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Sample records for dose naltrexone attenuates

  1. Low dose naltrexone administration in morphine dependent rats attenuates withdrawal-induced norepinephrine efflux in forebrain.

    PubMed

    Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J; Qian, Yaping; Sterling, Robert C; Page, Michelle E

    2008-05-15

    The administration of low dose opioid antagonists has been explored as a potential means of detoxification in opiate dependence. Previous results from our laboratory have shown that concurrent administration of low dose naltrexone in the drinking water of rats implanted with subcutaneous morphine pellets attenuates behavioral and biochemical signs of withdrawal in brainstem noradrenergic nuclei. Noradrenergic projections originating from the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and the locus coeruleus (LC) have previously been shown to be important neural substrates involved in the somatic expression of opiate withdrawal. The hypothesis that low dose naltrexone treatment attenuates noradrenergic hyperactivity typically associated with opiate withdrawal was examined in the present study by assessing norepinephrine tissue content and norepinephrine efflux using in vivo microdialysis coupled to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection (ED). The frontal cortex (FC), amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and cerebellum were analyzed for tissue content of norepinephrine following withdrawal in morphine dependent rats. Naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal elicited a significant decrease in tissue content of norepinephrine in the BNST and amygdala. This decrease was significantly attenuated in the BNST of rats that received low dose naltrexone pre-treatment compared to controls. No significant difference was observed in the other brain regions examined. In a separate group of rats, norepinephrine efflux was assessed with in vivo microdialysis in the BNST or the FC of morphine dependent rats or placebo treated rats subjected to naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal that received either naltrexone in their drinking water (5 mg/L) or unadulterated water. Following baseline dialysate collection, withdrawal was precipitated by injection of naltrexone and sample collection continued for an additional 4 h. At the end of the experiment

  2. Elevated mu-opioid receptor expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract accompanies attenuated withdrawal signs after chronic low dose naltrexone in opiate-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Van Bockstaele, E J; Rudoy, C; Mannelli, P; Oropeza, V; Qian, Y

    2006-02-15

    We previously described a decrease in withdrawal behaviors in opiate-dependent rats that were chronically treated with very low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water. Attenuated expression of withdrawal behaviors correlated with decreased c-Fos expression and intracellular signal transduction elements [protein kinase A regulatory subunit II (PKA) and phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB)] in brainstem noradrenergic nuclei. In this study, to determine whether similar cellular changes occurred in forebrain nuclei associated with drug reward, expressions of PKA and pCREB were analyzed in the ventral tegmental area, frontal cortex, striatum, and amygdala of opiate-treated rats that received low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water. No significant difference in PKA or pCREB was detected in these regions following drug treatment. To examine further the cellular mechanisms in noradrenergic nuclei that could underlie attenuated withdrawal behaviors following low dose naltrexone administration, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and locus coeruleus (LC) were examined for opioid receptor (OR) protein expression. Results showed a significant increase in muOR expression in the NTS of morphine-dependent rats that received low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water, and increases in muOR expression were also found to be dose dependent. Protein expression of muOR in the LC and deltaOR in either brain region remained unchanged. In conclusion, our previously reported decreases in c-Fos and PKA expression in the NTS following pretreatment with low doses of naltrexone may be partially explained by a greater inhibition of NTS neurons resulting from increased muOR expression in this region.

  3. Ultra-low dose naltrexone enhances cannabinoid-induced antinociception.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Jay; Olmstead, Mary C; Olmstead, Mary

    2005-12-01

    Both opioids and cannabinoids have inhibitory effects at micromolar doses, which are mediated by activated receptors coupling to Gi/o-proteins. Surprisingly, the analgesic effects of opioids are enhanced by ultra-low doses (nanomolar to picomolar) of the opioid antagonist, naltrexone. As opioid and cannabinoid systems interact, this study investigated whether ultra-low dose naltrexone also influences cannabinoid-induced antinociception. Separate groups of Long-Evans rats were tested for antinociception following an injection of vehicle, a sub-maximal dose of the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55 212-2, naltrexone (an ultra-low or a high dose) or a combination of WIN 55 212-2 and naltrexone doses. Tail-flick latencies were recorded for 3 h, at 10-min intervals for the first hour, and at 15-min intervals thereafter. Ultra-low dose naltrexone elevated WIN 55 212-2-induced tail flick thresholds without extending its duration of action. This enhancement was replicated in animals receiving intraperitoneal or intravenous injections. A high dose of naltrexone had no effect on WIN 55 212-2-induced tail flick latencies, but a high dose of the cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonist SR 141716 blocked the elevated tail-flick thresholds produced by WIN 55 212-2+ultra-low dose naltrexone. These data suggest a mechanism of cannabinoid-opioid interaction whereby activated opioid receptors that couple to Gs-proteins may attenuate cannabinoid-induced antinociception and/or motor functioning.

  4. Enhancing acupuncture by low dose naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Hesselink, Jan M Keppel; Kopsky, David J

    2011-06-01

    To find appropriate and effective treatment options for chronic pain syndromes is a challenging task. Multimodal treatment approach has been gaining acceptance for chronic pain. However, combining treatments, such as acupuncture, with rational pharmacology is still in its infancy. Acupuncture influences the opioid and cannabinoid system through releasing endogenous receptor ligands. Low dose naltrexone also acts on both these systems, and upregulates the opioid and cannabinoid receptors. The authors hypothesise that low dose naltrexone could enhance the pain-relieving effect of acupuncture.

  5. Low Dose Naltrexone in the Treatment of Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Metyas, Samy K; Yeter, Karen; Solyman, John; Arkfeld, Daniel

    2017-03-21

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain disorder characterized by diffuse musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance and cognitive impairment. A significant number of fibromyalgia patients do not respond adequately to the current drugs (pregabalin, milnacipran, duloxetine) approved for fibromyalgia treatment by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Thus, there is still a need for adjunctive therapies. Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist used to treat alcohol and opioid dependence. It is hypothesized that low dose naltrexone causes transient blockade of opioid receptors centrally resulting in a rebound of endorphin function which may attenuate pain in fibromyalgia. Treatment with low dose naltrexone may be an effective, highly tolerable and inexpensive treatment for fibromyalgia. Further controlled trials are needed.

  6. Low dose naltrexone therapy in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Y P

    2005-01-01

    The use of low doses of naltrexone for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) enjoys a worldwide following amongst MS patients. There is overwhelming anecdotal evidence, that in low doses naltrexone not only prevents relapses in MS but also reduces the progression of the disease. It is proposed that naltrexone acts by reducing apoptosis of oligodendrocytes. It does this by reducing inducible nitric oxide synthase activity. This results in a decrease in the formation of peroxynitrites, which in turn prevent the inhibition of the glutamate transporters. Thus, the excitatory neurotoxicity of glutamate on neuronal cells and oligodendrocytes via activation of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid class of glutamate receptor is prevented. It is crucial that the medical community respond to patient needs and investigate this drug in a clinical trial.

  7. Treatment of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) using low dose naltrexone (LDN).

    PubMed

    Chopra, Pradeep; Cooper, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a neuropathic pain syndrome, which involves glial activation and central sensitization in the central nervous system. Here, we describe positive outcomes of two CRPS patients, after they were treated with low-dose naltrexone (a glial attenuator), in combination with other CRPS therapies. Prominent CRPS symptoms remitted in these two patients, including dystonic spasms and fixed dystonia (respectively), following treatment with low-dose naltrexone (LDN). LDN, which is known to antagonize the Toll-like Receptor 4 pathway and attenuate activated microglia, was utilized in these patients after conventional CRPS pharmacotherapy failed to suppress their recalcitrant CRPS symptoms.

  8. An Orally Administered Opiate Blocker, Naltrexone, Attenuates Self-Injurious Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandman, Curt A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Four adults with severe/profound mental retardation and self-injurious behavior (SIB) received naltrexone in a double-blind procedure. All patients exhibited decreased SIB when treated with naltrexone; three patients decreased SIB as naltrexone dose increased. There were no consistent effects of naltrexone on stereotypy, activity, or performance…

  9. Naltrexone

    MedlinePlus

    ... decreasing the craving for alcohol and blocking the effects of opiate medications and opioid street drugs. ... during your treatment with naltrexone. Naltrexone blocks the effects of opioid medications and opioid street drugs. You ...

  10. Early outcomes following low dose naltrexone enhancement of opioid detoxification.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Paolo; Patkar, Ashwin A; Peindl, Kathleen; Gottheil, Edward; Wu, Li-Tzy; Gorelick, David A

    2009-01-01

    Although withdrawal severity and treatment completion are the initial focus of opioid detoxification, post-detoxification outcome better defines effective interventions. Very low dose naltrexone (VLNTX) in addition to methadone taper was recently associated with attenuated withdrawal intensity during detoxification. We describe the results of a seven-day follow-up evaluation of 96 subjects who completed inpatient detoxification consisting of the addition of VLNTX (0.125 or 0.250 mg per day) or placebo to methadone taper in a double blind, randomized investigation. Individuals receiving VLNTX during detoxification reported reduced withdrawal and drug use during the first 24 hours after discharge. VLNTX addition was also associated with higher rates of negative drug tests for opioids and cannabis and increased engagement in outpatient treatment after one week. Further studies are needed to test the utility of this approach in easing the transition from detoxification to various follow-up treatment modalities designed to address opioid dependence.

  11. Low dose naltrexone: side effects and efficacy in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Ploesser, Jennifer; Weinstock, Leonard B; Thomas, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Use of low dose naltrexone has been advocated for a variety of medical problems. Only a few articles published in peer review journals have documented side effects of low dose naltrexone. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of adverse effects of low dose naltrexone in patients who have been treated for a variety of gastrointestinal disorders. The secondary purpose was to determine global efficacy in a retrospective survey. Patients (206) form a single gastroenterologist's clinical practice who had been prescribed naltrexone were mailed a survey to evaluate the side effects and efficacy of naltrexone. Patients had either irritable bowel syndrome without evidence for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, chronic idiopathic constipation, or inflammatory bowel disease. Patients with diarrhea were given 2.5 mg daily, constipation 2.5 mg twice daily, and inflammatory bowel disease 4.5 mg daily. In the patients who returned the survey, 47/121 (38.8%) had no side effects. Of the 74/121 (61.2%) patients who had side effects, 58 had one or more neurological complaints, and 32 had one or more gastrointestinal side effects. In the patients with side effects, 24/74 (32.4%) had short lived symptoms. Low dose naltrexone was terminated owing to side effects in 20/74 patients (27.0%). In 13 patients with idiopathic irritable bowel syndrome, 2 were markedly worse. In 85 patients with irritable bowel syndrome-small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, 15 were markedly improved, 32 were moderately worse, and 1 was markedly worse. In 12 patients with chronic constipation, 7 were markedly improved, 1 was moderately improved, 1 was mildly improved, and 4 were unchanged. Low dose naltrexone frequently has side effects but in most is tolerable. It appears to be helpful for a member of patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

  12. Low-Dose Naltrexone: A New Therapy Option for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I Patients.

    PubMed

    Sturn, Kayla M; Collin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Naltrexone (an opioid antagonist) has long been used in patients overcoming alcohol and opioid dependency. However, at doses one-tenth of those commonly prescribed for the above conditions, an unexpected effect occurs that aids in alleviating pain. Although there are currently no randomized clinical trials supporting the use of low-dose naltrexone, we present a case study describing the impact of compounding low-dose naltrexone that has dramatically improved the patient's pain symptoms which were refractory to other treatments.

  13. Oxytrex: an oxycodone and ultra-low-dose naltrexone formulation.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynn R

    2007-08-01

    Oxytrex (Pain Therapeutics, Inc.) is an oral opioid that combines a therapeutic amount of oxycodone with an ultra-low dose of the antagonist naltrexone. Animal data indicate that this combination minimizes the development of physical dependence and analgesic tolerance while prolonging analgesia. Oxytrex is in late-stage clinical development by Pain Therapeutics for the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the oxycodone/naltrexone combination, three clinical studies have been conducted, one in healthy volunteers and the other two in patients with chronic pain. The putative mechanism of ultra-low-dose naltrexone is to prevent an alteration in G-protein coupling by opioid receptors that is associated with opioid tolerance and dependence. Opioid agonists are initially inhibitory but become excitatory through constant opioid receptor activity. The agonist/antagonist combination of Oxytrex may reduce the conversion from an inhibitory to an excitatory receptor, thereby decreasing the development of tolerance and physical dependence.

  14. High-dose naltrexone therapy for cocaine-alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Joy M; Lindsay, Jan A; Green, Charles E; Herin, David V; Stotts, Angela L; Moeller, F Gerard

    2009-01-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the effects of high-dose (100 mg/d) naltrexone versus placebo in a sample of 87 randomized subjects with both cocaine and alcohol dependence. Medication conditions were crossed with two behavioral therapy platforms that examined whether adding contingency management (CM) that targeted cocaine abstinence would enhance naltrexone effects compared to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) without CM. Primary outcome measures for cocaine (urine screens) and alcohol use (timeline followback) were collected thrice-weekly during 12 weeks of treatment. Retention in treatment and medication compliance rates were low. Rates of cocaine use and drinks per day did not differ between treatment groups; however naltrexone did reduce frequency of heavy drinking days, as did CBT without CM. Notably, adding CM to CBT did not enhance treatment outcomes. These weak findings suggest that pharmacological and behavioral interventions that have shown efficacy in the treatment of a single drug dependence disorder may not provide the coverage needed when targeting dual drug dependence.

  15. Naltrexone attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress induced hepatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Moslehi, A; Nabavizadeh, F; Nabavizadeh, Fatemeh; Dehpour, A R; Dehpou, A R; Tavanga, S M; Hassanzadeh, G; Zekri, A; Nahrevanian, H; Sohanaki, H

    2014-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress provides abnormalities in insulin action, inflammatory responses, lipoprotein B100 degradation and hepatic lipogenesis. Excess accumulation of triglyceride in hepatocytes may also lead to disorders such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Opioid peptides are involved in triglyceride and cholesterol dysregulation, inflammation and cell death. In this study, we evaluated Naltrexone effects on ER stress induced liver injury. To do so, C57/BL6 mice received saline, DMSO and Naltrexone, as control groups. ER stress was induced by tunicamycin (TM) injection. Naltrexone was given before TM administration. Liver blood flow and biochemical serum analysis were measured. Histopathological evaluations, TNF-α measurement and Real-time RT-PCR were also performed. TM challenge provokes steatosis, cellular ballooning and lobular inflammation which significantly reduced in Naltrexone treated animals. ALT, AST and TNF-α increased in the TM group and improved in the Naltrexone plus TM group. Triglyceride and cholesterol levels decreased in TM treated mice with no increase in Naltrexone treated animals. In the Naltrexone plus TM group, gene expression of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase3 significantly lowered compared with the TM group. In this study, we found that Naltrexone had a notable alleviating role in ER stress induced steatosis and liver injury.

  16. A Systematic Review of Naltrexone for Attenuating Alcohol Consumption in Women with Alcohol Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Canidate, Shantrel S; Carnaby, Giselle D; Cook, Christa L; Cook, Robert L

    2017-03-01

    Several clinical trials have evaluated naltrexone as a treatment for alcohol use disorders (AUDs), but few have focused on women. The aim of this review was to systematically review and summarize the evidence regarding the impact of naltrexone compared to placebo for attenuating alcohol consumption in women with an AUD. A systematic review was conducted using PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Alcohol Studies Database to identify relevant peer-reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published between January 1990 and August 2016. Seven published trials have evaluated the impact of naltrexone on drinking outcomes in women distinct from men; 903 alcohol-dependent or heavy drinking women were randomized to receive once daily oral or depot (injectable) naltrexone or placebo with/without behavioral intervention. Two studies examining the quantity of drinks per day observed trends toward reduction in drinking quantity among women who received naltrexone versus placebo. The 4 studies examining the frequency of drinking had mixed results, with 1 study showing a trend that favored naltrexone, 2 showing a trend that favored placebo, and 1 that showed no difference. Two of the 3 studies examining time to relapse observed trends that tended to favor naltrexone for time to any drinking and time to heavy drinking among women who received naltrexone versus placebo. While the growing body of evidence suggests a variety of approaches to treat AUD, the impact of naltrexone to combat AUD in women is understudied. Taken together, the results suggest that naltrexone may lead to modest reductions in quantity of drinking and time to relapse, but not on the frequency of drinking in women. Future research should incorporate sophisticated study designs that examine gender differences and treatment effectiveness among those diagnosed with an AUD and present data separately for men and women.

  17. Functional modulation on macrophage by low dose naltrexone (LDN).

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhe; Guo, Shengnan; Hu, Xu; Wang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Griffin, Noreen; Shan, Fengping

    2016-10-01

    Previously it was confirmed that naltrexone, a non-peptide δ-opioid receptor selective antagonist is mainly used for alcoholic dependence and opioid addiction treatment. However, there is increasing data on immune regulation of low dose naltrexone (LDN). The aim of this work was to explore the effect of LDN on the phenotype and function of macrophage. The changes of macrophage after treatment with LDN were examined using flow cytometry (FCM); FITC-dextran phagocytosis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We have found that LDN enhances function of macrophage as confirmed by up-regulating MHC II molecule and CD64 on macrophage while down-regulating CD206 expression. Furthermore the productions of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, increased significantly. Macrophages in LDN treated group performed the enhanced phagocytosis. Therefore it is concluded that LDN could promote function of macrophage and this work has provided concrete data of impact on immune system by LDN. Especially the data would support interaction between CD4+T cell and macrophage in AIDS treatment with LDN in Africa (LDN has already been approved in Nigeria for the use in AIDS treatment).

  18. A non-rewarding, non-aversive buprenorphine/naltrexone combination attenuates drug-primed reinstatement to cocaine and morphine in rats in a conditioned place preference paradigm.

    PubMed

    Cordery, Sarah F; Taverner, Alistair; Ridzwan, Irna E; Guy, Richard H; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Husbands, Stephen M; Bailey, Christopher P

    2014-07-01

    Concurrent use of cocaine and heroin is a major public health issue with no effective relapse prevention treatment currently available. To this purpose, a combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone, a mixed very-low efficacy mu-opioid receptor agonist/kappa-opioid receptor antagonist/nociceptin receptor agonist, was investigated. The tail-withdrawal and the conditioned place preference (CPP) assays in adult Sprague Dawley rats were used to show that naltrexone dose-dependently blocked the mu-opioid receptor agonism of buprenorphine. Furthermore, in the CPP assay, a combination of 0.3 mg/kg buprenorphine and 3.0 mg/kg naltrexone was aversive. A combination of 0.3 mg/kg buprenorphine and 1.0 mg/kg naltrexone was neither rewarding nor aversive, but still possessed mu-opioid receptor antagonist properties. In the CPP extinction and reinstatement method, a combination of 0.3 mg/kg buprenorphine and 1.0 mg/kg naltrexone completely blocked drug-primed reinstatement in cocaine-conditioned rats (conditioned with 3 mg/kg cocaine, drug prime was 3 mg/kg cocaine) and attenuated drug-primed reinstatement in morphine-conditioned rats (conditioned with 5 mg/kg morphine, drug prime was 1.25 mg/kg morphine). These data add to the growing evidence that a buprenorphine/naltrexone combination may be protective against relapse in a polydrug abuse situation.

  19. Ultra-low dose naltrexone potentiates the anticonvulsant effect of low dose morphine on clonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Honar, H; Riazi, K; Homayoun, H; Sadeghipour, H; Rashidi, N; Ebrahimkhani, M R; Mirazi, N; Dehpour, A R

    2004-01-01

    Significant potentiation of analgesic effects of opioids can be achieved through selective blockade of their stimulatory effects on intracellular signaling pathways by ultra-low doses of opioid receptor antagonists. However, the generality and specificity of this interaction is not well understood. The bimodal modulation of pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold by opioids provide a model to assess the potential usefulness of this approach in seizure disorders and to examine the differential mechanisms involved in opioid anti- (morphine at 0.5-3 mg/kg) versus pro-convulsant (20-100 mg/kg) effects. Systemic administration of ultra-low doses of naltrexone (100 fg/kg-10 ng/kg) significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of morphine at 0.5 mg/kg while higher degrees of opioid receptor antagonism blocked this effect. Moreover, inhibition of opioid-induced excitatory signaling by naltrexone (1 ng/kg) unmasked a strong anticonvulsant effect for very low doses of morphine (1 ng/kg-100 microg/kg), suggesting that a presumed inhibitory component of opioid receptor signaling can exert strong seizure-protective effects even at very low levels of opioid receptor activation. However, ultra-low dose naltrexone could not increase the maximal anticonvulsant effect of morphine (1-3 mg/kg), possibly due to a ceiling effect. The proconvulsant effects of morphine on seizure threshold were minimally altered by ultra-low doses of naltrexone while being completely blocked by a higher dose (1 mg/kg) of the antagonist. The present data suggest that ultra-low doses of opioid receptor antagonists may provide a potent strategy to modulate seizure susceptibility, especially in conjunction with very low doses of opioids.

  20. Potentiation of low dose ketamine effects by naltrexone: potential implications for the pharmacotherapy of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Krystal, John H; Madonick, Steven; Perry, Edward; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Brush, Laura; Wray, Yola; Belger, Aysenil; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2006-08-01

    The interplay of opiate and NMDA glutamate receptors may contribute to psychosis, cognitive function, alcoholism, and substance dependence. Ketamine and ethanol block the NMDA glutamate receptor. The purpose of this randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled human laboratory study was to evaluate whether the interactive effects of drugs acting at opiate and NMDA glutamate receptors might partially explain the efficacy of naltrexone for the treatment of alcoholism, that is, whether naltrexone 25 mg pretreatment would modulate ketamine effects in healthy human subjects. Two groups of healthy subjects were studied. An initial group (n=31) received a perception-altering subanesthetic dose of ketamine (bolus of 0.23 mg/kg over 1 min followed by a 60-min infusion of 0.58 mg/kg or saline bolus and infusion). A second group (n=24) completed the same testing procedures, but received a subperceptual ketamine dose (bolus 0.081 mg/kg over 10 min followed by an infusion of 0.4 mg/kg/h). Ketamine produced positive symptoms, negative symptoms, emotional discomfort, and cognitive effects as measured by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) in a dose-related fashion. The lower ketamine dose produced subjective effects similar to two standard ethanol drinks, whereas the higher ketamine dose produced effects similar to five standard drinks. Although naltrexone produced no significant behavioral effects, it significantly magnified the increase in the total PANSS score produced by the lower subperceptual dose of ketamine, but not the higher perception-altering dose of ketamine. These data suggest that the interplay of opiate receptor antagonism and NMDA receptor antagonism may be relevant to the protective effects of naltrexone on alcohol consumption via potentiation of dysphoric effects associated with the NMDA receptor antagonist effects of ethanol. However, these data suggest that at levels of NMDA receptor antagonism associated with heavy drinking, this protective

  1. Very low dose naltrexone addition in opioid detoxification: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Paolo; Patkar, Ashwin A; Peindl, Kathi; Gorelick, David A; Wu, Li-Tzy; Gottheil, Edward

    2009-04-01

    Although current treatments for opioid detoxification are not always effective, medical detoxification remains a required step before long-term interventions. The use of opioid antagonist medications to improve detoxification has produced inconsistent results. Very low dose naltrexone (VLNTX) was recently found to reduce opioid tolerance and dependence in animal and clinical studies. We decided to evaluate safety and efficacy of VLNTX adjunct to methadone in reducing withdrawal during detoxification. In a multi-center, double-blind, randomized study at community treatment programs, where most detoxifications are performed, 174 opioid-dependent subjects received NTX 0.125 mg, 0.250 mg or placebo daily for 6 days, together with methadone in tapering doses. VLNTX-treated individuals reported attenuated withdrawal symptoms [F = 7.24 (2,170); P = 0.001] and reduced craving [F = 3.73 (2,107); P = 0.03]. Treatment effects were more pronounced at discharge and were not accompanied by a significantly higher retention rate. There were no group differences in use of adjuvant medications and no treatment-related adverse events. Further studies should explore the use of VLNTX, combined with full and partial opioid agonist medications, in detoxification and long-term treatment of opioid dependence.

  2. Enhancement of Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity by Morphine and Its Attenuation by the Opioid Antagonist Naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Aminian, Atefeh; Javadi, Shiva; Rahimian, Reza; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Asadi Amoli, Fahimeh; Moghaddas, Payman; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram

    2016-07-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin, a widely used chemotherapy agent. Morphine and other opioids are also used extensively in different types of cancer for the clinical management of pain associated with local or metastatic neoplastic lesions. In addition to its analgesic effects, morphine has also been reported to possess potential immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties. Herein, we investigated the effects of morphine in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Following administration of a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg), animals received intraperitoneal injections of morphine (5 mg/kg/day) and/or naltrexone (20 mg/kg/day), an opioid antagonist, for 5 days. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was detected by a significant increase in plasma urea and creatinine levels in addition to alterations in kidney tissue morphology. Levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly increased in the renal tissue in cisplatin group. Moreover, glutathione (GSH) concentration and superoxide dismutase activity were significantly reduced in renal tissue in cisplatin group compared with control animals. Treatment with morphine aggravated the deleterious effects of cisplatin at clinical, biochemical and histopathological levels; whereas naltrexone diminished the detrimental effects of morphine in animals receiving morphine and cisplatin. Morphine or naltrexone alone had no effect on the mentioned parameters. Our findings indicate that concomitant treatment with morphine might intensify cisplatin-induced renal damage in rats. These findings suggest that morphine and other opioids should be administered cautiously in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy.

  3. The cannabinoid anticonvulsant effect on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure is potentiated by ultra-low dose naltrexone in mice.

    PubMed

    Bahremand, Arash; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Nasrabady, Sara Ebrahimi; Gholizadeh, Shervin; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2008-09-01

    Cannabinoid compounds are anticonvulsant since they have inhibitory effects at micromolar doses, which are mediated by activated receptors coupling to G(i/o) proteins. Surprisingly, both the analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of opioids are enhanced by ultra-low doses (nanomolar to picomolar) of the opioid antagonist naltrexone and as opioid and cannabinoid systems interact, it has been shown that ultra-low dose naltrexone also enhances cannabinoid-induced antinociception. Thus, concerning the seizure modulating properties of both classes of receptors this study investigated whether the ultra-low dose opioid antagonist naltrexone influences cannabinoid anticonvulsant effects. The clonic seizure threshold was tested in separate groups of male NMRI mice following injection of vehicle, the cannabinoid selective agonist arachidonyl-2-chloroethylamide (ACEA) and ultra-low doses of the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone and a combination of ACEA and naltrexone doses in a model of clonic seizure induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). Systemic injection of ultra-low doses of naltrexone (1pg/kg to 1ng/kg, i.p.) significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of ACEA (1mg/kg, i.p.). Moreover, the very low dose of naltrexone (500pg/kg) unmasked a strong anticonvulsant effect for very low doses of ACEA (10 and 100microg/kg). A similar potentiation by naltrexone (500pg/kg) of anticonvulsant effects of non-effective dose of ACEA (1mg/kg) was also observed in the generalized tonic-clonic model of seizure. The present data indicate that the interaction between opioid and cannabinoid systems extends to ultra-low dose levels and ultra-low doses of opioid receptor antagonist in conjunction with very low doses of cannabinoids may provide a potent strategy to modulate seizure susceptibility.

  4. Extended release naltrexone injection is performed in the majority of opioid dependent patients receiving outpatient induction: a very low dose naltrexone and buprenorphine open label trial

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, Paolo; Wu, Li-Tzy; Peindl, Kathleen S.; Swartz, Marvin S.; Woody, George E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The approval of extended release injectable naltrexone (XR-NTX; Vivitrol®) has introduced a new option for treating opioid addiction, but studies are needed to identify its place within the spectrum of available therapies. The absence of physiological opioid dependence is a necessary and challenging first step for starting XR-NTX. Outpatient detoxification gives poor results and inpatient detoxification is either unavailable or too brief for the physiological effects of opioids to resolve. Here we present findings from an open label study that tested whether the transition from opioid addiction to XR-NTX can be safely and effectively performed in an outpatient setting using very low dose naltrexone and buprenorphine. METHODS Twenty treatment seeking opioid addicted individuals were given increasing doses of naltrexone starting at 0.25 mg with decreasing doses of buprenorphine starting at 4 mg during a 7-day outpatient XR-NTX induction procedure. Withdrawal discomfort, craving, drug use, and adverse events were assessed daily until the XR-NTX injection, then weekly over the next month. RESULTS Fourteen of the 20 participants received XR-NTX and 13 completed weekly assessments. Withdrawal, craving, and opioid or other drug use were significantly lower during induction and after XR-NTX administration compared with baseline, and no serious adverse events were recorded. CONCLUSIONS Outpatient transition to XR-NTX combining upward titration of very low dose naltrexone with downward titration of low dose buprenorphine was safe, well tolerated, and completed by most participants. Further studies with larger numbers of subjects are needed to see if this approach is useful for naltrexone induction. PMID:24602363

  5. Low-Dose Prazosin Alone and in Combination with Propranolol or Naltrexone: Effects on Ethanol- and Sucrose-Seeking and Self-Administration in the P Rat

    PubMed Central

    Verplaetse, Terril L.; Czachowski, Cristine L.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Evidence suggests that the noradrenergic system mediates ethanol-reinforcement. However, preclinical studies suggest that noradrenergic antagonists block other oral reinforcers indicating possible unwanted secondary medication effects. Methods This study examined combinations of low-dose prazosin with propranolol or naltrexone using a behavioral paradigm that separately assesses reinforcer-seeking and self-administration. Male alcohol-preferring (P) rats (n=20/experiment) were trained to complete a response requirement (RR) resulting in access to 1% sucrose (n=10) or 10% ethanol (n=10) for 20min. Rats received vehicle, prazosin alone (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 mg/kg; intraperitoneally (IP)) or prazosin in combination with propranolol (5 mg/kg (IP); Exp1) or in combination with naltrexone (0.03 mg/kg (subcutaneously (SC); Exp2). Results For Exp1, prazosin alone effectively decreased sucrose-seeking more than ethanol-seeking, but decreased ethanol self-administration only. Propranolol alone effectively decreased ethanol-seeking more than sucrose-seeking and decreased ethanol intake only. At some dose combinations, there was a greater attenuation of ethanol and sucrose intake relative to either drug alone. For Exp2, prazosin alone and naltrexone alone were effective in decreasing ethanol-seeking and intake only. Combination treatment was more effective than either drug alone at decreasing ethanol-seeking and consumption and sucrose intake, but not sucrose-seeking. Conclusions Propranolol and naltrexone alone were specific to ethanol indicating that low doses of either medication may be beneficial in treating alcohol use disorders. Prazosin in combination with propranolol or naltrexone was more effective than either drug alone, but also reduced sucrose-reinforced behaviors. These data suggest that the noradrenergic system is a viable target for developing treatment approaches for problem drinkers. PMID:25743758

  6. Potentiation of buprenorphine antinociception with ultra-low dose naltrexone in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Hay, J L; La Vincente, S F; Somogyi, A A; Chapleo, C B; White, J M

    2011-03-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated greater antinociception following administration of a buprenorphine/naloxone combination compared to buprenorphine alone among healthy volunteers. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether buprenorphine antinociception could be enhanced with the addition of ultra-low dose naltrexone, using a range of dose ratios. A repeated-measures, double-blind, cross-over trial was undertaken with 10 healthy participants. The effects of each buprenorphine:naltrexone ratio (100:1, 133:1, 166:1, and 200:1) on cold pressor tolerance time and respiration were compared to the effects of buprenorphine only. The 166:1 ratio was associated with significantly greater tolerance time to cold pressor pain than buprenorphine alone. Minimal respiratory depression and few adverse events were observed in all conditions. These findings suggest that, as previously described with naloxone, the addition of ultra-low dose naltrexone can enhance the antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine in humans. This potentiation is dose-ratio dependent and occurs without a concomitant increase in adverse effects.

  7. Dose Dependent Reduction of Hazardous Alcohol Use in a Placebo-Controlled Trial of Naltrexone for Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    O’Malley, Stephanie S.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; McKee, Sherry A.; Leeman, Robert F.; Cooney, Ned L.; Meandzija, Boris; Wu, Ran; Makuch, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    The opiate antagonist naltrexone has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of alcohol dependence and as a component of treatment to reduce heavy drinking. At present, there are no published dose-ranging clinical trials of the oral preparation for treatment of problem drinking. The present study evaluated the effects of naltrexone on alcohol use among the subset of hazardous drinkers (N = 102) who participated in a placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trial of oral naltrexone (25 mg, 50 mg and 100 mg doses) combined with open-label transdermal nicotine patch for enhancing smoking cessation. On the primary outcome—no hazardous drinking (drinking that exceeded weekly or daily limits) during treatment—25 mg and 50 mg naltrexone were superior to placebo (each p < 0.05). These findings remained after controlling for baseline predictors or smoking abstinence during treatment. Time to remission of hazardous drinking was examined as a secondary outcome with definitions of hazardous drinking based on weekly limits, daily limits and the combination of weekly and daily limits and the results were consistent with the primary findings. In conclusion, the findings suggest that naltrexone can reduce the risk of hazardous drinking in smokers who are not seeking or receiving alcohol treatment, providing strong evidence for the pharmacological effects of naltrexone on drinking. This effect appears to favor lower doses that may be better tolerated and less expensive than the higher 100 mg dose. Given its efficacy and favorable side effect profile, the 25 mg dose should be considered for future studies of combination therapy. PMID:18796184

  8. The use of low-dose naltrexone (LDN) as a novel anti-inflammatory treatment for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Younger, Jarred; Parkitny, Luke; McLain, David

    2014-04-01

    Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) has been demonstrated to reduce symptom severity in conditions such as fibromyalgia, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, and complex regional pain syndrome. We review the evidence that LDN may operate as a novel anti-inflammatory agent in the central nervous system, via action on microglial cells. These effects may be unique to low dosages of naltrexone and appear to be entirely independent from naltrexone's better-known activity on opioid receptors. As a daily oral therapy, LDN is inexpensive and well-tolerated. Despite initial promise of efficacy, the use of LDN for chronic disorders is still highly experimental. Published trials have low sample sizes, and few replications have been performed. We cover the typical usage of LDN in clinical trials, caveats to using the medication, and recommendations for future research and clinical work. LDN may represent one of the first glial cell modulators to be used for the management of chronic pain disorders.

  9. A pilot trial of low-dose naltrexone in primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gironi, M; Martinelli-Boneschi, F; Sacerdote, P; Solaro, C; Zaffaroni, M; Cavarretta, R; Moiola, L; Bucello, S; Radaelli, M; Pilato, V; Rodegher, Me; Cursi, M; Franchi, S; Martinelli, V; Nemni, R; Comi, G; Martino, G

    2008-09-01

    A sixth month phase II multicenter-pilot trial with a low dose of the opiate antagonist Naltrexone (LDN) has been carried out in 40 patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). The primary end points were safety and tolerability. Secondary outcomes were efficacy on spasticity, pain, fatigue, depression, and quality of life. Clinical and biochemical evaluations were serially performed. Protein concentration of beta-endorphins (BE) and mRNA levels and allelic variants of the mu-opiod receptor gene (OPRM1) were analyzed. Five dropouts and two major adverse events occurred. The remaining adverse events did not interfere with daily living. Neurological disability progressed in only one patient. A significant reduction of spasticity was measured at the end of the trial. BE concentration increased during the trial, but no association was found between OPRM1 variants and improvement of spasticity. Our data clearly indicate that LDN is safe and well tolerated in patients with PPMS.

  10. Low-dose naltrexone for disease prevention and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Brown, Norman; Panksepp, Jaak

    2009-03-01

    The use of low-dose naltrexone (LDN) for the treatment and prophylaxis of various bodily disorders is discussed. Accumulating evidence suggests that LDN can promote health supporting immune-modulation which may reduce various oncogenic and inflammatory autoimmune processes. Since LDN can upregulate endogenous opioid activity, it may also have a role in promoting stress resilience, exercise, social bonding, and emotional well-being, as well as amelioration of psychiatric problems such a autism and depression. It is proposed that LDN can be used effectively as a buffer for a large variety of bodily and mental ailments through its ability to beneficially modulate both the immune system and the brain neurochemistries that regulate positive affect.

  11. Low-dose Naltrexone Augmentation of Nicotine Replacement for Smoking Cessation with Reduced Weight Gain: A Randomized Trial*

    PubMed Central

    Toll, Benjamin A.; White, Marney; Wu, Ran; Meandzija, Boris; Jatlow, Peter; Makuch, Robert; O’Malley, Stephanie S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Fear of weight gain is a significant obstacle to smoking cessation, preventing some smokers from attempting to quit. Several previous studies of naltrexone yielded promising results for minimization of post-quit weight gain. Given these encouraging findings, we endeavored to test whether minimization of weight gain might translate to better quit outcomes for a population that is particularly concerned about gaining weight upon quitting. Methods Smokers (N = 172) in this investigation were prospectively randomized to receive either 25 mg naltrexone or placebo for 27 weeks (1 week pre-, 26 weeks post-quit) for minimization of post-quit weight gain and smoking cessation. All participants received open label therapy with the nicotine patch for the first 8 weeks post-quit and behavioral counseling over the 27 week treatment. The 2 pre-specified primary outcomes were change in weight for continuously abstinent participants and biologically verified end-of-treatment 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 26 weeks after the quit date. Results The difference in weight at 26 weeks post-quit between the naltrexone and placebo groups (naltrexone: 6.8 lbs ± 8.94 vs placebo: 9.7 lbs ± 9.19, p = .45) was not statistically different. Seven-day point prevalence smoking abstinence rates at 26 weeks post-quit was not significantly different between the 2 groups (naltrexone: 22% vs placebo: 27%, p = .43). Conclusions For smokers high in weight concern, the relatively small reduction in weight gain with low dose naltrexone is not worth the potential for somewhat lower rates of smoking abstinence. PMID:20542391

  12. Ultra-low-dose naltrexone reduces the rewarding potency of oxycodone and relapse vulnerability in rats.

    PubMed

    Leri, Francesco; Burns, Lindsay H

    2005-10-01

    Ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists have been shown to enhance opioid analgesia and alleviate opioid tolerance and dependence. Our present studies in male Sprague-Dawley rats assessed the abuse potential of oxycodone+ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX) versus oxycodone alone. The lowest NTX dose (1 pg/kg/infusion), but not slightly higher doses (10 and 100 pg/kg/infusion), enhanced oxycodone (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) intravenous self-administration, suggesting a reduced rewarding potency per infusion. During tests of reinstatement performed in extinction conditions, co-self-administration of any of these three NTX doses significantly reduced drug-seeking precipitated by priming injections of oxycodone (0.25 mg/kg, s.c.), a drug-conditioned cue, or foot-shock stress. During self-administration on a progressive-ratio schedule, animals self-administering oxycodone (0.1 mg/kg/infusion)+NTX (1 pg/kg/infusion) reached a "break-point" sooner and showed a trend toward less responding compared to rats self-administering oxycodone alone (0.1 mg/kg/infusion). In the final experiment, the addition of ultra-low-dose NTX (10 pg/kg, s.c.) enhanced the acute stimulatory effect of oxycodone (1 mg/kg, s.c.), as well as locomotor sensitization produced by repeated oxycodone administration (7 x 1 mg/kg, s.c.). In summary, this work shows that ultra-low-dose NTX co-treatment augments the locomotor effects of oxycodone as it enhances opioid analgesia, but reduces oxycodone's rewarding potency and subsequent vulnerability to relapse.

  13. Naltrexone Prevents in Males and Attenuates in Females the Expression of Behavioral Sensitization to Ethanol Regardless of Maternal Separation

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Suzi E.; Quadros, Isabel M. H.; Suchecki, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Maternal separation alters the activity of the opioid system, which modulates ethanol-induced stimulation and behavioral sensitization. This study examined the effects of an opioid antagonist, naltrexone (NTX), on the expression of behavioral sensitization to ethanol in adult male and female mice submitted to maternal separation from postnatal days (PNDs) 2 to 14. Whole litters of Swiss mice were either not separated [animal facility rearing (AFR)] or separated from their mothers for 3 h [long maternal separation (LMS)]. Starting on PND 90, male and female AFR and LMS mice received daily i.p. injections of saline (SAL) or ethanol (EtOH, 2.2 g/kg) for 21 days. Locomotor activity was assessed in cages containing photoelectric beams, once a week, to examine the development of behavioral sensitization. Five days after the end of the chronic treatment, animals were submitted to four locomotor activity tests spaced by 48 h, to assess the expression of behavioral sensitization. In all tests, animals received two i.p. injections with a 30-min interval and were then assessed for locomotor response to different treatment challenges, which were: SAL/SAL, SAL/EtOH (2.2 g/kg), NTX 2.0 mg/kg (NTX2)/EtOH, and NTX 4.0 mg/kg (NTX4)/EtOH. Regardless of maternal separation, EtOH-treated male and female mice displayed increased locomotor responses to EtOH during the 21-day treatment, indicating the development of behavioral sensitization. In the SAL/EtOH challenge, EtOH-treated LMS and AFR male and female mice exhibited higher locomotor activity than their SAL-treated counterparts, indicating the expression of sensitization. The coadministration of either dose of NTX blocked the expression of locomotor sensitization in both AFR and LMS male mice with a history of EtOH sensitization. In females, a significant attenuation of EtOH sensitization was promoted by both NTX doses, while still maintaining an augmented stimulant response to EtOH. Importantly, maternal separation

  14. Gender Differences in Predictors of Treatment Attrition with High Dose Naltrexone in Cocaine and Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jesse J.; Pettinati, Helen M.; Kampman, Kyle M.; O’Brien, Charles P.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, we reported that naltrexone at 150mg/day significantly decreased cocaine and alcohol use for men, but not women with co-occurring cocaine and alcohol dependence. The present study is an exploratory investigation of predictors that explain the different gender response to naltrexone, with a particular focus on differential predictors of treatment attrition. No significant predictors were associated with treatment discontinuation in men. Women, however, were more likely to discontinue treatment when reporting severe pre-treatment psychiatric problems, or nausea while in treatment. Further research on the impact of pre-treatment and in-treatment gender differences with naltrexone is warranted. PMID:19034737

  15. Naltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Naltrexone injection is used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped drinking large amounts of alcohol to avoid drinking again. Naltrexone injection is also used along with counseling and social ...

  16. Combination of Levo-Tetrahydropalmatine and Low Dose Naltrexone: A Promising Treatment for Prevention of Cocaine Relapse.

    PubMed

    Sushchyk, Sarah; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Wang, Jia Bei

    2016-05-01

    Relapse to drug use is often cited as the major obstacle in overcoming a drug addiction. Whereas relapse can occur for a myriad of reasons, it is well established that complex neuroadaptations that occur over the course of addiction are major factors. Cocaine, as a potent dopamine transporter blocker, specifically induces alterations in the dopaminergic as well as other monoaminergic neurotransmissions, which lead to cocaine abuse and dependence. Evidence also suggests that adaptations in the endogenous opioids play important roles in pathophysiology of cocaine addiction. Following this evidence, we investigated a combination medication, levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) and low dose naltrexone (LDN), targeting primarily dopaminergic and endogenous opioid systems as a cocaine-relapse-prevention treatment. In the present study Wistar rats were used to assess the effects ofl-THP and LDN on cocaine self-administration, drug-seeking behavior during cocaine reinstatement, spontaneous locomotion, and effects on the endogenous opioid system. We determined that the combination ofl-THP and LDN reduces drug-seeking behavior during reinstatement more potently thanl-THP alone. Additionally, the combination ofl-THP and LDN attenuates the sedative locomotor effect induced byl-THP. Furthermore, we revealed that treatment with the combination ofl-THP and LDN has an upregulatory effect on both plasmaβ-endorphin and hypothalamic POMC that was not observed inl-THP-treated groups. These results suggest that the combination ofl-THP and LDN has great potential as an effective and well-tolerated medication for cocaine relapse prevention.

  17. Combination of Levo-Tetrahydropalmatine and Low Dose Naltrexone: A Promising Treatment for Prevention of Cocaine Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Sushchyk, Sarah; Xi, Zheng-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Relapse to drug use is often cited as the major obstacle in overcoming a drug addiction. Whereas relapse can occur for a myriad of reasons, it is well established that complex neuroadaptations that occur over the course of addiction are major factors. Cocaine, as a potent dopamine transporter blocker, specifically induces alterations in the dopaminergic as well as other monoaminergic neurotransmissions, which lead to cocaine abuse and dependence. Evidence also suggests that adaptations in the endogenous opioids play important roles in pathophysiology of cocaine addiction. Following this evidence, we investigated a combination medication, levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) and low dose naltrexone (LDN), targeting primarily dopaminergic and endogenous opioid systems as a cocaine-relapse-prevention treatment. In the present study Wistar rats were used to assess the effects of l-THP and LDN on cocaine self-administration, drug-seeking behavior during cocaine reinstatement, spontaneous locomotion, and effects on the endogenous opioid system. We determined that the combination of l-THP and LDN reduces drug-seeking behavior during reinstatement more potently than l-THP alone. Additionally, the combination of l-THP and LDN attenuates the sedative locomotor effect induced by l-THP. Furthermore, we revealed that treatment with the combination of l-THP and LDN has an upregulatory effect on both plasma β-endorphin and hypothalamic POMC that was not observed in l-THP-treated groups. These results suggest that the combination of l-THP and LDN has great potential as an effective and well-tolerated medication for cocaine relapse prevention. PMID:26903543

  18. Long-term remission of adenoid cystic tongue carcinoma with low dose naltrexone and vitamin D3--a case report.

    PubMed

    Khan, Akbar

    2014-09-01

    Naltrexone (ReVia®) is a long-acting oral pure opiate antagonist which is approved for the treatment of alcohol addiction as a 50mg per day tablet. The mechanism of action is complete opiate blockade, which removes the pleasure sensation derived from drinking alcohol (created by endorphins). Low Dose Naltrexone ("LDN") in the range of 3-4.5 mg per day has been shown to have the opposite effect - brief opiate receptor blockade with resulting upregulation of endogenous opiate production. Through the work of Bihari and Zagon, it has been determined that the level of the endogenous opiate methionine-enkephalin is increased by LDN. Met-enkephalin is involved in regulating cell proliferation and can inhibit cancer cell growth in multiple cell lines. Increased met-enkepahlin levels created by LDN thus have the potential to inhibit cancer growth in humans. Phase II human trials of met-enkephalin, case reports published by Berkson and Rubin, and the clinical experience of Bihari confirmed the potential role of LDN in treating pancreatic and other cancers. However, large scale trials are lacking and are unlikely to be funded given the current non-proprietary status of naltrexone. A case report is presented of successful treatment of adenoid cystic carcinoma as further evidence of LDN's potential as a unique non-toxic cancer therapy.

  19. Naltrexone at low doses upregulates a unique gene expression not seen with normal doses: Implications for its use in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wai M; Scott, Katherine A; Dennis, Jayne L; Kaminska, Elwira; Levett, Alan J; Dalgleish, Angus G

    2016-08-01

    It has been reported that lower doses of the opioid antagonist naltrexone are able to reduce tumour growth by interfering with cell signalling as well as by modifying the immune system. We have evaluated the gene expression profile of a cancer cell line after treatment with low-dose naltrexone (LDN), and assessed the effect that adapting treatment schedules with LDN may have on enhancing efficacy. LDN had a selective impact on genes involved with cell cycle regulation and immune modulation. Similarly, the pro-apoptotic genes BAD and BIK1 were increased only after LDN. Continuous treatment with LDN had little effect on growth in different cell lines; however, altering the treatment schedule to include a phase of culture in the absence of drug following an initial round of LDN treatment, resulted in enhanced cell killing. Furthermore, cells pre-treated with LDN were more sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of a number of common chemotherapy agents. For example, priming HCT116 with LDN before treatment with oxaliplatin significantly increased cell killing to 49±7.0 vs. 14±2.4% in cultures where priming was not used. Interestingly, priming with NTX before oxaliplatin resulted in just 32±1.8% cell killing. Our data support further the idea that LDN possesses anticancer activity, which can be improved by modifying the treatment schedule.

  20. Low dose naltrexone (LDN) enhances maturation of bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs).

    PubMed

    Meng, Jingjuan; Meng, Yiming; Plotnikoff, Nicholas P; Youkilis, Gene; Griffin, Noreen; Shan, Fengping

    2013-12-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that immune cell activation and proliferation were sensitive to the effects of naltrexone, a non-peptidic δ-opioid receptor selective antagonist and opioid receptors on BMDCs have been detected [1]. However, there is little prior data published on naltrexone and DCs. Therefore, we hypothesized that LDN could exert modulating effect on BMDCs. In present study, we studied influence of LDN on both phenotypic and functional maturation of BMDCs. Changes of BMDC post-treatment with LDN were evaluated using conventional light microscope and transmission electron microscopy (TEM); flow cytometry(FCM); cytochemistry; acid phosphatase activity(ACP) test; FITC-dextran bio-assay; mixed lymphocytes and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We have found that LDN enhances maturation of BMDCs as evidenced by 1) up-regulating the expression of MHC II, CD40, CD83, CD80 and CD86 molecules on BMDCs; 2) down-regulating the rates of pinocytosis and phagocytosis accompanied by the results of decreased ACP, and FITC-dextran bio-assay; 3) mounting potential of BMDCs to drive T cell; and 4) inducing secretion of higher levels of IL-12 and TNF-α. It is therefore concluded that LDN can efficiently promote the maturation of BMDCs via precise modulation inside and outside BMDCs. Our study has provided meaningful mode of action on the role of LDN in immunoregulation, and rationale on future application of LDN for enhancing host immunity in cancer therapy and potent use in the design of DC-based vaccines for a number of diseases.

  1. Dose-dependent reduction of hazardous alcohol use in a placebo-controlled trial of naltrexone for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Stephanie S; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; McKee, Sherry A; Leeman, Robert F; Cooney, Ned L; Meandzija, Boris; Wu, Ran; Makuch, Robert W

    2009-06-01

    The opiate antagonist naltrexone (Ntx) has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of alcohol dependence and as a component of treatment to reduce heavy drinking. At present, there are no published dose-ranging clinical trials of the oral preparation for treatment of problem drinking. The present study evaluated the effects of Ntx on alcohol use among the subset of hazardous drinkers (n=102) who participated in a placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trial of oral Ntx (25-mg, 50-mg and 100-mg doses) combined with open-label transdermal nicotine patch for enhancing smoking cessation. On the primary outcome--no hazardous drinking (drinking that exceeded weekly or daily limits) during treatment--25 mg and 50 mg Ntx were superior to placebo (each p<0.05). These findings remained after controlling for baseline predictors or smoking abstinence during treatment. Time to remission of hazardous drinking was examined as a secondary outcome with definitions of hazardous drinking based on weekly limits, daily limits and the combination of weekly and daily limits and the results were consistent with the primary findings. In conclusion, the findings suggest that Ntx can reduce the risk of hazardous drinking in smokers who are not seeking or receiving alcohol treatment, providing strong evidence for the pharmacological effects of Ntx on drinking. This effect appears to favour lower doses that may be better tolerated and less expensive than the higher 100-mg dose. Given its efficacy and favourable side-effect profile, the 25-mg dose should be considered for future studies of combination therapy.

  2. Pharmacodynamic Profile of Tramadol in Humans: Influence of Naltrexone Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, William W.; Lofwall, Michelle R.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Craig, Lori B.; Siegel, Anthony J.; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Tramadol is a prescription analgesic that activates mu opioid and monoamine receptor systems. Tramadol is thought to have limited abuse potential compared to mu opioid agonists, but laboratory data indicate that it shares some of their pharmacodynamic effects. Objectives This study evaluated the effect of mu opioid receptor blockade with naltrexone on the pharmacodynamic action of tramadol in humans. Methods This inpatient, double-blind, randomized, within-subject study examined the effects of oral placebo, tramadol (87.5, 175 and 350 mg) and hydromorphone (4 and 16 mg; positive control) after 1 hr pretreatment with oral naltrexone (0 and 50 mg). Ten recreational opioid users completed the study. Pharmacodynamic effects were measured before and for 7 hr after initial drug administration. Results Lower doses of tramadol and hydromorphone were generally placebo-like. Hydromorphone (16 mg) produced prototypic mu opioid agonist-like effects that were blocked by naltrexone. Tramadol (350 mg) produced miosis and increased ratings of “Good Effects” and “Liking ,” but also increased ratings of “Bad Effects.” Naltrexone reversed tramadol-induced physiological effects and mydriasis emerged, but unlike results with hydromorphone, naltrexone only partially attenuated tramadol’s positive subjective effects and actually enhanced several unpleasant subjective ratings. Conclusions Naltrexone can be used to disentangle the mixed neuropharmacological actions of tramadol. High dose tramadol produces a mixed profile of effects. These data suggest that both mu and non-mu opioid actions play a role in tramadol’s subjective profile of action. PMID:22623016

  3. Low-dose naltrexone suppresses ovarian cancer and exhibits enhanced inhibition in combination with cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Renee N; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2011-07-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecological malignancies. Although initial therapeutic modalities are successful, 65% of these women relapse with only palliative treatments available thereafter. Endogenous opioids repress the proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells in vitro, and do so in a receptor-mediated manner. The present study examined whether modulation of opioid systems by the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX), alone or in combination with standard of care therapies (taxol/paclitaxel, cisplatin), alters human ovarian cancer cell proliferation in tissue culture and tumor progression in mice. Administration of NTX for six hours every two days, but not continuously, reduced DNA synthesis and cell replication from vehicle-treated controls in tissue culture. Moreover, brief exposure to NTX in combination with taxol or cisplatin had an enhanced anticancer action. Mice with established ovarian tumors and treated with a low dosage of NTX (LDN), which invokes a short period of opioid receptor blockade, repressed tumor progression in a non-toxic fashion by reducing DNA synthesis and angiogenesis but not altering cell survival. The combination of LDN with cisplatin, but not taxol, resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on tumorigenesis with enhanced depression of DNA synthesis and angiogenesis. LDN combined with cisplatin alleviated the toxicity (e.g. weight loss) associated with cisplatin. LDN treatment upregulated the expression of the opioid growth factor (OGF, chemical term ([Met(5)]-enkephalin) and its receptor, OGFr. Previous tissue culture studies have reported that OGF is the only opioid peptide with antiproliferative activity on ovarian cancer cells, with OGF action mediated by OGFr. Thus, the common denominator of intermittent opioid receptor blockade by short-term NTX or LDN on ovarian cancer proliferation and tumorigenesis recorded herein appears to be related to the OGF-OGFr axis. These preclinical data may offer a non

  4. Ex vivo studies for the passive transdermal delivery of low-dose naltrexone from a cream; detection of naltrexone and its active metabolite, 6β-naltrexol, using a novel LC Q-ToF MS assay.

    PubMed

    Dodou, Kalliopi; Armstrong, Andrew; Kelly, Ivan; Wilkinson, Simon; Carr, Kevin; Shattock, Paul; Whiteley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Naltrexone (NTX) is a long-acting opiate antagonist. Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) therapy has shown promising results in the treatment of several autoimmune disorders. Our aim was to formulate NTX into a cream for the delivery of LDN and develop an analytical technique for the quantification of NTX and its active metabolite 6-β-naltrexol (NTXol) during transdermal diffusion cell permeation studies. A 1% w/w NTX cream was formulated and drug permeation was examined over 24 h using static Franz diffusion cells mounted with pig skin. A Liquid Chromatography Quadrupole-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS Q-ToF) method was developed for the detection of NTX and NTXol in the receptor solution, skin membrane and residual cream on the donor chamber after completion of the diffusion studies. The cream formulation exhibited steady state release of NTX over 24 h after an initial lag time of 2.74 h. The bioconversion of NTX to NTXol in the skin membrane was 1.1%. It was concluded that the cream may be an effective formulation for the sustained transdermal delivery of LDN. The novel LC Q-ToF MS method allowed the accurate measurement of NTX and NTXol levels across the diffusion cell assemblies and the quantification of NTX metabolism in the skin.

  5. Naltrexone: Not Just for Opioids Anymore.

    PubMed

    Sudakin, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Naltrexone is a semi-synthetic opioid with competitive antagonist activity at mu opioid receptors. Its efficacy has been demonstrated in the treatment of alcohol and opioid dependence, but adherence to daily dosing has been recognized as a factor limiting long-term effectiveness. Recently, a long-acting injectable formulation of naltrexone has received FDA-approval for treating alcohol and opioid dependence. This article reviews the pharmacology of naltrexone, the current evidence supporting the use of extended-release naltrexone, and the clinical challenges in the induction of patients to this medication.

  6. Separate and Combined Effects of Naltrexone and Extended-Release Alprazolam on the Reinforcing, Subject-Rated, and Cardiovascular Effects of Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Marks, Katherine R; Lile, Joshua A; Stoops, William W; Glaser, Paul E A; Hays, Lon R; Rush, Craig R

    2016-06-01

    Opioid antagonists (eg, naltrexone) and positive modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (eg, alprazolam) each modestly attenuate the abuse-related effects of stimulants. A previous study demonstrated that acute pretreatment with the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam attenuated a greater number of the subject-rated effects of D-amphetamine than the constituent drugs alone. This study tested the hypothesis that maintenance on the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam XR would attenuate the reinforcing and "positive" subject-rated effects of methamphetamine to a greater extent than the constituent drugs alone.Eight non-treatment-seeking, stimulant-using individuals completed a placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind inpatient protocol. Participants were maintained on naltrexone (0 and 50 mg), alprazolam XR (0 and 1 mg), and the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam XR (50 mg and 1 mg, respectively) for 6 to 7 days. Under each maintenance condition, participants sampled intranasal doses of methamphetamine (0, 10, and 30 mg), and were then offered the opportunity to work for the sampled dose on a modified progressive-ratio procedure. Subject-rated drug effect questionnaires, psychomotor, and physiology assessments were collected.Intranasal methamphetamine functioned as a reinforcer and produced prototypical stimulant-like "positive" subject-rated and physiological effects. Maintenance on naltrexone significantly decreased the reinforcing, but not subject-rated drug effects of 10-mg methamphetamine. Alprazolam XR and the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam XR did not impact methamphetamine self-administration or subject-rated drug effects. The results support the continued evaluation of naltrexone for methamphetamine dependence, as well as the identification of other drugs that enhance its ability to reduce drug-taking behavior.

  7. Revisiting the ALA/N (alpha-lipoic acid/low-dose naltrexone) protocol for people with metastatic and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer: a report of 3 new cases.

    PubMed

    Berkson, Burton M; Rubin, Daniel M; Berkson, Arthur J

    2009-12-01

    The authors, in a previous article, described the long-term survival of a man with pancreatic cancer and metastases to the liver, treated with intravenous alpha-lipoic acid and oral low-dose naltrexone (ALA/N) without any adverse effects. He is alive and well 78 months after initial presentation. Three additional pancreatic cancer case studies are presented in this article. At the time of this writing, the first patient, GB, is alive and well 39 months after presenting with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas with metastases to the liver. The second patient, JK, who presented to the clinic with the same diagnosis was treated with the ALA/N protocol and after 5 months of therapy, PET scan demonstrated no evidence of disease. The third patient, RC, in addition to his pancreatic cancer with liver and retroperitoneal metastases, has a history of B-cell lymphoma and prostate adenocarcinoma. After 4 months of the ALA/N protocol his PET scan demonstrated no signs of cancer. In this article, the authors discuss the poly activity of ALA: as an agent that reduces oxidative stress, its ability to stabilize NF(k)B, its ability to stimulate pro-oxidant apoptosic activity, and its discriminative ability to discourage the proliferation of malignant cells. In addition, the ability of lowdose naltrexone to modulate an endogenous immune response is discussed. This is the second article published on the ALA/N protocol and the authors believe the protocol warrants clinical trial.

  8. Prevention and diminished expression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by low dose naltrexone (LDN) or opioid growth factor (OGF) for an extended period: Therapeutic implications for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Kristen A; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2011-03-24

    Endogenous opioids inhibit the onset and progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) with 30days of treatment. This study examined the long term effects of the opioid growth factor (OGF, [Met(5)]-enkephalin) and a low dose of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (LDN) on expression of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced EAE. C57BL/6 mice began receiving daily injections of 10mg/kg OGF (MOG+OGF), 0.1mg/kg naltrexone (MOG+LDN), or saline (MOG+Vehicle) at the time of EAE induction and continuing for 60days. In contrast to 100% of the MOG+Vehicle group with behavioral symptoms of EAE, 63% and 68% of the MOG+OGF and MOG+LDN mice expressed disease. Both severity and disease indices of EAE in OGF- and LDN-treated mice were notably decreased from MOG+Vehicle cohorts. By day 60, 6- and 3-fold more animals in the MOG+OGF and MOG+LDN groups, respectively, had a remission compared to MOG+Vehicle mice. Neuropathological studies revealed i) astrocyte activation and neuronal damage as early as day 10 (prior to behavioral symptoms) in all MOG-injected groups, ii) a significant reduction of activated astrocytes in MOG+OGF and MOG+LDN groups compared to MOG+Vehicle mice at day 30, and iii) no demyelination on day 60 in mice treated with OGF or LDN and not displaying disease symptoms. These results indicate that treatment with OGF or LDN had no deleterious long-term repercussions and did not exacerbate EAE, but i) halted progression of disease, ii) reversed neurological deficits, and iii) prevented the onset of neurological dysfunction across a considerable span of time.

  9. Naltrexone-induced hypothermia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ary, M; Chesarek, W; Sorensen, S M; Lomax, P

    1976-10-01

    Naltrexone, in relatively high doses, has been reported to cause a fall in body temperature in human ex-heroin addicts who had been abstinent for at least 6 weeks. The underlying mechanism of this hypothermic effect has been investigated in rats. The first consideration was that the temperature change was a reflection of delayed withdrawal but rats implanted with a morphine pellet 45 days earlier showed no significant change in temperature after a dose of naltrexone that caused marked withdrawal hypothermia in dependent rats implanted 3 days previously. A fall in core temperature was only induced in rats after doses of 80 and 160 mg/kg i.p. of naltrexone. Behavioral thermoregulatory studies revealed that the animals correct the falling body temperature by increased exposure to a radiant heat source indicating that the central thermostats had not been significantly affected by the drug. These data suggest that the major component in the hypothermic effect of naltrexone is activation of efferent heat loss pathways or peripheral heat loss mechanisms. Due to current suggestions that opiate receptors might represent the receptors for an endogenous transmitter the results are discussed in relation to this consideration. When compared to the sites and mechanism of action of opiates on thermoregulation the results with naltrexone lend little support to the hypothesis that the fall in temperature is due to displacement of an endogenous substance from central opiate receptors.

  10. Low-dose naltrexone targets the opioid growth factor-opioid growth factor receptor pathway to inhibit cell proliferation: mechanistic evidence from a tissue culture model.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Renee N; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2011-09-01

    Naltrexone (NTX) is an opioid antagonist that inhibits or accelerates cell proliferation in vivo when utilized in a low (LDN) or high (HDN) dose, respectively. The mechanism of opioid antagonist action on growth is not well understood. We established a tissue culture model of LDN and HDN using short-term and continuous opioid receptor blockade, respectively, in human ovarian cancer cells, and found that the duration of opioid receptor blockade determines cell proliferative response. The alteration of growth by NTX also was detected in cells representative of pancreatic, colorectal and squamous cell carcinomas. The opioid growth factor (OGF; [Met(5)]-enkephalin) and its receptor (OGFr) were responsible for mediating the action of NTX on cell proliferation. NTX upregulated OGF and OGFr at the translational but not at the transcriptional level. The mechanism of inhibition by short-term NTX required p16 and/or p21 cyclin-dependent inhibitory kinases, but was not dependent on cell survival (necrosis, apoptosis). Sequential administration of short-term NTX and OGF had a greater inhibitory effect on cell proliferation than either agent alone. Given the parallels between short-term NTX in vitro and LDN in vivo, we now demonstrate at the molecular level that the OGF-OGFr axis is a common pathway that is essential for the regulation of cell proliferation by NTX.

  11. Dose reduction using a dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Fleischmann, Dominik; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors recently proposed a dynamic, prepatient x-ray attenuator capable of producing a piecewise-linear attenuation profile customized to each patient and viewing angle. This attenuator was intended to reduce scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), dynamic range, and dose by redistributing flux. In this work the authors tested the ability of the attenuator to reduce dose and SPR in simulations. Methods: The authors selected four clinical applications, including routine full field-of-view scans of the thorax and abdomen, and targeted reconstruction tasks for an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the pancreas. Raw data were estimated by forward projection of the image volume datasets. The dynamic attenuator was controlled to reduce dose while maintaining peak variance by solving a convex optimization problem, assuminga priori knowledge of the patient anatomy. In targeted reconstruction tasks, the noise in specific regions was given increased weighting. A system with a standard attenuator (or “bowtie filter”) was used as a reference, and used either convex optimized tube current modulation (TCM) or a standard TCM heuristic. The noise of the scan was determined analytically while the dose was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Scatter was also estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. The sensitivity of the dynamic attenuator to patient centering was also examined by shifting the abdomen in 2 cm intervals. Results: Compared to a reference system with optimized TCM, use of the dynamic attenuator reduced dose by about 30% in routine scans and 50% in targeted scans. Compared to the TCM heuristics which are typically used withouta priori knowledge, the dose reduction is about 50% for routine scans. The dynamic attenuator gives the ability to redistribute noise and variance and produces more uniform noise profiles than systems with a conventional bowtie filter. The SPR was also modestly reduced by 10% in the thorax and 24% in the abdomen. Imaging with the dynamic

  12. Clinical safety of 1500 mg oral naltrexone overdose

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2010-01-01

    This case represents a clinical overdose of the largest known dose of oral naltrexone, equivalent to the taking of a whole bottle of the oral naltrexone preparation. The patient's intention was to control craving for alcohol and opiates. The patient quickly settled with expectant management. As such it demonstrates that earlier concerns that have been voiced in this area, particularly relating to naltrexone-related hepatotoxicity and depression, may have been overstated, at least in the experience of this patient. This patient's course was marked only by gastric irritation, of which she had some history. As such the present profile provides case report evidence consistent with more robust views of the patient safety of naltrexone itself, and opposing more cautious views. Her polydrug craving was suppressed for a period of 2 weeks, which raises the important question of the mechanism of action of naltrexone's generalised suppression of refractory hedonic consumptive addictive behaviours. PMID:22778191

  13. Quaternary naltrexone reverses radiogenic and morphine-induced locomotor hyperactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.; Galbraith, J.A.; White, G.A.; Gibbs, G.L.

    1984-04-01

    The present study attempted to determine the relative role of the peripheral and central nervous system in the production of morphine-induced or radiation-induced locomotor hyperactivity of the mouse. Toward this end, we used a quaternary derivative of an opiate antagonist (naltrexone methobromide), which presumably does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Quaternary naltrexone was used to challenge the stereotypic locomotor response observed in these mice after either an i.p. injection of morphine or exposure to 1500 rads /sup 60/Co. The quaternary derivative of naltrexone reversed the locomotor hyperactivity normally observed in the C57BL/6J mouse after an injection of morphine. It also significantly attenuated radiation-induced locomotion. The data reported here support the hypothesis of endorphin involvement in radiation-induced and radiogenic behaviors. However, these conclusions are contingent upon further research which more fully evaluates naltrexone methobromide's capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  14. Memantine enhances the inhibitory effects of naltrexone on ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Alexander; Stenback, Tove; Liljequist, Sture

    2008-04-28

    Effects of the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.1; 0.3; 1.0 mg/kg i.p.) on operant ethanol self-administration alone and in combination with the non-competitive NMDA antagonist memantine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.) were studied in rats. Acute administration of naltrexone (0.1; 0.3; 1.0 mg/kg i.p.) inhibited ethanol self-administration in a dose-dependent manner. Memantine (1.0 mg/kg) significantly enhanced the effects of naltrexone at 0.1 mg/kg, failing per se to inhibit ethanol consumption. Thus, low, sub-effective dose of memantine in combination with low doses of naltrexone blocked the reinforcing properties of ethanol in rats. It is suggested that the combination of sub-effective doses of memantine and naltrexone may have therapeutic value in the treatment of alcoholism particularly in a subgroup of alcoholic patients who have high sensitivity to the adverse side effects of naltrexone.

  15. Maternally Administered Sustained-Release Naltrexone in Rats Affects Offspring Neurochemistry and Behaviour in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Krstew, Elena V.; Tait, Robert J.; Hulse, Gary K.

    2012-01-01

    Naltrexone is not recommended during pregnancy. However, sustained-release naltrexone implant use in humans has resulted in cases of inadvertent foetal exposure. Here, we used clinically relevant dosing to examine the effects of maternally administered sustained-release naltrexone on the rat brain by examining offspring at birth and in adulthood. Maternal treatment (naltrexone or placebo implant) started before conception and ceased during gestation, birth or weaning. Morphometry was assessed in offspring at birth and adulthood. Adult offspring were evaluated for differences in locomotor behaviour (basal and morphine-induced, 10 mg/kg, s.c.) and opioid neurochemistry, propensity to self-administer morphine and cue-induced drug-seeking after abstinence. Blood analysis confirmed offspring exposure to naltrexone during gestation, birth and weaning. Naltrexone exposure increased litter size and reduced offspring birth-weight but did not alter brain morphometry. Compared to placebo, basal motor activity of naltrexone-exposed adult offspring was lower, yet they showed enhanced development of psychomotor sensitization to morphine. Developmental naltrexone exposure was associated with resistance to morphine-induced down-regulation of striatal preproenkephalin mRNA expression in adulthood. Adult offspring also exhibited greater operant responding for morphine and, in addition, cue-induced drug-seeking was enhanced. Collectively, these data show pronounced effects of developmental naltrexone exposure, some of which persist into adulthood, highlighting the need for follow up of humans that were exposed to naltrexone in utero. PMID:23300784

  16. Low doses of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitors rapidly evoke opioid receptor-mediated thermal hyperalgesia in naïve mice which is converted to prominent analgesia by cotreatment with ultra-low-dose naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Crain, Stanley M; Shen, Ke-Fei

    2008-09-22

    Systemic (s.c.) injection in naïve mice of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) inhibitors, e.g. 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine [(IBMX) or caffeine, 10 mg/kg] or the more specific cAMP-PDE inhibitor, rolipram (1 mug/kg), rapidly evokes thermal hyperalgesia (lasting >5 h). These effects appear to be mediated by enhanced excitatory opioid receptor signaling, as occurs during withdrawal in opioid-dependent mice. Cotreatment of these mice with ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX, 0.1 ng/kg-1 pg/kg, s.c.) results in prominent opioid analgesia (lasting >4 h) even when the dose of rolipram is reduced to 1 pg/kg. Cotreatment of these cAMP-PDE inhibitors in naïve mice with an ultra-low-dose (0.1 ng/kg) of the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) or the mu-opioid receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA) also results in opioid analgesia. These excitatory effects of cAMP-PDE inhibitors in naïve mice may be mediated by enhanced release of small amounts of endogenous bimodally-acting (excitatory/inhibitory) opioid agonists by neurons in nociceptive networks. Ultra-low-dose NTX, nor-BNI or beta-FNA selectively antagonizes high-efficacy excitatory (hyperalgesic) Gs-coupled opioid receptor-mediated signaling in naïve mice and results in rapid conversion to inhibitory (analgesic) Gi/Go-coupled opioid receptor-mediated signaling which normally requires activation by much higher doses of opioid agonists. Cotreatment with a low subanalgesic dose of kelatorphan, an inhibitor of multiple endogenous opioid peptide-degrading enzymes, stabilizes endogenous opioid agonists released by cAMP-PDE inhibitors, resulting in conversion of the hyperalgesia to analgesia without requiring selective blockade of excitatory opioid receptor signaling. The present study provides a novel pharmacologic paradigm that may facilitate development of valuable non-narcotic clinical analgesics utilizing cotreatment with ultra-low-dose rolipram plus ultra-low-dose NTX or related

  17. Ocular Safety of Topical Naltrexone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-09-1-0312 TITLE: Ocular Safety of Topical Naltrexone ...Topical Naltrexone 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0312 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Joseph W. Sassani, M.D.; Ian...associates have been funded to perform a Phase I Clinical Trial of Naltrexone dissolved in Vigamox® and applied topically as eye drops preliminary to a

  18. Effects of naltrexone on firing activity of rat cortex neurons and its interactions with ethanol.

    PubMed

    Kozhechkin, S N; Mednikova, Yu S; Kolik, L G

    2013-09-01

    Naltrexone dose-dependently decreased neuron firing rate in the rat frontal cortex after intravenous (1-20 mg/kg) and microelectrophoretic administration. Microelectrophoretic applications of naltrexone reduced the excitatory neuronal response of neurons to low doses of ethanol (electroosmotic application) and potentiated depression of firing activity induced by ethanol in high doses. We concluded that opioid peptides take part in generation of spontaneous neuronal activity in the frontal cortex and neuronal excitation caused by ethanol in low doses. Naltrexone acts as a synergist of ethanol in its depressive effect on cortical neurons.

  19. Ultra low-dose CT attenuation correction in PET SPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shyh-Jen; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tsai, Chia-Jung; Yang, Ching-Ching; Lee, Jason J. S.; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2010-07-01

    The use of CT images for attenuation correction (CTAC) allows significantly shorter scanning time and a high quality noise-free attenuation map compared with conventional germanium-68 transmission scan because at least 10 4 times greater of photon flux would be generated from a CT scan under standard operating condition. However, this CTAC technique would potentially introduce more radiation risk to the patients owing to the higher radiation exposure from CT scan. Statistic parameters mapping (SPM) is a prominent technique in nuclear medicine community for the analysis of brain imaging data. The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of low-dose CT (LDCT) and ultra low-dose CT (UDCT) in PET SPM applications. The study was divided into two parts. The first part was to evaluate of tracer uptake distribution pattern and quantity analysis by using the striatal phantom to initially assess the feasibility of AC for clinical purpose. The second part was to examine the group SPM analysis using the Hoffman brain phantom. The phantom study is to simulate the human brain and to reduce the experimental uncertainty of real subjects. The initial studies show that the results of PET SPM analysis have no significant differences between LDCT and UDCT comparing to the current used default CTAC. Moreover, the dose of the LDCT is lower than that of the default CT by a factor of 9, and UDCT can even yield a 42 times dose reduction. We have demonstrated the SPM results while using LDCT and UDCT for PET AC is comparable to those using default CT setting, suggesting their feasibility in PET SPM applications. In addition, the necessity of UDCT in PET SPM studies to avoid excess radiation dose is also evident since most of the subjects involved are non-cancer patients or children and some normal subjects are even served as a comparison group in the experiment. It is our belief that additional attempts to decrease the radiation dose would be valuable, especially for children and

  20. Naltrexone changes the expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum stress induced hepatic steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Moslehi, Azam; Nabavizadeh, Fatemeh; Zekri, Ali; Amiri, Fatemeh

    2017-02-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is closely associated with several chronic diseases such as obesity, atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, and hepatic steatosis. Steatosis in hepatocytes may also lead to disorders such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, and possibly cirrhosis. Opioid peptides are involved in triglyceride and cholesterol dysregulation. Naltrexone also attenuates ER stress induced hepatic steatosis in mice. In this study, we evaluated the effects of naltrexone on the expression of lipid metabolism-related nuclear factors and enzymes in the ER stress induced hepatic steatosis. C57/BL6 mice received saline, DMSO and naltrexone as control groups. In a fourth group, ER stress was induced by tunicamycin (TM) injection and in the last group, naltrexone was given before TM administration. Histopathological evaluations, real-time RT-PCR and western blot were performed. We found that GRP78, IRE1α, PERK and ATF6 gene expression and steatosis significantly reduced in naltrexone treated animals. Naltrexone alleviated the gene and protein expression of SREBP1c. Expression of ACAT1, apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and PPARα also increased after naltrexone treatment. In conclusion, this study, for the first time, shows that naltrexone has a considerable role in attenuation of ER stress-induced liver injury.

  1. Opioid growth factor and low-dose naltrexone impair central nervous system infiltration by CD4 + T lymphocytes in established experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Leslie A; Waldner, Hanspeter; Zagon, Ian S; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS), characterized by infiltrating myelin-reactive T lymphocytes and demyelinating lesions. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is the animal model widely utilized to study MS. EAE is mediated by CD4(+) T cells and can be induced in EAE-susceptible mice through immunization with a myelin antigen, such as proteolipid protein 139-151 (PLP139-151) in SJL mice. In this PLP-induced EAE model, autoreactive CD4(+) T cells migrate from peripheral tissues into the CNS where they are reactivated resulting in CNS damage. Th1 and Th17 cells produce the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFNγ and IL-17, respectively, that have been shown to have pathogenic roles in EAE and MS. Anti-inflammatory Th2, IL-4 secreting cells, have been indicated to inhibit EAE exacerbation. However, given the inflammatory environment of EAE, Th2 effector cells are outnumbered by Th1/Th17 cells. Regulatory CD4(+) T cells suppress immune reactions and have been demonstrated to be dysfunctional in MS patients. Opioid growth factor (OGF), chemically termed [Met(5)]-enkephalin, is a negative growth factor that interacts with the OGF receptor. The OGF-OGFr axis can be activated through exogenous administration of OGF or a low dosage of naltrexone (LDN), an opioid antagonist. We have previously demonstrated that modulation of the OGF-OGFr axis results in alleviation from relapse-remitting EAE, and that CNS-infiltrating CD3(+) T cells are diminished with exogenous OGF or intermittent blockade with LDN administration. In this paper, we aimed to determine whether OGF or LDN alter the Th effector responses of CD4(+) T lymphocytes within the CNS in established EAE. We report in these studies that the numbers of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in the CNS of EAE mice are decreased following treatment with OGF for five days but not LDN. However, modulation of the OGF-OGFr axis did not result in changes to CD4(+) Th effector cell responses

  2. Gender differences in treatment and clinical characteristics among patients receiving extended release naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Herbeck, Diane M; Jeter, Kira E; Cousins, Sarah J; Abdelmaksoud, Reham; Crèvecoeur-MacPhail, Desirée

    2016-01-01

    Further research is needed to investigate real-world acceptability of extended-release naltrexone for alcohol and opioid use disorders, and potential gender differences. This study examines treatment and clinical characteristics among men and women receiving extended-release naltrexone in a large, publicly funded substance use disorder treatment system (N = 465; 52% female). Patient demographics, treatment characteristics, and the number of extended-release naltrexone doses received were collected from administrative data and treatment program staff. Additionally, patients provided information on experiences with extended-release naltrexone in an open-ended format at 1, 2, and 3 weeks following their first injection. For a subsample of patients (N = 220), alcohol/opioid cravings and specific adverse effects were also assessed. Compared to men, women reported experiencing a higher rate and mean number of adverse effects. Overall, craving scores showed substantial reductions over time. However, among patients taking extended-release naltrexone for alcohol use, women showed a significantly greater reduction in craving scores compared to men. No gender differences were observed in the number of extended-release naltrexone doses received. Although women may have a greater need for additional support in managing early adverse effects, extended-release naltrexone as an adjunct to psychosocial treatment may be an acceptable and promising treatment approach for both men and women, and particularly for women prescribed extended-release naltrexone for alcohol use. This study contributes further information on patients' experiences during the early course of extended-release naltrexone treatment in real-world settings. Understanding these experiences may assist policy makers and treatment providers in addressing challenges of implementing this treatment into wider practice.

  3. Minor pathological changes are induced by naltrexone-poly(DL-lactide) implants in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Farid, W O; McCallum, D; Tait, R J; Dunlop, S A; Hulse, G K

    2009-12-15

    Oral naltrexone is used to treat alcohol and heroin dependence but is associated with poor patient compliance. Sustained-release preparations have been developed to overcome noncompliance. Many sustained-release preparations are composed of polymers combined with naltrexone. Limited data indicate that polymers induce variable levels of tissue reactivity and that naltrexone may increase this effect. A slow-release subcutaneous naltrexone-poly (DL-lactide) implant is currently being trialed to treat heroin dependence in Western Australia. A minority of women fall pregnant and, although tissue reactivity in nonpregnant humans is relatively minor, detailed chronological data during pregnancy are lacking. Histological changes in pregnant rats were assessed; a single active tablet containing poly[trans-3,6-dimethyl-1,4-dioxyane-2,5-dione] (DL-lactide) loaded with 25 mg of naltrexone was implanted subcutaneously, and tissue response was compared with inactive polymer implantation. Rats were timed mated at 13-26 days postimplant. Tissue assessment up to 75 days by a pathologist showed that naltrexone induced chronic inflammatory response in a dose-dependent manner, although still at a low level. Furthermore, for inactive implants, minimal foreign body reaction and fibrosis, together with low-level inflammation, suggested good long-term biocompatibility. We conclude that the Australian naltrexone-poly(DL-lactide) implant is tolerated in pregnant rats, reinforcing its potential role for managing alcohol and heroin dependence in pregnant humans.

  4. SU-E-T-233: Modeling Linac Couch Effects On Attenuation and Skin Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, L; Halvorsen, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Treatment couch tops in medical LINAC rooms lead to attenuation to beams penetrating them, plus higher skin dose which can become a significant concern with the high fraction doses associated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. This work measures the attenuation and shallow depth dose due to a BrainLab couch, and studies the modeling of the couch top in our treatment planning system (TPS) as a uniform solid material with homogeneous density. Methods: LINAC photon beams of size 10×10 cm and nominal energy 6 MV were irradiated from different gantry angles on a stack of solid water. Depth dose were measured with two types of parallel plate chambers, MPPK and Markus. In the Philips Pinnacle TPS, the couch was modeled as a slab with varying thickness and density. A digital phantom of size 30×30×10 cm with density 1 g/cc was created to simulate the measurement setup. Both the attenuation and skin dose effects due to the couch were studied. Results: An orthogonal attenuation rate of 3.2% was observed with both chamber measurements. The attenuation can be modeled by couch models of varying thicknesses. Once the orthogonal attenuation was modeled well, the oblique beam attenuation in TPS agreed with measurement within 1.5%. The depth dose at shallow depth (0.5 cm) was also shown to be modeled correctly within 1.5% of the measurement using a 12 mm thick couch model with density of 0.9 g/cc. Agreement between calculation and measurement diverges at very shallow depths (≤1 mm) but remains acceptable (<5%) with the aforementioned couch model parameters. Conclusion: Modeling the couch top as a uniform solid in a treatment planning system can predict both the attenuation and surface dose simultaneously well within clinical tolerance in the same model.

  5. Naltrexone Maintenance Decreases Cannabis Self-Administration and Subjective Effects in Daily Cannabis Smokers.

    PubMed

    Haney, Margaret; Ramesh, Divya; Glass, Andrew; Pavlicova, Martina; Bedi, Gillinder; Cooper, Ziva D

    2015-10-01

    Given that cannabis use is increasing in the United States, pharmacological treatment options to treat cannabis use disorder are needed. Opioid antagonists modulate cannabinoid effects and may offer a potential approach to reducing cannabis use. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled human laboratory study, we assessed the effects of naltrexone maintenance on the reinforcing, subjective, psychomotor, and cardiovascular effects of active and inactive cannabis. Nontreatment-seeking, daily cannabis smokers were randomized to receive naltrexone (50 mg: n=18 M and 5 F) or placebo (0 mg; n=26 M and 2 F) capsules for 16 days. Before, during, and after medication maintenance, participants completed 10 laboratory sessions over 4-6 weeks, assessing cannabis' behavioral and cardiovascular effects. Medication compliance was verified by observed capsule administration, plasma naltrexone, and urinary riboflavin. Relative to placebo, maintenance on naltrexone significantly reduced both active cannabis self-administration and its positive subjective effects ('good effect'). Participants in the placebo group had 7.6 times (95% CI: 1.1-51.8) the odds of self-administering active cannabis compared with the naltrexone group. This attenuation of reinforcing and positive subjective effects also influenced cannabis use in the natural ecology. Naltrexone had intrinsic effects: decreasing ratings of friendliness, food intake, and systolic blood pressure, and increasing spontaneous reports of stomach upset and headache, yet dropout rates were comparable between groups. In summary, we show for the first time that maintenance on naltrexone decreased cannabis self-administration and ratings of 'good effect' in nontreatment-seeking daily cannabis smokers. Clinical studies in patients motivated to reduce their cannabis use are warranted to evaluate naltrexone's efficacy as a treatment for cannabis use disorder.

  6. Naltrexone Maintenance Decreases Cannabis Self-Administration and Subjective Effects in Daily Cannabis Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Margaret; Ramesh, Divya; Glass, Andrew; Pavlicova, Martina; Bedi, Gillinder; Cooper, Ziva D

    2015-01-01

    Given that cannabis use is increasing in the United States, pharmacological treatment options to treat cannabis use disorder are needed. Opioid antagonists modulate cannabinoid effects and may offer a potential approach to reducing cannabis use. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled human laboratory study, we assessed the effects of naltrexone maintenance on the reinforcing, subjective, psychomotor, and cardiovascular effects of active and inactive cannabis. Nontreatment-seeking, daily cannabis smokers were randomized to receive naltrexone (50 mg: n=18 M and 5 F) or placebo (0 mg; n=26 M and 2 F) capsules for 16 days. Before, during, and after medication maintenance, participants completed 10 laboratory sessions over 4–6 weeks, assessing cannabis' behavioral and cardiovascular effects. Medication compliance was verified by observed capsule administration, plasma naltrexone, and urinary riboflavin. Relative to placebo, maintenance on naltrexone significantly reduced both active cannabis self-administration and its positive subjective effects (‘good effect'). Participants in the placebo group had 7.6 times (95% CI: 1.1–51.8) the odds of self-administering active cannabis compared with the naltrexone group. This attenuation of reinforcing and positive subjective effects also influenced cannabis use in the natural ecology. Naltrexone had intrinsic effects: decreasing ratings of friendliness, food intake, and systolic blood pressure, and increasing spontaneous reports of stomach upset and headache, yet dropout rates were comparable between groups. In summary, we show for the first time that maintenance on naltrexone decreased cannabis self-administration and ratings of ‘good effect' in nontreatment-seeking daily cannabis smokers. Clinical studies in patients motivated to reduce their cannabis use are warranted to evaluate naltrexone's efficacy as a treatment for cannabis use disorder. PMID:25881117

  7. Naltrexone for impulse control disorders in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Papay, Kimberly; Xie, Sharon X.; Stern, Matthew; Hurtig, Howard; Siderowf, Andrew; Duda, John E.; Minger, James

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson disease (PD) are common and can be difficult to manage. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy and tolerability of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, for the treatment of ICDs in PD. Methods: Patients with PD (n = 50) and an ICD were enrolled in an 8-week, randomized (1:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled study of naltrexone 50–100 mg/d (flexible dosing). The primary outcome measure was response based on the Clinical Global Impression–Change score, and the secondary outcome measure was change in symptom severity using the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease–Rating Scale (QUIP-RS) ICD score. Results: Forty-five patients (90%) completed the study. The Clinical Global Impression–Change response rate difference favoring naltrexone in completers was 19.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] −8.7% to 44.2%). While this difference was not significant (odds ratio = 1.6, 95% CI 0.5–5.2, Wald χ2 [df] = 0.5 [1], p = 0.5), naltrexone treatment led to a significantly greater decrease in QUIP-RS ICD score over time compared with placebo (regression coefficient for interaction term in linear mixed-effects model = −7.37, F[df] = 4.3 [1, 49], p = 0.04). The estimated changes in QUIP-RS ICD scores from baseline to week 8 were 14.9 points (95% CI 9.9–19.9) for naltrexone and 7.5 points (95% CI 2.5–12.6) for placebo. Conclusions: Naltrexone treatment was not efficacious for the treatment of ICDs in PD using a global assessment of response, but findings using a PD-specific ICD rating scale support further evaluation of opioid antagonists for the treatment of ICD symptoms in PD. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that in patients with PD and an ICD, naltrexone does not significantly increase the probability of achieving response. However, the study lacked the precision to exclude an important difference in response rates. PMID

  8. Naltrexone + bupropion (Mysimba). Too risky for only modest weight loss.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    Weight loss and its long-term maintenance are mainly based on dietary measures and regular physical activity. There are currently no weight-loss medications with a favourable harm-benefit balance. Bupropion is chemically related to certain amphetamines, while naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist. A fixed-dose combination of these two drugs has received marketing authorisation in the European Union for obese patients and for over-weight patients with other cardiovascular risk factors. In five placebo-controlled, randomised, double-blind trials, the patients, weighing on average between 100 kg and 105 kg (average body mass index 36 kg/m2), the naltrexone + bupropion combination was associated with an average weight loss of a few additional kilograms compared with placebo, after 6 months or one year of treatment. There are no post-trial follow-up data to show whether or not the patients regained their lost weight after treatment discontinuation. One trial including more than 8900 patients examined the effect of the naltrexone + bupropion combination on the freauency of maior cardiovascular events, but poor handling of an interim analysis undermined the validity of the final results. The known adverse effects of bupropion consist of potentially severe neuropsychiatric disorders such as aggressiveness, depression and suicidal ideation, and also allergic reactions, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Misuse and excessive consumption have been reported. In trials in obese or overweight patients, the naltrexone + bupropion combination caused sometimes severe neuropsychiatric disorders, including seizures, cognitive impairment, dizziness, anxiety, sleep disorders and psychotic symptoms. In clinical trials, the combination led to an increase in blood pressure compared with placebo, and also an excess of cardiac arrhythmias. About half of patients who took naltrexone + bupropion experienced gastrointestinal disorders such as nausea, vomiting and constipation. The

  9. A combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone blocks compulsive cocaine intake in rodents without producing dependence.

    PubMed

    Wee, Sunmee; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Misra, Kaushik K; Schlosburg, Joel E; Koob, George F

    2012-08-08

    Buprenorphine, a synthetic opioid that acts at both μ and κ opioid receptors, can decrease cocaine use in individuals with opioid addiction. However, the potent agonist action of buprenorphine at μ opioid receptors raises its potential for creating opioid dependence in non-opioid-dependent cocaine abusers. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone (a potent μ opioid antagonist with weaker δ and κ antagonist properties) could block compulsive cocaine self-administration without producing opioid dependence. The effects of buprenorphine and various doses of naltrexone on cocaine self-administration were assessed in rats that self-administered cocaine under conditions of either short access (noncompulsive cocaine seeking) or extended access (compulsive cocaine seeking). Buprenorphine alone reproducibly decreased cocaine self-administration. Although this buprenorphine-alone effect was blocked in a dose-dependent manner by naltrexone in both the short-access and the extended-access groups, the combination of the lowest dose of naltrexone with buprenorphine blocked cocaine self-administration in the extended-access group but not in the short-access group. Rats given this low dose of naltrexone with buprenorphine did not exhibit the physical opioid withdrawal syndrome seen in rats treated with buprenorphine alone, and naltrexone at this dose did not block κ agonist-induced analgesia. The results suggest that the combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone at an appropriate dosage decreases compulsive cocaine self-administration with minimal liability to produce opioid dependence and may be useful as a treatment for cocaine addiction.

  10. Ocular safety of Topical Naltrexone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    prescription medicines, vitamins and herbal supplements . Especially tell your doctor if you take any opioid-containing medicines for pain, cough, or diarrhea...media containing 10-6 M naltrexone or in control media supplemented with an equal volume of water. NTX accelerates the rate of epithelial migration by...between 96 and 120 hours after wounding, whereas all of the control corneas are not healed until 168 hours. Conversely, supplementation of culture medium

  11. Risk-Taking Propensity as a Predictor of Induction onto Naltrexone Treatment for Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Aklin, Will M.; Severtson, S. Geoffrey; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E.; Lejuez, C. W.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Objective Heroin addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that has devastating social, medical, and economic consequences. Naltrexone is an antagonist that blocks opioid effects and could be an effective medication for the treatment of opioid dependence. However, its clinical utility has been limited partly because of poor adherence and acceptability. Given the importance of compliance to naltrexone treatment for opioid dependence, the goal of the current study was to examine predictors involved in successful induction onto naltrexone treatment. Method Parametric and nonparametric statistical tests were performed on data from a sample of 64 individuals entering treatment who met DSM-IV criteria for opioid dependence. The relationship between naltrexone induction (i.e., inducted- vs. not-inducted onto naltrexone) and risk-taking propensity, as indexed by riskiness on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) was examined. Participants were recruited from local detoxification programs, inpatient drug treatment, and other Baltimore programs that provided services to opioid dependent adults (e.g., Baltimore Needle Exchange Program) during the period from August 2007 to September 2008. Results Positive association between risk-taking propensity and odds of naltrexone induction. Specifically, each five point increase in the total BART score was associated with a 25% decrease in odds of naltrexone induction (OR=0.76, 95% CI: 0.58–0.99, p = .041). This association remained statistically significant even after adjusting for potential confounds, including injection drug use and cocaine positive urine results (p = .05). After adjusting for the covariates, each five point increase in BART score was associated with 28% decrease in the odds of achieving the maintenance dose (AOR=0.73, 95% CI: 0.54–0.99, p = .046). Conclusions Risk taking propensity was predictive of induction onto naltrexone treatment, above and beyond injection drug use and cocaine-positive urine samples. PMID

  12. Investigating treatment dose error due to beam attenuation by a carbon fiber tabletop.

    PubMed

    Myint, W Kenji; Niedbala, Malgorzata; Wilkins, David; Gerig, Lee H

    2006-08-24

    Carbon fiber is commonly used in radiation therapy for treatment tabletops and various immobilization and support devices, partially because it is generally perceived to be almost radiotransparent to high-energy photons. To avoid exposure to normal tissue during modern radiation therapy, one must deliver the radiation from all gantry angles; hence, beams often transit the couch proximal to the patient. The effects of the beam attenuation by the support structure of the couch are often neglected in the planning process. In this study, we investigate the attenuation of 6-MV and 18-MV photon beams by a Medtec (Orange City, IA) carbon fiber couch. We have determined that neglecting the attenuation of oblique treatment fields by the carbon fiber couch can result in localized dose reduction from 4% to 16%, depending on energy, field size, and geometry. Further, we investigate the ability of a commercial treatment-planning system (Theraplan Plus v3.8) to account for the attenuation by the treatment couch. Results show that incorporating the carbon fiber couch in the patient model reduces the dose error to less than 2%. The variation in dose reduction as a function of longitudinal couch position was also measured. In the triangular strut region of the couch, the attenuation varied +/- 0.5% following the periodic nature of the support structure. Based on these findings, we propose the routine incorporation of the treatment tabletop into patient treatment planning dose calculations.

  13. Impact of radiation attenuation by a carbon fiber couch on patient dose verification

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chun-Yen; Chou, Wen-Tsae; Liao, Yi-Jen; Lee, Jeng-Hung; Liang, Ji-An; Hsu, Shih-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the difference between the measured and calculated irradiation attenuations obtained using two algorithms and to identify the influence of couch attenuation on patient dose verification. We performed eight tests of couch attenuation with two photon energies, two longitudinal couch positions, and two rail positions. The couch attenuation was determined using a radiation treatment planning system. The measured and calculated attenuations were compared. We also performed 12 verifications of head-and-neck and rectum cases by using a Delta phantom. The dose deviation (DD), distance to agreement (DTA), and gamma index of pencil-beam convolution (PBC) verifications were nearly the same. The agreement was least consistent for the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) without the couch for the head-and-neck case, in which the DD, DTA, and gamma index were 74.4%, 99.3%, and 89%, respectively; for the rectum case, the corresponding values were 56.2%, 95.1%, and 92.4%. We suggest that dose verification should be performed using the following three metrics simultaneously: DD, DTA, and the gamma index. PMID:28240236

  14. Impact of radiation attenuation by a carbon fiber couch on patient dose verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chun-Yen; Chou, Wen-Tsae; Liao, Yi-Jen; Lee, Jeng-Hung; Liang, Ji-An; Hsu, Shih-Ming

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the difference between the measured and calculated irradiation attenuations obtained using two algorithms and to identify the influence of couch attenuation on patient dose verification. We performed eight tests of couch attenuation with two photon energies, two longitudinal couch positions, and two rail positions. The couch attenuation was determined using a radiation treatment planning system. The measured and calculated attenuations were compared. We also performed 12 verifications of head-and-neck and rectum cases by using a Delta phantom. The dose deviation (DD), distance to agreement (DTA), and gamma index of pencil-beam convolution (PBC) verifications were nearly the same. The agreement was least consistent for the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) without the couch for the head-and-neck case, in which the DD, DTA, and gamma index were 74.4%, 99.3%, and 89%, respectively; for the rectum case, the corresponding values were 56.2%, 95.1%, and 92.4%. We suggest that dose verification should be performed using the following three metrics simultaneously: DD, DTA, and the gamma index.

  15. Impact of radiation attenuation by a carbon fiber couch on patient dose verification.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun-Yen; Chou, Wen-Tsae; Liao, Yi-Jen; Lee, Jeng-Hung; Liang, Ji-An; Hsu, Shih-Ming

    2017-02-27

    The aim of this study was to understand the difference between the measured and calculated irradiation attenuations obtained using two algorithms and to identify the influence of couch attenuation on patient dose verification. We performed eight tests of couch attenuation with two photon energies, two longitudinal couch positions, and two rail positions. The couch attenuation was determined using a radiation treatment planning system. The measured and calculated attenuations were compared. We also performed 12 verifications of head-and-neck and rectum cases by using a Delta phantom. The dose deviation (DD), distance to agreement (DTA), and gamma index of pencil-beam convolution (PBC) verifications were nearly the same. The agreement was least consistent for the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) without the couch for the head-and-neck case, in which the DD, DTA, and gamma index were 74.4%, 99.3%, and 89%, respectively; for the rectum case, the corresponding values were 56.2%, 95.1%, and 92.4%. We suggest that dose verification should be performed using the following three metrics simultaneously: DD, DTA, and the gamma index.

  16. Effects of baclofen and naltrexone, alone and in combination, on the consumption of palatable food in male rats.

    PubMed

    Avena, Nicole M; Bocarsly, Miriam E; Murray, Susan; Gold, Mark S

    2014-10-01

    Excess consumption of palatable food has been shown to affect reward-related brain regions, and pharmaceutical treatments for drug addiction may also be effective in treating overeating of such foods. The GABA-B agonist baclofen and opioid antagonist naltrexone have both been used to treat addiction, and have been shown to suppress intake of certain foods. The combination of these drugs has shown to be more effective in reducing alcohol consumption than either drug alone. The present study assessed the effects of naltrexone and baclofen, alone and in combination, on intake of foods comprised of various macronutrients. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given 12-hr daily access to chow and a fat emulsion, sugar-fat emulsion, or a sugar solution for 21 days. Rats were then administered (intraperitoneal) baclofen-naltrexone combinations (0.1 mg/kg naltrexone and 1.0 mg/kg baclofen, 1.0 mg/kg naltrexone and 1.8 mg/kg baclofen), and naltrexone (0.1, 1.0 mg/kg) and baclofen (1.0, 1.8 mg/kg) alone. The high dose of the baclofen-naltrexone combination reduced palatable food intake in both the fat and sugar-fat groups compared with vehicle, without affecting chow consumption in these groups. Naltrexone showed little significant effects on intake of either palatable food or chow. Baclofen also reduced palatable food intake in the fat and fat-sugar groups, but differences were only noted between the low and high dose. The combination of baclofen and naltrexone may be a useful tool in selectively targeting the consumption of high-fat and sugar- and fat-rich foods.

  17. Patient self-attenuation and technologist dose in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zeff, Benjamin W.; Yester, Michael V.

    2005-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET), with 511-keV radiation and long patient-uptake times, presents unique radiation safety concerns. This two-part study considers aspects of PET radiation safety as they relate to PET suite design, dose to the public, and technologist occupational dose. In the first part of the study, the self-attenuation of radiation by patients' bodies was quantified. The radiation exposure was measured at three positions from 64 patients injected with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) during the uptake period. Compared with an in vitro control used as a point source, a significant decrease in exposure (>40% at 1 m) was observed due to nonuniform distribution of FDG and attenuation within the patients. The attenuation data are consistent with results from simulations [M. E. Phelps, ''Comments and Perspectives,'' J. Nucl. Med. 45, 1601 (2004)] that treat the body as a uniform, water-filled cylinder. As distance is often the principal source of protection for 511-keV radiation, the considerable self-attenuation may allow for more compact PET suites. However, despite high patient self-attenuation, shielding, and standard precautionary measures, PET technologist occupational doses can remain quite high ({approx}12 mSv/year). The second part of this study tracked the daily dose received by PET technologists. Close technologist-patient interaction both during and following FDG administration, as much as 20 min/study, contribute to the high doses and point to the need for a more innovative approach to radiation protection for PET technologists.

  18. A placebo-controlled trial of memantine as an adjunct to injectable extended-release naltrexone for opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Bisaga, Adam; Sullivan, Maria A; Glass, Andrew; Mishlen, Kaitlyn; Carpenter, Kenneth M; Mariani, John J; Levin, Frances R; Nunes, Edward V

    2014-01-01

    There is preclinical support for using NMDA receptor glutamatergic antagonists to aid in naltrexone-based treatment of opioid dependence. We hypothesized that adding memantine will improve efficacy of extended-release (XR) naltrexone to prevent relapse. In this double blind study opioid-dependent participants (N=82) underwent inpatient detoxification and naltrexone induction. During naltrexone initiation participants were randomized to receive memantine 40 mg or placebo and continued treatment for 12-weeks with XR naltrexone and relapse-prevention therapy. Sixty eight percent of participants completed detoxification and received the first dose of XR naltrexone. Rates of trial completion were significantly greater in participants receiving placebo than memantine (70% vs. 43%, p<0.05). Severity of opioid withdrawal symptoms during the first 3 weeks of the trial appeared to be lower in the group receiving memantine (p=0.07). Adding memantine does not appear to increase the effectiveness of injectable XR naltrexone as a relapse prevention strategy in opioid dependence and may lead to an increase in treatment drop-out.

  19. Naltrexone and bupropion, alone or combined, do not alter the reinforcing effects of intranasal methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Stoops, William W; Pike, Erika; Hays, Lon R; Glaser, Paul E; Rush, Craig R

    2015-02-01

    Naltrexone and bupropion, when administered alone in clinical trials, modestly reduce amphetamine use. Whether combining these drugs would result in greater reductions in methamphetamine taking relative to either drug alone is undetermined. This study examined the influence of naltrexone, bupropion and a naltrexone-bupropion combination on methamphetamine self-administration in humans. Seven subjects reporting recent illicit stimulant use completed a placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind study in which the reinforcing, subject-rated and physiological effects of intranasal methamphetamine (0, 10 and 30 mg) were assessed during maintenance on placebo, naltrexone (50 mg), bupropion (300 mg/day), and naltrexone combined with bupropion. Methamphetamine maintained responding and produced prototypic subjective and physiological effects (e.g., increased ratings of good effects, elevated systolic blood pressure). Maintenance doses were well tolerated and generally devoid of effects. No maintenance condition reduced methamphetamine self-administration or systematically altered the subject-rated effects of methamphetamine. These outcomes demonstrate the robust behavioral effects of methamphetamine that could make it resistant to pharmacological manipulation. Although these outcomes indicate that this combination may be ineffective for managing methamphetamine use disorder, future work should evaluate longer maintenance dosing, individuals with different levels of amphetamine use, adding this combination to a behavioral platform and other pharmacotherapy combinations for reducing methamphetamine use.

  20. Combined administration of buprenorphine and naltrexone produces antidepressant-like effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Almatroudi, Abdulrahman; Husbands, Stephen M; Bailey, Christopher P; Bailey, Sarah J

    2015-07-01

    Opiates have been used historically for the treatment of depression. Renewed interest in the use of opiates as antidepressants has focused on the development of kappa opioid receptor (κ-receptor) antagonists. Buprenorphine acts as a partial µ-opioid receptor agonist and a κ-receptor antagonist. By combining buprenorphine with the opioid antagonist naltrexone, the activation of µ-opioid receptors will be reduced and the κ-antagonist properties enhanced. We have established that a combination dose of buprenorphine (1 mg/kg) with naltrexone (1 mg/kg) functions as a short-acting κ-antagonist in the mouse tail withdrawal test. Furthermore, this dose combination is neither rewarding nor aversive in the conditioned place preference paradigm, and is without significant locomotor effects. We have shown for the first time that systemic co-administration of buprenorphine (1 mg/kg) with naltrexone (1 mg/kg) in CD-1 mice produced an antidepressant-like response in behaviours in both the forced swim test and novelty induced hypophagia task. Behaviours in the elevated plus maze and light dark box were not significantly altered by treatment with buprenorphine alone, or in combination with naltrexone. We propose that the combination of buprenorphine with naltrexone represents a novel, and potentially a readily translatable approach, to the treatment of depression.

  1. Naltrexone and Bupropion, Alone or Combined, Do Not Alter the Reinforcing Effects of Intranasal Methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, William W.; Pike, Erika; Hays, Lon R.; Glaser, Paul E.; Rush, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Naltrexone and bupropion, when administered alone in clinical trials, modestly reduce amphetamine use. Whether combining these drugs would result in greater reductions in methamphetamine taking relative to either drug alone is undetermined. This study examined the influence of naltrexone, bupropion and a naltrexone-bupropion combination on methamphetamine self-administration in humans. Seven subjects reporting recent illicit stimulant use completed a placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind study in which the reinforcing, subject-rated and physiological effects of intranasal methamphetamine (0, 10 and 30 mg) were assessed during maintenance on placebo, naltrexone (50 mg), bupropion (300 mg/day), and naltrexone combined with bupropion. Methamphetamine maintained responding and produced prototypic subjective and physiological effects (e.g., increased ratings of Good Effects, elevated systolic blood pressure). Maintenance doses were well tolerated and generally devoid of effects. No maintenance condition reduced methamphetamine self-administration or systematically altered the subject-rated effects of methamphetamine. These outcomes demonstrate the robust behavioral effects of methamphetamine that could make it resistant to pharmacological manipulation. Although these outcomes indicate that this combination may be ineffective for managing methamphetamine use disorder, future work should evaluate longer maintenance dosing, individuals with different levels of amphetamine use, adding this combination to a behavioral platform and other pharmacotherapy combinations for reducing methamphetamine use. PMID:25459104

  2. Combined administration of buprenorphine and naltrexone produces antidepressant-like effects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Almatroudi, Abdulrahman; Husbands, Stephen M.; Bailey, Christopher P.; Bailey, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Opiates have been used historically for the treatment of depression. Renewed interest in the use of opiates as antidepressants has focussed on the development of kappa opioid receptor (κ-receptor) antagonists. Buprenorphine acts as a partial μ-opioid receptor agonist and a κ-receptor antagonist. By combining buprenorphine with the opioid antagonist naltrexone, the activation of μ-opioid receptors would be reduced and the κ-antagonist properties enhanced. We have established that a combination dose of buprenorphine (1mg/kg) with naltrexone (1mg/kg) functions as a short-acting κ-antagonist in the mouse tail withdrawal test. Furthermore, this dose combination is neither rewarding nor aversive in the conditioned place preference paradigm and is without significant locomotor effects. We have shown for the first time that systemic co-administration of buprenorphine (1mg/kg) with naltrexone (1mg/kg) in CD-1 mice produced significant antidepressant-like responses in behaviours in both the forced swim test and novelty induced hypophagia task. Behaviours in the elevated plus maze and light dark box were not significantly altered by treatment with buprenorphine alone, or in combination with naltrexone. We propose that the combination of buprenorphine with naltrexone represents a novel, and potentially a readily translatable approach, to the treatment of depression. PMID:26045511

  3. Effects of concurrent intravenous morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride on end-tidal carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Respiratory depression, a potentially fatal side-effect of opioid-overdose, may be reversed by timely administration of an opioid antagonist, such as naloxone or naltrexone. Tampering with a formulation of morphine sulfate and sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride extended release capsules (MS-sNT) releases both the opioid morphine and the antagonist naltrexone. A study in recreational opioid-users indicated that morphine and naltrexone injected in the 25:1 ratio (duplicating the ratio of the formulation) found MS-sNT reduced morphine-induced euphoric effects vs intravenous (IV) morphine alone. In the same study, the effects of morphine + naltrexone on end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2), a measure of respiratory-depression, were evaluated and these data are reported here. Methods Single-center, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study. Non-dependent male opioid users were randomized to receive single IV doses of placebo, 30 mg morphine alone, and 30 mg morphine + 1.2 mg naltrexone. EtCO2 was measured by noninvasive capnography. Results Significant differences in EtCO2 least-squares means across all treatments for maximal effect (Emax) and area under the effect curve (AUE0-2, AUE0-8, AUE0-24) were detected (all p ≤ 0.0011). EtCO2 Emax values for morphine + naltrexone were significantly reduced vs morphine alone (42.9 mm Hg vs 47.1 mm Hg, p < 0.0001) and were not significantly different vs placebo (41.9 mm Hg). Median time to reach maximal effect (TEmax) was delayed for morphine + naltrexone vs morphine alone (5.0 h vs 1.0 h). Conclusions Results provide preliminary evidence that the naltrexone:morphine ratio within MS-sNT is sufficient to significantly reduce EtCO2 when administered intravenously to non-dependent male recreational opioid-users. Further studies with multiple measures of respiratory-function are warranted to determine if risk of respiratory depression is also reduced by naltrexone in the tampered formulation. PMID:22420453

  4. Low Dose Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Hemodynamic Response to Skull Pin Holder Application

    PubMed Central

    Kondavagilu, Shwethashri Ramaprasannakumar; Pujari, Vinayak Seenappa; Chadalawada, Mohan V. R.; Bevinguddaiah, Yatish

    2017-01-01

    Background: The application of skull pin holder elicits an adverse hemodynamic response that can be deleterious; there are many drugs that have been used to attenuate this response. We have conducted this study to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (i.v.) dexmedetomidine on attenuation of hemodynamic responses to skull pin head holder application and to compare the effectiveness of two doses of i.v. dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg and 0.5 μg/kg bolus). Materials and Methods: Ninety American Society of Anesthesiologists physical Status I–III patients undergoing craniotomy were randomized into three groups of thirty each. After intubation, patients in Group A received 1 μg/kg of i.v. dexmedetomidine, Group B received 0.5 μg/kg of i.v. dexmedetomidine, whereas Group C received an equivalent quantity of normal saline. Hemodynamic parameters were monitored regularly after skull pin insertion. Results: There was no significant difference in the monitored hemodynamic parameters among the three groups from baseline until intubation. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased significantly at skull pin insertion and subsequent points in Group C, whereas the values decreased in Groups A and B (P < 0.05). Patients in Group A showed a higher and sustained attenuation of MAP. Patients in Group C had a higher incidence of tachycardia and hypertension requiring additional measures to attenuate the response. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine in either dosage (1 μg/kg or 0.5 μg/kg) was effective in attenuating hemodynamic response to skull pin insertion. Dexmedetomidine in doses of 0.5 μg/kg was as effective in attenuating the HR and MAP response to skull pin insertion as compared to a dose of 1 μg/kg. PMID:28298757

  5. Blood morphine levels in naltrexone-exposed compared to non-naltrexone-exposed fatal heroin overdoses.

    PubMed

    Arnold-Reed, Diane E; Hulse, Gary K; Hansson, Robert C; Murray, Sean D; O'Neil, George; Basso, Maria R; Holman, C D'Arcy J

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between prior exposure to naltrexone and increased risk of fatal heroin overdose using a review of toxicology reports for heroin-related fatalities between July 1997 to August 1999 for two groups: those treated with oral naltrexone and those who were not treated. Additional information for the oral naltrexone group was obtained from clinic files. Naltrexone-treated deaths were identified from the patient database at the Australian Medical Procedures Research Foundation (AMPRF), Perth, Western Australia (WA) through the Western Australian Department of Health, Data Linkage Project. Non-treated cases were identified from the database at the Forensic Science Laboratory, State Chemistry Centre (WA). We identified and investigated blood morphine concentrations following 21 fatal heroin overdoses with prior exposure to naltrexone and in 71 non-naltrexone-exposed cases over the same time period. The proportion of deaths where heroin use was a major contributing factor was little different in the non-naltrexone compared to the naltrexone-exposed group. Furthermore, in 'acute opiate toxicity' deaths, blood morphine levels were lower in non-naltrexone-exposed compared with naltrexone-exposed cases. Although there was a higher number of deaths designated as rapid (i.e. occurring within 20 minutes) in the naltrexone-exposed (89%) compared with the non-exposed group (72%) this was not statistically significant. Other drug use in relation to heroin-related fatalities is discussed. Findings do not support the hypothesis that prior exposure to naltrexone increases sensitivity to heroin toxicity.

  6. Dosing schedule-dependent attenuation of dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Reiko; Yamamoto, Saori; Yasumoto, Yuki; Oishi, Katsutaka

    2014-05-01

    Many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases are treated using synthetic glucocorticoids. However, excessive glucocorticoid can often cause unpredictable effects including muscle atrophy. Endogenous glucocorticoid levels robustly fluctuate in a circadian manner and peak just before the onset of the active phase in both humans and nocturnal rodents. The present study determines whether muscle atrophy induced by exogenous glucocorticoid can be avoided by optimizing dosing times. We administered single daily doses of the glucocorticoid analog dexamethasone (Dex) to mice for 10 days at the times of day corresponding to peak (early night) or trough (early morning) endogenous glucocorticoid levels. Administration at the acrophase of endogenous glucocorticoids significantly attenuated Dex-induced wasting of the gastrocnemius (Ga) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles that comprise mostly fast-twitch muscle fibers. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that the Dex-induced mRNA expression of genes encoding the atrophy-related ubiquitin ligases Muscle Atrophy F-box (Fbxo32, also known as MAFbx/Atrogin-1) and Muscle RING finger 1 (Trim63, also known as MuRF1) in the Ga and TA muscles was significantly attenuated by Dex when administered during the early night. Dex negligibly affected the weight of the soleus (So) muscle that mostly comprises slow-twitch muscle fibers, but significantly and similarly decreased the weight of the spleen at both dosing times. These results suggest that glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy can be attenuated by optimizing the dosing schedule.

  7. Low-Dose Aronia melanocarpa Concentrate Attenuates Paraquat-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Case, A J; Agraz, D; Ahmad, I M; Zimmerman, M C

    2016-01-01

    Herbicides containing paraquat may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Paraquat induces reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in neurons, which is a primary mechanism behind its toxicity. We sought to test the effectiveness of a commercially available polyphenol-rich Aronia melanocarpa (aronia berry) concentrate in the amelioration of paraquat-induced neurotoxicity. Considering the abundance of antioxidants in aronia berries, we hypothesized that aronia berry concentrate attenuates the paraquat-induced increase in reactive oxygen species and protects against paraquat-mediated neuronal cell death. Using a neuronal cell culture model, we observed that low doses of aronia berry concentrate protected against paraquat-mediated neurotoxicity. Additionally, low doses of the concentrate attenuated the paraquat-induced increase in superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and oxidized glutathione levels. Interestingly, high doses of aronia berry concentrate increased neuronal superoxide levels independent of paraquat, while at the same time decreasing hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, high-dose aronia berry concentrate potentiated paraquat-induced superoxide production and neuronal cell death. In summary, aronia berry concentrate at low doses restores the homeostatic redox environment of neurons treated with paraquat, while high doses exacerbate the imbalance leading to further cell death. Our findings support that moderate levels of aronia berry concentrate may prevent reactive oxygen species-mediated neurotoxicity.

  8. Low-Dose Aronia melanocarpa Concentrate Attenuates Paraquat-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Case, A. J.; Agraz, D.; Ahmad, I. M.; Zimmerman, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Herbicides containing paraquat may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Paraquat induces reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in neurons, which is a primary mechanism behind its toxicity. We sought to test the effectiveness of a commercially available polyphenol-rich Aronia melanocarpa (aronia berry) concentrate in the amelioration of paraquat-induced neurotoxicity. Considering the abundance of antioxidants in aronia berries, we hypothesized that aronia berry concentrate attenuates the paraquat-induced increase in reactive oxygen species and protects against paraquat-mediated neuronal cell death. Using a neuronal cell culture model, we observed that low doses of aronia berry concentrate protected against paraquat-mediated neurotoxicity. Additionally, low doses of the concentrate attenuated the paraquat-induced increase in superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and oxidized glutathione levels. Interestingly, high doses of aronia berry concentrate increased neuronal superoxide levels independent of paraquat, while at the same time decreasing hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, high-dose aronia berry concentrate potentiated paraquat-induced superoxide production and neuronal cell death. In summary, aronia berry concentrate at low doses restores the homeostatic redox environment of neurons treated with paraquat, while high doses exacerbate the imbalance leading to further cell death. Our findings support that moderate levels of aronia berry concentrate may prevent reactive oxygen species-mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:26770655

  9. Ultralow dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric PET CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Samuel L.; Shulkin, Barry L.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To develop ultralow dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultralow doses (10–35 mA s). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for 11 tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% volume computed tomography dose index (0.39/3.64; mGy) from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUV{sub bw}) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the nondose reduced CTAC image for 90% dose reduction. No change in SUV{sub bw}, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols was found down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62% and 86% (3.2/8.3–0.9/6.2). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from predose-reduced patient images. Conclusions: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CT dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for colocalization of hybrid CT anatomy and PET radioisotope uptake.

  10. A Synopsis of an Open-Trial of Naltrexone Treatment of Autism with Four Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panksepp, Jaak; Lensing, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    Four individuals (ages 5-21) with severe mental retardation and autism were administered Naltrexone. Results indicated a reduction in such symptoms as hyperactivity, aggressiveness, self-injurious behavior, stereotyped behaviors; and promotion of positive social behaviors. Intermittent administration at low doses seemed more beneficial than more…

  11. Effects of naltrexone on adolescent alcohol cue reactivity and sensitivity: an initial randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Robert; Ray, Lara; Blanchard, Alexander; Reynolds, Elizabeth K; Monti, Peter M; Chun, Thomas; Justus, Alicia; Swift, Robert M; Tidey, Jennifer; Gwaltney, Chad J; Ramirez, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Adolescent alcohol use is associated with myriad adverse consequences and contributes to the leading causes of mortality among youth. Despite the magnitude of this public health problem, evidenced-based treatment initiatives for alcohol use disorders in youth remain inadequate. Identifying promising pharmacological approaches may improve treatment options. Naltrexone is an opiate receptor antagonist that is efficacious for reducing drinking in adults by attenuating craving and the rewarding effects of alcohol. Implications of these findings for adolescents are unclear; however, given that randomized trials of naltrexone with youth are non-existent. We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over study, comparing naltrexone (50 mg/daily) and placebo in 22 adolescent problem drinkers aged 15-19 years (M = 18.36, standard deviation = 0.95; 12 women). The primary outcome measures were alcohol use, subjective responses to alcohol consumption, and alcohol-cue-elicited craving assessed in the natural environment using ecological momentary assessment methods, and craving and physiological reactivity assessed using standard alcohol cue reactivity procedures. Results showed that naltrexone reduced the likelihood of drinking and heavy drinking (P's ≤ 0.03), blunted craving in the laboratory and in the natural environment (P's ≤ 0.04), and altered subjective responses to alcohol consumption (P's ≤ 0.01). Naltrexone was generally well tolerated by participants. This study provides the first experimentally controlled evidence that naltrexone reduces drinking and craving, and alters subjective responses to alcohol in a sample of adolescent problem drinkers, and suggests larger clinical trials with long-term follow-ups are warranted.

  12. Low-dose interpolated average CT for attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Zhang, Geoffrey; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2010-07-01

    Because of the advantages in the use of high photon flux and thus the short scan times of CT imaging, the traditional 68Ge scans for positron emission tomography (PET) image attenuation correction have been replaced by CT scans in the modern PET/CT technology. The combination of fast CT scan and slow PET scan often causes image misalignment between the PET and CT images due to respiration motion. Use of the average CT derived from cine CT images is reported to reduce such misalignment. However, the radiation dose to patients is higher with cine CT scans. This study introduces a method that uses breath-hold CT images and their interpolations to generate the average CT for PET image attenuation correction. Breath-hold CT sets are taken at end-inspiration and end-expiration. Deformable image registration is applied to generate a voxel-to-voxel motion matrix between the two CT sets. The motion is equally divided into 5 steps from inspiration to expiration and 5 steps from expiration to inspiration, generating a total of 8 phases of interpolated CT sets. An average CT image is generated from all the 10 phase CT images, including original inhale/exhale CT and 8 interpolated CT sets. Quantitative comparison shows that the reduction of image misalignment artifacts using the average CT from the interpolation technique for PET attenuation correction is at a similar level as that using cine average CT, while the dose to the patient from the CT scans is reduced significantly. The interpolated average CT method hence provides a low dose alternative to cine CT scans for PET attenuation correction.

  13. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  14. Effects of ethanol and naltrexone on aggressive display in the siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Galizio, M; Woodard, R L; Keith, J

    1985-01-01

    The present study used the aggressive display of Betta splendens in response to a mirror as an index of the effects of ethanol and the opiate antagonist, naltrexone. Naltrexone produces an opiate receptor blockade and thus provided a test of the hypothesis that ethanol effects on aggression are mediated by the opioid system. Eighty fish were randomly assigned to one of eight groups in a 4 X 2 factorial design with Ethanol (0, 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 g%) and Naltrexone (0 and 5 mg/l) as the main factors. The 0.75 g% dose of ethanol reliably suppressed aggressive display as measured by number of gill show responses, but lower doses had no effect or tended to increase aggressive display. At the same time, all doses of ethanol increased arousal in the fish as measured by airgulping. Naltrexone alone did not have effects on aggression or arousal, and did not interact with ethanol on either measure. Thus the results did not support the ethanol-opioid common-link hypothesis.

  15. Effects of oral loperamide on efficacy of naltrexone, baclofen and AM-251 in blocking ethanol self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Dean, Reginald L; Eyerman, David; Todtenkopf, Mark S; Turncliff, Ryan Z; Bidlack, Jean M; Deaver, Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    Naltrexone is a μ-opioid receptor antagonist that has been extensively studied for its ability to block the rewarding effects of ethanol. Opioid receptors are widely distributed within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Typically, naltrexone is administered by parenteral routes in nonclinical studies. We initially tested if opioid receptors within the GIT would influence the ability of oral naltrexone to inhibit ethanol oral self-administration in rats using the co-administration of oral loperamide, a peripherally restricted opioid agonist. As expected, oral naltrexone only had modest effects on ethanol intake, and the response was not dose-dependent. However in rats, treatment with loperamide prior to the administration of naltrexone resulted in a suppression of ethanol intake which approached that observed with naltrexone given by the subcutaneous (SC) route. Importantly, administration of loperamide prior to administration of naltrexone did not alter blood concentrations of naltrexone. We then evaluated if oral loperamide would enhance effects of baclofen (a GABA(B) receptor agonist) and AM-251 (a CB-1 receptor antagonist) and found that pre-treatment with loperamide did potentiate the action of both drugs to reduce ethanol self-administration. Finally, the specific opioid receptor type involved was investigated using selective μ- and κ-receptor antagonists to determine if these would affect the ability of the AM-251 and loperamide combination to block ethanol drinking behavior. The effect of loperamide was blocked by ALKS 37, a peripherally restricted μ-receptor antagonist. These data suggest an important role for opioid receptors within the GIT in modulating central reward pathways and may provide new insights into strategies for treating reward disorders, including drug dependency.

  16. Nociceptive Flexion Reflex and Pain Rating Responses During Endogenous Opiate Blockade with Naltrexone in Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    France, Christopher R.; al'Absi, Mustafa; Ring, Christopher; France, Janis L.; Harju, Angie; Wittmers, Lorentz E.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of opioid blockade on nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) activity and subjective pain ratings was examined in 151 healthy young men and women. Using a within-subjects design, NFR threshold was assessed on two days after administration of either placebo or a 50 mg dose of naltrexone. Electrocutaneous pain threshold and tolerance levels were measured after NFR threshold assessment on each day. Results indicated that administration of naltrexone was consistently associated with hypoalgesic responding. Specifically, participants exhibited lower levels of NFR activity and reported lower pain ratings for electrocutaneous stimulation delivered at pain threshold and tolerance levels following administration of naltrexone as compared to placebo. These findings indicate that opiate blockade using the current standard dose may elicit hypoalgesia. A potential moderating effect of dose of opiate blockade medication and level of endogenous opioid activation should be carefully examined in future research. PMID:17244518

  17. Dose response of surfactants to attenuate gas embolism related platelet aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckmann, David M.; Eckmann, Yonaton Y.; Tomczyk, Nancy

    2014-03-01

    Intravascular gas embolism promotes blood clot formation, cellular activation, and adhesion events, particularly with platelets. Populating the interface with surfactants is a chemical-based intervention to reduce injury from gas embolism. We studied platelet activation and platelet aggregation, prominent adverse responses to blood contact with bubbles. We examined dose-response relationships for two chemically distinct surfactants to attenuate the rise in platelet function stimulated by exposure to microbubbles. Significant reduction in platelet aggregation and platelet activation occurred with increasing concentration of the surfactants, indicating presence of a saturable system. A population balance model for platelet aggregation in the presence of embolism bubbles and surfactants was developed. Monte Carlo simulations for platelet aggregation were performed. Results agree qualitatively with experimental findings. Surfactant dose-dependent reductions in platelet activation and aggregation indicate inhibition of the gas/liquid interface's ability to stimulate cellular activation mechanically.

  18. Additive feeding inhibitory and aversive effects of naltrexone and exendin-4 combinations

    PubMed Central

    Liang, N-C; Bello, NT; Moran, TH

    2012-01-01

    Objective One developing strategy for obesity treatment has been to use combinations of differently acting pharmacotherapies to improve weight loss with fewer adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the combination of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist acting on the reward system, and exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) agonist, acting on satiety signaling, would produce larger reductions in food intake than either alone in rats. Because the anorectic potencies of both compounds have been associated with nausea and malaise, the influence of these drug combinations on the acquisition of a conditioned taste aversion (CTA) was also determined. Methods In Experiment 1, the acute anorectic effects of naltrexone (0.32–3.2 mg/kg; IP) and exendin-4 (1–10 µg/kg; IP) were assessed alone or in combination. Combinational doses were further investigated by the repeated daily administration of 1 mg/kg naltrexone + 3.2 µg/kg exendin-4 for 4 days. In Experiment 2, both compounds alone or in combination were used as unconditioned stimuli in a series of CTA tests. Results Naltrexone and exendin-4, alone or in combination, suppressed food intake in a dose dependent fashion, and the interaction on food intake between naltrexone and exendin-4 was additive. In the CTA paradigm, naltrexone (1 mg/Kg) alone did not support acquisition, whereas a CTA was evident with doses of Ex-4 (1 or 3.2 µg/Kg). Combinations of naltrexone and exendin-4 also resulted in a more rapid and robust acquisition of a CTA. Conclusion Given that the Nal and Ex-4 combination produces additive effects on not only food intake reduction but also food aversion learning, this specific drug combination does not have the benefit of minimizing the adverse effects associated with each individual drug. These data suggest that it is necessary to evaluate both the positive and adverse effects at early stages of combinational drug development. PMID:22310470

  19. Open Label Trial of Naltrexone Implants: Measuring Blood Serum Levels of Naltrexone

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    The usefulness of oral naltrexone has been limited by compliance. Sub-cutaneous implants would seem to offer a solution to this problem and improve long-term outcomes. The aim of the present study was to compare levels of blood serum naltrexone of patients who had received a naltrexone implant after detoxification to a number of dependent variables of interest. These dependent variables included drug use including urine screens of each patient, any adverse response to the implant, subjective evaluation of self-esteem, quality of relationships, and changes in social functioning. Sixty six patients received an implant and were surveyed; urine and blood samples were taken at about 1, 3, and 6 months after implantation. Naltrexone levels were on average above 1 ng/mL at 6 months after insertion and patients showed significant improvements on all dependent variables. The preliminary evidence indicates that implants can improve compliance rates and outcomes. PMID:23761973

  20. Acute opioid pretreatment potentiates naltrexone-induced drinking suppression in water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    White, D A; Holtzman, S G

    2001-07-01

    Pretreatment with morphine-like agonists potentiates the behavioral effects of opioid antagonists, possibly reflecting a state of acute physical dependence. Several studies have used operant behavior to quantify these effects. However, little research has been done using unconditioned behavior. One objective of this study was to determine whether opioid agonist pretreatment (e.g., morphine, fentanyl, and meperidine) potentiated naltrexone-induced suppression of water consumption following deprivation. Another objective was to determine whether the agonist pretreatment interval was functionally related to efficacy for the manifestation of acute dependence. Finally, we compared temporally the effects of the three agonists. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were water deprived for 18, 20, or 22 h and given an injection (s.c.) of an agonist or saline. After 1.75, 3.75, or 5.75 h, animals received a single dose (s.c.) of naltrexone (0.01-30 mg/kg) or saline. Fifteen minutes later, subjects had access to water for 30 min. A time course of antinociception was constructed after agonist administration, using the tail-flick procedure. All three agonists dose dependently potentiated naltrexone-induced drinking suppression, decreasing the ED50 of naltrexone by as much as 150-fold. There was no clear relationship between agonist efficacy and pretreatment interval. Sensitization to naltrexone was seen up to 6 h after agonist administration, occurring in the apparent absence of an antinociceptive effect. These data extend the range of behavioral effects of opioid antagonists potentiated by opioid agonist pretreatment to suppression of drinking and show that such potentiation can occur in the absence of a prototypical agonist effect.

  1. Naltrexone for treatment of impaired awareness of hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Moheet, Amir; Mangia, Silvia; Kumar, Anjali; Tesfaye, Nolawit; Eberly, Lynn E; Bai, Yun; Kubisiak, Kristine; Seaquist, Elizabeth R

    2016-01-01

    Aims Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH) is a limiting factor in the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and is a challenging condition to reverse. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that naltrexone therapy in subjects with T1D and IAH will improve counterregulatory hormone response and recognition of hypoglycemia symptoms during hypoglycemia. Methods We performed a pilot randomized double blind trial of 4 weeks of naltrexone therapy (n=10) or placebo (n=12) given orally in subjects with T1D and IAH. Outcome measures included hypoglycemia symptom scores, counterregulatory hormone levels and thalamic activation as measured by cerebral blood flow using MRI during experimental hypoglycemia in all subjects before and after 4 weeks of intervention. Results After 4 weeks of therapy with naltrexone or placebo, no significant differences in response to hypoglycemia were seen in any outcomes of interest within each group. Conclusions In this small study, short-term treatment with naltrexone did not improve recognition of hypoglycemia symptoms or counterregulatory hormone response during experimental hypoglycemia in subjects with T1D and IAH. Whether this lack of effect is related to the small sample size or due to the dose, the advanced stage of study population or the drug itself should be the subject of future investigation. PMID:26345338

  2. Clinical Effects of Naltrexone on Autistic Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingarelli, Gene; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Eight young adults (ages 19-39) with autism were given the opiate antagonist naltrexone to control self-injurious behavior and maladaptive idiosyncratic mannerisms. Although one subject appeared to have partial decreases in maladaptive behaviors, the drug did not clearly reduce the self-injurious and other maladaptive behaviors of the subjects.…

  3. The mesolimbic system participates in the naltrexone-induced reversal of sexual exhaustion: opposite effects of intra-VTA naltrexone administration on copulation of sexually experienced and sexually exhausted male rats.

    PubMed

    Garduño-Gutiérrez, René; León-Olea, Martha; Rodríguez-Manzo, Gabriela

    2013-11-01

    Male rats allowed to copulate until reaching sexual exhaustion exhibit a long-lasting sexual behavior inhibition (around 72 h) that can be reversed by systemic opioid receptor antagonist administration. Copulation activates the mesolimbic dopaminergic system (MLS) and promotes endogenous opioid release. In addition, endogenous opioids, acting at the ventral tegmental area (VTA), modulate the activity of the MLS. We hypothesized that endogenous opioids participate in the sexual exhaustion phenomenon by interacting with VTA opioid receptors and consequently, its reversal by opioid antagonists could be exerted at those receptors. In this study we determined the effects of intra-VTA infusion of different doses of the non-specific opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.1-1.0 μg/rat) on the already established sexual behavior inhibition of sexually exhausted male rats. To elucidate the possible involvement of VTA δ-opioid receptors in the naltrexone-mediated reversal of sexual exhaustion, the effects of different doses of the selective δ-opioid receptor antagonist, naltrindole (0.03-1.0 μg/rat) were also tested. Results showed that intra-VTA injection of 0.3 μg naltrexone reversed the sexual inhibition of sexually exhausted rats, evidenced by an increased percentage of animals capable of showing two successive ejaculations. Intra-VTA infused naltrindole did not reverse sexual exhaustion at any dose. It is concluded that the MLS is involved in the reversal of sexual exhaustion induced by systemic naltrexone, and that μ-, but not δ-opioid receptors participate in this effect. Intra-VTA naltrexone infusion to sexually experienced male rats had an inhibitory effect on sexual activity. The opposite effects of intra-VTA naltrexone on male rat sexual behavior expression of sexually experienced and sexually exhausted rats is discussed.

  4. Impact of 6MV photon beam attenuation by carbon fiber couch and immobilization devices in IMRT planning and dose delivery.

    PubMed

    Munjal, R K; Negi, P S; Babu, A G; Sinha, S N; Anand, A K; Kataria, T

    2006-04-01

    Multiple fields in IMRT and optimization allow conformal dose to the target and reduced dose to the surroundings and the regions of interest. Thus we can escalate the dose to the target to achieve better tumor control with low morbidity. Orientation of multiple beams can be achieved by i) different gantry angles, ii) rotating patient's couch isocentrically. In doing so, one or more beam may pass through different materials like the treatment couch, immobilization cast fixation plate, head and neck rest or any other supportive device. Our observations for 6MV photon beam on PRIMUS-KXE2 with MED-TEC carbon fiber tabletop and 10 × 10 cm(2) field size reveals that the maximum dose attenuation by the couch was of the order of 2.96% from gantry angle 120-160°. Attenuation due to cast fixation base plate of PMMA alone was of the order of 5.8-10.55% at gantry angle between 0 and 90°. Attenuation due to carbon fiber base plate alone was 3.8-7.98%. Attenuation coefficient of carbon fiber and PMMA was evaluated and was of the order of 0.082 cm(-1) and 0.064 cm(-1) respectively. Most of the TPS are configured for direct beam incidence attenuation correction factors only. Whereas when the beam is obliquely incident on the couch, base plate, headrest and any other immobilization device get attenuated more than the direct beam incidence. The correction factors for oblique incidence beam attenuation are not configured in most of the commercially available treatment planning systems. Therefore, such high variations in dose delivery could lead to under-dosage to the target volume for treatments requiring multiple fields in IMRT and 3D-CRT and need to be corrected for monitor unit calculations.

  5. Single-dose attenuated Vesiculovax vaccines protect primates against Ebola Makona virus.

    PubMed

    Mire, Chad E; Matassov, Demetrius; Geisbert, Joan B; Latham, Theresa E; Agans, Krystle N; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Egan, Michael A; Fenton, Karla A; Clarke, David K; Eldridge, John H; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2015-04-30

    The family Filoviridae contains three genera, Ebolavirus (EBOV), Marburg virus, and Cuevavirus. Some members of the EBOV genus, including Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV), can cause lethal haemorrhagic fever in humans. During 2014 an unprecedented ZEBOV outbreak occurred in West Africa and is still ongoing, resulting in over 10,000 deaths, and causing global concern of uncontrolled disease. To meet this challenge a rapid-acting vaccine is needed. Many vaccine approaches have shown promise in being able to protect nonhuman primates against ZEBOV. In response to the current ZEBOV outbreak several of these vaccines have been fast tracked for human use. However, it is not known whether any of these vaccines can provide protection against the new outbreak Makona strain of ZEBOV. One of these approaches is a first-generation recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV)-based vaccine expressing the ZEBOV glycoprotein (GP) (rVSV/ZEBOV). To address safety concerns associated with this vector, we developed two candidate, further-attenuated rVSV/ZEBOV vaccines. Both attenuated vaccines produced an approximately tenfold lower vaccine-associated viraemia compared to the first-generation vaccine and both provided complete, single-dose protection of macaques from lethal challenge with the Makona outbreak strain of ZEBOV.

  6. Live attenuated B. pertussis as a single-dose nasal vaccine against whooping cough.

    PubMed

    Mielcarek, Nathalie; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Raze, Dominique; Bertout, Julie; Rouanet, Carine; Younes, Amena Ben; Creusy, Colette; Engle, Jacquelyn; Goldman, William E; Locht, Camille

    2006-07-01

    Pertussis is still among the principal causes of death worldwide, and its incidence is increasing even in countries with high vaccine coverage. Although all age groups are susceptible, it is most severe in infants too young to be protected by currently available vaccines. To induce strong protective immunity in neonates, we have developed BPZE1, a live attenuated Bordetella pertussis strain to be given as a single-dose nasal vaccine in early life. BPZE1 was developed by the genetic inactivation or removal of three major toxins. In mice, BPZE1 was highly attenuated, yet able to colonize the respiratory tract and to induce strong protective immunity after a single nasal administration. Protection against B. pertussis was comparable to that induced by two injections of acellular vaccine (aPV) in adult mice, but was significantly better than two administrations of aPV in infant mice. Moreover, BPZE1 protected against Bordetella parapertussis infection, whereas aPV did not. BPZE1 is thus an attractive vaccine candidate to protect against whooping cough by nasal, needle-free administration early in life, possibly at birth.

  7. Single dose attenuated Vesiculovax vaccines protect primates against Ebola Makona virus

    PubMed Central

    Geisbert, Joan B.; Latham, Theresa E.; Agans, Krystle N.; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Egan, Michael A.; Fenton, Karla A.; Clarke, David K.; Eldridge, John H.; Geisbert, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    The family Filoviridae contains three genera, Ebolavirus (EBOV), Marburg virus, and Cuevavirus1. Some members of the EBOV genus, including Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV), can cause lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans. During 2014 an unprecedented ZEBOV outbreak occurred in West Africa and is still ongoing, resulting in nearly 10,000 deaths, and causing global concern of uncontrolled disease. To meet this challenge a rapid acting vaccine is needed. Many vaccine approaches have shown promise in being able to protect nonhuman primate (NHPs) against ZEBOV2. In response to the current ZEBOV outbreak several of these vaccines have been fast tracked for human use. However, it is not known whether any of these vaccines can provide protection against the new outbreak Makona strain of ZEBOV. One of these approaches is a first generation recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV)-based vaccine expressing the ZEBOV glycoprotein (GP) (rVSV/ZEBOV). To address safety concerns associated with this vector, we developed two candidate, further attenuated rVSV/ZEBOV vaccines. Both attenuated vaccines produced an approximately ten-fold lower vaccine-associated viremia compared to the first generation vaccine and both provided complete, single dose protection of macaques from lethal challenge with the Makona outbreak strain of ZEBOV. PMID:25853476

  8. Live Attenuated B. pertussis as a Single-Dose Nasal Vaccine against Whooping Cough

    PubMed Central

    Mielcarek, Nathalie; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Raze, Dominique; Bertout, Julie; Rouanet, Carine; Younes, Amena Ben; Creusy, Colette; Engle, Jacquelyn; Goldman, William E; Locht, Camille

    2006-01-01

    Pertussis is still among the principal causes of death worldwide, and its incidence is increasing even in countries with high vaccine coverage. Although all age groups are susceptible, it is most severe in infants too young to be protected by currently available vaccines. To induce strong protective immunity in neonates, we have developed BPZE1, a live attenuated Bordetella pertussis strain to be given as a single-dose nasal vaccine in early life. BPZE1 was developed by the genetic inactivation or removal of three major toxins. In mice, BPZE1 was highly attenuated, yet able to colonize the respiratory tract and to induce strong protective immunity after a single nasal administration. Protection against B. pertussis was comparable to that induced by two injections of acellular vaccine (aPV) in adult mice, but was significantly better than two administrations of aPV in infant mice. Moreover, BPZE1 protected against Bordetella parapertussis infection, whereas aPV did not. BPZE1 is thus an attractive vaccine candidate to protect against whooping cough by nasal, needle-free administration early in life, possibly at birth. PMID:16839199

  9. Optimal dose of intravenous oxycodone for attenuating hemodynamic changes after endotracheal intubation in healthy patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Hee; Lee, Seung-Hyuk; Lee, Oh Haeng; Kang, Hyun; Shin, Hwa-Yong; Baek, Chong-Wha; Jung, Yong Hun; Woo, Young Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intravenous oxycodone has been used as an adjunct to anesthetic agents. This study aimed to assess the optimal dose of intravenous oxycodone for the attenuation of the hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind study was conducted. Ninety-five patients were randomly divided into 5 groups based on the oxycodone dose: 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 mg/kg. After administering the assigned dose of intravenous oxycodone, anesthesia was induced with thiopental. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured at baseline, before intubation, and 1, 2, and 3 minutes after intubation. The percentage increase of BP was calculated as (highest BP after intubation − baseline BP)/baseline BP × 100 (%). The percentage increase of HR was calculated in same formula as above. Hypertension was defined as a 15% increase of systolic BP from baseline, and probit analysis was conducted. Results: Hemodynamic data from 86 patients were analyzed. The percentage increase of mean arterial pressure after intubation in groups 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.2 was significantly different from that in the control (P < 0.001). For HR, the percentage increase was lower than control group when oxycodone was same or more than 0.1 mg/kg (P < 0.05). Using probit analysis, the 95% effective dose (ED95) for preventing hypertension was 0.159 mg/kg (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.122–0.243). In addition, ED50 was 0.020 mg/kg (95% CI, −0.037 to 0.049). However, oxycodone was not effective for maintaining the HR in our study dosage. There were no significant differences in the incidence of hypotension during induction between groups. Conclusions: Using 0.1 mg/kg of intravenous oxycodone is sufficient to attenuate the increase of BP and HR during induction period in healthy patients. The ED95, which was 0.159 mg/kg, can be useful to adjust the dosage of IV oxycodone for maintain stable BP

  10. Microwave attenuation of ethanol-induced hypothermia: ethanol tolerance, time course, exposure duration, and dose response studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hjeresen, D.L.; Francendese, A.; O'Donnell, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to quantify the reported attenuation by microwave (MW) irradiation of ethanol-induced hypothermia. In one experiment rats were irradiated (continuous wave 2.45 GHz, specific absorption rate = 0.3 W/kg) or sham irradiated for 45 min, injected with 3.6 g/kg, 20% (v/v) ethanol (EtOH) or saline (NaCl) i.p.. Colonic temperature was monitored at 20-min intervals for 2 h. This procedure was repeated for 8 days to determine the rate of tolerance development to the hypothermic effect of ethanol. While MW irradiation did significantly attenuate EtOH-induced hypothermia, it did not enhance or retard the rate of tolerance development. To determine the duration of irradiation necessary to attenuate EtOH-induced hypothermia, groups of rats were irradiated or sham irradiated for 5, 15, 30, or 60 min prior to EtOH injection and subsequent temperature measurements. The attenuation was apparent only after 60 min of irradiation. To determine the duration of the attenuation effect after irradiation, rats were injected with EtOH or NaCl at 0, 30, 60, 120, or 480 min after 45 min of irradiation or sham irradiation. The attenuation effect was apparent among rats injected 0 to 30 min after irradiation and for the first 40 min for groups injected at 120 min. Additional rats were injected with NaCl or 0.9, 1.8, or 2.7 g/kg of EtOH i.p. following 45 min of irradiation or sham irradiation to determine if the attenuation effect depends on the dose of EtOH administered. Attenuation of EtOH-induced hypothermia was more apparent at lower doses of EtOH than at higher doses. These results indicate that the effect is an acute response to irradiation, and rule out several other potential explanations.

  11. Methamphetamine treatment during development attenuates the dopaminergic deficits caused by subsequent high-dose methamphetamine administration.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Lisa M; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Vieira-Brock, Paula L; Stout, Kristen A; Sawada, Nicole M; Ellis, Jonathan D; Allen, Scott C; Walters, Elliot T; Nielsen, Shannon M; Gibb, James W; Alburges, Mario E; Wilkins, Diana G; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2011-08-01

    Administration of high doses of methamphetamine (METH) causes persistent dopaminergic deficits in both nonhuman preclinical models and METH-dependent persons. Noteworthy, adolescent [i.e., postnatal day (PND) 40] rats are less susceptible to this damage than young adult (PND90) rats. In addition, biweekly treatment with METH, beginning at PND40 and continuing throughout development, prevents the persistent dopaminergic deficits caused by a "challenge" high-dose METH regimen when administered at PND90. Mechanisms underlying this "resistance" were thus investigated. Results revealed that biweekly METH treatment throughout development attenuated both the acute and persistent deficits in VMAT2 function, as well as the acute hyperthermia, caused by a challenge METH treatment. Pharmacokinetic alterations did not appear to contribute to the protection afforded by the biweekly treatment. Maintenance of METH-induced hyperthermia abolished the protection against both the acute and persistent VMAT2-associated deficits suggesting that alterations in thermoregulation were caused by exposure of rats to METH during development. These findings suggest METH during development prevents METH-induced hyperthermia and the consequent METH-related neurotoxicity.

  12. Methamphetamine treatment during development attenuates the dopaminergic deficits caused by subsequent high-dose methamphetamine administration

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Lisa M; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Vieira-Brock, Paula L; Stout, Kristen A; Sawada, Nicole M; Ellis, Jonathan D; Allen, Scott C; Walters, Elliot T; Nielsen, Shannon M; Gibb, James W; Alburges, Mario E; Wilkins, Diana G; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2013-01-01

    Administration of high doses of methamphetamine (METH) causes persistent dopaminergic deficits in both nonhuman preclinical models and METH-dependent persons. Noteworthy, adolescent (i.e., postnatal day (PND) 40) rats are less susceptible to this damage than young adult (PND90) rats. In addition, biweekly treatment with METH, beginning at PND40 and continuing throughout development, prevents the persistent dopaminergic deficits caused by a “challenge” high-dose METH regimen when administered at PND90. Mechanisms underlying this “resistance” were thus investigated. Results revealed that biweekly METH treatment throughout development attenuated both the acute and persistent deficits in VMAT2 function, as well as the acute hyperthermia, caused by a challenge METH treatment. Pharmacokinetic alterations did not appear to contribute to the protection afforded by the biweekly treatment. Maintenance of METH-induced hyperthermia abolished the protection against both the acute and persistent VMAT2-associated deficits suggesting that alterations in thermoregulation were caused by exposure of rats to METH during development. These findings suggest METH during development prevents METH-induced hyperthermia and the consequent METH-related neurotoxicity. PMID:21190217

  13. Five-year antibody persistence in children after one dose of inactivated or live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhilun; Zhu, Xiangjun; Hu, Yuansheng; Liang, Miao; Sun, Jin; Song, Yufei; Yang, Qi; Ji, Haiquan; Zeng, Gang; Song, Lifei; Chen, Jiangting

    2017-02-14

    In China, both inactivated hepatitis A (HA) vaccine and live attenuated HA vaccine are available. We conducted a trial to evaluate 5-year immune persistence induced by one dose of inactivated or live attenuated HA vaccines in children. Subjects with no HA vaccination history had randomly received one dose of inactivated or live attenuated HA vaccine at 18-60 months of age. Anti-HAV antibody concentrations were measured before vaccination and at the first, second, and fifth year after vaccination. Suspected cases of hepatitis A were monitored during the study period. A total of 332 subjects were enrolled and 182 provided evaluable serum samples at all planned time points. seropositive rate at 5 y was 85.9% in the inactivated HA vaccine group and 90.7% in the live attenuated HA vaccine group. GMCs were 76.3% mIU/ml (95% CI: 61.7 - 94.4) and 66.8mIU/ml (95% CI: 57.8 - 77.3), respectively. No significant difference in antibody persistence between 2 groups was found. No clinical hepatitis A case was reported. A single dose of an inactivated or live attenuated HA vaccine at 18-60 months of age resulted in high HAV seropositive rate and anti-HAV antibody concentrations that lasted for at least 5 y.

  14. Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans Illnesses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    W81XWH-09-2-0065 TITLE: Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans Illnesses PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William J. Meggs, MD...2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illness 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09...that many with Gulf War Illness could enter either the naltrexone or dextromethorphan arm but not both. We are applying to allow subjects to enter

  15. Pharmacological enhancement of naltrexone treatment for opioid dependence: a review

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, Paolo; Peindl, Kathleen S; Wu, Li-Tzy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Opioid dependence (OD) is a serious and growing clinical condition with increasing social costs that requires expanding treatment beyond opioid agonist substitution. The opioid antagonist naltrexone has displayed a remarkable association of theoretical effectiveness and poor clinical utility in treating OD due to noncompliant behavior and low acceptability among patients, only partly modified by psychosocial interventions. We reviewed pharmacological studies, including naltrexone depot formulations and combination treatments. Method We searched PubMed for clinical studies on the use of naltrexone implants and slow-release injections in OD, and investigations using adjunct medications to improve naltrexone maintenance therapy of OD. We discussed the results in view of their application to the clinical practice. Results Significant reduction in opioid use and improved retention in treatment have been found in several studies using depot naltrexone formulations, some of which are controlled clinical trials. Pilot investigations have gathered initial positive results on the use of naltrexone in combination with serotonin reuptake inhibitors, α-2 adrenergic, opioid, and γ-aminobutyric acid agonist medications. Conclusion Current evidence suggests that more research on effectiveness and safety is needed in support of depot naltrexone treatment for OD. Further research comparing slow-release with oral naltrexone and opioid agonist medications will help characterize the role of opioid antagonist-mediated treatment of OD. Preliminary investigations on naltrexone combination treatments suggest the opportunity to continue study of new mixed receptor activities for the treatment of OD and other drug addictions. PMID:21731898

  16. Synthesis of Novel Basic Skeletons Derived from Naltrexone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideaki

    We will describe eight interesting reactions using naltrexone derivatives. Almost all these reactions are characteristic of naltrexone derivatives, and can lead to the synthesis of many novel skeletons that provide new interesting pharmacological data. Some of the new reactions that were found with naltrexone derivatives were expanded into general reactions. For example, the reaction of 6α-hydroxyaldehyde derived from naltrexone led to the oxazoline dimer and the 1,3,5-trioxazatriquinane skeleton (triplet drug); this reaction was applied to general ketones which were converted to α-hydroxyaldehydes, followed by conversion to dimers and trimers, as described in Sect. 7.

  17. Naltrexone metabolism and concomitant drug concentrations in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Janet C; Ma, Joseph D; Morello, Candis M; Atayee, Rabia S; Best, Brookie M

    2014-05-01

    Naltrexone is effective in treating opioid dependence by blocking µ, κ and δ opiate receptors. Naltrexone is mainly metabolized to an active metabolite 6β-naltrexol by dihydrodiol dehydrogenase enzymes. Concomitant opioids will not be effective while patients are taking this antagonist. This was a retrospective analysis of urinary excretion data collected from patients being treated with pain between November 2011 and May 2012. Naltrexone, 6β-naltrexol and concomitant opiate concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Interpatient variability was calculated from first-visit specimens, and intrapatient variability was calculated from patients with two or more visits. Relationships of the metabolic ratio (MR; 6β-naltrexol/naltrexone) with age, gender and urinary pH were also explored. From 88 first-visit patient specimens, the median MR was 3.28 (range 0.73-17.42). The MR was higher in women than men (5.00 vs. 3.14, P< 0.05). The MR showed no association based on age and urinary pH. Eighteen of 88 patients taking oral naltrexone tested positive for concomitant opiate use. Urinary MRs of 6β-naltrexol/naltrexone were highly variable, which may contribute to variability in efficacy, toxicity and patient willingness to take naltrexone as directed. Twenty percent of patients tested positive for opiates and naltrexone, thus showing the importance of monitoring patients taking naltrexone.

  18. Attenuation of 10 MeV electron beam energy to achieve low doses does not affect Salmonella spp. inactivation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieke, Anne-Sophie Charlotte; Pillai, Suresh D.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of attenuating the energy of a 10 MeV electron beam on Salmonella inactivation kinetics was investigated. No statistically significant differences were observed between the D10 values of either Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- or a Salmonella cocktail (S. 4,[5],12:i:-, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Newport, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella) when irradiated with either a non-attenuated 10 MeV eBeam or an attenuated 10 MeV eBeam (~2.9±0.22 MeV). The results show that attenuating the energy of a 10 MeV eBeam to achieve low doses does not affect the inactivation kinetics of Salmonella spp. when compared to direct 10 MeV eBeam irradiation.

  19. Supplier-dependent differences in intermittent voluntary alcohol intake and response to naltrexone in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Shima; Segerström, Lova; Roman, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a worldwide public health problem and a polygenetic disorder displaying substantial individual variation. This work aimed to study individual differences in behavior and its association to voluntary alcohol intake and subsequent response to naltrexone in a seamless heterogenic group of animals. Thus, by this approach the aim was to more accurately recapitulate the existing heterogeneity within the human population. Male Wistar rats from three different suppliers (Harlan Laboratories B.V., RccHan™:WI; Taconic Farms A/S, HanTac:WH; and Charles River GmbH, Crl:WI) were used to create a heterogenic group for studies of individual differences in behavior, associations to intermittent voluntary alcohol intake and subsequent response to naltrexone. The rats were tested in the open field prior to the Y-maze and then given voluntary intermittent access to alcohol or water in the home cage for 6 weeks, where after, naltrexone in three different doses or saline was administered in a Latin square design over 4 weeks and alcohol intake and preference was measured. However, supplier-dependent differences and concomitant skew subgroup formations, primarily in open field behavior and intermittent alcohol intake, resulted in a shifted focus to instead study voluntary alcohol intake and preference, and the ensuing response to naltrexone in Wistar rats from three different suppliers. The results showed that outbred Wistar rats are diverse with regard to voluntary alcohol intake and preference in a supplier-dependent manner; higher in RccHan™:WI relative to HanTac:WH and Crl:WI. The results also revealed supplier-dependent differences in the effect of naltrexone that were dose- and time-dependent; evident differences in high-drinking RccHan™:WI rats relative to HanTac:WH and Crl:WI rats. Overall these findings render RccHan™:WI rats more suitable for studies of individual differences in voluntary alcohol intake and response to naltrexone and

  20. Supplier-dependent differences in intermittent voluntary alcohol intake and response to naltrexone in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Shima; Segerström, Lova; Roman, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a worldwide public health problem and a polygenetic disorder displaying substantial individual variation. This work aimed to study individual differences in behavior and its association to voluntary alcohol intake and subsequent response to naltrexone in a seamless heterogenic group of animals. Thus, by this approach the aim was to more accurately recapitulate the existing heterogeneity within the human population. Male Wistar rats from three different suppliers (Harlan Laboratories B.V., RccHan™:WI; Taconic Farms A/S, HanTac:WH; and Charles River GmbH, Crl:WI) were used to create a heterogenic group for studies of individual differences in behavior, associations to intermittent voluntary alcohol intake and subsequent response to naltrexone. The rats were tested in the open field prior to the Y-maze and then given voluntary intermittent access to alcohol or water in the home cage for 6 weeks, where after, naltrexone in three different doses or saline was administered in a Latin square design over 4 weeks and alcohol intake and preference was measured. However, supplier-dependent differences and concomitant skew subgroup formations, primarily in open field behavior and intermittent alcohol intake, resulted in a shifted focus to instead study voluntary alcohol intake and preference, and the ensuing response to naltrexone in Wistar rats from three different suppliers. The results showed that outbred Wistar rats are diverse with regard to voluntary alcohol intake and preference in a supplier-dependent manner; higher in RccHan™:WI relative to HanTac:WH and Crl:WI. The results also revealed supplier-dependent differences in the effect of naltrexone that were dose- and time-dependent; evident differences in high-drinking RccHan™:WI rats relative to HanTac:WH and Crl:WI rats. Overall these findings render RccHan™:WI rats more suitable for studies of individual differences in voluntary alcohol intake and response to naltrexone and

  1. Low doses of isosorbide mononitrate attenuate the postprandial increase in portal pressure in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Bellis, Lia; Berzigotti, Annalisa; Abraldes, Juan G; Moitinho, Eduardo; García-Pagán, Juan C; Bosch, Jaime; Rodés, Juan

    2003-02-01

    Postprandial hyperemia is associated with a significant increase in portal pressure in cirrhosis, which may contribute to progressive dilation and rupture of gastroesophageal varices. In cirrhosis, an insufficient hepatic production of nitric oxide (NO) may impair the expected hepatic vasodilatory response to increased blood flow, further exaggerating the postprandial increase in portal pressure. This study was aimed at investigating whether low doses of an oral NO donor might counteract the postprandial peak in portal pressure. Twenty-three portal hypertensive cirrhotics, 8 of them under propranolol therapy, were randomized to receive orally 5-isosorbide mononitrate (ISMN; 10 mg; n = 11) or placebo (n = 12) and a standard liquid meal 15 minutes later. Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and hepatic blood flow (HBF) were measured at baseline and 15, 30, and 45 minutes after a meal. ISMN significantly attenuated the postprandial increase in portal pressure as compared with placebo (peak HVPG increase: 2.4 +/- 1.4 mm Hg vs. 5.2 +/- 2.1 mm Hg, P =.002). Percentual increases in HBF were similar in both groups. MAP decreased slightly in ISMN group (-7.5% +/-.5%; P <.01 vs. baseline). These effects were also observed in patients on chronic propranolol therapy. In conclusion, hepatic NO supplementation by low doses of ISMN effectively reduces the postprandial increase of portal pressure in cirrhosis, with only a mild effect on arterial pressure. The same was observed in patients receiving propranolol. Our results suggest that therapeutic strategies based on selective hepatic NO delivery may improve the treatment of portal hypertension.

  2. Linear attenuation coefficient and buildup factor of MCP-96 alloy for dose accuracy, beam collimation, and radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Deidre N; Maqbool, Muhammad; Islam, Mohammed S

    2012-07-01

    The linear attenuation coefficients and buildup factor of MCP-96 alloy were determined for (60)Co, (54)Mn, and (137)Cs gamma emitters and a NaI detector. The thickness of the MCP-96 attenuator was varied from 1 to 4 cm. A collimated beam of gamma rays was allowed to pass through various thicknesses of the MCP-96 alloy. The attenuated beam was detected by a NaI detector, and data were recorded by a multichannel analyzer. The run was repeated without the collimator for broad-beam geometry. For each run, the attenuated beam intensity was normalized by the intensity of the unattenuated incident beam obtained by removing the attenuators. Linear attenuation coefficients were determined by plotting of the intensity of the collimated beam against the attenuator thickness. For every thickness of the alloy, the ratio of the attenuated to the unattenuated beam was found to be higher in broad-beam geometry as compared to the same ratio in narrow-beam geometry. We used the difference in these ratios in broad and narrow-beam geometries to calculate the buildup factor. The buildup factor was found to increase with beam energy and attenuator thickness. Variation in the source-to-detector distance gave a lower value of the buildup factor for a small and a large distance and a higher value for an intermediate distance. The buildup factor was found to be greater than 1 in all cases. We conclude that the buildup factor must be calculated and incorporated for dose correction and precision when the MCP-96 alloy is used for tissue compensation or radiation shielding and protection purposes.

  3. Naltrexone/bupropion: Contrave(R); naltrexone SR/bupropion SR.

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    In March 2010, Orexigen(R) Therapeutics submitted a new drug application (NDA) for approval of naltrexone sustained release (SR)/bupropion SR (Contrave(R)) for the treatment of obesity in the US. The tablet contains naltrexone SR 32 mg and bupropion SR 360 mg. The drug has been tested in four randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III trials and the co-primary endpoints were met in each case. This review discusses the key development milestones and clinical trial program to date.

  4. Hormonal contraceptive use diminishes salivary cortisol response to psychosocial stress and naltrexone in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel J O; King, Andrea C; Cohoon, Andrew J; Lovallo, William R

    2013-08-01

    The use of hormonal contraception (HC) may affect salivary cortisol levels at rest and in response to a pharmacological or stress challenge. Therefore, the current study used a secondary data analysis to investigate the effect of HC on salivary cortisol levels in response to the mu-opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone and a psychosocial stressor, and also across the diurnal curve. Two hundred and nine women (n=72 using hormonal contraception; HC+) completed a two-session stress response study that consisted of a stress day, in which they were exposed to public speaking and mental arithmetic, and a rest day, in which unstimulated cortisol levels were measured to assess the diurnal rhythm. A subset of seventy women (n=24 HC+) also completed a second study in which they were administered oral naltrexone (50mg) or placebo in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind fashion. Women who were HC+ had a significantly reduced salivary cortisol response to both the psychosocial stressor (p<0.001) and naltrexone (p<0.05) compared to HC- women. Additionally, HC+ women had a significantly altered morning diurnal cortisol rhythm (p<0.01), with a delayed peak and higher overall levels. The results of the current study confirm that HC attenuates salivary cortisol response to a psychosocial stressor and mu-opioid receptor antagonism, and also alters the morning diurnal cortisol curve.

  5. Source terms and attenuation lengths for estimating shielding requirements or dose analyses of proton therapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lai, Bo-Lun; Lin, Uei-Tyng; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2013-08-01

    Proton therapy accelerators in the energy range of 100-300 MeV could potentially produce intense secondary radiation, which must be carefully evaluated and shielded for the purpose of radiation safety in a densely populated hospital. Monte Carlo simulations are generally the most accurate method for accelerator shielding design. However, simplified approaches such as the commonly used point-source line-of-sight model are usually preferable on many practical occasions, especially for scoping shielding design or quick sensitivity studies. This work provides a set of reliable shielding data with reasonable coverage of common target and shielding materials for 100-300 MeV proton accelerators. The shielding data, including source terms and attenuation lengths, were derived from a consistent curve fitting process of a number of depth-dose distributions within the shield, which were systematically calculated by using MCNPX for various beam-target shield configurations. The general characteristics and qualities of this data set are presented. Possible applications in cases of single- and double-layer shielding are considered and demonstrated.

  6. Reduction of Alcohol Drinking in Young Adults by Naltrexone: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Clinical Trial of Efficacy and Safety

    PubMed Central

    O’Malley, Stephanie S.; Corbin, William R.; Leeman, Robert F.; DeMartini, Kelly S.; Fucito, Lisa M.; Ikomi, Jolomi; Romano, Denise M.; Wu, Ran; Toll, Benjamin A.; Sher, Kenneth J.; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Kranzler, Henry R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, may facilitate reduction in drinking among young adults. We compared the efficacy and safety of naltrexone administered daily plus targeted dosing with placebo to reduce drinking in heavy drinking young adults. Methods Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, outpatient research center, March 2008-January 2012. Participants were ages 18-25, reporting ≥ 4 heavy drinking days in the prior 4 weeks. Interventions included naltrexone 25 mg daily plus 25 mg targeted (at most daily) in anticipation of drinking (n = 61) or daily/targeted placebo (n = 67). All received a personalized feedback session and brief counseling every other week. Primary outcomes were percent days heavy drinking (PHDD) and percent days abstinent (PDA) over the 8-week treatment period. Secondary outcomes included drinks/drinking day and percent days with estimated blood alcohol levels ≥0.08 g/dL. Results Of 140 randomized, 128 began treatment, comprising the evaluable sample. During treatment, PHDD (Naltrexone M=21.60, SD=16.05; Placebo M=22.90, SD=13.20) (p=0.58) and PDA (Naltrexone M=56.60, SD=22.52; Placebo M=62.50, SD=15.75) (p=0.39) did not differ by group. Naltrexone significantly reduced drinks per drinking day (Naltrexone M=4.90, SD=2.28; Placebo M=5.90, SD=2.51) (p=0.009) and percentage of drinking days with estimated BAC ≥0.08 g/dL (Naltrexone M=35.36, SD=28.40; Placebo M=45.74, SD=26.80) (p=0.042). There were no serious adverse events. Sleepiness was more common with naltrexone. Conclusions Naltrexone did not reduce frequency of drinking or heavy drinking days, but reduced secondary measures of drinking intensity. While effects were modest, the risk-benefit ratio favors offering naltrexone to help young adult heavy drinkers reduce their drinking. Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00568958 PMID:25742208

  7. Lipid emulsion attenuates apoptosis induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine in H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Ok, S-H; Yu, J; Lee, Y; Cho, H; Shin, I-W; Sohn, J-T

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of lipid emulsion on apoptosis induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine (BPV) in H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cell lines. The effect of lipid emulsion on the decreased cell viability and count induced by BPV or mepivacaine (MPV) in the H9c2 cells was assessed using an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay or a cell count assay. The effect of BPV or lipid emulsion combined with BPV on cleaved caspase 3, caspase 8, and Bax in H9c2 cells was investigated using Western blotting. A terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed to detect apoptosis of H9c2 cells treated with BPV alone or lipid emulsion combined with BPV. The magnitude of lipid emulsion-mediated attenuation of decreased cell viability induced by BPV was higher than that of lipid emulsion-mediated attenuation of decreased cell viability induced by MPV. Lipid emulsion attenuated the increases in cleaved caspase 3, caspase 8 and Bax induced by BPV. Lipid emulsion attenuated the increases in TUNEL-positive cells induced by BPV. These results suggest that lipid emulsion attenuates a toxic dose of BPV-induced apoptosis via inhibition of the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. The protective effect of lipid emulsion may be partially associated with the relatively high lipid solubility of BPV.

  8. Attenuation correction of PET cardiac data with low-dose average CT in PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama; Luo, Dershan; Liu, Hui H.; Chi Paichun, M.; Mar, Martha V.; Gladish, Gregory; Truong, Mylene; Erasmus, Jeremy Jr.; Liao Zhongxing; Macapinlac, H. A.

    2006-10-15

    We proposed a low-dose average computer tomography (ACT) for attenuation correction (AC) of the PET cardiac data in PET/CT. The ACT was obtained from a cine CT scan of over one breath cycle per couch position while the patient was free breathing. We applied this technique on four patients who underwent tumor imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG in PET/CT, whose PET data showed high uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the heart and whose CT and PET data had misregistration. All four patients did not have known myocardiac infarction or ischemia. The patients were injected with 555-740 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG and scanned 1 h after injection. The helical CT (HCT) data were acquired in 16 s for the coverage of 100 cm. The PET acquisition was 3 min per bed of 15 cm. The duration of cine CT acquisition per 2 cm was 5.9 s. We used a fast gantry rotation cycle time of 0.5 s to minimize motion induced reconstruction artifacts in the cine CT images, which were averaged to become the ACT images for AC of the PET data. The radiation dose was about 5 mGy for 5.9 s cine duration. The selection of 5.9 s was based on our analysis of the respiratory signals of 600 patients; 87% of the patients had average breath cycles of less than 6 s and 90% had standard deviations of less than 1 s in the period of breath cycle. In all four patient studies, registrations between the CT and the PET data were improved. An increase of average uptake in the anterior and the lateral walls up to 48% and a decrease of average uptake in the septal and the inferior walls up to 16% with ACT were observed. We also compared ACT and conventional slow scan CT (SSCT) of 4 s duration in one patient study and found ACT was better than SSCT in depicting average respiratory motion and the SSCT images showed motion-induced reconstruction artifacts. In conclusion, low-dose ACT improved registration of the CT and the PET data in the heart region in our study of four patients. ACT was superior than SSCT for depicting average respiration

  9. SU-E-P-39: Characterization of Dose Impact On Different Beam Fields Size Attenuation for Elekta IGRT Couch

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R; Bai, W; Xiaomei, F; Chi, Z; Runxiao, L; Ren, Q; Gao, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of the dosimetric impact of the Elekta IGRT treatment couch in different beam field sizes. Established the relationship of relative dose versus beam angle at different beam field sizes. Methods: Measurements of couch attenuation were performed at gantry angles from 180° to 120°, using a 0.125cc semiflex ionization chamber, isocentrically placed in the center of a homogeneous cylindric sliced RW3 phantom for 6 photon beams. Measurements were performed at six different field sizes (3×3, 5×5, 7×7,10×10, 12×12 and 15×15 cm2). The phantom were positioned at the center of the couche,100 MU were delivered at every gantry angle. The dose difference to the ion chamber was determined. Results: For oblique fields with 6 MV photons at the same gantry angle the attenuation coefficient value from the lagest to the smallest the order is field size 7 cm2,5 cm2,10 cm2,12 cm2,15 cm2 and 3 cm2. The biggest couch attenuation by up to 4.15% at the gantry angle of 140°for the field size of 7 cm2, while for the field size of 3 cm2 the couch attenuated value only 3.5%. The other field size couch attenuation values are between the couch attenuated value of field size of 7 cm2 and 3 cm2 Conclusion: The recommended treatment couch attenuation measured beam field size is 10×10 or 12×12 cm2. When measured using the beam field size 3×3 cm2 the tested value will be lower, while measuerd using the beam field size 7×7 cm2 the tested value will be higer than the recommended beam field size. This should be noted when modeling the treatment couch in the treatment planning system.

  10. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT: analysis of sparse view data acquisition and reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Xue; Cheng, Lishui; Long, Yong; Fu, Lin; Alessio, Adam M.; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.; De Man, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    For PET/CT systems, PET image reconstruction requires corresponding CT images for anatomical localization and attenuation correction. In the case of PET respiratory gating, multiple gated CT scans can offer phase-matched attenuation and motion correction, at the expense of increased radiation dose. We aim to minimize the dose of the CT scan, while preserving adequate image quality for the purpose of PET attenuation correction by introducing sparse view CT data acquisition. We investigated sparse view CT acquisition protocols resulting in ultra-low dose CT scans designed for PET attenuation correction. We analyzed the tradeoffs between the number of views and the integrated tube current per view for a given dose using CT and PET simulations of a 3D NCAT phantom with lesions inserted into liver and lung. We simulated seven CT acquisition protocols with {984, 328, 123, 41, 24, 12, 8} views per rotation at a gantry speed of 0.35 s. One standard dose and four ultra-low dose levels, namely, 0.35 mAs, 0.175 mAs, 0.0875 mAs, and 0.043 75 mAs, were investigated. Both the analytical Feldkamp, Davis and Kress (FDK) algorithm and the Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm were used for CT image reconstruction. We also evaluated the impact of sinogram interpolation to estimate the missing projection measurements due to sparse view data acquisition. For MBIR, we used a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) cost function with an approximate total-variation (TV) regularizing penalty function. We compared a tube pulsing mode and a continuous exposure mode for sparse view data acquisition. Global PET ensemble root-mean-squares-error (RMSE) and local ensemble lesion activity error were used as quantitative evaluation metrics for PET image quality. With sparse view sampling, it is possible to greatly reduce the CT scan dose when it is primarily used for PET attenuation correction with little or no measureable effect on the PET image. For the four ultra-low dose

  11. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT: analysis of sparse view data acquisition and reconstruction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Rui, Xue; Cheng, Lishui; Long, Yong; Fu, Lin; Alessio, Adam M; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E; De Man, Bruno

    2015-10-07

    For PET/CT systems, PET image reconstruction requires corresponding CT images for anatomical localization and attenuation correction. In the case of PET respiratory gating, multiple gated CT scans can offer phase-matched attenuation and motion correction, at the expense of increased radiation dose. We aim to minimize the dose of the CT scan, while preserving adequate image quality for the purpose of PET attenuation correction by introducing sparse view CT data acquisition.We investigated sparse view CT acquisition protocols resulting in ultra-low dose CT scans designed for PET attenuation correction. We analyzed the tradeoffs between the number of views and the integrated tube current per view for a given dose using CT and PET simulations of a 3D NCAT phantom with lesions inserted into liver and lung. We simulated seven CT acquisition protocols with {984, 328, 123, 41, 24, 12, 8} views per rotation at a gantry speed of 0.35 s. One standard dose and four ultra-low dose levels, namely, 0.35 mAs, 0.175 mAs, 0.0875 mAs, and 0.043 75 mAs, were investigated. Both the analytical Feldkamp, Davis and Kress (FDK) algorithm and the Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm were used for CT image reconstruction. We also evaluated the impact of sinogram interpolation to estimate the missing projection measurements due to sparse view data acquisition. For MBIR, we used a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) cost function with an approximate total-variation (TV) regularizing penalty function. We compared a tube pulsing mode and a continuous exposure mode for sparse view data acquisition. Global PET ensemble root-mean-squares-error (RMSE) and local ensemble lesion activity error were used as quantitative evaluation metrics for PET image quality.With sparse view sampling, it is possible to greatly reduce the CT scan dose when it is primarily used for PET attenuation correction with little or no measureable effect on the PET image. For the four ultra-low dose levels

  12. Measurements of neutron effective doses and attenuation lengths for shielding materials at the heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Noda, Yutaka; Sato, Yukio; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Murakami, Takeshi

    2005-05-01

    The effective doses and attenuation lengths for concrete and iron were measured for the design of heavy ion facilities. Neutrons were produced through the reaction of copper, carbon, and lead bombarded by carbon ions at 230 and 400 MeV.A, neon ions at 400 and 600 MeV.A, and silicon ions at 600 and 800 MeV.A. The detectors used were a Linus and a Andersson-Braun-type rem counter and a detector based on the activation of a plastic scintillator. Representative effective dose rates (in units of 10(-8) microSv h(-1) pps(-1) at 1 m from the incident target surface, where pps means particles per second) and the attenuation lengths (in units of m) were 9.4 x 10(4), 0.46 for carbon ions at 230 MeV.A; 8.9 x 10(5), 0.48 for carbon ions at 400 MeV.A; 9.3 x 10(5), 0.48 for neon ions at 400 MeV.A; 3.8 x 10(6), 0.50 for neon ions at 600 MeV.A; 3.9 x 10(6), 0.50 for silicon ions at 600 MeV.A; and 1.1 x 10(7), 0.51 for silicon ions at 800 MeV.A. The attenuation provided by an iron plate approximately 20 cm thick (nearly equal to the attenuation length) corresponded to that of a 50-cm block of concrete in the present energy range. Miscellaneous results, such as the angular distributions of the neutron effective dose, narrow beam attenuation experiments, decay of gamma-ray doses after the bombardment of targets, doses around an irradiation room, order effects in the multi-layer (concrete and iron) shielding, the doses from different targets, the doses measured with a scintillator activation detector, the gamma-ray doses out of walls and the ratio of the response between the Andersson-Braun-type and the Linus rem counters are also reported.

  13. Low-dose memantine attenuated morphine addictive behavior through its anti-inflammation and neurotrophic effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiou-Lan; Tao, Pao-Luh; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Heng; Wu, Hsiang-En; Tseng, Leon F; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2012-06-01

    Opioid abuse and dependency are international problems. Studies have shown that neuronal inflammation and degeneration might be related to the development of opioid addiction. Thus, using neuroprotective agents might be beneficial for treating opioid addiction. Memantine, an Alzheimer's disease medication, has neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated whether a low dose of memantine prevents opioid-induced drug-seeking behavior in rats and analyzed its mechanism. A conditioned-place-preference test was used to investigate the morphine-induced drug-seeking behaviors in rats. We found that a low-dose (0.2-1 mg/kg) of subcutaneous memantine significantly attenuated the chronic morphine-induced place-preference in rats. To clarify the effects of chronic morphine and low-dose memantine, serum and brain levels of cytokines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured. After 6 days of morphine treatment, cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6) levels had significantly increased in serum; IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA levels had significantly increased in the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex, both addiction-related brain areas; and BDNF levels had significantly decreased, both in serum and in addiction-related brain areas. Pretreatment with low-dose memantine significantly attenuated chronic morphine-induced increases in serum and brain cytokines. Low-dose memantine also significantly potentiated serum and brain BDNF levels. We hypothesize that neuronal inflammation and BDNF downregulation are related to the progression of opioid addiction. We hypothesize that the mechanism low-dose memantine uses to attenuate morphine-induced addiction behavior is its anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic effects.

  14. [High dose cinobufocini in attenuation and treatment of infection and granulocytopenia during combined chemotherapy of malignant blood diseases].

    PubMed

    Yue, B B

    1992-03-01

    The use of high dose Cinobufocini in attenuation and treatment of infection and granulocytopenia during combined chemotherapy was observed in patients with malignant blood diseases. The study was designed in such a way that each patient served as self control. The patients, 18 males and 12 females, aged 16-66 (average 34), 62 experiments in 20 patients with acute leukemia, 8 with malignant lymphoma and 2 with multiple myeloma were observed. In patients with the treatment of high dose Cinobufocini, infection was significantly decreased and the number of granulocytes was not markedly changed before and after the treatment. The observation demonstrated that high dose Cinobufocini can significantly reduce the risk of infection and degree and duration of granulocytopenia associated with chemotherapy of patients with malignant blood diseases. The use of high dose Cinobufocini is simple and convenient and with very little side effects.

  15. Aripiprazole in the treatment of patients with alcohol dependence: a double-blind, comparison trial vs. naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Martinotti, G; Di Nicola, M; Di Giannantonio, M; Janiri, L

    2009-03-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that both partial dopamine agents and mixed 5-HT1A/2A receptor drugs independently show significant efficacy in reducing alcohol use in both animals and humans. Aripiprazole, which acts as a dopamine/5-HT system stabilizer, approaches the optimal characteristics sought in medication to be considered for testing in the treatment of alcohol dependence. In this randomised, double-blind, confrontation trial with naltrexone, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of aripiprazole on alcohol-drinking indices. Craving and psychiatric symptom improvements were the secondary end points. Seventy-five alcohol dependent subjects were detoxified and were subsequently randomised into two groups, receiving 50 mg of naltrexone and 5-15 mg of aripiprazole, respectively. Craving (Visual Analogue Scale; Obsessive and Compulsive Drinking Scale) and withdrawal (Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment) rating scales were applied; psychiatric symptoms were evaluated through the Symptom Check List 90-Revised. The number of subjects remained alcohol free for the entire study period (16 weeks) and the number of subjects relapsed were not significantly different in the two groups. The survival function showed that patients treated with aripiprazole remained abstinent from any alcohol amount for a longer time with respect to those treated with naltrexone. As for craving scores, patients treated with naltrexone showed a better outcome. Results from this study globally place aripiprazole at the same range of efficacy of naltrexone, one of the approved drugs used in alcohol relapse prevention. If it could be demonstrated in placebo-controlled trials that aripiprazole is efficacious in decreasing alcohol use, lessening craving, and attenuating psychopathological symptom severity, we will have gained a powerful agent for the treatment of alcohol-dependent subjects.

  16. An experimental attenuation plate to improve the dose distribution in intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy for breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Shimozato, T.; Sawaki, M.; Imai, T.; Ito, Y.; Obata, Y.; Tabushi, K.

    2009-06-01

    Intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IOERT) is a technique in which a single-fraction high dose is intraoperatively delivered to subclinical tumour cells using an electron beam after breast-conserving surgery. In IOERT, an attenuation plate consisting of a pair of metal disks is commonly used to protect the normal tissues posterior to the breast. However, the dose in front of the plate is affected by backscatter, resulting in an unpredictable delivered dose to the tumour cells. In this study, an experimental attenuation plate, termed a shielding plate, was designed using Monte Carlo simulation, which significantly diminished the electron beam without introducing any backscatter radiation. The plate's performance was verified by measurements. It was made of two layers, a first layer (source side) of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and a second layer of copper, which was selected from among other metals (aluminium, copper and lead) after testing for shielding capability and the range and magnitude of backscatter. The optimal thicknesses of the PMMA (0.71 cm) and copper (0.3 cm) layers were determined by changing their thicknesses during simulations. On the basis of these results, a shielding plate was prototyped and depth doses with and without the plate were measured by radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters using a conventional stationary linear accelerator and a mobile linear accelerator dedicated for IOERT. The trial shielding plate functioned as intended, indicating its applicability in clinical practice.

  17. Vaccination With a Highly Attenuated Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vector Protects Against Challenge With a Lethal Dose of Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    Matassov, Demetrius; Marzi, Andrea; Latham, Terri; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Joan B; Mire, Chad E; Hamm, Stefan; Nowak, Becky; Egan, Michael A; Geisbert, Thomas W; Eldridge, John H; Feldmann, Heinz; Clarke, David K

    2015-10-01

    Previously, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) pseudotypes expressing Ebolavirus glycoproteins (GPs) in place of the VSV G protein demonstrated protection of nonhuman primates from lethal homologous Ebolavirus challenge. Those pseudotype vectors contained no additional attenuating mutations in the rVSV genome. Here we describe rVSV vectors containing a full complement of VSV genes and expressing the Ebola virus (EBOV) GP from an additional transcription unit. These rVSV vectors contain the same combination of attenuating mutations used previously in the clinical development pathway of an rVSV/human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vaccine. One of these rVSV vectors (N4CT1-EBOVGP1), which expresses membrane-anchored EBOV GP from the first position in the genome (GP1), elicited a balanced cellular and humoral GP-specific immune response in mice. Guinea pigs immunized with a single dose of this vector were protected from any signs of disease following lethal EBOV challenge, while control animals died in 7-9 days. Subsequently, N4CT1-EBOVGP1 demonstrated complete, single-dose protection of 2 macaques following lethal EBOV challenge. A single sham-vaccinated macaque died from disease due to EBOV infection. These results demonstrate that highly attenuated rVSV vectors expressing EBOV GP may provide safer alternatives to current EBOV vaccines.

  18. Vaccination With a Highly Attenuated Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vector Protects Against Challenge With a Lethal Dose of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Matassov, Demetrius; Marzi, Andrea; Latham, Terri; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Joan B.; Mire, Chad E.; Hamm, Stefan; Nowak, Becky; Egan, Michael A.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Eldridge, John H.; Feldmann, Heinz; Clarke, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Previously, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) pseudotypes expressing Ebolavirus glycoproteins (GPs) in place of the VSV G protein demonstrated protection of nonhuman primates from lethal homologous Ebolavirus challenge. Those pseudotype vectors contained no additional attenuating mutations in the rVSV genome. Here we describe rVSV vectors containing a full complement of VSV genes and expressing the Ebola virus (EBOV) GP from an additional transcription unit. These rVSV vectors contain the same combination of attenuating mutations used previously in the clinical development pathway of an rVSV/human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vaccine. One of these rVSV vectors (N4CT1-EBOVGP1), which expresses membrane-anchored EBOV GP from the first position in the genome (GP1), elicited a balanced cellular and humoral GP-specific immune response in mice. Guinea pigs immunized with a single dose of this vector were protected from any signs of disease following lethal EBOV challenge, while control animals died in 7–9 days. Subsequently, N4CT1-EBOVGP1 demonstrated complete, single-dose protection of 2 macaques following lethal EBOV challenge. A single sham-vaccinated macaque died from disease due to EBOV infection. These results demonstrate that highly attenuated rVSV vectors expressing EBOV GP may provide safer alternatives to current EBOV vaccines. PMID:26109675

  19. Serum naltrexone and 6-beta-naltrexol levels from naltrexone implants can block very large amounts of heroin: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Colin

    2002-07-01

    The maximum dose of heroin that is blocked by customary doses of oral naltrexone (NTX) and its active metabolite 6-beta-naltrexol (6BNT) is unknown, particularly at trough serum levels which show much interindividual variation and can be low. NTX has only once been tested formally against opiate equivalents of more than 25 mg of diamorphine. Increasing interest in long-acting implantable NTX preparations makes it important to have objective information about blocking activity at various blood levels of NTX and 6BNT. Two cases are described in which NTX and 6BNT levels as low as 2.8 and 9.0 ng/ml, respectively, were sufficient to block doses of pure diamorphine as high as 500 mg.

  20. Fast analytical approach of application specific dose efficient spectrum selection for diagnostic CT imaging and PET attenuation correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Xue; Jin, Yannan; FitzGerald, Paul F.; Wu, Mingye; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; De Man, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used for a variety of applications, two of which include diagnostic imaging and attenuation correction for PET or SPECT imaging. Ideally, the x-ray tube spectrum should be optimized for the specific application to minimize the patient radiation dose while still providing the necessary information. In this study, we proposed a projection-based analytic approach for the analysis of contrast, noise, and bias. Dose normalized contrast to noise ratio (CNRD), inverse noise normalized by dose (IND) and bias are used as evaluation metrics to determine the optimal x-ray spectrum. Our simulation investigated the dose efficiency of the x-ray spectrum ranging from 40 kVp to 200 kVp. Water cylinders with diameters of 15 cm, 24 cm, and 35 cm were used in the simulation to cover a variety of patient sizes. The effects of electronic noise and pre-patient copper filtration were also evaluated. A customized 24 cm CTDI-like phantom with 13 mm diameter inserts filled with iodine (10 mg ml-1), tantalum (10 mg ml-1), water, and PMMA was measured with both standard (1.5 mGy) and ultra-low (0.2 mGy) dose to verify the simulation results at tube voltages of 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp. For contrast-enhanced diagnostic imaging, the simulation results indicated that for high dose without filtration, the optimal kVp for water contrast is approximately 100 kVp for a 15 cm water cylinder. However, the 60 kVp spectrum produces the highest CNRD for bone and iodine. The optimal kVp for tantalum has two selections: approximately 50 and 100 kVp. The kVp that maximizes CNRD increases when the object size increases. The trend in the CTDI phantom measurements agrees with the simulation results, which also agrees with previous studies. Copper filtration improved the dose efficiency for water and tantalum, but reduced the iodine and bone dose efficiency in a clinically-relevant range (70-140 kVp). Our study also shows that for CT-based attenuation

  1. Naltrexone implant treatment for buprenorphine dependence--Mauritian case series.

    PubMed

    Jhugroo, Anil; Ellayah, Darmen; Norman, Amanda; Hulse, Gary

    2014-08-01

    Although substitution therapy with opiate agonist treatments such as methadone and buprenorphine has resulted in a reduction of illicit drug use related harm, such treatment has also resulted in severe problems in some countries where opioid-dependent individuals now inject illicitly sold buprenorphine or buprenorphine-naloxone instead of heroin. There is no approved treatment for buprenorphine dependence. Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist which has been used for the treatment of both alcohol and opioid dependencies. Although both buprenorphine and heroin resemble each other concerning their effects, buprenorphine has a higher affinity to opioid receptors than heroin. Therefore, it is not known if naltrexone can block the psychoactive effects of buprenorphine as it does for heroin. This paper presents observational case series data on the use of a sustained-release naltrexone implant for the treatment of buprenorphine dependence. To the authors' knowledge this is the first use of sustained-release naltrexone for this indication.

  2. Facts about Naltrexone for Treatment of Opioid Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... mood swings when taking naltrexone. It does NOT cause depression. If you have symptoms of depression, talk to your doctor— there may be some other cause. 11 Support groups and information • This is not ...

  3. 21 CFR 522.1465 - Naltrexone hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... this chapter. (c) Conditions of use in elk and moose—(1) Amount. 100 milligrams of naltrexone...) Indications for use. As an antagonist to carfentanil citrate immobilization in free-ranging or confined...

  4. 21 CFR 522.1465 - Naltrexone hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... this chapter. (c) Conditions of use in elk and moose—(1) Amount. 100 milligrams of naltrexone...) Indications for use. As an antagonist to carfentanil citrate immobilization in free-ranging or confined...

  5. 21 CFR 522.1465 - Naltrexone hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... this chapter. (c) Conditions of use in elk and moose—(1) Amount. 100 milligrams of naltrexone...) Indications for use. As an antagonist to carfentanil citrate immobilization in free-ranging or confined...

  6. 21 CFR 522.1465 - Naltrexone hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... this chapter. (c) Conditions of use in elk and moose—(1) Amount. 100 milligrams of naltrexone...) Indications for use. As an antagonist to carfentanil citrate immobilization in free-ranging or confined...

  7. Dose reduction by moving a region of interest (ROI) beam attenuator to follow a moving object of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panse, Ashish S.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    Region-of-interest (ROI) fluoroscopy takes advantage of the fact that most neurovascular interventional activity is performed in only a small portion of an x-ray imaging field of view (FOV). The ROI beam filter is an attenuating material that reduces patient dose in the area peripheral to the object of interest. This project explores a method of moving the beam-attenuator aperture with the object of interest such that it always remains in the ROI. In this study, the ROI attenuator, which reduces the dose by 80% in the peripheral region, is mounted on a linear stage placed near the xray tube. Fluoroscopy is performed using the Microangiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) which is a high-resolution, CCD-based x-ray detector. A stainless-steel stent is selected as the object of interest, and is moved across the FOV and localized using an object-detection algorithm available in the IMAQ Vision package of LabVIEW. The ROI is moved to follow the stent motion. The pixel intensities are equalized in both FOV regions and an adaptive temporal filter dependent on the motion of the object of interest is implemented inside the ROI. With a temporal filter weight of 5% for the current image in the peripheral region, the SNR measured is 47.8. The weights inside the ROI vary between 10% and 33% with a measured SNR of 57.9 and 35.3 when the object is stationary and moving, respectively. This method allows patient dose reduction as well as maintenance of superior image quality in the ROI while tracking the object.

  8. Dose reduction by moving a region of interest (ROI) beam attenuator to follow a moving object of interest.

    PubMed

    Panse, Ashish S; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Jain, A; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    Region-of-interest (ROI) fluoroscopy takes advantage of the fact that most neurovascular interventional activity is performed in only a small portion of an x-ray imaging field of view (FOV). The ROI beam filter is an attenuating material that reduces patient dose in the area peripheral to the object of interest. This project explores a method of moving the beam-attenuator aperture with the object of interest such that it always remains in the ROI. In this study, the ROI attenuator, which reduces the dose by 80% in the peripheral region, is mounted on a linear stage placed near the x-ray tube. Fluoroscopy is performed using the Microangiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) which is a high-resolution, CCD-based x-ray detector. A stainless-steel stent is selected as the object of interest, and is moved across the FOV and localized using an object-detection algorithm available in the IMAQ Vision package of LabVIEW. The ROI is moved to follow the stent motion. The pixel intensities are equalized in both FOV regions and an adaptive temporal filter dependent on the motion of the object of interest is implemented inside the ROI. With a temporal filter weight of 5% for the current image in the peripheral region, the SNR measured is 47.8. The weights inside the ROI vary between 10% and 33% with a measured SNR of 57.9 and 35.3 when the object is stationary and moving, respectively. This method allows patient dose reduction as well as maintenance of superior image quality in the ROI while tracking the object.

  9. Attenuation-based size metric for estimating organ dose to patients undergoing tube current modulated CT exams

    SciTech Connect

    Bostani, Maryam McMillan, Kyle; Lu, Peiyun; Kim, Hyun J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; DeMarco, John J.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Task Group 204 introduced effective diameter (ED) as the patient size metric used to correlate size-specific-dose-estimates. However, this size metric fails to account for patient attenuation properties and has been suggested to be replaced by an attenuation-based size metric, water equivalent diameter (D{sub W}). The purpose of this study is to investigate different size metrics, effective diameter, and water equivalent diameter, in combination with regional descriptions of scanner output to establish the most appropriate size metric to be used as a predictor for organ dose in tube current modulated CT exams. Methods: 101 thoracic and 82 abdomen/pelvis scans from clinically indicated CT exams were collected retrospectively from a multidetector row CT (Sensation 64, Siemens Healthcare) with Institutional Review Board approval to generate voxelized patient models. Fully irradiated organs (lung and breasts in thoracic scans and liver, kidneys, and spleen in abdominal scans) were segmented and used as tally regions in Monte Carlo simulations for reporting organ dose. Along with image data, raw projection data were collected to obtain tube current information for simulating tube current modulation scans using Monte Carlo methods. Additionally, previously described patient size metrics [ED, D{sub W}, and approximated water equivalent diameter (D{sub Wa})] were calculated for each patient and reported in three different ways: a single value averaged over the entire scan, a single value averaged over the region of interest, and a single value from a location in the middle of the scan volume. Organ doses were normalized by an appropriate mAs weighted CTDI{sub vol} to reflect regional variation of tube current. Linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the correlations between normalized organ doses and each size metric. Results: For the abdominal organs, the correlations between normalized organ dose and size metric were overall slightly higher for all three

  10. Naltrexone ameliorates functional network abnormalities in alcohol-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Morris, Laurel S; Baek, Kwangyeol; Tait, Roger; Elliott, Rebecca; Ersche, Karen D; Flechais, Remy; McGonigle, John; Murphy, Anna; Nestor, Liam J; Orban, Csaba; Passetti, Filippo; Paterson, Louise M; Rabiner, Ilan; Reed, Laurence; Smith, Dana; Suckling, John; Taylor, Eleanor M; Bullmore, Edward T; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Deakin, Bill; Nutt, David J; Sahakian, Barbara J; Robbins, Trevor W; Voon, Valerie

    2017-02-28

    Naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist, is commonly used as a relapse prevention medication in alcohol and opiate addiction, but its efficacy and the mechanisms underpinning its clinical usefulness are not well characterized. In the current study, we examined the effects of 50-mg naltrexone compared with placebo on neural network changes associated with substance dependence in 21 alcohol and 36 poly-drug-dependent individuals compared with 36 healthy volunteers. Graph theoretic and network-based statistical analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data revealed that alcohol-dependent subjects had reduced functional connectivity of a dispersed network compared with both poly-drug-dependent and healthy subjects. Higher local efficiency was observed in both patient groups, indicating clustered and segregated network topology and information processing. Naltrexone normalized heightened local efficiency of the neural network in alcohol-dependent individuals, to the same levels as healthy volunteers. Naltrexone failed to have an effect on the local efficiency in abstinent poly-substance-dependent individuals. Across groups, local efficiency was associated with substance, but no alcohol exposure implicating local efficiency as a potential premorbid risk factor in alcohol use disorders that can be ameliorated by naltrexone. These findings suggest one possible mechanism for the clinical effects of naltrexone, namely, the amelioration of disrupted network topology.

  11. Naltrexone ER/Bupropion ER: A Review in Obesity Management.

    PubMed

    Greig, Sarah L; Keating, Gillian M

    2015-07-01

    Oral naltrexone extended-release/bupropion extended-release (naltrexone ER/bupropion ER; Contrave(®), Mysimba(™)) is available as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity in adults with an initial body mass index (BMI) of ≥ 30 kg/m(2) (i.e. obese) or a BMI of ≥ 27 kg/m(2) (i.e. overweight) in the presence of at least one bodyweight-related comorbidity, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension or dyslipidaemia. In 56-week phase III trials in these patient populations, oral naltrexone ER/bupropion ER 32/360 mg/day was significantly more effective than placebo with regard to percentage bodyweight reductions from baseline and the proportion of patients who achieved bodyweight reductions of ≥ 5 and ≥ 10%. Significantly greater improvements in several cardiometabolic risk factors were also observed with naltrexone ER/bupropion ER versus placebo, as well as greater improvements in glycated haemoglobin levels in obese or overweight adults with type 2 diabetes. Naltrexone ER/bupropion ER was generally well tolerated in phase III trials, with nausea being the most common adverse event. Thus, naltrexone ER/bupropion ER 32/360 mg/day as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity, is an effective and well tolerated option for chronic bodyweight management in obese adults or overweight adults with at least one bodyweight-related comorbidity.

  12. Anhedonia to music and mu-opioids: Evidence from the administration of naltrexone

    PubMed Central

    Mallik, Adiel; Chanda, Mona Lisa; Levitin, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Music’s universality and its ability to deeply affect emotions suggest an evolutionary origin. Previous investigators have found that naltrexone (NTX), a μ-opioid antagonist, may induce reversible anhedonia, attenuating both positive and negative emotions. The neurochemical basis of musical experience is not well-understood, and the NTX-induced anhedonia hypothesis has not been tested with music. Accordingly, we administered NTX or placebo on two different days in a double-blind crossover study, and assessed participants’ responses to music using both psychophysiological (objective) and behavioral (subjective) measures. We found that both positive and negative emotions were attenuated. We conclude that endogenous opioids are critical to experiencing both positive and negative emotions in music, and that music uses the same reward pathways as food, drug and sexual pleasure. Our findings add to the growing body of evidence for the evolutionary biological substrates of music. PMID:28176798

  13. Anhedonia to music and mu-opioids: Evidence from the administration of naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Adiel; Chanda, Mona Lisa; Levitin, Daniel J

    2017-02-08

    Music's universality and its ability to deeply affect emotions suggest an evolutionary origin. Previous investigators have found that naltrexone (NTX), a μ-opioid antagonist, may induce reversible anhedonia, attenuating both positive and negative emotions. The neurochemical basis of musical experience is not well-understood, and the NTX-induced anhedonia hypothesis has not been tested with music. Accordingly, we administered NTX or placebo on two different days in a double-blind crossover study, and assessed participants' responses to music using both psychophysiological (objective) and behavioral (subjective) measures. We found that both positive and negative emotions were attenuated. We conclude that endogenous opioids are critical to experiencing both positive and negative emotions in music, and that music uses the same reward pathways as food, drug and sexual pleasure. Our findings add to the growing body of evidence for the evolutionary biological substrates of music.

  14. Attenuation of haemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation with intravenous dexmedetomidine: A comparison between two doses

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Bon; Talikoti, Anand T; Krishnamurthy, Dinesh

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Laryngoscopic manipulation and endotracheal intubation are noxious stimuli capable of producing tachycardia, arrhythmias and hypertension. The aim of this study was to arrive at an optimal dose of dexmedetomidine by comparing two doses with placebo to attenuate stress response during laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. Methods: It was a randomised, prospective, double-blind placebo-controlled study. After Institutional Ethical Committee clearance, ninety patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status 1 were enrolled in the study and divided into three equal groups. Group A received normal saline, Group B received injection dexmedetomidine 0.5 μg/kg and Group C received injection dexmedetomidine 0.75 μg/kg as infusion over 10 min. The general anaesthesia technique was standardised for all three groups. The primary outcome measures were haemodynamic response at 1, 3 and 5 min after intubation. The secondary outcome measures were to note down any adverse effects associated with drugs. The statistical package used was SPSS version 15. Results: Groups were well matched for their demographic data. There was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between dexmedetomidine and normal saline in heart rate, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures at all time points after tracheal intubation with dexmedetomidine 0.75 μg/kg being most effective. Sedation scores were more with dexmedetomidine. None of the patients had any adverse effects such as hypotension, bradycardia, respiratory depression and fall in oxygen saturation. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine in a dose of 0.75 μg/kg intravenous is the optimal dose to attenuate stress response to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. PMID:28216704

  15. THC-methadone and THC-naltrexone interactions on discrimination, antinociception, and locomotion in rats.

    PubMed

    Wakley, Alexa A; Craft, Rebecca M

    2011-09-01

    This study examined cannabinoid-opioid interactions within the same subjects on measures of discrimination, antinociception, horizontal locomotion, and catalepsy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, 3 mg/kg) from vehicle. THC alone (0.32-10 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased THC-appropriate lever responding and decreased response rate. THC alone also produced paw pressure antinociception and decreased locomotor activity, but did not produce catalepsy. Methadone (0.32-5.6 mg/kg) and naltrexone (0.32-3.2 mg/kg) alone produced low THC-appropriate lever responding up to doses that decreased response rate. When combined with THC, methadone (1.0 mg/kg) flattened the THC discrimination curve, but did not affect antinociceptive or motoric effects of THC. Naltrexone did not alter any effects of THC. In rats that were not trained to discriminate THC from vehicle, 1.0 mg/kg methadone did enhance THC antinociception. These results suggest that μ-opioid receptor agonists can disrupt the discriminative stimulus effects of cannabinoids while not significantly altering their antinociceptive or motoric effects, in chronically drug-exposed subjects. Further research is required to determine whether opioid enhancement of cannabinoid antinociception is limited to acute exposure, or simply requires higher doses in chronically drug-exposed subjects.

  16. Naltrexone but Not Ketanserin Antagonizes the Subjective, Cardiovascular, and Neuroendocrine Effects of Salvinorin-A in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Maqueda, Ana Elda; Valle, Marta; Addy, Peter H.; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Puntes, Montserrat; Coimbra, Jimena; Ballester, Maria Rosa; Garrido, Maite; González, Mireia; Claramunt, Judit; Barker, Steven; Lomnicka, Izabela; Waguespack, Marian; Johnson, Matthew W.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Salvinorin-A is a terpene found in the leaves of the plant Salvia divinorum. When administered to humans, salvinorin-A induces an intense but short-lasting modified state of awareness, sharing features with those induced by the classical serotonin-2A receptor agonist psychedelics. However, unlike substances such as psilocybin or mescaline, salvinorin-A shows agonist activity at the kappa-opioid receptor rather than at the serotonin-2A receptor. Here, we assessed the involvement of kappa-opioid receptor and serotonin-2A agonism in the subjective, cardiovascular, and neuroendocrine effects of salvinorin-A in humans. Methods: We conducted a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study with 2 groups of 12 healthy volunteers with experience with psychedelic drugs. There were 4 experimental sessions. In group 1, participants received the following treatment combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+salvinorin-A, naltrexone+placebo, and naltrexone+salvinorin-A. Naltrexone, a nonspecific opioid receptor antagonist, was administered at a dose of 50mg orally. In group 2, participants received the treatment combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+salvinorin-A, ketanserin+placebo, and ketanserin+salvinorin-A. Ketanserin, a selective serotonin-2A antagonist, was administered at a dose of 40mg orally. Results: Inhalation of 1mg of vaporized salvinorin-A led to maximum plasma concentrations at 1 and 2 minutes after dosing. When administered alone, salvinorin-A severely reduced external sensory perception and induced intense visual and auditory modifications, increased systolic blood pressure, and cortisol and prolactin release. These effects were effectively blocked by naltrexone, but not by ketanserin. Conclusions: Results support kappa opioid receptor agonism as the mechanism of action underlying the subjective and physiological effects of salvinorin-A in humans and rule out the involvement of a serotonin-2A-mediated mechanism. PMID:26874330

  17. Vagotomy attenuates the effect of lipopolysaccharide on body temperature of rats in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Azab, A N; Kaplanski, J

    2001-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that vagal afferents play a major role in peripheral-neural communication. This study was undertaken to determine whether a dose-dependent effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on vagotomy-induced febrile unresponsiveness exists, and to examine the effect of vagotomy on LPS-induced increase in hypothalamic prostaglandin E2 (HT PGE2) production. Vagotomized and sham-operated rats were subjected to two experimental protocols. In the first, vagotomized and sham-operated rats were injected intraperitoneally with different doses of LPS (200, 500 and 1000 microg/kg) in order to examine the dose-dependent effect of LPS on the biphasic febrile response of the rats. In the second protocol, vagotomized and sham-operated rats were injected intraperitoneally with LPS (500 microg/kg). Two hours post injection, body temperature was measured, the rats were decapitated and blood was collected. Simultaneously, the rats' hypothalami were excised and incubated for 1 h in a Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Next, HT PGE2 was determined by radioimmunoassay. Vagotomy-induced gastric enlargement was then measured to examine the correlation between the magnitude of the enlargement and that of the vagotomy-related febrile unresponsiveness. It was found that vagotomized-induced febrile unresponsiveness is a dose-dependent effect. Subdiaphragmatic resection of the vagus prevented the biphasic febrile response caused by the lowest dose (200 microg/kg) of LPS, whereas the highest dose of LPS (1000 microg/kg) caused a similar biphasic febrile response in both vagotomized and sham-operated rats. Indeed, vagotomy attenuates LPS-induced increase in HT PGE2, and blocks the hypothermic phase of the febrile response. On the other hand, no correlation between gastric enlargement and febrile unresponsiveness was found. The results of the present study may cast further light on the crucial role of the vagus nerve as a peripheral-neural pathway in the mediation of the

  18. Dose reduction technique using a combination of a region of interest (ROI) material x-ray attenuator and spatially different temporal filtering for fluoroscopic interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Panse, A.; Jain, A.; Sharma, P.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A. H.; Cartwright, A. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for achieving patient dose savings during image-guided neurovascular interventions, involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and a spatially different ROI temporal filtering technique. The part of the image under the attenuator is reduced in dose but noisy and less bright due to fewer x-ray quanta reaching the detector, as compared to the non-attenuating (or less attenuating) region. First the brightness is equalized throughout the image by post processing and then a temporal filter with higher weights is applied to the high attenuating region to reduce the noise, at the cost of increased lag; however, in the regions where less attenuation is present, a lower temporal weight is needed and is applied to preserve temporal resolution. A simulation of the technique is first presented on an actual image sequence obtained from an endovascular image guided interventional (EIGI) procedure. Then the actual implementation of the technique with a physical ROI attenuator is presented. Quantitative analysis including noise analysis and integral dose calculations are presented to validate the proposed technique.

  19. Long-Term Effects of Naltrexone on Self-Injurious Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandman, Curt A.; Hetrick, William; Taylor, Derek V.; Marion, Sarah D.; Touchette, Paul; Barron, Jennifer L.; Martinezzi, Vernon; Steinberg, Russell M.; Crinella, Francis M.

    2000-01-01

    A study examined the effects of naltrexone after acute treatment and the long-term effects of naltrexone on the self-injurious behavior (SIB) of 15 individuals with mental retardation. Results found that a subgroup of patients decreased SIB for a year without treatment after acute exposure to naltrexone. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  20. Chrysin, a flavonoid attenuates histological changes of hyperammonemic rats: A dose dependent study.

    PubMed

    Renuka, Mani; Vijayakumar, Natesan; Ramakrishnan, Arumugam

    2016-08-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) is a major component of some traditional medicinal herbs present in honey, propolis and many plant extracts. The study was aimed to illuminate the effect of chrysin in the pathogenesis of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) induced hyperammonemic rat model in a dose dependent manner. Rats were injected with NH4Cl (100mg/kg b.w.) by intraperitonially (i.p) thrice a week for 8 consecutive weeks for the induction of experimental hyperammonemia. Hyperammonemic rats were treated with chrysin by orally at a dose of 25, 50 & 100mg/kg b.w. respectively. Protective effect of chrysin against hyperammonemia was evaluated by performing biochemical estimations and morphopathological investigations of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of liver, brain and kidney tissues. Supplementation of chrysin reinstated the levels of blood ammonia, plasma urea, uric acid, total bilirubin, creatinine, brain glutamate, glutamine, nitric oxide (NO) and the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, and liver marker enzymes. On the other hand increased level of plasma urea was observed in chrysin treated rats as compared with hyperammonemic rats. Chrysin administration caused distortion of hepatic, brain and kidney architecture as shown by histological examination. Chrysin at a dose (100mg/kg b.w.) showed an utmost decline in the level of all biochemical estimations. Both biochemical and morphological studies clearly revealed that chrysin protects against cell injury induced by ammonia intoxication in a dose-response manner with respect to endogenous antioxidants and hypoammonemic effects.

  1. Evaluation of the dependence of the exposure dose on the attenuation correction in brain PET/CT scans using 18F-FDG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eun-Jin; Jeong, Moon-Taeg; Jang, Seong-Joo; Choi, Nam-Gil; Han, Jae-Bok; Yang, Nam-Hee; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Lee, Yun-Jong; Ryu, Young-Hwan; Choi, Sung-Hyun; Seong, Kyeong-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether scanning could be performed with minimum dose and minimum exposure to the patient after an attenuation correction. A Hoffman 3D Brain Phantom was used in BIO_40 and D_690 PET/CT scanners, and the CT dose for the equipment was classified as a low dose (minimum dose), medium dose (general dose for scanning) and high dose (dose with use of contrast medium) before obtaining the image at a fixed kilo-voltage-peak (kVp) and milliampere (mA) that were adjusted gradually in 17-20 stages. A PET image was then obtained to perform an attenuation correction based on an attenuation map before analyzing the dose difference. Depending on tube current in the range of 33-190 milliampere-second (mAs) when BIO_40 was used, a significant difference in the effective dose was observed between the minimum and the maximum mAs (p < 0.05). According to a Scheffe post-hoc test, the ratio of the minimum to the maximum of the effective dose was increased by approximately 5.26-fold. Depending on the change in the tube current in the range of 10-200 mA when D_690 was used, a significant difference in the effective dose was observed between the minimum and the maximum of mA (p < 0.05). The Scheffe posthoc test revealed a 20.5-fold difference. In conclusion, because effective exposure dose increases with increasing operating current, it is possible to reduce the exposure limit in a brain scan can be reduced if the CT dose can be minimized for a transmission scan.

  2. Evaluation of dosimetry and image of very low-dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric positron emission tomography/computed tomography: phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, Y. K.; Park, H. H.; Lee, C. H.; Kim, H. S.; Lyu, K. Y.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, phantom was used to evaluate attenuation correction computed tomography (CT) dose and image in case of pediatric positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan. Three PET/CT scanners were used along with acryl phantom in the size for infant and ion-chamber dosimeter. The CT image acquisition conditions were changed from 10 to 20, 40, 80, 100 and 160 mA and from 80 to 100, 120 and 140 kVp, which aimed at evaluating penetrate dose and computed tomography dose indexvolume (CTDIvol) value. And NEMA PET Phantom™ was used to obtain PET image under the same CT conditions in order to evaluate each attenuation-corrected PET image based on standard uptake value (SUV) value and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In general, the penetrate dose was reduced by around 92% under the minimum CT conditions (80 kVp and 10 mA) with the decrease in CTDIvol value by around 88%, compared with the pediatric abdomen CT conditions (100 kVp and 100 mA). The PET image with its attenuation corrected according to each CT condition showed no change in SUV value and no influence on the SNR. In conclusion, if the minimum dose CT that is properly applied to body of pediatric patient is corrected for attenuation to ensure that the effective dose is reduced by around 90% or more compared with that for adult patient, this will be useful to reduce radiation exposure level.

  3. Naltrexone treatment reverses astrocyte atrophy and immune dysfunction in self-harming macaques.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kim M; Chiu, Kevin B; Didier, Peter J; Baker, Kate C; MacLean, Andrew G

    2015-11-01

    The role of glia in the development and treatment of behavioral abnormalities is understudied. Recent reports have observed glial activation in several disorders, including depression, autism spectrum disorders and self-injurious behaviors (SIB). In the current study, we examined SIB in the physiologically and anatomically relevant nonhuman primate (NHP) model. At the Tulane National Primate Research Center (TNPRC), approximately 5% of singly housed macaques develop symptoms of SIB. We have previously demonstrated that naltrexone hydrochloride can be effective in reducing SIB. We have also demonstrated that the astrocytes of animals with SIB are distinctly atrophic and display heightened innate immune activation compared with control animals. We have added a third group of animals (five macaques identified with SIB and treated with oral naltrexone at a dose of 3.2mg/kg) to the previous cohort (six macaques with a history of SIB but not treated, and nine animals with no history of SIB) for this study. Gray and white matter astrocytes from frontal cortical tissue were examined following necropsy. Innate immune activation of astrocytes, which was increased in SIB animals, was markedly decreased in animals receiving naltrexone, as was atrophy of both grey and white matter astrocytes. This was concomitant with improved behavioral correlates. Preventing astrocyte activation in select areas of the brain to reduce injurious behavior is an innovative concept with implications for mental health studies. Differences in multiple areas of primate brain would help determine how self-injurious behavior develops. These studies suggest a stronger role for astrocytes in the cellular events associated with self-injurious behaviors.

  4. Naltrexone effect on pulsatile GnRH therapy for ovulation induction in polycystic ovary syndrome: a pilot prospective study.

    PubMed

    Fulghesu, A M; Ciampelli, M; Belosi, C; Apa, R; Guido, M; Caruso, A; Mancuso, S; Lanzone, A

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the opioid influence on LH pulsatility in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of a long-term opioid antagonist (naltrexone) treatment in improving the pulsatile GnRH therapy which is successful in this syndrome. Ten obese women affected by PCOS participated in the study. Patients were hospitalized during the early follicular phase and underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with 75 g of glucose and a pulse pattern study followed by a GnRH test (100 pg i.v.). All patients were then treated for ovulation induction with pulsatile administration of GnRH (5 microg/bolus every 90 min). Since pregnancies did not occurr in any patient, after spontaneous or progestin-induced menstrual cycles, all patients received naltrexone at a dose of 50 mg/day orally for 8 weeks and during treatment repeated the basal protocol study and the ovulation induction cycle with the same modalities. The naltrexone treatment significantly reduced the insulin response to OGTT and the LH response to GnRH bolus, whereas it did not affect the FSH and LH pulsatility patterns. Concerning the ovulation induction by pulsatile GnRH, naltrexone treatment was able to improve, although not significantly, the ovulation rate (60% pre-treatment vs 90% post-treatment). Furthermore, the maximum diameter of the dominant follicle and the pre-ovulatory estradiol concentration were higher after long-term opioid blockade (follicular diameter 19.5+/-1.76 mm pre-treatment vs 21.6+/-2.19 mm post-treatment, p<0.001; maximum estradiol level 728.7+/-288.5 pmol/l pre-treatment vs 986.4+/-382.1 pmol/l post-treatment, p<0.05). During the naltrexone-pulsatile GnRH co-treatment two pregnancies occurred. In conclusion, our data show that naltrexone-pulsatile GnRH co-treatment is able to improve the ovarian responsiveness to ovulation induction in obese PCOS patients when compared to pulsatile GnRH alone. This action seems to be related to

  5. Design of naltrexone-loaded hydrolyzable crosslinked nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wusheng; Akala, Emmanuel O.; Taylor, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    A hydrolyzable crosslinker (N,O-dimethacryloylhydroxylamine (MANHOMA)) was synthesized by a modified method and was characterized using 1H-NMR, FTIR, and melting point determination. Naltrexone-loaded nanoparticles were prepared by copolymerization of poly(ethylene glycol)1000 monomethyl ether mono methacrylate (PEO-MA), methyl methacrylate (MMA) and N,O-dimethacryloylhydroxylamine (MANHOMA) in 0.4% poly(vinyl alcohol) aqueous solution. The nanoparticles were characterized by FTIR, particle size determination and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The TEM photomicrographs of the nanoparticles show a crosslinked core surrounded by a ring formed by the polyethylene glycol tail of PEO-MA. The loading efficiency of the nanoparticles and in vitro drug availability from the nanoparticles were investigated. The naltrexone-loaded hydrolyzable crosslinked nanoparticles were able to sustain the release of naltrexone for different periods of time, depending on the monomer feed composition. PMID:12204561

  6. Oleoylethanolamide dose-dependently attenuates cocaine-induced behaviours through a PPARα receptor-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, Ainhoa; Blanco, Eduardo; Luque-Rojas, María Jesús; Suárez, Juan; Palomino, Ana; Vida, Margarita; Araos, Pedro; Bermúdez-Silva, Francisco J; Fernández-Espejo, Emilio; Spanagel, Rainer; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is an acylethanolamide that acts as an agonist of nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) to exert their biological functions, which include the regulation of appetite and metabolism. Increasing evidence also suggests that OEA may participate in the control of reward-related behaviours. However, direct experimental evidence for the role of the OEA-PPARα receptor interaction in drug-mediated behaviours, such as cocaine-induced behavioural phenotypes, is lacking. The present study explored the role of OEA and its receptor PPARα on the psychomotor and rewarding responsiveness to cocaine using behavioural tests indicative of core components of addiction. We found that acute administration of OEA (1, 5 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced spontaneous locomotor activity and attenuated psychomotor activation induced by cocaine (20 mg/kg) in C57Bl/6 mice. However, PPARα receptor knockout mice showed normal sensitization, although OEA was capable of reducing behavioural sensitization with fewer efficacies. Furthermore, conditioned place preference and reinstatement to cocaine were intact in these mice. Our results indicate that PPARα receptor does not play a critical, if any, role in mediating short- and long-term psychomotor and rewarding responsiveness to cocaine. However, further research is needed for the identification of the targets of OEA for its inhibitory action on cocaine-mediated responses.

  7. Naltrexone for treatment of acral lick dermatitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    White, S D

    1990-04-01

    Acral lick dermatitis (lick granuloma) was diagnosed in 11 dogs on the basis of history, physical examination, and histopathologic findings. A predilection for the left forelimb was noticed. All 11 dogs were given the narcotic antagonist naltrexone. Successful treatment (cessation of licking, reepithelialization of lesions) was seen in 7 dogs. All 7 dogs' lesions recurred when naltrexone was stopped, but reepithelialized in 5 dogs when the drug was readministered. Adverse effects (drowsiness, withdrawal from owner) were seen in 1 dog, but resolved within 48 hours of stopping the drug.

  8. Resistance to change of alcohol self-administration: effects of alcohol-delivery rate on disruption by extinction and naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Shahan, Timothy A

    2007-03-01

    A common finding in resistance to change research with food-maintained operant behavior is that the persistence of behavior depends on the rate of reinforcement delivered in the context in which the behavior occurs. The present experiment evaluated the effects of rate of response-dependent alcohol delivery on the resistance to change of rats' alcohol self-administration in the face of disruption produced by extinction and a range of doses of naltrexone (1.0, 3.0, 10.0 mg/kg, subcutaneous). Rats responded for a 10% alcohol solution in a multiple schedule of reinforcement arranging a higher rate of alcohol delivery (variable interval 15 s) in the presence of one stimulus and a lower rate of alcohol delivery (variable interval 45 s) in the presence of another stimulus. Baseline response rates and resistance to extinction were higher in the presence of the stimulus associated with higher rates of alcohol delivery. This finding is consistent with studies of the resistance to change of food-maintained behavior. The rate of alcohol delivered in the components, however, did not systematically affect resistance to disruption by naltrexone. One interpretation of this finding from the perspective of behavioral momentum theory is that naltrexone may decrease the impact of alcohol-associated stimuli on the persistence of drinking by reducing sensitivity to the relative reinforcement conditions arranged in the presence of different stimuli.

  9. Psychosocial and treatment correlates of opiate free success in a clinical review of a naltrexone implant program

    PubMed Central

    Reece, AS

    2007-01-01

    Background There is on-going controversy in relation to the efficacy of naltrexone used for the treatment of heroin addiction, and the important covariates of that success. We were also interested to review our experience with two depot forms of implantable naltrexone. Methods A retrospective review of patients' charts was undertaken, patients were recalled by telephone and by letter, and urine drug screen samples were collected. Opiate free success (OFS) was the parameter of interest. Three groups were defined. The first two were treated in the previous 12 months and comprised "implant" and "tablet" patients. A third group was "historical" comprising those treated orally in the preceding 12 months. Results There were 102, 113 and 161 patients in each group respectively. Groups were matched for age, sex, and dose of heroin used, but not financial status or social support. The overall follow-up rate was 82%. The Kaplan Meier 12 month OFS were 82%, 58% and 52% respectively. 12 post-treatment variables were independently associated with treatment retention. In a Cox proportional hazard multivariate model social support, the number of detoxification episodes, post-treatment employment, the use of multiple implant episodes and spiritual belief were significantly related to OFS. Conclusion Consistent with the voluminous international literature clinically useful retention rates can be achieved with naltrexone, which may be improved by implants and particularly serial implants, repeat detoxification, meticulous clinical follow-up, and social support. As depot formulations of naltrexone become increasingly available such results can guide their clinical deployment, improve treatment outcomes, and enlarge the policy options for an exciting non-addictive pharmacotherapy for opiate addiction. PMID:18036213

  10. The Effects of Maternally Administered Methadone, Buprenorphine and Naltrexone on Offspring: Review of Human and Animal Data

    PubMed Central

    Farid, W.O; Dunlop, S.A; Tait, R.J; Hulse, G.K

    2008-01-01

    Most women using heroin are of reproductive age with major risks for their infants. We review clinical and experimental data on fetal, neonatal and postnatal complications associated with methadone, the current “gold standard”, and compare these with more recent, but limited, data on developmental effects of buprenorphine, and naltrexone. Methadone is a µ-opioid receptor agonist and is commonly recommended for treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy. However, it has undesired outcomes including neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Animal studies also indicate detrimental effects on growth, behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry, and increased perinatal mortality. Buprenorphine is a partial µ-opioid receptor agonist and a κ-opioid receptor antagonist. Clinical observations suggest that buprenorphine during pregnancy is similar to methadone on developmental measures but is potentially superior in reducing the incidence and prognosis of NAS. However, small animal studies demonstrate that low doses of buprenorphine during pregnancy and lactation lead to changes in offspring behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry. Naltrexone is a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist. Although data are limited, humans treated with oral or sustained-release implantable naltrexone suggest outcomes potentially superior to those with methadone or buprenorphine. However, animal studies using oral or injectable naltrexone have shown developmental changes following exposure during pregnancy and lactation, raising concerns about its use in humans. Animal studies using chronic exposure, equivalent to clinical depot formulations, are required to evaluate safety. While each treatment is likely to have maternal advantages and disadvantages, studies are urgently required to determine which is optimal for offspring in the short and long term. PMID:19305793

  11. Taenia crassiceps infection attenuates multiple low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett; Rivera-Montoya, Irma; Cárdenas-Arreola, Roberto; Morán, Liborio; Terrazas, Luis I

    2010-01-01

    Taenia crassiceps, like other helminths, can exert regulatory effects on the immune system of its host. This study investigates the effect of chronic T. crassiceps infection on the outcome of Multiple Low Dose Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes (MLDS). Healthy or previously T. crassiceps-infected mice received MLDS and type 1 diabetes (T1D) symptoms were evaluated for 6 weeks following the induction of MLDS. T. crassiceps-infected mice displayed lower blood glucose levels throughout the study. A significantly lower percentage of T. crassiceps-infected mice (40%) developed T1D compared to the uninfected group (100%). Insulitis was remarkably absent in T. crassiceps-infected mice, which had normal pancreatic insulin content, whereas uninfected mice showed a dramatic reduction in pancreatic insulin. Infected mice that received MLDS did not show an increase in their regulatory T cell population, however, they had a greater number of alternatively activated macrophages, higher levels of the cytokine IL-4, and lower levels of TNF-alpha. Therefore, infection with T. crassiceps causes an immunomodulation that modifies the incidence and development of MLDS-induced autoimmune diabetes.

  12. Naltrexone in Treatment of Self Injurious Behavior: A Clinical Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, Ludwik; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The oral opiate, naltrexone, was used in a double-blind placebo-controlled study with two young profoundly mentally adults who exhibited intractable self-injurious behavior. No measurable effects on the self-injurious behavior were observed. (Author/DB)

  13. Argon Inhalation Attenuates Retinal Apoptosis after Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in a Time- and Dose-Dependent Manner in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrich, Felix; Schallner, Nils; Coburn, Mark; Loop, Torsten; Lagrèze, Wolf Alexander; Biermann, Julia; Goebel, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Retinal ischemia and reperfusion injuries (IRI) permanently affect neuronal tissue and function by apoptosis and inflammation due to the limited regenerative potential of neurons. Recently, evidence emerged that the noble gas Argon exerts protective properties, while lacking any detrimental or adverse effects. We hypothesized that Argon inhalation after IRI would exert antiapoptotic effects in the retina, thereby protecting retinal ganglion cells (RGC) of the rat's eye. Methods IRI was performed on the left eyes of rats (n = 8) with or without inhaled Argon postconditioning (25, 50 and 75 Vol%) for 1 hour immediately or delayed after ischemia (i.e. 1.5 and 3 hours). Retinal tissue was harvested after 24 hours to analyze mRNA and protein expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3, NF-κB. Densities of fluorogold-prelabeled RGCs were analyzed 7 days after injury in whole-mounts. Histological tissue samples were prepared for immunohistochemistry and blood was analyzed regarding systemic effects of Argon or IRI. Statistics were performed using One-Way ANOVA. Results IRI induced RGC loss was reduced by Argon 75 Vol% inhalation and was dose-dependently attenuated by lower concentrations, or by delayed Argon inhalation (1504±300 vs. 2761±257; p<0.001). Moreover, Argon inhibited Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA expression significantly (Bax: 1.64±0.30 vs. 0.78±0.29 and Bcl-2: 2.07±0.29 vs. 0.99±0.22; both p<0.01), as well as caspase-3 cleavage (1.91±0.46 vs. 1.05±0.36; p<0.001). Expression of NF-κB was attenuated significantly. Immunohistochemistry revealed an affection of Müller cells and astrocytes. In addition, IRI induced leukocytosis was reduced significantly after Argon inhalation at 75 Vol%. Conclusion Immediate and delayed Argon postconditioning protects IRI induced apoptotic loss of RGC in a time- and dose-dependent manner, possibly mediated by the inhibition of NF-κB. Further studies need to evaluate Argon's possible role as a therapeutic option. PMID

  14. A standard, single dose of inhaled terbutaline attenuates hyperpnea-induced bronchoconstriction and mast cell activation in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, A. J.; Bood, J. R.; Anderson, S. D.; Romer, L. M.; Dahlén, B.; Dahlén, S.-E.

    2016-01-01

    Release of bronchoactive mediators from mast cells during exercise hyperpnea is a key factor in the pathophysiology of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). Our aim was to investigate the effect of a standard, single dose of an inhaled β2-adrenoceptor agonist on mast cell activation in response to dry air hyperpnea in athletes with EIB. Twenty-seven athletes with EIB completed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Terbutaline (0.5 mg) or placebo was inhaled 15 min prior to 8 min of eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea (EVH) with dry air. Pre- and postbronchial challenge, urine samples were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay for 11β-prostaglandin F2α (11β-PGF2α). The maximum fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 14 (12–20)% (median and interquartile range) following placebo was attenuated to 7 (5–9)% with the administration of terbutaline (P < 0.001). EVH caused a significant increase in 11β-PGF2α from 41 (27–57) ng/mmol creatinine at baseline to 58 (43–72) ng/mmol creatinine at its peak post-EVH following placebo (P = 0.002). The rise in 11β-PGF2α was inhibited with administration of terbutaline: 39 (28–44) ng/mmol creatinine at baseline vs. 40 (33–58) ng/mmol creatinine at its peak post-EVH (P = 0.118). These data provide novel in vivo evidence of mast cell stabilization following inhalation of a standard dose of terbutaline prior to bronchial provocation with EVH in athletes with EIB. PMID:26846550

  15. Single-dose live-attenuated Nipah virus vaccines confer complete protection by eliciting antibodies directed against surface glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    DeBuysscher, Blair L.; Scott, Dana; Marzi, Andrea; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Background Nipah virus (NiV), a zoonotic pathogen causing severe respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans, emerged in Malaysia in 1998 with subsequent outbreaks on an almost annual basis since 2001 in parts of the Indian subcontinent. The high case fatality rate, human-to-human transmission, wide-ranging reservoir distribution and lack of licensed intervention options are making NiV a serious regional and potential global public health problem. The objective of this study was to develop a fast-acting, single-dose NiV vaccine that could be implemented in a ring vaccination approach during outbreaks. Methods In this study we have designed new live-attenuated vaccine vectors based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses (rVSV) expressing NiV glycoproteins (G or F) or nucleoprotein (N) and evaluated their protective efficacy in Syrian hamsters, an established NiV animal disease model. We further characterized the humoral immune response to vaccination in hamsters using ELISA and neutralization assays and performed serum transfer studies. Results Vaccination of Syrian hamsters with a single dose of the rVSV vaccine vectors resulted in strong humoral immune responses with neutralizing activities found only in those animals vaccinated with rVSV expressing NiV G or F proteins. Vaccinated animals with neutralizing antibody responses were completely protected from lethal NiV disease, whereas animals vaccinated with rVSV expressing NiV N showed only partial protection. Protection of NiV G or F vaccinated animals was conferred by antibodies, most likely the neutralizing fraction, as demonstrated by serum transfer studies. Protection of N-vaccinated hamsters was not antibody-dependent indicating a role of adaptive cellular responses for protection. Conclusions The rVSV vectors expressing Nipah virus G or F are prime candidates for new ‘emergency vaccines’ to be utilized for NiV outbreak management. PMID:24631094

  16. Lipid Emulsion Inhibits Vasodilation Induced by a Toxic Dose of Bupivacaine via Attenuated Dephosphorylation of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit 1 in Isolated Rat Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Byon, Hyo-Jin; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Park, Jungchul; Lee, Youngju; Hwang, Yeran; Baik, Jiseok; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Lipid emulsions are widely used for the treatment of systemic toxicity that arises from local anesthetics. The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the cellular mechanism associated with the lipid emulsion-mediated attenuation of vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine in isolated endothelium-denuded rat aorta. The effects of lipid emulsion on vasodilation induced by bupivacaine, mepivacaine, and verapamil were assessed in isolated aorta precontracted with phenylephrine, the Rho kinase stimulant NaF, and the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu). The effects of Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 on contraction induced by phenylephrine or NaF were assessed. The effects of bupivacaine on intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and tension induced by NaF were simultaneously measured. The effects of bupivacaine alone and lipid emulsion plus bupivacaine on myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) phosphorylation induced by NaF were examined in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. In precontracted aorta, the lipid emulsion attenuated bupivacaine-induced vasodilation but had no effect on mepivacaine-induced vasodilation. Y-27632 attenuated contraction induced by either phenylephrine or NaF. The lipid emulsion attenuated verapamil-induced vasodilation. Compared with phenylephrine-induced precontracted aorta, bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was slightly attenuated in NaF-induced precontracted aorta. The magnitude of the bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was higher than that of a bupivacaine-induced decrease in [Ca2+]i. Bupivacaine attenuated NaF-induced MYPT1 phosphorylation, whereas lipid emulsion pretreatment attenuated the bupivacaine-induced inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation induced by NaF. Taken together, these results suggest that lipid emulsions attenuate bupivacaine-induced vasodilation via the attenuation of inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation evoked by NaF. PMID:26664257

  17. Lipid Emulsion Inhibits Vasodilation Induced by a Toxic Dose of Bupivacaine via Attenuated Dephosphorylation of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit 1 in Isolated Rat Aorta.

    PubMed

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Byon, Hyo-Jin; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Park, Jungchul; Lee, Youngju; Hwang, Yeran; Baik, Jiseok; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Lipid emulsions are widely used for the treatment of systemic toxicity that arises from local anesthetics. The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the cellular mechanism associated with the lipid emulsion-mediated attenuation of vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine in isolated endothelium-denuded rat aorta. The effects of lipid emulsion on vasodilation induced by bupivacaine, mepivacaine, and verapamil were assessed in isolated aorta precontracted with phenylephrine, the Rho kinase stimulant NaF, and the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu). The effects of Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 on contraction induced by phenylephrine or NaF were assessed. The effects of bupivacaine on intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) and tension induced by NaF were simultaneously measured. The effects of bupivacaine alone and lipid emulsion plus bupivacaine on myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) phosphorylation induced by NaF were examined in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. In precontracted aorta, the lipid emulsion attenuated bupivacaine-induced vasodilation but had no effect on mepivacaine-induced vasodilation. Y-27632 attenuated contraction induced by either phenylephrine or NaF. The lipid emulsion attenuated verapamil-induced vasodilation. Compared with phenylephrine-induced precontracted aorta, bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was slightly attenuated in NaF-induced precontracted aorta. The magnitude of the bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was higher than that of a bupivacaine-induced decrease in [Ca(2+)]i. Bupivacaine attenuated NaF-induced MYPT1 phosphorylation, whereas lipid emulsion pretreatment attenuated the bupivacaine-induced inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation induced by NaF. Taken together, these results suggest that lipid emulsions attenuate bupivacaine-induced vasodilation via the attenuation of inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation evoked by NaF.

  18. SU-E-T-352: Effects of Skull Attenuation and Missing Backscatter On Brain Dose in HDR Treatment of the Head with Surface Applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Cifter, F; Dhou, S; Lewis, J; Cormack, R; Altundal, Y; Sajo, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To calculate the effect of lack of backscatter from air and attenuation of bone on dose distributions in brachytherapy surface treatment of head. Existing treatment planning systems based on TG43 do not account for heterogeneities, and thus may overestimate the dose to the brain. While brachytherapy generally has rapid dose falloff, the dose to the deeper tissues (in this case, the brain) can become significant when treating large curved surfaces. Methods: Applicator geometries representing a range of clinical cases were simulated in MCNP5. An Ir-192 source was modeled using the energy spectrum presented by TG-43. The head phantom was modeled as a 7.5-cm radius water sphere, with a 7 -mm thick skull embedded 5-mm beneath the surface. Dose values were calculated at 20 points inside the head, in which 10 of them were on the central axis and the other 10 on the axis connecting the central of the phantom with the second to last source from the applicator edge. Results: Central and peripheral dose distributions for a range of applicator and head sizes are presented. The distance along the central axis at which the dose falls to 80% of the prescribed dose (D80) was 7 mm for a representative small applicator and 9 mm for a large applicator. Corresponding D50 and D30 for the same small applicator were 17 mm and 32 mm respectively. D50 and D30 for the larger applicator were 32 mm and 60 mm respectively. These results reflect the slower falloff expected for larger applicators on a curved surface. Conclusion: Our results can provide guidance for clinicians to calculate the dose reduction effect due to bone attenuation and the lack of backscatter from air to estimate the brain dose for the HDR treatments of surface lesions.

  19. Influence of breast composition and interseed attenuation in dose calculations for post-implant assessment of permanent breast 103Pd seed implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsharpour, Hossein; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Carrier, Jean-François; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2010-08-01

    The impact of tissue heterogeneity and interseed attenuation is studied in post-implant evaluation of five clinical permanent breast 103Pd seed implants using the Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation method. Dose metrics for the target (PTV) as well as an organ at risk (skin) are used to visualize the differences between a TG43-like MC method and more accurate MC methods capable of considering the breast tissue heterogeneity as well as the interseed attenuation. PTV dose is reduced when using a breast tissue model instead of water in MC calculations while the dose to the skin is increased. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of varying the glandular/adipose proportion of the breast tissue on dose distributions. The dose to the PTV (skin) decreases (increases) with the increasing adipose proportion inside the breast. In a complete geometry and compared to a TG43-like situation, the average PTV D90 reduction varies from 3.9% in a glandular breast to 35.5% when the breast consists entirely of adipose. The skin D10 increases by 28.2% in an entirely adipose breast. The results of this work show the importance of an accurate and patient-dependent breast tissue model to be used in the dosimetry for this kind of low energy implant.

  20. Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-09-2-0065 TITLE: Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illness 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-2-0065...ABSTRACT Approval to separate the study into a separate dextromethorphan arm and naltrexone arm from the Department of Defense Institutional Review

  1. Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    09-2-0065 TITLE: Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illness PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William Joel Meggs, MD, PhD...From - To) 1 JUL 2009 - 30 JUN 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veteravns’ Illness 5a...dextromethorphan & naltrexone for gulf war illness. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Dextromethorphan, naltexone, gulf war illness 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  2. Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-09-2-0065 TITLE: Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illness 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-2-0065 5c...Sciences has demonstrated that Morphine-related analogs, including Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan, have great potency in anti-inflammation and

  3. Unintended attenuation in the Leksell Gamma Knife registered Perfexion trade mark sign calibration-phantom adaptor and its effect on dose calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, Jagdish P.; Novotny, Josef Jr.; Quader, Mubina A.; Bednarz, Greg; Huq, M. Saiful

    2009-04-15

    The calibration of Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (LGK PFX) is performed using a spherical polystyrene phantom 160 mm in diameter, which is provided by the manufacturer. This is the same phantom that has been used with LGK models U, B, C, and 4C. The polystyrene phantom is held in irradiation position by an aluminum adaptor, which has stainless steel side-fixation screws. The phantom adaptor partially attenuates the beams from sectors 3 and 7 by 3.2% and 4.6%, respectively. This unintended attenuation introduces a systematic error in dose calibration. The overall effect of phantom-adaptor attenuation on output calibration of the LGK PFX unit is to underestimate output by about 1.0%.

  4. High-phosphorus diet maximizes and low-dose calcitriol attenuates skeletal muscle changes in long-term uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Luz M; López, Ignacio; Peralta-Ramírez, Alan; Pineda, Carmen; Chamizo, Verónica E; Rodríguez, Mariano; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2016-05-01

    Although disorders of mineral metabolism and skeletal muscle are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), their potential relationship remains unexplored. Elevations in plasma phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and fibroblastic growth factor 23 together with decreased calcitriol levels are common features of CKD. High-phosphate intake is a major contributor to progression of CKD. This study was primarily aimed to determine the influence of high-phosphate intake on muscle and to investigate whether calcitriol supplementation counteracts negative skeletal muscle changes associated with long-term uremia. Proportions and metabolic and morphological features of myosin-based muscle fiber types were assessed in the slow-twitch soleus and the fast-twitch tibialis cranialis muscles of uremic rats (5/6 nephrectomy, Nx) and compared with sham-operated (So) controls. Three groups of Nx rats received either a standard diet (0.6% phosphorus, Nx-Sd), or a high-phosphorus diet (0.9% phosphorus, Nx-Pho), or a high-phosphorus diet plus calcitriol (10 ng/kg 3 day/wk ip, Nx-Pho + Cal) for 12 wk. Two groups of So rats received either a standard diet or a high-phosphorus diet (So-Pho) over the same period. A multivariate analysis encompassing all fiber-type characteristics indicated that Nx-Pho + Cal rats displayed skeletal muscle phenotypes intermediate between Nx-Pho and So-Pho rats and that uremia-induced skeletal muscle changes were of greater magnitude in Nx-Pho than in Nx-Sd rats. In uremic rats, treatment with calcitriol preserved fiber-type composition, cross-sectional size, myonuclear domain size, oxidative capacity, and capillarity of muscle fibers. These data demonstrate that a high-phosphorus diet potentiates and low-dose calcitriol attenuates adverse skeletal muscle changes in long-term uremic rats.

  5. Dose reduction in fluoroscopic interventions using a combination of a region of interest (ROI) x-ray attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable temporal filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Pope, Liza; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A. H.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2013-03-01

    A novel dose reduction technique for fluoroscopic interventions involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable ROI temporal recursive filter, was used to guide the catheter to the ROI in three live animal studies, two involving rabbits and one involving a sheep. In the two rabbit studies presented , a catheter was guided to the entrance of the carotid artery. With the added ROI attenuator the image under the high attenuation region is very noisy. By using temporal filtering with a filter weight of 0.6 on previous frames, the noise is reduced. In the sheep study the catheter was guided to the descending aorta of the animal. The sheep offered a relatively higher attenuation to the incident x-rays and thus a higher temporal filter weight of 0.8 on previous frames was used during the procedure to reduce the noise to levels acceptable by the interventionalist. The image sequences from both studies show that significant dose reduction of 5-6 times can be achieved with acceptable image quality outside the ROI by using the above mentioned technique. Even though the temporal filter weighting outside the ROI is higher, the consequent lag does not prevent perception of catheter movement.

  6. Dose Reduction in Fluoroscopic Interventions Using a Combination of a Region of Interest (ROI) X-Ray Attenuator and Spatially-Different, Temporally-Variable Temporal Filtering.

    PubMed

    Vasan, S N Swetadri; Pope, Liza; Ionita, Ciprian N; Titus, A H; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2013-03-06

    A novel dose reduction technique for fluoroscopic interventions involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable ROI temporal recursive filter, was used to guide the catheter to the ROI in three live animal studies, two involving rabbits and one involving a sheep. In the two rabbit studies presented, a catheter was guided to the entrance of the carotid artery. With the added ROI attenuator the image under the high attenuation region is very noisy. By using temporal filtering with a filter weight of 0.6 on previous frames, the noise is reduced. In the sheep study the catheter was guided to the descending aorta of the animal. The sheep offered a relatively higher attenuation to the incident x-rays and thus a higher temporal filter weight of 0.8 on previous frames was used during the procedure to reduce the noise to levels acceptable by the interventionalist. The image sequences from both studies show that significant dose reduction of 5-6 times can be achieved with acceptable image quality outside the ROI by using the above mentioned technique. Even though the temporal filter weighting outside the ROI is higher, the consequent lag does not prevent perception of catheter movement.

  7. Synergistic blockade of alcohol escalation drinking in mice by a combination of novel kappa opioid receptor agonist Mesyl Salvinorin B and naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Cowley, Rachel Saylor; Ben, Konrad; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2017-03-02

    Mesyl Salvinorin B (MSB) is a potent selective kappa opioid receptor (KOP-r) agonist that has potential for development as an anti-psychostimulant agent with fewer side-effects (e.g., sedation, depression and dysphoria) than classic KOP-r agonists. However, no such study has been done on alcohol. We investigated whether MSB alone or in combination with naltrexone (mu-opioid receptor antagonist) altered voluntary alcohol drinking in both male and female mice. Mice, subjected to 3 weeks of chronic escalation drinking (CED) in a two-bottle choice paradigm with 24-h access every other day, developed rapid escalation of alcohol intake and high preference. We found that single, acute administration of MSB dose-dependently reduced alcohol intake and preference in mice after 3-week CED. The effect was specific to alcohol, as shown by the lack of any effect of MSB on sucrose or saccharin intake. We also used the drinking-in-the-dark (DID) model with limited access (4 h/day) to evaluate the pharmacological effect of MSB after 3 weeks of DID. However, MSB had no effect on alcohol drinking after 3-week DID. Upon investigation of potential synergistic effects between naltrexone and MSB, we found that acute administration of a combination of MSB and naltrexone reduced alcohol intake profoundly after 3-week CED at doses lower than those individual effective doses. Repeated administrations of this combination showed less tolerance development than repeated MSB alone. Our study suggests that the novel KOP-r agonist MSB both alone and in combination with naltrexone shows potential in alcoholism treatment models.

  8. Acute Myocardial Infarction following Naltrexone Consumption; a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dadpour, Bita; Gholoobi, Arash; Tajoddini, Shahrad; Habibi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of opioid withdrawal have long been studied. It was reported that patients with underlying ischemic heart disease and atherosclerotic vessels may be complicated by a sudden physical and emotional stress due to withdrawal syndrome. But some other believes sudden increase in catecholamine level as a sympathetic overflow might effect on heart with and without underlying ischemia. In the current study, a patient on methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) who experienced myocardial infarction (MI) after taking naltrexone was described. PMID:28286852

  9. Employment-based reinforcement of adherence to oral naltrexone treatment in unemployed injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kelly E; Defulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J; Donlin, Wendy D; Aklin, Will M; Nuzzo, Paul A; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E; Silverman, Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Oral naltrexone has high potential for use as a relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for opiate dependence yet suffers from notoriously poor adherence. This study evaluated whether entry to a therapeutic workplace could reinforce adherence with oral naltrexone. Opiate-dependent and cocaine-using injection drug users were detoxified, inducted onto oral naltrexone, and randomly assigned to a contingency (n = 35) or prescription (n = 32) group for a 26-week period. Contingency participants were required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain access to the therapeutic workplace. Prescription participants received a take-home supply of naltrexone and could access the workplace independent of naltrexone ingestion. Primary outcome measures were percent of urine samples positive for naltrexone at 30-day assessments and negative for opiates and cocaine at 30-day assessments. Contingency participants provided significantly more urine samples that were positive for naltrexone compared with prescription participants (72% vs. 21%, p < .01); however, no effect of experimental group was observed on percent opiate-negative (71% vs. 60%, p = .19.) or cocaine-negative (56% vs. 53%, p = .82) samples in the contingency and prescription groups, respectively. Opiate-positive samples were significantly more likely to occur in conjunction with cocaine (p < .001) and when not protected by naltrexone (p < .02), independent of experimental group. Overall, these results show that contingent access to a therapeutic workplace significantly promoted adherence to oral naltrexone, and that the majority of opiate use occurred in conjunction with cocaine use, suggesting that untreated cocaine use may limit the effectiveness of oral naltrexone in promoting opiate abstinence.

  10. Employment-Based Reinforcement of Adherence to Oral Naltrexone Treatment in Unemployed Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kelly; Defulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J.; Donlin, Wendy D.; Aklin, Will M.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Naltrexone has high potential for use as a relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for opiate dependence; however suffers from notoriously poor adherence when prescribed for oral self-administration. This study evaluated whether entry to a therapeutic workplace could be used to reinforce adherence with oral naltrexone. Opiate-dependent and cocaine-using injection drug users were detoxified, inducted onto oral naltrexone, and randomly assigned to a Contingency (n=35) or Prescription (n=32) group for a 26-week period. Contingency participants were required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain access to the therapeutic workplace. Prescription participants received a take-home supply of naltrexone and could access the workplace independent of naltrexone ingestion. Primary outcome measures were percent of urine samples positive for naltrexone at 30-day assessments and negative for opiates and cocaine at 30-day assessments. Contingency participants provided significantly more urine samples that were positive for naltrexone compared to Prescription participants (72% vs. 21%, P<.01), however no effect of experimental group was observed on percent opiate-negative (71% vs. 60%, P=.19.) or cocaine-negative (56% vs. 53%, P=.82) samples in the Contingency and Prescription groups, respectively. Opiate-positive samples were significantly more likely to occur in conjunction with cocaine (P<.001), and when not protected by naltrexone (P<.02), independent of experimental group. Overall, these results show that contingent access to a therapeutic workplace significantly promoted adherence to oral naltrexone, and that the majority of opiate use occurred in conjunction with cocaine use, suggesting that untreated cocaine use may limit the effectiveness of oral naltrexone in promoting opiate abstinence. PMID:23205722

  11. SU-E-I-86: Ultra-Low Dose Computed Tomography Attenuation Correction for Pediatric PET CT Using Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASiR™)

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S; Shulkin, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop ultra-low dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultra-low doses (10–35 mAs). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for eleven tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% CTDIvol (0.39/3.64; mGy) radiation dose from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUVbw) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation organ dose, as derived from patient exam size specific dose estimate (SSDE), was converted to effective dose using the standard ICRP report 103 method. Effective dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative patient population dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the non-dose reduced CTAC image down to 90% dose reduction. No change in SUVbw, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols reconstructed with ASiR and down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62%–86% (3.2/8.3−0.9/6.2; mSv). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from pre dose-reduced patient images. Conclusion: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CTAC dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for co

  12. Vaccination of Volunteers with Low-Dose, Live-Attenuated, Dengue Viruses Leads to Serotype-specific Immunologic and Virologic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Lindow, Janet C.; Durbin, Anna P.; Whitehead, Stephen S.; Pierce, Kristen K.; Carmolli, Marya P.; Kirkpatrick, Beth D.

    2013-01-01

    There are currently no vaccines or therapeutics to prevent dengue disease which ranges in severity from asymptomatic infections to life-threatening illness. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Division of Intramural Research has developed live, attenuated vaccines to each of the four dengue serotypes (DENV-1 – DENV-4). Two doses (10 PFU and 1000 PFU) of three monovalent vaccines were tested in human clinical trials to compare safety and immunogenicity profiles. DEN4Δ30 had been tested previously at multiple doses. The three dengue vaccine candidates tested (DEN1Δ30, DEN2/4Δ30, and DEN3Δ30/31) were very infectious, each with a Human Infectious Dose 50% ≤ 10 PFU. Further, infectivity rates ranged from 90 −100% regardless of dose, excepting DEN2/4Δ30 which dropped from 100% at the 1000 PFU dose to 60% at the 10 PFU dose. Mean geometric peak antibody titers did not differ significantly between doses for DEN1Δ30 (92 ± 19 vs. 214 ± 97, p = 0.08); however, significant differences were observed between the 10 PFU and 1000 PFU doses for DEN2/4Δ30, 19 ± 9 vs. 102 ± 25 (p = 0.001), and DEN3Δ30/31, 119 ± 135 vs. 50 ± 50 (p=0.046). No differences in the incidences of rash, neutropenia, or viremia were observed between doses for any vaccines, though the mean peak titer of viremia for DEN1Δ30 was higher at the 1000 PFU dose (0.5 ± 0 vs. 1.1 ± 0.1, p = 0.007). These data demonstrate that atarget dose of 1000 PFU for inclusion of each dengue serotype into a tetravalent vaccine is likely to be safe and generate a balanced immune response for all serotypes. PMID:23735680

  13. Developmental lead exposure attenuates methamphetamine dose-effect self-administration performance and progressive ratio responding in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Angelica; Valles, Rodrigo; Hart, Nigel; Bratton, Gerald R; Nation, Jack R

    2008-06-01

    Perinatal (gestation/lactation) lead exposure modifies the reinforcement efficacy of various psychoactive drugs (e.g., cocaine, opiates) across the phases of initial selection, use, and abuse [Nation J.R., Cardon A.L., Heard H.M., Valles R., Bratton G.R. Perinatal lead exposure and relapse to drug-seeking behavior in the rat: a cocaine reinstatement study. Psychopharmacol 2003;168: 236-243.; Nation J.R., Smith K.R., Bratton G.R. Early developmental lead exposure increases sensitivity to cocaine in a self-administration paradigm. Pharmacol Biochem Behave 2004; 77: 127-13; Rocha A., Valles R., Cardon A.L., Bratton G.R., Nation J.R. Enhanced acquisition of cocaine self-administration in rats developmentally exposed to lead. Neuropsychopharmacol 2005; 30: 2058-2064.]. However, changes in sensitivity to methamphetamine across the phases of drug abuse have not been examined in animals perinatally exposed to lead. Because the mainstream popularity of methamphetamine in the United States is increasing and lead exposure continues to be widespread, an examination of this drug and how it may be modified by perinatal exposure to lead is warranted. The studies reported here examined the effects of perinatal lead exposure on adult self-administration of intravenous (i.v.) methamphetamine across the maintenance phase of drug addiction. Experiment 1 examined dose-effect patterns in control and lead-exposed animals. Experiment 2 evaluated control and lead-exposed animals in a progressive ratio task. Female rats were administered a 16-mg lead or a control solution for 30 days prior to breeding with non-exposed males. Exposure continued through pregnancy and lactation and was discontinued at weaning (postnatal day [PND] 21). Animals born to control or lead-exposed dams received indwelling jugular catheters as adults (PND 70) and subsequently were randomly assigned to one of the two studies, using only one male rat per litter for each study. The data showed a general attenuation of

  14. Long-Term Safety and Immunogenicity of a Tetravalent Live-Attenuated Dengue Vaccine and Evaluation of a Booster Dose Administered to Healthy Thai Children.

    PubMed

    Watanaveeradej, Veerachai; Simasathien, Sriluck; Mammen, Mammen P; Nisalak, Ananda; Tournay, Elodie; Kerdpanich, Phirangkul; Samakoses, Rudiwilai; Putnak, Robert J; Gibbons, Robert V; Yoon, In-Kyu; Jarman, Richard G; De La Barrera, Rafael; Moris, Philippe; Eckels, Kenneth H; Thomas, Stephen J; Innis, Bruce L

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of two doses of a live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue virus vaccine (F17/Pre formulation) and a booster dose in a dengue endemic setting in two studies. Seven children (7- to 8-year-olds) were followed for 1 year after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17/Pre formulation), and followed for four more years (Child study). In the Infant study, 49 2-year-olds, vaccinated as infants, were followed for approximately 3.5 years after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17) and followed for one additional year. Two clinically notable events were observed, both in dengue vaccine recipients in the Infant study: 1 case of dengue approximately 2.7 years after dose 2 and 1 case of suspected dengue after booster vaccinations. The booster vaccinations had a favorable safety profile in terms of reactogenicity and adverse events reported during the 1-month follow-up periods. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported during the studies. Neutralizing antibodies against dengue viruses 1-4 waned during the 1-3 years before boosting, which elicited a short-lived booster response but did not provide a long-lived, multivalent antibody response in most subjects. Overall, this candidate vaccine did not elicit a durable humoral immune response.

  15. [Effect of Low Dose of Chicken Infectious Anemia Virus in Attenuated Vaccine on SPF Chicken Body Weight and Vaccine Immune Antibody].

    PubMed

    Fang, Lichun; Li, Xiaohan; Ren, Zhihao; Li, Yang; Wang, Yixin; Cui, Zhizhong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng

    2016-03-01

    In order to observe the effect of the immune and weight of chickens after use the attenuated vaccine with low dose of chicken infectious anemia virus (CIAV). In this study, the effects of low dose of CIAV on the weight of SPF chickens and NDV antibody production were observed by simulated experiments. The results showed that 10 EID50 and 5 EID50 CIAV per plume attenuated NDV vaccines were used to cause the weight loss of SPF chickens. Compared with the use of the non contaminated vaccine group, it has significant difference. And NDV antibody levels compared with the use of the non contaminated groups also decreased after use the vaccine with two doses of CIAV contaminated. It has significant difference. A certain proportion of CIAV antibody positive was detected at the beginning of the second week after use the NDV vaccine with two doses of CIAV contaminated. The detection of a high proportion of CIAV nucleic acid was detected in the first week after the use of a contaminated vaccine. The results of the study demonstrate the effects of CIAV pollution on the production and immune function of SPF chickens, and it is suggested that increasing the detection of viral nucleic acid can help save time and improve the detection rate in the detection of exogenous virus contamination by SPF chicken test method.

  16. Cessation of Long-term Naltrexone Administration: Longitudinal Follow-Ups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crews, W. David, Jr.; Rhodes, Robert D.; Bonaventura, Sharon H.; Rowe, Frederick B.; Goering, Aaron M.

    1999-01-01

    Longitudinal follow-ups of the cessation of long-term Naltrexone administration were conducted with a women with profound mental retardation who had previously displayed dramatic decreases in self-injurious behavior (SIB). After two and four years post-Naltrexone therapy, the subject exhibited near-zero rates of SIB despite changes in staff and in…

  17. An opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone, does not alter taste and smell responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Scińska, A; Koroś, E; Polanowska, E; Kukwa, A; Bogucka-Bonikowska, A; Kostowski, W; Habrat, B; Bieńkowski, P

    2000-01-01

    Several studies have shown that an opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone, decreases palatable food consumption. Naltrexone has also been reported to reduce ethanol intake in alcohol-preferring rodents and human alcoholics. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of naltrexone on taste and smell responses in healthy male volunteers. Naltrexone did not alter intensity and pleasantness of sucrose, quinine, citric acid, sodium chloride, and ethanol taste. Similarly, ratings of olfactory stimuli (orange extract and ethanol) and Coca-Cola flavor were not influenced by the opioid antagonist. Our findings may indicate that: (i) naltrexone exerts marginal, if any, effects on gustatory and olfactory responses in humans; (ii) the drug does not alter orosensory responses to ethanol.

  18. Cloninger's typology and treatment outcome in alcohol-dependent subjects during pharmacotherapy with naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Falk; Jiménez-Arriero, Miguel Angel; Klein, Oliver; Diehl, Alexander; Rubio, Gabriel

    2008-03-01

    Naltrexone is an opiate receptor antagonist mainly at the micro-receptor that is thought to reduce the positively reinforcing, pleasurable effects of alcohol and to reduce craving. An increase in time to first relapse to heavy drinking has been the most consistent finding obtained with naltrexone, although not all trials including two of the largest have been positive. Inconsistent outcome data suggest that effectiveness varies among different subgroups of patients. This paper re-evaluates recent data on the effectiveness of naltrexone in subjects differentiated according to Cloninger Type I and II. Moreover, it combines and cross-validates results of two recent European studies that found naltrexone treatment more beneficial in alcohol-dependent patients with early age at onset of drinking problems (Cloninger Type II). It is discussed whether especially these subjects should be targeted for pharmacological relapse prevention treatment with naltrexone.

  19. WE-E-18A-05: Bremsstrahlung of Laser-Plasma Interaction at KeV Temperature: Forward Dose and Attenuation Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Saez-Beltran, M; Fernandez Gonzalez, F

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To obtain an analytical empirical formula for the photon dose source term in forward direction from bremsstrahlung generated from laser-plasma accelerated electron beams in aluminum solid targets, with electron-plasma temperatures in the 10–100 keV energy range, and to calculate transmission factors for iron, aluminum, methacrylate, lead and concrete and air, materials most commonly found in vacuum chamber labs. Methods: Bremsstrahlung fluence is calculated from the convolution of thin-target bremsstrahlung spectrum for monoenergetic electrons and the relativistic Maxwell-Juettner energy distribution for the electron-plasma. Unattenuatted dose in tissue is calculated by integrating the photon spectrum with the mass-energy absorption coefficient. For the attenuated dose, energy dependent absorption coefficient, build-up factors and finite shielding correction factors were also taken into account. For the source term we use a modified formula from Hayashi et al., and we fitted the proportionality constant from experiments with the aid of the previously calculated transmission factors. Results: The forward dose has a quadratic dependence on electron-plasma temperature: 1 joule of effective laser energy transferred to the electrons at 1 m in vacuum yields 0,72 Sv per MeV squared of electron-plasma temperature. Air strongly filters the softer part of the photon spectrum and reduce the dose to one tenth in the first centimeter. Exponential higher energy tail of maxwellian spectrum contributes mainly to the transmitted dose. Conclusion: A simple formula for forward photon dose from keV range temperature plasma is obtained, similar to those found in kilovoltage x-rays but with higher dose per dissipated electron energy, due to thin target and absence of filtration.

  20. Part I. Naltrexone-derived conjugate addition ligands for opioid receptors. Part II. Chemical and enantioselective aspects of the metabolism of verapamil

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    Selective chemoaffinity ligands to aid in identification and purification of opioid receptor subtypes were prepared from 6..cap alpha..- and 6..beta..-naltrexol, obtained stereoselectively from the ..mu..-receptor antagonist naltrexone. The targets were the 6..cap alpha..- and 6..beta..-methacrylate ethers and 6..cap alpha..- and 6..beta..-methacrylate esters prepared from reaction of 6..cap alpha..- and 6..beta..-naltrexol with methyl ..cap alpha..-(bromomethyl)acrylate or methacryloyl chloride. Of three methacrylate derivatives, the 6..cap alpha..-ether was the most potent in an opioid receptor binding assay with (/sup 3/H)-naltrexone. In the presence of sodium ion, preincubation of the 6..cap alpha..-ether resulted in recovery of about 60% of original (/sup 3/H)-naltrexone binding suggesting some irreversible effects. The methacrylate esters precipitated withdrawal in morphine dependent monkeys. The enantiomers of verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, have different pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties. The oxidative metabolism of verapamil was studied in rat and human liver microsomes and in man after a single oral dose.

  1. TU-EF-204-08: Dose Efficiency of Added Beam-Shaping Filter with Varied Attenuation Levels in Lung-Cancer Screening CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Yu, L; Vrieze, T; Leng, S; Fletcher, J; McCollough, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Added filtration such as tin filter has the potential to improve dose efficiency of x-ray beam in lung-cancer screening CT. However, dose efficiency with added beam filtration is highly dependent on patient attenuation level. In this phantom study, we evaluated the image quality at different tube voltages with and without added tin filter when attenuation level varies. Methods: A 30 x 20 cm anthropomorphic thorax phantom with three added extension rings were used to simulate small (S), medium (M), large (L), and extra-large (XL) adult patients. These phantoms were scanned on a 192-slice CT scanner (Force, Siemens) at 100 and 120kV without tin filtration, and 100 and 150 kV with tin filtration (100Sn and 150Sn), at multiple dose levels at each kV. Images were reconstructed using iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE, Siemens). Radiation dose was measured with a 0.6 cc ion chamber in the middle and peripheral areas of the phantom. Image quality was assessed using mean image noise at uniform areas in the central region and lung. Radiation dose that is required for each kV to match the noise in a routine lung-cancer CT screening technique (120kV, 25 quality reference mAs) was calculated. Results: At each of the four phantom sizes, 100Sn had the lowest noise in both soft tissue and lung. Compared with 120 kV, 100Sn saved 39%–60% dose for the same noise, depending on phantom size. For the XL phantom (50 by 40 cm), 150Sn provided images with the least beam-hardening artifact in peripheral region. Conclusion: For thoracic CT, added tin filtration can provide considerable dose reduction compared with 120 kV. 100Sn provides better dose efficiencies for all phantom sizes, while 150Sn provides better image quality in peripheral region for extra-large patients. Drs.Joel G. Fletcher and Cynthia H. McCollough receive research support from Siemens Healthcare.

  2. High-dose ascorbate with low-dose amphotericin B attenuates severity of disease in a model of the reappearance of candidemia during sepsis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Somparn, Poorichaya; Bootprapan, Tanabodee; Tu, Hongbin; Tangtanatakul, Pattarin; Nuengjumnong, Ratchanok; Worasilchai, Navaporn; Tiranathanagul, Khajohn; Eiam-ong, Somchai; Levine, Mark; Chinampon, Ariya; Srisawat, Nattachai

    2015-08-01

    Amphotericin B (Ampho B) isa fungicidal drug that causes cell wall injury. Pharmacological ascorbate induces the extracellular prooxidants, which might enter the Ampho B-induced cell wall porosity and act synergistically.W e tested low-dose Ampho B with a short course of pharmacological ascorbate using a mouse model of sepsis preconditioned with an injection of Candida albicans 6 h prior to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). In this model, candidemia reappeared as early as 6 h after CLP with a predictably high mortality rate. This characteristic mimics sepsis in the phase of immunosuppression inpatients. Using the model, at 12- and 18-h post-CLP, we administered isotonic (pH neutralized) pharmacological ascorbate intravenously with low-dose Ampho B or sodium deoxycholate, vehicle-controlled, administered IP. The survival rate of low-dose Ampho B plus ascorbate was 53%, compared with < 11% for low-dose Ampho B or high-dose Ampho B alone. In addition, a beneficial effect was demonstrated in terms of kidney damage,liver injury, spleen histopathology, and serum markers at 24 h after CLP. Kidney injury was less severe in low-dose Ampho B plus ascorbate combination therapy due to less severe sepsis. Moreover, ascorbate enhanced the effectiveness of phagocytosis against C. albicans in human phagocytic cells. Taken together, the data indicate that the new mouse model simulates sepsis-induced immunosuppression and that the combination of pharmacological ascorbate with an antifungal drug is a potentially effective treatment that may reduce nephrotoxicity, and perhaps also increase fungicidal activity in patients with systemic candidiasis caused by Candida albicans.

  3. Suhuang antitussive capsule at lower doses attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Lan-Hong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Lai, Tian-Wen; Wang, Hai-Sheng; Xiao, Hui; Che, Luan-Qing; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Suhuang antitussive capsule (Suhuang), a traditional Chinese medication, is found effective in treating chronic cough and cough variant asthma (CVA). This study aimed to determine the possible effects and underlying mechanisms of Suhuang on chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodeling in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to six experimental groups: control, OVA model with or without Suhuang (low dose: 3.5 g/kg, middle dose: 7.0 g/kg, high dose: 14.0 g/kg), or dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg). AHR, inflammatory cells, cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung pathology, mucus production, and airway remodeling were examined. We found Suhuang treated at lower doses effectively inhibited OVA-induced AHR, airway inflammation, mucus production and collagen deposition around the airway. High dose of Suhuang reduced most of the inflammatory hallmarks while exerted inconsiderable effects on the number of macrophages in BALF and AHR. At all doses, Suhuang significantly reduced the levels of interlukin (IL) -13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, but had little effects on IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A and interferon (IFN)-γ. Thus, Suhuang administration alleviates the pathological changes of chronic asthma likely through inhibition of IL-13 and TGF-β1. Suhuang might be a promising therapy for patients with allergic asthma in the future. PMID:26861679

  4. Dexmedetomidine in Attenuation of Haemodynamic Response and Dose Sparing Effect on Opioid and Anaesthetic Agents in Patients undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy- A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Nandlal; Karim, Habib Md Reazaul; Hajong, Ranendra; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis; Singh, Manorama

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Perioperative procedures are stressful and lead to haemodynamic instability with potentially devastating consequences. Dexmedetomidine is found to have many of the desired characteristics that are required in perioperative period. Aim To evaluate the ability of pre and intraoperative dexmedetomidine to attenuate stress induced haemodynamic responses, quantifying the anaesthetic agents sparing as well as its cost-effectiveness in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods The present single blind randomized study was conducted with 120 ASA I and II consented patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups (i.e., group D and group N). Prior to induction, group D received 1 μg/kg of Dexmedetomidine and group N received Normal saline infusion over 20 minutes. Group D also received maintenance Dexmedetomidine intraoperatively. Bispectral index and minimum alveolar concentration monitoring was done in both the groups. Haemodynamic parameters were noted till 100 minutes post laryngoscopy. Opioid and anaesthetic agent consumptions were also noted and cost analysis was done. Medcalc–Version 12.5.0.0 software was used for statistics and p <0.05 was considered significant. Results Dexmedetomidine attenuated the stress induced haemodynamics responses and produced stable, relatively non fluctuating haemodynamics throughout. The Minimum Alveolar Concentration (MAC) requirement and the consumptions of Fentanyl and Isoflurane were significantly less in the Dexmedetomidine group (p<0.0001). However, despite anaesthetic dose sparing effect the anaesthetic technique was not cost-effective. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine is effective in attenuating haemodynamic responses in laparoscopic surgery and having dose sparing effect on Fentanyl, Propofol and Isoflurane. However, overall this technique is not cost-effective. PMID:28050479

  5. Multiple Low-Dose Radiation Prevents Type 2 Diabetes-Induced Renal Damage through Attenuation of Dyslipidemia and Insulin Resistance and Subsequent Renal Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Minglong; Lu, Xuemian; Cong, Weitao; Xing, Xiao; Tan, Yi; Li, Yunqian; Li, Xiaokun; Jin, Litai; Wang, Xiaojie; Dong, Juancong; Jin, Shunzi; Zhang, Chi; Cai, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia and lipotoxicity-induced insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress are the key pathogeneses of renal damage in type 2 diabetes. Increasing evidence shows that whole-body low dose radiation (LDR) plays a critical role in attenuating insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress. Objective The aims of the present study were to investigate whether LDR can prevent type 2 diabetes-induced renal damage and the underlying mechanisms. Methods Mice were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD, 40% of calories from fat) for 12 weeks to induce obesity followed by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 50 mg/kg) to develop a type 2 diabetic mouse model. The mice were exposed to LDR at different doses (25, 50 and 75 mGy) for 4 or 8 weeks along with HFD treatment. At each time-point, the kidney weight, renal function, blood glucose level and insulin resistance were examined. The pathological changes, renal lipid profiles, inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis were also measured. Results HFD/STZ-induced type 2 diabetic mice exhibited severe pathological changes in the kidney and renal dysfunction. Exposure of the mice to LDR for 4 weeks, especially at 50 and 75 mGy, significantly improved lipid profiles, insulin sensitivity and protein kinase B activation, meanwhile, attenuated inflammation and oxidative stress in the diabetic kidney. The LDR-induced anti-oxidative effect was associated with up-regulation of renal nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf-2) expression and function. However, the above beneficial effects were weakened once LDR treatment was extended to 8 weeks. Conclusion These results suggest that LDR exposure significantly prevented type 2 diabetes-induced kidney injury characterized by renal dysfunction and pathological changes. The protective mechanisms of LDR are complicated but may be mainly attributed to the attenuation of dyslipidemia and the subsequent lipotoxicity-induced insulin resistance

  6. Different routes and doses influence protection in pigs immunised with the naturally attenuated African swine fever virus isolate OURT88/3.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cordón, Pedro J; Chapman, Dave; Jabbar, Tamara; Reis, Ana L; Goatley, Lynnette; Netherton, Christopher L; Taylor, Geraldine; Montoya, Maria; Dixon, Linda

    2017-02-01

    This study compares different combinations of doses and routes of immunisation of pigs with low virulent African swine fever virus (ASFV) genotype I isolate OURT88/3, including the intramuscular and intranasal route, the latter not previously tested. Intranasal immunisations with low and moderate doses (10(3) and 10(4) TCID50) of OURT88/3 provided complete protection (100%) against challenge with virulent genotype I OURT88/1 isolate. Only mild and transient clinical reactions were observed in protected pigs. Transient moderate virus genome levels were detected in blood samples after challenge that decreased, but persisted until the end of the experiment in some animals. In contrast, pigs immunised intramuscularly with low and moderate doses (10(3) and 10(4) TCID50) displayed lower percentages of protection (50-66%), and low or undetectable levels of virus genome were detected in blood samples throughout the study. In addition, clinical courses observed in protected pigs were asymptomatic. In pigs that were not protected and developed acute ASF, an exacerbated increase of IL-10 sometimes accompanied by an increase of IFNγ was observed before euthanasia. These results showed that factors including delivery route and dose determine the outcome of immunisation with the naturally attenuated isolate OURT88/3.

  7. Employment-based reinforcement of adherence to oral naltrexone in unemployed injection drug users: 12-month outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kelly; DeFulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J; Donlin, Wendy D; Aklin, Will M; Nuzzo, Paul A; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E; Silverman, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    Oral naltrexone could be a promising relapse-prevention pharmacotherapy for recently detoxified opioid-dependent patients; however, interventions are often needed to promote adherence with this treatment approach. We recently conducted a study to evaluate a 26-week employment-based reinforcement intervention of oral naltrexone in unemployed injection drug users (Dunn et al., 2013). Participants were randomly assigned into a contingency (n = 35) group required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain entry into a therapeutic workplace or a prescription (n = 32) group given a take-home supply of oral naltrexone and access to the workplace without observed ingestion. Monthly urine samples were collected and analyzed for evidence for naltrexone adherence, opioid use, and cocaine use. As previously reported, contingency participants provided significantly more naltrexone-positive urine samples than prescription participants during the 26-week intervention period. The goal of this current study is to report the 12-month outcomes, which occurred 6 months after the intervention ended. Results at the 12-month visit showed no between-groups differences in naltrexone-positive, opioid-negative, or cocaine-negative urine samples and no participant self-reported using naltrexone at the follow-up visit. These results show that even after a period of successfully reinforced oral naltrexone adherence, longer-term naltrexone use is unlikely to be maintained after reinforcement contingencies are discontinued. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Employment-based Reinforcement of Adherence to Oral Naltrexone in Unemployed Injection Drug Users: 12-month Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kelly; DeFulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J.; Donlin, Wendy D.; Aklin, Will M.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Oral naltrexone could be a promising relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for recently detoxified opioid-dependent patients, however interventions are often needed to promote adherence with this treatment approach. We recently conducted a study to evaluate a 26-week employment-based reinforcement intervention of oral naltrexone in unemployed injection drug users (Dunn et al., 2013). Participants were randomly assigned into a Contingency (n=35) group required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain entry into a therapeutic workplace, or a Prescription (n=32) group given a take-home supply of oral naltrexone and access to the workplace without observed ingestion. Monthly urine samples were collected and analyzed for evidence for naltrexone adherence, opioid use, and cocaine use. As previously reported, Contingency participants provided significantly more naltrexone-positive urine samples than Prescription participants during the 26-week intervention period. The goal of this current study is to report the 12-month outcomes, which occurred 6 months after the intervention ended. Results at the 12-month visit showed no between-group differences in naltrexone-positive, opioid-negative, or cocaine-negative urine samples, and no participant self-reported using naltrexone at the follow-up visit. These results show that even after a period of successfully reinforced oral naltrexone adherence longer-term naltrexone use is unlikely to be maintained after reinforcement contingencies are discontinued. PMID:25134047

  9. Low-dose memantine attenuated methadone dose in opioid-dependent patients: a 12-week double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Po See; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Liang-Jen; Lee, I Hui; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Chen, Kao Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2015-05-19

    Low-dose memantine might have anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic effects mechanistically remote from an NMDA receptor. We investigated whether add-on memantine reduced cytokine levels and benefitted patients with opioid dependence undergoing methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) in a randomized, double-blind, controlled 12-week study. Patients were randomly assigned to a group: Memantine (5 mg/day) (n = 53) or Placebo (n = 75). The methadone dose required and retention in treatment were monitored. Plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were examined during weeks 0, 1, 4, 8, and 12. General linear mixed models were used to examine therapeutic effect. After 12 weeks, Memantine-group required a somewhat lower methadone dose than did Placebo-group (P = 0.039). They also had significantly lower plasma TNF-α and significantly higher TGF-β1 levels. We provide evidence of the benefit of add-on memantine in opioid dependent patients undergoing MMT.

  10. MO-E-17A-08: Attenuation-Based Size Adjusted, Scanner-Independent Organ Dose Estimates for Head CT Exams: TG 204 for Head CT

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M; Zankl, M; DeMarco, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group 204 described size specific dose estimates (SSDE) for body scans. The purpose of this work is to use a similar approach to develop patient-specific, scanner-independent organ dose estimates for head CT exams using an attenuation-based size metric. Methods: For eight patient models from the GSF family of voxelized phantoms, dose to brain and lens of the eye was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations of contiguous axial scans for 64-slice MDCT scanners from four major manufacturers. Organ doses were normalized by scannerspecific 16 cm CTDIvol values and averaged across all scanners to obtain scanner-independent CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients for each patient model. Head size was measured at the first slice superior to the eyes; patient perimeter and effective diameter (ED) were measured directly from the GSF data. Because the GSF models use organ identification codes instead of Hounsfield units, water equivalent diameter (WED) was estimated indirectly. Using the image data from 42 patients ranging from 2 weeks old to adult, the perimeter, ED and WED size metrics were obtained and correlations between each metric were established. Applying these correlations to the GSF perimeter and ED measurements, WED was calculated for each model. The relationship between the various patient size metrics and CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients was then described. Results: The analysis of patient images demonstrated the correlation between WED and ED across a wide range of patient sizes. When applied to the GSF patient models, an exponential relationship between CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients and the WED size metric was observed with correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.77 for the brain and lens of the eye, respectively. Conclusion: Strong correlation exists between CTDIvol normalized brain dose and WED. For the lens of the eye, a lower correlation is observed, primarily due to surface dose variations. Funding

  11. Post-treatment with an ultra-low dose of NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium attenuates disease progression in multiple Parkinson's disease models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingshan; Qian, Li; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Wilson, Belinda; Oyarzabal, Esteban; Ali, Syed; Robinson, Bonnie; Rao, Deepa; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2015-05-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, a key superoxide-producing enzyme, plays a critical role in microglia-mediated chronic neuroinflammation and subsequent progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. Although nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-targeting anti-inflammatory therapy for Parkinson's disease has been proposed, its application in translational research remains limited. The aim of this study was to obtain preclinical evidence supporting this therapeutic strategy by testing the efficacy of an ultra-low dose of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium in both endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide)- and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated mice using post-treatment regimens. Our data revealed that post-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium significantly attenuated progressive dopaminergic degeneration and improved rotarod activity. Remarkably, post-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium 10 months after lipopolysaccharide injection when mice had 30% loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons, showed high efficacy in protecting the remaining neuronal population and restoring motor function. Diphenyleneiodonium-elicited neuroprotection was associated with the inhibition of microglial activation, a reduction in the expression of proinflammatory factors and an attenuation of α-synuclein aggregation. A pathophysiological evaluation of diphenyleneiodonium-treated mice, including assessment of body weight, organs health, and neuronal counts, revealed no overt signs of toxicity. In summary, infusion of ultra-low dose diphenyleneiodonium potently reduced microglia-mediated chronic neuroinflammation by selectively inhibiting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and halted the progression of neurodegeneration in mouse models of Parkinson's disease. The robust neuroprotective effects and lack of apparent toxic side effects suggest that diphenyleneiodonium at

  12. Post-treatment with an ultra-low dose of NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium attenuates disease progression in multiple Parkinson’s disease models

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Li; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Wilson, Belinda; Oyarzabal, Esteban; Ali, Syed; Robinson, Bonnie; Rao, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, a key superoxide-producing enzyme, plays a critical role in microglia-mediated chronic neuroinflammation and subsequent progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease. Although nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-targeting anti-inflammatory therapy for Parkinson’s disease has been proposed, its application in translational research remains limited. The aim of this study was to obtain preclinical evidence supporting this therapeutic strategy by testing the efficacy of an ultra-low dose of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium in both endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide)- and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated mice using post-treatment regimens. Our data revealed that post-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium significantly attenuated progressive dopaminergic degeneration and improved rotarod activity. Remarkably, post-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium 10 months after lipopolysaccharide injection when mice had 30% loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons, showed high efficacy in protecting the remaining neuronal population and restoring motor function. Diphenyleneiodonium-elicited neuroprotection was associated with the inhibition of microglial activation, a reduction in the expression of proinflammatory factors and an attenuation of α-synuclein aggregation. A pathophysiological evaluation of diphenyleneiodonium-treated mice, including assessment of body weight, organs health, and neuronal counts, revealed no overt signs of toxicity. In summary, infusion of ultra-low dose diphenyleneiodonium potently reduced microglia-mediated chronic neuroinflammation by selectively inhibiting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and halted the progression of neurodegeneration in mouse models of Parkinson’s disease. The robust neuroprotective effects and lack of apparent toxic side effects suggest that diphenyleneiodonium

  13. Achievement of a target dose of bisoprolol may not be a preferred option for attenuating pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Shizhao; Zhang, Ning; Yang, Zheng; Bian, Zhouyan; Yuan, Yuan; Tang, Qizhu

    2016-01-01

    Bisoprolol is a drug that acts via the mechanism of specifically and selectively inhibiting the β1-adrenoreceptor in cardiac myocytes, and provides a pure reduction of heart rate without changing other cardiac parameters. It has long been clinically used to treat cerebrovascular and cardiovascular illnesses. However, there is little information available on whether the role of bisoprolol in the attenuation of ventricular remodeling is dependent upon the achievement of a target dose, and whether it must be used as a preferred option. The aim of the present study was to clarify the underlying benefits of bisoprolol in the attenuation of pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis at different doses. C57BL/6J male mice, aged 6–8 weeks, were treated with saline or one of three different doses of bisoprolol (Biso: 2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks from day 1 after aortic banding (AB). A number of mice underwent sham surgery and were treated with saline or bisoprolol. The mice were randomly assigned into the sham (n=24) and AB (n=62) groups. The results revealed that bisoprolol had a protective role against the cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and dysfunction caused by AB. This was determined on the basis of heart/body and lung/body weight ratios and heart weight/tibia length ratios, as well as echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters, histological analysis, and the gene expression levels of hypertrophic and fibrotic markers. The present study revealed that administration of bisoprolol for a long time period may enhance its role in the prevention of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis induced by AB, whereas no statistically significant difference was observed between the middle- and high-doses. These observations indicated that the function of bisoprolol in protecting against cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and dysfunction is time-dependent. Furthermore, it is proposed that a middle dose of bisoprolol may be a better option for patients with

  14. Achievement of a target dose of bisoprolol may not be a preferred option for attenuating pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shizhao; Zhang, Ning; Yang, Zheng; Bian, Zhouyan; Yuan, Yuan; Tang, Qizhu

    2016-10-01

    Bisoprolol is a drug that acts via the mechanism of specifically and selectively inhibiting the β1-adrenoreceptor in cardiac myocytes, and provides a pure reduction of heart rate without changing other cardiac parameters. It has long been clinically used to treat cerebrovascular and cardiovascular illnesses. However, there is little information available on whether the role of bisoprolol in the attenuation of ventricular remodeling is dependent upon the achievement of a target dose, and whether it must be used as a preferred option. The aim of the present study was to clarify the underlying benefits of bisoprolol in the attenuation of pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis at different doses. C57BL/6J male mice, aged 6-8 weeks, were treated with saline or one of three different doses of bisoprolol (Biso: 2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks from day 1 after aortic banding (AB). A number of mice underwent sham surgery and were treated with saline or bisoprolol. The mice were randomly assigned into the sham (n=24) and AB (n=62) groups. The results revealed that bisoprolol had a protective role against the cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and dysfunction caused by AB. This was determined on the basis of heart/body and lung/body weight ratios and heart weight/tibia length ratios, as well as echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters, histological analysis, and the gene expression levels of hypertrophic and fibrotic markers. The present study revealed that administration of bisoprolol for a long time period may enhance its role in the prevention of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis induced by AB, whereas no statistically significant difference was observed between the middle- and high-doses. These observations indicated that the function of bisoprolol in protecting against cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and dysfunction is time-dependent. Furthermore, it is proposed that a middle dose of bisoprolol may be a better option for patients with cardiovascular

  15. Development of TV003/TV005, a single dose, highly immunogenic live attenuated dengue vaccine; what makes this vaccine different from the Sanofi-Pasteur CYD™ vaccine?

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is caused by four serotype-distinct dengue viruses (DENVs), and developing a multivalent vaccine against dengue has not been straightforward since partial immunity to DENV may predispose to more severe disease upon subsequent DENV infection. The vaccine that is furthest along in development is CYD™, a live attenuated tetravalent vaccine (LATV) produced by Sanofi Pasteur. Although the multi-dose vaccine demonstrated protection against severe dengue, its overall efficacy was limited by DENV serotype, serostatus at vaccination, region and age. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has developed the LATV dengue vaccines TV003/TV005. A single dose of either TV003 or TV005 induced seroconversion to four DENV serotypes in 74-92% (TV003) and 90% (TV005) of flavivirus seronegative adults and elicited near-sterilizing immunity to a second dose of vaccine administered 6-12 months later. The important differences in the structure, infectivity and immune responses to TV003/TV005 are compared with CYD™.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of carfentanil and naltrexone in female common eland (Taurotragus oryx).

    PubMed

    Cole, Alexander; Mutlow, Adrian; Isaza, Ramiro; Carpenter, James W; Koch, David E; Hunter, Robert P; Dresser, Betsy L

    2006-09-01

    The pharmacokinetic parameters of carfentanil and naltrexone were determined in the common eland (Taurotragus oryx). Six adult females were immobilized with xylazine (0.23 +/- 0.03 mg/kg i.m.) and carfentanil (0.0169 +/- 0.0005 mg/kg i.m.) for a 45-min period, during which time routine health care procedures were performed. Heart and respiration rates and body temperatures were monitored throughout the immobilization period. A single intramuscular injection of naltrexone (1.66 +/- 0.08 mg/kg i.m.) was sufficient for reversal. The eland were intermittently restrained in a hydraulic squeeze chute for serial blood sample collection via jugular venipuncture during immobilization and up to 48 hr post-immobilization. The quantification of carfentanil and naltrexone in the plasma was performed by liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy methods. Carfentanil was rapidly absorbed following administration, with the peak plasma concentration (C(max)) at 13.8 min. Naltrexone was readily absorbed and reached C(max) at 23.4 +/- 16.8 min after administration. All animals stood 2.7 +/- 2.2 min after naltrexone administration. Carfentanil has a half-life of 7.7 hr, whereas naltrexone has a much shorter half-life of 3.7 hr. Although respiratory rates appeared to fluctuate widely among animals, heart rates and body temperature remained stable throughout the immobilization. Renarcotization was not noted as a major complication.

  17. Improving clinical outcomes for naltrexone as a management of problem alcohol use.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Gary K

    2013-11-01

    Despite being a relatively effective and safe treatment, the clinical management of alcohol abuse/dependence by oral naltrexone can be compromised due to the patient's non-compliance with daily use of this medication. Over the past decade an increasing body of research has suggested that the use of sustained release depot naltrexone preparations can overcome this issue and deliver improved clinical outcomes. However, at the same time, research findings from diverse areas of pharmacogenetics, neurobiology and behavioural psychology have also been converging to identify variables including genetic markers, patient psychosocial characteristics and drug use history differences, or clusters of these variables that play a major role in mediating the response of alcohol abuse/dependent persons to treatment by naltrexone. While this article does not attempt to review all available data pertaining to an individual alcohol dependent patient's response to treatment by naltrexone, it does identify relevant research areas and highlights the importance of data arising from them. The characterization of clinical markers, to identify those patients who are most likely to benefit from naltrexone and to tailor a more individual naltrexone treatment, will ultimately provide significant benefit to both patients and clinicians by optimizing treatment outcome.

  18. A randomized trial of oral naltrexone for treating opioid-dependent offenders.

    PubMed

    Coviello, Donna M; Cornish, James W; Lynch, Kevin G; Alterman, Arthur I; O'Brien, Charles P

    2010-01-01

    Offenders with a history of opioid dependence are a particularly difficult group to treat. A large proportion of offenders typically relapse shortly after release from prison, commit drug-related crimes, and then are arrested and eventually re-incarcerated. Previous research demonstrated that oral naltrexone was effective in reducing opioid use and preventing recidivism among offenders under federal supervision. The 111 opioid-dependent offenders in this study were under various levels of supervision that included county and federal probation/parole, a treatment court, an alternative disposition program, and an intermediate punishment program. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive 6 months of either 300 mg per week of oral naltrexone plus standard psychosocial treatment as usual (n = 56) or standard psychosocial treatment as usual (TAU) without naltrexone (n = 55). While the TAU subjects who remained in treatment used more opioids than the naltrexone subjects who remained, the high dropout rate for both groups made it difficult to assess the effectiveness of naltrexone. The study provides limited support for the use of oral naltrexone for offenders who are not closely monitored by the criminal justice system.

  19. Optimization of Naltrexone Diclofenac Codrugs for Sustained Drug Delivery Across Microneedle-Treated Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Priyanka; Lee, DoMin; Kim, Kyung Bo; Stinchcomb, Audra L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was to optimize the structure of codrugs for extended delivery across microneedle treated skin. Naltrexone, the model compound was linked with diclofenac, a nonspecific cyclooxygenase inhibitor to enhance the pore lifetime following microneedle treatment and develop a 7 day transdermal system for naltrexone. Methods Four different codrugs of naltrexone and diclofenac were compared in terms of stability and solubility. Transdermal flux, permeability and skin concentration of both parent drugs and codrugs were quantified to form a structure permeability relationship. Results The results indicated that all codrugs bioconverted in the skin. The degree of conversion was dependent on the structure, phenol linked codrugs were less stable compared to the secondary alcohol linked structures. The flux of naltrexone across microneedle treated skin and the skin concentration of diclofenac were higher for the phenol linked codrugs. The polyethylene glycol link enhanced solubility of the codrugs, which translated into flux enhancement. Conclusion The current studies indicated that formulation stability of codrugs and the flux of naltrexone can be enhanced via structure design optimization. The polyethylene glycol linked naltrexone diclofenac codrug is better suited for a 7 day drug delivery system both in terms of stability and drug delivery. PMID:23943543

  20. A review of parenteral sustained-release naltrexone systems

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, J.L.; Kincl, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    The ideal naltrexone sustained-release delivery system should be easy to inject or implant, not cause adverse tissue reaction, release the drug at a relatively constant rate for at least 30 days, and biodegrade within a short time afterwards. Mechanisms which can be used for sustaining drug release include reducing solubility and surface area, coating, encapsulation and microencapsulation, complexation, binding and hydrophilic gelation. Drug release from such systems is controlled by diffusion through a barrier/film, diffusion from a monolithic device, erosion of the surface, hydrolysis, ion exchange, biodegradation, or a combination of these. Injectable systems would seem to be ultimately preferred because of the ease of administration and handling, while the implantable devices may find first use in man since they are easily removable, should that be necessary. Maintaining particulate-free products and sterilization methods are two problems with all parenteral dosage forms. Production must be particularly well controlled and validated.

  1. Controlled delivery of naltrexone by an intraoral device: in vivo study on human subjects.

    PubMed

    Paderni, Carlo; Campisi, Giuseppina; Schumacher, Axel; Göttsche, Thorsten; Giannola, Libero Italo; De Caro, Viviana; Wolff, Andy

    2013-08-16

    Naltrexone is widely used in the treatment of opiate addiction but its current peroral administration is characterized by low bioavailability with various side effects. The development of a long-acting transbuccal delivery device (IntelliDrug) for NLX may be useful to improve patient compliance and the therapy effectiveness. The aims of the study are (a) to test basic safety and effectiveness of controlled transbuccal drug delivery on human subjects; (b) to compare NLX bioavailability following transbuccal delivery vs per os conventional delivery; and (c) to test the hypothesis that transbuccal delivery is more efficient than the conventional route. In this randomized cross-over pilot study, 12 healthy subjects received in a different order 2 types of NLX administration, per os or transbuccal delivery, based on which group they were randomized to. For per os administration 50mg NLX tablets were used, while for transbuccal administration, a NLX-loaded prototype of the IntelliDrug device was fixed on patients' dental arch. Serial blood samples were drawn and analysed for the NLX concentration. The IntelliDrug prototype functioned properly and it did not exert any adverse side-effect. The transbuccal route resulted in administration efficiency 4-17 times higher than conventional per os route. Transbuccal delivery of NLX appears to be a more efficient drug administration route compared to peroral one. It allows to reach a given therapeutic blood level using a small drug dose.

  2. Safety, dose, immunogenicity, and transmissibility of an oral live attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a vaccine candidate (SC602) among healthy adults and school children in Matlab, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Kazi Mizanur; Arifeen, Shams El; Zaman, K; Rahman, Mahbubur; Raqib, Rubhana; Yunus, Mohammad; Begum, Nazma; Islam, Md Shaheenul; Sohel, Badrul Munir; Rahman, Muntasirur; Venkatesan, Malabi; Hale, Thomas L; Isenbarger, Daniel W; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Black, Robert E; Baqui, Abdullah H

    2011-02-01

    In double-blind trials in Bangladesh, 88 adults, and 79 children (8-10 years) were randomized to receive either a single oral dose of 1 × 10(4), 1 × 10(5) or 1 × 10(6)CFU of SC602 (a live, attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a strain vaccine) or placebo. In the adult outpatient 1 × 10(6) CFU group, severe joint pain and body aches were reported by one and two vaccinees respectively. In the adult inpatient trial, SC602 was isolated from 3 volunteers, pre-vaccination antibody titers were high, and fourfold increases in serum IgG anti-LPS responses were observed in 2 of 5 subjects of the 1 × 10(6)CFU group. None of the volunteers developed diarrhea. Overall, SC602 was found to be associated with minimal vaccine shedding, minimal reactogenicity, no transmission risk, and low immune stimulation.

  3. Attenuation of cell motility observed with high doses of sphingosine 1-phosphate or phosphorylated FTY720 involves RGS2 through its interactions with the receptor S1P.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Takayuki; Igarashi, Yasuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) stimulation enhances cell motility via the G-protein coupled S1P receptor S1P1. This ligand-induced, receptor-mediated cell motility follows a typical bell-shaped dose-response curve, that is, stimulation with low concentrations of S1P enhances cell motility, whereas excess ligand stimulation does not enhance it. So far, the attenuation of the response at higher ligand concentrations has not been explained. We report here that S1P1 interacts with the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS)-2 protein, which is a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for heterotrimeric G proteins, in a concentration dependent manner. The RGS2-S1P1 complex dissociated at higher ligand concentrations, yet it was unaffected at low concentrations, suggesting that the dissociated RGS2 is involved in the concurrent decrease of cell motility. In RGS2 knockdown cells, the decrease of cell motility induced by high ligand concentrations was rescued. S1P1 internalization was not implicated in the attenuation of the response. Similar results were observed upon stimulation with the phosphorylated form of FTY720 (FTYP), which is an S1P1 agonist. In conclusion, the suppressed response in cell motility induced by excess S1P or FTYP via S1P1 is regulated by RGS2 functioning through a mechanism that is independent of S1P1 internalization.

  4. Employment-Based Reinforcement to Motivate Naltrexone Ingestion and Drug Abstinence in the Treatment of Drug Addiction. - 1

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-11-03

    Behavior Therapy; Cocaine; Cocaine (IV); Cocaine Abuse; Cocaine Dependence; Contingency Management; HIV Risk Behaviors; Heroin; Heroin Dependence; Naltrexone; Opioid Dependence; Substance Abuse, Intravenous; Sexual Risk Behaviors

  5. Safety and immunogenicity of a mutagenized, live attenuated Rift Valley fever vaccine, MP-12, in a Phase 1 dose escalation and route comparison study in humans.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Phillip R; McClain, David; Quinn, Xiaofei; Coonan, Kevin M; Mangiafico, Joseph; Makuch, Richard S; Morrill, John; Peters, Clarence J

    2016-01-20

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) poses a risk as a potential agent in bioterrorism or agroterrorism. A live attenuated RVF vaccine (RVF MP-12) has been shown to be safe and protective in animals and showed promise in two initial clinical trials. In the present study, healthy adult human volunteers (N=56) received a single injection of (a) RVF MP-12, administered subcutaneously (SQ) at a concentration of 10(4.7) plaque-forming units (pfu) (SQ Group); (b) RVF MP-12, administered intramuscularly (IM) at 10(3.4)pfu (IM Group 1); (c) RVF MP-12, administered IM at 10(4.4)pfu (IM Group 2); or (d) saline (Placebo Group). The vaccine was well tolerated by volunteers in all dose and route groups. Infrequent and minor adverse events were seen among recipients of both placebo and RVF MP-12. One subject had viremia detectable by direct plaque assay, and six subjects from IM Group 2 had transient low-titer viremia detectable only by nucleic acid amplification. Of the 43 vaccine recipients, 40 (93%) achieved neutralizing antibodies (measured as an 80% plaque reduction neutralization titer [PRNT80]) as well as RVF-specific IgM and IgG. The highest peak geometric mean PRNT80 titers were observed in IM Group 2. Of 34 RVF MP-12 recipients available for testing 1 year following inoculation, 28 (82%) remained seropositive (PRNT80≥1:20); this included 20 of 23 vaccinees (87%) from IM Group 2. The live attenuated RVF MP-12 vaccine was safe and immunogenic at the doses and routes studied. Given the need for an effective vaccine against RVF virus, further evaluation in humans is warranted.

  6. Long term follow-up study to evaluate immunogenicity and safety of a single dose of live attenuated hepatitis a vaccine in children.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Monjori; Shah, Nitin; Faridi, Mma; Ghosh, Apurba; Sankaranarayanan, V S; Aggarwal, Anju; Chatterjee, Suparna; Bhattacharyya, Nisha; Kadhe, Ganesh; Vishnoi, Gaurav; Mane, Amey

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, viral hepatitis continues to be a cause of considerable morbidity and mortality. Mass immunization with a single dose of live attenuated HAV has been shown to significantly reduce disease burden in the community. This was a phase IV, 5-year follow up study carried out at 4 centers (Kolkata, Delhi, Mumbai and Chennai) across India. The subjects with antibody titer <20 mIU/mL at baseline were evaluated for long term immunogenicity. Of the 503 subjects enrolled, 349 subjects were baseline seronegative with an anti-HAV antibody titer <20 mIU/mL. Overall, 343 subjects could be followed up at some point of time during this 5 y post vaccination period. In the last year (60 months) of follow-up, 108 subjects (97.3%) of 111 subjects (who came for follow-up at the end of 5 y) had a protective antibody titer (anti-HAV antibody titer >20 mIU/mL). The seroconversion rates considering seroprotection levels of anti-HAV antibody titer >20 mIU/mL, following vaccination starting from 6 weeks, 6 months, 12 months, 24 months, 36 months, 48 months and 60 months were 95.1%, 97.9%, 98.3%, 96.2%, 97.8%, 92.6% and 97.3%, respectively. The geometric mean concentration (GMC) over the years increased from 64.9 mIU/mL at 6 weeks to 38.1 mIU/mL and 135.2 mIU/mL at 6 months and 12 months, respectively and was maintained at 127.1 mIU/mL at 60 months. In conclusion, the result of this 5-year follow up study showed that the single dose of live attenuated vaccine is well tolerated and provides long-term immunogenicity in healthy Indian children.

  7. Comparison of two different doses of dexmedetomidine in attenuating cardiovascular responses during laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation: A double blind, randomized, clinical trial study.

    PubMed

    Jarineshin, H; Abdolahzade Baghaei, A; Fekrat, F; Kargar, A; Abdi, N; Navabipour, S; Zare, A; Akhlaghi, H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Secure airway for proper ventilation during anesthesia is one important component of a successful surgery. Endotracheal intubation is one of the most important methods in this context. Intubation method and used medication are considerably important in attenuating complications. This research aimed to investigate the impact of two different doses of dexmedetomidine in mitigating cardiovascular responses to endotracheal intubation in candidate cases supporting voluntary operation. Methods. The current research contained 90 cases in the range of 18 and 50 old, with ASA I,II supporting voluntary operation, who were randomly classified into three teams, each group consisting of 30 cases. The first set (A) got 0.5 μg/ kg dexmedetomidine, the second set (B) got 1 μg/ kg dexmedetomidine and the third set (C) got an equal volume of saline as placebo, 600 seconds earlier the initiation of anesthesia. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded at baseline (T0), then after the injection and the earlier initiation of anesthesia (T1), after the induction of anesthesia and before the endotracheal intubation (T2), promptly after tracheal intubation, 180, and 300 after endotracheal intubation (T4, T5). Data was analyzed and p < 0.05 was supposed notable. Findings. In this research, 3 teams were similar regarding weight, age, height, sex and duration of laryngoscopy. The diastolic mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and systolic arterial pressure were significantly lower in dexmedetomidine teams (A,B) at all times after the endotracheal intubation compared to group C. There were no significant differences in hemodynamic factors among group A, B. Conclusion. Dexmedetomidine effectively and significantly attenuates cardiovascular and hemodynamic responses during endotracheal intubation. In addition, different doses of dexmedetomidine did not cause any significant distinct result in mitigating cardiovascular responses.

  8. Effects of naltrexone are influenced by childhood adversity during negative emotional processing in addiction recovery.

    PubMed

    Savulich, G; Riccelli, R; Passamonti, L; Correia, M; Deakin, J F W; Elliott, R; Flechais, R S A; Lingford-Hughes, A R; McGonigle, J; Murphy, A; Nutt, D J; Orban, C; Paterson, L M; Reed, L J; Smith, D G; Suckling, J; Tait, R; Taylor, E M; Sahakian, B J; Robbins, T W; Ersche, K D

    2017-03-07

    Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist used in the management of alcohol dependence. Although the endogenous opioid system has been implicated in emotion regulation, the effects of mu-opioid receptor blockade on brain systems underlying negative emotional processing are not clear in addiction. Individuals meeting criteria for alcohol dependence alone (n=18, alcohol) and in combination with cocaine and/or opioid dependence (n=21, alcohol/drugs) and healthy individuals without a history of alcohol or drug dependence (n=21) were recruited. Participants were alcohol and drug abstinent before entered into this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover study. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to investigate brain response while viewing aversive and neutral images relative to baseline on 50 mg of naltrexone and placebo. We found that naltrexone modulated task-related activation in the medial prefrontal cortex and functional connectivity between the anterior cingulate cortex and the hippocampus as a function of childhood adversity (for aversive versus neutral images) in all groups. Furthermore, there was a group-by-treatment-by-condition interaction in the right amygdala, which was mainly driven by a normalization of response for aversive relative to neutral images under naltrexone in the alcohol/drugs group. We conclude that early childhood adversity is one environmental factor that influences pharmacological response to naltrexone. Pharmacotherapy with naltrexone may also have some ameliorative effects on negative emotional processing in combined alcohol and drug dependence, possibly due to alterations in endogenous opioid transmission or the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist actions of naltrexone.

  9. Sex differences in acute hormonal and subjective response to naltrexone: The impact of menstrual cycle phase.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel J O; King, Andrea C

    2015-02-01

    Women often exhibit larger hormonal and subjective responses to opioid receptor antagonists than men, but the biological mechanisms mediating this effect remain unclear. Among women, fluctuations in estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) across the menstrual cycle (MC) affect the endogenous opioid system. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to compare acute naltrexone response between women in the early follicular phase of the MC (low E2 and P4), women in the luteal phase of the MC (high E2 and P4), and men. Seventy healthy controls (n=46 women) participated in two morning sessions in which they received 50mg naltrexone or placebo in a randomized, counterbalanced order. Women were randomized to complete both sessions in either the early follicular (n=23) or luteal phase of the MC. Serum cortisol, salivary cortisol, prolactin, luteinizing hormone (LH), and subjective response were assessed upon arrival to the laboratory and at regular intervals after pill administration. In luteal and early follicular women but not men, naltrexone (vs. placebo) increased serum cortisol and prolactin levels from baseline; however, the naltrexone-induced increases in these hormones were significantly greater in luteal women than early follicular women. Additionally, only luteal women demonstrated an increase from baseline in salivary cortisol levels and the severity of adverse drug effects in response to naltrexone. In sum, the results indicate that luteal phase women are more sensitive to acute hormonal and subjective effects of naltrexone than early follicular women and men. These findings may have important implications for the use of naltrexone in women.

  10. Retention rates in two naltrexone programmes for heroin addicts in Vitoria, Spain.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M; Ballesteros, J; González-Oliveros, R; de Apodaka, J R

    1995-01-01

    The main finding of a former Spanish multicenter study (SMS) on the effectiveness of naltrexone maintenance in heroin addicts, was the high retention rate achieved at 24 weeks of follow-up since naltrexone induction (40%). The authors claimed this rate was one of the highest ever reported in the literature for a non-selected sample of opiate addicts and discussed the possible relevance of a set of variables - like motivations and expectations due to a new treatment - on the findings. To assess the possible effects of these variables, we have compared the retention rates in two similar naltrexone programmes. The first programme (hospital sample) included 56 individuals who were also included in the SMS where they accounted for 37% of the total sample. That programme was developed formerly to the naltrexone marketing. The second sample (ambulatory sample) included 67 individuals who were recruited at least a year apart since naltrexone marketing was approved by the Spanish Health Boards. The time-lag between the beginnig of both studies was in the range of 15 to 25 months. The subjects in both programmes had similar distributions regarding age (p = 0.27), sex (p = 0.79), weeks on treatment after naltrexone induction (p = 0.20), and program compliance (p = 0.78). The retention rates evaluated over a period of 24 weeks were also similar (p = 0.45). The only difference appeared at 12 weeks of follow-up, showing in higher retention the hospital sample than the ambulatory sample (+23%; p < 0.05). The results are discussed according to other studies and it is concluded that findings reported in the former SMS and in this study are not unusual but compatible with recent research. Also underlined is the potential importance of naltrexone as a concomitant treatment for extinguishing high risk behaviours and the conditional stimuli associated with treatment relapse in heroin addicts.

  11. Employment-Based Reinforcement of Adherence to Depot Naltrexone in Unemployed Opioid-Dependent Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Everly, Jeffrey J.; DeFulio, Anthony; Koffarnus, Mikhail N.; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Donlin, Wendy D.; Aklin, Will M.; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Aims Naltrexone can be used to treat opioid dependence, but patients refuse to take it. Extended-release depot formulations may improve adherence, but long-term adherence rates to depot naltrexone are not known. This study determined long-term rates of adherence to depot naltrexone and whether employment-based reinforcement can improve adherence. Design Participants who were inducted onto oral naltrexone were randomly assigned to Contingency (n=18) or Prescription (n=17) groups. Participants were offered six depot naltrexone injections and invited to work at the therapeutic workplace weekdays for 26 weeks where they earned stipends for participating in job skills training. Contingency participants were required to accept naltrexone injections to maintain workplace access and to maintain maximum pay. Prescription participants could work independent of whether they accepted injections. Setting The therapeutic workplace, a model employment-based intervention for drug addiction and unemployment. Participants Opioid-dependent unemployed adults. Measurements Depot naltrexone injections accepted and opiate-negative urine samples. Findings Contingency participants accepted significantly more naltrexone injections than Prescription participants (81% versus 42%), and were more likely to accept all injections (66% versus 35%). At monthly assessments (with missing urine samples imputed as positive), the groups provided similar percentages of samples negative for opiates (74% versus 62%) and for cocaine (56% versus 54%). Opiate positive samples were more likely when samples were also positive for cocaine. Conclusions Employment-based reinforcement can maintain adherence to depot naltrexone. Future research should determine whether persistent cocaine use compromises naltrexone's effect on opiate use. Workplaces may be useful for promoting sustained adherence to depot naltrexone. PMID:21320227

  12. Brief Report: Six Months Continuation Treatment in Naltrexone-Responsive Children with Autism: An Open-Label Case-Control Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willemsen-Swinkels, Sophie H. N.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina A.; van Engeland, Herman

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports on a six-month continuation treatment with naltrexone of six children with autism, previously found to be responsive to naltrexone in a four-week trial. Results indicated the moderate hyperactivity-reducing effect of naltrexone was maintained during the six-month continuation treatment but no additional gains in the domains of…

  13. Low-dose growth hormone and hypocaloric nutrition attenuate the protein-catabolic response after major operation.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Z M; He, G Z; Zhang, S Y; Wang, X R; Yang, N F; Zhu, Y; Wilmore, D W

    1989-01-01

    To determine the effects of low-dose recombinant human growth hormone (GH) and hypocaloric nutrition on postoperative convalescence, we performed a placebo-controlled randomized double-blind trial in 18 patients after elective gastrectomy or colectomy. The subjects received parenteral nutrition containing 20 calories/kg per day and 1 g protein/kg per day. Daily injections of drug or placebo were given during the first postoperative week. The nine control subjects lost 3.3 kg (5.9% of preoperative weight) and had a cumulative nitrogen loss of 32.6 +/- 4.2 g nitrogen at eight days. The patients receiving GH lost significantly less weight (1.3 kg) and nitrogen loss was 7.1 +/- 3.1 g at eight days (p less than 0.001). Kinetic studies demonstrated that the anabolic effects of GH were associated with increased protein synthesis, and amino acid flux studies across the forearm revealed increased uptake of amino acid nitrogen in the GH-treated patients. Body compositional analysis revealed that the patients receiving GH maintained their lean body mass despite the major surgical procedure. Analysis of hand grip force showed a 10% loss of strength in the control subjects; with GH the patients maintained their grip force throughout the postoperative period. We conclude that the postoperative catabolic response can be modified with GH and hypocaloric nutrition. These metabolic and physiologic effects should now be studied in a larger number of patients to determine if this approach can reduce morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay for surgical patients. PMID:2802836

  14. Examining naltrexone and alcohol effects in a minority population: results from an initial human laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Plebani, Jennifer G; Oslin, David W; Lynch, Kevin G

    2011-01-01

    Prior clinical findings have indicated a potential lack of naltrexone efficacy among African Americans with alcohol dependence. However, no definitive conclusions have been drawn due to the relatively small numbers of African Americans in most alcohol treatment trials. The purpose of this study was to examine alcohol and naltrexone effects on healthy African-American individuals in a laboratory environment. Nonalcohol-dependent social drinking adults of African descent (n = 43) were recruited for participation. After consenting and completing the baseline assessment, they participated in four separate alcohol challenge sessions each separated by at least 10 days. During each of the sessions, subjects were administered alcohol or sham drinks, after pretreatment with either naltrexone (50 mg/day) or placebo in a double-blind fashion. The order of the four sessions was randomly assigned. During each session, breath alcohol levels and subjective responses were measured. Results indicate an alcohol effect among these subjects for subjective responses, but no naltrexone effect. Similar to the apparent lack of clinical efficacy findings, naltrexone does not appear to impact alcohol effects in African-American social drinkers. Future studies should investigate African-American populations with heavy drinking as well as alcohol-dependent subjects in order to strengthen the parallels to clinical findings.

  15. Effects of Naloxone and Naltrexone on Self-Injury: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Rowland P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Double blind study compared effects of two drug treatments, naloxone hydrochloride and naltrexone hydrochloride, on self-injurious behavior of a 12-year-old mentally retarded and autistic girl. Self-injury increased with naloxone treatment but decreased to near zero with naltrexone, a change which persisted at follow-up 22 months after treatment.…

  16. Delayed mTOR Inhibition with Low Dose of Everolimus Reduces TGFβ Expression, Attenuates Proteinuria and Renal Damage in the Renal Mass Reduction Model

    PubMed Central

    Kurdián, Melania; Herrero-Fresneda, Inmaculada; Lloberas, Nuria; Gimenez-Bonafe, Pepita; Coria, Virginia; Grande, María T.; Boggia, José; Malacrida, Leonel; Torras, Joan; Arévalo, Miguel A.; González-Martínez, Francisco; López-Novoa, José M.; Grinyó, Josep; Noboa, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Background The immunosuppressive mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are widely used in solid organ transplantation, but their effect on kidney disease progression is controversial. mTOR has emerged as one of the main pathways regulating cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of delayed inhibition of mTOR pathway with low dose of everolimus on progression of renal disease and TGFβ expression in the 5/6 nephrectomy model in Wistar rats. Methods This study evaluated the effects of everolimus (0.3 mg/k/day) introduced 15 days after surgical procedure on renal function, proteinuria, renal histology and mechanisms of fibrosis and proliferation. Results Everolimus treated group (EveG) showed significantly less proteinuria and albuminuria, less glomerular and tubulointerstitial damage and fibrosis, fibroblast activation cell proliferation, when compared with control group (CG), even though the EveG remained with high blood pressure. Treatment with everolimus also diminished glomerular hypertrophy. Everolimus effectively inhibited the increase of mTOR developed in 5/6 nephrectomy animals, without changes in AKT mRNA or protein abundance, but with an increase in the pAKT/AKT ratio. Associated with this inhibition, everolimus blunted the increased expression of TGFβ observed in the remnant kidney model. Conclusion Delayed mTOR inhibition with low dose of everolimus significantly prevented progressive renal damage and protected the remnant kidney. mTOR and TGFβ mRNA reduction can partially explain this anti fibrotic effect. mTOR can be a new target to attenuate the progression of chronic kidney disease even in those nephropathies of non-immunologic origin. PMID:22427849

  17. Naltrexone/bupropion for obesity: an investigational combination pharmacotherapy for weight loss.

    PubMed

    Billes, Sonja K; Sinnayah, Puspha; Cowley, Michael A

    2014-06-01

    The mechanism of action of the combination therapy, naltrexone/bupropion (NB), for obesity has not been fully described to date. Weight loss attempts rarely result in long-term success. This is likely a result of complex interactions among multiple peripheral and CNS systems that defend against weight loss, and may explain the overwhelming lack of effective obesity treatments. NB is an investigational combination therapy for obesity that was developed based on evidence that obesity involves alterations in the hypothalamic melanocortin system as well as brain reward systems that influence food craving and mood. Naltrexone and bupropion both have actions in these brain regions that may cause them to influence food intake, food craving, and other aspects of eating behavior that affect body weight. We review the individual actions of naltrexone and bupropion in brain hypothalamic and reward systems, and describe the current in vitro, in vivo, and clinical evidence for how NB influences food intake and produces weight loss.

  18. Systemic Dosing of Thymosin Beta 4 before and after Ischemia Does Not Attenuate Global Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Christoffer K.-J.; Tarkia, Miikka; Kentala, Rasmus; Malmberg, Markus; Vähäsilta, Tommi; Savo, Matti; Hynninen, Ville-Veikko; Helenius, Mikko; Ruohonen, Saku; Jalkanen, Juho; Taimen, Pekka; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Saraste, Antti; Knuuti, Juhani; Savunen, Timo; Koskenvuo, Juha

    2016-01-01

    The use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and aortic cross-clamping causes myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury (I-RI) and can lead to reduced postoperative cardiac function. We investigated whether this injury could be attenuated by thymosin beta 4 (TB4), a peptide which has showed cardioprotective effects. Pigs received either TB4 or vehicle and underwent CPB and aortic cross-clamping for 60 min with cold intermittent blood-cardioplegia and were then followed for 30 h. Myocardial function and blood flow was studied by cardiac magnetic resonance and PET imaging. Tissue and plasma samples were analyzed to determine the amount of cardiomyocyte necrosis and apoptosis as well as pharmacokinetics of the peptide. In vitro studies were performed to assess its influence on blood coagulation and vasomotor tone. Serum levels of the peptide were increased after administration compared to control samples. TB4 did not decrease the amount of cell death. Cardiac function and global myocardial blood flow was similar between the study groups. At high doses a vasoconstrictor effect on mesentery arteries and a vasodilator effect on coronary arteries was observed and blood clot firmness was reduced when tested in the presence of an antiplatelet agent. Despite promising results in previous trials the cardioprotective effect of TB4 was not demonstrated in this model for global myocardial I-RI. PMID:27199757

  19. Repetitive exposure to low-dose X-irradiation attenuates testicular apoptosis in type 2 diabetic rats, likely via Akt-mediated Nrf2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuguang; Kong, Chuipeng; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Zhenyu; Wan, Zhiqiang; Jia, Lin; Liu, Qiuju; Wang, Yuehui; Li, Wei; Cui, Jiuwei; Han, Fujun; Cai, Lu

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether repetitive exposure to low-dose radiation (LDR) attenuates type 2 diabetes (T2DM)-induced testicular apoptotic cell death in a T2DM rat model, we examined the effects of LDR exposure on diabetic and age-matched control rats. We found that testicular apoptosis and oxidative stress levels were significantly higher in T2DM rats than in control rats. In addition, glucose metabolism-related Akt and GSK-3β function was downregulated and Akt negative regulators PTP1B and TRB3 were upregulated in the T2DM group. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and catalase content were also found to be decreased in T2DM rats. These effects were partially prevented or reversed by repetitive LDR exposure. Nrf2 and its downstream genes NQO1, SOD, and catalase were significantly upregulated by repetitive exposure to LDR, suggesting that the reduction of T2DM-induced testicular apoptosis due to repetitive LDR exposure likely involves enhancement of testicular Akt-mediated glucose metabolism and anti-oxidative defense mechanisms. PMID:26704079

  20. Effects of naltrexone plus topiramate on ethanol self-administration and tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression changes.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Francisco; Rubio, Gabriel; Manzanares, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of naltrexone (0.7 mg/kg) and/or topiramate (25 mg/kg) on ethanol consumption and the motivation to drink in an oral-operant conditioning paradigm in C57BL/6 mice. Subsequent real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments were performed to analyze gene expression changes in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The administration of naltrexone significantly reduced ethanol consumption and the motivation to drink during the different stages of the experiment, whereas the treatment with topiramate resulted in a much lower effect. Interestingly, the administration of naltrexone plus topiramate reduced ethanol consumption markedly compared with single-drug treatment. The water self-administration paradigm was also performed using the same drugs and no differences were found between treatment groups. Real-time PCR analyses revealed that naltrexone significantly normalized the increase of TH gene expression in the VTA induced by ethanol, whereas the administration of topiramate did not produce any significant effect. In the ethanol self-administration procedure, the combination of both drugs further reduced TH gene expression, reaching statistical significance compared with the vehicle, naltrexone or topiramate groups. Taken together, these findings indicate that the administration of naltrexone plus topiramate further reduced ethanol consumption and the motivation to drink in comparison with single-drug treatment. This action may be due, at least in part, to a greater decrease in TH gene expression in the VTA. These results suggest that the combination of both drugs deserves further exploration for the treatment of problems related to alcohol consumption.

  1. A Phase I Clinical Study of a Live Attenuated Bordetella pertussis Vaccine - BPZE1; A Single Centre, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Dose-Escalating Study of BPZE1 Given Intranasally to Healthy Adult Male Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Thorstensson, Rigmor; Trollfors, Birger; Al-Tawil, Nabil; Jahnmatz, Maja; Bergström, Jakob; Ljungman, Margaretha; Törner, Anna; Wehlin, Lena; Van Broekhoven, Annie; Bosman, Fons; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Mielcarek, Nathalie; Locht, Camille

    2014-01-01

    Background Acellular pertussis vaccines do not control pertussis. A new approach to offer protection to infants is necessary. BPZE1, a genetically modified Bordetella pertussis strain, was developed as a live attenuated nasal pertussis vaccine by genetically eliminating or detoxifying 3 toxins. Methods We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating study of BPZE1 given intranasally for the first time to human volunteers, the first trial of a live attenuated bacterial vaccine specifically designed for the respiratory tract. 12 subjects per dose group received 103, 105 or 107 colony-forming units as droplets with half of the dose in each nostril. 12 controls received the diluent. Local and systemic safety and immune responses were assessed during 6 months, and nasopharyngeal colonization with BPZE1 was determined with repeated cultures during the first 4 weeks after vaccination. Results Colonization was seen in one subject in the low dose, one in the medium dose and five in the high dose group. Significant increases in immune responses against pertussis antigens were seen in all colonized subjects. There was one serious adverse event not related to the vaccine. Other adverse events were trivial and occurred with similar frequency in the placebo and vaccine groups. Conclusions BPZE1 is safe in healthy adults and able to transiently colonize the nasopharynx. It induces immune responses in all colonized individuals. BPZE1 can thus undergo further clinical development, including dose optimization and trials in younger age groups. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01188512 PMID:24421886

  2. Combined varenicline and naltrexone treatment reduces smoking topography intensity in heavy-drinking smokers.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel J O; Bujarski, Spencer; Hartwell, Emily; Green, ReJoyce; Ray, Lara A

    2015-07-01

    Heavy drinking smokers constitute a distinct sub-population of smokers for whom traditional smoking cessation therapies may not be effective. Recent evidence suggested that combined varenicline (VAR) and naltrexone (NTX) therapy may be more efficacious than either monotherapy alone in reducing smoking and drinking-related behavior in this population. The manner in which individuals smoke a cigarette (i.e., smoking topography) may be predictive of smoking cessation outcomes, yet the effects of smoking pharmacotherapies on puffing behavior have not been thoroughly examined. Therefore, the current double-blind medication study examined the effects of VAR alone (1mg BID), low dose NTX alone (25mg QD), the combination of VAR+NTX, and placebo on smoking topography measures in heavy drinking, non-treatment seeking daily smokers (n=120). After a 9-day titration period, participants completed a laboratory session in which they smoked their first cigarette of the day using a smoking topography device following 12h of nicotine abstinence and consumption of an alcoholic beverage (BrAC=0.06g/dl). The primary measures were puff count, volume, duration, and velocity and inter-puff interval (IPI). Independent of medication group, puff velocity and IPI increased, while puff volume and duration decreased, over the course of the cigarette. The active medication groups, vs. the placebo group, had significantly blunted puff duration and velocity slopes over the course of the cigarette, and this effect was particularly evident in the VAR+NTX group. Additionally, the VAR+NTX group demonstrated lower average IPI than the monotherapy groups and lower average puff volume than all other groups. These results suggest that smoking pharmacotherapies, particularly the combination of VAR+NTX, alter smoking topography in heavy drinking smokers, producing a pattern of less intense puffing behavior. As smoking topography has been predictive of the ability to quit smoking, future studies should

  3. Attenuation-based estimation of patient size for the purpose of size specific dose estimation in CT. Part II. Implementation on abdomen and thorax phantoms using cross sectional CT images and scanned projection radiograph images

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jia; Christner, Jodie A.; Duan Xinhui; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To estimate attenuation using cross sectional CT images and scanned projection radiograph (SPR) images in a series of thorax and abdomen phantoms. Methods: Attenuation was quantified in terms of a water cylinder with cross sectional area of A{sub w} from both the CT and SPR images of abdomen and thorax phantoms, where A{sub w} is the area of a water cylinder that would absorb the same dose as the specified phantom. SPR and axial CT images were acquired using a dual-source CT scanner operated at 120 kV in single-source mode. To use the SPR image for estimating A{sub w}, the pixel values of a SPR image were calibrated to physical water attenuation using a series of water phantoms. A{sub w} and the corresponding diameter D{sub w} were calculated using the derived attenuation-based methods (from either CT or SPR image). A{sub w} was also calculated using only geometrical dimensions of the phantoms (anterior-posterior and lateral dimensions or cross sectional area). Results: For abdomen phantoms, the geometry-based and attenuation-based methods gave similar results for D{sub w}. Using only geometric parameters, an overestimation of D{sub w} ranging from 4.3% to 21.5% was found for thorax phantoms. Results for D{sub w} using the CT image and SPR based methods agreed with each other within 4% on average in both thorax and abdomen phantoms. Conclusions: Either the cross sectional CT or SPR images can be used to estimate patient attenuation in CT. Both are more accurate than use of only geometrical information for the task of quantifying patient attenuation. The SPR based method requires calibration of SPR pixel values to physical water attenuation and this calibration would be best performed by the scanner manufacturer.

  4. Nitric oxide mediates effects of acute, not chronic, naltrexone on LPS-induced hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic rats.

    PubMed

    Ghiassy, Bentolhoda; Rahimi, Nastaran; Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest endogenous opioids and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, the interaction between the opioid receptor antagonist and NO was investigated on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HE in cirrhotic rats. Male rats were divided in the sham- and bile duct ligation (BDL)-operated groups. Animals were treated with saline; naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i.p.); or L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or in combination with naltrexone. To induce HE, LPS (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 1 h after the final drug treatment. HE scoring, hepatic histology, and plasma NO metabolites levels and mortality rate were recorded. Deteriorated level of consciousness and mortality after LPS administration significantly ameliorated following both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone in cirrhotic rats. However, acute and chronic administration of L-NAME did not change HE scores in cirrhotic rats. The effects of acute but not chronic treatment of naltrexone on HE parameters were reversed by L-NAME. Plasma NOx concentrations elevated in BDL rats, which were decreased after acute and chronic treatment by naltrexone or L-NAME, significantly. We suggest both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone improved LPS-induced HE. But, only acute treatment with naltrexone may affect through NO pathway.

  5. Predicting the effect of naltrexone and acamprosate in alcohol-dependent patients using genetic indicators.

    PubMed

    Ooteman, Wendy; Naassila, Mickaël; Koeter, Maarten W J; Verheul, Roel; Schippers, Gerard M; Houchi, Hakim; Daoust, Martine; van den Brink, Wim

    2009-07-01

    Acamprosate and naltrexone are effective medications in the treatment of alcoholism. However, effect sizes are modest. Pharmacogenomics may improve patient-treatment-matching and effect sizes. It is hypothesized that naltrexone exerts its effect through genetic characteristics associated with the dopaminergic/opioidergic positive reinforcement system, whereas acamprosate works through the glutamatergic/GABAergic negative reinforcement system. Alcohol-dependent subjects were randomly assigned to either acamprosate or naltrexone. Subjects participated in a cue-exposure experiment at the day before and at the last day of medication. Reductions in cue-induced craving and physiological cue reactivity were measured. Differential effects of naltrexone and acamprosate on these outcomes were tested for different polymorphisms of the opioid, dopamine, glutamate and GABA-receptors. Significant matching effects were found for polymorphisms at the DRD2, GABRA6 and GABRB2 gene. In addition, a trend was found for the OPRM1 polymorphism. This provides evidence for the matching potential of genotypes. It is expected that more effective treatments can be offered when genetic information is used in patient-treatment-matching.

  6. A Case Report of Naltrexone Treatment of Self-Injury and Social Withdrawal in Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Anne S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Naltrexone hydrochloride was administered to an autistic mentally retarded male, age 14, to investigate the endogenous opiate release theory of self-injurious behavior (SIB). Results yielded a marked decrease in SIB and increased social relatedness during two phases of drug treatment. SIB did not revert to original placebo levels during a second…

  7. Using Analog Baselines To Assess the Effects of Naltrexone on Self-Injurious Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, David; Smith, Richard G.

    1999-01-01

    A study administered Naltrexone (NLTX) to two adult females with profound mental retardation who engaged in self-injurious behavior (SIB). For one participant, NLTX produced slight reductions in SIB across baseline conditions. The second participant's results showed NLTX reduced head-slapping during demand sessions but had no apparent effect on…

  8. Cessation of Long-Term Naltrexone Therapy and Self-Injury: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crews, W. David, Jr.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This case study of a woman with profound mental retardation and a history of severe self-injurious behavior (SIB) found that the dramatic decrease in SIB following Naltrexone administration was maintained through placebo and no drug phases and at six-month follow-up. Findings are discussed in terms of endogenous opioid system theories of SIB. (DB)

  9. Self-Injurious Behavior and the Efficacy of Naltrexone Treatment: A Quantitative Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symons, Frank J.; Thompson, Andrea; Rodriguez, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    People with mental retardation, autism, and related developmental disabilities who self-injure are treated with a wide array of behavioral techniques and psychotropic medications. Despite numerous reports documenting short-term and some long-term changes in self-injury associated with the opiate antagonist naltrexone hydrochloride, no quantitative…

  10. Bupropion-SR plus naltrexone-SR for the treatment of mild-to-moderate obesity.

    PubMed

    Ali, Khawla F; Shukla, Alpana P; Aronne, Louis J

    2016-01-01

    Naltrexone-bupropion is a recently approved drug combination for chronic weight management. In this article, we discuss the rationale for its use as a combination followed by a comprehensive review of safety and efficacy data from major preclinical, phase II and III clinical trials.

  11. Naltrexone HCI/bupropion HCI for chronic weight management in obese adults: patient selection and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tek, Cenk

    2016-01-01

    Naltrexone, an opiate antagonist, and bupropion, a noradrenergic/dopaminergic antidepressant, have many effects on the reward systems of the brain. These medications impact eating behavior, presumably via their impact on food reward. However, only bupropion induces weight loss in obese individuals, while naltrexone does not have any appreciable effect. The combination of 32 mg of naltrexone and 360 mg of bupropion in a sustained-release combination pill form has been recently approved for obesity treatment. Studies have shown that the combination of these two medications is more effective in inducing weight loss, when combined with lifestyle intervention and calorie reduction, than each individual medicine alone. The naltrexone–bupropion combination, when combined with lifestyle intervention and modest calorie reduction, seems to be quite effective for 6-month and 1-year outcomes for clinically significant weight loss (over 5% of total body weight). These medications are not devoid of serious side effects, however, and careful patient selection can reduce dramatic complications and increase positive outcomes. This paper reviews existing weight loss clinical trials with bupropion and the bupropion–naltrexone combination. Additionally, the rationale for the suggested patient selection and clinical strategies for special patient populations are discussed. PMID:27217728

  12. Opioid receptor selectivity profile change via isosterism for 14-O-substitued naltrexone derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Elbegdorj, Orgil; Yuan, Yunyun; Beletskaya, Irina O.; Selley, Dana E.

    2013-01-01

    Isosterism is commonly used in drug discovery and development to address stability, selectivity, toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy issues. A series of 14-O-substituted naltrexone derivatives were identified as potent mu opioid receptor (MOR) antagonists with improved selectivity over the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) and the delta opioid receptor (DOR), compared to naltrexone. Since esters are not metabolically very stable under typical physiological conditions, their corresponding amide analogs were thus synthesized and biologically evaluated. Unlike their isosteres, most of these novel ligands seem to be dually selective for the MOR and the KOR over the DOR. The restricted flexibility of the amide bond linkage might be responsible for their altered selectivity profile. However, the majority of the 14-N-substituted naltrexone derivatives produced marginal or no MOR stimulation in the 35S-GTP[γS] assay, which resembled their ester analogs. The current study thus indicated that the 14-substituted naltrexone isosteres are not bioisosteres since they have distinctive pharmacological profile with the regard to their opioid receptor binding affinity and selectivity. PMID:23721804

  13. Opioid receptor selectivity profile change via isosterism for 14-O-substituted naltrexone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Elbegdorj, Orgil; Yuan, Yunyun; Beletskaya, Irina O; Selley, Dana E

    2013-07-01

    Isosterism is commonly used in drug discovery and development to address stability, selectivity, toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy issues. A series of 14-O-substituted naltrexone derivatives were identified as potent mu opioid receptor (MOR) antagonists with improved selectivity over the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) and the delta opioid receptor (DOR), compared to naltrexone. Since esters are not metabolically very stable under typical physiological conditions, their corresponding amide analogs were thus synthesized and biologically evaluated. Unlike their isosteres, most of these novel ligands seem to be dually selective for the MOR and the KOR over the DOR. The restricted flexibility of the amide bond linkage might be responsible for their altered selectivity profile. However, the majority of the 14-N-substituted naltrexone derivatives produced marginal or no MOR stimulation in the (35)S-GTP[γS] assay, which resembled their ester analogs. The current study thus indicated that the 14-substituted naltrexone isosteres are not bioisosteres since they have distinctive pharmacological profile with the regard to their opioid receptor binding affinity and selectivity.

  14. Targeted Naltrexone Treatment Moderates the Relations Between Mood and Drinking Behavior Among Problem Drinkers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kranzler, Henry P.; Armeli, Stephen; Feinn, Richard; Tennen, Howard

    2004-01-01

    One hundred fifty-three problem drinkers were randomly assigned to receive naltrexone 50 mg or placebo on a daily or targeted (to high-risk drinking situations) basis. Using structured nightly diaries, participants recorded negative and positive mood, desire to drink, and alcohol consumption over 8 weeks. Results indicated that individuals engaged…

  15. Attenuation properties and percentage depth dose of tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboard phantoms using computed tomography (CT) and treatment planning system (TPS) at high energy x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, M. F. Mohd; Abdullah, R.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Hashim, R.; Bauk, S.

    2016-01-01

    A set of tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboard phantoms with dimension of 30 cm x 30 cm was fabricated at target density of 1.0 g/cm3. The mass attenuation coefficient of the phantom was measured using 60Co gamma source. The phantoms were scanned using Computed Tomography (CT) scanner and the percentage depth dose (PDD) of the phantom was calculated using treatment planning system (TPS) at 6 MV and 10 MV x-ray and compared to that in solid water phantoms. The result showed that the mass attenuation coefficient of tannin-based Rhizohora spp. phantoms was near to the value of water with χ2 value of 1.2. The measured PDD also showed good agreement with solid water phantom at both 6 MV and 10 MV x-ray with percentage deviation below 8% at depth beyond the maximum dose, Zmax.

  16. Attenuation properties and percentage depth dose of tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboard phantoms using computed tomography (CT) and treatment planning system (TPS) at high energy x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yusof, M. F. Mohd; Abdullah, R.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Hashim, R.; Bauk, S.

    2016-01-22

    A set of tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboard phantoms with dimension of 30 cm x 30 cm was fabricated at target density of 1.0 g/cm{sup 3}. The mass attenuation coefficient of the phantom was measured using {sup 60}Co gamma source. The phantoms were scanned using Computed Tomography (CT) scanner and the percentage depth dose (PDD) of the phantom was calculated using treatment planning system (TPS) at 6 MV and 10 MV x-ray and compared to that in solid water phantoms. The result showed that the mass attenuation coefficient of tannin-based Rhizohora spp. phantoms was near to the value of water with χ{sup 2} value of 1.2. The measured PDD also showed good agreement with solid water phantom at both 6 MV and 10 MV x-ray with percentage deviation below 8% at depth beyond the maximum dose, Z{sub max}.

  17. Control algorithms for dynamic attenuators

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The authors describe algorithms to control dynamic attenuators in CT and compare their performance using simulated scans. Dynamic attenuators are prepatient beam shaping filters that modulate the distribution of x-ray fluence incident on the patient on a view-by-view basis. These attenuators can reduce dose while improving key image quality metrics such as peak or mean variance. In each view, the attenuator presents several degrees of freedom which may be individually adjusted. The total number of degrees of freedom across all views is very large, making many optimization techniques impractical. The authors develop a theory for optimally controlling these attenuators. Special attention is paid to a theoretically perfect attenuator which controls the fluence for each ray individually, but the authors also investigate and compare three other, practical attenuator designs which have been previously proposed: the piecewise-linear attenuator, the translating attenuator, and the double wedge attenuator. Methods: The authors pose and solve the optimization problems of minimizing the mean and peak variance subject to a fixed dose limit. For a perfect attenuator and mean variance minimization, this problem can be solved in simple, closed form. For other attenuator designs, the problem can be decomposed into separate problems for each view to greatly reduce the computational complexity. Peak variance minimization can be approximately solved using iterated, weighted mean variance (WMV) minimization. Also, the authors develop heuristics for the perfect and piecewise-linear attenuators which do not requirea priori knowledge of the patient anatomy. The authors compare these control algorithms on different types of dynamic attenuators using simulated raw data from forward projected DICOM files of a thorax and an abdomen. Results: The translating and double wedge attenuators reduce dose by an average of 30% relative to current techniques (bowtie filter with tube current

  18. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized pilot study comparing quetiapine with placebo, associated to naltrexone, in the treatment of alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Guardia, Josep; Roncero, Carlos; Galan, Jaime; Gonzalvo, Begoña; Burguete, Teresa; Casas, Miquel

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether quetiapine plus naltrexone is more effective than naltrexone alone for the treatment of alcohol-dependent patients. This was a double-blind, randomized clinical trial where eligible alcohol-dependent patients were randomized to receive naltrexone (50mg/day) plus quetiapine (25-200mg/day) or naltrexone (50mg/day) plus placebo for 12 weeks, and afterwards patients received naltrexone alone during 4 additional weeks. The primary efficacy measures were percent days abstinent, drinks per drinking day, and the relapse rate. Sixty-two patients received a single-blind treatment with placebo plus naltrexone, and they were thereafter randomly assigned to quetiapine plus naltrexone (n=30) or placebo plus naltrexone (n=32). Eleven (36.7%) patients in the quetiapine-treated group and 4 (12.5%) patients in the placebo-treated group withdrew before they completed 12 weeks of treatment. There were no statistically significant differences for any primary drinking outcomes between treatment groups. Both regimens were well tolerated. This study failed to demonstrate any additional benefit from the combination of quetiapine and naltrexone compared to naltrexone alone on drinking outcomes.

  19. Robust and Balanced Immune Responses to All 4 Dengue Virus Serotypes Following Administration of a Single Dose of a Live Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine to Healthy, Flavivirus-Naive Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Beth D.; Durbin, Anna P.; Pierce, Kristen K.; Carmolli, Marya P.; Tibery, Cecilia M.; Grier, Palmtama L.; Hynes, Noreen; Diehl, Sean A.; Elwood, Dan; Jarvis, Adrienne P.; Sabundayo, Beulah P.; Lyon, Caroline E.; Larsson, Catherine J.; Jo, Matthew; Lovchik, Janece M.; Luke, Catherine J.; Walsh, Mary C.; Fraser, Ellen A.; Subbarao, Kanta; Whitehead, Steven S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The 4 serotypes of dengue virus, DENV-1–4, are the leading cause of arboviral disease globally. The ideal dengue vaccine would provide protection against all serotypes after a single dose. Methods. Two randomized, placebo-controlled trials were performed with 168 flavivirus-naive adults to demonstrate the safety and immunogenicity of a live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (TV003), compared with those of a second tetravalent vaccine with an enhanced DENV-2 component (TV005), and to evaluate the benefit of a booster dose at 6 months. Safety data, viremia, and neutralizing antibody titers were evaluated. Results. A single dose of TV005 elicited a tetravalent response in 90% of vaccinees by 3 months after vaccination and a trivalent response in 98%. Compared with TV003, the higher-dose DENV-2 component increased the observed frequency of immunogenicity to DENV-2 in the TV005 trial. Both the first and second doses were well tolerated. Neither vaccine viremia, rash, nor a significant antibody boost were observed following a second dose. Conclusions. A single subcutaneous dose of TV005 dengue vaccine is safe and induces a tetravalent antibody response at an unprecedented frequency among vaccinees. A second dose has limited benefit and appears to be unnecessary. Studies to confirm these findings and assess vaccine efficacy will now move to populations in regions where DENV transmission is endemic. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01072786 and NCT01436422. PMID:25801652

  20. Randomized trial of long-acting sustained-release naltrexone implant vs oral naltrexone or placebo for preventing relapse to opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Krupitsky, Evgeny; Zvartau, Edwin; Blokhina, Elena; Verbitskaya, Elena; Wahlgren, Valentina; Tsoy-Podosenin, Marina; Bushara, Natalia; Burakov, Andrey; Masalov, Dmitry; Romanova, Tatyana; Tyurina, Arina; Palatkin, Vladimir; Slavina, Tatyana; Pecoraro, Anna; Woody, George E

    2012-09-01

    CONTEXT Sustained-release naltrexone implants may improve outcomes of nonagonist treatment of opioid addiction. OBJECTIVE To compare outcomes of naltrexone implants, oral naltrexone hydrochloride, and nonmedication treatment. DESIGN Six-month double-blind, double-dummy, randomized trial. SETTING Addiction treatment programs in St Petersburg, Russia. PARTICIPANTS Three hundred six opioid-addicted patients recently undergoing detoxification. INTERVENTIONS Biweekly counseling and 1 of the following 3 treatments for 24 weeks: (1) 1000-mg naltrexone implant and oral placebo (NI+OP group; 102 patients); (2) placebo implant and 50-mg oral naltrexone hydrochloride (PI+ON group; 102 patients); or (3) placebo implant and oral placebo (PI+OP group; 102 patients). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Percentage of patients retained in treatment without relapse. RESULTS By month 6, 54 of 102 patients in the NI+OP group (52.9%) remained in treatment without relapse compared with 16 of 102 patients in the PI+ON group (15.7%) (survival analysis, log-rank test, P < .001) and 11 of 102 patients in the PI+OP group (10.8%) (P < .001). The PI+ON vs PI+OP comparison showed a nonsignificant trend favoring the PI+ON group (P = .07). Counting missing test results as positive, the proportion of urine screening tests yielding negative results for opiates was 63.6% (95% CI, 60%-66%) for the NI+OP group; 42.7% (40%-45%) for the PI+ON group; and 34.1% (32%-37%) for the PI+OP group (P < .001, Fisher exact test, compared with the NI+OP group). Twelve wound infections occurred among 244 implantations (4.9%) in the NI+OP group, 2 among 181 (1.1%) in the PI+ON group, and 1 among 148 (0.7%) in the PI+OP group (P = .02). All events were in the first 2 weeks after implantation and resolved with antibiotic therapy. Four local-site reactions (redness and swelling) occurred in the second month after implantation in the NI+OP group (P = .12), and all resolved with antiallergy medication treatment. Other nonlocal

  1. Reduction of conditioned pain modulation in humans by naltrexone: an exploratory study of the effects of pain catastrophizing.

    PubMed

    King, Christopher D; Goodin, Burel; Kindler, Lindsay L; Caudle, Robert M; Edwards, Robert R; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Riley, Joseph L; Fillingim, Roger B

    2013-06-01

    The current study tested the hypothesis that conditioned pain modulation is mediated by the release of endogenous opioids with a placebo-controlled (sugar pill) study of naltrexone (50 mg) in 33 healthy volunteers over two counter-balanced sessions. Pain modulation consisted of rating of heat pain (palm) during concurrent cold water immersion (foot). Compared to baseline heat pain ratings, concurrent foot immersion lowered pain intensity ratings, which suggests an inhibitory effect, was reduced with naltrexone, suggesting at least partial dependence of inhibition on endogenous opioids. An exploratory analysis revealed that individual differences in catastrophizing moderated the effects of naltrexone; endogenous opioid blockade abolished modulation in subjects lower in catastrophizing while modulation was unaffected by naltrexone among high catastrophizers. The results suggest a role of endogenous opioids in endogenous analgesia, but hint that multiple systems might contribute to conditioned pain modulation, and that these systems might be differentially activated as a function of individual differences in responses to pain.

  2. A randomized trial of combined citalopram and naltrexone for nonabstinent outpatients with co-occurring alcohol dependence and major depression.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Simon J; Sellman, J Douglas; Foulds, James A; Frampton, Christopher M A; Deering, Daryle; Dunn, Alistair; Berks, John; Nixon, Lee; Cape, Gavin

    2015-04-01

    Despite the high rate of co-occurrence of major depression and alcohol dependence, the role of pharmacotherapy in their treatment remains unclear. In the new era of naltrexone for alcohol dependence, it is notable that only 1 study to date has examined the efficacy of antidepressant medication prescribed concurrently with naltrexone. We aimed to determine whether combining naltrexone with citalopram produced better treatment outcomes than naltrexone alone in patients with co-occurring alcohol dependence and depression, and to investigate whether either sex or depression type (independent or substance-induced depression) moderated treatment response. Participants were 138 depressed alcohol-dependent adults who were not required to be abstinent at the commencement of the trial. They were randomized to 12 weeks of citalopram or placebo, plus naltrexone and clinical case management. Treatment was well attended, and medications were reasonably well tolerated with high adherence rates. Substantial improvements in both mood and drinking occurred in both groups, with no significant differences between groups on any of the mood or drinking outcome measures, whether or not other variables were controlled for. No interaction effect was found for independent/substance-induced depression status, whereas there was a marginal effect found by sex, with greater improvement in 1 drinking outcome measure (percent days abstinent) in women taking citalopram. These findings suggest that citalopram is not a clinically useful addition to naltrexone and clinical case management in this treatment population. Independent/substance-induced depression status did not predict treatment response. Findings for sex were equivocal.

  3. Naltrexone/bupropion for the treatment of obesity and obesity with Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Apovian, Caroline M

    2016-03-01

    Contrave(®) is a combination of naltrexone hydrochloride extended release and bupropion hydrochloride extended release for the treatment of obesity, and is used with lifestyle modification. Its safety and efficacy were assessed in four randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 56-week Phase III clinical trials in 4536 adult subjects: COR-1, COR-II, COR-BMOD and COR-DM. All four studies demonstrated statistically significant and clinically meaningful weight loss following up to 52 weeks of treatment with naltrexone/bupropion compared with placebo. The average weight loss from baseline across the four studies was approximately 11-22 lbs (5-9 kg). Results show the efficacy of Contrave for weight loss, as well as significant improvements in cardiometabolic markers. This review focuses on the four studies, their outcomes and the mechanism of action of Contrave.

  4. NALTREXONE EFFECT ON PHYSIOLOGICAL AND SUBJECTIVE RESPONSE TO A COLD PRESSOR TASK

    PubMed Central

    Kotlyar, Michael; al’Absi, Mustafa; Brauer, Lisa H.; Grant, Jon E.; Fong, Erine; Kim, Suck Won

    2009-01-01

    In this double-blind, cross-over study physiological (i.e. blood pressure, heart rate, plasma catecholamine concentrations, plasma cortisol concentrations) and subjective (i.e. McGill Pain Questionnaire, positive affect, distress) response to a cold pressor task was assessed in 19 subjects one hour after the administration of 50 mg naltrexone and after placebo. Significant differences in plasma catecholamine concentrations were found. Plasma epinephrine concentrations increased during the one hour period after naltrexone administration but remained largely unchanged after placebo administration. A significant treatment × period effect was also found for plasma norepinephrine concentrations. No significant differences were found for other measures assessed. Further research is necessary to determine the subpopulations in which these effects are of greatest magnitude and the long term safety implications of these effects. PMID:18053632

  5. Immunogenicity and safety of a live attenuated shingles (herpes zoster) vaccine (Zostavax®) in individuals aged ≥ 70 years: a randomized study of a single dose vs. two different two-dose schedules.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, Timo; Hardt, Roland; Rümke, Hans C; Icardi, Giancarlo; Montero, Jordi; Thomas, Stéphane; Sadorge, Christine; Fiquet, Anne

    2013-04-01

    Disease protection provided by herpes zoster (HZ) vaccination tends to reduce as age increases. This study was designed to ascertain whether a second dose of the HZ vaccine, Zostavax(®), would increase varicella zoster virus (VZV)-specific immune response among individuals aged ≥ 70 y. Individuals aged ≥ 70 y were randomized to receive HZ vaccine in one of three schedules: a single dose (0.65 mL), two doses at 0 and 1 mo, or two doses at 0 and 3 mo. VZV antibody titers were measured at baseline, 4 weeks after each vaccine dose, and 12 mo after the last dose. In total, 759 participants (mean age 76.1 y) were randomized to receive vaccination. Antibody responses were similar after a single dose or two doses of HZ vaccine [post-dose 2/post-dose 1 geometric mean titer (GMT) ratios for the 1-mo or 3-mo schedules were 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.22 and 0.78, 95% CI 0.73-0.85], respectively). The 12-mo post-dose 2/12-mo post-dose 1 GMT ratio was similar for the 1-mo schedule and for the 3-mo schedule (1.06, 95% CI 0.96-1.17 and 1.08, 95% CI 0.98-1.19, respectively). Similar immune responses were observed in participants aged 70-79 y and those aged ≥ 80 y. HZ vaccine was generally well tolerated, with no evidence of increased adverse event incidence after the second dose with either schedule. Compared with a single-dose regimen, two-dose vaccination did not increase VZV antibody responses among individuals aged ≥ 70 y. Antibody persistence after 12 mo was similar with all three schedules.

  6. Extended-Release Naltrexone for Alcohol and Opioid Problems in Missouri Parolees and Probationers.

    PubMed

    Crits-Christoph, Paul; Lundy, Christie; Stringer, Mark; Gallop, Robert; Gastfriend, David R

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the naturalistic outcomes of parolees and probationers with alcohol and/or opioid problems who were treated with extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) to those treated with other medication-assisted therapies or psychosocial treatment only. Methods consisted of using intake and discharge data collected as part of SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) assessments, controlling for group differences using propensity scores that were based on a range of intake variables. Results showed that patients receiving XR-NTX had longer durations of care (compared to oral naltrexone and psychosocial treatment only) and were more likely to become abstinent (compared to oral naltrexone, buprenorphine/naloxone, and psychosocial treatment only). Findings were similar for the total sample and those with opioid problems. These XR-NTX results were found in the absence of significant differences in rates of self-help participation. No differences were found in employment or arrests in this relatively short time frame. This study documents the real-world effectiveness study of current FDA-approved addiction medications in parolees/probationers and encourages the use of XR-NTX in such a criminal justice population.

  7. A stability-indicating HPLC method for simultaneous determination of morphine and naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Jafari-Nodoushan, Milad; Barzin, Jalal; Mobedi, Hamid

    2016-02-01

    This study developed a stability-indicating reversed-phase HPLC method for the simultaneous determination of morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride content in bulk, Solid dosage forms and in-vitro dissolution samples to support product development and quality control efforts. Chromatographic separation of the pharmaceutical compound was achieved on a perfectSil™ MZ C18 column (250×4.6mm, 5μm) with an isocratic mobile phase composed of a mixture of acetate buffer (10mM, pH 4, containing 0.1% of 1-heptanesulfonic acid sodium salt) and acetonitrile with 80/20 at a flow rate of 1.5mlmin(-1). Both analytes were quantified using a photodiode array detector set at a wavelength of 280nm and column temperature was set to 30°C. naltrexone, morphine and a mixture of the two were subjected to thermal, peroxide, acid, base and photolytic degradation and their peak homogeneity was obtained using a photodiode array detector, demonstrating the specificity of method. These pharmaceuticals were spiked in biological fluid to examine method selectivity. The method was validated for system suitability, linearity, accuracy, precision, detection and quantification limits and robustness and was found it is acceptable in range of 2-250μgml(-1) for morphine and 4-100μgml(-1) for naltrexone.

  8. Injectable and implantable sustained release naltrexone in the treatment of opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Kunøe, Nikolaj; Lobmaier, Philipp; Ngo, Hanh; Hulse, Gary

    2014-02-01

    Sustained release technologies for administering the opioid antagonist naltrexone (SRX) have the potential to assist opioid-addicted patients in their efforts to maintain abstinence from heroin and other opioid agonists. Recently, reliable SRX formulations in intramuscular or implantable polymers that release naltrexone for 1-7 months have become available for clinical use and research. This qualitative review of the literature provides an overview of the technologies currently available for SRX and their effectiveness in reducing opioid use and other relevant outcomes. The majority of studies indicate that SRX is effective in reducing heroin use, and the most frequently studied SRX formulations have acceptable adverse events profiles. Registry data indicate a protective effect of SRX on mortality and morbidity. In some studies, SRX also seems to affect other outcomes, such as concomitant substance use, vocational training attendance, needle use, and risk behaviour for blood-borne diseases such as hepatitis or human immunodeficiency virus. There is a general need for more controlled studies, in particular to compare SRX with agonist maintenance treatment, to study combinations of SRX with behavioural interventions, and to study at-risk groups such as prison inmates or opioid-addicted pregnant patients. The literature suggests that sustained release naltrexone is a feasible, safe and effective option for assisting abstinence efforts in opioid addiction.

  9. Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Naltrexone Combination Therapy in Older Patients with Severe Pruritus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungsoo; Shin, Jung U; Noh, Seongmin; Park, Chang Ook

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe pruritus is a challenging condition, and it is more difficult to deal with in older patients due to their limitations in taking oral medication because of underlying diseases, possible interaction with concurrent medications, and poor general condition. Objective We evaluated the efficacy and safety of naltrexone (Revia®), an opioid antagonist, in elderly patients with severe pruritus that was not easily controlled with conventional antipruritics. Methods Eighteen patients were enrolled, with a mean age of 73 years. They additionally received 50 mg of naltrexone per day for an average of 2 months. Results Using the visual analogue scale, 13 (72.2%) of 18 patients showed a "much improved" condition, reporting more than a 50% decrease in pruritus intensity. Sixteen (88.9%) showed symptomatic improvement, and only 2 (11.1%) had persistent pruritus. Five patients reported side effects including insomnia, fatigue, constipation, and anorexia. However, reactions were either limited to the first 2 weeks or well managed. Conclusion Naltrexone could be an effective and safe alternative treatment option to control severe pruritus in older patients. PMID:27081261

  10. Incorporating Quantitative Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography into Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer: Impact of Attenuation and Scatter Correction on the Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography-Weighted Mean Dose and Functional Lung Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Lingshu; Shcherbinin, Sergey; Celler, Anna

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of attenuation and scatter corrections on the calculation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-weighted mean dose (SWMD) and functional volume segmentation as applied to radiation therapy treatment planning for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Nine patients with lung cancer underwent a SPECT lung perfusion scan. For each scan, four image sets were reconstructed using the ordered subsets expectation maximization method with attenuation and scatter corrections ranging from none to a most comprehensive combination of attenuation corrections and direct scatter modeling. Functional volumes were segmented in each reconstructed image using 10%, 20%, ..., 90% of maximum SPECT intensity as a threshold. Systematic effects of SPECT reconstruction methods on treatment planning using functional volume were studied by calculating size and spatial agreements of functional volumes, and V{sub 20} for functional volume from actual treatment plans. The SWMD was calculated for radiation beams with a variety of possible gantry angles and field sizes. Results: Functional volume segmentation is sensitive to the particular method of SPECT reconstruction used. Large variations in functional volumes, as high as >50%, were observed in SPECT images reconstructed with different attenuation/scatter corrections. However, SWMD was less sensitive to the type of scatter corrections. SWMD was consistent within 2% for all reconstructions as long as computed tomography-based attenuation correction was used. Conclusion: When using perfusion SPECT images during treatment planning optimization/evaluation, the SWMD may be the preferred figure of merit, as it is less affected by reconstruction technique, compared with threshold-based functional volume segmentation.

  11. Intranasal administration of crushed ALO-02 (extended-release oxycodone with sequestered naltrexone): A randomized, controlled abuse-potential study in nondependent recreational opioid users.

    PubMed

    Setnik, Beatrice; Bramson, Candace; Bass, Almasa; Levy-Cooperman, Naama; Malhotra, Bimal; Matschke, Kyle; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Wolfram, Gernot; Geoffroy, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    ALO-02 is an abuse-deterrent formulation consisting of capsules filled with pellets of extended-release oxycodone surrounding sequestered naltrexone. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-/active-controlled, 4-way crossover study examined the abuse potential of crushed ALO-02 administered intranasally to healthy, nondependent, recreational opioid users. Following drug discrimination and naloxone challenge, eligible participants (n = 32) entered a 4-way crossover treatment phase: crushed single dose of 1 of 2 placebos, ALO-02 30 mg/3.6 mg (oxycodone/naltrexone) or oxycodone immediate-release (IR) 30 mg. Primary end points were Drug Liking and High, measured on visual analog scales (VAS) summarized as maximum effect (Emax ) and effect occurring over 2 hours postdose (AUE0-2  h ). Crushed ALO-02 resulted in significantly lower scores versus oxycodone IR on Drug Liking (Emax , 60.5 vs 92.8; AUE0-2  h , 105.4 vs 160.0, respectively) and High (Emax , 25.2 vs 86.9; AUE0-2  h , 27.1 vs 136.4, respectively; n = 28; P < .0001). Adverse events occurred most frequently with oxycodone IR, followed by ALO-02, then placebo, and were considered mild and consistent with opioid therapy. Crushed ALO-02 administered intranasally to nondependent recreational opioid users resulted in significantly lower scores on Drug Liking/High VAS and other positive subjective measures versus crushed oxycodone IR, suggesting less abuse potential. Demonstration of actual abuse deterrence in the real world requires further research.

  12. Methadone ameliorates multiple-low-dose streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Amirshahrokhi, K.; Dehpour, A.R.; Hadjati, J.; Sotoudeh, M.; Ghazi-Khansari, M.

    2008-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of pancreatic islets and destruction of {beta} cells by the immune system. Opioids have been shown to modulate a number of immune functions, including T helper 1 (Th1) and T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines. The immunosuppressive effect of long-term administration of opioids has been demonstrated both in animal models and humans. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of methadone, a {mu}-opioid receptor agonist, on type 1 diabetes. Administration of multiple low doses of streptozotocin (STZ) (MLDS) (40mg/kg intraperitoneally for 5 consecutive days) to mice resulted in autoimmune diabetes. Mice were treated with methadone (10mg/kg/day subcutaneously) for 24days. Blood glucose, insulin and pancreatic cytokine levels were measured. Chronic methadone treatment significantly reduced hyperglycemia and incidence of diabetes, and restored pancreatic insulin secretion in the MLDS model. The protective effect of methadone can be overcome by pretreatment with naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist. Also, methadone treatment decreased the proinflammatory Th1 cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interferon-{gamma}] and increased anti-inflammatory Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Histopathological observations indicated that STZ-mediated destruction of {beta} cells was attenuated by methadone treatment. It seems that methadone as an opioid agonist may have a protective effect against destruction of {beta} cells and insulitis in the MLDS model of type 1 diabetes.

  13. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor ligand PD123319 attenuates hyperoxia-induced lung and heart injury at a low dose in newborn rats

    PubMed Central

    Sengers, Rozemarijn M. A.; Laghmani, El Houari; Chen, Xueyu; Lindeboom, Melissa P. H. A.; Roks, Anton J. M.; Folkerts, Gert; Walther, Frans J.

    2014-01-01

    Intervening in angiotensin (Ang)-II type 2 receptor (AT2) signaling may have therapeutic potential for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) by attenuating lung inflammation and preventing arterial hypertension (PAH)-induced right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH). We first investigated the role of AT2 inhibition with PD123319 (0.5 and 2 mg·kg−1·day−1) on the beneficial effect of AT2 agonist LP2–3 (5 μg/kg twice a day) on RVH in newborn rats with hyperoxia-induced BPD. Next we determined the cardiopulmonary effects of PD123319 (0.1 mg·kg−1·day−1) in two models: early treatment during continuous exposure to hyperoxia for 10 days and late treatment starting on day 6 in rat pups exposed postnatally to hyperoxia for 9 days, followed by a 9-day recovery period in room air. Parameters investigated included lung and heart histopathology, fibrin deposition, vascular leakage, and differential mRNA expression. Ten days of coadministration of LP2–3 and PD123319 abolished the beneficial effects of LP2–3 on RVH in experimental BPD. In the early treatment model PD123319 attenuated cardiopulmonary injury by reducing alveolar septal thickness, pulmonary influx of inflammatory cells, including macrophages and neutrophils, medial wall thickness of small arterioles, and extravascular collagen III deposition, and by preventing RVH. In the late treatment model PD123319 diminished PAH and RVH, demonstrating that PAH is reversible in the neonatal period. At high concentrations PD123319 blocks the beneficial effects of the AT2-agonist LP2–3 on RVH. At low concentrations PD123319 attenuates cardiopulmonary injury by reducing pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and preventing PAH-induced RVH but does not affect alveolar and vascular development in newborn rats with experimental BPD. PMID:24951776

  14. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor ligand PD123319 attenuates hyperoxia-induced lung and heart injury at a low dose in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Gerry T M; Sengers, Rozemarijn M A; Laghmani, El Houari; Chen, Xueyu; Lindeboom, Melissa P H A; Roks, Anton J M; Folkerts, Gert; Walther, Frans J

    2014-08-01

    Intervening in angiotensin (Ang)-II type 2 receptor (AT2) signaling may have therapeutic potential for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) by attenuating lung inflammation and preventing arterial hypertension (PAH)-induced right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH). We first investigated the role of AT2 inhibition with PD123319 (0.5 and 2 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) on the beneficial effect of AT2 agonist LP2-3 (5 μg/kg twice a day) on RVH in newborn rats with hyperoxia-induced BPD. Next we determined the cardiopulmonary effects of PD123319 (0.1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) in two models: early treatment during continuous exposure to hyperoxia for 10 days and late treatment starting on day 6 in rat pups exposed postnatally to hyperoxia for 9 days, followed by a 9-day recovery period in room air. Parameters investigated included lung and heart histopathology, fibrin deposition, vascular leakage, and differential mRNA expression. Ten days of coadministration of LP2-3 and PD123319 abolished the beneficial effects of LP2-3 on RVH in experimental BPD. In the early treatment model PD123319 attenuated cardiopulmonary injury by reducing alveolar septal thickness, pulmonary influx of inflammatory cells, including macrophages and neutrophils, medial wall thickness of small arterioles, and extravascular collagen III deposition, and by preventing RVH. In the late treatment model PD123319 diminished PAH and RVH, demonstrating that PAH is reversible in the neonatal period. At high concentrations PD123319 blocks the beneficial effects of the AT2-agonist LP2-3 on RVH. At low concentrations PD123319 attenuates cardiopulmonary injury by reducing pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and preventing PAH-induced RVH but does not affect alveolar and vascular development in newborn rats with experimental BPD.

  15. Effects of naltrexone on post-abstinence alcohol drinking in C57BL/6NCRL and DBA/2J mice.

    PubMed

    Tomie, Arthur; Azogu, Idu; Yu, Lei

    2013-07-01

    The present experiment evaluated the effects of naltrexone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, on post-abstinence alcohol drinking in C57BL/6NCRL and DBA/2J male mice. Home cage 2-bottle (alcohol vs. water) free-choice procedures were employed. During the pre-abstinence period, alcohol intake was much lower for the DBA/2J mice relative to the C57BL/6NCRL mice, and this strain difference was observed for groups receiving either 3% or 10% alcohol concentrations. The four-day abstinence period effectively reduced alcohol intakes (i.e., a negative alcohol deprivation effect, negative ADE) in both groups of DBA/2J mice, but had no effect on alcohol intakes in either group of C57BL/6NCRL mice. Both groups trained with 3% alcohol received the second four-day abstinence period, where the effects of acute administration of either naltrexone or saline on post-abstinence alcohol drinking were assessed. Naltrexone was more effective in reducing post-abstinence drinking of 3% alcohol in the DBA/2J mice than in the C57BL/6NCRL mice. In the DBA/2J mice, naltrexone further reduced, relative to saline-injected controls, the low levels of post-abstinence alcohol intake. Thus, the low baseline levels of alcohol drinking in DBA/2J mice were further diminished by the four-day abstinence period (negative ADE), and this suppressed post-abstinence level of alcohol drinking was still further reduced by acute administration of naltrexone. The results indicate that naltrexone is effective in reducing further the low levels of alcohol drinking induced by the negative ADE.

  16. Prescription drug monitoring program data tracking of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in integrated dual diagnosis care involving injectable naltrexone

    PubMed Central

    Sajid, Ayesha; Whiteman, Aaron; Bell, Richard L.; Greene, Marion S.; Engleman, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Fourfold increases in opioid prescribing and dispensations over 2 decades in the U.S. has paralleled increases in opioid addictions and overdoses, requiring new preventative, diagnostic, and treatment strategies. This study examines Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) tracking as a novel measure of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in a university‐affiliated integrated mental health‐addiction treatment clinic. Methods Repeated measure parametrics examined PDMP and urine drug screening (UDS) data before and after first injection for all patients (N = 68) who received at least one long‐acting naltrexone injection (380 mg/IM) according to diagnostic groupings of having either (i) alcohol (control); (ii) opioid; or (iii) combined alcohol and opioid use disorders. Results There were no group differences post‐injection in treatment days, injections delivered, or treatment service encounters. UDS and PDMP measures of opioid exposures were greater in opioid compared to alcohol‐only patients. Post‐first injection, UDS's positive for opioids declined (p < .05) along with PDMP measures of opioid prescriptions (p < .001), doses (p < .01), types (p < .001), numbers of dispensing prescribers (p < .001) and pharmacies (p < .001). Opioid patients without alcohol disorders showed the best outcomes with 50% to 80% reductions in PDMP‐measures of opioids, down to levels of alcohol‐only patients. Conclusions This study shows PDMP utility for measuring opioid addiction treatment outcomes, supporting the routine use of PDMPs in clinical and research settings. Scientific Significance These findings demonstrate that opioid addiction in patients with complex addictions and mental illnesses comorbidities can show effective treatment responses as measured by PDMP tracking of decreases in opioid prescriptions to those patients. (Am J Addict 2016;25:557–564) PMID:27647699

  17. Kinetics and inhibition of the formation of 6β-naltrexol from naltrexone in human liver cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Susan J; Somogyi, Andrew A; White, Jason M

    2000-01-01

    Aims To determine the kinetics of the formation of 6β-naltrexol from naltrexone in human liver cytosol, and to investigate the role of potential inhibitors. Methods The kinetics of the formation of 6β-naltrexol from naltrexone were examined in eight human liver cytosol preparations using h.p.l.c. to quantify 6β-naltrexol and, the extent of inhibition of 6β-naltrexol formation was determined using chemical inhibitors. The formation of 6β-naltrexol and the back reaction of 6β-naltrexol to naltrexone were also examined in a microsomal preparation. Results The Vmax, Km and CLint values for the formation of 6β-naltrexol from naltrexone were in the ranges of 16–45 nmol mg−1 protein h−1, 17–53 µm and 0.3–2.2 ml h−1 mg−1 protein, respectively. The steroid hormones testosterone (Ki = 0.3 ± 0.1 µm) and dihydrotestosterone (Ki = 0.7 ± 0.4 µm) were the most potent competitive inhibitors of 6β-naltrexol formation, with naloxone, menadione and corticosterone also producing > 50% inhibition at a concentration of 100 µm. The opioid agonists morphine, oxycodone, oxymorphone and hydromorphone, and a range of benzodiazepines showed < 20% inhibition at 100 µm. In the microsomal preparation, there was no formation of naltrexone from 6β-naltrexol nor any formation of 6β-naltrexol from naltrexone. Conclusions The intersubject variability in the kinetic parameters of 6β-naltrexol formation could play a role in the efficacy of and patient compliance with naltrexone treatment. This variability could be due in part to a genetic polymorphism of the dihydrodiol dehydrogenase DD4, one of the enzymes reported to be responsible for the formation of 6β-naltrexol from naltrexone. DD4 also has hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity which could account for the potent inhibition by the steroid hormones testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. The clinical significance of the latter finding remains to be established. PMID:11069441

  18. Extended-release naltrexone modulates brain response to drug cues in abstinent heroin-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Langleben, Daniel D; Ruparel, Kosha; Elman, Igor; Loughead, James W; Busch, Elliot L; Cornish, James; Lynch, Kevin G; Nuwayser, Elie S; Childress, Anna R; O'Brien, Charles P

    2014-03-01

    Drug cues play an important role in relapse to drug use. Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist that is used to prevent relapse in opioid dependence. Central opioidergic pathways may be implicated in the heightened drug cue-reactivity, but the effects of the opioid receptors' blockade on the brain responses to drug cues in opioid dependence are unknown. To pursue this question, we studied 17 abstinent i.v. heroin users with brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during exposure to visual heroin-related cues and matched neutral images before and 10-14 days after an injection of extended-release naltrexone (XRNTX). Whole brain analysis of variance of fMRI data showed main effect of XRNTX in the medial frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, cuneus, precuneus, caudate and the amygdala. fMRI response was decreased in the amygdala, cuneus, caudate and the precentral gyrus and increased in the medial frontal gyrus and the precuneus. Higher plasma levels of naltrexone's major metabolite, 6-beta-naltrexol, were associated with larger reduction in the fMRI response to drug cues after XRNTX in the precentral, caudate and amygdala clusters. The present data suggest that XRNTX pharmacotherapy of opioid-dependent patients may, respectively, decrease and potentiate prefrontal and limbic cortical responses to drug cues and that this effect might be related to the XRNTX metabolism. Our findings call for further evaluation of the brain fMRI response to drug-related cues and of the 6-beta-naltrexol levels as potential biomarkers of XRNTX therapeutic effects in patients with opioid dependence.

  19. Unsweetened Natural Cocoa Powder Has the Potential to Attenuate High Dose Artemether-Lumefantrine-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Non-Malarious Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Edem Kukuia, Kennedy Kwami; Seidu, Abdulai Mahmood; Antwi-Boasiako, Charles; N'guessan, Benoit Banga; Frimpong-Manso, Samuel; Adjei, Samuel; Zobi, Jonathan; Tettey, Abraham Terkpertey; Nyarko, Alexander Kwadwo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study investigated the elemental composition of unsweetened natural cocoa powder (UNCP), its effect on nitric oxide, and its hepatoprotective potential during simultaneous administration with high-dose artemether/lumefantrine (A/L). Method. Macro- and microelements in UNCP were analyzed with EDXRF spectroscopy. Thirty (30) male guinea-pigs were then divided into five groups. For groups 3 (low-dose), 4 (medium-dose), and 5 (high-dose), the animals received oral UNCP prophylactically for 14 days. Group 1 received distilled water (14 days) and group 2 A/L for the last 3 days (days 12 to 14). After euthanisation, biochemical and histopathological examinations were carried out in all groups. Results. Phytochemical analysis of UNCP showed the presence of saponins, flavonoids, tannins, and cardiac glycosides. Thirty-eight (38) macro- and microelements were found. UNCP produced significant decreases in ALT, ALP, GGT, and AST levels. A significant increase in total protein levels was observed during A/L+UNCP administration in comparison to 75 mg/kg A/L group. Histopathological examinations buttressed the protective effects of cocoa administration. UNCP administration increased nitric oxide levels 149.71% (P < 0.05) compared to controls. Conclusion. UNCP increases nitric oxide levels and has hepatoprotective potential during A/L administration. A high level of copper was observed which may be detrimental during high daily consumptions of UNCP. PMID:27493672

  20. Dexmedetomidine Dose-Dependently Attenuates Ropivacaine-Induced Seizures and Negative Emotions Via Inhibiting Phosphorylation of Amygdala Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Ming-Zhu; Wu, Huang-Hui; Yin, Jun-Bin; Cui, Yuan-Yuan; Mei, Xiao-Peng; Zhang, Han; Zhu, Xia; Shen, Xue-Feng; Kaye, Alan David; Chen, Guo-Zhong

    2016-05-01

    Ropivacaine (Ropi), one of the newest and safest amino amide local anesthetics, is linked to toxicity, including the potential for seizures, changes in behavior, and even cardiovascular collapse. Dexmedetomidine (Dex), an α2-adrenergic receptor agonist, has been widely used in anesthesia and critical care practice. To date, the underlying mechanisms of the effects of Dex premedication on Ropi-induced toxicity have not been clearly identified. In the current study, we investigated the effects of increasing doses of Dex premedication on 50% convulsive dose (CD50) of Ropi. With increasing doses of intraperitoneal (i.p.) Dex 10 min prior to each i.p. RopiCD50, the latency and duration of seizure activity were recorded. Open-field (OF) and elevated plus maze (EPM) test were used to measure negative behavioral emotions such as depression and anxiety. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were utilized to investigate phosphorylation-extracellular regulated protein kinases (p-ERK) expression in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) on 2 h and in the central amygdala (CeA) on 24 h after convulsion in mice. The results of our investigation demonstrated that Dex dose-dependently increased RopiCD50, prolonged the latency and shortened the duration of each RopiCD50-induced seizure, improved the negative emotions revealed by both OF and EPM test, and inhibited p-ERK expression in the BLA and the CeA.

  1. Phase II Trial of Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Bevacizumab in Combination With Attenuated Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients With Localized Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Small, William; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Rademaker, Alfred; Bentrem, David J.; Benson, Al B.; Weitner, Bing Bing; Talamonti, Mark S.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate response rate, survival, and toxicity in patients with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients received three cycles of therapy over 10 weeks. In total, treatment consisted of intravenous (IV) gemcitabine, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}, every 1 to 2 weeks (7 doses), IV bevacizumab, 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks (5 doses), and 36 Gy of radiotherapy (2.4-Gy fractions during cycle two). Response was assessed by cross-sectional imaging and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) levels. Patients with resectable tumors underwent surgery 6 to 8 weeks after the last dose of bevacizumab. Maintenance gemcitabine and bevacizumab doses were delivered to patients who had unresected tumors and no progression. Results: Twenty-eight of the 32 enrolled patients completed all three cycles. The median follow-up was 11.07 months. Most grade 3 or 4 toxicities occurred in the initial treatment phase; the most frequent toxicities were leukopenia (21%), neutropenia (17%), and nausea (17%). At week 10, 1 patient (4%) had a complete response, 2 patients (7%) had partial responses, 21 patients (75%) had stable disease, and 4 patients (14%) had progressive disease. The median pretreatment and posttreatment CA 19-9 levels (25 patients) were 184.3 and 57.9 U/ml, respectively (p = 0.0006). One of 10 patients proceeding to surgery experienced a major complication. Two of 6 patients undergoing resection had complete pathologic responses. The median progression-free and overall survival durations were 9.9 months and 11.8 months, respectively. Conclusions: The combination of full-dose gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and radiotherapy was active and was not associated with a high rate of major surgical complications.

  2. Safety and immunogenicity of single dose live attenuated varicella vaccine (VR 795 Oka strain) in healthy Indian children: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Monjori; Faridi, Mma; Ghosh, Apurba; Shah, Nitin; Shah, Raju; Chaterjee, Suparna; Narang, Manish; Bhattacharya, Nisha; Bhat, Gandhali; Choudhury, Harish; Kadhe, Ganesh; Mane, Amey; Roy, Sucheta

    2015-01-01

    Varicella, an acute viral systemic infection that may cause lifelong latent infection with the potential for causing clinical reactivation, may be prevented by immunization. The present study was an open label, randomized, controlled, phase III, multicentre trial, conducted to evaluate and compare the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of a freeze dried live attenuated Oka strain Varicella Vaccine (VR 795 Oka strain) with Varilrix (Oka-RIT strain) in children. A total of 268 healthy Indian children aged 12 months to 12 y with baseline VZV IgG antibody (<100 mIU/ mL) were enrolled, and 256 children completed the study. The extent of rise of VZV IgG antibody titer assessed as 3-fold and 4-fold rise from baseline was found to be significantly higher (89.1% and 85.2%) in the test group as compared to control group (73.4% and 61.7%). The post-vaccination GMT of the test group was significantly higher (112.5 mIU/mL) as compared with the control group (67.8 mIU/mL) (P < 0.001). The seroconversion rate considering the 5 gp ELISA units/ml equivalent to 10mIU/ml were similar in the control (96.5%) and the test (98.3%) groups. The adverse events were not different in the control and test groups (P > 0.05). The test live attenuated vaccine was found to be highly immunogenic, safe and comparable to Varilrix used in control arm.

  3. Geraniol attenuates α-synuclein expression and neuromuscular impairment through increase dopamine content in MPTP intoxicated mice by dose dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Rekha, Karamkolly R; Selvakumar, Govindasamy P; Santha, Karunanithi; Inmozhi Sivakamasundari, Ramu

    2013-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive loss of dopamine (DA) neurons in the nigrostriatal system and by the presence of Lewy bodies (LB), proteinaceous inclusions mainly composed of filamentous α-synuclein (α-Syn) aggregates. 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was adopted to generate PD models in C57BL/6 mice. In the present study, we investigated the effect of geraniol (GE) against α-Syn aggregation on MPTP induced mouse model of PD in dose dependant manner. When pretreatment of GE improved neuromuscular impairment, TH expressions and decreases α-Syn expressions in MPTP intoxicated PD mice by dose dependent manner. In addition, we confirmed that sub-chronic administration of MPTP in mice leads to permanent neuromuscular deficits and depletion of dopamine and its metabolites. Our results suggest that GE is beneficial for the treatment of PD associated with neuromuscular disability and LB aggregation.

  4. Low-dose benznidazole treatment results in parasite clearance and attenuates heart inflammatory reaction in an experimental model of infection with a highly virulent Trypanosoma cruzi strain

    PubMed Central

    Cevey, Ágata Carolina; Mirkin, Gerardo Ariel; Penas, Federico Nicolás; Goren, Nora Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is the main cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Americas. Antiparasitic treatment mostly relies on benznidazole (Bzl) due to Nifurtimox shortage or unavailability. Both induce adverse drug effects (ADE) of varied severity in many patients, leading to treatment discontinuation or abandonment. Since dosage may influence ADE, we aimed to assess Bzl efficacy in terms of parasiticidal and anti-inflammatory activity, using doses lower than those previously reported. BALB/c mice infected with the T. cruzi RA strain were treated with different doses of Bzl. Parasitaemia, mortality and weight change were assessed. Parasite load, tissue infiltrates and inflammatory mediators were studied in the heart. Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity was determined as a marker of heart damage. The infection-independent anti-inflammatory properties of Bzl were studied in an in vitro model of LPS-treated cardiomyocyte culture. Treatment with 25 mg/kg/day Bzl turned negative the parasitological parameters, induced a significant decrease in IL-1β, IL-6 and NOS2 in the heart and CK activity in serum, to normal levels. No mortality was observed in infected treated mice. Primary cultured cardiomyocytes treated with Bzl showed that inflammatory mediators were reduced via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. A Bzl dose lower than that previously reported for treatment of experimental Chagas disease exerts adequate antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory effects leading to parasite clearance and tissue healing. This may be relevant to reassess the dose currently used for the treatment of human Chagas disease, aiming to minimize ADE. PMID:26862474

  5. Effects of naltrexone in postnatal rats on the recovery of disturbed brain and lymphatic tissues after X-irradiation or ethylnitrosourea treatment in utero

    SciTech Connect

    Schmahl, W.G.; Plendl, J.; Reinoehl-Kompa, S.

    1987-01-01

    The role of endogenous opioid systems in preweaning development after intrauterine exposure to X-irradiation or ethylnitrosourea (ENU) was explored in rats using naltrexone, a potent antagonist of beta-endorphin. After daily s.c. injections of 50 mg/kg naltrexone only the prenatally untreated controls had body weights increased by 11% from control level on day 28 (weaning). In the X-irradiated as well as the ENU-treated pups no significant effects of naltrexone on body weight gain were observed. However, brain weight increased in all animals under the influence of naltrexone, irrespective of prenatal treatment or the severity of brain lesions: 9.5% above control values in untreated offspring and 14% after X-irradiation (1 Gy) on gestation day 14. The brain weight of ENU-treated rats (50 mg/kg on gest. day 14) was 13% higher after postnatal naltrexone application than that of their postnatally untreated counterparts. ENU (80 mg/kg) effects on the brain when given on gestation day 18 were ameliorated to 9.2% by naltrexone in the weaning period. Naltrexone significantly increased the thymus weight in controls. Prenatally treated animals also showed an increased thymus weight at weaning, presumably due to compensatory growth. In these cases naltrexone revealed a suppressive effect on the thymus, whereas spleen weight was apparently not influenced by naltrexone treatment. These results provide compelling evidence that endogenous opioid systems play a crucial role not only in normal development, but also in reparative growth events of the brain after prenatal injuries. The thymus, predominantly containing T-lymphocytes, seems to represent another sensitive system which is regulated under the influence of opioids.

  6. Naltrexone-sensitive analgesia following exposure of mice to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Maillefer, R.H.; Quock, R.M. )

    1991-03-11

    This study was conducted to determine whether exposure to RFR might induce sufficient thermal stress to activate endogenous opioid mechanisms and induce analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 10, 15 or 20 mV/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested in the abdominal constriction paradigm. Specific absorption rates (SAR) were 23.7 W/kg at 10 mW/cm{sup 2}, 34.6 W/kg at 15 mW/cm{sup 2} and 45.5 W/kg at 20 mW/cm{sup 2}. Confinement in the exposure chamber alone did not appreciably alter body temperature but did appear to induce a stress-associated analgesia that was insensitive to the opioid receptor blocker naltrexone. Exposure of confined mice to RFR elevated body temperature and further increased analgesia in SAR-dependent manner. The high-SAR RFR-induced analgesia, but not the hyperthermia, was reduced by naltrexone. These findings suggest that (1) RFR produces SAR-dependent hyperthermia and analgesia and (2) RFR-induced analgesia is mediated by opioid mechanisms while confinement-induced analgesia involves non-opioid mechanisms.

  7. A pilot study of naltrexone and BASICS for heavy drinking young adults.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Robert F; Palmer, Rebekka S; Corbin, William R; Romano, Denise M; Meandzija, Boris; O'Malley, Stephanie S

    2008-08-01

    Heavy drinking young adults often have limited motivation to change their drinking behavior. Adding pharmacotherapy to brief counseling is a novel approach to treating this population. A small open-label pilot study was conducted to assess the feasibility of offering eight weeks of daily and targeted (i.e., taken as needed in anticipation of drinking) naltrexone with BASICS (brief motivational) counseling to heavy drinking young adults; to assess the tolerability of the medication in this population and to obtain preliminary efficacy data. The sample (N=14) showed strong adherence to study appointments and medication taking, supporting the feasibility of this approach. Overall, the medication was well-tolerated. Significant reductions from baseline were observed in drinks per drinking day and in percent heavy drinking days and these gains were maintained one month after treatment ended. A significant decrease in alcohol-related consequences was also observed. Findings from this small pilot study suggest that naltrexone in combination with BASICS represents a promising strategy to reduce heavy drinking among young adults.

  8. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Naltrexone and Behavioral Therapy for Problem Drinking Men Who Have Sex with Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgenstern, Jon; Kuerbis, Alexis N.; Chen, Andrew C.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Bux, Donald A., Jr.; Kranzler, Henry R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study tested the comparative effectiveness of modified behavioral self-control therapy (MBSCT) and naltrexone (NTX), as well as the added benefit of combining the 2, in problem drinking men who have sex with men (MSM) seeking to reduce but not quit drinking. Method: Participants (N = 200) were recruited and urn randomized to 1 of 2…

  9. Organizational-Level Predictors of Adoption Across Time: Naltrexone in Private Substance-Use Disorders Treatment Centers*

    PubMed Central

    Oser, Carrie B.; Roman, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Prominent on the nation's research agenda on substance-use disorders treatment is the dissemination of effective pharmacotherapies. Thus, the purpose of this article is to use a “diffusion of innovations” theoretical framework to examine the organizational-level predictors of the adoption of a pharmacotherapy, naltrexone (Revia), in private substance use-disorders treatment centers (N = 165). Method Data for these analyses were derived from the National Treatment Center Study, which contains four waves of data collected between 1994 and 2003. An event history model examined the impact of culture, leadership characteristics, internal structure, and external characteristics on the likelihood of adopting naltrexone between 1994 and 2003. Results The results suggest that organizations embracing a 12-step model and those employing more experienced administrators were significantly less likely to adopt naltrexone. Moreover, treatment centers that used prescription drugs, possessed an employee handbook, were accredited, and operated on a for-profit basis were significantly more likely to adopt naltrexone over time. Conclusions Structural characteristics do affect the innovation adoption behaviors of private substance-use disorders treatment centers. Organizational-level “research to practice” implications to further the adoption of innovative evidence-based treatments are discussed. PMID:17960303

  10. Foxp3(+)-Treg cells enhanced by repeated low-dose gamma-irradiation attenuate ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Bum Soo; Hong, Gwan Ui; Ro, Jai Youl

    2013-05-01

    Gamma radiation is used for several therapeutic indications such as cancers and autoimmune diseases. Low-dose whole-body γ irradiation has been shown to activate immune responses in several ways, however, the effect and mechanism of irradiation on allergic asthma remains poorly understood. This study investigated whether or not irradiation exacerbates allergic asthma responses and its potential mechanism. C57BL/6 mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce asthma. The mice received whole-body irradiation once daily for 3 consecutive days with a dose of 0.667 Gy using (137)Cs γ rays 24 h before every OVA challenge. Repeated low-dose irradiation reduced OVA-specific IgE levels, the number of inflammatory cells including mast cells, goblet cell hyperplasia, collagen deposition, airway hyperresponsiveness, expression of inflammatory cytokines, CCL2/CCR2, as well as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 activities. All of these factors were increased in BAL cells and lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice. Irradiation increased the number of Treg cells, expression of interleukin (IL)-10, IL-2 and IL-35 in BAL cells and lung tissue. Irradiation also increased Treg cell-expressed Foxp3 and IL-10 by NF-κB and RUNX1 in OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, while Treg cell-expressing OX40 and IL-10 were enhanced in lung tissue or act-bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) with Treg cells, but BMMCs-expressing OX40L and TGF-β were decreased. The data suggest that irradiation enhances Foxp3(+)- and IL-10-producing Treg cells, which reduce OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation and tissue remodeling through the down-regulation of migration by the CCL2/CCR2 axis and activation of mast cells via OX40/OX40L in lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice.

  11. Effects of naltrexone and LY255582 on ethanol maintenance, seeking, and relapse responding by alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Dhaher, Ronnie; Toalston, Jamie E; Hauser, Sheketha R; Bell, Richard L; McKinzie, David L; McBride, William J; Rodd, Zachary A

    2012-02-01

    Research indicates opioid antagonists can reduce alcohol drinking in rodents. However, tests examining the effects of opioid antagonists on ethanol seeking and relapse behavior have been limited. The present study examined the effects of two opioid antagonists on ethanol maintenance, seeking, and relapse responding by alcohol-preferring (P) rats. Adult P rats were self-trained in two-lever operant chambers to self-administer 15% (vol/vol) ethanol on a fixed-ratio 5 (FR5) versus water on a FR1 concurrent schedule of reinforcement in daily 1-h sessions. After 10 weeks, rats underwent extinction training, followed by 2 weeks in their home cages. Rats were then returned to the operant chambers without ethanol or water to measure responses on the ethanol and water levers for four sessions. After a subsequent 2 weeks in the home cage, without access to ethanol, rats were returned to the operant chambers with ethanol and water available. Effects of antagonists on maintenance responding were tested after several weeks of daily 1-h sessions. Naltrexone (NAL; 1-10mg/kg, subcutaneously [s.c.]; n=8/dose), LY255582 (LY; 0.03-1mg/kg, s.c.; n=8/dose), or vehicle were injected 30min before the first session (in the absence of ethanol), following 2 weeks in their home cages, and for four consecutive sessions of ethanol self-administration under maintenance and relapse conditions. Both NAL and LY reduced responses on the ethanol lever without any fluids present, and ethanol self-administration under relapse and on-going drinking conditions, with LY being more potent than NAL. Both NAL and LY were less effective in reducing responding in the absence of ethanol than in reducing ethanol self-administration. Overall, the results indicate that the opioid system is involved in mediating ethanol seeking, and ethanol self-administration under relapse and on-going alcohol drinking, but that different neurocircuits may underlie these behaviors.

  12. Silver Nanoparticles Exhibit the Dose-Dependent Anti-Proliferative Effect against Human Squamous Carcinoma Cells Attenuated in the Presence of Berberine.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Arkadiusz; Kubina, Robert; Bułdak, Rafał J; Skonieczna, Magda; Cholewa, Krzysztof

    2016-03-17

    The biological activity of nanosize silver particles towards oral epithelium-derived carcinoma seems to be still underinvestigated. We evaluated the influence of low doses of nanosize scale silver particles on the proliferation and viability of malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes in vitro, alone and in conjunction with the plant alkaloid berberine. Cells of human tongue squamous carcinoma SCC-25 (ATCC CRL-1628), cultivated with the mixture of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, were exposed to silver nanoparticles alone (AgNPs, concentrations from 0.31 to 10 μg/mL) and to a combination of AgNPs with berberine chloride (BER, 1/2 IC50 concentration) during 24 h and 48 h. The cytotoxic activity of AgNPs with diameters of 10 nm ± 4 nm was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell cycle analysis was performed by treating cells with propidium iodide followed by flow-activated cell sorting. RT-QPCR reaction was used to assess expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic protein Bcl-2-associated X protein Bax genes expression. Monodisperse silver nanoparticles at a concentration of 10 μg/mL arrested SCC-25 cells cycle after 48 h at the G0/G1 phase in a dose- and time-dependent manner through disruption G0/G1 checkpoint, with increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio gene expression. AgNPs exhibit cytotoxic effects on SCC-25 malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes, which is diminished when combined with BER. The AgNPs concentration required to inhibit the growth of carcinoma cells by 50% (IC50) after 48 h was estimated at 5.19 μg/mL. AgNPs combined with BER increased the expression of Bcl-2 while decreasing the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 in SCC-25 cells. Silver particles at low doses therefore reduce the proliferation and viability of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. SCC-25 cells are susceptible to damage from AgNPs-induced stress, which can be regulated by the natural alkaloid berberine, suggesting that nanoparticles

  13. Attenuation of mild hyperandrogenic activity in postpubertal acne by a triphasic oral contraceptive containing low doses of ethynyl estradiol and d,l-norgestrel.

    PubMed

    Lemay, A; Dewailly, S D; Grenier, R; Huard, J

    1990-07-01

    The effect of a low dose triphasic oral contraceptive (OC) was evaluated during a 6-month treatment period in 41 patients (mean age, 25.4 +/- 0.7 yr) who had grade I-IV postpubertal acne and normal menses. The OC contained three dose levels of ethynyl estradiol and dl-norgestrel. Acne lesions were assessed, and serum androgen levels were measured during a control cycle and between days 17-21 of treatment cycles 1, 2, 3, and 6. Four patients dropped out after 3 months of treatment. Acne was significantly improved after the first OC cycle. After six cycles, the number of comedones had decreased by 79.6 +/- 3.2% (range, 50-100%) in 69.4% of the patients. Mean baseline levels of testosterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate were in the upper third of the normal range, with elevated individual values in 18.9%, 36.5%, and 26.8% of the women, respectively. Mean baseline levels of androstenedione, free testosterone (T), and 3 alpha-androstanediol glucuronide (3 alpha-diol-G) were above the normal range, with elevated individual values in 51.2%, 75.0%, and 85.4% of the patients, respectively. Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels were below the normal range in 26.8% of the cases. At the end of the first OC cycle, there was a significant (P less than 0.01) decrease in all androgen precursors and a 2-fold increase in SHBG. Androstenedione and free T decreased into the normal range during OC intake. Serum 3 alpha-diol-G levels remained elevated, but had decreased by 34.5% at cycle 6 (P less than 0.05). These results show that the triphasic OC has significantly improved acne in postpubertal women for whom acne was the main manifestation of mild hyperandrogenic activity. The improvement in acne corresponded to a decrease in adrenal/ovarian androgens and free T, which led to a decreased metabolism to 3 alpha-diol-G, presumably by the sebaceous glands. The increase in SHBG is considered an estrogenic effect, and the triphasic formulation containing

  14. The Effects of Naltrexone on Subjective Response to Methamphetamine in a Clinical Sample: a Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Laboratory Study.

    PubMed

    Ray, Lara A; Bujarski, Spencer; Courtney, Kelly E; Moallem, Nathasha R; Lunny, Katy; Roche, Daniel; Leventhal, Adam M; Shoptaw, Steve; Heinzerling, Keith; London, Edythe D; Miotto, Karen

    2015-09-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) use disorder is a serious psychiatric condition for which there are no FDA-approved medications. Naltrexone (NTX) is an opioid receptor antagonist with demonstrated efficacy, albeit moderate, for the treatment of alcoholism and opioid dependence. Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that NTX may be useful for the treatment of MA use disorder. To inform treatment development, we conducted a double-blind, randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled human laboratory study of NTX. Non-treatment-seeking individuals meeting DSM-IV criteria for MA abuse or dependence (n=30) completed two separate 5-day inpatient stays. During each admission, participants completed testing sessions comprised of MA cue-reactivity and intravenous MA administration (30 mg) after receiving oral NTX (50 mg) or placebo for 4 days. This study tested the hypotheses that NTX would (a) attenuate cue-induced MA craving, and (b) reduce subjective responses to MA administration. Results largely supported the study hypotheses such that (a) NTX significantly blunted cue-induced craving for MA and (b) attenuated several of the hedonic subjective effects of MA, including craving, during controlled MA administration and as compared with placebo. NTX decreased overall subjective ratings of 'crave drug,' 'stimulated,' and 'would like drug access,' decreased the the post-MA administration timecourse of 'anxious' and increased ratings of 'bad drug effects,' as compared with placebo. These findings support a potential mechanism of action by showing that NTX reduced cue-induced craving and subjective responses to MA. This is consistent with positive treatment studies of NTX for amphetamine dependence, as well as ongoing clinical trials for MA.

  15. Effect of Prazosin and Naltrexone on Script Induced Alcohol Craving in Veterans with Alcohol Use Disorders with and without Co-Occurring PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    despite recent gains in establishing effective pharmacological and behavioral treatments for alcohol use disorders (AUD), nonremittance and relapse...including PTSD status, moderate medication response. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Alcohol Drinking, Drinking Behavior , Naltrexone, Prazosin, Adrenergic Agents...Provide a brief list of keywords (limit to 20 words). Alcohol Drinking  Drinking  Behavior   Alcohol Craving  Naltrexone  Prazosin  Adrenergic Agents

  16. Persistent overexpression of DNA methyltransferase 1 attenuating GABAergic inhibition in basolateral amygdala accounts for anxiety in rat offspring exposed perinatally to low-dose bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rong; Chen, Fang; Chang, Fei; Bai, Yinyang; Chen, Ling

    2013-10-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that predisposition to diseases can be acquired during early stages of development and interactions between environmental and genetic factors may be implicated in the onset of many pathological conditions. We have shown that perinatal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) at environmental dose level causes long-term anxiety-like behaviors in rats. The aim of this study was to examine epigenetic reprogramming effect of BPA on anxiety-related neurobehavior in the rat offspring. The results of real-time RT-PCR displayed that the overexpression of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) mRNA was accompanied by the reduction of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) mRNA level in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) of postnatal day 45 BPA-exposed female rats. Chronic intro-BLA injection with 5-ada-CdR could rectify the GAD67 mRNA expression. Behavioral data showed that the anxiety-like behaviors in BPA-exposed rats were reversed by intro-BLA treatment with 5-ada-CdR which could be further blocked by PTX. Electrophysiological study revealed behavioral alterations were associated with the increase of postsynaptic neuronal excitability in the cortical-BLA pathway which appeared as multispike responses, paired-pulse facilitation instead of paired-pulse inhibition and long-term potentiation and 5-aza-CdR treatment restored the increased synaptic transmission in the BLA via improving GABAergic system. The above results suggest that the overexpression of DNMT1 in the BLA is responsible for the etiology of anxiety associated with BPA exposure via GABAergic disinhibition. In addition, we also find these long-term neurobehavioral effects of developmental BPA exposure are reversible in adolescent period.

  17. DSM IV axis II traits can influence compliance to treatment with oral naltrexone: a preliminary study on 30 opiate dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Streel, Emmanuel; Chenut, Christie; Papageorgiou, Constentin; Verbanck, Paul

    2014-01-01

    For many decades, health specialists have successfully used their clinical ingenuity to increase the efficiency of opiate detoxification protocols. However, even if drop-out rate has decreased significantly in today's protocols, relapse after opiate detoxification remains a major problem. Therefore, naltrexone hydrochloride, an opiate antagonist, has been considered by many as a potential tool to support abstinence in what has been called "antagonist-assisted abstinence" (AAA). Nevertheless, while naltrexone implants are becoming more accessible, a large majority of centers still use oral naltrexone and adherence to treatment remains a major obstacle to AAA's efficiency. As the personality profile could give an insight into compliance, we investigated the relationship between personality profiles and naltrexone adherence in a cohort of 30 patients. The results indicate that the Axis II profile influences the likely pattern of oral naltrexone compliance. As clinicians need to identify opiate dependent patients who are most likely to benefit from oral naltrexone treatment, it therefore carries important implications and could lead to a better adjustment of therapeutic strategies for opiate dependent patients.

  18. Modulation of nucleus accumbens connectivity by alcohol drinking and naltrexone in alcohol-preferring rats: A manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Mateusz; Canals, Santiago; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Hyytiä, Petri

    2016-03-01

    The nonselective opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone is now used for the treatment of alcoholism, yet naltrexone's central mechanism of action remains poorly understood. One line of evidence suggests that opioid antagonists regulate alcohol drinking through interaction with the mesolimbic dopamine system. Hence, our goal here was to examine the role of the nucleus accumbens connectivity in alcohol reinforcement and naltrexone's actions using manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). Following long-term free-choice drinking of alcohol and water, AA (Alko Alcohol) rats received injections of MnCl2 into the nucleus accumbens for activity-dependent tracing of accumbal connections. Immediately after the accumbal injections, rats were imaged using MEMRI, and then allowed to drink either alcohol or water for the next 24h. Naltrexone was administered prior to the active dark period, and the second MEMRI was performed 24h after the first scan. Comparison of signal intensity at 1 and 24h after accumbal MnCl2 injections revealed an ipsilateral continuum through the ventral pallidum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, globus pallidus, and lateral hypothalamus to the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. Activation was also seen in the rostral part of the insular cortex and regions of the prefrontal cortex. Alcohol drinking resulted in enhanced activation of these connections, whereas naltrexone suppressed alcohol-induced activity. These data support the involvement of the accumbal connections in alcohol reinforcement and mediation of naltrexone's suppressive effects on alcohol drinking through their deactivation.

  19. Naltrexone: a review of existing sustained drug delivery systems and emerging nano-based systems.

    PubMed

    Goonoo, Nowsheen; Bhaw-Luximon, Archana; Ujoodha, Reetesh; Jhugroo, Anil; Hulse, Gary K; Jhurry, Dhanjay

    2014-06-10

    Narcotic antagonists such as naltrexone (NTX) have shown some efficiency in the treatment of both opiate addiction and alcohol dependence. A few review articles have focused on clinical findings and pharmacogenetics of NTX, advantages and limitations of sustained release systems as well as pharmacological studies of NTX depot formulations for the treatment of alcohol and opioid dependency. To date, three NTX implant systems have been developed and tested in humans. In this review, we summarize the latest clinical data on commercially available injectable and implantable NTX-sustained release systems and discuss their safety and tolerability aspects. Emphasis is also laid on recent developments in the area of nanodrug delivery such as NTX-loaded micelles and nanogels as well as related research avenues. Due to their ability to increase the therapeutic index and to improve the selectivity of drugs (targeted delivery), nanodrug delivery systems are considered as promising sustainable drug carriers for NTX in addressing opiate and alcohol dependence.

  20. Contrave, a bupropion and naltrexone combination therapy for the potential treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Padwal, Raj

    2009-10-01

    Contrave, under development by Orexigen Therapeutics Inc for the potential treatment of obesity, is an oral, sustained-release combination of the dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake antagonist bupropion and the opioid antagonist naltrexone. The proposed dual mechanism of action of the compound involves complementary stimulation of central melanocortin pathways, resulting in increased energy expenditure and reduced appetite. At the time of publication, Contrave was being assessed in phase III clinical trials. Preliminary data demonstrated placebo-subtracted weight losses of 3 to 7% and improvements in obesity-related comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors. The primary adverse effect leading to discontinuation of treatment was nausea. Assuming that the results of the Contrave phase III clinical program reaffirm the efficacy and safety of the drug combination, this agent could be approved and launched to become a market leader in the anti-obesity therapeutic arena.

  1. A Categorical Typology of Naltrexone Adopting Private Substance Abuse Treatment Centers*

    PubMed Central

    Oser, Carrie B.; Roman, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    This study uses a diffusion of innovations theoretical framework (Rogers, 2003) to identify organizational-level predictors of a categorical typology of substance abuse treatment centers based on naltrexone adoption. Data from the National Treatment Center Study (n=158) was used to examine the impact of socio-economic status, organizational personality, and communication behavior on adopter categorization (i.e., innovators, early adopters, early majority, late majority, or laggards). Results from the ordered logistic regression model indicate that organizations’ that did not have on-site 12-step meetings and were familiar with treatment innovations were more likely to be in a more innovative category. Organizations that learned about innovations from professional development seminars and informal conversations with external treatment providers were more likely to be in a less innovative category. Identifying and targeting the early and late majority categories of adopting organizations for better training and community linkages could help to reduce the research to practice gap. PMID:17997266

  2. Design of controlled release inert matrices of naltrexone hydrochloride based on percolation concepts.

    PubMed

    Caraballo, I; Melgoza, L M; Alvarez-Fuentes, J; Soriano, M C; Rabasco, A M

    1999-04-20

    The percolation theory is a statistical theory able to study chaotic or disordered systems that has been applied in the pharmaceutical field since 1987. Through the application of this theory, the design of controlled release inert matrices has been improved. The aim of the present paper is to estimate the percolation thresholds, the most important concept of the percolation theory, which characterise the release behaviour of controlled release inert matrices of naltrexone hydrochloride. Matrix tablets were prepared using naltrexone hydrochloride as a potent narcotic antagonist and Eudragit(R) RS-PM as matrix forming material in different ratios, keeping constant the drug and excipient particle sizes. In vitro release assays were carried out exposing only one side of the tablets to the dissolution medium. The drug percolation threshold was estimated using different methods. The method of Leuenberger and Bonny gives 31.11+/-7.95% v/v as the critical porosity, which corresponds to a percolation range from 12 to 20% (w/w) of drug content. The release profiles and the release kinetics are in agreement with this result. A change in the exponent k (from 0.29 to 0.57) has been found in this region. Using scanning electron microscopy, the percolation threshold has been observed in a higher concentration range (20-35% w/w). This fact can be attributed to the low accuracy of the visual methods, mainly due to the extrapolation from 2D to 3D systems. If a percolating cluster is observed in two dimensions, the percolation threshold of the 3D system will be already clearly exceeded. The excipient percolation threshold is estimated between 25.4 and 31.1% (v/v) based on the release profiles and the analysis of the release kinetics.

  3. Investigation of structure, vibrational and NMR spectra of oxycodone and naltrexone: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakol, Hossein; Esfandyari, Maryam; Taheri, Salman; Heydari, Akbar

    2011-08-01

    In this work, two important opioid antagonists, naltrexone and oxycodone, were prepared from thebaine and were characterized by IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Moreover, computational NMR and IR parameters were obtained using density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory. Complete NMR and vibrational assignment were carried out using the observed and calculated spectra. The IR frequencies and NMR chemical shifts, determined experimentally, were compared with those obtained theoretically from DFT calculations, showed good agreements. The RMS errors observed between experimental and calculated data for the IR absorptions are 85 and 105 cm -1, for the 1H NMR peaks are 0.87 and 0.17 ppm and for those of 13C NMR are 5.6 and 5.3 ppm, respectively for naltrexone and oxycodone.

  4. Determination of naloxone and naltrexone as perfluoroalkyl ester derivatives by electron-capture gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sams, R A; Malspeis, L

    1976-10-13

    An electron-capture gas chromatographic method is described for the determination of naloxone and naltrexone as the perfluoroalkyl esters. Each compound serves as internal standard for determination of the other. The method permits quantitation of 2-100 ng of either compound. Conditions for derivatization with heptafluorobutyric anhydride (HFBA), pentafluoropropionic anhydride (PFPA), and trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA) have been investigated. When catalyzed with pyridine, derivatization with HFBA and PFPA at 70 degrees gives naloxone and naltrexone triesters. Evidence for triester formation was obtained from gas chromatography-methane chemical ionization mass spectrometry and infrared spectral analysis. It was found that both the HFB and PFP triesters are suitable for quantitation of the narcotic antagonists, the HFB derivatives having greater stability than the PFP derivatives. The TFA derivatives are substantially less stable.

  5. Evaluating the Impact of Naltrexone on the Rat Gambling Task to Test Its Predictive Validity for Gambling Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Di Ciano, Patricia; Le Foll, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Gambling Disorder has serious consequences and no medications are currently approved for the treatment of this disorder. One factor that may make medication development difficult is the lack of animal models of gambling that would allow for the pre-clinical screening of efficacy. Despite this, there is evidence from clinical trials that opiate antagonists, in particular naltrexone, may be useful in treating gambling disorder. To-date, the effects of naltrexone on pre-clinical models of gambling have not been evaluated. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of naltrexone in an animal model of gambling, the rat gambling task (rGT), to determine whether this model has some predictive validity. The rGT is a model in which rats are given a choice of making either a response that produces a large reward or a small reward. The larger the reward, the greater the punishment, and thus this task requires that the animal inhibit the ‘tempting’ choice, as the smaller reward option produces overall the most number of rewards per session. People with gambling disorder chose the tempting option more, thus the rGT may provide a model of problem gambling. It was found that naltrexone improved performance on this task in a subset of animals that chose the ‘tempting’, disadvantageous choice, more at baseline. Thus, the results of this study suggest that the rGT should be further investigated as a pre-clinical model of gambling disorder and that further investigation into whether opioid antagonists are effective in treating Gambling Disorder may be warranted. PMID:27191857

  6. Gestational naltrexone ameliorates fetal ethanol exposures enhancing effect on the postnatal behavioral and neural response to ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Youngentob, Steven L; Kent, Paul F; Youngentob, Lisa M

    2012-01-01

    The association between gestational exposure to ethanol and adolescent ethanol abuse is well established. Recent animal studies support the role of fetal ethanol experience-induced chemosensory plasticity as contributing to this observation. Previously, we established that fetal ethanol exposure, delivered through a dam’s diet throughout gestation, tuned the neural response of the peripheral olfactory system of early postnatal rats to the odor of ethanol. This occurred in conjunction with a loss of responsiveness to other odorants. The instinctive behavioral response to the odor of ethanol was also enhanced. Importantly, there was a significant contributory link between the altered response to the odor of ethanol and increased ethanol avidity when assessed in the same animals. Here, we tested whether the neural and behavioral olfactory plasticity, and their relationship to enhanced ethanol intake, is a result of the mere exposure to ethanol or whether it requires the animal to associate ethanol’s reinforcing properties with its odor attributes. In this later respect, the opioid system is important in the mediation (or modulation) of the reinforcing aspects of ethanol. To block endogenous opiates during prenatal life, pregnant rats received daily intraperitoneal administration of the opiate antagonist naltrexone from gestational day 6–21 jointly with ethanol delivered via diet. Relative to control progeny, we found that gestational exposure to naltrexone ameliorated the enhanced postnatal behavioral response to the odor of ethanol and postnatal drug avidity. Our findings support the proposition that in utero ethanol-induced olfactory plasticity (and its relationship to postnatal intake) requires, at least in part, the associative pairing between ethanol’s odor quality and its reinforcing aspects. We also found suggestive evidence that fetal naltrexone ameliorated the untoward effects of gestational ethanol exposure on the neural response to non

  7. Subchronic administration of short-acting naltrexone has no effect on striatal dopamine transporter availability, food intake or body weight gain in rats.

    PubMed

    Zaaijer, Eline R; de Bruin, Kora; la Fleur, Susanne E; Goudriaan, Anna E; van den Brink, Wim; Booij, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone is successfully used in the treatment of opioid and alcohol dependence. However, questions have been raised about possible anhedonic side effects, because the opioid system is directly involved in hedonic responses to natural rewarding activities, possibly due to its indirect effects on the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT). In order to test this hypothesis, 30 rats were randomized to either a 10-day treatment with 3 mg/kg short-acting naltrexone or vehicle. No significant differences between the groups were found in striatal DAT availability, cumulative food intake (for 48 or 72 h), body weight gain and abdominal fatpad weight. Thus, the results of this study suggest that (sub)chronic treatment with short-acting naltrexone does not induce possible anhedonic effects. However, it cannot be ruled out the anhedonic effect of naltrexone is only short-lived and thus not detected in the current study. Therefore, future studies are needed to study possible acute anhedonic effects at several time points shortly after short-acting naltrexone administration and to directly compare the possible anhedonic effects of long-acting with those of short-acting opioid antagonists.

  8. Extended-Release Naltrexone: A Qualitative Analysis of Barriers to Routine Use.

    PubMed

    Alanis-Hirsch, Kelly; Croff, Raina; Ford, James H; Johnson, Kim; Chalk, Mady; Schmidt, Laura; McCarty, Dennis

    2016-03-01

    The Medication Research Partnership (a national health plan and nine addiction treatment centers contracted with the health plan) sought to facilitate the adoption of pharmacotherapy for alcohol and opioid use disorders. Qualitative analysis of interviews with treatment center change leaders, individuals working for the manufacturer and its technical assistance contractor, and health plan managers extracted details on the processes used to order, store, bill for, and administer extended-release naltrexone. Qualitative themes were categorized using domains from the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (intervention characteristics, outer setting, inner setting, and provider characteristics). Characteristics of XR-NTX that inhibited use included the complexity of ordering and using the medication; cost was also a barrier. Outer setting barriers reflected patient needs and external health plan policies on formulary coverage, benefit management, and reimbursement. Program structures, the lack of physician linkages, a culture resistant to the use of medication, and unease with change were inner setting elements that limited use of XR-NTX. Patient stereotypes and a lack of knowledge about XR-NTX affected practitioner willingness to treat patients and prescribe XR-NTX. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research provided a useful lens to understand and interpret the processes affecting access to XR-NTX.

  9. Naltrexone pretreatment blocks microwave-induced changes in central cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Wen, Y.F.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Repeated exposure of rats to pulsed, circularly polarized microwaves (2,450-MHz, 2-microseconds pulses at 500 pps, power density 1 mW/cm2, at an averaged, whole-body SAR of 0.6 W/kg) induced biphasic changes in the concentration of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the central nervous system. An increase in receptor concentration occurred in the hippocampus of rats subjected to ten 45-min sessions of microwave exposure, whereas a decrease in concentration was observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats exposed to ten 20-min sessions. These findings, which confirm earlier work in the authors' laboratory, were extended to include pretreatment of rats with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone (1 mg/kg, IP) before each session of exposure. The drug treatment blocked the microwave-induced changes in cholinergic receptors in the brain. These data further support the authors' hypothesis that endogenous opioids play a role in the effects of microwaves on central cholinergic systems.

  10. Enhanced skin permeation of naltrexone by pulsed electromagnetic fields in human skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Gayathri; Edwards, Jeffrey; Chen, Yan; Benson, Heather A E

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the skin permeation of naltrexone (NTX) under the influence of a pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF). The permeation of NTX across human epidermis and a silicone membrane in vitro was monitored during and after application of the PEMF and compared to passive application. Enhancement ratios of NTX human epidermis permeation by PEMF over passive diffusion, calculated based on the AUC of cumulative NTX permeation to the receptor compartment verses time for 0-4 h, 4-8 h, and over the entire experiment (0-8 h) were 6.52, 5.25, and 5.66, respectively. Observation of the curve indicated an initial enhancement of NTX permeation compared to passive delivery whilst the PEMF was active (0-4 h). This was followed by a secondary phase after termination of PEMF energy (4-8 h) in which there was a steady increase in NTX permeation. No significant enhancement of NTX penetration across silicone membrane occurred with PEMF application in comparison to passively applied NTX. In a preliminary experiment PEMF enhanced the penetration of 10 nm gold nanoparticles through the stratum corneum as visualized by multiphoton microscopy. This suggests that the channels through which the nanoparticles move must be larger than the 10 nm diameter of these rigid particles.

  11. Extended-release naltrexone: A qualitative analysis of barriers to routine use

    PubMed Central

    Alanis-Hirsch, Kelly; Croff, Raina; Ford, James H.; Johnson, Kim; Chalk, Mady; Schmidt, Laura; McCarty, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    The Medication Research Partnership (a national health plan and nine addiction treatment centers contracted with the health plan) sought to facilitate the adoption of pharmacotherapy for alcohol and opioid use disorders. Qualitative analysis of interviews with treatment center change leaders, individuals working for the manufacturer and its technical assistance contractor, and health plan managers extracted details on the processes used to order, store, bill for, and administer extended-release naltrexone. Qualitative themes were categorized using domains from the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (intervention characteristics, outer setting, inner setting, and provider characteristics). Characteristics of XR-NTX that inhibited use included the complexity of ordering and using the medication; cost was also a barrier. Outer setting barriers reflected patient needs and external health plan policies on formulary coverage, benefit management, and reimbursement. Program structures, the lack of physician linkages, a culture resistant to the use of medication, and unease with change were inner setting elements that limited use of XR-NTX. Patient stereotypes and a lack of knowledge about XR-NTX affected practitioner willingness to treat patients and prescribe XR-NTX. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research provided a useful lens to understand and interpret the processes affecting access to XR-NTX. PMID:26654934

  12. HUMAN SKIN PERMEATION OF 3-O-ALKYL CARBAMATE PRODRUGS OF NALTREXONE

    PubMed Central

    Vaddi, Haranath K.; Banks, Stan L.; Chen, Jianhong; Hammell, Dana C.; Crooks, Peter A.; Stinchcomb, Audra L.

    2009-01-01

    N-Monoalkyl and N,N-dialkyl carbamate prodrugs of naltrexone (NTX), an opioid antagonist, were synthesized and their in vitro permeation across human skin was determined. Relevant physicochemical properties were also determined. Most prodrugs exhibited lower melting points, lower aqueous solubilities, and higher oil solubilities than NTX. The flux values from N-monoalkyl carbamate prodrugs were significantly higher than those from NTX and N,N-dialkyl carbamates. The melting points of N-monoalkyl carbamate prodrugs were quite low compared to the N,N-dialkyl carbamate prodrugs and NTX. Heats of fusion for the N,N-dialkyl carbamate prodrugs were higher than that for NTX. N-Monoalkyl carbamate prodrugs had higher stratum corneum/vehicle partition coefficients than their N,N-dialkyl counterparts. Higher percent prodrug bioconversion to NTX in skin appeared to be related to increased skin flux. N,N-Dialkyl carbamate prodrugs were more stable in buffer and in plasma than N-monoalkyl carbamate prodrugs. In conclusion, N-monoalkyl carbamate prodrugs of NTX improved the systemic delivery of NTX across human skin in vitro. N,N-Dialkyl substitution in the prodrug moiety decreased skin permeation and plasma hydrolysis to the parent drug. The cross-sectional area of the carbamate head group was the major determinant of flux of the N-monoalkyl and N,N-dialkyl carbamate prodrugs of NTX. PMID:18972573

  13. Lithium attenuated the behavioral despair induced by acute neurogenic stress through blockade of opioid receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Khaloo, Pegah; Sadeghi, Banafshe; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Zolfagharie, Samira; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-10-01

    Major depressive disorder is disease with high rate of morbidity and mortality. Stressful events lead to depression and they can be used as a model of depression in rodents. In this study we aimed to investigate whether lithium modifies the stressed-induced depression through blockade of opioid receptors in mice. We used foot shock stress as stressor and forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST) and open field test (OFT) to evaluation the behavioral responses in mice. We also used naltrexone hydrochloride (as opioid receptor antagonist), and morphine (as opioid receptor agonist). Our results displayed that foot-shock stress significantly increased the immobility time in TST and FST but it could not change the locomotor behavior in OFT. When we combined the low concentrations of lithium and naltrexone a significant reduction in immobility time was seen in the FST and TST in comparison with control foot-shock stressed group administered saline only. Despite the fact that our data showed low concentrations of lithium, when administered independently did not significantly affect the immobility time. Also our data indicated that concurrent administration of lithium and naltrexone had no effect on open field test. Further we demonstrated that simultaneous administration of morphine and lithium reverses the antidepressant like effect of active doses of lithium. Our data acclaimed that we lithium can augment stressed-induced depression and opioid pathways are involved in this action.

  14. Epidemiologic and Molecular Pathophysiology of Chronic Opioid Dependence and the Place of Naltrexone Extended-Release Formulations in its Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Naltrexone implants and depot injections (NI) are a novel form of treatment for opiate dependence (OD). Major questions relate to their absolute and relative efficacy and safety. Opportunely, six recent clinical trial data from several continents have uniformly provided dramatic evidence of the potent, dose-related and highly significant efficacy of NI, with minimal or manageable accompanying toxicity and safety concerns. The opiate-free lifestyle is attained significantly more often with NI adjusted O.R. = 6.00 (95% C.I. 3.86–9.50), P < 10−10. Other drug use and drug craving are also rapidly reduced. The optimum manner in which to commence NI remains to be established. Of particular relevance is the relative safety of NI compared to the chronic opiate agonists (COA) usually employed, as the long-term toxicity of COA is only just being elucidated. Large population-based studies have found elevated rates of cardiovascular disease, six cancers, liver and respiratory disease, and all-cause mortality in COA. Whilst opiates have been shown to trigger numerous molecular pathways, the most interesting is the demonstration that the opiate morphinan’s nucleus binds to the endotoxin groove of the TLR4-MD2 heterodimer. This has the effect of triggering a low grade endotoxaemic-like state, which over time may account for these protean clinical findings, an effect which is reversed by opiate antagonists. This emerging evidence suggests an exciting new treatment paradigm for OD and a corresponding increase in the role of NI in treatment. PMID:23055738

  15. Effect of Prazosin and Naltrexone on Script Induced Alcohol Craving in Veterans with Alcohol Use Disorders with and without Co-occurring PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0025 TITLE: Effect of Prazosin and Naltrexone on Script Induced Alcohol Craving in Veterans with Alcohol Use...2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 4 Dec 2013 – 3 Dec 2014 4. Effect of Prazosin and Naltrexone on Script Induced Alcohol Craving in...Veterans with Alcohol Use Disorders with and without Co-occurring PTSD 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0025 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  16. Passive diffusion of naltrexone into human and animal cells and upregulation of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fan; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Banks, William A; Zagon, Ian S

    2009-09-01

    Naltrexone (NTX) is a potent opioid antagonist that promotes cell proliferation by upregulating DNA synthesis through displacement of the tonically active inhibitory peptide, opioid growth factor (OGF) from its receptor (OGFr). To investigate how NTX enters cells, NTX was fluorescently labeled [1-(N)-fluoresceinyl NTX thiosemicarbazone; FNTX] to study its uptake by living cultured cells. When human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell line (SCC-1) was incubated with FNTX for as little as 1 min, cells displayed nuclear and cytoplasmic staining of FNTX as determined by fluorescent deconvolution microscopy, with enrichment of fluorescent signal in the nucleus and nucleolus. The same temporal-spatial distribution of FNTX was detected in a human pancreatic cancer cell line (MIA PaCa-2), African green monkey kidney cell line (COS-7), and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). FNTX remained in cells for as long as 48 h. FNTX was internalized in SCC-1 cells when incubation occurred at 4 degrees C, with the signal being comparable to that recorded at 37 degrees C. A 100-fold excess of NTX or a variety of other opioid ligands did not alter the temporal-spatial distribution of FNTX. Neither fluorescein-labeled dextran nor fluorescein alone entered the cells. To study the effect of FNTX on DNA synthesis, cells incubated with FNTX at concentrations ranging from 10(-5) to 10(-8) M had a 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine index that was 39-82% greater than for vehicle-treated cells and was comparable to that of unlabeled NTX (37-70%). Taken together, these results suggested that NTX enters cells by passive diffusion in a nonsaturable manner.

  17. Neural correlates of adherence to extended-release naltrexone pharmacotherapy in heroin dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, A-L; Elman, I; Lowen, S B; Blady, S J; Lynch, K G; Hyatt, J M; O'Brien, C P; Langleben, D D

    2015-01-01

    Injectable extended-release naltrexone (XRNTX) presents an effective therapeutic strategy for opioid addiction, however its utility could be hampered by poor adherence. To gain a better insight into this phenomenon, we utilized blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in conjunction with a validated cue-induced craving procedure to examine neural correlates of XRNTX adherence. We operationalized treatment adherence as the number of monthly XRNTX injections (range: 0–3) administered to a group of fully detoxified heroin-dependent subjects (n=32). Additional outcomes included urine toxicology screening and self-reported tobacco use. The presented heroin-related visual cues reliably elicited heroin craving in all tested subjects. Nine, five, three and 15 of the participants, respectively, received zero, one, two and three XRNTX injections, predicted by the individual baseline fMRI signal change in response to the cues in the medial prefrontal cortex, a brain region involved in inhibitory self-control and emotional appraisal. The incidence of opioid-positive urines during the XRNTX therapy was low and remained about half the pre-treatment rate after the XRNTX ended. During the treatment, cigarette smoking behaviors followed patterns of opioid use, while cocaine consumption was increased with reductions in opioid use. The present data support the hypothesis that medial prefrontal cortex functions are involved in adherence to opioid antagonist therapy. A potential role of concurrent non-opioid addictive substances consumption during the XRNTX pharmacotherapy warrants further investigation. Our findings set the stage for further bio-behavioral investigations of the mechanisms of relapse prevention in opioid dependence. PMID:25781230

  18. Topical naltrexone accelerates full-thickness wound closure in type 1 diabetic rats by stimulating angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Patricia J; Immonen, Jessica A; Zagon, Ian S

    2013-07-01

    Delays in wound healing often result in infection, chronic ulceration, and possible amputation of extremities. Impaired wound healing is a major complication of the 23 million people in the USA with diabetes, and financial and medical burdens are demanding new treatments for wound healing. Previous studies have demonstrated that topical application of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX) dissolved in moisturizing cream reverses delays in wound closure in rats with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes. A target of NTX's action is DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. In this study, granulation tissue was evaluated to ascertain the specific cellular targets that were impaired in diabetic wounds, as well as those that were enhanced following NTX application. Mast cell number as well as the number of new blood vessels immunoreactive to fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) antibodies were recorded at 3, 5, 8, 10, 15, and 20 days following creation of full-thickness dorsal cutaneous wounds in normal and type 1 diabetic rats. Diabetic rats displayed delays in wound closure as well as a reduction in the number of mast cells responding to the injury, and delays in the spatial and temporal expression of FGF-2, VEGF, and α-SMA in capillaries. Topical NTX accelerated the rate of wound closure and stimulated expression of angiogenic factors within granulation tissue of diabetic rats relative to control animals receiving saline in moisturizing cream. These data support observations that a novel biological pathway is impaired under diabetic conditions and can be modulated by topical NTX to enhance proliferative events in wound healing.

  19. Neural correlates of adherence to extended-release naltrexone pharmacotherapy in heroin dependence.

    PubMed

    Wang, A-L; Elman, I; Lowen, S B; Blady, S J; Lynch, K G; Hyatt, J M; O'Brien, C P; Langleben, D D

    2015-03-17

    Injectable extended-release naltrexone (XRNTX) presents an effective therapeutic strategy for opioid addiction, however its utility could be hampered by poor adherence. To gain a better insight into this phenomenon, we utilized blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in conjunction with a validated cue-induced craving procedure to examine neural correlates of XRNTX adherence. We operationalized treatment adherence as the number of monthly XRNTX injections (range: 0-3) administered to a group of fully detoxified heroin-dependent subjects (n=32). Additional outcomes included urine toxicology screening and self-reported tobacco use. The presented heroin-related visual cues reliably elicited heroin craving in all tested subjects. Nine, five, three and 15 of the participants, respectively, received zero, one, two and three XRNTX injections, predicted by the individual baseline fMRI signal change in response to the cues in the medial prefrontal cortex, a brain region involved in inhibitory self-control and emotional appraisal. The incidence of opioid-positive urines during the XRNTX therapy was low and remained about half the pre-treatment rate after the XRNTX ended. During the treatment, cigarette smoking behaviors followed patterns of opioid use, while cocaine consumption was increased with reductions in opioid use. The present data support the hypothesis that medial prefrontal cortex functions are involved in adherence to opioid antagonist therapy. A potential role of concurrent non-opioid addictive substances consumption during the XRNTX pharmacotherapy warrants further investigation. Our findings set the stage for further bio-behavioral investigations of the mechanisms of relapse prevention in opioid dependence.

  20. Microneedle-assisted percutaneous delivery of naltrexone hydrochloride in Yucatan minipig: in vitro-in vivo correlation

    PubMed Central

    Milewski, Mikolaj; Paudel, Kalpana S.; Brogden, Nicole K.; Ghosh, Priyanka; Banks, Stan L.; Hammell, Dana C.; Stinchcomb, Audra L.

    2013-01-01

    Although microneedle-assisted transdermal drug delivery has been the subject of multiple scientific investigations, very few attempts have been made to quantitatively relate in vitro and in vivo permeation. The case of naltrexone hydrochloride is not an exception. In the present study a pharmacokinetic profile obtained following a “poke and patch” microneedle application method in Yucatan minipig is reported. The profile demonstrates rapid achievement of maximum naltrexone hydrochloride plasma concentration followed by a relatively abrupt concentration decline. No steady-state was achieved in vivo. In an attempt to correlate the present in vivo findings with formerly published in vitro steady-state permeation data, a diffusion-compartmental mathematical model was developed. The model incorporates two parallel permeation pathways, barrier thickness-dependent diffusional resistance, microchannel closure kinetics, and a pharmacokinetic module. The regression analysis of the pharmacokinetic data demonstrated good agreement with independently calculated microchannel closure rate and in vitro permeation data. Interestingly, full-thickness rather than split-thickness skin employed in in vitro diffusion experiments provided the best correlation with in vivo data. Data analysis carried out with the model presented herein provides new mechanistic insight and permits predictions with respect to pharmacokinetics coupled with altered microchannel closure rates. PMID:24053426

  1. Ethanol injected into the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus induces behavioral stimulation in rats: an effect prevented by catalase inhibition and naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Raúl; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2008-10-01

    It is suggested that some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, including its psychomotor properties, are mediated by beta-endorphin and opioid receptors. Ethanol-induced increases in the release of hypothalamic beta-endorphin depend on the catalasemic conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde. Here, we evaluated the locomotor activity in rats microinjected with ethanol directly into the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ArcN), the main site of beta-endorphin synthesis in the brain and a region with high levels of catalase expression. Intra-ArcN ethanol-induced changes in motor activity were also investigated in rats pretreated with the opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone (0-2 mg/kg) or the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT; 0-1 g/kg). We found that ethanol microinjections of 64 or 128, but not 256 microg, produced locomotor stimulation. Intra-ArcN ethanol (128 microg)-induced activation was prevented by naltrexone and AT, whereas these compounds did not affect spontaneous activity. The present results support earlier evidence indicating that the ArcN and the beta-endorphinic neurons of this nucleus are necessary for ethanol to induce stimulation. In addition, our data suggest that brain structures that, as the ArcN, are rich in catalase may support the formation of ethanol-derived pharmacologically relevant concentrations of acetaldehyde and, thus be of particular importance for the behavioral effects of ethanol.

  2. Extended-release naltrexone for alcohol and opioid dependence: a meta-analysis of healthcare utilization studies.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Daniel M; McCarty, Dennis; Fu, Rongwei; Wiest, Katharina; Chalk, Mady; Gastfriend, David R

    2014-08-01

    Through improved adherence, once-monthly injectable extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) may provide an advantage over other oral agents approved for alcohol and opioid dependence treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate cost and utilization outcomes between XR-NTX and other pharmacotherapies for treatment of alcohol and opioid dependence. Published studies were identified through comprehensive search of two electronic databases. Studies were included if they compared XR-NTX to other approved medicines and reported economic and healthcare utilization outcomes in patients with opioid or alcohol dependence. We identified five observational studies comparing 1,565 patients using XR-NTX to other therapies over 6 months. Alcohol dependent XR-NTX patients had longer medication refill persistence versus acamprosate and oral naltrexone. Healthcare utilization and costs was generally lower or as low for XR-NTX-treated patients relative to other alcohol dependence agents. Opioid dependent XR-NTX patients had lower inpatient substance abuse-related utilization versus other agents and $8170 lower total cost versus methadone.

  3. Changes in hospital and out-patient events and costs following implant naltrexone treatment for problematic alcohol use.

    PubMed

    Kelty, Erin; Hayes, Lesleigh; O'Neil, Graeme; Kyle, Sarah; Jeffrey, Gary P; O'Neil, George; Hendrie, Delia; Mukhtar, Aqif; Hulse, Gary

    2014-08-01

    The harmful use of alcohol places a considerable burden on the community, both socially and financially. The aim of this study was to determine if the use of implant naltrexone is associated with a reduction in health care events and costs in patients treated for problematic alcohol use. Ninety four patients (60.6% male) treated between 2002 and 2007 were matched against state hospital, emergency department (ED), mental health out-patients and mortality data sets for 6 months prior to and 6 months post treatment. The number of patients, events, and costs associated with each health event were compared before and after treatment. Overall health care events and costs were reduced from $509033 prior to treatment to $270001 following treatment. Costs associated with hospital admission showed the most significant reduction, falling from $424605 (82 admissions/36 patients) before treatment to $203462 (43 admission/24 patients) after. While costs associated with ED attendances also fell ($74885 to $54712), costs associated with mental health out-patient attendances increased ($9543 to $11827). The use of implant naltrexone was associated with a reduction health events and costs in patients with problematic alcohol use in the first 6 months following treatment.

  4. Examination of the effects of varenicline, bupropion, lorcaserin, or naltrexone on responding for conditioned reinforcement in nicotine-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Guy, Elizabeth G; Fisher, Daniel C; Higgins, Guy A; Fletcher, Paul J

    2014-12-01

    Smoking tobacco remains one of the leading causes of preventable deaths in North America. Nicotine reinforces smoking behavior, in part, by enhancing the reinforcing properties of reward-related stimuli, or conditioned stimuli (CSs), associated with tobacco intake. To investigate how pharmaceutical interventions may affect this property of nicotine, we examined the effect of four US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs on the ability of nicotine to enhance operant responding for a CS as a conditioned reinforcer. Thirsty rats were exposed to 13 Pavlovian sessions where a CS was paired with water delivery. Nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) injections were administered before each Pavlovian session. Then, in separate groups of rats, the effects of varenicline (1 mg/kg), bupropion (10 and 30 mg/kg), lorcaserin (0.6 mg/kg), and naltrexone (2 mg/kg), and their interaction with nicotine on responding for conditioned reinforcement were examined. Varenicline and lorcaserin each reduced nicotine-enhanced responding for conditioned reinforcement, whereas naltrexone had a modest effect of reducing response enhancements by nicotine. In contrast, bupropion enhanced the effect of nicotine on this measure. The results of these studies may inform how pharmaceutical interventions can affect smoking cessation attempts and relapse through diverse mechanisms, either substituting for, or interacting with, the reinforcement-enhancing properties of nicotine.

  5. Brief Report: Case Reports on Naltrexone Use in Children with Autism: Controlled Observations Regarding Benefits and Practical Issues of Medication Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Patricia Gail; Allard, AnnaMary; Sears, Lonnie; Dalrymple, Nancy; Bloom, Allen S.

    2001-01-01

    A study involving six boys (ages 2-9) with autism found the use of naltrexone improved social initiations on videotape samples, social scale of the Gilliam Autism Rating Scales (4 out of 6 improved), stereotypies scale of GARS (5 out of 6 improved), and attention problems (4 out of 6 improved). (Contains references.) (CR)

  6. Weight loss with naltrexone SR/bupropion SR combination therapy as an adjunct to behavior modification: the COR-BMOD trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This 56-week, randomized, placebo-controlled trial examined the efficacy and safety of naltrexone plus bupropion as an adjunct to intensive behavior modification (BMOD). A total of 793 participants (BMI = 36.5 +/- 4.2 kg/m(2)) was randomly assigned in a 1:3 ratio to: (i) placebo + BMOD (N = 202); or...

  7. DC attenuation meter

    DOEpatents

    Hargrove, Douglas L.

    2004-09-14

    A portable, hand-held meter used to measure direct current (DC) attenuation in low impedance electrical signal cables and signal attenuators. A DC voltage is applied to the signal input of the cable and feedback to the control circuit through the signal cable and attenuators. The control circuit adjusts the applied voltage to the cable until the feedback voltage equals the reference voltage. The "units" of applied voltage required at the cable input is the system attenuation value of the cable and attenuators, which makes this meter unique. The meter may be used to calibrate data signal cables, attenuators, and cable-attenuator assemblies.

  8. Impact of prospectively-determined A118G polymorphism on treatment response to injectable naltrexone among methamphetamine-dependent patients: An open-label, pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Reshmi; Mendelson, John E.; Flower, Keith; Garrison, Kathleen; Yount, Garret; Coyle, Jeremy R.; Galloway, Gantt P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Methamphetamine (MA) addiction has no known effective pharmacotherapy. Small trials showed beneficial effects for oral naltrexone in amphetamine users. Trials in alcohol dependent subjects showed better response in persons with the A118G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the µ-opioid receptor. We conducted a pharmacogenetic trial of sustained release intramuscular naltrexone to examine the role of the A118G SNP in MA dependence. Method All eligible A118G subjects screened were enrolled; an equal number of wild type (A118A) subjects were selected using modified urn randomization, balanced on gender and frequency of recent MA use. Enrolled subjects received a single 380 mg naltrexone injection and weekly psychotherapy for four weeks. Self-report of MA use and urine toxicology for MA was assessed twice weekly. Urine samples with <1,000 ng/mL of MA were considered negative. Results Eleven A118G and 11 A118A subjects were enrolled. There were no significant differences between the groups in days of abstinence from MA use (11.5 v. 14.8, respectively, p = 0.51), number of MA-negative urine samples (1.7 v. 1.8, respectively, p = 0.97), consecutive MA-negative urine samples (1.0 v. 1.5, respectively, p = 0.91), or number of MA-negative urine samples before first relapse (0.9 v. 1.5, respectively, p = 0.86). Conclusions Although A118G polymorphism has been shown to be associated with improved treatment response to naltrexone among alcoholics, whether this polymorphism impacts naltrexone treatment response among MA users is unclear at this time. PMID:25622123

  9. The Effect of CRH, Dexamethasone and Naltrexone on the Mu, Delta and Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist Binding in Lamb Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis.

    PubMed

    Pierzchała-Koziec, Krystyna; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta; Oeltgen, Peter; Zubel-Łojek, Joanna; Latacz, Anna; Ocłon, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in the opioid receptor binding (mu, delta and kappa) in the hypothalamus, anterior pituitary and adrenal cortex (HPA) of lambs treated in vivo with corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH), naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist (NAL), and dexamethasone, a potent cortisol analog (DEX). Experiment was carried out on 3 months old female lambs of polish mountain strain. Lambs received a single i.v. injection of NaCl (control), CRH (alone or in combination with naltrexone), naltrexone or dexamethasone. One hour later animals were decapitated under anaesthesia, tissues were dissected out and receptor binding assays were performed with radioligands for each type of opioid receptors--3H-DAGO, 3H-DPDPE and 3H-EKC for mu, delta and kappa receptor, respectively. Coexistence of specific binding sites for each type of opioid receptor was demonstrated in all levels of HPA axis of control lambs, however their distribution was uneven. Acute treatment with CRH, DEX and NAL caused downregulation or upregulation of mu, delta, kappa receptor binding in each level of HPA axis. CRH effects on mu, delta and kappa opioid receptor binding varied within the HPA axis and were modulated by naltrexone. Treatment with naltrexone increased in vitro mu, delta and kappa receptor binding in most tested structures except delta receptor binding in adrenal (decrease by 52%) and kappa receptor binding in pituitary (decrease by 41%). Dexamethasone significantly decreased the mu, delta and kappa opioid receptor binding in adrenal cortex but differentially affected opioid receptor binding in hypothalamus and pituitary. It seems probable that endogenous opioid peptides acting through mu, delta and kappa receptors interact with the hormones released from the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in physiological and pathophysiological situations.

  10. Chronic Treatment with Naltrexone Prevents Memory Retention Deficits in Rats Poisoned with the Sarin Analog Diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and Treated with Atropine and Pralidoxime.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Kori L; Tran, Tuan; Meggs, William J

    2015-12-01

    Humans and rats poisoned with sarin develop chronic neurological disabilities that are not prevented with standardized antidotal therapy. We hypothesized that rats poisoned with the sarin analogue diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and resuscitated with atropine and pralidoxime would have long-term memory deficits that were preventable with naltrexone treatment. Long Evans rats (250-275 g) were randomized to: DFP (N = 8): single subcutaneous (SC) injection of DFP (5 mg/kg). Treatment (N = 9): DFP (5 mg/kg) followed by chronic naltrexone (5 mg/kg/day × 12 weeks). Control (N = 12): single SC injection of isopropyl alcohol, (DFP vehicle) followed by chronic naltrexone (5 mg/kg/day). If toxicity developed after injection, antidotal therapy was initiated with atropine (2 mg/kg) and pralidoxime (25 mg/kg) and repeated as needed. After 12 weeks, rats underwent testing for place learning (acquisition) across 5 days of training using the Morris Water Maze. On day 6 a memory retention test was performed. Statistical analysis was performed using IBM SPSS Statistics. Rats receiving DFP rapidly developed toxicity requiring antidotal rescue. No differences in acquisition were seen between the DFP vs. DFP + naltrexone rats. During memory testing, DFP-poisoned rats spent significantly less time (29.4 ± 2.11 versus 38.5 ± 2.5 s, p < 0.05) and traveled less distance (267 ± 24.6 versus 370 ± 27.5 cm, p < 0.05) in the target quadrant compared to the treatment group. Treatment rats performed as well as control rats (p > 0.05) on the test for memory retention. Poisoning with DFP induced impaired memory retention. Deficits were not prevented by acute rescue with atropine and pralidoxime. Chronic naltrexone treatment led to preserved memory after DFP poisoning.

  11. A Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial that Combines Sertraline and Naltrexone for Treating Co-Occurring Depression and Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Pettinati, Helen M.; Oslin, David W.; Kampman, Kyle M.; Dundon, William D.; Xie, Hu; Gallis, Thea L.; Dackis, Charles A.; O’Brien, Charles P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Empirical evidence has only weakly supported antidepressant treatment for patients with co-occurring depression and alcohol dependence. While some studies have demonstrated that antidepressants reduce these patients’ depressive symptoms, most studies have not found antidepressants helpful in reducing excessive drinking in these patients. We provide results from a double blind, placebo-controlled trial that evaluated the efficacy of combining approved medications for depression (sertraline) and alcohol dependence (naltrexone) for treating patients with both disorders. METHODS 170 depressed, alcohol-dependent patients were randomized for 14 weeks to sertraline (200mg/day), naltrexone (100mg/day), the combination, or placebo, while receiving weekly cognitive behavioral therapy. RESULTS The sertraline + naltrexone combination produced a higher alcohol abstinence rate (53.7%; p = .001; odds ratio = 3.7), and a longer delay before relapse to heavy drinking (98 median days; p = .003; d = .54), than the other treatments: naltrexone (21.3% abstinent, 29 days), sertraline (27.5% abstinent, 23 days), or placebo (23.1% abstinent, 26 days). There also was a trend for more patients in the medication combination group not to be depressed by the end of treatment (83.3%; p = .014; odds ratio = 3.6), compared to the other treatments. The serious adverse event rate was 25.9%, with fewer reported by the medication combination group (11.9%; p < .02) than the other treatments. CONCLUSION More depressed, alcohol-dependent patients taking the sertraline + naltrexone combination achieved abstinence from alcohol, delayed relapse to heavy drinking, reported fewer serious adverse events, and tended not to be depressed by the end of treatment. PMID:20231324

  12. Efficacy of naltrexone on acetylcholine-induced alloknesis in atopic eczema.

    PubMed

    Heyer, G; Groene, D; Martus, P

    2002-10-01

    Atopic eczema (AE) is a chronically pruritic inflammatory skin disease. Although the mediators and exact mechanisms eliciting and sustaining pruritus are not completely known, AE patients in clinical trials have been shown to benefit under treatment with morphine antagonists. Naltrexone (NAL) is a relatively pure morphine antagonist that blocks the effects of opioids twice as much as naloxone. NAL exhibits minimal pharmacological activity and displaces endorphines at mu- and kappa-receptors without its own intrinsic activity. NAL's excellent oral bioavailability and linear increases in the area under plasma concentration-time curve make it ideal for use in experimental studies. We designed our present experiments similar to former experiments evaluating both peripheral cutaneous sensations and central itch procession in order to gain more information about the possible distribution of opioid receptors and their involvement in the pathophysiology of pruritus. Eleven AE patients participated in our double-blind study. Either 25 mg of NAL (Nemexin) or a placebo (PLA) was given to the participants 60 min prior to the acetylcholine (ACH) injection [intracutaneous (i.c.) injection of 0.02 ml of 0.55 M]. A PLA stimulus with buffered saline served as control on the opposite forearm. We used laser Doppler flowmetry to measure the vasomotoric changes after ACH injection and recorded the duration and intensity of itch with a visual analogue scale (VAS). Following the evaluation of wheal and flare sensation, we obtained the area of itchy skin around the injection site (alloknesis) by gently stroking the surrounding skin with a brush in the centripetal direction towards the injection site. The results were planimetrically evaluated. Oral NAL reduced the perifocal itch significantly (P < 0.009). In four of our observations the area of alloknesis completely disappeared. Itch duration was reduced by 20 s and the intensity of itch was diminished, yet not significantly. NAL had no

  13. Opioid Antagonists and the A118G Polymorphism in the μ-Opioid Receptor Gene: Effects of GSK1521498 and Naltrexone in Healthy Drinkers Stratified by OPRM1 Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Ziauddeen, Hisham; Nestor, Liam J; Subramaniam, Naresh; Dodds, Chris; Nathan, Pradeep J; Miller, Sam R; Sarai, Bhopinder K; Maltby, Kay; Fernando, Disala; Warren, Liling; Hosking, Louise K; Waterworth, Dawn; Korzeniowska, Anna; Win, Beta; Richards, Duncan B; Vasist Johnson, Lakshmi; Fletcher, Paul C; Bullmore, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    The A118G single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs1799971) in the μ-opioid receptor gene, OPRM1, has been much studied in relation to alcohol use disorders. The reported effects of allelic variation at this SNP on alcohol-related behaviors, and on opioid receptor antagonist treatments, have been inconsistent. We investigated the pharmacogenetic interaction between A118G variation and the effects of two μ-opioid receptor antagonists in a clinical lab setting. Fifty-six overweight and moderate–heavy drinkers were prospectively stratified by genotype (29 AA homozygotes, 27 carriers of at least 1 G allele) in a double-blind placebo-controlled, three-period crossover design with naltrexone (NTX; 25 mg OD for 2 days, then 50 mg OD for 3 days) and GSK1521498 (10 mg OD for 5 days). The primary end point was regional brain activation by the contrast between alcohol and neutral tastes measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Secondary end points included other fMRI contrasts, subjective responses to intravenous alcohol challenge, and food intake. GSK1521498 (but not NTX) significantly attenuated fMRI activation by appetitive tastes in the midbrain and amygdala. GSK1521498 (and NTX to a lesser extent) significantly affected self-reported responses to alcohol infusion. Both drugs reduced food intake. Across all end points, there was less robust evidence for significant effects of OPRM1 allelic variation, or for pharmacogenetic interactions between genotype and drug treatment. These results do not support strong modulatory effects of OPRM1 genetic variation on opioid receptor antagonist attenuation of alcohol- and food-related behaviors. However, they do support further investigation of GSK1521498 as a potential therapeutic for alcohol use and eating disorders. PMID:27109624

  14. Pressure surge attenuator

    DOEpatents

    Christie, Alan M.; Snyder, Kurt I.

    1985-01-01

    A pressure surge attenuation system for pipes having a fluted region opposite crushable metal foam. As adapted for nuclear reactor vessels and heads, crushable metal foam is disposed to attenuate pressure surges.

  15. Reduction in arterial stiffness and vascular age by naltrexone-induced interruption of opiate agonism: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Albert Stuart; Hulse, Gary Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Objective To prospectively assess if opiate antagonist treatment or the opiate-free status could reverse opiate-related vasculopathy. Design Longitudinal Open Observational, Serial ‘N of One’, over 6.5 years under various treatment conditions: opiate dependence, naltrexone and opiate-free. Setting Primary care, Australia. Participants 20 opiate-dependent patients (16 males: 16 cases of buprenorphine 4.11±1.17 mg, two of methadone 57.5±12.5 mg and two of heroin 0.75±0.25 g). Intervention Studies of central arterial stiffness and vascular reference age (RA) were performed longitudinally by SphygmoCor Pulse Wave Analysis (AtCor, Sydney). Primary outcomes Primary outcome was vascular age and arterial stiffness accrual under different treatment conditions. Results The mean chronological age (CA) was 33.62±2.03 years. The opiate-free condition was associated with a lower apparent vascular age both in itself (males: p=0.0402 and females: p=0.0360) and in interaction with time (males: p=0.0001 and females: p=0.0004), and confirmed with other measures of arterial stiffness. The mean modelled RA was 38.82, 37.73 and 35.05 years in the opiate, naltrexone and opiate-free conditions, respectively. The opiate-free condition was superior to opiate agonism after full multivariate adjustment (p=0.0131), with modelled RA/CA of 1.0173, 0.9563 and 0.8985 (reductions of 6.1% and 11.9%, respectively). Conclusions Data demonstrate that opiate-free status improves vascular age and arterial stiffness in previous chronic opiate users. The role of opiate antagonist treatment in achieving these outcomes requires future clarification and offers hope of novel therapeutic remediation. PMID:23524044

  16. Evidence that Melanocortin Receptor Agonist Melanotan-II Synergistically Augments the Ability of Naltrexone to Blunt Binge-Like Ethanol Intake in Male C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Montserrat; Carvajal, Francisca; Lerma-Cabrera, Jose Manuel; Cubero, Inmaculada; Picker, Mitchell J.; Thiele, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone (NAL), reduces alcohol (ethanol) consumption in animals and humans and is an approved medication for treating alcohol abuse disorders. Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived melanocortin (MC) and opioid peptides are produced in the same neurons in the brain, and recent pre-clinical evidence shows that MC receptor (MCR) agonists reduce excessive ethanol drinking in animal models. Interestingly, there is a growing body of literature revealing interactions between the MC and opioid systems in the modulation of pain, drug tolerance, and food intake. Method In the present report, a mouse model of binge ethanol drinking was employed to determine if the MCR agonist, melanotan-II (MTII), would improve the effectiveness of NAL in reducing excessive binge-like ethanol drinking when these drugs were co-administered prior to ethanol access. Results Both NAL and MTII blunt binge-like ethanol drinking and associated blood ethanol levels, and when administered together, a low dose of MTII (0.26 mg/kg) produces a 7.6-fold increase in the effectiveness of NAL in reducing binge-like ethanol drinking. Using isobolographic analysis, it is demonstrated that MTII increases the effectiveness of NAL in a synergistic manner. Conclusions The current observations suggest that activators of MC signaling may represent a new approach to treating alcohol abuse disorders, and a way to potentially improve existing NAL-based therapies. PMID:26108334

  17. Tracer attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    The self-purifying capacity of aquifers strongly depends on the attenuation of waterborne contaminants, i.e., irreversible loss of contaminant mass on a given scale as a result of coupled transport and transformation processes. A general formulation of tracer attenuation in groundwater is presented. Basic sensitivities of attenuation to macrodispersion and retention are illustrated for a few typical retention mechanisms. Tracer recovery is suggested as an experimental proxy for attenuation. Unique experimental data of tracer recovery in crystalline rock compare favorably with the theoretical model that is based on diffusion-controlled retention. Non-Fickian hydrodynamic transport has potentially a large impact on field-scale attenuation of dissolved contaminants.

  18. Co-relationship between sexual dysfunction and high-risk sexual behavior in patients receiving buprenorphine and naltrexone maintenance therapy for opioid dependence

    PubMed Central

    Ramdurg, Santosh; Ambekar, Atul; Lal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: People suffering from substance dependence suffer from various sexual dysfunctions and are at risk for indulging in various high-risk sexual behaviors and thus are vulnerable to acquire various infections such as HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections. AIM: The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between sexual dysfunction and high-risk sexual behavior in opioid-dependent men receiving buprenorphine and naltrexone maintenance therapy. Materials and Methods: Semi-structured questionnaire, brief male sexual functioning inventory and HIV-risk taking behavior scale was administered to a sample of 60 sexually active men, receiving buprenorphine (n = 30) and naltrexone (n = 30) maintenance therapy for opioid dependence. Results: The main outcomes are correlation between severity of sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior. The study results showed 83% of the men on buprenorphine and 90% on naltrexone reported at least one of the sexual dysfunction symptoms. There was a negative correlation between sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior that suggest severe the dysfunction, higher the risk taking behavior. Significant correlation was present with overall sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior (P = 0.028 and in naltrexone receiving group premature ejaculation versus HIV-risk taking behavior however, (P = 0.022, P < 0.05) there were no significant differences among both the groups except above findings. Conclusion: Conclusion was treatment is associated with sexual dysfunctions and HIV-risk taking behavior, which has clinical implication. Future research should explore this further using biochemical analyses. PMID:26257480

  19. Effects of the Opioid Receptor Antagonist Naltrexone on Smoking and Related Behaviors in Smokers Preparing to Quit: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    King, Andrea; Cao, Dingcai; Zhang, Lingjiao; Rueger, Sandra Yu

    2013-01-01

    Aims To determine if naltrexone affects smoking behaviours in smokers preparing to quit, and whether such pre-quit responses predict post-quit date outcomes. Design Double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study. Current study focused on smoking-related outcomes in the pre-quit phase, which was one week prior to the quit date, and these findings were linked with reductions in same outcomes demonstrated in the post-quit phase previously published for this RCT in mediation analyses. Setting Community sample of adult smokers desiring to quit in Chicago, Illinois USA. Participants Participants were 315 smokers randomized to naltrexone (n=161; mean age=42.6 years; 60% white) or placebo (n=154; mean age=41.3 years; 55% white). Measurements Difference from baseline in the number of cigarettes smoked during pre-quit phase interval was the primary outcome. Secondary pre-quit outcomes were assessed using Likert scales of subjective responses and consumption of cigarettes, alcohol, and food. Number of cigarettes smoked, alcoholic drinks consumed, and the Brief Questionnaire of Smoking Urges were assessed in the post-quit phase. Findings Relative to placebo, naltrexone decreased the number of cigarettes smoked (−4.21 vs. −2.93, p<.05), smoking urge (p=.02), and number of alcoholic drinks consumed (p=.04). Exploratory mediation analyses linking outcomes of the pre quit and post quit phases found that naltrexone’s effects on reducing smoking urge, cigarettes smoked and alcoholic drinks consumed in the pre-quit phase demonstrated full mediation of their respective effects during the post-quit phase. Conclusions Naltrexone taken in the week before a quit attempt appears to reduce cigarette consumption, urges to smoke and alcohol consumption relative to placebo. The size of the effect statistically mediates the size of similar effects after the quit date. PMID:23714324

  20. Variable laser attenuator

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprng one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength.

  1. Variable laser attenuator

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, S.R.

    1987-05-29

    The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprising one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength. 9 figs.

  2. Naltrexone/Bupropion extended release-induced weight loss is independent of nausea in subjects without diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hong, K; Herrmann, K; Dybala, C; Halseth, A E; Lam, H; Foreyt, J P

    2016-10-01

    Naltrexone/bupropion extended release (NB) is indicated as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity for chronic weight management in adults with an initial body mass index of ≥30 or ≥27 kg m(-2) and ≥1 weight-related comorbidity (e.g. hypertension, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidaemia). In phase 3 clinical studies, nausea occurred in significantly higher proportions of subjects randomized to NB vs. placebo (PBO). In this pooled analysis of three phase 3, 56-week, PBO-controlled studies, we characterized nausea and weight loss in NB- and PBO-treated subjects without diabetes. Subjects receiving NB (n = 1778) lost significantly more weight than those receiving PBO (n = 1160). Weight change was not significantly different between subjects reporting and not reporting nausea in either treatment arm. Severity of nausea was mild to moderate in ≥95% of all cases. In the NB arm, the highest incidence of nausea onset (9%) was reported during week 1. The median duration of mild, moderate and severe nausea in subjects receiving NB was 14, 9 and 13 days, respectively. Our results demonstrate that nausea associated with NB is rarely severe, primarily occurs early in treatment and is not a contributor to weight loss.

  3. Naltrexone sustained-release/bupropion sustained-release for the management of obesity: review of the data to date

    PubMed Central

    Caixàs, Assumpta; Albert, Lara; Capel, Ismael; Rigla, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an emerging disease worldwide. Changes in living habits, especially with increased consumption of high-calorie foods and decreased levels of physical activity, lead to an energy imbalance that brings weight gain. Overweight and obesity are major risk factors for several chronic diseases (including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer), reduce quality of life, and are associated with higher mortality. For all these reasons, it is of the utmost importance that the trend be reversed and obese people enabled to lose weight. It is known that eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly can help prevent obesity, but data show that in many cases these steps are not enough. This is the reason why, over the last few decades, several antiobesity drugs have been developed. However, the disappointing results demonstrated for the vast majority of them have not discouraged the pharmaceutical industry from continuing to look for an effective drug or combination of drugs. The systematic review presented here focuses on naltrexone sustained-release/bupropion sustained-release combination (Contrave®). We conclude from the current published reports that its effectiveness in the treatment of obesity can be estimated as a placebo-subtracted weight loss of around 4.5%. This weight reduction is moderate but similar to other antiobesity drugs. The safety profile of this combination is acceptable, despite additional data regarding cardiovascular disease being needed. PMID:25258511

  4. Method‐of‐use study of naltrexone sustained release (SR)/bupropion SR on body weight in individuals with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Kevin; Walsh, Brandon; Gilder, Kye; Fujioka, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the effects of 32 mg naltrexone sustained release (SR)/360 mg bupropion SR (NB) on body weight in adults with obesity, with comprehensive lifestyle intervention (CLI), for 78 weeks. Methods In this phase 3b, randomized, open‐label, controlled study, subjects received NB + CLI or usual care (standard diet/exercise advice) for 26 weeks. NB subjects not achieving 5% weight loss at week 16 were discontinued, as indicated by product labeling. After week 26, usual care subjects began NB + CLI. Assessments continued through week 78. The primary end point was percent change in weight from baseline to week 26 in the per protocol population. Other end points included percentage of subjects achieving ≥5%, ≥10%, and ≥15% weight loss, percent change in weight at week 78, and adverse events (AEs) necessitating study medication discontinuation. Results NB + CLI subjects lost significantly more weight than usual care subjects at week 26 (8.52% difference; P < 0.0001). Weight loss persisted through 78 weeks. In total, 20.7% of subjects discontinued medication for AEs, including 7.0% for nausea. Conclusions Treatment with NB, used as indicated by prescribing information and with CLI, significantly improved weight loss over usual care alone. NB‐facilitated weight loss was sustained for 78 weeks and was deemed safe and well tolerated. PMID:28026920

  5. Naltrexone sustained-release/bupropion sustained-release for the management of obesity: review of the data to date.

    PubMed

    Caixàs, Assumpta; Albert, Lara; Capel, Ismael; Rigla, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an emerging disease worldwide. Changes in living habits, especially with increased consumption of high-calorie foods and decreased levels of physical activity, lead to an energy imbalance that brings weight gain. Overweight and obesity are major risk factors for several chronic diseases (including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer), reduce quality of life, and are associated with higher mortality. For all these reasons, it is of the utmost importance that the trend be reversed and obese people enabled to lose weight. It is known that eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly can help prevent obesity, but data show that in many cases these steps are not enough. This is the reason why, over the last few decades, several antiobesity drugs have been developed. However, the disappointing results demonstrated for the vast majority of them have not discouraged the pharmaceutical industry from continuing to look for an effective drug or combination of drugs. The systematic review presented here focuses on naltrexone sustained-release/bupropion sustained-release combination (Contrave(®)). We conclude from the current published reports that its effectiveness in the treatment of obesity can be estimated as a placebo-subtracted weight loss of around 4.5%. This weight reduction is moderate but similar to other antiobesity drugs. The safety profile of this combination is acceptable, despite additional data regarding cardiovascular disease being needed.

  6. Improved effect of the combination naltrexone/D-penicillamine in the prevention of alcohol relapse-like drinking in rats.

    PubMed

    Orrico, Alejandro; Martí-Prats, Lucía; Cano-Cebrián, María J; Granero, Luis; Polache, Ana; Zornoza, Teodoro

    2014-01-01

    Opioid antagonists are licensed drugs for treating alcohol use disorders; nonetheless, clinical studies have evidenced their limited effectiveness. Preclinical findings indicate that opioid receptor (OR) antagonists, such as naltrexone (NTX), reduce the alcohol deprivation effect (ADE). However, a detailed analysis of published data shows the existence of a delayed increase in ethanol consumption after continuous OR blockade, a phenomenon originally called as 'delayed ADE'. We have recently reported that D-penicillamine (DP) is able to prevent ADE through a mechanism dependent on the inactivation of acetaldehyde, the main metabolite of ethanol. Hypothetically, OR activation would be triggered by acetaldehyde after ethanol consumption. Hence, we conjecture that the combination of NTX and DP, due to their distinct but complementary mechanisms to impede OR activation, may be more efficacious in the prevention of the ADE and, specifically, the 'delayed ADE'. Herein, we compare the effects of the combination NTX/DP (NTX: 2×5 mg/kg SC injection daily/DP: SC infusion (0.25 mg/h)) versus NTX on the ADE in long-term ethanol-experienced rats. As expected, NTX-treated animals displayed a delayed ADE. However, NTX/DP treatment prevented this delayed effect. Our present data indicate that this combination therapy shows an adequate anti-relapse preclinical efficacy being able to overcome the preclinical limitations of NTX alone.

  7. Sustained-release morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone for moderate to severe pain: a new opioid analgesic formulation and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiulu

    2011-05-01

    Opioid usage during chronic nonmalignant pain has increased substantially over the past two decades. Prescription opioids have become the second most misused drug in the USA and prescription opioid abuse has escalated into a widespread public health problem. It is hoped that abuse-deterrent opioid formulations will take an important role in reducing opioid abuse, misuse and diversion. Embeda (sustained-release morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone)represents a new opioid formulation with an intended abuse-deterrent feature, now available on the market. Although Embeda seems to be a successful formulation by passing the efficacy trial, safety trial, pharmacokinetic study and abuse liability study, etc., it will require some long-term prospective epidemiological studies to substantiate fully its abuse-deterrent benefit. Embeda represents a new opioid formulation, adding to our arsenal to treat moderate to severe pain and playing its potential role in discouraging opioid abuse, misuse and diversion. Faced with an overwhelmingly expanding public health burden due to prescription opioid abuse, clinicians should always keep in mind the balance of maximizing pain relief and minimizing prescription opioid abuse.

  8. Recent developments in naltrexone implants and depot injections for opiate abuse: the new kid on the block is approaching adulthood.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Colin; Streel, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Implants and depot injections (DI) of naltrexone (NTX) have undergone considerable development since the first commercially available implants appeared in the mid-1990s. In particular, long-acting implants that can deliver relapse-preventing serum NTX levels for around six months have now been subjected to classic randomised controlled trials that have given positive and generally significant results when compared with oral NTX and placebo implants, or with standard post-detoxification care. They also provide lower serum levels that can prevent opiate overdose for several additional months and 3-year mortality rates are similar to those of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). At least 18 months of antagonist-assisted abstinence may be desirable to normalise new, opiatefree cognitive-behavioural habits and extinguish old, maladaptive ones. We discuss ideological antagonisms between protagonists of MMT and of NTX implants, notably in Australia, but we argue that both treatments can and should co-exist. The main obstacle to the expansion of longacting implant treatment is not the lack of an evidential or theoretical base but the lack of a licensed product. NTX appears to block all opiates if serum levels are adequate and we stress its apparent lack of clinically significant hepatotoxicity. Some patients may need above-average serum levels and occasionally, habitual injectors continue to inject opiates despite experiencing no opiate effects.

  9. Cost Effectiveness of Injectable Extended Release Naltrexone Compared to Methadone Maintenance and Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment for Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Heide; Mandell, Kara; Johnson, Kimberly; Chatterjee, Debanjana; Vanness, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of injectable extended release naltrexone (XR-NTX) compared to methadone maintenance and buprenorphine maintenance treatment (MMT and BMT respectively) for adult males enrolled in treatment for opioid dependence in the United States from the perspective of state-level addiction treatment payers. Methods We used a Markov model with daily time cycles to estimate the incremental cost per opioid-free day in a simulated cohort of adult males ages 18–65 over a six-month period from the state health program perspective. Results XR-NTX is predicted to be more effective and more costly than methadone or buprenorphine in our target population, with an incremental cost per opioid-free day gained relative to the next-most effective treatment (MMT) of $72. The cost-effectiveness of XR-NTX relative to MMT was driven by its effectiveness in deterring opioid use while receiving treatment. Conclusions XR-NTX is a cost-effective medication for treating opioid dependence if state addiction treatment payers are willing to pay at least $72 per opioid-free day. PMID:25775099

  10. Over-dose insulin and stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157. Attenuated gastric ulcers, seizures, brain lesions, hepatomegaly, fatty liver, breakdown of liver glycogen, profound hypoglycemia and calcification in rats.

    PubMed

    Ilic, S; Brcic, I; Mester, M; Filipovic, M; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Barisic, I; Radic, B; Zoricic, Z; Bilic, V; Berkopic, L; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Romic, Z; Pazanin, L; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2009-12-01

    We focused on over-dose insulin (250 IU/kg i.p.) induced gastric ulcers and then on other disturbances that were concomitantly induced in rats, seizures (eventually fatal), severely damaged neurons in cerebral cortex and hippocampus, hepatomegaly, fatty liver, increased AST, ALT and amylase serum values, breakdown of liver glycogen with profound hypoglycemia and calcification development. Calcium deposits were present in the blood vessel walls, hepatocytes surrounding blood vessels and sometimes even in parenchyma of the liver mainly as linear and only occasionally as granular accumulation. As an antidote after insulin, we applied the stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (10 microg/kg) given (i) intraperitoneally or (ii) intragastrically immediately after insulin. Controls received simultaneously an equivolume of saline (5 ml/kg). Those rats that survived till the 180 minutes after over-dose application were further assessed. Interestingly, pentadecapeptide BPC 157, as an antiulcer peptide, may besides stomach ulcer consistently counteract all insulin disturbances and fatal outcome. BPC 157 rats showed no fatal outcome, they were mostly without hypoglycemic seizures with apparently higher blood glucose levels (glycogen was still present in hepatocytes), less liver pathology (i.e., normal liver weight, less fatty liver), decreased ALT, AST and amylase serum values, markedly less damaged neurons in brain and they only occasionally had small gastric lesions. BPC 157 rats exhibited mostly only dot-like calcium presentation. In conclusion, the success of BPC 157 therapy may indicate a likely role of BPC 157 in insulin controlling and BPC 157 may influence one or more causative process(es) after excessive insulin application.

  11. RADIO FREQUENCY ATTENUATOR

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1963-11-12

    A high peak power level r-f attenuator that is readily and easily insertable along a coaxial cable having an inner conductor and an outer annular conductor without breaking the ends thereof is presented. Spaced first and second flares in the outer conductor face each other with a slidable cylindrical outer conductor portion therebetween. Dielectric means, such as water, contact the cable between the flares to attenuate the radio-frequency energy received thereby. The cylindrical outer conductor portion is slidable to adjust the voltage standing wave ratio to a low level, and one of the flares is slidable to adjust the attenuation level. An integral dielectric container is also provided. (AFC)

  12. Landing gear noise attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  13. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled efficacy and safety study of ALO-02 (extended-release oxycodone surrounding sequestered naltrexone) for moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain treatment.

    PubMed

    Rauck, Richard L; Hale, Martin E; Bass, Almasa; Bramson, Candace; Pixton, Glenn; Wilson, Jacquelyn G; Setnik, Beatrice; Meisner, Paul; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Malhotra, Bimal K; Wolfram, Gernot

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized withdrawal study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ALO-02, an abuse-deterrent formulation containing pellets of extended-release oxycodone hydrochloride (HCl) surrounding sequestered naltrexone HCl, compared with placebo in the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain. An open-label titration period in which all patients received ALO-02 was followed by a double-blind treatment period where patients meeting treatment response criteria were randomized to either a fixed dose of ALO-02 or placebo. Daily average low back pain was assessed using an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS)-Pain. Of the 663 patients screened, 410 received ALO-02 during the open-label conversion and titration period and 281 patients were randomized to the double-blind treatment period (n = 134, placebo; n = 147, ALO-02). Change in the mean NRS-Pain score from randomization baseline to the final 2 weeks of the treatment period was significantly different favoring ALO-02 compared with placebo (P = 0.0114). Forty-four percent of patients treated with placebo and 57.5% of patients treated with ALO-02 reported ≥30% improvement in weekly average NRS-Pain scores from screening to the final 2 weeks of the treatment period (P = 0.0248). In the double-blind treatment period, 56.8% of patients in the ALO-02 group and 56.0% of patients in the placebo group experienced a treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE). The most common treatment-related TEAEs for ALO-02 during the treatment period were nausea, vomiting, and constipation, consistent with opioid therapy. ALO-02 has been demonstrated to provide significant reduction of pain in patients with chronic low back pain and has a safety profile similar to other opioids.

  14. Weight loss with naltrexone SR/bupropion SR combination therapy as an adjunct to behavior modification: the COR-BMOD trial.

    PubMed

    Wadden, Thomas A; Foreyt, John P; Foster, Gary D; Hill, James O; Klein, Samuel; O'Neil, Patrick M; Perri, Michael G; Pi-Sunyer, F Xavier; Rock, Cheryl L; Erickson, Janelle S; Maier, Holly N; Kim, Dennis D; Dunayevich, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    This 56-week, randomized, placebo-controlled trial examined the efficacy and safety of naltrexone plus bupropion as an adjunct to intensive behavior modification (BMOD). A total of 793 participants (BMI = 36.5 ± 4.2 kg/m²) was randomly assigned in a 1:3 ratio to: (i) placebo + BMOD (N = 202); or (ii) naltrexone sustained-release (SR, 32 mg/day), combined with bupropion SR (360 mg/day) plus BMOD (i.e., NB32 + BMOD; N = 591). Both groups were prescribed an energy-reduced diet and 28 group BMOD sessions. Co-primary end points were percentage change in weight and the proportion of participants who lost ≥5% weight at week 56. Efficacy analyses were performed on a modified intent-to-treat population (ITT; i.e., participants with ≥1 postbaseline weight while taking study drug (placebo + BMOD, N = 193; NB32 + BMOD, N = 482)). Missing data were replaced with the last observation obtained on study drug. At week 56, weight loss was 5.1 ± 0.6% with placebo + BMOD vs. 9.3 ± 0.4% with NB32 + BMOD (P < 0.001). A completers analysis revealed weight losses of 7.3 ± 0.9% (N = 106) vs. 11.5 ± 0.6% (N = 301), respectively (P < 0.001). A third analysis, which included all randomized participants, yielded losses of 4.9 ± 0.6 vs. 7.8 ± 0.4%, respectively (P < 0.001). Significantly more NB32 + BMOD- vs. placebo + BMOD-treated participants lost ≥5 and ≥10% of initial weight, and the former had significantly greater improvements in markers of cardiometabolic disease risk. NB32 + BMOD was generally well tolerated, although associated with more reports of nausea than placebo + BMOD. The present findings support the efficacy of combined naltrexone/bupropion therapy as an adjunct to intensive BMOD for obesity.

  15. Attenuator And Conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Carson, Richard F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; Kemme, Shanalyn Adair; McCormick, Frederick B.; Peterson, David W.

    2006-04-04

    An apparatus and method of attenuating and/or conditioning optical energy for an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module is disclosed. An apparatus for attenuating the optical output of an optoelectronic connector including: a mounting surface; an array of optoelectronic devices having at least a first end; an array of optical elements having at least a first end; the first end of the array of optical elements optically aligned with the first end of the array of optoelectronic devices; an optical path extending from the first end of the array of optoelectronic devices and ending at a second end of the array of optical elements; and an attenuator in the optical path for attenuating the optical energy emitted from the array of optoelectronic devices. Alternatively, a conditioner may be adapted in the optical path for conditioning the optical energy emitted from the array of optoelectronic devices.

  16. Enabling photon counting detectors with dynamic attenuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) are being investigated as a replacement for conventional x-ray detectors because they promise several advantages, including better dose efficiency, higher resolution and spectral imaging. However, many of these advantages disappear when the x-ray flux incident on the detector is too high. We recently proposed a dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator (or beam shaping filter) that can control the flux incident on the detector. This can restrict the operating range of the PCXD to keep the incident count rate below a given limit. We simulated a system with the piecewise-linear attenuator and a PCXD using raw data generated from forward projected DICOM files. We investigated the classic paralyzable and nonparalyzable PCXD as well as a weighted average of the two, with the weights chosen to mimic an existing PCXD (Taguchi et al, Med Phys 2011). The dynamic attenuator has small synergistic benefits with the nonparalyzable detector and large synergistic benefits with the paralyzable detector. Real PCXDs operate somewhere between these models, and the weighted average model still shows large benefits from the dynamic attenuator. We conclude that dynamic attenuators can reduce the count rate performance necessary for adopting PCXDs.

  17. Patient-reported quality of life in a randomized placebo-controlled trial of naltrexone/bupropion for obesity.

    PubMed

    Kolotkin, R L; Chen, S; Klassen, P; Gilder, K; Greenway, F L

    2015-10-01

    Weight loss is associated with improved quality of life in some, but not all, weight loss trials. We evaluated changes at 56 weeks in quality of life, measured by the Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite (IWQOL-Lite) questionnaire, in a pooled analysis of patient-level data from four randomized controlled Phase 3 studies of naltrexone/bupropion (NB32 or Contrave®). The total number of subjects was 3362 (NB32 = 2043; placebo = 1319; mean body mass index = 36.3 kg m(2); mean age = 46). Improvements in IWQOL-Lite Total Score were greater in subjects treated with NB32 (11.9 points [SE 0.3]) vs. placebo (8.2 points [SE 0.3]; P < 0.001), corresponding to weight reductions of 7.0% (SE 0.2) and 2.3% (SE 0.2), respectively. Greater improvements were also observed for NB32 vs. placebo on all five subscale scores of the IWQOL-Lite. Fifty per cent of NB32-treated subjects achieved clinically meaningful improvements in IWQOL-Lite Total Score vs. 32.3% of placebo-treated subjects (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval; 2.09, 1.79-2.44). Subjects losing the most weight (≥ 15% of baseline weight) experienced the greatest improvement in IWQOL-Lite Total Score (19.3 points [SE 0.7] for NB32 and 18.7 points [SE 1.3] for placebo; P = 0.624). Improved quality of life was associated with weight reduction and was achieved in more subjects treated with NB32 than placebo.

  18. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Naltrexone and Behavioral Therapy for Problem Drinking Men who have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Jon; Kuerbis, Alexis N.; Chen, Andrew C.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Bux, Donald A.; Kranzler, Henry R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study tested the comparative effectiveness of Modified Behavioral Self-Control Therapy (MBSCT) and naltrexone (NTX), as well as the added benefit of combining the two, in problem drinking men who have sex with men (MSM) seeking to reduce, but not quit drinking. Method: Participants (N=200) were recruited and urn randomized to one of two medication conditions, NTX or placebo (PBO) and either MSBCT or no behavioral intervention, yielding four conditions: PBO, NTX, MSBCT, and NTX+MSBCT. In addition, all participants received a brief medication compliance intervention. Participants were treated for 12 weeks and assessed one week after treatment completion. Two primary outcomes - sum of standard drinks and number of heavy drinking days - and one secondary outcome - percentage of those drinking in a non-hazardous manner (NoH) - were selected a-priori. Results: There was a significant main effect for MBSCT (all ps < .01), but not NTX on all three outcomes. In addition, the combination of NTX and MBSCT was not more effective than either MSCBT or PBO. There was a significant interaction effect on NoH, such that NTX significantly increased the likelihood (OR = 3.3) of achieving a non-hazardous drinking outcome relative to PBO. In addition, NTX was significantly more effective than PBO on a descriptive outcome: negative consequences of drinking. Conclusions There was no advantage to adding NTX to MBSCT. In addition, MBSCT showed stronger evidence of efficacy than NTX. At the same time, NTX delivered in the context of a minimal medication compliance intervention was significantly more effective than PBO on an important clinical indicator. Results provide new information to guide the treatment of problem drinking, including in primary care settings. PMID:22612306

  19. 5-HTTLPR moderates naltrexone and psychosocial treatment responses in heavy drinking men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Andrew C.H.; Davis, Christine M.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Kuerbis, Alexis N.; Covault, Jonathan; Kranzler, Henry R.; Morgenstern, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Background A functional polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene has been widely studied as a risk factor and moderator of treatment for a variety of psychopathologic conditions. To evaluate whether 5-HTTLPR moderates the effects of treatment to reduce heavy drinking, we studied 112 high-functioning European-American men who have sex with men (MSM). Subjects participated in a randomized clinical trial of naltrexone (NTX) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for problem drinking. Methods Subjects were treated for 12 weeks with 100 mg/day of oral NTX or placebo. All participants received medical management with adjusted Brief Behavioral Compliance Enhancement Treatment (BBCET) alone or in combination with Modified Behavioral Self-Control Therapy (MBSCT, an amalgam of motivational interviewing and CBT). Participants were genotyped for the tri-allelic 5-HTTLPR polymorphism (i.e., low-activity S′ or high-activity L′ alleles). Results During treatment, the number of weekly heavy drinking days (HDD, defined as 5 or more standard drinks per day) was significantly lower in subjects with the L′L′ (N=26, p=0.015) or L′S′ (N=52, p=0.016) genotype than those with the S′S′ (N=34) genotype regardless of treatment type. There was a significant interaction of genotype with treatment: For subjects with the S′S′ genotype, the effects of MBSCT or NTX on HDD were significantly greater than the minimal intervention (i.e., BBCET or placebo, p=0.007 and p=0.049, respectively). In contrast, for subjects with one or two L′ alleles, the effects of the more intensive psychosocial treatment (MBSCT) or NTX did not significantly differ from BBCET or placebo. Conclusions These preliminary findings support the utility of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism for personalizing treatment selection in problem drinkers. PMID:25070809

  20. A multicenter, primary-care-based, open-label study to assess the success of converting opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride extended-release capsules using a standardized conversion guide

    PubMed Central

    Setnik, Beatrice; Roland, Carl L; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Pixton, Glenn C; Berke, Robert; Calkins, Anne; Goli, Veeraindar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the conversion of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to extended-release morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride (MSN) using a standardized conversion guide. Methods This open-label, single-arm study was conducted in 157 primary care centers in the United States. A total of 684 opioid-experienced adults with chronic moderate-to-severe pain were converted to oral administration of MSN from transdermal fentanyl and oral formulations of hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, oxycodone, oxymorphone, and other morphine products using a standardized conversion guide. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients achieving a stable MSN dose within a 6-week titration phase. Secondary endpoints included duration of time to stable dose, number of titration steps, safety and efficacy measures, and investigator assessment of conversion guide utility. Results Of the 684 patients, 51.3% were converted to a stable dose of MSN (95% confidence interval: 47.5%, 55.1%). The mean (standard deviation) number of days to stable dose was 20 (8.94), and number of titration steps to stable dose was 2.4 (1.37). The majority of adverse events were mild/moderate and consistent with opioid therapy. Mean pain scores at stable dose decreased from baseline. Investigators were generally satisfied with the conversion guide and, in 94% of cases, reported they would use it again. Conclusion Conversion to MSN treatment using the standardized MSN conversion guide was an attainable goal in approximately half of the population of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain. Investigators found the guide to be a useful tool to assist conversion of opioid-experienced patients to MSN. PMID:26185466

  1. Murine immunization by cesium-137 irradiation attenuated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Stek, M. Jr.; Minard, P.; Cruess, D.F.

    1984-06-01

    Cesium-137, becoming a more readily available ionizing gamma radiation source for laboratory use, was shown to effectively attenuate Schistosoma mansoni cercariae for vaccine production. In parallel comparison studies with the murine model, cesium-137 attenuated cercariae consistently afforded better protection than did the cobalt-60 prepared vaccine. Dose-response data indicated that the optimal total irradiation with cesium-137 was between 45 and 50 Krad.

  2. An evaluation of hepatic enzyme elevations among HIV-infected released prisoners enrolled in two randomized placebo-controlled trials of extended release naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Vagenas, Panagiotis; Di Paola, Angela; Herme, Maua; Lincoln, Thomas; Skiest, Daniel J; Altice, Frederick L; Springer, Sandra A

    2014-07-01

    Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX), an approved treatment for opioid or alcohol dependence, is a once-monthly injectable formulation of naltrexone. Hepatotoxicity concerns have limited its use, necessitating further investigation. This study aims to examine hepatic enzyme levels in participants of 2 randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) of XR-NTX. Hepatic transaminases were measured in 85 patients enrolled in RCTs of XR-NTX among HIV-infected prisoners, transitioning to the community and receiving treatment for either dependence on alcohol (52.9%), opioids (44.7%) or both (16.5%). Baseline characteristics included HCV co-infection (55.7%), antiretroviral therapy (81%), mental illness (39%) and receiving psychiatric medications (34.1%). Levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) were not statistically different between persons randomized to placebo (N=24) and XR-NTX (N=61) arms. These results confirm that XR-NTX is safe to use among opioid and alcohol dependent HIV-infected released prisoners receiving ART with high rates of co-morbid HCV infection and mental illness.

  3. An efficient synthesis of 3-OBn-6β,14-epoxy-bridged opiates from naltrexone and identification of a related dual MOR inverse agonist/KOR agonist.

    PubMed

    Martin, David J; FitzMorris, Paul E; Li, Bo; Ayestas, Mario; Sally, Ellicott J; Dersch, Christina M; Rothman, Richard B; Deveau, Amy M

    2012-11-15

    In an effort to better understand the conformational preferences that inform the biological activity of naltrexone and related naltrexol derivatives, a new synthesis of the restricted analog 3-OBn-6β,14-epoxymorphinan 4 is described. 4 was synthesized starting from naltrexone in 50% overall yield, proceeding through the OBn-6α-triflate intermediate 8. Key steps to the synthesis include benzylation (96% yield), reduction (90% yield, α:β:3:2), followed by a one-pot triflation/displacement sequence (96% yield) to yield the desired bridged epoxy derivative 4. X-ray crystallographic analysis of intermediate 3-OBn-6α-naltrexol 7a supports population of the key boat conformation required for the epoxy ring closure. We also report that the 6β-mesylate 10-a high affinity opioid receptor ligand, the epimeric derivative of 11, and an analog of 12-functions as an inverse agonist at the mu opioid receptor using herkinorin pre-conditioned cells and an agonist at the kappa opioid receptor when evaluated in independent in vitro [(35)S]-GTP-γ-S assays.

  4. Preparation and characterization of tri-block poly(lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactide) nanogels for controlled release of naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Asadi, H; Rostamizadeh, K; Salari, D; Hamidi, M

    2011-09-15

    Tri-block poly(lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactide) (PLA-PEG-PLA) copolymers and related acrylated derivative were synthesized and used to prepare micelles and nanogels for controlled release of naltrexone. The resulting copolymers, micelles and nanogels were characterized by various techniques such as proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography, fluorescence spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry, photon correlation spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The nanogels exhibited high encapsulation efficiency around 60% and excellent stability for long periods of time. The drug release profiles of micelles and nanogels were compared and it was found that the naltrexone loaded nanogels offered a steady and long-term release pattern for different periods of time up to 35 days, depending on the crosslinker concentration, compared to the micelles. The size of nanogels could be manipulated easily in the range of 128-200nm by variations in polymer concentration used in the nanogels preparation step. From the results obtained it can be concluded that PLA-PEG-PLA nanogels can be considered as a promising carrier for drug delivery purpose.

  5. Seismic attenuation in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, J.J.; Bartolini, T.J.; Lord, K.M.; Smith, D.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Seismic signals recorded by the expanded distribution of earthquake seismograph stations throughout Florida and data from a comprehensive review of record archives from stations GAI contribute to an initial seismic attenuation model for the Florida Plateau. Based on calculations of surface particle velocity, a pattern of attenuation exists that appears to deviate from that established for the remainder of the southeastern US. Most values suggest greater seismic attenuation within the Florida Plateau. However, a separate pattern may exist for those signals arising from the Gulf of Mexico. These results have important implications for seismic hazard assessments in Florida and may be indicative of the unique lithospheric identity of the Florida basement as an exotic terrane.

  6. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.; Agrawal, Anoop; Hall, Simon B.

    2009-11-10

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3 C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  7. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.; Agrawal, Anoop; Hall, Simon B.

    2009-01-20

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  8. Tritium Attenuation by Distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Wittman, N.E.

    2001-07-31

    The objective of this study was to determine how a 100 Area distillation system could be used to reduce to a satisfactory low value the tritium content of the dilute moderator produced in the 100 Area stills, and whether such a tritium attenuator would have sufficient capacity to process all this material before it is sent to the 400 Area for reprocessing.

  9. Weight Loss With Naltrexone SR/Bupropion SR Combination Therapy as an adjunct to Behavior Modification: The COR-BMOD Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wadden, Thomas A.; Foreyt, John P.; Foster, Gary D.; Hill, James O.; Klein, Samuel; O’Neil, Patrick M.; Perri, Michael G.; Pi-Sunyer, F. Xavier; Rock, Cheryl L.; Erickson, Janelle S.; Maier, Holly N.; Kim, Dennis D.; Dunayevich, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    This 56-week, randomized, placebo-controlled trial examined the efficacy and safety of naltrexone plus bupropion as an adjunct to intensive behavior modification (BMOD). A total of 793 participants (BMI = 36.5 ± 4.2 kg/m2) was randomly assigned in a 1:3 ratio to: (i) placebo + BMOD (N = 202); or (ii) naltrexone sustained-release (SR, 32 mg/day), combined with bupropion SR (360 mg/day) plus BMOD (i.e., NB32 + BMOD; N = 591). Both groups were prescribed an energy-reduced diet and 28 group BMOD sessions. Co-primary end points were percentage change in weight and the proportion of participants who lost ≥5% weight at week 56. Efficacy analyses were performed on a modified intent-to-treat population (ITT; i.e., participants with ≥1 postbaseline weight while taking study drug (placebo + BMOD, N = 193; NB32 + BMOD, N = 482)). Missing data were replaced with the last observation obtained on study drug. At week 56, weight loss was 5.1 ± 0.6% with placebo + BMOD vs. 9.3 ± 0.4% with NB32 + BMOD (P < 0.001). A completers analysis revealed weight losses of 7.3 ± 0.9% (N = 106) vs. 11.5 ± 0.6% (N = 301), respectively (P < 0.001). A third analysis, which included all randomized participants, yielded losses of 4.9 ± 0.6 vs. 7.8 ± 0.4%, respectively (P < 0.001). Significantly more NB32 + BMOD- vs. placebo + BMOD-treated participants lost ≥5 and ≥10% of initial weight, and the former had significantly greater improvements in markers of cardiometabolic disease risk. NB32 + BMOD was generally well tolerated, although associated with more reports of nausea than placebo + BMOD. The present findings support the efficacy of combined naltrexone/bupropion therapy as an adjunct to intensive BMOD for obesity. PMID:20559296

  10. Hypothermic anesthesia attenuates postoperative proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D J; Brooks, D C; Pressler, V M; Hulton, N R; Colpoys, M F; Smith, R J; Wilmore, D W

    1986-01-01

    The catabolic response that commonly occurs after major operation is characterized by net skeletal muscle proteolysis and accelerated nitrogen excretion. This response was absent in patients undergoing cardiac surgical procedures associated with the combination of cardiopulmonary bypass, narcotic anesthesia, neuromuscular blockade, and hypothermia. Forearm nitrogen release was 422 +/- 492 nmol/100 ml X min on the first postoperative day, approximately 25% of preoperative values (1677 +/- 411, p less than 0.05). Nitrogen excretion and the degree of negative nitrogen balance were comparable to levels observed in nonstressed, fasting subjects. The potential role of hypothermia, high-dose fentanyl anesthesia, and neuromuscular blockade in modifying the catabolic response to laparotomy and retroperitoneal dissection was further evaluated in animal studies. Six hours after operation, amino acid nitrogen release from the hindquarter was 84% less than control values (p less than 0.05). Nitrogen excretion and urea production were also reduced compared to normothermic controls. It is concluded that the combination of hypothermia, narcotic anesthesia, and neuromuscular blockade attenuates the catabolic response to injury and thus may be useful in the care of critically ill surgical patients. PMID:3767477

  11. A Randomized, Phase 3 Trial of Naltrexone SR/Bupropion SR on Weight and Obesity-related Risk Factors (COR-II)

    PubMed Central

    Apovian, Caroline M; Aronne, Louis; Rubino, Domenica; Still, Christopher; Wyatt, Holly; Burns, Colleen; Kim, Dennis; Dunayevich, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of naltrexone/bupropion (NB) combination therapy on weight and weight-related risk factors in overweight and obese participants. Design and Methods CONTRAVE Obesity Research-II (COR-II) was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 1,496 obese (BMI 30-45 kg/m2) or overweight (27-45 kg/m2 with dyslipidemia and/or hypertension) participants randomized 2:1 to combined naltrexone sustained-release (SR) (32 mg/day) plus bupropion SR (360 mg/day) (NB32) or placebo for up to 56 weeks. The co-primary endpoints were percent weight change and proportion achieving ≥5% weight loss at week 28. Results Significantly (P < 0.001) greater weight loss was observed with NB32 versus placebo at week 28 (−6.5% vs. −1.9%) and week 56 (−6.4% vs. −1.2%). More NB32-treated participants (P < 0.001) experienced ≥5% weight loss versus placebo at week 28 (55.6% vs. 17.5%) and week 56 (50.5% vs. 17.1%). NB32 produced greater improvements in various cardiometabolic risk markers, participant-reported weight-related quality of life, and control of eating. The most common adverse event with NB was nausea, which was generally mild to moderate and transient. NB was not associated with increased events of depression or suicidality versus placebo. Conclusion NB represents a novel pharmacological approach to the treatment of obesity, and may become a valuable new therapeutic option. PMID:23408728

  12. Ultrasonic attenuation in pearlitic steel.

    PubMed

    Du, Hualong; Turner, Joseph A

    2014-03-01

    Expressions for the attenuation coefficients of longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic waves are developed for steel with pearlitic microstructure. This type of lamellar duplex microstructure influences attenuation because of the lamellar spacing. In addition, longitudinal attenuation measurements were conducted using an unfocused transducer with 10 MHz central frequency on the cross section of a quenched railroad wheel sample. The dependence of longitudinal attenuation on the pearlite microstructure is observed from the changes of longitudinal attenuation from the quenched tread surface to deeper locations. The results show that the attenuation value is lowest and relatively constant within the quench depth, then increases linearly. The experimental results demonstrate a reasonable agreement with results from the theoretical model. Ultrasonic attenuation provides an important non-destructive method to evaluate duplex microstructure within grains which can be implemented for quality control in conjunction with other manufacturing processes.

  13. Dose-dependent changes in the locomotor responses to methamphetamine in BALB/c mice: low doses induce hypolocomotion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rana A K; Kosten, Therese A; Kinsey, Berma M; Shen, Xiaoyun; Lopez, Angel Y; Kosten, Thomas R; Orson, Frank M

    2012-12-01

    The overall goal of the present study was to determine the effects of different doses of (+)-methamphetamine (meth) on locomotor activity of Balb/C mice. Four experiments were designed to test a wide range of meth doses in BALB/c female mice. In Experiment 1, we examined locomotor activity induced by an acute administration of low doses of meth (0.01 and 0.03mg/kg) in a 90-min session. Experiment 2 was conducted to test higher meth doses (0.3-10mg/kg). In Experiment 3, separate sets of mice were pre-treated with various meth doses once or twice (one injection/week) prior to a locomotor challenge with a low meth dose. Finally, in Experiment 4, we tested whether locomotor activation would be affected by pretreatment with a low or moderate dose of meth one month prior to the low meth dose challenge. Results show that low doses of meth induce hypolocomotion whereas moderate to high doses induce hyperlocomotion. Prior exposure to either one moderate or high dose of meth or to two, low doses of meth attenuated the hypolocomotor effect of a low meth dose one week later. This effect was also attenuated in mice tested one month after administration of a moderate meth dose. These results show that low and high doses of meth can have opposing effects on locomotor activity. Further, prior exposure to the drug leads to tolerance, rather than sensitization, of the hypolocomotor response to low meth doses.

  14. Naltrexone for Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well- ...

  15. Ultrasonic Attenuation in Zircaloy-4

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M.P.; Banchik, A.D.; Lopez Pumarega, M.I.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    2005-04-09

    In this work the relationship between Zircaloy-4 grain size and ultrasonic attenuation behavior was studied for longitudinal waves in the frequency range of 10-90 MHz. The attenuation was analyzed as a function of frequency for samples with different mechanical and heat treatments having recrystallized and Widmanstatten structures with different grain size. The attenuation behavior was analyzed by different scattering models, depending on grain size, wavelength and frequency.

  16. Attenuation of Cavity Bay Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    amplification, known as peaking. Overall, the palliative devices based on resonant arrays have demonstrated high levels of attenuation which are...when the resonant frequency condition is met. The attenuation from a Helmholtz type resonator is achieved through frictional losses, vortex shedding...3 the λ/4 condition can be fulfilled and therefore porous mesh devices may not be able to provide a high level of attenuation . Resonant arrays

  17. First results from a prototype dynamic attenuator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Peng, Mark V.; May, Christopher A.; Shunhavanich, Picha; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator has been proposed as a concept which can shape the radiation flux incident on the patient. By reducing the signal to photon-rich measurements and increasing the signal to photon-starved measurements, the piecewise-linear attenuator has been shown to improve dynamic range, scatter, and variance and dose metrics in simulation. The piecewise-linear nature of the proposed attenuator has been hypothesized to mitigate artifacts at transitions by eliminating jump discontinuities in attenuator thickness at these points. We report the results of a prototype implementation of this concept. The attenuator was constructed using rapid prototyping technologies and was affixed to a tabletop x-ray system. Images of several sections of an anthropormophic pediatric phantom were produced and compared to those of the same system with uniform illumination. The thickness of the illuminated slab was limited by beam collimation and an analytic water beam hardening correction was used for both systems. Initial results are encouraging and show improved image quality, reduced dose and low artifact levels.

  18. Molecular determinants for drug-receptor interactions. 8. Anisotropic and internal motions in morphine, nalorphine, oxymorphone, naloxone and naltrexone in aqueous solution by carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Antonio; Perly, Bruno; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.

    1989-02-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1) were measured for morphine, oxymorphone, nalorphine, naloxone and naltrexone as hydrochloride salts in 2H 2O solution. The data refer to the molecules in the N-equatorial configuration. The experimental T1 values were interpreted using a model of anisotropic reorientation of a rigid body with superimposed internal motions of the flexible N-methyl, N-methyl-allyl and N-methyl-cyclopropyl fragments. The calculated internal motional rates were found to markedly decrease on passing from agonists to mixed (nalorphine) and pure (naloxone, naltrexone) antagonists. For these latter the observed trend of the internal flexibility about NC and CC bonds of the N-substituents is discussed in terms of a correlation with their relative antagonistic potencies. In fact, such an evidence of decreasing internal conformational dynamics in the order nalorphine, naloxone, naltrexone, appeared interestingly in line with the "two-state" model of opiate receptor operation mode proposed by Snyder.

  19. LINE-ABOVE-GROUND ATTENUATOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilds, R.B.; Ames, J.R.

    1957-09-24

    The line-above-ground attenuator provides a continuously variable microwave attenuator for a coaxial line that is capable of high attenuation and low insertion loss. The device consists of a short section of the line-above- ground plane type transmission lime, a pair of identical rectangular slabs of lossy material like polytron, whose longitudinal axes are parallel to and indentically spaced away from either side of the line, and a geared mechanism to adjust amd maintain this spaced relationship. This device permits optimum fineness and accuracy of attenuator control which heretofore has been difficult to achieve.

  20. Two-dimensional dynamic fluid bowtie attenuators.

    PubMed

    Hermus, James R; Szczykutowicz, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    Fluence field modulated (FFM) CT allows for improvements in image quality and dose reduction. To date, only one-dimensional modulators have been proposed, as the extension to two-dimensional (2-D) modulation is difficult with solid-metal attenuation-based fluence field modulated designs. This work proposes to use liquid and gas to attenuate the x-ray beam, as unlike solids, these materials can be arranged allowing for 2-D fluence modulation. The thickness of liquid and the pressure for a given path length of gas were determined that provided the same attenuation as 30 cm of soft tissue at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. Liquid iodine, zinc chloride, cerium chloride, erbium oxide, iron oxide, and gadolinium chloride were studied. Gaseous xenon, uranium hexafluoride, tungsten hexafluoride, and nickel tetracarbonyl were also studied. Additionally, we performed a proof-of-concept experiment using a 96 cell array in which the liquid thickness in each cell was adjusted manually. Liquid thickness varied as a function of kV and chemical composition, with erbium oxide allowing for the smallest thickness. For the gases, tungsten hexaflouride required the smallest pressure to compensate for 30 cm of soft tissue. The 96 cell iodine attenuator allowed for a reduction in both dynamic range to the detector and scatter-to-primary ratio. For both liquids and gases, when k-edges were located within the diagnostic energy range used for imaging, the mean beam energy exhibited the smallest change with compensation amount. The thickness of liquids and the gas pressure seem logistically implementable within the space constraints of C-arm-based cone beam CT (CBCT) and diagnostic CT systems. The gas pressures also seem logistically implementable within the space and tube loading constraints of CBCT and diagnostic CT systems.

  1. Two-dimensional dynamic fluid bowtie attenuators

    PubMed Central

    Hermus, James R.; Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Fluence field modulated (FFM) CT allows for improvements in image quality and dose reduction. To date, only one-dimensional modulators have been proposed, as the extension to two-dimensional (2-D) modulation is difficult with solid-metal attenuation-based fluence field modulated designs. This work proposes to use liquid and gas to attenuate the x-ray beam, as unlike solids, these materials can be arranged allowing for 2-D fluence modulation. The thickness of liquid and the pressure for a given path length of gas were determined that provided the same attenuation as 30 cm of soft tissue at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. Liquid iodine, zinc chloride, cerium chloride, erbium oxide, iron oxide, and gadolinium chloride were studied. Gaseous xenon, uranium hexafluoride, tungsten hexafluoride, and nickel tetracarbonyl were also studied. Additionally, we performed a proof-of-concept experiment using a 96 cell array in which the liquid thickness in each cell was adjusted manually. Liquid thickness varied as a function of kV and chemical composition, with erbium oxide allowing for the smallest thickness. For the gases, tungsten hexaflouride required the smallest pressure to compensate for 30 cm of soft tissue. The 96 cell iodine attenuator allowed for a reduction in both dynamic range to the detector and scatter-to-primary ratio. For both liquids and gases, when k-edges were located within the diagnostic energy range used for imaging, the mean beam energy exhibited the smallest change with compensation amount. The thickness of liquids and the gas pressure seem logistically implementable within the space constraints of C-arm-based cone beam CT (CBCT) and diagnostic CT systems. The gas pressures also seem logistically implementable within the space and tube loading constraints of CBCT and diagnostic CT systems. PMID:26835499

  2. Attenuation correction effects on SPECT/CT procedures: phantoms studies.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M L; Seren, M E G; Rocha, F C; Brunetto, S Q; Ramos, C D; Button, V L S N

    2013-01-01

    Attenuation correction is widely used in SPECT/CT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) procedures, especially for imaging of the thorax region. Different compensation methods have been developed and introduced into clinical practice. Most of them use attenuation maps obtained using transmission scanning systems. However, this gives extra dose of radiation to the patient. The purpose of this study was to identify when attenuation correction is really important during SPECT/CT procedures.For this purpose, we used Jaszczak phantom and phantom with three line sources, filled with technetium ((99m)-Tc), with scattering materials, like air, water and acrylic, in different detectors configurations. In all images acquired were applied analytic and iterative reconstruction algorithms; the last one with or without attenuation correction. We analyzed parameters such as eccentricity, contrast and spatial resolution in the images.The best reconstruction algorithm on average was iterative, for images with 128 × 128 and 64 × 64 matrixes. The analytical algorithm was effective only to improve eccentricity in 64 × 64 matrix and matrix in contrast 128 × 128 with low statistics. Turning to the clinical routine examinations, on average, for 128 × 128 matrix and low statistics counting, the best algorithm was the iterative, without attenuation correction,improving in 150% the three parameters analyzed and, for the same matrix size, but with high statistical counting, iterative algorithm with attenuation correction was 25% better than that without correction. We can conclude that using the iterative algorithm with attenuation correction in the water, and its extra dose given, is not justified for the procedures of low statistic counting, being relevant only if the intention is to prioritize contrast in acquisitions with high statistic counting.

  3. Suicide Risk: Amplifiers and Attenuators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plutchik, Robert; Van Praag, Herman M.

    1994-01-01

    Attempts to integrate findings on correlates of suicide and violent risk in terms of a theory called a two-stage model of countervailing forces, which assumes that the strength of aggressive impulses is modified by amplifiers and attenuators. The vectorial interaction of amplifiers and attenuators creates an unstable equilibrium making prediction…

  4. Adjustable Optical-Fiber Attenuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzetti, Mike F.

    1994-01-01

    Adjustable fiber-optic attenuator utilizes bending loss to reduce strength of light transmitted along it. Attenuator functions without introducing measurable back-reflection or insertion loss. Relatively insensitive to vibration and changes in temperature. Potential applications include cable television, telephone networks, other signal-distribution networks, and laboratory instrumentation.

  5. Effects of chronic postnatal opioid receptor blockade by naltrexone upon proliferation capacity in the prenatally x-irradiated brain of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Schmahl, W.; Miaskowski, U. )

    1991-01-01

    We recently reported that in rats prenatally x-irradiated on gestation day 14 with 1 Gy, postnatal chronic application of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (Nx) led to a remarkable growth spurt of the microencephalic brain. In the present study we present histological and autoradiographic results found in the subependymal layer (SEL) of the forebrain lateral ventricles. Nx led to an intermittent augmentation of the mitotic index of the x-irradiated brains within a postnatal observation period of 24 weeks. The most conspicuous finding was transient hyperplasia of the SEL at 4-6 weeks of age which occurred in close proximity to an intact ependymal lining. Districts of the lateral ventricles which were denuded from ependyme and where the rest of the ependymal layer (EL) was dislocated peripherally showed upon Nx treatment a long-lasting SEL hyperplasia with a tendency towards dysplasia. These results revealed that repair proliferation of embryotoxic x-irradiation is normally under strong control by the opioid system. If that system, which exerts a suppressing effect upon glial growth, is blocked by Nx, prominent hyperplastic reactions occur which may be useful for repairing the lesion pattern.

  6. Novel in situ gelling ocular films for the opioid growth factor-receptor antagonist-naltrexone hydrochloride: fabrication, mechanical properties, mucoadhesion, tolerability and stability studies.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Hamdy; Pierscionek, Barbara; Alany, Raid G

    2014-12-30

    Naltrexone hydrochloride (NTX) is an innovative drug used in ophthalmology for treatment of ocular surface diseases such as impaired corneal wound healing and severe dry eye. Poor chemical stability has been a major limitation for development of NTX in solution form. The aim of this study was to develop and characterise NTX in situ ocular films for enhanced chemical stability and improved ocular tolerability. The films were prepared from different amorphous polymers and characterised for physicochemical compatibility, moisture-sorption, surface pH, mechanical properties, sterilisability, surface morphology, mucoadhesion, in vitro release, conjunctival irritation and accelerated stability at 40°C/75% relative humidity for 3 months. Glycerin (GLY)-plasticised films exhibited significantly better mechanical properties, compared with polyethylene glycol (PEG) 400 and triethylcitrate (TEC)-plasticised formulations. Superior mucoadhesion was recorded for F7 and F9 plasticised with GLY and PEG 400, respectively. The stability of NTX was significantly enhanced more than 18-times, compared with the solution form. Combination of carboxymethylcellulose sodium (CMC) and sodium alginate (ALG) in a film formulation demonstrated minimal % moisture sorption, good mechanical properties, in vitro release, excellent chemical stability and minimal conjunctival irritation lending them as promising ocular formulations.

  7. Pentoxifylline besides naltrexone recovers morphine-induced inflammation in male reproductive system of rats by regulating Toll-like receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Chehrei, S; Moradi, M; Ghiabi, H R; Falahi, M; Kaviani, S; Ghanbari, A

    2016-12-07

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of pentoxifylline on complications of prolonged usage of morphine upon the testis and sperm parameters of rats. In this study, forty male Wistar rats were divided into five groups (n = 8) and treated for 56 days to only saline, only morphine, only pentoxifylline, pentoxifylline + morphine and naltrexone + morphine. The diameters of seminiferous tubules, the maturity of germ line epithelium and sperm parameters were evaluated. The expression of inflammatory-related factors in testis tissues were also investigated at gene and protein levels. The data were calculated by one-way ANOVA test followed by Tukey's post hoc test using SPSS software for windows (version 20). Seminiferous tubule diameter, the maturity of spermatogonia and sperm parameters were significantly decreased in morphine group in comparison with control, pentoxifylline and pentoxifylline + morphine groups (p < .001). The expression of anti-inflammatory markers, at both gene and protein levels, was significantly increased in testis of morphine-treated rats in comparison with other groups (p < .001). Chronic morphine administration induces destructive effects on male reproductive system by regulating inflammatory responses. Pentoxifylline recovers the destructive effects of morphine on male reproductive system by inhibiting TLR (Toll-like receptor) activity, as an anti-inflammatory response.

  8. Ganglioside inserted into PEGylated liposome attenuates anti-PEG immunity.

    PubMed

    Mima, Yu; Abu Lila, Amr S; Shimizu, Taro; Ukawa, Masami; Ando, Hidenori; Kurata, Yasuko; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2017-03-28

    Despite the clinical introduction of a vast number of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated therapeutics, conjugated PEG is also known for an unfortunate inclination toward immunogenicity. Immunogenicity of PEG, manifested by the robust production of anti-PEG IgM, is known to compromise the therapeutic efficacy and/or reduce the tolerance of PEGylated therapeutics. In the present study, we inserted ganglioside into the membrane of PEGylated liposome (PL) to prepare ganglioside-modified PEGylated liposomes (G-PL), and investigated its efficacy in attenuating the anti-PEG IgM response against PL. A single intravenous injection of G-PL significantly attenuated the anti-PEG IgM production, compared with that of naïve PL. In addition, pretreatment with G-PL substantially alleviated the anti-PEG IgM response elicited by a subsequent dose of PL, presumably via inducing B cell tolerance, and as a consequence, this modification abrogated/attenuated the incidence of the rapid clearance of subsequently administrated PL. These results indicate that incorporating gangliosides in PEGylated liposome membrane not only prevents the immunogenicity of PEG but also induces the tolerance of B cells to subsequent doses of the immunogenic PL. Consequently, liposomal membrane modification with ganglioside might represent a promising approach to attenuating the immunogenicity of PEGylated liposomes while preserving their therapeutic efficacy, particularly upon repeated administration.

  9. Triptans attenuate circadian responses to light.

    PubMed

    Basu, Priyoneel; Ie, Naomi; Wensel, Adrienne L; Baskerville, Joelle D; Smith, Victoria M; Antle, Michael C

    2015-10-01

    Daily exposure to light synchronizes the circadian clock, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), to external day/night cycles. These responses to light can be modified by serotonergic drugs, such as serotonin 5HT1B receptor agonists. Triptans are specific 5HT1B agonists prescribed to treat migraines. Here, we examined the effects of two triptans (zolmitriptan and sumatriptan) on photic phase resetting in Syrian hamsters. Pre-treatment with intra-SCN sumatriptan significantly attenuates, and at higher doses completely blocks, phase advances to light during the late night. Pre-treatment with systemic zolmitriptan significantly attenuates both light-induced phase advances and phase delays. Neither of these drugs, nor their vehicles, causes phase shifts on their own. Pre-treatment with zolmitriptan also significantly reduces the expression of light-induced c-fos in the SCN. Neither zolmitriptan nor vehicle alone induces significant c-fos expression in the SCN. Finally, pre-treatment with zolmitriptan does not attenuate phase shifts to intra-SCN N-methyl-d-aspartate injections, indicating that the mechanism of action for zolmitriptan is likely to be through activation of presynaptic 5HT1B receptors on retinal terminals, thereby decreasing light-induced neurotransmitter release. As triptans are commercially available medications, there is potential for their use in blocking unwanted photic phase shifting during shift-work or jet-lag. Additionally, triptans may also affect the circadian clock in patients receiving them regularly for migraines. Finally, our results may hint at the mechanism by which triptans can alleviate the photophobia that frequently accompanies migraines, namely by activating 5HT1B receptors on retinal terminals elsewhere in the brain, and thereby diminishing visually-evoked neurotransmitter signalling in those areas.

  10. REINFORCER MAGNITUDE ATTENUATES

    PubMed Central

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Lamb, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    When given to pigeons, the direct-acting dopamine agonist apomorphine elicits pecking. The response has been likened to foraging pecking because it bears remarkable similarity to foraging behavior, and it is enhanced by food deprivation. On the other hand, other data suggest the response is not related to foraging behavior and may even interfere with food ingestion. Although elicited pecking interferes with food capture, it may selectively alter procurement phases of feeding, which can be isolated in operant preparations. To explore the relation between operant and elicited pecking, we provided pigeons the opportunity to earn different reinforcer magnitudes during experimental sessions. During signaled components, each of 4 pigeons could earn 2-, 4-, or 8-s access to grain for a single peck made at the end of a 5-min interval. In general, responding increased as a function of reinforcer magnitude. Apomorphine increased pecking for 2 pigeons and decreased pecking for the other 2. In both cases, apomorphine was more potent under the component providing the smallest reinforcer magnitude. Analysis of the pattern of pecking across the interval indicated that behavior lost its temporal organization as dose increased. Because apomorphine-induced pecking varied inversely with reinforcer magnitude, we conclude that elicited pecks are not functionally related to food procurement. The data are consistent with the literature on behavioral resistance to change and suggest that the effects of apomorphine may be modulated by prevailing stimulus–reinforcer relationships. PMID:23144505

  11. A prototype piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Peng, Mark V.; May, Christopher A.; Shunhavanich, Picha; Fleischmann, Dominik; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-07-01

    The piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator has been proposed as a mechanism in CT scanning for personalizing the x-ray illumination on a patient- and application-specific basis. Previous simulations have shown benefits in image quality, scatter, and dose objectives. We report on the first prototype implementation. This prototype is reduced in scale and speed and is integrated into a tabletop CT system with a smaller field of view (25 cm) and longer scan time (42 s) compared to a clinical system. Stainless steel wedges were machined and affixed to linear actuators, which were in turn held secure by a frame built using rapid prototyping technologies. The actuators were computer-controlled, with characteristic noise of about 100 microns. Simulations suggest that in a clinical setting, the impact of actuator noise could lead to artifacts of only 1 HU. Ring artifacts were minimized by careful design of the wedges. A water beam hardening correction was applied and the scan was collimated to reduce scatter. We scanned a 16 cm water cylinder phantom as well as an anthropomorphic pediatric phantom. The artifacts present in reconstructed images are comparable to artifacts normally seen with this tabletop system. Compared to a flat-field reference scan, increased detectability at reduced dose is shown and streaking is reduced. Artifacts are modest in our images and further refinement is possible. Issues of mechanical speed and stability in the challenging clinical CT environment will be addressed in a future design.

  12. Topical treatment with the opioid antagonist naltrexone accelerates the remodeling phase of full-thickness wound healing in type 1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Immonen, Jessica A; Zagon, Ian S; Lewis, Gregory S; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2013-10-01

    Wound repair involves a series of overlapping phases that include inflammation, proliferation, and tissue remodeling, with the latter phase requiring months for proper healing. Delays in any of these processes can result in infection, chronic ulceration, and possible amputation. Diabetes is a major risk factor for improper wound repair, and impaired wound healing is a major complication for more than 26 million people in the US diagnosed with diabetes. Previous studies have demonstrated that the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX) dissolved in moisturizing cream reverses delays in wound closure in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic (T1D) rats. NTX accelerated DNA synthesis and increased the number of epithelial and mast cells, as well as new blood vessel formation. In this study, remodeling was evaluated in T1D rats up to eight weeks after initial wounding. Twenty days following wounding, diabetic rats treated with vehicle had elevated numbers of MMP-2+ fibroblasts, suggesting delayed healing processes; birefringence of granulation tissue stained with Sirius red revealed diminished collagen formation and maturation. Wound tissue from NTX-treated T1D rats had comparable numbers of MMP-2+ fibroblasts to control specimens, as well as accelerated maturation of granulation tissue. The integrity of wounded skin was evaluated by tensile strength measurements. T1D resulted in delayed wound healing, and wounded skin that displayed reduced tensile strength relative to normal rats. Topical NTX applied to wounds in T1D rats resulted in enhanced collagen formation and maturation over a 60-day period of time. Moreover, the force required to tear skin of NTX-treated T1D rats was elevated relative to the force necessary to tear the skin of vehicle-treated T1D rats, and comparable to that for normal rats. These data reveal that complications in wound healing associated with T1D involve the novel OGF-OGFr pathway, and that topical NTX is an effective treatment to enhance wound

  13. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  14. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-04-01

    In this report we will show results of seismic and well log derived attenuation attributes from a deep water Gulf of Mexico data set. This data was contributed by Burlington Resources and Seitel Inc. The data consists of ten square kilometers of 3D seismic data and three well penetrations. We have computed anomalous seismic absorption attributes on the seismic data and have computed Q from the well log curves. The results show a good correlation between the anomalous absorption (attenuation) attributes and the presence of gas as indicated by well logs.

  15. Attenuation assessment of medical protective eyewear: the AVEN experience.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, M; Benecchi, G; Amici, M; Piola, A; Piccagli, V; Giordano, C; Nocetti, L

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to test the attenuation capability of seven models of protective eyewear used in routine clinical practice. Scattered radiation from a standard patient was simulated by using a water tank located over the treatment couch of a GE Innova 3100 x-ray angiography system. Seven protective eyewear models were tested using an anthropomorphic phantom mimicking the first operator. At each test, 4 thermoluminiscent dosimeters were placed on the phantom (respectively in front of the protective eyewear, under the eyewear, on the left earpiece and at chest level) in order to have an eyewear-independent reference. A test session without glasses was also acquired. Each model was tested with standard posterior-anterior (PA) projections and the two most common protective eyewear were tested using LAO90° and LAO45°CRA30° projections. A worst-case scenario was created to be sure of having an upper limit for the assessment of eyewear attenuation in routine clinical practice. In PA projections, the absolute attenuation value ranged between 71% and 81%, while relative attenuation between dose measured at eye lens and that measured at eyewear earpiece ranged from 67% to 85%. The slightly wider range was probably due to scatter radiation variability; anyway, differences are still included in the variable uncertainty of experimental measurements. It is worth noting that #3 eyewear model (the one without lateral protection) allows an attenuation similar to that of #5 eyewear model (with 0.5 mm lead lateral protection) in LAO90° and LAO45°CRA30° projections. Despite the experimental limitations, a description of the radiation properties of protective eyewear concerning radiation attenuation can be useful to rely on protection devices which can be used in routine clinical practice.

  16. Nicotine Administration Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Novel Object Recognition Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Vieira-Brock, Paula L.; McFadden, Lisa M.; Nielsen, Shannon M.; Smith, Misty D.; Hanson, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have demonstrated that methamphetamine abuse leads to memory deficits and these are associated with relapse. Furthermore, extensive evidence indicates that nicotine prevents and/or improves memory deficits in different models of cognitive dysfunction and these nicotinic effects might be mediated by hippocampal or cortical nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The present study investigated whether nicotine attenuates methamphetamine-induced novel object recognition deficits in rats and explored potential underlying mechanisms. Methods: Adolescent or adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received either nicotine water (10–75 μg/mL) or tap water for several weeks. Methamphetamine (4×7.5mg/kg/injection) or saline was administered either before or after chronic nicotine exposure. Novel object recognition was evaluated 6 days after methamphetamine or saline. Serotonin transporter function and density and α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor density were assessed on the following day. Results: Chronic nicotine intake via drinking water beginning during either adolescence or adulthood attenuated the novel object recognition deficits caused by a high-dose methamphetamine administration. Similarly, nicotine attenuated methamphetamine-induced deficits in novel object recognition when administered after methamphetamine treatment. However, nicotine did not attenuate the serotonergic deficits caused by methamphetamine in adults. Conversely, nicotine attenuated methamphetamine-induced deficits in α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor density in the hippocampal CA1 region. Furthermore, nicotine increased α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor density in the hippocampal CA3, dentate gyrus and perirhinal cortex in both saline- and methamphetamine-treated rats. Conclusions: Overall, these findings suggest that nicotine-induced increases in α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex might be one mechanism by which

  17. Acetate supplementation attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Reisenauer, Chris J; Bhatt, Dhaval P; Mitteness, Dane J; Slanczka, Evan R; Gienger, Heidi M; Watt, John A; Rosenberger, Thad A

    2011-04-01

    Glyceryl triacetate (GTA), a compound effective at increasing circulating and tissue levels of acetate was used to treat rats subjected to a continual 28 day intra-ventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This model produces a neuroinflammatory injury characterized by global neuroglial activation and a decrease in choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity in the basal forebrain. During the LPS infusion, rats were given a daily treatment of either water or GTA at a dose of 6 g/kg by oral gavage. In parallel experiments, free-CoA and acetyl-CoA levels were measured in microwave fixed brains and flash frozen heart, liver, kidney and muscle following a single oral dose of GTA. We found that a single oral dose of GTA significantly increased plasma acetate levels by 15 min and remained elevated for up to 4 h. At 30 min the acetyl-CoA levels in microwave-fixed brain and flash frozen heart and liver were increased at least 2.2-fold. The concentrations of brain acetyl-CoA was significantly increased between 30 and 45 min following treatment and remained elevated for up to 4 h. The concentration of free-CoA in brain was significantly decreased compared to controls at 240 min. Immunohistochemical and morphological analysis demonstrated that a daily treatment with GTA significantly reduced the percentage of reactive glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes and activated CD11b-positive microglia by 40-50% in rats subjected to LPS-induced neuroinflammation. Further, in rats subjected to neuroinflammation, GTA significantly increased the number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive cells by 40% in the basal forebrain compared to untreated controls. These data suggest that acetate supplementation increases intermediary short chain acetyl-CoA metabolism and that treatment is potentially anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective with regards to attenuating neuroglial activation and increasing ChAT immunoreactivity in this model.

  18. Determination of the Absorption Coefficient and Cloudiness Multiplicity Attenuation During the Gamma-Radiation Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, K. N.; Borovikov, I. F.; Gaidamak, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents background value equivalent dose of gamma-radiation investigation in different weather: clear cloudy and overcast. The change of the dose rate of gamma radiation, depending on the weather and the ability cloudiness to shield gamma rays is shown. A new method for eliminating the consequences of accidents at nuclear power plants or plants using radioactive elements is proposed. A calculation method of cloudiness coefficient absorption and cloudiness gamma-radiation multiplicity attenuation is developed. The gamma- radiation multiplicity attenuation and the absorption coefficient of gamma radiation were calculated.

  19. Immobilization of free-ranging male pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) with carfentanil citrate and naltrexone hydrochloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Tuomi, P.A.; Garner, Gerald W.; Jay, Chadwick V.

    2003-01-01

    Collins, CO 80524) was administered by dart with a 10-cm needle to the lumbar region. Most animals received a dose of 2.7 or 3.0 mg of carfentanil. One animal received a second dose after the first syringe apparently burst on impact. Induction times were measured as being the time at which the animal collapsed, failed to respond to external stimuli, or as the time when the darter stood up and moved towards the animal.

  20. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range

  1. Absorbed Dose and Dose Equivalent Calculations for Modeling Effective Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Andrew; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    While in orbit, Astronauts are exposed to a much higher dose of ionizing radiation than when on the ground. It is important to model how shielding designs on spacecraft reduce radiation effective dose pre-flight, and determine whether or not a danger to humans is presented. However, in order to calculate effective dose, dose equivalent calculations are needed. Dose equivalent takes into account an absorbed dose of radiation and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This is important in preventing long-term, stochastic radiation effects in humans spending time in space. Monte carlo simulations run with the particle transport code FLUKA, give absorbed and equivalent dose data for relevant shielding. The shielding geometry used in the dose calculations is a layered slab design, consisting of aluminum, polyethylene, and water. Water is used to simulate the soft tissues that compose the human body. The results obtained will provide information on how the shielding performs with many thicknesses of each material in the slab. This allows them to be directly applicable to modern spacecraft shielding geometries.

  2. Aripiprazole attenuates established behavioral sensitization induced by methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Futamura, Takashi; Akiyama, Satoshi; Sugino, Haruhiko; Forbes, Andy; McQuade, Robert D; Kikuchi, Tetsuro

    2010-08-16

    Psychostimulant-induced behavioral sensitization is an experimental model of the stimulant psychosis and the vulnerability to relapse in schizophrenia. This study investigated the effects of aripiprazole, an antipsychotic drug that has dopamine D2 receptor partial agonist activity, on established sensitization induced by methamphetamine (MAP) in mice. Repeated treatment with MAP (1.0mg/kg, s.c.) for 10 days progressively increased the ability of MAP to increase locomotor activity. The enhanced locomotion induced by a challenge dose of MAP (0.24 mg/kg, s.c.) also occurred after withdrawal from MAP pretreatment. Repeated treatment with aripiprazole from days 10 to 14 during withdrawal from MAP administration attenuated the effect of MAP pretreatment, enhancing the motor response to a challenge dose of stimulant 3 days after the aripiprazole preparation. In contrast, sulpiride, a dopamine D2 receptor specific antagonist, and risperidone, a serotonin 5-HT2 and dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, did not show effects similar to aripiprazole. The attenuation effect of aripiprazole was blocked by pretreatment with the specific serotonin 5-HT1A antagonist WAY100635. These results of aripiprazole suggest that the attenuation effect of aripiprazole was mediated by 5-HT1A receptors and imply that aripiprazole may have therapeutic value in treating drug-induced psychosis and schizophrenia.

  3. Attenuation of scopolamine-induced cognitive dysfunction by obovatol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Young; Lee, Young-Jung; Lee, Sun Young; Lee, Yoot Mo; Lee, Hyun Hee; Choi, Im Seop; Oh, Ki-Wan; Han, Sang Bae; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Hong, Jin Tae

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent cause of dementia in the elderly people. The disease is pathologically characterized by extracellular deposition of beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ), cholinergic neurodegeneration and elevation of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity in the affected regions. In this study, we investigated the effects of obovatol on memory dysfunction, which was caused by scopolamine. Obovatol (0.2, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg for 7 day) attenuated scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced amnesia in a dose-dependent manner, as revealed by the Morris water maze test and step-through passive avoidance test. Mechanism studies exhibited that obovatol dose-dependently alleviated scopolamine-induced increase in Aβ generation and β-secretase activity in the cortex and hippocampus. Obovatol also attenuated scopolamine-induced rise in AChE activity in the cortex and hippocampus. Obovatol might rescue scopolamine-mediated impaired learning and memory function by attenuating Aβ accumulation and stabilizing cholinergic neurotransmission, which suggests that the natural compound could be a useful agent for the prevention of the development or progression of AD neurodegeneration.

  4. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2002-07-01

    In fully-saturated rock and at ultrasonic frequencies, the microscopic squirt flow induced between the stiff and soft parts of the pore space by an elastic wave is responsible for velocity-frequency dispersion and attenuation. In the seismic frequency range, it is the macroscopic cross-flow between the stiffer and softer parts of the rock. We use the latter hypothesis to introduce simple approximate equations for velocity-frequency dispersion and attenuation in a fully water saturated reservoir. The equations are based on the assumption that in heterogeneous rock and at a very low frequency, the effective elastic modulus of the fully-saturated rock can be estimated by applying a fluid substitution procedure to the averaged (upscaled) dry frame whose effective porosity is the mean porosity and the effective elastic modulus is the Backus-average (geometric mean) of the individual dry-frame elastic moduli of parts of the rock. At a higher frequency, the effective elastic modulus of the saturated rock is the Backus-average of the individual fully-saturated-rock elastic moduli of parts of the rock. The difference between the effective elastic modulus calculated separately by these two methods determines the velocity-frequency dispersion. The corresponding attenuation is calculated from this dispersion by using (e.g.) the standard linear solid attenuation model.

  5. Stormwater Attenuation by Green Roofs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, A.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Robinson, C. E.; Smart, C. C.

    2014-12-01

    Innovative municipal stormwater management technologies are urgently required in urban centers. Inadequate stormwater management can lead to excessive flooding, channel erosion, decreased stream baseflows, and degraded water quality. A major source of urban stormwater is unused roof space. Green roofs can be used as a stormwater management tool to reduce roof generated stormwater and generally improve the quality of runoff. With recent legislation in some North American cities, including Toronto, requiring the installation of green roofs on large buildings, research on the effectiveness of green roofs for stormwater management is important. This study aims to assess the hydrologic response of an extensive sedum green roof in London, Ontario, with emphasis on the response to large precipitation events that stress municipal stormwater infrastructure. A green roof rapidly reaches field capacity during large storm events and can show significantly different behavior before and after field capacity. At field capacity a green roof has no capillary storage left for retention of stormwater, but may still be an effective tool to attenuate peak runoff rates by transport through the green roof substrate. The attenuation of green roofs after field capacity is linked to gravity storage, where gravity storage is the water that is temporarily stored and can drain freely over time after field capacity has been established. Stormwater attenuation of a modular experimental green roof is determined from water balance calculations at 1-minute intervals. Data is used to evaluate green roof attenuation and the impact of field capacity on peak flow rates and gravity storage. In addition, a numerical model is used to simulate event based stormwater attenuation. This model is based off of the Richards equation and supporting theory of multiphase flow through porous media.

  6. Attenuator design for organs at risk in total body irradiation using a translation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lavallee, Marie-Claude; Aubin, Sylviane; Chretien, Mario; Larochelle, Marie; Beaulieu, Luc

    2008-05-15

    Total body irradiation (TBI) is an efficient part of the treatment for malignant hematological diseases. Dynamic TBI techniques provide great advantages (e.g., dose homogeneity, patient comfort) while overcoming treatment room space restrictions. However, with dynamic techniques come additional organs at risk (OAR) protection challenges. In most dynamic TBI techniques, lead attenuators are used to diminish the dose received by the OARs. The purpose of this study was to characterize the dose deposition under various shapes of attenuators in static and dynamic treatments. This characterization allows for the development of a correction method to improve attenuator design in dynamic treatments. The dose deposition under attenuators at different depths in dynamic treatment was compared with the static situation based on two definitions: the coverage areas and the penumbra regions. The coverage area decreases with depth in dynamic treatment while it is stable for the static situation. The penumbra increases with depth in both treatment modes, but the increasing rate is higher in the dynamic situation. Since the attenuator coverage is deficient in the dynamic treatment mode, a correction method was developed to modify the attenuator design in order to improve the OAR protection. The correction method is divided in two steps. The first step is based on the use of elongation charts, which provide appropriate attenuator coverage and acceptable penumbra for a specific depth. The second point is a correction method for the thoracic inclination, which can introduce an orientation problem in both static and dynamic treatments. This two steps correction method is simple to use and personalized to each patient's anatomy. It can easily be adapted to any dynamic TBI techniques.

  7. Controlling Dose to Low Z Solids at LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Bionta, R.M.

    2000-01-03

    Calculations of the dose suffered by the low Z solids, Li, Be, B, B{sub 4}C, BeO and C at various points along the LCLS beamline as a function of FEL photon energy are presented. Specific column densities of attenuator gases necessary to control the dose to C are calculated for assumed damage thresholds of 0.1 eV/atom and 0.01 eV/atom.

  8. Ferrite attenuator modulation improves antenna performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, J. C.; Larson, S. G.; Shorkley, F. H.; Williams, B. T.

    1970-01-01

    Ferrite attenuator inserted into appropriate waveguide reduces the gain of the antenna element which is causing interference. Modulating the ferrite attenuator to change the antenna gain at the receive frequency permits ground tracking until the antenna is no longer needed.

  9. Correlates of Retention on Extended-Release Naltrexone among Persons Living with HIV Infection Transitioning to the Community from the Criminal Justice System

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Sandra A.; Altice, Frederick L.; Brown, Shan-Estelle; Di Paola, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Background The acceptability of and retention on extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX), an FDA-approved medication for the treatment of alcohol and opioid use disorders, among persons living with HIV disease (PLH) under criminal justice setting (CJS) supervision has not been evaluated to date. Methods Two double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials of XR-NTX for inmates with HIV disease transitioning to the community with (1) alcohol use disorders (AUDs) or (2) opioid use disorders, are underway. Reasons for not accepting XR-NTX and an evaluation of differences in demographic features between those who were retained on study drug and those who did not return for their second injection post-release are discussed. Results 70% of eligible persons consented to participate; almost 90% received their first injection; and almost 60% returned for their second injection after release. Variables found to be associated (p<0.10) with returning for the second injection included: not meeting criteria for hazardous drinking (p=0.035; OR 0.424 (CI 0.191–0.941)); being prescribed antiretroviral therapy (p=0.068; OR 2.170 (CI 0.943–4.992)); expressing experiencing serious depression 30 days prior to incarceration (p=0.068; OR 1.889 (CI 0.955–3.737)); not having a positive cocaine urine screen on the day of release (DOR) (p=0.011; OR 0.258 (CI 0.091–0.729)); and not meeting criteria for an AUD plus any substance use disorder (p=0.068; OR 0.521 (CI 0.259–1.048)). Only positive cocaine urine test on DOR was statistically significant after multivariate regression analyses (p=0.005; OR 0.207 (CI 0.068–0.623)). Conclusion CJS based XR-NTX programs are highly acceptable among PLH, however retention on XR-NTX after release is negatively impacted by relapse to cocaine use. PMID:26560326

  10. ENHANCEMENTS TO NATURAL ATTENUATION: SELECTED CASE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, K; W. H. Albright, W; E. S. Becvar, E; C. H. Benson, C; T. O. Early, T; E. Hood, E; P. M. Jardine, P; M. Lorah, M; E. Majche, E; D. Major, D; W. J. Waugh, W; G. Wein, G; O. R. West, O

    2007-05-15

    In 2003 the US Department of Energy (DOE) embarked on a project to explore an innovative approach to remediation of subsurface contaminant plumes that focused on introducing mechanisms for augmenting natural attenuation to achieve site closure. Termed enhanced attenuation (EA), this approach has drawn its inspiration from the concept of monitored natural attenuation (MNA).

  11. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method.

  12. Ultrasound fields in attenuating media.

    PubMed

    Lerch, R; Friedrich, W

    1986-10-01

    For medical ultrasonic imaging and for nondestructive testing, the attenuation of pressure waves and the resulting shift in wave velocity are important features in commonly used transmission media such as biological tissue. An algorithm for the numerical evaluation of pressure field distributions generated by ultrasonic transducers is presented. The attenuation and dispersion of the sound transmission medium are taken into consideration. The sound fields are computed numerically for continuous wave as well as pulse excitation. The transducer has plane or gently curved geometry and is embedded in a plane rigid baffle. The numerically determined pressure fields are presented as 3D plots, as gray-scale images for a fixed time stamp (like a snapshot), or as isobars regarding the maximum values over time for each local point in the area under investigation. The algorithm described here can be utilized as a tool for design of ultrasound transducers, especially array antennas.

  13. Acetaminophen Attenuates Lipid Peroxidation in Children Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Scott A.; Zaccagni, Hayden; Bichell, David P.; Christian, Karla G.; Mettler, Bret A.; Donahue, Brian S.; Roberts, L. Jackson; Pretorius, Mias

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hemolysis, occurring during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), is associated with lipid peroxidation and postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI). Acetaminophen (ApAP) inhibits lipid peroxidation catalyzed by hemeproteins and in an animal model attenuated rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI. This pilot study tests the hypothesis that ApAP attenuates lipid peroxidation in children undergoing CPB. Design Single center prospective randomized double blinded study. Setting University-affiliated pediatric hospital. Patients Thirty children undergoing elective surgical correction of a congenital heart defect. Interventions Patients were randomized to ApAP (OFIRMEV® (acetaminophen) injection, Cadence Pharmaceuticals, San Diego, CA) or placebo every 6 hours for 4 doses starting before the onset of CPB. Measurement and Main Results Markers of hemolysis, lipid peroxidation (isofurans and F2-isoprostanes) and AKI were measured throughout the perioperative period. CPB was associated with a significant increase in free hemoglobin (from a pre-bypass level of 9.8±6.2 mg/dl to a peak of 201.5±42.6 mg/dl post-bypass). Plasma and urine isofuran and F2-isoprostane concentrations increased significantly during surgery. The magnitude of increase in plasma isofurans was greater than the magnitude in increase in plasma F2-isoprostanes. ApAP attenuated the increase in plasma isofurans compared to placebo (P=0.02 for effect of study drug). There was no significant effect of ApAP on plasma F2-isoprostanes or urinary makers of lipid peroxidation. ApAP did not affect postoperative creatinine, urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin or prevalence of AKI. Conclusion CPB in children is associated with hemolysis and lipid peroxidation. ApAP attenuated the increase in plasma isofuran concentrations. Future studies are needed to establish whether other therapies that attenuate or prevent the effects of free hemoglobin result in more effective inhibition of lipid peroxidation in patients

  14. Mapping Lateral Pn Attenuation Variation in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Phillips, W. S.; Randall, G. E.

    2009-12-01

    Pn travels most of its path in the uppermost mantle. Mapping of the lateral variation of Pn amplitude attenuation may shed light on the physical and chemical state, and dynamics of the upper mantle. In addition to material attenuation, Pn amplitudes are affected by other factors including the spherical shape of the Earth and Moho topography. In order to derive reliable Pn attenuation, we adopt a frequency-dependent Pn geometric-spreading model, which was designed to account for the effect of the Earth’s sphericity, to correct Pn amplitudes in preparation for attenuation estimation. We obtain physically reasonable attenuation estimates from Pn amplitudes corrected using the new spreading model. Pn amplitudes corrected using the traditional frequency-independent power-law spreading model, on the other hand, yield attenuation estimates that are either too large or negative. Using properly geometric-spreading corrected Pn amplitudes, we conducted attenuation tomography and developed 2D Pn attenuation models at multiple frequencies from 0.5 Hz to 8 Hz for Asia. Overall Pn attenuation patterns correlate, to some degree, with our current knowledge of the state of the upper mantle of the region. We see consistent low attenuation in cratonic regions and high attenuation along the western Pacific Ocean. The attenuation pattern in the Tibetan Plateau region seems to be frequency dependent with high attenuation around 1 Hz and low attenuation at 8 Hz. Application of the attenuation model to the nuclear-explosion discrimination problem leads to appreciable improvements of the discriminant compared with currently adopted method.

  15. Simulation of Transmission and Attenuation of Photons in a Labyrinth

    SciTech Connect

    Hudek, K.

    2004-09-03

    Neutrons travel through tunnels and ducts (labyrinths) according to curves that are universally applicable, regardless of labyrinth geometry or particle energy. Photons were believed to follow this manner, but this has been found not to be the case. Photons transmit through labyrinths with a definite functional dependence upon both particle energy and labyrinth geometry. In the first leg of a two-legged labyrinth, photons attenuate according to the function: Dose = 1/1 + A {center_dot} x{sup 2}. In the second leg, photons attenuate according to the function: Dose = 1/1 + B {center_dot} x{sup 3} in which A and B are functions of energy and labyrinth geometry, and x is a dimensionless unit of d/sqrt(a) in which d is the distance from the labyrinth mouth and a is the cross-sectional area. Dose is an attenuation factor. The A and B values have not been analyzed sufficiently to determine their functional dependence upon energy and cross-sectional area, however they have been tabularized which allows for interpolation of the data for use in calculations. These results were determined by simulating a mono-energetic beam incident upon a two-legged labyrinth with angular spread to cover the mouth. Work was begun on utilizing a real spectrum to determine a functional dependence by placing an iron target at the mouth of the labyrinth, and striking it with an electron beam. However, the techniques used to gather the mono-energetic beam data were not sufficient to effectively gather a complete set of real spectrum data and analyze its functionality.

  16. Dose optimization tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ornit; Braunstein, David; Altman, Ami

    2003-05-01

    A dose optimization tool for CT scanners is presented using patient raw data to calculate noise. The tool uses a single patient image which is modified for various lower doses. Dose optimization is carried out without extra measurements by interactively visualizing the dose-induced changes in this image. This tool can be used either off line, on existing image(s) or, as a pre - requisite for dose optimization for the specific patient, during the patient clinical study. The algorithm of low-dose simulation consists of reconstruction of two images from a single measurement and uses those images to create the various lower dose images. This algorithm enables fast simulation of various low dose (mAs) images on a real patient image.

  17. Neutron attenuation characteristics of polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and heavy aggregate concrete and mortars.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Majid, S; Othman, F

    1994-03-01

    Polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride pellets were introduced into concrete to improve its neutron attenuation characteristics while several types of heavy coarse aggregates were used to improve its gamma ray attenuation properties. Neutron and gamma ray attenuation were studied in concrete samples containing coarse aggregates of barite, pyrite, basalt, hematite, and marble as well as polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride pellets in narrow-beam geometry. The highest neutron attenuation was shown by polyethylene mortar, followed by polyvinyl chloride mortar; barite and pyrite concrete showed higher gamma ray attenuation than ordinary concrete. Broad-beam and continuous (infinite) medium geometries were used to study the neutron attenuation of samples containing polymers at different concentrations with and without heavy aggregates, the fitting equations were established, and from these the neutron removal coefficients were deduced. In a radiation field of neutrons and gamma rays, the appropriate concentration of polymer and heavy aggregate can be selected to give the optimum total dose attenuation depending on the relative intensities of each type of radiation. This would give much better design flexibility over ordinary concrete. The compressive strength tests performed on mortar and concrete samples showed that their value, in general, decreases as polymer concentration increases and that the polyvinyl chloride mortar showed higher values than the polyethylene mortar. For general construction purposes, the compression strength was considered acceptable in these samples.

  18. The effect of scatter and attenuation on aerosol deposition as determined by gamma scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Z; Berridge, M S; Nelson, A D; Heald, D L

    2001-01-01

    Gamma scintigraphy is often used to quantify deposition patterns from aerosol inhalers. The errors caused by scatter and tissue attenuation in planar Tc-99m gamma scintigraphy were investigated based on the data collected from four subjects in this study. Several error correction methods were tested. The results from two scatter correction methods, Jaszczak's method and factor analysis of dynamic sequences (FADS), were similar. Scatter accounted for 20% of raw data in the whole lung, 20% in the oropharynx, and 43% in the central airways and esophagus. Three attenuation correction methods were investigated and compared. These were: uniform attenuation correction (UAC), a known method used for inhalation drug imaging work; the broad-beam attenuation correction used for organ imaging in nuclear medicine; and a narrow-beam inhomogeneous tissue attenuation correction proposed in this study. The three methods differed significantly (p < 0.05), but all indicated that attenuation is a severe quantification problem. The narrow beam attenuation correction with scatter correction, showed that raw data underestimated tracer deposition by 44% in the lung, 137% in the oropharynx, and 153% in the trachea/esophageal region. To quantify aerosol lung deposition using planar scintigraphy even in relative terms, corrections are necessary. Much of the literature concerning quantified aerosol dose distributions measured by gamma scintigraphy needs to be interpreted carefully.

  19. Learning the language of abstinence in addiction treatment: some similarities between relapse-prevention with disulfiram, naltrexone, and other pharmacological antagonists and intensive "immersion" methods of foreign language teaching.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Colin; Streel, Emmannuel

    2003-09-01

    Relapse-prevention (RP) is an educational process. Learning to abstain from alcohol or opiates after years of dependence involves selectively suppressing old, maladaptive habits of thought and behavior and establishing new, adaptive ones. This process resembles foreign language (FL) learning. Effective FL teaching techniques are relevant to RP. "Immersion," the most effective FL teaching method, discourages students from using their first language ab initio, requiring them to use the FL instead, however inexpertly. It resembles exposure and response-prevention for phobic or compulsive disorders. Supervised disulfiram aids RP by discouraging alcoholics from responding to real-life drinking cues in the "language" of excessive drinking, requiring them, ab initio, to practice new, alcohol-free responses. Supervised or depot naltrexone acts similarly in opiate dependence. We discuss the concept of antagonist-assisted abstinence.

  20. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-04-01

    In this report we will show some new Q related seismic attributes on the Burlington-Seitel data set. One example will be called Energy Absorption Attribute (EAA) and is based on a spectral analysis. The EAA algorithm is designed to detect a sudden increase in the rate of exponential decay in the relatively higher frequency portion of the spectrum. In addition we will show results from a hybrid attribute that combines attenuation with relative acoustic impedance to give a better indication of commercial gas saturation.

  1. Cocaine attenuates vasoconstriction to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Bove, A.A.; Morley, D.; Vosacek, R.; Zhang, X.Y.; Shah, R. )

    1991-03-11

    The purpose of this study was to determine the combined effects of cocaine and ethanol on vasomotor tone. Using a standard isolated vascular ring preparation, 24 rings from 7 New Zealand White Rabbits were studied. All rings were denuded as verified by methacholine challenge. The dose response to NE for each ring was used as a standard for vasoconstrictors Dose response curves to ETH and C were done in random order. Concentrations of both ETH and C employed were physiologically attainable in man and below thresholds for coma or death. The dose response curve to ETH was repeated after addition of 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M C to the arterial bath. After adding 1,500 ug/ml of ETH, the dose response curve to C was repeated. Ethanol, alone caused significant vasoconstriction of arterial rings. After the addition of C to the bath, the dose response to ETH was significantly shifted to the right, peak contraction achieved was 36.6 {plus minus} 3.2% of maximal NE contraction. Cocaine alone did not result in any change in resting tension of the rings. When ETH was added to the bath, C caused vasoconstriction, the peak value equivalent to 12.5 {plus minus} 2.2% of maximal contraction to NE.

  2. Imaging Rayleigh wave attenuation with USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xueyang; Dalton, Colleen A.; Jin, Ge; Gaherty, James B.; Shen, Yang

    2016-07-01

    The EarthScope USArray provides an opportunity to obtain detailed images of the continental upper mantle at an unprecedented scale. The majority of mantle models derived from USArray data to date contain spatial variations in seismic-wave speed; however, in many cases these data sets do not by themselves allow a non-unique interpretation. Joint interpretation of seismic attenuation and velocity models can improve upon the interpretations based only on velocity and provide important constraints on the temperature, composition, melt content, and volatile content of the mantle. The surface wave amplitudes that constrain upper-mantle attenuation are sensitive to factors in addition to attenuation, including the earthquake source excitation, focusing and defocusing by elastic structure, and local site amplification. Because of the difficulty of isolating attenuation from these other factors, little is known about the attenuation structure of the North American upper mantle. In this study, Rayleigh wave traveltime and amplitude in the period range 25-100 s are measured using an interstation cross-correlation technique, which takes advantage of waveform similarity at nearby stations. Several estimates of Rayleigh wave attenuation and site amplification are generated at each period, using different approaches to separate the effects of attenuation and local site amplification on amplitude. It is assumed that focusing and defocusing effects can be described by the Laplacian of the traveltime field. All approaches identify the same large-scale patterns in attenuation, including areas where the attenuation values are likely contaminated by unmodelled focusing and defocusing effects. Regionally averaged attenuation maps are constructed after removal of the contaminated attenuation values, and the variations in intrinsic shear attenuation that are suggested by these Rayleigh wave attenuation maps are explored.

  3. Antibody Response to Live Attenuated Vaccines in Adults in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama-Nakamura, Fukumi; Sugata-Tsubaki, Aiko; Yamada, Yutaka; Uno, Kenji; Kasahara, Kei; Maeda, Koichi; Konishi, Mitsuru; Mikasa, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy rendered with a single dose of live attenuated measles, rubella, mumps, and varicella containing vaccine. We inoculated healthcare workers (HCWs) with a single dose of vaccine to a disease lacking in antibody titer for those not meeting the criteria of our hospital (measles: <16.0 (IgG enzyme immunoassay (EIA)), rubella: ≤1:32 (hemagglutination-inhibition), mumps: <4.0 (IgG EIA), and varicella: <4.0 (IgG EIA)). At 28–60 days after vaccination, the antibody titer was tested again. We included 48 HCWs. A total of 32, 15, 31, and 10 individuals were inoculated with a single dose of measles-containing, rubella-containing, mumps, or varicella vaccine, respectively, and showed significant antibody elevation (9.2 ± 12.3 to 27.6 ± 215.6, p<0.001; 8 ± 1.2 to 32 ± 65.5, p<0.001; 3.0 ± 1.0 to 13.1 ± 8.6, p<0.05; and 2.6 ± 1.3 to 11.8 ± 8.1, p<0.001, respectively). Major side effects were not observed. In a limited population, a single dose of live attenuated vaccine showed elevation of antibody titer without any severe adverse reactions. However, whether the post-vaccination response rate criteria of our university was fulfilled could not be determined owing to limited sample size. PMID:28352840

  4. Live attenuated hepatitis A vaccines developed in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Two live, attenuated hepatitis A vaccines, H 2 and LA-1 virus strains, were developed through serial passages of the viruses in cell cultures at 32 °C and 35 °C respectively. Both vaccines were safe and immunogenic, providing protection against clinical hepatitis A in 95% of the vaccinees, with a single dose by subcutaneous injection. The vaccine recipients were not protected from asymptomatic, subclinical hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, which induced a similar antibody response as for unvaccinated subjects. A second dose caused anamnestic response and can be used for boosting. Oral immunization of human with H 2 vaccine or of marmoset with LA-1 vaccine failed, and no evidence was found for person-to-person transmission of the H 2 strain or for marmoset-to-marmoset transmission of LA-1 strain, by close contact. H 2 strain was genetically stable when passaged in marmosets, humans or cell cultures at 37 °C; 3 consecutive passages of the virus in marmosets did not cause virulence mutation. The live vaccines offer the benefits of low cost, single dose injection, long- term protection, and increased duration of immunity through subclinical infection. Improved sanitation and administration of 150 million doses of the live vaccines to children had led to a 90% reduction in the annual national incidence rate of hepatitis A in China during the 16-year period, from 1991 to 2006. Hepatitis A immunization with both live and inactivated HA vaccines was implemented in the national routine childhood immunization program in 2008 and around 92% of the 16 million annual births received the affordable live, attenuated vaccines at 18 months of age. Near elimination of the disease was achieved in China for 14 years following introduction of the H 2 live vaccine into the Expanded Immunization Program (EPI) in 1992.

  5. Plasmodium yoelii: induction of attenuated mutants by irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Waki, S.; Yonome, I.; Suzuki, M.

    1986-12-01

    When erythrocytic forms of Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis, which is invariably fatal in mice, were exposed to X rays, the dose to reduce surviving parasites to one millionth was 100 gray (10 Krad). A suspension of 5 X 10(6) per ml of parasitized erythrocyte was irradiated at 100 gray, and 0.2 ml aliquots were inoculated into 22 mice. Eleven mice showed patent parasitemia, and in these the growth curves were less steep than that found in nonirradiated parasites. The infections of 8 mice of the 11 were self-resolving, and the attenuated feature of the parasites maintained following a limited number of blood passages. The parasites were slowly growing even in nude mice and cause self-resolving infections in intact mice. BALB/c mice immunized with the attenuated parasites were protected against subsequent challenge infections with the original virulent erythrocytic and sporogonic forms. These findings indicate that attenuated mutants of malaria parasites can be readily induced by this method.

  6. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-12-01

    We have developed and tested technology for a new type of direct hydrocarbon detection. The method uses inelastic rock properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic methods to the presence of oil and gas saturation. These methods include use of energy absorption, dispersion, and attenuation (Q) along with traditional seismic attributes like velocity, impedance, and AVO. Our approach is to combine three elements: (1) a synthesis of the latest rock physics understanding of how rock inelasticity is related to rock type, pore fluid types, and pore microstructure, (2) synthetic seismic modeling that will help identify the relative contributions of scattering and intrinsic inelasticity to apparent Q attributes, and (3) robust algorithms that extract relative wave attenuation attributes from seismic data. This project provides: (1) Additional petrophysical insight from acquired data; (2) Increased understanding of rock and fluid properties; (3) New techniques to measure reservoir properties that are not currently available; and (4) Provide tools to more accurately describe the reservoir and predict oil location and volumes. These methodologies will improve the industry's ability to predict and quantify oil and gas saturation distribution, and to apply this information through geologic models to enhance reservoir simulation. We have applied for two separate patents relating to work that was completed as part of this project.

  7. Safety of Japanese encephalitis live attenuated vaccination in post-marketing surveillance in Guangdong, China, 2005-2012.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Lin, Hualiang; Zhu, Qi; Wu, Chenggang; Zhao, Zhanjie; Zheng, Huizhen

    2014-03-26

    We reviewed the adverse events following immunization of live attenuated Japanese encephalitis vaccine in Guangdong Province, China. During the period of 2005-2012, 23 million doses of live attenuated Japanese encephalitis vaccine were used and 1426 adverse events were reported (61.24 per million doses); of which, 570 (40%) were classified as allergic reactions (24.48 per million doses), 31 (2%) were neurologic events (1.33 per million doses), and 36 (2.5%) were diagnosed as serious adverse events (1.55 per million doses). This study suggests that the JEV-L has a reasonable safety profile, most adverse events are relatively mild, with relatively rare neurologic events being observed.

  8. A review of immunogenicity and tolerability of live attenuated Hepatitis A vaccine in children

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sameer; Mao, J. S.; Motlekar, Salman; Fangcheng, Zhuang; Kadhe, Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Changing epidemiology of Hepatitis A virus (HAV) has led to an increased susceptibility of adolescents and adults to the infection. Vaccination can remarkably reduce the incidence and associated morbidity of HAV infection. This review is focused on the safety and efficacy of H2 strain derived live attenuated Hepatitis A vaccine. We found the vaccine to be highly immunogenic with minimal or negligible safety issues. Moreover, a single dose of live attenuated vaccine persists a long term immune response and can be a preferred option for developing countries. In 2014, Indian Academy of Paediatrics (IAP) also updated their recommendations for H2 vaccine as a single dose as against the previous 2 dose schedule. A focused approach to include the vaccine in national immunization program should be explored. PMID:27532370

  9. Calculation Of Pneumatic Attenuation In Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    Errors caused by attenuation of air-pressure waves in narrow tubes calculated by method based on fundamental equations of flow. Changes in ambient pressure transmitted along narrow tube to sensor. Attenuation of high-frequency components of pressure wave calculated from wave equation derived from Navier-Stokes equations of viscous flow in tube. Developed to understand and compensate for frictional attenuation in narrow tubes used to connect aircraft pressure sensors with pressure taps on affected surfaces.

  10. Global Attenuation Model of the Upper Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adenis, A.; Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present a three-dimensional shear attenuation model based on a massive surface wave data-set (372,629 Rayleigh waveforms analysed in the period range 50-300s by Debayle and Ricard, 2012). For each seismogram, this approach yields depth-dependent path average models of shear velocity and quality factor, and a set of fundamental and higher-mode dispersion and attenuation curves. We combine these attenuation measurements in a tomographic inversion after a careful rejection of the noisy data. We first remove data likely to be biased by a poor knowledge of the source. Then we assume that waves corresponding to events having close epicenters and recorded at the same station sample the same elastic and anelastic structure, we cluster the corresponding rays and average the attenuation measurements. Logarithms of the attenuations are regionalized using the non-linear east square formalism of Tarantola and Valette (1982), resulting in attenuation tomographic maps between 50s and 300s. After a first inversion, outlyers are rejected and a second inversion yields a moderate variance reduction of about 20%. We correct the attenuation curves for focusing effect using the linearized ray theory of Woodhouse and Wong (1986). Accounting for focussing effects allows building tomographic maps with variance reductions reaching 40%. In the period range 120-200s, the root mean square of the model perturbations increases from about 5% to 20%. Our 3-D attenuation models present strong agreement with surface tectonics at period lower than 200s. Areas of low attenuation are located under continents and areas of high attenuation are associated with oceans. Surprisingly, although mid oceanic ridges are located in attenuating regions, their signature, even if enhanced by focusing corrections, remains weaker than in the shear velocity models. Synthetic tests suggests that regularisation contributes to damp the attenuation signature of ridges, which could therefore be underestimated.

  11. General relationships between ultrasonic attenuation and dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonnell, M.; Jaynes, E. T.; Miller, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    General relationships between the ultrasonic attenuation and dispersion are presented. The validity of these nonlocal relationships hinges only on the properties of causality and linearity, and does not depend upon details of the mechanism responsible for the attenuation and dispersion. Approximate, nearly local relationships are presented and are demonstrated to predict accurately the ultrasonic dispersion in solutions of hemoglobin from the results of attenuation measurements.

  12. Ocular Safety of Topical Naltrexone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    prescription medicines, vitamins and herbal supplements . Especially tell your doctor if you take any opioid-containing medicines for pain, cough, or...control media supplemented with an equal volume of water. NTX accelerates the rate of epithelial migration by 21% to 89% during the period 24 to 96...whereas all of the control corneas are not healed until 168 hours. Conversely, supplementation of culture medium with 10-6 M OGF delays wound healing

  13. Optimal ultrasonic array focusing in attenuative media.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, A; Gao, R X; Liang, K; Jundt, J

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a parametric study on the efficiency of ultrasound focusing in an attenuative medium, using phased arrays. Specifically, an analytical model of ultrasound wave focusing in a homogeneous, isotropic and attenuative fluid with point sources is presented. Calculations based on the model have shown that in an attenuative medium, an optimum frequency exists for the best focusing performance for a particular size of aperture and focal distance. The effect of different f numbers on the focusing performance in the attenuative medium is further investigated. The information obtained from the analytical model provides insights into the design and installation of a phased transducer array for energy efficient wave focusing.

  14. Differential dust attenuation in CALIFA galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vale Asari, N.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Amorim, A. L.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; Schlickmann, M.; Wild, V.; Kennicutt, R. C.

    2016-06-01

    Dust attenuation has long been treated as a simple parameter in SED fitting. Real galaxies are, however, much more complicated: The measured dust attenuation is not a simple function of the dust optical depth, but depends strongly on galaxy inclination and the relative distribution of stars and dust. We study the nebular and stellar dust attenuation in CALIFA galaxies, and propose some empirical recipes to make the dust treatment more realistic in spectral synthesis codes. By adding optical recombination emission lines, we find better constraints for differential attenuation. Those recipes can be applied to unresolved galaxy spectra, and lead to better recovered star formation rates.

  15. Neutron dose equivalent meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Casson, William H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.; Kleck, Jeffrey H.; Beverding, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

  16. Ceftriaxone attenuates cocaine relapse after abstinence through modulation of nucleus accumbens AMPA subunit expression.

    PubMed

    LaCrosse, Amber L; Hill, Kristine; Knackstedt, Lori A

    2016-02-01

    Using the extinction-reinstatement model of cocaine relapse, we and others have demonstrated that the antibiotic ceftriaxone attenuates cue- and cocaine-primed reinstatement of cocaine-seeking. Reinstatement is contingent on the release of glutamate in the nucleus accumbens core (NAc) and manipulations that reduce glutamate efflux or block post-synaptic glutamate receptors attenuate reinstatement. We have demonstrated that the mechanism of action by which ceftriaxone attenuates reinstatement involves increased NAc GLT-1 expression and a reduction in NAc glutamate efflux during reinstatement. Here we investigated the effects of ceftriaxone (100 and 200 mg/kg) on context-primed relapse following abstinence without extinction training and examined the effects of ceftriaxone on GluA1, GluA2 and GLT-1 expression. We conducted microdialysis during relapse to determine if an increase in NAc glutamate accompanies relapse after abstinence and whether ceftriaxone blunts glutamate efflux. We found that both doses of ceftriaxone attenuated relapse. While relapse was accompanied by an increase in NAc glutamate, ceftriaxone (200 mg/kg) was unable to significantly reduce NAc glutamate efflux during relapse despite its ability to upregulate GLT-1. GluA1 was reduced in the NAc by both doses of ceftriaxone while GluA2 expression was unchanged, indicating that ceftriaxone altered AMPA subunit composition following cocaine. Finally, GLT-1 was not altered in the PFC by ceftriaxone. These results indicate that it is possible to attenuate context-primed relapse to cocaine-seeking through modification of post-synaptic receptor properties without attenuating glutamate efflux during relapse. Furthermore, increasing NAc GLT-1 protein expression is not sufficient to attenuate glutamate efflux.

  17. Ultrasonic attenuation in molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Bernard

    1981-11-01

    It is now well established from an experimental point of view that, concerning the ultrasonic attenuation, molecular crystals exhibit a specific behavior among dielectric crystals. This fact suggests the presence of a relaxation process. Liebermann, who has introduced this field, has proposed a way to analyze this problem and in particular has given an expression for the ultrasonic absorption coefficient in terms of a relaxation time and some thermodynamic quantities. In contrast to Liebermann's approach, a solid-state viewpoint is presented here, and it is shown that this ultrasonic relaxation can be taken into account in the framework of Akhieser's theory. A general expression of the ultrasonic absorption coefficient is calculated in terms of the phonon collision operator using the Boltzmann-equation approach of Woodruff and Ehrenreich. The collision-time approximation widely used in dielectric crystals fails in molecular crystals for which the presence of slow relaxation times in the collision operator prevents the thermalization of the whole set of phonons and gives rise to an ultrasonic relaxation. Thus a more suitable approximation is suggested here, which leads to a new expression of the ultrasonic attenuation valid in molecular crystals. Different forms of this expression are discussed, and comparison with Liebermann's expression used in most of the previous papers shows that the present treatment takes better account of the anisotropy of the solid state. The fit of experimental results obtained for some ionic-molecular crystals also shows that the expression derived here gives better agreement than does Liebermann's. Finally, it is shown that in the framework of the present treatment and under rather general conditions, the anisotropy affects primarily the magnitude of the ultrasonic absorption due to the molecular relaxation, but it does not affect its frequency dependence.

  18. Research on reducing radiation exposure for clinical applications of X-ray attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Min-Cheol; Han, Man-Seok; So, Woon-Young; Lee, Hyeon-Guck; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Lee, Seung-Yeol

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed at identifing areas with low radiation exposure where workers could be taken in the examination room in case that they had to hold the patients by estimating the attenuation of primary radiation and measuring the spatial distribution of scattered radiation. The laboratory equipment included on the X-ray generator, a phantom (human phantom), and a dosimeter. The experiment measured the performance of the examination system (dose reproducibility), the dose of primary radiation (X-rays), and the dose of scattered radiation (secondary radiation). Both the primary and the scattered radiation were attenuated by a factor of tube in vacuum experimental tests of the inverse square law. In this study, the attenuation was 2 ˜ 2.246 for primary radiation and 2 ˜ 2.105 for secondary radiation. Natural attenuation occurred as the X-rays passed through air, and an attenuation equation was established in this study. The equation for primary radiation (1st dose) was y = A1* exp(- x/t1)+ y0. The high-intensity contour of the direction for the cathode was wider than that of the direction for the anode, showing a wide range on the rear side of the cathode and on the rear side of the anode. We tried to find the positions where the workers' radiation exposure could be reduced. When the medical radiation workers have to hold the patient for an abdominal examination, they should be placed towards the tube anode and on the left side of the patient. For a lumbar-spine lateral examination, they should be placed towards the tube anode and behind the patient, and for a femur AP (anterior-posterior) examination, they should be placed towards the tube anode and on the right side of the patient.

  19. Experimental investigation of the factors influencing temperature dependence of radiation-induced attenuation in optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jing; Xu, Raomei; Liu, Jixun; Song, Ningfang

    2014-03-01

    The effects of transmission wavelength, total dose and light source power on temperature dependence of radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) in Ge-P co-doped fibers were investigated. Three fibers irradiated up to total dose of 100 Gy and 10,000 Gy were used as test samples. A test system for temperature dependence of RIA was built up. The influence of transmission wavelength, total dose and light power on temperature sensitivity and linearity of RIA in three irradiated fibers were researched. The test results show that temperature sensitivity and linearity of RIA in optical fibers could be improved by adjusting total dose and selecting transmission wavelength. The light source power does not have obvious influence on temperature sensitivity and linearity. The Ge-P co-doped fiber at 850 nm transmission wavelength with higher total dose is a very promising candidate for fiber-optic temperature sensor.

  20. LONG TERM MONITORING FOR NATURAL ATTENUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have good statistical methods to: (1) determine whether concentrations of a contaminant are attenuating over time, (2) determine the rate of attenuation and confidence interval on the rate, and (3) determine whether concentrations have met a particular clean up goal. We do no...

  1. SU-E-T-151: Enhanced Radiation Attenuation with Multi-Layer Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Warmington, L; Watanabe, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of increasing the number of thin high Z foils on the dose enhancement and the overall radiation attenuation with a 24MV photon beam. Methods: DOSXYZnrc was used to perform Monte Carlo simulations of multi-layer lead foil configurations. The foil size was 7cm x 7cm. and the foil thickness was adjusted to give a combined thickness of 1mm. The number of foils used was 4, 6, 8, and 10. The separation between foils was also varied from 3 to 9 mm. The Mohan 24MV energy spectrum was used as a photon source. The field size was 5cm x 5cm and SSD was 100 cm. The phantom size was 16cm × 16cm × 28cm. The number of histories ranged from 1 to 2 billion. The percentage difference of the dose between the medium with foils and the homogeneous water was computed along the beam axis. The minimum dose enhancement and the change of integrated dose between the foils were determined. Results: Increasing the number of foils resulted in a decrease in the minimum dose enhancement. The highest dose region occurred in the last section for the 4 and 6 foil cases, whereas the 8 and 10 foil configurations showed the maximum dose region towards the center of the foil group. Increasing the number of foils increased the total integrated dose between foils. For example, the total integrated dose increase between the first and the last foils with a 3mm foil separation were 34.2, 43.4, 57.4, and 64.7% for 4, 6, 8 and 10 foils, respectively. Conclusion: This work showed the degree of dose enhancement around multiple thin lead foils. The results suggest that the total attenuation of photon beam can be increased by increasing the number of foils with a fixed total foil thickness.

  2. Nifedipine attenuation of abdominal aortic aneurysm in hypertensive and non-hypertensive mice: Mechanisms and implications.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiao Niu; Siu, Kin Lung; Cai, Hua

    2015-10-01

    Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a lethal event. No oral medicine has been available to prevent or treat AAA. We have recently identified a novel mechanism of eNOS uncoupling by which AAA develops, in angiotensin II (Ang II) infused hyperphenylalaninemia 1 (hph-1) mice. Using this unique model we investigated effects on AAA formation of the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine, in view of the unclear relationship between hypertension and AAA, and unclear mechanisms of aneurysm protective effects of some blood pressure lowering drugs. Six-month old hph-1 mice were infused with Ang II (0.7 mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks, and fed nifedipine chow at two different doses (5 and 20 mg/kg/day). While the high dose of nifedipine reduced blood pressure, the lower dose had no effect. Interestingly, the incidence rate of AAA dropped from 71% to 7 and 12.5% for low and high dose nifedipine, respectively. Expansion of abdominal aorta, determined by ultrasound imaging, was abolished by both doses of nifedipine, which recoupled eNOS completely to improve NO bioavailability. Both also abrogated aortic superoxide production. Of note, Ang II activation of NADPH oxidase in vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, known to uncouple eNOS, was also attenuated by nifedipine. Although low dose was a sub-pressor while the high dose reduced blood pressure via inhibition of calcium channels, both doses were highly effective in preventing AAA by preserving eNOS coupling activity to eliminate sustained oxidative stress from uncoupled eNOS. These data demonstrate that oral treatment of nifedipine is highly effective in preserving eNOS function to attenuate AAA formation. Nifedipine may be used for AAA prevention either at low dose in AAA risk group, or at high dose in patients with co-existing hypertension.

  3. Nifedipine Attenuation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Hypertensive and non-Hypertensive Mice: Mechanisms and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xiao Niu; Siu, Kin Lung; Cai, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a lethal event. No oral medicine has been available to prevent or treat AAA. We have recently identified a novel mechanism of eNOS uncoupling by which AAA develops, in Angiotensin II (Ang II) infused hyperphenylalaninemia 1 (hph-1) mice. Using this unique model we investigated effects on AAA formation of the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine, in view of the unclear relationship between hypertension and AAA, and unclear mechanisms of aneurysm protective effects of some blood pressure lowering drugs. Six-month old hph-1 mice were infused with Ang II (0.7 mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks, and fed nifedipine chow at two different doses (5 and 20 mg/kg/day). While the high dose of nifedipine reduced blood pressure, the lower dose had no effect. Interestingly, the incidence rate of AAA dropped from 71% to 7 and 12.5% for low and high dose nifedipine, respectively. Expansion of abdominal aorta, determined by ultrasound imaging, was abolished by both doses of nifedipine, which recoupled eNOS completely to improve NO bioavailability. Both also abrogated aortic superoxide production. Of note, Ang II activation of NADPH oxidase in vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, known to uncouple eNOS, was also attenuated by nifedipine. Although low dose was a sub-pressor while the high dose reduced blood pressure via inhibition of calcium channels, both doses were highly effective in preventing AAA by preserving eNOS coupling activity to eliminate sustained oxidative stress from uncoupled eNOS. These data demonstrate that oral treatment of nifedipine is highly effective in preserving eNOS function to attenuate AAA formation. Nifedipine may be used for AAA prevention either at low dose to AAA risk group, or at high dose to patients with co-existing hypertension. PMID:26254182

  4. Patient-specific dose calculation methods for high-dose-rate iridium-192 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Emily S.

    In high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, the radiation dose received by the patient is calculated according to the AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) formalism. This table-based dose superposition method uses dosimetry parameters derived with the radioactive 192Ir source centered in a water phantom. It neglects the dose perturbations caused by inhomogeneities, such as the patient anatomy, applicators, shielding, and radiographic contrast solution. In this work, we evaluated the dosimetric characteristics of a shielded rectal applicator with an endocavitary balloon injected with contrast solution. The dose distributions around this applicator were calculated by the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code and measured by ionization chamber and GAFCHROMIC EBT film. A patient-specific dose calculation study was then carried out for 40 rectal treatment plans. The PTRAN_CT MC code was used to calculate the dose based on computed tomography (CT) images. This study involved the development of BrachyGUI, an integrated treatment planning tool that can process DICOM-RT data and create PTRAN_CT input initialization files. BrachyGUI also comes with dose calculation and evaluation capabilities. We proposed a novel scatter correction method to account for the reduction in backscatter radiation near tissue-air interfaces. The first step requires calculating the doses contributed by primary and scattered photons separately, assuming a full scatter environment. The scatter dose in the patient is subsequently adjusted using a factor derived by MC calculations, which depends on the distances between the point of interest, the 192Ir source, and the body contour. The method was validated for multicatheter breast brachytherapy, in which the target and skin doses for 18 patient plans agreed with PTRAN_CT calculations better than 1%. Finally, we developed a CT-based analytical dose calculation method. It corrects for the photon attenuation and scatter based upon the radiological paths determined by ray tracing

  5. Calculation of effective dose.

    PubMed

    McCollough, C H; Schueler, B A

    2000-05-01

    The concept of "effective dose" was introduced in 1975 to provide a mechanism for assessing the radiation detriment from partial body irradiations in terms of data derived from whole body irradiations. The effective dose is the mean absorbed dose from a uniform whole-body irradiation that results in the same total radiation detriment as from the nonuniform, partial-body irradiation in question. The effective dose is calculated as the weighted average of the mean absorbed dose to the various body organs and tissues, where the weighting factor is the radiation detriment for a given organ (from a whole-body irradiation) as a fraction of the total radiation detriment. In this review, effective dose equivalent and effective dose, as established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 1977 and 1990, respectively, are defined and various methods of calculating these quantities are presented for radionuclides, radiography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography and mammography. In order to calculate either quantity, it is first necessary to estimate the radiation dose to individual organs. One common method of determining organ doses is through Monte Carlo simulations of photon interactions within a simplified mathematical model of the human body. Several groups have performed these calculations and published their results in the form of data tables of organ dose per unit activity or exposure. These data tables are specified according to particular examination parameters, such as radiopharmaceutical, x-ray projection, x-ray beam energy spectra or patient size. Sources of these organ dose conversion coefficients are presented and differences between them are examined. The estimates of effective dose equivalent or effective dose calculated using these data, although not intended to describe the dose to an individual, can be used as a relative measure of stochastic radiation detriment. The calculated values, in units of sievert (or rem), indicate the amount of

  6. Beam Attenuators and the Risk of Unrecognized Large-Fraction Irradiation of Critical Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Luka, S.; Marks, J.E.

    2015-01-15

    The use of radiation beam attenuators led to radiation injury of the spinal cord in one patient and of the peripheral nerve in another due to unsuspected large-fraction irradiation. The anatomic distribution of radiation dose was reconstructed in the sagittal plane for the patient who developed radiation myelopathy and in the axial plane for the patient who developed peripheral neuropathy. The actual dose delivered to the injured structure in each patient was taken from the dose distribution and recorded along with the time, number of fractions, and dose per fraction. The patient who developed radiation myelopathy received a total of 46.5 Gy in twenty-three 2.1 Gy fractions in 31 days to the upper cervical spinal cord where the thickness of the neck was less than the central axis thickness due to cervical lordosis and absence of a posterior compensating filter. The patient who developed peripheral neuropathy received 55 Gy in twenty-five 2.2 Gy fractions in 50 days to the femoral nerve using bolus over the groins and an anterior one-half value layer Cerrobend pelvic block to bias the dose anteriorly. Compensating filters and other beam attenuators should be used with caution because they may result in unsuspected large-fraction irradiation and total doses of radiation that exceed the tolerance of critical structures.

  7. Hormetic Effect of Berberine Attenuates the Anticancer Activity of Chemotherapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiaolin; Huang, Borong; Zou, Lidi; Chen, Shenghui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jian-Bo; Su, Huanxing; Wang, Yitao; He, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of biphasic dose response characterized by exhibiting stimulatory or beneficial effects at low doses and inhibitory or toxic effects at high doses. Increasing numbers of chemicals of various types have been shown to induce apparent hormetic effect on cancer cells. However, the underlying significance and mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Berberine, one of the major active components of Rhizoma coptidis, has been manifested with notable anticancer activities. This study aims to investigate the hormetic effect of berberine and its influence on the anticancer activities of chemotherapeutic agents. Our results demonstrated that berberine at low dose range (1.25 ~ 5 μM) promoted cell proliferation to 112% ~170% of the untreated control in various cancer cells, while berberine at high dose rage (10 ~ 80 μM) inhibited cell proliferation. Further, we observed that co-treatment with low dose berberine could significantly attenuate the anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic agents, including fluorouracil (5-FU), camptothecin (CPT), and paclitaxel (TAX). The hormetic effect and thereby the attenuated anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic drugs by berberine may attributable to the activated protective stress response in cancer cells triggered by berberine, as evidenced by up-regulated MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These results provided important information to understand the potential side effects of hormesis, and suggested cautious application of natural compounds and relevant herbs in adjuvant treatment of cancer.

  8. Cerebrolysin attenuates cerebral and hepatic injury due to lipopolysaccharide in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, O M E; Omara, E A; Mohammed, N A; Youness, E R; Khadrawy, Y A; Sleem, A A

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of cerebrolysin on oxidative stress in the brain and liver during systemic inflammation. Rats were intraperitoneally challenged with a single subseptic dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 300 μg/kg) without or with cerebrolysin at doses of 21.5, 43 or 86 mg/kg. After 4 h, rats were euthanized and the brain and liver tissues were subjected to biochemical and histopathological analyses. Cerebrolysin revealed inhibitory effects on the elevation of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide induced by LPS. In contrast, the decrease in reduced glutathione level and paraoxonase activity induced by LPS was attenuated by an injection of cerebrolysin in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, cerebrolysin reduced LPS-induced activation of brain NF-κB and reversed LPS-induced decline of brain butyrylcholinesterase and acetylcholinesterase activities in a dose-dependent manner. Histopathological analyses revealed that neuronal damage and liver necrosis induced by LPS were ameliorated by cerebrolysin dose-dependently. Cerebrolysin treatment dose-dependently attenuated LPS-induced expressions in cyclooxygenase 2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and caspase-3 in the cortex or striatum as well as the liver. These results suggest that cerebrolysin treatment might have beneficial therapeutic effects in cerebral inflammation. Cerebrolysin might also prove of value in liver disease and this possibility requires further exploration.

  9. Curcumin Mediated Attenuation of Carbofuran Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Ashish; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Sharma, Bechan

    2016-01-01

    The indiscriminate use of carbofuran to improve crop productivity causes adverse effects in nontargets including mammalian systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate carbofuran induced oxidative stress in rat brain stem and its attenuation by curcumin, a herbal product. Out of 6 groups of rats, 2 groups received two different doses of carbofuran, that is, 15 and 30% of LD50, respectively, for 30 days. Out of these, 2 groups receiving same doses of carbofuran were pretreated with curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight). The levels of antioxidants, TBARS, GSH, SOD, catalase, and GST were determined in rat brain stem. The 2 remaining groups served as placebo and curcumin treated, respectively. The data suggested that carbofuran at different doses caused significant alterations in the levels of TBARS and GSH in dose dependent manner. The TBARS and GSH contents were elevated. The activities of SOD, catalase, and GST were significantly inhibited at both doses of carbofuran. The ratio of P/A was also found to be sharply increased. The pretreatment of curcumin exhibited significant protection from carbofuran induced toxicity. The results suggested that carbofuran at sublethal doses was able to induce oxidative stress in rat brain which could be attenuated by curcumin. PMID:27213055

  10. Absorbed Dose in the Uterus of a Three Months Pregnant Woman Due to 131I

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene; Manzanares-Acuna, Eduardo; Hernandez-Davila, Victor Martin; Arcos-Pichardo, Areli; Barquero, Raquel; Iniguez, M. Pilar

    2006-09-08

    The use of 131I is widely used in diagnostic and treatment of patients. If the patient is pregnant the 131I presence in the thyroid it becomes a source of constant exposition to other organs and the fetus. In this study the absorbed dose in the uterus of a 3 months pregnant woman with 131I in her thyroid gland has been calculated. The dose was determined using Monte Carlo methods in which a detailed model of the woman has been developed. The dose was also calculated using a simple procedure that was refined including the photons' attenuation in the woman organs and body. To verify these results an experiment was carried out using a neck phantom with 131I. Comparing the results it was found that the simple calculation tend to overestimate the absorbed dose, by doing the corrections due to body and organs photon attenuation the dose is 0.14 times the Monte Carlo estimation.

  11. Absorbed Dose in the Uterus of a Three Months Pregnant Woman Due to 131I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; Manzanares-Acuña, Eduardo; Hernández-Dávila, Víctor Martín; Arcos-Pichardo, Areli; Barquero, Raquel; Iñiguez, M. Pilar

    2006-09-01

    The use of 131I is widely used in diagnostic and treatment of patients. If the patient is pregnant the 131I presence in the thyroid it becomes a source of constant exposition to other organs and the fetus. In this study the absorbed dose in the uterus of a 3 months pregnant woman with 131I in her thyroid gland has been calculated. The dose was determined using Monte Carlo methods in which a detailed model of the woman has been developed. The dose was also calculated using a simple procedure that was refined including the photons' attenuation in the woman organs and body. To verify these results an experiment was carried out using a neck phantom with 131I. Comparing the results it was found that the simple calculation tend to overestimate the absorbed dose, by doing the corrections due to body and organs photon attenuation the dose is 0.14 times the Monte Carlo estimation.

  12. Strategies to reduce radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung Hsin; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Wu, Jay; S. P. Mok, Greta; Yang, Ching-Ching; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to investigate CT dose reduction strategies on a hybrid PET/CT scanner for cardiac applications.MaterialsImage quality and dose estimation of different CT scanning protocols for CT coronary angiography (CTCA), and CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging were investigated. Fifteen patients underwent CTCA, perfusion PET imaging at rest and under stress, and FDG PET for myocardial viability. These patients were divided into three groups based on the CTCA technique performed: retrospectively gated helical (RGH), ECG tube current modulation (ETCM), and prospective gated axial (PGA) acquisitions. All emission images were corrected for photon attenuation using CT images obtained by default setting and an ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) scan.ResultsRadiation dose in RGH technique was 22.2±4.0 mSv. It was reduced to 10.95±0.82 and 4.13±0.31 mSv using ETCM and PGA techniques, respectively. Radiation dose in CT transmission scan was reduced by 96.5% (from 4.53±0.5 to 0.16±0.01 mSv) when applying ULDCT as compared to the default CT. No significant difference in terms of image quality was found among various protocols.ConclusionThe proposed CT scanning strategies, i.e. ETCM or PGA for CTCA and ULDCT for PET attenuation correction, could reduce radiation dose up to 47% without degrading imaging quality in an integrated cardiac PET/CT coronary artery examination.

  13. Nitrogen narcosis attenuates shivering thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mekjavić, I B; Savić, S A; Eiken, O

    1995-06-01

    Thermoregulatory responses of eight healthy subjects (six men and two women) were compared when they were head-out immersed in 15 degrees C water at both 1 and 6 ATA. Both trials were conducted in a hyperbaric chamber. During the immersions, esophageal temperature (T(es)) and skin temperature at two sites (chest and calf) were recorded at minute intervals. Oxygen uptake was determined at 5-min intervals with the Douglas bag method. The order of the two trials was alternated. The rate of T(es) cooling was greater during the 6-ATA trial [2.1 +/- 0.5 degrees C/h (SE)] than during the 1-ATA trial (1.3 +/- 0.5 degrees C/h; P < 0.01). Despite the greater rate of core cooling, and presumably a greater thermal drive for shivering, the oxygen uptake response for a similar decrement in T(es) was lower during exposure to 6 than to 1 ATA (P < 0.05). Also, for similar displacement in T(es), the subjects perceived the immersions at 6 ATA to be less cold than those at 1 ATA (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the development of hypothermia in compressed-air divers may be due, in large part, to the attenuation of heat production and cold perception. Most likely, the observed effects on the autonomic responses and thermal perception are due to an inhibitory action of hyperbaric nitrogen on central neural structures involved in temperature regulation.

  14. Filtered back-projection reconstruction for attenuation proton CT along most likely paths.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, C T; Létang, J M; Rit, S

    2016-05-07

    This work investigates the attenuation of a proton beam to reconstruct the map of the linear attenuation coefficient of a material which is mainly caused by the inelastic interactions of protons with matter. Attenuation proton computed tomography (pCT) suffers from a poor spatial resolution due to multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) of protons in matter, similarly to the conventional energy-loss pCT. We therefore adapted a recent filtered back-projection algorithm along the most likely path (MLP) of protons for energy-loss pCT (Rit et al 2013) to attenuation pCT assuming a pCT scanner that can track the position and the direction of protons before and after the scanned object. Monte Carlo simulations of pCT acquisitions of density and spatial resolution phantoms were performed to characterize the new algorithm using Geant4 (via Gate). Attenuation pCT assumes an energy-independent inelastic cross-section, and the impact of the energy dependence of the inelastic cross-section below 100 MeV showed a capping artifact when the residual energy was below 100 MeV behind the object. The statistical limitation has been determined analytically and it was found that the noise in attenuation pCT images is 411 times and 278 times higher than the noise in energy-loss pCT images for the same imaging dose at 200 MeV and 300 MeV, respectively. Comparison of the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT images with a conventional straight-line path binning showed that incorporating the MLP estimates during reconstruction improves the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT. Moreover, regardless of the significant noise in attenuation pCT images, the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT was better than that of conventional energy-loss pCT in some studied situations thanks to the interplay of MCS and attenuation known as the West-Sherwood effect.

  15. Filtered back-projection reconstruction for attenuation proton CT along most likely paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiñones, C. T.; Létang, J. M.; Rit, S.

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates the attenuation of a proton beam to reconstruct the map of the linear attenuation coefficient of a material which is mainly caused by the inelastic interactions of protons with matter. Attenuation proton computed tomography (pCT) suffers from a poor spatial resolution due to multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) of protons in matter, similarly to the conventional energy-loss pCT. We therefore adapted a recent filtered back-projection algorithm along the most likely path (MLP) of protons for energy-loss pCT (Rit et al 2013) to attenuation pCT assuming a pCT scanner that can track the position and the direction of protons before and after the scanned object. Monte Carlo simulations of pCT acquisitions of density and spatial resolution phantoms were performed to characterize the new algorithm using Geant4 (via Gate). Attenuation pCT assumes an energy-independent inelastic cross-section, and the impact of the energy dependence of the inelastic cross-section below 100 MeV showed a capping artifact when the residual energy was below 100 MeV behind the object. The statistical limitation has been determined analytically and it was found that the noise in attenuation pCT images is 411 times and 278 times higher than the noise in energy-loss pCT images for the same imaging dose at 200 MeV and 300 MeV, respectively. Comparison of the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT images with a conventional straight-line path binning showed that incorporating the MLP estimates during reconstruction improves the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT. Moreover, regardless of the significant noise in attenuation pCT images, the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT was better than that of conventional energy-loss pCT in some studied situations thanks to the interplay of MCS and attenuation known as the West-Sherwood