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  1. Chronic very low dose naltrexone administration attenuates opioid withdrawal expression.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Paolo; Gottheil, Edward; Peoples, James F; Oropeza, Veronica C; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J

    2004-08-15

    Different regimens of agonist and antagonist drugs have been used in opioid withdrawal management, with variable results. We examined whether administering extremely small quantities of opiate antagonists in the presence of opiate agonist drugs reduces withdrawal expression. Forty-one male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with morphine or placebo pellets for eight days. Starting on day 3, some rats received naltrexone in their drinking water (5 mg/L), or unadulterated water. On day 8, rats were injected with saline or naltrexone (100 mg/kg) and evaluated for behavioral signs of withdrawal. Next, sections through the locus coeruleus (LC) and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), brainstem areas exhibiting cellular activation following opiate withdrawal, were processed for c-Fos to detect early gene expression. Finally, the same nuclei were examined for protein kinase A regulatory subunit II (PKA) and phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (pCREB), using Western blot analysis. Withdrawal was attenuated and c-Fos, PKA, and pCREB expression was decreased in the NTS and LC of rats receiving chronic very low doses of naltrexone. Reduction of withdrawal upon chronic very low naltrexone administration may be due in part to decreased activation of brainstem noradrenergic neurons in morphine dependent rats.

  2. Low dose naltrexone administration in morphine dependent rats attenuates withdrawal-induced norepinephrine efflux in forebrain.

    PubMed

    Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J; Qian, Yaping; Sterling, Robert C; Page, Michelle E

    2008-05-15

    The administration of low dose opioid antagonists has been explored as a potential means of detoxification in opiate dependence. Previous results from our laboratory have shown that concurrent administration of low dose naltrexone in the drinking water of rats implanted with subcutaneous morphine pellets attenuates behavioral and biochemical signs of withdrawal in brainstem noradrenergic nuclei. Noradrenergic projections originating from the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and the locus coeruleus (LC) have previously been shown to be important neural substrates involved in the somatic expression of opiate withdrawal. The hypothesis that low dose naltrexone treatment attenuates noradrenergic hyperactivity typically associated with opiate withdrawal was examined in the present study by assessing norepinephrine tissue content and norepinephrine efflux using in vivo microdialysis coupled to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection (ED). The frontal cortex (FC), amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and cerebellum were analyzed for tissue content of norepinephrine following withdrawal in morphine dependent rats. Naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal elicited a significant decrease in tissue content of norepinephrine in the BNST and amygdala. This decrease was significantly attenuated in the BNST of rats that received low dose naltrexone pre-treatment compared to controls. No significant difference was observed in the other brain regions examined. In a separate group of rats, norepinephrine efflux was assessed with in vivo microdialysis in the BNST or the FC of morphine dependent rats or placebo treated rats subjected to naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal that received either naltrexone in their drinking water (5 mg/L) or unadulterated water. Following baseline dialysate collection, withdrawal was precipitated by injection of naltrexone and sample collection continued for an additional 4 h. At the end of the experiment

  3. Low dose naltrexone administration in morphine dependent rats attenuates withdrawal-induced norepinephrine efflux in forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.; Qian, Yaping; Sterling, Robert C.; Page, Michelle E.

    2009-01-01

    The administration of low dose opioid antagonists has been explored as a potential means of detoxification in opiate dependence. Previous results from our laboratory have shown that concurrent administration of low dose naltrexone in the drinking water of rats implanted with subcutaneous morphine pellets attenuates behavioral and biochemical signs of withdrawal in brainstem noradrenergic nuclei. Noradrenergic projections originating from the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and the locus coeruleus (LC) have previously been shown to be important neural substrates involved in the somatic expression of opiate withdrawal. The hypothesis that low dose naltrexone treatment attenuates noradrenergic hyperactivity typically associated with opiate withdrawal was examined in the present study by assessing norepinephrine tissue content and norepinephrine efflux using in vivo microdialysis coupled to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection (ED). The frontal cortex (FC), amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and cerebellum were analyzed for tissue content of norepinephrine following withdrawal in morphine dependent rats. Naltrexone precipitated withdrawal elicited a significant decrease in tissue content of norepinephrine in the BNST and amygdala. This decrease was significantly attenuated in the BNST of rats that received low dose naltrexone pretreatment compared to controls. No significant difference was observed in the other brain regions examined. In a separate group of rats, norepinephrine efflux was assessed with in vivo microdialysis in the BNST or the FC of morphine dependent rats or placebo treated rats subjected to naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal that received either naltrexone in their drinking water (5 mg/L) or unadulterated water. Following baseline dialysate collection, withdrawal was precipitated by injection of naltrexone and sample collection continued for an additional four hours. At the end of the

  4. Ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuates chronic morphine-induced gliosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of analgesic tolerance following chronic morphine administration can be a significant clinical problem. Preclinical studies demonstrate that chronic morphine administration induces spinal gliosis and that inhibition of gliosis prevents the development of analgesic tolerance to opioids. Many studies have also demonstrated that ultra-low doses of naltrexone inhibit the development of spinal morphine antinociceptive tolerance and clinical studies demonstrate that it has opioid sparing effects. In this study we demonstrate that ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuates glial activation, which may contribute to its effects on attenuating tolerance. Results Spinal cord sections from rats administered chronic morphine showed significantly increased immuno-labelling of astrocytes and microglia compared to saline controls, consistent with activation. 3-D images of astrocytes from animals administered chronic morphine had significantly larger volumes compared to saline controls. Co-injection of ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuated this increase in volume, but the mean volume differed from saline-treated and naltrexone-treated controls. Astrocyte and microglial immuno-labelling was attenuated in rats co-administered ultra-low dose naltrexone compared to morphine-treated rats and did not differ from controls. Glial activation, as characterized by immunohistochemical labelling and cell size, was positively correlated with the extent of tolerance developed. Morphine-induced glial activation was not due to cell proliferation as there was no difference observed in the total number of glial cells following chronic morphine treatment compared to controls. Furthermore, using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine, no increase in spinal cord cell proliferation was observed following chronic morphine administration. Conclusion Taken together, we demonstrate a positive correlation between the prevention of analgesic tolerance and the inhibition of spinal gliosis by treatment with

  5. Ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuates chronic morphine-induced gliosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Theresa-Alexandra M; Milne, Brian; Cahill, Catherine M

    2010-04-16

    The development of analgesic tolerance following chronic morphine administration can be a significant clinical problem. Preclinical studies demonstrate that chronic morphine administration induces spinal gliosis and that inhibition of gliosis prevents the development of analgesic tolerance to opioids. Many studies have also demonstrated that ultra-low doses of naltrexone inhibit the development of spinal morphine antinociceptive tolerance and clinical studies demonstrate that it has opioid sparing effects. In this study we demonstrate that ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuates glial activation, which may contribute to its effects on attenuating tolerance. Spinal cord sections from rats administered chronic morphine showed significantly increased immuno-labelling of astrocytes and microglia compared to saline controls, consistent with activation. 3-D images of astrocytes from animals administered chronic morphine had significantly larger volumes compared to saline controls. Co-injection of ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuated this increase in volume, but the mean volume differed from saline-treated and naltrexone-treated controls. Astrocyte and microglial immuno-labelling was attenuated in rats co-administered ultra-low dose naltrexone compared to morphine-treated rats and did not differ from controls. Glial activation, as characterized by immunohistochemical labelling and cell size, was positively correlated with the extent of tolerance developed. Morphine-induced glial activation was not due to cell proliferation as there was no difference observed in the total number of glial cells following chronic morphine treatment compared to controls. Furthermore, using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine, no increase in spinal cord cell proliferation was observed following chronic morphine administration. Taken together, we demonstrate a positive correlation between the prevention of analgesic tolerance and the inhibition of spinal gliosis by treatment with ultra-low dose naltrexone

  6. Elevated mu-opioid receptor expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract accompanies attenuated withdrawal signs after chronic low dose naltrexone in opiate-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Van Bockstaele, E J; Rudoy, C; Mannelli, P; Oropeza, V; Qian, Y

    2006-02-15

    We previously described a decrease in withdrawal behaviors in opiate-dependent rats that were chronically treated with very low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water. Attenuated expression of withdrawal behaviors correlated with decreased c-Fos expression and intracellular signal transduction elements [protein kinase A regulatory subunit II (PKA) and phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB)] in brainstem noradrenergic nuclei. In this study, to determine whether similar cellular changes occurred in forebrain nuclei associated with drug reward, expressions of PKA and pCREB were analyzed in the ventral tegmental area, frontal cortex, striatum, and amygdala of opiate-treated rats that received low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water. No significant difference in PKA or pCREB was detected in these regions following drug treatment. To examine further the cellular mechanisms in noradrenergic nuclei that could underlie attenuated withdrawal behaviors following low dose naltrexone administration, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and locus coeruleus (LC) were examined for opioid receptor (OR) protein expression. Results showed a significant increase in muOR expression in the NTS of morphine-dependent rats that received low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water, and increases in muOR expression were also found to be dose dependent. Protein expression of muOR in the LC and deltaOR in either brain region remained unchanged. In conclusion, our previously reported decreases in c-Fos and PKA expression in the NTS following pretreatment with low doses of naltrexone may be partially explained by a greater inhibition of NTS neurons resulting from increased muOR expression in this region.

  7. Oxycodone plus ultra-low-dose naltrexone attenuates neuropathic pain and associated mu-opioid receptor-Gs coupling.

    PubMed

    Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Guo, Wenhong; Wang, Hoau-Yan; Burns, Lindsay H; Vanderah, Todd W

    2008-08-01

    Both peripheral nerve injury and chronic opioid treatment can result in hyperalgesia associated with enhanced excitatory neurotransmission at the level of the spinal cord. Chronic opioid administration leads to a shift in mu-opioid receptor (MOR)-G protein coupling from G(i/o) to G(s) that can be prevented by cotreatment with an ultra-low-dose opioid antagonist. In this study, using lumbar spinal cord tissue from rats with L(5)/L(6) spinal nerve ligation (SNL), we demonstrated that SNL injury induces MOR linkage to G(s) in the damaged (ipsilateral) spinal dorsal horn. This MOR-G(s) coupling occurred without changing G(i/o) coupling levels and without changing the expression of MOR or Galpha proteins. Repeated administration of oxycodone alone or in combination with ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX) was assessed on the SNL-induced MOR-G(s) coupling as well as on neuropathic pain behavior. Repeated spinal oxycodone exacerbated the SNL-induced MOR-G(s) coupling, whereas ultra-low-dose NTX cotreatment slightly but significantly attenuated this G(s) coupling. Either spinal or oral administration of oxycodone plus ultra-low-dose NTX markedly enhanced the reductions in allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia produced by oxycodone alone and minimized tolerance to these effects. The MOR-G(s) coupling observed in response to SNL may in part contribute to the excitatory neurotransmission in spinal dorsal horn in neuropathic pain states. The antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of oxycodone plus ultra-low-dose NTX (Oxytrex, Pain Therapeutics, Inc., San Mateo, CA) suggest a promising new treatment for neuropathic pain. The current study investigates whether Oxytrex (oxycodone with an ultra-low dose of naltrexone) alleviates mechanical and thermal hypersensitivities in an animal model of neuropathic pain over a period of 7 days, given locally or systemically. In this report, we first describe an injury-induced shift in mu-opioid receptor coupling from G(i/o) to G(s), suggesting

  8. Oxycodone Plus Ultra-Low-Dose Naltrexone Attenuates Neuropathic Pain and Associated μ-Opioid Receptor–Gs Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Guo, Wenhong; Wang, Hoau-Yan; Burns, Lindsay H.; Vanderah, Todd W.

    2017-01-01

    Both peripheral nerve injury and chronic opioid treatment can result in hyperalgesia associated with enhanced excitatory neurotransmission at the level of the spinal cord. Chronic opioid administration leads to a shift in μ-opioid receptor (MOR)–G protein coupling from Gi/o to Gs that can be prevented by cotreatment with an ultra-low-dose opioid antagonist. In this study, using lumbar spinal cord tissue from rats with L5/L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL), we demonstrated that SNL injury induces MOR linkage to Gs in the damaged (ipsilateral) spinal dorsal horn. This MOR-Gs coupling occurred without changing Gi/o coupling levels and without changing the expression of MOR or Gα proteins. Repeated administration of oxycodone alone or in combination with ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX) was assessed on the SNL-induced MOR-Gs coupling as well as on neuropathic pain behavior. Repeated spinal oxycodone exacerbated the SNL-induced MOR-Gs coupling, whereas ultra-low-dose NTX cotreatment slightly but significantly attenuated this Gs coupling. Either spinal or oral administration of oxycodone plus ultra-low-dose NTX markedly enhanced the reductions in allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia produced by oxycodone alone and minimized tolerance to these effects. The MOR-Gs coupling observed in response to SNL may in part contribute to the excitatory neurotransmission in spinal dorsal horn in neuropathic pain states. The antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of oxycodone plus ultra-low-dose NTX (Oxytrex, Pain Therapeutics, Inc., San Mateo, CA) suggest a promising new treatment for neuropathic pain. PMID:18468954

  9. Ultra-low dose naltrexone enhances cannabinoid-induced antinociception.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Jay; Olmstead, Mary C; Olmstead, Mary

    2005-12-01

    Both opioids and cannabinoids have inhibitory effects at micromolar doses, which are mediated by activated receptors coupling to Gi/o-proteins. Surprisingly, the analgesic effects of opioids are enhanced by ultra-low doses (nanomolar to picomolar) of the opioid antagonist, naltrexone. As opioid and cannabinoid systems interact, this study investigated whether ultra-low dose naltrexone also influences cannabinoid-induced antinociception. Separate groups of Long-Evans rats were tested for antinociception following an injection of vehicle, a sub-maximal dose of the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55 212-2, naltrexone (an ultra-low or a high dose) or a combination of WIN 55 212-2 and naltrexone doses. Tail-flick latencies were recorded for 3 h, at 10-min intervals for the first hour, and at 15-min intervals thereafter. Ultra-low dose naltrexone elevated WIN 55 212-2-induced tail flick thresholds without extending its duration of action. This enhancement was replicated in animals receiving intraperitoneal or intravenous injections. A high dose of naltrexone had no effect on WIN 55 212-2-induced tail flick latencies, but a high dose of the cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonist SR 141716 blocked the elevated tail-flick thresholds produced by WIN 55 212-2+ultra-low dose naltrexone. These data suggest a mechanism of cannabinoid-opioid interaction whereby activated opioid receptors that couple to Gs-proteins may attenuate cannabinoid-induced antinociception and/or motor functioning.

  10. Enhancing acupuncture by low dose naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Hesselink, Jan M Keppel; Kopsky, David J

    2011-06-01

    To find appropriate and effective treatment options for chronic pain syndromes is a challenging task. Multimodal treatment approach has been gaining acceptance for chronic pain. However, combining treatments, such as acupuncture, with rational pharmacology is still in its infancy. Acupuncture influences the opioid and cannabinoid system through releasing endogenous receptor ligands. Low dose naltrexone also acts on both these systems, and upregulates the opioid and cannabinoid receptors. The authors hypothesise that low dose naltrexone could enhance the pain-relieving effect of acupuncture.

  11. Low Dose Naltrexone in the Treatment of Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Metyas, Samy K; Yeter, Karen; Solyman, John; Arkfeld, Daniel

    2017-03-21

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain disorder characterized by diffuse musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance and cognitive impairment. A significant number of fibromyalgia patients do not respond adequately to the current drugs (pregabalin, milnacipran, duloxetine) approved for fibromyalgia treatment by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Thus, there is still a need for adjunctive therapies. Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist used to treat alcohol and opioid dependence. It is hypothesized that low dose naltrexone causes transient blockade of opioid receptors centrally resulting in a rebound of endorphin function which may attenuate pain in fibromyalgia. Treatment with low dose naltrexone may be an effective, highly tolerable and inexpensive treatment for fibromyalgia. Further controlled trials are needed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Low dose naltrexone therapy in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Y P

    2005-01-01

    The use of low doses of naltrexone for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) enjoys a worldwide following amongst MS patients. There is overwhelming anecdotal evidence, that in low doses naltrexone not only prevents relapses in MS but also reduces the progression of the disease. It is proposed that naltrexone acts by reducing apoptosis of oligodendrocytes. It does this by reducing inducible nitric oxide synthase activity. This results in a decrease in the formation of peroxynitrites, which in turn prevent the inhibition of the glutamate transporters. Thus, the excitatory neurotoxicity of glutamate on neuronal cells and oligodendrocytes via activation of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid class of glutamate receptor is prevented. It is crucial that the medical community respond to patient needs and investigate this drug in a clinical trial.

  13. [Low dose naltrexone for treatment of pain].

    PubMed

    Plesner, Karin Bruun; Vægter, Henrik Bjarke; Handberg, Gitte

    2015-10-09

    Recent years have seen an increasing interest in the use of low dose naltrexone (LDN) for off-label treatment of pain in diseases as fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis and morbus Crohn. The evidence is poor, with only few randomized double-blind placebo-controlled studies. The studies currently available are reviewed in this paper. LDN could be a potentially useful drug in the future for the treatment of pain in fibromyalgia, but more studies are needed to verify that it is superior to placebo, and currently it cannot be recommended as first-line therapy.

  14. Treatment of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) using low dose naltrexone (LDN).

    PubMed

    Chopra, Pradeep; Cooper, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a neuropathic pain syndrome, which involves glial activation and central sensitization in the central nervous system. Here, we describe positive outcomes of two CRPS patients, after they were treated with low-dose naltrexone (a glial attenuator), in combination with other CRPS therapies. Prominent CRPS symptoms remitted in these two patients, including dystonic spasms and fixed dystonia (respectively), following treatment with low-dose naltrexone (LDN). LDN, which is known to antagonize the Toll-like Receptor 4 pathway and attenuate activated microglia, was utilized in these patients after conventional CRPS pharmacotherapy failed to suppress their recalcitrant CRPS symptoms.

  15. An Orally Administered Opiate Blocker, Naltrexone, Attenuates Self-Injurious Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandman, Curt A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Four adults with severe/profound mental retardation and self-injurious behavior (SIB) received naltrexone in a double-blind procedure. All patients exhibited decreased SIB when treated with naltrexone; three patients decreased SIB as naltrexone dose increased. There were no consistent effects of naltrexone on stereotypy, activity, or performance…

  16. Naltrexone

    MedlinePlus

    Naltrexone is used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped drinking alcohol and using street drugs continue to avoid drinking or using drugs. Naltrexone should not be ...

  17. Early outcomes following low dose naltrexone enhancement of opioid detoxification.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Paolo; Patkar, Ashwin A; Peindl, Kathleen; Gottheil, Edward; Wu, Li-Tzy; Gorelick, David A

    2009-01-01

    Although withdrawal severity and treatment completion are the initial focus of opioid detoxification, post-detoxification outcome better defines effective interventions. Very low dose naltrexone (VLNTX) in addition to methadone taper was recently associated with attenuated withdrawal intensity during detoxification. We describe the results of a seven-day follow-up evaluation of 96 subjects who completed inpatient detoxification consisting of the addition of VLNTX (0.125 or 0.250 mg per day) or placebo to methadone taper in a double blind, randomized investigation. Individuals receiving VLNTX during detoxification reported reduced withdrawal and drug use during the first 24 hours after discharge. VLNTX addition was also associated with higher rates of negative drug tests for opioids and cannabis and increased engagement in outpatient treatment after one week. Further studies are needed to test the utility of this approach in easing the transition from detoxification to various follow-up treatment modalities designed to address opioid dependence.

  18. Early Outcomes Following Low Dose Naltrexone Enhancement of Opioid Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, Paolo; Patkar, Ashwin A; Peindl, Kathleen; Gottheil, Edward; Wu, Li-Tzy; Gorelick, David A

    2011-01-01

    Although withdrawal severity and treatment completion are the initial focus of opioid detoxification, post-detoxification outcome better defines effective interventions. Very low dose naltrexone (VLNTX) in addition to methadone taper was recently associated with attenuated withdrawal intensity during detoxification. We describe the results of a seven-day follow-up evaluation of 96 subjects who completed inpatient detoxification consisting of the addition of VLNTX (0.125 or 0.250 mg per day) or placebo to methadone taper in a double blind, randomized investigation. Individuals receiving VLNTX during detoxification reported reduced withdrawal and drug use during the first 24 hours after discharge. VLNTX addition was also associated with higher rates of negative drug tests for opioids and cannabis and increased engagement in outpatient treatment after one week. Further studies are needed to test the utility of this approach in easing the transition from detoxification to various follow-up treatment modalities designed to address opioid dependence. PMID:19283561

  19. Low dose naltrexone: side effects and efficacy in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Ploesser, Jennifer; Weinstock, Leonard B; Thomas, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Use of low dose naltrexone has been advocated for a variety of medical problems. Only a few articles published in peer review journals have documented side effects of low dose naltrexone. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of adverse effects of low dose naltrexone in patients who have been treated for a variety of gastrointestinal disorders. The secondary purpose was to determine global efficacy in a retrospective survey. Patients (206) form a single gastroenterologist's clinical practice who had been prescribed naltrexone were mailed a survey to evaluate the side effects and efficacy of naltrexone. Patients had either irritable bowel syndrome without evidence for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, chronic idiopathic constipation, or inflammatory bowel disease. Patients with diarrhea were given 2.5 mg daily, constipation 2.5 mg twice daily, and inflammatory bowel disease 4.5 mg daily. In the patients who returned the survey, 47/121 (38.8%) had no side effects. Of the 74/121 (61.2%) patients who had side effects, 58 had one or more neurological complaints, and 32 had one or more gastrointestinal side effects. In the patients with side effects, 24/74 (32.4%) had short lived symptoms. Low dose naltrexone was terminated owing to side effects in 20/74 patients (27.0%). In 13 patients with idiopathic irritable bowel syndrome, 2 were markedly worse. In 85 patients with irritable bowel syndrome-small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, 15 were markedly improved, 32 were moderately worse, and 1 was markedly worse. In 12 patients with chronic constipation, 7 were markedly improved, 1 was moderately improved, 1 was mildly improved, and 4 were unchanged. Low dose naltrexone frequently has side effects but in most is tolerable. It appears to be helpful for a member of patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

  20. Use of very low-dose naltrexone during opiate detoxification.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Paolo; Gottheil, Edward; Buonanno, Antonio; De Risio, Sergio

    2003-01-01

    The use of antagonist drugs to reduce the duration of opiate detoxification severely enhances withdrawal symptoms. To investigate the feasibility of administering antagonists with opiates without intense withdrawal during detoxification, 5 methadone maintained patients were evaluated while tapering methadone and receiving at the same time very low (0.125 mg), then increasing daily doses of naltrexone in the course of a 6-day, day hospital treatment. Reduced quantities of adjunctive medications were administered, as compared to the standard protocols, the treatment was completed without incidents or particular discomfort and all patients were easily induced to naltrexone maintenance by the day of discharge. Controlled studies will clarify whether very low-dose naltrexone provides a safe and comfortable detoxification technique to reduce withdrawal intensity and duration without the problems of heavy sedation, as suggested by the description of these clinical cases.

  1. [Low dose naltrexone in the treatment of dissociative symptoms].

    PubMed

    Pape, W; Wöller, W

    2015-03-01

    Following the hypothesis that blocking opioid receptors leads to a decline in opiate-modulated dissociative phenomena, experiences with naltrexone as medication for dissociative symptoms have been gained since 1999 (mainly in doses of 25-100 mg/day). In this study patients with severe trauma-related and dissociative disorders were treated with naltrexone in doses of 2-6 mg/day (0.06 mg/kg body weight). The low dose treatment with naltrexone proved to be effective whereby 11 out of 15 patients reported immediate positive effects and 7 described a lasting helpful effect. The majority of patients who felt positive effects reported a clearer perception of both their surroundings and their inner life. Assessment of reality and dealing with it improved as did the perception of their own body and affects as well as self-regulation. The treatment was very low in side effects. Treatment with low-dose naltrexone may be a helpful element in the treatment of patients with complex posttraumatic stress disorder. However, it has to be realized that the decrease of dissociation may lead patients to a not yet resolvable challenge, in as much as dissociation had previously been a necessary mechanism of self-protection.

  2. The combination very low-dose naltrexone-clonidine in the management of opioid withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Paolo; Peindl, Kathleen; Wu, Li-Tzy; Patkar, Ashwin A; Gorelick, David A

    2012-05-01

    The management of withdrawal absorbs substantial clinical efforts in opioid dependence (OD). The real challenge lies in improving current pharmacotherapies. Although widely used, clonidine causes problematic adverse effects and does not alleviate important symptoms of opioid withdrawal, alone or in combination with the opioid antagonist naltrexone. Very low-dose naltrexone (VLNTX) has been shown to attenuate withdrawal intensity and noradrenaline release following opioid agonist taper, suggesting a combination with clonidine may result in improved safety and efficacy. We investigated the effects of a VLNTX-clonidine combination in a secondary analysis of data from a double-blind, randomized opioid detoxification trial. Withdrawal symptoms and treatment completion were compared following VLNTX (.125 or .25 mg/day) and clonidine (.1-.2 mg q6h) in 127 individuals with OD undergoing 6-day methadone inpatient taper at a community program. VLNTX was more effective than placebo or clonidine in reducing symptoms and signs of withdrawal. The use of VLNTX in combination with clonidine was associated with attenuated subjective withdrawal compared with each medication alone, favoring detoxification completion in comparison with clonidine or naltrexone placebo. VLNTX/clonidine was effective in reducing symptoms that are both undertreated and well controlled with clonidine treatment and was not associated with significant adverse events compared with other treatments. Preliminary results elucidate neurobiological mechanisms of OD and support the utility of controlled studies on a novel VLNTX + low-dose clonidine combination for the management of opioid withdrawal.

  3. Oxytrex: an oxycodone and ultra-low-dose naltrexone formulation.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynn R

    2007-08-01

    Oxytrex (Pain Therapeutics, Inc.) is an oral opioid that combines a therapeutic amount of oxycodone with an ultra-low dose of the antagonist naltrexone. Animal data indicate that this combination minimizes the development of physical dependence and analgesic tolerance while prolonging analgesia. Oxytrex is in late-stage clinical development by Pain Therapeutics for the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the oxycodone/naltrexone combination, three clinical studies have been conducted, one in healthy volunteers and the other two in patients with chronic pain. The putative mechanism of ultra-low-dose naltrexone is to prevent an alteration in G-protein coupling by opioid receptors that is associated with opioid tolerance and dependence. Opioid agonists are initially inhibitory but become excitatory through constant opioid receptor activity. The agonist/antagonist combination of Oxytrex may reduce the conversion from an inhibitory to an excitatory receptor, thereby decreasing the development of tolerance and physical dependence.

  4. High-dose naltrexone therapy for cocaine-alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Joy M; Lindsay, Jan A; Green, Charles E; Herin, David V; Stotts, Angela L; Moeller, F Gerard

    2009-01-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the effects of high-dose (100 mg/d) naltrexone versus placebo in a sample of 87 randomized subjects with both cocaine and alcohol dependence. Medication conditions were crossed with two behavioral therapy platforms that examined whether adding contingency management (CM) that targeted cocaine abstinence would enhance naltrexone effects compared to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) without CM. Primary outcome measures for cocaine (urine screens) and alcohol use (timeline followback) were collected thrice-weekly during 12 weeks of treatment. Retention in treatment and medication compliance rates were low. Rates of cocaine use and drinks per day did not differ between treatment groups; however naltrexone did reduce frequency of heavy drinking days, as did CBT without CM. Notably, adding CM to CBT did not enhance treatment outcomes. These weak findings suggest that pharmacological and behavioral interventions that have shown efficacy in the treatment of a single drug dependence disorder may not provide the coverage needed when targeting dual drug dependence.

  5. Naltrexone attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress induced hepatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Moslehi, A; Nabavizadeh, F; Nabavizadeh, Fatemeh; Dehpour, A R; Dehpou, A R; Tavanga, S M; Hassanzadeh, G; Zekri, A; Nahrevanian, H; Sohanaki, H

    2014-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress provides abnormalities in insulin action, inflammatory responses, lipoprotein B100 degradation and hepatic lipogenesis. Excess accumulation of triglyceride in hepatocytes may also lead to disorders such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Opioid peptides are involved in triglyceride and cholesterol dysregulation, inflammation and cell death. In this study, we evaluated Naltrexone effects on ER stress induced liver injury. To do so, C57/BL6 mice received saline, DMSO and Naltrexone, as control groups. ER stress was induced by tunicamycin (TM) injection. Naltrexone was given before TM administration. Liver blood flow and biochemical serum analysis were measured. Histopathological evaluations, TNF-α measurement and Real-time RT-PCR were also performed. TM challenge provokes steatosis, cellular ballooning and lobular inflammation which significantly reduced in Naltrexone treated animals. ALT, AST and TNF-α increased in the TM group and improved in the Naltrexone plus TM group. Triglyceride and cholesterol levels decreased in TM treated mice with no increase in Naltrexone treated animals. In the Naltrexone plus TM group, gene expression of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase3 significantly lowered compared with the TM group. In this study, we found that Naltrexone had a notable alleviating role in ER stress induced steatosis and liver injury.

  6. A Systematic Review of Naltrexone for Attenuating Alcohol Consumption in Women with Alcohol Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Canidate, Shantrel S; Carnaby, Giselle D; Cook, Christa L; Cook, Robert L

    2017-03-01

    Several clinical trials have evaluated naltrexone as a treatment for alcohol use disorders (AUDs), but few have focused on women. The aim of this review was to systematically review and summarize the evidence regarding the impact of naltrexone compared to placebo for attenuating alcohol consumption in women with an AUD. A systematic review was conducted using PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Alcohol Studies Database to identify relevant peer-reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published between January 1990 and August 2016. Seven published trials have evaluated the impact of naltrexone on drinking outcomes in women distinct from men; 903 alcohol-dependent or heavy drinking women were randomized to receive once daily oral or depot (injectable) naltrexone or placebo with/without behavioral intervention. Two studies examining the quantity of drinks per day observed trends toward reduction in drinking quantity among women who received naltrexone versus placebo. The 4 studies examining the frequency of drinking had mixed results, with 1 study showing a trend that favored naltrexone, 2 showing a trend that favored placebo, and 1 that showed no difference. Two of the 3 studies examining time to relapse observed trends that tended to favor naltrexone for time to any drinking and time to heavy drinking among women who received naltrexone versus placebo. While the growing body of evidence suggests a variety of approaches to treat AUD, the impact of naltrexone to combat AUD in women is understudied. Taken together, the results suggest that naltrexone may lead to modest reductions in quantity of drinking and time to relapse, but not on the frequency of drinking in women. Future research should incorporate sophisticated study designs that examine gender differences and treatment effectiveness among those diagnosed with an AUD and present data separately for men and women. Copyright © 2017 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  7. Functional modulation on macrophage by low dose naltrexone (LDN).

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhe; Guo, Shengnan; Hu, Xu; Wang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Griffin, Noreen; Shan, Fengping

    2016-10-01

    Previously it was confirmed that naltrexone, a non-peptide δ-opioid receptor selective antagonist is mainly used for alcoholic dependence and opioid addiction treatment. However, there is increasing data on immune regulation of low dose naltrexone (LDN). The aim of this work was to explore the effect of LDN on the phenotype and function of macrophage. The changes of macrophage after treatment with LDN were examined using flow cytometry (FCM); FITC-dextran phagocytosis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We have found that LDN enhances function of macrophage as confirmed by up-regulating MHC II molecule and CD64 on macrophage while down-regulating CD206 expression. Furthermore the productions of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, increased significantly. Macrophages in LDN treated group performed the enhanced phagocytosis. Therefore it is concluded that LDN could promote function of macrophage and this work has provided concrete data of impact on immune system by LDN. Especially the data would support interaction between CD4+T cell and macrophage in AIDS treatment with LDN in Africa (LDN has already been approved in Nigeria for the use in AIDS treatment). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Low-dose naltrexone therapy improves active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jill P; Stock, Heather; Bingaman, Sandra; Mauger, David; Rogosnitzky, Moshe; Zagon, Ian S

    2007-04-01

    Endogenous opioids and opioid antagonists have been shown to play a role in healing and repair of tissues. In an open-labeled pilot prospective trial, the safety and efficacy of low-dose naltrexone (LDN), an opioid antagonist, were tested in patients with active Crohn's disease. Eligible subjects with histologically and endoscopically confirmed active Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) score of 220-450 were enrolled in a study using 4.5 mg naltrexone/day. Infliximab was not allowed for a minimum of 8 wk prior to study initiation. Other therapy for Crohn's disease that was at a stable dose for 4 wk prior to enrollment was continued at the same doses. Patients completed the inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ) and the short-form (SF-36) quality of life surveys and CDAI scores were assessed pretreatment, every 4 wk on therapy and 4 wk after completion of the study drug. Drug was administered by mouth each evening for a 12-wk period. Seventeen patients with a mean CDAI score of 356 +/- 27 were enrolled. CDAI scores decreased significantly (P= 0.01) with LDN, and remained lower than baseline 4 wk after completing therapy. Eighty-nine percent of patients exhibited a response to therapy and 67% achieved a remission (P < 0.001). Improvement was recorded in both quality of life surveys with LDN compared with baseline. No laboratory abnormalities were noted. The most common side effect was sleep disturbances, occurring in seven patients. LDN therapy appears effective and safe in subjects with active Crohn's disease. Further studies are needed to explore the use of this compound.

  9. Low-Dose Naltrexone: A New Therapy Option for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I Patients.

    PubMed

    Sturn, Kayla M; Collin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Naltrexone (an opioid antagonist) has long been used in patients overcoming alcohol and opioid dependency. However, at doses one-tenth of those commonly prescribed for the above conditions, an unexpected effect occurs that aids in alleviating pain. Although there are currently no randomized clinical trials supporting the use of low-dose naltrexone, we present a case study describing the impact of compounding low-dose naltrexone that has dramatically improved the patient's pain symptoms which were refractory to other treatments. Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

  10. Low-dose naltrexone for pruritus in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Frech, Tracy; Novak, Kirsten; Revelo, Monica P; Murtaugh, Maureen; Markewitz, Boaz; Hatton, Nathan; Scholand, Mary Beth; Frech, Edward; Markewitz, David; Sawitzke, Allen D

    2011-01-01

    Pruritus is a common symptom in systemic sclerosis (SSc), an autoimmune disease which causes fibrosis and vasculopathy in skin, lung, and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Unfortunately, pruritus has limited treatment options in this disease. Pilot trials of low-dose naltrexone hydrochloride (LDN) for pruritus, pain, and quality of life (QOL) in other GIT diseases have been successful. In this case series we report three patients that had significant improvement in pruritus and total GIT symptoms as measured by the 10-point faces scale and the University of California Los Angeles Scleroderma Clinical Trials Consortium Gastrointestinal Tract 2.0 (UCLA SCTC GIT 2.0) questionnaire. This small case series suggests LDN may be an effective, highly tolerable, and inexpensive treatment for pruritus and GIT symptoms in SSc.

  11. Low-Dose Naltrexone for Pruritus in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frech, Tracy; Novak, Kirsten; Revelo, Monica P.; Murtaugh, Maureen; Markewitz, Boaz; Hatton, Nathan; Scholand, Mary Beth; Frech, Edward; Markewitz, David; Sawitzke, Allen D.

    2011-01-01

    Pruritus is a common symptom in systemic sclerosis (SSc), an autoimmune disease which causes fibrosis and vasculopathy in skin, lung, and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Unfortunately, pruritus has limited treatment options in this disease. Pilot trials of low-dose naltrexone hydrochloride (LDN) for pruritus, pain, and quality of life (QOL) in other GIT diseases have been successful. In this case series we report three patients that had significant improvement in pruritus and total GIT symptoms as measured by the 10-point faces scale and the University of California Los Angeles Scleroderma Clinical Trials Consortium Gastrointestinal Tract 2.0 (UCLA SCTC GIT 2.0) questionnaire. This small case series suggests LDN may be an effective, highly tolerable, and inexpensive treatment for pruritus and GIT symptoms in SSc. PMID:21918649

  12. The opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone attenuates reinstatement of amphetamine drug-seeking in the rat.

    PubMed

    Häggkvist, Jenny; Lindholm, Sara; Franck, Johan

    2009-01-30

    Amphetamine produces its rewarding effects by enhancing dopamine transmission in the mesocorticolimbic pathway. Several studies have also suggested the involvement of the endogenous opioid system in mediating the neurochemical and behavioural effects of amphetamine. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the unselective opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (NTX) on reinstatement of amphetamine self-administration in the rat. Animals were trained to self-administer amphetamine under a fixed ratio 1 (FR1) schedule (0.1mg/kg/infusion). After receiving a stable drug intake the amphetamine was replaced with saline and the animals went through an extinction period. After reaching the extinction criteria, animals were pre-treated with NTX (0, 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0mg/kg, s.c.) 30min before giving a priming dose of amphetamine (0.5mg/kg s.c). To study the effects of NTX on operant behaviour, animals were trained to lever press for food pellets under a FR1 schedule of reinforcement. Results from the present study shows that a single injection of amphetamine reinstated self-administration behaviour. NTX (0.3 and 1.0mg/kg) significantly attenuated the amphetamine-induced reinstatement but NTX had no effect at any dose studied on food taking behaviour. These results show that NTX attenuates reinstatement of amphetamine self-administration in rats without suppressing general behaviour, implicating a functional role for opioid receptors in modulating amphetamine seeking behaviour.

  13. Varenicline, low dose naltrexone, and their combination for heavy-drinking smokers: human laboratory findings.

    PubMed

    Ray, Lara A; Courtney, Kelly E; Ghahremani, Dara G; Miotto, Karen; Brody, Arthur; London, Edythe D

    2014-10-01

    Heavy-drinking smokers constitute a sizeable and hard-to-treat subgroup of smokers, for whom tailored smoking cessation therapies are not yet available. The present study used a double-blind, randomized, 2 × 2 medication design, testing varenicline alone (VAR; 1 mg twice daily), low dose naltrexone alone (L-NTX; 25 mg once daily), varenicline plus naltrexone, and placebo for effects on cigarette craving and subjective response to alcohol and cigarettes in a sample (n = 130) of heavy-drinking daily smokers (≥10 cigarettes/day). All participants were tested after a 9-day titration period designed to reach a steady state on the target medication. Testing was completed at 12 h of nicotine abstinence, after consuming a standard dose of alcohol (target breath alcohol concentration = 0.06 g/dl) and after smoking the first cigarette of the day. The combination of VAR + L-NTX was superior to placebo, and at times superior to monotherapy, in attenuating cigarette craving, cigarette and alcohol "high," and in reducing ad-lib consumption of both cigarettes and alcohol during the 9-day medication titration period. These preliminary findings indicate that clinical studies of the combination of VAR + L-NTX for heavy drinkers trying to quit smoking are warranted and may ultimately improve clinical care for this sizeable and treatment-resistant subgroup of smokers.

  14. Varenicline, Low Dose naltrexone, and their combination for heavy-drinking smokers: Human laboratory findings

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Lara A.; Courtney, Kelly E.; Ghahremani, Dara G.; Miotto, Karen; Brody, Arthur; London, Edythe D.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Heavy drinking smokers constitute a sizeable and hard-to-treat subgroup of smokers, for whom tailored smoking cessation therapies are not yet available. Objectives The present study used a double-blind, randomized, 2×2 medication design, testing varenicline alone (VAR; 1mg twice daily), low dose naltrexone alone (L-NTX; 25mg once daily), varenicline plus naltrexone, and placebo for effects on cigarette craving and subjective response to alcohol and cigarettes in a sample (n=130) of heavy drinking daily smokers (≥10 cigarettes/day). Methods All participants were tested after a 9-day titration period designed to reach steady state on the target medication. Testing was completed at 12-hrs of nicotine abstinence, after consuming a standard dose of alcohol (target Breath Alcohol Concentration = 0.06 g/dl), and after smoking the first cigarette of the day. Results The combination of VAR+L-NTX was superior to placebo, and at times superior to monotherapy, in attenuating cigarette craving, cigarette and alcohol “high,” and in reducing ad-lib consumption of both cigarettes and alcohol during the 9-day medication titration period. Conclusions These preliminary findings indicate that clinical studies of the combination of VAR+L-NTX for heavy drinkers trying to quit smoking are warranted and may ultimately improve clinical care for this sizeable and treatment-resistant subgroup of smokers. PMID:24733235

  15. A randomised, controlled trial of low dose naltrexone for the treatment of opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Rea, Felicity; Bell, James R; Young, Malcolm R; Mattick, Richard P

    2004-07-15

    To investigate the efficacy of low doses of naltrexone in relapse prevention for heroin dependence. Double blind, randomised comparison of three groups-Group 1 taking 50mg per day, Group 2: 0.5mg per day, and Group 3: 0.05 mg per day. Sixty-six dependent heroin users. After detoxification followed by 1 week on 50mg per day naltrexone, participants were randomised to trial medication. All were offered counselling and monitored with weekly clinical reviews. Research interviews were conducted at three and 6 months. Retention in treatment and heroin use at 3 and 6 months. Secondary outcome measures were side effects and craving. Mean days retained in randomised treatment were-Group 1: 58.9 days; Group 2: 46.6 days; and Group 3: 47.8 days. Differences in retention were not significant using survival analysis. However, nine of the first 60 participants, transferred to the 50 mg dose, and one transferred to a lower dose (chi-square = 0.142; P = 0.018). At follow-up, there was no relationship between abstinence from heroin and naltrexone dose, nor between level of heroin use and dose. There were no differences between groups in craving or depression. Low doses of naltrexone had no discernible advantage, and participants preferred 50mg per day. Despite preference for blocking doses of naltrexone, outcomes appeared to be independent of naltrexone dose.

  16. Low-dose naltrexone inhibits pemoline-induced self-biting behavior in prepubertal rats.

    PubMed

    King, B H; Au, D; Poland, R E

    1993-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pemoline-induced self-biting behavior has been compared to similar self-injurious behavior (SIB) that occurs in the context of some mental retardation syndromes. The opiate antagonist, naltrexone, has been used successfully in the treatment of SIB in individuals with autism or mental retardation. This is the first report of the effect of naltrexone in an animal model of self-biting behavior. Naltrexone (0.01 mg/kg s.c.) significantly reduced the severity of self-biting behavior, but higher doses (0.10-10 mg/kg s.c.) had no such effect. Consistent with these results in the rat, a review of the clinical use of naltrexone in SIB is also suggestive of a relative loss of efficacy at higher doses (apparent therapeutic window). Naltrexone has higher affinity for mu receptors than other opioid receptor subtypes. Thus, the effect of naltrexone in treating SIB appears to be due to (mu-receptor interactions, with the loss of effect at higher doses due to supervening kappa receptor binding. Speculatively, one may ask if dosage reduction would convert naltrexone nonresponders to responders by lowering kappa receptor-mediated effects. Given the co-localization of opioids and dopamine inputs in some neurons, opioid-dopamine system interactions may also be important in pemoline-induced self-biting behavior.

  17. Ultra-low dose naltrexone potentiates the anticonvulsant effect of low dose morphine on clonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Honar, H; Riazi, K; Homayoun, H; Sadeghipour, H; Rashidi, N; Ebrahimkhani, M R; Mirazi, N; Dehpour, A R

    2004-01-01

    Significant potentiation of analgesic effects of opioids can be achieved through selective blockade of their stimulatory effects on intracellular signaling pathways by ultra-low doses of opioid receptor antagonists. However, the generality and specificity of this interaction is not well understood. The bimodal modulation of pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold by opioids provide a model to assess the potential usefulness of this approach in seizure disorders and to examine the differential mechanisms involved in opioid anti- (morphine at 0.5-3 mg/kg) versus pro-convulsant (20-100 mg/kg) effects. Systemic administration of ultra-low doses of naltrexone (100 fg/kg-10 ng/kg) significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of morphine at 0.5 mg/kg while higher degrees of opioid receptor antagonism blocked this effect. Moreover, inhibition of opioid-induced excitatory signaling by naltrexone (1 ng/kg) unmasked a strong anticonvulsant effect for very low doses of morphine (1 ng/kg-100 microg/kg), suggesting that a presumed inhibitory component of opioid receptor signaling can exert strong seizure-protective effects even at very low levels of opioid receptor activation. However, ultra-low dose naltrexone could not increase the maximal anticonvulsant effect of morphine (1-3 mg/kg), possibly due to a ceiling effect. The proconvulsant effects of morphine on seizure threshold were minimally altered by ultra-low doses of naltrexone while being completely blocked by a higher dose (1 mg/kg) of the antagonist. The present data suggest that ultra-low doses of opioid receptor antagonists may provide a potent strategy to modulate seizure susceptibility, especially in conjunction with very low doses of opioids.

  18. Treatment of Hailey-Hailey Disease With Low-Dose Naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Albers, Lauren N; Arbiser, Jack L; Feldman, Ron J

    2017-08-02

    Hailey-Hailey disease is a severe genetic blistering disease of intertriginous skin locations that can lead to poor quality of life and increased morbidities. Multiple therapies are available with inconsistent outcomes and potentially severe adverse effects. To determine whether low-dose naltrexone is an effective treatment for Hailey-Hailey disease. This study was a case series performed at a dermatology outpatient clinic of 3 patients with severe Hailey-Hailey disease recalcitrant to at least 4 therapies. Low-dose naltrexone, 3 mg nightly, titrated to 4.5 mg nightly in 2 patients. Reduction in size of lesions as well as subjective improvement of symptoms. All 3 patients noted significant healing of erosions and plaques starting from the peripheral aspect within 1 to 2 weeks of treatment, and clinical resolution of lesions within 2 months. Discontinuation of low-dose naltrexone resulted in flaring of symptoms, which cleared within 2 to 3 days on rechallenge with low-dose naltrexone. We present herein 3 cases of patients with severe Hailey-Hailey disease treated with low-dose naltrexone who achieved clinical resolution of symptoms. The success of these cases suggests low-dose naltrexone as a novel therapy for Hailey-Hailey disease. The possible mechanism may involve low-dose naltrexone influencing opioid or toll-like receptor signaling to improve calcium mobilization and improve keratinocyte differentiation and wound healing. Future studies are needed to clarify the mechanism and to define the role of low-dose naltrexone for treatment of Hailey-Hailey disease.

  19. Fibromyalgia symptoms are reduced by low-dose naltrexone: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Younger, Jarred; Mackey, Sean

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain disorder that is characterized by diffuse musculoskeletal pain and sensitivity to mechanical stimulation. In this pilot clinical trial, we tested the effectiveness of low-dose naltrexone in treating the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Participants completed a single-blind, crossover trial with the following time line: baseline (2 weeks), placebo (2 weeks), drug (8 weeks), and washout (2 weeks). Ten women meeting criteria for fibromyalgia and not taking an opioid medication. Naltrexone, in addition to antagonizing opioid receptors on neurons, also inhibits microglia activity in the central nervous system. At low doses (4.5 mg), naltrexone may inhibit the activity of microglia and reverse central and peripheral inflammation. Participants completed reports of symptom severity everyday, using a handheld computer. In addition, participants visited the lab every 2 weeks for tests of mechanical, heat, and cold pain sensitivity. Low-dose naltrexone reduced fibromyalgia symptoms in the entire cohort, with a greater than 30% reduction of symptoms over placebo. In addition, laboratory visits showed that mechanical and heat pain thresholds were improved by the drug. Side effects (including insomnia and vivid dreams) were rare, and described as minor and transient. Baseline erythrocyte sedimentation rate predicted over 80% of the variance in drug response. Individuals with higher sedimentation rates (indicating general inflammatory processes) had the greatest reduction of symptoms in response to low-dose naltrexone. We conclude that low-dose naltrexone may be an effective, highly tolerable, and inexpensive treatment for fibromyalgia.

  20. Low dose naltrexone for induction of remission in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dan; Macdonald, John K; Chande, Nilesh

    2014-02-21

    Crohn's disease is a transmural, relapsing inflammatory condition afflicting the digestive tract. Opioid signalling, long known to affect secretion and motility in the gut, has been implicated in the inflammatory cascade of Crohn's disease. Low dose naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, has garnered interest as a potential therapy. The primary objective was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of low dose naltrexone for induction of remission in Crohn's disease. A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and the Cochrane Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Functional Bowel Disorders Review Group Specialized Register was performed from inception to February 2013 to identify relevant studies. Abstracts from major gastroenterology conferences including Digestive Disease Week and United European Gastroenterology Week and reference lists from retrieved articles were also reviewed. Randomized controlled trials of low dose naltrexone (LDN) for treatment of active Crohn's disease were included. Data were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis using Review Manager (RevMan 5.2). The primary outcome was induction of clinical remission defined by a Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) of < 150 or a pediatric Crohn's disease activity index (PCDAI) of < 10. Secondary outcomes included clinical response (70- or 100-point decrease in CDAI from baseline), endoscopic remission or response, quality of life, and adverse events as defined by the included studies. Risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for dichotomous outcomes. The methodological quality of included studies was evaluated using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. The overall quality of the evidence supporting the primary outcome and selected secondary outcomes was assessed using the GRADE criteria. Two studies were identified (46 participants). One study assessed the efficacy and safety of 12 weeks of LDN (4.5 mg/day) treatment compared to placebo in adult patients (N = 34). The other study assessed

  1. A non-rewarding, non-aversive buprenorphine/naltrexone combination attenuates drug-primed reinstatement to cocaine and morphine in rats in a conditioned place preference paradigm.

    PubMed

    Cordery, Sarah F; Taverner, Alistair; Ridzwan, Irna E; Guy, Richard H; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Husbands, Stephen M; Bailey, Christopher P

    2014-07-01

    Concurrent use of cocaine and heroin is a major public health issue with no effective relapse prevention treatment currently available. To this purpose, a combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone, a mixed very-low efficacy mu-opioid receptor agonist/kappa-opioid receptor antagonist/nociceptin receptor agonist, was investigated. The tail-withdrawal and the conditioned place preference (CPP) assays in adult Sprague Dawley rats were used to show that naltrexone dose-dependently blocked the mu-opioid receptor agonism of buprenorphine. Furthermore, in the CPP assay, a combination of 0.3 mg/kg buprenorphine and 3.0 mg/kg naltrexone was aversive. A combination of 0.3 mg/kg buprenorphine and 1.0 mg/kg naltrexone was neither rewarding nor aversive, but still possessed mu-opioid receptor antagonist properties. In the CPP extinction and reinstatement method, a combination of 0.3 mg/kg buprenorphine and 1.0 mg/kg naltrexone completely blocked drug-primed reinstatement in cocaine-conditioned rats (conditioned with 3 mg/kg cocaine, drug prime was 3 mg/kg cocaine) and attenuated drug-primed reinstatement in morphine-conditioned rats (conditioned with 5 mg/kg morphine, drug prime was 1.25 mg/kg morphine). These data add to the growing evidence that a buprenorphine/naltrexone combination may be protective against relapse in a polydrug abuse situation. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  2. Tolerance to the anticonvulsant effect of morphine in mice: blockage by ultra-low dose naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Roshanpour, Maryam; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Riazi, Kiarash; Rafiei-Tabatabaei, Neda; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2009-02-01

    The present study evaluated the development of tolerance to the anticonvulsant effect of morphine in a mouse model of clonic seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole, and whether ultra-low doses of the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone which selectively block G(s) opioid receptors were capable of preventing the observed tolerance. The results showed that the morphine anticonvulsant effect could be subject to tolerance after repeated administration. Both the development and expression of tolerance were inhibited by ultra-low doses of naltrexone, suggesting the possible involvement of G(s)-coupled opioid receptors in the development of tolerance to the anticonvulsant effect of morphine.

  3. Fibromyalgia Symptoms Are Reduced by Low-Dose Naltrexone: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Younger, Jarred; Mackey, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain disorder that is characterized by diffuse musculoskeletal pain and sensitivity to mechanical stimulation. In this pilot clinical trial, we tested the effectiveness of low-dose naltrexone in treating the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Design Participants completed a single-blind, crossover trial with the following time line: baseline (2 weeks), placebo (2 weeks), drug (8 weeks), and washout (2 weeks). Patients Ten women meeting criteria for fibromyalgia and not taking an opioid medication. Interventions Naltrexone, in addition to antagonizing opioid receptors on neurons, also inhibits microglia activity in the central nervous system. At low doses (4.5 mg), naltrexone may inhibit the activity of microglia and reverse central and peripheral inflammation. Outcome Measures Participants completed reports of symptom severity everyday, using a handheld computer. In addition, participants visited the lab every 2 weeks for tests of mechanical, heat, and cold pain sensitivity. Results Low-dose naltrexone reduced fibromyalgia symptoms in the entire cohort, with a greater than 30% reduction of symptoms over placebo. In addition, laboratory visits showed that mechanical and heat pain thresholds were improved by the drug. Side effects (including insomnia and vivid dreams) were rare, and described as minor and transient. Baseline erythrocyte sedimentation rate predicted over 80% of the variance in drug response. Individuals with higher sedimentation rates (indicating general inflammatory processes) had the greatest reduction of symptoms in response to low-dose naltrexone. Conclusions We conclude that low-dose naltrexone may be an effective, highly tolerable, and inexpensive treatment for fibromyalgia. PMID:19453963

  4. Potentiation of low dose ketamine effects by naltrexone: potential implications for the pharmacotherapy of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Krystal, John H; Madonick, Steven; Perry, Edward; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Brush, Laura; Wray, Yola; Belger, Aysenil; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2006-08-01

    The interplay of opiate and NMDA glutamate receptors may contribute to psychosis, cognitive function, alcoholism, and substance dependence. Ketamine and ethanol block the NMDA glutamate receptor. The purpose of this randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled human laboratory study was to evaluate whether the interactive effects of drugs acting at opiate and NMDA glutamate receptors might partially explain the efficacy of naltrexone for the treatment of alcoholism, that is, whether naltrexone 25 mg pretreatment would modulate ketamine effects in healthy human subjects. Two groups of healthy subjects were studied. An initial group (n=31) received a perception-altering subanesthetic dose of ketamine (bolus of 0.23 mg/kg over 1 min followed by a 60-min infusion of 0.58 mg/kg or saline bolus and infusion). A second group (n=24) completed the same testing procedures, but received a subperceptual ketamine dose (bolus 0.081 mg/kg over 10 min followed by an infusion of 0.4 mg/kg/h). Ketamine produced positive symptoms, negative symptoms, emotional discomfort, and cognitive effects as measured by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) in a dose-related fashion. The lower ketamine dose produced subjective effects similar to two standard ethanol drinks, whereas the higher ketamine dose produced effects similar to five standard drinks. Although naltrexone produced no significant behavioral effects, it significantly magnified the increase in the total PANSS score produced by the lower subperceptual dose of ketamine, but not the higher perception-altering dose of ketamine. These data suggest that the interplay of opiate receptor antagonism and NMDA receptor antagonism may be relevant to the protective effects of naltrexone on alcohol consumption via potentiation of dysphoric effects associated with the NMDA receptor antagonist effects of ethanol. However, these data suggest that at levels of NMDA receptor antagonism associated with heavy drinking, this protective

  5. Very low dose naltrexone addition in opioid detoxification: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Paolo; Patkar, Ashwin A; Peindl, Kathi; Gorelick, David A; Wu, Li-Tzy; Gottheil, Edward

    2009-04-01

    Although current treatments for opioid detoxification are not always effective, medical detoxification remains a required step before long-term interventions. The use of opioid antagonist medications to improve detoxification has produced inconsistent results. Very low dose naltrexone (VLNTX) was recently found to reduce opioid tolerance and dependence in animal and clinical studies. We decided to evaluate safety and efficacy of VLNTX adjunct to methadone in reducing withdrawal during detoxification. In a multi-center, double-blind, randomized study at community treatment programs, where most detoxifications are performed, 174 opioid-dependent subjects received NTX 0.125 mg, 0.250 mg or placebo daily for 6 days, together with methadone in tapering doses. VLNTX-treated individuals reported attenuated withdrawal symptoms [F = 7.24 (2,170); P = 0.001] and reduced craving [F = 3.73 (2,107); P = 0.03]. Treatment effects were more pronounced at discharge and were not accompanied by a significantly higher retention rate. There were no group differences in use of adjuvant medications and no treatment-related adverse events. Further studies should explore the use of VLNTX, combined with full and partial opioid agonist medications, in detoxification and long-term treatment of opioid dependence.

  6. Very low dose naltrexone addition in opioid detoxification: a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, Paolo; Patkar, Ashwin A.; Peindl, Kathi; Gorelick, David A.; Wu, Li-Tzy; Gottheil, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Although current treatments for opioid detoxification are not always effective, medical detoxification remains a required step before long-term interventions. The use of opioid antagonist medications to improve detoxification has produced inconsistent results. Very low dose naltrexone (VLNTX) was recently found to reduce opioid tolerance and dependence in animal and clinical studies. We decided to evaluate safety and efficacy of VLNTX adjunct to methadone in reducing withdrawal during detoxification. In a multi-center, double-blind, randomized study at community treatment programs, where most detoxifications are performed, 174 opioid-dependent subjects received NTX 0.125 mg, 0.250 mg or placebo daily for 6 days, together with methadone in tapering doses. VLNTX-treated individuals reported attenuated withdrawal symptoms [F = 7.24 (2,170); P = 0.001] and reduced craving [F = 3.73 (2,107); P = 0.03]. Treatment effects were more pronounced at discharge and were not accompanied by a significantly higher retention rate. There were no group differences in use of adjuvant medications and no treatment-related adverse events. Further studies should explore the use of VLNTX, combined with full and partial opioid agonist medications, in detoxification and long-term treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:18715283

  7. Enhancement of Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity by Morphine and Its Attenuation by the Opioid Antagonist Naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Aminian, Atefeh; Javadi, Shiva; Rahimian, Reza; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Asadi Amoli, Fahimeh; Moghaddas, Payman; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram

    2016-07-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin, a widely used chemotherapy agent. Morphine and other opioids are also used extensively in different types of cancer for the clinical management of pain associated with local or metastatic neoplastic lesions. In addition to its analgesic effects, morphine has also been reported to possess potential immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties. Herein, we investigated the effects of morphine in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Following administration of a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg), animals received intraperitoneal injections of morphine (5 mg/kg/day) and/or naltrexone (20 mg/kg/day), an opioid antagonist, for 5 days. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was detected by a significant increase in plasma urea and creatinine levels in addition to alterations in kidney tissue morphology. Levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly increased in the renal tissue in cisplatin group. Moreover, glutathione (GSH) concentration and superoxide dismutase activity were significantly reduced in renal tissue in cisplatin group compared with control animals. Treatment with morphine aggravated the deleterious effects of cisplatin at clinical, biochemical and histopathological levels; whereas naltrexone diminished the detrimental effects of morphine in animals receiving morphine and cisplatin. Morphine or naltrexone alone had no effect on the mentioned parameters. Our findings indicate that concomitant treatment with morphine might intensify cisplatin-induced renal damage in rats. These findings suggest that morphine and other opioids should be administered cautiously in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy.

  8. The cannabinoid anticonvulsant effect on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure is potentiated by ultra-low dose naltrexone in mice.

    PubMed

    Bahremand, Arash; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Nasrabady, Sara Ebrahimi; Gholizadeh, Shervin; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2008-09-01

    Cannabinoid compounds are anticonvulsant since they have inhibitory effects at micromolar doses, which are mediated by activated receptors coupling to G(i/o) proteins. Surprisingly, both the analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of opioids are enhanced by ultra-low doses (nanomolar to picomolar) of the opioid antagonist naltrexone and as opioid and cannabinoid systems interact, it has been shown that ultra-low dose naltrexone also enhances cannabinoid-induced antinociception. Thus, concerning the seizure modulating properties of both classes of receptors this study investigated whether the ultra-low dose opioid antagonist naltrexone influences cannabinoid anticonvulsant effects. The clonic seizure threshold was tested in separate groups of male NMRI mice following injection of vehicle, the cannabinoid selective agonist arachidonyl-2-chloroethylamide (ACEA) and ultra-low doses of the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone and a combination of ACEA and naltrexone doses in a model of clonic seizure induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). Systemic injection of ultra-low doses of naltrexone (1pg/kg to 1ng/kg, i.p.) significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of ACEA (1mg/kg, i.p.). Moreover, the very low dose of naltrexone (500pg/kg) unmasked a strong anticonvulsant effect for very low doses of ACEA (10 and 100microg/kg). A similar potentiation by naltrexone (500pg/kg) of anticonvulsant effects of non-effective dose of ACEA (1mg/kg) was also observed in the generalized tonic-clonic model of seizure. The present data indicate that the interaction between opioid and cannabinoid systems extends to ultra-low dose levels and ultra-low doses of opioid receptor antagonist in conjunction with very low doses of cannabinoids may provide a potent strategy to modulate seizure susceptibility.

  9. Extended release naltrexone injection is performed in the majority of opioid dependent patients receiving outpatient induction: a very low dose naltrexone and buprenorphine open label trial

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, Paolo; Wu, Li-Tzy; Peindl, Kathleen S.; Swartz, Marvin S.; Woody, George E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The approval of extended release injectable naltrexone (XR-NTX; Vivitrol®) has introduced a new option for treating opioid addiction, but studies are needed to identify its place within the spectrum of available therapies. The absence of physiological opioid dependence is a necessary and challenging first step for starting XR-NTX. Outpatient detoxification gives poor results and inpatient detoxification is either unavailable or too brief for the physiological effects of opioids to resolve. Here we present findings from an open label study that tested whether the transition from opioid addiction to XR-NTX can be safely and effectively performed in an outpatient setting using very low dose naltrexone and buprenorphine. METHODS Twenty treatment seeking opioid addicted individuals were given increasing doses of naltrexone starting at 0.25 mg with decreasing doses of buprenorphine starting at 4 mg during a 7-day outpatient XR-NTX induction procedure. Withdrawal discomfort, craving, drug use, and adverse events were assessed daily until the XR-NTX injection, then weekly over the next month. RESULTS Fourteen of the 20 participants received XR-NTX and 13 completed weekly assessments. Withdrawal, craving, and opioid or other drug use were significantly lower during induction and after XR-NTX administration compared with baseline, and no serious adverse events were recorded. CONCLUSIONS Outpatient transition to XR-NTX combining upward titration of very low dose naltrexone with downward titration of low dose buprenorphine was safe, well tolerated, and completed by most participants. Further studies with larger numbers of subjects are needed to see if this approach is useful for naltrexone induction. PMID:24602363

  10. Extended release naltrexone injection is performed in the majority of opioid dependent patients receiving outpatient induction: a very low dose naltrexone and buprenorphine open label trial.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Paolo; Wu, Li-Tzy; Peindl, Kathleen S; Swartz, Marvin S; Woody, George E

    2014-05-01

    The approval of extended release injectable naltrexone (XR-NTX; Vivitrol(®)) has introduced a new option for treating opioid addiction, but studies are needed to identify its place within the spectrum of available therapies. The absence of physiological opioid dependence is a necessary and challenging first step for starting XR-NTX. Outpatient detoxification gives poor results and inpatient detoxification is either unavailable or too brief for the physiological effects of opioids to resolve. Here we present findings from an open label study that tested whether the transition from opioid addiction to XR-NTX can be safely and effectively performed in an outpatient setting using very low dose naltrexone and buprenorphine. Twenty treatment seeking opioid addicted individuals were given increasing doses of naltrexone starting at 0.25mg with decreasing doses of buprenorphine starting at 4 mg during a 7-day outpatient XR-NTX induction procedure. Withdrawal discomfort, craving, drug use, and adverse events were assessed daily until the XR-NTX injection, then weekly over the next month. Fourteen of the 20 participants received XR-NTX and 13 completed weekly assessments. Withdrawal, craving, and opioid or other drug use were significantly lower during induction and after XR-NTX administration compared with baseline, and no serious adverse events were recorded. Outpatient transition to XR-NTX combining upward titration of very low dose naltrexone with downward titration of low dose buprenorphine was safe, well tolerated, and completed by most participants. Further studies with larger numbers of subjects are needed to see if this approach is useful for naltrexone induction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Low-dose prazosin alone and in combination with propranolol or naltrexone: effects on ethanol and sucrose seeking and self-administration in the P rat.

    PubMed

    Verplaetse, Terril L; Czachowski, Cristine L

    2015-08-01

    Evidence suggests that the noradrenergic system mediates ethanol reinforcement. However, preclinical studies suggest that noradrenergic antagonists block other oral reinforcers indicating possible unwanted secondary medication effects. This study examined combinations of low-dose prazosin with propranolol or naltrexone using a behavioral paradigm that separately assesses reinforcer seeking and self-administration. Male alcohol-preferring (P) rats (n = 20/experiment) were trained to complete a response requirement (RR) resulting in access to 1 % sucrose (n = 10) or 10 % ethanol (n = 10) for 20 min. Rats received vehicle, prazosin alone (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (IP)), or prazosin in combination with propranolol (5 mg/kg (IP); Exp. 1) or in combination with naltrexone (0.03 mg/kg, subcutaneously (SC); Exp. 2). For Exp. 1, prazosin alone effectively decreased sucrose seeking more than ethanol seeking, but decreased ethanol self-administration only. Propranolol alone effectively decreased ethanol seeking more than sucrose seeking and decreased ethanol intake only. At some dose combinations, there was a greater attenuation of ethanol and sucrose intake relative to either drug alone. For Exp. 2, prazosin alone and naltrexone alone were effective in decreasing ethanol seeking and intake only. Combination treatment was more effective than either drug alone at decreasing ethanol seeking and consumption and sucrose intake, but not sucrose seeking. Propranolol and naltrexone alone were specific to ethanol indicating that low doses of either medication may be beneficial in treating alcohol use disorders. Prazosin in combination with propranolol or naltrexone was more effective than either drug alone and also reduced sucrose-reinforced behaviors. These data suggest that the noradrenergic system is a viable target for developing treatment approaches for problem drinkers.

  12. Low-Dose Prazosin Alone and in Combination with Propranolol or Naltrexone: Effects on Ethanol- and Sucrose-Seeking and Self-Administration in the P Rat

    PubMed Central

    Verplaetse, Terril L.; Czachowski, Cristine L.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Evidence suggests that the noradrenergic system mediates ethanol-reinforcement. However, preclinical studies suggest that noradrenergic antagonists block other oral reinforcers indicating possible unwanted secondary medication effects. Methods This study examined combinations of low-dose prazosin with propranolol or naltrexone using a behavioral paradigm that separately assesses reinforcer-seeking and self-administration. Male alcohol-preferring (P) rats (n=20/experiment) were trained to complete a response requirement (RR) resulting in access to 1% sucrose (n=10) or 10% ethanol (n=10) for 20min. Rats received vehicle, prazosin alone (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 mg/kg; intraperitoneally (IP)) or prazosin in combination with propranolol (5 mg/kg (IP); Exp1) or in combination with naltrexone (0.03 mg/kg (subcutaneously (SC); Exp2). Results For Exp1, prazosin alone effectively decreased sucrose-seeking more than ethanol-seeking, but decreased ethanol self-administration only. Propranolol alone effectively decreased ethanol-seeking more than sucrose-seeking and decreased ethanol intake only. At some dose combinations, there was a greater attenuation of ethanol and sucrose intake relative to either drug alone. For Exp2, prazosin alone and naltrexone alone were effective in decreasing ethanol-seeking and intake only. Combination treatment was more effective than either drug alone at decreasing ethanol-seeking and consumption and sucrose intake, but not sucrose-seeking. Conclusions Propranolol and naltrexone alone were specific to ethanol indicating that low doses of either medication may be beneficial in treating alcohol use disorders. Prazosin in combination with propranolol or naltrexone was more effective than either drug alone, but also reduced sucrose-reinforced behaviors. These data suggest that the noradrenergic system is a viable target for developing treatment approaches for problem drinkers. PMID:25743758

  13. Potentiation of buprenorphine antinociception with ultra-low dose naltrexone in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Hay, J L; La Vincente, S F; Somogyi, A A; Chapleo, C B; White, J M

    2011-03-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated greater antinociception following administration of a buprenorphine/naloxone combination compared to buprenorphine alone among healthy volunteers. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether buprenorphine antinociception could be enhanced with the addition of ultra-low dose naltrexone, using a range of dose ratios. A repeated-measures, double-blind, cross-over trial was undertaken with 10 healthy participants. The effects of each buprenorphine:naltrexone ratio (100:1, 133:1, 166:1, and 200:1) on cold pressor tolerance time and respiration were compared to the effects of buprenorphine only. The 166:1 ratio was associated with significantly greater tolerance time to cold pressor pain than buprenorphine alone. Minimal respiratory depression and few adverse events were observed in all conditions. These findings suggest that, as previously described with naloxone, the addition of ultra-low dose naltrexone can enhance the antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine in humans. This potentiation is dose-ratio dependent and occurs without a concomitant increase in adverse effects. Copyright © 2010 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Does adding low doses of oral naltrexone to morphine alter the subsequent opioid requirements and side effects in trauma patients?

    PubMed

    Farahmand, Shervin; Ahmadi, Omid; Dehpour, Ahmadreza; Khashayar, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims to assess the influence of ultra-low doses of opioid antagonists on the analgesic properties of opioids and their side effects. In the present randomized, double-blind controlled trial, the influence of the combination of ultra-low-dose naltrexone and morphine on the total opioid requirement and the frequency of the subsequent side effects was compared with that of morphine alone (added with placebo) in patients with trauma in the upper or lower extremities. Although the morphine and naltrexone group required 0.04 mg more opioids during the study period, there was no significant difference between the opioid requirements of the 2 groups. Nausea was less frequently reported in patients receiving morphine and naltrexone. The combination of ultra-low-dose naltrexone and morphine in extremity trauma does not affect the opioid requirements; it, however, lowers the risk of nausea. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Long-term treatment with low dose naltrexone maintains stable health in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Michael D; Turel, Anthony P; Zagon, Ian S; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted on patients at Penn State Hershey Medical Center diagnosed with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis between 2006 and 2015. Laboratory and clinical data collected over this 10-year period were reviewed. Two cohorts of patients were established based on their relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis therapy at the time of their first visit to Penn State. One group of patients (n = 23) was initially prescribed low dose naltrexone at the time first seen at Hershey. This group was offered low dose naltrexone because of symptoms of fatigue or refusal to take an available disease-modifying therapy. The second group of patients (n = 31) was treated with the glatiramer acetate (Copaxone) and offered low dose naltrexone as an adjunct therapy to their disease-modifying therapy. Patient data from visits after 1-50 months post-diagnosis were evaluated in a retrospective manner. Data obtained from patient charts included clinical laboratory values from standard blood tests, timed 25-foot walking trials, and changes in magnetic resonance imaging reports. Statistical analyses between the groups and for each patient over time indicated no significant differences in clinical laboratory values, timed walking, or changes in magnetic resonance imaging. These data suggest that the apparently non-toxic, inexpensive, biotherapeutic is safe and if taken alone did not result in an exacerbation of disease symptoms.

  16. Long-term treatment with low dose naltrexone maintains stable health in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Michael D; Turel, Anthony P; Zagon, Ian S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A retrospective study was conducted on patients at Penn State Hershey Medical Center diagnosed with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis between 2006 and 2015. Methodology Laboratory and clinical data collected over this 10-year period were reviewed. Two cohorts of patients were established based on their relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis therapy at the time of their first visit to Penn State. One group of patients (n = 23) was initially prescribed low dose naltrexone at the time first seen at Hershey. This group was offered low dose naltrexone because of symptoms of fatigue or refusal to take an available disease-modifying therapy. The second group of patients (n = 31) was treated with the glatiramer acetate (Copaxone) and offered low dose naltrexone as an adjunct therapy to their disease-modifying therapy. Results Patient data from visits after 1–50 months post-diagnosis were evaluated in a retrospective manner. Data obtained from patient charts included clinical laboratory values from standard blood tests, timed 25-foot walking trials, and changes in magnetic resonance imaging reports. Statistical analyses between the groups and for each patient over time indicated no significant differences in clinical laboratory values, timed walking, or changes in magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion These data suggest that the apparently non-toxic, inexpensive, biotherapeutic is safe and if taken alone did not result in an exacerbation of disease symptoms. PMID:28607740

  17. Ultra-low-dose naltrexone suppresses rewarding effects of opiates and aversive effects of opiate withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Mary C; Burns, Lindsay H

    2005-09-01

    Ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists enhance opiate analgesia and attenuate tolerance and withdrawal. To determine whether ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX) coadministration alters the rewarding effects of opiates or the aversive effects of opiate withdrawal. We used the conditioned place preference (CPP) and conditioned place aversion (CPA) paradigms to assess whether ultra-low-dose NTX alters the acute rewarding effects of oxycodone or morphine, or the aversive aspect of withdrawal from either drug. To assess the dose response for ultra-low-dose NTX, a range of NTX doses (0.03-30 ng/kg) was tested in the oxycodone CPP experiment. In order to avoid tolerance or sensitization effects, we used single conditioning sessions and female rats, as females are more sensitive to the conditioning effects of these drugs. Ultra-low-dose NTX (5 ng/kg) blocked the CPP to morphine (5 mg/kg) and the CPA to withdrawal from chronic morphine (5 mg/kg, for 7 days). Coadministration of ultra-low-dose NTX (30 pg/kg) also blocked the CPA to withdrawal from chronic oxycodone administration (3 mg/kg, for 7 days). The effects of NTX on the CPP to oxycodone (3 mg/kg) revealed a biphasic dose response. The two lowest doses (0.03 and 0.3 ng/kg) blocked the CPP, the middle dose (3 ng/kg) was ineffective, and oxycodone combined with the highest dose (30 ng/kg) produced a trend toward a CPP. Ultra-low-dose NTX coadministration blocks the acute rewarding effects of analgesic doses of oxycodone or morphine as well as the anhedonia of withdrawal from chronic administration.

  18. Pilot trial of low-dose naltrexone and quality of life in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cree, Bruce A C; Kornyeyeva, Elena; Goodin, Douglas S

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of 4.5mg nightly naltrexone on the quality of life of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. This single-center, double-masked, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluated the efficacy of 8 weeks of treatment with 4.5mg nightly naltrexone (low-dose naltrexone, LDN) on self-reported quality of life of MS patients. Eighty subjects with clinically definite MS were enrolled, and 60 subjects completed the trial. Ten withdrew before completing the first trial period: 8 for personal reasons, 1 for a non-MS-related adverse event, and 1 for perceived benefit. Database management errors occurred in 4 other subjects, and quality of life surveys were incomplete in 6 subjects for unknown reasons. The high rate of subject dropout and data management errors substantially reduced the trial's statistical power. LDN was well tolerated, and serious adverse events did not occur. LDN was associated with significant improvement on the following mental health quality of life measures: a 3.3-point improvement on the Mental Component Summary score of the Short Form-36 General Health Survey (p = 0.04), a 6-point improvement on the Mental Health Inventory (p < 0.01), a 1.6-point improvement on the Pain Effects Scale (p =.04), and a 2.4-point improvement on the Perceived Deficits Questionnaire (p = 0.05). LDN significantly improved mental health quality of life indices. Further studies with LDN in MS are warranted.

  19. Evaluation of therapeutic effect of low dose naltrexone in experimentally-induced Crohn's disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Dina Ibrahim; Osman, Afaf Sayed; Tolba, Hedayat Mahmoud; Khattab, Aida; Abdel-Salam, Lubna O; Kamel, Mahmoud M

    2016-10-01

    Crohn's disease is a relapsing inflammatory condition afflicting the digestive tract. Drugs used for treatment of Crohn's disease may be associated with serious side effects. Endogenous opioid peptides modulate inflammatory cytokine production. Opioid antagonists have been shown to play a role in healing and repair of tissues. This work was designed to detect the possible beneficial effects of opioid antagonist naltrexone in indomethacin-induced Crohn's disease in rats. Enteritis was induced in male albino rats by two subcutaneous injection of indomethacin in a dose of 7.5mg/kg 24h apart started on day one. Salfasalazine, naltrexone and their combination were administered orally from day one of induction of enteritis to day 10. Disease activity index, serum levels of C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor-α, macroscopic and microscopic pathological scores and in vitro motility studies were evaluated. Induction of enteritis resulted in significant increase of disease activity index, significant elevation of serum levels of C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor-α, significant deterioration of pathological scores and significant increase in the mean contractility response of the isolated ileal segments compared with normal untreated rats. Treatment with sulfasalazine, low dose of natrexone or their combination resulted in significant improvement of all measured parameters compared with enteritis group. The current finding could provide new interesting opportunity for developing new therapeutic approaches for treatment of Crohn's disease. Use of naltrexone, especially in small dose, has little side effects making it of interest for treatment of Crohn's disease. Also, it provides the possibility of reduced doses of other drugs if it is used as combined therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Low-Dose Naltrexone Treatment of Familial Benign Pemphigus (Hailey-Hailey Disease).

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Omer; Hogan, Sara R; Vij, Alok; Fernandez, Anthony P

    2017-08-02

    Familial benign pemphigus, or Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD), is a rare and debilitating genetic dermatosis characterized by chronic, recurrent vesicles, erosions, and maceration in flexural areas. Despite the reported therapeutic modalities, such as topical and systemic corticosteroids, systemic immunomodulators, topical and systemic retinoids, and laser, HHD can still be markedly difficult to control. To assess low-dose naltrexone hydrochloride in the treatment of recalcitrant HHD. In this case series, 3 patients with biopsy-proven recalcitrant HHD were evaluated in the outpatient dermatology clinic at the Cleveland Clinic. Each patient was treated with low-dose naltrexone hydrochloride at a dosage of 1.5 to 3.0 mg per day. No laboratory monitoring was necessary. Clinical response (healing of erosions, improvement in erythema, and alleviation of pain), adverse effects, and subjective quality of life were monitored throughout the treatment. The study dates were January 2016 to January 2017. Objective clinical response as assessed by the treating dermatologist, subjective quality of life as reported by the patient, and recorded adverse effects were monitored throughout the treatment at intervals of 2 to 3 months. The 3 patients included a woman in her 40s and 2 men in their 60s. Each patient exhibited at least an 80% improvement in extent of disease, with one patient demonstrating 90% clearance. All 3 patients had substantial improvement in quality of life, with one patient reporting improvement in his depression. No adverse effects were recorded. Low-dose naltrexone may represent a low-cost and low-risk alternative or adjunct in the treatment of HHD.

  1. Dose Dependent Reduction of Hazardous Alcohol Use in a Placebo-Controlled Trial of Naltrexone for Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    O’Malley, Stephanie S.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; McKee, Sherry A.; Leeman, Robert F.; Cooney, Ned L.; Meandzija, Boris; Wu, Ran; Makuch, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    The opiate antagonist naltrexone has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of alcohol dependence and as a component of treatment to reduce heavy drinking. At present, there are no published dose-ranging clinical trials of the oral preparation for treatment of problem drinking. The present study evaluated the effects of naltrexone on alcohol use among the subset of hazardous drinkers (N = 102) who participated in a placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trial of oral naltrexone (25 mg, 50 mg and 100 mg doses) combined with open-label transdermal nicotine patch for enhancing smoking cessation. On the primary outcome—no hazardous drinking (drinking that exceeded weekly or daily limits) during treatment—25 mg and 50 mg naltrexone were superior to placebo (each p < 0.05). These findings remained after controlling for baseline predictors or smoking abstinence during treatment. Time to remission of hazardous drinking was examined as a secondary outcome with definitions of hazardous drinking based on weekly limits, daily limits and the combination of weekly and daily limits and the results were consistent with the primary findings. In conclusion, the findings suggest that naltrexone can reduce the risk of hazardous drinking in smokers who are not seeking or receiving alcohol treatment, providing strong evidence for the pharmacological effects of naltrexone on drinking. This effect appears to favor lower doses that may be better tolerated and less expensive than the higher 100 mg dose. Given its efficacy and favorable side effect profile, the 25 mg dose should be considered for future studies of combination therapy. PMID:18796184

  2. Human abuse liability assessment of oxycodone combined with ultra-low-dose naltrexone

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Ryan K.; Harrison, Joseph A.; Strain, Eric C.; Bigelow, George E.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Prescription opioid abuse has risen dramatically in the United States as clinicians have increased opioid prescribing for alleviation of both acute and chronic pain. Opioid analgesics with decreased risk for abuse are needed. Objective Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that opioids combined with ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX) may have increased analgesic potency and have suggested reduced abuse or dependence liability. This study addressed whether addition of ultra-low-dose naltrexone might decrease the abuse liability of oxycodone (OXY) in humans. Materials and methods This double-blind, placebo-controlled study systematically examined the subjective and physiological effects of combining oral OXY and ultra-low NTX doses in 14 experienced opioid abusers. Seven acute drug conditions given at least 5 days apart were compared in a within-subject crossover design: placebo, OXY 20 mg, OXY 40 mg, plus each of the active OXY doses combined with 0.0001 and 0.001 mg NTX. Results The methods were sensitive to detecting opioid effects on abuse liability indices, with significant differences between all OXY conditions and placebo as well as between 20 and 40 mg OXY doses on positive subjective ratings (e.g., “I feel a good drug effect” or “I like the drug”), on observer- and participant-rated opioid agonist effects, and on a drug-versus-money value rating. There were no significant differences or evident trends associated with the addition of either NTX dose on any abuse liability indices. Conclusions The addition of ultra-low-dose NTX to OXY did not decrease abuse liability of acutely administered OXY in experienced opioid abusers. PMID:20386884

  3. Human abuse liability assessment of oxycodone combined with ultra-low-dose naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, David Andrew; Lanier, Ryan K; Harrison, Joseph A; Strain, Eric C; Bigelow, George E

    2010-07-01

    Prescription opioid abuse has risen dramatically in the United States as clinicians have increased opioid prescribing for alleviation of both acute and chronic pain. Opioid analgesics with decreased risk for abuse are needed. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that opioids combined with ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX) may have increased analgesic potency and have suggested reduced abuse or dependence liability. This study addressed whether addition of ultra-low-dose naltrexone might decrease the abuse liability of oxycodone (OXY) in humans. This double-blind, placebo-controlled study systematically examined the subjective and physiological effects of combining oral OXY and ultra-low NTX doses in 14 experienced opioid abusers. Seven acute drug conditions given at least 5 days apart were compared in a within-subject crossover design: placebo, OXY 20 mg, OXY 40 mg, plus each of the active OXY doses combined with 0.0001 and 0.001 mg NTX. The methods were sensitive to detecting opioid effects on abuse liability indices, with significant differences between all OXY conditions and placebo as well as between 20 and 40 mg OXY doses on positive subjective ratings (e.g., "I feel a good drug effect" or "I like the drug"), on observer- and participant-rated opioid agonist effects, and on a drug-versus-money value rating. There were no significant differences or evident trends associated with the addition of either NTX dose on any abuse liability indices. The addition of ultra-low-dose NTX to OXY did not decrease abuse liability of acutely administered OXY in experienced opioid abusers.

  4. Acute thermal hyperalgesia elicited by low-dose morphine in normal mice is blocked by ultra-low-dose naltrexone, unmasking potent opioid analgesia.

    PubMed

    Crain, S M; Shen, K F

    2001-01-05

    Our previous electrophysiologic studies on nociceptive types of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in culture demonstrated that extremely low fM-nM concentrations of morphine and many other bimodally-acting mu, delta and kappa opioid agonists can elicit direct excitatory opioid receptor-mediated effects, whereas higher (microM) opioid concentrations evoked inhibitory effects. Cotreatment with pM naloxone or naltrexone (NTX) plus fM-nM morphine blocked the excitatory effects and unmasked potent inhibitory effects of these low opioid concentrations. In the present study, hot-water-immersion tail-flick antinociception assays at 52 degrees C on mice showed that extremely low doses of morphine (ca. 0.1 microg/kg) can, in fact, elicit acute hyperalgesic effects, manifested by rapid onset of decreases in tail-flick latency for periods >3 h after drug administration. Cotreatment with ultra-low-dose NTX (ca. 1-100 pg/kg) blocks this opioid-induced hyperalgesia and unmasks potent opioid analgesia. The consonance of our in vitro and in vivo evidence indicates that doses of morphine far below those currently required for clinical treatment of pain may become effective when opioid hyperalgesic effects are blocked by coadministration of appropriately low doses of opioid antagonists. This low-dose-morphine cotreatment procedure should markedly attenuate morphine tolerance, dependence and other aversive side-effects.

  5. The use of low-dose naltrexone (LDN) as a novel anti-inflammatory treatment for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Younger, Jarred; Parkitny, Luke; McLain, David

    2014-04-01

    Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) has been demonstrated to reduce symptom severity in conditions such as fibromyalgia, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, and complex regional pain syndrome. We review the evidence that LDN may operate as a novel anti-inflammatory agent in the central nervous system, via action on microglial cells. These effects may be unique to low dosages of naltrexone and appear to be entirely independent from naltrexone's better-known activity on opioid receptors. As a daily oral therapy, LDN is inexpensive and well-tolerated. Despite initial promise of efficacy, the use of LDN for chronic disorders is still highly experimental. Published trials have low sample sizes, and few replications have been performed. We cover the typical usage of LDN in clinical trials, caveats to using the medication, and recommendations for future research and clinical work. LDN may represent one of the first glial cell modulators to be used for the management of chronic pain disorders.

  6. Ultra-Low Doses of Naltrexone Enhance the Antiallodynic Effect of Pregabalin or Gabapentin in Neuropathic Rats.

    PubMed

    Pineda-Farias, Jorge B; Caram-Salas, Nadia L; Salinas-Abarca, Ana B; Ocampo, Jorge; Granados-Soto, Vinicio

    2017-09-03

    Preclinical Research Treatment of neuropathic pain is an area of largely unmet medical need. Pregabalin and gabapentin are anticonvulsants widely used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Unfortunately, these drugs are only effective in 50-60% of the treated patients. In addition, both drugs have substantial side effects. Several studies have reported that ultralow doses of opioid receptor antagonists can induce analgesia and enhance the analgesic effect of opioids in rodents and humans. The objective of the present study was to assess the antiallodynic synergistic interaction between gabapentinoids and naltrexone in rats. Oral administration of pregabalin (ED50  = 2.79 ± 0.16 mg/kg) or gabapentin (ED50  = 21.04 ± 2.87 mg/kg) as well as intrathecal naltrexone (ED50  = 0.11 ± 0.02 ng) reduced in a dose-dependent manner tactile allodynia in rats. Maximal antiallodynic effects (∼100%) were reached with 30 mg/kg of pregabalin, 300 mg/kg of gabapentin or 0.5 ng of naltrexone. Co-administration of pregabalin or gabapentin and naltrexone in a fixed-dose ratio (1:1) remarkably reduced spinal nerve ligation-induced tactile allodynia showing a synergistic interaction. The data indicate that combinations of pregabalin or gabapentin and ultra-low doses of naltrexone are able to reduce tactile allodynia in neuropathic rats with lower doses that those used when drugs are given individually and with an improved side effects profile. Drug Dev Res, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A pilot trial of low-dose naltrexone in primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gironi, M; Martinelli-Boneschi, F; Sacerdote, P; Solaro, C; Zaffaroni, M; Cavarretta, R; Moiola, L; Bucello, S; Radaelli, M; Pilato, V; Rodegher, Me; Cursi, M; Franchi, S; Martinelli, V; Nemni, R; Comi, G; Martino, G

    2008-09-01

    A sixth month phase II multicenter-pilot trial with a low dose of the opiate antagonist Naltrexone (LDN) has been carried out in 40 patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). The primary end points were safety and tolerability. Secondary outcomes were efficacy on spasticity, pain, fatigue, depression, and quality of life. Clinical and biochemical evaluations were serially performed. Protein concentration of beta-endorphins (BE) and mRNA levels and allelic variants of the mu-opiod receptor gene (OPRM1) were analyzed. Five dropouts and two major adverse events occurred. The remaining adverse events did not interfere with daily living. Neurological disability progressed in only one patient. A significant reduction of spasticity was measured at the end of the trial. BE concentration increased during the trial, but no association was found between OPRM1 variants and improvement of spasticity. Our data clearly indicate that LDN is safe and well tolerated in patients with PPMS.

  8. Low-dose naltrexone for disease prevention and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Brown, Norman; Panksepp, Jaak

    2009-03-01

    The use of low-dose naltrexone (LDN) for the treatment and prophylaxis of various bodily disorders is discussed. Accumulating evidence suggests that LDN can promote health supporting immune-modulation which may reduce various oncogenic and inflammatory autoimmune processes. Since LDN can upregulate endogenous opioid activity, it may also have a role in promoting stress resilience, exercise, social bonding, and emotional well-being, as well as amelioration of psychiatric problems such a autism and depression. It is proposed that LDN can be used effectively as a buffer for a large variety of bodily and mental ailments through its ability to beneficially modulate both the immune system and the brain neurochemistries that regulate positive affect.

  9. The efficacy of a low dose combination of topiramate and naltrexone on ethanol reinforcement and consumption in rat models

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Catherine F; Protzuk, Omar A; Johnson, Bankole A; Lynch, Wendy J

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Combined medication approaches, by targeting multiple neurotransmitter systems involved in alcohol use disorders (AUDs), may be more efficacious than single-medication approaches. Objectives We examined, in animals models of consumption and reinforcement, the combined effects of naltrexone (an opioid antagonist) and topiramate (a GABA/glutamate modulator), two medications that have shown promise for treating AUDs, hypothesizing that their combination would be more efficacious than either alone. Methods The effects of naltrexone and topiramate on ethanol consumption were examined in alcohol preferring (P) rats (N=10) and in rats from their background strain (Wistar, N=9) using conditions that induce high levels of consumption (24-hr, 3-bottle, free-choice procedure). Low doses of each medication (1 mg/kg, naltrexone; 10 mg/kg, topiramate) were selected in an attempt to maximize their combined efficacy while minimizing potential side-effects. Their effects on ethanol reinforcement were assessed under a progressive-ratio schedule in additional groups of (N=22) P rats. A moderate dose of topiramate (20 mg/kg) was also included to verify topiramate’s efficacy on its own. Results In P rats, but not Wistar rats, the combination effectively and persistently reduced consumption; whereas, neither dose alone was effective. The combination and naltrexone alone were equally effective at reducing ethanol reinforcement; however, with the combination, but not naltrexone alone, this effect was selective for ethanol. All treatments produced a similar decrease in home-cage food consumption. The 20 mg/kg dose of topiramate also effectively reduced ethanol consumption and reinforcement. Conclusions With greater efficacy and fewer side-effects, the combination shows promise as a treatment for AUDs. PMID:24252444

  10. The efficacy of a low dose combination of topiramate and naltrexone on ethanol reinforcement and consumption in rat models.

    PubMed

    Moore, Catherine F; Protzuk, Omar A; Johnson, Bankole A; Lynch, Wendy J

    2014-01-01

    Combined medication approaches, by targeting multiple neurotransmitter systems involved in alcohol use disorders (AUDs), may be more efficacious than single-medication approaches. We examined, in animal models of consumption and reinforcement, the combined effects of naltrexone (an opioid antagonist) and topiramate (a GABA/glutamate modulator), two medications that have shown promise for treating AUDs, hypothesizing that their combination would be more efficacious than either alone. The effects of naltrexone and topiramate on ethanol consumption were examined in alcohol preferring (P) rats (N=10) and in rats from their background strain (Wistar, N=9) using conditions that induce high levels of consumption (24-h, 3-bottle, free-choice procedure). Low doses of each medication (1mg/kg, naltrexone; 10mg/kg, topiramate) were selected in an attempt to maximize their combined efficacy while minimizing potential side-effects. Their effects on ethanol reinforcement were assessed under a progressive-ratio schedule in additional groups of (N=22) P rats. A moderate dose of topiramate (20mg/kg) was also included to verify topiramate's efficacy on its own. In P rats, but not in Wistar rats, the combination effectively and persistently reduced consumption; whereas, neither dose alone was effective. The combination and naltrexone alone were equally effective at reducing ethanol reinforcement; however, with the combination, but not naltrexone alone, this effect was selective for ethanol. All treatments produced a similar decrease in home-cage food consumption. The 20mg/kg dose of topiramate also effectively reduced ethanol consumption and reinforcement. With greater efficacy and fewer side-effects, the combination shows promise as a treatment for AUDs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Low-dose naltrexone augmentation of nicotine replacement for smoking cessation with reduced weight gain: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Toll, Benjamin A; White, Marney; Wu, Ran; Meandzija, Boris; Jatlow, Peter; Makuch, Robert; O'Malley, Stephanie S

    2010-10-01

    Fear of weight gain is a significant obstacle to smoking cessation, preventing some smokers from attempting to quit. Several previous studies of naltrexone yielded promising results for minimization of post-quit weight gain. Given these encouraging findings, we endeavored to test whether minimization of weight gain might translate to better quit outcomes for a population that is particularly concerned about gaining weight upon quitting. Smokers (N=172) in this investigation were prospectively randomized to receive either 25 mg naltrexone or placebo for 27 weeks (1 week pre-, 26 weeks post-quit) for minimization of post-quit weight gain and smoking cessation. All participants received open label therapy with the nicotine patch for the first 8 weeks post-quit and behavioral counseling over the 27-week treatment. The 2 pre-specified primary outcomes were change in weight for continuously abstinent participants and biologically verified end-of-treatment 7-day point-prevalence abstinence at 26 weeks after the quit date. The difference in weight at 26 weeks post-quit between the naltrexone and placebo groups (naltrexone: 6.8 lbs ± 8.94 vs placebo: 9.7 lbs ± 9.19, p = 0.45) was not statistically different. Seven-day point-prevalence smoking abstinence rates at 26 weeks post-quit was not significantly different between the 2 groups (naltrexone: 22% vs placebo: 27%, p = 0.43). For smokers high in weight concern, the relatively small reduction in weight gain with low-dose naltrexone is not worth the potential for somewhat lower rates of smoking abstinence. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Low-dose Naltrexone Augmentation of Nicotine Replacement for Smoking Cessation with Reduced Weight Gain: A Randomized Trial*

    PubMed Central

    Toll, Benjamin A.; White, Marney; Wu, Ran; Meandzija, Boris; Jatlow, Peter; Makuch, Robert; O’Malley, Stephanie S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Fear of weight gain is a significant obstacle to smoking cessation, preventing some smokers from attempting to quit. Several previous studies of naltrexone yielded promising results for minimization of post-quit weight gain. Given these encouraging findings, we endeavored to test whether minimization of weight gain might translate to better quit outcomes for a population that is particularly concerned about gaining weight upon quitting. Methods Smokers (N = 172) in this investigation were prospectively randomized to receive either 25 mg naltrexone or placebo for 27 weeks (1 week pre-, 26 weeks post-quit) for minimization of post-quit weight gain and smoking cessation. All participants received open label therapy with the nicotine patch for the first 8 weeks post-quit and behavioral counseling over the 27 week treatment. The 2 pre-specified primary outcomes were change in weight for continuously abstinent participants and biologically verified end-of-treatment 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 26 weeks after the quit date. Results The difference in weight at 26 weeks post-quit between the naltrexone and placebo groups (naltrexone: 6.8 lbs ± 8.94 vs placebo: 9.7 lbs ± 9.19, p = .45) was not statistically different. Seven-day point prevalence smoking abstinence rates at 26 weeks post-quit was not significantly different between the 2 groups (naltrexone: 22% vs placebo: 27%, p = .43). Conclusions For smokers high in weight concern, the relatively small reduction in weight gain with low dose naltrexone is not worth the potential for somewhat lower rates of smoking abstinence. PMID:20542391

  13. Featured Article: Serum [Met(5)]-enkephalin levels are reduced in multiple sclerosis and restored by low-dose naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Michael D; Zagon, Ian S; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2017-09-01

    Low-dose naltrexone is a widely used off-label therapeutic prescribed for a variety of immune-related disorders. The mechanism underlying low-dose naltrexone's efficacy for fatigue, Crohn's disease, fibromyalgia, and multiple sclerosis is, in part, intermittent blockade of opioid receptors followed by upregulation of endogenous opioids. Short, intermittent blockade by naltrexone specifically blocks the opioid growth factor receptor resulting in biofeedback events that increase production of the endogenous opioid growth factor (OGF) (chemically termed [Met(5)]-enkephalin) facilitating interactions between opioid growth factor and opioid growth factor receptor that ultimately, result in inhibited cell proliferation. Preclinical studies have reported that enkephalin levels are deficient in animal models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Our hypothesis is that serum enkephalin levels are diminished in humans with multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice, and that change in serum opioid growth factor levels may serve as a reasonable candidate biomarker for the onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and response to therapy. To address this, we designed a two-part study to measure endogenous opioids in multiple sclerosis patients, and to investigate the temporal pattern of decline in serum enkephalin concentrations in mice with chronic progressive experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and treated with low-dose naltrexone. For comparison, we investigated whether low-dose naltrexone exposure in normal mice also resulted in altered enkephalin levels. In both animal models, we monitored tactile and heat sensitivity, as well as differential white blood cell counts as indicators of inflammation. Serum [Met(5)]-enkephalin levels were lower in humans with multiple sclerosis relative to non-multiple sclerosis patients, and low-dose naltrexone restored their levels. In experimental

  14. Problem drinking and low-dose naltrexone-assisted opioid detoxification.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Paolo; Peindl, Kathleen; Patkar, Ashwin A; Wu, Li-Tzy; Tharwani, Haresh M; Gorelick, David A

    2011-05-01

    The influence of alcohol use on opioid dependence is a major problem that warrants a search for more effective treatment strategies. The addition of very-low-dose naltrexone (VLNTX) to methadone taper was recently associated with reduced withdrawal intensity during detoxification. In a secondary analysis of these data, we sought to determine whether problem drinking affects detoxification outcomes and whether symptoms are influenced by VLNTX use. Opioid-dependent patients (N = 174) received naltrexone (0.125 or 0.250 mg/day) or placebo in a double-blind, randomized design during methadone-based, 6-day inpatient detoxification. Alcohol consumption was assessed at admission using the Addiction Severity Index and selfreport. Outcome measures were opioid withdrawal intensity, craving, and retention in treatment. Problem drinking-opioid dependent patients (n = 79) showed episodic heavy alcohol use and reported increased subjective opioid withdrawal intensity (p = .001), craving (p = .001), and significantly lower rate of retention in treatment (p = .02). Individuals with problem drinking and opioid dependence who were treated with VLNTX (n = 55) showed reduced withdrawal (p = .05) and a lower rate of treatment discontinuation (p = .03), resuming alcohol intake in smaller numbers the day following discharge (p = .03). Treatment effects were more pronounced on anxiety, perspiration, shakiness, nausea, stomach cramps, and craving. There were no group differences in use of adjuvant medications and no treatment-related adverse events. Heavy drinking is associated with worse opioid detoxification outcomes. The addition of VLNTX is safe and is associated with reduced withdrawal symptoms and better completion rate in these patients. Further studies should explore the use of VLNTX in detoxification and long-term treatment of combined alcohol-opioid dependence and alcohol dependence alone.

  15. Problem Drinking and Low-Dose Naltrexone-Assisted Opioid Detoxification*

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, Paolo; Peindl, Kathleen; Patkar, Ashwin A.; Wu, Li-Tzy; Tharwani, Haresh M.; Gorelick, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The influence of alcohol use on opioid dependence is a major problem that warrants a search for more effective treatment strategies. The addition of very-low-dose naltrexone (VLNTX) to methadone taper was recently associated with reduced withdrawal intensity during detoxification. In a secondary analysis of these data, we sought to determine whether problem drinking affects detoxification outcomes and whether symptoms are influenced by VLNTX use. Method: Opioid-dependent patients (N = 174) received naltrexone (0.125 or 0.250 mg/day) or placebo in a double-blind, randomized design during methadone-based, 6-day inpatient detoxification. Alcohol consumption was assessed at admission using the Addiction Severity Index and self-report. Outcome measures were opioid withdrawal intensity, craving, and retention in treatment. Results: Problem drinking—opioid dependent patients (n = 79) showed episodic heavy alcohol use and reported increased subjective opioid withdrawal intensity (p = .001), craving (p = .001), and significantly lower rate of retention in treatment (p = .02). Individuals with problem drinking and opioid dependence who were treated with VLNTX (n = 55) showed reduced withdrawal (p = .05) and a lower rate of treatment discontinuation (p = .03), resuming alcohol intake in smaller numbers the day following discharge (p = .03). Treatment effects were more pronounced on anxiety, perspiration, shakiness, nausea, stomach cramps, and craving. There were no group differences in use of adjuvant medications and no treatment-related adverse events. Conclusions: Heavy drinking is associated with worse opioid detoxification outcomes. The addition of VLNTX is safe and is associated with reduced withdrawal symptoms and better completion rate in these patients. Further studies should explore the use of VLNTX in detoxification and long-term treatment of combined alcohol—opioid dependence and alcohol dependence alone. PMID:21513688

  16. Naltrexone Prevents in Males and Attenuates in Females the Expression of Behavioral Sensitization to Ethanol Regardless of Maternal Separation.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Suzi E; Quadros, Isabel M H; Suchecki, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Maternal separation alters the activity of the opioid system, which modulates ethanol-induced stimulation and behavioral sensitization. This study examined the effects of an opioid antagonist, naltrexone (NTX), on the expression of behavioral sensitization to ethanol in adult male and female mice submitted to maternal separation from postnatal days (PNDs) 2 to 14. Whole litters of Swiss mice were either not separated [animal facility rearing (AFR)] or separated from their mothers for 3 h [long maternal separation (LMS)]. Starting on PND 90, male and female AFR and LMS mice received daily i.p. injections of saline (SAL) or ethanol (EtOH, 2.2 g/kg) for 21 days. Locomotor activity was assessed in cages containing photoelectric beams, once a week, to examine the development of behavioral sensitization. Five days after the end of the chronic treatment, animals were submitted to four locomotor activity tests spaced by 48 h, to assess the expression of behavioral sensitization. In all tests, animals received two i.p. injections with a 30-min interval and were then assessed for locomotor response to different treatment challenges, which were: SAL/SAL, SAL/EtOH (2.2 g/kg), NTX 2.0 mg/kg (NTX2)/EtOH, and NTX 4.0 mg/kg (NTX4)/EtOH. Regardless of maternal separation, EtOH-treated male and female mice displayed increased locomotor responses to EtOH during the 21-day treatment, indicating the development of behavioral sensitization. In the SAL/EtOH challenge, EtOH-treated LMS and AFR male and female mice exhibited higher locomotor activity than their SAL-treated counterparts, indicating the expression of sensitization. The coadministration of either dose of NTX blocked the expression of locomotor sensitization in both AFR and LMS male mice with a history of EtOH sensitization. In females, a significant attenuation of EtOH sensitization was promoted by both NTX doses, while still maintaining an augmented stimulant response to EtOH. Importantly, maternal separation

  17. Naltrexone Prevents in Males and Attenuates in Females the Expression of Behavioral Sensitization to Ethanol Regardless of Maternal Separation

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Suzi E.; Quadros, Isabel M. H.; Suchecki, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Maternal separation alters the activity of the opioid system, which modulates ethanol-induced stimulation and behavioral sensitization. This study examined the effects of an opioid antagonist, naltrexone (NTX), on the expression of behavioral sensitization to ethanol in adult male and female mice submitted to maternal separation from postnatal days (PNDs) 2 to 14. Whole litters of Swiss mice were either not separated [animal facility rearing (AFR)] or separated from their mothers for 3 h [long maternal separation (LMS)]. Starting on PND 90, male and female AFR and LMS mice received daily i.p. injections of saline (SAL) or ethanol (EtOH, 2.2 g/kg) for 21 days. Locomotor activity was assessed in cages containing photoelectric beams, once a week, to examine the development of behavioral sensitization. Five days after the end of the chronic treatment, animals were submitted to four locomotor activity tests spaced by 48 h, to assess the expression of behavioral sensitization. In all tests, animals received two i.p. injections with a 30-min interval and were then assessed for locomotor response to different treatment challenges, which were: SAL/SAL, SAL/EtOH (2.2 g/kg), NTX 2.0 mg/kg (NTX2)/EtOH, and NTX 4.0 mg/kg (NTX4)/EtOH. Regardless of maternal separation, EtOH-treated male and female mice displayed increased locomotor responses to EtOH during the 21-day treatment, indicating the development of behavioral sensitization. In the SAL/EtOH challenge, EtOH-treated LMS and AFR male and female mice exhibited higher locomotor activity than their SAL-treated counterparts, indicating the expression of sensitization. The coadministration of either dose of NTX blocked the expression of locomotor sensitization in both AFR and LMS male mice with a history of EtOH sensitization. In females, a significant attenuation of EtOH sensitization was promoted by both NTX doses, while still maintaining an augmented stimulant response to EtOH. Importantly, maternal separation

  18. Ultra-low-dose naltrexone reduces the rewarding potency of oxycodone and relapse vulnerability in rats.

    PubMed

    Leri, Francesco; Burns, Lindsay H

    2005-10-01

    Ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists have been shown to enhance opioid analgesia and alleviate opioid tolerance and dependence. Our present studies in male Sprague-Dawley rats assessed the abuse potential of oxycodone+ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX) versus oxycodone alone. The lowest NTX dose (1 pg/kg/infusion), but not slightly higher doses (10 and 100 pg/kg/infusion), enhanced oxycodone (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) intravenous self-administration, suggesting a reduced rewarding potency per infusion. During tests of reinstatement performed in extinction conditions, co-self-administration of any of these three NTX doses significantly reduced drug-seeking precipitated by priming injections of oxycodone (0.25 mg/kg, s.c.), a drug-conditioned cue, or foot-shock stress. During self-administration on a progressive-ratio schedule, animals self-administering oxycodone (0.1 mg/kg/infusion)+NTX (1 pg/kg/infusion) reached a "break-point" sooner and showed a trend toward less responding compared to rats self-administering oxycodone alone (0.1 mg/kg/infusion). In the final experiment, the addition of ultra-low-dose NTX (10 pg/kg, s.c.) enhanced the acute stimulatory effect of oxycodone (1 mg/kg, s.c.), as well as locomotor sensitization produced by repeated oxycodone administration (7 x 1 mg/kg, s.c.). In summary, this work shows that ultra-low-dose NTX co-treatment augments the locomotor effects of oxycodone as it enhances opioid analgesia, but reduces oxycodone's rewarding potency and subsequent vulnerability to relapse.

  19. Behavioural profile of exendin-4/naltrexone dose combinations in male rats during tests of palatable food consumption.

    PubMed

    Wright, F L; Rodgers, R J

    2014-09-01

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist exendin-4 potently suppresses food intake in animals and humans. However, little is known about the behavioural specificity of this effect either when administered alone or when co-administered with another anorectic agent. The present study characterises the effects of exendin-4, both alone and in combination with naltrexone, on behaviours displayed by male rats during tests with palatable mash. Experiment 1 examined the dose-response effects of exendin-4 (0.025-2.5 μg/kg, IP), while experiment 2 profiled the effects of low-dose combinations of the peptide (0.025 and 0.25 μg/kg) and naltrexone (0.1 mg/kg). In experiment 1, exendin-4 dose dependently suppressed food intake as well as the frequency and rate of eating. However, these effects were accompanied by dose-dependent reductions in all active behaviours and, at 2.5 μg/kg, a large increase in resting and disruption of the behavioural satiety sequence (BSS). In experiment 2, while exendin-4 (0.25 μg/kg) and naltrexone each produced a significant reduction in intake and feeding behaviour (plus an acceleration in the BSS), co-treatment failed to produce stronger effects than those seen in response to either compound alone. Similarities between the behavioural signature of exendin-4 and that previously reported for the emetic agent lithium chloride would suggest that exendin-4 anorexia is related to the aversive effects of the peptide. Furthermore, as low-dose combinations of the peptide with naltrexone failed to produce an additive/synergistic anorectic effect, this particular co-treatment strategy would not appear to have therapeutic significance.

  20. Low-dose naltrexone for the treatment of fibromyalgia: findings of a small, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, counterbalanced, crossover trial assessing daily pain levels.

    PubMed

    Younger, Jarred; Noor, Noorulain; McCue, Rebecca; Mackey, Sean

    2013-02-01

    To determine whether low dosages (4.5 mg/day) of naltrexone reduce fibromyalgia severity as compared with the nonspecific effects of placebo. In this replication and extension study of a previous clinical trial, we tested the impact of low-dose naltrexone on daily self-reported pain. Secondary outcomes included general satisfaction with life, positive mood, sleep quality, and fatigue. Thirty-one women with fibromyalgia participated in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, counterbalanced, crossover study. During the active drug phase, participants received 4.5 mg of oral naltrexone daily. An intensive longitudinal design was used to measure daily levels of pain. When contrasting the condition end points, we observed a significantly greater reduction of baseline pain in those taking low-dose naltrexone than in those taking placebo (28.8% reduction versus 18.0% reduction; P = 0.016). Low-dose naltrexone was also associated with improved general satisfaction with life (P = 0.045) and with improved mood (P = 0.039), but not improved fatigue or sleep. Thirty-two percent of participants met the criteria for response (defined as a significant reduction in pain plus a significant reduction in either fatigue or sleep problems) during low-dose naltrexone therapy, as contrasted with an 11% response rate during placebo therapy (P = 0.05). Low-dose naltrexone was rated equally tolerable as placebo, and no serious side effects were reported. The preliminary evidence continues to show that low-dose naltrexone has a specific and clinically beneficial impact on fibromyalgia pain. The medication is widely available, inexpensive, safe, and well-tolerated. Parallel-group randomized controlled trials are needed to fully determine the efficacy of the medication. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Gender Differences in Predictors of Treatment Attrition with High Dose Naltrexone in Cocaine and Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jesse J.; Pettinati, Helen M.; Kampman, Kyle M.; O’Brien, Charles P.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, we reported that naltrexone at 150mg/day significantly decreased cocaine and alcohol use for men, but not women with co-occurring cocaine and alcohol dependence. The present study is an exploratory investigation of predictors that explain the different gender response to naltrexone, with a particular focus on differential predictors of treatment attrition. No significant predictors were associated with treatment discontinuation in men. Women, however, were more likely to discontinue treatment when reporting severe pre-treatment psychiatric problems, or nausea while in treatment. Further research on the impact of pre-treatment and in-treatment gender differences with naltrexone is warranted. PMID:19034737

  2. Reduced Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines after Eight Weeks of Low-Dose Naltrexone for Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Parkitny, Luke; Younger, Jarred

    2017-04-18

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a complex, multi-symptom condition that predominantly affects women. The majority of those affected are unlikely to gain significant symptomatic control from the few treatments that are approved for FM. In this 10-week, single-blind, crossover trial we tested the immune effects of eight weeks of oral administration of low-dose naltrexone (LDN). We enrolled eight women with an average age of 46 years, symptom severity of 62 out of 100, and symptom duration of 14 years. We found that LDN was associated with reduced plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17A, IL-27, interferon (IFN)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-α, TGF-β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). We also found a 15% reduction of FM-associated pain and an 18% reduction in overall symptoms. The findings of this pilot trial suggest that LDN treatment in fibromyalgia is associated with a reduction of several key pro-inflammatory cytokines and symptoms. The potential role of LDN as an atypical anti-inflammatory medication should be explored further.

  3. Reduced Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines after Eight Weeks of Low-Dose Naltrexone for Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Parkitny, Luke; Younger, Jarred

    2017-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a complex, multi-symptom condition that predominantly affects women. The majority of those affected are unlikely to gain significant symptomatic control from the few treatments that are approved for FM. In this 10-week, single-blind, crossover trial we tested the immune effects of eight weeks of oral administration of low-dose naltrexone (LDN). We enrolled eight women with an average age of 46 years, symptom severity of 62 out of 100, and symptom duration of 14 years. We found that LDN was associated with reduced plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17A, IL-27, interferon (IFN)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-α, TGF-β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). We also found a 15% reduction of FM-associated pain and an 18% reduction in overall symptoms. The findings of this pilot trial suggest that LDN treatment in fibromyalgia is associated with a reduction of several key pro-inflammatory cytokines and symptoms. The potential role of LDN as an atypical anti-inflammatory medication should be explored further. PMID:28536359

  4. Combination of Levo-Tetrahydropalmatine and Low Dose Naltrexone: A Promising Treatment for Prevention of Cocaine Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Sushchyk, Sarah; Xi, Zheng-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Relapse to drug use is often cited as the major obstacle in overcoming a drug addiction. Whereas relapse can occur for a myriad of reasons, it is well established that complex neuroadaptations that occur over the course of addiction are major factors. Cocaine, as a potent dopamine transporter blocker, specifically induces alterations in the dopaminergic as well as other monoaminergic neurotransmissions, which lead to cocaine abuse and dependence. Evidence also suggests that adaptations in the endogenous opioids play important roles in pathophysiology of cocaine addiction. Following this evidence, we investigated a combination medication, levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) and low dose naltrexone (LDN), targeting primarily dopaminergic and endogenous opioid systems as a cocaine-relapse-prevention treatment. In the present study Wistar rats were used to assess the effects of l-THP and LDN on cocaine self-administration, drug-seeking behavior during cocaine reinstatement, spontaneous locomotion, and effects on the endogenous opioid system. We determined that the combination of l-THP and LDN reduces drug-seeking behavior during reinstatement more potently than l-THP alone. Additionally, the combination of l-THP and LDN attenuates the sedative locomotor effect induced by l-THP. Furthermore, we revealed that treatment with the combination of l-THP and LDN has an upregulatory effect on both plasma β-endorphin and hypothalamic POMC that was not observed in l-THP-treated groups. These results suggest that the combination of l-THP and LDN has great potential as an effective and well-tolerated medication for cocaine relapse prevention. PMID:26903543

  5. Combination of Levo-Tetrahydropalmatine and Low Dose Naltrexone: A Promising Treatment for Prevention of Cocaine Relapse.

    PubMed

    Sushchyk, Sarah; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Wang, Jia Bei

    2016-05-01

    Relapse to drug use is often cited as the major obstacle in overcoming a drug addiction. Whereas relapse can occur for a myriad of reasons, it is well established that complex neuroadaptations that occur over the course of addiction are major factors. Cocaine, as a potent dopamine transporter blocker, specifically induces alterations in the dopaminergic as well as other monoaminergic neurotransmissions, which lead to cocaine abuse and dependence. Evidence also suggests that adaptations in the endogenous opioids play important roles in pathophysiology of cocaine addiction. Following this evidence, we investigated a combination medication, levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) and low dose naltrexone (LDN), targeting primarily dopaminergic and endogenous opioid systems as a cocaine-relapse-prevention treatment. In the present study Wistar rats were used to assess the effects ofl-THP and LDN on cocaine self-administration, drug-seeking behavior during cocaine reinstatement, spontaneous locomotion, and effects on the endogenous opioid system. We determined that the combination ofl-THP and LDN reduces drug-seeking behavior during reinstatement more potently thanl-THP alone. Additionally, the combination ofl-THP and LDN attenuates the sedative locomotor effect induced byl-THP. Furthermore, we revealed that treatment with the combination ofl-THP and LDN has an upregulatory effect on both plasmaβ-endorphin and hypothalamic POMC that was not observed inl-THP-treated groups. These results suggest that the combination ofl-THP and LDN has great potential as an effective and well-tolerated medication for cocaine relapse prevention. U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright.

  6. Effectiveness of low-dose naltrexone in the post-detoxification treatment of opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Paolo; Patkar, Ashwin A; Peindl, Kathleen; Murray, Heather W; Wu, Li-Tzy; Hubbard, Robert

    2007-10-01

    The clinical use of naltrexone (NTX) in the treatment of opioid dependence has been limited because of poor compliance and inconsistent outcomes. In particular, the therapeutic benefit of extended treatment with NTX after opioid detoxification is unclear. The present study evaluated whether the augmentation with low-dose NTX during the post-detoxification treatment of opioid dependence would improve outcomes. In an open-label naturalistic design, 435 opioid-dependent patients who had completed inpatient detoxification were offered the choice of entering 1 of the 2 outpatient treatment arms: clonidine extended treatment (CET) (clonidine + psychosocial treatment), or enhanced extended treatment (EET) (oral NTX [1-10 mg/d] + CET) for 21 days. The primary outcome measure was retention in treatment. Secondary outcomes included abstinence from opioids, dropouts, and adherence to postdischarge care. One hundred sixty-two patients (37.2%) accepted EET. Subjects receiving EET stayed longer in the program (F = 64.4; P = 0.000), were less likely to drop out, used less opioids, and followed through with referral to long-term outpatient treatment in a higher number, compared with patients in the CET arm (P = 0.000 in each case). The NTX + clonidine combination was safe and well tolerated. This preliminary study indicates the potential benefit of augmentation with low-dose NTX to improve outcomes after opioid detoxification for a preferred group of patients. Randomized controlled trials are necessary to further evaluate the role of low-dose NTX in the outpatient treatment of opioid dependence.

  7. Naltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Naltrexone injection is used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped drinking large amounts of alcohol to avoid drinking again. Naltrexone injection is also used along with counseling and social ...

  8. Long-term remission of adenoid cystic tongue carcinoma with low dose naltrexone and vitamin D3--a case report.

    PubMed

    Khan, Akbar

    2014-09-01

    Naltrexone (ReVia®) is a long-acting oral pure opiate antagonist which is approved for the treatment of alcohol addiction as a 50mg per day tablet. The mechanism of action is complete opiate blockade, which removes the pleasure sensation derived from drinking alcohol (created by endorphins). Low Dose Naltrexone ("LDN") in the range of 3-4.5 mg per day has been shown to have the opposite effect - brief opiate receptor blockade with resulting upregulation of endogenous opiate production. Through the work of Bihari and Zagon, it has been determined that the level of the endogenous opiate methionine-enkephalin is increased by LDN. Met-enkephalin is involved in regulating cell proliferation and can inhibit cancer cell growth in multiple cell lines. Increased met-enkepahlin levels created by LDN thus have the potential to inhibit cancer growth in humans. Phase II human trials of met-enkephalin, case reports published by Berkson and Rubin, and the clinical experience of Bihari confirmed the potential role of LDN in treating pancreatic and other cancers. However, large scale trials are lacking and are unlikely to be funded given the current non-proprietary status of naltrexone. A case report is presented of successful treatment of adenoid cystic carcinoma as further evidence of LDN's potential as a unique non-toxic cancer therapy.

  9. Adding ultralow-dose naltrexone to oxycodone enhances and prolongs analgesia: a randomized, controlled trial of Oxytrex.

    PubMed

    Chindalore, Vishala L; Craven, Richard A; Yu, K Peony; Butera, Peter G; Burns, Lindsay H; Friedmann, Nadav

    2005-06-01

    Oxytrex is a novel drug that combines oxycodone with ultralow-dose naltrexone, an opioid antagonist. Ultralow-dose opioid antagonists have been demonstrated to enhance and prolong opiate analgesia and alleviate opioid tolerance and withdrawal in rodents. This 3-week, Phase II clinical trial assessed safety and analgesic efficacy of Oxytrex in patients with moderate to severe pain from osteoarthritis. Patients with a pain score > or =5 received placebo, oxycodone 4 times a day (qid), Oxytrex qid, or Oxytrex twice a day (bid). All active treatment groups received the same total daily dose and dose escalation of oxycodone starting at 10 and ending at 40 mg/day. Importantly, the Oxytrex bid group received a lower daily dose of naltrexone than Oxytrex qid (0.002 vs 0.004 mg/day). Oxytrex bid produced a 39% reduction in pain intensity, which was significantly greater than that of placebo (P < .001), oxycodone qid (P = .006), and Oxytrex qid (P = .003). Oxytrex bid was also superior to placebo in quality of analgesia (P = .002), duration of pain control each day (P = .05), patients' global assessments (P = .04), and the Western Ontario and MacMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index total score (P = .03). The incidence of side effects was comparable between active treatments. In this Phase II dose-ranging study, Oxytrex bid demonstrated greater pain relief with a more convenient dosing schedule compared to oxycodone qid. Preclinical data have shown ultralow-dose opioid antagonists to enhance and prolong opioid analgesia while reducing analgesic tolerance and physical dependence. Recent molecular pharmacology data show a mechanism of action to be the prevention of aberrant G protein coupling by opioid receptors that underlies opioid tolerance and dependence.

  10. Naltrexone attenuates cue- but not drug-induced methamphetamine seeking: a possible mechanism for the dissociation of primary and secondary reward.

    PubMed

    Anggadiredja, Kusnandar; Sakimura, Katsuya; Hiranita, Takato; Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki

    2004-09-24

    The present study was aimed to clarify the role of the opioid system in the reinstatement of methamphetamine (METH)-seeking behavior in METH self-administering rats. Following 12 days of self-administration of METH, the replacement of METH with saline resulted in a gradual decrease in lever press responses (extinction). Under extinction conditions, METH-priming or re-exposure to cues previously paired with METH infusion markedly increased the responses (reinstatement of drug-seeking). Naltrexone administered 30 min before re-exposure to METH-associated cues attenuated reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. On the other hand, administration of this antagonist had no effect on the reinstatement induced by METH-priming. We discussed these findings in relation with the dissociation of primary and secondary reward, suggesting that an opioid mechanism is responsible for this dissociation. Further, these results indicate the possibility of using naltrexone as an anti-relapse agent.

  11. Naltrexone treatment for opioid dependence: does its effectiveness depend on testing the blockade?

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Maria A; Bisaga, Adam; Mariani, John J; Glass, Andrew; Levin, Frances R; Comer, Sandra D; Nunes, Edward V

    2013-11-01

    FDA approval of long-acting injectable naltrexone (Vivitrol) for opioid dependence highlights the relevance of understanding mechanisms of antagonist treatment. Principles of learning suggest an antagonist works through extinguishing drug-seeking behavior, as episodes of drug use ("testing the blockade") fail to produce reinforcement. We hypothesized that opiate use would moderate the effect of naltrexone, specifically, that opiate-positive urines precede dropout in the placebo group, but not in the active-medication groups. An 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (N=57), compared the efficacy of low (192 mg) and high (384 mg) doses of a long-acting injectable naltrexone (Depotrex) with placebo (Comer et al., 2006). A Cox proportional hazard model was fit, modeling time-to-dropout as a function of treatment assignment and urine toxicology during treatment. Interaction of opiate urines with treatment group was significant. Opiate-positive urines predicted dropout on placebo and low-dose, but less so on high-dose naltrexone, where positive urines were more likely followed by sustained abstinence. Among patients with no opiate-positive urines, retention was higher in both low- and high-dose naltrexone conditions, compared to placebo. Findings confirm that injection naltrexone produces extinction of drug-seeking behavior after episodes of opiate use. Adequate dosage appears important, as low-dose naltrexone resembled the placebo group; opiate positive urines were likely to be followed by dropout from treatment. The observation of high treatment retention among naltrexone-treated patients who do not test the blockade, suggests naltrexone may also exert direct effects on opiate-taking behavior that do not depend on extinction, perhaps by attenuating craving or normalizing dysregulated hedonic or neuroendocrine systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Naltrexone treatment for opioid dependence: Does its effectiveness depend on testing the blockade?

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Maria A.; Bisaga, Adam; Mariani, John J.; Glass, Andrew; Levin, Frances R.; Comer, Sandra D.; Nunes, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    Background FDA approval of long-acting injectable naltrexone (Vivitrol) for opioid dependence highlights the relevance of understanding mechanisms of antagonist treatment. Principles of learning suggest an antagonist works through extinguishing drug-seeking behavior, as episodes of drug use (“testing the blockade”) fail to produce reinforcement. We hypothesized that opiate use would moderate the effect of naltrexone, specifically, that opiate-positive urines precede dropout in the placebo group, but not in the active-medication groups. Methods An 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (N=57), compared the efficacy of low (192-mg) and high (384-mg) doses of a long-acting injectable naltrexone (Depotrex) with placebo (Comer et al., 2006). A Cox proportional hazard model was fit, modeling time-to-dropout as a function of treatment assignment and urine toxicology during treatment. Results Interaction of opiate urines with treatment group was significant. Opiate-positive urines predicted dropout on placebo and low-dose, but less so on high-dose naltrexone, where positive urines were more likely followed by sustained abstinence. Among patients with no opiate-positive urines, retention was higher in both low- and high-dose naltrexone conditions, compared to placebo. Conclusions Findings confirm that injection naltrexone produces extinction of drug-seeking behavior after episodes of opiate use. Adequate dosage appears important, as low-dose naltrexone resembled the placebo group; opiate positive urines were likely to be followed by dropout from treatment. The observation of high treatment retention among naltrexone-treated patients who do not test the blockade, suggests naltrexone may also exert direct effects on opiate-taking behavior that do not depend on extinction, perhaps by attenuating craving or normalizing dysregulated hedonic or neuroendocrine systems. PMID:23827259

  13. Low-dose naltrexone and opioid consumption: a drug utilization cohort study based on data from the Norwegian prescription database.

    PubMed

    Raknes, Guttorm; Småbrekke, Lars

    2017-06-01

    Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) is used in a wide range of conditions, including chronic pain and fibromyalgia. Because of the opioid antagonism of naltrexone, LDN users are probably often warned against concomitant use with opioids. In this study, based on data from the Norwegian prescription database, we examine changes in opioid consumption after starting LDN therapy. We included all Norwegian patients (N = 3775) with at least one recorded LDN prescription in 2013 and at least one dispensed opioid prescription during the 365 days preceding the first LDN prescription. We allocated the patients into three subgroups depending on the number of collected LDN prescriptions and recorded the number of defined daily doses (DDDs) on collected prescriptions on opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and other analgesics and antipyretics from the same patients. Among the patients collecting ≥4 LDN prescriptions, annual average opioid consumption was reduced by 41 DDDs per person (46%) compared with that of the previous year. The reduction was 12 DDDs per person (15%) among users collecting two to three prescriptions and no change among those collecting only one LDN prescription. We observed no increase in the number of DDDs in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or other analgesics and antipyretics corresponding to the decrease in opioid use. Possibly, LDN users avoided opioids because of warnings on concomitant use or the patients continuing on LDN were less opioid dependent than those terminating LDN. Therapeutic effects of LDN contributing to lower opioid consumption cannot be ruled out. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology & Drug Safety Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology & Drug Safety Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Low‐dose naltrexone and opioid consumption: a drug utilization cohort study based on data from the Norwegian prescription database

    PubMed Central

    Småbrekke, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Low‐dose naltrexone (LDN) is used in a wide range of conditions, including chronic pain and fibromyalgia. Because of the opioid antagonism of naltrexone, LDN users are probably often warned against concomitant use with opioids. In this study, based on data from the Norwegian prescription database, we examine changes in opioid consumption after starting LDN therapy. Methods We included all Norwegian patients (N = 3775) with at least one recorded LDN prescription in 2013 and at least one dispensed opioid prescription during the 365 days preceding the first LDN prescription. We allocated the patients into three subgroups depending on the number of collected LDN prescriptions and recorded the number of defined daily doses (DDDs) on collected prescriptions on opioids, nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs and other analgesics and antipyretics from the same patients. Results Among the patients collecting ≥4 LDN prescriptions, annual average opioid consumption was reduced by 41 DDDs per person (46%) compared with that of the previous year. The reduction was 12 DDDs per person (15%) among users collecting two to three prescriptions and no change among those collecting only one LDN prescription. We observed no increase in the number of DDDs in nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs or other analgesics and antipyretics corresponding to the decrease in opioid use. Conclusions Possibly, LDN users avoided opioids because of warnings on concomitant use or the patients continuing on LDN were less opioid dependent than those terminating LDN. Therapeutic effects of LDN contributing to lower opioid consumption cannot be ruled out. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology & Drug Safety Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:28370746

  15. Naltrexone at low doses upregulates a unique gene expression not seen with normal doses: Implications for its use in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wai M; Scott, Katherine A; Dennis, Jayne L; Kaminska, Elwira; Levett, Alan J; Dalgleish, Angus G

    2016-08-01

    It has been reported that lower doses of the opioid antagonist naltrexone are able to reduce tumour growth by interfering with cell signalling as well as by modifying the immune system. We have evaluated the gene expression profile of a cancer cell line after treatment with low-dose naltrexone (LDN), and assessed the effect that adapting treatment schedules with LDN may have on enhancing efficacy. LDN had a selective impact on genes involved with cell cycle regulation and immune modulation. Similarly, the pro-apoptotic genes BAD and BIK1 were increased only after LDN. Continuous treatment with LDN had little effect on growth in different cell lines; however, altering the treatment schedule to include a phase of culture in the absence of drug following an initial round of LDN treatment, resulted in enhanced cell killing. Furthermore, cells pre-treated with LDN were more sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of a number of common chemotherapy agents. For example, priming HCT116 with LDN before treatment with oxaliplatin significantly increased cell killing to 49±7.0 vs. 14±2.4% in cultures where priming was not used. Interestingly, priming with NTX before oxaliplatin resulted in just 32±1.8% cell killing. Our data support further the idea that LDN possesses anticancer activity, which can be improved by modifying the treatment schedule.

  16. Naltrexone Improves Quit Rates, Attenuates Smoking Urge, and Reduces Alcohol Use in Heavy Drinking Smokers Attempting to Quit Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Fridberg, Daniel J.; Cao, Dingcai; Grant, Jon E.; King, Andrea C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heavy drinking smokers (HDS) have more difficulty quitting smoking than lighter drinkers or abstainers. The opioid antagonist naltrexone may improve smoking quit rates and reduce alcohol use in drinker–smokers, but its relative efficacy in smokers with a range of drinking patterns is unknown. The current study tested the hypothesis that HDS would show differential benefit of naltrexone versus placebo relative to moderate-to-light or nondrinking smokers in terms of improving smoking outcomes and reducing alcohol consumption. Methods Adult smokers (N = 315) enrolled in a 12-week, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of 50 mg naltrexone for smoking cessation were categorized into subgroups based upon past 6-month drinking patterns: HDS (n = 69; i.e., averaged ≥2 heavy drinking episodes per month), moderate-to-light drinking smokers (n = 204, i.e., consumed 1 drink up to a maximum of <2 heavy drinking episodes per month on average), or nondrinking smokers (n = 42, no alcohol consumed in the past 6 months). The groups were compared on the main study outcomes of biochemically verified prolonged abstinence quit rates (i.e., no smoking weeks 2 to 12), and smoking urge and alcohol use (drinks/wk) during treatment. Results Naltrexone significantly increased 12-week smoking abstinence rates and decreased smoking urge and alcohol use among HDS, but not moderate-to-light or nondrinking smokers. Mediation analyses in HDS revealed that naltrexone’s effect on smoking urge during the first 4 weeks of treatment mediated its effect on quit rates. Conclusions HDS appear to be particularly sensitive to naltrexone effects on smoking and drinking outcomes. This group may represent an important target for adjunctive treatment with naltrexone to optimize smoking cessation outcomes. PMID:25335648

  17. Low dose naltrexone (LDN) enhances maturation of bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs).

    PubMed

    Meng, Jingjuan; Meng, Yiming; Plotnikoff, Nicholas P; Youkilis, Gene; Griffin, Noreen; Shan, Fengping

    2013-12-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that immune cell activation and proliferation were sensitive to the effects of naltrexone, a non-peptidic δ-opioid receptor selective antagonist and opioid receptors on BMDCs have been detected [1]. However, there is little prior data published on naltrexone and DCs. Therefore, we hypothesized that LDN could exert modulating effect on BMDCs. In present study, we studied influence of LDN on both phenotypic and functional maturation of BMDCs. Changes of BMDC post-treatment with LDN were evaluated using conventional light microscope and transmission electron microscopy (TEM); flow cytometry(FCM); cytochemistry; acid phosphatase activity(ACP) test; FITC-dextran bio-assay; mixed lymphocytes and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We have found that LDN enhances maturation of BMDCs as evidenced by 1) up-regulating the expression of MHC II, CD40, CD83, CD80 and CD86 molecules on BMDCs; 2) down-regulating the rates of pinocytosis and phagocytosis accompanied by the results of decreased ACP, and FITC-dextran bio-assay; 3) mounting potential of BMDCs to drive T cell; and 4) inducing secretion of higher levels of IL-12 and TNF-α. It is therefore concluded that LDN can efficiently promote the maturation of BMDCs via precise modulation inside and outside BMDCs. Our study has provided meaningful mode of action on the role of LDN in immunoregulation, and rationale on future application of LDN for enhancing host immunity in cancer therapy and potent use in the design of DC-based vaccines for a number of diseases.

  18. Effects of Naltrexone on Smoking Cessation Outcomes and Weight Gain in Nicotine-Dependent Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    King, Andrea C.; Cao, Dingcai; O'Malley, Stephanie S.; Kranzler, Henry R.; Cai, Xiaochen; deWit, Harriet; Matthews, Alicia K.; Stachoviak, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone is efficacious in smoking cessation and whether sex moderates the response. We assessed smoking quit rates and weight gain in a double-blind randomized trial comparing oral naltrexone (n = 162) with placebo (n = 154) in nicotine-dependent participants who wanted to quit smoking. The medication was gradually titrated up to 50 mg during the week before the quit date and then maintained at this dose for 12 weeks. For the first 4 weeks after the quit date, all participants received a nicotine patch to mitigate tobacco withdrawal and attended weekly individual cognitive-behavioral smoking cessation counseling sessions. After this time, participants continued with naltrexone or placebo through 12 weeks. Follow-up assessments were conducted at 26 and 52 weeks. During treatment, naltrexone (vs placebo) increased quit rates, attenuated smoking urge, and reduced weight gain. At follow-up, after medication discontinuation, the effect of naltrexone on improving quit rates was no longer evident. Men and women experienced different benefits from naltrexone; men showed greater reductions in smoking, whereas women showed greater reductions in weight gain. In sum, naltrexone showed acute efficacy in treating nicotine dependence, but after the medication was discontinued, the effect on quit rate was not maintained. Further study of naltrexone in smoking cessation treatment and reduction of cessation-related weight gain, as well as preclinical investigation of mechanisms underlying sex differences, is warranted. PMID:22926596

  19. Relative oral bioavailability of morphine and naltrexone derived from crushed morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride extended-release capsules versus intact product and versus naltrexone solution: a single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, three-way crossover trial in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Franklin K; Stark, Jeffrey G; Bieberdorf, Frederick A; Stauffer, Joe

    2010-06-01

    Morphine sulfate/sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride (HCl) (MS-sNT) extended-release fixed-dose combination capsules, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in August 2009 for chronic moderate to severe pain, contain extended-release morphine pellets with a sequestered core of the opioid antagonist naltrexone. MS-sNT was designed so that if the product is tampered with by crushing, the naltrexone becomes bioavailable to mitigate morphine-induced subjective effects, rendering the product less attractive for tampering. The primary aim of this study was to compare the oral bioavailability of naltrexone and its metabolite 6-beta-naltrexol, derived from crushed pellets from MS-sNT capsules, to naltrexone solution. This study also assessed the relative bioavailability of morphine from crushed pellets from MS-sNT capsules and that from the whole, intact product. This single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, 3-period, 3-treatment crossover trial was conducted in healthy volunteers. Adults admitted to the study center underwent a 10-hour overnight fast before study drug administration. Each subject received all 3 of the following treatments, 1 per session, separated by a 14-day washout: tampered pellets (crushed for >or=2 minutes with a mortar and pestle) from a 60-mg MS-sNT capsule (60 mg morphine/2.4 mg naltrexone); 60-mg whole, intact MS-sNT capsule; and oral naltrexone HCl (2.4 mg) solution. Plasma concentrations of naltrexone and 6-beta-naltrexol were measured 0 to 168 hours after administration. Morphine pharmaco-kinetics of crushed and whole pellets were determined 0 to 72 hours after administration. The analysis of relative bioavailability was based on conventional FDA criteria for assuming bioequivalence; that is, 90% CIs for ratios of geometric means (natural logarithm [In]-transformed C(max) and AUC) fell within the range of 80% to 125%. Subjects underwent physical examinations, clinical laboratory tests, and ECG at screening and study

  20. Lack of Specific Involvement of (+)-Naloxone and (+)-Naltrexone on the Reinforcing and Neurochemical Effects of Cocaine and Opioids.

    PubMed

    Tanda, Gianluigi; Mereu, Maddalena; Hiranita, Takato; Quarterman, Juliana C; Coggiano, Mark; Katz, Jonathan L

    2016-10-01

    Effective medications for drug abuse remain a largely unmet goal in biomedical science. Recently, the (+)-enantiomers of naloxone and naltrexone, TLR4 antagonists, have been reported to attenuate preclinical indicators of both opioid and stimulant abuse. To further examine the potential of these compounds as drug-abuse treatments, we extended the previous assessments to include a wider range of doses and procedures. We report the assessment of (+)-naloxone and (+)-naltrexone on the acute dopaminergic effects of cocaine and heroin determined by in vivo microdialysis, on the reinforcing effects of cocaine and the opioid agonist, remifentanil, tested under intravenous self-administration procedures, as well as the subjective effects of cocaine determined by discriminative-stimulus effects in rats. Pretreatments with (+)-naloxone or (+)-naltrexone did not attenuate, and under certain conditions enhanced the stimulation of dopamine levels produced by cocaine or heroin in the nucleus accumbens shell. Furthermore, although an attenuation of either cocaine or remifentanil self-administration was obtained at the highest doses of (+)-naloxone and (+)-naltrexone, those doses also attenuated rates of food-maintained behaviors, indicating a lack of selectivity of TLR4 antagonist effects for behaviors reinforced with drug injections. Drug-discrimination studies failed to demonstrate a significant interaction of (+)-naloxone with subjective effects of cocaine. The present studies demonstrate that under a wide range of doses and experimental conditions, the TLR4 antagonists, (+)-naloxone and (+)-naltrexone, did not specifically block neurochemical or behavioral abuse-related effects of cocaine or opioid agonists.

  1. Dose-dependent reduction of hazardous alcohol use in a placebo-controlled trial of naltrexone for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Stephanie S; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; McKee, Sherry A; Leeman, Robert F; Cooney, Ned L; Meandzija, Boris; Wu, Ran; Makuch, Robert W

    2009-06-01

    The opiate antagonist naltrexone (Ntx) has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of alcohol dependence and as a component of treatment to reduce heavy drinking. At present, there are no published dose-ranging clinical trials of the oral preparation for treatment of problem drinking. The present study evaluated the effects of Ntx on alcohol use among the subset of hazardous drinkers (n=102) who participated in a placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trial of oral Ntx (25-mg, 50-mg and 100-mg doses) combined with open-label transdermal nicotine patch for enhancing smoking cessation. On the primary outcome--no hazardous drinking (drinking that exceeded weekly or daily limits) during treatment--25 mg and 50 mg Ntx were superior to placebo (each p<0.05). These findings remained after controlling for baseline predictors or smoking abstinence during treatment. Time to remission of hazardous drinking was examined as a secondary outcome with definitions of hazardous drinking based on weekly limits, daily limits and the combination of weekly and daily limits and the results were consistent with the primary findings. In conclusion, the findings suggest that Ntx can reduce the risk of hazardous drinking in smokers who are not seeking or receiving alcohol treatment, providing strong evidence for the pharmacological effects of Ntx on drinking. This effect appears to favour lower doses that may be better tolerated and less expensive than the higher 100-mg dose. Given its efficacy and favourable side-effect profile, the 25-mg dose should be considered for future studies of combination therapy.

  2. Pharmacodynamic Profile of Tramadol in Humans: Influence of Naltrexone Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, William W.; Lofwall, Michelle R.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Craig, Lori B.; Siegel, Anthony J.; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Tramadol is a prescription analgesic that activates mu opioid and monoamine receptor systems. Tramadol is thought to have limited abuse potential compared to mu opioid agonists, but laboratory data indicate that it shares some of their pharmacodynamic effects. Objectives This study evaluated the effect of mu opioid receptor blockade with naltrexone on the pharmacodynamic action of tramadol in humans. Methods This inpatient, double-blind, randomized, within-subject study examined the effects of oral placebo, tramadol (87.5, 175 and 350 mg) and hydromorphone (4 and 16 mg; positive control) after 1 hr pretreatment with oral naltrexone (0 and 50 mg). Ten recreational opioid users completed the study. Pharmacodynamic effects were measured before and for 7 hr after initial drug administration. Results Lower doses of tramadol and hydromorphone were generally placebo-like. Hydromorphone (16 mg) produced prototypic mu opioid agonist-like effects that were blocked by naltrexone. Tramadol (350 mg) produced miosis and increased ratings of “Good Effects” and “Liking ,” but also increased ratings of “Bad Effects.” Naltrexone reversed tramadol-induced physiological effects and mydriasis emerged, but unlike results with hydromorphone, naltrexone only partially attenuated tramadol’s positive subjective effects and actually enhanced several unpleasant subjective ratings. Conclusions Naltrexone can be used to disentangle the mixed neuropharmacological actions of tramadol. High dose tramadol produces a mixed profile of effects. These data suggest that both mu and non-mu opioid actions play a role in tramadol’s subjective profile of action. PMID:22623016

  3. Low-dose naltrexone suppresses ovarian cancer and exhibits enhanced inhibition in combination with cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Renee N; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2011-07-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecological malignancies. Although initial therapeutic modalities are successful, 65% of these women relapse with only palliative treatments available thereafter. Endogenous opioids repress the proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells in vitro, and do so in a receptor-mediated manner. The present study examined whether modulation of opioid systems by the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX), alone or in combination with standard of care therapies (taxol/paclitaxel, cisplatin), alters human ovarian cancer cell proliferation in tissue culture and tumor progression in mice. Administration of NTX for six hours every two days, but not continuously, reduced DNA synthesis and cell replication from vehicle-treated controls in tissue culture. Moreover, brief exposure to NTX in combination with taxol or cisplatin had an enhanced anticancer action. Mice with established ovarian tumors and treated with a low dosage of NTX (LDN), which invokes a short period of opioid receptor blockade, repressed tumor progression in a non-toxic fashion by reducing DNA synthesis and angiogenesis but not altering cell survival. The combination of LDN with cisplatin, but not taxol, resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on tumorigenesis with enhanced depression of DNA synthesis and angiogenesis. LDN combined with cisplatin alleviated the toxicity (e.g. weight loss) associated with cisplatin. LDN treatment upregulated the expression of the opioid growth factor (OGF, chemical term ([Met(5)]-enkephalin) and its receptor, OGFr. Previous tissue culture studies have reported that OGF is the only opioid peptide with antiproliferative activity on ovarian cancer cells, with OGF action mediated by OGFr. Thus, the common denominator of intermittent opioid receptor blockade by short-term NTX or LDN on ovarian cancer proliferation and tumorigenesis recorded herein appears to be related to the OGF-OGFr axis. These preclinical data may offer a non

  4. Safety and tolerability of low-dose naltrexone therapy in children with moderate to severe Crohn's disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jill P; Field, Douglas; Bingaman, Sandra I; Evans, Robert; Mauger, David T

    2013-04-01

    There is an unmet need for safe and effective medicines to treat children with Crohn's disease. Recently, investigations have shown an association between endogenous opioid peptides and inflammatory cells. The aims of this study were to evaluate the safety and tolerability of an opioid antagonist, naltrexone, in children with moderate to severe Crohn's disease. A pilot clinical trial was conducted in children with moderate to severe Crohn's disease. Fourteen subjects with a mean age of 12.3 years (range, 8 to 17 y) were enrolled. Children were randomized to placebo or naltrexone (0.1 mg/kg) orally for 8 weeks followed by open-labeled treatment with 8 additional weeks of naltrexone. Safety and toxicity were monitored by physical examinations and blood chemistries. Clinical activity was assessed by the Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) and Quality of life was monitored by the Impact III survey. Oral naltrexone was well tolerated without any serious adverse events in children with moderate to severe Crohn's disease. PCDAI scores significantly decreased from pretreatment values (34.2±3.3) with an 8-week course of naltrexone therapy (21.7±3.9) (P=0.005). Twenty-five percent of those treated with naltrexone were considered in remission (score ≤10) and 67% had improved with mild disease activity (decrease in PCDAI score by at least 10 points) at the end of the study. Systemic and social quality of life improved with naltrexone treatment (P=0.035). Naltrexone therapy seems safe with limited toxicity when given to children with Crohn's disease and may reduce disease activity.

  5. Ex vivo studies for the passive transdermal delivery of low-dose naltrexone from a cream; detection of naltrexone and its active metabolite, 6β-naltrexol, using a novel LC Q-ToF MS assay.

    PubMed

    Dodou, Kalliopi; Armstrong, Andrew; Kelly, Ivan; Wilkinson, Simon; Carr, Kevin; Shattock, Paul; Whiteley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Naltrexone (NTX) is a long-acting opiate antagonist. Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) therapy has shown promising results in the treatment of several autoimmune disorders. Our aim was to formulate NTX into a cream for the delivery of LDN and develop an analytical technique for the quantification of NTX and its active metabolite 6-β-naltrexol (NTXol) during transdermal diffusion cell permeation studies. A 1% w/w NTX cream was formulated and drug permeation was examined over 24 h using static Franz diffusion cells mounted with pig skin. A Liquid Chromatography Quadrupole-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS Q-ToF) method was developed for the detection of NTX and NTXol in the receptor solution, skin membrane and residual cream on the donor chamber after completion of the diffusion studies. The cream formulation exhibited steady state release of NTX over 24 h after an initial lag time of 2.74 h. The bioconversion of NTX to NTXol in the skin membrane was 1.1%. It was concluded that the cream may be an effective formulation for the sustained transdermal delivery of LDN. The novel LC Q-ToF MS method allowed the accurate measurement of NTX and NTXol levels across the diffusion cell assemblies and the quantification of NTX metabolism in the skin.

  6. Naltrexone for Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... careful not to take any narcotics, such as codeine, morphine or heroin, while you are taking naltrexone. Do not take any cough medicine with codeine in it while you are taking naltrexone. Naltrexone ...

  7. Naltrexone: Not Just for Opioids Anymore.

    PubMed

    Sudakin, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Naltrexone is a semi-synthetic opioid with competitive antagonist activity at mu opioid receptors. Its efficacy has been demonstrated in the treatment of alcohol and opioid dependence, but adherence to daily dosing has been recognized as a factor limiting long-term effectiveness. Recently, a long-acting injectable formulation of naltrexone has received FDA-approval for treating alcohol and opioid dependence. This article reviews the pharmacology of naltrexone, the current evidence supporting the use of extended-release naltrexone, and the clinical challenges in the induction of patients to this medication.

  8. Efficacy and safety of naltrexone use in pediatric patients with autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Elchaar, Gladys M; Maisch, Nicole M; Augusto, Laura M Gianni; Wehring, Heidi J

    2006-06-01

    To review the efficacy and safety of naltrexone in pediatric patients with autistic disorder (AD). Using the terms pediatric, child, naltrexone, autism, and autistic disorder, a literature search was performed using MEDLINE (1966-May 18, 2006) and the International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1971-May 18, 2006) database. The references of these articles were scanned for additional relevant literature. All articles describing or evaluating the efficacy and/or safety of naltrexone in pediatric patients with AD were included in this review. Three case reports, 8 case series, and 14 clinical studies were identified as pertinent. Naltrexone has been used most commonly at doses ranging from 0.5 to 2 mg/kg/day and found to be predominantly effective in decreasing self-injurious behavior. Naltrexone may also attenuate hyperactivity, agitation, irritability, temper tantrums, social withdrawal, and stereotyped behaviors. Patients may also exhibit improved attention and eye contact. Transient sedation was the most commonly reported adverse event. Small sample size, short duration, and inconsistent evaluative methods characterize the available research. A child affected by AD may benefit from a trial of naltrexone therapy, particularly if the child exhibits self-injurious behavior and other attempted therapies have failed. Serious adverse effects have not been reported in short-term studies.

  9. Separate and Combined Effects of Naltrexone and Extended-Release Alprazolam on the Reinforcing, Subject-Rated, and Cardiovascular Effects of Methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Katherine R.; Lile, Joshua A.; Stoops, William W.; Glaser, Paul E.A.; Hays, Lon R.; Rush, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    Opioid antagonists (e.g., naltrexone) and positive modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors (e.g., alprazolam) each modestly attenuate the abuse-related effects of stimulants. A previous study demonstrated that acute pretreatment with the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam attenuated a greater number of the subject-rated effects of d-amphetamine than the constituent drugs alone. This study tested the hypothesis that maintenance on the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam XR would attenuate the reinforcing and “positive” subject-rated effects of methamphetamine to a greater extent than the constituent drugs alone. Eight non-treatment-seeking, stimulant-using individuals completed a placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind inpatient protocol. Participants were maintained on naltrexone (0 and 50 mg), alprazolam XR (0 and 1 mg), and the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam XR (50 mg and 1 mg, respectively) for 6–7 days. Under each maintenance condition, participants sampled intranasal doses of methamphetamine (0, 10, and 30 mg), and were then offered the opportunity to work for the sampled dose on a modified progressive-ratio procedure. Subject-rated drug effect questionnaires, psychomotor, and physiology assessments were collected. Intranasal methamphetamine functioned as a reinforcer and produced prototypical stimulant-like “positive” subject-rated and physiological effects. Maintenance on naltrexone significantly decreased the reinforcing, but not subject-rated drug effects of 10 mg methamphetamine. Alprazolam XR and the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam XR did not impact methamphetamine self-administration or subject-rated drug effects. The results support the continued evaluation of naltrexone for methamphetamine dependence, as well as the identification of other drugs that enhance its ability to reduce drug-taking behavior. PMID:27043121

  10. Separate and Combined Effects of Naltrexone and Extended-Release Alprazolam on the Reinforcing, Subject-Rated, and Cardiovascular Effects of Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Marks, Katherine R; Lile, Joshua A; Stoops, William W; Glaser, Paul E A; Hays, Lon R; Rush, Craig R

    2016-06-01

    Opioid antagonists (eg, naltrexone) and positive modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (eg, alprazolam) each modestly attenuate the abuse-related effects of stimulants. A previous study demonstrated that acute pretreatment with the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam attenuated a greater number of the subject-rated effects of D-amphetamine than the constituent drugs alone. This study tested the hypothesis that maintenance on the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam XR would attenuate the reinforcing and "positive" subject-rated effects of methamphetamine to a greater extent than the constituent drugs alone.Eight non-treatment-seeking, stimulant-using individuals completed a placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind inpatient protocol. Participants were maintained on naltrexone (0 and 50 mg), alprazolam XR (0 and 1 mg), and the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam XR (50 mg and 1 mg, respectively) for 6 to 7 days. Under each maintenance condition, participants sampled intranasal doses of methamphetamine (0, 10, and 30 mg), and were then offered the opportunity to work for the sampled dose on a modified progressive-ratio procedure. Subject-rated drug effect questionnaires, psychomotor, and physiology assessments were collected.Intranasal methamphetamine functioned as a reinforcer and produced prototypical stimulant-like "positive" subject-rated and physiological effects. Maintenance on naltrexone significantly decreased the reinforcing, but not subject-rated drug effects of 10-mg methamphetamine. Alprazolam XR and the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam XR did not impact methamphetamine self-administration or subject-rated drug effects. The results support the continued evaluation of naltrexone for methamphetamine dependence, as well as the identification of other drugs that enhance its ability to reduce drug-taking behavior.

  11. Long-Acting Injectable Naltrexone Induction: A Randomized Trial of Outpatient Opioid Detoxification With Naltrexone Versus Buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Maria; Bisaga, Adam; Pavlicova, Martina; Choi, C Jean; Mishlen, Kaitlyn; Carpenter, Kenneth M; Levin, Frances R; Dakwar, Elias; Mariani, John J; Nunes, Edward V

    2017-05-01

    At present there is no established optimal approach for transitioning opioid-dependent adults to extended-release injection naltrexone (XR-naltrexone) while preventing relapse. The authors conducted a trial examining the efficacy of two methods of outpatient opioid detoxification for induction to XR-naltrexone. Participants were 150 opioid-dependent adults randomly assigned 2:1 to one of two outpatient detoxification regimens, naltrexone-assisted detoxification or buprenorphine-assisted detoxification, followed by an injection of XR-naltrexone. Naltrexone-assisted detoxification lasted 7 days and included a single day of buprenorphine followed by ascending doses of oral naltrexone along with clonidine and other adjunctive medications. Buprenorphine-assisted detoxification included a 7-day buprenorphine taper followed by a week-long delay before administration of XR-naltrexone, consistent with official prescribing information for XR-naltrexone. Participants from both groups received behavioral therapy focused on medication adherence and a second dose of XR-naltrexone. Compared with participants in the buprenorphine-assisted detoxification condition, participants assigned to naltrexone-assisted detoxification were significantly more likely to be successfully inducted to XR-naltrexone (56.1% compared with 32.7%) and to receive the second injection at week 5 (50.0% compared with 26.9%). Both models adjusted for primary type of opioid use, route of opioid administration, and morphine equivalents at baseline. These results demonstrate the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of low-dose naltrexone, in conjunction with single-day buprenorphine dosing and adjunctive nonopioid medications, for initiating adults with opioid dependence to XR-naltrexone. This strategy offers a promising alternative to the high rates of attrition and relapse currently observed with agonist tapers in both inpatient and outpatient settings.

  12. Revisiting the ALA/N (alpha-lipoic acid/low-dose naltrexone) protocol for people with metastatic and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer: a report of 3 new cases.

    PubMed

    Berkson, Burton M; Rubin, Daniel M; Berkson, Arthur J

    2009-12-01

    The authors, in a previous article, described the long-term survival of a man with pancreatic cancer and metastases to the liver, treated with intravenous alpha-lipoic acid and oral low-dose naltrexone (ALA/N) without any adverse effects. He is alive and well 78 months after initial presentation. Three additional pancreatic cancer case studies are presented in this article. At the time of this writing, the first patient, GB, is alive and well 39 months after presenting with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas with metastases to the liver. The second patient, JK, who presented to the clinic with the same diagnosis was treated with the ALA/N protocol and after 5 months of therapy, PET scan demonstrated no evidence of disease. The third patient, RC, in addition to his pancreatic cancer with liver and retroperitoneal metastases, has a history of B-cell lymphoma and prostate adenocarcinoma. After 4 months of the ALA/N protocol his PET scan demonstrated no signs of cancer. In this article, the authors discuss the poly activity of ALA: as an agent that reduces oxidative stress, its ability to stabilize NF(k)B, its ability to stimulate pro-oxidant apoptosic activity, and its discriminative ability to discourage the proliferation of malignant cells. In addition, the ability of lowdose naltrexone to modulate an endogenous immune response is discussed. This is the second article published on the ALA/N protocol and the authors believe the protocol warrants clinical trial.

  13. Prevention and diminished expression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by low dose naltrexone (LDN) or opioid growth factor (OGF) for an extended period: Therapeutic implications for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Kristen A; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2011-03-24

    Endogenous opioids inhibit the onset and progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) with 30days of treatment. This study examined the long term effects of the opioid growth factor (OGF, [Met(5)]-enkephalin) and a low dose of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (LDN) on expression of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced EAE. C57BL/6 mice began receiving daily injections of 10mg/kg OGF (MOG+OGF), 0.1mg/kg naltrexone (MOG+LDN), or saline (MOG+Vehicle) at the time of EAE induction and continuing for 60days. In contrast to 100% of the MOG+Vehicle group with behavioral symptoms of EAE, 63% and 68% of the MOG+OGF and MOG+LDN mice expressed disease. Both severity and disease indices of EAE in OGF- and LDN-treated mice were notably decreased from MOG+Vehicle cohorts. By day 60, 6- and 3-fold more animals in the MOG+OGF and MOG+LDN groups, respectively, had a remission compared to MOG+Vehicle mice. Neuropathological studies revealed i) astrocyte activation and neuronal damage as early as day 10 (prior to behavioral symptoms) in all MOG-injected groups, ii) a significant reduction of activated astrocytes in MOG+OGF and MOG+LDN groups compared to MOG+Vehicle mice at day 30, and iii) no demyelination on day 60 in mice treated with OGF or LDN and not displaying disease symptoms. These results indicate that treatment with OGF or LDN had no deleterious long-term repercussions and did not exacerbate EAE, but i) halted progression of disease, ii) reversed neurological deficits, and iii) prevented the onset of neurological dysfunction across a considerable span of time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride extended-release capsules: naltrexone release, pharmacodynamics, and tolerability.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Franklin; Setnik, Beatrice

    2011-01-01

    Morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride extended-release capsules (EMBEDA, King Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Bristol, TN), indicated for management of chronic, moderate-to-severe pain, contain pellets of extended-release morphine sulfate with a sequestered naltrexone core (MS-sNT). Taken as directed, morphine provides analgesia while naltrexone remains sequestered; if tampered with by crushing, naltrexone is released to mitigate morphine-induced euphoric effects. While it is necessary to establish that formulations intended to reduce attractiveness for abuse are successful in doing so, it is also necessary to demonstrate that product therapeutic integrity is maintained for patients. Data were reviewed from 3 studies to determine: 1) the quantity of naltrexone released when MS-sNT pellets are crushed (MS-sNTC) for at least 2 minutes with mortar and pestle); 2) the extent to which the naltrexone released upon crushing mitigated morphine-induced subjective effects; and 3) whether sequestered naltrexone precipitates opioid withdrawal when MS-sNT is taken as directed. The naltrexone bioavailability study compared naltrexone release from MS-sNTC with that from whole intact MS-sNT capsules (MS-sNTW) and an equal naltrexone solution (NS) dose. Equivalent bioavailability was established if 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for geometric mean ratios (maximum plasma naltrexone concentration [Cmax] and area under the concentration-time curve extrapolated to infinity [AUC∞]) fell between 80% and 125%. The oral pharmacodynamic study assessed drug liking and euphoria and pharmacokinetic properties of MS-sNTC and MS-sNTW compared with morphine sulfate solution (MSS) and placebo. The 12-month, open-label (OL) safety study evaluated safety of MS-sNT administered orally as directed in patients with chronic, moderate-to-severe pain. Safety assessments included withdrawal symptoms based on the Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS). Naltrexone from MS-sNTC met criteria for equivalent

  15. Management of relapse in naltrexone maintenance for heroin dependence.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Maria A; Garawi, Fatima; Bisaga, Adam; Comer, Sandra D; Carpenter, Kenneth; Raby, Wilfrid N; Anen, Stephen J; Brooks, Adam C; Jiang, Huiping; Akerele, Evaristo; Nunes, Edward V

    2007-12-01

    Opioid dependence is a growing public health problem. Maintenance on the antagonist naltrexone for clinic- or office-based treatment of opioid dependence is plagued by high rates of relapse. This paper identifies critical determinants of lapses to opioid use during naltrexone maintenance. Time retained in treatment was examined as a function of whether lapses to opioid use occurred while adherent to naltrexone (blocked use), or after having missed naltrexone doses (unblocked). Participants (N=83) met DSM-IV criteria for opioid dependence and identified a significant other willing to participate in their treatment. Following inpatient detoxification, participants were enrolled in a 26-week outpatient course of therapy and naltrexone maintenance. Patients with unblocked use had a very high rate of dropout (10% retained at 6 months), dropout usually occurring within 2 weeks after unblocked use. Patients with only blocked use had less dropout (33% retained at 6 months). However, episodes of blocked use were often followed by unblocked use and dropout. During naltrexone maintenance for opioid dependence unblocked opioid use calls for immediate intervention, such as detoxification or switching to the partial agonist buprenorphine. Episodes of blocked use warrant increased clinical attention, such as direct observation of naltrexone ingestion, increased dose, or increased intensity of treatment contact. Maintenance on oral naltrexone is a fragile treatment because it is so easily undermined by episodes of opioid use while non-compliant. New long-acting injectable or implantable formulations of naltrexone may address this limitation and should be investigated for treatment of opioid dependence.

  16. The opioid growth factor (OGF) and low dose naltrexone (LDN) suppress human ovarian cancer progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Renee N; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2011-08-01

    The opioid growth factor (OGF) and its receptor, OGFr, serve as a tonically active inhibitory axis regulating cell proliferation in normal cells and a variety of cancers, including human ovarian cancer. Blockade of OGF and OGFr with the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (NTX) upregulates expression of OGF and OGFr. Administration of a low dosage of NTX (LDN) blocks endogenous opioids from opioid receptors for a short period of time (4-6 h) each day, providing a window of 18-20 h for the upregulated opioids and receptors to interact. The present study investigated the repercussions of upregulating the OGF-OGFr axis by treatment with OGF or LDN on human ovarian tumorigenesis in vivo. Female nude mice were transplanted intraperitoneally with SKOV-3 human ovarian cancer cells and treated on a daily basis with OGF (10 mg/kg), LDN (0.1 mg/kg), or an equivalent volume of vehicle (saline). Tumor burden, as well as DNA synthesis, apoptosis, and angiogenesis was assessed in tumor tissue following 40 days of treatment. OGF and LDN markedly reduced ovarian tumor burden (tumor nodule number and weight). The mechanism of action was targeted to an inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis; no changes in cell survival were noted. This study shows that a native opioid pathway can suppress human ovarian cancer in a xenograft model, and provides novel non-toxic therapies for the treatment of this lethal neoplasia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dose reduction using a dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Fleischmann, Dominik; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors recently proposed a dynamic, prepatient x-ray attenuator capable of producing a piecewise-linear attenuation profile customized to each patient and viewing angle. This attenuator was intended to reduce scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), dynamic range, and dose by redistributing flux. In this work the authors tested the ability of the attenuator to reduce dose and SPR in simulations. Methods: The authors selected four clinical applications, including routine full field-of-view scans of the thorax and abdomen, and targeted reconstruction tasks for an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the pancreas. Raw data were estimated by forward projection of the image volume datasets. The dynamic attenuator was controlled to reduce dose while maintaining peak variance by solving a convex optimization problem, assuminga priori knowledge of the patient anatomy. In targeted reconstruction tasks, the noise in specific regions was given increased weighting. A system with a standard attenuator (or “bowtie filter”) was used as a reference, and used either convex optimized tube current modulation (TCM) or a standard TCM heuristic. The noise of the scan was determined analytically while the dose was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Scatter was also estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. The sensitivity of the dynamic attenuator to patient centering was also examined by shifting the abdomen in 2 cm intervals. Results: Compared to a reference system with optimized TCM, use of the dynamic attenuator reduced dose by about 30% in routine scans and 50% in targeted scans. Compared to the TCM heuristics which are typically used withouta priori knowledge, the dose reduction is about 50% for routine scans. The dynamic attenuator gives the ability to redistribute noise and variance and produces more uniform noise profiles than systems with a conventional bowtie filter. The SPR was also modestly reduced by 10% in the thorax and 24% in the abdomen. Imaging with the dynamic

  18. Dose reduction using a dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Scott S; Fleischmann, Dominik; Pelc, Norbert J

    2014-02-01

    The authors recently proposed a dynamic, prepatient x-ray attenuator capable of producing a piecewise-linear attenuation profile customized to each patient and viewing angle. This attenuator was intended to reduce scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), dynamic range, and dose by redistributing flux. In this work the authors tested the ability of the attenuator to reduce dose and SPR in simulations. The authors selected four clinical applications, including routine full field-of-view scans of the thorax and abdomen, and targeted reconstruction tasks for an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the pancreas. Raw data were estimated by forward projection of the image volume datasets. The dynamic attenuator was controlled to reduce dose while maintaining peak variance by solving a convex optimization problem, assuminga priori knowledge of the patient anatomy. In targeted reconstruction tasks, the noise in specific regions was given increased weighting. A system with a standard attenuator (or "bowtie filter") was used as a reference, and used either convex optimized tube current modulation (TCM) or a standard TCM heuristic. The noise of the scan was determined analytically while the dose was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Scatter was also estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. The sensitivity of the dynamic attenuator to patient centering was also examined by shifting the abdomen in 2 cm intervals. Compared to a reference system with optimized TCM, use of the dynamic attenuator reduced dose by about 30% in routine scans and 50% in targeted scans. Compared to the TCM heuristics which are typically used withouta priori knowledge, the dose reduction is about 50% for routine scans. The dynamic attenuator gives the ability to redistribute noise and variance and produces more uniform noise profiles than systems with a conventional bowtie filter. The SPR was also modestly reduced by 10% in the thorax and 24% in the abdomen. Imaging with the dynamic attenuator was relatively

  19. Dose reduction using a dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Fleischmann, Dominik; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors recently proposed a dynamic, prepatient x-ray attenuator capable of producing a piecewise-linear attenuation profile customized to each patient and viewing angle. This attenuator was intended to reduce scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), dynamic range, and dose by redistributing flux. In this work the authors tested the ability of the attenuator to reduce dose and SPR in simulations. Methods: The authors selected four clinical applications, including routine full field-of-view scans of the thorax and abdomen, and targeted reconstruction tasks for an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the pancreas. Raw data were estimated by forward projection of the image volume datasets. The dynamic attenuator was controlled to reduce dose while maintaining peak variance by solving a convex optimization problem, assuming a priori knowledge of the patient anatomy. In targeted reconstruction tasks, the noise in specific regions was given increased weighting. A system with a standard attenuator (or “bowtie filter”) was used as a reference, and used either convex optimized tube current modulation (TCM) or a standard TCM heuristic. The noise of the scan was determined analytically while the dose was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Scatter was also estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. The sensitivity of the dynamic attenuator to patient centering was also examined by shifting the abdomen in 2 cm intervals. Results: Compared to a reference system with optimized TCM, use of the dynamic attenuator reduced dose by about 30% in routine scans and 50% in targeted scans. Compared to the TCM heuristics which are typically used without a priori knowledge, the dose reduction is about 50% for routine scans. The dynamic attenuator gives the ability to redistribute noise and variance and produces more uniform noise profiles than systems with a conventional bowtie filter. The SPR was also modestly reduced by 10% in the thorax and 24% in the abdomen. Imaging with the

  20. Naltrexone augmentation in OCD: a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Amiaz, Revital; Fostick, Leah; Gershon, Ari; Zohar, Joseph

    2008-06-01

    Current treatments for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) rely primarily on serotonergic mechanisms. However, approximately 30% of patients do not respond to serotonin reuptake inhibitors and remain chronically ill. Given the behavioral similarities between some of the compulsive behaviors in OCD and addiction, we hypothesized that the opioid antagonist naltrexone might attenuate compulsions in OCD as well. The effect of naltrexone augmentation to SRI was compared to placebo in 10 OCD outpatients who had not responded to an adequate dose of SSRI or clomipramine for at least 2 months. Participants underwent 5 weeks of treatment with naltrexone or placebo (and 1 week of tapering) in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. Patients were evaluated weekly using the Y-BOCS, CGI, HAM-A, and MADRS scales. A two-way repeated measures MANOVA revealed no significant effect for Y-BOCS. However, while receiving naltrexone, patients had significantly higher scores on CGI, MADRS and HAM-A as compared to placebo. The lack of significant findings on OC symptoms could be due to either ceiling effect or alternatively, due to a non-specific exacerbation on anxiety and depression but not on OC symptoms.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of carfentanil and naltrexone in domestic goats (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Mutlow, Adrian; Isaza, Ramiro; Carpenter, James W; Koch, David E; Hunter, Robert P

    2004-12-01

    Using a crossover study design, the pharmacokinetics of carfentanil and naltrexone after i.v., i.m., and s.c. administration were determined in eight domestic goats (Capra hircus). Serial blood samples were taken up to 120 hr after carfentanil administration, and the plasma drug concentrations were determined using liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy. All goats were immobilized with 40 microg/kg carfentanil i.m., although the resulting neurologic effects varied considerably. Plasma profiles showed rapid carfentanil absorption and a simple biphasic decline for 12-48 hr. Naltrexone given at 100 mg naltrexone/mg carfentanil 30 min after carfentanil administration produced rapid reversal of immobilization after all routes of administration. Variable fluctuations in the naltrexone plasma concentrations during the first 2.5-3.5 hr were observed, followed by a more consistent biphasic decline. The time to standing was significantly shorter after i.v. compared with s.c. naltrexone, although the time difference (1 min) had little clinical relevance. No statistically significant differences between the naltrexone pharmacokinetic parameters measured for the three routes of naltrexone administration were identified, although the recoveries after i.m. administration were, subjectively, the smoothest. The carfentanil half-life did not differ significantly in the goats given naltrexone by different routes. Although it is currently recommended that the naltrexone dose be divided into s.c. and i.v. portions, this practice does not appear to offer any benefit.

  2. Depot naltrexone: long-lasting antagonism of the effects of heroin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Eric D.; Kleber, Herbert D.; Nuwayser, Elie S.; Kerrigan, James H.; Fischman, Marian W.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, is currently approved as a treatment for heroin dependence. However, naltrexone is generally not well accepted by patients, and medication non-compliance is a difficult obstacle to treatment. A sustained-release form of naltrexone may improve compliance. Objective The present study was designed to evaluate the time course, safety, and effectiveness of a depot formulation of naltrexone (Depotrex®). Methods Twelve heroin-dependent individuals participated in an 8-week inpatient study. After a 1-week detoxification period, six participants received 192 mg naltrexone base and six participants received 384 mg naltrexone base. For safety, the low dose of depot naltrexone was tested before the high dose. The effects of heroin (0, 6.25, 12.5, 18.75, 25 mg, IV) were evaluated for the next 6 weeks. One dose of heroin was tested per day on Mondays through Fridays, and the entire dose range was tested each week. Active heroin doses were administered in ascending order during the week, while placebo could be administered on any day. Subjective, performance, and physiological effects were measured both before and after heroin administration. The hypotheses were that depot naltrexone would antagonize the effects of heroin, and that the high dose of depot naltrexone would produce a more effective and longer-lasting antagonism than the low dose. Results The low and high doses of depot naltrexone antagonized heroin-induced subjective ratings for 3 and 5 weeks, respectively. Plasma levels of naltrexone remained above 1 ng/ml for approximately 3 and 4 weeks after administration of 192 mg and 384 mg naltrexone. Other than the initial discomfort associated with the injection of depot naltrexone, there were no untoward side-effects. Conclusions: These results suggest that this depot formulation of naltrexone provides a safe, effective, long-lasting antagonism of the effects of heroin. PMID:11823887

  3. Naltrexone-induced hypothermia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ary, M; Chesarek, W; Sorensen, S M; Lomax, P

    1976-10-01

    Naltrexone, in relatively high doses, has been reported to cause a fall in body temperature in human ex-heroin addicts who had been abstinent for at least 6 weeks. The underlying mechanism of this hypothermic effect has been investigated in rats. The first consideration was that the temperature change was a reflection of delayed withdrawal but rats implanted with a morphine pellet 45 days earlier showed no significant change in temperature after a dose of naltrexone that caused marked withdrawal hypothermia in dependent rats implanted 3 days previously. A fall in core temperature was only induced in rats after doses of 80 and 160 mg/kg i.p. of naltrexone. Behavioral thermoregulatory studies revealed that the animals correct the falling body temperature by increased exposure to a radiant heat source indicating that the central thermostats had not been significantly affected by the drug. These data suggest that the major component in the hypothermic effect of naltrexone is activation of efferent heat loss pathways or peripheral heat loss mechanisms. Due to current suggestions that opiate receptors might represent the receptors for an endogenous transmitter the results are discussed in relation to this consideration. When compared to the sites and mechanism of action of opiates on thermoregulation the results with naltrexone lend little support to the hypothesis that the fall in temperature is due to displacement of an endogenous substance from central opiate receptors.

  4. A sudden and unprecedented increase in low dose naltrexone (LDN) prescribing in Norway. Patient and prescriber characteristics, and dispense patterns. A drug utilization cohort study.

    PubMed

    Raknes, Guttorm; Småbrekke, Lars

    2017-02-01

    Following a TV documentary in 2013, there was a tremendous increase in low dose naltrexone (LDN) use in a wide range of unapproved indications in Norway. We aim to describe the extent of this sudden and unprecedented increase in LDN prescribing, to characterize patients and LDN prescribers, and to estimate LDN dose sizes. LDN prescriptions recorded in the Norwegian Prescription Database (NorPD) in 2013 and 2014, and sales data not recorded in NorPD from the only Norwegian LDN manufacturer were included in the study. According to NorPD, 15 297 patients (0.3% of population) collected at least one LDN prescription. The actual number of users was higher as at least 23% of total sales were not recorded in NorPD. After an initial wave, there was a steady stream of new and persistent users throughout the study period. Median patient age was 52 years, and 74% of patients were female. Median daily dose was 3.7 mg. Twenty percent of all doctors and 71% of general medicine practitioners registered in Norway in 2014 prescribed LDN at least once. The TV documentary on LDN in Norway was followed by a large increase in LDN prescribing, and the proportion of LDN users went from an insignificant number to 0.3% of the population. There was a high willingness to use and prescribe off label despite limited evidence. Observed median LDN dose, and age and gender distribution were as expected in typical LDN using patients. © 2016 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Sustained-release naltrexone for opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Lobmaier, P; Kornør, H; Kunøe, N; Bjørndal, A

    2008-04-16

    Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist which effectively blocks heroin effects. Since opioid dependence treatment with naltrexone tablets suffers from high dropout rates, several depot injections and implants are under investigation. Sustained-release formulations are claimed to be effective, but a systematic review of the literature is lacking. To evaluate the effectiveness of sustained-release naltrexone for opioid dependence and its adverse effects in different study populations. The following databases were searched from their inception to November 2007: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, trial database at http://clinicaltrials.gov, available NIDA monographs, CPDD and AAAP conference proceedings. The reference lists of identified studies, published reviews and relevant web sides were searched manually. Study authors and drug companies were contacted to obtain any unpublished material or missing data. To evaluate effectiveness only RCTs were included. To evaluate safety, any clinical trial reporting adverse effects was assessed. Treatment condition was extended to include alcohol dependent subjects and healthy volunteers. Reviewers independently evaluated the reports, rated methodological quality and extracted data. Analyses were performed separately for opioid dependent, alcohol dependent and healthy participants. Foe effectiveness, one report met inclusion criteria. Two dosages of naltrexone depot injections (192 and 384 mg) were compared to placebo. High-dose significantly increased days in treatment compared to placebo (WMD 21.00, 95% CI 10.68 to 31.32, p<0.0001). High-dose compared to low-dose significantly increased days in treatment (WMD 12.00, 95% CI 1.69 to 22.31, p=0.02). Number of patients retained in treatment did not show significant differences between groups. For adverse effects, seventeen reports met inclusion criteria analyses, six were RCTs. Side effects were significantly

  6. Separate and combined impact of acute naltrexone and alprazolam on subjective and physiological effects of oral d-amphetamine in stimulant users

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Katherine R.; Lile, Joshua A.; Stoops, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Opioid antagonists (e.g., naltrexone) and positive modulators of γ-aminobutyric-acidA (GABAA) receptors (e.g., alprazolam) modestly attenuate the abuse-related effects of stimulants like amphetamine. The use of higher doses to achieve greater efficacy is precluded by side effects. Combining naltrexone and alprazolam might safely maximize efficacy while avoiding the untoward effects of the constituent compounds. Objectives The present pilot study tested the hypothesis that acute pretreatment with the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam would not produce clinically problematic physiological effects or negative subjective effects and would reduce the positive subjective effects of d-amphetamine to a greater extent than the constituent drugs alone. Methods Eight nontreatment-seeking, stimulant-using individuals completed an outpatient experiment in which oral d-amphetamine (0, 15, and 30 mg) was administered following acute pretreatment with naltrexone (0 and 50 mg) and alprazolam (0 and 0.5 mg). Subjective effects, psychomotor task performance, and physiological measures were collected. Results Oral d-amphetamine produced prototypical physiological and stimulant-like positive subjective effects (e.g., VAS ratings of Active/Alert/Energetic, Good Effect, and High). Pretreatment with naltrexone, alprazolam, and their combination did not produce clinically problematic acute physiological effects or negative subjective effects. Naltrexone and alprazolam each significantly attenuated some of the subjective effects of d-amphetamine. The combination attenuated a greater number of subjective effects than the constituent drugs alone. Conclusions The present results support the continued evaluation of an opioid receptor antagonist combined with a GABAA-positive modulator using more clinically relevant experimental conditions like examining the effect of chronic dosing with these drugs on methamphetamine self-administration. PMID:24464531

  7. Separate and combined impact of acute naltrexone and alprazolam on subjective and physiological effects of oral d-amphetamine in stimulant users.

    PubMed

    Marks, Katherine R; Lile, Joshua A; Stoops, William W; Rush, Craig R

    2014-07-01

    Opioid antagonists (e.g., naltrexone) and positive modulators of γ-aminobutyric-acidA (GABAA) receptors (e.g., alprazolam) modestly attenuate the abuse-related effects of stimulants like amphetamine. The use of higher doses to achieve greater efficacy is precluded by side effects. Combining naltrexone and alprazolam might safely maximize efficacy while avoiding the untoward effects of the constituent compounds. The present pilot study tested the hypothesis that acute pretreatment with the combination of naltrexone and alprazolam would not produce clinically problematic physiological effects or negative subjective effects and would reduce the positive subjective effects of d-amphetamine to a greater extent than the constituent drugs alone. Eight nontreatment-seeking, stimulant-using individuals completed an outpatient experiment in which oral d-amphetamine (0, 15, and 30 mg) was administered following acute pretreatment with naltrexone (0 and 50 mg) and alprazolam (0 and 0.5 mg). Subjective effects, psychomotor task performance, and physiological measures were collected. Oral d-amphetamine produced prototypical physiological and stimulant-like positive subjective effects (e.g., VAS ratings of Active/Alert/Energetic, Good Effect, and High). Pretreatment with naltrexone, alprazolam, and their combination did not produce clinically problematic acute physiological effects or negative subjective effects. Naltrexone and alprazolam each significantly attenuated some of the subjective effects of d-amphetamine. The combination attenuated a greater number of subjective effects than the constituent drugs alone. The present results support the continued evaluation of an opioid receptor antagonist combined with a GABAA-positive modulator using more clinically relevant experimental conditions like examining the effect of chronic dosing with these drugs on methamphetamine self-administration.

  8. SAFETY AND TOLERABILITY OF LOW DOSE NALTREXONE THERAPY IN CHILDREN WITH MODERATE TO SEVERE CROHN’S DISEASE: A PILOT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jill P.; Field, Douglas; Bingaman, Sandra; Evans, Robert; Mauger, David

    2012-01-01

    Background There is an unmet need for safe and effective medicines to treat children with Crohn’s disease. Recently, investigations have shown an association between endogenous opioid peptides and inflammatory cells. Aims The aims of this study were to evaluate the safety and tolerability of an opioid antagonist, naltrexone, in children with moderate to severe Crohn’s disease. Methods A pilot clinical trial was conducted in children with moderate to severe Crohn’s disease. Fourteen subjects with a mean age of 12.3 years (8–17, range) were enrolled. Children were randomized to placebo or naltrexone 0.1 mg/kg orally for 8 weeks followed by open-labeled treatment with 8 additional weeks of naltrexone. Safety and toxicity were monitored by physical examinations and blood chemistries. Clinical activity was assessed by the PCDAI (Pediatric Crohn’s Disease Activity Index) and Quality of life was monitored by the Impact III survey. Results Oral naltrexone was well tolerated without any serious adverse events in children with moderate to severe Crohn’s disease. PCDAI scores significantly decreased from pretreatment values (34.2±3.3) with an eight-week course of naltrexone therapy (21.7±3.9) (p=0.005). Twenty-five percent of those treated with naltrexone were considered in remission (score < 10) and 67% had improved with mild disease activity (decrease PCDAI score by at least 10 points) at the end of the study. Systemic and social quality of life improved with naltrexone treatment (p=0.035). Conclusions Naltrexone therapy appears safe with limited toxicity when given to children with Crohn’s disease and may reduce disease activity. PMID:23188075

  9. Randomized, proof-of-concept trial of low dose naltrexone for patients with breakthrough symptoms of major depressive disorder on antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Mischoulon, David; Hylek, Lindsay; Yeung, Albert S; Clain, Alisabet J; Baer, Lee; Cusin, Cristina; Ionescu, Dawn Flosnik; Alpert, Jonathan E; Soskin, David P; Fava, Maurizio

    2017-01-15

    Given the proposed dopaminergic mechanism of low-dose naltrexone (LDN), we examined its efficacy as augmentation for depressive breakthrough on pro-dopaminergic antidepressant regimens. 12 adults (67% female, mean age = 45±12) with recurrent DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD) on dopaminergic antidepressant regimens (stimulants, dopamine agonists, bupropion [≥300mg/day], aripiprazole [≤2.5mg/day], or sertraline [≥150mg/day]) were randomized to naltrexone 1mg b.i.d. (n=6) or placebo (n=6) augmentation for 3 weeks. All subjects completed the trial. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D-17) scores (primary outcome measure) decreased from 21.2±2.0 to 11.7±7.7 for LDN, from 23.7±2.3 to 17.8±5.9 for placebo (Cohen's d=0.62; p=0.3 between treatment groups). HAM-D-28 scores decreased from 26.2±4.0 to 12.0±9.8 for LDN, from 26.3±2.6 to 19.8±6.6 for placebo (d=1.15; p=0.097). Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-10 item) scores decreased from 30.4±4.9 to 12.2±8.4 for LDN, from 30.7±4.3 to 22.8±8.5) for placebo (d=1.45; p=0.035). MADRS-15 item scores decreased from 36.6±6.2 to 13.2±8.8 for LDN, from 36.7±4.2 to 26.0±10.0 for placebo (d=1.49; p=0.035). Clinical Global Improvement Scale-Severity (CGI-S) scores decreased from 4.3±0.5 to 3.0±1.1 for LDN, from 4.3±0.5 to 4.0±0.6 for placebo (d=1.22; p=0.064). Small study; restrictions on allowed antidepressants. LDN augmentation showed some benefit for MDD relapse on dopaminergic agents. Confirmation in larger studies is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Low-dose naltrexone targets the opioid growth factor-opioid growth factor receptor pathway to inhibit cell proliferation: mechanistic evidence from a tissue culture model.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Renee N; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2011-09-01

    Naltrexone (NTX) is an opioid antagonist that inhibits or accelerates cell proliferation in vivo when utilized in a low (LDN) or high (HDN) dose, respectively. The mechanism of opioid antagonist action on growth is not well understood. We established a tissue culture model of LDN and HDN using short-term and continuous opioid receptor blockade, respectively, in human ovarian cancer cells, and found that the duration of opioid receptor blockade determines cell proliferative response. The alteration of growth by NTX also was detected in cells representative of pancreatic, colorectal and squamous cell carcinomas. The opioid growth factor (OGF; [Met(5)]-enkephalin) and its receptor (OGFr) were responsible for mediating the action of NTX on cell proliferation. NTX upregulated OGF and OGFr at the translational but not at the transcriptional level. The mechanism of inhibition by short-term NTX required p16 and/or p21 cyclin-dependent inhibitory kinases, but was not dependent on cell survival (necrosis, apoptosis). Sequential administration of short-term NTX and OGF had a greater inhibitory effect on cell proliferation than either agent alone. Given the parallels between short-term NTX in vitro and LDN in vivo, we now demonstrate at the molecular level that the OGF-OGFr axis is a common pathway that is essential for the regulation of cell proliferation by NTX.

  11. Low-dose naltrexone effects on plasma chemistries and clinical symptoms in autism: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Bouvard, M P; Leboyer, M; Launay, J M; Recasens, C; Plumet, M H; Waller-Perotte, D; Tabuteau, F; Bondoux, D; Dugas, M; Lensing, P

    1995-10-16

    The effect of month-long naltrexone (NTX) treatment at a daily oral dose of 0.5 mg/kg/day was contrasted with placebo (PLC) in a double-blind study with conjoint clinical and biochemical evaluations of therapeutic effects. Modest clinical benefits were achieved with both PLC and NTX, with marginally better overall results following NTX, and degree of improvement appeared to be related to plasma chemical profiles. Massively elevated levels of beta-endorphin were observed in all children with assays using C-terminal antibody but not with an N-terminal antibody assay. In addition, 70% of the children exhibited abnormally low levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone, and smaller subsets exhibited elevated norepinephrine (60%), arginine-vasopressin (50%), and serotonin (20%). The best clinical responders exhibited the clearest normalization of the elevated plasma chemistries, especially in C-terminal-beta-endorphin and serotonin. There was some evidence of therapeutic carry-over effects in both clinical and biochemical measures in those children who received NTX before PLC. The results suggest that NTX only benefits a subgroup of autistic children, who may be identified by the presence of certain plasma abnormalities. These results suggest a possible linkage between abnormal plasma chemistries, especially those related to the pro-opiomelanocortin system, and autistic symptoms.

  12. Naltrexone-precipitated morphine withdrawal in infant rat is attenuated by acute administration of NOS inhibitors but not NMDA receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Barr, G A

    2000-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and the nitric oxide system are involved in opiate dependence in the adult rat, but whether these results in the adult apply to the infant rat is unknown. Here we examined the effects of NMDA receptor antagonists and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors, which reduce the opiate abstinence syndrome in adult animals, on morphine withdrawal in the infant rat. Neonatal rats were injected with morphine sulfate (10.0 mg/kg) twice daily for 6.5 days. On the 7th day, pups were injected with NOS inhibitors (L-NAME or 7-NI), NMDA receptor antagonists (MK-801 or AP-5), or vehicle. After 15 min, the pups were injected with naltrexone (1 mg/kg) to precipitate withdrawal. Behavior for each pup was identified and recorded every 15 s for 10 min before naltrexone injection and 15 min after naltrexone injection. Both L-NAME and 7-NI significantly reduced most withdrawal behaviors in the infant rat, a result in line with previous studies in the adult rat. In contrast, AP-5 reduced some withdrawal behaviors but also increased others (e.g., moving paws). MK-801 was likewise ineffective in reducing most withdrawal behaviors and increased certain withdrawal behaviors (walking and wall climbing). In the infant rat, the production of nitric oxide is involved in opiate withdrawal whereas the NMDA receptor may not yet be functionally active or may play only a minor role.

  13. Clinical safety of 1500 mg oral naltrexone overdose

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2010-01-01

    This case represents a clinical overdose of the largest known dose of oral naltrexone, equivalent to the taking of a whole bottle of the oral naltrexone preparation. The patient's intention was to control craving for alcohol and opiates. The patient quickly settled with expectant management. As such it demonstrates that earlier concerns that have been voiced in this area, particularly relating to naltrexone-related hepatotoxicity and depression, may have been overstated, at least in the experience of this patient. This patient's course was marked only by gastric irritation, of which she had some history. As such the present profile provides case report evidence consistent with more robust views of the patient safety of naltrexone itself, and opposing more cautious views. Her polydrug craving was suppressed for a period of 2 weeks, which raises the important question of the mechanism of action of naltrexone's generalised suppression of refractory hedonic consumptive addictive behaviours. PMID:22778191

  14. Acute behavioural effects of bupropion and naltrexone, alone and in combination, in non-deprived male rats presented with palatable mash.

    PubMed

    Wright, F L; Rodgers, R J

    2013-07-01

    In appetite research, drugs frequently progress to clinical trials on the basis of outcome (reduced food intake/body weight gain) with insufficient attention to process (behavioural analysis). Although bupropion and naltrexone (alone and in combination) reduce food consumption in rodents and humans, their effects on behaviour during feeding tests have not been thoroughly investigated. This study aimed to assess the behavioural specificity of anorectic responses to bupropion, naltrexone and their combination. Video analysis was employed to characterise the behavioural effects of acute systemic treatment with bupropion (10.0-40.0 mg/kg), naltrexone (0.1-3.0 mg/kg) and combined bupropion (20 mg/kg) plus naltrexone (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) in non-deprived male rats exposed for 1 h to palatable mash. Particular attention was paid to the behavioural satiety sequence (BSS). In experiment 1, the anorectic response to 40 mg/kg bupropion was associated with significant psychomotor stimulation and a complete disruption of the BSS. In experiment 2, the anorectic response to 3 mg/kg naltrexone was associated with an accelerated but otherwise normal BSS. In experiment 3, the co-administration of 20 mg/kg bupropion and naltrexone (0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg) not only produced an additive anorectic profile (including a reduced rate of eating), but the addition of the opioid receptor antagonist also concurrently attenuated the psychomotor stimulant response to the atypical antidepressant. Low-dose co-treatment with naltrexone and bupropion produces a stronger suppression of appetite than that seen with either agent alone and has the additional advantage of reducing some of the unwanted effects of bupropion.

  15. The effect of low-dose naltrexone on quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sharafaddinzadeh, Naser; Moghtaderi, Ali; Kashipazha, Davood; Majdinasab, Nastaran; Shalbafan, Bita

    2010-08-01

    Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) may promote psychological well-being as well as generalized health especially in autoimmune disorders. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of LDN on the Quality of Life (QoL) of patients with relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) using the scales and composite scores of the MSQoL-54 questionnaire. A 17-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, crossover-design clinical trial was conducted in two universities. A total of 96 adult patients aged between 15 and 65 years with relapsing-remitting (RR) or secondary progressive (SP) clinically definite MS with disease duration longer than 6 months enrolled into the study. The primary outcome of the study was comparison of the scores of physical and mental health by conducting independent t-test of the results obtained in the middle and at the end of study between the two groups. Variables including presence of pain, energy, emotional well-being, social, cognitive, and sexual functions, role limitation due to physical and emotional problems, health distress, and overall QoL did not show any meaningful statistically difference between the two groups. Factor analysis revealed that health perception scores were statistically different between the groups before starting, in the middle, and at the end of the study. The study clearly illustrates that LDN is a relatively safe therapeutic option in RRMS and SPMS but its efficacy is under question and probably a long duration trial is needed in the future.

  16. Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    trials in humans with low dose naltrexone have established benefits in syndromes related to Gulf War Illness such as fibromyalgia. We have successfully...sectional epidemiologic study. JAMA. 1997:15;277:231-7. Younger J, Noor N, McCue R, Mackey S. Low - dose naltrexone for the treatment of fibromyalgia...is related to low grade neuron-inflammation, which can be down regulated, by Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan. This is untested but potentially

  17. Rapid opiate detoxication in outpatient treatment: relationship with naltrexone compliance.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Zaimovic, A; Rustichelli, P; Fontanesi, B; Zambelli, U; Timpano, M; Bocchi, C; Delsignore, R

    2000-03-01

    A variety of detoxification methods have been utilized for the treatment of heroin withdrawal before individuals begin long-term opiate-free and naltrexone programs. While methadone in decreasing doses is still widely used for detoxication procedures, rapid and ultrarapid protocols including clonidine and opiate receptors antagonists have been proposed. This study compares the efficacy of different detoxification methods and investigates possible changes in naltrexone compliance. Ninety-eight heroin-addicted individuals were studied to evaluate withdrawal symptoms, craving, mood, urine toxicologic screens, and drop-out rate during therapy with: Group A: clonidine only (5 days); Group B: clonidine, oxazepam, baclofen, and ketoprofene with naloxone and naltrexone (2 days); and Group C: methadone in decreasing doses (10 days). Naltrexone compliance and relapse rates were evaluated during a 6-month follow-up period. Rapid detoxification with opiate antagonists (Group B) induced slight and transient withdrawal symptoms, and resulted in a significantly lower percentage of heroin catabolites in urine controls during the detoxification procedure, lower negative and positive craving, less mood problems, and higher compliance in extended naltrexone treatment. In comparison with clonidine only (Group A) and methadone (Group C), the early use of naltrexone during detoxification in combination with benzodiazepines and clonidine facilitated extended naltrexone acceptance and improved the recovery outcome in outpatients.

  18. Electron Dose Attenuation Kernels for Slab and Spherical Geometries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    geometries. Sectoring methods used for satellites and space vehicles are discussed and several mathematical relation- ships are summarized. Dose attenuation...angle sectoring methods are commonly used for complex geometry calculations. The selection of kernels appropriate to sectoring calculations is... methods described iv Reference 1. Histories were generated for 1. Jordan, T.’., An Adjoint Charged Particle Transport Method , EMP.L7f.072, July 1976. 6

  19. Quaternary naltrexone reverses radiogenic and morphine-induced locomotor hyperactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.; Galbraith, J.A.; White, G.A.; Gibbs, G.L.

    1984-04-01

    The present study attempted to determine the relative role of the peripheral and central nervous system in the production of morphine-induced or radiation-induced locomotor hyperactivity of the mouse. Toward this end, we used a quaternary derivative of an opiate antagonist (naltrexone methobromide), which presumably does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Quaternary naltrexone was used to challenge the stereotypic locomotor response observed in these mice after either an i.p. injection of morphine or exposure to 1500 rads /sup 60/Co. The quaternary derivative of naltrexone reversed the locomotor hyperactivity normally observed in the C57BL/6J mouse after an injection of morphine. It also significantly attenuated radiation-induced locomotion. The data reported here support the hypothesis of endorphin involvement in radiation-induced and radiogenic behaviors. However, these conclusions are contingent upon further research which more fully evaluates naltrexone methobromide's capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  20. Memantine enhances the inhibitory effects of naltrexone on ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Alexander; Stenback, Tove; Liljequist, Sture

    2008-04-28

    Effects of the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.1; 0.3; 1.0 mg/kg i.p.) on operant ethanol self-administration alone and in combination with the non-competitive NMDA antagonist memantine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.) were studied in rats. Acute administration of naltrexone (0.1; 0.3; 1.0 mg/kg i.p.) inhibited ethanol self-administration in a dose-dependent manner. Memantine (1.0 mg/kg) significantly enhanced the effects of naltrexone at 0.1 mg/kg, failing per se to inhibit ethanol consumption. Thus, low, sub-effective dose of memantine in combination with low doses of naltrexone blocked the reinforcing properties of ethanol in rats. It is suggested that the combination of sub-effective doses of memantine and naltrexone may have therapeutic value in the treatment of alcoholism particularly in a subgroup of alcoholic patients who have high sensitivity to the adverse side effects of naltrexone.

  1. Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illnesses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    low dose naltrexone have established benefits in syndromes related to Gulf War Illness such as fibromyalgia. We have successfully enrolled 41 subjects...09-2-0065 TITLE: Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans Illnesses PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William J. Meggs, MD, PhD...Dextromethorphan and Naltrexone for Gulf War Veterens’ Illness 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-2-0065 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  2. Maternally Administered Sustained-Release Naltrexone in Rats Affects Offspring Neurochemistry and Behaviour in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Krstew, Elena V.; Tait, Robert J.; Hulse, Gary K.

    2012-01-01

    Naltrexone is not recommended during pregnancy. However, sustained-release naltrexone implant use in humans has resulted in cases of inadvertent foetal exposure. Here, we used clinically relevant dosing to examine the effects of maternally administered sustained-release naltrexone on the rat brain by examining offspring at birth and in adulthood. Maternal treatment (naltrexone or placebo implant) started before conception and ceased during gestation, birth or weaning. Morphometry was assessed in offspring at birth and adulthood. Adult offspring were evaluated for differences in locomotor behaviour (basal and morphine-induced, 10 mg/kg, s.c.) and opioid neurochemistry, propensity to self-administer morphine and cue-induced drug-seeking after abstinence. Blood analysis confirmed offspring exposure to naltrexone during gestation, birth and weaning. Naltrexone exposure increased litter size and reduced offspring birth-weight but did not alter brain morphometry. Compared to placebo, basal motor activity of naltrexone-exposed adult offspring was lower, yet they showed enhanced development of psychomotor sensitization to morphine. Developmental naltrexone exposure was associated with resistance to morphine-induced down-regulation of striatal preproenkephalin mRNA expression in adulthood. Adult offspring also exhibited greater operant responding for morphine and, in addition, cue-induced drug-seeking was enhanced. Collectively, these data show pronounced effects of developmental naltrexone exposure, some of which persist into adulthood, highlighting the need for follow up of humans that were exposed to naltrexone in utero. PMID:23300784

  3. Low doses of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitors rapidly evoke opioid receptor-mediated thermal hyperalgesia in naïve mice which is converted to prominent analgesia by cotreatment with ultra-low-dose naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Crain, Stanley M; Shen, Ke-Fei

    2008-09-22

    Systemic (s.c.) injection in naïve mice of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) inhibitors, e.g. 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine [(IBMX) or caffeine, 10 mg/kg] or the more specific cAMP-PDE inhibitor, rolipram (1 mug/kg), rapidly evokes thermal hyperalgesia (lasting >5 h). These effects appear to be mediated by enhanced excitatory opioid receptor signaling, as occurs during withdrawal in opioid-dependent mice. Cotreatment of these mice with ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX, 0.1 ng/kg-1 pg/kg, s.c.) results in prominent opioid analgesia (lasting >4 h) even when the dose of rolipram is reduced to 1 pg/kg. Cotreatment of these cAMP-PDE inhibitors in naïve mice with an ultra-low-dose (0.1 ng/kg) of the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) or the mu-opioid receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA) also results in opioid analgesia. These excitatory effects of cAMP-PDE inhibitors in naïve mice may be mediated by enhanced release of small amounts of endogenous bimodally-acting (excitatory/inhibitory) opioid agonists by neurons in nociceptive networks. Ultra-low-dose NTX, nor-BNI or beta-FNA selectively antagonizes high-efficacy excitatory (hyperalgesic) Gs-coupled opioid receptor-mediated signaling in naïve mice and results in rapid conversion to inhibitory (analgesic) Gi/Go-coupled opioid receptor-mediated signaling which normally requires activation by much higher doses of opioid agonists. Cotreatment with a low subanalgesic dose of kelatorphan, an inhibitor of multiple endogenous opioid peptide-degrading enzymes, stabilizes endogenous opioid agonists released by cAMP-PDE inhibitors, resulting in conversion of the hyperalgesia to analgesia without requiring selective blockade of excitatory opioid receptor signaling. The present study provides a novel pharmacologic paradigm that may facilitate development of valuable non-narcotic clinical analgesics utilizing cotreatment with ultra-low-dose rolipram plus ultra-low-dose NTX or related

  4. Ultra low-dose CT attenuation correction in PET SPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shyh-Jen; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tsai, Chia-Jung; Yang, Ching-Ching; Lee, Jason J. S.; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2010-07-01

    The use of CT images for attenuation correction (CTAC) allows significantly shorter scanning time and a high quality noise-free attenuation map compared with conventional germanium-68 transmission scan because at least 10 4 times greater of photon flux would be generated from a CT scan under standard operating condition. However, this CTAC technique would potentially introduce more radiation risk to the patients owing to the higher radiation exposure from CT scan. Statistic parameters mapping (SPM) is a prominent technique in nuclear medicine community for the analysis of brain imaging data. The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of low-dose CT (LDCT) and ultra low-dose CT (UDCT) in PET SPM applications. The study was divided into two parts. The first part was to evaluate of tracer uptake distribution pattern and quantity analysis by using the striatal phantom to initially assess the feasibility of AC for clinical purpose. The second part was to examine the group SPM analysis using the Hoffman brain phantom. The phantom study is to simulate the human brain and to reduce the experimental uncertainty of real subjects. The initial studies show that the results of PET SPM analysis have no significant differences between LDCT and UDCT comparing to the current used default CTAC. Moreover, the dose of the LDCT is lower than that of the default CT by a factor of 9, and UDCT can even yield a 42 times dose reduction. We have demonstrated the SPM results while using LDCT and UDCT for PET AC is comparable to those using default CT setting, suggesting their feasibility in PET SPM applications. In addition, the necessity of UDCT in PET SPM studies to avoid excess radiation dose is also evident since most of the subjects involved are non-cancer patients or children and some normal subjects are even served as a comparison group in the experiment. It is our belief that additional attempts to decrease the radiation dose would be valuable, especially for children and

  5. Opioid use and dropout in patients receiving oral naltrexone with or without single administration of injection naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Maria A; Bisaga, Adam; Glass, Andrew; Mishlen, Kaitlyn; Pavlicova, Martina; Carpenter, Kenneth M; Mariani, John J; Levin, Frances R; Nunes, Edward V

    2015-02-01

    Adherence to oral naltrexone has been poor and can be improved somewhat with behavioral therapy. We compared behavioral naltrexone therapy (BNT) to compliance enhancement (CE) and tested efficacy of single-dose injection naltrexone (XR-NTX; 384 mg) with behavioral therapies at further improving adherence to oral naltrexone. A 24-week, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (n=125) compared four treatment conditions following inpatient detoxification and oral naltrexone induction: (1) BNT+XR-NTX; (2) BNT+placebo injection; (3) CE+XR-NTX; and (4) CE+placebo injection. All participants were maintained on oral naltrexone throughout the trial. Primary outcome was retention in treatment. Of 89 randomized participants, 78.7% (70/89) completed 4 weeks, 58.2% (54/89) completed 8 weeks, 47.2% (42/89) completed 12 weeks, and 25.8% (23/89) completed 24 weeks. A Cox proportional hazards regression modeled time to dropout as a function of treatment condition, baseline opioid dependence severity (bags per day of heroin use), and their interaction. Interaction of conditions by baseline severity was significant (X3(2)=9.19, p=0.027). For low-severity patients (≤ 6 bags/day), retention was highest in the BNT-XR-NTX group (60% at 6 months), as hypothesized. For high-severity (>6 bags/day) patients, BNT-XR-NTX did not perform as well, due to high early attrition. For low-severity heroin users, single-dose XR-NTX improved long-term treatment retention when combined with behavioral therapy. In higher-severity opioid-dependent patients, XR-NTX was less helpful, perhaps because, combined with oral naltrexone, it produced higher blood levels and more withdrawal discomfort. When cost considerations recommend oral naltrexone following XR-NTX, the latter should be phased in slowly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Opioid use and dropout in patients receiving oral naltrexone with or without single administration of injection naltrexone

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Maria A.; Bisaga, Adam; Glass, Andrew; Mishlen, Kaitlyn; Pavlicova, Martina; Carpenter, Kenneth M.; Mariani, John J; Levin, Frances R.; Nunes, Edward V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence to oral naltrexone has been poor and can be improved somewhat with behavioral therapy. We compared Behavioral Naltrexone Therapy (BNT) to Compliance Enhancement (CE) and tested efficacy of single-dose injection naltrexone (XR-NTX; 384 mg) with behavioral therapies at further improving aherence to oral naltrexone. Methods A 24-week, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (N=125) compared four treatment conditions following inpatient detoxification and oral naltrexone induction: (1) BNT+XR-NTX; (2) BNT+ placebo injection; (3) CE+ XR-NTX; and (4) CE+placebo injection. All participants were maintained on oral naltrexone throughout the trial. Primary outcome was retention in treatment. Results Of 89 randomized participants, 78.7% (70/89) completed 4 weeks, 58.2% (54/89) completed 8 weeks, 47.2% (42/89) completed 12 weeks, and 25.8% (23/89) completed 24 weeks. A Cox proportional hazards regression modeled time to dropout as a function of treatment condition, baseline opioid dependence severity (bags per day of heroin use), and their interaction. Interaction of conditions by baseline severity was significant (X23 = 9.19, p = .027). For low-severity patients (<6 bags/day), retention was highest in the BNT-XRNTX group (60% at 6 months), as hypothesized. For high-severity (> 6 bags/day) patients, BNT-XR-NTX did not perform as well, due to high early attrition. Conclusion For low-severity heroin users, single-dose XR-NTX improved long-term treatment retention when combined with behavioral therapy. In higher-severity opioid-dependent patients, XR-NTX was less helpful, perhaps because, combined with oral naltrexone, it produced higher blood levels and more withdrawal discomfort. When cost considerations recommend oral naltrexone following XR-NTX, the latter should be phased in slowly. PMID:25555621

  7. Technique for greatly shortening the transition from methadone to naltrexone maintenance of patients addicted to opiates.

    PubMed

    Loimer, N; Lenz, K; Schmid, R; Presslich, O

    1991-07-01

    Acute methadone detoxification was induced by the intravenous administration of naloxone during simultaneous intravenous sedation with midazolam, a fully reversible short-acting benzodiazepine, in seven patients addicted to opiates. Within hours the patients tolerated full doses of naltrexone. This technique enables patients to transfer easily, quickly, and safely from methadone to naltrexone maintenance.

  8. Effects of naltrexone on firing activity of rat cortex neurons and its interactions with ethanol.

    PubMed

    Kozhechkin, S N; Mednikova, Yu S; Kolik, L G

    2013-09-01

    Naltrexone dose-dependently decreased neuron firing rate in the rat frontal cortex after intravenous (1-20 mg/kg) and microelectrophoretic administration. Microelectrophoretic applications of naltrexone reduced the excitatory neuronal response of neurons to low doses of ethanol (electroosmotic application) and potentiated depression of firing activity induced by ethanol in high doses. We concluded that opioid peptides take part in generation of spontaneous neuronal activity in the frontal cortex and neuronal excitation caused by ethanol in low doses. Naltrexone acts as a synergist of ethanol in its depressive effect on cortical neurons.

  9. Opioid Detoxification and Naltrexone Induction Strategies: Recommendations for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sigmon, Stacey C.; Bisaga, Adam; Nunes, Edward V.; O'Connor, Patrick G.; Kosten, Thomas; Woody, George

    2015-01-01

    Background Opioid dependence is a significant public health problem associated with high risk for relapse if treatment is not ongoing. While maintenance on opioid agonists (i.e., methadone, buprenorphine) often produces favorable outcomes, detoxification followed by treatment with the μ-opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone may offer a potentially useful alternative to agonist maintenance for some patients. Method Treatment approaches for making this transition are described here based on a literature review and solicitation of opinions from several expert clinicians and scientists regarding patient selection, level of care, and detoxification strategies. Conclusion Among the current detoxification regimens, the available clinical and scientific data suggest that the best approach may be using an initial 2–4 mg dose of buprenorphine combined with clonidine, other ancillary medications, and progressively increasing doses of oral naltrexone over 3–5 days up to the target dose of naltrexone. However, more research is needed to empirically validate the best approach for making this transition. PMID:22404717

  10. Risk factors for craving and relapse in heroin users treated with oral or implant naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Gary K; Ngo, Hanh T T; Tait, Robert J

    2010-08-01

    Oral naltrexone effectively antagonizes heroin, but patient noncompliance limits its utility; sustained-release preparations may overcome this. Few data are available on optimal blood naltrexone levels for preventing craving and/or return to heroin use. This study assesses various risk factors, including blood naltrexone level, for heroin craving and relapse to illicit opioids. Heroin-dependent persons from a randomized controlled trial of oral versus implant naltrexone were followed up for 6 months. Thirty-four participants received 50 mg oral naltrexone daily, plus placebo implant; thirty-five participants received a single dose of 2.3 g naltrexone implant, plus daily oral placebo tablets. Compared to oral naltrexone patients, implant naltrexone patients were significantly less likely to use any opioids and had one-fifth the risk of using heroin > or = weekly. Risk of > or = weekly heroin use increased by 2.5 times at blood naltrexone concentration < .5 ng/mL compared with > or = .5 ng/mL, with 3 ng/mL associated with very low risk of use. Craving remained near "floor" levels for implant patients but rebounded to higher levels among oral patients. Lower craving scores (< or = 20/70) predicted lower relapse risk. Noncompliance with daily oral formula, higher baseline craving, longer history of use, and being younger predicted higher craving at follow-up. Implant naltrexone was better associated with reduced heroin craving and relapse than oral naltrexone. Effective treatment was achieved at blood naltrexone levels of 1 ng/mL to 3 ng/mL, with higher levels associated with greater efficacy. Craving assessment may be valuable in predicting relapse risk allowing timely intervention. Copyright 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Advances in the use of naltrexone: an integration of preclinical and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Stephanie S; Froehlich, Janice C

    2003-01-01

    Both preclinical and clinical studies are critical in the development of effective pharmacotherapeutic approaches for treating alcoholism. Nowhere has this been more evident than in the development of naltrexone for treating alcohol relapse. As studies continue on the use of naltrexone for modifying alcohol intake, promising avenues for continued work on maximizing the efficacy of naltrexone for treating alcohol abuse and alcoholism are emerging. Recent research suggests that naltrexone can influence key components of alcohol dependence, including loss of control over the decision to drink and the amount of alcohol consumed. Although not uniformly positive, the majority of clinical trials supports the hypothesis that naltrexone can reduce the urge to drink, increase the number of days abstinent, and minimize the risk of relapse to heavy drinking. Human laboratory and preclinical paradigms that have investigated how naltrexone alters patterns of drinking suggest that naltrexone treatment results in earlier cessation of drinking within a session. In addition, preclinical data suggest that the amount of alcohol consumed declines during subsequent sessions in the presence of naltrexone. Based on this analysis, future clinical trials should consider using analytic approaches that evaluate patterns of drinking (e.g., multiple event analysis) rather than single events (e.g., survival analysis). Furthermore, behavioral interventions and instructions can also be developed to take advantage of this effect. Additional preclinical and clinical work is warranted to identify dosing strategies that ensure adequate drug levels while reducing the possibility of developing tolerance to naltrexone. Finally, studies designed to identify the characteristics of drinking populations that are responsive to naltrexone and studies investigating the potential advantage of combining naltrexone with agents that alter a number of neurotransmitter systems are exciting new avenues of research

  12. Drug safety evaluation of naltrexone/bupropion for the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Verpeut, Jessica L; Bello, Nicholas T

    2014-06-01

    Obesity is a known health risk for the development of several preventable diseases. Obesity-related metabolic alterations negatively impact different physiological mechanisms, which supports the rationale for the use of combined drug therapy. Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist for the treatment of opioid and alcohol dependency, whereas bupropion is a norepinephrine/dopamine reuptake inhibitor used to treat depression and smoking cessation. Although not effective as individual monotherapies for obesity, naltrexone and bupropion in combination produce weight loss and a metabolic profile beneficial for the potential treatment of obesity. This review examines the safety and antiobesity effects of naltrexone and bupropion alone and in combination. It reviews the results of four Phase III clinical trials of a novel fixed dose of sustained-released naltrexone/bupropion. Naltrexone/bupropion has a greater weight loss efficacy than two FDA-approved medications, orlistat and lorcaserin. Although the weight loss produced by phentermine/topiramate is superior to naltrexone/bupropion, the safety profile of naltrexone/bupropion has less severe adverse effects. In addition, naltrexone/bupropion is well tolerated, with nausea being the most reported adverse event. Unlike other centrally acting medications, lorcaserin and phentermine/topiramate, naltrexone/bupropion has no abuse potential.

  13. Ocular Safety of Topical Naltrexone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    give informed consent g. Allergy to opioids, or to components of the proprietary antibiotic vehicle utilized, which will be Vigamox topical antibiotic ...14. 36. Zagon IS, McLaughlin PJ. Naltrexone modulates growth in infant rats. Life Sciences 1983;33:2449-54. 37. Zagon IS, McLaughlin PJ. Naltrexone...containing peptides in pancreas and pituitary of genetically obese diabetic (db/db) mice during development of diabetic syndrome. Diabetes 1986;35:1143-51. 48

  14. Efficacy and safety of naltrexone hydrochloride for antagonizing carfentanil citrate immobilization in captive Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni).

    PubMed

    Miller, M W; Wild, M A; Lance, W R

    1996-04-01

    We evaluated efficacy and safety of naltrexone for antagonizing carfentanil immobilization in 12 captive Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) using a randomized incomplete block experiment. In three replicate trials, elk were hand-injected with 10 micrograms carfentanil citrate/kg body weight intramuscularly. Fifteen min after each elk became recumbent, we administered naltrexone HCl (25% of dose intravenously, 75% subcutaneously) dosed at 0 (control), 25, 50, or 100 mg/mg carfentanil; after an additional 15 min of immobilization, controls received 500 mg naltrexone HCl/mg carfentanil. Elk were immobilized in 34 of 36 attempts; the mean (+/-SE) induction time was 3.1 +/- 0.2 min. Regardless of dose, all elk stood < 9 min after receiving naltrexone; controls remained immobilized until they received antagonist. Mean recovery times did not differ with increasing naltrexone dose (P = 0.31) or among individuals (P = 0.16). None of the elk receiving 100 or 500 mg naltrexone/mg carfentanil renarcotized, but three of eight and seven of nine elk receiving 50 and 25 mg naltrexone/mg carfentanil, respectively, showed signs of mild renarcotization 8 to 24 hr later (P = 0.0002). We observed no adverse clinical effects in elk receiving < or = 500 mg naltrexone/mg carfentanil. Based on these data, we recommend 100 mg/mg carfentanil as a minimum effective dose for rapidly antagonizing immobilization and preventing renarcotization.

  15. Naltrexone changes the expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum stress induced hepatic steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Moslehi, Azam; Nabavizadeh, Fatemeh; Zekri, Ali; Amiri, Fatemeh

    2017-02-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is closely associated with several chronic diseases such as obesity, atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, and hepatic steatosis. Steatosis in hepatocytes may also lead to disorders such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, and possibly cirrhosis. Opioid peptides are involved in triglyceride and cholesterol dysregulation. Naltrexone also attenuates ER stress induced hepatic steatosis in mice. In this study, we evaluated the effects of naltrexone on the expression of lipid metabolism-related nuclear factors and enzymes in the ER stress induced hepatic steatosis. C57/BL6 mice received saline, DMSO and naltrexone as control groups. In a fourth group, ER stress was induced by tunicamycin (TM) injection and in the last group, naltrexone was given before TM administration. Histopathological evaluations, real-time RT-PCR and western blot were performed. We found that GRP78, IRE1α, PERK and ATF6 gene expression and steatosis significantly reduced in naltrexone treated animals. Naltrexone alleviated the gene and protein expression of SREBP1c. Expression of ACAT1, apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and PPARα also increased after naltrexone treatment. In conclusion, this study, for the first time, shows that naltrexone has a considerable role in attenuation of ER stress-induced liver injury.

  16. The long-term survival of a patient with pancreatic cancer with metastases to the liver after treatment with the intravenous alpha-lipoic acid/low-dose naltrexone protocol.

    PubMed

    Berkson, Burton M; Rubin, Daniel M; Berkson, Arthur J

    2006-03-01

    The authors describe the long-term survival of a patient with pancreatic cancer without any toxic adverse effects. The treatment regimen includes the intravenous alpha-lipoic acid and low-dose naltrexone (ALA-N) protocol and a healthy lifestyle program. The patient was told by a reputable university oncology center in October 2002 that there was little hope for his survival. Today, January 2006, however, he is back at work, free from symptoms, and without appreciable progression of his malignancy. The integrative protocol described in this article may have the possibility of extending the life of a patient who would be customarily considered to be terminal. The authors believe that life scientists will one day develop a cure for metastatic pancreatic cancer, perhaps via gene therapy or another biological platform. But until such protocols come to market, the ALA-N protocol should be studied and considered, given its lack of toxicity at levels reported. Several other patients are on this treatment protocol and appear to be doing well at this time.

  17. The effects of naltrexone on cadmium-induced increases in oral ethanol self-administration.

    PubMed

    Nation, J R; Horger, B A; Pugh, C K; Bratton, G R; Rowe, L D

    1990-01-01

    Adult male rats were exposed to a standard laboratory diet (N = 20), or an adulterated diet containing 100 ppm added cadmium (N = 20), for 60 days. On Day 61, half the animals from each dietary condition received subcutaneous implants of two 30 mg naltrexone pellets, and the remaining half the animals received identical implants of 30 mg placebo pellets. One week later, animals from groups created by this interaction (Groups Control-Placebo, Control-Naltrexone, Cadmium-Placebo, Cadmium-Naltrexone) were tested in an ethanol self-administration paradigm that presented a 10% ethanol solution (v/v) in both a choice and nonchoice format. The results indicated that cadmium exposure increased the oral self-administration of ethanol in the choice setting where water was offered as an alternative, and the opiate antagonist naltrexone failed to attenuate this effect.

  18. Opioid growth factor and low-dose naltrexone impair central nervous system infiltration by CD4 + T lymphocytes in established experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Leslie A; Waldner, Hanspeter; Zagon, Ian S; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS), characterized by infiltrating myelin-reactive T lymphocytes and demyelinating lesions. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is the animal model widely utilized to study MS. EAE is mediated by CD4(+) T cells and can be induced in EAE-susceptible mice through immunization with a myelin antigen, such as proteolipid protein 139-151 (PLP139-151) in SJL mice. In this PLP-induced EAE model, autoreactive CD4(+) T cells migrate from peripheral tissues into the CNS where they are reactivated resulting in CNS damage. Th1 and Th17 cells produce the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFNγ and IL-17, respectively, that have been shown to have pathogenic roles in EAE and MS. Anti-inflammatory Th2, IL-4 secreting cells, have been indicated to inhibit EAE exacerbation. However, given the inflammatory environment of EAE, Th2 effector cells are outnumbered by Th1/Th17 cells. Regulatory CD4(+) T cells suppress immune reactions and have been demonstrated to be dysfunctional in MS patients. Opioid growth factor (OGF), chemically termed [Met(5)]-enkephalin, is a negative growth factor that interacts with the OGF receptor. The OGF-OGFr axis can be activated through exogenous administration of OGF or a low dosage of naltrexone (LDN), an opioid antagonist. We have previously demonstrated that modulation of the OGF-OGFr axis results in alleviation from relapse-remitting EAE, and that CNS-infiltrating CD3(+) T cells are diminished with exogenous OGF or intermittent blockade with LDN administration. In this paper, we aimed to determine whether OGF or LDN alter the Th effector responses of CD4(+) T lymphocytes within the CNS in established EAE. We report in these studies that the numbers of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in the CNS of EAE mice are decreased following treatment with OGF for five days but not LDN. However, modulation of the OGF-OGFr axis did not result in changes to CD4(+) Th effector cell responses

  19. Opioid growth factor and low-dose naltrexone impair central nervous system infiltration by CD4 + T lymphocytes in established experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Leslie A; Waldner, Hanspeter; Zagon, Ian S

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS), characterized by infiltrating myelin-reactive T lymphocytes and demyelinating lesions. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is the animal model widely utilized to study MS. EAE is mediated by CD4+ T cells and can be induced in EAE-susceptible mice through immunization with a myelin antigen, such as proteolipid protein 139–151 (PLP139-151) in SJL mice. In this PLP-induced EAE model, autoreactive CD4+ T cells migrate from peripheral tissues into the CNS where they are reactivated resulting in CNS damage. Th1 and Th17 cells produce the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFNγ and IL-17, respectively, that have been shown to have pathogenic roles in EAE and MS. Anti-inflammatory Th2, IL-4 secreting cells, have been indicated to inhibit EAE exacerbation. However, given the inflammatory environment of EAE, Th2 effector cells are outnumbered by Th1/Th17 cells. Regulatory CD4+ T cells suppress immune reactions and have been demonstrated to be dysfunctional in MS patients. Opioid growth factor (OGF), chemically termed [Met5]-enkephalin, is a negative growth factor that interacts with the OGF receptor. The OGF-OGFr axis can be activated through exogenous administration of OGF or a low dosage of naltrexone (LDN), an opioid antagonist. We have previously demonstrated that modulation of the OGF-OGFr axis results in alleviation from relapse-remitting EAE, and that CNS-infiltrating CD3+ T cells are diminished with exogenous OGF or intermittent blockade with LDN administration. In this paper, we aimed to determine whether OGF or LDN alter the Th effector responses of CD4+ T lymphocytes within the CNS in established EAE. We report in these studies that the numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes in the CNS of EAE mice are decreased following treatment with OGF for five days but not LDN. However, modulation of the OGF-OGFr axis did not result in changes to CD4+ Th effector cell responses in the CNS of

  20. SU-E-T-233: Modeling Linac Couch Effects On Attenuation and Skin Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, L; Halvorsen, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Treatment couch tops in medical LINAC rooms lead to attenuation to beams penetrating them, plus higher skin dose which can become a significant concern with the high fraction doses associated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. This work measures the attenuation and shallow depth dose due to a BrainLab couch, and studies the modeling of the couch top in our treatment planning system (TPS) as a uniform solid material with homogeneous density. Methods: LINAC photon beams of size 10×10 cm and nominal energy 6 MV were irradiated from different gantry angles on a stack of solid water. Depth dose were measured with two types of parallel plate chambers, MPPK and Markus. In the Philips Pinnacle TPS, the couch was modeled as a slab with varying thickness and density. A digital phantom of size 30×30×10 cm with density 1 g/cc was created to simulate the measurement setup. Both the attenuation and skin dose effects due to the couch were studied. Results: An orthogonal attenuation rate of 3.2% was observed with both chamber measurements. The attenuation can be modeled by couch models of varying thicknesses. Once the orthogonal attenuation was modeled well, the oblique beam attenuation in TPS agreed with measurement within 1.5%. The depth dose at shallow depth (0.5 cm) was also shown to be modeled correctly within 1.5% of the measurement using a 12 mm thick couch model with density of 0.9 g/cc. Agreement between calculation and measurement diverges at very shallow depths (≤1 mm) but remains acceptable (<5%) with the aforementioned couch model parameters. Conclusion: Modeling the couch top as a uniform solid in a treatment planning system can predict both the attenuation and surface dose simultaneously well within clinical tolerance in the same model.

  1. Gender differences in treatment and clinical characteristics among patients receiving extended release naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Herbeck, Diane M; Jeter, Kira E; Cousins, Sarah J; Abdelmaksoud, Reham; Crèvecoeur-MacPhail, Desirée

    2016-01-01

    Further research is needed to investigate real-world acceptability of extended-release naltrexone for alcohol and opioid use disorders, and potential gender differences. This study examines treatment and clinical characteristics among men and women receiving extended-release naltrexone in a large, publicly funded substance use disorder treatment system (N = 465; 52% female). Patient demographics, treatment characteristics, and the number of extended-release naltrexone doses received were collected from administrative data and treatment program staff. Additionally, patients provided information on experiences with extended-release naltrexone in an open-ended format at 1, 2, and 3 weeks following their first injection. For a subsample of patients (N = 220), alcohol/opioid cravings and specific adverse effects were also assessed. Compared to men, women reported experiencing a higher rate and mean number of adverse effects. Overall, craving scores showed substantial reductions over time. However, among patients taking extended-release naltrexone for alcohol use, women showed a significantly greater reduction in craving scores compared to men. No gender differences were observed in the number of extended-release naltrexone doses received. Although women may have a greater need for additional support in managing early adverse effects, extended-release naltrexone as an adjunct to psychosocial treatment may be an acceptable and promising treatment approach for both men and women, and particularly for women prescribed extended-release naltrexone for alcohol use. This study contributes further information on patients' experiences during the early course of extended-release naltrexone treatment in real-world settings. Understanding these experiences may assist policy makers and treatment providers in addressing challenges of implementing this treatment into wider practice.

  2. Minor pathological changes are induced by naltrexone-poly(DL-lactide) implants in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Farid, W O; McCallum, D; Tait, R J; Dunlop, S A; Hulse, G K

    2009-12-15

    Oral naltrexone is used to treat alcohol and heroin dependence but is associated with poor patient compliance. Sustained-release preparations have been developed to overcome noncompliance. Many sustained-release preparations are composed of polymers combined with naltrexone. Limited data indicate that polymers induce variable levels of tissue reactivity and that naltrexone may increase this effect. A slow-release subcutaneous naltrexone-poly (DL-lactide) implant is currently being trialed to treat heroin dependence in Western Australia. A minority of women fall pregnant and, although tissue reactivity in nonpregnant humans is relatively minor, detailed chronological data during pregnancy are lacking. Histological changes in pregnant rats were assessed; a single active tablet containing poly[trans-3,6-dimethyl-1,4-dioxyane-2,5-dione] (DL-lactide) loaded with 25 mg of naltrexone was implanted subcutaneously, and tissue response was compared with inactive polymer implantation. Rats were timed mated at 13-26 days postimplant. Tissue assessment up to 75 days by a pathologist showed that naltrexone induced chronic inflammatory response in a dose-dependent manner, although still at a low level. Furthermore, for inactive implants, minimal foreign body reaction and fibrosis, together with low-level inflammation, suggested good long-term biocompatibility. We conclude that the Australian naltrexone-poly(DL-lactide) implant is tolerated in pregnant rats, reinforcing its potential role for managing alcohol and heroin dependence in pregnant humans.

  3. Long-term immunogenicity of single dose of live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine in Indian children.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Sheila; Sapru, Amita; Bavdekar, Ashish; Kapatkar, Vaibhavi; Mane, Amey

    2015-08-01

    To assess immunogenicity of a single dose of live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine in Indian children, ten years after immunization. Of 143 children vaccinated in 2004, 121 children were evaluated in 2014, clinically and for anti-HAV antibodies. 13 children were early vaccine failures who received two doses of HAV vaccine subsequently. 106 (98%) of 108 remaining children had seroprotective levels with a geometric mean titer of 100.5 mIU/mL. On analysis of all 121 children, the immunogenicity was 87.6%. Single dose of live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine provides long-term immunity in Indian children.

  4. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the opiate antagonist, naltrexone, in the treatment of kleptomania.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Kim, Suck Won; Odlaug, Brian L

    2009-04-01

    Kleptomania is a rare psychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent stealing and for which there exists no empirically validated treatments. This study examined the efficacy and tolerability of the opioid antagonist naltrexone in adults with kleptomania who have urges to steal. An 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of oral naltrexone for kleptomania. Twenty-five individuals with DSM-IV kleptomania were randomized to naltrexone (dosing ranging from 50 mg/day to 150 mg/day) or placebo. Twenty-three subjects (92%) completed the study. Subjects were assessed every 2 weeks with the Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale Modified for Kleptomania (K-YBOCS), the urge and behavior subscales of the K-YBOCS, the Kleptomania Symptom Assessment Scale (K-SAS), the Clinical Global Impressions Scale (CGI), and measures of depression, anxiety, and psychosocial functioning. Subjects assigned to naltrexone had significantly greater reductions in K-YBOCS total scores (p = .001), stealing urges (p = .032), and stealing behavior (p < .001) compared with subjects on placebo. Subjects assigned to naltrexone also had greater improvement in overall kleptomania severity (reflected in the CGI scores) (p < .001). The mean effective dose of naltrexone was 116.7 (+/-44.4) mg/day. Naltrexone demonstrated statistically significant reductions in stealing urges and behavior in kleptomania. Naltrexone was well tolerated.

  5. Naltrexone Maintenance Decreases Cannabis Self-Administration and Subjective Effects in Daily Cannabis Smokers.

    PubMed

    Haney, Margaret; Ramesh, Divya; Glass, Andrew; Pavlicova, Martina; Bedi, Gillinder; Cooper, Ziva D

    2015-10-01

    Given that cannabis use is increasing in the United States, pharmacological treatment options to treat cannabis use disorder are needed. Opioid antagonists modulate cannabinoid effects and may offer a potential approach to reducing cannabis use. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled human laboratory study, we assessed the effects of naltrexone maintenance on the reinforcing, subjective, psychomotor, and cardiovascular effects of active and inactive cannabis. Nontreatment-seeking, daily cannabis smokers were randomized to receive naltrexone (50 mg: n=18 M and 5 F) or placebo (0 mg; n=26 M and 2 F) capsules for 16 days. Before, during, and after medication maintenance, participants completed 10 laboratory sessions over 4-6 weeks, assessing cannabis' behavioral and cardiovascular effects. Medication compliance was verified by observed capsule administration, plasma naltrexone, and urinary riboflavin. Relative to placebo, maintenance on naltrexone significantly reduced both active cannabis self-administration and its positive subjective effects ('good effect'). Participants in the placebo group had 7.6 times (95% CI: 1.1-51.8) the odds of self-administering active cannabis compared with the naltrexone group. This attenuation of reinforcing and positive subjective effects also influenced cannabis use in the natural ecology. Naltrexone had intrinsic effects: decreasing ratings of friendliness, food intake, and systolic blood pressure, and increasing spontaneous reports of stomach upset and headache, yet dropout rates were comparable between groups. In summary, we show for the first time that maintenance on naltrexone decreased cannabis self-administration and ratings of 'good effect' in nontreatment-seeking daily cannabis smokers. Clinical studies in patients motivated to reduce their cannabis use are warranted to evaluate naltrexone's efficacy as a treatment for cannabis use disorder.

  6. Naltrexone Maintenance Decreases Cannabis Self-Administration and Subjective Effects in Daily Cannabis Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Margaret; Ramesh, Divya; Glass, Andrew; Pavlicova, Martina; Bedi, Gillinder; Cooper, Ziva D

    2015-01-01

    Given that cannabis use is increasing in the United States, pharmacological treatment options to treat cannabis use disorder are needed. Opioid antagonists modulate cannabinoid effects and may offer a potential approach to reducing cannabis use. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled human laboratory study, we assessed the effects of naltrexone maintenance on the reinforcing, subjective, psychomotor, and cardiovascular effects of active and inactive cannabis. Nontreatment-seeking, daily cannabis smokers were randomized to receive naltrexone (50 mg: n=18 M and 5 F) or placebo (0 mg; n=26 M and 2 F) capsules for 16 days. Before, during, and after medication maintenance, participants completed 10 laboratory sessions over 4–6 weeks, assessing cannabis' behavioral and cardiovascular effects. Medication compliance was verified by observed capsule administration, plasma naltrexone, and urinary riboflavin. Relative to placebo, maintenance on naltrexone significantly reduced both active cannabis self-administration and its positive subjective effects (‘good effect'). Participants in the placebo group had 7.6 times (95% CI: 1.1–51.8) the odds of self-administering active cannabis compared with the naltrexone group. This attenuation of reinforcing and positive subjective effects also influenced cannabis use in the natural ecology. Naltrexone had intrinsic effects: decreasing ratings of friendliness, food intake, and systolic blood pressure, and increasing spontaneous reports of stomach upset and headache, yet dropout rates were comparable between groups. In summary, we show for the first time that maintenance on naltrexone decreased cannabis self-administration and ratings of ‘good effect' in nontreatment-seeking daily cannabis smokers. Clinical studies in patients motivated to reduce their cannabis use are warranted to evaluate naltrexone's efficacy as a treatment for cannabis use disorder. PMID:25881117

  7. Investigating treatment dose error due to beam attenuation by a carbon fiber tabletop.

    PubMed

    Myint, W Kenji; Niedbala, Malgorzata; Wilkins, David; Gerig, Lee H

    2006-08-24

    Carbon fiber is commonly used in radiation therapy for treatment tabletops and various immobilization and support devices, partially because it is generally perceived to be almost radiotransparent to high-energy photons. To avoid exposure to normal tissue during modern radiation therapy, one must deliver the radiation from all gantry angles; hence, beams often transit the couch proximal to the patient. The effects of the beam attenuation by the support structure of the couch are often neglected in the planning process. In this study, we investigate the attenuation of 6-MV and 18-MV photon beams by a Medtec (Orange City, IA) carbon fiber couch. We have determined that neglecting the attenuation of oblique treatment fields by the carbon fiber couch can result in localized dose reduction from 4% to 16%, depending on energy, field size, and geometry. Further, we investigate the ability of a commercial treatment-planning system (Theraplan Plus v3.8) to account for the attenuation by the treatment couch. Results show that incorporating the carbon fiber couch in the patient model reduces the dose error to less than 2%. The variation in dose reduction as a function of longitudinal couch position was also measured. In the triangular strut region of the couch, the attenuation varied +/- 0.5% following the periodic nature of the support structure. Based on these findings, we propose the routine incorporation of the treatment tabletop into patient treatment planning dose calculations.

  8. Naltrexone for impulse control disorders in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Papay, Kimberly; Xie, Sharon X.; Stern, Matthew; Hurtig, Howard; Siderowf, Andrew; Duda, John E.; Minger, James

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson disease (PD) are common and can be difficult to manage. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy and tolerability of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, for the treatment of ICDs in PD. Methods: Patients with PD (n = 50) and an ICD were enrolled in an 8-week, randomized (1:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled study of naltrexone 50–100 mg/d (flexible dosing). The primary outcome measure was response based on the Clinical Global Impression–Change score, and the secondary outcome measure was change in symptom severity using the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease–Rating Scale (QUIP-RS) ICD score. Results: Forty-five patients (90%) completed the study. The Clinical Global Impression–Change response rate difference favoring naltrexone in completers was 19.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] −8.7% to 44.2%). While this difference was not significant (odds ratio = 1.6, 95% CI 0.5–5.2, Wald χ2 [df] = 0.5 [1], p = 0.5), naltrexone treatment led to a significantly greater decrease in QUIP-RS ICD score over time compared with placebo (regression coefficient for interaction term in linear mixed-effects model = −7.37, F[df] = 4.3 [1, 49], p = 0.04). The estimated changes in QUIP-RS ICD scores from baseline to week 8 were 14.9 points (95% CI 9.9–19.9) for naltrexone and 7.5 points (95% CI 2.5–12.6) for placebo. Conclusions: Naltrexone treatment was not efficacious for the treatment of ICDs in PD using a global assessment of response, but findings using a PD-specific ICD rating scale support further evaluation of opioid antagonists for the treatment of ICD symptoms in PD. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that in patients with PD and an ICD, naltrexone does not significantly increase the probability of achieving response. However, the study lacked the precision to exclude an important difference in response rates. PMID

  9. Naltrexone + bupropion (Mysimba). Too risky for only modest weight loss.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    Weight loss and its long-term maintenance are mainly based on dietary measures and regular physical activity. There are currently no weight-loss medications with a favourable harm-benefit balance. Bupropion is chemically related to certain amphetamines, while naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist. A fixed-dose combination of these two drugs has received marketing authorisation in the European Union for obese patients and for over-weight patients with other cardiovascular risk factors. In five placebo-controlled, randomised, double-blind trials, the patients, weighing on average between 100 kg and 105 kg (average body mass index 36 kg/m2), the naltrexone + bupropion combination was associated with an average weight loss of a few additional kilograms compared with placebo, after 6 months or one year of treatment. There are no post-trial follow-up data to show whether or not the patients regained their lost weight after treatment discontinuation. One trial including more than 8900 patients examined the effect of the naltrexone + bupropion combination on the freauency of maior cardiovascular events, but poor handling of an interim analysis undermined the validity of the final results. The known adverse effects of bupropion consist of potentially severe neuropsychiatric disorders such as aggressiveness, depression and suicidal ideation, and also allergic reactions, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Misuse and excessive consumption have been reported. In trials in obese or overweight patients, the naltrexone + bupropion combination caused sometimes severe neuropsychiatric disorders, including seizures, cognitive impairment, dizziness, anxiety, sleep disorders and psychotic symptoms. In clinical trials, the combination led to an increase in blood pressure compared with placebo, and also an excess of cardiac arrhythmias. About half of patients who took naltrexone + bupropion experienced gastrointestinal disorders such as nausea, vomiting and constipation. The

  10. [Impulsive behaviors in opiate-dependent subjects treated with naltrexone].

    PubMed

    Pérez de los Cobos, J; Pinet, C; Ribalta, E; Trujols, J; Casas, M

    1994-01-01

    Thirty three heroin dependents (DSM-III-R) attending a naltrexone clinic were assessed to see if their histories of bulimic and non-suicidal self-aggressive behaviours would allow to predict the therapeutic response of the opioid antagonist. Neither these impulsive behaviours non previous suicide attempts or over-doses could predict such a response, which was evaluated according to the time spent under treatment with naltrexone. Before the administration of naltrexone, one or more of the studied impulsive conducts were detected in 87.8% of the sample (n = 29). None of the patients combined enough criteria to be diagnosed of bulimia (DSM-III-R). In 32 patients the occurrence of changes in the impulsive behaviours studied during the treatment period with the opioid antagonist were determined. These variations were not related to the determinations of abuse drugs in urine or with intake of psychoactive drugs. During the treatment with naltrexone, 15 patients ceased to present self-injuries without suicidal purposes and none of the patients began these behaviours for the first time. However, some patients without a previous history of bulimic behaviour developed this condition during the administration of the opioid antagonist. In this sense, four subgroups of patients can be differentiated according to the moment in which the bulimic behaviour appeared: subgroup A includes 7 individuals (21.7%) who discontinued this behaviour upon receiving the antagonist, while subgroup B (n = 3; 9.3%) is made up of those who presented this behaviour during both heroin consumption and the administration of naltrexone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. A combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone blocks compulsive cocaine intake in rodents without producing dependence.

    PubMed

    Wee, Sunmee; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Misra, Kaushik K; Schlosburg, Joel E; Koob, George F

    2012-08-08

    Buprenorphine, a synthetic opioid that acts at both μ and κ opioid receptors, can decrease cocaine use in individuals with opioid addiction. However, the potent agonist action of buprenorphine at μ opioid receptors raises its potential for creating opioid dependence in non-opioid-dependent cocaine abusers. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone (a potent μ opioid antagonist with weaker δ and κ antagonist properties) could block compulsive cocaine self-administration without producing opioid dependence. The effects of buprenorphine and various doses of naltrexone on cocaine self-administration were assessed in rats that self-administered cocaine under conditions of either short access (noncompulsive cocaine seeking) or extended access (compulsive cocaine seeking). Buprenorphine alone reproducibly decreased cocaine self-administration. Although this buprenorphine-alone effect was blocked in a dose-dependent manner by naltrexone in both the short-access and the extended-access groups, the combination of the lowest dose of naltrexone with buprenorphine blocked cocaine self-administration in the extended-access group but not in the short-access group. Rats given this low dose of naltrexone with buprenorphine did not exhibit the physical opioid withdrawal syndrome seen in rats treated with buprenorphine alone, and naltrexone at this dose did not block κ agonist-induced analgesia. The results suggest that the combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone at an appropriate dosage decreases compulsive cocaine self-administration with minimal liability to produce opioid dependence and may be useful as a treatment for cocaine addiction.

  12. A Combination of Buprenorphine and Naltrexone Blocks Compulsive Cocaine Intake in Rodents Without Producing Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Sunmee; Vendruscolo, Leandro F.; Misra, Kaushik K.; Schlosburg, Joel E.; Koob, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Buprenorphine, a synthetic opioid that acts at both μ and κ opioid receptors, can decrease cocaine use in individuals with opioid addiction. However, the potent agonist action of buprenorphine at μ opioid receptors raises its potential for creating opioid dependence in non–opioid-dependent cocaine abusers. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone (a potent μ opioid antagonist with weaker δ and κ antagonist properties) could block compulsive cocaine self-administration without producing opioid dependence. The effects of buprenorphine and various doses of naltrexone on cocaine self-administration were assessed in rats that self-administered cocaine under conditions of either short access (noncompulsive cocaine seeking) or extended access (compulsive cocaine seeking). Buprenorphine alone reproducibly decreased cocaine self-administration. Although this buprenorphine-alone effect was blocked in a dose-dependent manner by naltrexone in both the short-access and the extended-access groups, the combination of the lowest dose of naltrexone with buprenorphine blocked cocaine self-administration in the extended-access group but not in the short-access group. Rats given this low dose of naltrexone with buprenorphine did not exhibit the physical opioid withdrawal syndrome seen in rats treated with buprenorphine alone, and naltrexone at this dose did not block κ agonist–induced analgesia. The results suggest that the combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone at an appropriate dosage decreases compulsive cocaine self-administration with minimal liability to produce opioid dependence and may be useful as a treatment for cocaine addiction. PMID:22875830

  13. Nebulized Live-Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Provides Protection in Ferrets at a Reduced Dose

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jennifer Humberd; Papania, Mark; Knaus, Darin; Brooks, Paula; Haas, Debra L.; Mair, Raydel; Barry, James; Tompkins, S. Mark; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2011-01-01

    Live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) is delivered to vaccine recipients using a nasal spray syringe. LAIV delivered by this method is immunogenic at current doses; however, improvements in nasal delivery might allow for significant dose reduction. We investigated LAIV vaccination in ferrets using a high efficiency nebulizer designed for nasal delivery. LAIV nasal aerosol elicited high levels of serum neutralizing antibodies and protected ferrets from homologous virus challenge at conventional (107 TCID50) and significantly reduced (103 TCID50) doses. Aerosol LAIV also provided a significant level of subtype-specific cross protection. These results demonstrate the dose-sparing potential of nebulizer-based nasal aerosol LAIV delivery. PMID:22075083

  14. Impact of radiation attenuation by a carbon fiber couch on patient dose verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chun-Yen; Chou, Wen-Tsae; Liao, Yi-Jen; Lee, Jeng-Hung; Liang, Ji-An; Hsu, Shih-Ming

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the difference between the measured and calculated irradiation attenuations obtained using two algorithms and to identify the influence of couch attenuation on patient dose verification. We performed eight tests of couch attenuation with two photon energies, two longitudinal couch positions, and two rail positions. The couch attenuation was determined using a radiation treatment planning system. The measured and calculated attenuations were compared. We also performed 12 verifications of head-and-neck and rectum cases by using a Delta phantom. The dose deviation (DD), distance to agreement (DTA), and gamma index of pencil-beam convolution (PBC) verifications were nearly the same. The agreement was least consistent for the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) without the couch for the head-and-neck case, in which the DD, DTA, and gamma index were 74.4%, 99.3%, and 89%, respectively; for the rectum case, the corresponding values were 56.2%, 95.1%, and 92.4%. We suggest that dose verification should be performed using the following three metrics simultaneously: DD, DTA, and the gamma index.

  15. Impact of radiation attenuation by a carbon fiber couch on patient dose verification

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chun-Yen; Chou, Wen-Tsae; Liao, Yi-Jen; Lee, Jeng-Hung; Liang, Ji-An; Hsu, Shih-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the difference between the measured and calculated irradiation attenuations obtained using two algorithms and to identify the influence of couch attenuation on patient dose verification. We performed eight tests of couch attenuation with two photon energies, two longitudinal couch positions, and two rail positions. The couch attenuation was determined using a radiation treatment planning system. The measured and calculated attenuations were compared. We also performed 12 verifications of head-and-neck and rectum cases by using a Delta phantom. The dose deviation (DD), distance to agreement (DTA), and gamma index of pencil-beam convolution (PBC) verifications were nearly the same. The agreement was least consistent for the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) without the couch for the head-and-neck case, in which the DD, DTA, and gamma index were 74.4%, 99.3%, and 89%, respectively; for the rectum case, the corresponding values were 56.2%, 95.1%, and 92.4%. We suggest that dose verification should be performed using the following three metrics simultaneously: DD, DTA, and the gamma index. PMID:28240236

  16. Impact of radiation attenuation by a carbon fiber couch on patient dose verification.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun-Yen; Chou, Wen-Tsae; Liao, Yi-Jen; Lee, Jeng-Hung; Liang, Ji-An; Hsu, Shih-Ming

    2017-02-27

    The aim of this study was to understand the difference between the measured and calculated irradiation attenuations obtained using two algorithms and to identify the influence of couch attenuation on patient dose verification. We performed eight tests of couch attenuation with two photon energies, two longitudinal couch positions, and two rail positions. The couch attenuation was determined using a radiation treatment planning system. The measured and calculated attenuations were compared. We also performed 12 verifications of head-and-neck and rectum cases by using a Delta phantom. The dose deviation (DD), distance to agreement (DTA), and gamma index of pencil-beam convolution (PBC) verifications were nearly the same. The agreement was least consistent for the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) without the couch for the head-and-neck case, in which the DD, DTA, and gamma index were 74.4%, 99.3%, and 89%, respectively; for the rectum case, the corresponding values were 56.2%, 95.1%, and 92.4%. We suggest that dose verification should be performed using the following three metrics simultaneously: DD, DTA, and the gamma index.

  17. Risk-Taking Propensity as a Predictor of Induction onto Naltrexone Treatment for Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Aklin, Will M.; Severtson, S. Geoffrey; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E.; Lejuez, C. W.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Objective Heroin addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that has devastating social, medical, and economic consequences. Naltrexone is an antagonist that blocks opioid effects and could be an effective medication for the treatment of opioid dependence. However, its clinical utility has been limited partly because of poor adherence and acceptability. Given the importance of compliance to naltrexone treatment for opioid dependence, the goal of the current study was to examine predictors involved in successful induction onto naltrexone treatment. Method Parametric and nonparametric statistical tests were performed on data from a sample of 64 individuals entering treatment who met DSM-IV criteria for opioid dependence. The relationship between naltrexone induction (i.e., inducted- vs. not-inducted onto naltrexone) and risk-taking propensity, as indexed by riskiness on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) was examined. Participants were recruited from local detoxification programs, inpatient drug treatment, and other Baltimore programs that provided services to opioid dependent adults (e.g., Baltimore Needle Exchange Program) during the period from August 2007 to September 2008. Results Positive association between risk-taking propensity and odds of naltrexone induction. Specifically, each five point increase in the total BART score was associated with a 25% decrease in odds of naltrexone induction (OR=0.76, 95% CI: 0.58–0.99, p = .041). This association remained statistically significant even after adjusting for potential confounds, including injection drug use and cocaine positive urine results (p = .05). After adjusting for the covariates, each five point increase in BART score was associated with 28% decrease in the odds of achieving the maintenance dose (AOR=0.73, 95% CI: 0.54–0.99, p = .046). Conclusions Risk taking propensity was predictive of induction onto naltrexone treatment, above and beyond injection drug use and cocaine-positive urine samples. PMID

  18. Ocular safety of Topical Naltrexone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    administered f. Individuals who cannot give informed consent g. Allergy to opioids, or to components of the proprietary antibiotic vehicle utilized...which will be Vigamox topical antibiotic solution 3. Study design All test medications will be prepared by the Skip’s Pharmacy using sterile...Research Molecular Brain Research 2000;84:106-14. 36. Zagon IS, McLaughlin PJ. Naltrexone modulates growth in infant rats. Life Sciences 1983;33:2449-54. 37

  19. Patient self-attenuation and technologist dose in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zeff, Benjamin W.; Yester, Michael V.

    2005-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET), with 511-keV radiation and long patient-uptake times, presents unique radiation safety concerns. This two-part study considers aspects of PET radiation safety as they relate to PET suite design, dose to the public, and technologist occupational dose. In the first part of the study, the self-attenuation of radiation by patients' bodies was quantified. The radiation exposure was measured at three positions from 64 patients injected with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) during the uptake period. Compared with an in vitro control used as a point source, a significant decrease in exposure (>40% at 1 m) was observed due to nonuniform distribution of FDG and attenuation within the patients. The attenuation data are consistent with results from simulations [M. E. Phelps, ''Comments and Perspectives,'' J. Nucl. Med. 45, 1601 (2004)] that treat the body as a uniform, water-filled cylinder. As distance is often the principal source of protection for 511-keV radiation, the considerable self-attenuation may allow for more compact PET suites. However, despite high patient self-attenuation, shielding, and standard precautionary measures, PET technologist occupational doses can remain quite high ({approx}12 mSv/year). The second part of this study tracked the daily dose received by PET technologists. Close technologist-patient interaction both during and following FDG administration, as much as 20 min/study, contribute to the high doses and point to the need for a more innovative approach to radiation protection for PET technologists.

  20. Low Dose Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Hemodynamic Response to Skull Pin Holder Application

    PubMed Central

    Kondavagilu, Shwethashri Ramaprasannakumar; Pujari, Vinayak Seenappa; Chadalawada, Mohan V. R.; Bevinguddaiah, Yatish

    2017-01-01

    Background: The application of skull pin holder elicits an adverse hemodynamic response that can be deleterious; there are many drugs that have been used to attenuate this response. We have conducted this study to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (i.v.) dexmedetomidine on attenuation of hemodynamic responses to skull pin head holder application and to compare the effectiveness of two doses of i.v. dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg and 0.5 μg/kg bolus). Materials and Methods: Ninety American Society of Anesthesiologists physical Status I–III patients undergoing craniotomy were randomized into three groups of thirty each. After intubation, patients in Group A received 1 μg/kg of i.v. dexmedetomidine, Group B received 0.5 μg/kg of i.v. dexmedetomidine, whereas Group C received an equivalent quantity of normal saline. Hemodynamic parameters were monitored regularly after skull pin insertion. Results: There was no significant difference in the monitored hemodynamic parameters among the three groups from baseline until intubation. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased significantly at skull pin insertion and subsequent points in Group C, whereas the values decreased in Groups A and B (P < 0.05). Patients in Group A showed a higher and sustained attenuation of MAP. Patients in Group C had a higher incidence of tachycardia and hypertension requiring additional measures to attenuate the response. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine in either dosage (1 μg/kg or 0.5 μg/kg) was effective in attenuating hemodynamic response to skull pin insertion. Dexmedetomidine in doses of 0.5 μg/kg was as effective in attenuating the HR and MAP response to skull pin insertion as compared to a dose of 1 μg/kg. PMID:28298757

  1. Effects of baclofen and naltrexone, alone and in combination, on the consumption of palatable food in male rats.

    PubMed

    Avena, Nicole M; Bocarsly, Miriam E; Murray, Susan; Gold, Mark S

    2014-10-01

    Excess consumption of palatable food has been shown to affect reward-related brain regions, and pharmaceutical treatments for drug addiction may also be effective in treating overeating of such foods. The GABA-B agonist baclofen and opioid antagonist naltrexone have both been used to treat addiction, and have been shown to suppress intake of certain foods. The combination of these drugs has shown to be more effective in reducing alcohol consumption than either drug alone. The present study assessed the effects of naltrexone and baclofen, alone and in combination, on intake of foods comprised of various macronutrients. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given 12-hr daily access to chow and a fat emulsion, sugar-fat emulsion, or a sugar solution for 21 days. Rats were then administered (intraperitoneal) baclofen-naltrexone combinations (0.1 mg/kg naltrexone and 1.0 mg/kg baclofen, 1.0 mg/kg naltrexone and 1.8 mg/kg baclofen), and naltrexone (0.1, 1.0 mg/kg) and baclofen (1.0, 1.8 mg/kg) alone. The high dose of the baclofen-naltrexone combination reduced palatable food intake in both the fat and sugar-fat groups compared with vehicle, without affecting chow consumption in these groups. Naltrexone showed little significant effects on intake of either palatable food or chow. Baclofen also reduced palatable food intake in the fat and fat-sugar groups, but differences were only noted between the low and high dose. The combination of baclofen and naltrexone may be a useful tool in selectively targeting the consumption of high-fat and sugar- and fat-rich foods. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Dosing schedule-dependent attenuation of dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Reiko; Yamamoto, Saori; Yasumoto, Yuki; Oishi, Katsutaka

    2014-05-01

    Many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases are treated using synthetic glucocorticoids. However, excessive glucocorticoid can often cause unpredictable effects including muscle atrophy. Endogenous glucocorticoid levels robustly fluctuate in a circadian manner and peak just before the onset of the active phase in both humans and nocturnal rodents. The present study determines whether muscle atrophy induced by exogenous glucocorticoid can be avoided by optimizing dosing times. We administered single daily doses of the glucocorticoid analog dexamethasone (Dex) to mice for 10 days at the times of day corresponding to peak (early night) or trough (early morning) endogenous glucocorticoid levels. Administration at the acrophase of endogenous glucocorticoids significantly attenuated Dex-induced wasting of the gastrocnemius (Ga) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles that comprise mostly fast-twitch muscle fibers. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that the Dex-induced mRNA expression of genes encoding the atrophy-related ubiquitin ligases Muscle Atrophy F-box (Fbxo32, also known as MAFbx/Atrogin-1) and Muscle RING finger 1 (Trim63, also known as MuRF1) in the Ga and TA muscles was significantly attenuated by Dex when administered during the early night. Dex negligibly affected the weight of the soleus (So) muscle that mostly comprises slow-twitch muscle fibers, but significantly and similarly decreased the weight of the spleen at both dosing times. These results suggest that glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy can be attenuated by optimizing the dosing schedule.

  3. Low-Dose Aronia melanocarpa Concentrate Attenuates Paraquat-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Case, A. J.; Agraz, D.; Ahmad, I. M.; Zimmerman, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Herbicides containing paraquat may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Paraquat induces reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in neurons, which is a primary mechanism behind its toxicity. We sought to test the effectiveness of a commercially available polyphenol-rich Aronia melanocarpa (aronia berry) concentrate in the amelioration of paraquat-induced neurotoxicity. Considering the abundance of antioxidants in aronia berries, we hypothesized that aronia berry concentrate attenuates the paraquat-induced increase in reactive oxygen species and protects against paraquat-mediated neuronal cell death. Using a neuronal cell culture model, we observed that low doses of aronia berry concentrate protected against paraquat-mediated neurotoxicity. Additionally, low doses of the concentrate attenuated the paraquat-induced increase in superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and oxidized glutathione levels. Interestingly, high doses of aronia berry concentrate increased neuronal superoxide levels independent of paraquat, while at the same time decreasing hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, high-dose aronia berry concentrate potentiated paraquat-induced superoxide production and neuronal cell death. In summary, aronia berry concentrate at low doses restores the homeostatic redox environment of neurons treated with paraquat, while high doses exacerbate the imbalance leading to further cell death. Our findings support that moderate levels of aronia berry concentrate may prevent reactive oxygen species-mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:26770655

  4. Low-Dose Aronia melanocarpa Concentrate Attenuates Paraquat-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Case, A J; Agraz, D; Ahmad, I M; Zimmerman, M C

    2016-01-01

    Herbicides containing paraquat may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Paraquat induces reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in neurons, which is a primary mechanism behind its toxicity. We sought to test the effectiveness of a commercially available polyphenol-rich Aronia melanocarpa (aronia berry) concentrate in the amelioration of paraquat-induced neurotoxicity. Considering the abundance of antioxidants in aronia berries, we hypothesized that aronia berry concentrate attenuates the paraquat-induced increase in reactive oxygen species and protects against paraquat-mediated neuronal cell death. Using a neuronal cell culture model, we observed that low doses of aronia berry concentrate protected against paraquat-mediated neurotoxicity. Additionally, low doses of the concentrate attenuated the paraquat-induced increase in superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and oxidized glutathione levels. Interestingly, high doses of aronia berry concentrate increased neuronal superoxide levels independent of paraquat, while at the same time decreasing hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, high-dose aronia berry concentrate potentiated paraquat-induced superoxide production and neuronal cell death. In summary, aronia berry concentrate at low doses restores the homeostatic redox environment of neurons treated with paraquat, while high doses exacerbate the imbalance leading to further cell death. Our findings support that moderate levels of aronia berry concentrate may prevent reactive oxygen species-mediated neurotoxicity.

  5. A placebo-controlled trial of memantine as an adjunct to injectable extended-release naltrexone for opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Bisaga, Adam; Sullivan, Maria A; Glass, Andrew; Mishlen, Kaitlyn; Carpenter, Kenneth M; Mariani, John J; Levin, Frances R; Nunes, Edward V

    2014-01-01

    There is preclinical support for using NMDA receptor glutamatergic antagonists to aid in naltrexone-based treatment of opioid dependence. We hypothesized that adding memantine will improve efficacy of extended-release (XR) naltrexone to prevent relapse. In this double blind study opioid-dependent participants (N=82) underwent inpatient detoxification and naltrexone induction. During naltrexone initiation participants were randomized to receive memantine 40 mg or placebo and continued treatment for 12-weeks with XR naltrexone and relapse-prevention therapy. Sixty eight percent of participants completed detoxification and received the first dose of XR naltrexone. Rates of trial completion were significantly greater in participants receiving placebo than memantine (70% vs. 43%, p<0.05). Severity of opioid withdrawal symptoms during the first 3 weeks of the trial appeared to be lower in the group receiving memantine (p=0.07). Adding memantine does not appear to increase the effectiveness of injectable XR naltrexone as a relapse prevention strategy in opioid dependence and may lead to an increase in treatment drop-out.

  6. Combined administration of buprenorphine and naltrexone produces antidepressant-like effects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Almatroudi, Abdulrahman; Husbands, Stephen M.; Bailey, Christopher P.; Bailey, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Opiates have been used historically for the treatment of depression. Renewed interest in the use of opiates as antidepressants has focussed on the development of kappa opioid receptor (κ-receptor) antagonists. Buprenorphine acts as a partial μ-opioid receptor agonist and a κ-receptor antagonist. By combining buprenorphine with the opioid antagonist naltrexone, the activation of μ-opioid receptors would be reduced and the κ-antagonist properties enhanced. We have established that a combination dose of buprenorphine (1mg/kg) with naltrexone (1mg/kg) functions as a short-acting κ-antagonist in the mouse tail withdrawal test. Furthermore, this dose combination is neither rewarding nor aversive in the conditioned place preference paradigm and is without significant locomotor effects. We have shown for the first time that systemic co-administration of buprenorphine (1mg/kg) with naltrexone (1mg/kg) in CD-1 mice produced significant antidepressant-like responses in behaviours in both the forced swim test and novelty induced hypophagia task. Behaviours in the elevated plus maze and light dark box were not significantly altered by treatment with buprenorphine alone, or in combination with naltrexone. We propose that the combination of buprenorphine with naltrexone represents a novel, and potentially a readily translatable approach, to the treatment of depression. PMID:26045511

  7. Naltrexone and Bupropion, Alone or Combined, Do Not Alter the Reinforcing Effects of Intranasal Methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, William W.; Pike, Erika; Hays, Lon R.; Glaser, Paul E.; Rush, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Naltrexone and bupropion, when administered alone in clinical trials, modestly reduce amphetamine use. Whether combining these drugs would result in greater reductions in methamphetamine taking relative to either drug alone is undetermined. This study examined the influence of naltrexone, bupropion and a naltrexone-bupropion combination on methamphetamine self-administration in humans. Seven subjects reporting recent illicit stimulant use completed a placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind study in which the reinforcing, subject-rated and physiological effects of intranasal methamphetamine (0, 10 and 30 mg) were assessed during maintenance on placebo, naltrexone (50 mg), bupropion (300 mg/day), and naltrexone combined with bupropion. Methamphetamine maintained responding and produced prototypic subjective and physiological effects (e.g., increased ratings of Good Effects, elevated systolic blood pressure). Maintenance doses were well tolerated and generally devoid of effects. No maintenance condition reduced methamphetamine self-administration or systematically altered the subject-rated effects of methamphetamine. These outcomes demonstrate the robust behavioral effects of methamphetamine that could make it resistant to pharmacological manipulation. Although these outcomes indicate that this combination may be ineffective for managing methamphetamine use disorder, future work should evaluate longer maintenance dosing, individuals with different levels of amphetamine use, adding this combination to a behavioral platform and other pharmacotherapy combinations for reducing methamphetamine use. PMID:25459104

  8. Combined administration of buprenorphine and naltrexone produces antidepressant-like effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Almatroudi, Abdulrahman; Husbands, Stephen M; Bailey, Christopher P; Bailey, Sarah J

    2015-07-01

    Opiates have been used historically for the treatment of depression. Renewed interest in the use of opiates as antidepressants has focused on the development of kappa opioid receptor (κ-receptor) antagonists. Buprenorphine acts as a partial µ-opioid receptor agonist and a κ-receptor antagonist. By combining buprenorphine with the opioid antagonist naltrexone, the activation of µ-opioid receptors will be reduced and the κ-antagonist properties enhanced. We have established that a combination dose of buprenorphine (1 mg/kg) with naltrexone (1 mg/kg) functions as a short-acting κ-antagonist in the mouse tail withdrawal test. Furthermore, this dose combination is neither rewarding nor aversive in the conditioned place preference paradigm, and is without significant locomotor effects. We have shown for the first time that systemic co-administration of buprenorphine (1 mg/kg) with naltrexone (1 mg/kg) in CD-1 mice produced an antidepressant-like response in behaviours in both the forced swim test and novelty induced hypophagia task. Behaviours in the elevated plus maze and light dark box were not significantly altered by treatment with buprenorphine alone, or in combination with naltrexone. We propose that the combination of buprenorphine with naltrexone represents a novel, and potentially a readily translatable approach, to the treatment of depression.

  9. Naltrexone and bupropion, alone or combined, do not alter the reinforcing effects of intranasal methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Stoops, William W; Pike, Erika; Hays, Lon R; Glaser, Paul E; Rush, Craig R

    2015-02-01

    Naltrexone and bupropion, when administered alone in clinical trials, modestly reduce amphetamine use. Whether combining these drugs would result in greater reductions in methamphetamine taking relative to either drug alone is undetermined. This study examined the influence of naltrexone, bupropion and a naltrexone-bupropion combination on methamphetamine self-administration in humans. Seven subjects reporting recent illicit stimulant use completed a placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind study in which the reinforcing, subject-rated and physiological effects of intranasal methamphetamine (0, 10 and 30 mg) were assessed during maintenance on placebo, naltrexone (50 mg), bupropion (300 mg/day), and naltrexone combined with bupropion. Methamphetamine maintained responding and produced prototypic subjective and physiological effects (e.g., increased ratings of good effects, elevated systolic blood pressure). Maintenance doses were well tolerated and generally devoid of effects. No maintenance condition reduced methamphetamine self-administration or systematically altered the subject-rated effects of methamphetamine. These outcomes demonstrate the robust behavioral effects of methamphetamine that could make it resistant to pharmacological manipulation. Although these outcomes indicate that this combination may be ineffective for managing methamphetamine use disorder, future work should evaluate longer maintenance dosing, individuals with different levels of amphetamine use, adding this combination to a behavioral platform and other pharmacotherapy combinations for reducing methamphetamine use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of concurrent intravenous morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride on end-tidal carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Respiratory depression, a potentially fatal side-effect of opioid-overdose, may be reversed by timely administration of an opioid antagonist, such as naloxone or naltrexone. Tampering with a formulation of morphine sulfate and sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride extended release capsules (MS-sNT) releases both the opioid morphine and the antagonist naltrexone. A study in recreational opioid-users indicated that morphine and naltrexone injected in the 25:1 ratio (duplicating the ratio of the formulation) found MS-sNT reduced morphine-induced euphoric effects vs intravenous (IV) morphine alone. In the same study, the effects of morphine + naltrexone on end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2), a measure of respiratory-depression, were evaluated and these data are reported here. Methods Single-center, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study. Non-dependent male opioid users were randomized to receive single IV doses of placebo, 30 mg morphine alone, and 30 mg morphine + 1.2 mg naltrexone. EtCO2 was measured by noninvasive capnography. Results Significant differences in EtCO2 least-squares means across all treatments for maximal effect (Emax) and area under the effect curve (AUE0-2, AUE0-8, AUE0-24) were detected (all p ≤ 0.0011). EtCO2 Emax values for morphine + naltrexone were significantly reduced vs morphine alone (42.9 mm Hg vs 47.1 mm Hg, p < 0.0001) and were not significantly different vs placebo (41.9 mm Hg). Median time to reach maximal effect (TEmax) was delayed for morphine + naltrexone vs morphine alone (5.0 h vs 1.0 h). Conclusions Results provide preliminary evidence that the naltrexone:morphine ratio within MS-sNT is sufficient to significantly reduce EtCO2 when administered intravenously to non-dependent male recreational opioid-users. Further studies with multiple measures of respiratory-function are warranted to determine if risk of respiratory depression is also reduced by naltrexone in the tampered formulation. PMID:22420453

  11. Retention in naltrexone implant treatment for opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Kunøe, Nikolaj; Lobmaier, Philipp; Vederhus, John Kåre; Hjerkinn, Bjørg; Hegstad, Solfrid; Gossop, Michael; Kristensen, Oistein; Waal, Helge

    2010-09-01

    Naltrexone's usefulness in the treatment of opioid dependence stems from its ability to block the action of heroin and other opioids. However, many patients are ambivalent towards naltrexone and often drop out of treatment with orally administered naltrexone. Sustained release naltrexone seems promising in reducing opioid use, but the extent to which patients remain in treatment beyond the first dosage of naltrexone is not clear. Patients (n=61) receving treatment with sustained release naltrexone implants were offered a second naltrexone implant after 6 months. Patients who remained in treatment were compared to those who did not, on drug use, mental health, and social problems before and during naltrexone implant treatment. Information was obtained on other treatments sought by patients who discontinued naltrexone. Blood samples were used to verify naltrexone release, and hair samples to confirm opioid intake. Of the patients who received the first naltrexone implant, 51% (n=31) remained in naltrexone implant treatment. Among those who discontinued treatment, 21% expressed a wish to reimplant but failed to attend for reimplantation and 28% declined reimplantation: 6 non-retained patients initiated maintenance or residential treatment. Remaining in naltrexone treatment was related to pre-study length of employment, illicit drug use, and concern for family problems. Higher levels of substance misuse and criminal activity during naltrexone treatment were negatively related to subsequent retention. Rates of retention among opioid-dependent patients receiving naltrexone implant treatment are encouraging and support this as a feasible long-term treatment option. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultralow dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric PET CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Samuel L.; Shulkin, Barry L.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To develop ultralow dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultralow doses (10–35 mA s). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for 11 tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% volume computed tomography dose index (0.39/3.64; mGy) from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUV{sub bw}) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the nondose reduced CTAC image for 90% dose reduction. No change in SUV{sub bw}, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols was found down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62% and 86% (3.2/8.3–0.9/6.2). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from predose-reduced patient images. Conclusions: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CT dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for colocalization of hybrid CT anatomy and PET radioisotope uptake.

  13. Blood morphine levels in naltrexone-exposed compared to non-naltrexone-exposed fatal heroin overdoses.

    PubMed

    Arnold-Reed, Diane E; Hulse, Gary K; Hansson, Robert C; Murray, Sean D; O'Neil, George; Basso, Maria R; Holman, C D'Arcy J

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between prior exposure to naltrexone and increased risk of fatal heroin overdose using a review of toxicology reports for heroin-related fatalities between July 1997 to August 1999 for two groups: those treated with oral naltrexone and those who were not treated. Additional information for the oral naltrexone group was obtained from clinic files. Naltrexone-treated deaths were identified from the patient database at the Australian Medical Procedures Research Foundation (AMPRF), Perth, Western Australia (WA) through the Western Australian Department of Health, Data Linkage Project. Non-treated cases were identified from the database at the Forensic Science Laboratory, State Chemistry Centre (WA). We identified and investigated blood morphine concentrations following 21 fatal heroin overdoses with prior exposure to naltrexone and in 71 non-naltrexone-exposed cases over the same time period. The proportion of deaths where heroin use was a major contributing factor was little different in the non-naltrexone compared to the naltrexone-exposed group. Furthermore, in 'acute opiate toxicity' deaths, blood morphine levels were lower in non-naltrexone-exposed compared with naltrexone-exposed cases. Although there was a higher number of deaths designated as rapid (i.e. occurring within 20 minutes) in the naltrexone-exposed (89%) compared with the non-exposed group (72%) this was not statistically significant. Other drug use in relation to heroin-related fatalities is discussed. Findings do not support the hypothesis that prior exposure to naltrexone increases sensitivity to heroin toxicity.

  14. Low-dose interpolated average CT for attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Zhang, Geoffrey; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2010-07-01

    Because of the advantages in the use of high photon flux and thus the short scan times of CT imaging, the traditional 68Ge scans for positron emission tomography (PET) image attenuation correction have been replaced by CT scans in the modern PET/CT technology. The combination of fast CT scan and slow PET scan often causes image misalignment between the PET and CT images due to respiration motion. Use of the average CT derived from cine CT images is reported to reduce such misalignment. However, the radiation dose to patients is higher with cine CT scans. This study introduces a method that uses breath-hold CT images and their interpolations to generate the average CT for PET image attenuation correction. Breath-hold CT sets are taken at end-inspiration and end-expiration. Deformable image registration is applied to generate a voxel-to-voxel motion matrix between the two CT sets. The motion is equally divided into 5 steps from inspiration to expiration and 5 steps from expiration to inspiration, generating a total of 8 phases of interpolated CT sets. An average CT image is generated from all the 10 phase CT images, including original inhale/exhale CT and 8 interpolated CT sets. Quantitative comparison shows that the reduction of image misalignment artifacts using the average CT from the interpolation technique for PET attenuation correction is at a similar level as that using cine average CT, while the dose to the patient from the CT scans is reduced significantly. The interpolated average CT method hence provides a low dose alternative to cine CT scans for PET attenuation correction.

  15. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-01-21

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  16. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for PET/CT quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently-available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration CINE CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. Methods We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. Results CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. Conclusion When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging. PMID:22156174

  17. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  18. A Synopsis of an Open-Trial of Naltrexone Treatment of Autism with Four Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panksepp, Jaak; Lensing, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    Four individuals (ages 5-21) with severe mental retardation and autism were administered Naltrexone. Results indicated a reduction in such symptoms as hyperactivity, aggressiveness, self-injurious behavior, stereotyped behaviors; and promotion of positive social behaviors. Intermittent administration at low doses seemed more beneficial than more…

  19. A Synopsis of an Open-Trial of Naltrexone Treatment of Autism with Four Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panksepp, Jaak; Lensing, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    Four individuals (ages 5-21) with severe mental retardation and autism were administered Naltrexone. Results indicated a reduction in such symptoms as hyperactivity, aggressiveness, self-injurious behavior, stereotyped behaviors; and promotion of positive social behaviors. Intermittent administration at low doses seemed more beneficial than more…

  20. Effects of Naltrexone on Adolescent Alcohol Cue Reactivity and Sensitivity: An Initial Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Robert; Ray, Lara; Blanchard, Alexander; Reynolds, Elizabeth K.; Monti, Peter M.; Chun, Thomas; Justus, Alicia; Swift, Robert M.; Tidey, Jennifer; Gwaltney, Chad J.; Ramirez, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent alcohol use is associated with myriad adverse consequences and contributes to the leading causes of mortality among youth. Despite the magnitude of this public health problem, evidenced-based treatment initiatives for alcohol use disorders in youth remain inadequate. Identifying promising pharmacological approaches may improve treatment options. Naltrexone is an opiate receptor antagonist that is efficacious for reducing drinking in adults by attenuating craving and the rewarding effects of alcohol. Implications of these findings for adolescents are unclear, however, given that randomized trials of naltrexone with youth are nonexistent. We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled crossover study, comparing naltrexone (50 mg/daily) and placebo in 22 adolescent problem drinkers aged 15 – 19 years (M = 18.36, SD = 0.95; 12 females). The primary outcome measures were alcohol use, subjective responses to alcohol consumption, and alcohol-cue-elicited craving assessed in the natural environment using ecological momentary assessment methods, and craving and physiological reactivity assessed using standard alcohol cue reactivity procedures. Results showed that naltrexone reduced the likelihood of drinking and heavy drinking (p’s ≤ .03), blunted craving in the laboratory and in the natural environment (p’s ≤ .04), and altered subjective responses to alcohol consumption (p’s ≤ .01). Naltrexone was generally well tolerated by participants. This study provides the first experimentally controlled evidence that naltrexone reduces drinking and craving, and alters subjective responses to alcohol in a sample of adolescent problem drinkers, and suggests larger clinical trials with long-term follow ups are warranted. PMID:23489253

  1. Effects of naltrexone on adolescent alcohol cue reactivity and sensitivity: an initial randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Robert; Ray, Lara; Blanchard, Alexander; Reynolds, Elizabeth K; Monti, Peter M; Chun, Thomas; Justus, Alicia; Swift, Robert M; Tidey, Jennifer; Gwaltney, Chad J; Ramirez, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Adolescent alcohol use is associated with myriad adverse consequences and contributes to the leading causes of mortality among youth. Despite the magnitude of this public health problem, evidenced-based treatment initiatives for alcohol use disorders in youth remain inadequate. Identifying promising pharmacological approaches may improve treatment options. Naltrexone is an opiate receptor antagonist that is efficacious for reducing drinking in adults by attenuating craving and the rewarding effects of alcohol. Implications of these findings for adolescents are unclear; however, given that randomized trials of naltrexone with youth are non-existent. We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over study, comparing naltrexone (50 mg/daily) and placebo in 22 adolescent problem drinkers aged 15-19 years (M = 18.36, standard deviation = 0.95; 12 women). The primary outcome measures were alcohol use, subjective responses to alcohol consumption, and alcohol-cue-elicited craving assessed in the natural environment using ecological momentary assessment methods, and craving and physiological reactivity assessed using standard alcohol cue reactivity procedures. Results showed that naltrexone reduced the likelihood of drinking and heavy drinking (P's ≤ 0.03), blunted craving in the laboratory and in the natural environment (P's ≤ 0.04), and altered subjective responses to alcohol consumption (P's ≤ 0.01). Naltrexone was generally well tolerated by participants. This study provides the first experimentally controlled evidence that naltrexone reduces drinking and craving, and alters subjective responses to alcohol in a sample of adolescent problem drinkers, and suggests larger clinical trials with long-term follow-ups are warranted.

  2. Effects of naltrexone on alcohol drinking patterns and extinction of alcohol seeking in baboons

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Barbara J.; Duke, Angela N.; Weerts, Elise M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Understanding naltrexone’s effect on motivation to drink and pattern of drinking is important for better treatment outcomes and for comparison with novel medications. Objectives Naltrexone’s effects on number and pattern of seeking, self-administration, and extinction responses were evaluated in two groups of baboons trained under a 3 component chained schedule of reinforcement (CSR). Methods Alcohol (4% w/v; n=4; Alcohol Group) or a preferred non-alcoholic beverage (n=4; Control Group) was available for self-administration only in Component 3 of the CSR. Responses in Component 2 provided indices of motivation to drink (seeking). Naltrexone (0.32 – 3.2 mg/kg) and saline were administered before drinking and Component 2 extinction sessions. Results Acute doses of naltrexone significantly decreased total self-administration responses (p<0.01), intake volume (p<0.001) and g/kg of alcohol (p<0.01) in the Alcohol Group only. Pattern of drinking did not change, but number of drinks during the initial drinking bout was decreased significantly by naltrexone for both groups (P<0.05). During within-session extinction tests, acute naltrexone significantly decreased time to reach extinction (p<0.01) and number of seeking responses (p<0.05), particularly early in the extinction period in the Alcohol Group only. When administered chronically, naltrexone did not decrease progressive-ratio breaking points to gain access to alcohol, but dose-dependently reduced alcohol self-administration (p<0.05) by decreasing the magnitude of the initial drinking bout. Conclusions The results support clinical observations that naltrexone may be most effective at reducing self-administration in the context of ongoing alcohol availability and may reduce motivation to drink in the presence of alcohol-related cues. PMID:22451093

  3. Comparison of Primary Doses Obtained in Three 6 MV Photon Beams Using a Small Attenuator.

    PubMed

    Trauernicht, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    It is a common technique in radiotherapy treatment planning systems to simplify the calculations by splitting the radiation beam into two components: namely the primary and scattered components. The contributions of the two components are evaluated separately and then summed to give the dose at the point of interest. Usually, the primary dose is obtained experimentally by extrapolating the ionization measured within the medium to zero-field size (Godden, Gamma radiation from cobalt 60 teletherapy units. Br. J. Radiol. Suppl. , 45(1983)). This approach offers the opportunity to obtain the primary component of dose without the need for an uncertain non-linear extrapolation. The primary dose can be obtained from two measurements of ionization in a large beam in a water phantom, as well as four measurements of ionization in a narrow beam geometry. The measurements were done over a range of different depths and thus the primary linear attenuation coefficient was also obtained. The calibrated output of a linear accelerator is usually 1.00 Gy per 100 monitor units (MU) at the depth of maximum dose ( d max ) in water for a 10 cm × 10 cm field. The values for the primary dose components at d max in a 10 cm × 10 cm field obtained in three different 6 MV beams using this method are D P ( d max , 10 cm × 10 cm) = 0.925-0.943 Gy/100 MU. The obtained values of the primary dose components compare well with measurements in the same beams extrapolated to zero-field size and also to literature. One can thus conclude that this method has the potential to provide an independent measurable verification of calculations of primary dose.

  4. Effects of ethanol and naltrexone on aggressive display in the siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Galizio, M; Woodard, R L; Keith, J

    1985-01-01

    The present study used the aggressive display of Betta splendens in response to a mirror as an index of the effects of ethanol and the opiate antagonist, naltrexone. Naltrexone produces an opiate receptor blockade and thus provided a test of the hypothesis that ethanol effects on aggression are mediated by the opioid system. Eighty fish were randomly assigned to one of eight groups in a 4 X 2 factorial design with Ethanol (0, 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 g%) and Naltrexone (0 and 5 mg/l) as the main factors. The 0.75 g% dose of ethanol reliably suppressed aggressive display as measured by number of gill show responses, but lower doses had no effect or tended to increase aggressive display. At the same time, all doses of ethanol increased arousal in the fish as measured by airgulping. Naltrexone alone did not have effects on aggression or arousal, and did not interact with ethanol on either measure. Thus the results did not support the ethanol-opioid common-link hypothesis.

  5. Effects of oral loperamide on efficacy of naltrexone, baclofen and AM-251 in blocking ethanol self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Dean, Reginald L; Eyerman, David; Todtenkopf, Mark S; Turncliff, Ryan Z; Bidlack, Jean M; Deaver, Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    Naltrexone is a μ-opioid receptor antagonist that has been extensively studied for its ability to block the rewarding effects of ethanol. Opioid receptors are widely distributed within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Typically, naltrexone is administered by parenteral routes in nonclinical studies. We initially tested if opioid receptors within the GIT would influence the ability of oral naltrexone to inhibit ethanol oral self-administration in rats using the co-administration of oral loperamide, a peripherally restricted opioid agonist. As expected, oral naltrexone only had modest effects on ethanol intake, and the response was not dose-dependent. However in rats, treatment with loperamide prior to the administration of naltrexone resulted in a suppression of ethanol intake which approached that observed with naltrexone given by the subcutaneous (SC) route. Importantly, administration of loperamide prior to administration of naltrexone did not alter blood concentrations of naltrexone. We then evaluated if oral loperamide would enhance effects of baclofen (a GABA(B) receptor agonist) and AM-251 (a CB-1 receptor antagonist) and found that pre-treatment with loperamide did potentiate the action of both drugs to reduce ethanol self-administration. Finally, the specific opioid receptor type involved was investigated using selective μ- and κ-receptor antagonists to determine if these would affect the ability of the AM-251 and loperamide combination to block ethanol drinking behavior. The effect of loperamide was blocked by ALKS 37, a peripherally restricted μ-receptor antagonist. These data suggest an important role for opioid receptors within the GIT in modulating central reward pathways and may provide new insights into strategies for treating reward disorders, including drug dependency.

  6. A single-dose live-attenuated vaccine prevents Zika virus pregnancy transmission and testis damage.

    PubMed

    Shan, Chao; Muruato, Antonio E; Jagger, Brett W; Richner, Justin; Nunes, Bruno T D; Medeiros, Daniele B A; Xie, Xuping; Nunes, Jannyce G C; Morabito, Kaitlyn M; Kong, Wing-Pui; Pierson, Theodore C; Barrett, Alan D; Weaver, Scott C; Rossi, Shannan L; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Graham, Barney S; Diamond, Michael S; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2017-09-22

    Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause congenital abnormities or fetal demise. The persistence of Zika virus in the male reproductive system poses a risk of sexual transmission. Here we demonstrate that live-attenuated Zika virus vaccine candidates containing deletions in the 3' untranslated region of the Zika virus genome (ZIKV-3'UTR-LAV) prevent viral transmission during pregnancy and testis damage in mice, as well as infection of nonhuman primates. After a single-dose vaccination, pregnant mice challenged with Zika virus at embryonic day 6 and evaluated at embryonic day 13 show markedly diminished levels of viral RNA in maternal, placental, and fetal tissues. Vaccinated male mice challenged with Zika virus were protected against testis infection, injury, and oligospermia. A single immunization of rhesus macaques elicited a rapid and robust antibody response, conferring complete protection upon challenge. Furthermore, the ZIKV-3'UTR-LAV vaccine candidates have a desirable safety profile. These results suggest that further development of ZIKV-3'UTR-LAV is warranted for humans.Zika virus infection can result in congenital disorders and cause disease in adults, and there is currently no approved vaccine. Here Shan et al. show that a single dose of a live-attenuated Zika vaccine prevents infection, testis damage and transmission to the fetus during pregnancy in different animal models.

  7. Verification of the dose attenuation of a newly developed vacuum cushion for intensity-modulated radiation therapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Toru; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Higashikawa, Akinori; Nishiyama, Tomohiro; Sakamoto, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    This study measured the dose attenuation of a newly developed vacuum cushion for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer, and verified the effect of dose-correction accuracy in a radiation treatment planning system (RTPS). The new cushion was filled with polystyrene foams inflated 15-fold (Sφ ≒ 1 mm) to reduce contraction caused by air suction and was compared to normal polystyrene foam inflated to 50-fold (Sφ ≒ 2 mm). The dose attenuation at several thicknesses of compression bag filled with normal and low-inflation materials was measured using an ionization chamber; and then the calculated RTPS dose was compared to ionization chamber measurements, while the new cushion was virtually included as region of interest in the calculation area. The dose attenuation rate of the normal cushion was 0.010 %/mm (R (2) = 0.9958), compared to 0.031 %/mm (R (2) = 0.9960) in the new cushion. Although the dose attenuation rate of the new cushion was three times that of the normal cushion, the high agreement between calculated dose by RTPS and ionization chamber measurements was within approximately 0.005 %/mm. Thus, the results of the current study indicate that the new cushion may be effective in clinical use for dose calculation accuracy in RTPS.

  8. Injectable, sustained-release naltrexone for the treatment of opioid dependence: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Sandra D.; Sullivan, Maria A.; Yu, Elmer; Rothenberg, Jami L.; Kleber, Herbert D.; Kampman, Kyle; Dackis, Charles; O'Brien, Charles P.; Chiang, C. Nora; Hawks, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Context Naltrexone is a medication available in oral form that can completely block the effects produced by opioid agonists, such as heroin. However, poor medication compliance with naltrexone has been a major obstacle to the effective treatment of opioid dependence. Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a sustained-release depot formulation of naltrexone in treating opioid dependence. Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 8-week multi-center trial of male and female heroin-dependent patients who participated in the study between September 2000 and November 2003. Participants were stratified by years of heroin use (≥5, <4.9) and gender, and then randomized to receive one of three doses: placebo, 192 mg, or 384 mg depot naltrexone. Doses were administered at the beginning of Week 1 and then again four weeks later at the beginning of Week 5. All participants received twice-weekly relapse prevention therapy, provided observed urine samples, and completed other assessments at each visit. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcome measures were retention in treatment and percentage of opioid-negative urine samples. Results A total of 60 patients were randomized at two centers. Retention in treatment was dose related with 39%, 60%, and 68% of the patients in the placebo, naltrexone 192 mg, and naltrexone 384 mg groups, respectively, remaining in treatment at the end of the two-month treatment period. Analysis of the time to dropout revealed a significant main effect of dose with mean time to dropout of 27, 36, and 48 days, respectively, for the placebo, naltrexone 192 mg, and naltrexone 384 mg groups. The percentage of urine samples negative for opioids varied significantly as a function of dose, as did the percentage of urine samples negative for methadone, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and amphetamine. The percentage of urine samples negative for cannabinoids was not significantly different across groups. When the data were

  9. A quantitative three-dimensional dose attenuation analysis around Fletcher-Suit-Delclos due to stainless steel tube for high-dose-rate brachytherapy by Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Parsai, E Ishmael; Zhang, Zhengdong; Feldmeier, John J

    2009-01-01

    The commercially available brachytherapy treatment-planning systems today, usually neglects the attenuation effect from stainless steel (SS) tube when Fletcher-Suit-Delclos (FSD) is used in treatment of cervical and endometrial cancers. This could lead to potential inaccuracies in computing dwell times and dose distribution. A more accurate analysis quantifying the level of attenuation for high-dose-rate (HDR) iridium 192 radionuclide ((192)Ir) source is presented through Monte Carlo simulation verified by measurement. In this investigation a general Monte Carlo N-Particles (MCNP) transport code was used to construct a typical geometry of FSD through simulation and compare the doses delivered to point A in Manchester System with and without the SS tubing. A quantitative assessment of inaccuracies in delivered dose vs. the computed dose is presented. In addition, this investigation expanded to examine the attenuation-corrected radial and anisotropy dose functions in a form parallel to the updated AAPM Task Group No. 43 Report (AAPM TG-43) formalism. This will delineate quantitatively the inaccuracies in dose distributions in three-dimensional space. The changes in dose deposition and distribution caused by increased attenuation coefficient resulted from presence of SS are quantified using MCNP Monte Carlo simulations in coupled photon/electron transport. The source geometry was that of the Vari Source wire model VS2000. The FSD was that of the Varian medical system. In this model, the bending angles of tandem and colpostats are 15 degrees and 120 degrees , respectively. We assigned 10 dwell positions to the tandem and 4 dwell positions to right and left colpostats or ovoids to represent a typical treatment case. Typical dose delivered to point A was determined according to Manchester dosimetry system. Based on our computations, the reduction of dose to point A was shown to be at least 3%. So this effect presented by SS-FSD systems on patient dose is of concern.

  10. Nociceptive Flexion Reflex and Pain Rating Responses During Endogenous Opiate Blockade with Naltrexone in Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    France, Christopher R.; al'Absi, Mustafa; Ring, Christopher; France, Janis L.; Harju, Angie; Wittmers, Lorentz E.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of opioid blockade on nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) activity and subjective pain ratings was examined in 151 healthy young men and women. Using a within-subjects design, NFR threshold was assessed on two days after administration of either placebo or a 50 mg dose of naltrexone. Electrocutaneous pain threshold and tolerance levels were measured after NFR threshold assessment on each day. Results indicated that administration of naltrexone was consistently associated with hypoalgesic responding. Specifically, participants exhibited lower levels of NFR activity and reported lower pain ratings for electrocutaneous stimulation delivered at pain threshold and tolerance levels following administration of naltrexone as compared to placebo. These findings indicate that opiate blockade using the current standard dose may elicit hypoalgesia. A potential moderating effect of dose of opiate blockade medication and level of endogenous opioid activation should be carefully examined in future research. PMID:17244518

  11. THE EFFECTS OF DRONABINOL DURING DETOXIFICATION AND THE INITIATION OF TREATMENT WITH EXTENDED RELEASE NALTREXONE

    PubMed Central

    Bisaga, Adam; Sullivan, Maria A.; Glass, Andrew; Mishlen, Kaitlyn; Pavlicova, Martina; Haney, Margaret; Raby, Wilfrid N.; Levin, Frances R.; Carpenter, Kenneth M.; Mariani, John J.; Nunes, Edward V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that the cannabinoid system is involved in the maintenance of opioid dependence. We examined whether dronabinol, a cannabinoid receptor type 1 partial agonist, reduces opioid withdrawal and increases retention in treatment with extended release naltrexone (XR-naltrexone). Methods Opioid dependent participants were randomized to receive dronabinol 30 mg/d (n=40) or placebo (n=20), under double-blind conditions, while they underwent inpatient detoxification and naltrexone induction. Before discharge all participants received an injection of XR-naltrexone, with an additional dose given four weeks later. Dronabinol or placebo was given while inpatient and for 5 weeks afterwards. The primary outcomes were the severity of opioid withdrawal, measured with the Subjective Opioid Withdrawal Scale, and retention in treatment at the end of the inpatient phase and at the end of the 8-week trial. Results The severity of opioid withdrawal during inpatient phase was lower in the dronabinol group relative to placebo group (p=0.006). Rates of successful induction onto XR-naltrexone (dronabinol 66%, placebo 55%) and completion of treatment (dronabinol 35%, placebo 35%) were not significantly different. Post-hoc analysis showed that the 32% of participants who smoked marijuana regularly during the outpatient phase had significantly lower ratings of insomnia and anxiety and were more likely to complete the 8-week trial. Conclusion Dronabinol reduced the severity of opiate withdrawal during acute detoxification but had no effect on rates of XR-naltrexone treatment induction and retention. Participants who elected to smoke marijuana during the trial were more likely to complete treatment regardless of treatment group assignment. PMID:26187456

  12. Estimation of patient attenuation factor for iodine-131 based on direct dose rate measurements from radioiodine therapy patients.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Khaled; Alenezi, Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the actual dose at 1 m from the patients per unit activity with the aim of providing a more accurate prediction of the dose levels around radioiodine patients in the hospital, as well as to compare our results with the literature. In this work the demonstration of a patient body tissue attenuation factor is verified by comparing the dose rates measured from the patients with those measured from the unshielded radioiodine capsules immediately after administration of the radioactivity. The normalized dose rate per unit activity is therefore proposed as an operational quantity that can be used to predict exposure rates to staff and patients' relatives. The average dose rate measured from our patient per unit activity was 38.4±11.8 μSv/h/GBq. The calculated attenuation correction factor based on our measurements was 0.55±0.17. The calculated dose rate from a radioiodine therapy patient should normally include a factor accounting for patient body tissue attenuation and scatter. The attenuation factor is currently neglected and not applied in operational radiation protection. Realistic estimation of radiation dose levels from radioiodine therapy patients when properly performed will reduce the operational cost and optimize institutional radiation protection practice. It is recommended to include patient attenuation factors in risk assessment exercises - in particular, when accurate estimates of total effective doses to exposed individuals are required when direct measurements are not possible. The information provided about patient attenuation might benefit radiation protection specialists and regulators.

  13. Prior Methamphetamine Self-Administration Attenuates Serotonergic Deficits Induced by Subsequent High-Dose Methamphetamine Administrations

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Lisa M.; Hunt, Madison M.; Vieira-Brock, Paula L.; Muehle, Janice; Nielsen, Shannon; Allen, Scott C.; Hanson, Glen R.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pre-clinical studies indicate that high-dose, non-contingent methamphetamine (METH) administration both rapidly and persistently decreases serotonergic neuronal function. Despite research indicating the hippocampus plays an important role in METH abuse and is affected by METH use, effects of METH self-administration on hippocampal serotonergic neurons are not well understood, and were thus an important focus of the current study. Because humans often administer METH in a binge-like pattern, effects of prior METH self-administration on a subsequent “binge-like” METH treatment were also examined. Methods Rats were treated as described above, and sacrificed 1 or 8 d after self-administration or 1 h or 7 d after the final binge METH or saline exposure. Hippocampal serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5HT) content and transporter (SERT) function were assessed. Results METH self-administration per se had no persistent effect on hippocampal 5HT content or SERT function. However, this treatment attenuated the persistent, but not acute, hippocampal serotonergic deficits caused by a subsequent repeated, high-dose, non-continent METH treatment administered 1 d the last self-administration session. No attenuation in persistent deficits were seen when the high-dose administration of METH occurred 15 d after the last self-administration session. Conclusions The present findings demonstrate that METH self-administration alters serotonergic neurons so as to engender “tolerance” to the persistent serotonergic deficits caused by a subsequent METH exposure. However, this “tolerance” does not persist. These data provide a foundation to investigate complex questions including how the response of serotonergic neurons to METH may contribute to contingent-related disorders such as dependence and relapse. PMID:22647900

  14. Internet sex addiction treated with naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, J Michael; Bucci, Jeffrey A

    2008-02-01

    Malfunctioning of the brain's reward center is increasingly understood to underlie all addictive behavior. Composed of mesolimbic incentive salience circuitry, the reward center governs all behavior in which motivation has a central role, including acquiring food, nurturing young, and having sex. To the detriment of normal functioning, basic survival activities can pale in importance when challenged by the allure of addictive substances or behaviors. Dopamine is the neurotransmitter driving both normal and addictive behavior. Other neurotransmitters modulate the amount of dopamine released in response to a stimulus, with the salience determined by the intensity of the dopamine pulse. Opiates (either endogenous or exogenous) exemplify such modulators. Prescribed for treating alcoholism, naltrexone blocks opiates' capacity to augment dopamine release. This article reviews naltrexone's mechanism of action in the reward center and describes a novel use for naltrexone in suppressing a euphorically compulsive and interpersonally devastating addiction to Internet pornography.

  15. Impact of 6MV photon beam attenuation by carbon fiber couch and immobilization devices in IMRT planning and dose delivery.

    PubMed

    Munjal, R K; Negi, P S; Babu, A G; Sinha, S N; Anand, A K; Kataria, T

    2006-04-01

    Multiple fields in IMRT and optimization allow conformal dose to the target and reduced dose to the surroundings and the regions of interest. Thus we can escalate the dose to the target to achieve better tumor control with low morbidity. Orientation of multiple beams can be achieved by i) different gantry angles, ii) rotating patient's couch isocentrically. In doing so, one or more beam may pass through different materials like the treatment couch, immobilization cast fixation plate, head and neck rest or any other supportive device. Our observations for 6MV photon beam on PRIMUS-KXE2 with MED-TEC carbon fiber tabletop and 10 × 10 cm(2) field size reveals that the maximum dose attenuation by the couch was of the order of 2.96% from gantry angle 120-160°. Attenuation due to cast fixation base plate of PMMA alone was of the order of 5.8-10.55% at gantry angle between 0 and 90°. Attenuation due to carbon fiber base plate alone was 3.8-7.98%. Attenuation coefficient of carbon fiber and PMMA was evaluated and was of the order of 0.082 cm(-1) and 0.064 cm(-1) respectively. Most of the TPS are configured for direct beam incidence attenuation correction factors only. Whereas when the beam is obliquely incident on the couch, base plate, headrest and any other immobilization device get attenuated more than the direct beam incidence. The correction factors for oblique incidence beam attenuation are not configured in most of the commercially available treatment planning systems. Therefore, such high variations in dose delivery could lead to under-dosage to the target volume for treatments requiring multiple fields in IMRT and 3D-CRT and need to be corrected for monitor unit calculations.

  16. Alterations of naltrexone-induced conditioned place avoidance by pre-exposure to high fructose corn syrup or heroin in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Stephen; Marshall, Paul; Leri, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    It has been suggested that withdrawal from sugar produces a set of symptoms that resemble those observed following withdrawal from opiate drugs. This study explored naltrexone-induced withdrawal in animals pre-exposed to acute, chronic, and intermittent high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) or acute and chronic heroin administration. Experiment 1 examined conditioned place avoidance (CPA) induced by different doses of naltrexone (0.01-1 mg/kg) in naïve male Sprague-Dawley rats. In experiment 2, rats received continuous or intermittent home cage HFCS access (0 or 50 %) prior to conditioning with 1 mg/kg naltrexone. In experiment 3, HFCS ingestion was increased by food restriction and rats were conditioned with 3 mg/kg naltrexone. In experiment 4, the timing and quantity of HFCS ingestion (0, 0.5, 1, 2 g/kg) was controlled by intragastric administration, and rats were conditioned with 1 mg/kg naltrexone. In experiment 5, rats received acute (2 mg/kg) or chronic heroin (3.5 mg/kg/day) prior to conditioning with 1 mg/kg naltrexone. Administration of naltrexone produced moderate conditioned place avoidance in naïve rats. Importantly, acute, continuous, and intermittent HFCS pre-exposure did not significantly amplify this effect, but acute and chronic heroin pre-exposure did. As assessed by CPA, these results in rats fail to support the hypothesis that an opioid antagonist can precipitate similar affective withdrawal states following pre-exposure to sugars and opiates.

  17. Is a booster dose necessary in children after immunization with live attenuated Japanese encephalitis vaccine?

    PubMed

    Choi, Ui Yoon; Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Dong Soo; Choi, Kyong Min; Cha, Sung Ho; Kang, Jin Han

    2013-10-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus is a common cause of encephalitis in Asian children; therefore, maintenance of immunity against Japanese encephalitis virus is essential. Although many countries recommend booster vaccination, some trials have concluded that administration of one or two vaccinations is sufficient. The current study was conducted to evaluate immunogenicity and safety after a booster vaccination with live attenuated vaccine. For 68 study subjects, measurement of antibody titer was performed before and at 4-6 weeks after administration of a booster dose. Adverse reactions occurring at the injection site and systemic adverse reactions were documented. The percentages of subjects with seroprotective neutralizing antibody titers was 100% before and after booster vaccination, and the geometric mean titer increased after booster vaccination. Thus, we predict that immunity will be maintained for a long time by an amnestic response. Low percentages of adverse reactions indicated the safety of the immunizations.

  18. Single-dose attenuated Vesiculovax vaccines protect primates against Ebola Makona virus.

    PubMed

    Mire, Chad E; Matassov, Demetrius; Geisbert, Joan B; Latham, Theresa E; Agans, Krystle N; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Egan, Michael A; Fenton, Karla A; Clarke, David K; Eldridge, John H; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2015-04-30

    The family Filoviridae contains three genera, Ebolavirus (EBOV), Marburg virus, and Cuevavirus. Some members of the EBOV genus, including Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV), can cause lethal haemorrhagic fever in humans. During 2014 an unprecedented ZEBOV outbreak occurred in West Africa and is still ongoing, resulting in over 10,000 deaths, and causing global concern of uncontrolled disease. To meet this challenge a rapid-acting vaccine is needed. Many vaccine approaches have shown promise in being able to protect nonhuman primates against ZEBOV. In response to the current ZEBOV outbreak several of these vaccines have been fast tracked for human use. However, it is not known whether any of these vaccines can provide protection against the new outbreak Makona strain of ZEBOV. One of these approaches is a first-generation recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV)-based vaccine expressing the ZEBOV glycoprotein (GP) (rVSV/ZEBOV). To address safety concerns associated with this vector, we developed two candidate, further-attenuated rVSV/ZEBOV vaccines. Both attenuated vaccines produced an approximately tenfold lower vaccine-associated viraemia compared to the first-generation vaccine and both provided complete, single-dose protection of macaques from lethal challenge with the Makona outbreak strain of ZEBOV.

  19. Single dose attenuated Vesiculovax vaccines protect primates against Ebola Makona virus

    PubMed Central

    Geisbert, Joan B.; Latham, Theresa E.; Agans, Krystle N.; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Egan, Michael A.; Fenton, Karla A.; Clarke, David K.; Eldridge, John H.; Geisbert, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    The family Filoviridae contains three genera, Ebolavirus (EBOV), Marburg virus, and Cuevavirus1. Some members of the EBOV genus, including Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV), can cause lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans. During 2014 an unprecedented ZEBOV outbreak occurred in West Africa and is still ongoing, resulting in nearly 10,000 deaths, and causing global concern of uncontrolled disease. To meet this challenge a rapid acting vaccine is needed. Many vaccine approaches have shown promise in being able to protect nonhuman primate (NHPs) against ZEBOV2. In response to the current ZEBOV outbreak several of these vaccines have been fast tracked for human use. However, it is not known whether any of these vaccines can provide protection against the new outbreak Makona strain of ZEBOV. One of these approaches is a first generation recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV)-based vaccine expressing the ZEBOV glycoprotein (GP) (rVSV/ZEBOV). To address safety concerns associated with this vector, we developed two candidate, further attenuated rVSV/ZEBOV vaccines. Both attenuated vaccines produced an approximately ten-fold lower vaccine-associated viremia compared to the first generation vaccine and both provided complete, single dose protection of macaques from lethal challenge with the Makona outbreak strain of ZEBOV. PMID:25853476

  20. Live attenuated B. pertussis as a single-dose nasal vaccine against whooping cough.

    PubMed

    Mielcarek, Nathalie; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Raze, Dominique; Bertout, Julie; Rouanet, Carine; Younes, Amena Ben; Creusy, Colette; Engle, Jacquelyn; Goldman, William E; Locht, Camille

    2006-07-01

    Pertussis is still among the principal causes of death worldwide, and its incidence is increasing even in countries with high vaccine coverage. Although all age groups are susceptible, it is most severe in infants too young to be protected by currently available vaccines. To induce strong protective immunity in neonates, we have developed BPZE1, a live attenuated Bordetella pertussis strain to be given as a single-dose nasal vaccine in early life. BPZE1 was developed by the genetic inactivation or removal of three major toxins. In mice, BPZE1 was highly attenuated, yet able to colonize the respiratory tract and to induce strong protective immunity after a single nasal administration. Protection against B. pertussis was comparable to that induced by two injections of acellular vaccine (aPV) in adult mice, but was significantly better than two administrations of aPV in infant mice. Moreover, BPZE1 protected against Bordetella parapertussis infection, whereas aPV did not. BPZE1 is thus an attractive vaccine candidate to protect against whooping cough by nasal, needle-free administration early in life, possibly at birth.

  1. Live Attenuated B. pertussis as a Single-Dose Nasal Vaccine against Whooping Cough

    PubMed Central

    Mielcarek, Nathalie; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Raze, Dominique; Bertout, Julie; Rouanet, Carine; Younes, Amena Ben; Creusy, Colette; Engle, Jacquelyn; Goldman, William E; Locht, Camille

    2006-01-01

    Pertussis is still among the principal causes of death worldwide, and its incidence is increasing even in countries with high vaccine coverage. Although all age groups are susceptible, it is most severe in infants too young to be protected by currently available vaccines. To induce strong protective immunity in neonates, we have developed BPZE1, a live attenuated Bordetella pertussis strain to be given as a single-dose nasal vaccine in early life. BPZE1 was developed by the genetic inactivation or removal of three major toxins. In mice, BPZE1 was highly attenuated, yet able to colonize the respiratory tract and to induce strong protective immunity after a single nasal administration. Protection against B. pertussis was comparable to that induced by two injections of acellular vaccine (aPV) in adult mice, but was significantly better than two administrations of aPV in infant mice. Moreover, BPZE1 protected against Bordetella parapertussis infection, whereas aPV did not. BPZE1 is thus an attractive vaccine candidate to protect against whooping cough by nasal, needle-free administration early in life, possibly at birth. PMID:16839199

  2. Additive feeding inhibitory and aversive effects of naltrexone and exendin-4 combinations

    PubMed Central

    Liang, N-C; Bello, NT; Moran, TH

    2012-01-01

    Objective One developing strategy for obesity treatment has been to use combinations of differently acting pharmacotherapies to improve weight loss with fewer adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the combination of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist acting on the reward system, and exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) agonist, acting on satiety signaling, would produce larger reductions in food intake than either alone in rats. Because the anorectic potencies of both compounds have been associated with nausea and malaise, the influence of these drug combinations on the acquisition of a conditioned taste aversion (CTA) was also determined. Methods In Experiment 1, the acute anorectic effects of naltrexone (0.32–3.2 mg/kg; IP) and exendin-4 (1–10 µg/kg; IP) were assessed alone or in combination. Combinational doses were further investigated by the repeated daily administration of 1 mg/kg naltrexone + 3.2 µg/kg exendin-4 for 4 days. In Experiment 2, both compounds alone or in combination were used as unconditioned stimuli in a series of CTA tests. Results Naltrexone and exendin-4, alone or in combination, suppressed food intake in a dose dependent fashion, and the interaction on food intake between naltrexone and exendin-4 was additive. In the CTA paradigm, naltrexone (1 mg/Kg) alone did not support acquisition, whereas a CTA was evident with doses of Ex-4 (1 or 3.2 µg/Kg). Combinations of naltrexone and exendin-4 also resulted in a more rapid and robust acquisition of a CTA. Conclusion Given that the Nal and Ex-4 combination produces additive effects on not only food intake reduction but also food aversion learning, this specific drug combination does not have the benefit of minimizing the adverse effects associated with each individual drug. These data suggest that it is necessary to evaluate both the positive and adverse effects at early stages of combinational drug development. PMID:22310470

  3. Optimal dose of intravenous oxycodone for attenuating hemodynamic changes after endotracheal intubation in healthy patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Hee; Lee, Seung-Hyuk; Lee, Oh Haeng; Kang, Hyun; Shin, Hwa-Yong; Baek, Chong-Wha; Jung, Yong Hun; Woo, Young Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intravenous oxycodone has been used as an adjunct to anesthetic agents. This study aimed to assess the optimal dose of intravenous oxycodone for the attenuation of the hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind study was conducted. Ninety-five patients were randomly divided into 5 groups based on the oxycodone dose: 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 mg/kg. After administering the assigned dose of intravenous oxycodone, anesthesia was induced with thiopental. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured at baseline, before intubation, and 1, 2, and 3 minutes after intubation. The percentage increase of BP was calculated as (highest BP after intubation − baseline BP)/baseline BP × 100 (%). The percentage increase of HR was calculated in same formula as above. Hypertension was defined as a 15% increase of systolic BP from baseline, and probit analysis was conducted. Results: Hemodynamic data from 86 patients were analyzed. The percentage increase of mean arterial pressure after intubation in groups 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.2 was significantly different from that in the control (P < 0.001). For HR, the percentage increase was lower than control group when oxycodone was same or more than 0.1 mg/kg (P < 0.05). Using probit analysis, the 95% effective dose (ED95) for preventing hypertension was 0.159 mg/kg (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.122–0.243). In addition, ED50 was 0.020 mg/kg (95% CI, −0.037 to 0.049). However, oxycodone was not effective for maintaining the HR in our study dosage. There were no significant differences in the incidence of hypotension during induction between groups. Conclusions: Using 0.1 mg/kg of intravenous oxycodone is sufficient to attenuate the increase of BP and HR during induction period in healthy patients. The ED95, which was 0.159 mg/kg, can be useful to adjust the dosage of IV oxycodone for maintain stable BP

  4. The Combination Very Low-Dose Naltrexone–Clonidine in the Management of Opioid Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, Paolo; Peindl, Kathleen; Wu, Li-Tzy; Patkar, Ashwin A.; Gorelick, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The management of withdrawal absorbs substantial clinical efforts in opioid dependence (OD). The real challenge lies in improving current pharmacotherapies. Although widely used, clonidine causes problematic adverse effects and does not alleviate important symptoms of opioid withdrawal, alone or in combination with the opioid antagonist naltrexone. Very low-dose naltrexone (VLNTX) has been shown to attenuate withdrawal intensity and noradrenaline release following opioid agonist taper, suggesting a combination with clonidine may result in improved safety and efficacy. Objectives We investigated the effects of a VLNTX–clonidine combination in a secondary analysis of data from a double-blind, randomized opioid detoxification trial. Methods Withdrawal symptoms and treatment completion were compared following VLNTX (.125 or .25 mg/day) and clonidine (.1–.2 mg q6h) in 127 individuals with OD undergoing 6-day methadone inpatient taper at a community program. Results VLNTX was more effective than placebo or clonidine in reducing symptoms and signs of withdrawal. The use of VLNTX in combination with clonidine was associated with attenuated subjective withdrawal compared with each medication alone, favoring detoxification completion in comparison with clonidine or naltrexone placebo. VLNTX/clonidine was effective in reducing symptoms that are both undertreated and well controlled with clonidine treatment and was not associated with significant adverse events compared with other treatments. Conclusions and Scientific Significance Preliminary results elucidate neurobiological mechanisms of OD and support the utility of controlled studies on a novel VLNTX + low-dose clonidine combination for the management of opioid withdrawal. PMID:22233189

  5. Ethosuximide and phenytoin dose-dependently attenuate acute nonconvulsive seizures after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Andrea; Shear, Deborah A; Potter, Brittney; Marcsisin, Sean R; Sousa, Jason; Melendez, Victor; Tortella, Frank C; Lu, Xi-Chun M

    2013-12-01

    Acute seizures frequently occur following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and have been associated with poor patient prognosis. Silent or nonconvulsive seizures (NCS) manifest in the absence of motor convulsion, can only be detected via continuous electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, and are often unidentified and untreated. Identification of effective anti-epileptic drugs (AED) against post-traumatic NCS remains crucial to improve neurological outcome. Here, we assessed the anti-seizure profile of ethosuximide (ETX, 12.5-187.5 mg/kg) and phenytoin (PHT, 5-30 mg/kg) in a spontaneously occurring NCS model associated with penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI). Rats were divided between two drug cohorts, PHT or ETX, and randomly assigned to one of four doses or vehicle within each cohort. Following PBBI, NCS were detected by continuous EEG monitoring for 72 h post-injury. Drug efficacy was evaluated on NCS parameters of incidence, frequency, episode duration, total duration, and onset latency. Both PHT and ETX attenuated NCS in a dose-dependent manner. In vehicle-treated animals, 69-73% experienced NCS (averaging 9-10 episodes/rat) with average onset of NCS occurring at 30 h post-injury. Compared with control treatment, the two highest PHT and ETX doses significantly reduced NCS incidence to 13-40%, reduced NCS frequency (1.8-6.2 episodes/rat), and delayed seizure onset: <20% of treated animals exhibited NCS within the first 48 h. NCS durations were also dose-dependently mitigated. For the first time, we demonstrate that ETX and PHT are effective against spontaneously occurring NCS following PBBI, and suggest that these AEDs may be effective at treating post-traumatic NCS.

  6. Ethosuximide and Phenytoin Dose-Dependently Attenuate Acute Nonconvulsive Seizures after Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shear, Deborah A.; Potter, Brittney; Marcsisin, Sean R.; Sousa, Jason; Melendez, Victor; Tortella, Frank C.; Lu, Xi-Chun M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Acute seizures frequently occur following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and have been associated with poor patient prognosis. Silent or nonconvulsive seizures (NCS) manifest in the absence of motor convulsion, can only be detected via continuous electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, and are often unidentified and untreated. Identification of effective anti-epileptic drugs (AED) against post-traumatic NCS remains crucial to improve neurological outcome. Here, we assessed the anti-seizure profile of ethosuximide (ETX, 12.5–187.5 mg/kg) and phenytoin (PHT, 5–30 mg/kg) in a spontaneously occurring NCS model associated with penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI). Rats were divided between two drug cohorts, PHT or ETX, and randomly assigned to one of four doses or vehicle within each cohort. Following PBBI, NCS were detected by continuous EEG monitoring for 72 h post-injury. Drug efficacy was evaluated on NCS parameters of incidence, frequency, episode duration, total duration, and onset latency. Both PHT and ETX attenuated NCS in a dose-dependent manner. In vehicle-treated animals, 69–73% experienced NCS (averaging 9–10 episodes/rat) with average onset of NCS occurring at 30 h post-injury. Compared with control treatment, the two highest PHT and ETX doses significantly reduced NCS incidence to 13–40%, reduced NCS frequency (1.8–6.2 episodes/rat), and delayed seizure onset: <20% of treated animals exhibited NCS within the first 48 h. NCS durations were also dose-dependently mitigated. For the first time, we demonstrate that ETX and PHT are effective against spontaneously occurring NCS following PBBI, and suggest that these AEDs may be effective at treating post-traumatic NCS. PMID:23822888

  7. High-dose insulin therapy attenuates systemic inflammatory response in coronary artery bypass grafting patients.

    PubMed

    Albacker, Turki; Carvalho, George; Schricker, Thomas; Lachapelle, Kevin

    2008-07-01

    Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) induces an acute phase reaction that is implicated in the pathogenesis of several postoperative complications. Studies have shown that proinflammatory cytokines are increased by acute hyperglycemia. Recent evidence suggests that insulin has antiinflammatory properties. Therefore, we hypothesized that high-dose insulin therapy would attenuate the systemic inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass and surgery in coronary artery bypass patients while maintaining normoglycemia. A total of 52 patients who presented for elective coronary artery bypass were randomized to receive intraoperative intravenous insulin infusion, titrated to maintain blood glucose concentrations less than 180 mg/dL (group I, n = 25), or receive intraoperative fixed high dose of intravenous insulin infusion (5 mU/kg/min) with dextrose 20% infused separately to maintain a blood glucose level between 70 and 110 mg/dL (group II, n = 27). Blood samples were collected at different time points to determine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 6 and 8 (IL6 and IL8), and complement factor 3 and 4 (C3 and C4). Patients in both groups had similar preoperative characteristics. Patients in the high-dose insulin group had higher blood insulin concentrations and tighter blood glucose control. There were lower levels of IL6 (150 pg/dL vs 245 pg/dL, p = 0.03), IL-8 (49 pg/dL vs 74 pg/dL, p = 0.05), and TNFalpha (2.2 pg/dL vs 3.0 pg/dL, p = 0.04) in group II in the early postoperative period. High-dose insulin therapy blunts the early postoperative surge in inflammatory response to CPB as reflected by decreased levels of IL6, IL8, and TNFalpha.

  8. Open Label Trial of Naltrexone Implants: Measuring Blood Serum Levels of Naltrexone

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    The usefulness of oral naltrexone has been limited by compliance. Sub-cutaneous implants would seem to offer a solution to this problem and improve long-term outcomes. The aim of the present study was to compare levels of blood serum naltrexone of patients who had received a naltrexone implant after detoxification to a number of dependent variables of interest. These dependent variables included drug use including urine screens of each patient, any adverse response to the implant, subjective evaluation of self-esteem, quality of relationships, and changes in social functioning. Sixty six patients received an implant and were surveyed; urine and blood samples were taken at about 1, 3, and 6 months after implantation. Naltrexone levels were on average above 1 ng/mL at 6 months after insertion and patients showed significant improvements on all dependent variables. The preliminary evidence indicates that implants can improve compliance rates and outcomes. PMID:23761973

  9. Microwave attenuation of ethanol-induced hypothermia: ethanol tolerance, time course, exposure duration, and dose response studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hjeresen, D.L.; Francendese, A.; O'Donnell, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to quantify the reported attenuation by microwave (MW) irradiation of ethanol-induced hypothermia. In one experiment rats were irradiated (continuous wave 2.45 GHz, specific absorption rate = 0.3 W/kg) or sham irradiated for 45 min, injected with 3.6 g/kg, 20% (v/v) ethanol (EtOH) or saline (NaCl) i.p.. Colonic temperature was monitored at 20-min intervals for 2 h. This procedure was repeated for 8 days to determine the rate of tolerance development to the hypothermic effect of ethanol. While MW irradiation did significantly attenuate EtOH-induced hypothermia, it did not enhance or retard the rate of tolerance development. To determine the duration of irradiation necessary to attenuate EtOH-induced hypothermia, groups of rats were irradiated or sham irradiated for 5, 15, 30, or 60 min prior to EtOH injection and subsequent temperature measurements. The attenuation was apparent only after 60 min of irradiation. To determine the duration of the attenuation effect after irradiation, rats were injected with EtOH or NaCl at 0, 30, 60, 120, or 480 min after 45 min of irradiation or sham irradiation. The attenuation effect was apparent among rats injected 0 to 30 min after irradiation and for the first 40 min for groups injected at 120 min. Additional rats were injected with NaCl or 0.9, 1.8, or 2.7 g/kg of EtOH i.p. following 45 min of irradiation or sham irradiation to determine if the attenuation effect depends on the dose of EtOH administered. Attenuation of EtOH-induced hypothermia was more apparent at lower doses of EtOH than at higher doses. These results indicate that the effect is an acute response to irradiation, and rule out several other potential explanations.

  10. Acute opioid pretreatment potentiates naltrexone-induced drinking suppression in water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    White, D A; Holtzman, S G

    2001-07-01

    Pretreatment with morphine-like agonists potentiates the behavioral effects of opioid antagonists, possibly reflecting a state of acute physical dependence. Several studies have used operant behavior to quantify these effects. However, little research has been done using unconditioned behavior. One objective of this study was to determine whether opioid agonist pretreatment (e.g., morphine, fentanyl, and meperidine) potentiated naltrexone-induced suppression of water consumption following deprivation. Another objective was to determine whether the agonist pretreatment interval was functionally related to efficacy for the manifestation of acute dependence. Finally, we compared temporally the effects of the three agonists. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were water deprived for 18, 20, or 22 h and given an injection (s.c.) of an agonist or saline. After 1.75, 3.75, or 5.75 h, animals received a single dose (s.c.) of naltrexone (0.01-30 mg/kg) or saline. Fifteen minutes later, subjects had access to water for 30 min. A time course of antinociception was constructed after agonist administration, using the tail-flick procedure. All three agonists dose dependently potentiated naltrexone-induced drinking suppression, decreasing the ED50 of naltrexone by as much as 150-fold. There was no clear relationship between agonist efficacy and pretreatment interval. Sensitization to naltrexone was seen up to 6 h after agonist administration, occurring in the apparent absence of an antinociceptive effect. These data extend the range of behavioral effects of opioid antagonists potentiated by opioid agonist pretreatment to suppression of drinking and show that such potentiation can occur in the absence of a prototypical agonist effect.

  11. Methamphetamine treatment during development attenuates the dopaminergic deficits caused by subsequent high-dose methamphetamine administration.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Lisa M; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Vieira-Brock, Paula L; Stout, Kristen A; Sawada, Nicole M; Ellis, Jonathan D; Allen, Scott C; Walters, Elliot T; Nielsen, Shannon M; Gibb, James W; Alburges, Mario E; Wilkins, Diana G; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2011-08-01

    Administration of high doses of methamphetamine (METH) causes persistent dopaminergic deficits in both nonhuman preclinical models and METH-dependent persons. Noteworthy, adolescent [i.e., postnatal day (PND) 40] rats are less susceptible to this damage than young adult (PND90) rats. In addition, biweekly treatment with METH, beginning at PND40 and continuing throughout development, prevents the persistent dopaminergic deficits caused by a "challenge" high-dose METH regimen when administered at PND90. Mechanisms underlying this "resistance" were thus investigated. Results revealed that biweekly METH treatment throughout development attenuated both the acute and persistent deficits in VMAT2 function, as well as the acute hyperthermia, caused by a challenge METH treatment. Pharmacokinetic alterations did not appear to contribute to the protection afforded by the biweekly treatment. Maintenance of METH-induced hyperthermia abolished the protection against both the acute and persistent VMAT2-associated deficits suggesting that alterations in thermoregulation were caused by exposure of rats to METH during development. These findings suggest METH during development prevents METH-induced hyperthermia and the consequent METH-related neurotoxicity.

  12. Methamphetamine treatment during development attenuates the dopaminergic deficits caused by subsequent high-dose methamphetamine administration

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Lisa M; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Vieira-Brock, Paula L; Stout, Kristen A; Sawada, Nicole M; Ellis, Jonathan D; Allen, Scott C; Walters, Elliot T; Nielsen, Shannon M; Gibb, James W; Alburges, Mario E; Wilkins, Diana G; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2013-01-01

    Administration of high doses of methamphetamine (METH) causes persistent dopaminergic deficits in both nonhuman preclinical models and METH-dependent persons. Noteworthy, adolescent (i.e., postnatal day (PND) 40) rats are less susceptible to this damage than young adult (PND90) rats. In addition, biweekly treatment with METH, beginning at PND40 and continuing throughout development, prevents the persistent dopaminergic deficits caused by a “challenge” high-dose METH regimen when administered at PND90. Mechanisms underlying this “resistance” were thus investigated. Results revealed that biweekly METH treatment throughout development attenuated both the acute and persistent deficits in VMAT2 function, as well as the acute hyperthermia, caused by a challenge METH treatment. Pharmacokinetic alterations did not appear to contribute to the protection afforded by the biweekly treatment. Maintenance of METH-induced hyperthermia abolished the protection against both the acute and persistent VMAT2-associated deficits suggesting that alterations in thermoregulation were caused by exposure of rats to METH during development. These findings suggest METH during development prevents METH-induced hyperthermia and the consequent METH-related neurotoxicity. PMID:21190217

  13. Attenuation of fission neutrons by some hydrogeneous shield materials and the exponential dependence of the attenuated total neutron dose rate on the shield thickness.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M A

    2000-01-01

    This work deals with the attenuation of fission neutrons by some hydrogeneous shield materials. The attenuated fission neutrons are described by the energy groups (fast, epithermal and thermal). The exponential decrease in the fast flux is represented by the removal cross section concept. Each of the epithermal and thermal fluxes is expressed using the diffusion equation including a pair of arbitrary constants to be determined using the corresponding boundary conditions. The solution obtained for the required arbitrary constants is then approximated in a simplified form such that it may easily replace the corresponding exact solution. The attenuation values, by which the neutron dose rate distributions are exponentially decreased through certain thicknesses are also determined for the given materials. They are compared to the corresponding experimental and theoretical data. The results obtained for the total neutron dose rate distributions in terms of a suitable range of layer thicknesses are then used to determine--for each material--an average value for the total neutron dose rate representing the exponential decrease during passage through the considered range of layer thicknesses.

  14. Naltrexone for treatment of impaired awareness of hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Moheet, Amir; Mangia, Silvia; Kumar, Anjali; Tesfaye, Nolawit; Eberly, Lynn E; Bai, Yun; Kubisiak, Kristine; Seaquist, Elizabeth R

    2016-01-01

    Aims Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH) is a limiting factor in the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and is a challenging condition to reverse. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that naltrexone therapy in subjects with T1D and IAH will improve counterregulatory hormone response and recognition of hypoglycemia symptoms during hypoglycemia. Methods We performed a pilot randomized double blind trial of 4 weeks of naltrexone therapy (n=10) or placebo (n=12) given orally in subjects with T1D and IAH. Outcome measures included hypoglycemia symptom scores, counterregulatory hormone levels and thalamic activation as measured by cerebral blood flow using MRI during experimental hypoglycemia in all subjects before and after 4 weeks of intervention. Results After 4 weeks of therapy with naltrexone or placebo, no significant differences in response to hypoglycemia were seen in any outcomes of interest within each group. Conclusions In this small study, short-term treatment with naltrexone did not improve recognition of hypoglycemia symptoms or counterregulatory hormone response during experimental hypoglycemia in subjects with T1D and IAH. Whether this lack of effect is related to the small sample size or due to the dose, the advanced stage of study population or the drug itself should be the subject of future investigation. PMID:26345338

  15. Effective Bolus Dose of Sufentanil to Attenuate Cardiovascular Responses in Laryngoscopic Double-Lumen Endobronchial Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byung-Hee; Lee, Yong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Background Sufentanil is a potent opioid analgesic frequently used in clinical anesthesia. Double-lumen endobronchial intubation induces profound cardiovascular responses in comparison with ordinary endotracheal intubation because of the larger tube diameter and direct irritation of the carina. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the effective bolus dose of sufentanil to attenuate hemodynamic changes in response to laryngoscopic double-lumen endobronchial intubation. Patients and Methods We randomly assigned 72 patients aged 18 - 65 years and with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status of 1 or 2 to one of four sufentanil dose groups: NS, S0.1, S0.2, or S0.3. The respective doses for the groups were as follows: normal saline, 0.1 mcg/kg of sufentanil, 0.2 mcg/kg of sufentanil, and 0.3 mcg/kg of sufentanil. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded during the pre-anesthesia period at baseline, pre-intubation, immediate post-intubation, and every minute during 5 minutes after intubation. Results Baseline mean arterial pressures in the NS, S0.1, S0.2, and S0.3 groups were 89.8 ± 12.1, 89.2 ± 10.9, 88.8 ± 13.6, and 90.7 ± 11.1, respectively. At immediate post-intubation, the mean arterial pressures in the NS, S0.1, S0.2, and S0.3 groups were 129.7 ± 14.7, 120.7 ± 14.2, 120.8 ± 17.2, and 96.7 ± 10.4, respectively. At immediate post-intubation, the mean arterial pressure in the NS, S0.1, and S0.2 groups significantly increased from baseline (P < 0.001), but the S0.3 group showed no difference. In the time point comparison at immediate post- intubation, the S0.3 group had a significantly lower mean arterial pressure than did the NS, S0.1, and S0.2 groups (P < 0.001). Conclusions We found that 0.3 mcg/kg of sufentanil attenuates cardiovascular responses to double-lumen endobronchial intubation without adverse effects. PMID:27252903

  16. Dose titration of BAF312 attenuates the initial heart rate reducing effect in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Legangneux, Eric; Gardin, Anne; Johns, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Aim Previous studies have shown transient decreases in heart rate (HR) following administration of sphingosine 1‐phosphate (S1P) receptor modulators including BAF312. This study was conducted to determine whether dose titration of BAF312 reduces or eliminates these effects. Methods Fifty‐six healthy subjects were randomized 1:1:1:1 to receive BAF312 in one of two dose titration (DT) regimens (DT1 and DT2: 0.25–10 mg over 9–10 days), no titration (10 mg starting dose) or placebo. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed. Results Neither DT1 nor DT2 resulted in clinically significant bradycardia or atrioventricular conduction effects. Both titration regimens showed a favourable difference on each of days 1–12 vs. the non‐titration regimen on day 1 for HR effects (P < 0.0001). On day 1, the geometric mean ratio of the fraction from the previous day in minimum daily HR between DT1 and non‐titration was 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13, 1.23) and 1.14 (95% CI 1.09, 1.18) for DT2 (both P < 0.05) with significant differences noted through to day 12. Non‐titration HRs showed considerable separation from placebo throughout the study. There was no statistically significant reduction in HR vs. placebo on day 1 in either titration regimen. On days 3–7 subjects in DT1 and DT2 experienced minor reductions in HR vs. placebo (approximately 5 beats min−1; P ≤ 0.0001). From days 9–12, HRs in both titration regimens were comparable with placebo. Conclusion Both titration regimens effectively attenuated the initial bradyarrhythmia observed on day 1 of treatment with BAF312 10 mg. PMID:22845008

  17. Dose titration of BAF312 attenuates the initial heart rate reducing effect in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Legangneux, Eric; Gardin, Anne; Johns, Donald

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have shown transient decreases in heart rate (HR) following administration of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulators including BAF312. This study was conducted to determine whether dose titration of BAF312 reduces or eliminates these effects. Fifty-six healthy subjects were randomized 1:1:1:1 to receive BAF312 in one of two dose titration (DT) regimens (DT1 and DT2: 0.25-10 mg over 9-10 days), no titration (10 mg starting dose) or placebo. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed. Neither DT1 nor DT2 resulted in clinically significant bradycardia or atrioventricular conduction effects. Both titration regimens showed a favourable difference on each of days 1-12 vs. the non-titration regimen on day 1 for HR effects (P < 0.0001). On day 1, the geometric mean ratio of the fraction from the previous day in minimum daily HR between DT1 and non-titration was 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13, 1.23) and 1.14 (95% CI 1.09, 1.18) for DT2 (both P < 0.05) with significant differences noted through to day 12. Non-titration HRs showed considerable separation from placebo throughout the study. There was no statistically significant reduction in HR vs. placebo on day 1 in either titration regimen. On days 3-7 subjects in DT1 and DT2 experienced minor reductions in HR vs. placebo (approximately 5 beats min⁻¹; P ≤ 0.0001). From days 9-12, HRs in both titration regimens were comparable with placebo. Both titration regimens effectively attenuated the initial bradyarrhythmia observed on day 1 of treatment with BAF312 10 mg. © 2012 Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (NIBIR). British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Five-year antibody persistence in children after one dose of inactivated or live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhilun; Zhu, Xiangjun; Hu, Yuansheng; Liang, Miao; Sun, Jin; Song, Yufei; Yang, Qi; Ji, Haiquan; Zeng, Gang; Song, Lifei; Chen, Jiangting

    2017-02-14

    In China, both inactivated hepatitis A (HA) vaccine and live attenuated HA vaccine are available. We conducted a trial to evaluate 5-year immune persistence induced by one dose of inactivated or live attenuated HA vaccines in children. Subjects with no HA vaccination history had randomly received one dose of inactivated or live attenuated HA vaccine at 18-60 months of age. Anti-HAV antibody concentrations were measured before vaccination and at the first, second, and fifth year after vaccination. Suspected cases of hepatitis A were monitored during the study period. A total of 332 subjects were enrolled and 182 provided evaluable serum samples at all planned time points. seropositive rate at 5 y was 85.9% in the inactivated HA vaccine group and 90.7% in the live attenuated HA vaccine group. GMCs were 76.3% mIU/ml (95% CI: 61.7 - 94.4) and 66.8mIU/ml (95% CI: 57.8 - 77.3), respectively. No significant difference in antibody persistence between 2 groups was found. No clinical hepatitis A case was reported. A single dose of an inactivated or live attenuated HA vaccine at 18-60 months of age resulted in high HAV seropositive rate and anti-HAV antibody concentrations that lasted for at least 5 y.

  19. The mesolimbic system participates in the naltrexone-induced reversal of sexual exhaustion: opposite effects of intra-VTA naltrexone administration on copulation of sexually experienced and sexually exhausted male rats.

    PubMed

    Garduño-Gutiérrez, René; León-Olea, Martha; Rodríguez-Manzo, Gabriela

    2013-11-01

    Male rats allowed to copulate until reaching sexual exhaustion exhibit a long-lasting sexual behavior inhibition (around 72 h) that can be reversed by systemic opioid receptor antagonist administration. Copulation activates the mesolimbic dopaminergic system (MLS) and promotes endogenous opioid release. In addition, endogenous opioids, acting at the ventral tegmental area (VTA), modulate the activity of the MLS. We hypothesized that endogenous opioids participate in the sexual exhaustion phenomenon by interacting with VTA opioid receptors and consequently, its reversal by opioid antagonists could be exerted at those receptors. In this study we determined the effects of intra-VTA infusion of different doses of the non-specific opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.1-1.0 μg/rat) on the already established sexual behavior inhibition of sexually exhausted male rats. To elucidate the possible involvement of VTA δ-opioid receptors in the naltrexone-mediated reversal of sexual exhaustion, the effects of different doses of the selective δ-opioid receptor antagonist, naltrindole (0.03-1.0 μg/rat) were also tested. Results showed that intra-VTA injection of 0.3 μg naltrexone reversed the sexual inhibition of sexually exhausted rats, evidenced by an increased percentage of animals capable of showing two successive ejaculations. Intra-VTA infused naltrindole did not reverse sexual exhaustion at any dose. It is concluded that the MLS is involved in the reversal of sexual exhaustion induced by systemic naltrexone, and that μ-, but not δ-opioid receptors participate in this effect. Intra-VTA naltrexone infusion to sexually experienced male rats had an inhibitory effect on sexual activity. The opposite effects of intra-VTA naltrexone on male rat sexual behavior expression of sexually experienced and sexually exhausted rats is discussed.

  20. Clinical Effects of Naltrexone on Autistic Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingarelli, Gene; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Eight young adults (ages 19-39) with autism were given the opiate antagonist naltrexone to control self-injurious behavior and maladaptive idiosyncratic mannerisms. Although one subject appeared to have partial decreases in maladaptive behaviors, the drug did not clearly reduce the self-injurious and other maladaptive behaviors of the subjects.…

  1. Attenuation of 10 MeV electron beam energy to achieve low doses does not affect Salmonella spp. inactivation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieke, Anne-Sophie Charlotte; Pillai, Suresh D.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of attenuating the energy of a 10 MeV electron beam on Salmonella inactivation kinetics was investigated. No statistically significant differences were observed between the D10 values of either Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- or a Salmonella cocktail (S. 4,[5],12:i:-, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Newport, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella) when irradiated with either a non-attenuated 10 MeV eBeam or an attenuated 10 MeV eBeam (~2.9±0.22 MeV). The results show that attenuating the energy of a 10 MeV eBeam to achieve low doses does not affect the inactivation kinetics of Salmonella spp. when compared to direct 10 MeV eBeam irradiation.

  2. The opioid antagonist naltrexone reduces the reinforcing effects of Delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Justinova, Zuzana; Tanda, Gianluigi; Munzar, Patrik; Goldberg, Steven R

    2004-04-01

    Experimental evidence from animal studies suggests reciprocal functional interactions between endogenous brain cannabinoid and opioid systems. There is recent evidence for a role of the opioid system in the modulation of the reinforcing effects of synthetic cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists in rodents. Since Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the natural psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, is actively and persistently self-administered by squirrel monkeys, this provides an opportunity to directly study involvement of opioid systems in the reinforcing effects of THC in non-human primates. To study the effects of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, on THC self-administration behavior in squirrel monkeys. Monkeys pressed a lever for intravenous injections of THC under a ten-response, fixed-ratio (FR) schedule with a 60-s time-out after each injection. Effects of pre-session treatment with naltrexone (0.03-0.3 mg/kg intramuscularly, 15 min before session) for 5 consecutive days on self-administration of different doses of THC (2-8 microg/kg per injection) were studied. Self-administration responding for THC was significantly reduced by pretreatment with 0.1 mg/kg naltrexone for five consecutive daily sessions. Naltrexone pretreatment had no significant effect on cocaine self-administration responding under identical conditions. Self-administration behavior under a fixed-ratio schedule of intravenous THC injection was markedly reduced by daily pre-session treatment with naltrexone, but remained above saline self-administration levels. These findings demonstrate for the first time the modulation of the reinforcing effects of THC by an opioid antagonist in a non-human primate model of marijuana abuse.

  3. Low doses of isosorbide mononitrate attenuate the postprandial increase in portal pressure in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Bellis, Lia; Berzigotti, Annalisa; Abraldes, Juan G; Moitinho, Eduardo; García-Pagán, Juan C; Bosch, Jaime; Rodés, Juan

    2003-02-01

    Postprandial hyperemia is associated with a significant increase in portal pressure in cirrhosis, which may contribute to progressive dilation and rupture of gastroesophageal varices. In cirrhosis, an insufficient hepatic production of nitric oxide (NO) may impair the expected hepatic vasodilatory response to increased blood flow, further exaggerating the postprandial increase in portal pressure. This study was aimed at investigating whether low doses of an oral NO donor might counteract the postprandial peak in portal pressure. Twenty-three portal hypertensive cirrhotics, 8 of them under propranolol therapy, were randomized to receive orally 5-isosorbide mononitrate (ISMN; 10 mg; n = 11) or placebo (n = 12) and a standard liquid meal 15 minutes later. Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and hepatic blood flow (HBF) were measured at baseline and 15, 30, and 45 minutes after a meal. ISMN significantly attenuated the postprandial increase in portal pressure as compared with placebo (peak HVPG increase: 2.4 +/- 1.4 mm Hg vs. 5.2 +/- 2.1 mm Hg, P =.002). Percentual increases in HBF were similar in both groups. MAP decreased slightly in ISMN group (-7.5% +/-.5%; P <.01 vs. baseline). These effects were also observed in patients on chronic propranolol therapy. In conclusion, hepatic NO supplementation by low doses of ISMN effectively reduces the postprandial increase of portal pressure in cirrhosis, with only a mild effect on arterial pressure. The same was observed in patients receiving propranolol. Our results suggest that therapeutic strategies based on selective hepatic NO delivery may improve the treatment of portal hypertension.

  4. Linear attenuation coefficient and buildup factor of MCP-96 alloy for dose accuracy, beam collimation, and radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Deidre N; Maqbool, Muhammad; Islam, Mohammed S

    2012-07-01

    The linear attenuation coefficients and buildup factor of MCP-96 alloy were determined for (60)Co, (54)Mn, and (137)Cs gamma emitters and a NaI detector. The thickness of the MCP-96 attenuator was varied from 1 to 4 cm. A collimated beam of gamma rays was allowed to pass through various thicknesses of the MCP-96 alloy. The attenuated beam was detected by a NaI detector, and data were recorded by a multichannel analyzer. The run was repeated without the collimator for broad-beam geometry. For each run, the attenuated beam intensity was normalized by the intensity of the unattenuated incident beam obtained by removing the attenuators. Linear attenuation coefficients were determined by plotting of the intensity of the collimated beam against the attenuator thickness. For every thickness of the alloy, the ratio of the attenuated to the unattenuated beam was found to be higher in broad-beam geometry as compared to the same ratio in narrow-beam geometry. We used the difference in these ratios in broad and narrow-beam geometries to calculate the buildup factor. The buildup factor was found to increase with beam energy and attenuator thickness. Variation in the source-to-detector distance gave a lower value of the buildup factor for a small and a large distance and a higher value for an intermediate distance. The buildup factor was found to be greater than 1 in all cases. We conclude that the buildup factor must be calculated and incorporated for dose correction and precision when the MCP-96 alloy is used for tissue compensation or radiation shielding and protection purposes.

  5. Attenuation of Cardiovascular Responses and Upper Airway Events to Tracheal Extubation by Low Dose Propofol

    PubMed Central

    Moein Vaziri, Mohammad Taghy; Jouybar, Reza; Moein Vaziri, Nader; Moein Vaziri, Najmeh; Panah, Ashkan

    2013-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic changes and respiratory tract complications are often followed by tracheal extubation. These events may be dangerous in neurosurgical patients and those with cardiovascular disease or at an old age. Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the attenuation of cardiovascular responses and upper airway events resulting from tracheal extubation by low dose propofol. Materials and Methods 80 patients with ASA physical status I, undergoing an elective surgery in a double blind manner received 0.5mg/kg propofol or normal saline 2 minutes before extubation. Heart rate and blood pressure and quality of tracheal extubation were recorded. Results Heart rate and blood pressure in patients receiving propofol were less than the control group (P < 0.05) at the time of injection of propofol, but there were no differences between the two groups at the time of extubation. Conclusions We concluded that propofol can reduce SBP, DBP, MAP, HR & cough production at the time of injection but there were no significant changes in these parameters after extubation. PMID:24083001

  6. Source terms and attenuation lengths for estimating shielding requirements or dose analyses of proton therapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lai, Bo-Lun; Lin, Uei-Tyng; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2013-08-01

    Proton therapy accelerators in the energy range of 100-300 MeV could potentially produce intense secondary radiation, which must be carefully evaluated and shielded for the purpose of radiation safety in a densely populated hospital. Monte Carlo simulations are generally the most accurate method for accelerator shielding design. However, simplified approaches such as the commonly used point-source line-of-sight model are usually preferable on many practical occasions, especially for scoping shielding design or quick sensitivity studies. This work provides a set of reliable shielding data with reasonable coverage of common target and shielding materials for 100-300 MeV proton accelerators. The shielding data, including source terms and attenuation lengths, were derived from a consistent curve fitting process of a number of depth-dose distributions within the shield, which were systematically calculated by using MCNPX for various beam-target shield configurations. The general characteristics and qualities of this data set are presented. Possible applications in cases of single- and double-layer shielding are considered and demonstrated.

  7. Lipid emulsion attenuates apoptosis induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine in H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Ok, S-H; Yu, J; Lee, Y; Cho, H; Shin, I-W; Sohn, J-T

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of lipid emulsion on apoptosis induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine (BPV) in H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cell lines. The effect of lipid emulsion on the decreased cell viability and count induced by BPV or mepivacaine (MPV) in the H9c2 cells was assessed using an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay or a cell count assay. The effect of BPV or lipid emulsion combined with BPV on cleaved caspase 3, caspase 8, and Bax in H9c2 cells was investigated using Western blotting. A terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed to detect apoptosis of H9c2 cells treated with BPV alone or lipid emulsion combined with BPV. The magnitude of lipid emulsion-mediated attenuation of decreased cell viability induced by BPV was higher than that of lipid emulsion-mediated attenuation of decreased cell viability induced by MPV. Lipid emulsion attenuated the increases in cleaved caspase 3, caspase 8 and Bax induced by BPV. Lipid emulsion attenuated the increases in TUNEL-positive cells induced by BPV. These results suggest that lipid emulsion attenuates a toxic dose of BPV-induced apoptosis via inhibition of the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. The protective effect of lipid emulsion may be partially associated with the relatively high lipid solubility of BPV.

  8. SU-E-P-39: Characterization of Dose Impact On Different Beam Fields Size Attenuation for Elekta IGRT Couch

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R; Bai, W; Xiaomei, F; Chi, Z; Runxiao, L; Ren, Q; Gao, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of the dosimetric impact of the Elekta IGRT treatment couch in different beam field sizes. Established the relationship of relative dose versus beam angle at different beam field sizes. Methods: Measurements of couch attenuation were performed at gantry angles from 180° to 120°, using a 0.125cc semiflex ionization chamber, isocentrically placed in the center of a homogeneous cylindric sliced RW3 phantom for 6 photon beams. Measurements were performed at six different field sizes (3×3, 5×5, 7×7,10×10, 12×12 and 15×15 cm2). The phantom were positioned at the center of the couche,100 MU were delivered at every gantry angle. The dose difference to the ion chamber was determined. Results: For oblique fields with 6 MV photons at the same gantry angle the attenuation coefficient value from the lagest to the smallest the order is field size 7 cm2,5 cm2,10 cm2,12 cm2,15 cm2 and 3 cm2. The biggest couch attenuation by up to 4.15% at the gantry angle of 140°for the field size of 7 cm2, while for the field size of 3 cm2 the couch attenuated value only 3.5%. The other field size couch attenuation values are between the couch attenuated value of field size of 7 cm2 and 3 cm2 Conclusion: The recommended treatment couch attenuation measured beam field size is 10×10 or 12×12 cm2. When measured using the beam field size 3×3 cm2 the tested value will be lower, while measuerd using the beam field size 7×7 cm2 the tested value will be higer than the recommended beam field size. This should be noted when modeling the treatment couch in the treatment planning system.

  9. Attenuation correction of PET cardiac data with low-dose average CT in PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama; Luo, Dershan; Liu, Hui H.; Chi Paichun, M.; Mar, Martha V.; Gladish, Gregory; Truong, Mylene; Erasmus, Jeremy Jr.; Liao Zhongxing; Macapinlac, H. A.

    2006-10-15

    We proposed a low-dose average computer tomography (ACT) for attenuation correction (AC) of the PET cardiac data in PET/CT. The ACT was obtained from a cine CT scan of over one breath cycle per couch position while the patient was free breathing. We applied this technique on four patients who underwent tumor imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG in PET/CT, whose PET data showed high uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the heart and whose CT and PET data had misregistration. All four patients did not have known myocardiac infarction or ischemia. The patients were injected with 555-740 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG and scanned 1 h after injection. The helical CT (HCT) data were acquired in 16 s for the coverage of 100 cm. The PET acquisition was 3 min per bed of 15 cm. The duration of cine CT acquisition per 2 cm was 5.9 s. We used a fast gantry rotation cycle time of 0.5 s to minimize motion induced reconstruction artifacts in the cine CT images, which were averaged to become the ACT images for AC of the PET data. The radiation dose was about 5 mGy for 5.9 s cine duration. The selection of 5.9 s was based on our analysis of the respiratory signals of 600 patients; 87% of the patients had average breath cycles of less than 6 s and 90% had standard deviations of less than 1 s in the period of breath cycle. In all four patient studies, registrations between the CT and the PET data were improved. An increase of average uptake in the anterior and the lateral walls up to 48% and a decrease of average uptake in the septal and the inferior walls up to 16% with ACT were observed. We also compared ACT and conventional slow scan CT (SSCT) of 4 s duration in one patient study and found ACT was better than SSCT in depicting average respiratory motion and the SSCT images showed motion-induced reconstruction artifacts. In conclusion, low-dose ACT improved registration of the CT and the PET data in the heart region in our study of four patients. ACT was superior than SSCT for depicting average respiration

  10. [Naltrexone. An opioid antagonist to support the drug-free state in previous opioid addicts having stopped the habit].

    PubMed

    Jepsen, P W

    1990-09-03

    Naltrexon (Nemexin) is an opioid antagonist for oral use and with a relatively long duration time. The preparation is valuable as supplementary therapy for maintenance of the drug-free state in previous opioid addicts who have broken the habit. Clinical use requires thus that the patient is completely detoxified from opioids. Prior to commencement of the first dose of naltrexon, a drug-free period of seven to ten days is recommended. The drug-free state may be verified by screening of the urine or a trial injection of naloxon. The detoxification/drug-free phase may be abbreviated by combined treatment with clonidine and naltrexon. Following the detoxification and drug-free phase, naltrexon therapy is initiated with the half dose (25 mg) on the first day and continued with 50 mg daily. The preparation should not be given to pregnant women or women who are breast-feeding, to children under the age of 18 years or to patients with renal failure. Liver enzyme control tests should be carried out before and during treatment. The number of side-effects reported are few. In clinical investigations, naltrexon has proved to be valuable in a significant minority of opioid dependent patients investigated. Utility is increased with the patients' motivation for this form of treatment. The success rate for naltrexon supportive treatment measured by retention in the therapeutic programme is higher than for traditional drug-free treatment but lower than for methadone supported treatment. Effects on the risk of relapse in the long run have not been documented.

  11. Baseline Characteristics of Patients Predicting Suitability for Rapid Naltrexone Induction

    PubMed Central

    Mogali, Shanthi; Khan, Nabil A.; Drill, Esther S.; Pavlicova, Martina; Sullivan, Maria A.; Nunes, Edward; Bisaga, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Extended-release (XR) injection naltrexone has proved promising in the treatment of opioid dependence. Induction onto naltrexone is often accomplished with a procedure known as rapid naltrexone induction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pre-treatment patient characteristics as predictors of successful completion of a rapid naltrexone induction procedure prior to XR naltrexone treatment. Methods A chart review of 150 consecutive research participants (N = 84 completers and N = 66 non-completers) undergoing a rapid naltrexone induction with the buprenorphone-clonidine procedure were compared on a number of baseline demographic, clinical and psychosocial factors. Logistic regression was used to identify client characteristics that may predict successful initiation of naltrexone after a rapid induction-detoxification. Results Patients who failed to successfully initiate naltrexone were younger (AOR: 1.040, CI: 1.006, 1.075), and using 10 or more bags of heroin (or equivalent) per day (AOR: 0.881, CI: 0.820, 0.946). Drug use other than opioids was also predictive of failure to initiate naltrexone in simple bivariate analyses, but was no longer significant when controlling for age and opioid use level. Conclusions Younger age, and indicators of greater substance dependence severity (more current opioid use, other substance use) predict difficulty completing a rapid naltrexone induction procedure. Such patients might require a longer period of stabilization and/or more gradual detoxification prior to initiating naltrexone. Scientific Significance Our study findings identify specific characteristics of patients who responded positively to rapid naltrexone induction. PMID:25907815

  12. Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans Illnesses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    W81XWH-09-2-0065 TITLE: Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans Illnesses PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William J. Meggs, MD...2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illness 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09...that many with Gulf War Illness could enter either the naltrexone or dextromethorphan arm but not both. We are applying to allow subjects to enter

  13. [Naltrexone therapy. Experience with "Telephone Assistance" in Rome].

    PubMed

    Coccoli, M; Rugolo, A P; Rocchi, R; Giannini, P; Ciervo, U

    1993-03-01

    From March 1989 to February 1991, at "Telefono in Aiuto" (USL RM/10), Naltrexone has been used in 271 heroin addict patients. Naltrexone, a pure opiate antagonist, nullifies subjective heroin effects, preventing the setting up of tolerance and physical dependence. By administration for one year to drug-free addicts, it proved to be useful in relapse prevention. Naltrexone seems to be safe and without side-effects. Its effectiveness grows if its use is matched with psychological help.

  14. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT: analysis of sparse view data acquisition and reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Xue; Cheng, Lishui; Long, Yong; Fu, Lin; Alessio, Adam M.; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.; De Man, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    For PET/CT systems, PET image reconstruction requires corresponding CT images for anatomical localization and attenuation correction. In the case of PET respiratory gating, multiple gated CT scans can offer phase-matched attenuation and motion correction, at the expense of increased radiation dose. We aim to minimize the dose of the CT scan, while preserving adequate image quality for the purpose of PET attenuation correction by introducing sparse view CT data acquisition. We investigated sparse view CT acquisition protocols resulting in ultra-low dose CT scans designed for PET attenuation correction. We analyzed the tradeoffs between the number of views and the integrated tube current per view for a given dose using CT and PET simulations of a 3D NCAT phantom with lesions inserted into liver and lung. We simulated seven CT acquisition protocols with {984, 328, 123, 41, 24, 12, 8} views per rotation at a gantry speed of 0.35 s. One standard dose and four ultra-low dose levels, namely, 0.35 mAs, 0.175 mAs, 0.0875 mAs, and 0.043 75 mAs, were investigated. Both the analytical Feldkamp, Davis and Kress (FDK) algorithm and the Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm were used for CT image reconstruction. We also evaluated the impact of sinogram interpolation to estimate the missing projection measurements due to sparse view data acquisition. For MBIR, we used a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) cost function with an approximate total-variation (TV) regularizing penalty function. We compared a tube pulsing mode and a continuous exposure mode for sparse view data acquisition. Global PET ensemble root-mean-squares-error (RMSE) and local ensemble lesion activity error were used as quantitative evaluation metrics for PET image quality. With sparse view sampling, it is possible to greatly reduce the CT scan dose when it is primarily used for PET attenuation correction with little or no measureable effect on the PET image. For the four ultra-low dose

  15. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT: analysis of sparse view data acquisition and reconstruction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Rui, Xue; Cheng, Lishui; Long, Yong; Fu, Lin; Alessio, Adam M; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E; De Man, Bruno

    2015-10-07

    For PET/CT systems, PET image reconstruction requires corresponding CT images for anatomical localization and attenuation correction. In the case of PET respiratory gating, multiple gated CT scans can offer phase-matched attenuation and motion correction, at the expense of increased radiation dose. We aim to minimize the dose of the CT scan, while preserving adequate image quality for the purpose of PET attenuation correction by introducing sparse view CT data acquisition.We investigated sparse view CT acquisition protocols resulting in ultra-low dose CT scans designed for PET attenuation correction. We analyzed the tradeoffs between the number of views and the integrated tube current per view for a given dose using CT and PET simulations of a 3D NCAT phantom with lesions inserted into liver and lung. We simulated seven CT acquisition protocols with {984, 328, 123, 41, 24, 12, 8} views per rotation at a gantry speed of 0.35 s. One standard dose and four ultra-low dose levels, namely, 0.35 mAs, 0.175 mAs, 0.0875 mAs, and 0.043 75 mAs, were investigated. Both the analytical Feldkamp, Davis and Kress (FDK) algorithm and the Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm were used for CT image reconstruction. We also evaluated the impact of sinogram interpolation to estimate the missing projection measurements due to sparse view data acquisition. For MBIR, we used a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) cost function with an approximate total-variation (TV) regularizing penalty function. We compared a tube pulsing mode and a continuous exposure mode for sparse view data acquisition. Global PET ensemble root-mean-squares-error (RMSE) and local ensemble lesion activity error were used as quantitative evaluation metrics for PET image quality.With sparse view sampling, it is possible to greatly reduce the CT scan dose when it is primarily used for PET attenuation correction with little or no measureable effect on the PET image. For the four ultra-low dose levels

  16. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT: analysis of sparse view data acquisition and reconstruction algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Xue; Cheng, Lishui; Long, Yong; Fu, Lin; Alessio, Adam M.; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.; De Man, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    For PET/CT systems, PET image reconstruction requires corresponding CT images for anatomical localization and attenuation correction. In the case of PET respiratory gating, multiple gated CT scans can offer phase-matched attenuation and motion correction, at the expense of increased radiation dose. We aim to minimize the dose of the CT scan, while preserving adequate image quality for the purpose of PET attenuation correction by introducing sparse view CT data acquisition. Methods We investigated sparse view CT acquisition protocols resulting in ultra-low dose CT scans designed for PET attenuation correction. We analyzed the tradeoffs between the number of views and the integrated tube current per view for a given dose using CT and PET simulations of a 3D NCAT phantom with lesions inserted into liver and lung. We simulated seven CT acquisition protocols with {984, 328, 123, 41, 24, 12, 8} views per rotation at a gantry speed of 0.35 seconds. One standard dose and four ultra-low dose levels, namely, 0.35 mAs, 0.175 mAs, 0.0875 mAs, and 0.04375 mAs, were investigated. Both the analytical FDK algorithm and the Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm were used for CT image reconstruction. We also evaluated the impact of sinogram interpolation to estimate the missing projection measurements due to sparse view data acquisition. For MBIR, we used a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) cost function with an approximate total-variation (TV) regularizing penalty function. We compared a tube pulsing mode and a continuous exposure mode for sparse view data acquisition. Global PET ensemble root-mean-squares-error (RMSE) and local ensemble lesion activity error were used as quantitative evaluation metrics for PET image quality. Results With sparse view sampling, it is possible to greatly reduce the CT scan dose when it is primarily used for PET attenuation correction with little or no measureable effect on the PET image. For the four ultra-low dose levels

  17. Measurements of neutron effective doses and attenuation lengths for shielding materials at the heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Noda, Yutaka; Sato, Yukio; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Murakami, Takeshi

    2005-05-01

    The effective doses and attenuation lengths for concrete and iron were measured for the design of heavy ion facilities. Neutrons were produced through the reaction of copper, carbon, and lead bombarded by carbon ions at 230 and 400 MeV.A, neon ions at 400 and 600 MeV.A, and silicon ions at 600 and 800 MeV.A. The detectors used were a Linus and a Andersson-Braun-type rem counter and a detector based on the activation of a plastic scintillator. Representative effective dose rates (in units of 10(-8) microSv h(-1) pps(-1) at 1 m from the incident target surface, where pps means particles per second) and the attenuation lengths (in units of m) were 9.4 x 10(4), 0.46 for carbon ions at 230 MeV.A; 8.9 x 10(5), 0.48 for carbon ions at 400 MeV.A; 9.3 x 10(5), 0.48 for neon ions at 400 MeV.A; 3.8 x 10(6), 0.50 for neon ions at 600 MeV.A; 3.9 x 10(6), 0.50 for silicon ions at 600 MeV.A; and 1.1 x 10(7), 0.51 for silicon ions at 800 MeV.A. The attenuation provided by an iron plate approximately 20 cm thick (nearly equal to the attenuation length) corresponded to that of a 50-cm block of concrete in the present energy range. Miscellaneous results, such as the angular distributions of the neutron effective dose, narrow beam attenuation experiments, decay of gamma-ray doses after the bombardment of targets, doses around an irradiation room, order effects in the multi-layer (concrete and iron) shielding, the doses from different targets, the doses measured with a scintillator activation detector, the gamma-ray doses out of walls and the ratio of the response between the Andersson-Braun-type and the Linus rem counters are also reported.

  18. Synthesis of Novel Basic Skeletons Derived from Naltrexone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideaki

    We will describe eight interesting reactions using naltrexone derivatives. Almost all these reactions are characteristic of naltrexone derivatives, and can lead to the synthesis of many novel skeletons that provide new interesting pharmacological data. Some of the new reactions that were found with naltrexone derivatives were expanded into general reactions. For example, the reaction of 6α-hydroxyaldehyde derived from naltrexone led to the oxazoline dimer and the 1,3,5-trioxazatriquinane skeleton (triplet drug); this reaction was applied to general ketones which were converted to α-hydroxyaldehydes, followed by conversion to dimers and trimers, as described in Sect. 7.

  19. Reductions in Alcohol Craving Following Naltrexone Treatment for Heavy Drinking.

    PubMed

    Helstrom, Amy W; Blow, Frederick C; Slaymaker, Valerie; Kranzler, Henry R; Leong, Shirley; Oslin, David

    2016-09-01

    The role of craving for alcohol as a response to alcohol treatment is not well understood. We examined daily diary ratings of craving over the course of 28 days among individuals participating in an inpatient substance abuse treatment program. Participants were alcohol dependent patients (n = 100) in the Hazelden residential treatment program who were offered and agreed to take naltrexone and an age- and gender-matched comparison group (n = 100) of alcohol-dependent patients in the same program who declined the offer of treatment with naltrexone. Changes in craving over time were compared between the two groups. The naltrexone-treated group reported a more rapid decrease in craving than the usual care group. The change in the trajectory of craving is consistent with prior reports suggesting that craving reduction is a mechanism of naltrexone's efficacy in treating alcohol dependence. Providing naltrexone to individuals seeking treatment for alcohol dependence may accelerate a reduction in their craving, consistent with a primary target of many addiction treatment programs. Craving ratings by 100 residential patients taking naltrexone for alcohol dependence were compared to ratings by 100 patients who did not take naltrexone. Craving for alcohol decreased more rapidly in the patients taking naltrexone. Providing naltrexone to individuals seeking treatment for alcohol dependence may accelerate a reduction in craving, which may benefit treatment efforts. © The Author 2016. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  20. Pharmacological enhancement of naltrexone treatment for opioid dependence: a review

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, Paolo; Peindl, Kathleen S; Wu, Li-Tzy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Opioid dependence (OD) is a serious and growing clinical condition with increasing social costs that requires expanding treatment beyond opioid agonist substitution. The opioid antagonist naltrexone has displayed a remarkable association of theoretical effectiveness and poor clinical utility in treating OD due to noncompliant behavior and low acceptability among patients, only partly modified by psychosocial interventions. We reviewed pharmacological studies, including naltrexone depot formulations and combination treatments. Method We searched PubMed for clinical studies on the use of naltrexone implants and slow-release injections in OD, and investigations using adjunct medications to improve naltrexone maintenance therapy of OD. We discussed the results in view of their application to the clinical practice. Results Significant reduction in opioid use and improved retention in treatment have been found in several studies using depot naltrexone formulations, some of which are controlled clinical trials. Pilot investigations have gathered initial positive results on the use of naltrexone in combination with serotonin reuptake inhibitors, α-2 adrenergic, opioid, and γ-aminobutyric acid agonist medications. Conclusion Current evidence suggests that more research on effectiveness and safety is needed in support of depot naltrexone treatment for OD. Further research comparing slow-release with oral naltrexone and opioid agonist medications will help characterize the role of opioid antagonist-mediated treatment of OD. Preliminary investigations on naltrexone combination treatments suggest the opportunity to continue study of new mixed receptor activities for the treatment of OD and other drug addictions. PMID:21731898

  1. Naltrexone metabolism and concomitant drug concentrations in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Janet C; Ma, Joseph D; Morello, Candis M; Atayee, Rabia S; Best, Brookie M

    2014-05-01

    Naltrexone is effective in treating opioid dependence by blocking µ, κ and δ opiate receptors. Naltrexone is mainly metabolized to an active metabolite 6β-naltrexol by dihydrodiol dehydrogenase enzymes. Concomitant opioids will not be effective while patients are taking this antagonist. This was a retrospective analysis of urinary excretion data collected from patients being treated with pain between November 2011 and May 2012. Naltrexone, 6β-naltrexol and concomitant opiate concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Interpatient variability was calculated from first-visit specimens, and intrapatient variability was calculated from patients with two or more visits. Relationships of the metabolic ratio (MR; 6β-naltrexol/naltrexone) with age, gender and urinary pH were also explored. From 88 first-visit patient specimens, the median MR was 3.28 (range 0.73-17.42). The MR was higher in women than men (5.00 vs. 3.14, P< 0.05). The MR showed no association based on age and urinary pH. Eighteen of 88 patients taking oral naltrexone tested positive for concomitant opiate use. Urinary MRs of 6β-naltrexol/naltrexone were highly variable, which may contribute to variability in efficacy, toxicity and patient willingness to take naltrexone as directed. Twenty percent of patients tested positive for opiates and naltrexone, thus showing the importance of monitoring patients taking naltrexone.

  2. Supplier-dependent differences in intermittent voluntary alcohol intake and response to naltrexone in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Shima; Segerström, Lova; Roman, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a worldwide public health problem and a polygenetic disorder displaying substantial individual variation. This work aimed to study individual differences in behavior and its association to voluntary alcohol intake and subsequent response to naltrexone in a seamless heterogenic group of animals. Thus, by this approach the aim was to more accurately recapitulate the existing heterogeneity within the human population. Male Wistar rats from three different suppliers (Harlan Laboratories B.V., RccHan™:WI; Taconic Farms A/S, HanTac:WH; and Charles River GmbH, Crl:WI) were used to create a heterogenic group for studies of individual differences in behavior, associations to intermittent voluntary alcohol intake and subsequent response to naltrexone. The rats were tested in the open field prior to the Y-maze and then given voluntary intermittent access to alcohol or water in the home cage for 6 weeks, where after, naltrexone in three different doses or saline was administered in a Latin square design over 4 weeks and alcohol intake and preference was measured. However, supplier-dependent differences and concomitant skew subgroup formations, primarily in open field behavior and intermittent alcohol intake, resulted in a shifted focus to instead study voluntary alcohol intake and preference, and the ensuing response to naltrexone in Wistar rats from three different suppliers. The results showed that outbred Wistar rats are diverse with regard to voluntary alcohol intake and preference in a supplier-dependent manner; higher in RccHan™:WI relative to HanTac:WH and Crl:WI. The results also revealed supplier-dependent differences in the effect of naltrexone that were dose- and time-dependent; evident differences in high-drinking RccHan™:WI rats relative to HanTac:WH and Crl:WI rats. Overall these findings render RccHan™:WI rats more suitable for studies of individual differences in voluntary alcohol intake and response to naltrexone and

  3. Supplier-dependent differences in intermittent voluntary alcohol intake and response to naltrexone in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Shima; Segerström, Lova; Roman, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a worldwide public health problem and a polygenetic disorder displaying substantial individual variation. This work aimed to study individual differences in behavior and its association to voluntary alcohol intake and subsequent response to naltrexone in a seamless heterogenic group of animals. Thus, by this approach the aim was to more accurately recapitulate the existing heterogeneity within the human population. Male Wistar rats from three different suppliers (Harlan Laboratories B.V., RccHan™:WI; Taconic Farms A/S, HanTac:WH; and Charles River GmbH, Crl:WI) were used to create a heterogenic group for studies of individual differences in behavior, associations to intermittent voluntary alcohol intake and subsequent response to naltrexone. The rats were tested in the open field prior to the Y-maze and then given voluntary intermittent access to alcohol or water in the home cage for 6 weeks, where after, naltrexone in three different doses or saline was administered in a Latin square design over 4 weeks and alcohol intake and preference was measured. However, supplier-dependent differences and concomitant skew subgroup formations, primarily in open field behavior and intermittent alcohol intake, resulted in a shifted focus to instead study voluntary alcohol intake and preference, and the ensuing response to naltrexone in Wistar rats from three different suppliers. The results showed that outbred Wistar rats are diverse with regard to voluntary alcohol intake and preference in a supplier-dependent manner; higher in RccHan™:WI relative to HanTac:WH and Crl:WI. The results also revealed supplier-dependent differences in the effect of naltrexone that were dose- and time-dependent; evident differences in high-drinking RccHan™:WI rats relative to HanTac:WH and Crl:WI rats. Overall these findings render RccHan™:WI rats more suitable for studies of individual differences in voluntary alcohol intake and response to naltrexone and

  4. Low dose systemic morphine attenuates operant escape but facilitates innate reflex responses to thermal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vierck, Charles J; Acosta-Rua, Antonio; Nelligan, Russell; Tester, Nicole; Mauderli, Andre

    2002-08-01

    Effects of systemic morphine on operant escape responses of rats to thermal stimulation were compared directly with effects on innate licking and guarding responses. For these independent tests, thermal stimulation was delivered via the floor of testing chambers with or without platforms that provided an escape option. The principal findings were (1) administration of 0.5 to 1.5 mg/kg morphine attenuated escape from nociceptive heat and (2) in distinct contrast, licking and guarding responses to heat were enhanced by these doses. When escape responding was calculated as time on the heated plate without licking or guarding, sensitivity to morphine was greater for 44 degrees C than for 47 degrees C or 50 degrees C. Also, escape responses to cold (0 degrees C or 10 degrees C) were unaffected by 1.5 mg/kg morphine. The preferential reduction of heat nociception by morphine was demonstrated also by an operant preference task that gave the animals the option of standing on a cold (10 degrees C) or a hot (45 degrees C) surface. Administration of 0.5 mg/kg morphine increased occupancy of the hot surface. Platform time during operant tests was low and variable for warm stimulation (36 degrees C) and was significantly increased by each level of heat, showing that platform occupancy represented escape from nociception rather than avoidance responses. A lack of significant effects of 1.5 mg/kg morphine on operant performance during cold or warm stimulation controls for effects of systemic morphine other than antinociception.

  5. Hormonal contraceptive use diminishes salivary cortisol response to psychosocial stress and naltrexone in healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Daniel J.O.; King, Andrea C.; Cohoon, Andrew J.; Lovallo, William R.

    2013-01-01

    The use of hormonal contraception (HC) may affect salivary cortisol levels at rest and in response to a pharmacological or stress challenge. Therefore, the current study used a secondary data analysis to investigate the effect of HC on salivary cortisol levels in response to the mu-opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone and a psychosocial stressor, and also across the diurnal curve. Two hundred and nine women (n = 72 using hormonal contraception; HC+) completed a two-session stress response study that consisted of a stress day, in which they were exposed to public speaking and mental arithmetic, and a rest day, in which unstimulated cortisol levels were measured to assess the diurnal rhythm. A subset of seventy women (n = 24 HC+) also completed a second study in which they were administered oral naltrexone (50 mg) or placebo in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind fashion. Women who were HC+ had a significantly reduced salivary cortisol response to both the psychosocial stressor (p < 0.001) and naltrexone (p < 0.05) compared to HC− women. Additionally, HC+ women had a significantly altered morning diurnal cortisol rhythm (p < 0.01), with a delayed peak and higher overall levels. The results of the current study confirm that HC attenuates salivary cortisol response to a psychosocial stressor and mu-opioid receptor antagonism, and also alters the morning diurnal cortisol curve. PMID:23672966

  6. Reduction of Alcohol Drinking in Young Adults by Naltrexone: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Clinical Trial of Efficacy and Safety

    PubMed Central

    O’Malley, Stephanie S.; Corbin, William R.; Leeman, Robert F.; DeMartini, Kelly S.; Fucito, Lisa M.; Ikomi, Jolomi; Romano, Denise M.; Wu, Ran; Toll, Benjamin A.; Sher, Kenneth J.; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Kranzler, Henry R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, may facilitate reduction in drinking among young adults. We compared the efficacy and safety of naltrexone administered daily plus targeted dosing with placebo to reduce drinking in heavy drinking young adults. Methods Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, outpatient research center, March 2008-January 2012. Participants were ages 18-25, reporting ≥ 4 heavy drinking days in the prior 4 weeks. Interventions included naltrexone 25 mg daily plus 25 mg targeted (at most daily) in anticipation of drinking (n = 61) or daily/targeted placebo (n = 67). All received a personalized feedback session and brief counseling every other week. Primary outcomes were percent days heavy drinking (PHDD) and percent days abstinent (PDA) over the 8-week treatment period. Secondary outcomes included drinks/drinking day and percent days with estimated blood alcohol levels ≥0.08 g/dL. Results Of 140 randomized, 128 began treatment, comprising the evaluable sample. During treatment, PHDD (Naltrexone M=21.60, SD=16.05; Placebo M=22.90, SD=13.20) (p=0.58) and PDA (Naltrexone M=56.60, SD=22.52; Placebo M=62.50, SD=15.75) (p=0.39) did not differ by group. Naltrexone significantly reduced drinks per drinking day (Naltrexone M=4.90, SD=2.28; Placebo M=5.90, SD=2.51) (p=0.009) and percentage of drinking days with estimated BAC ≥0.08 g/dL (Naltrexone M=35.36, SD=28.40; Placebo M=45.74, SD=26.80) (p=0.042). There were no serious adverse events. Sleepiness was more common with naltrexone. Conclusions Naltrexone did not reduce frequency of drinking or heavy drinking days, but reduced secondary measures of drinking intensity. While effects were modest, the risk-benefit ratio favors offering naltrexone to help young adult heavy drinkers reduce their drinking. Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00568958 PMID:25742208

  7. Low-dose memantine attenuated morphine addictive behavior through its anti-inflammation and neurotrophic effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiou-Lan; Tao, Pao-Luh; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Heng; Wu, Hsiang-En; Tseng, Leon F; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2012-06-01

    Opioid abuse and dependency are international problems. Studies have shown that neuronal inflammation and degeneration might be related to the development of opioid addiction. Thus, using neuroprotective agents might be beneficial for treating opioid addiction. Memantine, an Alzheimer's disease medication, has neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated whether a low dose of memantine prevents opioid-induced drug-seeking behavior in rats and analyzed its mechanism. A conditioned-place-preference test was used to investigate the morphine-induced drug-seeking behaviors in rats. We found that a low-dose (0.2-1 mg/kg) of subcutaneous memantine significantly attenuated the chronic morphine-induced place-preference in rats. To clarify the effects of chronic morphine and low-dose memantine, serum and brain levels of cytokines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured. After 6 days of morphine treatment, cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6) levels had significantly increased in serum; IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA levels had significantly increased in the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex, both addiction-related brain areas; and BDNF levels had significantly decreased, both in serum and in addiction-related brain areas. Pretreatment with low-dose memantine significantly attenuated chronic morphine-induced increases in serum and brain cytokines. Low-dose memantine also significantly potentiated serum and brain BDNF levels. We hypothesize that neuronal inflammation and BDNF downregulation are related to the progression of opioid addiction. We hypothesize that the mechanism low-dose memantine uses to attenuate morphine-induced addiction behavior is its anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic effects.

  8. Naltrexone/bupropion: Contrave(R); naltrexone SR/bupropion SR.

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    In March 2010, Orexigen(R) Therapeutics submitted a new drug application (NDA) for approval of naltrexone sustained release (SR)/bupropion SR (Contrave(R)) for the treatment of obesity in the US. The tablet contains naltrexone SR 32 mg and bupropion SR 360 mg. The drug has been tested in four randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III trials and the co-primary endpoints were met in each case. This review discusses the key development milestones and clinical trial program to date.

  9. [High dose cinobufocini in attenuation and treatment of infection and granulocytopenia during combined chemotherapy of malignant blood diseases].

    PubMed

    Yue, B B

    1992-03-01

    The use of high dose Cinobufocini in attenuation and treatment of infection and granulocytopenia during combined chemotherapy was observed in patients with malignant blood diseases. The study was designed in such a way that each patient served as self control. The patients, 18 males and 12 females, aged 16-66 (average 34), 62 experiments in 20 patients with acute leukemia, 8 with malignant lymphoma and 2 with multiple myeloma were observed. In patients with the treatment of high dose Cinobufocini, infection was significantly decreased and the number of granulocytes was not markedly changed before and after the treatment. The observation demonstrated that high dose Cinobufocini can significantly reduce the risk of infection and degree and duration of granulocytopenia associated with chemotherapy of patients with malignant blood diseases. The use of high dose Cinobufocini is simple and convenient and with very little side effects.

  10. Improved parameters of metabolic glycaemic and immune function and arterial stiffness with naltrexone implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Here the dramatic and rapid response of a 54-year-old obese hypertensive man with poorly controlled insulin-dependent diabetes with a 33 year history of high dose heroin use, a 1 year history of refractory ulceration of his hands, ankles and feet, treated coronary artery disease, and the metabolic syndrome, to implantation with long-acting naltrexone implants is presented. In particular his hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, proinflammatory state, evidence of hepatic and renal insufficiency, arterial stiffness, and extensive and chronic cutaneous ulceration all improved dramatically over just 13 weeks, in association with complete control of his heroin, benzodiazepine, tobacco and cannabis use. The metabolic and vascular benefits were all highly statistically significant. The case is the first to document dramatic and rapid metabolic, immune and vascular improvements in association with clinical naltrexone therapy and are consistent with its likely effects in restoring addiction-related stem cell and immunological deficits.

  11. Alpha-methyldopa induces a naltrexone-insensitive antinociception and hypomotility in rats.

    PubMed Central

    van Giersbergen, P. L.; van Duinkerken, E.; Sweep, C. G.; Wiegant, V. M.; van Ree, J. M.; de Jong, W.

    1990-01-01

    1. This study served to investigate whether endogenous opioid peptides play a role in the putative antinociceptive and the sedative actions of alpha-methyldopa. 2. In conscious normotensive rats, alpha-methyldopa induced hypotension, starting around 1 h and reaching a maximum 3-4 h after administration. Pretreatment with naltrexone resulted in an inhibition of alpha-methyldopa-induced hypotension. 3. alpha-Methyldopa dose-dependently increased hot plate latency which became evident after a 4 h lag period and reaching a maximum effect at 6 h. The antinociceptive effect of alpha-methyldopa was not affected by naltrexone. 4. In a small open field, alpha-methyldopa dose-dependently suppressed locomotion and sniffing behaviour. These effects of alpha-methyldopa were apparent 1 h after administration and were naltrexone-insensitive. 5. No changes in the level of beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid were observed after administration of alpha-methyldopa. 6. The results indicate that endogenous opioid peptides are involved in the hypotensive action of alpha-methyldopa but not in alpha-methyldopa-induced hypomotility and antinociception. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2331579

  12. Effects of amylin and bupropion/naltrexone on food intake and body weight are interactive in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Clapper, Jason R; Athanacio, Jennifer; Wittmer, Carrie; Griffin, Pete S; D'Souza, Lawrence; Parkes, David G; Roth, Jonathan D

    2013-01-05

    Antagonism of opioid systems (e.g., with naltrexone) has been explored as an anti-obesity strategy, and is particularly effective when co-administered with dual inhibitors of dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake (e.g., bupropion). Previously, we demonstrated that amylin enhances the food intake lowering and weight loss effects of neurohormonal (e.g., leptin, cholecystokinin, melanocortins) and small molecule (e.g., phentermine, sibutramine) agents. Here, we sought to characterize the interaction of amylin with naltrexone/bupropion on energy balance. Wild-type and amylin knockout mice were similarly responsive to the food intake lowering effects of either naltrexone (1mg/kg, subcutaneous) or bupropion (50mg/kg, subcutaneous) suggesting that they act independently of amylinergic systems and could interact additively when given in combination with amylin. To test this, diet-induced obese rats were treated (for 11 days) with vehicle, rat amylin (50 μg/kg/d, infused subcutaneously), naltrexone/bupropion (1 and 20mg/kg, respectively by twice daily subcutaneous injection) or their combination. We found that amylin+naltrexone/bupropion combination therapy exerted additive effects to reduce cumulative food intake, body weight and fat mass. In a separate study, the effects of amylin and naltrexone/bupropion administered at the same doses (for 14 days) were compared to a pair-fed group. Although the combination and pair-fed groups lost a similar amount of body weight, rats treated with the combination lost 68% more fat and better maintained their lean mass. These findings support the strategy of combined amylin agonism with opioid and catecholaminergic signaling systems for the treatment of obesity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Naltrexone and amperozide modify chocolate and saccharin drinking in high alcohol-preferring P rats.

    PubMed

    Biggs, T A; Myers, R D

    1998-06-01

    Previous studies showed that the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, amperozide, is somewhat more potent than the opiate antagonist, naltrexone, in reducing alcohol drinking in high alcohol-preferring (P) rats. The purpose of this study was to determine in the P rat whether the effect of either drug could be due, in part, to an alteration in gustatory function. In an unlimited, 24-h free choice paradigm, P rats were offered water simultaneously with either a highly palatable 0.1% saccharin solution or a 1:4 dilution of Nestlé Sweet Success chocolate drink. Throughout all phases of the study, the P rats always consumed significantly greater volumes of the chocolate drink than of the saccharin solution, i.e., 526 ml/kg vs. 181 ml/kg, respectively. Successive 12-day experimental periods consisted of three phases: a 4-day predrug control interval; 4 days of administration of saline control vehicle or either drug; and a final 4 day postdrug interval. In a counterbalance design, saline, amperozide (1.0 or 5.0 mg/kg) or naltrexone (2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg) was administered subcutaneously twice daily at 1600 and 2200 h for 4 days. Amperozide and naltrexone significantly reduced the drinking of chocolate in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, only the two higher doses of amperozide and naltrexone decreased the intake of saccharin significantly. Thus, these findings suggest that different populations of central serotonin and opioid receptors concurrently underpin, in part, the preferences for both palatable and/or nutrient fluids. Finally, because both the opiate and 5-HT2A antagonists reduce the ingestion of saccharin and chocolate solutions differentially, it is apparent that preferences for alternative palatable fluids should be examined when candidate drugs are screened for suppressing alcohol drinking and ultimately the treatment of alcohol abuse.

  14. On the behavioural specificity of hypophagia induced in male rats by mCPP, naltrexone, and their combination.

    PubMed

    Wright, F L; Rodgers, R J

    2014-02-01

    Serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and opioidergic mechanisms are intimately involved in appetite regulation. In view of recent evidence of positive anorectic interactions between opioid and various non-opioid substrates, our aim was to assess the behavioural specificity of anorectic responses to the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone, the 5-HT2C/1B receptor agonist mCPP and their combination. Behavioural profiling techniques, including the behavioural satiety sequence (BSS), were used to examine acute drug effects in non-deprived male rats tested with palatable mash. Experiment 1 characterised the dose-response profile of mCPP (0.1-3.0 mg/kg), while experiment 2 assessed the effects of combined treatment with a sub-anorectic dose of mCPP (0.1 mg/kg) and one of two low doses of naltrexone (0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg). Experiment 1 confirmed the dose-dependent anorectic efficacy of mCPP, with robust effects on intake and feeding-related measures observed at 3.0 mg/kg. However, that dose was also associated with other behavioural alterations including increased grooming, reductions in locomotion and sniffing, and disruption of the BSS. In experiment 2, naltrexone dose-dependently reduced food intake and time spent feeding, effects accompanied by a behaviourally selective acceleration in the BSS. However, the addition of 0.1 mg/kg mCPP did not significantly alter the behavioural changes observed in response to either dose of naltrexone given alone. In contrast to recently reported positive anorectic interactions involving low-dose combinations of opioid receptor antagonists or mCPP with cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists, present results would not appear to provide any support for potentially clinically relevant anorectic interactions between opioid and 5-HT2C/1B receptor mechanisms.

  15. An experimental attenuation plate to improve the dose distribution in intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy for breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Shimozato, T.; Sawaki, M.; Imai, T.; Ito, Y.; Obata, Y.; Tabushi, K.

    2009-06-01

    Intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IOERT) is a technique in which a single-fraction high dose is intraoperatively delivered to subclinical tumour cells using an electron beam after breast-conserving surgery. In IOERT, an attenuation plate consisting of a pair of metal disks is commonly used to protect the normal tissues posterior to the breast. However, the dose in front of the plate is affected by backscatter, resulting in an unpredictable delivered dose to the tumour cells. In this study, an experimental attenuation plate, termed a shielding plate, was designed using Monte Carlo simulation, which significantly diminished the electron beam without introducing any backscatter radiation. The plate's performance was verified by measurements. It was made of two layers, a first layer (source side) of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and a second layer of copper, which was selected from among other metals (aluminium, copper and lead) after testing for shielding capability and the range and magnitude of backscatter. The optimal thicknesses of the PMMA (0.71 cm) and copper (0.3 cm) layers were determined by changing their thicknesses during simulations. On the basis of these results, a shielding plate was prototyped and depth doses with and without the plate were measured by radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters using a conventional stationary linear accelerator and a mobile linear accelerator dedicated for IOERT. The trial shielding plate functioned as intended, indicating its applicability in clinical practice.

  16. Vaccination With a Highly Attenuated Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vector Protects Against Challenge With a Lethal Dose of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Matassov, Demetrius; Marzi, Andrea; Latham, Terri; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Joan B.; Mire, Chad E.; Hamm, Stefan; Nowak, Becky; Egan, Michael A.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Eldridge, John H.; Feldmann, Heinz; Clarke, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Previously, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) pseudotypes expressing Ebolavirus glycoproteins (GPs) in place of the VSV G protein demonstrated protection of nonhuman primates from lethal homologous Ebolavirus challenge. Those pseudotype vectors contained no additional attenuating mutations in the rVSV genome. Here we describe rVSV vectors containing a full complement of VSV genes and expressing the Ebola virus (EBOV) GP from an additional transcription unit. These rVSV vectors contain the same combination of attenuating mutations used previously in the clinical development pathway of an rVSV/human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vaccine. One of these rVSV vectors (N4CT1-EBOVGP1), which expresses membrane-anchored EBOV GP from the first position in the genome (GP1), elicited a balanced cellular and humoral GP-specific immune response in mice. Guinea pigs immunized with a single dose of this vector were protected from any signs of disease following lethal EBOV challenge, while control animals died in 7–9 days. Subsequently, N4CT1-EBOVGP1 demonstrated complete, single-dose protection of 2 macaques following lethal EBOV challenge. A single sham-vaccinated macaque died from disease due to EBOV infection. These results demonstrate that highly attenuated rVSV vectors expressing EBOV GP may provide safer alternatives to current EBOV vaccines. PMID:26109675

  17. Vaccination With a Highly Attenuated Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vector Protects Against Challenge With a Lethal Dose of Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    Matassov, Demetrius; Marzi, Andrea; Latham, Terri; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Joan B; Mire, Chad E; Hamm, Stefan; Nowak, Becky; Egan, Michael A; Geisbert, Thomas W; Eldridge, John H; Feldmann, Heinz; Clarke, David K

    2015-10-01

    Previously, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) pseudotypes expressing Ebolavirus glycoproteins (GPs) in place of the VSV G protein demonstrated protection of nonhuman primates from lethal homologous Ebolavirus challenge. Those pseudotype vectors contained no additional attenuating mutations in the rVSV genome. Here we describe rVSV vectors containing a full complement of VSV genes and expressing the Ebola virus (EBOV) GP from an additional transcription unit. These rVSV vectors contain the same combination of attenuating mutations used previously in the clinical development pathway of an rVSV/human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vaccine. One of these rVSV vectors (N4CT1-EBOVGP1), which expresses membrane-anchored EBOV GP from the first position in the genome (GP1), elicited a balanced cellular and humoral GP-specific immune response in mice. Guinea pigs immunized with a single dose of this vector were protected from any signs of disease following lethal EBOV challenge, while control animals died in 7-9 days. Subsequently, N4CT1-EBOVGP1 demonstrated complete, single-dose protection of 2 macaques following lethal EBOV challenge. A single sham-vaccinated macaque died from disease due to EBOV infection. These results demonstrate that highly attenuated rVSV vectors expressing EBOV GP may provide safer alternatives to current EBOV vaccines.

  18. Baclofen, raclopride, and naltrexone differentially affect intake of fat and sucrose under limited access conditions.

    PubMed

    Corwin, Rebecca L; Wojnicki, Francis H

    2009-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), dopamine, and opioids are implicated in impulse control, addiction and binge eating. Recent evidence suggests that sucrose alters the effects of GABAergic, dopaminergic, and opioid receptor ligands on consumption of a fatty food in a rat limited-access binge protocol. This study determined the independent effects of fat and sucrose on the efficacy of these ligands under limited-access conditions. Nonfood-deprived male Sprague-Dawley rats had 1 h access to fat (vegetable shortening) or sucrose (3.2, 10, or 32% w/v). Half had intermittent access (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) and half had daily access. Effects of baclofen (GABAB agonist), SCH 23390 (D1 antagonist), raclopride (D2 antagonist), and naltrexone (opioid antagonist) were assessed. Baclofen and naltrexone reduced fat intake regardless of the access schedule. Baclofen had no effect on sucrose intake; naltrexone reduced sucrose intake at higher doses than were required to reduce fat intake. Raclopride stimulated fat intake in intermittent-access rats and had no effect in daily-access rats; raclopride reduced sucrose intake in all groups. SCH 23390 reduced intake in a nonspecific manner. The results indicate the involvement of GABAB receptors in fat but not sucrose intake, and of D2 receptor dysfunction in rats with a history of bingeing on fat.

  19. Aripiprazole in the treatment of patients with alcohol dependence: a double-blind, comparison trial vs. naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Martinotti, G; Di Nicola, M; Di Giannantonio, M; Janiri, L

    2009-03-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that both partial dopamine agents and mixed 5-HT1A/2A receptor drugs independently show significant efficacy in reducing alcohol use in both animals and humans. Aripiprazole, which acts as a dopamine/5-HT system stabilizer, approaches the optimal characteristics sought in medication to be considered for testing in the treatment of alcohol dependence. In this randomised, double-blind, confrontation trial with naltrexone, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of aripiprazole on alcohol-drinking indices. Craving and psychiatric symptom improvements were the secondary end points. Seventy-five alcohol dependent subjects were detoxified and were subsequently randomised into two groups, receiving 50 mg of naltrexone and 5-15 mg of aripiprazole, respectively. Craving (Visual Analogue Scale; Obsessive and Compulsive Drinking Scale) and withdrawal (Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment) rating scales were applied; psychiatric symptoms were evaluated through the Symptom Check List 90-Revised. The number of subjects remained alcohol free for the entire study period (16 weeks) and the number of subjects relapsed were not significantly different in the two groups. The survival function showed that patients treated with aripiprazole remained abstinent from any alcohol amount for a longer time with respect to those treated with naltrexone. As for craving scores, patients treated with naltrexone showed a better outcome. Results from this study globally place aripiprazole at the same range of efficacy of naltrexone, one of the approved drugs used in alcohol relapse prevention. If it could be demonstrated in placebo-controlled trials that aripiprazole is efficacious in decreasing alcohol use, lessening craving, and attenuating psychopathological symptom severity, we will have gained a powerful agent for the treatment of alcohol-dependent subjects.

  20. Fast analytical approach of application specific dose efficient spectrum selection for diagnostic CT imaging and PET attenuation correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Xue; Jin, Yannan; FitzGerald, Paul F.; Wu, Mingye; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; De Man, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used for a variety of applications, two of which include diagnostic imaging and attenuation correction for PET or SPECT imaging. Ideally, the x-ray tube spectrum should be optimized for the specific application to minimize the patient radiation dose while still providing the necessary information. In this study, we proposed a projection-based analytic approach for the analysis of contrast, noise, and bias. Dose normalized contrast to noise ratio (CNRD), inverse noise normalized by dose (IND) and bias are used as evaluation metrics to determine the optimal x-ray spectrum. Our simulation investigated the dose efficiency of the x-ray spectrum ranging from 40 kVp to 200 kVp. Water cylinders with diameters of 15 cm, 24 cm, and 35 cm were used in the simulation to cover a variety of patient sizes. The effects of electronic noise and pre-patient copper filtration were also evaluated. A customized 24 cm CTDI-like phantom with 13 mm diameter inserts filled with iodine (10 mg ml-1), tantalum (10 mg ml-1), water, and PMMA was measured with both standard (1.5 mGy) and ultra-low (0.2 mGy) dose to verify the simulation results at tube voltages of 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp. For contrast-enhanced diagnostic imaging, the simulation results indicated that for high dose without filtration, the optimal kVp for water contrast is approximately 100 kVp for a 15 cm water cylinder. However, the 60 kVp spectrum produces the highest CNRD for bone and iodine. The optimal kVp for tantalum has two selections: approximately 50 and 100 kVp. The kVp that maximizes CNRD increases when the object size increases. The trend in the CTDI phantom measurements agrees with the simulation results, which also agrees with previous studies. Copper filtration improved the dose efficiency for water and tantalum, but reduced the iodine and bone dose efficiency in a clinically-relevant range (70-140 kVp). Our study also shows that for CT-based attenuation

  1. Dose reduction by moving a region of interest (ROI) beam attenuator to follow a moving object of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panse, Ashish S.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    Region-of-interest (ROI) fluoroscopy takes advantage of the fact that most neurovascular interventional activity is performed in only a small portion of an x-ray imaging field of view (FOV). The ROI beam filter is an attenuating material that reduces patient dose in the area peripheral to the object of interest. This project explores a method of moving the beam-attenuator aperture with the object of interest such that it always remains in the ROI. In this study, the ROI attenuator, which reduces the dose by 80% in the peripheral region, is mounted on a linear stage placed near the xray tube. Fluoroscopy is performed using the Microangiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) which is a high-resolution, CCD-based x-ray detector. A stainless-steel stent is selected as the object of interest, and is moved across the FOV and localized using an object-detection algorithm available in the IMAQ Vision package of LabVIEW. The ROI is moved to follow the stent motion. The pixel intensities are equalized in both FOV regions and an adaptive temporal filter dependent on the motion of the object of interest is implemented inside the ROI. With a temporal filter weight of 5% for the current image in the peripheral region, the SNR measured is 47.8. The weights inside the ROI vary between 10% and 33% with a measured SNR of 57.9 and 35.3 when the object is stationary and moving, respectively. This method allows patient dose reduction as well as maintenance of superior image quality in the ROI while tracking the object.

  2. Dose reduction by moving a region of interest (ROI) beam attenuator to follow a moving object of interest.

    PubMed

    Panse, Ashish S; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Jain, A; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    Region-of-interest (ROI) fluoroscopy takes advantage of the fact that most neurovascular interventional activity is performed in only a small portion of an x-ray imaging field of view (FOV). The ROI beam filter is an attenuating material that reduces patient dose in the area peripheral to the object of interest. This project explores a method of moving the beam-attenuator aperture with the object of interest such that it always remains in the ROI. In this study, the ROI attenuator, which reduces the dose by 80% in the peripheral region, is mounted on a linear stage placed near the x-ray tube. Fluoroscopy is performed using the Microangiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) which is a high-resolution, CCD-based x-ray detector. A stainless-steel stent is selected as the object of interest, and is moved across the FOV and localized using an object-detection algorithm available in the IMAQ Vision package of LabVIEW. The ROI is moved to follow the stent motion. The pixel intensities are equalized in both FOV regions and an adaptive temporal filter dependent on the motion of the object of interest is implemented inside the ROI. With a temporal filter weight of 5% for the current image in the peripheral region, the SNR measured is 47.8. The weights inside the ROI vary between 10% and 33% with a measured SNR of 57.9 and 35.3 when the object is stationary and moving, respectively. This method allows patient dose reduction as well as maintenance of superior image quality in the ROI while tracking the object.

  3. Dose reduction by moving a region of interest (ROI) beam attenuator to follow a moving object of interest

    PubMed Central

    Panse, Ashish S.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    Region-of-interest (ROI) fluoroscopy takes advantage of the fact that most neurovascular interventional activity is performed in only a small portion of an x-ray imaging field of view (FOV). The ROI beam filter is an attenuating material that reduces patient dose in the area peripheral to the object of interest. This project explores a method of moving the beam-attenuator aperture with the object of interest such that it always remains in the ROI. In this study, the ROI attenuator, which reduces the dose by 80% in the peripheral region, is mounted on a linear stage placed near the x-ray tube. Fluoroscopy is performed using the Microangiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) which is a high-resolution, CCD-based x-ray detector. A stainless-steel stent is selected as the object of interest, and is moved across the FOV and localized using an object-detection algorithm available in the IMAQ Vision package of LabVIEW. The ROI is moved to follow the stent motion. The pixel intensities are equalized in both FOV regions and an adaptive temporal filter dependent on the motion of the object of interest is implemented inside the ROI. With a temporal filter weight of 5% for the current image in the peripheral region, the SNR measured is 47.8. The weights inside the ROI vary between 10% and 33% with a measured SNR of 57.9 and 35.3 when the object is stationary and moving, respectively. This method allows patient dose reduction as well as maintenance of superior image quality in the ROI while tracking the object. PMID:22866212

  4. Attenuation-based size metric for estimating organ dose to patients undergoing tube current modulated CT exams

    SciTech Connect

    Bostani, Maryam McMillan, Kyle; Lu, Peiyun; Kim, Hyun J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; DeMarco, John J.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Task Group 204 introduced effective diameter (ED) as the patient size metric used to correlate size-specific-dose-estimates. However, this size metric fails to account for patient attenuation properties and has been suggested to be replaced by an attenuation-based size metric, water equivalent diameter (D{sub W}). The purpose of this study is to investigate different size metrics, effective diameter, and water equivalent diameter, in combination with regional descriptions of scanner output to establish the most appropriate size metric to be used as a predictor for organ dose in tube current modulated CT exams. Methods: 101 thoracic and 82 abdomen/pelvis scans from clinically indicated CT exams were collected retrospectively from a multidetector row CT (Sensation 64, Siemens Healthcare) with Institutional Review Board approval to generate voxelized patient models. Fully irradiated organs (lung and breasts in thoracic scans and liver, kidneys, and spleen in abdominal scans) were segmented and used as tally regions in Monte Carlo simulations for reporting organ dose. Along with image data, raw projection data were collected to obtain tube current information for simulating tube current modulation scans using Monte Carlo methods. Additionally, previously described patient size metrics [ED, D{sub W}, and approximated water equivalent diameter (D{sub Wa})] were calculated for each patient and reported in three different ways: a single value averaged over the entire scan, a single value averaged over the region of interest, and a single value from a location in the middle of the scan volume. Organ doses were normalized by an appropriate mAs weighted CTDI{sub vol} to reflect regional variation of tube current. Linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the correlations between normalized organ doses and each size metric. Results: For the abdominal organs, the correlations between normalized organ dose and size metric were overall slightly higher for all three

  5. Attenuation-based size metric for estimating organ dose to patients undergoing tube current modulated CT exams.

    PubMed

    Bostani, Maryam; McMillan, Kyle; Lu, Peiyun; Kim, Hyun J; Cagnon, Chris H; DeMarco, John J; McNitt-Gray, Michael F

    2015-02-01

    Task Group 204 introduced effective diameter (ED) as the patient size metric used to correlate size-specific-dose-estimates. However, this size metric fails to account for patient attenuation properties and has been suggested to be replaced by an attenuation-based size metric, water equivalent diameter (DW). The purpose of this study is to investigate different size metrics, effective diameter, and water equivalent diameter, in combination with regional descriptions of scanner output to establish the most appropriate size metric to be used as a predictor for organ dose in tube current modulated CT exams. 101 thoracic and 82 abdomen/pelvis scans from clinically indicated CT exams were collected retrospectively from a multidetector row CT (Sensation 64, Siemens Healthcare) with Institutional Review Board approval to generate voxelized patient models. Fully irradiated organs (lung and breasts in thoracic scans and liver, kidneys, and spleen in abdominal scans) were segmented and used as tally regions in Monte Carlo simulations for reporting organ dose. Along with image data, raw projection data were collected to obtain tube current information for simulating tube current modulation scans using Monte Carlo methods. Additionally, previously described patient size metrics [ED, DW, and approximated water equivalent diameter (DWa)] were calculated for each patient and reported in three different ways: a single value averaged over the entire scan, a single value averaged over the region of interest, and a single value from a location in the middle of the scan volume. Organ doses were normalized by an appropriate mAs weighted CTDIvol to reflect regional variation of tube current. Linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the correlations between normalized organ doses and each size metric. For the abdominal organs, the correlations between normalized organ dose and size metric were overall slightly higher for all three differently (global, regional, and middle slice

  6. The Potential Role of Naltrexone in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Moghaddas, Azadeh; Dianatkhah, Mehrnoush; Ghaffari, Saba; Ghaeli, Padideh

    2017-04-01

    Objective: Management of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a difficult challenge due to the complex features of this disorder. This article reviews the use of naltrexone in the treatment of BPD. Method: Published articles and clinical trials were searched in Google Scholar, MedLine, ELSEVIER, and Cochrane database of systematic reviews abstracts in English language between 1990 and 2017. Results: Naltrexone (NTX), a nonspecific competitive opiate antagonist, has been noted to be helpful in controlling self-injurious behavior (SIB) and dissociative symptoms in patients with BPD. Conclusion: Further studies should be conducted on the effects of naltrexone to confirm the role of this medication in the treatment of BPD.

  7. Low-dose DHA-induced astrocyte proliferation can be attenuated by insufficient expression of BLBP in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoming; Yang, Qingqing; Han, Xiao; Tan, Xuefeng; Qin, Jianbing; Jin, Guohua

    2017-09-14

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) that is involved in a wide range of cellular processes in human cells. Brain lipid binding protein (BLBP) exhibits a high affinity for n-3 PUFAs, especially DHA, but the precise functional contributions of DHA and BLBP in astrocytes are not clear. We analyzed cell viability and the ratio of Ki67 positive cells after manipulating DHA and/or BLBP levels in cultured astrocytes, and found that low-dose DHA stimulated proliferation of astrocytes, whereas this proliferative effect could be attenuated by downregulation of BLBP. Moreover, we found that astrocyte proliferation was directly regulated by BLBP independently of DHA. Taken together, low-dose DHA-induced astrocyte proliferation was disturbed by insufficient BLBP; and besides acting as a fatty acid transporter, BLBP was also involved in the proliferation of astrocytes directly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Single low-dose CT scan optimized for rest-stress PET attenuation correction and quantification of coronary artery calcium.

    PubMed

    Kaster, Tyler S; Dwivedi, Girish; Susser, Leah; Renaud, Jennifer M; Beanlands, Rob S B; Chow, Benjamin J W; deKemp, Robert A

    2015-06-01

    Coronary artery calcium is an important marker of coronary artery disease. Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using PET-CT technology requires a CT scan for attenuation correction (CTAC) but is not used routinely to measure coronary calcium burden. This study aimed to determine if a low-dose CTAC scan can also accurately quantify coronary artery calcium. Twenty-three patients underwent both a traditional coronary artery calcium scan on a dedicated cardiac CT scanner (CAC-CT) and a myocardial perfusion scan on a hybrid PET-CT scanner. The standard MPI protocol includes rest and stress-matched PET and CTAC scans. The post-stress CTAC scan was modified to approximate the CAC-CT scan protocol while maintaining ~0.5 mSv dose. Coronary artery calcium scores were compared between the Ca-CTAC and CAC-CT scans. The modified Ca-CTAC scan showed a trend toward slight decreases in segmental stress perfusion of 2-3.5% in the anterior wall segments (P < 0.05). Correlation and agreement between the proposed Ca-CTAC and standard CAC-CT calcium scores at the optimal threshold of 110 HU were also excellent (r (2) = 0.99, κ = 1.0). There was a small difference in the regression slope vs unity: Ca-CTAC = 0.96 × CAC (P < 0.05), but the categorical classification of calcium was accurate in all twenty-three patients (κ = 1.0). A single low-dose rest CTAC scan can be used for accurate attenuation correction of rest and stress PET perfusion images, thus allowing a post-stress CTAC scan to be optimized for improved quantification of coronary artery calcium without increasing radiation dose vs standard protocols.

  9. Attenuation of haemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation with intravenous dexmedetomidine: A comparison between two doses

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Bon; Talikoti, Anand T; Krishnamurthy, Dinesh

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Laryngoscopic manipulation and endotracheal intubation are noxious stimuli capable of producing tachycardia, arrhythmias and hypertension. The aim of this study was to arrive at an optimal dose of dexmedetomidine by comparing two doses with placebo to attenuate stress response during laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. Methods: It was a randomised, prospective, double-blind placebo-controlled study. After Institutional Ethical Committee clearance, ninety patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status 1 were enrolled in the study and divided into three equal groups. Group A received normal saline, Group B received injection dexmedetomidine 0.5 μg/kg and Group C received injection dexmedetomidine 0.75 μg/kg as infusion over 10 min. The general anaesthesia technique was standardised for all three groups. The primary outcome measures were haemodynamic response at 1, 3 and 5 min after intubation. The secondary outcome measures were to note down any adverse effects associated with drugs. The statistical package used was SPSS version 15. Results: Groups were well matched for their demographic data. There was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between dexmedetomidine and normal saline in heart rate, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures at all time points after tracheal intubation with dexmedetomidine 0.75 μg/kg being most effective. Sedation scores were more with dexmedetomidine. None of the patients had any adverse effects such as hypotension, bradycardia, respiratory depression and fall in oxygen saturation. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine in a dose of 0.75 μg/kg intravenous is the optimal dose to attenuate stress response to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. PMID:28216704

  10. Serum naltrexone and 6-beta-naltrexol levels from naltrexone implants can block very large amounts of heroin: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Colin

    2002-07-01

    The maximum dose of heroin that is blocked by customary doses of oral naltrexone (NTX) and its active metabolite 6-beta-naltrexol (6BNT) is unknown, particularly at trough serum levels which show much interindividual variation and can be low. NTX has only once been tested formally against opiate equivalents of more than 25 mg of diamorphine. Increasing interest in long-acting implantable NTX preparations makes it important to have objective information about blocking activity at various blood levels of NTX and 6BNT. Two cases are described in which NTX and 6BNT levels as low as 2.8 and 9.0 ng/ml, respectively, were sufficient to block doses of pure diamorphine as high as 500 mg.

  11. Assessment of organ and effective dose when using region-of-interest attenuators in cone-beam CT and interventional fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhenyu; Vijayan, Sarath; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R

    2017-07-01

    In some medical-imaging procedures using cone-beam CT (CBCT) and fluoroscopy, only the center of the field of view (FOV) may be needed to be visualized with optimal image quality. To reduce the dose to the patient while maintaining visualization of the entire FOV, a Cu attenuator with a circular aperture for the region of interest (ROI) is used. The potential organ and effective dose reductions of ROI imaging when applied to CBCT and interventional fluoroscopic procedures were determined using EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. The Monte Carlo model was first validated by comparing the surface dose distribution in a solid-water block phantom with measurement by Gafchromic film. The dependence of dose reduction on the ROI attenuator thickness, the opening size of the ROI, the axial beam position, and the location of the different organs for both neuro and thoracic imaging was evaluated. The results showed a reduction in most organ doses of 45% to 70% and in effective dose of 46% to 66% compared to the dose in a CBCT scan and in an interventional procedure without the ROI attenuator. This work provides evidence of a substantial reduction of organ and effective doses when using an ROI attenuator during CBCT and fluoroscopic procedures.

  12. Immunogenicity of a Live Attenuated Chimeric Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine as a Booster Dose After Primary Vaccination With Live Attenuated SA14-14-2 Vaccine: A Phase IV Study in Thai Children.

    PubMed

    Sricharoenchai, Sirintip; Lapphra, Keswadee; Chuenkitmongkol, Sunate; Phongsamart, Wanatpreeya; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Wittawatmongkol, Orasri; Rungmaitree, Supattra; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2017-02-01

    This single-group study investigated the immunogenicity and safety of a booster dose of the recently licensed live attenuated chimeric Japanese encephalitis vaccine in 50 healthy children (1-5 years old) who were primed with the live attenuated SA14-14-2 vaccine. A strong anamnestic response was induced 28 days postbooster: geometric mean titer, 9144 (95% confidence interval: 7365-11353); and seroprotection rate, 49 of 49 (100%) children.

  13. Coadministration of puerarin (low dose) and zinc attenuates bone loss and suppresses bone marrow adiposity in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Li, Wei; Ge, Xiyuan; Jia, Shengnan; Li, Binbin

    2016-12-01

    Puerarin is a phytoestrogen that shows osteogenic effects. Meanwhile, zinc stimulates bone formation and inhibits bone resorption. The study aims to investigate the effects of coadministration of puerarin (low dose) and zinc on bone formation in ovariectomized rats. Co-administration or use alone of puerarin (low dose) and/or zinc were gavaged in OVX rats. The estrogen-like effects were detected by the uterus weight, the histologic observation and the IGF-1 protein expression. The osteogenic effects were determined by bone histomorphometric and mechanical parameters, osteogenic and adipogenic blood markers, and so on. The results showed that oral administration of puerarin (low dose) plus zinc didn't significantly increase uterus weight. The glandular epithelial of endometrium had no proliferation and no protein expression of IGF-1. Moreover, co-administration attenuated bone loss and biomechanical decrease more than single use of puerarin or zinc (p<0.05). Next, combined administration of puerarin and zinc promoted the serological level of osteocalcin, bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) proliferation, and the expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and suppressed the serological level of adiponectin and adiposity in bone marrow (BM). In conclusion, co-administrated puerarin (low dose) and zinc can partially reverse OVX-induced bone loss and suppress the adiposity of BM in rats, which shed light on the potential use of puerarin and zinc in the treatment of osteoporosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 21 CFR 522.1465 - Naltrexone hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... this chapter. (c) Conditions of use in elk and moose—(1) Amount. 100 milligrams of naltrexone...) Indications for use. As an antagonist to carfentanil citrate immobilization in free-ranging or confined...

  15. 21 CFR 522.1465 - Naltrexone hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... this chapter. (c) Conditions of use in elk and moose—(1) Amount. 100 milligrams of naltrexone...) Indications for use. As an antagonist to carfentanil citrate immobilization in free-ranging or confined...

  16. 21 CFR 522.1465 - Naltrexone hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... this chapter. (c) Conditions of use in elk and moose—(1) Amount. 100 milligrams of naltrexone...) Indications for use. As an antagonist to carfentanil citrate immobilization in free-ranging or confined...

  17. 21 CFR 522.1465 - Naltrexone hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... this chapter. (c) Conditions of use in elk and moose—(1) Amount. 100 milligrams of naltrexone...) Indications for use. As an antagonist to carfentanil citrate immobilization in free-ranging or confined...

  18. Naltrexone implant treatment for buprenorphine dependence--Mauritian case series.

    PubMed

    Jhugroo, Anil; Ellayah, Darmen; Norman, Amanda; Hulse, Gary

    2014-08-01

    Although substitution therapy with opiate agonist treatments such as methadone and buprenorphine has resulted in a reduction of illicit drug use related harm, such treatment has also resulted in severe problems in some countries where opioid-dependent individuals now inject illicitly sold buprenorphine or buprenorphine-naloxone instead of heroin. There is no approved treatment for buprenorphine dependence. Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist which has been used for the treatment of both alcohol and opioid dependencies. Although both buprenorphine and heroin resemble each other concerning their effects, buprenorphine has a higher affinity to opioid receptors than heroin. Therefore, it is not known if naltrexone can block the psychoactive effects of buprenorphine as it does for heroin. This paper presents observational case series data on the use of a sustained-release naltrexone implant for the treatment of buprenorphine dependence. To the authors' knowledge this is the first use of sustained-release naltrexone for this indication.

  19. Vagotomy attenuates the effect of lipopolysaccharide on body temperature of rats in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Azab, A N; Kaplanski, J

    2001-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that vagal afferents play a major role in peripheral-neural communication. This study was undertaken to determine whether a dose-dependent effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on vagotomy-induced febrile unresponsiveness exists, and to examine the effect of vagotomy on LPS-induced increase in hypothalamic prostaglandin E2 (HT PGE2) production. Vagotomized and sham-operated rats were subjected to two experimental protocols. In the first, vagotomized and sham-operated rats were injected intraperitoneally with different doses of LPS (200, 500 and 1000 microg/kg) in order to examine the dose-dependent effect of LPS on the biphasic febrile response of the rats. In the second protocol, vagotomized and sham-operated rats were injected intraperitoneally with LPS (500 microg/kg). Two hours post injection, body temperature was measured, the rats were decapitated and blood was collected. Simultaneously, the rats' hypothalami were excised and incubated for 1 h in a Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Next, HT PGE2 was determined by radioimmunoassay. Vagotomy-induced gastric enlargement was then measured to examine the correlation between the magnitude of the enlargement and that of the vagotomy-related febrile unresponsiveness. It was found that vagotomized-induced febrile unresponsiveness is a dose-dependent effect. Subdiaphragmatic resection of the vagus prevented the biphasic febrile response caused by the lowest dose (200 microg/kg) of LPS, whereas the highest dose of LPS (1000 microg/kg) caused a similar biphasic febrile response in both vagotomized and sham-operated rats. Indeed, vagotomy attenuates LPS-induced increase in HT PGE2, and blocks the hypothermic phase of the febrile response. On the other hand, no correlation between gastric enlargement and febrile unresponsiveness was found. The results of the present study may cast further light on the crucial role of the vagus nerve as a peripheral-neural pathway in the mediation of the

  20. Dose reduction technique using a combination of a region of interest (ROI) material x-ray attenuator and spatially different temporal filtering for fluoroscopic interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Panse, A.; Jain, A.; Sharma, P.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A. H.; Cartwright, A. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for achieving patient dose savings during image-guided neurovascular interventions, involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and a spatially different ROI temporal filtering technique. The part of the image under the attenuator is reduced in dose but noisy and less bright due to fewer x-ray quanta reaching the detector, as compared to the non-attenuating (or less attenuating) region. First the brightness is equalized throughout the image by post processing and then a temporal filter with higher weights is applied to the high attenuating region to reduce the noise, at the cost of increased lag; however, in the regions where less attenuation is present, a lower temporal weight is needed and is applied to preserve temporal resolution. A simulation of the technique is first presented on an actual image sequence obtained from an endovascular image guided interventional (EIGI) procedure. Then the actual implementation of the technique with a physical ROI attenuator is presented. Quantitative analysis including noise analysis and integral dose calculations are presented to validate the proposed technique.

  1. Dose Reduction Technique Using a Combination of a Region of Interest (ROI) Material X-Ray Attenuator and Spatially Different Temporal Filtering for Fluoroscopic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Vasan, S.N Swetadri; Panse, A.; Jain, A.; Sharma, P.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A.H.; Cartwright, A.N.; Bednarek, D.R; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for achieving patient dose savings during image-guided neurovascular interventions, involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and a spatially different ROI temporal filtering technique. The part of the image under the attenuator is reduced in dose but noisy and less bright due to fewer x-ray quanta reaching the detector, as compared to the non-attenuating (or less attenuating) region. First the brightness is equalized throughout the image by post processing and then a temporal filter with higher weights is applied to the high attenuating region to reduce the noise, at the cost of increased lag; however, in the regions where less attenuation is present, a lower temporal weight is needed and is applied to preserve temporal resolution. A simulation of the technique is first presented on an actual image sequence obtained from an endovascular image guided interventional (EIGI) procedure. Then the actual implementation of the technique with a physical ROI attenuator is presented. Quantitative analysis including noise analysis and integral dose calculations are presented to validate the proposed technique. PMID:24027617

  2. Dose Reduction Technique Using a Combination of a Region of Interest (ROI) Material X-Ray Attenuator and Spatially Different Temporal Filtering for Fluoroscopic Interventions.

    PubMed

    Vasan, S N Swetadri; Panse, A; Jain, A; Sharma, P; Ionita, Ciprian N; Titus, A H; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-02-23

    We demonstrate a novel approach for achieving patient dose savings during image-guided neurovascular interventions, involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and a spatially different ROI temporal filtering technique. The part of the image under the attenuator is reduced in dose but noisy and less bright due to fewer x-ray quanta reaching the detector, as compared to the non-attenuating (or less attenuating) region. First the brightness is equalized throughout the image by post processing and then a temporal filter with higher weights is applied to the high attenuating region to reduce the noise, at the cost of increased lag; however, in the regions where less attenuation is present, a lower temporal weight is needed and is applied to preserve temporal resolution. A simulation of the technique is first presented on an actual image sequence obtained from an endovascular image guided interventional (EIGI) procedure. Then the actual implementation of the technique with a physical ROI attenuator is presented. Quantitative analysis including noise analysis and integral dose calculations are presented to validate the proposed technique.

  3. Anhedonia to music and mu-opioids: Evidence from the administration of naltrexone

    PubMed Central

    Mallik, Adiel; Chanda, Mona Lisa; Levitin, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Music’s universality and its ability to deeply affect emotions suggest an evolutionary origin. Previous investigators have found that naltrexone (NTX), a μ-opioid antagonist, may induce reversible anhedonia, attenuating both positive and negative emotions. The neurochemical basis of musical experience is not well-understood, and the NTX-induced anhedonia hypothesis has not been tested with music. Accordingly, we administered NTX or placebo on two different days in a double-blind crossover study, and assessed participants’ responses to music using both psychophysiological (objective) and behavioral (subjective) measures. We found that both positive and negative emotions were attenuated. We conclude that endogenous opioids are critical to experiencing both positive and negative emotions in music, and that music uses the same reward pathways as food, drug and sexual pleasure. Our findings add to the growing body of evidence for the evolutionary biological substrates of music. PMID:28176798

  4. Anhedonia to music and mu-opioids: Evidence from the administration of naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Adiel; Chanda, Mona Lisa; Levitin, Daniel J

    2017-02-08

    Music's universality and its ability to deeply affect emotions suggest an evolutionary origin. Previous investigators have found that naltrexone (NTX), a μ-opioid antagonist, may induce reversible anhedonia, attenuating both positive and negative emotions. The neurochemical basis of musical experience is not well-understood, and the NTX-induced anhedonia hypothesis has not been tested with music. Accordingly, we administered NTX or placebo on two different days in a double-blind crossover study, and assessed participants' responses to music using both psychophysiological (objective) and behavioral (subjective) measures. We found that both positive and negative emotions were attenuated. We conclude that endogenous opioids are critical to experiencing both positive and negative emotions in music, and that music uses the same reward pathways as food, drug and sexual pleasure. Our findings add to the growing body of evidence for the evolutionary biological substrates of music.

  5. Putting the brakes on the "drive to eat": Pilot effects of naltrexone and reward based eating on food cravings among obese women

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Ashley E.; Laraia, Barbara; Daubenmier, Jennifer; Hecht, Frederick M.; Lustig, Robert H.; Puterman, Eli; Adler, Nancy; Dallman, Mary; Kiernan, Michaela; Gearhardt, Ashley N.; Epel, Elissa S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Obese individuals vary in their experience of food cravings and tendency to engage in reward-driven eating, both of which can be modulated by the neural reward system rather than physiological hunger. We examined two predictions in a sample of obese women: (1) whether opioidergic blockade reduced food-craving intensity, and (2) whether opioidergic blockade reduced an association between food-craving intensity and reward-driven eating, which is a trait-like index of three factors (lack of control over eating, lack of satiation, preoccupation with food). Methods Forty-four obese, pre-menopausal women completed the Reward-based Eating Drive (RED) scale at study start and daily food-craving intensity on 5 days on which they ingested either a pill-placebo (2 days), a 25mg naltrexone dose (1 day), or a standard 50mg naltrexone dose (2 days). Results Craving intensity was similar under naltrexone and placebo doses. The association between food-craving intensity and reward-driven eating significantly differed between placebo and 50mg naltrexone doses. Reward-driven eating and craving intensity were significantly positively associated under both placebo doses. As predicted, opioidergic blockade (for both doses 25mg and 50mg naltrexone) reduced this positive association between reward-driven eating and craving intensity to non-significance. Conclusions Opioidergic blockade did not reduce craving intensity; however, blockade reduced an association between trait-like reward-driven eating and daily food-craving intensity, and may help identify an important endophenotype within obesity. PMID:26164674

  6. Naltrexone ER/Bupropion ER: A Review in Obesity Management.

    PubMed

    Greig, Sarah L; Keating, Gillian M

    2015-07-01

    Oral naltrexone extended-release/bupropion extended-release (naltrexone ER/bupropion ER; Contrave(®), Mysimba(™)) is available as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity in adults with an initial body mass index (BMI) of ≥ 30 kg/m(2) (i.e. obese) or a BMI of ≥ 27 kg/m(2) (i.e. overweight) in the presence of at least one bodyweight-related comorbidity, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension or dyslipidaemia. In 56-week phase III trials in these patient populations, oral naltrexone ER/bupropion ER 32/360 mg/day was significantly more effective than placebo with regard to percentage bodyweight reductions from baseline and the proportion of patients who achieved bodyweight reductions of ≥ 5 and ≥ 10%. Significantly greater improvements in several cardiometabolic risk factors were also observed with naltrexone ER/bupropion ER versus placebo, as well as greater improvements in glycated haemoglobin levels in obese or overweight adults with type 2 diabetes. Naltrexone ER/bupropion ER was generally well tolerated in phase III trials, with nausea being the most common adverse event. Thus, naltrexone ER/bupropion ER 32/360 mg/day as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity, is an effective and well tolerated option for chronic bodyweight management in obese adults or overweight adults with at least one bodyweight-related comorbidity.

  7. Naltrexone ameliorates functional network abnormalities in alcohol-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Morris, Laurel S; Baek, Kwangyeol; Tait, Roger; Elliott, Rebecca; Ersche, Karen D; Flechais, Remy; McGonigle, John; Murphy, Anna; Nestor, Liam J; Orban, Csaba; Passetti, Filippo; Paterson, Louise M; Rabiner, Ilan; Reed, Laurence; Smith, Dana; Suckling, John; Taylor, Eleanor M; Bullmore, Edward T; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Deakin, Bill; Nutt, David J; Sahakian, Barbara J; Robbins, Trevor W; Voon, Valerie

    2017-02-28

    Naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist, is commonly used as a relapse prevention medication in alcohol and opiate addiction, but its efficacy and the mechanisms underpinning its clinical usefulness are not well characterized. In the current study, we examined the effects of 50-mg naltrexone compared with placebo on neural network changes associated with substance dependence in 21 alcohol and 36 poly-drug-dependent individuals compared with 36 healthy volunteers. Graph theoretic and network-based statistical analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data revealed that alcohol-dependent subjects had reduced functional connectivity of a dispersed network compared with both poly-drug-dependent and healthy subjects. Higher local efficiency was observed in both patient groups, indicating clustered and segregated network topology and information processing. Naltrexone normalized heightened local efficiency of the neural network in alcohol-dependent individuals, to the same levels as healthy volunteers. Naltrexone failed to have an effect on the local efficiency in abstinent poly-substance-dependent individuals. Across groups, local efficiency was associated with substance, but no alcohol exposure implicating local efficiency as a potential premorbid risk factor in alcohol use disorders that can be ameliorated by naltrexone. These findings suggest one possible mechanism for the clinical effects of naltrexone, namely, the amelioration of disrupted network topology.

  8. Chrysin, a flavonoid attenuates histological changes of hyperammonemic rats: A dose dependent study.

    PubMed

    Renuka, Mani; Vijayakumar, Natesan; Ramakrishnan, Arumugam

    2016-08-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) is a major component of some traditional medicinal herbs present in honey, propolis and many plant extracts. The study was aimed to illuminate the effect of chrysin in the pathogenesis of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) induced hyperammonemic rat model in a dose dependent manner. Rats were injected with NH4Cl (100mg/kg b.w.) by intraperitonially (i.p) thrice a week for 8 consecutive weeks for the induction of experimental hyperammonemia. Hyperammonemic rats were treated with chrysin by orally at a dose of 25, 50 & 100mg/kg b.w. respectively. Protective effect of chrysin against hyperammonemia was evaluated by performing biochemical estimations and morphopathological investigations of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of liver, brain and kidney tissues. Supplementation of chrysin reinstated the levels of blood ammonia, plasma urea, uric acid, total bilirubin, creatinine, brain glutamate, glutamine, nitric oxide (NO) and the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, and liver marker enzymes. On the other hand increased level of plasma urea was observed in chrysin treated rats as compared with hyperammonemic rats. Chrysin administration caused distortion of hepatic, brain and kidney architecture as shown by histological examination. Chrysin at a dose (100mg/kg b.w.) showed an utmost decline in the level of all biochemical estimations. Both biochemical and morphological studies clearly revealed that chrysin protects against cell injury induced by ammonia intoxication in a dose-response manner with respect to endogenous antioxidants and hypoammonemic effects.

  9. Evaluation of the dependence of the exposure dose on the attenuation correction in brain PET/CT scans using 18F-FDG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eun-Jin; Jeong, Moon-Taeg; Jang, Seong-Joo; Choi, Nam-Gil; Han, Jae-Bok; Yang, Nam-Hee; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Lee, Yun-Jong; Ryu, Young-Hwan; Choi, Sung-Hyun; Seong, Kyeong-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether scanning could be performed with minimum dose and minimum exposure to the patient after an attenuation correction. A Hoffman 3D Brain Phantom was used in BIO_40 and D_690 PET/CT scanners, and the CT dose for the equipment was classified as a low dose (minimum dose), medium dose (general dose for scanning) and high dose (dose with use of contrast medium) before obtaining the image at a fixed kilo-voltage-peak (kVp) and milliampere (mA) that were adjusted gradually in 17-20 stages. A PET image was then obtained to perform an attenuation correction based on an attenuation map before analyzing the dose difference. Depending on tube current in the range of 33-190 milliampere-second (mAs) when BIO_40 was used, a significant difference in the effective dose was observed between the minimum and the maximum mAs (p < 0.05). According to a Scheffe post-hoc test, the ratio of the minimum to the maximum of the effective dose was increased by approximately 5.26-fold. Depending on the change in the tube current in the range of 10-200 mA when D_690 was used, a significant difference in the effective dose was observed between the minimum and the maximum of mA (p < 0.05). The Scheffe posthoc test revealed a 20.5-fold difference. In conclusion, because effective exposure dose increases with increasing operating current, it is possible to reduce the exposure limit in a brain scan can be reduced if the CT dose can be minimized for a transmission scan.

  10. THC-methadone and THC-naltrexone interactions on discrimination, antinociception, and locomotion in rats.

    PubMed

    Wakley, Alexa A; Craft, Rebecca M

    2011-09-01

    This study examined cannabinoid-opioid interactions within the same subjects on measures of discrimination, antinociception, horizontal locomotion, and catalepsy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, 3 mg/kg) from vehicle. THC alone (0.32-10 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased THC-appropriate lever responding and decreased response rate. THC alone also produced paw pressure antinociception and decreased locomotor activity, but did not produce catalepsy. Methadone (0.32-5.6 mg/kg) and naltrexone (0.32-3.2 mg/kg) alone produced low THC-appropriate lever responding up to doses that decreased response rate. When combined with THC, methadone (1.0 mg/kg) flattened the THC discrimination curve, but did not affect antinociceptive or motoric effects of THC. Naltrexone did not alter any effects of THC. In rats that were not trained to discriminate THC from vehicle, 1.0 mg/kg methadone did enhance THC antinociception. These results suggest that μ-opioid receptor agonists can disrupt the discriminative stimulus effects of cannabinoids while not significantly altering their antinociceptive or motoric effects, in chronically drug-exposed subjects. Further research is required to determine whether opioid enhancement of cannabinoid antinociception is limited to acute exposure, or simply requires higher doses in chronically drug-exposed subjects.

  11. Naltrexone but Not Ketanserin Antagonizes the Subjective, Cardiovascular, and Neuroendocrine Effects of Salvinorin-A in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Maqueda, Ana Elda; Valle, Marta; Addy, Peter H.; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Puntes, Montserrat; Coimbra, Jimena; Ballester, Maria Rosa; Garrido, Maite; González, Mireia; Claramunt, Judit; Barker, Steven; Lomnicka, Izabela; Waguespack, Marian; Johnson, Matthew W.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Salvinorin-A is a terpene found in the leaves of the plant Salvia divinorum. When administered to humans, salvinorin-A induces an intense but short-lasting modified state of awareness, sharing features with those induced by the classical serotonin-2A receptor agonist psychedelics. However, unlike substances such as psilocybin or mescaline, salvinorin-A shows agonist activity at the kappa-opioid receptor rather than at the serotonin-2A receptor. Here, we assessed the involvement of kappa-opioid receptor and serotonin-2A agonism in the subjective, cardiovascular, and neuroendocrine effects of salvinorin-A in humans. Methods: We conducted a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study with 2 groups of 12 healthy volunteers with experience with psychedelic drugs. There were 4 experimental sessions. In group 1, participants received the following treatment combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+salvinorin-A, naltrexone+placebo, and naltrexone+salvinorin-A. Naltrexone, a nonspecific opioid receptor antagonist, was administered at a dose of 50mg orally. In group 2, participants received the treatment combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+salvinorin-A, ketanserin+placebo, and ketanserin+salvinorin-A. Ketanserin, a selective serotonin-2A antagonist, was administered at a dose of 40mg orally. Results: Inhalation of 1mg of vaporized salvinorin-A led to maximum plasma concentrations at 1 and 2 minutes after dosing. When administered alone, salvinorin-A severely reduced external sensory perception and induced intense visual and auditory modifications, increased systolic blood pressure, and cortisol and prolactin release. These effects were effectively blocked by naltrexone, but not by ketanserin. Conclusions: Results support kappa opioid receptor agonism as the mechanism of action underlying the subjective and physiological effects of salvinorin-A in humans and rule out the involvement of a serotonin-2A-mediated mechanism. PMID:26874330

  12. Evaluation of dosimetry and image of very low-dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric positron emission tomography/computed tomography: phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, Y. K.; Park, H. H.; Lee, C. H.; Kim, H. S.; Lyu, K. Y.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, phantom was used to evaluate attenuation correction computed tomography (CT) dose and image in case of pediatric positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan. Three PET/CT scanners were used along with acryl phantom in the size for infant and ion-chamber dosimeter. The CT image acquisition conditions were changed from 10 to 20, 40, 80, 100 and 160 mA and from 80 to 100, 120 and 140 kVp, which aimed at evaluating penetrate dose and computed tomography dose indexvolume (CTDIvol) value. And NEMA PET Phantom™ was used to obtain PET image under the same CT conditions in order to evaluate each attenuation-corrected PET image based on standard uptake value (SUV) value and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In general, the penetrate dose was reduced by around 92% under the minimum CT conditions (80 kVp and 10 mA) with the decrease in CTDIvol value by around 88%, compared with the pediatric abdomen CT conditions (100 kVp and 100 mA). The PET image with its attenuation corrected according to each CT condition showed no change in SUV value and no influence on the SNR. In conclusion, if the minimum dose CT that is properly applied to body of pediatric patient is corrected for attenuation to ensure that the effective dose is reduced by around 90% or more compared with that for adult patient, this will be useful to reduce radiation exposure level.

  13. [Treatment of a serious autistic disorder in a child with Naltrexone in an oral suspension form].

    PubMed

    Desjardins, S; Doyen, C; Contejean, Y; Kaye, K; Paubel, P

    2009-04-01

    that sometimes includes the administration of psychotropic medication. One of these children presented with a severe autistic disorder according to the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS). Considering ICD-10 criteria, he benefited from a multidisciplinary program, associating cognitive psychotherapy, psychomotor rehabilitation, speech therapy and educational intervention. However, persistent sleep disorder and motor instability led to successive prescriptions of several different psychotropic drugs. Initial treatment by thioridazine (10mg per day) followed by propericiazine (2.5mg per day) improved sleep, but was not efficient in reducing self-mutilating behaviour. A new treatment by risperidone (from 0.5mg to 1.5mg per day) was therefore chosen; however it lost its efficacy after five months. Finally, an anxiolytic (cyamemazine) and a thymoregulator (sodium valproate) were successively tried without yielding any clinical improvement. Owing to the persistence of communication difficulties, major instability, self-mutilating behaviour and heteroaggressiveness, treatment with naltrexone was subsequently chosen with parental consent. In France, naltrexone hydrochloride is only available in tablet form (Nalorex 50mg and Revia 50mg), which is not adapted to children at the efficient dose. Consequently, an oral suspension form marketed in Spain (Antaxone 50mg) was imported, having obtained the Afssaps' (the French drug administration) authorisation for its temporary use. The Connors and Nisonger scales were used as outcome measures of behavioural symptom change. The Conners scale is used to assess attention deficit and hyperactivity, whereas the Nisonger scale analyses social skills and behaviour disorders in children and adolescents with mental retardation. The onset of treatment, at a dose of 1mg/kg/day, led to a transitory increase in negative behaviour. However, a dose of 0.75mg/kg per day subsequently led to significant improvements, as shown by outcome measurements

  14. Challenges to antagonist blockade during sustained-release naltrexone treatment.

    PubMed

    Kunøe, Nikolaj; Lobmaier, Philipp; Vederhus, John Kåre; Hjerkinn, Bjørg; Gossop, Michael; Hegstad, Solfrid; Kristensen, Øistein; Waal, Helge

    2010-09-01

    Naltrexone is a competitive opioid antagonist that effectively blocks the action of heroin and other opioid agonists. Sustained-release naltrexone formulations are now available that provide long-acting opioid blockade. This study investigates the use of heroin and other opioids among opioid-dependent patients receiving treatment with long-acting naltrexone implants, their subjective experience of drug 'high' after opioid use, and factors associated with opioid use. Participants (n = 60) were opioid-dependent patients receiving treatment with naltrexone implants. Outcome data on substance use, drug 'high', depression and criminal activity were collected over a 6-month period. Blood samples were taken to monitor naltrexone plasma levels, and hair samples to verify self-reported opioid use. More than half [n = 34 or 56%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 44-68%)] the patients challenged the blockade with illicit opioids during the 6-month treatment period; 44% (n = 26; 95% CI 32-56%) were abstinent from opioids. Mean opioid use was reduced from 18 [standard deviation (SD)13] days during the month preceding treatment to 6 days (SD 11) after 6 months. Of the respondents questioned on opioid 'high' (n = 31), nine patients (30%; 95% CI 16-47%) reported partial drug 'high' following illicit opioid use, and three (12%; 95% CI 3-26%) reported full 'high'. Opioid use was associated with use of non-opioid drugs and criminal behaviour. Challenging naltrexone blockade with heroin on at least one occasion is common among sustained-release naltrexone patients, but only a minority of patients use opioids regularly. Challenges represent a warning sign for poor outcomes and often occur in the context of polydrug use and social adjustment problems.

  15. Oleoylethanolamide dose-dependently attenuates cocaine-induced behaviours through a PPARα receptor-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, Ainhoa; Blanco, Eduardo; Luque-Rojas, María Jesús; Suárez, Juan; Palomino, Ana; Vida, Margarita; Araos, Pedro; Bermúdez-Silva, Francisco J; Fernández-Espejo, Emilio; Spanagel, Rainer; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is an acylethanolamide that acts as an agonist of nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) to exert their biological functions, which include the regulation of appetite and metabolism. Increasing evidence also suggests that OEA may participate in the control of reward-related behaviours. However, direct experimental evidence for the role of the OEA-PPARα receptor interaction in drug-mediated behaviours, such as cocaine-induced behavioural phenotypes, is lacking. The present study explored the role of OEA and its receptor PPARα on the psychomotor and rewarding responsiveness to cocaine using behavioural tests indicative of core components of addiction. We found that acute administration of OEA (1, 5 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced spontaneous locomotor activity and attenuated psychomotor activation induced by cocaine (20 mg/kg) in C57Bl/6 mice. However, PPARα receptor knockout mice showed normal sensitization, although OEA was capable of reducing behavioural sensitization with fewer efficacies. Furthermore, conditioned place preference and reinstatement to cocaine were intact in these mice. Our results indicate that PPARα receptor does not play a critical, if any, role in mediating short- and long-term psychomotor and rewarding responsiveness to cocaine. However, further research is needed for the identification of the targets of OEA for its inhibitory action on cocaine-mediated responses. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  16. Long-Term Effects of Naltrexone on Self-Injurious Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandman, Curt A.; Hetrick, William; Taylor, Derek V.; Marion, Sarah D.; Touchette, Paul; Barron, Jennifer L.; Martinezzi, Vernon; Steinberg, Russell M.; Crinella, Francis M.

    2000-01-01

    A study examined the effects of naltrexone after acute treatment and the long-term effects of naltrexone on the self-injurious behavior (SIB) of 15 individuals with mental retardation. Results found that a subgroup of patients decreased SIB for a year without treatment after acute exposure to naltrexone. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  17. Comparing live attenuated and inactivated hepatitis A vaccines: an immunogenicity study after one single dose.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Chen, Yuansheng; Wang, Fuzhen; Gong, Xiaohong; Wu, Zhenhua; Miao, Ning; Zhang, Xiaoshu; Li, Hui; Chen, Chao; Hou, Xiang; Cui, Fuqiang; Wang, Huaqing

    2011-11-08

    While three types of hepatitis A vaccines are available in China, little data are available to compare them in terms of early antibody response. We conducted a trial to compare antibody response at 7, 14 and 28 days. We randomized primary school children in Gansu and Jilin provinces into four groups to receive either (1) Chinese live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine (H2 strain), (2) domestic inactivated hepatitis A vaccine (Healive(®)), (3) imported inactivated hepatitis A vaccine (Havrix(®)) or (4) hepatitis B vaccine (Control group). We compared groups at 7, 14 and 28 days in terms of proportion of sero-conversions (≥10 mUI/ml), and Geometric Mean Concentration (GMC) of antibodies measured with a Microparticle Enzyme Immunoassay (MEIA). We compared rates of self-reported adverse events following immunization (AEFI) in the first three days. 204 children received the H2 vaccine, 208 received Healive(®), 214 received Havrix(®), and 215 received hepatitis B vaccine (no differences across groups in terms of age, sex, weight and height). At seven days, sero-conversion proportions were 25%, 35%, 27% and 2% (p<0.0001) with GMC of 6 mIU/ml, 8 mIU/ml, 6 mIU/ml and 3 mIU/ml, respectively for the four groups. At 28 days, sero-conversion proportions were 98%, 100%, 93% and 3% (p<0.0001) with GMC of 47 mIU/ml, 71 mIU/ml, 67 mIU/ml and 3 mIU/ml, respectively. AEFI were benign and did not differ across groups (p=0.94). While our study was not able to identify differences between Havrix(®), Healive(®) and H2 vaccine in terms of sero-conversion proportion and GMC between seven and 28 days, further studies should evaluate non-inferiority or equivalence of the Chinese vaccines, particularly with respect to the GMC concentration for the H2 vaccine since it could affect long-term protection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Naltrexone treatment reverses astrocyte atrophy and immune dysfunction in self-harming macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kim M.; Chiu, Kevin B.; Didier, Peter J.; Baker, Kate C.; MacLean, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    The role of glia in the development and treatment of behavioral abnormalities is understudied. Recent reports have observed glial activation in several disorders, including depression, autism spectrum disorders and self-injurious behaviors (SIB). In the current study, we examined SIB in the physiologically and anatomically relevant nonhuman primate (NHP) model. At the Tulane National Primate Research Center (TNPRC), approximately 5% of singly housed macaques develop symptoms of SIB. We have previously demonstrated that naltrexone hydrochloride can be effective in reducing SIB. We have also demonstrated that the astrocytes of animals with SIB are distinctly atrophic and display heightened innate immune activation compared with control animals. We have added a third group of animals (five macaques identified with SIB and treated with oral naltrexone at a dose of 3.2 mg/kg) to the previous cohort (six macaques with a history of SIB but not treated, and nine animals with no history of SIB) for this study. Gray and white matter astrocytes from frontal cortical tissue were examined following necropsy. Innate immune activation of astrocytes, which was increased in SIB animals, was markedly decreased in animals receiving naltrexone, as was atrophy of both grey and white matter astrocytes. This was concomitant with improved behavioral correlates. Preventing astrocyte activation in select areas of the brain to reduce injurious behavior is an innovative concept with implications for mental health studies. Differences in multiple areas of primate brain would help determine how self-injurious behavior develops. These studies suggest a stronger role for astrocytes in the cellular events associated with self-injurious behaviors. PMID:26191654

  19. Naltrexone treatment reverses astrocyte atrophy and immune dysfunction in self-harming macaques.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kim M; Chiu, Kevin B; Didier, Peter J; Baker, Kate C; MacLean, Andrew G

    2015-11-01

    The role of glia in the development and treatment of behavioral abnormalities is understudied. Recent reports have observed glial activation in several disorders, including depression, autism spectrum disorders and self-injurious behaviors (SIB). In the current study, we examined SIB in the physiologically and anatomically relevant nonhuman primate (NHP) model. At the Tulane National Primate Research Center (TNPRC), approximately 5% of singly housed macaques develop symptoms of SIB. We have previously demonstrated that naltrexone hydrochloride can be effective in reducing SIB. We have also demonstrated that the astrocytes of animals with SIB are distinctly atrophic and display heightened innate immune activation compared with control animals. We have added a third group of animals (five macaques identified with SIB and treated with oral naltrexone at a dose of 3.2mg/kg) to the previous cohort (six macaques with a history of SIB but not treated, and nine animals with no history of SIB) for this study. Gray and white matter astrocytes from frontal cortical tissue were examined following necropsy. Innate immune activation of astrocytes, which was increased in SIB animals, was markedly decreased in animals receiving naltrexone, as was atrophy of both grey and white matter astrocytes. This was concomitant with improved behavioral correlates. Preventing astrocyte activation in select areas of the brain to reduce injurious behavior is an innovative concept with implications for mental health studies. Differences in multiple areas of primate brain would help determine how self-injurious behavior develops. These studies suggest a stronger role for astrocytes in the cellular events associated with self-injurious behaviors.

  20. Naltrexone effect on pulsatile GnRH therapy for ovulation induction in polycystic ovary syndrome: a pilot prospective study.

    PubMed

    Fulghesu, A M; Ciampelli, M; Belosi, C; Apa, R; Guido, M; Caruso, A; Mancuso, S; Lanzone, A

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the opioid influence on LH pulsatility in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of a long-term opioid antagonist (naltrexone) treatment in improving the pulsatile GnRH therapy which is successful in this syndrome. Ten obese women affected by PCOS participated in the study. Patients were hospitalized during the early follicular phase and underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with 75 g of glucose and a pulse pattern study followed by a GnRH test (100 pg i.v.). All patients were then treated for ovulation induction with pulsatile administration of GnRH (5 microg/bolus every 90 min). Since pregnancies did not occurr in any patient, after spontaneous or progestin-induced menstrual cycles, all patients received naltrexone at a dose of 50 mg/day orally for 8 weeks and during treatment repeated the basal protocol study and the ovulation induction cycle with the same modalities. The naltrexone treatment significantly reduced the insulin response to OGTT and the LH response to GnRH bolus, whereas it did not affect the FSH and LH pulsatility patterns. Concerning the ovulation induction by pulsatile GnRH, naltrexone treatment was able to improve, although not significantly, the ovulation rate (60% pre-treatment vs 90% post-treatment). Furthermore, the maximum diameter of the dominant follicle and the pre-ovulatory estradiol concentration were higher after long-term opioid blockade (follicular diameter 19.5+/-1.76 mm pre-treatment vs 21.6+/-2.19 mm post-treatment, p<0.001; maximum estradiol level 728.7+/-288.5 pmol/l pre-treatment vs 986.4+/-382.1 pmol/l post-treatment, p<0.05). During the naltrexone-pulsatile GnRH co-treatment two pregnancies occurred. In conclusion, our data show that naltrexone-pulsatile GnRH co-treatment is able to improve the ovarian responsiveness to ovulation induction in obese PCOS patients when compared to pulsatile GnRH alone. This action seems to be related to

  1. Taenia crassiceps infection attenuates multiple low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett; Rivera-Montoya, Irma; Cárdenas-Arreola, Roberto; Morán, Liborio; Terrazas, Luis I

    2010-01-01

    Taenia crassiceps, like other helminths, can exert regulatory effects on the immune system of its host. This study investigates the effect of chronic T. crassiceps infection on the outcome of Multiple Low Dose Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes (MLDS). Healthy or previously T. crassiceps-infected mice received MLDS and type 1 diabetes (T1D) symptoms were evaluated for 6 weeks following the induction of MLDS. T. crassiceps-infected mice displayed lower blood glucose levels throughout the study. A significantly lower percentage of T. crassiceps-infected mice (40%) developed T1D compared to the uninfected group (100%). Insulitis was remarkably absent in T. crassiceps-infected mice, which had normal pancreatic insulin content, whereas uninfected mice showed a dramatic reduction in pancreatic insulin. Infected mice that received MLDS did not show an increase in their regulatory T cell population, however, they had a greater number of alternatively activated macrophages, higher levels of the cytokine IL-4, and lower levels of TNF-alpha. Therefore, infection with T. crassiceps causes an immunomodulation that modifies the incidence and development of MLDS-induced autoimmune diabetes.

  2. Naltrexone treatment of kleptomania: a case report.

    PubMed

    Çetinay Aydın, Pınar; Belkız Güngör, Buket; Gülseren, Leyla

    2012-01-01

    Kleptomania is an impulse control disorder characterized by a recurrent failure to resist the impulse to steal worthless objects that are not needed for personal use. Very little is known about the etiology, prevalence and treatment. This disorder usually begins during puberty and lasts until late adulthood. In some patients, it may last throughout the person's life. Patients with kleptomania are likely to suffer from comorbid conditions like mood disorders. The patients usually seek treatment for the comorbid psychiatric complaints, rather than the kleptomaniac behavior itself. The literature lacks sufficient knowledge and controlled studies about the treatment of kleptomania. Regarding the treatment of SSRIs, there are case reports and case series, using mood stabilizers, antipsychotics and opioid antagonists. Cognitive behavioral therapy techniques are also used in the treatment of kleptomania. In this study, a female patient is presented with diminishing kleptomaniac symptoms after naltrexone is added to her cognitive behavioral therapy and fluoxetine treatment. She also suffers from the comorbidities of major depressive disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder.

  3. [Economic evaluation on different two-dose-vaccination-strategies related to Measles, Mumps and Rubella Combined Attenuated Live Vaccine].

    PubMed

    He, H Q; Zhang, B; Yan, R; Li, Q; Fu, J; Tang, X W; Zhou, Y; Deng, X; Xie, S Y

    2016-08-10

    To evaluate the economic effect of Measles, Mumps and Rubella Combined Attenuated Live Vaccine (MMR) under different two-dose vaccination programs. A hypothetical birth cohort of 750 000 infants over their lifetime, was followed up from birth through death in Zhejiang province. The current MMR vaccination strategie would include three different ones: 1) Childlern were vaccinated with Measles-Rubella Combined Attenuated Live Vaccine and MMR, respectively at the age of 8 months and 18 months. 2) Children receive MMR at 8 months and 18 months, 3) Strategy 1 plus an additional vaccination of MMR at 4 years of age. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), incremental cost-benefit ratio (ICBR) and incremental net benefit (INB) were applied to calculate the health economic difference for Strategy 2 and Strategy 3 as compared to Strategy 1. Univariate sensitivity analysis was used to assess the robustness of results with main parameters, including the rate of immunization coverage, effectiveness of the vaccines, incidence and burdens of the related diseases, cost of vaccines and the vaccination program itself. ICER, ICBR and INB for Strategy 2 and Strategy 3 appeared as 2 012.51∶1 RMB Yuan per case and 4 238.72∶1 RMB Yuan per case, 1∶3.14 and 1∶1.58, 21 277 800 RMB Yuan and 9 276 500 RMB Yuan, respectively. Only slight changes (<20%) were found under the univariate sensitivity analysis, with varied values on main parameters. Based on the current national immunization program, infants vaccinated with MMR at 8 months of age, generated more health economic effects than the Strategy 3.

  4. Treatment of fetishism with naltrexone: a case report.

    PubMed

    Firoz, K; Nidheesh Sankar, V; Rajmohan, V; Manoj Kumar, G; Raghuram, T M

    2014-04-01

    Fetishism is a paraphilic sexual disorder characterized by recurrent, intense sexually arousing fantasies, sexual urges or behaviors involving the use of nonliving objects. We describe a case of fetishism with comorbid alcohol and cannabis dependence. A 40-year-old man was presented with sexual fantasies and urges toward women's undergarments since the age of 25 years. He had fetish behavior even during prolonged period of abstinence from substance use. Our case remitted from fetishism and cannabis and alcohol use on treatment with naltrexone and maintains remission for the last 11 months. Experience with our patient suggests that naltrexone may be effective to treat fetishism with comorbid substance use. Our case is reported as it is the first reported case of successful use of naltrexone in fetishism comorbid with cannabis and alcohol dependence.

  5. Design of naltrexone-loaded hydrolyzable crosslinked nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wusheng; Akala, Emmanuel O.; Taylor, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    A hydrolyzable crosslinker (N,O-dimethacryloylhydroxylamine (MANHOMA)) was synthesized by a modified method and was characterized using 1H-NMR, FTIR, and melting point determination. Naltrexone-loaded nanoparticles were prepared by copolymerization of poly(ethylene glycol)1000 monomethyl ether mono methacrylate (PEO-MA), methyl methacrylate (MMA) and N,O-dimethacryloylhydroxylamine (MANHOMA) in 0.4% poly(vinyl alcohol) aqueous solution. The nanoparticles were characterized by FTIR, particle size determination and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The TEM photomicrographs of the nanoparticles show a crosslinked core surrounded by a ring formed by the polyethylene glycol tail of PEO-MA. The loading efficiency of the nanoparticles and in vitro drug availability from the nanoparticles were investigated. The naltrexone-loaded hydrolyzable crosslinked nanoparticles were able to sustain the release of naltrexone for different periods of time, depending on the monomer feed composition. PMID:12204561

  6. Argon inhalation attenuates retinal apoptosis after ischemia/reperfusion injury in a time- and dose-dependent manner in rats.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Felix; Schallner, Nils; Coburn, Mark; Loop, Torsten; Lagrèze, Wolf Alexander; Biermann, Julia; Goebel, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Retinal ischemia and reperfusion injuries (IRI) permanently affect neuronal tissue and function by apoptosis and inflammation due to the limited regenerative potential of neurons. Recently, evidence emerged that the noble gas Argon exerts protective properties, while lacking any detrimental or adverse effects. We hypothesized that Argon inhalation after IRI would exert antiapoptotic effects in the retina, thereby protecting retinal ganglion cells (RGC) of the rat's eye. IRI was performed on the left eyes of rats (n = 8) with or without inhaled Argon postconditioning (25, 50 and 75 Vol%) for 1 hour immediately or delayed after ischemia (i.e. 1.5 and 3 hours). Retinal tissue was harvested after 24 hours to analyze mRNA and protein expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3, NF-κB. Densities of fluorogold-prelabeled RGCs were analyzed 7 days after injury in whole-mounts. Histological tissue samples were prepared for immunohistochemistry and blood was analyzed regarding systemic effects of Argon or IRI. Statistics were performed using One-Way ANOVA. IRI induced RGC loss was reduced by Argon 75 Vol% inhalation and was dose-dependently attenuated by lower concentrations, or by delayed Argon inhalation (1504±300 vs. 2761±257; p<0.001). Moreover, Argon inhibited Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA expression significantly (Bax: 1.64±0.30 vs. 0.78±0.29 and Bcl-2: 2.07±0.29 vs. 0.99±0.22; both p<0.01), as well as caspase-3 cleavage (1.91±0.46 vs. 1.05±0.36; p<0.001). Expression of NF-κB was attenuated significantly. Immunohistochemistry revealed an affection of Müller cells and astrocytes. In addition, IRI induced leukocytosis was reduced significantly after Argon inhalation at 75 Vol%. Immediate and delayed Argon postconditioning protects IRI induced apoptotic loss of RGC in a time- and dose-dependent manner, possibly mediated by the inhibition of NF-κB. Further studies need to evaluate Argon's possible role as a therapeutic option.

  7. Argon Inhalation Attenuates Retinal Apoptosis after Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in a Time- and Dose-Dependent Manner in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrich, Felix; Schallner, Nils; Coburn, Mark; Loop, Torsten; Lagrèze, Wolf Alexander; Biermann, Julia; Goebel, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Retinal ischemia and reperfusion injuries (IRI) permanently affect neuronal tissue and function by apoptosis and inflammation due to the limited regenerative potential of neurons. Recently, evidence emerged that the noble gas Argon exerts protective properties, while lacking any detrimental or adverse effects. We hypothesized that Argon inhalation after IRI would exert antiapoptotic effects in the retina, thereby protecting retinal ganglion cells (RGC) of the rat's eye. Methods IRI was performed on the left eyes of rats (n = 8) with or without inhaled Argon postconditioning (25, 50 and 75 Vol%) for 1 hour immediately or delayed after ischemia (i.e. 1.5 and 3 hours). Retinal tissue was harvested after 24 hours to analyze mRNA and protein expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3, NF-κB. Densities of fluorogold-prelabeled RGCs were analyzed 7 days after injury in whole-mounts. Histological tissue samples were prepared for immunohistochemistry and blood was analyzed regarding systemic effects of Argon or IRI. Statistics were performed using One-Way ANOVA. Results IRI induced RGC loss was reduced by Argon 75 Vol% inhalation and was dose-dependently attenuated by lower concentrations, or by delayed Argon inhalation (1504±300 vs. 2761±257; p<0.001). Moreover, Argon inhibited Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA expression significantly (Bax: 1.64±0.30 vs. 0.78±0.29 and Bcl-2: 2.07±0.29 vs. 0.99±0.22; both p<0.01), as well as caspase-3 cleavage (1.91±0.46 vs. 1.05±0.36; p<0.001). Expression of NF-κB was attenuated significantly. Immunohistochemistry revealed an affection of Müller cells and astrocytes. In addition, IRI induced leukocytosis was reduced significantly after Argon inhalation at 75 Vol%. Conclusion Immediate and delayed Argon postconditioning protects IRI induced apoptotic loss of RGC in a time- and dose-dependent manner, possibly mediated by the inhibition of NF-κB. Further studies need to evaluate Argon's possible role as a therapeutic option. PMID

  8. Naltrexone depot formulations for opioid and alcohol dependence: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lobmaier, Philipp P; Kunøe, Nikolaj; Gossop, Michael; Waal, Helge

    2011-12-01

    Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist that blocks the reinforcing effects of opioids and reduces alcohol consumption and craving. It has no abuse potential, mild and transient side effects, and thus appears an ideal pharmacotherapy for opioid dependence. Its effectiveness in alcohol dependence is less evident, but compliance with naltrexone combined with psychosocial support has been repeatedly shown to improve drinking outcomes. Limited compliance with oral naltrexone treatment is a known drawback. Several naltrexone implant and injectable depot formulations are being investigated and provide naltrexone release for at least 1 month. Studies among opioid-dependent patients indicate significant reductions in heroin use, but sample sizes are usually small. In alcohol dependence, two large multicenter trials report alcohol and craving reductions for naltrexone and placebo groups, indicating a significant but moderate effect. The pharmacokinetic profile of the injectable formulation indicates reliable naltrexone release over 1 month at therapeutic levels. Implant formulations releasing naltrexone up to 7 months are reported. Findings on safety and tolerability confirm the generally mild adverse effects described for naltrexone tablets. However, further research on therapeutic levels (i.e., opioid blocking) is warranted. The majority of naltrexone implants lacks approval for regular clinical use and larger longitudinal studies are needed. The available naltrexone depot formulations have the potential to significantly improve medication compliance in opioid and alcohol dependence. In certain circumstances, they may constitute a promising new treatment option. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Naltrexone for treatment of acral lick dermatitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    White, S D

    1990-04-01

    Acral lick dermatitis (lick granuloma) was diagnosed in 11 dogs on the basis of history, physical examination, and histopathologic findings. A predilection for the left forelimb was noticed. All 11 dogs were given the narcotic antagonist naltrexone. Successful treatment (cessation of licking, reepithelialization of lesions) was seen in 7 dogs. All 7 dogs' lesions recurred when naltrexone was stopped, but reepithelialized in 5 dogs when the drug was readministered. Adverse effects (drowsiness, withdrawal from owner) were seen in 1 dog, but resolved within 48 hours of stopping the drug.

  10. Two patients with eating disorders treated by naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Kmoch, Vladimir; Papezova, Hana; Yamamotova, Anna

    2009-01-01

    According to a recent literature review on the opioid mechanism in eating disorders, we found that there is increasing reason to re-examine the treatment potential of naltrexone. The endogenous opioid system belongs to the important modulators of food intake. The eating disorders share many traits with substance dependence models. We present two case histories of time-limited naltrexone therapy to show that, in clinical practice, individualized indication may contribute to short-term improvement and to prediction of a different long-term treatment outcome.

  11. Resistance to change of alcohol self-administration: effects of alcohol-delivery rate on disruption by extinction and naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Shahan, Timothy A

    2007-03-01

    A common finding in resistance to change research with food-maintained operant behavior is that the persistence of behavior depends on the rate of reinforcement delivered in the context in which the behavior occurs. The present experiment evaluated the effects of rate of response-dependent alcohol delivery on the resistance to change of rats' alcohol self-administration in the face of disruption produced by extinction and a range of doses of naltrexone (1.0, 3.0, 10.0 mg/kg, subcutaneous). Rats responded for a 10% alcohol solution in a multiple schedule of reinforcement arranging a higher rate of alcohol delivery (variable interval 15 s) in the presence of one stimulus and a lower rate of alcohol delivery (variable interval 45 s) in the presence of another stimulus. Baseline response rates and resistance to extinction were higher in the presence of the stimulus associated with higher rates of alcohol delivery. This finding is consistent with studies of the resistance to change of food-maintained behavior. The rate of alcohol delivered in the components, however, did not systematically affect resistance to disruption by naltrexone. One interpretation of this finding from the perspective of behavioral momentum theory is that naltrexone may decrease the impact of alcohol-associated stimuli on the persistence of drinking by reducing sensitivity to the relative reinforcement conditions arranged in the presence of different stimuli.

  12. A standard, single dose of inhaled terbutaline attenuates hyperpnea-induced bronchoconstriction and mast cell activation in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, A. J.; Bood, J. R.; Anderson, S. D.; Romer, L. M.; Dahlén, B.; Dahlén, S.-E.

    2016-01-01

    Release of bronchoactive mediators from mast cells during exercise hyperpnea is a key factor in the pathophysiology of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). Our aim was to investigate the effect of a standard, single dose of an inhaled β2-adrenoceptor agonist on mast cell activation in response to dry air hyperpnea in athletes with EIB. Twenty-seven athletes with EIB completed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Terbutaline (0.5 mg) or placebo was inhaled 15 min prior to 8 min of eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea (EVH) with dry air. Pre- and postbronchial challenge, urine samples were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay for 11β-prostaglandin F2α (11β-PGF2α). The maximum fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 14 (12–20)% (median and interquartile range) following placebo was attenuated to 7 (5–9)% with the administration of terbutaline (P < 0.001). EVH caused a significant increase in 11β-PGF2α from 41 (27–57) ng/mmol creatinine at baseline to 58 (43–72) ng/mmol creatinine at its peak post-EVH following placebo (P = 0.002). The rise in 11β-PGF2α was inhibited with administration of terbutaline: 39 (28–44) ng/mmol creatinine at baseline vs. 40 (33–58) ng/mmol creatinine at its peak post-EVH (P = 0.118). These data provide novel in vivo evidence of mast cell stabilization following inhalation of a standard dose of terbutaline prior to bronchial provocation with EVH in athletes with EIB. PMID:26846550

  13. Single-dose live-attenuated Nipah virus vaccines confer complete protection by eliciting antibodies directed against surface glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    DeBuysscher, Blair L.; Scott, Dana; Marzi, Andrea; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Background Nipah virus (NiV), a zoonotic pathogen causing severe respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans, emerged in Malaysia in 1998 with subsequent outbreaks on an almost annual basis since 2001 in parts of the Indian subcontinent. The high case fatality rate, human-to-human transmission, wide-ranging reservoir distribution and lack of licensed intervention options are making NiV a serious regional and potential global public health problem. The objective of this study was to develop a fast-acting, single-dose NiV vaccine that could be implemented in a ring vaccination approach during outbreaks. Methods In this study we have designed new live-attenuated vaccine vectors based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses (rVSV) expressing NiV glycoproteins (G or F) or nucleoprotein (N) and evaluated their protective efficacy in Syrian hamsters, an established NiV animal disease model. We further characterized the humoral immune response to vaccination in hamsters using ELISA and neutralization assays and performed serum transfer studies. Results Vaccination of Syrian hamsters with a single dose of the rVSV vaccine vectors resulted in strong humoral immune responses with neutralizing activities found only in those animals vaccinated with rVSV expressing NiV G or F proteins. Vaccinated animals with neutralizing antibody responses were completely protected from lethal NiV disease, whereas animals vaccinated with rVSV expressing NiV N showed only partial protection. Protection of NiV G or F vaccinated animals was conferred by antibodies, most likely the neutralizing fraction, as demonstrated by serum transfer studies. Protection of N-vaccinated hamsters was not antibody-dependent indicating a role of adaptive cellular responses for protection. Conclusions The rVSV vectors expressing Nipah virus G or F are prime candidates for new ‘emergency vaccines’ to be utilized for NiV outbreak management. PMID:24631094

  14. Psychosocial and treatment correlates of opiate free success in a clinical review of a naltrexone implant program

    PubMed Central

    Reece, AS

    2007-01-01

    Background There is on-going controversy in relation to the efficacy of naltrexone used for the treatment of heroin addiction, and the important covariates of that success. We were also interested to review our experience with two depot forms of implantable naltrexone. Methods A retrospective review of patients' charts was undertaken, patients were recalled by telephone and by letter, and urine drug screen samples were collected. Opiate free success (OFS) was the parameter of interest. Three groups were defined. The first two were treated in the previous 12 months and comprised "implant" and "tablet" patients. A third group was "historical" comprising those treated orally in the preceding 12 months. Results There were 102, 113 and 161 patients in each group respectively. Groups were matched for age, sex, and dose of heroin used, but not financial status or social support. The overall follow-up rate was 82%. The Kaplan Meier 12 month OFS were 82%, 58% and 52% respectively. 12 post-treatment variables were independently associated with treatment retention. In a Cox proportional hazard multivariate model social support, the number of detoxification episodes, post-treatment employment, the use of multiple implant episodes and spiritual belief were significantly related to OFS. Conclusion Consistent with the voluminous international literature clinically useful retention rates can be achieved with naltrexone, which may be improved by implants and particularly serial implants, repeat detoxification, meticulous clinical follow-up, and social support. As depot formulations of naltrexone become increasingly available such results can guide their clinical deployment, improve treatment outcomes, and enlarge the policy options for an exciting non-addictive pharmacotherapy for opiate addiction. PMID:18036213

  15. The effects of maternally administered methadone, buprenorphine and naltrexone on offspring: review of human and animal data.

    PubMed

    Farid, W O; Dunlop, S A; Tait, R J; Hulse, G K

    2008-06-01

    Most women using heroin are of reproductive age with major risks for their infants. We review clinical and experimental data on fetal, neonatal and postnatal complications associated with methadone, the current "gold standard", and compare these with more recent, but limited, data on developmental effects of buprenorphine, and naltrexone. Methadone is a micro-opioid receptor agonist and is commonly recommended for treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy. However, it has undesired outcomes including neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Animal studies also indicate detrimental effects on growth, behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry, and increased perinatal mortality. Buprenorphine is a partial micro-opioid receptor agonist and a kappa-opioid receptor antagonist. Clinical observations suggest that buprenorphine during pregnancy is similar to methadone on developmental measures but is potentially superior in reducing the incidence and prognosis of NAS. However, small animal studies demonstrate that low doses of buprenorphine during pregnancy and lactation lead to changes in offspring behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry. Naltrexone is a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist. Although data are limited, humans treated with oral or sustained-release implantable naltrexone suggest outcomes potentially superior to those with methadone or buprenorphine. However, animal studies using oral or injectable naltrexone have shown developmental changes following exposure during pregnancy and lactation, raising concerns about its use in humans. Animal studies using chronic exposure, equivalent to clinical depot formulations, are required to evaluate safety. While each treatment is likely to have maternal advantages and disadvantages, studies are urgently required to determine which is optimal for offspring in the short and long term.

  16. The Effects of Maternally Administered Methadone, Buprenorphine and Naltrexone on Offspring: Review of Human and Animal Data

    PubMed Central

    Farid, W.O; Dunlop, S.A; Tait, R.J; Hulse, G.K

    2008-01-01

    Most women using heroin are of reproductive age with major risks for their infants. We review clinical and experimental data on fetal, neonatal and postnatal complications associated with methadone, the current “gold standard”, and compare these with more recent, but limited, data on developmental effects of buprenorphine, and naltrexone. Methadone is a µ-opioid receptor agonist and is commonly recommended for treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy. However, it has undesired outcomes including neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Animal studies also indicate detrimental effects on growth, behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry, and increased perinatal mortality. Buprenorphine is a partial µ-opioid receptor agonist and a κ-opioid receptor antagonist. Clinical observations suggest that buprenorphine during pregnancy is similar to methadone on developmental measures but is potentially superior in reducing the incidence and prognosis of NAS. However, small animal studies demonstrate that low doses of buprenorphine during pregnancy and lactation lead to changes in offspring behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry. Naltrexone is a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist. Although data are limited, humans treated with oral or sustained-release implantable naltrexone suggest outcomes potentially superior to those with methadone or buprenorphine. However, animal studies using oral or injectable naltrexone have shown developmental changes following exposure during pregnancy and lactation, raising concerns about its use in humans. Animal studies using chronic exposure, equivalent to clinical depot formulations, are required to evaluate safety. While each treatment is likely to have maternal advantages and disadvantages, studies are urgently required to determine which is optimal for offspring in the short and long term. PMID:19305793

  17. Lipid Emulsion Inhibits Vasodilation Induced by a Toxic Dose of Bupivacaine via Attenuated Dephosphorylation of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit 1 in Isolated Rat Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Byon, Hyo-Jin; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Park, Jungchul; Lee, Youngju; Hwang, Yeran; Baik, Jiseok; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Lipid emulsions are widely used for the treatment of systemic toxicity that arises from local anesthetics. The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the cellular mechanism associated with the lipid emulsion-mediated attenuation of vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine in isolated endothelium-denuded rat aorta. The effects of lipid emulsion on vasodilation induced by bupivacaine, mepivacaine, and verapamil were assessed in isolated aorta precontracted with phenylephrine, the Rho kinase stimulant NaF, and the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu). The effects of Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 on contraction induced by phenylephrine or NaF were assessed. The effects of bupivacaine on intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and tension induced by NaF were simultaneously measured. The effects of bupivacaine alone and lipid emulsion plus bupivacaine on myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) phosphorylation induced by NaF were examined in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. In precontracted aorta, the lipid emulsion attenuated bupivacaine-induced vasodilation but had no effect on mepivacaine-induced vasodilation. Y-27632 attenuated contraction induced by either phenylephrine or NaF. The lipid emulsion attenuated verapamil-induced vasodilation. Compared with phenylephrine-induced precontracted aorta, bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was slightly attenuated in NaF-induced precontracted aorta. The magnitude of the bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was higher than that of a bupivacaine-induced decrease in [Ca2+]i. Bupivacaine attenuated NaF-induced MYPT1 phosphorylation, whereas lipid emulsion pretreatment attenuated the bupivacaine-induced inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation induced by NaF. Taken together, these results suggest that lipid emulsions attenuate bupivacaine-induced vasodilation via the attenuation of inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation evoked by NaF. PMID:26664257

  18. Lipid Emulsion Inhibits Vasodilation Induced by a Toxic Dose of Bupivacaine via Attenuated Dephosphorylation of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit 1 in Isolated Rat Aorta.

    PubMed

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Byon, Hyo-Jin; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Park, Jungchul; Lee, Youngju; Hwang, Yeran; Baik, Jiseok; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Lipid emulsions are widely used for the treatment of systemic toxicity that arises from local anesthetics. The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the cellular mechanism associated with the lipid emulsion-mediated attenuation of vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine in isolated endothelium-denuded rat aorta. The effects of lipid emulsion on vasodilation induced by bupivacaine, mepivacaine, and verapamil were assessed in isolated aorta precontracted with phenylephrine, the Rho kinase stimulant NaF, and the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu). The effects of Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 on contraction induced by phenylephrine or NaF were assessed. The effects of bupivacaine on intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) and tension induced by NaF were simultaneously measured. The effects of bupivacaine alone and lipid emulsion plus bupivacaine on myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) phosphorylation induced by NaF were examined in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. In precontracted aorta, the lipid emulsion attenuated bupivacaine-induced vasodilation but had no effect on mepivacaine-induced vasodilation. Y-27632 attenuated contraction induced by either phenylephrine or NaF. The lipid emulsion attenuated verapamil-induced vasodilation. Compared with phenylephrine-induced precontracted aorta, bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was slightly attenuated in NaF-induced precontracted aorta. The magnitude of the bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was higher than that of a bupivacaine-induced decrease in [Ca(2+)]i. Bupivacaine attenuated NaF-induced MYPT1 phosphorylation, whereas lipid emulsion pretreatment attenuated the bupivacaine-induced inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation induced by NaF. Taken together, these results suggest that lipid emulsions attenuate bupivacaine-induced vasodilation via the attenuation of inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation evoked by NaF.

  19. SU-E-T-352: Effects of Skull Attenuation and Missing Backscatter On Brain Dose in HDR Treatment of the Head with Surface Applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Cifter, F; Dhou, S; Lewis, J; Cormack, R; Altundal, Y; Sajo, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To calculate the effect of lack of backscatter from air and attenuation of bone on dose distributions in brachytherapy surface treatment of head. Existing treatment planning systems based on TG43 do not account for heterogeneities, and thus may overestimate the dose to the brain. While brachytherapy generally has rapid dose falloff, the dose to the deeper tissues (in this case, the brain) can become significant when treating large curved surfaces. Methods: Applicator geometries representing a range of clinical cases were simulated in MCNP5. An Ir-192 source was modeled using the energy spectrum presented by TG-43. The head phantom was modeled as a 7.5-cm radius water sphere, with a 7 -mm thick skull embedded 5-mm beneath the surface. Dose values were calculated at 20 points inside the head, in which 10 of them were on the central axis and the other 10 on the axis connecting the central of the phantom with the second to last source from the applicator edge. Results: Central and peripheral dose distributions for a range of applicator and head sizes are presented. The distance along the central axis at which the dose falls to 80% of the prescribed dose (D80) was 7 mm for a representative small applicator and 9 mm for a large applicator. Corresponding D50 and D30 for the same small applicator were 17 mm and 32 mm respectively. D50 and D30 for the larger applicator were 32 mm and 60 mm respectively. These results reflect the slower falloff expected for larger applicators on a curved surface. Conclusion: Our results can provide guidance for clinicians to calculate the dose reduction effect due to bone attenuation and the lack of backscatter from air to estimate the brain dose for the HDR treatments of surface lesions.

  20. Naltrexone in Treatment of Self Injurious Behavior: A Clinical Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, Ludwik; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The oral opiate, naltrexone, was used in a double-blind placebo-controlled study with two young profoundly mentally adults who exhibited intractable self-injurious behavior. No measurable effects on the self-injurious behavior were observed. (Author/DB)

  1. Cigarette Smoking Predicts Differential Benefit from Naltrexone for Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Fucito, Lisa M.; Park, Aesoon; Gulliver, Suzy Bird; Mattson, Margaret E.; Gueorguieva, Ralitza V.; O’Malley, Stephanie S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Identifying factors that modify responsiveness to pharmacotherapies for alcohol dependence is important for treatment planning. Cigarette smoking predicts more severe alcohol dependence and poorer treatment response in general. Nevertheless, there is limited research on cigarette smoking as a potential predictor of differential response to pharmacological treatment of alcoholism. Methods We examined the association between cigarette smoking and drinking outcomes in the COMBINE study, a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled 16-week trial comparing combinations of medications (i.e., acamprosate and naltrexone) and behavioral interventions (i.e., medical management (MM), combined behavioral therapy (CBI)) in 1383 alcohol dependent individuals. Results Smokers (i.e., more than half the sample) significantly differed from nonsmokers on several demographic and drinking-related variables at baseline and generally had poorer treatment outcomes than nonsmokers. However, smokers who received naltrexone had better drinking outcomes than smokers who received placebo, whereas alcohol use among nonsmokers did not vary by naltrexone assignment. This pattern of findings occurred independent of whether patients received CBI or MM and remained after controlling for alcoholism typology and baseline demographic differences. Approximately 9% of smokers quit smoking and an additional 10% reduced their cigarette intake during treatment. Reductions in smoking did not vary by treatment assignment. Conclusions These results suggest that naltrexone may be particularly beneficial for improving alcohol use outcomes in alcohol dependent smokers. Trial Registration The COMBINE Study, NCT000626, http://www.cscc.unc.edu/combine/. PMID:22541040

  2. Influence of breast composition and interseed attenuation in dose calculations for post-implant assessment of permanent breast 103Pd seed implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsharpour, Hossein; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Carrier, Jean-François; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2010-08-01

    The impact of tissue heterogeneity and interseed attenuation is studied in post-implant evaluation of five clinical permanent breast 103Pd seed implants using the Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation method. Dose metrics for the target (PTV) as well as an organ at risk (skin) are used to visualize the differences between a TG43-like MC method and more accurate MC methods capable of considering the breast tissue heterogeneity as well as the interseed attenuation. PTV dose is reduced when using a breast tissue model instead of water in MC calculations while the dose to the skin is increased. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of varying the glandular/adipose proportion of the breast tissue on dose distributions. The dose to the PTV (skin) decreases (increases) with the increasing adipose proportion inside the breast. In a complete geometry and compared to a TG43-like situation, the average PTV D90 reduction varies from 3.9% in a glandular breast to 35.5% when the breast consists entirely of adipose. The skin D10 increases by 28.2% in an entirely adipose breast. The results of this work show the importance of an accurate and patient-dependent breast tissue model to be used in the dosimetry for this kind of low energy implant.

  3. Unintended attenuation in the Leksell Gamma Knife registered Perfexion trade mark sign calibration-phantom adaptor and its effect on dose calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, Jagdish P.; Novotny, Josef Jr.; Quader, Mubina A.; Bednarz, Greg; Huq, M. Saiful

    2009-04-15

    The calibration of Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (LGK PFX) is performed using a spherical polystyrene phantom 160 mm in diameter, which is provided by the manufacturer. This is the same phantom that has been used with LGK models U, B, C, and 4C. The polystyrene phantom is held in irradiation position by an aluminum adaptor, which has stainless steel side-fixation screws. The phantom adaptor partially attenuates the beams from sectors 3 and 7 by 3.2% and 4.6%, respectively. This unintended attenuation introduces a systematic error in dose calibration. The overall effect of phantom-adaptor attenuation on output calibration of the LGK PFX unit is to underestimate output by about 1.0%.

  4. Inhibition of DNA Methylation Attenuates Low-Dose Cadmium-Induced Cardiac Contractile and Intracellular Ca2+ Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Turdi, Subat; Sun, Weixia; Tan, Yi; Yang, Xiaohui; Cai, Lu; Ren, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium is a human carcinogen with unfavorable health impact probably associated with its DNA methylation property. Recent data suggest that environmental cadmium exposure is associated with incidence of myocardial infarction and peripheral arterial disease. Nonetheless, the effect of chronic cadmium exposure on cardiac contractile function remains elusive. This study was designed to examine the impact of low-dose cadmium exposure on cardiac contractile function and intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Adult male mice were exposed to cadmium for 4 weeks with or without the DNA methylation inhibitor (5-aza-2’-deoxyctidene, 5-AZA). Cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca2+ properties were analyzed including echocardiographic left ventricular parameters, fractional shortening (FS), peak shortening amplitude (PS), maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (± dL/dt), time-to-PS (TPS), time-to-90% relengthening (TR90), electrically-stimulated increase of intracellular Ca2+ and intracellular Ca2+ decay. Our results revealed that cadmium exposure depressed FS, PS, ± dL/dt and electrically-stimulated rise in intracellular Ca2+ without affecting TPS, TR90, intracellular Ca2+ level and decay rate, the effects of which were significantly attenuated or nullified by 5-AZA. Cadmium exposure led to overt interstitial fibrosis (collagen deposition), the effect of which was mitigated by 5-AZA. Western blot analysis showed unchanged expression of ICAM-1, TNF-α and Cleaved caspase-3 in response to cadmium exposure and/or 5-AZA treatment, suggesting a relatively minor role of pro-inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis in cadmium- and 5-AZA-induced cardiac responses. Taken together, our data demonstrated for the first time direct cardiac depressant effect following cadmium exposure, which may be rescued by DNA methylation inhibition. PMID:23902534

  5. High-phosphorus diet maximizes and low-dose calcitriol attenuates skeletal muscle changes in long-term uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Luz M; López, Ignacio; Peralta-Ramírez, Alan; Pineda, Carmen; Chamizo, Verónica E; Rodríguez, Mariano; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2016-05-01

    Although disorders of mineral metabolism and skeletal muscle are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), their potential relationship remains unexplored. Elevations in plasma phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and fibroblastic growth factor 23 together with decreased calcitriol levels are common features of CKD. High-phosphate intake is a major contributor to progression of CKD. This study was primarily aimed to determine the influence of high-phosphate intake on muscle and to investigate whether calcitriol supplementation counteracts negative skeletal muscle changes associated with long-term uremia. Proportions and metabolic and morphological features of myosin-based muscle fiber types were assessed in the slow-twitch soleus and the fast-twitch tibialis cranialis muscles of uremic rats (5/6 nephrectomy, Nx) and compared with sham-operated (So) controls. Three groups of Nx rats received either a standard diet (0.6% phosphorus, Nx-Sd), or a high-phosphorus diet (0.9% phosphorus, Nx-Pho), or a high-phosphorus diet plus calcitriol (10 ng/kg 3 day/wk ip, Nx-Pho + Cal) for 12 wk. Two groups of So rats received either a standard diet or a high-phosphorus diet (So-Pho) over the same period. A multivariate analysis encompassing all fiber-type characteristics indicated that Nx-Pho + Cal rats displayed skeletal muscle phenotypes intermediate between Nx-Pho and So-Pho rats and that uremia-induced skeletal muscle changes were of greater magnitude in Nx-Pho than in Nx-Sd rats. In uremic rats, treatment with calcitriol preserved fiber-type composition, cross-sectional size, myonuclear domain size, oxidative capacity, and capillarity of muscle fibers. These data demonstrate that a high-phosphorus diet potentiates and low-dose calcitriol attenuates adverse skeletal muscle changes in long-term uremic rats.

  6. Dose reduction in fluoroscopic interventions using a combination of a region of interest (ROI) x-ray attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable temporal filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Pope, Liza; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A. H.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2013-03-01

    A novel dose reduction technique for fluoroscopic interventions involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable ROI temporal recursive filter, was used to guide the catheter to the ROI in three live animal studies, two involving rabbits and one involving a sheep. In the two rabbit studies presented , a catheter was guided to the entrance of the carotid artery. With the added ROI attenuator the image under the high attenuation region is very noisy. By using temporal filtering with a filter weight of 0.6 on previous frames, the noise is reduced. In the sheep study the catheter was guided to the descending aorta of the animal. The sheep offered a relatively higher attenuation to the incident x-rays and thus a higher temporal filter weight of 0.8 on previous frames was used during the procedure to reduce the noise to levels acceptable by the interventionalist. The image sequences from both studies show that significant dose reduction of 5-6 times can be achieved with acceptable image quality outside the ROI by using the above mentioned technique. Even though the temporal filter weighting outside the ROI is higher, the consequent lag does not prevent perception of catheter movement.

  7. Dose Reduction in Fluoroscopic Interventions Using a Combination of a Region of Interest (ROI) X-Ray Attenuator and Spatially-Different, Temporally-Variable Temporal Filtering.

    PubMed

    Vasan, S N Swetadri; Pope, Liza; Ionita, Ciprian N; Titus, A H; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2013-03-06

    A novel dose reduction technique for fluoroscopic interventions involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable ROI temporal recursive filter, was used to guide the catheter to the ROI in three live animal studies, two involving rabbits and one involving a sheep. In the two rabbit studies presented, a catheter was guided to the entrance of the carotid artery. With the added ROI attenuator the image under the high attenuation region is very noisy. By using temporal filtering with a filter weight of 0.6 on previous frames, the noise is reduced. In the sheep study the catheter was guided to the descending aorta of the animal. The sheep offered a relatively higher attenuation to the incident x-rays and thus a higher temporal filter weight of 0.8 on previous frames was used during the procedure to reduce the noise to levels acceptable by the interventionalist. The image sequences from both studies show that significant dose reduction of 5-6 times can be achieved with acceptable image quality outside the ROI by using the above mentioned technique. Even though the temporal filter weighting outside the ROI is higher, the consequent lag does not prevent perception of catheter movement.

  8. Dose Reduction in Fluoroscopic Interventions Using a Combination of a Region of Interest (ROI) X-Ray Attenuator and Spatially-Different, Temporally-Variable Temporal Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Vasan, S.N Swetadri; Pope, Liza; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A.H.; Bednarek, D.R; Rudin, S.

    2013-01-01

    A novel dose reduction technique for fluoroscopic interventions involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable ROI temporal recursive filter, was used to guide the catheter to the ROI in three live animal studies, two involving rabbits and one involving a sheep. In the two rabbit studies presented, a catheter was guided to the entrance of the carotid artery. With the added ROI attenuator the image under the high attenuation region is very noisy. By using temporal filtering with a filter weight of 0.6 on previous frames, the noise is reduced. In the sheep study the catheter was guided to the descending aorta of the animal. The sheep offered a relatively higher attenuation to the incident x-rays and thus a higher temporal filter weight of 0.8 on previous frames was used during the procedure to reduce the noise to levels acceptable by the interventionalist. The image sequences from both studies show that significant dose reduction of 5–6 times can be achieved with acceptable image quality outside the ROI by using the above mentioned technique. Even though the temporal filter weighting outside the ROI is higher, the consequent lag does not prevent perception of catheter movement. PMID:24817800

  9. A dose-escalation safety and immunogenicity study of a new live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine (Rotavin-M1) in Vietnamese children.

    PubMed

    Dang, Duc Anh; Nguyen, Van Trang; Vu, Dinh Thiem; Nguyen, Thi Hien Anh; Nguyen, Duc Mao; Yuhuan, Wang; Baoming, Jiang; Nguyen, Dang Hien; Le, Thi Luan

    2012-04-27

    We tested a candidate live, oral, rotavirus vaccine (Rotavin-M1™) derived from an attenuated G1P [8] strain (KH0118-2003) isolated from a child in Vietnam. The vaccine was tested first for safety in 29 healthy adults. When deemed safe, it was further tested for safety and immunogenicity in 160 infants (4 groups) aged 6-12 weeks in a dose and schedule ranging study. The vaccine was administered in low titer (10(6.0)FFU/dose) on a 2-dose schedule given 2 months apart (Group 2L) and on a 3-dose schedule given 1 month apart (Group 3L) and in high titer (10(6.3)FFU/dose) in 2 doses 2 months apart (Group 2H) and in 3 doses 1 month apart (Group 3H). For comparison, 40 children (group Rotarix™) were given 2 doses of the lyophilized Rotarix™ vaccine (10(6.5)CCID(50)/dose) 1 month apart. All infants were followed for 30 days after each dose for clinical adverse events including diarrhea, vomiting, fever, abdominal pain, irritability and intussusception. Immunogenicity was assessed by IgA seroconversion and viral shedding was monitored for 7 days after administration of each dose. Two doses of Rotavin-M1 (10(6.3)FFU/dose) were well tolerated in adults. Among infants (average 8 weeks of age at enrollment), administration of Rotavin-M1 was safe and did not lead to an increased rate of fever, diarrhea, vomiting or irritability compared to Rotarix™, indicating that the candidate vaccine virus had been fully attenuated by serial passages. No elevation of levels of serum transaminase, blood urea, or blood cell counts were observed. The highest rotavirus IgA seroconversion rate (73%, 95%CI (58-88%)) was achieved in group 2H (2 doses--10(6.3)FFU/dose, 2 months apart). The 2 dose schedules performed slightly better than the 3 dose schedules and the higher titer doses performed slightly better than the lower titer doses. These rates of seroconversion were similar to that of the Rotarix™ group (58%, 95%CI (42-73%)). However more infants who received Rotarix™ (65%) shed virus

  10. [Pharmacological postconditioning with lactic acid and low dose edaravone could attenuate myocardial reperfusion injury through mitochondrial pathway].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-ming; Wang, Yu; Li, Xiao-yan; Xu, Lin; Sun, Yuan-yuan; Li, Yu-zhen; Liu, Li-feng

    2013-08-01

    area [(27.12 ± 5.55)% vs. (45.66 ± 10.81)%, P < 0.05] in Lac+Eda group were all significantly lower than those in I/R group. Pharmacological postconditioning with lactic acid and low dose edaravone could mimic the upper triggers of mechanical postconditioning and attenuate myocardial reperfusion injury through mitochondrial pathway.

  11. Naltrexone effects on male sexual behavior, corticosterone, and testosterone in stressed male rats.

    PubMed

    Retana-Márquez, S; Bonilla-Jaime, H; Vázquez-Palacios, G; Martínez-García, R

    2009-02-16

    Chronic physical or psychological stress disrupts male reproductive function. Studies in our laboratory have shown that stress by immersion in cold water (ICW) and by electrical foot shocks (EFS) has inhibitory effects on male sexual behavior; these effects do not seem to be mediated by an increase in corticosterone, nor by a decrease in testosterone. On the other hand, it is known that endogenous opioids are released in the brain in response to these same stressors; consequently, they could be participating in the impairment of sexual behavior, as well as in the changes in corticosterone and testosterone caused by stress. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX) on male sexual behavior, corticosterone, and testosterone in both stressed sexually experienced and naive male rats. Sexually experienced adult male rats were assigned to one of the following groups (n=10 each): 1) control group, males without sexual evaluation; 2) control group, rats injected ip with saline, non-stressed; 3) control group, rats injected with NTX (3 mg/kg) non-stressed; 4) rats injected ip with saline, and stressed by EFS; 5) rats injected ip with NTX (1.5 mg/kg) and stressed by EFS; 6) rats injected ip with saline and stressed by ICW; 7) rats injected ip with NTX (1.5 mg/kg) and stressed by ICW; 8) rats injected ip with NTX (3 mg/kg) and stressed by ICW. Naive males were assigned to the same control groups but only stressed by ICW and the NTX dose used was 3 mg/kg. Injections were given 30 min before stress sessions. Stress was applied on 20 consecutive days. Male sexual behavior was assessed 15 min after EFS or 30 min after ICW, on days 1, 4, 8, 12, 15, and 20. Trunk blood was collected at the end of the experiments on day 20 of stress. Corticosterone and testosterone were evaluated by HPLC. Mount, intromission and ejaculation latencies were longer in control saline naive males compared to control saline sexually experienced males on the

  12. Ostrich (Struthio camelus) immobilisation using carfentanil and xylazine and reversal with yohimbine and naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Raath, J P; Quandt, S K; Malan, J H

    1992-12-01

    Ostriches (Struthio camelus) (n = 20) were immobilised from a helicopter by darting with a total dose of 3 mg carfentanil and 150 mg xylazine. An initial excitement phase was displayed, commencing on average at 2.67 min (S.D. 0.72) after darting, and the average time to recumbency was 4.97 min (S.D. 1.05). The average heart and respiration rates prior to reversal were 121.2 (S.D. 19.96) and 13.7 (S.D. 5.96) min-1 respectively. Reversal was achieved by the intravenous injection of yohimbine at approximately 0.125 mg kg-1 and 300 mg of naltrexone, and was uneventful. Further investigations need to be done to establish the most appropriate dosage rates for these preparations in ostriches.

  13. Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    09-2-0065 TITLE: Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illness PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William Joel Meggs, MD, PhD...From - To) 1 JUL 2009 - 30 JUN 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veteravns’ Illness 5a... dextromethorphan & naltrexone for gulf war illness. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Dextromethorphan , naltexone, gulf war illness 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  14. Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-09-2-0065 TITLE: Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan ...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illness 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-2-0065 5c...Sciences has demonstrated that Morphine-related analogs, including Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan , have great potency in anti-inflammation and

  15. Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-09-2-0065 TITLE: Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Trial of Naltrexone and Dextromethorphan for Gulf War Veterans’ Illness 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-2-0065...ABSTRACT Approval to separate the study into a separate dextromethorphan arm and naltrexone arm from the Department of Defense Institutional Review

  16. SU-E-I-86: Ultra-Low Dose Computed Tomography Attenuation Correction for Pediatric PET CT Using Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASiR™)

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S; Shulkin, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop ultra-low dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultra-low doses (10–35 mAs). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for eleven tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% CTDIvol (0.39/3.64; mGy) radiation dose from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUVbw) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation organ dose, as derived from patient exam size specific dose estimate (SSDE), was converted to effective dose using the standard ICRP report 103 method. Effective dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative patient population dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the non-dose reduced CTAC image down to 90% dose reduction. No change in SUVbw, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols reconstructed with ASiR and down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62%–86% (3.2/8.3−0.9/6.2; mSv). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from pre dose-reduced patient images. Conclusion: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CTAC dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for co

  17. Vaccination of Volunteers with Low-Dose, Live-Attenuated, Dengue Viruses Leads to Serotype-specific Immunologic and Virologic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Lindow, Janet C.; Durbin, Anna P.; Whitehead, Stephen S.; Pierce, Kristen K.; Carmolli, Marya P.; Kirkpatrick, Beth D.

    2013-01-01

    There are currently no vaccines or therapeutics to prevent dengue disease which ranges in severity from asymptomatic infections to life-threatening illness. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Division of Intramural Research has developed live, attenuated vaccines to each of the four dengue serotypes (DENV-1 – DENV-4). Two doses (10 PFU and 1000 PFU) of three monovalent vaccines were tested in human clinical trials to compare safety and immunogenicity profiles. DEN4Δ30 had been tested previously at multiple doses. The three dengue vaccine candidates tested (DEN1Δ30, DEN2/4Δ30, and DEN3Δ30/31) were very infectious, each with a Human Infectious Dose 50% ≤ 10 PFU. Further, infectivity rates ranged from 90 −100% regardless of dose, excepting DEN2/4Δ30 which dropped from 100% at the 1000 PFU dose to 60% at the 10 PFU dose. Mean geometric peak antibody titers did not differ significantly between doses for DEN1Δ30 (92 ± 19 vs. 214 ± 97, p = 0.08); however, significant differences were observed between the 10 PFU and 1000 PFU doses for DEN2/4Δ30, 19 ± 9 vs. 102 ± 25 (p = 0.001), and DEN3Δ30/31, 119 ± 135 vs. 50 ± 50 (p=0.046). No differences in the incidences of rash, neutropenia, or viremia were observed between doses for any vaccines, though the mean peak titer of viremia for DEN1Δ30 was higher at the 1000 PFU dose (0.5 ± 0 vs. 1.1 ± 0.1, p = 0.007). These data demonstrate that atarget dose of 1000 PFU for inclusion of each dengue serotype into a tetravalent vaccine is likely to be safe and generate a balanced immune response for all serotypes. PMID:23735680

  18. Developmental lead exposure attenuates methamphetamine dose-effect self-administration performance and progressive ratio responding in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Angelica; Valles, Rodrigo; Hart, Nigel; Bratton, Gerald R; Nation, Jack R

    2008-06-01

    Perinatal (gestation/lactation) lead exposure modifies the reinforcement efficacy of various psychoactive drugs (e.g., cocaine, opiates) across the phases of initial selection, use, and abuse [Nation J.R., Cardon A.L., Heard H.M., Valles R., Bratton G.R. Perinatal lead exposure and relapse to drug-seeking behavior in the rat: a cocaine reinstatement study. Psychopharmacol 2003;168: 236-243.; Nation J.R., Smith K.R., Bratton G.R. Early developmental lead exposure increases sensitivity to cocaine in a self-administration paradigm. Pharmacol Biochem Behave 2004; 77: 127-13; Rocha A., Valles R., Cardon A.L., Bratton G.R., Nation J.R. Enhanced acquisition of cocaine self-administration in rats developmentally exposed to lead. Neuropsychopharmacol 2005; 30: 2058-2064.]. However, changes in sensitivity to methamphetamine across the phases of drug abuse have not been examined in animals perinatally exposed to lead. Because the mainstream popularity of methamphetamine in the United States is increasing and lead exposure continues to be widespread, an examination of this drug and how it may be modified by perinatal exposure to lead is warranted. The studies reported here examined the effects of perinatal lead exposure on adult self-administration of intravenous (i.v.) methamphetamine across the maintenance phase of drug addiction. Experiment 1 examined dose-effect patterns in control and lead-exposed animals. Experiment 2 evaluated control and lead-exposed animals in a progressive ratio task. Female rats were administered a 16-mg lead or a control solution for 30 days prior to breeding with non-exposed males. Exposure continued through pregnancy and lactation and was discontinued at weaning (postnatal day [PND] 21). Animals born to control or lead-exposed dams received indwelling jugular catheters as adults (PND 70) and subsequently were randomly assigned to one of the two studies, using only one male rat per litter for each study. The data showed a general attenuation of

  19. Inhibition of DNA methylation attenuates low-dose cadmium-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) anomalies.

    PubMed

    Turdi, Subat; Sun, Weixia; Tan, Yi; Yang, Xiaohui; Cai, Lu; Ren, Jun

    2013-10-01

    (1) Cadmium is a human carcinogen with unfavourable health impacts probably associated with its DNA methylation property. Recent data suggest that environmental cadmium exposure is associated with the incidence of myocardial infarction and peripheral arterial disease. Nonetheless, the effect of chronic cadmium exposure on cardiac contractile function remains unknown. (2) The present study was designed to examine the impact of low-dose cadmium exposure on cardiac contractile function and intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Adult male mice were exposed to cadmium for 4 weeks (20 nmol/kg, i.p. every other day for 4 weeks) with or without the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxyctidene (5-AZA; 0.25 mg/kg, i.p., twice a week for 6 weeks, starting at the same time as cadmium administration). Cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca2+ properties were analysed, including echocardiographic left ventricular parameters, fractional shortening (FS), peak shortening (PS) amplitude, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (±dL/dt), time to PS (TPS), time to 90% relengthening (TR90 ), electrically stimulated increases in intracellular Ca2+ and intracellular Ca2+ decay. (3) Cadmium exposure depressed FS, PS, ±dL/dt and electrically stimulated increases in intracellular Ca2+ without affecting TPS, TR90 , intracellular Ca2+ levels or the decay rate. The effects of cadmium were significantly attenuated (PS) or blocked altogether (all other parameters) by 5-AZA. Cadmium exposure led to overt interstitial fibrosis (collagen deposition), which was mitigated by 5-AZA treatment. Western blot analysis revealed that cadmium exposure and/or 5-AZA treatment had no effect on the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, tumour necrosis factor-α and cleaved caspase 3, suggesting a relatively minor role of proinflammatory cytokines and apoptosis in the cardiac responses to cadmium and 5-AZA. (4) Together, our data demonstrate, for the first time, direct cardiac depressant effects

  20. Long-Term Safety and Immunogenicity of a Tetravalent Live-Attenuated Dengue Vaccine and Evaluation of a Booster Dose Administered to Healthy Thai Children.

    PubMed

    Watanaveeradej, Veerachai; Simasathien, Sriluck; Mammen, Mammen P; Nisalak, Ananda; Tournay, Elodie; Kerdpanich, Phirangkul; Samakoses, Rudiwilai; Putnak, Robert J; Gibbons, Robert V; Yoon, In-Kyu; Jarman, Richard G; De La Barrera, Rafael; Moris, Philippe; Eckels, Kenneth H; Thomas, Stephen J; Innis, Bruce L

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of two doses of a live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue virus vaccine (F17/Pre formulation) and a booster dose in a dengue endemic setting in two studies. Seven children (7- to 8-year-olds) were followed for 1 year after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17/Pre formulation), and followed for four more years (Child study). In the Infant study, 49 2-year-olds, vaccinated as infants, were followed for approximately 3.5 years after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17) and followed for one additional year. Two clinically notable events were observed, both in dengue vaccine recipients in the Infant study: 1 case of dengue approximately 2.7 years after dose 2 and 1 case of suspected dengue after booster vaccinations. The booster vaccinations had a favorable safety profile in terms of reactogenicity and adverse events reported during the 1-month follow-up periods. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported during the studies. Neutralizing antibodies against dengue viruses 1-4 waned during the 1-3 years before boosting, which elicited a short-lived booster response but did not provide a long-lived, multivalent antibody response in most subjects. Overall, this candidate vaccine did not elicit a durable humoral immune response.

  1. Low dose risperidone attenuates cue-induced but not heroin-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking in an animal model of relapse.

    PubMed

    Lai, Miaojun; Chen, Weisheng; Zhu, Huaqiang; Zhou, Xiaoli; Liu, Huifen; Zhang, Fuqiang; Zhou, Wenhua

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of pretreatment with risperidone on heroin self-administration and heroin-seeking behaviour induced by cues and heroin priming. Rats were trained to self-administer heroin under a fixed ratio 1 schedule for 2 wk and nose-poke responding was extinguished for 10 d, after which reinstatement of drug seeking was induced by conditioned cues or heroin priming. Acute risperidone administration at doses 10-100 μg/kg potently and dose-dependently inhibited reinstatement of conditioned cue-induced heroin seeking; the minimum dose of inhibition was 30 μg/kg. In contrast, risperidone at the same doses did not attenuate reinstatement induced by two priming doses of heroin (100 or 250 μg/kg s.c.). Risperidone at these doses failed to alter heroin self-administration and locomotion activity. These data demonstrate that acute treatment with low-dose risperidone inhibits conditioned cue-induced heroin seeking and risperidone may be an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of heroin addiction.

  2. Long-Term Safety and Immunogenicity of a Tetravalent Live-Attenuated Dengue Vaccine and Evaluation of a Booster Dose Administered to Healthy Thai Children

    PubMed Central

    Watanaveeradej, Veerachai; Simasathien, Sriluck; Mammen, Mammen P.; Nisalak, Ananda; Tournay, Elodie; Kerdpanich, Phirangkul; Samakoses, Rudiwilai; Putnak, Robert J.; Gibbons, Robert V.; Yoon, In-Kyu; Jarman, Richard G.; De La Barrera, Rafael; Moris, Philippe; Eckels, Kenneth H.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Innis, Bruce L.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of two doses of a live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue virus vaccine (F17/Pre formulation) and a booster dose in a dengue endemic setting in two studies. Seven children (7- to 8-year-olds) were followed for 1 year after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17/Pre formulation), and followed for four more years (Child study). In the Infant study, 49 2-year-olds, vaccinated as infants, were followed for approximately 3.5 years after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17) and followed for one additional year. Two clinically notable events were observed, both in dengue vaccine recipients in the Infant study: 1 case of dengue approximately 2.7 years after dose 2 and 1 case of suspected dengue after booster vaccinations. The booster vaccinations had a favorable safety profile in terms of reactogenicity and adverse events reported during the 1-month follow-up periods. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported during the studies. Neutralizing antibodies against dengue viruses 1–4 waned during the 1–3 years before boosting, which elicited a short-lived booster response but did not provide a long-lived, multivalent antibody response in most subjects. Overall, this candidate vaccine did not elicit a durable humoral immune response. PMID:27022153

  3. [Effect of Low Dose of Chicken Infectious Anemia Virus in Attenuated Vaccine on SPF Chicken Body Weight and Vaccine Immune Antibody].

    PubMed

    Fang, Lichun; Li, Xiaohan; Ren, Zhihao; Li, Yang; Wang, Yixin; Cui, Zhizhong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng

    2016-03-01

    In order to observe the effect of the immune and weight of chickens after use the attenuated vaccine with low dose of chicken infectious anemia virus (CIAV). In this study, the effects of low dose of CIAV on the weight of SPF chickens and NDV antibody production were observed by simulated experiments. The results showed that 10 EID50 and 5 EID50 CIAV per plume attenuated NDV vaccines were used to cause the weight loss of SPF chickens. Compared with the use of the non contaminated vaccine group, it has significant difference. And NDV antibody levels compared with the use of the non contaminated groups also decreased after use the vaccine with two doses of CIAV contaminated. It has significant difference. A certain proportion of CIAV antibody positive was detected at the beginning of the second week after use the NDV vaccine with two doses of CIAV contaminated. The detection of a high proportion of CIAV nucleic acid was detected in the first week after the use of a contaminated vaccine. The results of the study demonstrate the effects of CIAV pollution on the production and immune function of SPF chickens, and it is suggested that increasing the detection of viral nucleic acid can help save time and improve the detection rate in the detection of exogenous virus contamination by SPF chicken test method.

  4. Synergistic blockade of alcohol escalation drinking in mice by a combination of novel kappa opioid receptor agonist Mesyl Salvinorin B and naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Cowley, Rachel Saylor; Ben, Konrad; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2017-03-02

    Mesyl Salvinorin B (MSB) is a potent selective kappa opioid receptor (KOP-r) agonist that has potential for development as an anti-psychostimulant agent with fewer side-effects (e.g., sedation, depression and dysphoria) than classic KOP-r agonists. However, no such study has been done on alcohol. We investigated whether MSB alone or in combination with naltrexone (mu-opioid receptor antagonist) altered voluntary alcohol drinking in both male and female mice. Mice, subjected to 3 weeks of chronic escalation drinking (CED) in a two-bottle choice paradigm with 24-h access every other day, developed rapid escalation of alcohol intake and high preference. We found that single, acute administration of MSB dose-dependently reduced alcohol intake and preference in mice after 3-week CED. The effect was specific to alcohol, as shown by the lack of any effect of MSB on sucrose or saccharin intake. We also used the drinking-in-the-dark (DID) model with limited access (4 h/day) to evaluate the pharmacological effect of MSB after 3 weeks of DID. However, MSB had no effect on alcohol drinking after 3-week DID. Upon investigation of potential synergistic effects between naltrexone and MSB, we found that acute administration of a combination of MSB and naltrexone reduced alcohol intake profoundly after 3-week CED at doses lower than those individual effective doses. Repeated administrations of this combination showed less tolerance development than repeated MSB alone. Our study suggests that the novel KOP-r agonist MSB both alone and in combination with naltrexone shows potential in alcoholism treatment models.

  5. Acute Myocardial Infarction following Naltrexone Consumption; a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dadpour, Bita; Gholoobi, Arash; Tajoddini, Shahrad; Habibi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of opioid withdrawal have long been studied. It was reported that patients with underlying ischemic heart disease and atherosclerotic vessels may be complicated by a sudden physical and emotional stress due to withdrawal syndrome. But some other believes sudden increase in catecholamine level as a sympathetic overflow might effect on heart with and without underlying ischemia. In the current study, a patient on methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) who experienced myocardial infarction (MI) after taking naltrexone was described. PMID:28286852

  6. Motion-compensated PET image reconstruction with respiratory-matched attenuation correction using two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images.

    PubMed

    Nam, Woo Hyun; Ahn, Il Jun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Byung Il; Ra, Jong Beom

    2013-10-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used for diagnosis and follow up assessment of radiotherapy. However, thoracic and abdominal PET suffers from false staging and incorrect quantification of the radioactive uptake of lesion(s) due to respiratory motion. Furthermore, respiratory motion-induced mismatch between a computed tomography (CT) attenuation map and PET data often leads to significant artifacts in the reconstructed PET image. To solve these problems, we propose a unified framework for respiratory-matched attenuation correction and motion compensation of respiratory-gated PET. For the attenuation correction, the proposed algorithm manipulates a 4D CT image virtually generated from two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images, rather than a real 4D CT image which significantly increases the radiation burden on a patient. It also utilizes CT-driven motion fields for motion compensation. To realize the proposed algorithm, we propose an improved region-based approach for non-rigid registration between body CT images, and we suggest a selection scheme of 3D CT images that are respiratory-matched to each respiratory-gated sinogram. In this work, the proposed algorithm was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by using patient datasets including lung and/or liver lesion(s). Experimental results show that the method can provide much clearer organ boundaries and more accurate lesion information than existing algorithms by utilizing two low-dose CT images.

  7. Motion-compensated PET image reconstruction with respiratory-matched attenuation correction using two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Woo Hyun; Ahn, Il Jun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Byung Il; Ra, Jong Beom

    2013-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used for diagnosis and follow up assessment of radiotherapy. However, thoracic and abdominal PET suffers from false staging and incorrect quantification of the radioactive uptake of lesion(s) due to respiratory motion. Furthermore, respiratory motion-induced mismatch between a computed tomography (CT) attenuation map and PET data often leads to significant artifacts in the reconstructed PET image. To solve these problems, we propose a unified framework for respiratory-matched attenuation correction and motion compensation of respiratory-gated PET. For the attenuation correction, the proposed algorithm manipulates a 4D CT image virtually generated from two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images, rather than a real 4D CT image which significantly increases the radiation burden on a patient. It also utilizes CT-driven motion fields for motion compensation. To realize the proposed algorithm, we propose an improved region-based approach for non-rigid registration between body CT images, and we suggest a selection scheme of 3D CT images that are respiratory-matched to each respiratory-gated sinogram. In this work, the proposed algorithm was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by using patient datasets including lung and/or liver lesion(s). Experimental results show that the method can provide much clearer organ boundaries and more accurate lesion information than existing algorithms by utilizing two low-dose CT images.

  8. The effects of lobeline and naltrexone on methamphetamine-induced place preference and striatal dopamine and serotonin levels in adolescent rats with a history of maternal separation.

    PubMed

    Dimatelis, J J; Russell, V A; Stein, D J; Daniels, W M

    2012-09-01

    Exposure to early life stress has been suggested to increase an individual's vulnerability to methamphetamine (MA) dependence. Although there is no cure for drug dependence, the opioid and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) systems may be useful targets for treatment insofar as they play pivotal roles in the neurochemistry of addiction. Here we investigated the effects of naltrexone (opioid antagonist) and lobeline (VMAT2 inhibitor) on MA-induced place preference in adolescent rodents subjected to early life trauma (maternal separation, MS) and controls, as well as the effects on dopamine and serotonin levels in the striatum. We found: (1) maternal separation attenuated methamphetamine-induced place preference; (2) lobeline and naltrexone treatment had differential effects on serotonin and dopamine concentrations in the striatum, naltrexone increased serotonin levels in the maternally separated animals. The hypothesized effect of early adversity increasing MA-induced place preference may not be apparent in adolescence. However the data are consistent with the hypothesis that early life stress influences neurochemical pathways that predispose an individual to drug dependence.

  9. The feasibility of low-dose CT protocols for coronary artery calcium scoring and PET attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Lu, Kun-Mu; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Mok, Greta S P; Yang, Bang-Hung; Yang, Ching-Ching

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using low-dose computed tomography (CT) in coronary artery calcium scoring and PET attenuation correction for patients in different weight categories undergoing cardiac PET/CT examinations. Calcium scoring computed tomography (CSCT) scans and PET scans of anthropomorphic cardiac phantoms simulating normal-weight, mildly obese, and severely obese patients were acquired with a hybrid PET/CT scanner. CSCT images were acquired at 120 kVp, with tube current ranging from 10 to 550 mA. PET scans were performed in three-dimensional mode, with acquisition time of 3 min/bed position. The image quality of cardiac PET/CT was evaluated by assessing the signal-to-noise ratio. CT-based coronary artery calcium quantification was performed using the Agatston scoring system. On the basis of our results, the CSCT protocols using tube currents of 50 and 150 mA should be able to achieve the lowest possible radiation dose while maintaining the desired image quality for normal-weight and mildly obese patients undergoing cardiac PET/CT examinations, respectively. When the proposed low-dose CSCT protocols were performed, radiation dose could be reduced by 83.34 and 50% compared with those from CSCT scans acquired with standard tube current settings for normal-weight and mildly obese patients, respectively. In the scanning of severely obese patients, an increase in tube voltage or current would help improve the reliability of image information provided by cardiac PET/CT. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of low-dose CT protocols for coronary artery calcium scoring and PET attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT to examine patients in different weight categories. The calculations performed in this work should be able to provide practical information to achieve necessary diagnostic information while keeping radiation dose as low as reasonably achievable.

  10. Employment-Based Reinforcement of Adherence to Oral Naltrexone Treatment in Unemployed Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kelly; Defulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J.; Donlin, Wendy D.; Aklin, Will M.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Naltrexone has high potential for use as a relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for opiate dependence; however suffers from notoriously poor adherence when prescribed for oral self-administration. This study evaluated whether entry to a therapeutic workplace could be used to reinforce adherence with oral naltrexone. Opiate-dependent and cocaine-using injection drug users were detoxified, inducted onto oral naltrexone, and randomly assigned to a Contingency (n=35) or Prescription (n=32) group for a 26-week period. Contingency participants were required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain access to the therapeutic workplace. Prescription participants received a take-home supply of naltrexone and could access the workplace independent of naltrexone ingestion. Primary outcome measures were percent of urine samples positive for naltrexone at 30-day assessments and negative for opiates and cocaine at 30-day assessments. Contingency participants provided significantly more urine samples that were positive for naltrexone compared to Prescription participants (72% vs. 21%, P<.01), however no effect of experimental group was observed on percent opiate-negative (71% vs. 60%, P=.19.) or cocaine-negative (56% vs. 53%, P=.82) samples in the Contingency and Prescription groups, respectively. Opiate-positive samples were significantly more likely to occur in conjunction with cocaine (P<.001), and when not protected by naltrexone (P<.02), independent of experimental group. Overall, these results show that contingent access to a therapeutic workplace significantly promoted adherence to oral naltrexone, and that the majority of opiate use occurred in conjunction with cocaine use, suggesting that untreated cocaine use may limit the effectiveness of oral naltrexone in promoting opiate abstinence. PMID:23205722

  11. Employment-based reinforcement of adherence to oral naltrexone treatment in unemployed injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kelly E; Defulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J; Donlin, Wendy D; Aklin, Will M; Nuzzo, Paul A; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E; Silverman, Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Oral naltrexone has high potential for use as a relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for opiate dependence yet suffers from notoriously poor adherence. This study evaluated whether entry to a therapeutic workplace could reinforce adherence with oral naltrexone. Opiate-dependent and cocaine-using injection drug users were detoxified, inducted onto oral naltrexone, and randomly assigned to a contingency (n = 35) or prescription (n = 32) group for a 26-week period. Contingency participants were required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain access to the therapeutic workplace. Prescription participants received a take-home supply of naltrexone and could access the workplace independent of naltrexone ingestion. Primary outcome measures were percent of urine samples positive for naltrexone at 30-day assessments and negative for opiates and cocaine at 30-day assessments. Contingency participants provided significantly more urine samples that were positive for naltrexone compared with prescription participants (72% vs. 21%, p < .01); however, no effect of experimental group was observed on percent opiate-negative (71% vs. 60%, p = .19.) or cocaine-negative (56% vs. 53%, p = .82) samples in the contingency and prescription groups, respectively. Opiate-positive samples were significantly more likely to occur in conjunction with cocaine (p < .001) and when not protected by naltrexone (p < .02), independent of experimental group. Overall, these results show that contingent access to a therapeutic workplace significantly promoted adherence to oral naltrexone, and that the majority of opiate use occurred in conjunction with cocaine use, suggesting that untreated cocaine use may limit the effectiveness of oral naltrexone in promoting opiate abstinence.

  12. Low dose dextromethorphan attenuates moderate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inhibiting NOX2 and reducing peripheral immune cells infiltration in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Chechneva, Olga V.; Mayrhofer, Florian; Daugherty, Daniel J.; Pleasure, David E.; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Deng, Wenbin

    2011-01-01

    Dextromethorphan (DM) is a dextrorotary morphinan and a widely used component of cough medicine. Relatively high doses of DM in combination with quinidine are used for the treatment of mood disorders for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, at lower doses, morphinans exert anti-inflammatory activities through the inhibition of NOX2-dependent superoxide production in activated microglia. Here we investigated the effects of high (10 mg/kg, i.p., “DM-10”) and low (0.1 mg/kg, i.p., “DM-0.1”) doses of DM on the development and progression of mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. We found no protection by high dose DM treatment. Interestingly, a minor late attenuation by low dose DM treatment was seen in severe EAE that was characterized by a chronic disease course and a massive spinal cord infiltration of CD45+ cells including T-lymphocytes, macrophages and neutrophils. Furthermore, in a less severe form of EAE, where lower levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, Iba1+ microglia/macrophages and no significant infiltration of neutrophils were seen in the spinal cord, the treatment with DM-0.1 was remarkably more beneficial. The effect was the most significant at the peak of disease and was associated with an inhibition of NOX2 expression and a decrease in infiltration of monocytes and lymphocytes into the spinal cord. In addition, chronic treatment with low dose DM resulted in decreased demyelination and reduced axonal loss in the lumbar spinal cord. Our study is the first report to show that low dose DM is effective in treating EAE of moderate severity. Our findings reveal that low dose morphinan DM treatment may represent a new promising protective strategy for treating MS. PMID:21704706

  13. WE-E-18A-05: Bremsstrahlung of Laser-Plasma Interaction at KeV Temperature: Forward Dose and Attenuation Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Saez-Beltran, M; Fernandez Gonzalez, F

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To obtain an analytical empirical formula for the photon dose source term in forward direction from bremsstrahlung generated from laser-plasma accelerated electron beams in aluminum solid targets, with electron-plasma temperatures in the 10–100 keV energy range, and to calculate transmission factors for iron, aluminum, methacrylate, lead and concrete and air, materials most commonly found in vacuum chamber labs. Methods: Bremsstrahlung fluence is calculated from the convolution of thin-target bremsstrahlung spectrum for monoenergetic electrons and the relativistic Maxwell-Juettner energy distribution for the electron-plasma. Unattenuatted dose in tissue is calculated by integrating the photon spectrum with the mass-energy absorption coefficient. For the attenuated dose, energy dependent absorption coefficient, build-up factors and finite shielding correction factors were also taken into account. For the source term we use a modified formula from Hayashi et al., and we fitted the proportionality constant from experiments with the aid of the previously calculated transmission factors. Results: The forward dose has a quadratic dependence on electron-plasma temperature: 1 joule of effective laser energy transferred to the electrons at 1 m in vacuum yields 0,72 Sv per MeV squared of electron-plasma temperature. Air strongly filters the softer part of the photon spectrum and reduce the dose to one tenth in the first centimeter. Exponential higher energy tail of maxwellian spectrum contributes mainly to the transmitted dose. Conclusion: A simple formula for forward photon dose from keV range temperature plasma is obtained, similar to those found in kilovoltage x-rays but with higher dose per dissipated electron energy, due to thin target and absence of filtration.

  14. Views about responsibility for alcohol addiction and negative evaluations of naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rebecca A; Lukens, Jonathan M; Kole, Jonathan W; Sisti, Dominic A

    2015-03-08

    Moral philosophers have debated the extent to which persons are individually responsible for the onset of and recovery from addiction. Empirical investigators have begun to explore counselors' attitudes on these questions. Meanwhile, a separate literature has investigated counselors' negative attitudes towards naltrexone, an important element of medication-assisted treatment for alcohol addiction. The present study bridges the literature on counselor views about responsibility for addiction with the literature on attitudes towards naltrexone. It investigates the extent to which a counselor's views of individual responsibility for alcohol addiction are related to that counselor's views of naltrexone. Using a vignette-based survey of 117 addiction treatment professionals, the study analyzes the relationship between an addiction counselor's views about individual responsibility for alcohol addiction and using naltrexone to treat it. We find a significant difference in counselors who assign greater responsibility to a person for the onset of alcohol addiction. They agreed more strongly with several objections to naltrexone, including worries about compliance, naltrexone's side effects outweighing its benefits, naltrexone treating symptoms but not underlying causes, and the idea that medication may undermine a person's motivation to recover. Combined views of greater responsibility for addiction's onset and recovery also significantly predicted stronger agreement with objections. We conclude that there is a strong relationship between a counselor assigning higher individual responsibility for addiction and holding more negative views about naltrexone. The study also sheds light on one reason why the model of addiction as a brain disease has had limited impact on clinical practice.

  15. Cessation of Long-term Naltrexone Administration: Longitudinal Follow-Ups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crews, W. David, Jr.; Rhodes, Robert D.; Bonaventura, Sharon H.; Rowe, Frederick B.; Goering, Aaron M.

    1999-01-01

    Longitudinal follow-ups of the cessation of long-term Naltrexone administration were conducted with a women with profound mental retardation who had previously displayed dramatic decreases in self-injurious behavior (SIB). After two and four years post-Naltrexone therapy, the subject exhibited near-zero rates of SIB despite changes in staff and in…

  16. Randomized controlled trial of a mobile phone intervention for improving adherence to naltrexone for alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Stoner, Susan A; Arenella, Pamela B; Hendershot, Christian S

    2015-01-01

    Naltrexone is a front-line treatment for alcohol use disorders, but its efficacy is limited by poor medication adherence. This randomized controlled trial evaluated whether a mobile health intervention could improve naltrexone adherence. Treatment-seeking participants with an alcohol use disorder (N = 76) were randomized to intervention and control conditions. All participants received naltrexone (50 mg/day) with a medication event monitoring system (MEMS) and a prepaid smartphone, and received a daily text message querying medication side effects, alcohol use, and craving. Those in the intervention arm received additional medication reminders and adherence assessment via text message. The primary outcome, proportion of participants with adequate adherence (defined as ≥80% of prescribed doses taken through Week 8), did not differ between groups in intent-to-treat analyses (p = .34). Mean adherence at study midpoint (Week 4) was 83% in the intervention condition and 77% in the control condition (p = .35). Survival analysis found that the intervention group sustained adequate adherence significantly longer (M = 19 days [95% CI = 0.0-44.0]) than those in the control group (M = 3 days [95% CI = 0.0-8.1]) during the first month of treatment (p = .04). Medication adherence did not predict drinking outcomes. These results suggest that in the context of daily monitoring and assessment via cell phone, additional text message reminders do not further improve medication adherence. Although this initial trial does not provide support for the efficacy of text messaging to improve adherence to pharmacotherapy for alcohol use disorders, additional trials with larger samples and alternate designs are warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01349985.

  17. TU-EF-204-08: Dose Efficiency of Added Beam-Shaping Filter with Varied Attenuation Levels in Lung-Cancer Screening CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Yu, L; Vrieze, T; Leng, S; Fletcher, J; McCollough, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Added filtration such as tin filter has the potential to improve dose efficiency of x-ray beam in lung-cancer screening CT. However, dose efficiency with added beam filtration is highly dependent on patient attenuation level. In this phantom study, we evaluated the image quality at different tube voltages with and without added tin filter when attenuation level varies. Methods: A 30 x 20 cm anthropomorphic thorax phantom with three added extension rings were used to simulate small (S), medium (M), large (L), and extra-large (XL) adult patients. These phantoms were scanned on a 192-slice CT scanner (Force, Siemens) at 100 and 120kV without tin filtration, and 100 and 150 kV with tin filtration (100Sn and 150Sn), at multiple dose levels at each kV. Images were reconstructed using iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE, Siemens). Radiation dose was measured with a 0.6 cc ion chamber in the middle and peripheral areas of the phantom. Image quality was assessed using mean image noise at uniform areas in the central region and lung. Radiation dose that is required for each kV to match the noise in a routine lung-cancer CT screening technique (120kV, 25 quality reference mAs) was calculated. Results: At each of the four phantom sizes, 100Sn had the lowest noise in both soft tissue and lung. Compared with 120 kV, 100Sn saved 39%–60% dose for the same noise, depending on phantom size. For the XL phantom (50 by 40 cm), 150Sn provided images with the least beam-hardening artifact in peripheral region. Conclusion: For thoracic CT, added tin filtration can provide considerable dose reduction compared with 120 kV. 100Sn provides better dose efficiencies for all phantom sizes, while 150Sn provides better image quality in peripheral region for extra-large patients. Drs.Joel G. Fletcher and Cynthia H. McCollough receive research support from Siemens Healthcare.

  18. Cloninger's typology and treatment outcome in alcohol-dependent subjects during pharmacotherapy with naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Falk; Jiménez-Arriero, Miguel Angel; Klein, Oliver; Diehl, Alexander; Rubio, Gabriel

    2008-03-01

    Naltrexone is an opiate receptor antagonist mainly at the micro-receptor that is thought to reduce the positively reinforcing, pleasurable effects of alcohol and to reduce craving. An increase in time to first relapse to heavy drinking has been the most consistent finding obtained with naltrexone, although not all trials including two of the largest have been positive. Inconsistent outcome data suggest that effectiveness varies among different subgroups of patients. This paper re-evaluates recent data on the effectiveness of naltrexone in subjects differentiated according to Cloninger Type I and II. Moreover, it combines and cross-validates results of two recent European studies that found naltrexone treatment more beneficial in alcohol-dependent patients with early age at onset of drinking problems (Cloninger Type II). It is discussed whether especially these subjects should be targeted for pharmacological relapse prevention treatment with naltrexone.

  19. An opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone, does not alter taste and smell responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Scińska, A; Koroś, E; Polanowska, E; Kukwa, A; Bogucka-Bonikowska, A; Kostowski, W; Habrat, B; Bieńkowski, P

    2000-01-01

    Several studies have shown that an opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone, decreases palatable food consumption. Naltrexone has also been reported to reduce ethanol intake in alcohol-preferring rodents and human alcoholics. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of naltrexone on taste and smell responses in healthy male volunteers. Naltrexone did not alter intensity and pleasantness of sucrose, quinine, citric acid, sodium chloride, and ethanol taste. Similarly, ratings of olfactory stimuli (orange extract and ethanol) and Coca-Cola flavor were not influenced by the opioid antagonist. Our findings may indicate that: (i) naltrexone exerts marginal, if any, effects on gustatory and olfactory responses in humans; (ii) the drug does not alter orosensory responses to ethanol.

  20. A pilot study of naltrexone-accelerated detoxification in opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Bell, J R; Young, M R; Masterman, S C; Morris, A; Mattick, R P; Bammer, G

    1999-07-05

    1. To determine whether naltrexone-accelerated detoxification with minimal sedation is an acceptable and effective form of induction onto naltrexone. 2. To monitor outcomes of detoxified patients. Observational study. Medical ward of a general hospital (for detoxification) and a community clinic (for follow-up) in Sydney, NSW, 1998. 15 heroin users and 15 people seeking withdrawal from methadone. Detoxification used naltrexone (12.5 or 50 mg), with flunitrazepam (2-3 mg), clonidine (150-750 micrograms) and octreotide (300 micrograms) for symptomatic support. Patients remained awake and were discharged when they felt well enough. Follow-up was daily for four days and then weekly for up to three months for supportive care. Acute side effects; patient ratings of severity and acceptability of withdrawal; nights of hospitalisation; rates of induction onto naltrexone; retention in treatment over three months; and relapse to opioid use. Acute withdrawal with delirium lasted about four hours. Octreotide was crucial for controlling vomiting; with octreotide no patient required intravenous fluids. There were no major complications. Eighteen patients (60%) reported that it was a "quite" acceptable procedure, 18 (60%) required only one night's hospitalisation, and 24 (80%) were successfully inducted onto naltrexone (defined as taking naltrexone on Day 8). Three months later, six (20%) were still taking naltrexone (with four of these occasionally using heroin) and seven (23%) were abstinent from opioids, including five not taking naltrexone. Eleven had gone onto methadone maintenance, seven had relapsed to heroin use, and one had died of a heroin overdose. Rates of induction onto naltrexone were comparable with those reported for accelerated detoxification under sedation, suggesting that it can be performed successfully with minimal sedation. As in other studies of naltrexone maintenance, retention was low, and relapse to heroin use was common.

  1. High-dose ascorbate with low-dose amphotericin B attenuates severity of disease in a model of the reappearance of candidemia during sepsis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Somparn, Poorichaya; Bootprapan, Tanabodee; Tu, Hongbin; Tangtanatakul, Pattarin; Nuengjumnong, Ratchanok; Worasilchai, Navaporn; Tiranathanagul, Khajohn; Eiam-ong, Somchai; Levine, Mark; Chinampon, Ariya; Srisawat, Nattachai

    2015-01-01

    Amphotericin B (Ampho B) is a fungicidal drug that causes cell wall injury. Pharmacological ascorbate induces the extracellular prooxidants, which might enter the Ampho B-induced cell wall porosity and act synergistically. We tested low-dose Ampho B with a short course of pharmacological ascorbate using a mouse model of sepsis preconditioned with an injection of Candida albicans 6 h prior to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). In this model, candidemia reappeared as early as 6 h after CLP with a predictably high mortality rate. This characteristic mimics sepsis in the phase of immunosuppression in patients. Using the model, at 12- and 18-h post-CLP, we administered isotonic (pH neutralized) pharmacological ascorbate intravenously with low-dose Ampho B or sodium deoxycholate, vehicle-controlled, administered IP. The survival rate of low-dose Ampho B plus ascorbate was 53%, compared with <11% for low-dose Ampho B or high-dose Ampho B alone. In addition, a beneficial effect was demonstrated in terms of kidney damage, liver injury, spleen histopathology, and serum markers at 24 h after CLP. Kidney injury was less severe in low-dose Ampho B plus ascorbate combination therapy due to less severe sepsis. Moreover, ascorbate enhanced the effectiveness of phagocytosis against C. albicans in human phagocytic cells. Taken together, the data indicate that the new mouse model simulates sepsis-induced immunosuppression and that the combination of pharmacological ascorbate with an antifungal drug is a potentially effective treatment that may reduce nephrotoxicity, and perhaps also increase fungicidal activity in patients with systemic candidiasis caused by Candida albicans. PMID:25994956

  2. High-dose ascorbate with low-dose amphotericin B attenuates severity of disease in a model of the reappearance of candidemia during sepsis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Somparn, Poorichaya; Bootprapan, Tanabodee; Tu, Hongbin; Tangtanatakul, Pattarin; Nuengjumnong, Ratchanok; Worasilchai, Navaporn; Tiranathanagul, Khajohn; Eiam-ong, Somchai; Levine, Mark; Chinampon, Ariya; Srisawat, Nattachai

    2015-08-01

    Amphotericin B (Ampho B) isa fungicidal drug that causes cell wall injury. Pharmacological ascorbate induces the extracellular prooxidants, which might enter the Ampho B-induced cell wall porosity and act synergistically.W e tested low-dose Ampho B with a short course of pharmacological ascorbate using a mouse model of sepsis preconditioned with an injection of Candida albicans 6 h prior to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). In this model, candidemia reappeared as early as 6 h after CLP with a predictably high mortality rate. This characteristic mimics sepsis in the phase of immunosuppression inpatients. Using the model, at 12- and 18-h post-CLP, we administered isotonic (pH neutralized) pharmacological ascorbate intravenously with low-dose Ampho B or sodium deoxycholate, vehicle-controlled, administered IP. The survival rate of low-dose Ampho B plus ascorbate was 53%, compared with < 11% for low-dose Ampho B or high-dose Ampho B alone. In addition, a beneficial effect was demonstrated in terms of kidney damage,liver injury, spleen histopathology, and serum markers at 24 h after CLP. Kidney injury was less severe in low-dose Ampho B plus ascorbate combination therapy due to less severe sepsis. Moreover, ascorbate enhanced the effectiveness of phagocytosis against C. albicans in human phagocytic cells. Taken together, the data indicate that the new mouse model simulates sepsis-induced immunosuppression and that the combination of pharmacological ascorbate with an antifungal drug is a potentially effective treatment that may reduce nephrotoxicity, and perhaps also increase fungicidal activity in patients with systemic candidiasis caused by Candida albicans.

  3. Attenuation of Multiple Organ Damage by Continuous Low-Dose Solvent-Free Infusions of Resveratrol after Severe Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats.

    PubMed

    Müller, Tobias; Kirsch, Michael; Petrat, Frank

    2017-08-17

    Therapeutic effects of continuous intravenous infusions of solvent-free low doses of resveratrol on organ injury and systemic consequences resulting from severe hemorrhagic shock in rats were studied. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by withdrawing arterial blood until a mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of 25-30 mmHg was reached. Following a shock phase of 60 min, rats were resuscitated with the withdrawn blood plus lactated Ringer's. Resveratrol (20 or 60 μg/kg × h) was continuously infused intravenously starting with the resuscitation phase (30 min) and continued until the end of the experiment (total treatment time 180 min). Animals of the shock control group received 0.9% NaCl solution. After the observation phase (150 min), rats were sacrificed. Resveratrol significantly stabilized the MAP and peripheral oxygen saturation after hemorrhagic shock, decreased the macroscopic injury of the small intestine, significantly attenuated the shock-induced increase in tissue myeloperoxidase activity in the small intestine, liver, kidney and lung, and diminished tissue hemorrhages (particularly in the small intestine and liver) as well as the rate of hemolysis. Already very low doses of resveratrol, continuously infused during resuscitation after severe hemorrhagic shock, can significantly improve impaired systemic parameters and attenuate multiple organ damage in rats.

  4. Attenuation of Multiple Organ Damage by Continuous Low-Dose Solvent-Free Infusions of Resveratrol after Severe Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Michael; Petrat, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic effects of continuous intravenous infusions of solvent-free low doses of resveratrol on organ injury and systemic consequences resulting from severe hemorrhagic shock in rats were studied. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by withdrawing arterial blood until a mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of 25–30 mmHg was reached. Following a shock phase of 60 min, rats were resuscitated with the withdrawn blood plus lactated Ringer’s. Resveratrol (20 or 60 μg/kg × h) was continuously infused intravenously starting with the resuscitation phase (30 min) and continued until the end of the experiment (total treatment time 180 min). Animals of the shock control group received 0.9% NaCl solution. After the observation phase (150 min), rats were sacrificed. Resveratrol significantly stabilized the MAP and peripheral oxygen saturation after hemorrhagic shock, decreased the macroscopic injury of the small intestine, significantly attenuated the shock-induced increase in tissue myeloperoxidase activity in the small intestine, liver, kidney and lung, and diminished tissue hemorrhages (particularly in the small intestine and liver) as well as the rate of hemolysis. Already very low doses of resveratrol, continuously infused during resuscitation after severe hemorrhagic shock, can significantly improve impaired systemic parameters and attenuate multiple organ damage in rats. PMID:28817064

  5. Suhuang antitussive capsule at lower doses attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Lan-Hong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Lai, Tian-Wen; Wang, Hai-Sheng; Xiao, Hui; Che, Luan-Qing; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Suhuang antitussive capsule (Suhuang), a traditional Chinese medication, is found effective in treating chronic cough and cough variant asthma (CVA). This study aimed to determine the possible effects and underlying mechanisms of Suhuang on chronic ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammation, and remodeling in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to six experimental groups: control, OVA model with or without Suhuang (low dose: 3.5 g/kg, middle dose: 7.0 g/kg, high dose: 14.0 g/kg), or dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg). AHR, inflammatory cells, cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung pathology, mucus production, and airway remodeling were examined. We found Suhuang treated at lower doses effectively inhibited OVA-induced AHR, airway inflammation, mucus production and collagen deposition around the airway. High dose of Suhuang reduced most of the inflammatory hallmarks while exerted inconsiderable effects on the number of macrophages in BALF and AHR. At all doses, Suhuang significantly reduced the levels of interlukin (IL) -13 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, but had little effects on IL-4, IL-5, IL-17A and interferon (IFN)-γ. Thus, Suhuang administration alleviates the pathological changes of chronic asthma likely through inhibition of IL-13 and TGF-β1. Suhuang might be a promising therapy for patients with allergic asthma in the future. PMID:26861679

  6. Dexmedetomidine in Attenuation of Haemodynamic Response and Dose Sparing Effect on Opioid and Anaesthetic Agents in Patients undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy- A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Nandlal; Karim, Habib Md Reazaul; Hajong, Ranendra; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis; Singh, Manorama

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Perioperative procedures are stressful and lead to haemodynamic instability with potentially devastating consequences. Dexmedetomidine is found to have many of the desired characteristics that are required in perioperative period. Aim To evaluate the ability of pre and intraoperative dexmedetomidine to attenuate stress induced haemodynamic responses, quantifying the anaesthetic agents sparing as well as its cost-effectiveness in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods The present single blind randomized study was conducted with 120 ASA I and II consented patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups (i.e., group D and group N). Prior to induction, group D received 1 μg/kg of Dexmedetomidine and group N received Normal saline infusion over 20 minutes. Group D also received maintenance Dexmedetomidine intraoperatively. Bispectral index and minimum alveolar concentration monitoring was done in both the groups. Haemodynamic parameters were noted till 100 minutes post laryngoscopy. Opioid and anaesthetic agent consumptions were also noted and cost analysis was done. Medcalc–Version 12.5.0.0 software was used for statistics and p <0.05 was considered significant. Results Dexmedetomidine attenuated the stress induced haemodynamics responses and produced stable, relatively non fluctuating haemodynamics throughout. The Minimum Alveolar Concentration (MAC) requirement and the consumptions of Fentanyl and Isoflurane were significantly less in the Dexmedetomidine group (p<0.0001). However, despite anaesthetic dose sparing effect the anaesthetic technique was not cost-effective. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine is effective in attenuating haemodynamic responses in laparoscopic surgery and having dose sparing effect on Fentanyl, Propofol and Isoflurane. However, overall this technique is not cost-effective. PMID:28050479

  7. Multiple Low-Dose Radiation Prevents Type 2 Diabetes-Induced Renal Damage through Attenuation of Dyslipidemia and Insulin Resistance and Subsequent Renal Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Minglong; Lu, Xuemian; Cong, Weitao; Xing, Xiao; Tan, Yi; Li, Yunqian; Li, Xiaokun; Jin, Litai; Wang, Xiaojie; Dong, Juancong; Jin, Shunzi; Zhang, Chi; Cai, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia and lipotoxicity-induced insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress are the key pathogeneses of renal damage in type 2 diabetes. Increasing evidence shows that whole-body low dose radiation (LDR) plays a critical role in attenuating insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress. Objective The aims of the present study were to investigate whether LDR can prevent type 2 diabetes-induced renal damage and the underlying mechanisms. Methods Mice were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD, 40% of calories from fat) for 12 weeks to induce obesity followed by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 50 mg/kg) to develop a type 2 diabetic mouse model. The mice were exposed to LDR at different doses (25, 50 and 75 mGy) for 4 or 8 weeks along with HFD treatment. At each time-point, the kidney weight, renal function, blood glucose level and insulin resistance were examined. The pathological changes, renal lipid profiles, inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis were also measured. Results HFD/STZ-induced type 2 diabetic mice exhibited severe pathological changes in the kidney and renal dysfunction. Exposure of the mice to LDR for 4 weeks, especially at 50 and 75 mGy, significantly improved lipid profiles, insulin sensitivity and protein kinase B activation, meanwhile, attenuated inflammation and oxidative stress in the diabetic kidney. The LDR-induced anti-oxidative effect was associated with up-regulation of renal nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf-2) expression and function. However, the above beneficial effects were weakened once LDR treatment was extended to 8 weeks. Conclusion These results suggest that LDR exposure significantly prevented type 2 diabetes-induced kidney injury characterized by renal dysfunction and pathological changes. The protective mechanisms of LDR are complicated but may be mainly attributed to the attenuation of dyslipidemia and the subsequent lipotoxicity-induced insulin resistance

  8. Different routes and doses influence protection in pigs immunised with the naturally attenuated African swine fever virus isolate OURT88/3.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cordón, Pedro J; Chapman, Dave; Jabbar, Tamara; Reis, Ana L; Goatley, Lynnette; Netherton, Christopher L; Taylor, Geraldine; Montoya, Maria; Dixon, Linda

    2017-02-01

    This study compares different combinations of doses and routes of immunisation of pigs with low virulent African swine fever virus (ASFV) genotype I isolate OURT88/3, including the intramuscular and intranasal route, the latter not previously tested. Intranasal immunisations with low and moderate doses (10(3) and 10(4) TCID50) of OURT88/3 provided complete protection (100%) against challenge with virulent genotype I OURT88/1 isolate. Only mild and transient clinical reactions were observed in protected pigs. Transient moderate virus genome levels were detected in blood samples after challenge that decreased, but persisted until the end of the experiment in some animals. In contrast, pigs immunised intramuscularly with low and moderate doses (10(3) and 10(4) TCID50) displayed lower percentages of protection (50-66%), and low or undetectable levels of virus genome were detected in blood samples throughout the study. In addition, clinical courses observed in protected pigs were asymptomatic. In pigs that were not protected and developed acute ASF, an exacerbated increase of IL-10 sometimes accompanied by an increase of IFNγ was observed before euthanasia. These results showed that factors including delivery route and dose determine the outcome of immunisation with the naturally attenuated isolate OURT88/3.

  9. Part I. Naltrexone-derived conjugate addition ligands for opioid receptors. Part II. Chemical and enantioselective aspects of the metabolism of verapamil

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    Selective chemoaffinity ligands to aid in identification and purification of opioid receptor subtypes were prepared from 6..cap alpha..- and 6..beta..-naltrexol, obtained stereoselectively from the ..mu..-receptor antagonist naltrexone. The targets were the 6..cap alpha..- and 6..beta..-methacrylate ethers and 6..cap alpha..- and 6..beta..-methacrylate esters prepared from reaction of 6..cap alpha..- and 6..beta..-naltrexol with methyl ..cap alpha..-(bromomethyl)acrylate or methacryloyl chloride. Of three methacrylate derivatives, the 6..cap alpha..-ether was the most potent in an opioid receptor binding assay with (/sup 3/H)-naltrexone. In the presence of sodium ion, preincubation of the 6..cap alpha..-ether resulted in recovery of about 60% of original (/sup 3/H)-naltrexone binding suggesting some irreversible effects. The methacrylate esters precipitated withdrawal in morphine dependent monkeys. The enantiomers of verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, have different pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties. The oxidative metabolism of verapamil was studied in rat and human liver microsomes and in man after a single oral dose.

  10. Naltrexone modifies the palatability of basic tastes and alcohol in outbred male rats.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Frank M; Hill, Katherine G; Kaczmarek, Helen J; Coonfield, Daniel L; Kiefer, Stephen W

    2002-06-01

    Naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, has been shown to reduce the palatability of 10% alcohol solutions in rats, as measured by taste reactivity. In the present study, the effect of acute naltrexone treatment on taste reactivity to a variety of taste solutions and concentrations was tested to determine whether naltrexone has generalized effects on taste responsiveness. Thirty minutes before a taste reactivity test, rats were injected with either naltrexone (3 mg/kg; n = 15) or saline (n = 15). On separate days, rats were tested with distilled water and three concentrations each of sucrose (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 M), sodium chloride (0.06, 0.10, and 0.30 M), quinine hydrochloride (0.0005, 0.001, and 0.005 M), and alcohol [10%, 20%, and 40% (vol./vol.)]. In Experiment 1, naltrexone consistently reduced the palatability of alcohol and sodium chloride solutions (across concentrations), as reflected by a decrease in ingestive responding and an increase in aversive responding. Naltrexone increased aversive responding for sucrose but did not affect ingestive responding for these solutions. Finally, there was no significant effect of naltrexone on responding to quinine hydrochloride. A second experiment with naive rats and five concentrations of sucrose (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 M) replicated the initial data: Across concentrations, naltrexone produced a significant increase in aversive responding but did not alter ingestive responding. In Experiment 3, naive rats were tested with five concentrations of quinine hydrochloride (0.00001, 0.00005, 0.0001, 0.0005, and 0.005 M). Results indicated that naltrexone significantly altered taste reactivity to the bitter solutions (less ingestive responding and more aversive responding), particularly at the lower concentrations. The results indicate that naltrexone treatment has significant effects on taste reactivity to some aqueous solutions (alcohol, sodium chloride), regardless of solution concentration. The effects of naltrexone on

  11. Low-dose memantine attenuated methadone dose in opioid-dependent patients: a 12-week double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Po See; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Liang-Jen; Lee, I Hui; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Chen, Kao Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2015-05-19

    Low-dose memantine might have anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic effects mechanistically remote from an NMDA receptor. We investigated whether add-on memantine reduced cytokine levels and benefitted patients with opioid dependence undergoing methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) in a randomized, double-blind, controlled 12-week study. Patients were randomly assigned to a group: Memantine (5 mg/day) (n = 53) or Placebo (n = 75). The methadone dose required and retention in treatment were monitored. Plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were examined during weeks 0, 1, 4, 8, and 12. General linear mixed models were used to examine therapeutic effect. After 12 weeks, Memantine-group required a somewhat lower methadone dose than did Placebo-group (P = 0.039). They also had significantly lower plasma TNF-α and significantly higher TGF-β1 levels. We provide evidence of the benefit of add-on memantine in opioid dependent patients undergoing MMT.

  12. Post-treatment with an ultra-low dose of NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium attenuates disease progression in multiple Parkinson's disease models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingshan; Qian, Li; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Wilson, Belinda; Oyarzabal, Esteban; Ali, Syed; Robinson, Bonnie; Rao, Deepa; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2015-05-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, a key superoxide-producing enzyme, plays a critical role in microglia-mediated chronic neuroinflammation and subsequent progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. Although nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-targeting anti-inflammatory therapy for Parkinson's disease has been proposed, its application in translational research remains limited. The aim of this study was to obtain preclinical evidence supporting this therapeutic strategy by testing the efficacy of an ultra-low dose of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium in both endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide)- and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated mice using post-treatment regimens. Our data revealed that post-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium significantly attenuated progressive dopaminergic degeneration and improved rotarod activity. Remarkably, post-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium 10 months after lipopolysaccharide injection when mice had 30% loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons, showed high efficacy in protecting the remaining neuronal population and restoring motor function. Diphenyleneiodonium-elicited neuroprotection was associated with the inhibition of microglial activation, a reduction in the expression of proinflammatory factors and an attenuation of α-synuclein aggregation. A pathophysiological evaluation of diphenyleneiodonium-treated mice, including assessment of body weight, organs health, and neuronal counts, revealed no overt signs of toxicity. In summary, infusion of ultra-low dose diphenyleneiodonium potently reduced microglia-mediated chronic neuroinflammation by selectively inhibiting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and halted the progression of neurodegeneration in mouse models of Parkinson's disease. The robust neuroprotective effects and lack of apparent toxic side effects suggest that diphenyleneiodonium at

  13. Post-treatment with an ultra-low dose of NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium attenuates disease progression in multiple Parkinson’s disease models

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Li; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Wilson, Belinda; Oyarzabal, Esteban; Ali, Syed; Robinson, Bonnie; Rao, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, a key superoxide-producing enzyme, plays a critical role in microglia-mediated chronic neuroinflammation and subsequent progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease. Although nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-targeting anti-inflammatory therapy for Parkinson’s disease has been proposed, its application in translational research remains limited. The aim of this study was to obtain preclinical evidence supporting this therapeutic strategy by testing the efficacy of an ultra-low dose of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium in both endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide)- and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated mice using post-treatment regimens. Our data revealed that post-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium significantly attenuated progressive dopaminergic degeneration and improved rotarod activity. Remarkably, post-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium 10 months after lipopolysaccharide injection when mice had 30% loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons, showed high efficacy in protecting the remaining neuronal population and restoring motor function. Diphenyleneiodonium-elicited neuroprotection was associated with the inhibition of microglial activation, a reduction in the expression of proinflammatory factors and an attenuation of α-synuclein aggregation. A pathophysiological evaluation of diphenyleneiodonium-treated mice, including assessment of body weight, organs health, and neuronal counts, revealed no overt signs of toxicity. In summary, infusion of ultra-low dose diphenyleneiodonium potently reduced microglia-mediated chronic neuroinflammation by selectively inhibiting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and halted the progression of neurodegeneration in mouse models of Parkinson’s disease. The robust neuroprotective effects and lack of apparent toxic side effects suggest that diphenyleneiodonium

  14. MO-E-17A-08: Attenuation-Based Size Adjusted, Scanner-Independent Organ Dose Estimates for Head CT Exams: TG 204 for Head CT

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M; Zankl, M; DeMarco, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group 204 described size specific dose estimates (SSDE) for body scans. The purpose of this work is to use a similar approach to develop patient-specific, scanner-independent organ dose estimates for head CT exams using an attenuation-based size metric. Methods: For eight patient models from the GSF family of voxelized phantoms, dose to brain and lens of the eye was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations of contiguous axial scans for 64-slice MDCT scanners from four major manufacturers. Organ doses were normalized by scannerspecific 16 cm CTDIvol values and averaged across all scanners to obtain scanner-independent CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients for each patient model. Head size was measured at the first slice superior to the eyes; patient perimeter and effective diameter (ED) were measured directly from the GSF data. Because the GSF models use organ identification codes instead of Hounsfield units, water equivalent diameter (WED) was estimated indirectly. Using the image data from 42 patients ranging from 2 weeks old to adult, the perimeter, ED and WED size metrics were obtained and correlations between each metric were established. Applying these correlations to the GSF perimeter and ED measurements, WED was calculated for each model. The relationship between the various patient size metrics and CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients was then described. Results: The analysis of patient images demonstrated the correlation between WED and ED across a wide range of patient sizes. When applied to the GSF patient models, an exponential relationship between CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients and the WED size metric was observed with correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.77 for the brain and lens of the eye, respectively. Conclusion: Strong correlation exists between CTDIvol normalized brain dose and WED. For the lens of the eye, a lower correlation is observed, primarily due to surface dose variations. Funding

  15. Naltrexone implants after in-patient treatment for opioid dependence: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kunøe, Nikolaj; Lobmaier, Philipp; Vederhus, John Kåre; Hjerkinn, Bjørg; Hegstad, Solfrid; Gossop, Michael; Kristensen, Øistein; Waal, Helge

    2009-06-01

    Naltrexone has considerable potential in helping to prevent relapse in heroin dependency. A longer-lasting formulation for naltrexone treatment is desirable to further reduce non-adherence and relapse during treatment of opiate dependence. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a 6-month naltrexone implant in reducing opioid use after in-patient treatment. A group of 56 abstinence-oriented patients who completed in-patient treatment for opioid dependence were randomly and openly assigned to receive either a 6-month naltrexone implant or their usual aftercare. Drug use and other outcomes were assessed at 6-month follow-up. Patients receiving naltrexone had on average 45 days less heroin use and 60 days less opioid use than controls in the 180-day period (both P<0.05). Blood tests showed naltrexone levels above 1 ng/ml for the duration of 6 months. Two patients died, neither of whom had received an implant. Naltrexone implant treatment safely and significantly reduces opioid use in a motivated population of patients.

  16. Achievement of a target dose of bisoprolol may not be a preferred option for attenuating pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Shizhao; Zhang, Ning; Yang, Zheng; Bian, Zhouyan; Yuan, Yuan; Tang, Qizhu

    2016-01-01

    Bisoprolol is a drug that acts via the mechanism of specifically and selectively inhibiting the β1-adrenoreceptor in cardiac myocytes, and provides a pure reduction of heart rate without changing other cardiac parameters. It has long been clinically used to treat cerebrovascular and cardiovascular illnesses. However, there is little information available on whether the role of bisoprolol in the attenuation of ventricular remodeling is dependent upon the achievement of a target dose, and whether it must be used as a preferred option. The aim of the present study was to clarify the underlying benefits of bisoprolol in the attenuation of pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis at different doses. C57BL/6J male mice, aged 6–8 weeks, were treated with saline or one of three different doses of bisoprolol (Biso: 2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks from day 1 after aortic banding (AB). A number of mice underwent sham surgery and were treated with saline or bisoprolol. The mice were randomly assigned into the sham (n=24) and AB (n=62) groups. The results revealed that bisoprolol had a protective role against the cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and dysfunction caused by AB. This was determined on the basis of heart/body and lung/body weight ratios and heart weight/tibia length ratios, as well as echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters, histological analysis, and the gene expression levels of hypertrophic and fibrotic markers. The present study revealed that administration of bisoprolol for a long time period may enhance its role in the prevention of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis induced by AB, whereas no statistically significant difference was observed between the middle- and high-doses. These observations indicated that the function of bisoprolol in protecting against cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and dysfunction is time-dependent. Furthermore, it is proposed that a middle dose of bisoprolol may be a better option for patients with

  17. Achievement of a target dose of bisoprolol may not be a preferred option for attenuating pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shizhao; Zhang, Ning; Yang, Zheng; Bian, Zhouyan; Yuan, Yuan; Tang, Qizhu

    2016-10-01

    Bisoprolol is a drug that acts via the mechanism of specifically and selectively inhibiting the β1-adrenoreceptor in cardiac myocytes, and provides a pure reduction of heart rate without changing other cardiac parameters. It has long been clinically used to treat cerebrovascular and cardiovascular illnesses. However, there is little information available on whether the role of bisoprolol in the attenuation of ventricular remodeling is dependent upon the achievement of a target dose, and whether it must be used as a preferred option. The aim of the present study was to clarify the underlying benefits of bisoprolol in the attenuation of pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis at different doses. C57BL/6J male mice, aged 6-8 weeks, were treated with saline or one of three different doses of bisoprolol (Biso: 2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks from day 1 after aortic banding (AB). A number of mice underwent sham surgery and were treated with saline or bisoprolol. The mice were randomly assigned into the sham (n=24) and AB (n=62) groups. The results revealed that bisoprolol had a protective role against the cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and dysfunction caused by AB. This was determined on the basis of heart/body and lung/body weight ratios and heart weight/tibia length ratios, as well as echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters, histological analysis, and the gene expression levels of hypertrophic and fibrotic markers. The present study revealed that administration of bisoprolol for a long time period may enhance its role in the prevention of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis induced by AB, whereas no statistically significant difference was observed between the middle- and high-doses. These observations indicated that the function of bisoprolol in protecting against cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and dysfunction is time-dependent. Furthermore, it is proposed that a middle dose of bisoprolol may be a better option for patients with cardiovascular

  18. Development of TV003/TV005, a single dose, highly immunogenic live attenuated dengue vaccine; what makes this vaccine different from the Sanofi-Pasteur CYD™ vaccine?

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is caused by four serotype-distinct dengue viruses (DENVs), and developing a multivalent vaccine against dengue has not been straightforward since partial immunity to DENV may predispose to more severe disease upon subsequent DENV infection. The vaccine that is furthest along in development is CYD™, a live attenuated tetravalent vaccine (LATV) produced by Sanofi Pasteur. Although the multi-dose vaccine demonstrated protection against severe dengue, its overall efficacy was limited by DENV serotype, serostatus at vaccination, region and age. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has developed the LATV dengue vaccines TV003/TV005. A single dose of either TV003 or TV005 induced seroconversion to four DENV serotypes in 74-92% (TV003) and 90% (TV005) of flavivirus seronegative adults and elicited near-sterilizing immunity to a second dose of vaccine administered 6-12 months later. The important differences in the structure, infectivity and immune responses to TV003/TV005 are compared with CYD™.

  19. Repeated dosing of ABT-102, a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, enhances TRPV1-mediated analgesic activity in rodents, but attenuates antagonist-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Honore, Prisca; Chandran, Prasant; Hernandez, Gricelda; Gauvin, Donna M; Mikusa, Joseph P; Zhong, Chengmin; Joshi, Shailen K; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Sevcik, Molly A; Fryer, Ryan M; Segreti, Jason A; Banfor, Patricia N; Marsh, Kennan; Neelands, Torben; Bayburt, Erol; Daanen, Jerome F; Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung; Kort, Michael E; Reilly, Regina M; Surowy, Carol S; Kym, Philip R; Mantyh, Patrick W; Sullivan, James P; Jarvis, Michael F; Faltynek, Connie R

    2009-03-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a ligand-gated ion channel that functions as an integrator of multiple pain stimuli including heat, acid, capsaicin and a variety of putative endogenous lipid ligands. TRPV1 antagonists have been shown to decrease inflammatory pain in animal models and to produce limited hyperthermia at analgesic doses. Here, we report that ABT-102, which is a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, is effective in blocking nociception in rodent models of inflammatory, post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain. ABT-102 decreased both spontaneous pain behaviors and those evoked by thermal and mechanical stimuli in these models. Moreover, we have found that repeated administration of ABT-102 for 5-12 days increased its analgesic activity in models of post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain without an associated accumulation of ABT-102 concentration in plasma or brain. Similar effects were also observed with a structurally distinct TRPV1 antagonist, A-993610. Although a single dose of ABT-102 produced a self-limiting increase in core body temperature that remained in the normal range, the hyperthermic effects of ABT-102 effectively tolerated following twice-daily dosing for 2 days. Therefore, the present data demonstrate that, following repeated administration, the analgesic activity of TRPV1 receptor antagonists is enhanced, while the associated hyperthermic effects are attenuated. The analgesic efficacy of ABT-102 supports its advancement into clinical studies.

  20. Employment-based Reinforcement of Adherence to Oral Naltrexone in Unemployed Injection Drug Users: 12-month Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kelly; DeFulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J.; Donlin, Wendy D.; Aklin, Will M.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Oral naltrexone could be a promising relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for recently detoxified opioid-dependent patients, however interventions are often needed to promote adherence with this treatment approach. We recently conducted a study to evaluate a 26-week employment-based reinforcement intervention of oral naltrexone in unemployed injection drug users (Dunn et al., 2013). Participants were randomly assigned into a Contingency (n=35) group required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain entry into a therapeutic workplace, or a Prescription (n=32) group given a take-home supply of oral naltrexone and access to the workplace without observed ingestion. Monthly urine samples were collected and analyzed for evidence for naltrexone adherence, opioid use, and cocaine use. As previously reported, Contingency participants provided significantly more naltrexone-positive urine samples than Prescription participants during the 26-week intervention period. The goal of this current study is to report the 12-month outcomes, which occurred 6 months after the intervention ended. Results at the 12-month visit showed no between-group differences in naltrexone-positive, opioid-negative, or cocaine-negative urine samples, and no participant self-reported using naltrexone at the follow-up visit. These results show that even after a period of successfully reinforced oral naltrexone adherence longer-term naltrexone use is unlikely to be maintained after reinforcement contingencies are discontinued. PMID:25134047

  1. Employment-based reinforcement of adherence to oral naltrexone in unemployed injection drug users: 12-month outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kelly; DeFulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J; Donlin, Wendy D; Aklin, Will M; Nuzzo, Paul A; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E; Silverman, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    Oral naltrexone could be a promising relapse-prevention pharmacotherapy for recently detoxified opioid-dependent patients; however, interventions are often needed to promote adherence with this treatment approach. We recently conducted a study to evaluate a 26-week employment-based reinforcement intervention of oral naltrexone in unemployed injection drug users (Dunn et al., 2013). Participants were randomly assigned into a contingency (n = 35) group required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain entry into a therapeutic workplace or a prescription (n = 32) group given a take-home supply of oral naltrexone and access to the workplace without observed ingestion. Monthly urine samples were collected and analyzed for evidence for naltrexone adherence, opioid use, and cocaine use. As previously reported, contingency participants provided significantly more naltrexone-positive urine samples than prescription participants during the 26-week intervention period. The goal of this current study is to report the 12-month outcomes, which occurred 6 months after the intervention ended. Results at the 12-month visit showed no between-groups differences in naltrexone-positive, opioid-negative, or cocaine-negative urine samples and no participant self-reported using naltrexone at the follow-up visit. These results show that even after a period of successfully reinforced oral naltrexone adherence, longer-term naltrexone use is unlikely to be maintained after reinforcement contingencies are discontinued. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of two doses of RIX4414 live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine in healthy infants.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Eliete C; Clemens, Sue Ann C; Oliveira, Consuelo S; Justino, Maria Cleonice A; Rubio, Pilar; Gabbay, Yvone B; da Silva, Veronilce B; Mascarenhas, Joana D P; Noronha, Vânia L; Clemens, Ralf; Gusmão, Rosa Helena P; Sanchez, Nervo; Monteiro, Talita Antônia F; Linhares, Alexandre C

    2007-01-01

    To determine the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of two doses of rotavirus vaccine in healthy Brazilian infants. A randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela. Infants received two oral doses of vaccine or placebo at 2 and 4 months of age, concurrently with routine immunizations, except for oral poliomyelitis vaccine (OPV). This paper reports results from Belém, Brazil, where the number of subjects per group and the viral vaccine titers were: 194 (10(4.7) focus forming units - FFU), 196 (10(5.2) FFU), 194 (10(5.8) FFU) and 194 (placebo). Anti-rotavirus (anti-RV) antibody response was assessed in 307 subjects. Clinical severity of gastroenteritis episodes was measured using a 20-point scoring system with a score of >or= 11 defined as severe GE. The rates of solicited general symptoms were similar in vaccine and placebo recipients. At 2 months after the second dose, a serum IgA response to RV occurred in 54.7 to 74.4% of vaccinees. No interference was seen in the immunogenicity of routine vaccines. Vaccine efficacy against any rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) was 63.5% (95%CI 20.8-84.4) for the highest concentration (10(5.8) FFU). Efficacy was 81.5% (95%CI 44.5-95.4) against severe RVGE. At its highest concentration (10(5.8) FFU), RIX4414 provided 79.8% (95%CI 26.4-96.3) protection against severe RVGE by G9 strain. RIX4414 was highly immunogenic with a low reactogenicity profile and did not interfere with seroresponse to diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B and Hib antigens. Two doses of RIX4414 provided significant protection against severe GE caused by RV.

  3. Long acting injectable versus oral naltrexone maintenance therapy with psychosocial intervention for heroin dependence: A quasi-experiment

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Adam C.; Comer, Sandra D.; Sullivan, Maria A.; Bisaga, Adam; Carpenter, Kenneth; Raby, Wilfrid M.; Yu, Elmer; O’Brien, Charles P.; Nunes, Edward V.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To conduct a quasi-experimental comparison of early clinical outcomes between injectable, sustained release, depot naltrexone formulation versus oral naltrexone maintenance therapy. Method Early retention and urine results were compared between patients participating in two concurrently run randomized clinical trials of oral (N = 69) and long acting injectable naltrexone maintenance therapy with psychosocial therapy (N = 42). Retention in treatment and opiate use in the first 8-weeks post-detoxification were compared. Results Long acting injectable naltrexone produced significantly better outcome than oral naltrexone on days retained in treatment and one measure of opiate use; other measures were not significantly different, but differences were in the same direction. In subanalyses, there were interaction effects between baseline heroin severity and type of treatment. In subanalyses, heroin users with more severe baseline use showed better retention in oral naltrexone maintenance combined with intensive psychotherapy (Behavior Naltrexone Therapy) as compared to retention of severe users treated with long acting naltrexone injections combined with standard cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy; less severe heroin users evidenced better outcomes when treated with long acting injectable naltrexone. Conclusions This quasi-experimental analysis provides tentative indications of superior outcomes for heroin dependent patients treated with long acting injectable naltrexone compared to oral naltrexone. The finding that heroin users with more severe baseline use achieved better outcomes with oral naltrexone is most probably attributable to the intensive nature of the psychosocial treatments provided, and points to the opportunity for continued research in augmenting injectable naltrexone with psychosocial strategies to further improve outcome especially in more severe users. The results should be considered exploratory given the quasi-experimental nature of the

  4. Safety, dose, immunogenicity, and transmissibility of an oral live attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a vaccine candidate (SC602) among healthy adults and school children in Matlab, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Kazi Mizanur; Arifeen, Shams El; Zaman, K; Rahman, Mahbubur; Raqib, Rubhana; Yunus, Mohammad; Begum, Nazma; Islam, Md Shaheenul; Sohel, Badrul Munir; Rahman, Muntasirur; Venkatesan, Malabi; Hale, Thomas L; Isenbarger, Daniel W; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Black, Robert E; Baqui, Abdullah H

    2011-02-01

    In double-blind trials in Bangladesh, 88 adults, and 79 children (8-10 years) were randomized to receive either a single oral dose of 1 × 10(4), 1 × 10(5) or 1 × 10(6)CFU of SC602 (a live, attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a strain vaccine) or placebo. In the adult outpatient 1 × 10(6) CFU group, severe joint pain and body aches were reported by one and two vaccinees respectively. In the adult inpatient trial, SC602 was isolated from 3 volunteers, pre-vaccination antibody titers were high, and fourfold increases in serum IgG anti-LPS responses were observed in 2 of 5 subjects of the 1 × 10(6)CFU group. None of the volunteers developed diarrhea. Overall, SC602 was found to be associated with minimal vaccine shedding, minimal reactogenicity, no transmission risk, and low immune stimulation.

  5. Attenuation of cell motility observed with high doses of sphingosine 1-phosphate or phosphorylated FTY720 involves RGS2 through its interactions with the receptor S1P.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Takayuki; Igarashi, Yasuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) stimulation enhances cell motility via the G-protein coupled S1P receptor S1P1. This ligand-induced, receptor-mediated cell motility follows a typical bell-shaped dose-response curve, that is, stimulation with low concentrations of S1P enhances cell motility, whereas excess ligand stimulation does not enhance it. So far, the attenuation of the response at higher ligand concentrations has not been explained. We report here that S1P1 interacts with the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS)-2 protein, which is a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for heterotrimeric G proteins, in a concentration dependent manner. The RGS2-S1P1 complex dissociated at higher ligand concentrations, yet it was unaffected at low concentrations, suggesting that the dissociated RGS2 is involved in the concurrent decrease of cell motility. In RGS2 knockdown cells, the decrease of cell motility induced by high ligand concentrations was rescued. S1P1 internalization was not implicated in the attenuation of the response. Similar results were observed upon stimulation with the phosphorylated form of FTY720 (FTYP), which is an S1P1 agonist. In conclusion, the suppressed response in cell motility induced by excess S1P or FTYP via S1P1 is regulated by RGS2 functioning through a mechanism that is independent of S1P1 internalization.

  6. Safety and immunogenicity of a mutagenized, live attenuated Rift Valley fever vaccine, MP-12, in a Phase 1 dose escalation and route comparison study in humans.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Phillip R; McClain, David; Quinn, Xiaofei; Coonan, Kevin M; Mangiafico, Joseph; Makuch, Richard S; Morrill, John; Peters, Clarence J

    2016-01-20

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) poses a risk as a potential agent in bioterrorism or agroterrorism. A live attenuated RVF vaccine (RVF MP-12) has been shown to be safe and protective in animals and showed promise in two initial clinical trials. In the present study, healthy adult human volunteers (N=56) received a single injection of (a) RVF MP-12, administered subcutaneously (SQ) at a concentration of 10(4.7) plaque-forming units (pfu) (SQ Group); (b) RVF MP-12, administered intramuscularly (IM) at 10(3.4)pfu (IM Group 1); (c) RVF MP-12, administered IM at 10(4.4)pfu (IM Group 2); or (d) saline (Placebo Group). The vaccine was well tolerated by volunteers in all dose and route groups. Infrequent and minor adverse events were seen among recipients of both placebo and RVF MP-12. One subject had viremia detectable by direct plaque assay, and six subjects from IM Group 2 had transient low-titer viremia detectable only by nucleic acid amplification. Of the 43 vaccine recipients, 40 (93%) achieved neutralizing antibodies (measured as an 80% plaque reduction neutralization titer [PRNT80]) as well as RVF-specific IgM and IgG. The highest peak geometric mean PRNT80 titers were observed in IM Group 2. Of 34 RVF MP-12 recipients available for testing 1 year following inoculation, 28 (82%) remained seropositive (PRNT80≥1:20); this included 20 of 23 vaccinees (87%) from IM Group 2. The live attenuated RVF MP-12 vaccine was safe and immunogenic at the doses and routes studied. Given the need for an effective vaccine against RVF virus, further evaluation in humans is warranted.

  7. Comparison of two different doses of dexmedetomidine in attenuating cardiovascular responses during laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation: A double blind, randomized, clinical trial study.

    PubMed

    Jarineshin, H; Abdolahzade Baghaei, A; Fekrat, F; Kargar, A; Abdi, N; Navabipour, S; Zare, A; Akhlaghi, H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Secure airway for proper ventilation during anesthesia is one important component of a successful surgery. Endotracheal intubation is one of the most important methods in this context. Intubation method and used medication are considerably important in attenuating complications. This research aimed to investigate the impact of two different doses of dexmedetomidine in mitigating cardiovascular responses to endotracheal intubation in candidate cases supporting voluntary operation. Methods. The current research contained 90 cases in the range of 18 and 50 old, with ASA I,II supporting voluntary operation, who were randomly classified into three teams, each group consisting of 30 cases. The first set (A) got 0.5 μg/ kg dexmedetomidine, the second set (B) got 1 μg/ kg dexmedetomidine and the third set (C) got an equal volume of saline as placebo, 600 seconds earlier the initiation of anesthesia. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded at baseline (T0), then after the injection and the earlier initiation of anesthesia (T1), after the induction of anesthesia and before the endotracheal intubation (T2), promptly after tracheal intubation, 180, and 300 after endotracheal intubation (T4, T5). Data was analyzed and p < 0.05 was supposed notable. Findings. In this research, 3 teams were similar regarding weight, age, height, sex and duration of laryngoscopy. The diastolic mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and systolic arterial pressure were significantly lower in dexmedetomidine teams (A,B) at all times after the endotracheal intubation compared to group C. There were no significant differences in hemodynamic factors among group A, B. Conclusion. Dexmedetomidine effectively and significantly attenuates cardiovascular and hemodynamic responses during endotracheal intubation. In addition, different doses of dexmedetomidine did not cause any significant distinct result in mitigating cardiovascular responses.

  8. Long term follow-up study to evaluate immunogenicity and safety of a single dose of live attenuated hepatitis a vaccine in children.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Monjori; Shah, Nitin; Faridi, Mma; Ghosh, Apurba; Sankaranarayanan, V S; Aggarwal, Anju; Chatterjee, Suparna; Bhattacharyya, Nisha; Kadhe, Ganesh; Vishnoi, Gaurav; Mane, Amey

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, viral hepatitis continues to be a cause of considerable morbidity and mortality. Mass immunization with a single dose of live attenuated HAV has been shown to significantly reduce disease burden in the community. This was a phase IV, 5-year follow up study carried out at 4 centers (Kolkata, Delhi, Mumbai and Chennai) across India. The subjects with antibody titer <20 mIU/mL at baseline were evaluated for long term immunogenicity. Of the 503 subjects enrolled, 349 subjects were baseline seronegative with an anti-HAV antibody titer <20 mIU/mL. Overall, 343 subjects could be followed up at some point of time during this 5 y post vaccination period. In the last year (60 months) of follow-up, 108 subjects (97.3%) of 111 subjects (who came for follow-up at the end of 5 y) had a protective antibody titer (anti-HAV antibody titer >20 mIU/mL). The seroconversion rates considering seroprotection levels of anti-HAV antibody titer >20 mIU/mL, following vaccination starting from 6 weeks, 6 months, 12 months, 24 months, 36 months, 48 months and 60 months were 95.1%, 97.9%, 98.3%, 96.2%, 97.8%, 92.6% and 97.3%, respectively. The geometric mean concentration (GMC) over the years increased from 64.9 mIU/mL at 6 weeks to 38.1 mIU/mL and 135.2 mIU/mL at 6 months and 12 months, respectively and was maintained at 127.1 mIU/mL at 60 months. In conclusion, the result of this 5-year follow up study showed that the single dose of live attenuated vaccine is well tolerated and provides long-term immunogenicity in healthy Indian children.

  9. Single high-dose dexamethasone and sodium salicylate failed to attenuate phosgene-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangfang; Pauluhn, Jürgen; Trübel, Hubert; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-06

    Life-threatening acute lung injury potentially occurs following high-level accidental exposures to phosgene gas. This situation was mirrored in rats exposed nose-only at 900-1000 mg phosgene/m(3)min. At this exposure level, previous studies on rats demonstrated sustained reflexively induced cardiopulmonary dysfunction and evidence of vascular fluid redistribution. These findings challenge the currently applied treatment strategies to mitigate the presumed non-cardiogenic lung edema by steroidal or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This study investigates whether high doses of curatively administered dexamethasone (DX; 100 mg/kg bw, ip) and sodium salicylate (SS; 200 mg/kg bw, ip), alone or in combination, show efficacy to mitigate the phosgene-induced lung edema. Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), animal morbidity and mortality, and increased lung weights one day postexposure served as endpoints of lung injury and drug efficacy. When applying this dosing regimen, SS showed minimal (if any) efficacy while DX, alone or in combination with SS, substantially aggravated the emerging lung edema (lung weights) with 40% mortality. The degree of acute lung injury (ALI) was mirrored by increased eNO. Its direct relationship to ALI-severity was evidenced by decreased eNO following NO-synthetase inhibitor administration (aminoguanidine-aerosol) and associated mitigation of ALI. All non-treated phosgene-exposed as well as treated but non-phosgene-exposed rats survived. This experimental evidence suggests that high-dose corticoid treatments may aggravate the pulmonary toxicity of phosgene. Similarly, this outcome supports the supposition that non-inflammatory, cardiogenic and/or neurogenic factors play a role in this type of acute lung injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Naltrexone implants compared to methadone: outcomes six months after prison release.

    PubMed

    Lobmaier, Philipp P; Kunøe, Nikolaj; Gossop, Michael; Katevoll, Tormod; Waal, Helge

    2010-01-01

    After prison release, offenders with heroin use problems are at high risk of relapse and overdose death. There is a particular need for treatments that can be initiated in prison and continued after release into the community. Methadone maintenance treatment has been shown to reduce heroin use, criminality and mortality. Naltrexone implant treatment has not previously been evaluated in prison settings. This study compares the effects of naltrexone implants and methadone treatment on heroin and other illicit drug use, and criminality among heroin-dependent inmates after release from prison. Forty-six volunteers were randomly allocated to naltrexone implants or methadone before release. Intention-to-treat analyses showed reductions in both groups in frequency of use of heroin and benzodiazepines, as well as criminality, 6 months after prison release. Naltrexone implants may be a valuable treatment option in prison settings. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. A randomized trial of oral naltrexone for treating opioid-dependent offenders.

    PubMed

    Coviello, Donna M; Cornish, James W; Lynch, Kevin G; Alterman, Arthur I; O'Brien, Charles P

    2010-01-01

    Offenders with a history of opioid dependence are a particularly difficult group to treat. A large proportion of offenders typically relapse shortly after release from prison, commit drug-related crimes, and then are arrested and eventually re-incarcerated. Previous research demonstrated that oral naltrexone was effective in reducing opioid use and preventing recidivism among offenders under federal supervision. The 111 opioid-dependent offenders in this study were under various levels of supervision that included county and federal probation/parole, a treatment court, an alternative disposition program, and an intermediate punishment program. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive 6 months of either 300 mg per week of oral naltrexone plus standard psychosocial treatment as usual (n = 56) or standard psychosocial treatment as usual (TAU) without naltrexone (n = 55). While the TAU subjects who remained in treatment used more opioids than the naltrexone subjects who remained, the high dropout rate for both groups made it difficult to assess the effectiveness of naltrexone. The study provides limited support for the use of oral naltrexone for offenders who are not closely monitored by the criminal justice system.

  12. Improving clinical outcomes for naltrexone as a management of problem alcohol use

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, Gary K

    2013-01-01

    Despite being a relatively effective and safe treatment, the clinical management of alcohol abuse/dependence by oral naltrexone can be compromised due to the patient's non-compliance with daily use of this medication. Over the past decade an increasing body of research has suggested that the use of sustained release depot naltrexone preparations can overcome this issue and deliver improved clinical outcomes. However, at the same time, research findings from diverse areas of pharmacogenetics, neurobiology and behavioural psychology have also been converging to identify variables including genetic markers, patient psychosocial characteristics and drug use history differences, or clusters of these variables that play a major role in mediating the response of alcohol abuse/dependent persons to treatment by naltrexone. While this article does not attempt to review all available data pertaining to an individual alcohol dependent patient's response to treatment by naltrexone, it does identify relevant research areas and highlights the importance of data arising from them. The characterization of clinical markers, to identify those patients who are most likely to benefit from naltrexone and to tailor a more individual naltrexone treatment, will ultimately provide significant benefit to both patients and clinicians by optimizing treatment outcome. PMID:22946873

  13. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of carfentanil and naltrexone in female common eland (Taurotragus oryx).

    PubMed

    Cole, Alexander; Mutlow, Adrian; Isaza, Ramiro; Carpenter, James W; Koch, David E; Hunter, Robert P; Dresser, Betsy L

    2006-09-01

    The pharmacokinetic parameters of carfentanil and naltrexone were determined in the common eland (Taurotragus oryx). Six adult females were immobilized with xylazine (0.23 +/- 0.03 mg/kg i.m.) and carfentanil (0.0169 +/- 0.0005 mg/kg i.m.) for a 45-min period, during which time routine health care procedures were performed. Heart and respiration rates and body temperatures were monitored throughout the immobilization period. A single intramuscular injection of naltrexone (1.66 +/- 0.08 mg/kg i.m.) was sufficient for reversal. The eland were intermittently restrained in a hydraulic squeeze chute for serial blood sample collection via jugular venipuncture during immobilization and up to 48 hr post-immobilization. The quantification of carfentanil and naltrexone in the plasma was performed by liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy methods. Carfentanil was rapidly absorbed following administration, with the peak plasma concentration (C(max)) at 13.8 min. Naltrexone was readily absorbed and reached C(max) at 23.4 +/- 16.8 min after administration. All animals stood 2.7 +/- 2.2 min after naltrexone administration. Carfentanil has a half-life of 7.7 hr, whereas naltrexone has a much shorter half-life of 3.7 hr. Although respiratory rates appeared to fluctuate widely among animals, heart rates and body temperature remained stable throughout the immobilization. Renarcotization was not noted as a major complication.

  14. Improving clinical outcomes for naltrexone as a management of problem alcohol use.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Gary K

    2013-11-01

    Despite being a relatively effective and safe treatment, the clinical management of alcohol abuse/dependence by oral naltrexone can be compromised due to the patient's non-compliance with daily use of this medication. Over the past decade an increasing body of research has suggested that the use of sustained release depot naltrexone preparations can overcome this issue and deliver improved clinical outcomes. However, at the same time, research findings from diverse areas of pharmacogenetics, neurobiology and behavioural psychology have also been converging to identify variables including genetic markers, patient psychosocial characteristics and drug use history differences, or clusters of these variables that play a major role in mediating the response of alcohol abuse/dependent persons to treatment by naltrexone. While this article does not attempt to review all available data pertaining to an individual alcohol dependent patient's response to treatment by naltrexone, it does identify relevant research areas and highlights the importance of data arising from them. The characterization of clinical markers, to identify those patients who are most likely to benefit from naltrexone and to tailor a more individual naltrexone treatment, will ultimately provide significant benefit to both patients and clinicians by optimizing treatment outcome.

  15. Optimization of Naltrexone Diclofenac Codrugs for Sustained Drug Delivery Across Microneedle-Treated Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Priyanka; Lee, DoMin; Kim, Kyung Bo; Stinchcomb, Audra L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was to optimize the structure of codrugs for extended delivery across microneedle treated skin. Naltrexone, the model compound was linked with diclofenac, a nonspecific cyclooxygenase inhibitor to enhance the pore lifetime following microneedle treatment and develop a 7 day transdermal system for naltrexone. Methods Four different codrugs of naltrexone and diclofenac were compared in terms of stability and solubility. Transdermal flux, permeability and skin concentration of both parent drugs and codrugs were quantified to form a structure permeability relationship. Results The results indicated that all codrugs bioconverted in the skin. The degree of conversion was dependent on the structure, phenol linked codrugs were less stable compared to the secondary alcohol linked structures. The flux of naltrexone across microneedle treated skin and the skin concentration of diclofenac were higher for the phenol linked codrugs. The polyethylene glycol link enhanced solubility of the codrugs, which translated into flux enhancement. Conclusion The current studies indicated that formulation stability of codrugs and the flux of naltrexone can be enhanced via structure design optimization. The polyethylene glycol linked naltrexone diclofenac codrug is better suited for a 7 day drug delivery system both in terms of stability and drug delivery. PMID:23943543

  16. A review of parenteral sustained-release naltrexone systems

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, J.L.; Kincl, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    The ideal naltrexone sustained-release delivery system should be easy to inject or implant, not cause adverse tissue reaction, release the drug at a relatively constant rate for at least 30 days, and biodegrade within a short time afterwards. Mechanisms which can be used for sustaining drug release include reducing solubility and surface area, coating, encapsulation and microencapsulation, complexation, binding and hydrophilic gelation. Drug release from such systems is controlled by diffusion through a barrier/film, diffusion from a monolithic device, erosion of the surface, hydrolysis, ion exchange, biodegradation, or a combination of these. Injectable systems would seem to be ultimately preferred because of the ease of administration and handling, while the implantable devices may find first use in man since they are easily removable, should that be necessary. Maintaining particulate-free products and sterilization methods are two problems with all parenteral dosage forms. Production must be particularly well controlled and validated.

  17. Controlled delivery of naltrexone by an intraoral device: in vivo study on human subjects.

    PubMed

    Paderni, Carlo; Campisi, Giuseppina; Schumacher, Axel; Göttsche, Thorsten; Giannola, Libero Italo; De Caro, Viviana; Wolff, Andy

    2013-08-16

    Naltrexone is widely used in the treatment of opiate addiction but its current peroral administration is characterized by low bioavailability with various side effects. The development of a long-acting transbuccal delivery device (IntelliDrug) for NLX may be useful to improve patient compliance and the therapy effectiveness. The aims of the study are (a) to test basic safety and effectiveness of controlled transbuccal drug delivery on human subjects; (b) to compare NLX bioavailability following transbuccal delivery vs per os conventional delivery; and (c) to test the hypothesis that transbuccal delivery is more efficient than the conventional route. In this randomized cross-over pilot study, 12 healthy subjects received in a different order 2 types of NLX administration, per os or transbuccal delivery, based on which group they were randomized to. For per os administration 50mg NLX tablets were used, while for transbuccal administration, a NLX-loaded prototype of the IntelliDrug device was fixed on patients' dental arch. Serial blood samples were drawn and analysed for the NLX concentration. The IntelliDrug prototype functioned properly and it did not exert any adverse side-effect. The transbuccal route resulted in administration efficiency 4-17 times higher than conventional per os route. Transbuccal delivery of NLX appears to be a more efficient drug administration route compared to peroral one. It allows to reach a given therapeutic blood level using a small drug dose. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Employment-Based Reinforcement to Motivate Naltrexone Ingestion and Drug Abstinence in the Treatment of Drug Addiction. - 1

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-11-03

    Behavior Therapy; Cocaine; Cocaine (IV); Cocaine Abuse; Cocaine Dependence; Contingency Management; HIV Risk Behaviors; Heroin; Heroin Dependence; Naltrexone; Opioid Dependence; Substance Abuse, Intravenous; Sexual Risk Behaviors

  19. Antioxidant activity elicited by low dose of caffeine attenuates pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures and oxidative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Souza, Mauren Assis; Mota, Bibiana Castagna; Gerbatin, Rogério Rosa; Rodrigues, Fernanda Silva; Castro, Mauro; Fighera, Michele Rechia; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire

    2013-05-01

    Although caffeine supplementation has a beneficial effect on people with neurological disorders, its implications for oxidative damage related to seizures are not well documented. Thus the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two weeks caffeine supplementation (6mg/kg; p.o.) on seizures and neurochemical alterations induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ 60mg/kg i.p.). Statistical analyses showed that long-term rather than single dose caffeine administration decreased the duration of PTZ-induced seizures in adult male Wistar rats as recorded by cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) and behavioral analysis. The quantification of EEG recordings also revealed that caffeine supplementation protected against a wave increase induced by PTZ. Neurochemical analyses revealed that caffeine supplementation increased glutathione (GSH) content per se and protected against the increase in the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and oxidized diclorofluoresceine diacetate (DCFH-DA). Also, caffeine prevent the decrease in GSH content and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity induced by PTZ. Our data also showed that the infusion of L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO; 3.2μmol/site i.c.v), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, two days before injecting PTZ reversed the anticonvulsant effect caused by caffeine. BSO infusion also decreased GSH content and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. However, it increased DCFH-DA oxidation and TBARS per se and reversed the protective effect of caffeine. Results presented in this paper support the neuroprotective effects of low long-term caffeine exposure to epileptic damage and suggest that the increase in the cerebral GSH content caused by caffeine supplementation may provide a new therapeutic approach to the control of seizure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Low-dose growth hormone and hypocaloric nutrition attenuate the protein-catabolic response after major operation.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Z M; He, G Z; Zhang, S Y; Wang, X R; Yang, N F; Zhu, Y; Wilmore, D W

    1989-01-01

    To determine the effects of low-dose recombinant human growth hormone (GH) and hypocaloric nutrition on postoperative convalescence, we performed a placebo-controlled randomized double-blind trial in 18 patients after elective gastrectomy or colectomy. The subjects received parenteral nutrition containing 20 calories/kg per day and 1 g protein/kg per day. Daily injections of drug or placebo were given during the first postoperative week. The nine control subjects lost 3.3 kg (5.9% of preoperative weight) and had a cumulative nitrogen loss of 32.6 +/- 4.2 g nitrogen at eight days. The patients receiving GH lost significantly less weight (1.3 kg) and nitrogen loss was 7.1 +/- 3.1 g at eight days (p less than 0.001). Kinetic studies demonstrated that the anabolic effects of GH were associated with increased protein synthesis, and amino acid flux studies across the forearm revealed increased uptake of amino acid nitrogen in the GH-treated patients. Body compositional analysis revealed that the patients receiving GH maintained their lean body mass despite the major surgical procedure. Analysis of hand grip force showed a 10% loss of strength in the control subjects; with GH the patients maintained their grip force throughout the postoperative period. We conclude that the postoperative catabolic response can be modified with GH and hypocaloric nutrition. These metabolic and physiologic effects should now be studied in a larger number of patients to determine if this approach can reduce morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay for surgical patients. PMID:2802836

  1. SU-C-206-07: A Practical Sparse View Ultra-Low Dose CT Acquisition Scheme for PET Attenuation Correction in the Extended Scan Field-Of-View

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, J; Fan, J; Gopinatha Pillai, A

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To further reduce CT dose, a practical sparse-view acquisition scheme is proposed to provide the same attenuation estimation as higher dose for PET imaging in the extended scan field-of-view. Methods: CT scans are often used for PET attenuation correction and can be acquired at very low CT radiation dose. Low dose techniques often employ low tube voltage/current accompanied with a smooth filter before backprojection to reduce CT image noise. These techniques can introduce bias in the conversion from HU to attenuation values, especially in the extended CT scan field-of-view (FOV). In this work, we propose an ultra-low dose CT technique for PET attenuation correction based on sparse-view acquisition. That is, instead of an acquisition of full amount of views, only a fraction of views are acquired. We tested this technique on a 64-slice GE CT scanner using multiple phantoms. CT scan FOV truncation completion was performed based on the published water-cylinder extrapolation algorithm. A number of continuous views per rotation: 984 (full), 246, 123, 82 and 62 have been tested, corresponding to a CT dose reduction of none, 4x, 8x, 12x and 16x. We also simulated sparse-view acquisition by skipping views from the fully-acquired view data. Results: FBP reconstruction with Q. AC filter on reduced views in the full extended scan field-of-view possesses similar image quality to the reconstruction on acquired full view data. The results showed a further potential for dose reduction compared to the full acquisition, without sacrificing any significant attenuation support to the PET. Conclusion: With the proposed sparse-view method, one can potential achieve at least 2x more CT dose reduction compared to the current Ultra-Low Dose (ULD) PET/CT protocol. A pre-scan based dose modulation scheme can be combined with the above sparse-view approaches, which can even further reduce the CT scan dose during a PET/CT exam.

  2. Preoperative high-dose steroid administration attenuates the surgical stress response following liver resection: results of a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sven C; Hamann, Susanne; Langrehr, Jan M; Höflich, Conny; Mittler, Jens; Jacob, Dictmar; Neuhaus, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Major abdominal surgery such as liver resection is associated with an excessive hyperinflammatory response and transient immunosuppression. We investigated the immunomodulating effect of preoperative pulse administration of high-dose methylprednisolone in patients undergoing hepatic resection without pedicle clamping. Twenty patients who underwent hepatic resection were randomized into two groups: a steroid group (n = 10), in which patients were given 30 mg/kg per body weight (BW) methylprednisolone intravenously, and a control group (n = 10), in which patients received a placebo (sodium chloride) infusion. The main outcome parameter to assess systemic stress was the serum plasma level of interleukin-6 (IL-6). To evaluate cell-mediated immune function, human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) expression on peripheral blood monocytes and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) release by peripheral monocytes was measured. Other investigated serum parameters included C-reactive protein (CRP), total bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), prothrombin time (PT)-INR, and cytokines such as IL-8 and IL-10 and TNF-alpha. Postoperative convalescence, complication rate, and length of hospital stay were compared between the groups. Postoperative plasma concentrations of IL-6 (days 1 and 2), IL-8 (days 2 and 3), and CRP (days 1-4) were significantly lower in the steroid than in the control group. The total bilirubin concentration was significantly lower on day 6 in the steroid than in the control group. Four hours after surgery, LPS-induced TNF-alpha secretion was significantly reduced in the steroid group, but it increased rapidly during the following days. HLA-DR, ALT, and PT-INR levels were not different between the two groups. The postoperative hospital stay in the steroid group was significantly lower compared to that in the control group (mean, 10.5 days versus 14.8 days; P < 0.05). No differences were found in the convalescence score or

  3. Effects of hypoxia-cadmium interactions on rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) mitochondrial bioenergetics: attenuation of hypoxia-induced proton leak by low doses of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Onukwufor, John O; MacDonald, Nicole; Kibenge, Fred; Stevens, Don; Kamunde, Collins

    2014-03-15

    the ETC and sensitizes mitochondria to Cd via mechanisms that involve, at least in part, ROS. Moreover, we provide, for the first time in fish, evidence for a hormetic effect of Cd on mitochondrial bioenergetics--the attenuation of hypoxia/reoxygenation-stimulated proton leak and partial rescue of complex I inhibition by low Cd doses.

  4. Retention rates in two naltrexone programmes for heroin addicts in Vitoria, Spain.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M; Ballesteros, J; González-Oliveros, R; de Apodaka, J R

    1995-01-01

    The main finding of a former Spanish multicenter study (SMS) on the effectiveness of naltrexone maintenance in heroin addicts, was the high retention rate achieved at 24 weeks of follow-up since naltrexone induction (40%). The authors claimed this rate was one of the highest ever reported in the literature for a non-selected sample of opiate addicts and discussed the possible relevance of a set of variables - like motivations and expectations due to a new treatment - on the findings. To assess the possible effects of these variables, we have compared the retention rates in two similar naltrexone programmes. The first programme (hospital sample) included 56 individuals who were also included in the SMS where they accounted for 37% of the total sample. That programme was developed formerly to the naltrexone marketing. The second sample (ambulatory sample) included 67 individuals who were recruited at least a year apart since naltrexone marketing was approved by the Spanish Health Boards. The time-