Science.gov

Sample records for dose response relationships

  1. The Dose Response Relationship for Radiation Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Eric

    2008-03-01

    Recent surveys show that the collective population radiation dose from medical procedures in the U.S. has increased by 750% in the past two decades. It would be impossible to imagine the practice of medicine today without diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, but nevertheless the widespread and rapidly increasing use of a modality which is a known human carcinogen is a cause for concern. To assess the magnitude of the problem it is necessary to establish the shape of the dose response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis. Information on radiation carcinogenesis comes from the A-bomb survivors, from occupationally exposed individuals and from radiotherapy patients. The A-bomb survivor data indicates a linear relationship between dose and the risk of solid cancers up to a dose of about 2.5 Sv. The lowest dose at which there is a significant excess cancer risk is debatable, but it would appear to be between 40 and 100 mSv. Data from the occupation exposure of nuclear workers shows an excess cancer risk at an average dose of 19.4 mSv. At the other end of the dose scale, data on second cancers in radiotherapy patients indicates that cancer risk does not continue to rise as a linear function of dose, but tends towards a plateau of 40 to 60 Gy, delivered in a fractionated regime. These data can be used to estimate the impact of diagnostic radiology at the low dose end of the dose response relationship, and the impact of new radiotherapy modalities at the high end of the dose response relationship. In the case of diagnostic radiology about 90% of the collective population dose comes from procedures (principally CT scans) which involve doses at which there is credible evidence of an excess cancer incidence. While the risk to the individual is small and justified in a symptomatic patient, the same is not true of some screening procedures is asymptomatic individuals, and in any case the huge number of procedures must add up to a potential public health problem. In the

  2. Dose-response relationships for carcinogens: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Zeise, L; Wilson, R; Crouch, E A

    1987-01-01

    We review the experimental evidence for various shapes of dose-response relationships for carcinogens and summarize those experiments that give the most information on relatively low doses. A brief review of some models is given to illustrate the shapes of dose-response curve expected from them. Our major interest is in the use of dose-response relationships to estimate risks to humans at low doses, and so we pay special attention to experimentally observed and theoretically expected nonlinearities. There are few experimental examples of nonlinear dose-response relations in humans, but this may simply be due to the limitations in the data. The several examples in rodents, even though for high dose data, suggest that nonlinearity is common. In some cases such nonlinearities may be rationalized on the basis of the pharmacokinetics of the test compound or its metabolites. PMID:3311725

  3. Dose-response relationship for supraglottic laryngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, L.J.; Thomas, H.D. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    In this editorial, two important issues in the treatment of cancers of the supraglottic larynx which had been raised by other authors, Harwood et al., are discussed. The first is the technique of elective irradiation of clinically uninvolved neck nodes. The second is the question of dose-response relationships for local control of tumors of this site. The present authors do not believe that the data of Harwood et al. can be construed as convincing evidence against a dose-response relationship, because of the heterogeneity of the clinical material and the narrow range of doses represented.(KRM)

  4. Quetiapine: dose-response relationship in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sparshatt, Anna; Jones, Sarah; Taylor, David

    2008-01-01

    Quetiapine is a widely used second-generation antipsychotic that is effective in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar mania. In recent years, various publications have suggested the possibility that, in some patients, higher than licensed dosages are necessary for full therapeutic effect. A 'high-dose' theory of quetiapine activity has developed, leading many prescribers to disregard the formal upper limit of the quetiapine dosage range (750 or 800 mg/day, depending on local labelling). In this review, we examine the clinical and neuroimaging data relating to the use of quetiapine in acute exacerbations of schizophrenia. Fixed-dose efficacy studies of immediate-release (IR) quetiapine suggest dosages of quetiapine of 150-450 mg/day are more effective than placebo and no less effective than dosages of 600 or 750 mg/day. A fixed-dose study of extended-release quetiapine indicated that dosages of 600 and 800 mg/day were equally efficacious and numerically superior to 400 mg/day. Dosages of IR quetiapine averaging between 254 and 525 mg/day have been shown to be equivalent in efficacy to standard dosages of conventional and other atypical antipsychotics. Pooled data support these findings. Effectiveness studies using quetiapine in daily doses averaging between 565 and 653 mg revealed quetiapine to be somewhat less effective than some comparator drugs. Support for the use of high-dosage quetiapine (>800 mg/day) is very limited: case reports, albeit numerous, describe quetiapine as showing therapeutic effects only at dosages above the licensed range; some data suggest widespread use of higher dosages in practice; and neuroimaging data suggest inadequate dopamine receptor occupancy at standard dosages (although these findings may reflect the low affinity of quetiapine for dopamine receptors). Overall, robust controlled data strongly suggest that the standard dosage range for quetiapine is appropriate for clinical use. The balance of evidence does not support the

  5. Radiation Dose-Response Relationships and Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-07-05

    The notion of a dose-response relationship was probably invented shortly after the discovery of poisons, the invention of alcoholic beverages, and the bringing of fire into a confined space in the forgotten depths of ancient prehistory. The amount of poison or medicine ingested can easily be observed to affect the behavior, health, or sickness outcome. Threshold effects, such as death, could be easily understood for intoxicants, medicine, and poisons. As Paracelsus (1493-1541), the 'father' of modern toxicology said, 'It is the dose that makes the poison.' Perhaps less obvious is the fact that implicit in such dose-response relationships is also the notion of dose rate. Usually, the dose is administered fairly acutely, in a single injection, pill, or swallow; a few puffs on a pipe; or a meal of eating or drinking. The same amount of intoxicants, medicine, or poisons administered over a week or month might have little or no observable effect. Thus, before the discovery of ionizing radiation in the late 19th century, toxicology ('the science of poisons') and pharmacology had deeply ingrained notions of dose-response relationships. This chapter demonstrates that the notion of a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation is hopelessly simplistic from a scientific standpoint. While useful from a policy or regulatory standpoint, dose-response relationships cannot possibly convey enough information to describe the problem from a quantitative view of radiation biology, nor can they address societal values. Three sections of this chapter address the concepts, observations, and theories that contribute to the scientific input to the practice of managing risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. The presentation begins with irradiation regimes, followed by responses to high and low doses of ionizing radiation, and a discussion of how all of this can inform radiation risk management. The knowledge that is really needed for prediction of individual risk is presented

  6. Curious cases: Altered dose-response relationships in addiction genetics.

    PubMed

    Uhl, George R; Drgonova, Jana; Hall, F Scott

    2014-03-01

    Dose-response relationships for most addictive substances are "inverted U"-shaped. Addictive substances produce both positive features that include reward, euphoria, anxiolysis, withdrawal-relief, and negative features that include aversion, dysphoria, anxiety and withdrawal symptoms. A simple model differentially associates ascending and descending limbs of dose-response curves with rewarding and aversive influences, respectively. However, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) diagnoses of substance dependence fail to incorporate dose-response criteria and don't directly consider balances between euphoric and dysphoric drug effects. Classical genetic studies document substantial heritable influences on DSM substance dependence. Linkage and genome-wide association studies identify modest-sized effects at any locus. Nevertheless, clusters of SNPs within selected genes display 10(-2)>p>10(-8) associations with dependence in many independent samples. For several of these genes, evidence for cis-regulatory, level-of-expression differences supports the validity of mouse models in which levels of expression are also altered. This review documents surprising, recently defined cases in which convergent evidence from humans and mouse models supports central influences of altered dose-response relationships in mediating the impact of relevant genomic variation on addiction phenotypes. For variation at loci for the α5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, cadherin 13, receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase Δ and neuronal cell adhesion molecule genes, changed dose-response relationships conferred by gene knockouts in mice are accompanied by supporting human data. These observations emphasize desirability of carefully elucidating dose-response relationships for both rewarding and aversive features of abused substances wherever possible. They motivate consideration of individual differences in dose-response relationships in addiction nosology and therapeutics.

  7. Curious cases: Altered dose-response relationships in addiction genetics.

    PubMed

    Uhl, George R; Drgonova, Jana; Hall, F Scott

    2014-03-01

    Dose-response relationships for most addictive substances are "inverted U"-shaped. Addictive substances produce both positive features that include reward, euphoria, anxiolysis, withdrawal-relief, and negative features that include aversion, dysphoria, anxiety and withdrawal symptoms. A simple model differentially associates ascending and descending limbs of dose-response curves with rewarding and aversive influences, respectively. However, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) diagnoses of substance dependence fail to incorporate dose-response criteria and don't directly consider balances between euphoric and dysphoric drug effects. Classical genetic studies document substantial heritable influences on DSM substance dependence. Linkage and genome-wide association studies identify modest-sized effects at any locus. Nevertheless, clusters of SNPs within selected genes display 10(-2)>p>10(-8) associations with dependence in many independent samples. For several of these genes, evidence for cis-regulatory, level-of-expression differences supports the validity of mouse models in which levels of expression are also altered. This review documents surprising, recently defined cases in which convergent evidence from humans and mouse models supports central influences of altered dose-response relationships in mediating the impact of relevant genomic variation on addiction phenotypes. For variation at loci for the α5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, cadherin 13, receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase Δ and neuronal cell adhesion molecule genes, changed dose-response relationships conferred by gene knockouts in mice are accompanied by supporting human data. These observations emphasize desirability of carefully elucidating dose-response relationships for both rewarding and aversive features of abused substances wherever possible. They motivate consideration of individual differences in dose-response relationships in addiction nosology and therapeutics. PMID:24189489

  8. Dose-response relationship of fibrous dusts in intraperitoneal studies.

    PubMed Central

    Roller, M; Pott, F; Kamino, K; Althoff, G H; Bellmann, B

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between the number of fibers injected intraperitoneally and the occurrence of peritoneal mesotheliomas in rats was investigated using data from a series of carcinogenicity studies with several fibrous dusts. Based on observed tumor incidences ranging between 10 and 90%, the hypothesis of a common slope of dose-response relationships (parallel probit lines in probit analysis) cannot be rejected. In general, parallelism of probit lines is considered an indication of a common mode of action. Analysis of the shape of the dose-response relationship, with one apparent exception, shows virtually linear or superlinear behavior, i.e., from these data, there is no indication of a decrease in carcinogenic potency of an elementary carcinogenic unit at lower doses. PMID:9400733

  9. Prediction of the mortality dose-response relationship in man

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.D.; Jones, T.D.

    1987-01-01

    Based upon an extensive data base including 100 separate animal studies, an estimate of the mortality dose-response relationship due to continuous photon radiation is predicted for 70 kg man. The model used in this prediction exercise includes fixed terms accounting for effects of body weight and dose rate, and random terms accounting for inter- and intra-species variation and experimental error. Point predictions and 95% prediction intervals are given for the LD/sub 05/, LD/sub 10/, LD/sub 25/, LD/sub 50/, LD/sub 75/, LD/sub 90/, and LD/sub 95/, for dose rates ranging from 1 to 50 R/min. 6 refs., 5 tabs.

  10. Dose-response relationships for radium-induced bone sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, R.E.; Stehney, A.F.; Lucas, H.F. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The incidence of bone sarcomas among 3055 female radium-dial workers who entered the dial industry before 1950 was used to determine dose-response relationships for the induction of bone sarcomas by radium. Two subpopulations were analyzed: all measured cases who survived at last five years after the start of employment and all cases who survived at least two years after first measurement. The first constituted a group based on year of entry; it contained 1468 women who experienced 42 bone sarcomas; the expected number was 0.4. The second comprised a group based on first measurement; it contained 1257 women who experienced 13 bone sarcomas; the expected number was 0.2. The dose-response function, I = (C + ..cap alpha..D + ..beta..D/sup 2/)e/sup -..gamma..D/, and simplifications of this general form, were fit to each data set. Two functions, I = (C + ..cap alpha..D + ..beta..D/sup 2/)e/sup -..gamma..D/ and I = (C + ..beta..D/sup 2/)e/sup -..gamma..D/, fit the data for year of entry (p greater than or equal to 0.05); both these functions and I = (C + ..cap alpha..D) fit the data for first measurement. The function I = (C + ..beta..D/sup 2/)e/sup -..gamma..D/ was used to predict the number of bone sarcomas in all other pre-1950 radium cases (medical, laboratory, and other exposure); fewer were actually observed than the fit of this function to the female dial workers predicted.

  11. Dose-response relationships and extrapolation in toxicology - Mechanistic and statistical considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Controversy on toxicological dose-response relationships and low-dose extrapolation of respective risks is often the consequence of misleading data presentation, lack of differentiation between types of response variables, and diverging mechanistic interpretation. In this chapter...

  12. Computer Simulation of Quantal Dose-Response Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGilliard, Kip L.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a program which simulates animal pharmacology experiments involving "all-or-none" responses. Use of the Applesoft BASIC program in the pharmacology teaching laboratory provides students with a rapid and economical way to gain experience in the design and statistical analysis of quantal dose-response experiments. Information on obtaining…

  13. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF DOSE-EFFECT AND DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT In 2003, the International Union of Pure and Applied chemistry (IUPAC) issued a glossary of terms that included the defi nition of dose-effect and doseresponse relationships (Nordberg et al., 2004). Dose effect relationship is defined as an association between dose and...

  14. Dose-Response Relationship between Exercise and Respiratory Disease Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess prospectively the dose-response relationship between respiratory disease (ICD10: J1-99), pneumonia (ICD10: J12.0-18.9), and asperation pneumonia mortality (ICD10: J69) vs. baseline walking and running energy expenditure (MET-hours/d, 1 MET = 3.5 ml O2/kg/min). Methods Cox proportional hazard analyses of 109,352 runners and 40,798 walkers adjusted for age, sex, smoking, diet, alcohol, and education. Results There were 236 deaths with respiratory disease listed as the underlying cause, and 833 deaths that were respiratory disease related (entity axis diagnosis). Included among these were 79 deaths with pneumonia listed as the underlying cause and 316 pneumonia-related deaths, and 77 deaths due to aspiration pneumonia. There was no significant difference in the effect of running compared to walking (per MET-hours/d) on mortality, thus runners and walkers were combined for analysis. Respiratory disease mortality decreased 7.9% per MET-hours/d as the underlying cause (95%CI: 1.6% to 14.0%, P=0.01) and 7.3% for all respiratory disease-related deaths (95%CI: 4.2% to 10.4%, P=10-5). Pneumonia mortality decreased 13.1% per MET-hours/d as the underlying cause (95%CI: 2.6% to 23.2%, P=0.01) and 10.5% per MET-hours/d for all pneumonia-related deaths (95%CI: 5.4% to 15.5%, P=0.0001). The risk for aspiration pneumonia mortality also did not differ between running and walking, and decreased 19.9% per MET-hours/d run or walked (95%CI: 8.9% to 30.2%, P=0.0004). These results remained significant when additionally adjusted for BMI. Conclusions Higher doses of running and walking were associated with lower risk of respiratory disease, pneumonia, and aspiration pneumonia mortality in a dose-dependent manner, and the effects of running and walking appear equivalent. These effects appear to be independent of the effects of exercise on cardiovascular disease. PMID:24002349

  15. Chronic periodontitis and smoking Prevalence and dose-response relationship

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahrukh; Khalid, Taimur; Awan, Kamran H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence and dose-response relationship of chronic periodontitis among smokers in Pakistan. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study among participants seeking dental care in Karachi Medical and Dental College, Karachi, Pakistan. A total of 443 participants with a mean age of 44.3 (±6.5) participated in the study from April 2011 to December 2011. Males comprised 64.7%, and females comprised 35.2%. Participants were interviewed on social demographics and oral habits. Participants with shallow pockets (3.5-5.5 mm) and deep pockets (>5.5 mm) were considered suffering from chronic periodontitis. The characteristics of participants were assessed using frequency distribution for categorical variables and mean (standard deviation) for continuous variables. Results: Among 443 participants, smokers were distributed as 55.1% and non-smokers as 44.9%. Smoking was found to be significantly related to young adults (p<0.007), male gender (p<0.001), and lower education level (p<0.01). Overall prevalence of chronic periodontitis among smokers was estimated at 81.6%. Heavy smoking was found to have significantly high prevalence (p<0.001) and severity (p<0.001) of periodontitis as compared with moderate and light smokers. The multivariate unadjusted model depicted 3.5 times higher risk of chronic periodontitis among smokers (p<0.001). Conclusion: Chronic periodontitis had a high prevalence among smokers. Heavy smoking was found to have a higher risk for having periodontitis. PMID:27464867

  16. Molecular circuits, biological switches, and nonlinear dose-response relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Melvin E; Yang, Raymond S H; French, C Tenley; Chubb, Laura S; Dennison, James E

    2002-01-01

    Signaling motifs (nuclear transcriptional receptors, kinase/phosphatase cascades, G-coupled protein receptors, etc.) have composite dose-response behaviors in relation to concentrations of protein receptors and endogenous signaling molecules. "Molecular circuits" include the biological components and their interactions that comprise the workings of these signaling motifs. Many of these molecular circuits have nonlinear dose-response behaviors for endogenous ligands and for exogenous toxicants, acting as switches with "all-or-none" responses over a narrow range of concentration. In turn, these biological switches regulate large-scale cellular processes, e.g., commitment to cell division, cell differentiation, and phenotypic alterations. Biologically based dose-response (BBDR) models accounting for these biological switches would improve risk assessment for many nonlinear processes in toxicology. These BBDR models must account for normal control of the signaling motifs and for perturbations by toxic compounds. We describe several of these biological switches, current tools available for constructing BBDR models of these processes, and the potential value of these models in risk assessment. PMID:12634127

  17. Continuous Toxicological Dose-Response Relationships Are Pretty Homogeneous (Society for Risk Analysis Annual Meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-response relationships for a wide range of in vivo and in vitro continuous datasets are well-described by a four-parameter exponential or Hill model, based on a recent analysis of multiple historical dose-response datasets, mostly with more than five dose groups (Slob and Se...

  18. BY HOW MUCH DO SHAPES OF TOXICOLOGICAL DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS VARY? (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A re-analysis of a large number of historical dose-response data for continuous endpoints showed that the shapes of the dose-response relationships were surprisingly homogenous. The datasets were selected on the sole criterion that they were expected to provide relatively good in...

  19. Development of the dose-response relationship for human toxoplasma gondii infection associated with meat consumption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite that is responsible for approximately 24% of deaths attributed to foodborne pathogens in the United States.A substantial portion of human T. gondii infections may be acquired through the consumption of meats. The dose-response relationship for human exposure...

  20. Is There a Dose-Response Relationship for Heart Disease With Low-Dose Radiation Therapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Corbett, James R.; Moran, Jean M.; Griffith, Kent A.; Marsh, Robin B.; Feng, Mary; Jagsi, Reshma; Kessler, Marc L.; Ficaro, Edward C.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify cardiac radiation therapy (RT) exposure using sensitive measures of cardiac dysfunction; and to correlate dysfunction with heart doses, in the setting of adjuvant RT for left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: On a randomized trial, 32 women with node-positive left-sided breast cancer underwent pre-RT stress single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT-CT) myocardial perfusion scans. Patients received RT to the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes to doses of 50 to 52.2 Gy. Repeat SPECT-CT scans were performed 1 year after RT. Perfusion defects (PD), summed stress defects scores (SSS), and ejection fractions (EF) were evaluated. Doses to the heart and coronary arteries were quantified. Results: The mean difference in pre- and post-RT PD was −0.38% ± 3.20% (P=.68), with no clinically significant defects. To assess for subclinical effects, PD were also examined using a 1.5-SD below the normal mean threshold, with a mean difference of 2.53% ± 12.57% (P=.38). The mean differences in SSS and EF before and after RT were 0.78% ± 2.50% (P=.08) and 1.75% ± 7.29% (P=.39), respectively. The average heart Dmean and D95 were 2.82 Gy (range, 1.11-6.06 Gy) and 0.90 Gy (range, 0.13-2.17 Gy), respectively. The average Dmean and D95 to the left anterior descending artery were 7.22 Gy (range, 2.58-18.05 Gy) and 3.22 Gy (range, 1.23-6.86 Gy), respectively. No correlations were found between cardiac doses and changes in PD, SSS, and EF. Conclusions: Using sensitive measures of cardiac function, no clinically significant defects were found after RT, with the average heart Dmean <5 Gy. Although a dose response may exist for measures of cardiac dysfunction at higher doses, no correlation was found in the present study for low doses delivered to cardiac structures and perfusion, SSS, or EF.

  1. Concord Grape Juice Polyphenols and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Dose-Response Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, Jeffrey B.; Vita, Joseph A.; Chen, C. -Y. Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Pure fruit juices provide nutritional value with evidence suggesting some of their benefits on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk may be derived from their constituent polyphenols, particularly flavonoids. However, few data from clinical trials are available on the dose-response relationship of fruit juice flavonoids to these outcomes. Utilizing the results of clinical trials testing single doses, we have analyzed data from studies of 100% Concord grape juice by placing its flavonoid content in the context of results from randomized clinical trials of other polyphenol-rich foods and beverages describing the same outcomes but covering a broader range of intake. We selected established biomarkers determined by similar methods for measuring flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), blood pressure, platelet aggregation, and the resistance of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) to oxidation. Despite differences among the clinical trials in the treatment, subjects, and duration, correlations were observed between the dose and FMD. Inverse dose-response relationships, albeit with lower correlation coefficients, were also noted for the other outcomes. These results suggest a clear relationship between consumption of even modest serving sizes of Concord grape juice, flavonoid intake, and effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This approach to dose-response relationships may prove useful for testing other individual foods and beverages. PMID:26633488

  2. Concord Grape Juice Polyphenols and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Dose-Response Relationships.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Vita, Joseph A; Chen, C-Y Oliver

    2015-12-02

    Pure fruit juices provide nutritional value with evidence suggesting some of their benefits on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk may be derived from their constituent polyphenols, particularly flavonoids. However, few data from clinical trials are available on the dose-response relationship of fruit juice flavonoids to these outcomes. Utilizing the results of clinical trials testing single doses, we have analyzed data from studies of 100% Concord grape juice by placing its flavonoid content in the context of results from randomized clinical trials of other polyphenol-rich foods and beverages describing the same outcomes but covering a broader range of intake. We selected established biomarkers determined by similar methods for measuring flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), blood pressure, platelet aggregation, and the resistance of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) to oxidation. Despite differences among the clinical trials in the treatment, subjects, and duration, correlations were observed between the dose and FMD. Inverse dose-response relationships, albeit with lower correlation coefficients, were also noted for the other outcomes. These results suggest a clear relationship between consumption of even modest serving sizes of Concord grape juice, flavonoid intake, and effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This approach to dose-response relationships may prove useful for testing other individual foods and beverages.

  3. Concord grape juice polyphenols and cardiovascular risk factors: dose-response relationships

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pure fruit juices provide nutritional value with evidence suggesting some of their benefits on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk may be derived from their constituent polyphenols, particularly flavonoids. However, few data from clinical trials are available on the dose-response relationship ...

  4. Mouse bioassay for palytoxin. Specific symptoms and dose-response against dose-death time relationships.

    PubMed

    Riobó, P; Paz, B; Franco, J M; Vázquez, J A; Murado, M A; Cacho, E

    2008-08-01

    Nowadays, a variety of protocols are applied to quantitate palytoxin. However, there is not desirable agreement among them, the confidence intervals of the basic toxicological parameters are too wide and the formal descriptions lack the necessary generality to establish comparisons. Currently, the mouse bioassay is the most accepted one to categorize marine toxins and it must constitute the reference for other methods. In the present work, the mouse bioassay for palytoxin is deeply analyzed and carefully described showing the initial symptoms of injected mice which are presented here in the first time. These symptoms clearly differ from the more common marine toxins described up to now. Regarding to the toxicological aspects two considerations are taking into account: (i) the empiric models based in the dose-death time relationships cause serious ambiguities and (ii) the traditional moving average method contains in its regular use any inaccuracy elements. Herein is demonstrated that the logistic equation and the accumulative function of Weibull's distribution (with the modifications proposed) generate satisfactory toxicological descriptions in all the respects.

  5. Perception and annoyance due to wind turbine noise--a dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Eja; Waye, Kerstin Persson

    2004-12-01

    Installed global wind power increased by 26% during 2003, with U.S and Europe accounting for 90% of the cumulative capacity. Little is known about wind turbines' impact on people living in their vicinity. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of annoyance due to wind turbine noise and to study dose-response relationships. Interrelationships between noise annoyance and sound characteristics, as well as the influence of subjective variables such as attitude and noise sensitivity, were also assessed. A cross-sectional study was performed in Sweden in 2000. Responses were obtained through questionnaires (n = 351; response rate 68.4%), and doses were calculated as A-weighted sound pressure levels for each respondent. A statistically significant dose-response relationship was found, showing higher proportion of people reporting perception and annoyance than expected from the present dose-response relationships for transportation noise. The unexpected high proportion of annoyance could be due to visual interference, influencing noise annoyance, as well as the presence of intrusive sound characteristics. The respondents' attitude to the visual impact of wind turbines on the landscape scenery was found to influence noise annoyance.

  6. Perception and annoyance due to wind turbine noise--a dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Eja; Waye, Kerstin Persson

    2004-12-01

    Installed global wind power increased by 26% during 2003, with U.S and Europe accounting for 90% of the cumulative capacity. Little is known about wind turbines' impact on people living in their vicinity. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of annoyance due to wind turbine noise and to study dose-response relationships. Interrelationships between noise annoyance and sound characteristics, as well as the influence of subjective variables such as attitude and noise sensitivity, were also assessed. A cross-sectional study was performed in Sweden in 2000. Responses were obtained through questionnaires (n = 351; response rate 68.4%), and doses were calculated as A-weighted sound pressure levels for each respondent. A statistically significant dose-response relationship was found, showing higher proportion of people reporting perception and annoyance than expected from the present dose-response relationships for transportation noise. The unexpected high proportion of annoyance could be due to visual interference, influencing noise annoyance, as well as the presence of intrusive sound characteristics. The respondents' attitude to the visual impact of wind turbines on the landscape scenery was found to influence noise annoyance. PMID:15658697

  7. Perception and annoyance due to wind turbine noise-a dose-response relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Eja; Persson Waye, Kerstin

    2004-12-01

    Installed global wind power increased by 26% during 2003, with U.S and Europe accounting for 90% of the cumulative capacity. Little is known about wind turbines' impact on people living in their vicinity. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of annoyance due to wind turbine noise and to study dose-response relationships. Interrelationships between noise annoyance and sound characteristics, as well as the influence of subjective variables such as attitude and noise sensitivity, were also assessed. A cross-sectional study was performed in Sweden in 2000. Responses were obtained through questionnaires (n=351; response rate 68.4%), and doses were calculated as A-weighted sound pressure levels for each respondent. A statistically significant dose-response relationship was found, showing higher proportion of people reporting perception and annoyance than expected from the present dose-response relationships for transportation noise. The unexpected high proportion of annoyance could be due to visual interference, influencing noise annoyance, as well as the presence of intrusive sound characteristics. The respondents' attitude to the visual impact of wind turbines on the landscape scenery was found to influence noise annoyance. .

  8. Characterization of the relationship between dose and blood eosinophil response following subcutaneous administration of mepolizumab

    PubMed Central

    Pouliquen, Isabelle J.; Kornmann, Oliver; Barton, Sharon V.; Price, Jeffrey A.; Ortega, Hector G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Mepolizumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that blocks human IL-5 from binding to the IL-5 receptor, which is mainly expressed on eosinophils. Eosinophils are key cells in the inflammatory cascade of various diseases, including asthma. This study investigated the pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) relationship between exposure of mepolizumab subcutaneous (SC) administration and blood eosinophil reduction compared with intravenous (IV) administration in adult subjects with asthma. Methods: In this multi-center, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, repeat-dose study, 70 adult subjects received one of four possible treatment regimens: mepolizumab 12.5, 125, or 250 mg SC or 75 mg IV. In addition to analyzing the dose and PK/PD relationship, absolute bioavailability, safety, tolerability, and incidence of anti-mepolizumab antibodies were evaluated. Results: Blood eosinophil levels decreased in a dose-dependent manner with the lowest (12.5 mg) dose clearly differentiating from the other doses. A non-linear inhibition Imax model based on blood eosinophil levels at week 12 identified that the SC doses providing 50% and 90% of maximal blood eosinophil inhibition were 11 mg (95% confidence interval (CI): 5.19 – 16.85) and 99 mg (95% CI: 47 – 152), respectively. The route of administration did not affect the exposure-response relationship. The estimated mepolizumab SC absolute bioavailability (arm) was 74% (90% CI: 54 – 102%). The safety profile of mepolizumab was favorable. Conclusions: A dose-dependent reduction in blood eosinophils across all mepolizumab doses investigated was observed. The subcutaneous absolute bioavailability was 74%. The route of administration did not affect the mepolizumab exposure eosinophil response relationship. PMID:26445140

  9. Dose-response relationship between amphibole fiber lung burden and mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Rödelsperger, K; Woitowitz, H J; Brückel, B; Arhelger, R; Pohlabeln, H; Jöckel, K H

    1999-01-01

    In a mesothelioma case-control study, asbestos and other mineral fibers from lung burden were examined as causal factors. Diagnosis was confirmed by a panel of pathologists. For 66 cases and 66 controls from hospitals in five German towns, lung tissue fiber analysis by transmission electron microscopy was available. Control patients were treated by a surgical lung resection mostly because of lung cancer. For chrysotile and other mineral fibers a significantly increased odds ratio (OR) was not observed. A clear dose-response relationship was demonstrated for the concentration CA of amphibole fibers longer than 5 microm. Between 0.025 and 2.5 fibers/microg dry weight (f/microg) the relationship can be approximated as OR = CA/(0. 025 f/microg). Similar but less distinct dose-response relationships were found in a Canadian and an Australian study. It is concluded that among German mesothelioma patients factors not associated with amphibole fiber concentration are not predominating.

  10. Effects of ozone on pulmonary function: the relationship of response to dose

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, M.T. )

    1991-07-01

    A dose-response relationship for the effects of ozone on pulmonary function in humans has been derived using the concept of internal thoracic dose. This quantity, which represents the dose of inhaled pollutant capable of reaching and affecting target sites in the lower respiratory tract, was estimated using a mathematical model derived in part from theory and in part from data obtained using human and animal subjects. The model was applied to ozone exposures of individuals ranging in age from infants to adults over age 65 and for exercise conditions ranging from rest to heavy exercise (greater than 6 times resting minute ventilation). The dose model was successfully used to compare results from clinical studies in which subjects were exposed under disparate conditions of exercise, exposure concentration and exposure duration. The model can also be applied to estimate doses to populations exposed to ambient pollution. The effects of ozone on pulmonary function in adults and children were evaluated using the model. On the basis of dose of ozone (micrograms O3 per kg body mass), children, aged 8 to 15 years, and adults were equally sensitive. When dose is analyzed as a function of age, the data suggest that children, under the age of 6 years, receive greater doses to respiratory tract tissues than do older children or adults, under equivalent conditions of exposure.

  11. Exploring the dose-response relationship between resistance exercise intensity and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Etnier, Jennifer L

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the dose-response relationship between resistance exercise intensity and cognitive performance. Sixty-eight participants were randomly assigned into control, 40%, 70%, or 100% of 10-repetition maximal resistance exercise groups. Participants were tested on Day 1 (baseline) and on Day 2 (measures were taken relative to performance of the treatment). Heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion, self-reported arousal, and affect were assessed on both days. Cognitive performance was assessed on Day 1 and before and following treatment on Day 2. Results from regression analyses indicated that there is a significant linear effect of exercise intensity on information processing speed, and a significant quadratic trend for exercise intensity on executive function. Thus, there is a dose-response relationship between the intensity of resistance exercise and cognitive performance such that high-intensity exercise benefits speed of processing, but moderate intensity exercise is most beneficial for executive function. PMID:20016113

  12. Dose-response relationships between pollination and fruiting refine pollinator comparisons for cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon [Ericaceae]).

    PubMed

    Cane, James H; Schiffhauer, Daniel

    2003-10-01

    Comparisons of pollinator efficacy using pollen received on stigmas can be refined by incorporating experimental dose-response relationships for pollen deposition and fruiting responses. A range of discrete pollen doses applied to cranberry stigmas resulted in decelerating curvilinear responses for fruiting, berry size, and seed set. Minimum thresholds and maximum asymptotes bounded reproductive responses to incremental stigmatic pollen loads. Four bee species were compared for their pollination efficacies on commercial cranberries, using counts of pollen received by stigmas during single bee visits to previously virgin flowers. Differences between these bee species were found to be exaggerated when raw pollen counts were used for comparison because foragers of some species often delivered pollen in excess of that needed to maximize fruit and seed production. Sixfold differences between species in mean pollen deposition translated into 1.5-2-fold differences in predicted cranberry fruit set and size. Implications for pollen tube competition and agricultural production are discussed.

  13. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man - I. Gustatory tissues response during photon and neutron radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1982-08-01

    Quantitative radiation dose-response curves for normal gustatory tissue in man were studied. Taste function, expressed as taste loss, was evaluated in 84 patients who were given either photon or neutron radiotherapy for tumors in the head and neck region. Patients were treated to average tumor doses of 6600 cGy (photon) or 2200 cGy intervals for photon patients and 320-cGy intervals for neutron patients during radiotherapy. The dose-response curves for photons and neutrons were analyzed by fitting a four-parameter logistic equation to the data. Photon and neutron curves differed principally in their relative position along the dose axis. Comparison of the dose-response curves were made by determination of RBE. At 320 cGy, the lowest neutron dose at which taste measurements were made, RBE = 5.7. If this RBE is correct, then the therapeutic gain factor may be equal to or less than 1, indicating no biological advantage in using neutrons over photons for this normal tissue. These studies suggest measurements of taste function and evaluation of dose-response relationships may also be useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficacy of chemical modifiers of radiation response such as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and radioprotectors.

  14. Dose-response relationships using brain–computer interface technology impact stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Young, Brittany M.; Nigogosyan, Zack; Walton, Léo M.; Remsik, Alexander; Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A.; Tyler, Mitchell E.; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Caldera, Kristin; Sattin, Justin A.; Williams, Justin C.; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) are an emerging novel technology for stroke rehabilitation. Little is known about how dose-response relationships for BCI therapies affect brain and behavior changes. We report preliminary results on stroke patients (n = 16, 11 M) with persistent upper extremity motor impairment who received therapy using a BCI system with functional electrical stimulation of the hand and tongue stimulation. We collected MRI scans and behavioral data using the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), 9-Hole Peg Test (9-HPT), and Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) before, during, and after the therapy period. Using anatomical and functional MRI, we computed Laterality Index (LI) for brain activity in the motor network during impaired hand finger tapping. Changes from baseline LI and behavioral scores were assessed for relationships with dose, intensity, and frequency of BCI therapy. We found that gains in SIS Strength were directly responsive to BCI therapy: therapy dose and intensity correlated positively with increased SIS Strength (p ≤ 0.05), although no direct relationships were identified with ARAT or 9-HPT scores. We found behavioral measures that were not directly sensitive to differences in BCI therapy administration but were associated with concurrent brain changes correlated with BCI therapy administration parameters: therapy dose and intensity showed significant (p ≤ 0.05) or trending (0.05 < p < 0.1) negative correlations with LI changes, while therapy frequency did not affect LI. Reductions in LI were then correlated (p ≤ 0.05) with increased SIS Activities of Daily Living scores and improved 9-HPT performance. Therefore, some behavioral changes may be reflected by brain changes sensitive to differences in BCI therapy administration, while others such as SIS Strength may be directly responsive to BCI therapy administration. Data preliminarily suggest that when using BCI in stroke rehabilitation, therapy frequency may be less important than dose

  15. Dose-response relationships using brain-computer interface technology impact stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Young, Brittany M; Nigogosyan, Zack; Walton, Léo M; Remsik, Alexander; Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A; Tyler, Mitchell E; Edwards, Dorothy F; Caldera, Kristin; Sattin, Justin A; Williams, Justin C; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are an emerging novel technology for stroke rehabilitation. Little is known about how dose-response relationships for BCI therapies affect brain and behavior changes. We report preliminary results on stroke patients (n = 16, 11 M) with persistent upper extremity motor impairment who received therapy using a BCI system with functional electrical stimulation of the hand and tongue stimulation. We collected MRI scans and behavioral data using the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), 9-Hole Peg Test (9-HPT), and Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) before, during, and after the therapy period. Using anatomical and functional MRI, we computed Laterality Index (LI) for brain activity in the motor network during impaired hand finger tapping. Changes from baseline LI and behavioral scores were assessed for relationships with dose, intensity, and frequency of BCI therapy. We found that gains in SIS Strength were directly responsive to BCI therapy: therapy dose and intensity correlated positively with increased SIS Strength (p ≤ 0.05), although no direct relationships were identified with ARAT or 9-HPT scores. We found behavioral measures that were not directly sensitive to differences in BCI therapy administration but were associated with concurrent brain changes correlated with BCI therapy administration parameters: therapy dose and intensity showed significant (p ≤ 0.05) or trending (0.05 < p < 0.1) negative correlations with LI changes, while therapy frequency did not affect LI. Reductions in LI were then correlated (p ≤ 0.05) with increased SIS Activities of Daily Living scores and improved 9-HPT performance. Therefore, some behavioral changes may be reflected by brain changes sensitive to differences in BCI therapy administration, while others such as SIS Strength may be directly responsive to BCI therapy administration. Data preliminarily suggest that when using BCI in stroke rehabilitation, therapy frequency may be less important than dose and

  16. New flux based dose-response relationships for ozone for European forest tree species.

    PubMed

    Büker, P; Feng, Z; Uddling, J; Briolat, A; Alonso, R; Braun, S; Elvira, S; Gerosa, G; Karlsson, P E; Le Thiec, D; Marzuoli, R; Mills, G; Oksanen, E; Wieser, G; Wilkinson, M; Emberson, L D

    2015-11-01

    To derive O3 dose-response relationships (DRR) for five European forest trees species and broadleaf deciduous and needleleaf tree plant functional types (PFTs), phytotoxic O3 doses (PODy) were related to biomass reductions. PODy was calculated using a stomatal flux model with a range of cut-off thresholds (y) indicative of varying detoxification capacities. Linear regression analysis showed that DRR for PFT and individual tree species differed in their robustness. A simplified parameterisation of the flux model was tested and showed that for most non-Mediterranean tree species, this simplified model led to similarly robust DRR as compared to a species- and climate region-specific parameterisation. Experimentally induced soil water stress was not found to substantially reduce PODy, mainly due to the short duration of soil water stress periods. This study validates the stomatal O3 flux concept and represents a step forward in predicting O3 damage to forests in a spatially and temporally varying climate.

  17. Influence of image slice thickness on rectal dose-response relationships following radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, C.; Thor, M.; Liu, M.; Moissenko, V.; Petersen, S. E.; Høyer, M.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2014-07-01

    When pooling retrospective data from different cohorts, slice thicknesses of acquired computed tomography (CT) images used for treatment planning may vary between cohorts. It is, however, not known if varying slice thickness influences derived dose-response relationships. We investigated this for rectal bleeding using dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum and rectal wall for dose distributions superimposed on images with varying CT slice thicknesses. We used dose and endpoint data from two prostate cancer cohorts treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to either 74 Gy (N = 159) or 78 Gy (N = 159) at 2 Gy per fraction. The rectum was defined as the whole organ with content, and the morbidity cut-off was Grade ≥2 late rectal bleeding. Rectal walls were defined as 3 mm inner margins added to the rectum. DVHs for simulated slice thicknesses from 3 to 13 mm were compared to DVHs for the originally acquired slice thicknesses at 3 and 5 mm. Volumes, mean, and maximum doses were assessed from the DVHs, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. For each organ and each of the simulated slice thicknesses, we performed predictive modeling of late rectal bleeding using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. For the most coarse slice thickness, rectal volumes increased (≤18%), whereas maximum and mean doses decreased (≤0.8 and ≤4.2 Gy, respectively). For all a values, the gEUD for the simulated DVHs were ≤1.9 Gy different than the gEUD for the original DVHs. The best-fitting LKB model parameter values with 95% CIs were consistent between all DVHs. In conclusion, we found that the investigated slice thickness variations had minimal impact on rectal dose-response estimations. From the perspective of predictive modeling, our results suggest that variations within 10 mm in slice thickness between cohorts are unlikely to be a limiting factor when pooling multi-institutional rectal dose data that include slice thickness

  18. Dose-Volume Response Relationship for Brain Metastases Treated with Frameless Single-Fraction Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jianmin; Yusuf, Mehran B; Dragun, Anthony; Dunlap, Neal; Guan, Timothy; Boling, Warren; Rai, Shesh; Woo, Shiao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to identify a dose-volume response relationship for brain metastases treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: We reviewed patients who underwent frameless single-fraction linear accelerator SRS for brain metastases between 2007 and 2013 from an institutional database. Proportional hazards modeling was used to identify predictors of outcome. A ratio of maximum lesion dose per mm-diameter (Gy/mm) was constructed to establish a dose-volume relationship. Results: There were 316 metastases evaluated in 121 patients (2 - 33 mm in the largest diameter). The median peripheral dose was 18.0 Gy (range: 10.0 – 24.0 Gy). Local control was 84.8% for all lesions and was affected by location, peripheral dose, maximum dose, and lesion size (p values < 0.050). A dose-volume response relationship was constructed using the maximum dose and lesion size. A unit increase in Gy/mm was associated with decreased local failure (p = 0.005). Local control of 80%, 85%, and 90% corresponded to maximum doses per millimeter of 1.67 Gy/mm, 2.86 Gy/mm, and 4.4 Gy/mm, respectively. Toxicity was uncommon and only 1.0% of lesions developed radionecrosis requiring surgery. Conclusions: For brain metastases less than 3 cm, a dose-volume response relationship exists between maximum radiosurgical dose and lesion size, which is predictive of local control. PMID:27284495

  19. Kidney dysfunction and cadmium exposure--factors influencing dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, Gunnar; Jin, Taiyi; Wu, Xunwei; Lu, Jian; Chen, Liang; Liang, Yihuai; Lei, Lijian; Hong, Feng; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Nordberg, Monica

    2012-06-01

    Our early toxicological studies showed that metallothionein (MT) is a protein that carries cadmium (Cd) to the kidney, explaining why Cd exposures during long time periods may give rise to kidney dysfunction. This dysfunction is usually considered to be the critical effect, i.e. the adverse effect that occurs at the lowest exposure level. MT also provides intracellular protection against cadmium toxicity. In studies of population groups in cadmium contaminated areas in China, we investigated factors that affected the relationship between internal dose of Cd, as indicated by blood Cd (BCd) or urinary Cd (UCd), and the prevalence of kidney dysfunction. We found dose-response relationships between UCd and the prevalence of increased levels of biomarkers of renal tubular dysfunction (urinary beta-2-microglobulin, B2M, or N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase - NAG) or urinary albumin (UAlb), a biomarker of glomerular kidney dysfunction. Two years after Cd intake from contaminated rice was diminished, renal tubular dysfunction appeared unchanged or aggravated among those with higher UCd; Another 8 years later, i.e. 10 years after Cd intake was decreased, the prevalence of renal tubular dysfunction was still increased but UAlb had returned to normal. Factors that influenced the dose-response relationships were: (1) time after maximum exposure. (2) Concomitant exposure to other nephrotoxic agents such as inorganic arsenic. (3) Cd induced metallothionein mRNA levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes, used as a biomarker of the ability of each person, to synthesize MT. (4) The occurrence of increased levels in blood plasma of autoantibodies against MT. The two last points further support a role in humans of MT as a protective protein against tissue damage from cadmium and gives support to previous ideas developed partly in experimental systems.

  20. Meta-analysis on occupational exposure to pesticides--neurobehavioral impact and dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Baron, Monika; Knapp, Guido; Schäper, Michael; van Thriel, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    While the health impact of high exposures to pesticides is acknowledged, the impact of chronic exposures in the absence of acute poisonings is controversial. A systematic analysis of dose-response relationships is still missing. Its absence may provoke alternative explanations for altered performances. Consequently, opportunities for health prevention in the occupational and environmental field may be missed. Objectives were (1) quantification of the neurotoxic impact of pesticides by an analysis of functional alterations in workers measured by neuropsychological performance tests, (2) estimates of dose-response relationships on the basis of exposure duration, and (3) exploration of susceptible subgroups. The meta-analysis employed a random effects model to obtain overall effects for individual performance tests. Twenty-two studies with a total of 1758 exposed and 1260 reference individuals met the inclusion criteria. At least three independent outcomes were available for twenty-six performance variables. Significant performance effects were shown in adults and referred to both cognitive and motor performances. Effect sizes ranging from dRE=-0.14 to dRE=-0.67 showed consistent outcomes for memory and attention. Relationships between effect sizes and exposure duration were indicated for individual performance variables and the total of measured performances. Studies on adolescents had to be analyzed separately due to numerous outliers. The large variation among outcomes hampered the analysis of the susceptibility in this group, while data on female workers was too scant for the analysis. Relationships exist between the impact of pesticides on performances and exposure duration. A change in test paradigms would help to decipher the impact more specifically. The use of biomarkers appropriate for lower exposures would allow a better prevention of neurotoxic effects due to occupational and environmental exposure. Intervention studies in adolescents seem warranted to

  1. Shape and Steepness of Toxicological Dose-Response Relationships of Continuous Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    A re-analysis of a large number of historical dose-response data for continuous endpoints indicates that an exponential or a Hill model with four parameters both adequately describe toxicological dose-responses. The four parameters relate to the background response, the potency o...

  2. The Dose Response Relationship between In Ear Occupational Noise Exposure and Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, Peter M.; Galusha, Deron; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Clougherty, Jane E.; Neitzel, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Current understanding of the dose-response relationship between occupational noise and hearing loss is based on cross-sectional studies prior to the widespread use hearing protection and with limited data regarding noise exposures below 85dBA. We report on the hearing loss experience of a unique cohort of industrial workers with daily monitoring of noise inside of hearing protection devices. Methods At an industrial facility, workers exhibiting accelerated hearing loss were enrolled in a mandatory program to monitor daily noise exposures inside of hearing protection. We compared these noise measurements (as time-weighted LAVG) to interval rates of high frequency hearing loss over a six year period using a mixed effects model, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Workers’ high frequency hearing levels at study inception averaged more than 40 dB hearing threshold level (HTL). Most noise exposures were less than 85dBA (mean LAVG 76 dBA, interquartile range 74 to 80 dBA). We found no statistical relationship between LAvg and high frequency hearing loss (p = 0.53). Using a metric for monthly maximum noise exposure did not improve model fit. Conclusion At-ear noise exposures below 85dBA did not show an association with risk of high frequency hearing loss among workers with substantial past noise exposure and hearing loss at baseline. Therefore, effective noise control to below 85dBA may lead to significant reduction in occupational hearing loss risk in such individuals. Further research is needed on the dose response relationship of noise and hearing loss in individuals with normal hearing and little prior noise exposure. PMID:23825197

  3. Dose-response relationship between ingested arsenic and cataracts among residents in Southwestern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    See, Lai-Chu; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Lee, Jiahn-Shing; Hsueh, Yu-Mei; Lin, Shu-Mei; Tu, Ming-Chang; Yang, Meng-Ling; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2007-10-01

    This association study was carried out to examine the effect of long-term exposure to ingested arsenic on various types of cataract. A total of 349 residents living in arseniasis-hyperendemic villages of southwestern Taiwan were recruited. Cumulative arsenic exposure was derived from the history of consuming artesian well water and the arsenic level in well water. The Lens Opacities System III was used to classify different types of cataract. The cataract surgery prevalence was 10% for the age group of 50 or more years. Cortical opacity was most common (35%), while nuclear and posterior subcapsular opacities were observed in 24% and 22% of subjects, respectively. Diabetes mellitus was a significant risk factor for all types of cataract. Occupational sunlight exposure was associated with cortical and posterior subcapsular opacities in a dose-response relationship. The cumulative exposure to arsenic from artesian well water and the duration of consuming artesian well water were associated with an increased risk of all types of lens opacity. But statistically significant dose-response relations with the cumulative arsenic exposure and the duration of consuming artesian well water were observed only for posterior subcapsular opacity (P=0.014 and P=0.023, respectively) after adjustment for age, sex, diabetes status, and occupational sunlight exposure. It was concluded that there was an increasing prevalence of posterior subcapsular opacity with the increase in exposure to ingested arsenic.

  4. Assessing dose-response relationships for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs): a focus on non-monotonicity.

    PubMed

    Zoeller, R Thomas; Vandenberg, Laura N

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental principle in regulatory toxicology is that all chemicals are toxic and that the severity of effect is proportional to the exposure level. An ancillary assumption is that there are no effects at exposures below the lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL), either because no effects exist or because they are not statistically resolvable, implying that they would not be adverse. Chemicals that interfere with hormones violate these principles in two important ways: dose-response relationships can be non-monotonic, which have been reported in hundreds of studies of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs); and effects are often observed below the LOAEL, including all environmental epidemiological studies examining EDCs. In recognition of the importance of this issue, Lagarde et al. have published the first proposal to qualitatively assess non-monotonic dose response (NMDR) relationships for use in risk assessments. Their proposal represents a significant step forward in the evaluation of complex datasets for use in risk assessments. Here, we comment on three elements of the Lagarde proposal that we feel need to be assessed more critically and present our arguments: 1) the use of Klimisch scores to evaluate study quality, 2) the concept of evaluating study quality without topical experts' knowledge and opinions, and 3) the requirement of establishing the biological plausibility of an NMDR before consideration for use in risk assessment. We present evidence-based logical arguments that 1) the use of the Klimisch score should be abandoned for assessing study quality; 2) evaluating study quality requires experts in the specific field; and 3) an understanding of mechanisms should not be required to accept observable, statistically valid phenomena. It is our hope to contribute to the important and ongoing debate about the impact of NMDRs on risk assessment with positive suggestions. PMID:25971795

  5. The Shape of the Dose-Response Relationship between Sugars and Caries in Adults.

    PubMed

    Bernabé, E; Vehkalahti, M M; Sheiham, A; Lundqvist, A; Suominen, A L

    2016-02-01

    Dental caries is considered a diet-mediated disease, as sugars are essential in the caries process. However, some gaps in knowledge about the sugars-caries relationship still need addressing. This longitudinal study aimed to explore 1) the shape of the dose-response association between sugars intake and caries in adults, 2) the relative contribution of frequency and amount of sugars intake to caries levels, and 3) whether the association between sugars intake and caries varies by exposure to fluoride toothpaste. We used data from 1,702 dentate adults who participated in at least 2 of 3 surveys in Finland (Health 2000, 2004/05 Follow-up Study of Adults' Oral Health, and Health 2011). Frequency and amount of sugars intake were measured with a validated food frequency questionnaire. The DMFT index was the repeated outcome measure. Data were analyzed with fractional polynomials and linear mixed effects models. None of the 43 fractional polynomials tested provided a better fit to the data than the simpler linear model. In a mutually adjusted linear mixed effects model, the amount of, but not the frequency of, sugars intake was significantly associated with DMFT throughout the follow-up period. Furthermore, the longitudinal association between amount of sugars intake and DMFT was weaker in adults who used fluoride toothpaste daily than in those using it less often than daily. The findings of this longitudinal study among Finnish adults suggest a linear dose-response relationship between sugars and caries, with amount of intake being more important than frequency of ingestion. Also, daily use of fluoride toothpaste reduced but did not eliminate the association between amount of sugars intake and dental caries.

  6. Biologically Effective Dose-Response Relationship for Breast Cancer Treated by Conservative Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To find a biologically effective dose (BED) response for adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) for initial-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Results of randomized trials of RT vs. non-RT were reviewed and the tumor control probability (TCP) after RT was calculated for each of them. Using the linear-quadratic formula and Poisson statistics of cell-kill, the average initial number of clonogens per tumor before RT and the average tumor cell radiosensitivity (alpha-value) were calculated. An {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 4 Gy was assumed for these calculations. Results: A linear regression equation linking BED to TCP was derived: -ln[-ln(TCP)] = -ln(No) + {alpha}{sup *} BED = -4.08 + 0.07 * BED, suggesting a rather low radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells (alpha = 0.07 Gy{sup -1}), which probably reflects population heterogeneity. From the linear relationship a sigmoid BED-response curve was constructed. Conclusion: For BED values higher than about 90 Gy{sub 4} the radiation-induced TCP is essentially maximizing at 90-100%. The relationship presented here could be an approximate guide in the design and reporting of clinical trials of adjuvant breast RT.

  7. New flux based dose-response relationships for ozone for European forest tree species.

    PubMed

    Büker, P; Feng, Z; Uddling, J; Briolat, A; Alonso, R; Braun, S; Elvira, S; Gerosa, G; Karlsson, P E; Le Thiec, D; Marzuoli, R; Mills, G; Oksanen, E; Wieser, G; Wilkinson, M; Emberson, L D

    2015-11-01

    To derive O3 dose-response relationships (DRR) for five European forest trees species and broadleaf deciduous and needleleaf tree plant functional types (PFTs), phytotoxic O3 doses (PODy) were related to biomass reductions. PODy was calculated using a stomatal flux model with a range of cut-off thresholds (y) indicative of varying detoxification capacities. Linear regression analysis showed that DRR for PFT and individual tree species differed in their robustness. A simplified parameterisation of the flux model was tested and showed that for most non-Mediterranean tree species, this simplified model led to similarly robust DRR as compared to a species- and climate region-specific parameterisation. Experimentally induced soil water stress was not found to substantially reduce PODy, mainly due to the short duration of soil water stress periods. This study validates the stomatal O3 flux concept and represents a step forward in predicting O3 damage to forests in a spatially and temporally varying climate. PMID:26164201

  8. Lead-induced anemia: Dose-response relationships and evidence for a threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.; Landrigan, P.J.; Baker, E.L. Jr.; Orenstein, W.A.; von Lindern, I.H. )

    1990-02-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional epidemiologic study to assess the association between blood lead level and hematocrit in 579 one to five year-old children living near a primary lead smelter in 1974. Blood lead levels ranged from 0.53 to 7.91 mumol/L (11 to 164 micrograms/dl). To predict hematocrit as a function of blood lead level and age, we derived non-linear regression models and fit percentile curves. We used logistic regression to predict the probability of hematocrit values less than 35 per cent. We found a strong non-linear, dose-response relationship between blood lead level and hematocrit. This relationship was influenced by age, but (in this age group) not by sex; the effect was strongest in youngest children. In one year-olds, the age group most severely affected, the risk of an hematocrit value below 35 percent was 2 percent above background at blood lead levels between 0.97 and 1.88 mumol/L (20 and 39 micrograms/dl), 18 percent above background at lead levels of 1.93 to 2.85 mumol/L (40 to 59 micrograms/dl), and 40 percent above background at lead levels of 2.9 mumol/L (60 micrograms/dl) and greater; background was defined as a blood lead level below 1.88 mumol/L (20 micrograms/dl). This effect appeared independent of iron deficiency. These findings suggest that blood lead levels close to the currently recommended limit value of 1.21 mumol/L (25 micrograms/dl) are associated with dose-related depression of hematocrit in young children.

  9. A resource conservative procedure for comparison of dose-response relationships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Hill, E.F.; Hines, J.E.; Henry, P.F.P.

    1996-01-01

    The evaluation of effects of toxicants on a wildlife community can be complicated by varying responses among the community's constituent populations. Even within populations, considerable variability in dose-response relations may result from different avenues of exposure to the toxicant. Full scale investigations of the dose-response relations among a variety of species and avenues of exposure can therefore be prohibitively expensive, whether this expense is measured by the number of experimental animals needed, by the human resources committed to the study, or by laboratory expenses. We propose an abbreviated protocol for investigations of multiple dose-response relations that is designed to limit these expenses. The protocol begins with the judicious choice of a baseline dose-response relation to be estimated by a full scale study involving a minimum of 5 doses levels, with 10 subjects per dose level. This relation is then used as the basis for rapid screening of subsequent dose-response relations, which are compared to the baseline relation by testing for differences in the median effective dosages. These secondary studies can consist of as few as 14 animals exposed to the estimated LC50 from the baseline study. We describe MS-DOS compatible software available from the authors which can be used to analyze these data.

  10. Generation of dose-response relationships to assess the effects of acidity in precipitation on growth and productivity of vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were performed with several plant species in natural environments as well in a greenhouse and/or tissue culture facilities to establish dose-response functions of plant responses to simulated acidic rain in order to determine environmental risk assessments to ambient levels of acidic rain. Response functions of foliar injury, biomass of leaves and seed of soybean and pinto beans, root yields of radishes and garden beets, and reproduction of bracken fern are considered. The dose-response function of soybean seed yields with the hydrogen ion concentration of simulated acidic rainfalls was expressed by the equation y = 21.06-1.01 log x where y = seed yield in grams per plant and x = the hydrogen concentration if ..mu..eq l/sup -1/. The correlation coefficient of this relationship was -0.90. A similar dose-response function was generated for percent fertilization of ferns in a forest understory. When percent fertilization is plotted on logarithmic scale with hydrogen ion concentration of the simulated rain solution, the Y intercept is 51.18, slope -0.041 with a correlation coefficient of -0.98. Other dose-response functions were generated that assist in a general knowledge as to which plant species and which physiological processes are most impacted by acidic precipitation. Some responses did not produce convenient dose-response relationships. In such cases the responses may be altered by other environmental factors or there may be no differences among treatment means.

  11. Dose-response relationships of rat fetal skeleton variations: Relevance for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Chahoud, Ibrahim; Paumgartten, Francisco J R

    2009-10-01

    In developmental toxicity studies, skeleton abnormalities found in fetuses at term are classified as variations or malformations. The relevance of skeleton variations for human risk assessment, however, is a controversial issue. This paper is a contribution to the discussion on the interpretation of fetal skeleton variations in the context of risk assessment. Dose-response relationships of skeleton variations and malformations induced by three antineoplastic drugs (FUDR: 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine, HU: hydroxyurea and 6-MPr: 6-mercaptopurine-riboside) were evaluated. FUDR (0, 3, 14, 25, 35, 45, 55 and 65mg/kg body wt sc) and HU (0, 250, 300, 350, 400, 450, 500 and 550mg/kg body wt ip) were administered to rats on gestation day 11 (GD 11) while 6-MPr (0, 3, 7, 10 and 14mg/kg body wt sc) was given on GD 11, or on GD 12. Caesarean sections were performed on GD 21 and all fetuses were cleared and stained with alizarin red S for skeleton examination. Drugs given on GD 11 increased the incidence of thoracic and lumbar vertebra (dumbbell-shaped and bipartite ossification center (o.c.) and sternum (misaligned sternebrae) variations in a dose-dependent manner. Occurrence of zygomatic bone fused with maxilla (a variation in our rats) was also increased by HU and 6-MPr (GD 11) but it was not altered by FUDR. Spontaneous occurrence of wavy ribs was reduced by all treatments. Malformations such as cleft palate, tympanic bone absent and tibia absent were also increased in a dose-dependent manner by the three compounds. No observed effect levels (NOEL) for variations, irrespective of the compound administered, were generally lower than NOELs for malformations. In the discussion, we supported the view that any dose-related increase in the incidence of variations should be taken into account for determination of NOELs in routine studies. Increased occurrences of skeleton variations in term fetuses are also to be considered in risk assessment, unless experimental evidence exists that

  12. The use of biochemical and molecular parameters to estimate dose-response relationships at low levels of exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, M E; Barton, H A

    1998-01-01

    Biomarkers based on alterations in molecular and biochemical parameters may be useful in chemical risk assessment for establishing the presence of an exposure, ranking relative risks among exposed individuals, and estimating risks at low levels of exposure. Because it is unlikely that the relation between toxic responses and the degree of alteration in the biomarker is equivalent at all doses, quantification of risks at low levels is not necessarily more accurate using these biomarkers for extrapolation. The application of response biomarkers for risk evaluation at low levels of exposure is discussed in relation to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a compound that causes induction of cytochromes CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in liver and other tissues. CYP1A1 induction in liver increases monotonically with TCDD dosage; however, several of the dose-response curves for hepatic effects of TCDD are U-shaped. The U-shaped dose-response curve for hepatic tumor promotion appears to result because the integrated toxicologic response depends on multiple underlying processes--mitosuppression, toxicity, and cell proliferation--each of which has a different dose-response relationship with respect to TCDD. Although dose-response relationships for the biomarkers are not expected to duplicate the complex shapes seen with the integrated responses, measurements and pharmacodynamic modeling of the changes in these molecular and biochemical parameters can still be useful for obtaining an upperbound risk estimate at low levels of exposure. Images Figure 2 PMID:9539029

  13. Does Incidental Irradiation With Doses Below 50 Gy Effectively Reduce Isolated Nodal Failures in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Dose-Response Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Kepka, Lucyna; Maciejewski, B. Withers, Rodney H.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose-response relationship for a wide range of doses lower than 50 Gy delivered to the hilar and mediastinal lymph node stations from incidental irradiation in 220 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The endpoint was isolated nodal recurrence (INR) in stations that were initially negative. Methods and Materials: The individual responses of 2596 nodal stations were analyzed. Different fractionation schedules were used in different patients. Total prescribed tumor doses ranged from 52 Gy to 74 Gy given over 16-56 days. There were 1198 nodal stations (46%) within and 1398 stations beyond the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) volumes. The INR incidence was estimated for six dose levels ranging from 5 {+-} 5 Gy to {>=}56 Gy. Results: There were a total of 25 INRs in 17 patients (8%). The incidence of INR within the electively treated volumes was 0.58%, compared with 1.28% in nodal stations beyond the ENI. Almost 80% of the INRs occurred during 10 months of follow-up. A strong dose-response relationship was seen for the lower 'incidental' doses, most of which were less than 50 Gy. As the dose increased from 5 {+-} 5 Gy to 40 {+-} 5 Gy, the rate of freedom from INR increased from 12% to 76% (p = 0.005). Conclusions: There is evidence of a dose-response relationship between a reduction in the rate of INR and doses lower than 50 Gy. This suggests that incidental irradiation can eradicate at least some subclinical metastases in regional lymph nodes.

  14. Site-specific dose-response relationships for cancer induction from the combined Japanese A-bomb and Hodgkin cohorts for doses relevant to radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Most information on the dose-response of radiation-induced cancer is derived from data on the A-bomb survivors. Since, for radiation protection purposes, the dose span of main interest is between zero and one Gy, the analysis of the A-bomb survivors is usually focused on this range. However, estimates of cancer risk for doses larger than one Gy are becoming more important for radiotherapy patients. Therefore in this work, emphasis is placed on doses relevant for radiotherapy with respect to radiation induced solid cancer. Materials and methods For various organs and tissues the analysis of cancer induction was extended by an attempted combination of the linear-no-threshold model from the A-bomb survivors in the low dose range and the cancer risk data of patients receiving radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease in the high dose range. The data were fitted using organ equivalent dose (OED) calculated for a group of different dose-response models including a linear model, a model including fractionation, a bell-shaped model and a plateau-dose-response relationship. Results The quality of the applied fits shows that the linear model fits best colon, cervix and skin. All other organs are best fitted by the model including fractionation indicating that the repopulation/repair ability of tissue is neither 0 nor 100% but somewhere in between. Bone and soft tissue sarcoma were fitted well by all the models. In the low dose range beyond 1 Gy sarcoma risk is negligible. For increasing dose, sarcoma risk increases rapidly and reaches a plateau at around 30 Gy. Conclusions In this work OED for various organs was calculated for a linear, a bell-shaped, a plateau and a mixture between a bell-shaped and plateau dose-response relationship for typical treatment plans of Hodgkin's disease patients. The model parameters (α and R) were obtained by a fit of the dose-response relationships to these OED data and to the A-bomb survivors. For any three

  15. Dose-response relationship of ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in unanesthetized guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, M.; Suzuki, S.; Ikeda, H.; Fukuda, T.; Suzuki, J.; Okubo, T. )

    1990-06-01

    The effect of ozone dose (the product of ozone concentration and exposure time) on airway responsiveness was examined in unanesthetized, spontaneously breathing guinea pigs. Airway responsiveness was assessed by measuring specific airway resistance (sRaw) as a function of increasing concentration of inhaled methacholine (Mch) aerosol (the concentration of Mch required in order to double the baseline sRaw: PC200Mch). The airway responsiveness was measured before and at 5 min, 5 h, and 24 h after exposure. A 30-min exposure to 1 ppm ozone (dose 30 ppm.min) did not change PC200Mch at any time after exposure. Both a 90-min exposure to 1 ppm ozone and a 30-min exposure to 3 ppm ozone, which are identical in terms of ozone dose (90 ppm.min), decreased PC200Mch to a similar degree. A 120-min exposure to 3 ppm ozone (360 ppm.min) produced a much greater decrease of PC200Mch at 5 min and 5 h after exposure, compared with low-dose exposure. There was a significant correlation between ozone dose and the change in airway responsiveness. In all groups, the baseline sRaw was increased by approximately 50% at 5 min after exposure, but there was no correlation between the changes in PC200Mch and the baseline sRaw. This study suggests that ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs is closely related to ozone dose.

  16. Dose - response relationship between noise exposure and the risk of occupational injury.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jin-Ha; Hong, Jeong-Suk; Roh, Jaehoon; Kim, Chi-Nyon; Won, Jong-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Many workers worldwide experience fatality and disability caused by occupational injuries. This study examined the relationship between noise exposure and occupational injuries at factories in Korea. A total of 1790 factories located in northern Gyeonggi Province, Korea was evaluated. The time-weighted average levels of dust and noise exposure were taken from Workplace Exposure Assessment data. Apart occupational injuries, sports events, traffic accidents, and other accidents occurring outside workplaces were excluded. The incidences of occupational injury in each factory were calculated by data from the Korea Workers' Compensation and Welfare Services. Workplaces were classified according to the incidence of any occupational injuries (incident or nonincident workplaces, respectively). Workplace dust exposure was classified as <1 or ≥ 1 mg/m³ , and noise exposure as <80, 80-89, or >90 dB. Workplaces with high noise exposure were significantly associated with being incident workplaces, whereas workplaces with high dust exposure were not. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) derived from a logistic regression model were 1.68 (1.27-2.24) and 3.42 (2.26-5.17) at 80-89 dB and ≥ 90 dB versus <80 dB. These associations remained significant when in a separate analysis according to high or low dust exposure level. Noise exposure increases the risk of occupational injury in the workplace. Furthermore, the risk of occupational injury increases with noise exposure level in a dose-response relationship. Therefore, strategies for reducing noise exposure level are required to decrease the risk of occupational injury.

  17. Dose response explorer: an integrated open-source tool for exploring and modelling radiotherapy dose-volume outcome relationships.

    PubMed

    El Naqa, I; Suneja, G; Lindsay, P E; Hope, A J; Alaly, J R; Vicic, M; Bradley, J D; Apte, A; Deasy, J O

    2006-11-21

    Radiotherapy treatment outcome models are a complicated function of treatment, clinical and biological factors. Our objective is to provide clinicians and scientists with an accurate, flexible and user-friendly software tool to explore radiotherapy outcomes data and build statistical tumour control or normal tissue complications models. The software tool, called the dose response explorer system (DREES), is based on Matlab, and uses a named-field structure array data type. DREES/Matlab in combination with another open-source tool (CERR) provides an environment for analysing treatment outcomes. DREES provides many radiotherapy outcome modelling features, including (1) fitting of analytical normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and tumour control probability (TCP) models, (2) combined modelling of multiple dose-volume variables (e.g., mean dose, max dose, etc) and clinical factors (age, gender, stage, etc) using multi-term regression modelling, (3) manual or automated selection of logistic or actuarial model variables using bootstrap statistical resampling, (4) estimation of uncertainty in model parameters, (5) performance assessment of univariate and multivariate analyses using Spearman's rank correlation and chi-square statistics, boxplots, nomograms, Kaplan-Meier survival plots, and receiver operating characteristics curves, and (6) graphical capabilities to visualize NTCP or TCP prediction versus selected variable models using various plots. DREES provides clinical researchers with a tool customized for radiotherapy outcome modelling. DREES is freely distributed. We expect to continue developing DREES based on user feedback.

  18. Dose-response relationship for light intensity and ocular and electroencephalographic correlates of human alertness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Zeitzer, J. M.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Light can elicit both circadian and acute physiological responses in humans. In a dose response protocol men and women were exposed to illuminances ranging from 3 to 9100 lux for 6.5 h during the early biological night after they had been exposed to <3 lux for several hours. Light exerted an acute alerting response as assessed by a reduction in the incidence of slow-eye movements, a reduction of EEG activity in the theta-alpha frequencies (power density in the 5-9 Hz range) as well as a reduction in self-reported sleepiness. This alerting response was positively correlated with the degree of melatonin suppression by light. In accordance with the dose response function for circadian resetting and melatonin suppression, the responses of all three indices of alertness to variations in illuminance were consistent with a logistic dose response curve. Half of the maximum alerting response to bright light of 9100 lux was obtained with room light of approximately 100 lux. This sensitivity to light indicates that variations in illuminance within the range of typical, ambient, room light (90-180 lux) can have a significant impact on subjective alertness and its electrophysiologic concomitants in humans during the early biological night.

  19. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man. II. Response of the salivary glands during radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1983-08-01

    A quantitative dose-response curve for salivary gland function in patients during radiotherapy is presented. Salivary-function data used in this study were obtained from four previously published reports. All patients were treated with /sup 60/Co teletherapy to the head and neck using conventional treatment techniques. Salivary dysfunction was determined at specific dose levels by comparing salivary flow rates before therapy with flow rates at specific dose intervals during radiotherapy up to a total dose of 6000 cGy. Fifty percent salivary dysfunction occurred after 1000 cGy and eighty percent dysfunction was observed by the end of the therapy course (6000 cGy). The salivary-function curve was also compared to the previously published dose-response curve for taste function. Comparisons of the two curves indicate that salivary dysfunction precedes taste loss and that the shapes of the dose-response curves are different. A new term, tissue tolerance ratio, defined as the ratio of responses of two tissues given the same radiation dose, was used to make the comparisons between gustatory and salivary gland tissue effects. Measurements of salivary gland function and analysis of dose-response curves may be useful in evaluating chemical modifiers of radiation response.

  20. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man. II. Response of the salivary glands during radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1983-08-01

    A quantitative dose-response curve for salivary gland function in patients during radiotherapy is presented. Salivary-function data used in this study were obtained from four previously published reports. All patients were treated wih /sup 60/Co teletherapy to the head and neck using conventional treatment techniques. Salivary dysfunction was determined at specific dose levels by comparing salivary flow rates before therapy with flow rates at specific dose intervals during radiotherapy up to a total dose of 6000 cGy. Fifty percent salivary dysfunction occurred after 1000 cGy and eighty percent dysfunction was observed by the end of the therapy course (6000 cGy). The salivary-function curve was also compared to the previously published dose-response curve for taste function. Comparisons of the two curves indicate that salivary dysfunction precedes taste loss and that the shapes of the dose-response curves are different. A new term, tissue tolerance ratio, defined as the ratio of responses of two tissues given the same radiation dose, was used to make the comparisons between gustatory and salivary gland tissue effects. Measurements of salivary gland function and analysis of dose-response curves may be useful in evaluating chemical modifiers of radiation response.

  1. Effects and dose--response relationships of skin cancer and blackfoot disease with arsenic.

    PubMed

    Tseng, W P

    1977-08-01

    In a limited area on the southwest coast of Taiwan, where artesian well water with a high concentration of arsenic has been used for more than 60 years, a high prevalence of chronic arsenicism has been observed in recent years. The total population of this "endemic" area is approximately 100,000. A general survey of 40,421 inhabitants and follow-up of 1,108 patients with blackfoot disease were made. Blackfoot disease, so-termed locally, is a peripheral vascular disorder resulting in gangrene of the extremities, especially the feet. The overall prevalence rates for skin cancer was 10.6 per 1000, and for blackfoot disease 8.9 per 1000. Generally speaking, the prevalence increased steadily with age in both diseases. The prevalence rates for skin cancer and blackfoot disease increased with the arsenic content of well water, i.e., the higher the arsenic content, the more patients with skin cancer and blackfoot disease. A dose-response relationship between blackfoot disease and the duration of water intake was also noted. Furthermore, the degree of permanent impairment of function in the patient was directly related to duration of intake of arsenical water and to duration of such intake at the time of onset. The most common cause of death in the patients with skin cancer and blackfoot disease was carcinoma of various sites. The 5-year survival rate after the onset of blackfoot disease was 76.3%; the 10-year survival rate was 63.3% and 15-year survival rate, 52.2%. The 50% survival point was 16 years after onset of the disease.

  2. The time-dose-response relationship for elicitation of contact dermatitis in isoeugenol allergic individuals.

    PubMed

    Andersen, K E; Johansen, J D; Bruze, M; Frosch, P J; Goossens, A; Lepoittevin, J P; Rastogi, S; White, I; Menné, T

    2001-02-01

    The elicitation response in allergic contact dermatitis is dose dependent, but the time-concentration relationship for elicitation has not previously been described. In this study 27 isoeugenol-sensitive patients participated in serial dilution patch tests with isoeugenol and a double-blinded Repeated Open Application Test (ROAT) using two concentrations of isoeugenol, 0.2 and 0.05%. Seven controls without isoeugenol allergy were also included. The participants applied 3.72 +/- 1.57 (mean +/- SD) mg/cm(2) of coded isoeugenol solutions twice a day to a 3 x 3 cm(2) area on the volar aspect of the right and left arm, respectively. For each test site the applications continued until a reaction appeared or for a maximum of 28 days. The minimal criteria for a positive reaction regarded as allergic contact dermatitis was persistent erythema at the ROAT test site. All controls were negative and 16/24 (66.7%) of the included isoeugenol-sensitive subjects showed a positive ROAT to the 0.2% solution within the study period (Fisher's test, p = 0.0024). Ten of the positive patients also reacted to the 0.05% solution. The median number of days until a positive reaction to the 0.2% solution was 7 days and was 15 days for the 0.05% solution. There was a highly significant correlation between the patients' patch test threshold and the number of days until a positive ROAT. In conclusion, the time until an isoeugenol allergic individual reacts in a ROAT depends on the individual sensitivity as well as the exposure concentrations; for low concentrations of the allergen or low degree of sensitivity, the allergic contact dermatitis may develop after several weeks of exposure. Therefore, a negative ROAT after 7 days may be a false negative.

  3. Dose-Response Relationships in Gene Expression Profiles in Rainbow Trout, Onorhyncus mykiss Exposed to Ethynylestradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Sharon E.; Skillman, Ann D.; Small, Jack A.; Schultz, Irv R.

    2006-07-10

    Determining how gene expression profiles change with toxicant dose will improve the utility of arrays in identifying biomarkers and modes of toxic action. We exposed isogenic rainbow trout, Onorhyncus mykiss, to 10, 50 or 100 ng/L ethynylestradiol (a xeno-estrogen) for 7 days. Following exposure, fish were euthanized, livers harvested and RNA extracted. Fluorescently labeled cDNA were generated and hybridized against a commercially available Atlantic Salmon/Trout array (GRASP project, University of Victoria) spotted with 16,000 cDNA's. The slides were scanned to measure abundance of a given transcript in each sample relative to controls. Data were analyzed via Genespring (Silicon Genetics) to identify genes with altered expression, as well as to determine gene clustering patterns that can be used as ''expression signatures''. Array results were confirmed via qRT PCR. Our analysis indicates that gene expression profiles varied somewhat with dose. Established biomarkers of exposure to estrogenic chemicals, such as vitellogenin, vitelline envelope proteins, and the estrogen receptor alpha, were induced at every dose. Other genes were dose specific, suggesting that different doses induce distinct physiological responses. These findings demonstrate that cDNA microarrays could be used to identify both toxicant class and relative dose.

  4. Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat M.F. Hughes1, D.G. Ross1, J.M. Starr1, E.J. Scollon1,2, M.J. Wolansky1,3, K.M. Crofton1, M.J. DeVito1,4 1U.S. EPA, ORD, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2U.S. EPA,...

  5. A meta-analysis on dose-response relationship between night shift work and the risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Yeung, K L; Chan, W C; Kwok, C C H; Leung, S L; Wu, C; Chan, E Y Y; Yu, I T S; Yang, X R; Tse, L A

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to conduct a systematic review to sum up evidence of the associations between different aspects of night shift work and female breast cancer using a dose-response meta-analysis approach. We systematicly searched all cohort and case-control studies published in English on MEDLINE, Embase, PSYCInfo, APC Journal Club and Global Health, from January 1971 to May 2013. We extracted effect measures (relative risk, RR; odd ratio, OR; or hazard ratio, HR) from individual studies to generate pooled results using meta-analysis approaches. A log-linear dose-response regression model was used to evaluate the relationship between various indicators of exposure to night shift work and breast cancer risk. Downs and Black scale was applied to assess the methodological quality of included studies. Ten studies were included in the meta-analysis. A pooled adjusted relative risk for the association between 'ever exposed to night shift work' and breast cancer was 1.19 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.35]. Further meta-analyses on dose-response relationship showed that every 5-year increase of exposure to night shift work would correspondingly enhance the risk of breast cancer of the female by 3% (pooled RR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.05; Pheterogeneity < 0.001). Our meta-analysis also suggested that an increase in 500-night shifts would result in a 13% (RR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.07-1.21; Pheterogeneity = 0.06) increase in breast cancer risk. This systematic review updated the evidence that a positive dose-response relationship is likely to present for breast cancer with increasing years of employment and cumulative shifts involved in the work.

  6. Origins and application of the European Union Position paper on dose response relationships between transportation noise and annoyance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Bernard F.

    2003-10-01

    Dose-response relationships of the sort pioneered by Schultz figure prominently in the current European noise regulation policy. A position paper developed by the Working Group on Dose-effects (part of the EU Expert Network) reviewed a range of potential health effects, but decided that annoyance and sleep disturbance remain the most prevalent and sensitive effects of transportation noise exposure, and those for which the best data were available. A Position paper providing guidance on the dose-effect relations to be used for the assessment of numbers of people annoyed by noise from transportation sources (rail, road and air) may be found at http://europa.eu.int/comm/environment/noise/home.htm This presentation explains the context in which the Paper was developed, outlines the process by which the dose-response relationships were derived and summarizes the key recommendations. Finally some observations are made as the Position Paper is being applied, and related future developments are discussed. The author acknowledges with deep gratitude the assistance of Dr. Henk Miedema of TNO in preparing this paper.

  7. Concentration- and flux-based ozone dose-response relationships for five poplar clones grown in North China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Enzhu; Gao, Feng; Xin, Yue; Jia, Huixia; Li, Kaihui; Hu, Jianjun; Feng, Zhaozhong

    2015-12-01

    Concentration- and flux-based O3 dose-response relationships were developed for poplars in China. Stomatal conductance (gs) of five poplar clones was measured to parameterize a Jarvis-type multiplicative gs model. The maximum gs and other model parameters varied between clones. The strongest relationship between stomatal O3 flux and total biomass was obtained when phytotoxic ozone dose (POD) was integrated using an uptake rate threshold of 7 nmol m(-2) s(-1). The R(2) value was similar between flux-based and concentration-based dose-response relationships. Ozone concentrations above 28-36 nmol mol(-1) contributed to reducing the biomass production of poplar. Critical levels of AOT40 (accumulated O3 exposure over 40 nmol mol(-1)) and POD7 in relation to 5% reduction in total biomass for poplar were 12 μmol mol(-1) h and 3.8 mmol m(-2), respectively.

  8. Dose-response and time course relationships for vitellogenin induction in male western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis) exposed to ethinylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Brasfield, Sandra M; Weber, Lynn P; Talent, Larry G; Janz, David M

    2002-07-01

    The long-term goal of this research is to develop and validate an in vivo reptile model for endocrine-mediated toxicity using fence lizards (Sceloporus spp.). One of the best defined estrogenic responses in oviparous vertebrates is induction of the yolk precursor protein, vitellogenin (Vtg). In this study, dose-response and time course relationships for Vtg induction were determined in male western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis) given intraperitoneal injections of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2). Plasma Vtg was quantified directly with an antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and indirectly using plasma alkaline-labile phosphate (ALP) in order to compare these two methods. Both ELISA and ALP predicted similar median effective dose (ED50 [dose causing a 50% maximal response]) values for plasma Vtg induction (0.167 mg/kg for ELISA and 0.095 mg/kg for ALP). In addition, both ELISA and ALP detected significant Vtg induction at a dose of 0.0003 mg/kg of EE2, which was the lowest dose used in our study. A decrease in body weight at the highest dose (10 mg/kg) and an increase in hepatosomatic index at the four highest doses were observed. Serial dilutions of plasma from an EE2-exposed male revealed a high correlation between plasma Vtg and ALP determinations in this species. In conclusion, our data show that plasma ALP may be a suitable alternative for measuring plasma Vtg compared with developing a Vtg ELISA in fence lizards exposed to estrogenic compounds. PMID:12109741

  9. The Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome in Rhesus Macaques: A Systematic Review of the Lethal Dose Response Relationship.

    PubMed

    MacVittie, Thomas J; Farese, Ann M; Jackson, William

    2015-11-01

    Well characterized animal models that mimic the human response to potentially lethal doses of radiation are required to assess the efficacy of medical countermeasures under the criteria of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration "animal rule." Development of a model requires the determination of the radiation dose response relationship and time course of mortality and morbidity across the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. The nonhuman primate, rhesus macaque, is a relevant animal model that may be used to determine the efficacy of medical countermeasures to mitigate major signs of morbidity and mortality at selected lethal doses of total body irradiation. A systematic review of relevant studies that determined the dose response relationship for the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome in the rhesus macaque relative to radiation quality, dose rate, and exposure uniformity has never been performed. The selection of data cohorts was made from the following sources: Ovid Medline (1957-present), PubMed (1954-present), AGRICOLA (1976-present), Web of Science (1954-present), and U.S. HHS REPORT (2002 to present). The following terms were used: Rhesus, total body-irradiation, total body x irradiation, TBI, irradiation, gamma radiation, hematopoiesis, LD50/60, Macaca mulatta, whole-body irradiation, nonhuman primate, NHP, monkey, primates, hematopoietic radiation syndrome, mortality, and nuclear radiation. The reference lists of all studies, published and unpublished, were reviewed for additional studies. The total number of hits across all search sites was 3,001. There were a number of referenced, unpublished, non-peer reviewed government reports that were unavailable for review. Fifteen studies, 11 primary (n = 863) and four secondary (n = 153) studies [n = 1,016 total nonhuman primates (NHP), rhesus Macaca mulatta] were evaluated to provide an informative and consistent review. The dose response relationships (DRRs) were determined for uniform or non-uniform total

  10. Minimum anesthetic concentration and cardiovascular dose-response relationship of isoflurane in cinereous vultures (Aegypius monachus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Young K; Lee, Scott S; Suh, Euy H; Lee, Lyon; Lee, Hee C; Lee, Hyo J; Yeon, Seong C

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) and dose-related cardiovascular effects of isoflurane during controlled ventilation in cinereous vultures (Aegypius monachus). The MAC was determined for 10 cinereous vultures as the midpoint between the end-tidal isoflurane concentration that allows gross purposeful movement and that which prevents the movement in response to clamping a pedal digit. Immediately after the MAC was determined, the cardiovascular effects of isoflurane at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 times the MAC were investigated in seven of the 10 birds. The MAC of isoflurane for 10 cinereous vultures during controlled ventilation was 1.06 +/- 0.07% (mean +/- SD). When the isoflurane concentration was increased to 1.5 and 2.0 times the MAC, there was significant dose-dependent decrease in the arterial blood pressure. However, the heart rate did not change over a range of 1.0 to 2.0 times the MAC.

  11. Recent odour regulation developments in Flanders: ambient odour quality standards based on dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Van Broeck, G; Van Langenhove, H; Nieuwejaers, B

    2001-01-01

    Until now there has been little uniformity in the approach of odour nuisance problems in Flanders. A switch to a standardised and scientifically underpinned approach is essential and is currently in full development. This paper mainly discusses the results of five year research on odour concentration standard developments in Flanders, executed in the period 1996-2000. The research was focused on five pilot sectors: pig farms, slaughterhouses, paint spray installations, sewage treatment plants and textile plants. The general approach of the method to determine the dose-response relation was found to be sufficient. The methodology used is fully described in the paper presented by Van Broeck and Van Langenhove at the CIWEM and IAWO Joint International Conference on Control and Prevention of Odours in the Water Industry in September 1999. For each location (16 locations in total) an unambiguous dose-response relation could be derived (rising nuisance for rising concentrations). In most cases, a "no effect" level could be determined. The background percentage nuisance fluctuated between 0 and 15%. For the sectors of the slaughterhouses, paint spray installations and sewage treatment plants a no effect level was 0.5, 2.0 and 0.5 sniffing units m(-3) as 98th percentile (sniffing units are odour concentrations measured by means of sniffing measurements on the field) was determined. For the sectors of the textile plants and pig farms, no unambiguous no effect level was found. Currently research is undertaken to translate the no effect levels to odour standards. Other initiatives, taken to underpin the Flemish odour regulations, such as the development of an odour source inventory and a complaint handling system, are also briefly discussed. PMID:11762449

  12. Analysis of the dose-response relationship between high-risk human papillomavirus viral load and cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min-Zhu; Li, Hong-Bo; Nie, Xin-Min; Jiang, Xiao-Man; Ming, Hui; Li, Deng-Qing; Wu, Xin-Yin

    2009-08-01

    The aims of this study were to explore the dose-response relationship between high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) load and cervical lesions; the relationship between hrHPV viral load and the severity of cervical lesions; and the clinical application of the hybrid capture II (HC-II) system in the secondary prevention of cervical cancer. HrHPV viral load was detected by the HC-II system and cervical lesions were diagnosed from biopsied tissue. Curve estimation and Mantel trend analysis were used to explore the dose-response relationship between hrHPV viral load and cervical lesions. Spearman's rank correlation analysis and ordinal regression model were used for the analysis of hrHPV viral load and the severity of cervical lesions. Curve estimation showed good correlation between cervical lesion rates and hrHPV viral load (r=0.775, P=0.008); the rate of cervical lesions increased with hrHPV viral load (chi(trend)=8.000, P<0.001). Medium intensity rank correlation was found between hrHPV viral load grades and the severity of cervical lesions (r(s)=0.321, P<0.001); a correlation appeared between hrHPV viral load and the severity of cervical lesions (P<0.001). These results suggest a dose-response relationship between hrHPV viral load and the severity of cervical lesions. This dependence has important clinical applications and shows the potential value of the HC-II system in cervical cancer prevention.

  13. Ondansetron: A newer aspect of dose response relationship on ileal smooth muscles of rabbit.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Ayesha; Khan, Bushra Tayyaba; Bakhtiar, Salman

    2016-01-01

    There are several life threatening deadly diseases in our world but ‘Cancer’ out powers them all in recent years. Chemotherapy may be used on its own or an adjunct to other forms of therapy. Despite the advancement in cytotoxic drug therapy and supportive treatment almost 70% of patient suffer from chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). Ondansetron, a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist has now become a gold standard in the treatment of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. The central actions of ondansetron are well established but its peripheral actions are not well recognized. The aim of our study was to explore the peripheral actions of ondansetron. Experiments were performed in five groups (n=6) and ileal smooth muscles activity was recorded on power lab (USA). The effects of increasing concentrations of acetylcholine, serotonin & ondansetron alone was observed in first three groups. In the next two groups effects of acetylcholine and serotonin pretreated with fixed concentration (1ml) of ondansetron (10¯ϖ M)were studied. The maximum response obtained by acetylcholine served as a control for our study. Maximum response with acetylcholine was taken as 100% and with serotonin was 177 percent of control. Cumulative dose response curve with ondansetron was triphasic. At 10¯ψM it was 28.8%, whereas with 10¯ξM the amplitude decreased to 16.87%, it reached to plateau at 10¯ϖ M. Response of acetylcholine & serotonin was decreased to 57% and 78% respectively in the presence of fixed concentration of ondansetron (10¯ϖ M). Ondansetron reduces the acetylcholine and serotonin induced gastrointestinal motility. Our study has indicated that ondansetron apart from having central action also has marked peripheral actions that play an important role in CINV and may act as a partial agonist.

  14. Ozone dose-response relationships for spring oilseed rape and broccoli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bock, Maarten; Op de Beeck, Maarten; De Temmerman, Ludwig; Guisez, Yves; Ceulemans, Reinhart; Vandermeiren, Karine

    2011-03-01

    Tropospheric ozone is an important air pollutant with known detrimental effects for several crops. Ozone effects on seed yield, oil percentage, oil yield and 1000 seed weight were examined for spring oilseed rape ( Brassica napus cv. Ability). For broccoli ( Brassica oleracea L. cv. Italica cv. Monaco) the effects on fresh marketable weight and total dry weight were studied. Current ozone levels were compared with an increase of 20 and 40 ppb during 8 h per day, over the entire growing season. Oilseed rape seed yield was negatively correlated with ozone dose indices calculated from emergence until harvest. This resulted in an R2 of 0.24 and 0.26 ( p < 0.001) for the accumulated hourly O 3 exposure over a threshold of 40 ppb (AOT40) and the phytotoxic ozone dose above a threshold of 6 nmol m -2 s -1 (POD 6) respectively. Estimated critical levels, above which 5% yield reduction is expected, were 3.7 ppm h and 4.4 mmol m -2 respectively. Our results also confirm that a threshold value of 6 nmol s -1 m -2 projected leaf area, as recommended for agricultural crops (UNECE, Mills, 2004), can indeed be applied for spring oilseed rape. The reduction of oilseed rape yield showed the highest correlation with the ozone uptake during the vegetative growth stage: when only the first 47 days after emergence were used to calculate POD 6, R2 values increased up to 0.476 or even 0.545 when the first 23 days were excluded. The highest ozone treatments, corresponding to the future ambient level by 2100 (IPCC, Meehl et al., 2007), led to a reduction of approximately 30% in oilseed rape seed yield in comparison to the current ozone concentrations. Oil percentage was also significantly reduced in response to ozone ( p < 0.001). As a consequence oil yield was even more severely affected by elevated ozone exposure compared to seed yield: critical levels for oil yield dropped to 3.2 ppm h and 3.9 mmol m -2. For broccoli the applied ozone doses had no effect on yield.

  15. Leisure Time Physical Activity and Mortality: A Detailed Pooled Analysis of the Dose-Response Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Arem, Hannah; Moore, Steven C.; Patel, Alpa; Hartge, Patricia; de Gonzalez, Amy Berrington; Visvanathan, Kala; Campbell, Peter T.; Freedman, Michal; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Adami, Hans Olov; Linet, Martha S.; Lee, I-Min; Matthews, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Importance The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommended a minimum of 75 vigorous-intensity or 150 moderate-intensity minutes per week (7.5 metabolic equivalent hours per week (MET h/wk)) of aerobic activity for “substantial” health benefit, and suggested “additional” benefits by doing more than double this amount. However, the upper limit of longevity benefit or possible harm with more physical activity is unclear. Objective To quantify the dose-response association between leisure-time physical activity and mortality, and to define the upper limit of benefit or harm associated with more physical activity. Design We pooled data from six studies in the NCI Cohort Consortium (baseline 1992–2003). We used Cox proportional hazards regression with cohort stratification to generate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Median follow-up time was 14.2 years. Setting Population-based prospective cohorts in the U.S. and Europe with self-reported physical activity. Participants 661,137 men and women (116,686 deaths); median age 62 (range 21–98) years. Exposure Leisure-time moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity Main Outcome Mortality Results Compared to those reporting no leisure-time physical activity, we observed a 20% lower mortality risk among those performing less than the recommended 7.5 MET h/wk minimum (HR=0.80, 95% CI 0.78–0.82), a 31% lower risk at 1–2 times the recommended minimum (0.69, 0.67–0.70), and a 37% lower risk at 2–3 times the minimum (0.63, 0.62–0.65). An upper threshold for mortality benefit occurred at 3–5 times the physical activity recommendation (0.61, 0.59–0.62), but compared to the recommended minimum, the additional benefit was modest (31% vs. 39%). There was no evidence of harm at 10+ times the recommended minimum (0.68, 0.59–0.78). A similar dose-response was observed for mortality due to cardiovascular disease and to cancer. Conclusions and

  16. Chronic health effects in people exposed to arsenic via the drinking water: dose-response relationships in review.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takahiko; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Fan Sun, Gui

    2004-08-01

    Chronic arsenic (As) poisoning has become a worldwide public health issue. Most human As exposure occurs from consumption of drinking water containing high amounts of inorganic As (iAs). In this paper, epidemiological studies conducted on the dose-response relationships between iAs exposure via the drinking water and related adverse health effects are reviewed. Before the review, the methods for evaluation of the individual As exposure are summarized and classified into two types, that is, the methods depending on As concentration of the drinking water and the methods depending on biological monitoring for As exposure; certain methods may be applied as optimum As exposure indexes to study dose-response relationship based on various As exposure situation. Chronic effects of iAs exposure via drinking water include skin lesions, neurological effects, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, diabetes mellitus, and malignancies including skin cancer. The skin is quite sensitive to arsenic, and skin lesions are some of the most common and earliest nonmalignant effects related to chronic As exposure. The increase of prevalence in the skin lesions has been observed even at the exposure levels in the range of 0.005-0.01 mg/l As in drinking waters. Skin, lung, bladder, kidney, liver, and uterus are considered as sites As-induced malignancies, and the skin is though to be perhaps the most sensitive site. Prospective studies in large area of endemic As poisoning, like Bangladesh or China, where the rate of malignancies is expected to increase within the next several decades, will help to clarify the dose-response relationship between As exposure levels and adverse health effects with enhanced accuracy.

  17. Occupational Exposure to Diesel Motor Exhaust and Lung Cancer: A Dose-Response Relationship Hidden by Asbestos Exposure Adjustment? The ICARE Study

    PubMed Central

    Matrat, Mireille; Guida, Florence; Cénée, Sylvie; Févotte, Joelle; Carton, Matthieu; Cyr, Diane; Menvielle, Gwenn; Paget-Bailly, Sophie; Radoï, Loredana; Schmaus, Annie; Bara, Simona; Velten, Michel; Luce, Danièle; Stücker, Isabelle; The Icare Study Group

    2015-01-01

    Background. In a French large population-based case-control study we investigated the dose-response relationship between lung cancer and occupational exposure to diesel motor exhaust (DME), taking into account asbestos exposure. Methods. Exposure to DME was assessed by questionnaire. Asbestos was taken into account through a global indicator of exposure to occupational carcinogens or by a specific JEM. Results. We found a crude dose response relationship with most of the indicators of DME exposure, including with the cumulative exposure index. All results were affected by adjustment for asbestos exposure. The dose response relationships between DME and lung cancer were observed among subjects never exposed to asbestos. Conclusions. Exposure to DME and to asbestos is frequently found among the same subjects, which may explain why dose-response relationships in previous studies that adjusted for asbestos exposure were inconsistent. PMID:26425123

  18. Dose-response relationship between sleep duration and human psychomotor vigilance and subjective alertness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, M. E.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Dinges, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    Although it has been well documented that sleep is required for human performance and alertness to recover from low levels after prolonged periods of wakefulness, it remains unclear whether they increase in a linear or asymptotic manner during sleep. It has been postulated that there is a relation between the rate of improvement in neurobehavioral functioning and rate of decline of slow-wave sleep and/or slow-wave activity (SWS/SWA) during sleep, but this has not been verified. Thus, a cross-study comparison was conducted in which dose-response curves (DRCs) were constructed for Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS) and Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) tests taken at 1000 hours by subjects who had been allowed to sleep 0 hours, 2 hours, 5 hours or 8 hours the previous night. We found that the DRCs to each PVT metric improved in a saturating exponential manner, with recovery rates that were similar [time constant (T) approximately 2.14 hours] for all the metrics. This recovery rate was slightly faster than, though not statistically significantly different from, the reported rate of SWS/SWA decline (T approximately 2.7 hours). The DRC to the SSS improved much more slowly than psychomotor vigilance, so that it could be fit equally well by a linear function (slope = -0.26) or a saturating exponential function (T = 9.09 hours). We conclude that although SWS/SWA, subjective alertness, and a wide variety of psychomotor vigilance metrics may all change asymptotically during sleep, it remains to be determined whether the underlying physiologic processes governing their expression are different.

  19. Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationships in Biology, Toxicology and Medicine - An International Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Edward J.; Kostecki, Paul T.

    2002-05-28

    Conference abstract book contains seven sections: Plenary-4 abstracts; Chemical-9 abstracts; Radiation-7 abstracts; Ultra Low Doses and Medicine-6 abstracts; Biomedical-11 abstracts; Risk Assessment-5 abstracts and Poster Sessions-25 abstracts. Each abstract was provided by the author/presenter participating in the conference.

  20. [Exercise-induced asthma in children and oral terbutaline. A dose-response relationship study].

    PubMed

    Hertz, B; Fuglsang, G; Holm, E B

    1994-09-26

    We wanted to assess the protective effects on exercise-induced asthma as well as the clinical efficacy and safety of increasing doses of a new sustained-release formulation of terbutaline sulphate in 17 asthmatic children aged 6-12 years (mean 9 years). Placebo, 2, 4, and 6 mg terbutaline were given b.i.d. for 14 days in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. At the end of each two week period, an exercise test was performed and plasma terbutaline was measured. Compared with placebo, no significant effect was seen on asthma symptoms monitored at home, or on exercise-induced asthma. The percentage falls in FEV1 after the exercise test were 36, 35, 27 and 28%, after placebo, 4, 8 and 12 mg terbutaline/day, respectively. A small but statistically significant dose-related increase was seen in morning and evening peak expiratory flow (PEF) recordings. It is concluded that continuous treatment, even with high doses or oral terbutaline, does not offer clinically useful protection against exercise-induced asthma. PMID:7985255

  1. Dose-response relationships for resetting of human circadian clock by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boivin, D. B.; Duffy, J. F.; Kronauer, R. E.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    Since the first report in unicells, studies across diverse species have demonstrated that light is a powerful synchronizer which resets, in an intensity-dependent manner, endogenous circadian pacemakers. Although it is recognized that bright light (approximately 7,000 to 13,000 lux) is an effective circadian synchronizer in humans, it is widely believed that the human circadian pacemaker is insensitive to ordinary indoor illumination (approximately 50-300 lux). It has been proposed that the relationship between the resetting effect of light and its intensity follows a compressive nonlinear function, such that exposure to lower illuminances still exerts a robust effect. We therefore undertook a series of experiments which support this hypothesis and report here that light of even relatively low intensity (approximately 180 lux) significantly phase-shifts the human circadian pacemaker. Our results clearly demonstrate that humans are much more sensitive to light than initially suspected and support the conclusion that they are not qualitatively different from other mammals in their mechanism of circadian entrainment.

  2. Dose-response relationship between total cadmium intake and prevalence of renal dysfunction using general linear models.

    PubMed

    Hochi, Y; Kido, T; Nogawa, K; Kito, H; Shaikh, Z A

    1995-01-01

    To determine the maximum allowable intake limits for chronic dietary exposure to cadmium (Cd), the dose-response relationship between total Cd intake and prevalence of renal dysfunction was examined using general linear models considering the effect of age as a confounder. The target population comprised 1850 Cd-exposed and 294 non-exposed inhabitants of Ishikawa, Japan. They were divided into 96 subgroups by sex, age (four categories) cadmium concentrations in rice (three categories) and length of residence (four categories). As indicators of the cadmium-induced renal dysfunction, glucose, total protein, amino nitrogen, beta 2-microglobulin and metallothionein in urine were employed. General linear models were fitted statistically to the relationship among prevalence of renal dysfunction, sex, age and total Cd intake. Prevalence of abnormal urinary findings other than glucosuria had significant associations with total Cd intake. When total Cd intake corresponding to the mean prevalence of each abnormal urinary finding in the non-exposed subjects was calculated using general linear models, total Cd intakes corresponding to glucosuria, proteinuria, aminoaciduria (men only) and proteinuria with glucosuria were determined to be ca. 2.2-3.8 g and those corresponding to prevalence of metallothioneinuria were calculated as ca. 1.5-2.6 g. The low-molecular-weight protein in urine was confirmed to be a more sensitive indicator of renal dysfunction, and these total Cd intake values were close to those calculated previously by simple regression analysis, suggesting them to be reasonable values as the maximum allowable intake of Cd.

  3. Dose-response relationships of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure and oxidative damage to DNA and lipid in coke oven workers.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Dan; Zhang, Wangzhen; Deng, Qifei; Zhang, Xiao; Huang, Kun; Guan, Lei; Hu, Die; Wu, Tangchun; Guo, Huan

    2013-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known to induce reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, but the dose-response relationships between exposure to PAHs and oxidative stress levels have not been established. In this study, we recruited 1333 male coke oven workers, monitored the levels of environmental PAHs, and measured internal PAH exposure biomarkers including 12 urinary PAH metabolites and plasma benzo[a]pyrene-r-7,t-8,t-9,c-10-tetrahydotetrol-albumin (BPDE-Alb) adducts, as well as the two oxidative biomarkers urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-iso-prostaglandin-F2α (8-iso-PGF2α). We found that the total concentration of urinary PAH metabolites and plasma BPDE-Alb adducts were both significantly associated with increased 8-OHdG and 8-iso-PGF2α in both smokers and nonsmokers (all p < 0.05). This exposure-response effect was also observed for most PAH metabolites (all p(trend) < 0.01), except for 4-hydroxyphenanthrene and 8-OHdG (p(trend) = 0.108). Furthermore, it was shown that only urinary 1-hydroxypyrene has a significant positive association with both 8-OHdG and 8-iso-PGF2α after a Bonferroni correction (p < 0.005). Our results indicated that urinary ΣOH-PAHs and plasma BPDE-Alb adducts can result in significant dose-related increases in oxidative damage to DNA and lipids. Furthermore, when a multianalyte method is unavailable, our findings demonstrate that urinary 1-hydroxypyrene is a useful biomarker for evaluating total PAHs exposure and assessing oxidative damage in coke oven workers.

  4. Second Solid Cancers After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Studies of the Radiation Dose-Response Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P.

    2013-06-01

    Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ≥60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

  5. Second solid cancers after radiation therapy: a systematic review of the epidemiologic studies of the radiation dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P

    2013-06-01

    Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ≥60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

  6. Dose-response relationships in chemical carcinogenesis: superposition of different mechanisms of action, resulting in linear-nonlinear curves, practical thresholds, J-shapes.

    PubMed

    Lutz, W K

    1998-09-20

    The shape of a carcinogen dose-cancer incidence curve is discussed as the result of a superposition of dose-response relationships for various effects of the carcinogen on the process of carcinogenesis. Effects include direct DNA damage, e.g., by covalent binding, indirect DNA damage, e.g., by increased formation of reactive oxygen species or interaction with DNA replication or chromosome integrity. The 'fixation' of a DNA adduct as a heritable mutation depends on its pro-mutagenic potency and on the rates of DNA repair and DNA replication. Endogenous and unavoidable DNA damage is responsible for a background rate of the process of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis and forms the basis of spontaneous cancer incidence. For DNA-reactive carcinogens, linearity of the dose response at the low-dose end is expected. With increasing dose, saturation of DNA repair can introduce a sublinearity (example: dimethylnitrosamine). Stimulation of cell division as a result of high-dose toxicity and regenerative proliferation also results in a sublinear deviation from low-dose linearity. If the DNA-damaging potency of the carcinogen is low in comparison with the high-dose effects, the linear part of the low dose-cancer incidence curve might be hidden within the background variability. Under such conditions, 'practical thresholds' could be discussed (formaldehyde). If a carcinogen increases the rate of cell division or the level of oxidative stress at high dose but has an antimitogenic or antioxidative effect at low dose, a J-shaped (or: U-shaped) curve with a decrease of the spontaneous tumor incidence at low dose could result (caffeic acid; TCDD). This phenomenon has been observed even under conditions of a genotoxic contribution (ionizing radiation; diesel exhaust particles). For a mechanism-based assessment of a low-dose cancer risk, information on the various modes of action and modulations should be available over the full dose range, and models should be refined to incorporate the

  7. A quantitative structure activity/dose response relationship for contact allergic potential of alkyl group transfer agents.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D W; Basketter, D A

    1990-11-01

    As part of the investigation of structure activity relationships in contact allergy, it has been shown that methyl transfer agents are capable of acting as skin sensitizers. This work has now been extended to a more general examination of alkyl transfer reactions. The modified single injection adjuvant test has been used to investigate the sensitization potential of C12, C16 and unsaturated C18 alkyl transfer agents. Dose responses to challenge and the patterns of cross-reactivity between these materials and methyl transfer agents have been studied. All alkyl transfer agents examined were potent sensitizers in the guinea pig. There was evidence of mutual cross-reactivity between all alkyl transfer agents examined (including methyl transfer agents). Analysis of the data in terms of a modified relative alkylation index showed evidence of an overload effect. The sensitization data has been accurately modelled using a mathematical equation. These results emphasize the possibilities for relating physicochemical parameters and skin sensitization potential. Further studies with alkyl transfer agents are in progress of amplify the observations and conclusions presented in this report. No in vitro model is available for the prediction of skin sensitization potential. Therefore an approach based on a model using physicochemical criteria is the most likely route to a reduced requirement for animal testing. PMID:1965716

  8. ESTIMATING A DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LENGTH OF STAY AND FUTURE RECIDIVISM IN SERIOUS JUVENILE OFFENDERS.

    PubMed

    Loughran, Thomas A; Mulvey, Edward P; Schubert, Carol A; Fagan, Jeffrey; Piquero, Alex R; Losoya, Sandra H

    2009-01-01

    The effect of sanctions on subsequent criminal activity is of central theoretical importance in criminology. A key question for juvenile justice policy is the degree to which serious juvenile offenders respond to sanctions and/or treatment administered by the juvenile court. The policy question germane to this debate is finding the level of confinement within the juvenile justice system that maximizes the public safety and therapeutic benefits of institutional confinement. Unfortunately, research on this issue has been limited with regard to serious juvenile offenders. We use longitudinal data from a large sample of serious juvenile offenders from two large cities to 1) estimate a causal treatment effect of institutional placement, as opposed to probation, on future rate of rearrest and 2) investigate the existence of a marginal effect (i.e., benefit) for longer length of stay once the institutional placement decision had been made. We accomplish the latter by determining a dose-response relationship between the length of stay and future rates of rearrest and self-reported offending. The results suggest that an overall null effect of placement exists on future rates of rearrest or self-reported offending for serious juvenile offenders. We also find that, for the group placed out of the community, it is apparent that little or no marginal benefit exists for longer lengths of stay. Theoretical, empirical, and policy issues are outlined.

  9. Image-Guided Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases: Is There a Dose Response Relationship?

    SciTech Connect

    Vautravers-Dewas, Claire; Dewas, Sylvain; Bonodeau, Francois; Adenis, Antoine; Lacornerie, Thomas; Penel, Nicolas; Lartigau, Eric; Mirabel, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome, tolerance, and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy, using image-guided robotic radiation delivery, for the treatment of patients with unresectable liver metastases. Methods and Material: Patients were treated with real-time respiratory tracking between July 2007 and April 2009. Their records were retrospectively reviewed. Metastases from colorectal carcinoma and other primaries were not necessarily confined to liver. Toxicity was evaluated using National Cancer Institute Common Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Forty-two patients with 62 metastases were treated with two dose levels of 40 Gy in four Dose per Fraction (23) and 45 Gy in three Dose per Fraction (13). Median follow-up was 14.3 months (range, 3-23 months). Actuarial local control for 1 and 2 years was 90% and 86%, respectively. At last follow-up, 41 (66%) complete responses and eight (13%) partial responses were observed. Five lesions were stable. Nine lesions (13%) were locally progressed. Overall survival was 94% at 1 year and 48% at 2 years. The most common toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 nausea. One patient experienced Grade 3 epidermitis. The dose level did not significantly contribute to the outcome, toxicity, or survival. Conclusion: Image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy is feasible, safe, and effective, with encouraging local control. It provides a strong alternative for patients who cannot undergo surgery.

  10. Dose-response relationships for the onset of avoidance of sonar by free-ranging killer whales.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patrick J O; Antunes, Ricardo N; Wensveen, Paul J; Samarra, Filipa I P; Alves, Ana Catarina; Tyack, Peter L; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Kleivane, Lars; Lam, Frans-Peter A; Ainslie, Michael A; Thomas, Len

    2014-02-01

    Eight experimentally controlled exposures to 1-2 kHz or 6-7 kHz sonar signals were conducted with four killer whale groups. The source level and proximity of the source were increased during each exposure in order to reveal response thresholds. Detailed inspection of movements during each exposure session revealed sustained changes in speed and travel direction judged to be avoidance responses during six of eight sessions. Following methods developed for Phase-I clinical trials in human medicine, response thresholds ranging from 94 to 164 dB re 1 μPa received sound pressure level (SPL) were fitted to Bayesian dose-response functions. Thresholds did not consistently differ by sonar frequency or whether a group had previously been exposed, with a mean SPL response threshold of 142 ± 15 dB (mean ± s.d.). High levels of between- and within-individual variability were identified, indicating that thresholds depended upon other undefined contextual variables. The dose-response functions indicate that some killer whales started to avoid sonar at received SPL below thresholds assumed by the U.S. Navy. The predicted extent of habitat over which avoidance reactions occur depends upon whether whales responded to proximity or received SPL of the sonar or both, but was large enough to raise concerns about biological consequences to the whales. PMID:25234905

  11. Dose-response relationships for the onset of avoidance of sonar by free-ranging killer whales.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patrick J O; Antunes, Ricardo N; Wensveen, Paul J; Samarra, Filipa I P; Alves, Ana Catarina; Tyack, Peter L; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Kleivane, Lars; Lam, Frans-Peter A; Ainslie, Michael A; Thomas, Len

    2014-02-01

    Eight experimentally controlled exposures to 1-2 kHz or 6-7 kHz sonar signals were conducted with four killer whale groups. The source level and proximity of the source were increased during each exposure in order to reveal response thresholds. Detailed inspection of movements during each exposure session revealed sustained changes in speed and travel direction judged to be avoidance responses during six of eight sessions. Following methods developed for Phase-I clinical trials in human medicine, response thresholds ranging from 94 to 164 dB re 1 μPa received sound pressure level (SPL) were fitted to Bayesian dose-response functions. Thresholds did not consistently differ by sonar frequency or whether a group had previously been exposed, with a mean SPL response threshold of 142 ± 15 dB (mean ± s.d.). High levels of between- and within-individual variability were identified, indicating that thresholds depended upon other undefined contextual variables. The dose-response functions indicate that some killer whales started to avoid sonar at received SPL below thresholds assumed by the U.S. Navy. The predicted extent of habitat over which avoidance reactions occur depends upon whether whales responded to proximity or received SPL of the sonar or both, but was large enough to raise concerns about biological consequences to the whales.

  12. Modulation of cytochrome P450 2A5 activity by lipopolysaccharide: low-dose effects and non-monotonic dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    De-Oliveira, Ana C A X; Poça, Kátia S; Totino, Paulo R R; Paumgartten, Francisco J R

    2015-01-01

    Mouse cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2A5 is induced by inflammatory conditions and infectious diseases that down-regulate the expression and activity of most other CYP isoforms. Enhanced oxidative stress and nuclear factor (erythroid 2-related factor) 2 (Nrf2) transcription factor activation have been hypothesised to mediate up-regulation of CYP2A5 expression in the murine liver. The unique and complex regulation of CYP2A5, however, is far from being thoroughly elucidated. Sepsis and high doses of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) elicit oxidative stress in the liver, but depression, not induction, of CYP2A5 has been observed in studies of mice treated with LPS. The foregoing facts prompted us to evaluate the response of CYP2A5 liver activity in female DBA-2 mice over a broad range of LPS doses (0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg). Cytokine levels (interleukin [IL]-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A, interferon gamma, tumour necrosis factor alpha) and nitric oxide (NO) were measured in the blood serum. Activities of CYP1A (EROD) and CYP2B (BROD) in the liver were also determined for comparative purposes. LPS depressed CYP2A5 at low doses (0.025-2.0 mg/kg) but not at doses (>2 mg/kg) that increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and NO serum levels, and depressed CYP1A and CYP2B activities. Blockade of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the overproduction of NO induced by co-treatment with pentoxifylline and LPS and iNOS inhibition with aminoguanidine both extended down-regulation of CYP2A5 to the high dose range while not affecting LPS-induced depression of CYP1A and CYP2B. Overall, the results suggested that NO plays a role in the reversal of the low-dose LPS-induced depression of CYP2A5 observed when mice were challenged with higher doses of LPS. PMID:25635819

  13. Characterizing dose response relationships: Chronic gamma radiation in Lemna minor induces oxidative stress and altered polyploidy level.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; Knapen, Dries; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2015-12-01

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied to assess the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. Upon exposure of plants to gamma radiation, ionisation events can cause, either directly or indirectly, severe biological damage to DNA and other biomolecules. However, the biological responses and oxidative stress related mechanisms under chronic radiation conditions are poorly understood in plant systems. In the following study, it was questioned if the Lemna minor growth inhibition test is a suitable approach to also assess the radiotoxicity of this freshwater plant. Therefore, L. minor plants were continuously exposed for seven days to 12 different dose rate levels covering almost six orders of magnitude starting from 80 μGy h(-1) up to 1.5 Gy h(-1). Subsequently, growth, antioxidative defence system and genomic responses of L. minor plants were evaluated. Although L. minor plants could survive the exposure treatment at environmental relevant exposure conditions, higher dose rate levels induced dose dependent growth inhibitions starting from approximately 27 mGy h(-1). A ten-percentage growth inhibition of frond area Effective Dose Rate (EDR10) was estimated at 95 ± 7 mGy h(-1), followed by 153 ± 13 mGy h(-1) and 169 ± 12 mGy h(-1) on fresh weight and frond number, respectively. Up to a dose rate of approximately 5 mGy h(-1), antioxidative enzymes and metabolites remained unaffected in plants. A significant change in catalase enzyme activity was found at 27 mGy h(-1) which was accompanied with significant increases of other antioxidative enzyme activities and shifts in ascorbate and glutathione content at higher dose rate levels, indicating an increase in oxidative stress in plants. Recent plant research hypothesized that environmental genotoxic stress conditions

  14. Characterizing dose response relationships: Chronic gamma radiation in Lemna minor induces oxidative stress and altered polyploidy level.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; Knapen, Dries; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2015-12-01

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied to assess the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. Upon exposure of plants to gamma radiation, ionisation events can cause, either directly or indirectly, severe biological damage to DNA and other biomolecules. However, the biological responses and oxidative stress related mechanisms under chronic radiation conditions are poorly understood in plant systems. In the following study, it was questioned if the Lemna minor growth inhibition test is a suitable approach to also assess the radiotoxicity of this freshwater plant. Therefore, L. minor plants were continuously exposed for seven days to 12 different dose rate levels covering almost six orders of magnitude starting from 80 μGy h(-1) up to 1.5 Gy h(-1). Subsequently, growth, antioxidative defence system and genomic responses of L. minor plants were evaluated. Although L. minor plants could survive the exposure treatment at environmental relevant exposure conditions, higher dose rate levels induced dose dependent growth inhibitions starting from approximately 27 mGy h(-1). A ten-percentage growth inhibition of frond area Effective Dose Rate (EDR10) was estimated at 95 ± 7 mGy h(-1), followed by 153 ± 13 mGy h(-1) and 169 ± 12 mGy h(-1) on fresh weight and frond number, respectively. Up to a dose rate of approximately 5 mGy h(-1), antioxidative enzymes and metabolites remained unaffected in plants. A significant change in catalase enzyme activity was found at 27 mGy h(-1) which was accompanied with significant increases of other antioxidative enzyme activities and shifts in ascorbate and glutathione content at higher dose rate levels, indicating an increase in oxidative stress in plants. Recent plant research hypothesized that environmental genotoxic stress conditions

  15. Time-course and dose-response relationships of imperatorin in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure threshold model.

    PubMed

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Glowniak, Kazimierz; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2007-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the anticonvulsant effects of imperatorin (a furanocoumarin isolated from fruits of Angelica archangelica) in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure threshold model. The threshold for electroconvulsions in mice was determined at several times: 15, 30, 60 and 120 min after i.p. administration of imperatorin at increasing doses of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 100 mg/kg. The evaluation of time-course relationship for imperatorin in the maximal electroshock seizure threshold test revealed that the agent produced its maximum antielectroshock action at 30 min after its i.p. administration. In this case, imperatorin at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly raised the threshold for electroconvulsions in mice by 38 and 68% (P<0.05 and P<0.001), respectively. The antiseizure effects produced by imperatorin at 15, 60 and 120 min after its systemic (i.p.) administration were less expressed than those observed for imperatorin injected 30 min before the maximal electroshock seizure threshold test. Based on this study, one can conclude that imperatorin produces the anticonvulsant effect in the maximal electroshock seizure threshold test in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:17602770

  16. Chemical stress and metabolic rate in aquatic invertebrates: Threshold, dose-response relationships, and mode of toxic action

    SciTech Connect

    Penttinen, O.P.; Kukkonen, J.

    1998-01-01

    Four automatic compounds were evaluated in laboratory studies to investigate their accumulation and toxicant-induced changes in the rate of heat dissipation in the freshwater invertebrates Chironomus riparius and Lumbriculus variegatus. The sublethal energetic response detected by direct calorimetry was related to tissue chemical concentration by the threshold model and an attempt was made to apply the critical body residue (CBR) concept. Below the compound-specific tissue threshold concentration or CBR, no correlations were found between the dose and the metabolic rate, and the slopes of the regression were close to zero. Above the threshold, depending on the chemical, metabolic rate either increased or decreased. An increase in heat output produced by 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), and 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP) was closely correlated with the dose. The order of toxicity for these phenols was 2,4-DNP = PCP > 2,4,5-TCP, which reflects the interaction of compounds` lipophilicities and acidities and their combined influence on bioaccumulation and effects on the energy-transducing membrane by uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation. A decrease in the heat output caused by 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4-TCB) was more variable relative to dose. Also, 1,2,4-TCB required a much higher molar tissue threshold concentration ({approximately}2.0 {micro}mol/g wet weight) than required by phenols to generate the response. Both the metabolic response and the chemical threshold value were those expected to result from narcosis. Results suggest that calorimetric measures can identify not only the integrated physiologic response but also have some resolution of the mechanism of toxic effects.

  17. Systematic review using meta-analyses to estimate dose-response relationships between iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status in different population groups.

    PubMed

    Ristić-Medić, Danijela; Dullemeijer, Carla; Tepsić, Jasna; Petrović-Oggiano, Gordana; Popović, Tamara; Arsić, Aleksandra; Glibetić, Marija; Souverein, Olga W; Collings, Rachel; Cavelaars, Adriënne; de Groot, Lisette; van't Veer, Pieter; Gurinović, Mirjana

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies investigating iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status, to assess the data of the selected studies, and to estimate dose-response relationships using meta-analysis. All randomized controlled trials, prospective cohort studies, nested case-control studies, and cross-sectional studies that supplied or measured dietary iodine and measured iodine biomarkers were included. The overall pooled regression coefficient (β) and the standard error of β were calculated by random-effects meta-analysis on a double-log scale, using the calculated intake-status regression coefficient (β) for each individual study. The results of pooled randomized controlled trials indicated that the doubling of dietary iodine intake increased urinary iodine concentrations by 14% in children and adolescents, by 57% in adults and the elderly, and by 81% in pregnant women. The dose-response relationship between iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status indicated a 12% decrease in thyroid-stimulating hormone and a 31% decrease in thyroglobulin in pregnant women. The model of dose-response quantification used to describe the relationship between iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status may be useful for providing complementary evidence to support recommendations for iodine intake in different population groups.

  18. A meta-analysis including dose-response relationship between night shift work and the risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Ji, Alin; Zhu, Yi; Liang, Zhen; Wu, Jian; Li, Shiqi; Meng, Shuai; Zheng, Xiangyi; Xie, Liping

    2015-09-22

    A meta-analysis was conducted to quantitatively evaluate the correlation between night shift work and the risk of colorectal cancer. We searched for publications up to March 2015 using PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, EMBASE and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases, and the references of the retrieved articles and relevant reviews were also checked. OR and 95% CI were used to assess the degree of the correlation between night shift work and risk of colorectal cancer via fixed- or random-effect models. A dose-response meta-analysis was performed as well. The pooled OR estimates of the included studies illustrated that night shift work was correlated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (OR = 1.318, 95% CI 1.121-1.551). No evidence of publication bias was detected. In the dose-response analysis, the rate of colorectal cancer increased by 11% for every 5 years increased in night shift work (OR = 1.11, 95% CI 1.03-1.20). In conclusion, this meta-analysis indicated that night shift work was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Further researches should be conducted to confirm our findings and clarify the potential biological mechanisms.

  19. Dose-response relationship of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes obtained for the fission neutron therapy facility MEDAPP at the research reactor FRM II.

    PubMed

    Schmid, E; Wagner, F M; Romm, H; Walsh, L; Roos, H

    2009-02-01

    The biological effectiveness of neutrons from the neutron therapy facility MEDAPP (mean neutron energy 1.9 MeV) at the new research reactor FRM II at Garching, Germany, has been analyzed, at different depths in a polyethylene phantom. Whole blood samples were exposed to the MEDAPP beam in special irradiation chambers to total doses of 0.14-3.52 Gy at 2-cm depth, and 0.18-3.04 Gy at 6-cm depth of the phantom. The neutron and gamma-ray absorbed dose rates were measured to be 0.55 Gy min(-1) and 0.27 Gy min(-1) at 2-cm depth, while they were 0.28 and 0.25 Gy min(-1) at 6-cm depth. Although the irradiation conditions at the MEDAPP beam and the RENT beam of the former FRM I research reactor were not identical, neutrons from both facilities gave a similar linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for dicentric chromosomes at a depth of 2 cm. Different dose-response curves for dicentrics were obtained for the MEDAPP beam at 2 and 6 cm depth, suggesting a significantly lower biological effectiveness of the radiation with increasing depth. No obvious differences in the dose-response curves for dicentric chromosomes estimated under interactive or additive prediction between neutrons or gamma-rays and the experimentally obtained dose-response curves could be determined. Relative to (60)Co gamma-rays, the values for the relative biological effectiveness at the MEDAPP beam decrease from 5.9 at 0.14 Gy to 1.6 at 3.52 Gy at 2-cm depth, and from 4.1 at 0.18 Gy to 1.5 at 3.04 Gy at 6-cm depth. Using the best possible conditions of consistency, i.e., using blood samples from the same donor and the same measurement techniques for about two decades, avoiding the inter-individual variations in sensitivity or the differences in methodology usually associated with inter-laboratory comparisons, a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for the mixed neutron and gamma-ray MEDAPP field as well as for its fission neutron part was obtained. Therefore, the debate on whether the fission

  20. Dose-Response Relationship Between Serum 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin and Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Michael; Narayan, K. M. Venkat; Flanders, Dana; Chang, Ellen T.; Adami, Hans-Olov; Boffetta, Paolo; Mandel, Jack S.

    2015-01-01

    We systematically evaluated studies published through May 2014 in which investigators assessed the dose-response relationship between serum levels of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and the occurrence of diabetes mellitus (DM), and we investigated the extent and sources of interstudy heterogeneity. The dose-response relationship between serum TCDD and DM across studies was examined using 2 dependent variables: an exposure level–specific proportion of persons with DM and a corresponding natural log-transformed ratio measure of the association between TCDD and DM. Regression slopes for each dependent variable were obtained for each study and included in a random-effects meta-analysis. Sensitivity analyses were used to assess the influence of inclusion and exclusion decisions, and sources of heterogeneity were explored using meta-regression models and a series of subanalyses. None of the summary estimates in the main models or in the sensitivity analyses indicated a statistically significant association. We found a pronounced dichotomy: a positive dose-response in cross-sectional studies of populations with low-level TCDD exposures (serum concentrations <10 pg/g lipid) and heterogeneous, but on balance null, results for prospective studies of persons with high prediagnosis TCDD body burdens. Considering the discrepancy of results for low current versus high past TCDD levels, the available data do not indicate that increasing TCDD exposure is associated with an increased risk of DM. PMID:25731889

  1. Dose-response relationship between serum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Michael; Narayan, K M Venkat; Flanders, Dana; Chang, Ellen T; Adami, Hans-Olov; Boffetta, Paolo; Mandel, Jack S

    2015-03-15

    We systematically evaluated studies published through May 2014 in which investigators assessed the dose-response relationship between serum levels of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and the occurrence of diabetes mellitus (DM), and we investigated the extent and sources of interstudy heterogeneity. The dose-response relationship between serum TCDD and DM across studies was examined using 2 dependent variables: an exposure level-specific proportion of persons with DM and a corresponding natural log-transformed ratio measure of the association between TCDD and DM. Regression slopes for each dependent variable were obtained for each study and included in a random-effects meta-analysis. Sensitivity analyses were used to assess the influence of inclusion and exclusion decisions, and sources of heterogeneity were explored using meta-regression models and a series of subanalyses. None of the summary estimates in the main models or in the sensitivity analyses indicated a statistically significant association. We found a pronounced dichotomy: a positive dose-response in cross-sectional studies of populations with low-level TCDD exposures (serum concentrations <10 pg/g lipid) and heterogeneous, but on balance null, results for prospective studies of persons with high prediagnosis TCDD body burdens. Considering the discrepancy of results for low current versus high past TCDD levels, the available data do not indicate that increasing TCDD exposure is associated with an increased risk of DM. PMID:25731889

  2. Dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and the serum enzymes for liver function tests in the individuals exposed to arsenic: a cross sectional study in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic arsenic exposure has been shown to cause liver damage. However, serum hepatic enzyme activity as recognized on liver function tests (LFTs) showing a dose-response relationship with arsenic exposure has not yet been clearly documented. The aim of our study was to investigate the dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and major serum enzyme marker activity associated with LFTs in the population living in arsenic-endemic areas in Bangladesh. Methods A total of 200 residents living in arsenic-endemic areas in Bangladesh were selected as study subjects. Arsenic concentrations in the drinking water, hair and nails were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The study subjects were stratified into quartile groups as follows, based on concentrations of arsenic in the drinking water, as well as in subjects' hair and nails: lowest, low, medium and high. The serum hepatic enzyme activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were then assayed. Results Arsenic concentrations in the subjects' hair and nails were positively correlated with arsenic levels in the drinking water. As regards the exposure-response relationship with arsenic in the drinking water, the respective activities of ALP, AST and ALT were found to be significantly increased in the high-exposure groups compared to the lowest-exposure groups before and after adjustments were made for different covariates. With internal exposure markers (arsenic in hair and nails), the ALP, AST and ALT activity profiles assumed a similar shape of dose-response relationship, with very few differences seen in the higher groups compared to the lowest group, most likely due to the temporalities of exposure metrics. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that arsenic concentrations in the drinking water were strongly correlated with arsenic concentrations in the subjects' hair and nails. Further, this study revealed a

  3. An update on modeling dose-response relationships: Accounting for correlated data structure and heterogeneous error variance in linear and nonlinear mixed models.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, M A D; Bello, N M; Dritz, S S; Tokach, M D; DeRouchey, J M; Woodworth, J C; Goodband, R D

    2016-05-01

    Advanced methods for dose-response assessments are used to estimate the minimum concentrations of a nutrient that maximizes a given outcome of interest, thereby determining nutritional requirements for optimal performance. Contrary to standard modeling assumptions, experimental data often present a design structure that includes correlations between observations (i.e., blocking, nesting, etc.) as well as heterogeneity of error variances; either can mislead inference if disregarded. Our objective is to demonstrate practical implementation of linear and nonlinear mixed models for dose-response relationships accounting for correlated data structure and heterogeneous error variances. To illustrate, we modeled data from a randomized complete block design study to evaluate the standardized ileal digestible (SID) Trp:Lys ratio dose-response on G:F of nursery pigs. A base linear mixed model was fitted to explore the functional form of G:F relative to Trp:Lys ratios and assess model assumptions. Next, we fitted 3 competing dose-response mixed models to G:F, namely a quadratic polynomial (QP) model, a broken-line linear (BLL) ascending model, and a broken-line quadratic (BLQ) ascending model, all of which included heteroskedastic specifications, as dictated by the base model. The GLIMMIX procedure of SAS (version 9.4) was used to fit the base and QP models and the NLMIXED procedure was used to fit the BLL and BLQ models. We further illustrated the use of a grid search of initial parameter values to facilitate convergence and parameter estimation in nonlinear mixed models. Fit between competing dose-response models was compared using a maximum likelihood-based Bayesian information criterion (BIC). The QP, BLL, and BLQ models fitted on G:F of nursery pigs yielded BIC values of 353.7, 343.4, and 345.2, respectively, thus indicating a better fit of the BLL model. The BLL breakpoint estimate of the SID Trp:Lys ratio was 16.5% (95% confidence interval [16.1, 17.0]). Problems with

  4. Dose-response relationship in music therapy for people with serious mental disorders: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gold, Christian; Solli, Hans Petter; Krüger, Viggo; Lie, Stein Atle

    2009-04-01

    Serious mental disorders have considerable individual and societal impact, and traditional treatments may show limited effects. Music therapy may be beneficial in psychosis and depression, including treatment-resistant cases. The aim of this review was to examine the benefits of music therapy for people with serious mental disorders. All existing prospective studies were combined using mixed-effects meta-analysis models, allowing to examine the influence of study design (RCT vs. CCT vs. pre-post study), type of disorder (psychotic vs. non-psychotic), and number of sessions. Results showed that music therapy, when added to standard care, has strong and significant effects on global state, general symptoms, negative symptoms, depression, anxiety, functioning, and musical engagement. Significant dose-effect relationships were identified for general, negative, and depressive symptoms, as well as functioning, with explained variance ranging from 73% to 78%. Small effect sizes for these outcomes are achieved after 3 to 10, large effects after 16 to 51 sessions. The findings suggest that music therapy is an effective treatment which helps people with psychotic and non-psychotic severe mental disorders to improve global state, symptoms, and functioning. Slight improvements can be seen with a few therapy sessions, but longer courses or more frequent sessions are needed to achieve more substantial benefits.

  5. Experimental studies in rat lungs on the carcinogenicity and dose-response relationships of eight frequently occurring environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch-Wenzel, R.P.; Brune, H.; Grimmer, G.; Dettbarn, G.; Misfeld, J.

    1983-09-01

    The biologic activity of eight highly purified polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) widely distributed in the human environment was tested in the respiratory tracts of rats. These studies were performed for the examination of carcinogenic activity of the compounds and determination of a dose-response relationship. The lung implantation method was used in 3-month-old female OM rats. A dose-response relationship was obtained for benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), anthanthrene (ANT), benzo(b)fluoranthene (BbF), indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene (IND), benzo(j)fluoranthene (BjF), and benzo(k)fluoranthene (BkF). Benzo(e)pyrene and benzo(ghi)perylene showed no tumor-producing effect in this system when given at doses of 5 mg. The histologic and mathematical evaluations indicated that the investigated compounds had distinct carcinogenic potencies. After probit analysis of the results, the carcinogenic potencies of PAH investigated in the lung implantation model rank as follows: BaP, 1.00; ANT, 0.19; BbF, 0.11; IND, 0.08; BkF, 0.03; and BjF, 0.03.

  6. Dose-response relationships for blood cobalt concentrations and health effects: a review of the literature and application of a biokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Finley, Brent L; Monnot, Andrew D; Gaffney, Shannon H; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2012-01-01

    Cobalt (Co) is an essential component of vitamin B(12). As with all metals, at sufficiently high doses, Co may exert detrimental effects on different organ systems, and adverse responses have been observed in animals, patients undergoing Co therapy, and workers exposed to respirable Co particulates. Although blood Co concentrations are postulated to be the most accurate indicator of ongoing Co exposure, little is known regarding the dose-response relationships between blood Co concentrations and adverse health effects in various organ systems. In this analysis, the animal toxicology and epidemiology literature were evaluated to identify blood Co concentrations at which effects have, and have not, been reported. Where necessary, a biokinetic model was used to convert oral doses to blood Co concentrations. Our results indicated that blood Co concentrations of 300 μg/L and less have not been associated with adverse responses of any type in humans. Concentrations of 300 μg/L and higher were associated with certain hematological and reversible endocrine responses, including polycythemia and reduced iodide uptake. Blood Co concentrations of 700-800 μg Co/L and higher may pose a risk of more serious neurological, reproductive, or cardiac effects. These blood concentrations should be useful to clinicians and toxicologists who are attempting to interpret blood Co concentrations in exposed individuals.

  7. Chernobyl doses. Volume 1. Analysis of forest canopy radiation response from multispectral imagery and the relationship to doses. Technical report, 29 July 1987-30 September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McClennan, G.E.; Anno, G.H.; Whicker, F.W.

    1994-09-01

    This volume of the report Chernobyl Doses presents details of a new, quantitative method for remotely sensing ionizing radiation dose to vegetation. Analysis of Landsat imagery of the area within a few kilometers of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor station provides maps of radiation dose to pine forest canopy resulting from the accident of April 26, 1986. Detection of the first date of significant, persistent deviation from normal of the spectral reflectance signature of pine foliage produces contours of radiation dose in the 20 to 80 Gy range extending up to 4 km from the site of the reactor explosion. The effective duration of exposure for the pine foliage is about 3 weeks. For this exposure time, the LD50 of Pinus sylvestris (Scotch pine) is about 23 Gy. The practical lower dose limit for the remote detection of radiation dose to pine foliage with the Landsat Thematic Mapper is about 5 Gy or 1/4 of the LD50.

  8. Glyphosate-resistant and -susceptible soybean (Glycine max) and canola (Brassica napus) dose response and metabolism relationships with glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Nandula, Vijay K; Reddy, Krishna N; Rimando, Agnes M; Duke, Stephen O; Poston, Daniel H

    2007-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine (1) dose response of glyphosate-resistant (GR) and -susceptible (non-GR) soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and canola (Brassica napus L.) to glyphosate, (2) if differential metabolism of glyphosate to aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA) is the underlying mechanism for differential resistance to glyphosate among GR soybean varieties, and (3) the extent of metabolism of glyphosate to AMPA in GR canola and to correlate metabolism to injury from AMPA. GR50 (glyphosate dose required to cause a 50% reduction in plant dry weight) values for GR (Asgrow 4603RR) and non-GR (HBKC 5025) soybean were 22.8 kg ae ha-1 and 0.47 kg ha-1, respectively, with GR soybean exhibiting a 49-fold level of resistance to glyphosate as compared to non-GR soybean. Differential reduction in chlorophyll by glyphosate was observed between GR soybean varieties, but there were no differences in shoot fresh weight reduction. No significant differences were found between GR varieties in metabolism of glyphosate to AMPA, and in shikimate levels. These results indicate that GR soybean varieties were able to outgrow the initial injury from glyphosate, which was previously caused at least in part by AMPA. GR50 values for GR (Hyola 514RR) and non-GR (Hyola 440) canola were 14.1 and 0.30 kg ha-1, respectively, with GR canola exhibiting a 47-fold level of resistance to glyphosate when compared to non-GR canola. Glyphosate did not cause reduction in chlorophyll content and shoot fresh weight in GR canola, unlike GR soybean. Less glyphosate (per unit leaf weight) was recovered in glyphosate-treated GR canola as compared to glyphosate-treated GR soybean. External application of AMPA caused similar injury in both GR and non-GR canola. The presence of a bacterial glyphosate oxidoreductase gene in GR canola contributes to breakdown of glyphosate to AMPA. However, the AMPA from glyphosate breakdown could have been metabolized to nonphytotoxic metabolites before causing injury

  9. Dose-Response Relationship between Cumulative Occupational Lead Exposure and the Associated Health Damages: A 20-Year Cohort Study of a Smelter in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Gu, Jun-Ming; Huang, Yun; Duan, Yan-Ying; Huang, Rui-Xue; Hu, Jian-An

    2016-03-01

    Long-term airborne lead exposure, even below official occupational limits, has been found to cause lead poisoning at higher frequencies than expected, which suggests that China's existing occupational exposure limits should be reexamined. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 1832 smelting workers from 1988 to 2008 in China. These were individuals who entered the plant and came into continuous contact with lead at work for longer than 3 months. The dose-response relationship between occupational cumulative lead exposure and lead poisoning, abnormal blood lead, urinary lead and erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) were analyzed and the benchmark dose lower bound confidence limits (BMDLs) were calculated. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between cumulative lead dust and lead fumes exposures and workplace seniority, blood lead, urinary lead and ZPP values. A dose-response relationship was observed between cumulative lead dust or lead fumes exposure and lead poisoning (p < 0.01). The BMDLs of the cumulative occupational lead dust and fumes doses were 0.68 mg-year/m³ and 0.30 mg-year/m³ for lead poisoning, respectively. The BMDLs of workplace airborne lead concentrations associated with lead poisoning were 0.02 mg/m³ and 0.01 mg/m³ for occupational exposure lead dust and lead fume, respectively. In conclusion, BMDLs for airborne lead were lower than occupational exposure limits, suggesting that the occupational lead exposure limits need re-examination and adjustment. Occupational cumulative exposure limits (OCELs) should be established to better prevent occupational lead poisoning. PMID:26999177

  10. Dose-Response Relationship between Cumulative Occupational Lead Exposure and the Associated Health Damages: A 20-Year Cohort Study of a Smelter in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yue; Gu, Jun-Ming; Huang, Yun; Duan, Yan-Ying; Huang, Rui-Xue; Hu, Jian-An

    2016-01-01

    Long-term airborne lead exposure, even below official occupational limits, has been found to cause lead poisoning at higher frequencies than expected, which suggests that China’s existing occupational exposure limits should be reexamined. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 1832 smelting workers from 1988 to 2008 in China. These were individuals who entered the plant and came into continuous contact with lead at work for longer than 3 months. The dose-response relationship between occupational cumulative lead exposure and lead poisoning, abnormal blood lead, urinary lead and erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) were analyzed and the benchmark dose lower bound confidence limits (BMDLs) were calculated. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between cumulative lead dust and lead fumes exposures and workplace seniority, blood lead, urinary lead and ZPP values. A dose-response relationship was observed between cumulative lead dust or lead fumes exposure and lead poisoning (p < 0.01). The BMDLs of the cumulative occupational lead dust and fumes doses were 0.68 mg-year/m3 and 0.30 mg-year/m3 for lead poisoning, respectively. The BMDLs of workplace airborne lead concentrations associated with lead poisoning were 0.02 mg/m3 and 0.01 mg/m3 for occupational exposure lead dust and lead fume, respectively. In conclusion, BMDLs for airborne lead were lower than occupational exposure limits, suggesting that the occupational lead exposure limits need re-examination and adjustment. Occupational cumulative exposure limits (OCELs) should be established to better prevent occupational lead poisoning. PMID:26999177

  11. Dose-Response Relationship between Cumulative Occupational Lead Exposure and the Associated Health Damages: A 20-Year Cohort Study of a Smelter in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Gu, Jun-Ming; Huang, Yun; Duan, Yan-Ying; Huang, Rui-Xue; Hu, Jian-An

    2016-03-16

    Long-term airborne lead exposure, even below official occupational limits, has been found to cause lead poisoning at higher frequencies than expected, which suggests that China's existing occupational exposure limits should be reexamined. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 1832 smelting workers from 1988 to 2008 in China. These were individuals who entered the plant and came into continuous contact with lead at work for longer than 3 months. The dose-response relationship between occupational cumulative lead exposure and lead poisoning, abnormal blood lead, urinary lead and erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) were analyzed and the benchmark dose lower bound confidence limits (BMDLs) were calculated. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between cumulative lead dust and lead fumes exposures and workplace seniority, blood lead, urinary lead and ZPP values. A dose-response relationship was observed between cumulative lead dust or lead fumes exposure and lead poisoning (p < 0.01). The BMDLs of the cumulative occupational lead dust and fumes doses were 0.68 mg-year/m³ and 0.30 mg-year/m³ for lead poisoning, respectively. The BMDLs of workplace airborne lead concentrations associated with lead poisoning were 0.02 mg/m³ and 0.01 mg/m³ for occupational exposure lead dust and lead fume, respectively. In conclusion, BMDLs for airborne lead were lower than occupational exposure limits, suggesting that the occupational lead exposure limits need re-examination and adjustment. Occupational cumulative exposure limits (OCELs) should be established to better prevent occupational lead poisoning.

  12. Dose-Response Analysis Using R

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Christian; Baty, Florent; Streibig, Jens C.; Gerhard, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Dose-response analysis can be carried out using multi-purpose commercial statistical software, but except for a few special cases the analysis easily becomes cumbersome as relevant, non-standard output requires manual programming. The extension package drc for the statistical environment R provides a flexible and versatile infrastructure for dose-response analyses in general. The present version of the package, reflecting extensions and modifications over the last decade, provides a user-friendly interface to specify the model assumptions about the dose-response relationship and comes with a number of extractors for summarizing fitted models and carrying out inference on derived parameters. The aim of the present paper is to provide an overview of state-of-the-art dose-response analysis, both in terms of general concepts that have evolved and matured over the years and by means of concrete examples. PMID:26717316

  13. Characterization of dose-response relationships in the induction of liver drug metabolizing enzymes in F344 rats by graded doses of Aroclor 1254

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.R.; Nims, R.W.; Stockus, D.L.; Lubet, R.A. )

    1990-02-26

    The use of induced levels of drug metabolizing enzymes in liver as a potential biomarker for environmental exposure to contaminants has both theoretical and practical appeal. The authors have examined the ability to graded doses of Aroclor 1254 (from 1 to 1,000 ppm) to induce a variety of drug metabolizing enzymes in F344 rat liver. They found that the O-dealkylation of ethoxyresorufin (ETR), mediated by cytochrome P450IA1, was induced > 40-fold by doses of Aroclor >33 ppm. In fact, ETR O-dealkylase was induced {approx} 7-fold by 3 ppm. In contrast, the O-dealkylation of benzyloxy- or pentoxy-resorufin (mediated by cytochrome P450IIB1) was induced {approx} 12-fold by a dose of 33 ppm. Specific hydroxylation of testosterone at the 6{beta} or 15{beta} positions was induced > 6-fold at an Aroclor dose of 333 ppm. Examination of other drug metabolizing enzymes (epoxide hydrolase, DT-diaphorase, glutathione transferase) showed limited < 6-fold induction even at 1,000 ppm Aroclor, while aldehyde dehydrogenase (benzaldehyde, NADP) showed high induction (> 80-fold) at 1,000 ppm it revealed limited induction at lower doses ({approx} 3-fold at 33 ppm). These results support the potential use of induced cytochrome P450 levels as biomarkers for exposure to environmental contaminants.

  14. No evident dose-response relationship between cellular ROS level and its cytotoxicity – a paradoxical issue in ROS-based cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chunpeng; Hu, Wei; Wu, Hao; Hu, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Targeting cancer via ROS-based mechanism has been proposed as a radical therapeutic approach. Cancer cells exhibit higher endogenous oxidative stress than normal cells and pharmacological ROS insults via either enhancing ROS production or inhibiting ROS-scavenging activity can selectively kill cancer cells. In this study, we randomly chose 4 cancer cell lines and primary colon or rectal cancer cells from 4 patients to test the hypothesis and obtained following paradoxical results: while piperlongumin (PL) and β-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), 2 well-defined ROS-based anticancer agents, induced an increase of cellular ROS and killed effectively the tested cells, lactic acidosis (LA), a common tumor environmental factor that plays multifaceted roles in promoting cancer progression, induced a much higher ROS level in the tested cancer cells than PL and PEITC, but spared them; L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO, 20 μM) depleted cellular GSH more effectively and increased higher ROS level than PL or PEITC but permitted progressive growth of the tested cancer cells. No evident dose-response relationship between cellular ROS level and cytotoxicity was observed. If ROS is the effecter, it should obey the fundamental therapeutic principle – the dose-response relationship. This is a major concern. PMID:24848642

  15. DOSE-RESPONSE Relationships Between Whole-Body Vibration and Lumbar Disk DISEASE—A Field Study on 388 Drivers of Different Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, S.; Notbohm, G.; Dupuis, H.; Hartung, E.

    1998-08-01

    In a longitudinal study, the dose-response relationships between long term occupational exposure to whole-body vibration and degenerative processes in the lumbar spine caused by the lumbar disks were examined. From 1990 to 1992, 388 vibration-exposed workers from different driving jobs were examined medically and by lumbar X-ray. For each individual, a history of all exposure conditions was recorded, and a cumulative vibration dose was calculated allowing comparisons between groups of low, middle, and high intensity of exposure. 310 subjects were selected for a follow-up four years later, of whom 90·6% (n=281) agreed to participate. In comparing the exposure groups, the results indicate that the limit value ofazw(8h)=0·8 m/s2should be reviewed. The best fit between the lifelong vibration dose and the occurrence of a lumbar syndrome was obtained by applying a daily reference ofazw(8h)=0·6 ms2as a limit value. The results became more distinct still when only those subjects were included in the statistical analysis who had had no lumbar symptoms up to the end of the first year of exposure. The prevalence of lumbar syndrome is 1·55 times higher in the highly exposed group when compared to the reference group with low exposure (CI95%=1·24/1·95). Calculating the cumulative incidence of new cases of lumbar syndrome in the follow-up period yields a relative risk ofRRMH=1·37 (CI95%=0·86/2·17) for the highly exposed group. It is concluded that the limit value for the calculation of an individual lifelong vibration dose should be based on a daily reference exposure ofazw(8h)=0·6 m/s2. With increasing dose it is more and more probable that cases of lumbar syndrome are caused by exposure to vibration.

  16. Nonlinear dose-response relationship between radon exposure and the risk of lung cancer: evidence from a meta-analysis of published observational studies.

    PubMed

    Duan, Peng; Quan, Chao; Hu, Chunhui; Zhang, Jicai; Xie, Fei; Hu, Xiuxue; Yu, Zongtao; Gao, Bo; Liu, Zhixiang; Zheng, Hong; Liu, Changjiang; Wang, Chengmin; Yu, Tingting; Qi, Suqin; Fu, Wenjuan; Kourouma, Ansoumane; Yang, Kedi

    2015-07-01

    Although radon exposure (RE) has been confirmed to increase the risk of lung cancer (LC), questions remain about the shape of the dose-response relationship between RE and the risk of LC. We carried out a dose-response meta-analysis to investigate and quantify the potential dose-response association between residential and occupational exposure to radon and the risk of LC. All cohort and case-control studies published in English and Chinese on Embase, PubMed, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) digital databases through November 2013 were identified systematically. We extracted effect measures (relative risk, odds ratio, standardized mortality ratio, standardized incidence ratio, or standardized rate ratio) from individual studies to generate pooled results using meta-analysis approaches. We derived meta-analytic estimates using random-effects models taking into account the correlation between estimates. Restricted cubic splines and generalized least-squares regression methods were used to model a potential curvilinear relationship and to carry out a dose-response meta-analysis. Stratified analysis, sensitivity analysis, and assessment of bias were performed in our meta-analysis. Sixty publications fulfilling the inclusion criteria for this meta-analysis were finally included. Occupational RE was associated with LC [risk ratio 1.86, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.67-2.09; I²=92.2%; 27 prospective studies], for pooled risk estimate of the: standardized mortality ratio [2.00 (95% CI=1.82-2.32)]; standardized incidence ratio [1.45 (95% CI=1.20-1.74)]; relative risk [2.10 (95% CI=1.64-2.69)]. In a subgroup analysis of uranium miners and residents exposed to occupational uranium, the summary risk was 2.23 (95% CI=1.86-2.68) and 1.23 (95% CI=1.05-1.44). The overall meta-analysis showed evidence of a nonlinear association between RE and the risk of LC (P(nonlinearity)<0.014); in addition, the point value of residential radon also improved the results

  17. Testosterone Dose-Response Relationships With Cardiovascular Risk Markers in Androgen-Deficient Women: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Elizabeth; Aakil, Adam; Anderson, Stephan; Jara, Hernan; Davda, Maithili; Stroh, Helene; Travison, Thomas G.; Bhasin, Shalender; Basaria, Shehzad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine dose-dependent effects of T administration on cardiovascular risk markers in women with low T levels. Methods: Seventy-one hysterectomized women with or without oophorectomy with total T < 31 ng/dL and/or free T < 3.5 pg/mL received a standardized transdermal estradiol regimen during the 12-week run-in period and were then randomized to receive weekly im injections of placebo or 3-, 6.25-, 12.5-, or 25-mg T enanthate for 24 weeks. Total and free T levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and equilibrium dialysis, respectively. Insulin resistance and inflammatory markers were measured at baseline and 24 weeks. In a subset of women, magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen was performed to quantify abdominal fat volume. Results: Fifty-nine women who completed the 24-week intervention were included in the final analysis. The five groups were similar at baseline. Mean on-treatment nadir total T concentrations were 14, 79, 105, 130, and 232 ng/dL in the placebo group and the 3-, 6.25-, 12.5-, and 25-mg groups, respectively. No significant changes in fasting glucose, fasting insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, adiponectin, blood pressure, and heart rate were observed at any T dose when compared to placebo. Similarly, no dose- or concentration-dependent changes were observed in abdominal fat on magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion: Short-term T administration over a wide range of doses for 24 weeks in women with low T levels was not associated with worsening of cardiovascular risk markers. PMID:24712568

  18. [Mesothelioma incidence decreases parallel to asbestos exposure decrement or interruption: a confirmation of a dose-response relationship, with implications in public health].

    PubMed

    Merler, Enzo

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the available evidence, several groups of experts and investigators identified a dose-response relationship between exposure to commercial types of asbestos fibres and mesothelioma risk. The first mathematical model was proposed by Peto et al. It was derived from a conceptualisation of the multistage theory of cancer and provides an interpretation of the risk for the occurrence of mesothelioma in cohorts of exposed workers. In the study described in this paper, the author reviewed the data suggesting a decrease in mesotheliomas rate follosing reduction or interruption of exposure. Descriptive analyses and the few available long-term cohort studies indicate a decrease in risk. This is supported also by the fact that even the most biopersistent asbestos fibres are eliminated from the lungs. Indeed, a slow but effective reduction of risk has been demonstrated in the cohort of Wittenoom workers in Australia, previously exposed to crocidolite.

  19. Dose-response-a challenge for allelopathy?

    PubMed

    Belz, Regina G; Hurle, Karl; Duke, Stephen O

    2005-04-01

    The response of an organism to a chemical depends, among other things, on the dose. Nonlinear dose-response relationships occur across a broad range of research fields, and are a well established tool to describe the basic mechanisms of phytotoxicity. The responses of plants to allelochemicals as biosynthesized phytotoxins, relate as well to nonlinearity and, thus, allelopathic effects can be adequately quantified by nonlinear mathematical modeling. The current paper applies the concept of nonlinearity to assorted aspects of allelopathy within several bioassays and reveals their analysis by nonlinear regression models. Procedures for a valid comparison of effective doses between different allelopathic interactions are presented for both, inhibitory and stimulatory effects. The dose-response applications measure and compare the responses produced by pure allelochemicals [scopoletin (7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one); DIBOA (2,4-dihydroxy-2H-1,4-benzoxaxin-3(4H)-one); BOA (benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one); MBOA (6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one)], involved in allelopathy of grain crops, to demonstrate how some general principles of dose responses also relate to allelopathy. Hereupon, dose-response applications with living donor plants demonstrate the validity of these principles for density-dependent phytotoxicity of allelochemicals produced and released by living plants (Avena sativa L., Secale cereale L., Triticum L. spp.), and reveal the use of such experiments for initial considerations about basic principles of allelopathy. Results confirm that nonlinearity applies to allelopathy, and the study of allelopathic effects in dose-response experiments allows for new and challenging insights into allelopathic interactions.

  20. A dose-response relationship between organic mercury exposure from thimerosal-containing vaccines and neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Geier, David A; Hooker, Brian S; Kern, Janet K; King, Paul G; Sykes, Lisa K; Geier, Mark R

    2014-09-05

    A hypothesis testing case-control study evaluated concerns about the toxic effects of organic-mercury (Hg) exposure from thimerosal-containing (49.55% Hg by weight) vaccines on the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs). Automated medical records were examined to identify cases and controls enrolled from their date-of-birth (1991-2000) in the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) project. ND cases were diagnosed with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), specific developmental delay, tic disorder or hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood. In addition, putative non-thimerosal-related outcomes of febrile seizure, failure to thrive and cerebral degenerations were examined. The cumulative total dose of Hg exposure from thimerosal-containing hepatitis B vaccine (T-HBV) administered within the first six months of life was calculated. On a per microgram of organic-Hg basis, PDD (odds ratio (OR) = 1.054), specific developmental delay (OR = 1.035), tic disorder (OR = 1.034) and hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood (OR = 1.05) cases were significantly more likely than controls to receive increased organic-Hg exposure. By contrast, none of the non-thimerosal related outcomes were significantly more likely than the controls to have received increased organic-Hg exposure. Routine childhood vaccination may be an important public health tool to reduce infectious disease-associated morbidity/mortality, but the present study significantly associates organic-Hg exposure from T-HBV with an increased risk of an ND diagnosis.

  1. A Dose-Response Relationship between Organic Mercury Exposure from Thimerosal-Containing Vaccines and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Geier, David A.; Hooker, Brian S.; Kern, Janet K.; King, Paul G.; Sykes, Lisa K.; Geier, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    A hypothesis testing case-control study evaluated concerns about the toxic effects of organic-mercury (Hg) exposure from thimerosal-containing (49.55% Hg by weight) vaccines on the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs). Automated medical records were examined to identify cases and controls enrolled from their date-of-birth (1991–2000) in the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) project. ND cases were diagnosed with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), specific developmental delay, tic disorder or hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood. In addition, putative non-thimerosal-related outcomes of febrile seizure, failure to thrive and cerebral degenerations were examined. The cumulative total dose of Hg exposure from thimerosal-containing hepatitis B vaccine (T-HBV) administered within the first six months of life was calculated. On a per microgram of organic-Hg basis, PDD (odds ratio (OR) = 1.054), specific developmental delay (OR = 1.035), tic disorder (OR = 1.034) and hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood (OR = 1.05) cases were significantly more likely than controls to receive increased organic-Hg exposure. By contrast, none of the non-thimerosal related outcomes were significantly more likely than the controls to have received increased organic-Hg exposure. Routine childhood vaccination may be an important public health tool to reduce infectious disease-associated morbidity/mortality, but the present study significantly associates organic-Hg exposure from T-HBV with an increased risk of an ND diagnosis. PMID:25198681

  2. Characteristics of dose-response relationships for late radiation effects: an analysis of skin telangiectasia and of head and neck morbidity.

    PubMed

    Turesson, I

    1991-03-01

    The dose-response characteristics were analysed for late skin telangiectasia in patients for 1, 2 and 5 fractions per week and 3 to 4 dose levels per schedule. Altogether 286 fields were used. Skin telangiectasia was scored on an arbitrary scale and dose-response analysis was performed at 10 year's follow-up for various degrees of telangiectasia, score greater than or equal to 1 to greater than or equal to 4. The following parameters were determined for each schedule and the equivalent single dose-response curves for each endpoint using probit analysis: the ED50, the absolute steepness, measured as the probit width, K, the relative steepness, K/ED50, and the normalised effect gradient, gamma 50. The inverse radiosensitivity, Doeff or Do, was estimated using the Poisson and LQ-models for tissue response. The alpha/beta value was found to be independent of the degree of telangiectasia used as endpoint. The absolute steepness of the dose-incidence curve increased with increasing dose per fraction and was correlated to the degree of damage. The relative steepness was independent of the dose per fraction when the dose-response curve was generated by a fixed dose per fraction, and was less than if generated by a fixed number of fractions. The relative steepness increased with higher degree of damage. Doeff decreased with increasing dose per fraction, and also with higher degree of telangiectasia. The highest steepness determined for telangiectasia score greater than or equal to 4 (partially confluent or more) at 10 years corresponded to K = 0.8 Gy, K/ED50 = 5%, gamma 50 = 7 and Do = 0.7 Gy. The dose-response characteristics found for late skin telangiectasia score greater than or equal to 2 to greater than or equal to 4 were consistent with those determined for necrosis and fatal complications 5 years after radiotherapy to head and neck tumours in our department.

  3. Meta-analysis for deriving age- and gender-specific dose-response relationships between urinary cadmium concentration and beta2-microglobulinuria under environmental exposure.

    PubMed

    Gamo, Masashi; Ono, Kyoko; Nakanishi, Junko

    2006-05-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to derive age- and gender-specific dose-response relationships between urinary cadmium (Cd) concentration and beta2-microglobulinuria (beta2MG-uria) under environmental exposure. beta2MG-uria was defined by a cutoff point of 1000 microg beta2-microglobulin/g creatinine. We proposed a model for describing the relationships among the interindividual variabilities in urinary Cd concentration, the ratio of Cd concentrations in the target organ and in urine, and the threshold Cd concentration in the target organ. The parameters in the model were determined so that good agreement might be achieved between the prevalence rates of beta2MG-uria reported in the literature and those estimated by the model. In this analysis, only the data from the literature on populations environmentally exposed to Cd were used. Using the model and estimated parameters, the prevalence rate of beta2MG-uria can be estimated for an age- and gender-specific subpopulation for which the distribution of urinary Cd concentrations is known. The maximum permissible level of urinary Cd concentration was defined as the maximum geometric mean of the urinary Cd concentration in an age- and gender-specific subpopulation that would not result in a statistically significant increase in the prevalence rate of beta2MG-uria. This was estimated to be approximately 3 microg/g creatinine for a population in a small geographical area and approximately 2 microg/g creatinine for a nationwide population.

  4. Evidence of a Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationship between Training Load and Stress Markers in Elite Female Futsal Players

    PubMed Central

    Milanez, Vinicius F.; Ramos, Solange P.; Okuno, Nilo M.; Boullosa, Daniel A.; Nakamura, Fabio Y.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was: to describe typical training load (TL) carried out by a professional female futsal team for a period of 5 weeks; and to verify the relationship between TL, stress symptoms, salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) levels, and symptoms of upper respiratory infections (URI). Over 45 sessions, the TL of the athletes was monitored daily by means of session-RPE method during the in-season period prior to the main national competition. Stress symptoms were measured weekly by means of the “Daily Analysis of Life Demands in Athletes Questionnaire” (DALDA), SIgA levels, and by symptoms of URI by the “Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21” (WURSS). There was a significant increase in TL, monotony, and training strain in week 3, with a concomitant and significant reduction in percentage variation (Δ%) of SIgA concentration and secretion rate (p < 0.05). Additionally, a second order regression model showed a high goodness of fit (R2 = 0.64 - 0.89) between TL and strain with SIgA concentration, secretion rate, and “worse than normal” responses of stress symptoms from the questionnaire. In conclusion, a link between TL and SIgA levels, and stress symptoms in female futsal players was evident in a non linear fashion. There appears to be an optimal range of values of daily TL between ~343 and ~419 AU and strain between ~2639 and 3060 AU, because at levels below and above these values there was an increase in stress symptoms and above ~435 and ~3160 AU to TL and strain there were a decrease in SIgA levels. In contrast, symptoms of URI failed to demonstrate relationship with the variables studied. Key Points There is a dose-response relationship between SIgA levels and stress symptoms with TL. For the athletes of the present study, values of ~436 AU and ~3161 AU to TL and strain training would be desirable because higher values would decrease responses of SIgA levels. An optimal range of values of TL between ~336 and ~412 AU to TL

  5. Aspects of the relationship between drug dose and drug effect.

    PubMed

    Peper, Abraham

    2009-02-09

    It is generally assumed that there exists a well-defined relationship between drug dose and drug effect and that this can be expressed by a dose-response curve. This paper argues that there is no such clear relation and that the dose-response curve provides only limited information about the drug effect. It is demonstrated that tolerance development during the measurement of the dose-response curve may cause major distortion of the curve and it is argued that the curve may only be used to indicate the response to the first administration of a drug, before tolerance has developed. The precise effect of a drug on an individual depends on the dynamic relation between several variables, particularly the level of tolerance, the dose anticipated by the organism and the actual drug dose. Simulations with a previously published mathematical model of drug tolerance demonstrate that the effect of a dose smaller than the dose the organism has developed tolerance to is difficult to predict and may be opposite to the action of the usual dose.

  6. The ligand-receptor-G-protein ternary complex as a GTP-synthase. steady-state proton pumping and dose-response relationships for beta -adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Broadley, K J; Nederkoorn, P H; Timmerman, H; Timms, D; Davies, R H

    2000-07-21

    Steady-state solutions are developed for the rate of G alpha.GTP production in a synthase model of the ligand-receptor-G-protein ternary complex activated by a ligand-receptor proton pumping mechanism. The effective rate, k(31), defining the proton transfer, phosphorylation and G alpha.GTP release is a controlling rate of the synthase in the presence of a ligand with an efficient mode of signal activation, the ligand-receptor interaction taking place under effectively equilibrium conditions. The composite rate, however, becomes an amplifying factor in any dose-response relationship. The amplification is a triple product of the rate, k(31), the equilibrium constant associated with the activation of the proton signal, K(act)and the fraction of agonist conformer transmitting the signal, f(*). Where the rate of activation of the proton signal becomes critically inefficient, the rate of activation, k(act 1)replaces k(31)K(act). A correlation between beta(1)-adrenergic receptor-stimulated GDP release and adenylate cyclase activation shows that this correlation is not unique to an exchange reaction. Within the initiating Tyr-Arg-Tyr receptor proton shuttle mechanism, the position of Arg(r156) paralleldictates the high-(R(p)) and low-(R(u)) ligand-binding affinities. These states are close to R(*)and R(0)of the equilibrium model (De Lean et al., 1980, J. Biol. Chem.255, 7108-7117). An increased rate of hydrogen ion diffusion into a receptor mutant can give rise to constitutive activity while increased rates of G-protein release and changes in receptor state balance can contribute to the resultant level of action. Constitutive action will arise from a faster rate of G-protein release alone if proton diffusion in the wild-type receptor contributes to a basal level of G-protein activation. Competitive ligand-receptor occupancy for constitutive mutants shows that, where the rate of G-protein activation from the proportion of ligand-occupied receptors is less than the

  7. Dose-response relationships of oral habits associated with the risk of oral pre-malignant lesions among men who chew betel quid.

    PubMed

    Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Chen, Shao-Ching; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2007-08-01

    Betel quid, cigarettes and alcohol are well-recognized risk factors for oral cancer. However, the combined effect of the frequency and duration of these oral habits on the risk for developing oral pre-malignancies among betel quid users has not been fully addressed. In this study, an oral screening programme for men chewing betel quid was carried out by well-trained dentists for early detection of oral pre-malignancy lesions. Using generalized logit model and proportional odds model, we found that, compared with the occasional user, the adjusted odds ratios of developing leukoplakia for men chewing one to 10 pieces of betel quid, 11-20 pieces, and more than 20 pieces per day were estimated as 2.14 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.62-2.81), 2.99 (95% CI 2.06-4.27), and 5.37 (95% CI 3.76-7.47), respectively. The corresponding figures for erythroleukoplakia were 3.69 (95% CI 1.55-8.79), 13.78 (95% CI 5.76-32.98), and 36.64 (95% CI 15.94-84.16), respectively. Similar results were found while the duration was considered. The dose-response relationships were not as noteworthy for cigarette and alcohol drinking.

  8. Meta-analysis for deriving age- and gender-specific dose-response relationships between urinary cadmium concentration and {beta} {sub 2}-microglobulinuria under environmental exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gamo, Masashi . E-mail: masashi-gamo@aist.go.jp; Ono, Kyoko; Nakanishi, Junko

    2006-05-15

    A meta-analysis was conducted to derive age- and gender-specific dose-response relationships between urinary cadmium (Cd) concentration and {beta} {sub 2}-microglobulinuria ({beta}2MG-uria) under environmental exposure. {beta}2MG-uria was defined by a cutoff point of 1000 {mu}g {beta} {sub 2}-microglobulin/g creatinine. We proposed a model for describing the relationships among the interindividual variabilities in urinary Cd concentration, the ratio of Cd concentrations in the target organ and in urine, and the threshold Cd concentration in the target organ. The parameters in the model were determined so that good agreement might be achieved between the prevalence rates of {beta}2MG-uria reported in the literature and those estimated by the model. In this analysis, only the data from the literature on populations environmentally exposed to Cd were used. Using the model and estimated parameters, the prevalence rate of {beta}2MG-uria can be estimated for an age- and gender-specific subpopulation for which the distribution of urinary Cd concentrations is known. The maximum permissible level of urinary Cd concentration was defined as the maximum geometric mean of the urinary Cd concentration in an age- and gender-specific subpopulation that would not result in a statistically significant increase in the prevalence rate of {beta}2MG-uria. This was estimated to be approximately 3 {mu}g/g creatinine for a population in a small geographical area and approximately 2 {mu}g/g creatinine for a nationwide population.

  9. A Method to Evaluate Hormesis in Nanoparticle Dose-Responses

    PubMed Central

    Nascarella, Marc A.; Calabrese, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    The term hormesis describes a dose-response relationship that is characterized by a response that is opposite above and below the toxicological or pharmacological threshold. Previous reports have shown that this relationship is ubiquitous in the response of pharmaceuticals, metals, organic chemicals, radiation, and physical stressor agents. Recent reports have also indicated that certain nanoparticles (NPs) may also exhibit a hormetic dose-response. We describe the application of three previously described methods to quantify the magnitude of the hormetic biphasic dose-responses in nanotoxicology studies. This methodology is useful in screening assays that attempt to parse the observed toxicological dose-response data into categories based on the magnitude of hormesis in the evaluation of NPs. For example, these methods may be used to quickly identify NP induced hormetic responses that are either desirably enhanced (e.g., neuronal cell viability) or undesirably stimulated (e.g., low dose stimulation of tumor cells). PMID:22942868

  10. [Dose-response relationship in the treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin type A (AGN 191622)--a phase II study].

    PubMed

    Mezaki, T; Kaji, R; Kimura, J; Mannen, T

    1995-09-01

    Injection of botulinum toxin type A has been the treatment of choice for spasmodic torticollis for several years. Although previous reports demonstrate its effectiveness and safety, the treatment strategy has been empirical. The present study, using the freeze-dried crystalline botulinum toxin type A (AGN 191622; Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA), aimed to compare the efficacy among three treatment groups divided into low, medium and high dosage levels. Fifty-one patients who entered the study were grouped into low-dose (60 units/session), medium-dose (120 units/session) and high-dose (240 units/session) groups. Two patients (one in low-dose group and the other in high-dose group) were excluded from the assessment of efficacy because they dropped out in the early phase of the study. One experienced worsening of an existing psychosis and the other developed an acute respiratory infection. Injection sites were decided individually by palpation. If the clinical response was not satisfactory four weeks after an injection, the patient was re-injected with the same dose of toxin. The follow-up period was 14 weeks from the initial injection. The results showed that the high-dose group improved more than the other groups in the parameters of severity of symptoms and subjective benefit (p = 0.000). Also, fewer injections were required in the high-dose group to achieve substantial clinical benefit. Although the mean reduction in Tsui's score was not statistically significant among the groups, the "marked improvement" was seen more frequently in the high-dose group (p = 0.033). Unfavorable adverse effects including excessive weakness and dysphasia were always mild and transient.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Dose-Response Calculator for ArcGIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanser, Steven E.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Leu, Matthias; Nielsen, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    The Dose-Response Calculator for ArcGIS is a tool that extends the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS 10 Desktop application to aid with the visualization of relationships between two raster GIS datasets. A dose-response curve is a line graph commonly used in medical research to examine the effects of different dosage rates of a drug or chemical (for example, carcinogen) on an outcome of interest (for example, cell mutations) (Russell and others, 1982). Dose-response curves have recently been used in ecological studies to examine the influence of an explanatory dose variable (for example, percentage of habitat cover, distance to disturbance) on a predicted response (for example, survival, probability of occurrence, abundance) (Aldridge and others, 2008). These dose curves have been created by calculating the predicted response value from a statistical model at different levels of the explanatory dose variable while holding values of other explanatory variables constant. Curves (plots) developed using the Dose-Response Calculator overcome the need to hold variables constant by using values extracted from the predicted response surface of a spatially explicit statistical model fit in a GIS, which include the variation of all explanatory variables, to visualize the univariate response to the dose variable. Application of the Dose-Response Calculator can be extended beyond the assessment of statistical model predictions and may be used to visualize the relationship between any two raster GIS datasets (see example in tool instructions). This tool generates tabular data for use in further exploration of dose-response relationships and a graph of the dose-response curve.

  12. Exploring the dose response of radiochromic dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skyt, P. S.; Wahlstedt, I.; Yates, E. S.; Muren, L. P.; Petersen, J. B. B.; Balling, P.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the dose response of a newly developed radio-chromic hydrogel dosimeter based on leuco malachite green dye in a gelatine matrix. The original dosimeter composition was first investigated in terms of dose response and dose-rate dependence. In addition, the initiating compounds producing chlorine radicals were substituted with compounds producing fluorine radicals, oxygen-centered radicals, carbon-centered radicals and bromine radicals. Also the surfactant was substituted by other compounds of different molecular size and charge. The original composition gave a dose response of 3.5·10-3 Gy-1cm-1 at 6 Gy/min with a dose rate dependence giving a 27 % increase when decreasing the dose rate to 1 Gy/min. None of the substituted initiating components contributed to an increase in dose response while only one surfactant increased the dose response slightly.

  13. Dose-response relationship of 15alpha-hydroxylated sex steroids to gonadotropin-releasing hormones and pituitary extract in male sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Young, Bradley A; Bryan, Mara B; Glenn, Jessica R; Yun, Sang Seon; Scott, Alexander P; Li, Weiming

    2007-03-01

    The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) is one of the earliest extant vertebrates for which the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis has been shown to control and regulate reproduction in a similar fashion to gnathostome vertebrates. While the two forms of gonadotropin-releasing hormones in the sea lamprey (GnRH I and GnRH III) have been studied extensively, their in vivo effect on synthesis of 15alpha-hydroxytestosterone (15alpha-T) and 15alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (15alpha-P) have only been partially characterized. In the present study, plasma concentrations of 15alpha-T and 15alpha-P were measured in prespermiating sea lampreys that were given a single injection of either GnRH I or GnRH III in doses ranging from 5 to 100 microg/kg, or of pituitary extract (as a source of gonadotropin). Plasma was sampled at 1-6h and 6-48 h post-injection, in separate experiments, in order to characterize the peak and duration of responses. 15alpha-T plasma concentrations increased slightly in response to all three treatments, but not in a dose-dependent manner, and the timing of peak concentrations varied between doses. However, 15alpha-P plasma concentrations showed a greater range of response (between 1 and 100 ng/ml) and were clearly correlated with the injection dose. Plasma concentrations of 15alpha-P also responded to far lower doses of GnRH I and GnRH III than any other steroid previously investigated in lampreys. The plasma concentrations of 15alpha-P peaked at 6h after injection for all three treatments, and levels reached a mean of 53.1 ng/ml. In female lampreys that were injected twice with 50 microg/ml GnRH I or III, 15alpha-T concentrations did not exceed 0.5 ng/ml and 15alpha-P concentrations did not exceed 1 ng/ml. These results lend further support to the hypothesis that 15alpha-P plays an important role in the reproductive endocrinology of male lampreys.

  14. Spatial distribution and dose-response relationship for different operation modes in a reaction-diffusion model of the MAPK cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Yi, Ming; Liu, Yan

    2011-10-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade plays a critical role in the control of cell growth. Deregulation of this pathway contributes to the development of many cancers. To better understand its signal transduction, we constructed a reaction-diffusion model for the MAPK pathway. We modeled the three layers of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation reactions and diffusion processes from the cell membrane to the nucleus. Based on different types of feedback in the MAPK cascade, four operation modes are introduced. For each of the four modes, spatial distributions and dose-response curves of active kinases (i.e. ppMAPK) are explored by numerical simulation. The effects of propagation length, diffusion coefficient and feedback strength on the pathway dynamics are investigated. We found that intrinsic bistability in the MAPK cascade can generate a traveling wave of ppMAPK with constant amplitude when the propagation length is short. ppMAPK in this mode of intrinsic bistability decays more slowly than it does in all other modes as the propagation length increases. Moreover, we examined the global and local responses to Ras-GTP of these four modes, and demonstrated how the shapes of these dose-response curves change as the propagation length increases. Also, we found that larger diffusion constant gives a higher response level on the zero-order regime and makes the ppMAPK profiles flatter under strong Ras-GTP stimulus. Furthermore, we observed that spatial responses of ppMAPK are more sensitive to negative feedback than to positive feedback in the broader signal range. Finally, we showed how oscillatory signals pass through the kinase cascade, and found that high frequency signals are damped faster than low frequency ones.

  15. A Bayesian Semiparametric Model for Radiation Dose-Response Estimation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Misumi, Munechika; Cologne, John B; Cullings, Harry M

    2016-06-01

    In evaluating the risk of exposure to health hazards, characterizing the dose-response relationship and estimating acceptable exposure levels are the primary goals. In analyses of health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, while there is a clear agreement that moderate to high radiation doses cause harmful effects in humans, little has been known about the possible biological effects at low doses, for example, below 0.1 Gy, which is the dose range relevant to most radiation exposures of concern today. A conventional approach to radiation dose-response estimation based on simple parametric forms, such as the linear nonthreshold model, can be misleading in evaluating the risk and, in particular, its uncertainty at low doses. As an alternative approach, we consider a Bayesian semiparametric model that has a connected piece-wise-linear dose-response function with prior distributions having an autoregressive structure among the random slope coefficients defined over closely spaced dose categories. With a simulation study and application to analysis of cancer incidence data among Japanese atomic bomb survivors, we show that this approach can produce smooth and flexible dose-response estimation while reasonably handling the risk uncertainty at low doses and elsewhere. With relatively few assumptions and modeling options to be made by the analyst, the method can be particularly useful in assessing risks associated with low-dose radiation exposures. PMID:26581473

  16. Hormones and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Low-Dose Effects and Nonmonotonic Dose Responses

    PubMed Central

    Colborn, Theo; Hayes, Tyrone B.; Heindel, Jerrold J.; Jacobs, David R.; Lee, Duk-Hee; Shioda, Toshi; Soto, Ana M.; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Welshons, Wade V.; Zoeller, R. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    For decades, studies of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have challenged traditional concepts in toxicology, in particular the dogma of “the dose makes the poison,” because EDCs can have effects at low doses that are not predicted by effects at higher doses. Here, we review two major concepts in EDC studies: low dose and nonmonotonicity. Low-dose effects were defined by the National Toxicology Program as those that occur in the range of human exposures or effects observed at doses below those used for traditional toxicological studies. We review the mechanistic data for low-dose effects and use a weight-of-evidence approach to analyze five examples from the EDC literature. Additionally, we explore nonmonotonic dose-response curves, defined as a nonlinear relationship between dose and effect where the slope of the curve changes sign somewhere within the range of doses examined. We provide a detailed discussion of the mechanisms responsible for generating these phenomena, plus hundreds of examples from the cell culture, animal, and epidemiology literature. We illustrate that nonmonotonic responses and low-dose effects are remarkably common in studies of natural hormones and EDCs. Whether low doses of EDCs influence certain human disorders is no longer conjecture, because epidemiological studies show that environmental exposures to EDCs are associated with human diseases and disabilities. We conclude that when nonmonotonic dose-response curves occur, the effects of low doses cannot be predicted by the effects observed at high doses. Thus, fundamental changes in chemical testing and safety determination are needed to protect human health. PMID:22419778

  17. Hormones and endocrine-disrupting chemicals: low-dose effects and nonmonotonic dose responses.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Laura N; Colborn, Theo; Hayes, Tyrone B; Heindel, Jerrold J; Jacobs, David R; Lee, Duk-Hee; Shioda, Toshi; Soto, Ana M; vom Saal, Frederick S; Welshons, Wade V; Zoeller, R Thomas; Myers, John Peterson

    2012-06-01

    For decades, studies of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have challenged traditional concepts in toxicology, in particular the dogma of "the dose makes the poison," because EDCs can have effects at low doses that are not predicted by effects at higher doses. Here, we review two major concepts in EDC studies: low dose and nonmonotonicity. Low-dose effects were defined by the National Toxicology Program as those that occur in the range of human exposures or effects observed at doses below those used for traditional toxicological studies. We review the mechanistic data for low-dose effects and use a weight-of-evidence approach to analyze five examples from the EDC literature. Additionally, we explore nonmonotonic dose-response curves, defined as a nonlinear relationship between dose and effect where the slope of the curve changes sign somewhere within the range of doses examined. We provide a detailed discussion of the mechanisms responsible for generating these phenomena, plus hundreds of examples from the cell culture, animal, and epidemiology literature. We illustrate that nonmonotonic responses and low-dose effects are remarkably common in studies of natural hormones and EDCs. Whether low doses of EDCs influence certain human disorders is no longer conjecture, because epidemiological studies show that environmental exposures to EDCs are associated with human diseases and disabilities. We conclude that when nonmonotonic dose-response curves occur, the effects of low doses cannot be predicted by the effects observed at high doses. Thus, fundamental changes in chemical testing and safety determination are needed to protect human health. PMID:22419778

  18. Dose-response relationship between alcohol consumption before and during pregnancy and the risks of low birth weight, preterm birth and small-size-for-gestational age (SGA) – A systematic review and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Jayadeep; Bakker, Rachel; Irving, Hyacinth; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Malini, Shobha; Rehm, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Background The effects of moderate alcohol consumption during pregnancy on adverse pregnancy outcomes have been inconsistent. Objective To review systematically and perform meta-analyses on the effect of maternal alcohol exposure on the risk of low birth weight, preterm birth and small-size-for-gestational age (SGA). Search Strategy Using Medical Subject Headings, a literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CABS, WHOlist, SIGLE, ETOH, and Web of Science between 1 January 1980 and 1 August 2009 was performed followed by manual searches. Selection Criteria Case control or cohort studies were assessed for quality (STROBE), 36 available studies were included. Data collection and Analysis Two reviewers independently extracted the information on low birth weight, preterm birth and SGA using a standardized protocol. Meta-analyses on dose-response relationship were performed using linear as well as first-order and second-order fractional polynomial regressions to estimate best fitting curves to the data. Main Results Compared to abstainers, the overall dose-response relationships for low birth weight and SGA had no effect up to 10 g/day (an average of about 1 drink/day) and preterm birth had no effect up to 18 g/day (an average of 1.5 drinks/day) of pure alcohol consumption; thereafter, the relationship had monotonically increasing risk for increasing maternal alcohol consumption. Moderate consumption during pre-pregnancy was associated with reduced risks for both outcomes. Conclusions Dose-response relationship indicates that heavy alcohol consumption during pregnancy increases the risks of all three outcomes while light to moderate alcohol consumption shows no effect. Preventive measures during antenatal consults should be initiated. PMID:21729235

  19. 5-ASA Dose-Response

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Seymour; Lichtenstein, Gary R; Safdi, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Mesalamine (5-aminosalicylic acid; 5-ASA) represents the cornerstone of first-line therapy for mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis (UC). Current guidelines suggest that the combination of oral and rectal therapies provide optimal symptom resolution and effectively maintain remission in the majority of these patients. Although effective, most oral 5-ASA formulations have a high pill burden and rectal therapies are associated with low adherence. Recent research has examined patterns of compliance, as well as the efficacy of different dose levels of 5-ASA in terms of symptom resolution, the maintenance of remission, and improvements in quality of life. The ASCEND I, II, and III trials found that doses of 4.8 g/day are more effective than 2.4 g/day doses in patients with moderate disease, those with previous steroid use, and those with a history of multiple medications. The benefits of effective long-term 5-ASA therapy include the avoidance of more costly and potentially toxic drugs (such as corticosteroids and biologic therapies), as well as improvements in quality of life, reductions in the need for future colectomy, and a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer. PMID:20567558

  20. A dose-response relationship between exposure to a large-scale HIV preventive intervention and consistent condom use with different sexual partners of female sex workers in southern India

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Avahan Initiative, a large-scale HIV preventive intervention targeted to high-risk populations including female sex workers (FSWs), was initiated in 2003 in six high-prevalence states in India, including Karnataka. This study assessed if intervention exposure was associated with condom use with FSWs’ sexual partners, including a dose-response relationship. Methods Data were from a cross-sectional study (2006-07) of 775 FSWs in three districts in Karnataka. Survey methods accounted for the complex cluster sampling design. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression was used to separately model the relationships between each of five intervention exposure variables and five outcomes for consistent condom use (CCU= always versus frequently/sometimes/never) with different sex partners, including with: all clients; occasional clients; most recent repeat client; most recent non-paying partner; and the husband or cohabiting partner. Linear tests for trends were conducted for three continuous intervention exposure variables. Results FSWs reported highest CCU with all clients (81.7%); CCU was lowest with FSWs’ husband or cohabiting partner (9.6%). In multivariable analysis, the odds of CCU with all clients and with occasional clients were 6.3-fold [95% confidence intervals, CIs: 2.8-14.5] and 2.3-fold [95% CIs: 1.4-4.1] higher among FSWs contacted by intervention staff and 4.9-fold [95% CIs: 2.6-9.3] and 2.3-fold [95% CIs: 1.3-4.1] higher among those who ever observed a condom demonstration by staff, respectively, compared to those who had not. A significant dose-response relationship existed between each of these CCU outcomes and increased duration since first contacted by staff (P=0.001; P=0.006) and numbers of condom demonstrations witnessed (P=0.004; P=0.026); a dose-response relationship was also observed between condom use with all clients and number of times contacted by staff (P=0.047). Intervention exposure was not associated with higher odds

  1. Linear Versus Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationship Between Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Meconium Concentration of Nine Different Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J.Y.; Kwak, H.S.; Choi, J.S.; Ahn, H.K.; Oh, Y.J.; Velázquez-Armenta, E.Y.; Nava-Ocampo, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Presence of individual fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in meconium is considered to be a reliable biomarker of prenatal alcohol exposure, and their concentration has been found to be linearly associated with poor postnatal development, supporting the widely extended idea that ethanol is a non-threshold teratogen. However, a growing number of epidemiological studies have consistently found a lack of adverse short- and long-term fetal outcomes at low exposure levels. We therefore aimed to investigate the relationship between the concentration of individual FAEEs and prenatal alcohol exposure in meconium samples collected within the first 6 to 12?h after birth from 182 babies born to abstainer mothers and from 54 babies born to women who self-reported either light or moderate alcohol ingestion in the second or third trimester of pregnancy. In most cases, the individual FAEE concentrations were negligible and not significantly different (P >0.05) between exposed and control babies. The concentrations appeared to increase linearly with the dose only in the few babies born to mothers who reported >3 drinks/week. These results provide evidence that the correlation between prenatal alcohol exposure and individual FAEE concentrations in meconium is non-linear shape, with a threshold probably at 3 drinks/week. PMID:26691866

  2. Linear Versus Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationship Between Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Meconium Concentration of Nine Different Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters.

    PubMed

    Yang, J Y; Kwak, H S; Han, J Y; Choi, J S; Ahn, H K; Oh, Y J; Velázquez-Armenta, E Y; Nava-Ocampo, A A

    2015-01-01

    Presence of individual fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in meconium is considered to be a reliable biomarker of prenatal alcohol exposure, and their concentration has been found to be linearly associated with poor postnatal development, supporting the widely extended idea that ethanol is a non-threshold teratogen. However, a growing number of epidemiological studies have consistently found a lack of adverse short- and long-term fetal outcomes at low exposure levels. We therefore aimed to investigate the relationship between the concentration of individual FAEEs and prenatal alcohol exposure in meconium samples collected within the first 6 to 12?h after birth from 182 babies born to abstainer mothers and from 54 babies born to women who self-reported either light or moderate alcohol ingestion in the second or third trimester of pregnancy. In most cases, the individual FAEE concentrations were negligible and not significantly different (P >0.05) between exposed and control babies. The concentrations appeared to increase linearly with the dose only in the few babies born to mothers who reported >3 drinks/week. These results provide evidence that the correlation between prenatal alcohol exposure and individual FAEE concentrations in meconium is non-linear shape, with a threshold probably at 3 drinks/week. PMID:26691866

  3. Linear Versus Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationship Between Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Meconium Concentration of Nine Different Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters.

    PubMed

    Yang, J Y; Kwak, H S; Han, J Y; Choi, J S; Ahn, H K; Oh, Y J; Velázquez-Armenta, E Y; Nava-Ocampo, A A

    2015-01-01

    Presence of individual fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in meconium is considered to be a reliable biomarker of prenatal alcohol exposure, and their concentration has been found to be linearly associated with poor postnatal development, supporting the widely extended idea that ethanol is a non-threshold teratogen. However, a growing number of epidemiological studies have consistently found a lack of adverse short- and long-term fetal outcomes at low exposure levels. We therefore aimed to investigate the relationship between the concentration of individual FAEEs and prenatal alcohol exposure in meconium samples collected within the first 6 to 12?h after birth from 182 babies born to abstainer mothers and from 54 babies born to women who self-reported either light or moderate alcohol ingestion in the second or third trimester of pregnancy. In most cases, the individual FAEE concentrations were negligible and not significantly different (P >0.05) between exposed and control babies. The concentrations appeared to increase linearly with the dose only in the few babies born to mothers who reported >3 drinks/week. These results provide evidence that the correlation between prenatal alcohol exposure and individual FAEE concentrations in meconium is non-linear shape, with a threshold probably at 3 drinks/week.

  4. Code System for Emergency Response Dose Assessment.

    2002-01-16

    Version: 00 A dose assessment model for emergency response applications. Dose pathways represented in the model are those that are most likely to be important during and immediately following a release (hours) rather than over an extended time frame (days or weeks). The doses computed include: external dose resulting from exposure to radiation emitted by radionuclides in the air and deposited on the ground, internal dose commitment resulting from inhalation, and total whole-body dose. Threemore » preprocessors are included. RSFPREP generates the MESORAD run specification (input) file, METWR creates the meteorological data file, and RELPREP prepares the release definition file. PRNT is a postprocessor for generating printer or screen-compatible output. All four programs run interactively. MESORAD was developed from version 2.0 of the MESOI atmospheric dispersion model (NESC 9862) retaining its modular nature.« less

  5. TESS-based dose-response using pediatric clonidine exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Blaine E. . E-mail: jebenson@salud.unm.edu; Spyker, Daniel A.; Troutman, William G.; Watson, William A. . E-mail: http://www.aapcc.org/

    2006-06-01

    Objective: The toxic and lethal doses of clonidine in children are unclear. This study was designed to determine whether data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS) could be utilized to determine a dose-response relationship for pediatric clonidine exposure. Methods: 3458 single-substance clonidine exposures in children <6 years of age reported to TESS from January 2000 through December 2003 were examined. Dose ingested, age, and medical outcome were available for 1550 cases. Respiratory arrest cases (n = 8) were classified as the most severe of the medical outcome categories (Arrest, Major, Moderate, Mild, and No effect). Exposures reported as a 'taste or lick' (n = 51) were included as a dose of 1/10 of the dosage form involved. Dose ranged from 0.4 to 1980 (median 13) {mu}g/kg. Weight was imputed based on a quadratic estimate of weight for age. Dose certainty was coded as exact (26% of cases) or not exact (74%). Medical outcome (response) was examined via logistic regression using SAS JMP (release 5.1). Results: The logistic model describing medical outcome (P < 0.0001) included Log dose/kg (P 0.0000) and Certainty (P = 0.045). Conclusion: TESS data can provide the basis for a statistically sound description of dose-response for pediatric clonidine poisoning exposures.

  6. The hormetic dose-response model is more common than the threshold model in toxicology.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J; Baldwin, Linda A

    2003-02-01

    The threshold dose-response model is widely viewed as the most dominant model in toxicology. The present study was designed to test the validity of the threshold model by assessing the responses of doses below the toxicological NOAEL (no observed adverse effect level) in relationship to the control response (i.e., unexposed group). Nearly 1,800 doses below the NOAEL, from 664 dose-response relationships derived from a previously published database that satisfied a priori entry criteria, were evaluated. While the threshold model predicts a 1:1 ratio of responses "greater than" to "less than" the control response (i.e., a random distribution), a 2.5:1 ratio (i.e., 1171:464) was observed, reflecting 31% more responses above the control value than expected (p < 0.0001). The mean response (calculated as % control response) of doses below the NOAEL was 115.0% +/- 1.5 standard error of the mean (SEM). These findings challenge the long-standing belief in the primacy of the threshold model in toxicology (and other areas of biology involving dose-response relationships) and provide strong support for the hormetic-like biphasic dose-response model characterized by a low-dose stimulation and a high-dose inhibition. These findings may affect numerous aspects of toxicological and biological/biomedical research related to dose-response relationships, including study design, risk assessment, as well as chemotherapeutic strategies.

  7. Biological stress response terminology: Integrating the concepts of adaptive response and preconditioning stress within a hormetic dose-response framework.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J; Bachmann, Kenneth A; Bailer, A John; Bolger, P Michael; Borak, Jonathan; Cai, Lu; Cedergreen, Nina; Cherian, M George; Chiueh, Chuang C; Clarkson, Thomas W; Cook, Ralph R; Diamond, David M; Doolittle, David J; Dorato, Michael A; Duke, Stephen O; Feinendegen, Ludwig; Gardner, Donald E; Hart, Ronald W; Hastings, Kenneth L; Hayes, A Wallace; Hoffmann, George R; Ives, John A; Jaworowski, Zbigniew; Johnson, Thomas E; Jonas, Wayne B; Kaminski, Norbert E; Keller, John G; Klaunig, James E; Knudsen, Thomas B; Kozumbo, Walter J; Lettieri, Teresa; Liu, Shu-Zheng; Maisseu, Andre; Maynard, Kenneth I; Masoro, Edward J; McClellan, Roger O; Mehendale, Harihara M; Mothersill, Carmel; Newlin, David B; Nigg, Herbert N; Oehme, Frederick W; Phalen, Robert F; Philbert, Martin A; Rattan, Suresh I S; Riviere, Jim E; Rodricks, Joseph; Sapolsky, Robert M; Scott, Bobby R; Seymour, Colin; Sinclair, David A; Smith-Sonneborn, Joan; Snow, Elizabeth T; Spear, Linda; Stevenson, Donald E; Thomas, Yolene; Tubiana, Maurice; Williams, Gary M; Mattson, Mark P

    2007-07-01

    Many biological subdisciplines that regularly assess dose-response relationships have identified an evolutionarily conserved process in which a low dose of a stressful stimulus activates an adaptive response that increases the resistance of the cell or organism to a moderate to severe level of stress. Due to a lack of frequent interaction among scientists in these many areas, there has emerged a broad range of terms that describe such dose-response relationships. This situation has become problematic because the different terms describe a family of similar biological responses (e.g., adaptive response, preconditioning, hormesis), adversely affecting interdisciplinary communication, and possibly even obscuring generalizable features and central biological concepts. With support from scientists in a broad range of disciplines, this article offers a set of recommendations we believe can achieve greater conceptual harmony in dose-response terminology, as well as better understanding and communication across the broad spectrum of biological disciplines.

  8. Dose-response model for teratological experiments involving quantal responses

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, K.; Van Ryzin, J.

    1985-03-01

    This paper introduces a dose-response model for teratological quantal response data where the probability of response for an offspring from a female at a given dose varies with the litter size. The maximum likelihood estimators for the parameters of the model are given as the solution of a nonlinear iterative algorithm. Two methods of low-dose extrapolation are presented, one based on the litter size distribution and the other a conservative method. The resulting procedures are then applied to a teratological data set from the literature.

  9. Analytical modelling of regional radiotherapy dose response of lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangkyu; Stroian, Gabriela; Kopek, Neil; AlBahhar, Mahmood; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of the dose-response of radiation-induced lung disease (RILD) is necessary for optimization of radiotherapy (RT) treatment plans involving thoracic cavity irradiation. This study models the time-dependent relationship between local radiation dose and post-treatment lung tissue damage measured by computed tomography (CT) imaging. Fifty-eight follow-up diagnostic CT scans from 21 non-small-cell lung cancer patients were examined. The extent of RILD was segmented on the follow-up CT images based on the increase of physical density relative to the pre-treatment CT image. The segmented RILD was locally correlated with dose distribution calculated by analytical anisotropic algorithm and the Monte Carlo method to generate the corresponding dose-response curves. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model was fit to the dose-response curves at six post-RT time periods, and temporal change in the LKB parameters was recorded. In this study, we observed significant correlation between the probability of lung tissue damage and the local dose for 96% of the follow-up studies. Dose-injury correlation at the first three months after RT was significantly different from later follow-up periods in terms of steepness and threshold dose as estimated from the LKB model. Dependence of dose response on superior-inferior tumour position was also observed. The time-dependent analytical modelling of RILD might provide better understanding of the long-term behaviour of the disease and could potentially be applied to improve inverse treatment planning optimization.

  10. Realizing autonomy in responsive relationships

    PubMed Central

    Houtepen, Rob; Spreeuwenberg, Cor; Widdershoven, Guy

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this article is to augment the ethical discussion among nurses with the findings from empirical research on autonomy of older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. There are many factors influencing autonomy. These include: health conditions, treatment, knowledge, experience and skills, personal approach as well as familial patterns, type of relationship, life history and social context. Fifteen older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus were interviewed in a nurse-led diabetes clinic. These participants perceive three processes which support autonomy in responsive relationships: preserving patterns of concern and interaction, nurturing collaborative responsibilities and being closely engaged in trustful and helpful family relations. People with diabetes realize autonomy in various responsive relationships in their unique life context. Next, we performed a literature review of care ethics and caring in nursing with regard to relational autonomy. We classified the literature in five strands of care: attitude-oriented, dialogue-oriented, activity-oriented, relationship-oriented and life-oriented. According to our respondents, autonomy in responsive relationships is fostered when patient, nurses, professionals of the health team and family members carry out care activities supported by a relational attitude of care. They can best realize autonomy in relationships with others when several essential aspects of care and caring are present in their lives. Therefore, we advocate a comprehensive approach to care and caring. PMID:20339930

  11. Testosterone Dose-Response Relationships in Hysterectomized Women with and without Oophorectomy: Effects on Sexual Function, Body Composition, Muscle Performance and Physical Function in a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Grace; Basaria, Shehzad; Travison, Thomas G.; Ho, Matthew H.; Davda, Maithili; Mazer, Norman A.; Miciek, Renee; Knapp, Philip E.; Zhang, Anqi; Collins, Lauren; Ursino, Monica; Appleman, Erica; Dzekov, Connie; Stroh, Helene; Ouellette, Miranda; Rundell, Tyler; Baby, Merilyn; Bhatia, Narender N.; Khorram, Omid; Friedman, Theodore; Storer, Thomas W.; Bhasin, Shalender

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine dose-dependent effects of testosterone on sexual function, body composition, muscle performance, and physical function in hysterectomized women with and without oophorectomy. Methods 71 menopausal women who previously underwent hysterectomy with or without oophorectomy with total testosterone<31ng/dl or free testosterone<3.5 pg/ml received a standardized transdermal estradiol regimen during the 12-week run-in period, and were then randomized to receive weekly IM injections of placebo, or 3, 6.25, 12.5 or 25 mg testosterone enanthate for 24 weeks. Total and free testosterone levels were measured by LC-MS/MS and equilibrium dialysis, respectively. The primary outcome was change in sexual function measured using Brief Index of Sexual Function (BISF-W); Secondary outcomes included changes in sexual activity, sexual distress, DeRogatis Inventory of Sexual Function, lean (LBM) and fat mass, muscle strength and power, and physical function. Results 71 women were randomized; five groups were similar at baseline. 62 women with analyzable data for the primary outcome were included in the final analysis. Mean on-treatment total testosterone concentrations were 19, 78, 102, 128 and 210ng/dl in the placebo, 3, 6.25, 12.5 and 25-mg groups, respectively. Changes in composite BISF-W scores, thoughts-desire, arousal, frequency of sexual activity, LBM, chest-press power and loaded stair-climb power were significantly related to increases in free testosterone concentrations; changes were significantly greater in women assigned to the 25-mg group when compared to placebo but not at the lower dose groups. Sexual activity increased by 2.7 encounters per week in 25-mg group. Frequency of androgenic adverse events was low. Conclusion Testosterone administration in hysterectomized women with and without oophorectomy for 24-weeks was associated with dose and concentration-dependent gains in several domains of sexual function, LBM, chest-press power and loaded stair

  12. Bayesian dose-response analysis for epidemiological studies with complex uncertainty in dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Deukwoo; Hoffman, F Owen; Moroz, Brian E; Simon, Steven L

    2016-02-10

    Most conventional risk analysis methods rely on a single best estimate of exposure per person, which does not allow for adjustment for exposure-related uncertainty. Here, we propose a Bayesian model averaging method to properly quantify the relationship between radiation dose and disease outcomes by accounting for shared and unshared uncertainty in estimated dose. Our Bayesian risk analysis method utilizes multiple realizations of sets (vectors) of doses generated by a two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation method that properly separates shared and unshared errors in dose estimation. The exposure model used in this work is taken from a study of the risk of thyroid nodules among a cohort of 2376 subjects who were exposed to fallout from nuclear testing in Kazakhstan. We assessed the performance of our method through an extensive series of simulations and comparisons against conventional regression risk analysis methods. When the estimated doses contain relatively small amounts of uncertainty, the Bayesian method using multiple a priori plausible draws of dose vectors gave similar results to the conventional regression-based methods of dose-response analysis. However, when large and complex mixtures of shared and unshared uncertainties are present, the Bayesian method using multiple dose vectors had significantly lower relative bias than conventional regression-based risk analysis methods and better coverage, that is, a markedly increased capability to include the true risk coefficient within the 95% credible interval of the Bayesian-based risk estimate. An evaluation of the dose-response using our method is presented for an epidemiological study of thyroid disease following radiation exposure.

  13. Platelet dysfunction induced by parenteral carbenicillin and ticarcillin. Studies of the dose-response relationship and mechanism of action in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, G. J.; Rao, G. H.; White, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    Sequential studies of platelet function were performed in dogs receiving continuous intravenous carbenicillin (CARB) or ticarcillin (TIC). Dose- and time-dependent platelet dysfunction was uniformly observed during the administration of CARB or TIC, 250 to 1000 mg/kg/24 hr. ADP-induced primary and secondary platelet aggregation was markedly inhibited within 24 to 48 hours in dogs receiving 750 or 1000 mg/kg/24 hr, but maximum impairment of aggregation did not occur until 3 to 5 days in dogs receiving 250 or 500 mg/kg/24 hr. Platelet glass bead column retention was abnormal in all dogs studied, and platelet factor 3 availability was impaired in 91%. Collagen-induced platelet aggregation was consistently impaired and the bleeding time was prolonged only during the infusion of greater than or equal to 750 mg/kg/24 hr. Plasma fibrinogen concentrations and thrombin times remained normal. CARB and TIC infusions resulted in inhibition of 14C-serotonin release and slightly decreased platelet ADP, while serotonin, ATP, and ultrastructure remained unchanged. The mutual correction of abnormal platelet aggregation by mixing CARB or TIC platelets with aspirin-treated platelets suggested that CARB and TIC inhibited the platelet release reaction by a mechanism other than inhibition of platelet cyclo-oxygenase. The platelet inhibitory properties of CARB and TIC demonstrated in this study suggest that they may be useful antithrombotic agents. PMID:645824

  14. Seamless integration of dose-response screening and flow chemistry: efficient generation of structure-activity relationship data of β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Werner, Michael; Kuratli, Christoph; Martin, Rainer E; Hochstrasser, Remo; Wechsler, David; Enderle, Thilo; Alanine, Alexander I; Vogel, Horst

    2014-02-01

    Drug discovery is a multifaceted endeavor encompassing as its core element the generation of structure-activity relationship (SAR) data by repeated chemical synthesis and biological testing of tailored molecules. Herein, we report on the development of a flow-based biochemical assay and its seamless integration into a fully automated system comprising flow chemical synthesis, purification and in-line quantification of compound concentration. This novel synthesis-screening platform enables to obtain SAR data on b-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors at an unprecedented cycle time of only 1 h instead of several days. Full integration and automation of industrial processes have always led to productivity gains and cost reductions, and this work demonstrates how applying these concepts to SAR generation may lead to a more efficient drug discovery process.

  15. Dichloroacetate toxicokinetics and disruption of tyrosine catabolism in B6C3F1 mice: dose-response relationships and age as a modifying factor

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Irv R. ); Merdink, James L.; Gonzalez-Leon, Alberto; Bull, R J.

    2002-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) is a well established rodent carcinogen commonly found in municipal drinking water supplies. Previous toxicokinetic studies have established that elimination of DCA is controlled by liver metabolism. DCA metabolism occurs by the cytosolic enzyme glutathione-S-transferase-zeta (GSTz). An important feature of the GSTz pathway is the autoinhibition of metabolism due to suicide inactivation of GSTz by DCA resulting in a direct reduction in GSTz activity. GSTz is identical to a key tyrosine catabolism enzyme known as maleylacetoacetate isomerase (MAAI; EC 5.3.1.2). In the tyrosine metabolism pathway, GSTz plays a critical role in catalyzing the isomerization of maleylacetoacetate to fumarylacetoacetate. Disruption of tyrosine catabolism has been linked to increased cancer risk in humans. We studied the elimination of i.v. doses of DCA to juvenile (8 week) and senescent (60 week) mice previously treated with DCA in their drinking water for 2 or 54 weeks. The diurnal change in blood concentrations of DCA was also monitored in mice exposed to three different drinking water concentrations of DCA (2.0, 0.5 and 0.05 g/L). Additional experiments measured the in-vitro metabolism of DCA in liver homogenates prepared from treated mice given various recovery times following treatment. The MAAI activity was also measured in liver cytosol obtained from treated mice. Results indicate juvenile mice were the most sensitive to changes in DCA elimination after drinking water treatment. MAAI activity was reduced up to 80% in liver cytosol from treated mice. These results indicate that inactivation and re-synthesis of GSTz is a highly dynamic process and is supportive of the hypothesis that decreased MAAI activity is a contributing factor in the carcinogenesis of DCA.

  16. Fewer Doses of HPV Vaccine Result in Immune Response Similar to Three-Dose Regimen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Releases NCI News Note Fewer doses of HPV vaccine result in immune response similar to three-dose ... that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum antibody ...

  17. Gastroduodenal response to low-dose glucagon.

    PubMed

    Feczko, P J; Simms, S M; Iorio, J; Halpert, R

    1983-05-01

    A prospective, double-blind clinical study of the double-contrast upper gastrointestinal examination involving 240 patients was performed using glucagon in doses from 0.025 to 0.125 mg, in 0.025 mg increments. Although motility was diminished, neither gastric distension or coating was improved with the use of glucagon. However, duodenal distension and coating were markedly enhanced. The response of the pylorus was individualistic. The pylorus remained patent in most patients, and glucagon would not prevent barium spillage in the duodenum. However, in those patients with a "competent" pylorus, increasing glucagon doses produced a delay in gastric emptying. Several other variables, including weight, age, and gender, were studied and were not believed to be of clinical significance. Spontaneous gastroesophageal reflux was also increased with the use of glucagon. Glucagon mainly enhanced duodenal visualization but had no beneficial effect on the stomach or pylorus. Absolute dose is the most important factor, and all observable changes can be seen once a certain threshold dose (0.05 mg) is reached.

  18. Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Low-Dose and LET Response.

    PubMed

    Chang, Polly Y; Cucinotta, Francis A; Bjornstad, Kathleen A; Bakke, James; Rosen, Chris J; Du, Nicholas; Fairchild, David G; Cacao, Eliedonna; Blakely, Eleanor A

    2016-05-01

    Increased cancer risk remains a primary concern for travel into deep space and may preclude manned missions to Mars due to large uncertainties that currently exist in estimating cancer risk from the spectrum of radiations found in space with the very limited available human epidemiological radiation-induced cancer data. Existing data on human risk of cancer from X-ray and gamma-ray exposure must be scaled to the many types and fluences of radiations found in space using radiation quality factors and dose-rate modification factors, and assuming linearity of response since the shapes of the dose responses at low doses below 100 mSv are unknown. The goal of this work was to reduce uncertainties in the relative biological effect (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) relationship for space-relevant doses of charged-particle radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The historical data from the studies of Fry et al. and Alpen et al. for Harderian gland (HG) tumors in the female CB6F1 strain of mouse represent the most complete set of experimental observations, including dose dependence, available on a specific radiation-induced tumor in an experimental animal using heavy ion beams that are found in the cosmic radiation spectrum. However, these data lack complete information on low-dose responses below 0.1 Gy, and for chronic low-dose-rate exposures, and there are gaps in the LET region between 25 and 190 keV/μm. In this study, we used the historical HG tumorigenesis data as reference, and obtained HG tumor data for 260 MeV/u silicon (LET ∼70 keV/μm) and 1,000 MeV/u titanium (LET ∼100 keV/μm) to fill existing gaps of data in this LET range to improve our understanding of the dose-response curve at low doses, to test for deviations from linearity and to provide RBE estimates. Animals were also exposed to five daily fractions of 0.026 or 0.052 Gy of 1,000 MeV/u titanium ions to simulate chronic exposure, and HG tumorigenesis from this fractionated study were compared to the

  19. Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Low-Dose and LET Response.

    PubMed

    Chang, Polly Y; Cucinotta, Francis A; Bjornstad, Kathleen A; Bakke, James; Rosen, Chris J; Du, Nicholas; Fairchild, David G; Cacao, Eliedonna; Blakely, Eleanor A

    2016-05-01

    Increased cancer risk remains a primary concern for travel into deep space and may preclude manned missions to Mars due to large uncertainties that currently exist in estimating cancer risk from the spectrum of radiations found in space with the very limited available human epidemiological radiation-induced cancer data. Existing data on human risk of cancer from X-ray and gamma-ray exposure must be scaled to the many types and fluences of radiations found in space using radiation quality factors and dose-rate modification factors, and assuming linearity of response since the shapes of the dose responses at low doses below 100 mSv are unknown. The goal of this work was to reduce uncertainties in the relative biological effect (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) relationship for space-relevant doses of charged-particle radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The historical data from the studies of Fry et al. and Alpen et al. for Harderian gland (HG) tumors in the female CB6F1 strain of mouse represent the most complete set of experimental observations, including dose dependence, available on a specific radiation-induced tumor in an experimental animal using heavy ion beams that are found in the cosmic radiation spectrum. However, these data lack complete information on low-dose responses below 0.1 Gy, and for chronic low-dose-rate exposures, and there are gaps in the LET region between 25 and 190 keV/μm. In this study, we used the historical HG tumorigenesis data as reference, and obtained HG tumor data for 260 MeV/u silicon (LET ∼70 keV/μm) and 1,000 MeV/u titanium (LET ∼100 keV/μm) to fill existing gaps of data in this LET range to improve our understanding of the dose-response curve at low doses, to test for deviations from linearity and to provide RBE estimates. Animals were also exposed to five daily fractions of 0.026 or 0.052 Gy of 1,000 MeV/u titanium ions to simulate chronic exposure, and HG tumorigenesis from this fractionated study were compared to the

  20. Microbial dose response modeling: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Haas, Charles N

    2015-02-01

    The understanding of the risk to humans from exposure to pathogens has been firmly put into a risk assessment framework. A key element of applying this approach is the understanding of the relationship between dose and response for particular pathogens. This understanding has progressed from early use of threshold concepts ("minimal infectious dose") thru multiple generations of models. Generation 1 models describe probability of response to exposed dose. Generation 2 models incorporate host factors (e.g., age) and/or pathogen factors (e.g., particle size of inhaled agents). Generation 3 models describe the rate at which effects develop, i.e. the epidemic curve. These (generation 1 through three models) have been developed and used in multiple contexts. Beyond Generation 3 lies an opportunity for the deep incorporation of in vivo physiological responses and the coupling of the individual host dynamics to the dynamics of spread of contagious diseases in the population. This would enable more direct extrapolation from controlled dosing studies to estimate population level effects. There remain also needs to understand broader categories of infectious agents, including pathogenic amoebae and fungi. More advanced models need to be validated against well-characterized human outbreak data.

  1. Radiological dose reconstruction for birds reconciles outcomes of Fukushima with knowledge of dose-effect relationships.

    PubMed

    Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Della-Vedova, Claire; Métivier, Jean-Michel; Ritz, Christian; Mousseau, Timothy A; Møller, Anders Pape

    2015-11-16

    We reconstructed the radiological dose for birds observed at 300 census sites in the 50-km northwest area affected by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant over 2011-2014. Substituting the ambient dose rate measured at the census points (from 0.16 to 31 μGy h(-1)) with the dose rate reconstructed for adult birds of each species (from 0.3 to 97 μGy h(-1)), we confirmed that the overall bird abundance at Fukushima decreased with increasing total doses. This relationship was directly consistent with exposure levels found in the literature to induce physiological disturbances in birds. Among the 57 species constituting the observed bird community, we found that 90% were likely chronically exposed at a dose rate that could potentially affect their reproductive success. We quantified a loss of 22.6% of the total number of individuals per increment of one unit log10-tansformed total dose (in Gy), over the four-year post-accident period in the explored area. We estimated that a total dose of 0.55 Gy reduced by 50% the total number of birds in the study area over 2011-2014. The data also suggest a significant positive relationship between total dose and species diversity.

  2. Radiological dose reconstruction for birds reconciles outcomes of Fukushima with knowledge of dose-effect relationships.

    PubMed

    Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Della-Vedova, Claire; Métivier, Jean-Michel; Ritz, Christian; Mousseau, Timothy A; Møller, Anders Pape

    2015-01-01

    We reconstructed the radiological dose for birds observed at 300 census sites in the 50-km northwest area affected by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant over 2011-2014. Substituting the ambient dose rate measured at the census points (from 0.16 to 31 μGy h(-1)) with the dose rate reconstructed for adult birds of each species (from 0.3 to 97 μGy h(-1)), we confirmed that the overall bird abundance at Fukushima decreased with increasing total doses. This relationship was directly consistent with exposure levels found in the literature to induce physiological disturbances in birds. Among the 57 species constituting the observed bird community, we found that 90% were likely chronically exposed at a dose rate that could potentially affect their reproductive success. We quantified a loss of 22.6% of the total number of individuals per increment of one unit log10-tansformed total dose (in Gy), over the four-year post-accident period in the explored area. We estimated that a total dose of 0.55 Gy reduced by 50% the total number of birds in the study area over 2011-2014. The data also suggest a significant positive relationship between total dose and species diversity. PMID:26567770

  3. Radiological dose reconstruction for birds reconciles outcomes of Fukushima with knowledge of dose-effect relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Della-Vedova, Claire; Métivier, Jean-Michel; Ritz, Christian; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Pape Møller, Anders

    2015-11-01

    We reconstructed the radiological dose for birds observed at 300 census sites in the 50-km northwest area affected by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant over 2011-2014. Substituting the ambient dose rate measured at the census points (from 0.16 to 31 μGy h-1) with the dose rate reconstructed for adult birds of each species (from 0.3 to 97 μGy h-1), we confirmed that the overall bird abundance at Fukushima decreased with increasing total doses. This relationship was directly consistent with exposure levels found in the literature to induce physiological disturbances in birds. Among the 57 species constituting the observed bird community, we found that 90% were likely chronically exposed at a dose rate that could potentially affect their reproductive success. We quantified a loss of 22.6% of the total number of individuals per increment of one unit log10-tansformed total dose (in Gy), over the four-year post-accident period in the explored area. We estimated that a total dose of 0.55 Gy reduced by 50% the total number of birds in the study area over 2011-2014. The data also suggest a significant positive relationship between total dose and species diversity.

  4. Radiological dose reconstruction for birds reconciles outcomes of Fukushima with knowledge of dose-effect relationships

    PubMed Central

    Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Della-Vedova, Claire; Métivier, Jean-Michel; Ritz, Christian; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Pape Møller, Anders

    2015-01-01

    We reconstructed the radiological dose for birds observed at 300 census sites in the 50-km northwest area affected by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant over 2011–2014. Substituting the ambient dose rate measured at the census points (from 0.16 to 31 μGy h−1) with the dose rate reconstructed for adult birds of each species (from 0.3 to 97 μGy h−1), we confirmed that the overall bird abundance at Fukushima decreased with increasing total doses. This relationship was directly consistent with exposure levels found in the literature to induce physiological disturbances in birds. Among the 57 species constituting the observed bird community, we found that 90% were likely chronically exposed at a dose rate that could potentially affect their reproductive success. We quantified a loss of 22.6% of the total number of individuals per increment of one unit log10-tansformed total dose (in Gy), over the four-year post-accident period in the explored area. We estimated that a total dose of 0.55 Gy reduced by 50% the total number of birds in the study area over 2011–2014. The data also suggest a significant positive relationship between total dose and species diversity. PMID:26567770

  5. Statistical strategies for averaging EC50 from multiple dose-response experiments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoqi; Kopp-Schneider, Annette

    2015-11-01

    In most dose-response studies, repeated experiments are conducted to determine the EC50 value for a chemical, requiring averaging EC50 estimates from a series of experiments. Two statistical strategies, the mixed-effect modeling and the meta-analysis approach, can be applied to estimate average behavior of EC50 values over all experiments by considering the variabilities within and among experiments. We investigated these two strategies in two common cases of multiple dose-response experiments in (a) complete and explicit dose-response relationships are observed in all experiments and in (b) only in a subset of experiments. In case (a), the meta-analysis strategy is a simple and robust method to average EC50 estimates. In case (b), all experimental data sets can be first screened using the dose-response screening plot, which allows visualization and comparison of multiple dose-response experimental results. As long as more than three experiments provide information about complete dose-response relationships, the experiments that cover incomplete relationships can be excluded from the meta-analysis strategy of averaging EC50 estimates. If there are only two experiments containing complete dose-response information, the mixed-effects model approach is suggested. We subsequently provided a web application for non-statisticians to implement the proposed meta-analysis strategy of averaging EC50 estimates from multiple dose-response experiments.

  6. Influences of mechanical exposure biographies on physical capabilities of workers from automotive industry - a study on possible dose-response relationships and consequences for short and long term job rotation.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, Holger; Bruder, Ralph; Sinn-Behrendt, Andrea; Landau, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a field study in production areas of a vehicle manufacturing plant, where 106 male workers (aged from 20 to 63 years) were examined and interviewed by the authors. Aim of study was to identify relationships between specific physical worker capabilities and doses of mechanical exposures using self-developed standardized questionnaires as well as a battery of work-specific tests. The dependent variables are different "physical capabilities", classified using a five-point rating scale with regard to the grade of limitation of the respective capability. Independent variables are "age" and specific "mechanical exposures". Several exposures were combined and multiplied with their respective durations in order to determine doses on three different body regions - back, shoulder-neck and upper limbs. There are significant positive correlations between "age" and "dose of mechanical exposure on back/shoulder-neck/upper limbs region". The analysis of the relationship between dose of exposure and different capabilities to lift or reposition loads (with variable weight) shows weak significant correlations for all three body regions. Data analysis shows no significant correlations between any dose of mechanical exposure and capabilities to work in awkward body postures.These results should be considered in age management programs when scheduling future employee assignments to workplaces, especially for production systems where manual handling tasks are dominant.

  7. Influences of mechanical exposure biographies on physical capabilities of workers from automotive industry - a study on possible dose-response relationships and consequences for short and long term job rotation.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, Holger; Bruder, Ralph; Sinn-Behrendt, Andrea; Landau, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a field study in production areas of a vehicle manufacturing plant, where 106 male workers (aged from 20 to 63 years) were examined and interviewed by the authors. Aim of study was to identify relationships between specific physical worker capabilities and doses of mechanical exposures using self-developed standardized questionnaires as well as a battery of work-specific tests. The dependent variables are different "physical capabilities", classified using a five-point rating scale with regard to the grade of limitation of the respective capability. Independent variables are "age" and specific "mechanical exposures". Several exposures were combined and multiplied with their respective durations in order to determine doses on three different body regions - back, shoulder-neck and upper limbs. There are significant positive correlations between "age" and "dose of mechanical exposure on back/shoulder-neck/upper limbs region". The analysis of the relationship between dose of exposure and different capabilities to lift or reposition loads (with variable weight) shows weak significant correlations for all three body regions. Data analysis shows no significant correlations between any dose of mechanical exposure and capabilities to work in awkward body postures.These results should be considered in age management programs when scheduling future employee assignments to workplaces, especially for production systems where manual handling tasks are dominant. PMID:22317513

  8. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always ¡Ý 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR < 1 may be more the rule than the exception. Directly tied to the current RR paradigm are the billion-dollar cleanup costs for radionuclide-contaminated DOE sites. Our research results suggest that continued use of the current RR paradigm for which RR ¡Ý 1 could cause more harm than benefit to society (e.g., by spreading unwarranted fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low

  9. Bayesian Dose-Response Modeling in Sparse Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Steven B.

    This book discusses Bayesian dose-response modeling in small samples applied to two different settings. The first setting is early phase clinical trials, and the second setting is toxicology studies in cancer risk assessment. In early phase clinical trials, experimental units are humans who are actual patients. Prior to a clinical trial, opinions from multiple subject area experts are generally more informative than the opinion of a single expert, but we may face a dilemma when they have disagreeing prior opinions. In this regard, we consider compromising the disagreement and compare two different approaches for making a decision. In addition to combining multiple opinions, we also address balancing two levels of ethics in early phase clinical trials. The first level is individual-level ethics which reflects the perspective of trial participants. The second level is population-level ethics which reflects the perspective of future patients. We extensively compare two existing statistical methods which focus on each perspective and propose a new method which balances the two conflicting perspectives. In toxicology studies, experimental units are living animals. Here we focus on a potential non-monotonic dose-response relationship which is known as hormesis. Briefly, hormesis is a phenomenon which can be characterized by a beneficial effect at low doses and a harmful effect at high doses. In cancer risk assessments, the estimation of a parameter, which is known as a benchmark dose, can be highly sensitive to a class of assumptions, monotonicity or hormesis. In this regard, we propose a robust approach which considers both monotonicity and hormesis as a possibility. In addition, We discuss statistical hypothesis testing for hormesis and consider various experimental designs for detecting hormesis based on Bayesian decision theory. Past experiments have not been optimally designed for testing for hormesis, and some Bayesian optimal designs may not be optimal under a

  10. Dose-Response Issues Concerning the Relations between Regular Physical Activity and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankinen, Tuomo; Bouchard, Claude

    2002-01-01

    This paper categorizes the many benefits of physical activity, offering information concerning the type of dose necessary to get that benefit. In 2000, Health Canada and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, along with other agencies, sponsored a symposium to determine whether there was a dose-response relationship between…

  11. Characterization of a developmental toxicity dose-response model

    SciTech Connect

    Faustman, E.M.; Wellington, D.G.; Smith, W.P.; Kimmel, C.A.

    1989-02-01

    The Rai and Van Ryzin dose-response model proposed for teratology experiments has been characterized for its appropriateness and applicability in modeling the dichotomous response data from developmental toxicity studies. Modifications were made in the initial probability statements to reflect more accurately biological events underlying developmental toxicity. Data sets used for the evaluation were obtained from the National Toxicology Program and U.S. EPA laboratories. The studies included developmental evaluations of ethylene glycol, diethylhexyl phthalate, di- and triethylene glycol dimethyl ethers, and nitrofen in rats, mice, or rabbits. Graphic examination and statistical evaluation demonstrate that this model is sensitive to the data when compared to directly measured experimental outcomes. The model was used to interpolate to low-risk dose levels, and comparisons were made between the values obtained and the no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) divided by an uncertainty factor. Our investigation suggests that the Rai and Van Ryzin model is sensitive to the developmental toxicity end points, prenatal deaths, and malformations, and appears to model closely their relationship to dose.

  12. Dose-Effect Relationship in Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Randomized Trial Comparing Two Radiation Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsen, Anders; Ploen, John; Vuong, Te; Appelt, Ane; Lindebjerg, Jan; Rafaelsen, Soren R.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Locally advanced rectal cancer represents a major therapeutic challenge. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy is considered standard, but little is known about the dose-effect relationship. The present study represents a dose-escalation phase III trial comparing 2 doses of radiation. Methods and Materials: The inclusion criteria were resectable T3 and T4 tumors with a circumferential margin of {<=}5 mm on magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were randomized to receive 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions to the tumor and pelvic lymph nodes (arm A) or the same treatment supplemented with an endorectal boost given as high-dose-rate brachytherapy (10 Gy in 2 fractions; arm B). Concomitant chemotherapy, uftoral 300 mg/m{sup 2} and L-leucovorin 22.5 mg/d, was added to both arms on treatment days. The primary endpoint was complete pathologic remission. The secondary endpoints included tumor response and rate of complete resection (R0). Results: The study included 248 patients. No significant difference was found in toxicity or surgical complications between the 2 groups. Based on intention to treat, no significant difference was found in the complete pathologic remission rate between the 2 arms (18% and 18%). The rate of R0 resection was different in T3 tumors (90% and 99%; P=.03). The same applied to the rate of major response (tumor regression grade, 1+2), 29% and 44%, respectively (P=.04). Conclusions: This first randomized trial comparing 2 radiation doses indicated that the higher dose increased the rate of major response by 50% in T3 tumors. The endorectal boost is feasible, with no significant increase in toxicity or surgical complications.

  13. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts After Exposure to Very Low Dose of High Let Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, K.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivor with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (0.01 - 0.20 Gy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28 ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56 ions, including doses where on average less than one direct ion traversal per cell nucleus occurs. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The responses for doses above 0.1 Gy (more than one ion traverses a cell) showed linear dose responses. However, for doses less than 0.1 Gy, both Si-28 ions and Fe-56 ions showed a dose independent response above background chromosome aberrations frequencies. Possible explanations for our results are non-targeted effects due to aberrant cell signaling [1], or delta-ray dose fluctuations [2] where a fraction of cells receive significant delta-ray doses due to the contributions of multiple ion tracks that do not directly traverse cell nuclei where chromosome aberrations are scored.

  14. Renal dysfunction after total body irradiation: Dose-effect relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Kal, Henk B. . E-mail: H.B.Kal@UMCUtrecht.nl; Kempen-Harteveld, M. Loes van

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: Late complications related to total body irradiation (TBI) as part of the conditioning regimen for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been increasingly noted. We reviewed and compared the results of treatments with various TBI regimens and tried to derive a dose-effect relationship for the endpoint of late renal dysfunction. The aim was to find the tolerance dose for the kidney when TBI is performed. Methods and Materials: A literature search was performed using PubMed for articles reporting late renal dysfunction. For intercomparison, the various TBI regimens were normalized using the linear-quadratic model, and biologically effective doses (BEDs) were calculated. Results: Eleven reports were found describing the frequency of renal dysfunction after TBI. The frequency of renal dysfunction as a function of the BED was obtained. For BED >16 Gy an increase in the frequency of dysfunction was observed. Conclusions: The tolerance BED for kidney tissue undergoing TBI is about 16 Gy. This BED can be realized with highly fractionated TBI (e.g., 6 x 1.7 Gy or 9 x 1.2 Gy at dose rates >5 cGy/min). To prevent late renal dysfunction, the TBI regimens with BED values >16 Gy (almost all found in published reports) should be applied with appropriate shielding of the kidneys.

  15. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Appelt, Ane L.; Ploen, John; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is part of the standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancers. Tumor regression at the time of operation is desirable, but not much is known about the relationship between radiation dose and tumor regression. In the present study we estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect of including clinical parameters in the model was examined. The radiation dose-response relationship for a specific grade of histopathologic tumor regression was parameterized in terms of the dose required for 50% response, D{sub 50,i}, and the normalized dose-response gradient, {gamma}{sub 50,i}. Results: A highly significant dose-response relationship was found (P=.002). For complete response (TRG1), the dose-response parameters were D{sub 50,TRG1} = 92.0 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI] 79.3-144.9 Gy), {gamma}{sub 50,TRG1} = 0.982 (CI 0.533-1.429), and for major response (TRG1-2) D{sub 50,TRG1} and {sub 2} = 72.1 Gy (CI 65.3-94.0 Gy), {gamma}{sub 50,TRG1} and {sub 2} = 0.770 (CI 0.338-1.201). Tumor size and N category both had a significant effect on the dose-response relationships. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a significant dose-response relationship for tumor regression after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer for tumor dose levels in the range of 50.4-70 Gy, which is higher than the dose range usually considered.

  16. Neonatal Outcomes and their Relationship to Maternal Buprenorphine Dose during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Hendrée E.; Dengler, Erin; Garrison, Anna; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Seashore, Carl; Horton, Evette; Andringa, Kim; Jansson, Lauren M.; Thorp, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Buprenorphine pharmacotherapy for opioid-dependent pregnant women is associated with maternal and neonatal outcomes superior to untreated opioid dependence. However, the literature is inconsistent regarding the possible existence of a dose-response relationship between maternal buprenorphine dose and neonatal clinical outcomes. Methods The present secondary analysis study (1) examined the relationship between maternal buprenorphine dose at delivery and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) peak score, estimated gestational age at delivery, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes, neonatal head circumference, length, and weight at birth, amount of morphine needed to treat NAS, duration of NAS treatment, and duration of neonatal hospital stay; and (2) compared neonates who required pharmacotherapy for NAS to neonates who did not require such pharmacotherapy on these same outcomes, in 58 opioid-dependent pregnant women receiving buprenorphine as participants in a randomized clinical trial. Results (1) Analyses failed to provide evidence of a relationship between maternal buprenorphine dose at delivery and any of the 10 outcomes (all p-values>.48); and (2) significant mean differences between the untreated (n=31) and treated (n=27) for NAS groups were found for duration of neonatal hospital stay and NAS peak score (both p-values<.001). Conclusions (1) Findings failed to support the existence of a dose-response relationship between maternal buprenorphine dose at delivery and any of 10 neonatal clinical outcomes, including NAS severity; and (2) that infants treated for NAS had a higher mean NAS peak score and, spent a longer time in the hospital than did the group not treated for NAS is unsurprising. PMID:24290979

  17. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examining the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute [gamma]-radiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. It was concluded that oligodendrocytes in irradiated cultures had significantly lower functional capacity than did unirradiated controls. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. At DIC 14, the group irradiated in a single fraction had significantly lower oligodendrocyte counts than any group given split doses; all irradiated cultures had marked depression of MBP synthesis, but to significant differences referable to time interval between doses. At DIC 21, cultures irradiated at intervals of 0 h to 2 h had similar oligodendrocyte counts to one another, but these counts were significantly lower than in cultures irradiated at intervals of 4 h to 6 h; MBP levels remained depressed at DIC 21 for all irradiated cultures. The oligodendrocyte response to dose rate (0.03 to 1.97 Gy/min) was evaluated at DIC 14 and DIC 21. Exposure at 0.03 Gy/min suppressed oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 21 less than did higher dose rates in 5-Gy irradiated cultures.

  18. Modeling Dose-response at Low Dose: A Systems Biology Approach for Ionization Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuchao; Ricci, Paolo F.

    2010-01-01

    For ionization radiation (IR) induced cancer, a linear non-threshold (LNT) model at very low doses is the default used by a number of national and international organizations and in regulatory law. This default denies any positive benefit from any level of exposure. However, experimental observations and theoretical biology have found that both linear and J-shaped IR dose-response curves can exist at those very low doses. We develop low dose J-shaped dose-response, based on systems biology, and thus justify its use regarding exposure to IR. This approach incorporates detailed, molecular and cellular descriptions of biological/toxicological mechanisms to develop a dose-response model through a set of nonlinear, differential equations describing the signaling pathways and biochemical mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, and tumor incidence due to IR. This approach yields a J-shaped dose response curve while showing where LNT behaviors are likely to occur. The results confirm the hypothesis of the J-shaped dose response curve: the main reason is that, at low-doses of IR, cells stimulate protective systems through a longer cell arrest time per unit of IR dose. We suggest that the policy implications of this approach are an increasingly correct way to deal with precautionary measures in public health. PMID:21191485

  19. The occurrence of hormetic dose responses in the toxicological literature, the hormesis database: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Edward J. . E-mail: edwardc@schoolph.umass.edu; Blain, Robyn

    2005-02-01

    A relational retrieval database has been developed compiling toxicological studies assessing the occurrence of hormetic dose responses and their quantitative characteristics. This database permits an evaluation of these studies over numerous parameters, including study design and dose-response features and physical/chemical properties of the agents. The database contains approximately 5600 dose-response relationships satisfying evaluative criteria for hormesis across over approximately 900 agents from a broadly diversified spectrum of chemical classes and physical agents. The assessment reveals that hormetic dose-response relationships occur in males and females of numerous animal models in all principal age groups as well as across species displaying a broad range of differential susceptibilities to toxic agents. The biological models are extensive, including plants, viruses, bacteria, fungi, insects, fish, birds, rodents, and primates, including humans. The spectrum of endpoints displaying hormetic dose responses is also broad being inclusive of growth, longevity, numerous metabolic parameters, disease incidences (including cancer), various performance endpoints such as cognitive functions, immune responses among others. Quantitative features of the hormetic dose response reveal that the vast majority of cases display a maximum stimulatory response less than two-fold greater than the control while the width of the stimulatory response is typically less than 100-fold in dose range immediately contiguous with the toxicological NO(A)EL. The database also contains a quantitative evaluation component that differentiates among the various dose responses concerning the strength of the evidence supporting a hormetic conclusion based on study design features, magnitude of the stimulatory response, statistical significance, and reproducibility of findings.

  20. Methodology for Estimating Ingestion Dose for Emergency Response at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, A.A.

    2003-07-21

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), emergency response computer models are used to estimate dose following releases of radioactive materials to the environment. Downwind air and ground concentrations and their associated doses from inhalation and ground shine pathways are estimated. The emergency response model (PUFF-PLUME) uses real-time data to track either instantaneous (puff) or continuous (plume) releases. A site-specific ingestion dose model was developed for use with PUFF-PLUME that includes the following ingestion dose pathways pertinent to the surrounding SRS area: milk, beef, water, and fish. The model is simplistic and can be used with existing code output.

  1. Dose Effects of Ion Beam Exposure on Deinococcus Radiodurans: Survival and Dose Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dao-jun; Wu, Li-fang; Wu, Li-jun; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2001-02-01

    To explore the survival and dose response of organism for different radiation sources is of great importance in the research of radiobiology. In this study, the survival-dose response of Deinococcus radiodurans (E.coli, as the control) for ultra-violet (UV), γ-rays radiation and ion beam exposure was investigated. The shoulder type of survival curves were found for both UV and γ-ray ionizing radiation, but the saddle type of survival curves were shown for H+, N+(20keV and 30keV) and Ar+ beam exposure. This dose effect of the survival initially decreased with the increase in dose and then increased in the high dose range and finally decreased again in the higher dose range. Our experimental results suggest that D. radiodurans, which is considerably radio-resistant to UV and x-ray and γ-ray ionizing radiation, do not resist ion beam exposure.

  2. Structure, Relationships, and Community Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiTomaso, Nancy; Parks-Yancy, Rochelle; Post, Corinne

    2003-01-01

    Offers several suggestions about how educators' efforts have gone wrong and makes recommendations about what they need to teach students about ethics and management to prepare students more adequately. Concludes that ethics are about structures, processes, and the relationships that endure, get reproduced, and that generate outcomes that affect…

  3. Structure- and dose-absorption relationships of coffee polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Erk, Thomas; Hauser, Johanna; Williamson, Gary; Renouf, Mathieu; Steiling, Heike; Dionisi, Fabiola; Richling, Elke

    2014-01-01

    Chlorogenic acids (CGAs) from coffee have biological effects related to human health. Thus, specific data on their bioavailability in the upper gastrointestinal tract are of high interest, since some molecules are absorbed here and so are not metabolized by colonic microflora. Up to now, no data on structure-absorption relationships for CGAs have been published, despite this being the most consumed group of polyphenols in the western diet. To address this gap, we performed ex vivo absorption experiments with pig jejunal mucosa using the Ussing chamber model (a model simulating the mucosa and its luminal/apical side). The main coffee polyphenols, caffeoylquinic acid (CQA), feruloylquinic acid (FQA), caffeic acid (CA), dicaffeoylquinic acid (diCQA), and D-(-)-quinic acid (QA), were incubated in individual experiments equivalent to gut lumen physiologically achievable concentrations (0.2-3.5 mM). Identification and quantification were performed with HPLC-diode array detection and HPLC-MS/MS. Additionally, the presence of ABC-efflux transporters was determined by Western blot analysis. The percentages of initially applied CGAs that were absorbed through the jejunal pig mucosa were, in increasing order: diCQA, trace; CQA, ≈ 1%; CA, ≈ 1.5%; FQA, ≈ 2%; and QA, ≈ 4%. No differences were observed within the CGA subgroups. Dose-absorption experiments with 5-CQA suggested a passive diffusion (nonsaturable absorption and a linear dose-flux relationship) and its secretion was affected by NaN3 , indicating an active efflux. The ABC-efflux transporters MDR 1 and MRP 2 were identified in pig jejunal mucosa for the first time. We conclude that active efflux plays a significant role in CGA bioavailability and, further, that the mechanism of CGA absorption in the jejunum is governed by their physicochemical properties.

  4. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute {gamma}-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain.

  5. Forecasting Cell Death Dose-Response from Early Signal Transduction Responses In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Vrana, Julie A.; Currie, Holly N.; Han, Alice A.; Boyd, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The rapid pharmacodynamic response of cells to toxic xenobiotics is primarily coordinated by signal transduction networks, which follow a simple framework: the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle mediated by kinases and phosphatases. However, the time course from initial pharmacodynamic response(s) to cell death following exposure can have a vast range. Viewing this time lag between early signaling events and the ultimate cellular response as an opportunity, we hypothesize that monitoring the phosphorylation of proteins related to cell death and survival pathways at key, early time points may be used to forecast a cell's eventual fate, provided that we can measure and accurately interpret the protein responses. In this paper, we focused on a three-phased approach to forecast cell death after exposure: (1) determine time points relevant to important signaling events (protein phosphorylation) by using estimations of adenosine triphosphate production to reflect the relationship between mitochondrial-driven energy metabolism and kinase response, (2) experimentally determine phosphorylation values for proteins related to cell death and/or survival pathways at these significant time points, and (3) use cluster analysis to predict the dose-response relationship between cellular exposure to a xenobiotic and plasma membrane degradation at 24 h post-exposure. To test this approach, we exposed HepG2 cells to two disparate treatments: a GSK-3β inhibitor and a MEK inhibitor. After using our three-phased approach, we were able to accurately forecast the 24 h HepG2 plasma membrane degradation dose-response from protein phosphorylation values as early as 20 min post-MEK inhibitor exposure and 40 min post-GSK-3β exposure. PMID:24824809

  6. Forecasting cell death dose-response from early signal transduction responses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vrana, Julie A; Currie, Holly N; Han, Alice A; Boyd, Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    The rapid pharmacodynamic response of cells to toxic xenobiotics is primarily coordinated by signal transduction networks, which follow a simple framework: the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle mediated by kinases and phosphatases. However, the time course from initial pharmacodynamic response(s) to cell death following exposure can have a vast range. Viewing this time lag between early signaling events and the ultimate cellular response as an opportunity, we hypothesize that monitoring the phosphorylation of proteins related to cell death and survival pathways at key, early time points may be used to forecast a cell's eventual fate, provided that we can measure and accurately interpret the protein responses. In this paper, we focused on a three-phased approach to forecast cell death after exposure: (1) determine time points relevant to important signaling events (protein phosphorylation) by using estimations of adenosine triphosphate production to reflect the relationship between mitochondrial-driven energy metabolism and kinase response, (2) experimentally determine phosphorylation values for proteins related to cell death and/or survival pathways at these significant time points, and (3) use cluster analysis to predict the dose-response relationship between cellular exposure to a xenobiotic and plasma membrane degradation at 24 h post-exposure. To test this approach, we exposed HepG2 cells to two disparate treatments: a GSK-3β inhibitor and a MEK inhibitor. After using our three-phased approach, we were able to accurately forecast the 24 h HepG2 plasma membrane degradation dose-response from protein phosphorylation values as early as 20 min post-MEK inhibitor exposure and 40 min post-GSK-3β exposure.

  7. Thermal dose and time-temperature factors for biological responses to heat shock.

    PubMed

    Gerner, E W

    1987-01-01

    The application of hyperthermia in human cancer therapy, especially by radiotherapists who are accustomed to prescribing ionizing radiation treatments in physical dose units, has stimulated workers in this area to consider the possibility and utility of defining a unit of 'thermal dose'. Previous thermal dose definitions have, primarily, been based on biological isoeffect response relationships, which attempt to relate exposure times that elicit a given biological response at one temperature to exposure times at another temperature that elicit the same biological response. This 'equivalent time' method is shown to have certain limitations. For both 42.4 and 45 degrees C hyperthermia, these relationships accurately describe cell survival responses only when the heating rate is rapid (greater than 0.5 degrees C min-1 from ambient to hyperthermic temperature). Further, the form of these isoeffect relationships appears to be temperature range and cell/tissue-type dependent, and it is suggested that these relationships be referred to as a 'time-temperature factor' (TTF) to help distinguish them from possible physical thermal dose definitions. Two physical dose definitions are discussed, one being simply exposure time at some temperature and the other being a more fundamental definition, the free energy change which is a temperature-dependent driving force for chemical reactions.

  8. Differential Response and Priming Dose Effect on the Proteome of Human Fibroblast and Stem Cells Induced by Exposure to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, Monika; Haghdoost, Siamak; Gomolka, Maria; Sarioglu, Hakan; Ueffing, Marius; Dietz, Anne; Kulka, Ulrike; Unger, Kristian; Babini, Gabriele; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Hornhardt, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    It has been suggested that a mechanistic understanding of the cellular responses to low dose and dose rate may be valuable in reducing some of the uncertainties involved in current risk estimates for cancer- and non-cancer-related radiation effects that are inherited in the linear no-threshold hypothesis. In this study, the effects of low-dose radiation on the proteome in both human fibroblasts and stem cells were investigated. Particular emphasis was placed on examining: 1. the dose-response relationships for the differential expression of proteins in the low-dose range (40-140 mGy) of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation; and 2. the effect on differential expression of proteins of a priming dose given prior to a challenge dose (adaptive response effects). These studies were performed on cultured human fibroblasts (VH10) and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC). The results from the VH10 cell experiments demonstrated that low-doses of low-LET radiation induced unique patterns of differentially expressed proteins for each dose investigated. In addition, a low priming radiation dose significantly changed the protein expression induced by the subsequent challenge exposure. In the ADSC the number of differentially expressed proteins was markedly less compared to VH10 cells, indicating that ADSC differ in their intrinsic response to low doses of radiation. The proteomic results are further discussed in terms of possible pathways influenced by low-dose irradiation. PMID:26934482

  9. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts after Exposure to Very Low Doses of High LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (1-20 cGy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28- ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56-ions. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving greater than 2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The curves for doses above 10 cGy were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. For Si-28- ions no dose response was observed in the 2-10 cGy dose range, suggesting a non-target effect in this range.

  10. Response of Biological Systems to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Hei, Tom K

    2016-03-01

    Radiation is ubiquitous in the environment. Biological effects of exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation are subjected to several modulating factors. Two of these, bystander response and adaptive protections, are discussed briefly. PMID:26808883

  11. BUMP: a FORTRAN program for identifying dose-response curves subject to downturns.

    PubMed

    Simpson, D G; Dallal, G E

    1989-02-01

    BUMP is a FORTRAN implementation of a modified Jonckheere-Terpstra test, proposed by Simpson and Margolin, to test nonparametrically for a dose-response curve when a downturn is possible at high doses. The Jonckheere-Terpstra statistic is commonly used to test for increasing or decreasing trends in dose-response relationships. In many experimental settings, however, a test agent has more than one effect, and a "bump"-shaped dose-response can occur. For instance, increasing the concentration of a certain nutrient on a petri dish may increase the growth rate at low doses yet decrease the growth rate at high doses because of toxicity. The modified test allows one to assess the significance of the initial increase in the dose-response curve and yet to minimize the effect on the conclusions of any downturn at higher doses. A complete system which operates directly on SYSTAT/MYSTAT files is available for the IBM-PC and compatibles; it includes a utility which converts ASCII data files to the SYSTAT/MYSTAT format. The FORTRAN 77 source code is available for those who would like to run BUMP on other machines.

  12. Environmental standards for ionizing radiation: theoretical basis for dose-response curves.

    PubMed

    Upton, A C

    1983-10-01

    The types of injury attributable to ionizing radiation are subdivided, for purposes of risk assessment and radiological protection, into two broad categories: stochastic effects and nonstochastic effects. Stochastic effects are viewed as probablistic phenomena, varying in frequency but not severity as a function of the dose, without any threshold; nonstochastic effects are viewed as deterministic phenomena, varying in both frequency and severity as a function of the dose, with clinical thresholds. Included among stochastic effects are heritable effects (mutations and chromosome aberrations) and carcinogenic effects. Both types of effects are envisioned as unicellular phenomena which can result from nonlethal injury of individual cells, without the necessity of damage to other cells. For the induction of mutations and chromosome aberrations in the low-to-intermediate dose range, the dose-response curve with high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation generally conforms to a linear nonthreshold relationship and varies relatively little with the dose rate. In contrast, the curve with low-LET radiation generally conforms to a linear-quadratic relationship, rising less steeply than the curve with high-LET radiation and increasing in slope with increasing dose and dose rate. The dose-response curve for carcinogenic effects varies widely from one type of neoplasm to another in the intermediate-to-high dose range, in part because of differences in the way large doses of radiation can affect the promotion and progression of different neoplasms. Information about dose-response relations for low-level irradiation is fragmentary but consistent, in general, with the hypothesis that the neoplastic transformation may result from mutation, chromosome aberration or genetic recombination in a single susceptible cell.

  13. Updating Dosimetry for Emergency Response Dose Projections.

    PubMed

    DeCair, Sara

    2016-02-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed an update to the 1992 Protective Action Guides (PAG) Manual. The PAG Manual provides guidance to state and local officials planning for radiological emergencies. EPA requested public comment on the proposed revisions, while making them available for interim use by officials faced with an emergency situation. Developed with interagency partners, EPA's proposal incorporates newer dosimetric methods, identifies tools and guidelines developed since the current document was issued, and extends the scope of the PAGs to all significant radiological incidents, including radiological dispersal devices or improvised nuclear devices. In order to best serve the emergency management community, scientific policy direction had to be set on how to use International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 60 age groups in dose assessment when implementing emergency guidelines. Certain guidelines that lend themselves to different PAGs for different subpopulations are the PAGs for potassium iodide (KI), food, and water. These guidelines provide age-specific recommendations because of the radiosensitivity of the thyroid and young children with respect to ingestion and inhalation doses in particular. Taking protective actions like using KI, avoiding certain foods or using alternative sources of drinking water can be relatively simple to implement by the parents of young children. Clear public messages can convey which age groups should take which action, unlike how an evacuation or relocation order should apply to entire households or neighborhoods. New in the PAG Manual is planning guidance for the late phase of an incident, after the situation is stabilized and efforts turn toward recovery. Because the late phase can take years to complete, decision makers are faced with managing public exposures in areas not fully remediated. The proposal includes quick-reference operational guidelines to inform re-entry to

  14. Updating Dosimetry for Emergency Response Dose Projections.

    PubMed

    DeCair, Sara

    2016-02-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed an update to the 1992 Protective Action Guides (PAG) Manual. The PAG Manual provides guidance to state and local officials planning for radiological emergencies. EPA requested public comment on the proposed revisions, while making them available for interim use by officials faced with an emergency situation. Developed with interagency partners, EPA's proposal incorporates newer dosimetric methods, identifies tools and guidelines developed since the current document was issued, and extends the scope of the PAGs to all significant radiological incidents, including radiological dispersal devices or improvised nuclear devices. In order to best serve the emergency management community, scientific policy direction had to be set on how to use International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 60 age groups in dose assessment when implementing emergency guidelines. Certain guidelines that lend themselves to different PAGs for different subpopulations are the PAGs for potassium iodide (KI), food, and water. These guidelines provide age-specific recommendations because of the radiosensitivity of the thyroid and young children with respect to ingestion and inhalation doses in particular. Taking protective actions like using KI, avoiding certain foods or using alternative sources of drinking water can be relatively simple to implement by the parents of young children. Clear public messages can convey which age groups should take which action, unlike how an evacuation or relocation order should apply to entire households or neighborhoods. New in the PAG Manual is planning guidance for the late phase of an incident, after the situation is stabilized and efforts turn toward recovery. Because the late phase can take years to complete, decision makers are faced with managing public exposures in areas not fully remediated. The proposal includes quick-reference operational guidelines to inform re-entry to

  15. The relationship between repeat-dose toxicity and aromatic-ring class profile of high-boiling petroleum substances.

    PubMed

    Roth, Randy N; Simpson, Barry J; Nicolich, Mark J; Murray, F Jay; Gray, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    A study was undertaken within the context of the U.S. EPA HPV Chemical Challenge Program to (1) characterize relationships between PAC content and repeat-dose toxicities of high-boiling petroleum substances (HBPS) and (2) develop statistical models that could be used to predict the repeat-dose toxicity of similar untested substances. The study evaluated 47 repeat-dose dermal toxicity and 157 chemical compositional studies. The four most sensitive endpoints of repeat-dose toxicity were platelet count, hemoglobin concentration, relative liver weight and thymus weight. Predictive models were developed for the dose-response relationships between the wt.% concentration of each of seven ring classes of aromatic compounds (the "ARC profile") and specific effects, with high correlations (r=0.91-0.94) between the observed and model-predicted data. The development of the mathematical models used to generate the results reported in this study is described by Nicolich et al. (2013). Model-generated dose-response curves permit the prediction of either the effect at a given dose or the dose that causes a given effect. The models generate values that are consistent with other standard measures. The models, using compositional data, can be used for predicting the repeat-dose toxicity of untested HBPS.

  16. Duration of Exposure and the Dose-Response Model of PTSD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaysen, Debra; Rosen, Gerald; Bowman, Marilyn; Resick, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    A dose-response model underlies posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and posits a relationship between event magnitude and clinical outcome. The present study examines whether one index of event magnitude--duration of exposure--contributes to risk of PTSD among female victims of sexual assault. Findings support a small but significant contribution…

  17. A Bayesian network model for biomarker-based dose response.

    PubMed

    Hack, C Eric; Haber, Lynne T; Maier, Andrew; Shulte, Paul; Fowler, Bruce; Lotz, W Gregory; Savage, Russell E

    2010-07-01

    A Bayesian network model was developed to integrate diverse types of data to conduct an exposure-dose-response assessment for benzene-induced acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The network approach was used to evaluate and compare individual biomarkers and quantitatively link the biomarkers along the exposure-disease continuum. The network was used to perform the biomarker-based dose-response analysis, and various other approaches to the dose-response analysis were conducted for comparison. The network-derived benchmark concentration was approximately an order of magnitude lower than that from the usual exposure concentration versus response approach, which suggests that the presence of more information in the low-dose region (where changes in biomarkers are detectable but effects on AML mortality are not) helps inform the description of the AML response at lower exposures. This work provides a quantitative approach for linking changes in biomarkers of effect both to exposure information and to changes in disease response. Such linkage can provide a scientifically valid point of departure that incorporates precursor dose-response information without being dependent on the difficult issue of a definition of adversity for precursors.

  18. Shared Dosimetry Error in Epidemiological Dose-Response Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed. PMID:25799311

  19. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses.

    PubMed

    Stram, Daniel O; Preston, Dale L; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.

  20. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre; Zeeb, Hajo

    2015-03-23

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.

  1. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre; Zeeb, Hajo

    2015-03-23

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takesmore » up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.« less

  2. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses.

    PubMed

    Stram, Daniel O; Preston, Dale L; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed. PMID:25799311

  3. Shared Dosimetry Error in Epidemiological Dose-Response Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Stram, Daniel; Preston, D. L.; Sokolnkov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce A.; Kopecky, Kenneth; Boice, John; Beck, Harold L.; Till, John E.; Bouville, A.

    2015-03-23

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. Use of these methods for several studies, including the Mayak Worker Cohort and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.

  4. A broadly applicable function for describing luminescence dose response

    SciTech Connect

    Burbidge, C. I.

    2015-07-28

    The basic form of luminescence dose response is investigated, with the aim of developing a single function to account for the appearance of linear, superlinear, sublinear, and supralinear behaviors and variations in saturation signal level and rate. A function is assembled based on the assumption of first order behavior in different major factors contributing to measured luminescence-dosimetric signals. Different versions of the function are developed for standardized and non-dose-normalized responses. Data generated using a two trap two recombination center model and experimental data for natural quartz are analyzed to compare results obtained using different signals, measurement protocols, pretreatment conditions, and radiation qualities. The function well describes a range of dose dependent behavior, including sublinear, superlinear, supralinear, and non-monotonic responses and relative response to α and β radiation, based on change in relative recombination and trapping probability affecting signals sourced from a single electron trap.

  5. Dose convolution filter: Incorporating spatial dose information into tissue response modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yimei; Joiner, Michael; Zhao Bo; Liao Yixiang; Burmeister, Jay

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: A model is introduced to integrate biological factors such as cell migration and bystander effects into physical dose distributions, and to incorporate spatial dose information in plan analysis and optimization. Methods: The model consists of a dose convolution filter (DCF) with single parameter {sigma}. Tissue response is calculated by an existing NTCP model with DCF-applied dose distribution as input. The authors determined {sigma} of rat spinal cord from published data. The authors also simulated the GRID technique, in which an open field is collimated into many pencil beams. Results: After applying the DCF, the NTCP model successfully fits the rat spinal cord data with a predicted value of {sigma}=2.6{+-}0.5 mm, consistent with 2 mm migration distances of remyelinating cells. Moreover, it enables the appropriate prediction of a high relative seriality for spinal cord. The model also predicts the sparing of normal tissues by the GRID technique when the size of each pencil beam becomes comparable to {sigma}. Conclusions: The DCF model incorporates spatial dose information and offers an improved way to estimate tissue response from complex radiotherapy dose distributions. It does not alter the prediction of tissue response in large homogenous fields, but successfully predicts increased tissue tolerance in small or highly nonuniform fields.

  6. Dose-Response Curves for Radish Seedling Phototropism 12

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Marylee

    1974-01-01

    Radish seedlings (Raphanus sativus L.) were grown for 4 days in complete darkness, or in white light, or for 3 days in darkness followed by 1 day of red light. Phototropic dose-response curves for the seedlings grown in these three ways were determined with 460-nm light. The dark-grown and red light-treated seedlings responded with positive curvatures of no more than 10° to energy doses in the first positive range and with larger positive curvatures in the second positive dose range. No indifferent or negative curvature was seen with the light intensity used. White light-grown seedlings did not respond to first positive energy doses, but responded as strongly to second positive doses as the other types of seedlings. PMID:16658864

  7. Total dose responses and reliability issues of 65 nm NMOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezhao, Yu; Qiwen, Zheng; Jiangwei, Cui; Hang, Zhou; Xuefeng, Yu; Qi, Guo

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, total dose responses and reliability issues of MOSFETs fabricated by 65 nm CMOS technology were examined. “Radiation-induced narrow channel effect” is observed in a narrow channel device. Similar to total dose responses of NMOSFETs, narrow channel NMOSFEs have larger hot-carrier-induced degradation than wide channel devices. Step Time-Dependent Dielectric Breakdown (TDDB) stresses are applied, and narrow channel devices have higher breakdown voltage than wide channel devices, which agree with “weakest link” theory of TDDB. Experimental results show that linear current, transconductance, saturated drain current and subthreshold swing are superposed degenerated by total dose irradiation and reliability issues, which may result in different lifetime from that considering total dose irradiation reliability issues separately. Project supported by “Light of West China” Program of CAS (No. XBBS201219).

  8. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, E.L.; DuFrain, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes are exposed to low-LET radiation, and the resulting dicentric chromosome aberrations follow the Poisson distribution. The expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been presented by Kellerer and Rossi (1972, Current Topics on Radiation Research Quarterly 8, 85-158; 1978, Radiation Research 75, 471-488) using the theory of dual radiation action. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting dose-time-response models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general-purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described, and estimation for the nonlinear models is illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure.

  9. The influence of cardiovascular physiology on dose/pharmacokinetic and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships.

    PubMed

    Fagiolino, Pietro; Eiraldi, Rosa; Vázquez, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Inter- and intraindividual variability in the relationship between dose and clinical--or pharmacodynamic--response of a drug can be analysed in two steps: firstly, by considering the plasma pharmacokinetic response to a given dose and, secondly, by the connection between both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses. As the cardiovascular system is the means of transport of endogenous and exogenous substances, blood flow fraction destined to each organ determines the relative mass of solute in plasma, which is constantly in contact with the tissue. Hence, not only the rate but also the extent of drug transfer would be increased when tissues are irrigated by a higher fraction of cardiac output. Aging and circadian rhythms present similar cardiac output distribution patterns when moving from young to aged adult and from nocturnal to diurnal hours. These two changes lead to an increased blood flow delivery to the extra-splanchnic-renal region in the elderly and in the morning, but with a decreased cardiac output in aged individuals and an increased one during the day. This scenario allows us to forecast substance concentrations outside the blood vessels, which are responsible for the extent of drug elimination and the intensity of drug effect. So available data on disposition and pharmacodynamics of drugs might be explained from another point of view that challenges current knowledge. Furthermore, the administration of cardiovascular active drugs might reverse the chronological sequence between pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses, since they could modify blood flow distribution.

  10. Cerebral radioprotection by pentobarbital: Dose-response characteristics and association with GABA agonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Orr, K.; Delaney, T.; Oldfield, E.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Pentobarbital reduces cerebral radiation toxicity; however, the mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. As an anesthetic and depressant of cerebral metabolism, pentobarbital induces its effects on the central nervous system by stimulating the binding of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to its receptor and by inhibiting postsynaptic excitatory amino acid activity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of these actions as well as other aspects of the radioprotective activity of pentobarbital. Fischer 344 rats were separated into multiple groups and underwent two dose-response evaluations. In one set of experiments to examine the relationship of radioprotection to pentobarbital dose, a range of pentobarbital doses (0 to 75 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally prior to a constant-level radiation dose (70 Gy). In a second series of experiments to determine the dose-response relationship of radiation protection to radiation dose, a range of radiation doses (10 to 90 Gy) were given with a single pentobarbital dose. Further groups of animals were used to evaluate the importance of the timing of pentobarbital administration, the function of the (+) and (-) isomers of pentobarbital, and the role of an alternative GABA agonist (diazepam). In addition, the potential protective effects of alternative methods of anesthesia (ketamine) and induction of cerebral hypometabolism (hypothermia) were examined. Enhancement of survival time from acute radiation injury due to high-dose single-fraction whole-brain irradiation was maximal with 60 mg/kg of pentobarbital, and occurred over the range of all doses examined between 30 to 90 Gy. Protection was seen only in animals that received the pentobarbital before irradiation. Administration of other compounds that enhance GABA binding (Saffan and diazepam) also significantly enhanced survival time.

  11. The Radiation Dose-Response of the Human Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To characterize the radiation dose-response of the human spinal cord. Methods and Materials: Because no single institution has sufficient data to establish a dose-response function for the human spinal cord, published reports were combined. Requisite data were dose and fractionation, number of patients at risk, number of myelopathy cases, and survival experience of the population. Eight data points for cervical myelopathy were obtained from five reports. Using maximum likelihood estimation correcting for the survival experience of the population, estimates were obtained for the median tolerance dose, slope parameter, and {alpha}/{beta} ratio in a logistic dose-response function. An adequate fit to thoracic data was not possible. Hyperbaric oxygen treatments involving the cervical cord were also analyzed. Results: The estimate of the median tolerance dose (cervical cord) was 69.4 Gy (95% confidence interval, 66.4-72.6). The {alpha}/{beta} = 0.87 Gy. At 45 Gy, the (extrapolated) probability of myelopathy is 0.03%; and at 50 Gy, 0.2%. The dose for a 5% myelopathy rate is 59.3 Gy. Graphical analysis indicates that the sensitivity of the thoracic cord is less than that of the cervical cord. There appears to be a sensitizing effect from hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Conclusions: The estimate of {alpha}/{beta} is smaller than usually quoted, but values this small were found in some studies. Using {alpha}/{beta} = 0.87 Gy, one would expect a considerable advantage by decreasing the dose/fraction to less than 2 Gy. These results were obtained from only single fractions/day and should not be applied uncritically to hyperfractionation.

  12. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, E.L; DuFrain, R.J.

    1983-10-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between the yield of dicentric chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The dicentric yields follow the Poisson distribution, and the expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose for low LET radiation. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been obtained by Kellerer and Rossi using the theory of dual radiation action. The yield of elementary lesions is kappa(..gamma..d + g(t, tau)d/sup 2/), where t is the time and d is dose. The coefficient of the d/sup 2/ term is determined by the recovery function and the temporal mode of irradiation. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described and illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure.

  13. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations.

  14. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations. PMID:26952004

  15. Responses to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Feinendegen, Ludwig E.; Pollycove, Myron; Sondhaus, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    Biological tissues operate through cells that act together within signaling networks. These assure coordinated cell function in the face of constant exposure to an array of potentially toxic agents, externally from the environment and endogenously from metabolism. Living tissues are indeed complex adaptive systems. To examine tissue effects specific for low-dose radiation, (1) absorbed dose in tissue is replaced by the sum of the energies deposited by each track event, or hit, in a cell-equivalent tissue micromass (1 ng) in all micromasses exposed, that is, by the mean energy delivered by all microdose hits in the exposed micromasses, with cell dose expressing the total energy per micromass from multiple microdoses; and (2) tissue effects are related to cell damage and protective cellular responses per average microdose hit from a given radiation quality for all such hits in the exposed micromasses. The probability of immediate DNA damage per low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) average micro-dose hit is extremely small, increasing over a certain dose range in proportion to the number of hits. Delayed temporary adaptive protection (AP) involves (a) induced detoxification of reactive oxygen species, (b) enhanced rate of DNA repair, (c) induced removal of damaged cells by apoptosis followed by normal cell replacement and by cell differentiation, and (d) stimulated immune response, all with corresponding changes in gene expression. These AP categories may last from less than a day to weeks and be tested by cell responses against renewed irradiation. They operate physiologically against nonradiogenic, largely endogenous DNA damage, which occurs abundantly and continually. Background radiation damage caused by rare microdose hits per micromass is many orders of magnitude less frequent. Except for apoptosis, AP increasingly fails above about 200 mGy of low-LET radiation, corresponding to about 200 microdose hits per exposed micromass. This ratio appears to exceed

  16. Dose response of chlorhexidine against plaque and comparison with triclosan.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, S; Addy, M; Newcombe, R G

    1994-04-01

    The optimum dose of chlorhexidine delivered by mouthrinse, which balances efficacy against local side-effects, is generally considered to be in the region of 20 mg 2 x daily. Unfortunately, there have been few dose-response studies for chlorhexidine mouthrinses and for these, only limited details are published. The aims of this study were to determine the dose response of chlorhexidine to plaque inhibition and position a 0.1% triclosan rinse within this model. 28 subjects took part in this 7-treatment, double-blind, randomised cross-over 4-day plaque regrowth study. The rinses were 0.01%, 0.05%, 0.1% and 0.2% chlorhexidine, 0.1% triclosan and minus active controls for chlorhexidine and triclosan. On day 1 from a zero plaque baseline, volunteers suspended tooth-cleaning and commenced supervised 2 x daily rinsing with 10 ml volumes of the allocated rinses. On Day 5, plaque was scored by index and area. Treatment differences between the 7 rinses were highly significant. A clear dose-response pattern was seen for chlorhexidine with mean plaque scores decreasing with increasing dose. Even at 0.01%, chlorhexidine showed considerable and significant plaque inhibition compared to control. Triclosan at 0.1% showed limited plaque inhibition and less than 0.01% chlorhexidine. The findings of this study suggest that consideration could be given to low concentration chlorhexidine rinses as adjuncts to oral hygiene.

  17. A Manual for Trustees: Role, Responsibilities, Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdy, Helen B.

    This manual provides information on trustees' roles, responsibilities, and relationships with other agencies in the state. Following a foreword and introduction, a historical overview is provided of the North Carolina Community College System, including a description of the system's guiding philosophy of total education, mission statement,…

  18. Dose and Radioadaptive Response Analysis of Micronucleus Induction in Mouse Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Laura A; Mantha, Rebecca R; Devantier, Yvonne; Petoukhov, Eugenia S; Brideau, Chantal L A; Serran, Mandy L; Klokov, Dmitry Y

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced cellular DNA repair efficiency and suppression of genomic instability have been proposed as mechanisms underlying radio-adaptive responses following low-dose radiation exposures. We previously showed that low-dose γ irradiation does not generate radio-adaptation by lowering radiation-induced cytogenetic damage in mouse spleen. Since radiation may exert tissue-specific effects, we extended these results here by examining the effects of γ radiation on cytogenetic damage and proliferative index in bone marrow erythrocytes of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. In C57BL/6 mice, the induction of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) was observed at radiation doses of 100 mGy and greater, and suppression of erythroblast maturation occurred at doses of >500 mGy. A linear dose-response relationship for MN-PCE frequencies in C57BL/6 mice was established for radiation doses between 100 mGy and 1 Gy, with departure from linearity at doses of >1 Gy. BALB/c mice exhibited increased MN-PCE frequencies above baseline following a 20 mGy radiation exposure but did not exhibit radio-sensitivity relative to C57BL/6 mice following 2 Gy exposure. Radio-adaptation of bone marrow erythrocytes was not observed in either strain of mice exposed to low-dose priming γ irradiation (single doses of 20 mGy or 100 mGy or multiple 20 mGy doses) administered at various times prior to acute 2 Gy irradiation, confirming the lack of radio-adaptive response for induction of cytogenetic damage or suppression or erythrocyte proliferation/maturation in bone marrow of these mouse strains. PMID:27649149

  19. Dose and Radioadaptive Response Analysis of Micronucleus Induction in Mouse Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Laura A; Mantha, Rebecca R; Devantier, Yvonne; Petoukhov, Eugenia S; Brideau, Chantal L A; Serran, Mandy L; Klokov, Dmitry Y

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced cellular DNA repair efficiency and suppression of genomic instability have been proposed as mechanisms underlying radio-adaptive responses following low-dose radiation exposures. We previously showed that low-dose γ irradiation does not generate radio-adaptation by lowering radiation-induced cytogenetic damage in mouse spleen. Since radiation may exert tissue-specific effects, we extended these results here by examining the effects of γ radiation on cytogenetic damage and proliferative index in bone marrow erythrocytes of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. In C57BL/6 mice, the induction of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) was observed at radiation doses of 100 mGy and greater, and suppression of erythroblast maturation occurred at doses of >500 mGy. A linear dose-response relationship for MN-PCE frequencies in C57BL/6 mice was established for radiation doses between 100 mGy and 1 Gy, with departure from linearity at doses of >1 Gy. BALB/c mice exhibited increased MN-PCE frequencies above baseline following a 20 mGy radiation exposure but did not exhibit radio-sensitivity relative to C57BL/6 mice following 2 Gy exposure. Radio-adaptation of bone marrow erythrocytes was not observed in either strain of mice exposed to low-dose priming γ irradiation (single doses of 20 mGy or 100 mGy or multiple 20 mGy doses) administered at various times prior to acute 2 Gy irradiation, confirming the lack of radio-adaptive response for induction of cytogenetic damage or suppression or erythrocyte proliferation/maturation in bone marrow of these mouse strains.

  20. Clinical-dosimetric relationship between lacrimal gland dose and ocular toxicity after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for sinonasal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Batth, S S; Sreeraman, R; Dienes, E; Beckett, L A; Daly, M E; Cui, J; Mathai, M; Purdy, J A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To characterise the relationship between lacrimal gland dose and ocular toxicity among patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for sinonasal tumours. Methods: 40 patients with cancers involving the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses were treated with IMRT to a median dose of 66.0 Gy. Toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity criteria based on conjunctivitis, corneal ulceration and keratitis. The paired lacrimal glands were contoured as organs at risk, and the mean dose, maximum dose, V10, V20 and V30 were determined. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression and the Akaike information criterion (AIC). Results: The maximum and mean dose to the ipsilateral lacrimal gland were 19.2 Gy (range, 1.4–75.4 Gy) and 14.5 Gy (range, 11.1–67.8 Gy), respectively. The mean V10, V20 and V30 values were 50%, 25% and 17%, respectively. The incidence of acute and late Grade 3+ toxicities was 23% and 19%, respectively. Based on logistic regression and AIC, the maximum dose to the ipsilateral lacrimal gland was identified as a more significant predictor of acute toxicity (AIC, 53.89) and late toxicity (AIC, 32.94) than the mean dose (AIC, 56.13 and 33.83, respectively). The V20 was identified as the most significant predictor of late toxicity (AIC, 26.81). Conclusion: A dose–response relationship between maximum dose to the lacrimal gland and ocular toxicity was established. Our data suggesting a threshold relationship may be useful in establishing dosimetric guidelines for IMRT planning that may decrease the risk of acute and late lacrimal toxicities in the future. Advances in knowledge: A threshold relationship between radiation dose to the lacrimal gland and ocular toxicity was demonstrated, which may aid in treatment planning and reducing the morbidity of radiotherapy for sinonasal tumours. PMID:24167183

  1. Construction of a cytogenetic dose-response curve for low-dose range gamma-irradiation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using three-color FISH.

    PubMed

    Suto, Yumiko; Akiyama, Miho; Noda, Takashi; Hirai, Momoki

    2015-12-01

    In order to estimate biological doses after low-dose ionizing radiation exposure, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using three differentially colored chromosome painting probes was employed to detect exchange-type chromosome aberrations. A reference dose response curve was constructed using blood samples from a female donor whose lymphocytes consistently exhibited a low frequency of cells at the second mitosis under routine culture conditions. Aberration yields were studied for a total of about 155 thousand metaphases obtained from seven dose-points of gamma irradiations (0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300mGy). In situ hybridization was performed using commercially available painting probes for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4. With the aid of an automated image-capturing method, exchange-type aberrations involving painted chromosomes were detected with considerable accuracy and speed. The results on the exchange-type aberrations (dicentrics plus translocations) at the seven dose-points showed a good fit to the linear-quadratic model (y=0.0023+0.0015x+0.0819x(2), P=0.83). A blind test proved the reproducibility of the reference dose-response relationship. In the control experiments using blood samples from another donor, the estimated doses calculated on the basis of the present reference curve were proved to be in good agreement with the actual physical doses applied. The present dose-response curve may serve as a means to assess the individual differences in cytogenetical radio-sensitivities.

  2. A Framework for "Fit for Purpose" Dose Response Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NRC report Science and Decisions: Advancing Risk Assessment made several recommendations to improve chemical risk assessment, with a focus on in-depth chronic dose-response assessments conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The recommendations addressed two ...

  3. [Relationship to Carcinogenesis of Repetitive Low-Dose Radiation Exposure].

    PubMed

    Ootsuyama, Akira

    2016-06-01

    We studied the carcinogenic effects caused by repetitive irradiation at a low dose, which has received attention in recent years, and examined the experimental methods used to evaluate radiation-induced carcinogenesis. For this experiment, we selected a mouse with as few autochthonous cancers as possible. Skin cancer was selected as the target for analysis, because it is a rare cancer in mice. Beta-rays were selected as the radiation source. The advantage of using beta-rays is weaker penetration power into tissues, thus protecting organs, such as the digestive and hematogenous organs. The benefit of our experimental method is that only skin cancer requires monitoring, and it is possible to perform long-term experiments. The back skin of mice was exposed repetitively to beta-rays three times a week until the occurrence of cancer or death, and the dose per exposure ranged from 0.5 to 11.8 Gy. With the high-dose range (2.5-11.8 Gy), the latency period and carcinogenic rate were almost the same in each experimental group. When the dose was reduced to 1-1.5 Gy, the latency period increased, but the carcinogenic rate remained. When the dose was further reduced to 0.5 Gy, skin cancer never happened, even though we continued irradiation until death of the last mouse in this group. The lifespan of 0.5 Gy group mice was the same as that of the controls. We showed that the 0.5 Gy dose did not cause cancer, even in mice exposed repetitively throughout their life span, and thus refer to 0.5 Gy as the threshold-like dose. PMID:27302731

  4. [Relationship to Carcinogenesis of Repetitive Low-Dose Radiation Exposure].

    PubMed

    Ootsuyama, Akira

    2016-06-01

    We studied the carcinogenic effects caused by repetitive irradiation at a low dose, which has received attention in recent years, and examined the experimental methods used to evaluate radiation-induced carcinogenesis. For this experiment, we selected a mouse with as few autochthonous cancers as possible. Skin cancer was selected as the target for analysis, because it is a rare cancer in mice. Beta-rays were selected as the radiation source. The advantage of using beta-rays is weaker penetration power into tissues, thus protecting organs, such as the digestive and hematogenous organs. The benefit of our experimental method is that only skin cancer requires monitoring, and it is possible to perform long-term experiments. The back skin of mice was exposed repetitively to beta-rays three times a week until the occurrence of cancer or death, and the dose per exposure ranged from 0.5 to 11.8 Gy. With the high-dose range (2.5-11.8 Gy), the latency period and carcinogenic rate were almost the same in each experimental group. When the dose was reduced to 1-1.5 Gy, the latency period increased, but the carcinogenic rate remained. When the dose was further reduced to 0.5 Gy, skin cancer never happened, even though we continued irradiation until death of the last mouse in this group. The lifespan of 0.5 Gy group mice was the same as that of the controls. We showed that the 0.5 Gy dose did not cause cancer, even in mice exposed repetitively throughout their life span, and thus refer to 0.5 Gy as the threshold-like dose.

  5. The Key Events Dose-Response Framework: Its Potential for Application to Foodborne Pathogenic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    BUCHANAN, ROBERT L.; HAVELAAR, ARIE H.; SMITH, MARY ALICE; WHITING, RICHARD C.; JULIEN, ELIZABETH

    2009-01-01

    The Key Events Dose-Response Framework (KEDRF) is an analytical approach that facilitates the use of currently available data to gain insight regarding dose-response relationships. The use of the KEDRF also helps identify critical knowledge gaps that once filled, will reduce reliance on assumptions. The present study considers how the KEDRF might be applied to pathogenic microorganisms, using fetal listeriosis resulting from maternal ingestion of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes as an initial example. Major biological events along the pathway between food ingestion and the endpoint of concern are systematically considered with regard to dose (i.e., number of organisms), pathogen factors (e.g., virulence), and protective host mechanisms (e.g., immune response or other homeostatic mechanisms). It is concluded that the KEDRF provides a useful structure for systematically evaluating the complex array of host and pathogen factors that influence the dose-response relationship. In particular, the KEDRF supports efforts to specify and quantify the sources of variability, a prerequisite to strengthening the scientific basis for food safety decision making. PMID:19690997

  6. Dose and Radioadaptive Response Analysis of Micronucleus Induction in Mouse Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, Laura A.; Mantha, Rebecca R.; Devantier, Yvonne; Petoukhov, Eugenia S.; Brideau, Chantal L. A.; Serran, Mandy L.; Klokov, Dmitry Y.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced cellular DNA repair efficiency and suppression of genomic instability have been proposed as mechanisms underlying radio-adaptive responses following low-dose radiation exposures. We previously showed that low-dose γ irradiation does not generate radio-adaptation by lowering radiation-induced cytogenetic damage in mouse spleen. Since radiation may exert tissue-specific effects, we extended these results here by examining the effects of γ radiation on cytogenetic damage and proliferative index in bone marrow erythrocytes of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. In C57BL/6 mice, the induction of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) was observed at radiation doses of 100 mGy and greater, and suppression of erythroblast maturation occurred at doses of >500 mGy. A linear dose–response relationship for MN-PCE frequencies in C57BL/6 mice was established for radiation doses between 100 mGy and 1 Gy, with departure from linearity at doses of >1 Gy. BALB/c mice exhibited increased MN-PCE frequencies above baseline following a 20 mGy radiation exposure but did not exhibit radio-sensitivity relative to C57BL/6 mice following 2 Gy exposure. Radio-adaptation of bone marrow erythrocytes was not observed in either strain of mice exposed to low-dose priming γ irradiation (single doses of 20 mGy or 100 mGy or multiple 20 mGy doses) administered at various times prior to acute 2 Gy irradiation, confirming the lack of radio-adaptive response for induction of cytogenetic damage or suppression or erythrocyte proliferation/maturation in bone marrow of these mouse strains. PMID:27649149

  7. Bayesian multimodel inference for dose-response studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Albers, P.H.

    2007-01-01

    Statistical inference in dose?response studies is model-based: The analyst posits a mathematical model of the relation between exposure and response, estimates parameters of the model, and reports conclusions conditional on the model. Such analyses rarely include any accounting for the uncertainties associated with model selection. The Bayesian inferential system provides a convenient framework for model selection and multimodel inference. In this paper we briefly describe the Bayesian paradigm and Bayesian multimodel inference. We then present a family of models for multinomial dose?response data and apply Bayesian multimodel inferential methods to the analysis of data on the reproductive success of American kestrels (Falco sparveriuss) exposed to various sublethal dietary concentrations of methylmercury.

  8. Dose response of alanine detectors irradiated with carbon ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jaekel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Bassler, Niels

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behavior of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results to model predictions. Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated with carbon ions with an energy range of 89-400 MeV/u. The relative effectiveness of alanine has been measured in this regime. Pristine and spread out Bragg peak depth-dose curves have been measured with alanine dosimeters. The track structure based alanine response model developed by Hansen and Olsen has been implemented in the Monte Carlo code FLUKA and calculations were compared to experimental results. Results: Calculations of the relative effectiveness deviate less than 5% from the measured values for monoenergetic beams. Measured depth-dose curves deviate from predictions in the peak region, most pronounced at the distal edge of the peak. Conclusions: The used model and its implementation show a good overall agreement for quasimonoenergetic measurements. Deviations in depth-dose measurements are mainly attributed to uncertainties of the detector geometry implemented in the Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Systemic response to low-dose endotoxin infusion in cats.

    PubMed

    DeClue, Amy E; Williams, Kurt J; Sharp, Claire; Haak, Carol; Lechner, Elizabeth; Reinero, Carol R

    2009-12-15

    Sepsis is a common problem in feline patients and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. There has been little research investigating the physiologic response to bacterial infection in cats, in part because appropriate models have not been developed. The objective of this study was to characterize the response to low-dose LPS infusion in conscious, healthy cats. Measures of systemic inflammation, hemodynamic stability, coagulation, metabolic function, and organ damage were compared between placebo and low-dose LPS infusion (2mcg/kg/hx4h, IV) in cats, with each cat serving as its own control. Markers of systemic inflammation including temperature, plasma TNF activity, IL-6, CXCL-8 and IL-10 concentrations were significantly increased and white blood cell counts were significantly decreased after LPS infusion. A biphasic hypotensive response was observed after initiation of LPS infusion without concurrent tachycardia. Additionally, LPS administration significantly increased blood glucose, lactate and creatinine concentrations. Patchy alveolar congestion, multifocal acute alveolar epithelial necrosis, and mild pulmonary edema were noted in the lungs along with acute centrilobular hepatocellular necrosis, and mild lymphocyte apoptosis in the spleen and/or intestinal Peyer's patches. No biologically significant alterations in coagulation parameters developed after LPS infusion. Low-dose LPS infusion in cats induced systemic inflammation, hemodynamic derangement, metabolic alterations and mild organ damage. Low-dose endotoxin infusion is a viable pre-clinical model to study naturally developing sepsis in cats.

  10. Dose-Effect Relationships for the Submandibular Salivary Glands and Implications for Their Sparing by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne; Kim, Hyugnjin M.; Vineberg, Karen A; Ship, Jonathan A.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Submandibular salivary glands (SMGs) dysfunction contributes to xerostomia after radiotherapy (RT) of head and neck (HN) cancer. We assessed SMG dose-response relationships and their implications for sparing these glands by intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Patients and Methods 148 HN cancer patients underwent unstimulated and stimulated SMG salivary flow rate measurements selectively from Wharton’s duct orifices, before RT and periodically through 24 months after RT. Correlations of flow rates and mean SMG doses were modeled throughout all time points. IMRT re-planning in eight patients whose contralateral level I was not a target incorporated the results in a new cost function aiming to spare contralateral SMGs. Results Stimulated SMG flow rates decreased exponentially by (1.2%)Gy as mean doses increased up to 39 Gy threshold, and then plateaued near zero. At mean doses ≤39 Gy, but not higher, flow rates recovered over time at 2.2%/month. Similarly, the unstimulated salivary flow rates decreased exponentially by (3%)Gy as mean dose increased and recovered over time if mean dose was <39 Gy. IMRT re-planning reduced mean contralateral SMG dose by average 12 Gy, achieving ≤39 Gy in 5/8 patients, without target under-dosing, increasing the mean doses to the parotid glands and swallowing structures by average 2–3 Gy. Conclusions SMG salivary flow rates depended on mean dose with recovery over time up to a threshold of 39 Gy. Substantial SMG dose reduction to below this threshold and without target under-dosing is feasible in some patients, at the expense of modestly higher doses to some other organs. PMID:18337023

  11. Evaluating quantitative formulas for dose-response assessment of chemical mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Hertzberg, Richard C; Teuschler, Linda K

    2002-01-01

    Risk assessment formulas are often distinguished from dose-response models by being rough but necessary. The evaluation of these rough formulas is described here, using the example of mixture risk assessment. Two conditions make the dose-response part of mixture risk assessment difficult, lack of data on mixture dose-response relationships, and the need to address risk from combinations of chemicals because of public demands and statutory requirements. Consequently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed methods for carrying out quantitative dose-response assessment for chemical mixtures that require information only on the toxicity of single chemicals and of chemical pair interactions. These formulas are based on plausible ideas and default parameters but minimal supporting data on whole mixtures. Because of this lack of mixture data, the usual evaluation of accuracy (predicted vs. observed) cannot be performed. Two approaches to the evaluation of such formulas are to consider fundamental biological concepts that support the quantitative formulas (e.g., toxicologic similarity) and to determine how well the proposed method performs under simplifying constraints (e.g., as the toxicologic interactions disappear). These ideas are illustrated using dose addition and two weight-of-evidence formulas for incorporating toxicologic interactions. PMID:12634126

  12. Dose-effect relationships, epidemiological analysis and the derivation of low dose risk.

    PubMed

    Leenhouts, H P; Chadwick, K H

    2011-03-01

    This paper expands on our recent comments in a letter to this journal about the analysis of epidemiological studies and the determination of low dose RBE of low LET radiation (Chadwick and Leenhouts 2009 J. Radiol. Prot. 29 445-7). Using the assumption that radiation induced cancer arises from a somatic mutation (Chadwick and Leenhouts 2011 J. Radiol. Prot. 31 41-8) a model equation is derived to describe cancer induction as a function of dose. The model is described briefly, evidence is provided in support of it, and it is applied to a set of experimental animal data. The results are compared with a linear fit to the data as has often been done in epidemiological studies. The article presents arguments to support several related messages which are relevant to epidemiological analysis, the derivation of low dose risk and the weighting factor of sparsely ionising radiations. The messages are: (a) cancer incidence following acute exposure should, in principle, be fitted to a linear-quadratic curve with cell killing using all the data available; (b) the acute data are dominated by the quadratic component of dose; (c) the linear fit of any acute data will essentially be dependent on the quadratic component and will be unrelated to the effectiveness of the radiation at low doses; consequently, (d) the method used by ICRP to derive low dose risk from the atomic bomb survivor data means that it is unrelated to the effectiveness of the hard gamma radiation at low radiation doses; (e) the low dose risk value should, therefore, not be used as if it were representative for hard gamma rays to argue for an increased weighting factor for tritium and soft x-rays even though there are mechanistic reasons to expect this; (f) epidemiological studies of chronically exposed populations supported by appropriate cellular radiobiological studies have the best chance of revealing different RBE values for different sparsely ionising radiations. PMID:21346287

  13. Characterization of Statin Dose-response within Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei-Qi; Feng, Qiping; Jiang, Lan; Waitara, Magarya S.; Iwuchukwu, Otito F.; Roden, Dan M.; Jiang, Min; Xu, Hua; Krauss, Ronald M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Davis, Robert L.; Berg, Richard L.; Peissig, Peggy L.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Wilke, Russell A.; Denny, Joshua C.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to define the genetic architecture underlying variable statin response have met with limited success possibly because previous studies were limited to effect based on one-single-dose. We leveraged electronic medical records (EMRs) to extract potency (ED50) and efficacy (Emax) of statin dose-response curves and tested them for association with 144 pre-selected variants. Two large biobanks were used to construct dose-response curves for 2,026 (simvastatin) and 2,252 subjects (atorvastatin). Atorvastatin was more efficacious, more potent, and demonstrated less inter-individual variability than simvastatin. A pharmacodynamic variant emerging from randomized trials (PRDM16) was associated with Emax for both. For atorvastatin, Emax was 51.7 mg/dl in homozygous for the minor allele versus 75.0 mg/dl for those homozygous for the major allele. We also identified several loci associated with ED50. The extraction of rigorously defined traits from EMRs for pharmacogenetic studies represents a promising approach to further understand of genetic factors contributing to drug response. PMID:24096969

  14. Lead in teeth from lead-dosed goats: Microdistribution and relationship to the cumulative lead dose

    SciTech Connect

    Bellis, David J.; Hetter, Katherine M.; Jones, Joseph; Amarasiriwardena, Dula; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2008-01-15

    Teeth are commonly used as a biomarker of long-term lead exposure. There appear to be few data, however, on the content or distribution of lead in teeth where data on specific lead intake (dose) are also available. This study describes the analysis of a convenience sample of teeth from animals that were dosed with lead for other purposes, i.e., a proficiency testing program for blood lead. Lead concentration of whole teeth obtained from 23 animals, as determined by atomic absorption spectrometry, varied from 0.6 to 80 {mu}g g{sup -1}. Linear regression of whole tooth lead ({mu}g g{sup -1}) on the cumulative lead dose received by the animal (g) yielded a slope of 1.2, with r{sup 2}=0.647 (p<0.0001). Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was employed to determine lead content at micrometer scale spatial resolution in the teeth of seven goats representing the dosing range. Highly localized concentrations of lead, ranging from about 10 to 2000 {mu}g g{sup -1}, were found in circumpulpal dentine. Linear regression of circumpulpal lead ({mu}g g{sup -1}) on cumulative lead dose (g) yielded a slope of 23 with r{sup 2}=0.961 (p=0.0001). The data indicated that whole tooth lead, and especially circumpulpal lead, of dosed goats increased linearly with cumulative lead exposure. These data suggest that circumpulpal dentine is a better biomarker of cumulative lead exposure than is whole tooth lead, at least for lead-dosed goats.

  15. Role of heme Oxygenase-1 in low dose Radioadaptive response

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lingzhi; Ma, Jie; Chen, Guodong; Hou, Jue; Hei, Tom K.; Yu, K.N.; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Radioadaptive response (RAR) is an important phenomenon induced by low dose radiation. However, the molecular mechanism of RAR is obscure. In this study, we focused on the possible role of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in RAR. Consistent with previous studies, priming dose of X-ray radiation (1–10 cGy) induced significant RAR in normal human skin fibroblasts (AG 1522 cells). Transcription and translation of HO-1 was up-regulated more than two fold by a priming dose of radiation (5 cGy). Zinc protoporphyrin Ⅸ, a specific competitive inhibitor of HO-1, efficiently inhibited RAR whereas hemin, an inducer of HO-1, could mimic priming dose of X-rays to induce RAR. Knocking down of HO-1 by transfection of HO-1 siRNA significantly attenuated RAR. Furthermore, the expression of HO-1 gene was modulated by the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), which translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus after priming dose radiation and enhance the antioxidant level of cells. PMID:26966892

  16. Ozone response relationships in healthy nonsmokers

    SciTech Connect

    Kulle, T.J.; Sauder, L.R.; Hebel, J.R.; Chatham, M.D.

    1985-07-01

    Significant concentration responses were observed in FVC, FEV1, FEF25-75, SGaw, IC, and TLC in 20 healthy, nonsmoking volunteers exposed randomly to 0.00, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25 ppm O/sub 3/. In addition, significant response changes for FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75 were shown with time over the 2-h exposure. Intermittent, heavy exercise (VE, 68 L/min) lasting 14 min was employed every 30 min during exposure. Inspection of the concentration and time response curves suggests that the threshold for the group response is at or below 0.15 ppm O/sub 3/. Six subjects experienced decreases greater than 5% in FEV1 or greater than 15% in SGaw at 0.15 ppm. This concentration is only slightly higher than the 1-h O/sub 3/ National Ambient Air Quality Standard. A dose-related response was also seen for cough, nose and throat irritation, and chest discomfort. The work load, length of exposure, and individual sensitivity must be considered for establishing a safe O/sub 3/ exposure level.

  17. Ozone-response relationships in healthy nonsmokers

    SciTech Connect

    Kulle, T.J.; Sauder, L.R.; Hebel, J.R.; Chatham, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    Significant concentration responses were observed in FVC1 FEV1, FEF 25-75, SGaw, IC, and TLC in 20 healthy, nonsmoking volunteers exposed randomly to 0.00, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25 ppm O3. In addition, significant response changes for FVC1 FEV1, FEF25-75 were shown with time over the 2-h exposure. Intermittent, heavy exercise (VE1 68L/min) lasting 14 min was employed every 30 min during exposure. Inspection of the concentration and time-response curves suggests that the threshold for the group response is at or below 0.15 ppm O/sub 3/. Six subjects experienced decreases > 5% in SGaw at 0.15 ppm. The concentration is only slightly higher than the 1-h O/sub 3/ National Ambient Air Quality Standard. A dose-related response was also seen for cough, nose and throat irritation, and chest discomfort. The work load, length of exposure, and individual sensitivity must be considered for establishing a safe O/sub 3/ exposure level.

  18. Dose-Effect Relationships for Individual Pelvic Floor Muscles and Anorectal Complaints After Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Hopman, Wim P.M.; Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. Results: The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: {<=}30 Gy to the IAS; {<=}10 Gy to the EAS; {<=}50 Gy to the PRM; and {<=}40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Conclusions: Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are

  19. Quantitative Dose-Response Curves from Subcellular Lipid Multilayer Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kusi-Appiah, A. E.; Lowry, T. W.; Darrow, E. M.; Wilson, K.; Chadwick, B. P.; Davidson, M. W.; Lenhert, S.

    2015-01-01

    The dose-dependent bioactivity of small molecules on cells is a crucial factor in drug discovery and personalized medicine. Although small-molecule microarrays are a promising platform for miniaturized screening, it has been a challenge to use them to obtain quantitative dose-response curves in vitro, especially for lipophilic compounds. Here we establish a small-molecule microarray assay capable of controlling the dosage of small lipophilic molecules delivered to cells by varying the sub-cellular volumes of surface supported lipid micro- and nanostructure arrays fabricated with nanointaglio. Features with sub-cellular lateral dimensions were found necessary to obtain normal cell adhesion with HeLa cells. The volumes of the lipophilic drug-containing nanostructures were determined using a fluorescence microscope calibrated by atomic-force microscopy. We used the surface supported lipid volume information to obtain EC-50 values for the response of HeLa cells to three FDA-approved lipophilic anticancer drugs, docetaxel, imiquimod and triethylenemelamine, which were found to be significantly different from neat lipid controls. No significant toxicity was observed on the control cells surrounding the drug/lipid patterns, indicating lack of interference or leakage from the arrays. Comparison of the microarray data to dose-response curves for the same drugs delivered liposomally from solution revealed quantitative differences in the efficacy values, which we explain in terms of cell-adhesion playing a more important role in the surface-based assay. The assay should be scalable to a density of at least 10,000 dose response curves on the area of a standard microtiter plate. PMID:26167949

  20. [Evaluation of the dose-effect relationship of perindopril in the treatment of arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Luccioni, R; Frances, Y; Gass, R; Gilgenkrantz, J M

    1989-05-01

    To evaluate the dose-effect relationship of antihypertensive drugs is essential to a rational determination of their effective dosage. Two double-blind and strictly controlled trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of perindopril 4 mg orally in the treatment of mild to moderate arterial hypertension (100 less than DAP less than 120 mmHg). The drug remained effective 24 hours after the last dose. The 2 mg dose proved insufficient to obtain a significant reduction of blood pressure. In case where the 4 mg dose was not sufficiently active, a better antihypertensive effect could be achieved with an 8 mg dose without major untoward reactions. The antihypertensive activity of perindopril was parallel to the percentage of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition induced by the compound. This study also illustrates clearly the value of semi-automatic blood pressure recording with the Dinamap system in the determination of dose-effect relationship, compared with the conventional sphygmomanometric method. PMID:2505712

  1. Biphasic Dose Response in Low Level Light Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Carroll, James D.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing cell death and tissue damage has been known for over forty years since the invention of lasers. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial in mainstream medicine. The biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and the complexity of rationally choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters such as wavelength, fluence, power density, pulse structure and treatment timing has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. A biphasic dose response has been frequently observed where low levels of light have a much better effect on stimulating and repairing tissues than higher levels of light. The so-called Arndt-Schulz curve is frequently used to describe this biphasic dose response. This review will cover the molecular and cellular mechanisms in LLLT, and describe some of our recent results in vitro and in vivo that provide scientific explanations for this biphasic dose response. PMID:20011653

  2. Myocardial adrenergic responsiveness after lethal and nonlethal doses of endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R.E.; Lang, C.H.; McDonough, K.H.

    1987-02-01

    A dose-dependent impairment of intrinsic myocardial performance has been observed following in vivo administration of endotoxin. The present study reports a dose-dependent increase in plasma catecholamines following endotoxin (ET) that may impair ..beta..-adrenergic responsiveness. Hearts were removed from pentobarbital-anesthetized rats 4 h after a bolus injection of saline or ET and were studied as isolated cell preparations following collagenase digestion. Responsiveness of isoproterenol-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in myocytes prepared from hearts of animals injected with 10 and 100 ..mu..g ET was decreased when compared with control rats and was significantly blunted in myocytes prepared from animals receiving 1000 ..mu..g ET. Similar sensitivities of the cAMP system existed, as judged by similar half-maximum effective concentration values. cAMP accumulation in the presence of 1 ..mu..M forskolin was depressed in myocytes from the 1000-..mu..g ET animals; ..beta..-adrenergic receptor density was decreased 25% in myocytes from high-dose ET animals when compared with control animals. This was accompanied by a nonsignificant reduction in the affinity of binding sites for (+/-)(/sup 3/H)CGP 12177. The blunted myocyte hormonal responsiveness following ET challenge appears to be related to the decreased activity of the adenylate cyclase that may be attributed to alterations in both receptor density and in the adenylate cyclase itself.

  3. BYSTANDERS, ADAPTIVE RESPONSES AND GENOMIC INSTABILITY - POTENTIAL MODIFIERS OF LOW-DOSE CANCER RESPONSES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bystanders, Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability -Potential Modifiers ofLow-Dose
    Cancer Responses
    .
    There has been a concerted effort in the field of radiation biology to better understand cellular
    responses that could have an impact on the estin1ation of cancer...

  4. Inorganic arsenic in drinking water and bladder cancer: a meta-analysis for dose-response assessment.

    PubMed

    Chu, Huei-An; Crawford-Brown, Douglas J

    2006-12-01

    Most arsenic cancer risk assessments have been based solely on epidemiological studies to characterize the dose-response relationship for arsenic-associated cancer and to perform risk calculations. However, current epidemiological evidence is too inconsistent and fraught with uncertainty regarding arsenic exposure to provide reliable estimates. This makes it hard to draw a firm conclusion about the shape and slope of the dose-response relationship from individual studies. Meta-analysis is a statistical approach to combining results across studies and offers expanded opportunities for obtaining an improved dose-response relationship. In this study, a meta-analysis of arsenic studies was conducted by combining seven epidemiological studies from different regions to get an overall dose-response relationship between the amount of arsenic intake and the excess probability of bladder cancer. Both the fixed-effect and random-effect models were used to calculate the averaged coefficient of the linear-logistic regression model. A homogeneity test was also conducted. The final product of this research is an aggregated dose-response model in the range of empirical observation of arsenic. Considering the most recent arsenic MCL (maximum contaminant level, i.e. 10microg/L), the associated bladder cancer risk (lifetime excess probability) at this MCL is 2.29 x 10-5.

  5. Modeling Effective Dosages in Hormetic Dose-Response Studies

    PubMed Central

    Belz, Regina G.; Piepho, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Two hormetic modifications of a monotonically decreasing log-logistic dose-response function are most often used to model stimulatory effects of low dosages of a toxicant in plant biology. As just one of these empirical models is yet properly parameterized to allow inference about quantities of interest, this study contributes the parameterized functions for the second hormetic model and compares the estimates of effective dosages between both models based on 23 hormetic data sets. Based on this, the impact on effective dosage estimations was evaluated, especially in case of a substantially inferior fit by one of the two models. Methodology/Principal Findings The data sets evaluated described the hormetic responses of four different test plant species exposed to 15 different chemical stressors in two different experimental dose-response test designs. Out of the 23 data sets, one could not be described by any of the two models, 14 could be better described by one of the two models, and eight could be equally described by both models. In cases of misspecification by any of the two models, the differences between effective dosages estimates (0–1768%) greatly exceeded the differences observed when both models provided a satisfactory fit (0–26%). This suggests that the conclusions drawn depending on the model used may diverge considerably when using an improper hormetic model especially regarding effective dosages quantifying hormesis. Conclusions/Significance The study showed that hormetic dose responses can take on many shapes and that this diversity can not be captured by a single model without risking considerable misinterpretation. However, the two empirical models considered in this paper together provide a powerful means to model, prove, and now also to quantify a wide range of hormetic responses by reparameterization. Despite this, they should not be applied uncritically, but after statistical and graphical assessment of their adequacy. PMID

  6. Radiation-induced genomic instability: radiation quality and dose response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie E.; Nagar, Shruti; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a term used to describe a phenomenon that results in the accumulation of multiple changes required to convert a stable genome of a normal cell to an unstable genome characteristic of a tumor. There has been considerable recent debate concerning the importance of genomic instability in human cancer and its temporal occurrence in the carcinogenic process. Radiation is capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells and instability is thought to be the driving force responsible for radiation carcinogenesis. Genomic instability is characterized by a large collection of diverse endpoints that include large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and aberrations, amplification of genetic material, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, microsatellite instability, and gene mutation. The capacity of radiation to induce genomic instability depends to a large extent on radiation quality or linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. There appears to be a low dose threshold effect with low LET, beyond which no additional genomic instability is induced. Low doses of both high and low LET radiation are capable of inducing this phenomenon. This report reviews data concerning dose rate effects of high and low LET radiation and their capacity to induce genomic instability assayed by chromosomal aberrations, delayed lethal mutations, micronuclei and apoptosis.

  7. Dose-Effect Relationships for the Submandibular Salivary Glands and Implications for Their Sparing by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne; Vineberg, Karen A.; Ship, Jonathan

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: Submandibular salivary glands (SMGs) dysfunction contributes to xerostomia after radiotherapy (RT) of head-and-neck (HN) cancer. We assessed SMG dose-response relationships and their implications for sparing these glands by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 148 HN cancer patients underwent unstimulated and stimulated SMG salivary flow rate measurements selectively from Wharton's duct orifices, before RT and periodically through 24 months after RT. Correlations of flow rates and mean SMG doses were modeled throughout all time points. IMRT replanning in 8 patients whose contralateral level I was not a target incorporated the results in a new cost function aiming to spare contralateral SMGs. Results: Stimulated SMG flow rates decreased exponentially by (1.2%){sup Gy} as mean doses increased up to 39 Gy threshold, and then plateaued near zero. At mean doses {<=}39 Gy, but not higher, flow rates recovered over time at 2.2%/month. Similarly, the unstimulated salivary flow rates decreased exponentially by (3%){sup Gy} as mean dose increased and recovered over time if mean dose was <39 Gy. IMRT replanning reduced mean contralateral SMG dose by average 12 Gy, achieving {<=}39 Gy in 5 of 8 patients, without target underdosing, increasing the mean doses to the parotid glands and swallowing structures by average 2-3 Gy. Conclusions: SMG salivary flow rates depended on mean dose with recovery over time up to a threshold of 39 Gy. Substantial SMG dose reduction to below this threshold and without target underdosing is feasible in some patients, at the expense of modestly higher doses to some other organs.

  8. Low-Dose Gamma Radiation Does Not Induce an Adaptive Response for Micronucleus Induction in Mouse Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Bannister, L A; Serran, M L; Mantha, R R

    2015-11-01

    Low-dose ionizing radiation is known to induce radioadaptive responses in cells in vitro as well as in mice in vivo. Low-dose radiation decreases the incidence and increases latency for spontaneous and radiation-induced tumors in mice, potentially as a result of enhanced cellular DNA repair efficiency or a reduction in genomic instability. In this study, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was used to examine dose response and potential radioadaptive response for cytogenetic damage and cell survival in C57BL/6 and BALB/c spleen cells exposed in vitro or in vivo to low-dose 60Co gamma radiation. The effects of genetic background, radiation dose and dose rate, sampling time and cell cycle were investigated with respect to dose response and radioadaptive response. In C57BL/6 mice, a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for the induction of micronuclei (MN) was observed for doses between 100 mGy and 2 Gy. BALB/c mice exhibited increased radiosensitivity for MN induction compared to C57BL/6 mice. A 20 mGy dose had no effect on MN frequencies in splenocytes of either mouse strain, however, increased spleen weight and a reduced number of dead cells were noted in the C57BL/6 strain only. Multiple experimental parameters were investigated in radioadaptive response studies, including dose and dose rate of the priming dose (20 mGy at 0.5 mGy/min and 100 mGy at 10 mGy/min), time interval (4 and 24 h) between priming and challenge doses, cell cycle stage (resting or proliferating) at exposure and kinetics after the challenge dose. Radioadaptive responses were not observed for MN induction for either mouse strain under any of the experimental conditions investigated. In contrast, a synergistic response for radiation-induced micronuclei in C57BL/6 spleen was detected after in vivo 20 mGy irradiation. This increase in the percentage of cells with cytogenetic damage was associated with a reduction in the number of nonviable spleen cells, suggesting that low-dose

  9. Searching for Drug Synergy in Complex Dose-Response Landscapes Using an Interaction Potency Model.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Bhagwan; Wennerberg, Krister; Aittokallio, Tero; Tang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Rational design of multi-targeted drug combinations is a promising strategy to tackle the drug resistance problem for many complex disorders. A drug combination is usually classified as synergistic or antagonistic, depending on the deviation of the observed combination response from the expected effect calculated based on a reference model of non-interaction. The existing reference models were proposed originally for low-throughput drug combination experiments, which make the model assumptions often incompatible with the complex drug interaction patterns across various dose pairs that are typically observed in large-scale dose-response matrix experiments. To address these limitations, we proposed a novel reference model, named zero interaction potency (ZIP), which captures the drug interaction relationships by comparing the change in the potency of the dose-response curves between individual drugs and their combinations. We utilized a delta score to quantify the deviation from the expectation of zero interaction, and proved that a delta score value of zero implies both probabilistic independence and dose additivity. Using data from a large-scale anticancer drug combination experiment, we demonstrated empirically how the ZIP scoring approach captures the experimentally confirmed drug synergy while keeping the false positive rate at a low level. Further, rather than relying on a single parameter to assess drug interaction, we proposed the use of an interaction landscape over the full dose-response matrix to identify and quantify synergistic and antagonistic dose regions. The interaction landscape offers an increased power to differentiate between various classes of drug combinations, and may therefore provide an improved means for understanding their mechanisms of action toward clinical translation.

  10. Adaptive Responses to Prochloraz Exposure That Alter Dose-Response and Time-Course Behaviors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose response and time-course (DRTC) are, along with exposure, the major determinants of health risk. Adaptive changes within exposed organisms in response to environmental stress are common, and alter DRTC behaviors to minimize the effects caused by stressors. In this project, ...

  11. Evaluation of the Emergency Response Dose Assessment System(ERDAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Randolph J.; Lambert, Winifred C.; Manobianco, John T.; Taylor, Gregory E.; Wheeler, Mark M.; Yersavich, Ann M.

    1996-01-01

    The emergency response dose assessment system (ERDAS) is a protype software and hardware system configured to produce routine mesoscale meteorological forecasts and enhanced dispersion estimates on an operational basis for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)/Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) region. ERDAS provides emergency response guidance to operations at KSC/CCAS in the case of an accidental hazardous material release or an aborted vehicle launch. This report describes the evaluation of ERDAS including: evaluation of sea breeze predictions, comparison of launch plume location and concentration predictions, case study of a toxic release, evaluation of model sensitivity to varying input parameters, evaluation of the user interface, assessment of ERDA's operational capabilities, and a comparison of ERDAS models to the ocean breeze dry gultch diffusion model.

  12. Evaluation of the dose-effect relationship of perindopril in the treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Luccioni, R; Frances, Y; Gass, R; Gilgenkrantz, J M

    1989-01-01

    The evaluation of the dose-antihypertensive effect relationship of a drug is essential for the rational determination of the effective dose. The efficacy and safety of the dose of 4 mg of perindopril in the treatment of mild-to-moderate hypertension were demonstrated by means of two double-blind studies conducted according to a rigorous methodology. This efficacy was still present 24 hours after the last dose of perindopril. The dose of 2 mg appeared to be insufficient to exert a significant antihypertensive effect. In the case of inadequate efficacy of the dose of 4 mg of perindopril, the dose of 8 mg is able to exert a greater antihypertensive effect without any major harmful effects. The antihypertensive efficacy is parallel to the percentage of converting enzyme inhibition induced by perindopril. The contribution of the automated method of blood pressure recording using the Dinamap method to establish a dose-effect relationship with reference to the classical sphygmomanometric method is clearly illustrated. PMID:2605801

  13. Dose-response in an outbreak of non-bacterial food poisoning traced to a mixed seafood cocktail.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, S. F.; Evans, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    An outbreak of non-bacterial food poisoning presumed due to small round, structured viruses (SRSV) occurred at a national conference. A detailed postal survey of all conference attenders was carried out to ascertain the cause of the outbreak and 355 questionnaires were returned. Univariate analysis showed that mussels in the seafood cocktail were the likely vehicle of infection. A dose-response relationship between the amount of seafood cocktail consumed and the risk of illness was demonstrated. Dose-response has not previously been documented in a food-borne outbreak due to small round structured virus. Detailed quantitative food histories can be useful in eliciting dose-response relationships and may be crucial in establishing the vehicle of infection when investigating food poisoning following consumption of a set-menu meal. Their use should be considered in other outbreak situations. PMID:8519323

  14. Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal?**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal? The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the 1940s, originally focusing on linear no threshold (LNT) versus threshold responses for cancer and noncanc...

  15. Optical and NMR dose response of N-isopropylacrylamide normoxic polymer gel for radiation therapy dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Mesbahi, Asghar; Jafarzadeh, Vahid; Gharehaghaji, Nahideh

    2012-01-01

    Background Application of less toxic normoxic polymer gel of N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAM) for radiation therapy has been studied in recent years. Aim In the current study the optical and NMR properties of NIPAM were studied for radiation therapy dosimetry application. Materials and methods NIPAM normoxic polymer gel was prepared and irradiated by 9 MV photon beam of a medical linac. The optical absorbance was measured using a conventional laboratory spectrophotometer in different wavelengths ranging from 390 to 860 nm. R2 measurements of NIPAM gels were performed using a 1.5 T scanner and R2–dose curve was obtained. Results Our results showed R2 dose sensitivity of 0.193 ± 0.01 s−1 Gy−1 for NIPAM gel. Both R2 and optical absorbance showed a linear relationship with dose from 1.5 to 11 Gy for NIPAM gel dosimeter. Moreover, absorbance–dose response varied considerably with light wavelength and highest sensitivity was seen for the blue part of the spectrum. Conclusion Our results showed that both optical and NMR approaches have acceptable sensitivity and accuracy for dose determination with NIPAM gel. However, for optical reading of the gel, utilization of an optimum optical wavelength is recommended. PMID:24377016

  16. Acute Effects of Classroom Exercise Breaks on Executive Function and Math Performance: A Dose-Response Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, Erin K.; Schatz, Jeffrey; Pate, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the acute dose-response relationship of classroom exercise breaks with executive function and math performance in 9- to 12-year-old children by comparing 5-min, 10-min, or 20-min classroom exercise breaks to 10 min of sedentary classroom activity. Method: This study used a within-subjects…

  17. Demonstration of dose response of flurbiprofen lozenges with the sore throat pain model.

    PubMed

    Schachtel, Bernard P; Homan, Harvey D; Gibb, Iain A; Christian, Jenny

    2002-05-01

    The dose response of flurbiprofen lozenges (2.5, 5.0, and 12.5 mg) was evaluated in the treatment of sore throat. A refined version of the sore throat pain model showed that 12.5 mg flurbiprofen was significantly more effective than placebo at providing total pain relief and reducing throat soreness (p <.05). Flurbiprofen, 5.0 mg, was more effective than placebo for the reduction of throat soreness and the sensation of throat swelling (P <.05). The 2.5-mg flurbiprofen lozenge was indistinguishable from placebo. For every milligram of increase in the dose of flurbiprofen, there was an approximately 0.3-unit increase in total pain relief (P <.05). Flurbiprofen lozenges in all 3 dosages were well tolerated. Flurbiprofen lozenges are effective for sore throat at a dose between 5.0 mg and 12.5 mg; the sore throat pain model is a sensitive assay for demonstration of the dose-response relationship of an analgesic agent.

  18. Demonstration of dose response of flurbiprofen lozenges with the sore throat pain model.

    PubMed

    Schachtel, Bernard P; Homan, Harvey D; Gibb, Iain A; Christian, Jenny

    2002-05-01

    The dose response of flurbiprofen lozenges (2.5, 5.0, and 12.5 mg) was evaluated in the treatment of sore throat. A refined version of the sore throat pain model showed that 12.5 mg flurbiprofen was significantly more effective than placebo at providing total pain relief and reducing throat soreness (p <.05). Flurbiprofen, 5.0 mg, was more effective than placebo for the reduction of throat soreness and the sensation of throat swelling (P <.05). The 2.5-mg flurbiprofen lozenge was indistinguishable from placebo. For every milligram of increase in the dose of flurbiprofen, there was an approximately 0.3-unit increase in total pain relief (P <.05). Flurbiprofen lozenges in all 3 dosages were well tolerated. Flurbiprofen lozenges are effective for sore throat at a dose between 5.0 mg and 12.5 mg; the sore throat pain model is a sensitive assay for demonstration of the dose-response relationship of an analgesic agent. PMID:12011823

  19. The niacin skin flush abnormality in schizophrenia: a quantitative dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Messamore, Erik; Hoffman, William F; Janowsky, Aaron

    2003-08-01

    Niacin dilates cutaneous blood vessels, resulting in a pronounced skin flush in most people. The flush response to niacin is attenuated in schizophrenia, but the quantification and physiological mechanism of this abnormality have not been described in detail. It is not clear whether the mechanism involves changes in the pharmacological sensitivity to niacin, or whether there is a reduced ability of the vasculature to dilate adequately in subjects with schizophrenia. We address this question in the present study by characterizing the dose-response relationship between topically applied alpha-methylnicotinate (AMN) and cutaneous blood flow changes, which were quantified by laser Doppler flowmetry. The dose-response curve was shifted to the right in subjects with schizophrenia. The EC(50) value of AMN was significantly increased in the schizophrenia group (mean: 1.66 mM; 95% confidence interval: 1.04-2.65 mM) as compared to the control group (mean: 0.38 mM; 95% confidence interval: 0.263-0.547 mM). The blood flow responses to higher AMN doses were lower in the schizophrenics; however, there was no statistically significant difference in the extrapolated maximal blood flow response value (F(max)) between the two groups. The results suggest that the skin flush abnormality in schizophrenia primarily reflects reduced pharmacological sensitivity to niacin rather than an inadequate cutaneous vasodilatory response to the stimulus. Since vasodilatation in response to niacin requires the release of prostaglandins, the data from this study suggest that schizophrenia is associated with abnormalities in enzymes, receptors, or signal transduction mechanisms that affect the synthesis, release, or response to vasodilatory prostaglandins.

  20. Untargeted Metabolomics Reveals Dose-Response Characteristics for Effect of Rhubarb in a Rat Model of Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cong-En; Niu, Ming; Li, Rui-Yu; Feng, Wu-Wen; Ma, Xiao; Dong, Qin; Ma, Zhi-Jie; Li, Guang-Quan; Meng, Ya-Kun; Wang, Ya; Yin, Ping; He, Lan-Zhi; Li, Yu-Meng; Tan, Peng; Zhao, Yan-Ling; Wang, Jia-Bo; Dong, Xiao-Ping; Xiao, Xiao-He

    2016-01-01

    Cholestasis is a serious manifestation of liver diseases with limited therapies. Rhubarb, a widely used herbal medicine, has been frequently used at a relatively large dose for treating cholestasis. However, whether large doses are optimal and the therapeutic mechanism remain unclear. To explore these questions, the anti-cholestatic effect of five doses of rhubarb (0.21, 0.66, 2.10, 6.60, and 21.0 g/kg) in an alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced rat model of cholestasis was examined by histopathology and serum biochemistry. A dose-dependent anti-cholestatic effect of rhubarb (0.21–6.6 g/kg) was observed, and an overdose of 21.0 g/kg showed a poor effect. LC-MS-based untargeted metabolomics together with pathway analysis were further applied to characterize the metabolic alterations induced by the different rhubarb doses. Altogether, 13 biomarkers were identified. The dose-response curve based on nine important biomarkers indicated that doses in the 0.42–6.61 g/kg range (EC20–EC80 range, corresponding to 4.00–62.95 g in the clinic) were effective for cholestasis treatment. The pathway analysis showed that bile acid metabolism and excretion, inflammation and amino acid metabolism were altered by rhubarb in a dose-dependent manner and might be involved in the dose-response relationship and therapeutic mechanism of rhubarb for cholestasis treatment. PMID:27065293

  1. Critical target and dose and dose-rate responses for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Corcoran, J. J.; Milligan, J. R.; Ward, J. F.; Morgan, W. F.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the critical target, dose response and dose-rate response for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-substituted and unsubstituted GM10115 cells were exposed to a range of doses (0.1-10 Gy) and different dose rates (0.092-17.45 Gy min(-1)). The status of chromosomal stability was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization approximately 20 generations after irradiation in clonal populations derived from single progenitor cells surviving acute exposure. Overall, nearly 700 individual clones representing over 140,000 metaphases were analyzed. In cells unsubstituted with BrdU, a dose response was found, where the probability of observing delayed chromosomal instability in any given clone was 3% per gray of X rays. For cells substituted with 25-66% BrdU, however, a dose response was observed only at low doses (<1.0 Gy); at higher doses (>1.0 Gy), the incidence of chromosomal instability leveled off. There was an increase in the frequency and complexity of chromosomal instability per unit dose compared to cells unsubstituted with BrdU. The frequency of chromosomal instability appeared to saturate around approximately 30%, an effect which occurred at much lower doses in the presence of BrdU. Changing the gamma-ray dose rate by a factor of 190 (0.092 to 17.45 Gy min(-1)) produced no significant differences in the frequency of chromosomal instability. The enhancement of chromosomal instability promoted by the presence of the BrdU argues that DNA comprises at least one of the critical targets important for the induction of this end point of genomic instability.

  2. Fewer doses of HPV vaccine result in immune response similar to three-dose regimen

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists report that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum antibody levels against two of the most carcinogenic types of HPV (16 and 18), compared to a standard three dose regimen.

  3. Biologically Based Dose-Response Modeling. What is the potential for accurate description of the biological linkages in the applied dose - tissue dose-health effect continuum?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Given knowledge of exposure, the shape of the dose response curve is the key to predicting health risk, which in turn determines allowable levels of exposure and the associated economic costs of compliance.

  4. Enhancement of phototropic response to a range of light doses in Triticum aestivum coleoptiles in clinostat-simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heathcote, D. G.; Bircher, B. W.; Brown, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The phototropic dose-response relationship has been determined for Triticum aestivum cv. Broom coleoptiles growing on a purpose-built clinostat apparatus providing gravity compensation by rotation about a horizontal axis at 2 rev min-1. These data are compared with data sets obtained with the clinostat axis vertical and stationary, as a 1 g control, and rotating vertically to examine clinostat effects other than gravity compensation. Triticum at 1 g follows the well-established pattern of other cereal coleoptiles with a first positive curvature at low doses, followed by an indifferent response region, and a second positive response at progressively increasing doses. However, these response regions lie at higher dose levels than reported for Avena. There is no significant difference between the responses observed with the clinostat axis vertical in the rotating and stationary modes, but gravity compensation by horizontal rotation increases the magnitude of first and second positive curvatures some threefold at 100 min after stimulation. The indifferent response is replaced by a significant curvature towards the light source, but remains apparent as a reduced curvature response at these dose levels.

  5. Relationship between dose of injected /sup 239/Pu and bone sarcoma mortality in young adult beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, A.V.; Prentice, R.L.; Marek, P.

    1982-04-01

    The effect of /sup 239/Pu on bone sarcoma mortality in young adult beagles is examined using data from a follow-up study conducted at the Radiobiology Laboratory at the University of Utah. A (proportional-hazards) model, which specifies that bone sarcoma mortality depends on both dose of injected plutonium and time since injection as the product of a dose factor and a time factor, is used both for describing the data and for performing inference about the relationship between dose of plutonium and bone sarcoma mortality. Relative bone sarcoma mortality rates are found to be approximately linear as a function of dose. There is evidence that relative bone sarcoma mortality decreases with time since injection.

  6. The relationship between organ dose and patient size in tube current modulated adult thoracic CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatonabadi, Maryam; Zhang, Di; Yang, Jeffrey; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris C.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2012-03-01

    Recently published AAPM Task Group 204 developed conversion coefficients that use scanner reported CTDIvol to estimate dose to the center of patient undergoing fixed tube current body exam. However, most performed CT exams use TCM to reduce dose to patients. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between organ dose and a variety of patient size metrics in adult chest CT scans that use tube current modulation (TCM). Monte Carlo simulations were performed for 32 voxelized models with contoured lungs and glandular breasts tissue, consisting of females and males. These simulations made use of patient's actual TCM data to estimate organ dose. Using image data, different size metrics were calculated, these measurements were all performed on one slice, at the level of patient's nipple. Estimated doses were normalized by scanner-reported CTDIvol and plotted versus different metrics. CTDIvol values were plotted versus different metrics to look at scanner's output versus size. The metrics performed similarly in terms of correlating with organ dose. Looking at each gender separately, for male models normalized lung dose showed a better linear correlation (r2=0.91) with effective diameter, while female models showed higher correlation (r2=0.59) with the anterior-posterior measurement. There was essentially no correlation observed between size and CTDIvol-normalized breast dose. However, a linear relationship was observed between absolute breast dose and size. Dose to lungs and breasts were consistently higher in females with similar size as males which could be due to shape and composition differences between genders in the thoracic region.

  7. Radiation dose response simulation for biomechanical-based deformable image registration of head and neck cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Mayah, Adil; Moseley, Joanne; Hunter, Shannon; Brock, Kristy

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical-based deformable image registration is conducted on the head and neck region. Patient specific 3D finite element models consisting of parotid glands (PG), submandibular glands (SG), tumor, vertebrae (VB), mandible, and external body are used to register pre-treatment MRI to post-treatment MR images to model the dose response using image data of five patients. The images are registered using combinations of vertebrae and mandible alignments, and surface projection of the external body as boundary conditions. In addition, the dose response is simulated by applying a new loading technique in the form of a dose-induced shrinkage using the dose-volume relationship. The dose-induced load is applied as dose-induced shrinkage of the tumor and four salivary glands. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) is calculated for the four salivary glands, and tumor to calculate the volume overlap of the structures after deformable registration. A substantial improvement in the registration is found by including the dose-induced shrinkage. The greatest registration improvement is found in the four glands where the average DSC increases from 0.53, 0.55, 0.32, and 0.37 to 0.68, 0.68, 0.51, and 0.49 in the left PG, right PG, left SG, and right SG, respectively by using bony alignment of vertebrae and mandible (M), body (B) surface projection and dose (D) (VB+M+B+D). PMID:26485227

  8. Radiation dose response simulation for biomechanical-based deformable image registration of head and neck cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mayah, Adil; Moseley, Joanne; Hunter, Shannon; Brock, Kristy

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical-based deformable image registration is conducted on the head and neck region. Patient specific 3D finite element models consisting of parotid glands (PG), submandibular glands (SG), tumor, vertebrae (VB), mandible, and external body are used to register pre-treatment MRI to post-treatment MR images to model the dose response using image data of five patients. The images are registered using combinations of vertebrae and mandible alignments, and surface projection of the external body as boundary conditions. In addition, the dose response is simulated by applying a new loading technique in the form of a dose-induced shrinkage using the dose-volume relationship. The dose-induced load is applied as dose-induced shrinkage of the tumor and four salivary glands. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) is calculated for the four salivary glands, and tumor to calculate the volume overlap of the structures after deformable registration. A substantial improvement in the registration is found by including the dose-induced shrinkage. The greatest registration improvement is found in the four glands where the average DSC increases from 0.53, 0.55, 0.32, and 0.37 to 0.68, 0.68, 0.51, and 0.49 in the left PG, right PG, left SG, and right SG, respectively by using bony alignment of vertebrae and mandible (M), body (B) surface projection and dose (D) (VB+M+B+D).

  9. Severity of killer whale behavioral responses to ship noise: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rob; Erbe, Christine; Ashe, Erin; Beerman, Amber; Smith, Jodi

    2014-02-15

    Critical habitats of at-risk populations of northeast Pacific "resident" killer whales can be heavily trafficked by large ships, with transits occurring on average once every hour in busy shipping lanes. We modeled behavioral responses of killer whales to ship transits during 35 "natural experiments" as a dose-response function of estimated received noise levels in both broadband and audiogram-weighted terms. Interpreting effects is contingent on a subjective and seemingly arbitrary decision about severity threshold indicating a response. Subtle responses were observed around broadband received levels of 130 dB re 1 μPa (rms); more severe responses are hypothesized to occur at received levels beyond 150 dB re 1 μPa, where our study lacked data. Avoidance responses are expected to carry minor energetic costs in terms of increased energy expenditure, but future research must assess the potential for reduced prey acquisition, and potential population consequences, under these noise levels. PMID:24373666

  10. Severity of killer whale behavioral responses to ship noise: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rob; Erbe, Christine; Ashe, Erin; Beerman, Amber; Smith, Jodi

    2014-02-15

    Critical habitats of at-risk populations of northeast Pacific "resident" killer whales can be heavily trafficked by large ships, with transits occurring on average once every hour in busy shipping lanes. We modeled behavioral responses of killer whales to ship transits during 35 "natural experiments" as a dose-response function of estimated received noise levels in both broadband and audiogram-weighted terms. Interpreting effects is contingent on a subjective and seemingly arbitrary decision about severity threshold indicating a response. Subtle responses were observed around broadband received levels of 130 dB re 1 μPa (rms); more severe responses are hypothesized to occur at received levels beyond 150 dB re 1 μPa, where our study lacked data. Avoidance responses are expected to carry minor energetic costs in terms of increased energy expenditure, but future research must assess the potential for reduced prey acquisition, and potential population consequences, under these noise levels.

  11. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity.

  13. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose- response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B.; Joseph, J.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation- induced disruption of dopaminergic function disrupts a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, spatial learning and memory (Morris water maze), and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current presentation will review the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are in fact common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity. Supported by N.A.S.A. Grant NAG9-1190.

  14. Different behavioral effect dose-response profiles in mice exposed to two-carbon chlorinated hydrocarbons: influence of structural and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Umezu, Toyoshi; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to clarify whether dose-response profiles of acute behavioral effects of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE), trichloroethylene (TRIC), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) differ. A test battery involving 6 behavioral endpoints was applied to evaluate the effects of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC in male ICR strain mice under the same experimental conditions. The behavioral effect dose-response profiles of these compounds differed. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the dose-response profiles and structural and physical properties of the compounds. Dose-response profile differences correlated significantly with differences in specific structural and physical properties. These results suggest that differences in specific structural and physical properties of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC are responsible for differences in behavioral effects that lead to a variety of dose-response profiles.

  15. Exposure-response relationships and drug interactions of sirolimus.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, James J

    2004-10-15

    Sirolimus (rapamycin, RAPAMUNE, RAPA) is an immunosuppressive agent used for the prophylaxis of renal allograft rejection and exhibits an immunosuppressive mechanism that is distinct from that for cyclosporine and tacrolimus. The purpose of this manuscript is to discuss the exposure-response relationships and drug interactions of sirolimus. The various factors affecting sirolimus whole blood exposure included first-pass extraction, formulation, food, demographics, liver disease, assay method, and interacting drugs. Clinically significant effects caused by food, pediatric age, hepatic impairment, and interacting drugs require recommendations for the safe and efficacious use of sirolimus in renal allograft patients. An exposure-response model based on multivariate logistic regression was developed using the interstudy data from 1832 renal allograft patients. The analysis revealed an increased probability of acute rejection for sirolimus troughs <5 ng/mL, cyclosporine troughs <150 ng/mL, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches > or =4, and females. The outcomes suggested that individualization of sirolimus doses immediately after transplantation, based on HLA mismatch and sex, would likely decrease the probability of acute rejections in renal allograft recipients who receive concomitant sirolimus, cyclosporine (full-dose), and corticosteroid therapy. Sirolimus is a substrate for both Cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and undergoes extensive first-pass extraction. Drugs that are known to inhibit or induce these proteins may potentially affect sirolimus whole blood exposure. In healthy volunteers, cyclosporine, diltiazem, erythromycin, ketoconazole, and verapamil significantly increased sirolimus whole blood exposure, and rifampin significantly decreased sirolimus exposure. However, sirolimus whole blood exposure was not affected by acyclovir, atorvastatin, digoxin, ethinyl estradiol/norgestrel, glyburide, nifedipine, or tacrolimus. Among the 15

  16. The relationship between infecting dose and severity of disease in reported outbreaks of Salmonella infections.

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, J. R.; Bradley, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between size of the infecting dose and severity of the resulting disease has been investigated for salmonella infections by reanalysis of data within epidemics for 32 outbreaks, and comparing data between outbreaks for 68 typhoid epidemics and 49 food-poisoning outbreaks due to salmonellas. Attack rate, incubation period, amount of infected food consumed and type of vehicle are used as proxy measures of infecting dose, while case fatality rates for typhoid and case hospitalization rates for food poisoning salmonellas were used to assess severity. Limitations of the data are discussed. Both unweighted and logit analysis models are used. There is no evidence for a dose-severity relationship for Salmonella typhi, but evidence of a correlation between dose and severity is available from within-epidemic or between-epidemic analysis, or both, for Salmonella typhimurium, S. enteritidis, S. infantis, S. newport, and S. thompson. The presence of such a relationship affects the way in which control interventions should be assessed. PMID:1468522

  17. Dose-response analysis of cadmium in man: body burden vs kidney dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, K.J.; Yuen, K.; Yasumura, S.; Cohn, S.H.

    1984-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to develop dose-response relationships of cadmium in human beings. In vivo measurements of kidney, liver, urine, and blood cadmium, and urinary levels of ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin and total protein were obtained in 82 industrially exposed workers and 30 control subjects. The values of 200 ..mu..g/g creatinine for urinary ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin and 250 mg/g creatinine for urinary total protein were used to define the upper limit for normal kidney function. Forty-one of the cadmium workers (18 active, 23 retired) were classified as having abnormal kidney function; all control subjects had normal kidney function. Most workers with Cd above 70 ppm in the liver were judged to have some evidence of kidney abnormalities. The dose-response relationship for liver cadmium for the actively employed workers could be described by a linear logistic regression model: In p/(1-p) = 0.118 x liver cadmium (ppm) - 5.00 where p is the individual's probability of having kidney dysfunction. The loss of cadmium from the kidney following dysfunction prohibited a direct logistic analysis of the kidney cadmium data. However, when the linear relationship between kidney and liver cadmium for the subjects with normal kidney function was combined with the logistic equation for the liver, a predicted-response curve was obtained for the kidney. The logistic models predict a 50% probability of having kidney dysfunction at 38.4 mg for the kidney and 42.3 ppm for the liver, respectively.

  18. Defining the Optimal Selenium Dose for Prostate Cancer Risk Reduction: Insights from the U-Shaped Relationship Between Selenium Status, DNA Damage, and Apoptosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our work in dogs has revealed a U-shaped dose response between selenium status and prostatic DNA damage that remarkably parallels the relationship between dietary selenium and prostate cancer risk in men, suggesting that more selenium is not necessarily better. Herein, we extend this canine work to ...

  19. Mutations induced in Tradescantia by small doses of X-rays and neutrons - Analysis of dose-response curves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, A. H.; Underbrink, A. G.; Rossi, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    Dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs were analyzed after neutron and X-ray irradiation with doses ranging from a fraction of a rad to the region of saturation. The dose-effect relation for neutrons indicates a linear dependence from 0.01 to 8 rads; between 0.25 and 5 rads, a linear dependence is indicated for X-rays also. As a consequence the relative biological effectiveness reaches a constant value (about 50) at low doses. The observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the theory of dual radiation action and support its interpretation of the effects of radiation on higher organisms. The doubling dose of X-rays was found to be nearly 1 rad.

  20. High-Dose Atomoxetine Treatment of ADHD in Youths with Limited Response to Standard Doses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Michelson, David; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Weiss, Margaret D.; Busner, Joan; Moore, Rodney J.; Ruff, Dustin D.; Ramsey, Janet; Dickson, Ruth; Turgay, Atilla; Saylor, Keith E.; Luber, Stephen; Vaughan, Brigette; Allen, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the utility and tolerability of higher than standard atomoxetine doses to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Two randomized, double-blind trials of atomoxetine nonresponders ages 6 to 16 years were conducted comparing continued treatment with same-dose atomoxetine to treatment using greater than…

  1. SU-F-18C-12: On the Relationship of the Weighted Dose to the Surface Dose In Abdominal CT - Patient Size Dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y; Scott, A; Allahverdian, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: It is possible to measure the patient surface dose non-invasively using radiolucent dosimeters. However, the patient size specific weighted dose remains unknown. We attempted to study the weighted dose to surface dose relationship as the patient size varies in abdominal CT. Methods: Seven abdomen phantoms (CIRS TE series) simulating patients from an infant to a large adult were used. Size specific doses were measured with a 100 mm CT chamber under axial scans using a Siemens Sensation 64 (mCT) and a GE 750 HD. The scanner settings were 120 kVp, 200 mAs with fully opened collimations. Additional kVps (80, 100, 140) were added depending on the phantom sizes. The ratios (r) of the weighted CT dose (Dw) to the surface dose (Ds) were related to the phantom size (L) defined as the diameter resulting the equivalent cross-sectional area. Results: The Dw versus Ds ratio (r) was fitted to a linear relationship: r = 1.083 − 0.007L (R square = 0.995), and r = 1.064 − 0.007L (R square = 0.953), for Siemens Sensation 64 and GE 750 HD, respectively. The relationship appears to be independent of the scanner specifics. Conclusion: The surface dose to the weighted dose ratio decreases linearly as the patient size increases. The result is independent of the scanner specifics. The result can be used to obtain in vivo CT dosimetry in abdominal CT.

  2. Laboratory measurement error in external dose estimates and its effects on dose-response analyses of Hanford worker mortality data

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.; Fix, J.J.

    1996-08-01

    This report addresses laboratory measurement error in estimates of external doses obtained from personnel dosimeters, and investigates the effects of these errors on linear dose-response analyses of data from epidemiologic studies of nuclear workers. These errors have the distinguishing feature that they are independent across time and across workers. Although the calculations made for this report were based on Hanford data, the overall conclusions are likely to be relevant for other epidemiologic studies of workers exposed to external radiation.

  3. Dose-response testing of peptides by hippocampal brain slice recording.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M I; Palovcik, R A

    1989-01-01

    The brain slice chamber described offers a method of studying, with intracellular electrodes, the relationship of response to dose of peptides. By raising the level of the slices 1 mm above the level of flowing perfusion medium, we can test substances in known concentrations, free from artifacts, during long duration, stable intracellular recordings. Manipulation of Ca2+/Mg2+ ratios in the medium can help to define synaptic and second messenger mediation of the responses. The addition of substances to the perfusion medium in this system could be combined with iontophoresis and/or micropressure techniques. Pathways in the slices may also be stimulated electrically and analyzed for the involvement of various synaptic transmitters. The results with the method so far show distinct differences among the peptides studied. Thus, there are several advantages to this method in establishing the physiological role of peptides in the brain.

  4. Dose response studies of bevantolol in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Okawa, K K

    1986-03-01

    This multicenter study, conducted to determine the antihypertensive efficacy of bevantolol at different fixed doses compared with placebo was carried out at four separate institutions using a common protocol. One hundred thirty-nine patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension were enrolled. At doses of 200 to 400 mg/day bevantolol was clearly effective in lowering diastolic blood pressure and in maintaining this effect over the eight weeks of this double-blind study. Twice a day dosing is indicated since efficacy was evident 12 hours post-dosing. Bevantolol was well tolerated.

  5. Hierarchical dose response of E. coli O157:H7 from human outbreaks incorporating heterogeneity in exposure.

    PubMed

    Teunis, P F M; Ogden, I D; Strachan, N J C

    2008-06-01

    The infectivity of pathogenic microorganisms is a key factor in the transmission of an infectious disease in a susceptible population. Microbial infectivity is generally estimated from dose-response studies in human volunteers. This can only be done with mildly pathogenic organisms. Here a hierarchical Beta-Poisson dose-response model is developed utilizing data from human outbreaks. On the lowest level each outbreak is modelled separately and these are then combined at a second level to produce a group dose-response relation. The distribution of foodborne pathogens often shows strong heterogeneity and this is incorporated by introducing an additional parameter to the dose-response model, accounting for the degree of overdispersion relative to Poisson distribution. It was found that heterogeneity considerably influences the shape of the dose-response relationship and increases uncertainty in predicted risk. This uncertainty is greater than previously reported surrogate and outbreak models using a single level of analysis. Monte Carlo parameter samples (alpha, beta of the Beta-Poisson model) can be readily incorporated in risk assessment models built using tools such as S-plus and @ Risk.

  6. Population variability in biological adaptive responses to DNA damage and the shapes of carcinogen dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Conolly, Rory B. . E-mail: Conolly.Rory@epa.gov; Gaylor, David W.; Lutz, Werner K.

    2005-09-01

    Carcinogen dose-response curves for both ionizing radiation and chemicals are typically assumed to be linear at environmentally relevant doses. This assumption is used to ensure protection of the public health in the absence of relevant dose-response data. A theoretical justification for the assumption has been provided by the argument that low dose linearity is expected when an exogenous agent adds to an ongoing endogenous process. Here, we use computational modeling to evaluate (1) how two biological adaptive processes, induction of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, may affect the shapes of dose-response curves for DNA-damaging carcinogens and (2) how the resulting dose-response behaviors may vary within a population. Each model incorporating an adaptive process was capable of generating not only monotonic dose-responses but also nonmonotonic (J-shaped) and threshold responses. Monte Carlo analysis suggested that all these dose-response behaviors could coexist within a population, as the spectrum of qualitative differences arose from quantitative changes in parameter values. While this analysis is largely theoretical, it suggests that (a) accurate prediction of the qualitative form of the dose-response requires a quantitative understanding of the mechanism (b) significant uncertainty is associated with human health risk prediction in the absence of such quantitative understanding and (c) a stronger experimental and regulatory focus on biological mechanisms and interindividual variability would allow flexibility in regulatory treatment of environmental carcinogens without compromising human health.

  7. Estradiol valerate and alcohol intake: dose-response assessments

    PubMed Central

    Quirarte, Gina L; Reid, Larry D; de la Teja, I Sofía Ledesma; Reid, Meta L; Sánchez, Marco A; Díaz-Trujillo, Arnulfo; Aguilar-Vazquez, Azucena; Prado-Alcalá, Roberto A

    2007-01-01

    Background An injection of estradiol valerate (EV) provides estradiol for a prolonged period. Recent research indicates that a single 2.0 mg injection of EV modifies a female rat's appetite for alcoholic beverages. This research extends the initial research by assessing 8 doses of EV (from .001 to 2.0 mg/female rat), as well assessing the effects of 2.0 mg EV in females with ovariectomies. Results With the administration of EV, there was a dose-related loss of bodyweight reaching the maximum loss, when it occurred, at about 4 days after injections. Subsequently, rats returned to gaining weight regularly. Of the doses tested, only the 2.0 mg dose produced a consistent increase in intake of ethanol during the time previous research indicated that the rats would show enhanced intakes. There was, however, a dose-related trend for smaller doses to enhance intakes. Rats with ovariectomies showed a similar pattern of effects, to intact rats, with the 2 mg dose. After extensive histories of intake of alcohol, both placebo and EV-treated females had estradiol levels below the average measured in females without a history of alcohol-intake. Conclusion The data support the conclusion that pharmacological doses of estradiol can produce enduring changes that are manifest as an enhanced appetite for alcoholic beverages. The effect can occur among females without ovaries. PMID:17335585

  8. Origin of the linearity no threshold (LNT) dose-response concept.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2013-09-01

    This paper identifies the origin of the linearity at low-dose concept [i.e., linear no threshold (LNT)] for ionizing radiation-induced mutation. After the discovery of X-ray-induced mutations, Olson and Lewis (Nature 121(3052):673-674, 1928) proposed that cosmic/terrestrial radiation-induced mutations provide the principal mechanism for the induction of heritable traits, providing the driving force for evolution. For this concept to be general, a LNT dose relationship was assumed, with genetic damage proportional to the energy absorbed. Subsequent studies suggested a linear dose response for ionizing radiation-induced mutations (Hanson and Heys in Am Nat 63(686):201-213, 1929; Oliver in Science 71:44-46, 1930), supporting the evolutionary hypothesis. Based on an evaluation of spontaneous and ionizing radiation-induced mutation with Drosophila, Muller argued that background radiation had a negligible impact on spontaneous mutation, discrediting the ionizing radiation-based evolutionary hypothesis. Nonetheless, an expanded set of mutation dose-response observations provided a basis for collaboration between theoretical physicists (Max Delbruck and Gunter Zimmer) and the radiation geneticist Nicolai Timoféeff-Ressovsky. They developed interrelated physical science-based genetics perspectives including a biophysical model of the gene, a radiation-induced gene mutation target theory and the single-hit hypothesis of radiation-induced mutation, which, when integrated, provided the theoretical mechanism and mathematical basis for the LNT model. The LNT concept became accepted by radiation geneticists and recommended by national/international advisory committees for risk assessment of ionizing radiation-induced mutational damage/cancer from the mid-1950s to the present. The LNT concept was later generalized to chemical carcinogen risk assessment and used by public health and regulatory agencies worldwide. PMID:23887208

  9. Risk Factors and Dose-Effect Relationship for Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis in Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ik Jae; Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Chang Geol; Kim, Yong Bae; Yoo, Sei Whan; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Gwi Eon; Choi, Eun Chang; Cha, In Ho

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze risk factors and the dose-effect relationship for osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the mandible after radiotherapy of oral and oropharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: One-hundred ninety-eight patients with oral (45%) and oropharyngeal cancer (55%) who had received external radiotherapy between 1990 and 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had a dental evaluation before radiotherapy. The median radiation dose was 60 Gy (range, 16-75 Gy), and the median biologically effective dose for late effects (BED{sub late}) in bone was 114 Gy{sub 2} (range, 30-167 Gy{sub 2}). Results: The frequency of ORN was 13 patients (6.6%). Among patients with mandibular surgery, eight had ORN at the surgical site. Among patients without mandibular surgery, five patients had ORN on the molar area of the mandible. The median time to ORN was 22 months (range, 1-69 months). Univariate analysis revealed that mandibular surgery and Co-60 were significant risk factors for ORN (p = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively). In multivariate analysis, mandibular surgery was the most important factor (p = 0.001). High radiation doses over BED 102.6 Gy{sub 2} (conventional dose of 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction) were also a significant factor for ORN (p = 0.008) and showed a positive dose-effect relationship in logistic regression (p = 0.04) for patients who had undergone mandibular surgery. Conclusions: Mandibular surgery was the most significant risk factor for ORN of mandible in oral and oropharyngeal cancers patients. A BED of 102.6 Gy{sub 2} or higher to the mandible also significantly increases the risk of ORN.

  10. Relationship between clozapine dose, serum concentration, and clinical outcome in children and adolescents in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Wohkittel, Christopher; Gerlach, Manfred; Taurines, Regina; Wewetzer, Christoph; Unterecker, Stefan; Burger, Rainer; Schreck, Diana; Mehler-Wex, Claudia; Romanos, Marcel; Egberts, Karin

    2016-08-01

    Information on dose- and concentration-related clinical effects of clozapine treatment in children and adolescents is scarce. This study aimed to examine the relationship between dose, serum concentration, and clinical outcome as well as the influencing factors thereof in paediatric patients treated with clozapine. Data from a routine Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) service between 2004 and 2014 were studied in 68 patients, aged 11-18 years. Severity of illness, therapeutic effectiveness and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were assessed by standardized means. A relationship between the daily dose (mean 319 mg, 4.9 mg/kg) and serum concentration (mean 387 ng/ml) of clozapine was found with the variation in dose explaining 30 % of the variability in clozapine serum concentrations. Also gender contributed to the variability, however, no influence of age or concomitant medications was detected. Furthermore, a significant association was found between clozapine serum concentration and the occurrence of ADRs. Patients without ADRs had a lower mean serum concentration than those with mild (261.4 vs 407.3 ng/ml, P = 0.018) and moderate ADRs (261.4 vs 416.3 ng/ml, P = 0.028). As clozapine was estimated to be effective in lower blood concentrations, guidance on a possibly lower therapeutic range of clozapine serum levels in paediatric patients is provided. With ADRs increasing under higher concentrations, TDM is strongly recommended in paediatric clozapine therapy for individualized dosing. Dose adjustment in females also might be reasonable according to gender-related differences in serum concentrations. However, regarding the limitations of this study results should be validated in larger studies with more standardized designs. PMID:27221285

  11. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay: dose-response calibration curve, background frequency in the population and dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Rastkhah, E; Zakeri, F; Ghoranneviss, M; Rajabpour, M R; Farshidpour, M R; Mianji, F; Bayat, M

    2016-03-01

    An in vitro study of the dose responses of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was conducted with the aim of creating calibrated dose-response curves for biodosimetry measuring up to 4 Gy (0.25-4 Gy) of gamma radiation. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay was employed to obtain the frequencies of micronuclei (MN) per binucleated cell in blood samples from 16 healthy donors (eight males and eight females) in two age ranges of 20-34 and 35-50 years. The data were used to construct the calibration curves for men and women in two age groups, separately. An increase in micronuclei yield with the dose in a linear-quadratic way was observed in all groups. To verify the applicability of the constructed calibration curve, MN yields were measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes of two real overexposed subjects and three irradiated samples with unknown dose, and the results were compared with dose values obtained from measuring dicentric chromosomes. The comparison of the results obtained by the two techniques indicated a good agreement between dose estimates. The average baseline frequency of MN for the 130 healthy non-exposed donors (77 men and 55 women, 20-60 years old divided into four age groups) ranged from 6 to 21 micronuclei per 1000 binucleated cells. Baseline MN frequencies were higher for women and for the older age group. The results presented in this study point out that the CBMN assay is a reliable, easier and valuable alternative method for biological dosimetry.

  12. A New Method for Synthesizing Radiation Dose-Response Data From Multiple Trials Applied to Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Diez, Patricia; Vogelius, Ivan S.; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: A new method is presented for synthesizing dose-response data for biochemical control of prostate cancer according to study design (randomized vs. nonrandomized) and risk group (low vs. intermediate-high). Methods and Materials: Nine published prostate cancer dose escalation studies including 6,539 patients were identified in the MEDLINE and CINAHL databases and reviewed to assess the relationship between dose and biochemical control. A novel method of analysis is presented in which the normalized dose-response gradient, {gamma}{sub 50}, is estimated for each study and subsequently synthesized across studies. Our method does not assume that biochemical control rates are directly comparable between studies. Results: Nonrandomized studies produced a statistically significantly higher {gamma}{sub 50} than randomized studies for intermediate- to high-risk patients ({gamma}{sub 50} = 1.63 vs. {gamma}{sub 50} = 0.93, p = 0.03) and a borderline significantly higher ({gamma}{sub 50} = 1.78 vs. {gamma}{sub 50} = 0.56, p = 0.08) for low-risk patients. No statistically significant difference in {gamma}{sub 50} was found between low- and intermediate- to high-risk patients (p = 0.31). From the pooled data of low and intermediate- to high-risk patients in randomized trials, we obtain the overall best estimate of {gamma}{sub 50} = 0.84 with 95% confidence interval 0.54-1.15. Conclusions: Nonrandomized studies overestimate the steepness of the dose-response curve as compared with randomized trials. This is probably the result of stage migration, improved treatment techniques, and a shorter follow-up in higher dose patients that were typically entered more recently. This overestimation leads to inflated expectations regarding the benefit from dose-escalation and could lead to underpowered clinical trials. There is no evidence of a steeper dose response for intermediate- to high-risk compared with low-risk patients.

  13. Environmental exposure to crocidolite and mesothelioma: exposure-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J; de Klerk, N H; Musk, A W; Hobbs, M S

    1998-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate exposure-response relationships for mesothelioma and environmental exposure to crocidolite. All 4,659 former residents of Wittenoom, Western Australia (WA) who lived there between 1943 and 1993 for at least 1 mo and were not directly employed in the crocidolite industry, were followed-up through the WA death, cancer and mesothelioma registries, electoral rolls, and telephone books. In 1992, all subjects who should be traced were sent a questionnaire. Exposure levels were estimated from results of periodic environmental surveys and duration of residence. Incidence rates were standardized to the World Population and Cox Regression was used to estimate the effects of exposure on incidence. To the end of 1993, 27 cases of mesothelioma were diagnosed. Mesothelioma cases stayed longer at Wittenoom, had a higher average intensity of exposure, and a higher cumulative exposure to crocidolite than control subjects. The standardized incidence of mesothelioma was 260 per million person-years, and was similar for males and females. The rate increased significantly with time from first exposure, duration of exposure and cumulative exposure. At these levels of crocidolite exposure, there is a significantly increased risk of mesothelioma, which is dose-dependent.

  14. 3'-deoxy-3'-[{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine PET Quantification of Bone Marrow Response to Radiation Dose

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, Sarah M.; Menda, Yusuf; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Gross, Brandie; Buatti, John; Bayouth, John E.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the relationship of bone marrow response to radiation dose, using 3'-deoxy-3'-[{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine ([{sup 18}F]FLT)-labeled uptake quantified in positron-emission tomography (PET) scans. Methods and Materials: Pre- and post-Week 1 treatment [{sup 18}F]FLT PET images were registered to the CT images used to create the radiation treatment plan. Changes in [{sup 18}F]FLT uptake values were measured using profile data of standardized uptake values (SUVs) and doses along the vertebral bodies located at a field border where a range of radiation doses were present for 10 patients. Data from the profile measurements were grouped into 1 Gy dose bins from 1 to 9 Gy to compare SUV changes for all patients. Additionally, the maximum pretreatment, the post-Week 1 treatment, and the dose values located within the C6-T7 vertebrae that straddled the field edge were measured for all patients. Results: Both the profile and the individual vertebral data showed a strong correlation between SUV change and radiation dose. Relative differences in SUVs between bins >1 Gy and <7 Gy were statistically significant (p < 0.01, two-sample t test). The reduction in SUV was approximately linear until it reached a reduction threshold of 75%-80% in SUV for doses greater than 6 Gy/week for both the dose-binned data and the vertebral maximum SUVs. Conclusions: The change in SUV observed in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiation shows the potential for using [{sup 18}F]FLT PET images for identifying active bone marrow and monitoring changes due to radiation dose. Additionally, the change in [{sup 18}F]FLT uptake observed in bone marrow for different weekly doses suggests potential dose thresholds for reducing bone marrow toxicity.

  15. Dose-Response for Multiple Biomarkers of Exposure and Genotoxic Effect Following Repeated Treatment of Rats with the Alkylating Agents, MMS and MNU.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhiying; LeBaron, Matthew J; Schisler, Melissa R; Zhang, Fagen; Bartels, Michael J; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Pottenger, Lynn H

    2016-05-01

    The nature of the dose-response relationship for various in vivo endpoints of exposure and effect were investigated using the alkylating agents, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and methylnitrosourea (MNU). Six male F344 rats/group were dosed orally with 0, 0.5, 1, 5, 25 or 50mg/kg bw/day (mkd) of MMS, or 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 5, 10, 25 or 50 mkd of MNU, for 4 consecutive days and sacrificed 24h after the last dose. The dose-responses for multiple biomarkers of exposure and genotoxic effect were investigated. In MMS-treated rats, the hemoglobin adduct level, a systemic exposure biomarker, increased linearly with dose (r (2) = 0.9990, P < 0.05), indicating the systemic availability of MMS; however, the N7MeG DNA adduct, a target exposure biomarker, exhibited a non-linear dose-response in blood and liver tissues. Blood reticulocyte micronuclei (MN), a genotoxic effect biomarker, exhibited a clear no-observed-genotoxic-effect-level (NOGEL) of 5 mkd as a point of departure (PoD) for MMS. Two separate dose-response models, the Lutz and Lutz model and the stepwise approach using PROC REG both supported a bilinear/threshold dose-response for MN induction. Liver gene expression, a mechanistic endpoint, also exhibited a bilinear dose-response. Similarly, in MNU-treated rats, hepatic DNA adducts, gene expression changes and MN all exhibited clear PoDs, with a NOGEL of 1 mkd for MN induction, although dose-response modeling of the MNU-induced MN data showed a better statistical fit for a linear dose-response. In summary, these results provide in vivo data that support the existence of clear non-linear dose-responses for a number of biologically significant events along the pathway for genotoxicity induced by DNA-reactive agents.

  16. New allometric scaling relationships and applications for dose and toxicity extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qiming; Yu, Jimmy; Connell, Des

    2014-01-01

    Allometric scaling between metabolic rate, size, body temperature, and other biological traits has found broad applications in ecology, physiology, and particularly in toxicology and pharmacology. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) was observed to scale with body size and temperature. However, the mass scaling exponent was increasingly debated whether it should be 2/3, 3/4, or neither, and scaling with body temperature also attracted recent attention. Based on thermodynamic principles, this work reports 2 new scaling relationships between BMR, size, temperature, and biological time. Good correlations were found with the new scaling relationships, and no universal scaling exponent can be obtained. The new scaling relationships were successfully validated with external toxicological and pharmacological studies. Results also demonstrated that individual extrapolation models can be built to obtain scaling exponent specific to the interested group, which can be practically applied for dose and toxicity extrapolations.

  17. Does a dose-response relation exist between spinal pain and temporomandibular disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Wiesinger, Birgitta; Malker, Hans; Englund, Erling; Wänman, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to test whether a reciprocal dose-response relation exists between frequency/severity of spinal pain and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Methods A total of 616 subjects with varying severity of spinal pain or no spinal pain completed a questionnaire focusing on symptoms in the jaw, head and spinal region. A subset of the population (n = 266) were sampled regardless of presence or absence of spinal pain. We used two different designs, one with frequency/severity of spinal pain, and the other, with frequency/severity of TMD symptoms as independent variable. All 616 participants were allocated to four groups, one control group without spinal pain and three spinal pain groups. The subjects in the subset were allocated to one control group without TMD symptoms and three TMD groups. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for presence of frequent TMD symptoms in the separate spinal pain groups as well as for frequent spinal pain in the separate TMD groups. Results The analysis showed increasing ORs for TMD with increasing frequency/severity of spinal pain. We also found increasing ORs for spinal pain with increasing frequency/severity of TMD symptoms. Conclusion This study shows a reciprocal dose-response-like relationship between spinal pain and TMD. The results indicate that these two conditions may share common risk factors or that they may influence each other. Studies on the temporal sequence between spinal pain and TMD are warranted. PMID:19254384

  18. Biphasic and triphasic dose responses in zebrafish embryos to low-dose 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness.

    PubMed

    Kong, Eva Yi; Cheng, Shuk Han; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-07-01

    The in vivo low-dose responses of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness were examined through the number of apoptotic events revealed at 24 h post fertilization by vital dye acridine orange staining. Our results suggested that a triphasic dose response was likely a common phenomenon in living organisms irradiated by X-rays, which comprised an ultra-low-dose inhibition, low-dose stimulation and high-dose inhibition. Our results also suggested that the hormetic zone (or the stimulation zone) was shifted towards lower doses with application of filters. The non-detection of a triphasic dose response in previous experiments could likely be attributed to the use of hard X-rays, which shifted the hormetic zone into an unmonitored ultra-low-dose region. In such cases where the subhormetic zone was missed, a biphasic dose response would be reported instead.

  19. Biphasic and triphasic dose responses in zebrafish embryos to low-dose 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Eva Yi; Cheng, Shuk Han; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo low-dose responses of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness were examined through the number of apoptotic events revealed at 24 h post fertilization by vital dye acridine orange staining. Our results suggested that a triphasic dose response was likely a common phenomenon in living organisms irradiated by X-rays, which comprised an ultra-low-dose inhibition, low-dose stimulation and high-dose inhibition. Our results also suggested that the hormetic zone (or the stimulation zone) was shifted towards lower doses with application of filters. The non-detection of a triphasic dose response in previous experiments could likely be attributed to the use of hard X-rays, which shifted the hormetic zone into an unmonitored ultra-low-dose region. In such cases where the subhormetic zone was missed, a biphasic dose response would be reported instead. PMID:26951078

  20. Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chuan-Yaun

    2009-01-27

    “Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation " was started on 09/01/03 and ended on 08/31/07. The primary objective of the project was to carry out mechanistic studies of the roles of the anti-oxidant SOD genes in mammalian cellular response to low dose ionizing radiation.

  1. NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS: DATA GAPS THAT CHALLENGE DOSE-RESPONSE ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxic effects of environmental agents: Data gaps that challenge dose-response estimation
    S Gutter*, P Mendola+, SG Selevan**, D Rice** (*UNC Chapel Hill; +US EPA, NHEERL; **US EPA, NCEA)

    Dose-response estimation is a critical feature of risk assessment. It can be...

  2. Estimation of dose-response models for discrete and continuous data in weed science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dose-response analysis is widely used in biological sciences and has application to a variety of risk assessment, bioassay, and calibration problems. In weed science, dose-response methodologies have typically relied on least squares estimation under an assumption of normality. Advances in computati...

  3. USE OF MECHANISTIC DATA TO HELP DEFINE DOSE-RESPONSE CURVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of Mechanistic Data to Help Define Dose-Response Curves

    The cancer risk assessment process described by the U.S. EPA necessitates a description of the dose-response curve for tumors in humans at low (environmental) exposures. This description can either be a default l...

  4. ENDOCRINE ACTIVE SUBSTANCES AND DOSE-RESPONSE FOR INDIVIDUALS AND POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine Active Substances and Dose-Response for Individuals and Populations
    Hugh A. Barton

    Abstract for IUPAC-SCOPE article

    Dose-response characteristics for endocrine disruption have been major focuses in efforts to understand potential impacts on human and ec...

  5. LARGE SCALE CARCINOGEN DOSE RESPONSE STUDIES WITH JAPANESE MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To investigate the responses to low carcinogen doses in animal models, large sample sizes are needed and it is an advantage if the model has a low spontaneous tumor rate. Three large scale dose response studies were conducted using Japanese medaka and the carcinogen diethylnitros...

  6. Cancer chemoprevention: Evidence of a nonlinear dose response for the protective effects of resveratrol in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hong; Scott, Edwina; Kholghi, Abeer; Andreadi, Catherine; Rufini, Alessandro; Karmokar, Ankur; Britton, Robert G; Horner-Glister, Emma; Greaves, Peter; Jawad, Dhafer; James, Mark; Howells, Lynne; Ognibene, Ted; Malfatti, Michael; Goldring, Christopher; Kitteringham, Neil; Walsh, Joanne; Viskaduraki, Maria; West, Kevin; Miller, Andrew; Hemingway, David; Steward, William P; Gescher, Andreas J; Brown, Karen

    2015-07-29

    Resveratrol is widely promoted as a potential cancer chemopreventive agent, but a lack of information on the optimal dose prohibits rationally designed trials to assess efficacy. To challenge the assumption that "more is better," we compared the pharmacokinetics and activity of a dietary dose with an intake 200 times higher. The dose-response relationship for concentrations generated and the metabolite profile of [(14)C]-resveratrol in colorectal tissue of cancer patients helped us to define clinically achievable levels. In Apc(Min) mice (a model of colorectal carcinogenesis) that received a high-fat diet, the low resveratrol dose suppressed intestinal adenoma development more potently than did the higher dose. Efficacy correlated with activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and increased expression of the senescence marker p21. Nonlinear dose responses were observed for AMPK and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in mouse adenoma cells, culminating in autophagy and senescence. In human colorectal tissues exposed to low dietary concentrations of resveratrol ex vivo, we measured enhanced AMPK phosphorylation and autophagy. The expression of the cytoprotective NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, quinone 1 (NQO1) enzyme was also increased in tissues from cancer patients participating in our [(14)C]-resveratrol trial. These findings warrant a revision of developmental strategies for diet-derived agents designed to achieve cancer chemoprevention.

  7. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander, II; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution’s standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R^2  >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented.

  8. Dose-response fallacy in human reproductive studies of toxic exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Selevan, S.G.; Lemasters, G.K.

    1987-05-01

    The manner in which exposure is defined can affect the findings of reproductive studies of toxic exposures. The individual end points potentially examined, such as fetal loss, subfertility, and congenital malformations observed at birth, are on a continuum by severity of effect: The most extreme effect of the three being infertility because no pregnancy is possible, and the least extreme, congenital malformations recognized at birth. End points observed at birth are survivors of a long and complex process. The process yielding one of these adverse end points may result from a number of factors, including level of exposure. For example, a very high exposure could result in early fetal loss, whereas a lower one might result in a congenital malformation observed at birth. If the probability of a less severe end point falls due to increasing probability of more severe end points with increasing exposure, then a nontraditional dose-response relationship may be observed in the study of one type of outcome.

  9. Dose-response fallacy in human reproductive studies of toxic exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Selevan, S.G.; Lemasters, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    The manner in which exposure is defined can affect the findings of reproductive studies of toxic exposures. The individual end points potentially examined, such as fetal loss, subfertility, and congenital malformations observed at birth, are on a continuum by severity of effect: the most extreme effects of the three being infertility because no pregnancy is possible, and the least extreme, congenital malformations recognized at birth. End points observed at birth are survivors of a long and complex process. The process yielding one of these adverse end points may result from a number of factors, including level of exposure could result in early fetal loss, whereas a lower one might result in a congenital malformation observed at birth. If the probability of a less-severe end point falls due to increasing probability of more-severe end points with increasing exposure, then a nontraditional dose-response relationship may be observed in the study of one type of outcome.

  10. Cytogenetic dose-response in vitro for biological dosimetry after exposure to high doses of gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr A; Maznyk, Nataliya A

    2013-04-01

    The dose response for dicentrics plus centric rings and total unstable chromosome-type aberrations was studied in the first mitoses of cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro to doses of ∼2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 16 and 20 Gy of acute (60)Со gamma-rays. A dose-dependent increase of aberration yield was accompanied by a tendency to the underdispersion of dicentrics and centric rings among cells distributions compared with Poisson statistics at doses ≥6 Gy. The formal fitting of the data to a linear-quadratic model resulted in an equation with the linear and quadratic coefficients ranged 0.098-0.129×cell(-1)×Gy(-1) and 0.039-0.034×cell(-1)×Gy(-2), respectively, depending on the fitting method. The actual radiation-induced aberration yield was markedly lower than expected from a calibration curve, generated earlier within a lower dose range. Interlaboratory variations in reported dicentric yields induced by medium-to-high radiation doses in vitro are discussed.

  11. Slipped femoral capital epiphyses in irradiated children: dose, volume and age relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, C.L.; Thomas, P.R.M.; McAlister, W.H.; Walker, S.; Whiteside, L.A.

    1981-10-01

    Between 1960 and 1979, 50 patients under 15 years of age received radiotherapy to the pelvis including the non-fused capital femoral epiphyseal plate. A total of 83 epiphyseal plates were at risk. Eight epiphyseal plates (9.6%) in five patients were abnormal: symptomatic capital femoral epiphyseal slippage--4, asymptomatic slippage--1, severe epiphyseal abnormalities of radiographs--3. No complication occurred below doses of 2,500 rad (25 Gy). Children under the age of 4 at time of irradiation were at a higher risk (7/15-47%) than those over 4 years of age (1/21-4.7%). Most slippages occurred at ages between 8 and 10 years. No dose response curve was obtained--higher doses above the threshold dose of 2,500 rad did not increase the incidence of slippage. A mechanism of action is postulated. This is a preventable complication; judicious use of primary or secondary blocking systems can eliminate or limit the dose to the non-fused epiphyseal plate and prevent later morbid complications.

  12. Exposure-dose-response of Tellina deltoidalis to metal contaminated estuarine sediments 2. Lead spiked sediments.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Anne M; Maher, William A

    2014-01-01

    Lead accumulation in estuarine sediments, as a result of activities such as mining and ore smelting, and through urban runoff is a continuing problem in the increasingly developed world. Marine organisms accumulate lead, which is known to be highly toxic to biological processes and to degrade organism and ecosystem health. Here the relationship between lead exposure, dose and response was investigated in the sediment dwelling, deposit feeding, marine bivalve Tellina deltoidalis. Bivalves were exposed in the laboratory to individual lead spiked sediments at < 0.01, 100 and 300 μg/g dry mass, for 28 days and accumulated total tissue lead concentrations of 4, 96 and 430 μg/g, respectively. Subcellular fractionation indicated that around 70% of the total accumulated tissue lead was detoxified, three quarters of the detoxified lead fraction was converted into metal rich granules, with the remainder in the metallothionein like protein fraction. The majority of biologically active lead was associated with the mitochondrial fraction with up to a 128 fold increase in lead burden in exposed organisms compared to controls. This indicates lead detoxification was occurring but the organism was unable to prevent lead interacting with sensitive organelles. With increased lead exposure T. deltoidalis showed a suppression in glutathione peroxidase activity, total glutathione concentration and reduced GSH:GSSG ratios, however, these differences were not significant. Lead exposed T. deltoidalis had a significantly reduced total antioxidant capacity which corresponded with increased lipid peroxidation, lysosomal destabilisation and micronuclei frequency. The exposure-dose-response relationships demonstrated for lead exposed T. deltoidalis supports its potential for the development of sublethal endpoints in lead toxicity assessment. PMID:24100051

  13. The relationship between carbohydrate and the mealtime insulin dose in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bell, Kirstine J; King, Bruce R; Shafat, Amir; Smart, Carmel E

    2015-01-01

    A primary focus of the nutritional management of type 1 diabetes has been on matching prandial insulin therapy with carbohydrate amount consumed. Different methods exist to quantify carbohydrate including counting in one gram increments, 10g portions or 15g exchanges. Clinicians have assumed that counting in one gram increments is necessary to precisely dose insulin and optimize postprandial control. Carbohydrate estimations in portions or exchanges have been thought of as inadequate because they may result in less precise matching of insulin dose to carbohydrate amount. However, studies examining the impact of errors in carbohydrate quantification on postprandial glycemia challenge this commonly held view. In addition it has been found that a single mealtime bolus of insulin can cover a range of carbohydrate intake without deterioration in postprandial control. Furthermore, limitations exist in the accuracy of the nutrition information panel on a food label. This article reviews the relationship between carbohydrate quantity and insulin dose, highlighting limitations in the evidence for a linear association. These insights have significant implications for patient education and mealtime insulin dose calculations.

  14. The relationship of immediate pigment darkening to minimal erythemal dose, skin type, and eye color.

    PubMed

    Agin, P P; Desrochers, D L; Sayre, R M

    1985-10-01

    Immediate pigment darkening (IPD) was recorded in over 1,300 volunteers participating in routine sun protection factor (SPF) testing. Medical history obtained included skin type, hair color, eye color, sunburn sensitivity, tanning ability, and current medications. The presence of IPD and the energy needed to produce it were recorded immediately following exposure to a filtered 2500 W xenon are solar simulator. Minimal erythemal dose (MED) values were recorded 16-24 hours post-exposure. The average MED was lowest for skin type I and highest for skin type IV. The IPD dose was also lowest for skin type I and highest for skin type IV. However, the average IPD dose was greater than the MED for skin type I and lower than the MED for skin type IV. For skin types II and III, the average IPD dose and MED were almost equivalent. For skin type I, 64% required equivalent or greater energy to produce IPD than their MED, and 30% showed no IPD at energy levels sufficient to produce erythema, whereas all skin type IV's had a measurable IPD response. For volunteers of skin type II and III showing no measurable IPD, the predominant eye color was blue or green (74%). Sunscreen usage altered the IPD response for all 4 skin types.

  15. Dose Effect Relationship for Late Side Effects of the Rectum and Urinary Bladder in Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Cervix Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Georg, Petra; Poetter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar; Lang, Stefan; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Sturdza, Alina E.; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Doerr, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To establish dose-response relationships for late side effects of the rectum and bladder in cervix cancer patients after magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). Methods and Materials: A cohort of 141 patients was treated with 45 to 50.4 Gy with or without cisplatin plus 4 fractions of 7 Gy IGABT. Doses for the most exposed 2, 1, and 0.1-cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cc}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 0.1cc}) volumes of the rectum and bladder were converted into the equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2), using a linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy). Late side effects were prospectively assessed (using late effects in normal tissues subjective, objective, management and analytic [LENT SOMA]) scales. Dose-response relationships were determined by logit analyses. Results: Eleven patients developed rectal side effects, and 23 patients had urinary side effects. A significant dose effect was found for all rectal dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for patients with side effect grades of 1 to 4 but was only significant for D{sub 2cc} and D{sub 1cc} for grades {>=}2. The ED10 values for D{sub 2cc} were 73 Gy for grades 1 to 4 and 78 Gy for grades 2 to 4 rectal morbidity. For bladder side effects, a significant dose effect was shown for all DVH parameters for complication grades {>=}2; the respective ED10 was 101 Gy. Conclusions: Well-defined dose-response curves could be established for D{sub 2cc} in the rectum and the urinary bladder.

  16. Responsibly managing the medical school--teaching hospital power relationship.

    PubMed

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B

    2005-07-01

    The relationship between medical schools and their teaching hospitals involves a complex and variable mixture of monopoly and monopsony power, which has not been previously been ethically analyzed. As a consequence, there is currently no ethical framework to guide leaders of both institutions in the responsible management of this complex power relationship. The authors define these two forms of power and, using economic concepts, analyze the nature of such power in the medical school-teaching hospital relationship, emphasizing the potential for exploitation. Using concepts from both business ethics and medical ethics, the authors analyze the nature of transparency and co-fiduciary responsibility in this relationship. On the basis of both rational self-interest, drawn from business ethics, and co-fiduciary responsibility, drawn from medical ethics, they argue for the centrality of transparency in the medical school-teaching hospital relationship. Understanding the ethics of monopoly and monopsony power is essential for the responsible management of the complex relationship between medical schools and their teaching hospitals and can assist the leadership of academic health centers in carrying out one of their major responsibilities: to prevent the exploitation of monopoly power and monopsony power in this relationship.

  17. Dose response of elastase-induced emphysema in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Raub, J A; Mercer, R R; Miller, F J; Graham, J A; O'Neil, J J

    1982-04-01

    Elastase-induced emphysema in hamsters was studied using pulmonary function tests in an effort to develop techniques for determining the effects of air pollutants on the progression of this disease. Single intratracheal injections of 6, 12, or 24 units of porcine pancreatic elastase produced dose-related changes in pulmonary function after 4 wk when compared with sham-injected control animals. Boyle's law end-expiratory volume and residual volume, measured by gas dilution, increased (p less than 0.05) at 12 and 24 units, respectively, whereas vital capacity, determined plethysmographically, and total lung capacity wee increased (p less than 0.05) at all 3 elastase doses. Respiratory system compliance, calculated by a nonlinear least squares regression fit of the deflation pressure-volume curve, increased (p less than 0.05) at 24 units only. The multiple-breath nitrogen washout slope (N2 slope) and the single-breath diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) decreased (p less than 0.05) at all 3 doses of elastase. Both histologic and physiologic evaluation showed dose-related pulmonary impairment. It appears, therefore, that as little as 6 units of elastase produces mild emphysema in hamsters, which is detectable by pulmonary function testing. Of these tests, the DLCO and N2 slope were the most effective in detecting the degree of impairment. PMID:6918202

  18. Dose-response patterns for vibration-induced white finger

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, M; Bovenzi, M; Nelson, C

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To investigate alternative relations between cumulative exposures to hand-transmitted vibration (taking account of vibration magnitude, lifetime exposure duration, and frequency of vibration) and the development of white finger (Raynaud's phenomenon). Methods: Three previous studies have been combined to provide a group of 1557 users of powered vibratory tools in seven occupational subgroups: stone grinders, stone carvers, quarry drillers, dockyard caulkers, dockyard boilermakers, dockyard painters, and forest workers. The estimated total operating duration in hours was thus obtained for each subject, for each tool, and for all tools combined. From the vibration magnitudes and exposure durations, seven alternative measurements of cumulative exposure were calculated for each subject, using expressions of the form: dose = ∑amiti, where ai is the acceleration magnitude on tool i, ti is the lifetime exposure duration for tool i, and m = 0, 1, 2, or 4. Results: For all seven alternative dose measures, an increase in dose was associated with a significant increase in the occurrence of vibration-induced white finger, after adjustment for age and smoking. However, dose measures with high powers of acceleration (m > 1) faired less well than measures in which the weighted or unweighted acceleration, and lifetime exposure duration, were given equal weight (m = 1). Dose determined solely by the lifetime exposure duration (without consideration of the vibration magnitude) gave better predictions than measures with m greater than unity. All measures of dose calculated from the unweighted acceleration gave better predictions than the equivalent dose measures using acceleration frequency-weighted according to current standards. Conclusions: Since the total duration of exposure does not discriminate between exposures accumulated over the day and those accumulated over years, a linear relation between vibration magnitude and exposure duration seems appropriate for predicting

  19. Curvilinearity in the dose-response curve for cancer in Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Little, M P; Muirhead, C R

    1997-12-01

    Recently released data on cancer incidence in Japanese atomic bomb survivors are analyzed using a variety of relative risk models that take account of errors in estimates of dose to assess the dose response at low doses. If a relative risk model with a threshold (the dose response is assumed linear above the threshold) is fitted to solid cancer data, a threshold of more than about 0.2 Sv is inconsistent with the data, whereas these data are consistent with there being no threshold. Among solid cancer subtypes there is strong evidence for a possible dose threshold only for nonmelanoma skin cancer. If a relative risk model with a threshold (the dose response is assumed linear above the threshold) is fitted to the leukemia data, a threshold of more than about 0.3 Sv is inconsistent with the data. In contrast to the estimates for the threshold level for solid cancer data, the best estimate for the threshold level in the leukemia data is significantly different from zero even when allowance is made for a possible quadratic term in the dose response, albeit at borderline levels of statistical significance (p = 0.04). There is little evidence for curvature in the leukemia dose response from 0.2 Sv upwards. However, possible underestimation of the errors in the estimates of the dose threshold as a result of confounding and uncertainties not taken into account in the analysis, together with the lack of biological plausibility of a threshold, makes interpretation of this finding questionable.

  20. Dose-response and risk assessment of airborne hexavalent chromium and lung cancer mortality.

    PubMed

    Crump, Casey; Crump, Kenny; Hack, Eric; Luippold, Rose; Mundt, Kenneth; Liebig, Elizabeth; Panko, Julie; Paustenbach, Dennis; Proctor, Deborah

    2003-12-01

    This study evaluates the dose-response relationship for inhalation exposure to hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and lung cancer mortality for workers of a chromate production facility, and provides estimates of the carcinogenic potency. The data were analyzed using relative risk and additive risk dose-response models implemented with both Poisson and Cox regression. Potential confounding by birth cohort and smoking prevalence were also assessed. Lifetime cumulative exposure and highest monthly exposure were the dose metrics evaluated. The estimated lifetime additional risk of lung cancer mortality associated with 45 years of occupational exposure to 1 microg/m3 Cr(VI) (occupational exposure unit risk) was 0.00205 (90%CI: 0.00134, 0.00291) for the relative risk model and 0.00216 (90%CI: 0.00143, 0.00302) for the additive risk model assuming a linear dose response for cumulative exposure with a five-year lag. Extrapolating these findings to a continuous (e.g., environmental) exposure scenario yielded an environmental unit risk of 0.00978 (90%CI: 0.00640, 0.0138) for the relative risk model [e.g., a cancer slope factor of 34 (mg/kg-day)-1] and 0.0125 (90%CI: 0.00833, 0.0175) for the additive risk model. The relative risk model is preferred because it is more consistent with the expected trend for lung cancer risk with age. Based on statistical tests for exposure-related trend, there was no statistically significant increased lung cancer risk below lifetime cumulative occupational exposures of 1.0 mg-yr/m3, and no excess risk for workers whose highest average monthly exposure did not exceed the current Permissible Exposure Limit (52 microg/m3). It is acknowledged that this study had limited power to detect increases at these low exposure levels. These cancer potency estimates are comparable to those developed by U.S. regulatory agencies and should be useful for assessing the potential cancer hazard associated with inhaled Cr(VI).

  1. Dose-dependent hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to sublethal doses of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Song, You; Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian; Heier, Lene Sørlie; Rosseland, Bjørn Olav; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2014-11-01

    Due to the production of free radicals, gamma radiation may pose a hazard to living organisms. The high-dose radiation effects have been extensively studied, whereas the ecotoxicity data on low-dose gamma radiation is still limited. The present study was therefore performed using Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to characterize effects of low-dose (15, 70 and 280 mGy) gamma radiation after short-term (48h) exposure. Global transcriptional changes were studied using a combination of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs; in this article the phrase gene expression is taken as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression can also be regulated, e.g., at protein stability and translational level) were determined and linked to their biological meanings predicted using both Gene Ontology (GO) and mammalian ortholog-based functional analyses. The plasma glucose level was also measured as a general stress biomarker at the organism level. Results from the microarray analysis revealed a dose-dependent pattern of global transcriptional responses, with 222, 495 and 909 DEGs regulated by 15, 70 and 280 mGy gamma radiation, respectively. Among these DEGs, only 34 were commonly regulated by all radiation doses, whereas the majority of differences were dose-specific. No GO functions were identified at low or medium doses, but repression of DEGs associated with GO functions such as DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed after 280mGy gamma exposure. Ortholog-based toxicity pathway analysis further showed that 15mGy radiation affected DEGs associated with cellular signaling and immune response; 70mGy radiation affected cell cycle regulation and DNA damage repair, cellular energy production; and 280mGy radiation affected pathways related to cell cycle regulation and DNA

  2. Skin sensitization in chemical risk assessment: report of a WHO/IPCS international workshop focusing on dose-response assessment.

    PubMed

    van Loveren, Henk; Cockshott, Amanda; Gebel, Tom; Gundert-Remy, Ursula; de Jong, Wim H; Matheson, Joanna; McGarry, Helen; Musset, Laurence; Selgrade, Maryjane K; Vickers, Carolyn

    2008-03-01

    An international workshop was held in 2006 to evaluate experimental techniques for hazard identification and hazard characterization of sensitizing agents in terms of their ability to produce data, including dose-response information, to inform risk assessment. Human testing to identify skin sensitizers is discouraged for ethical reasons. Animal-free alternatives, such as quantitative structure-activity relationships and in vitro testing approaches, have not been sufficiently developed for such application. Guinea pig tests do not generally include dose-response assessment and are therefore not designed for the assessment of potency, defined as the relative ability of a chemical to induce sensitization in a previously naive individual. In contrast, the mouse local lymph node assay does include dose-response assessment and is appropriate for this purpose. Epidemiological evidence can be used only under certain circumstances for the evaluation of the sensitizing potency of chemicals, as it reflects degree of exposure as well as intrinsic potency. Nevertheless, human diagnostic patch test data and quantitative elicitation data have provided very important information in reducing allergic contact dermatitis risk and sensitization in the general population. It is therefore recommended that clinical data, particularly dose-response data derived from sensitized patients, be included in risk assessment.

  3. Household physical activity and cancer risk: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yun; Li, Tingting; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Lingling; Qin, Qin; Yin, Jieyun; Wei, Sheng; Liu, Li; Nie, Shaofa

    2015-10-07

    Controversial results of the association between household physical activity and cancer risk were reported among previous epidemiological studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the relationship of household physical activity and cancer risk quantitatively, especially in dose-response manner. PubMed, Embase, Web of science and the Cochrane Library were searched for cohort or case-control studies that examined the association between household physical activity and cancer risks. Random-effect models were conducted to estimate the summary relative risks (RRs), nonlinear or linear dose-response meta-analyses were performed to estimate the trend from the correlated log RR estimates across levels of household physical activity quantitatively. Totally, 30 studies including 41 comparisons met the inclusion criteria. Total cancer risks were reduced 16% among the people with highest household physical activity compared to those with lowest household physical activity (RR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.76-0.93). The dose-response analyses indicated an inverse linear association between household physical activity and cancer risk. The relative risk was 0.98 (95% CI = 0.97-1.00) for per additional 10 MET-hours/week and it was 0.99 (95% CI = 0.98-0.99) for per 1 hour/week increase. These findings provide quantitative data supporting household physical activity is associated with decreased cancer risk in dose-response effect.

  4. External beam radiotherapy for palliation of painful bone metastases: pooled data bioeffect dose response analysis of dose fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveen, T.; Supe, Sanjay S.; Ganesh, K. M.; Samuel, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Bone metastases develop in up to 70% of newly diagnosed cancer patients and result in immobility, anxiety, and depression, severely diminishing the patients quality of life. Radiotherapy is a frequently used modality for bone metastasis and has been shown to be effective in reducing metastatic bone pain and in some instances, causing tumor shrinkage or growth inhibition. There is controversy surrounding the optimal fractionation schedule and total dose of external beam radiotherapy, despite many randomized trials and overviews addressing the issue. This study was undertaken to apply BED to clinical fractionation data of radiotherapeutic management of bone metastases in order to arrive at optimum BED values for acceptable level of response rate. A computerised literature search was conducted to identify all prospective clinical studies that addressed the issue of fractionation for the treatment of bone metastasis. The results of these studies were pooled together to form the database for the analysis. A total of 4111 number of patients received radiation dose ranging from 4 to 40.5 Gy in 1 to 15 fractions with dose per fraction ranging from 2 to 10 Gy. Single fraction treatments were delivered in 2013 patients and the dose varied from 4 to 10 Gy. Multifraction treatments were delivered in 2098 patients and the dose varied from 15 to 40.5 Gy. The biological effective dose (BED) was evaluated for each fractionation schedule using the linear quadratic model and an α/β value of 10 Gy. Response rate increased significantly beyond a BED value of 14.4 Gy (p < 0.01). Based on our analysis and indications from the literature about higher retreatment and fracture rate of single fraction treatments, minimum BED value of 14.4 Gy is recommended.

  5. Risk and responsibility: a complex and evolving relationship.

    PubMed

    Kermisch, Céline

    2012-03-01

    This paper analyses the nature of the relationship between risk and responsibility. Since neither the concept of risk nor the concept of responsibility has an unequivocal definition, it is obvious that there is no single interpretation of their relationship. After introducing the different meanings of responsibility used in this paper, we analyse four conceptions of risk. This allows us to make their link with responsibility explicit and to determine if a shift in the connection between risk and responsibility can be outlined. (1) In the engineer's paradigm, the quantitative conception of risk does not include any concept of responsibility. Their relationship is indirect, the locus of responsibility being risk management. (2) In Mary Douglas' cultural theory, risks are constructed through the responsibilities they engage. (3) Rayner and (4) Wolff go further by integrating forms of responsibility in the definition of risk itself. Analysis of these four frameworks shows that the concepts of risk and responsibility are increasingly intertwined. This tendency is reinforced by increasing public awareness and a call for the integration of a moral dimension in risk management. Therefore, we suggest that a form of virtue-responsibility should also be integrated in the concept of risk. PMID:21103951

  6. Risk and responsibility: a complex and evolving relationship.

    PubMed

    Kermisch, Céline

    2012-03-01

    This paper analyses the nature of the relationship between risk and responsibility. Since neither the concept of risk nor the concept of responsibility has an unequivocal definition, it is obvious that there is no single interpretation of their relationship. After introducing the different meanings of responsibility used in this paper, we analyse four conceptions of risk. This allows us to make their link with responsibility explicit and to determine if a shift in the connection between risk and responsibility can be outlined. (1) In the engineer's paradigm, the quantitative conception of risk does not include any concept of responsibility. Their relationship is indirect, the locus of responsibility being risk management. (2) In Mary Douglas' cultural theory, risks are constructed through the responsibilities they engage. (3) Rayner and (4) Wolff go further by integrating forms of responsibility in the definition of risk itself. Analysis of these four frameworks shows that the concepts of risk and responsibility are increasingly intertwined. This tendency is reinforced by increasing public awareness and a call for the integration of a moral dimension in risk management. Therefore, we suggest that a form of virtue-responsibility should also be integrated in the concept of risk.

  7. Responses of astrocytes in culture after low dose laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yew, D.T.; Zheng, D.R.; Au, C.; Li, W.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The effect of Helium-Neon low dose laser on astrocytes was investigated in cultures of isolated astrocytes from albino neonatal rats. The laser appeared to inhibit the growth of astrocytes as exemplified by the smaller sizes of the cells and the decreased leucine uptake in each cell after treatment. Temporary decrease in the number of mitoses was also observed, but this trend was reversed soon after. Electron microscopic studies revealed an increase in buddings from cell bodies and processes (branches) after irradiation.

  8. Estimation and uncertainty analysis of dose response in an inter-laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toman, Blaza; Rösslein, Matthias; Elliott, John T.; Petersen, Elijah J.

    2016-02-01

    An inter-laboratory experiment for the evaluation of toxic effects of NH2-polystyrene nanoparticles on living human cancer cells was performed with five participating laboratories. Previously published results from nanocytoxicity assays are often contradictory, mostly due to challenges related to producing a reliable cytotoxicity assay protocol for use with nanomaterials. Specific challenges include reproducibility preparing nanoparticle dispersions, biological variability from testing living cell lines, and the potential for nano-related interference effects. In this experiment, such challenges were addressed by developing a detailed experimental protocol and using a specially designed 96-well plate layout which incorporated a range of control measurements to assess multiple factors such as nanomaterial interference, pipetting accuracy, cell seeding density, and instrument performance. Detailed data analysis of these control measurements showed that good control of the experiments was attained by all participants in most cases. The main measurement objective of the study was the estimation of a dose response relationship between concentration of the nanoparticles and metabolic activity of the living cells, under several experimental conditions. The dose curve estimation was achieved by imbedding a three parameter logistic curve in a three level Bayesian hierarchical model, accounting for uncertainty due to all known experimental conditions as well as between laboratory variability in a top-down manner. Computation was performed using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The fit of the model was evaluated using Bayesian posterior predictive probabilities and found to be satisfactory.

  9. Is the assumption of normality or log-normality for continuous response data critical for benchmark dose estimation?

    PubMed

    Shao, Kan; Gift, Jeffrey S; Setzer, R Woodrow

    2013-11-01

    Continuous responses (e.g. body weight) are widely used in risk assessment for determining the benchmark dose (BMD) which is used to derive a U.S. EPA reference dose. One critical question that is not often addressed in dose-response assessments is whether to model the continuous data as normally or log-normally distributed. Additionally, if lognormality is assumed, and only summarized response data (i.e., mean±standard deviation) are available as is usual in the peer-reviewed literature, the BMD can only be approximated. In this study, using the "hybrid" method and relative deviation approach, we first evaluate six representative continuous dose-response datasets reporting individual animal responses to investigate the impact on BMD/BMDL estimates of (1) the distribution assumption and (2) the use of summarized versus individual animal data when a log-normal distribution is assumed. We also conduct simulation studies evaluating model fits to various known distributions to investigate whether the distribution assumption has influence on BMD/BMDL estimates. Our results indicate that BMDs estimated using the hybrid method are more sensitive to the distribution assumption than counterpart BMDs estimated using the relative deviation approach. The choice of distribution assumption has limited impact on the BMD/BMDL estimates when the within dose-group variance is small, while the lognormality assumption is a better choice for relative deviation method when data are more skewed because of its appropriateness in describing the relationship between mean and standard deviation. Additionally, the results suggest that the use of summarized data versus individual response data to characterize log-normal distributions has minimal impact on BMD estimates.

  10. Longitudinal FEV1 dose-response model for inhaled PF-00610355 and salmeterol in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jace C; Hutmacher, Matthew M; Cleton, Adriaan; Martin, Steven W; Ribbing, Jakob

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the dose-response relationship between two inhaled long-acting beta agonists (PF-00610355 and salmeterol) and the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) in order to inform dosing recommendations for future clinical trials in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This meta-analysis of four studies included 8,513 FEV1 measurements from 690 patients with moderate COPD. A longitudinal kinetic-pharmacodynamic (K-PD) model was developed and adequately described changes in FEV1 measurements over time, including circadian patterns within a day, as well as changes in FEV1 measurements elicited from administration of PF-00610355 or salmeterol. The fine-particle dose, the amount of drug present in particles small enough for lung delivery, was used as the exposure measure for PF-00610355. Greater reversibility following administration of a short-acting beta agonist during run-in was associated with increased FEV1 response to long-acting beta agonists (through an increased maximal response, E(max)). Simulations were conducted to better understand the response to PF-00610355 relative to placebo and salmeterol. The results of the simulations show that once daily fine-particle doses of 28.1 μg versus placebo have a moderate probability of providing an average improvement above 100 mL at trough. The 50 μg fine-particle dose, on the other hand, has a greater than 0.78 probability of achieving a 120 mL improvement versus placebo at trough. From an efficacy perspective and assuming a fine-particle fraction of 25 % for the Phase 3 formulation; 100 and 200 μg once daily nominal doses would be of interest to investigate in future Phase 3 trials.

  11. The development of statistical models to determine the relationship between aromatic-ring class profile and repeat-dose and developmental toxicities of high-boiling petroleum substances.

    PubMed

    Nicolich, Mark J; Simpson, Barry J; Murray, F Jay; Roth, Randy N; Gray, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    The repeat-dose and developmental toxicities of certain petroleum refinery streams are related to their polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) content (Feuston et al., 1994). Building on this foundation, and working within the context of the US EPA High Production Volume (HPV) Chemical Challenge Program, we: (1) characterized relationships between PAC content and repeat-dose and developmental toxicities of high boiling petroleum substances (HBPS), and (2) developed statistical models that can be used to predict critical effects of similar untested substances. Data from 39 dermal toxicity studies of HBPS were used to develop statistical models to predict the dose-response relationships between the weight percent concentration of each of their 1-7 aromatic ring classes and 4 repeat-dose and 3 developmental endpoints (absolute thymus weight, hemoglobin count, platelet count, liver to body weight, live fetus count, fetal weight, and percent resorptions). The correlations between the observed and model-predicted values are >0.90. The predictive ability of the models was tested via a series of evaluation or corroboration methods. As is shown in the paper, using only compositional data of untested HBPS, the models can be used to predict the effect at a given dose or the dose that causes an effect of a stipulated magnitude.

  12. Dose-effect relationships of nucleoplasmic bridges and complex nuclear anomalies in human peripheral lymphocytes exposed to 60Co γ-rays at a relatively low dose.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xue-Lei; Zhao, Hua; Cai, Tian-Jing; Lu, Xue; Chen, De-Qing; Li, Shuang; Liu, Qing-Jie

    2016-07-01

    The dose effect between nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and relatively low doses of ionising radiation remains unknown. Accordingly, this study investigated the NPB frequencies in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to low-dose (60)Co γ-rays. Complex anomalies, including fused nuclei (FUS), horse-shoe nuclei (HS) and circular nuclei (CIR), which possibly originated from multiple NPBs, were also scored. Human peripheral blood samples were collected from three healthy males and irradiated with 0-1 and 0-0.4 Gy (60)Co γ-rays. A cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay was then conducted to analyse NPB, PFHC (NPB plus three complex nuclear anomalies) and micronucleus (MN) in binucleated cells. All dose-response curves followed the linear model for both NPB frequency and PFHC cell frequency. The dose-response curves between NPB frequency and absorbed dose at 0-1 and 0-0.4 Gy were y = 0.0037x + 0.0005 (R (2) = 0.979, P < 0.05) and y = 0.0043x + 0.0004 (R (2) = 0.941, P < 0.05), respectively. The dose-response curves between PFHC cell frequency and absorbed dose at 0-1 and 0-0.4 Gy were y = 0.0044x + 0.0007 (R (2) = 0.982, P < 0.05) and y = 0.0059x + 0.0005 (R (2) = 0.969, P < 0.05), respectively. The statistical significance of differences between the irradiated groups (0-0.4 Gy) and background levels of NPB, PFHC and MN were also analysed. The lowest analysable doses of NPB, PFHC and MN were 0.12, 0.08 and 0.08 Gy, respectively. In conclusion, NPBs and PFHC positively correlated with the absorbed radiation at a relatively low dose.

  13. The Maturing of Hormesis as a Credible Dose-Response Model

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Edward J.

    2003-01-01

    Hormesis is a dose-response phenomenon that has received little recognition, credibility and acceptance as evidenced by its absence from major toxicological/risk assessment texts, governmental regulatory dose-response modeling for risk assessment, and non-visibility in major professional toxicological society national meetings. This paper traces the historical evolution of the hormetic dose-response hypothesis, why this model is not only credible but also more common than the widely accepted threshold model in direct comparative evaluation, and how the toxicological community made a critical error in rejecting hormesis, a rejection sustained over 70 years. PMID:19330138

  14. Dose Response of MARV/Angola Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques following IM or Aerosol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Sara C.; Lin, Kenny L.; Twenhafel, Nancy A.; Raymond, Jo Lynne W.; Shamblin, Joshua D.; Wollen, Suzanne E.; Wlazlowski, Carly B.; Wilkinson, Eric R.; Botto, Miriam A.; Goff, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    Marburg virus infection in humans causes a hemorrhagic disease with a high case fatality rate. Countermeasure development requires the use of well-characterized animal models that mimic human disease. To further characterize the cynomolgus macaque model of MARV/Angola, two independent dose response studies were performed using the intramuscular or aerosol routes of exposure. All animals succumbed at the lowest target dose; therefore, a dose effect could not be determined. For intramuscular-exposed animals, 100 PFU was the first target dose that was not significantly different than higher target doses in terms of time to disposition, clinical pathology, and histopathology. Although a significant difference was not observed between aerosol-exposed animals in the 10 PFU and 100 PFU target dose groups, 100 PFU was determined to be the lowest target dose that could be consistently obtained and accurately titrated in aerosol studies. PMID:26413900

  15. Low Dose Studies with Focused X-Rays in cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kathy Held; Kevin Prise; Barry Michael; Melvyn Folkard

    2002-12-14

    the relationship between high- and low-dose exposures. The targeting approach also allows us to study very clearly a newly recognized effect of radiation, the ''bystander effect'', which appears to dominate some low-dose responses and therefore may have a significant role in low-dose risk mechanisms. Our project also addresses the concept that the background of naturally occurring oxidative damage that takes place continually in cells due to byproducts of metabolism may play a role in low-dose radiation risk. This project therefore also examines how cells are damaged by treatments that modify the levels of oxidative damage, either alone or in combination with low-dose irradiation. In this project, we have used human and rodent cell lines and each set of experiments has been carried out on a single cell type. However, low-dose research has to extend into tissues because signaling between cells of different types is likely to influence the responses. Our studies have therefore also included microbeam experiments using a model tissue system that consists of an explant of a small piece of pig ureter grown in culture. The structure of this tissue is similar to that of epithelium and therefore it relates to the tissues in which carcinoma arises. Our studies have been able to measure bystander-induced changes in the cells growing out from the tissue fragment after it has been targeted with a few radiation tracks to mimic a low-dose exposure.

  16. No-threshold dose-response curves for nongenotoxic chemicals: Findings and applications for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, Daniel M. . E-mail: dansheeh@swbell.net

    2006-01-15

    We tested the hypothesis that no threshold exists when estradiol acts through the same mechanism as an active endogenous estrogen. A Michaelis-Menten (MM) equation accounting for response saturation, background effects, and endogenous estrogen level fit a turtle sex-reversal data set with no threshold and estimated the endogenous dose. Additionally, 31 diverse literature dose-response data sets were analyzed by adding a term for nonhormonal background; good fits were obtained but endogenous dose estimations were not significant due to low resolving power. No thresholds were observed. Data sets were plotted using a normalized MM equation; all 178 data points were accommodated on a single graph. Response rates from {approx}1% to >95% were well fit. The findings contradict the threshold assumption and low-dose safety. Calculating risk and assuming additivity of effects from multiple chemicals acting through the same mechanism rather than assuming a safe dose for nonthresholded curves is appropriate.

  17. A Dose-Response Study of Arsenic Exposure and Markers of Oxidative Damage in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Kristin N.; Liu, Xinhua; Hall, Megan N.; Ilievski, Vesna; Oka, Julie; Calancie, Larissa; Slavkovich, Vesna; Levy, Diane; Siddique, Abu; Alam, Shafiul; Mey, Jacob L.; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H.; Gamble, Mary V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and markers of oxidative damage in Bangladeshi adults. Methods We recruited 378 participants drinking from wells assigned to five water arsenic exposure categories; the distribution of subjects was as follows: 1) <10 μg/L (n=76); 2) 10–100 μg/L (n=104); 3) 101–200 μg/L (n=86); 4) 201–300 μg/L (n=67); and 5) > 300 μg/L (n=45). Arsenic concentrations were measured in well water, as well as in urine and blood. Urinary 8-oxo-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) and plasma protein carbonyls were measured to assess oxidative damage. Results None of our measures of arsenic exposure were significantly associated with protein carbonyl or 8-oxo-dG levels. Conclusions We found no evidence to support a significant relationship between chronic exposure to arsenic-contaminated drinking water and biomarkers of oxidative damage among Bangladeshi adults. PMID:24854259

  18. Baclofen for alcohol dependence: Relationships between baclofen and alcohol dosing and the occurrence of major sedation.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Benjamin; Labreuche, Julien; Duhamel, Alain; Deheul, Sylvie; Gautier, Sophie; Auffret, Marine; Pignon, Baptiste; Valin, Thomas; Bordet, Régis; Cottencin, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    High-dose baclofen, i.e., 300 mg/d or more, has recently emerged as a strategy for treating alcohol dependence. The impact that the co-exposure of large amounts of alcohol and baclofen has on sedation is unclear. In a prospective cohort of 253 subjects with alcohol dependence, we collected daily alcohol and baclofen doses across the first year of baclofen treatment and the monthly maximum subjective sedation experienced by each patient (0-10 visual analog scale). For each patient-month, we determined the average weekly alcohol consumption (AWAC; standard-drinks/week) and the maximum daily dose of baclofen (DDB; mg/d). The occurrence of an episode of major sedation (EMS) during a patient-month was defined as a sedation score ≥7. The relationship between the EMS occurrence and the concurrent AWAC and DDB was investigated using a generalized estimating equation model. In total, 1528 patient-months were compiled (70 with an EMS). Univariate analyses demonstrated that the rate of patient-month to EMS increased gradually with AWAC (p<0.001), from 0.9% for AWAC=0 to 9.4% for AWAC >35. There was also a significant gradual risk for EMS associated with DDB (<0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant interaction between DDB and AWAC on EMS risk (p=0.047). Each 20mg/d increase in DDB was associated with an OR of EMS in AWAC >35 of 1.22 (95%CI, 1.08-1.38) versus 1.11 (95%CI, 0.96-1.29) in AWAC=1-35, and 0.95 (95%CI, 0.76-1.19) in AWAC=0. The level of sedation observed in patients using baclofen for alcohol dependence appears to directly depend on the immediate doses of both the baclofen and the alcohol.

  19. Development of a biologically based dose response (BBDR) model for arsenic induced cancer

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are developing a biologically based dose response (BBDR) model for arsenic carcinogenicity in order to reduce uncertainty in estimates of low dose risk by maximizing the use of relevant data on the mode of action. Expert consultation and literature review are being conducted t...

  20. Dose Response Effects of Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate Treatment in Adults with ADHD: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faraone, Stephen V.; Spencer, Thomas J.; Kollins, Scott H.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Goodman, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore dose-response effects of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) treatment for ADHD. Method: This was a 4-week, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, forced-dose titration study in adult participants, aged 18 to 55 years, meeting "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.)…

  1. RISK ASSESSMENT FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM: A HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN ANALYSIS OF HUMAN DOSE-RESPONSE DATA. (R828035)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three dose¯response studies were conducted with healthy volunteers using different Cryptosporidium parvum isolates (IOWA, TAMU, and UCP). The study data were previously analyzed for median infectious dose (ID50) using a simple cumulative perce...

  2. Mode of Action (MOA) and Dose-Response Approaches for Nuclear Receptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: The presence of sub-threshold doses for non-cancer and (in appropriate cases) cancer has been the dominant paradigm for the practice of risk assessment, but the application of dose-response modeling approaches that include a threshold have been questioned in a 2009 NRC ...

  3. Non-Targeted Effects and the Dose Response for Heavy Ion Tumorigenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Lori J.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    There is no human epidemiology data available to estimate the heavy ion cancer risks experienced by astronauts in space. Studies of tumor induction in mice are a necessary step to estimate risks to astronauts. Previous experimental data can be better utilized to model dose response for heavy ion tumorigenesis and plan future low dose studies.

  4. Isometric exercise and cognitive function: an investigation of acute dose-response effects during submaximal fatiguing contractions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Denver M Y; Bray, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the dose-response relationship between exercise and cognitive performance using an acute bout of isometric exercise. University students (N = 55) were randomly assigned to control, 30%, 50% and 70% of maximum voluntary handgrip contraction groups. Participants performed a modified Stroop task before and after completion of an isometric handgrip endurance trial at their assigned exercise intensity. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and forearm muscle activation (EMG) showed linear trends of progressively greater RPE and muscle activation at greater exercise intensity levels. Regression analysis showed significant (P < .05) linear degradations in frequency of errors on the Stroop task with increasing exercise intensity. We conclude that performing isometric exercise until exhaustion is associated with reduced cognitive performance and that higher intensity isometric exercise leads to greater performance impairments in a linear dose-response manner.

  5. Parotid Glands Dose-Effect Relationships Based on Their Actually Delivered Doses: Implications for Adaptive Re-Planning in Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Klaudia U.; Fernandes, Laura; Vineberg, Karen A.; McShan, Daniel; Antonuk, Alan E.; Cornwall, Craig; Feng, Mary; Schipper, Mathew; Balter, James; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Doses actually delivered to the parotid glands during radiotherapy often exceed planned doses. We hypothesized that the delivered doses correlate better with parotid salivary output than the planned doses, used in all previous studies, and that determining these correlations will help decisions regarding adaptive re-planning (ART) aimed at reducing the delivered doses. Methods and Materials Prospective study: oropharyngeal cancer patients treated definitively with chemo-irradiation underwent daily cone beam CT (CBCT) with clinical set-up alignment based on C2 posterior edge. Parotid glands in the CBCTs were aligned by deformable registration to calculate cumulative delivered doses. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured separately from each parotid gland pretherapy and periodically posttherapy. Results 36 parotid glands of 18 patients were analyzed. Average mean planned doses was 32 Gy and differences from planned to delivered mean gland doses were −4.9 to +8.4 Gy, median difference +2.2 Gy in glands whose delivered doses increased relative to planned. Both planned and delivered mean doses were significantly correlated with post-treatment salivary outputs at almost all post-therapy time points, without statistically significant differences in the correlations. Large dispersions [on average, standard deviation (SD) 3.6 Gy] characterized the dose/effect relationships for both. The differences between the cumulative delivered doses and planned doses were evident already at first fraction (r=0.92, p<0.0001) due to complex set-up deviations, e.g. rotations and neck articulations, uncorrected by the translational clinical alignments. Conclusions After daily translational set-up corrections, differences between planned and delivered doses in most glands were small relative to the SDs of the dose/saliva data, suggesting that ART is not likely to gain measurable salivary output improvement in most cases. These differences were observed already at first

  6. The Use of Mode of Action Information in Risk Assessment: Quantitative Key Events/Dose-Response Framework for Modeling the Dose-Response for Key Events

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HESI RISK21 project formed the Dose-Response/Mode-of-Action Subteam to develop strategies for using all available data (in vitro, in vivo, and in silico) to advance the next-generation of chemical risk assessments. A goal of the Subteam is to enhance the existing Mode of Act...

  7. The eicosanoid response to high dose UVR exposure of individuals prone and resistant to sunburn.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Anna; Masoodi, Mojgan; Gledhill, Karl; Haylett, Ann Katarina; Thody, Anthony John; Tobin, Desmond John; Rhodes, Lesley Elizabeth

    2012-02-01

    High personal UVR doses can be gained during leisure activities, causing intense self-resolving inflammation (sunburn) of unprotected skin. UVR activates release of membrane fatty acids and upregulates their metabolism by cyclooxygenases (COX) and lipoxygenases (LOX) to different eicosanoids. While COX-derived prostaglandin (PG)E(2) is a potent mediator of sunburn vasodilatation, LOX-derived 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) and its lipoxin metabolites may contribute to sunburn limitation. We explored the relationships between expression of these lipid mediators and the clinical and histological outcomes, comparing responses of individuals prone and more resistant to sunburn. An acute UVR exposure of 12 SED (standard erythema dose) was applied to buttock skin of 32 white Caucasians (n = 16 phototype I/II, n = 16 phototype III/IV), and over the subsequent 72 h assessments were made of skin erythema, immunohistochemical expression of leukocyte markers, COX-2, 12-LOX, 15-LOX and nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and eicosanoid levels by LC/ESI-MS/MS. Evidence of a significant inflammatory response was seen earlier in phototype I/II with regard to expression of erythema (4 h, p < 0.001), neutrophil infiltration (24 h, p = 0.01), epidermal COX-2 (24 h, p < 0.05) and 12-LOX (24 h, p < 0.01), and dermal eNOS (24 h, p < 0.05) proteins, although CD3+ lymphocyte infiltration showed an earlier increase in phototype III/IV (24 h, p < 0.05). Although erythema was equivalent at 72 h in both groups, phototype I/II showed higher PGE(2) accompanied by elevated 15-HETE, and a strong positive correlation was seen between these mediators (n = 18, r = 0.805, p = 0.0001). Hence anti-inflammatory eicosanoid 15-HETE may temper the pro-inflammatory milieu in sunburn, having greater influence in those prone to sunburn than those more resistant, given the same high UVR exposure conditions.

  8. Inhaled nitric oxide: Dose response and the effects of blood in the isolated rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, G.F.; Roos, C.M.; Anderson, S.M.; Urich, D.C.; Daugherty, M.O.; Johns, R.A. )

    1993-09-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) is a vasodilator selective to the pulmonary circulation. Using isolated rat lungs, the authors determined the dose-response relationship of NO and the role of blood in mediating pulmonary vasodilation and selectivity. Inhaled 20, 50, 100, and 1,000 ppm NO attenuated (P < 0.001) hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction by 16.1 [+-] 4.9, 22.6 [+-] 6.8, 28.4 [+-] 3.5, and 69.3 [+-] 4.2%, respectively. Inhaled 13, 34, 67, and 670 ppm NO attenuated the increase in pulmonary arterial pressure secondary to angiotensin II more (P < 0.001) in Greenberg-Bohr buffer- (GB) than in blood-perfused lungs (51.7 [+-] 0.0, 71.9 [+-] 8.9, 78.2 [+-] 5.3, and 91.9 [+-] 2.1% vs. 14.3 [+-] 4.2, 23.8 [+-] 4.6, 28.4 [+-] 3.8, and 55.5 [+-] 5.9%, respectively). Samples from GB- but not blood-perfused lungs contained NO (93.0 [+-] 26.3 nM). Intravascular NO attenuated the response to angiotensin II more (P < 0.001) in GB- (with and without plasma) than in blood- (hematocrit = 41 and 5%) perfused lungs (75.6 [+-] 6.4 and 70.9 [+-] 4.8% vs. 22.2 [+-] 2.4 and 39.4 [+-] 7.6%). In conclusion, inhaled NO produces reversible dose-dependent pulmonary vasodilation over a large range of concentrations. Inhaled NO enters the circulation, but red blood cells prevent systematic vasodilation and also a significant amount of pulmonary vasodilation. 24 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Predictive Bayesian microbial dose-response assessment based on suggested self-organization in primary illness response: Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Englehardt, James D; Swartout, Jeff

    2006-04-01

    The probability of illness caused by very low doses of pathogens cannot generally be tested due to the numbers of subjects that would be needed, though such assessments of illness dose response are needed to evaluate drinking water standards. A predictive Bayesian dose-response assessment method was proposed previously to assess the unconditional probability of illness from available information and avoid the inconsistencies of confidence-based approaches. However, the method uses knowledge of the conditional dose-response form, and this form is not well established for the illness endpoint. A conditional parametric dose-response function for gastroenteric illness is proposed here based on simple numerical models of self-organized host-pathogen systems and probabilistic arguments. In the models, illnesses terminate when the host evolves by processes of natural selection to a self-organized critical value of wellness. A generalized beta-Poisson illness dose-response form emerges for the population as a whole. Use of this form is demonstrated in a predictive Bayesian dose-response assessment for cryptosporidiosis. Results suggest that a maximum allowable dose of 5.0 x 10(-7) oocysts/exposure (e.g., 2.5 x 10(-7) oocysts/L water) would correspond with the original goals of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Surface Water Treatment Rule, considering only primary illnesses resulting from Poisson-distributed pathogen counts. This estimate should be revised to account for non-Poisson distributions of Cryptosporidium parvum in drinking water and total response, considering secondary illness propagation in the population. PMID:16573639

  10. Toward a unified approach to dose-response modeling in ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This study reviews dose-response models that are used in ecotoxicology. The focus lies on clarification of differences and similarities between models, and as a side effect, their different guises in ecotoxicology are unravelled. A look at frequently used dose-response models reveals major discrepancies, among other things in naming conventions. Therefore, there is a need for a unified view on dose-response modeling in order to improve the understanding of it and to facilitate communication and comparison of findings across studies, thus realizing its full potential. This study attempts to establish a general framework that encompasses most dose-response models that are of interest to ecotoxicologists in practice. The framework includes commonly used models such as the log-logistic and Weibull models, but also features entire suites of models as found in various guidance documents. An outline on how the proposed framework can be implemented in statistical software systems is also provided.

  11. Light exposure at night, sleep duration, melatonin, and breast cancer: a dose-response analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan-Shui; Deng, Qin; Fan, Wen-Yan; Wang, Wei-Ye; Wang, Xin

    2014-07-01

    Evidence from observational studies on light at night (LAN) exposure, sleep duration, endogenous melatonin levels, and risk for breast cancer in women is conflicting. This led us to conduct a dose-response analysis of published observational data. Pertinent studies were identified by searching Medline, Web of Science, and EMBASE through April 2013. The dose-response relationship between sleep duration, urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin levels, and breast cancer was assessed using the restricted cubic spline model and by multivariate random-effects metaregression. A separate meta-analysis was also carried out to calculate the relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer for the comparable categories or highest levels of exposure versus the lowest levels. Twelve case-control and four cohort studies were included in the analysis. High artificial LAN exposure is associated with an increased risk for breast cancer (RR=1.17, 95% CI: 1.11-1.23), but not ambient LAN exposure (RR=0.91, 95% CI: 0.78-1.07). The summary RR for breast cancer is 1.00 (95% CI: 0.995-1.01) for an increment of 1 h of sleep per night. No significant dose-response relationship between sleep duration and breast cancer was found either for the linearity test (Ptrend=0.725) or for the nonlinearity (Ptrend=0.091) test. An increasein of 15 ng/mg creatinine in urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin is associated with a 14% reduced risk for breast cancer (RR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.78-0.95), with a linear dose-response trend (Ptrend=0.003). There was no evidence of substantial heterogeneity or publication bias in the analysis. Our study adds to the evidence of LAN breast cancer theory. Further research in this area is warranted.

  12. Light exposure at night, sleep duration, melatonin, and breast cancer: a dose-response analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan-Shui; Deng, Qin; Fan, Wen-Yan; Wang, Wei-Ye; Wang, Xin

    2014-07-01

    Evidence from observational studies on light at night (LAN) exposure, sleep duration, endogenous melatonin levels, and risk for breast cancer in women is conflicting. This led us to conduct a dose-response analysis of published observational data. Pertinent studies were identified by searching Medline, Web of Science, and EMBASE through April 2013. The dose-response relationship between sleep duration, urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin levels, and breast cancer was assessed using the restricted cubic spline model and by multivariate random-effects metaregression. A separate meta-analysis was also carried out to calculate the relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer for the comparable categories or highest levels of exposure versus the lowest levels. Twelve case-control and four cohort studies were included in the analysis. High artificial LAN exposure is associated with an increased risk for breast cancer (RR=1.17, 95% CI: 1.11-1.23), but not ambient LAN exposure (RR=0.91, 95% CI: 0.78-1.07). The summary RR for breast cancer is 1.00 (95% CI: 0.995-1.01) for an increment of 1 h of sleep per night. No significant dose-response relationship between sleep duration and breast cancer was found either for the linearity test (Ptrend=0.725) or for the nonlinearity (Ptrend=0.091) test. An increasein of 15 ng/mg creatinine in urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin is associated with a 14% reduced risk for breast cancer (RR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.78-0.95), with a linear dose-response trend (Ptrend=0.003). There was no evidence of substantial heterogeneity or publication bias in the analysis. Our study adds to the evidence of LAN breast cancer theory. Further research in this area is warranted. PMID:24858716

  13. Relationship between response rates and measures of reinforcing strength using a choice procedure in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Gould, Robert W; Czoty, Paul W; Nader, Michael A

    2008-07-01

    Concurrent schedules of reinforcement are increasingly being used to investigate the reinforcing strength of abused drugs. A purported advantage of concurrent schedules is that the primary dependent measure, percentage of responses emitted on the drug-associated manipulandum, is independent of the rate-altering effects of drugs. Data supporting this hypothesis are, however, rarely presented, which was one goal of this study. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that drug-induced decreases in response rates provides an additional index to characterize abuse liability of drugs. This study examined the relationship between response rate and response allocation (i.e. drug choice) when 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 0.03-0.3 mg/kg/inj) or cocaine (0.003-0.1 mg/kg/inj) was the alternative to food under concurrent fixed-ratio reinforcement schedules in rhesus (n=4) and cynomolgus (n=16) monkeys, respectively. Increasing doses of MDMA or cocaine resulted in increased drug choice and dose-dependent decreases in overall response rates. For both drugs, response rates on the drug-associated lever were not affected by dose and were not different from saline. Furthermore, at most doses, rates of responding on the food-associated lever were significantly higher than response rates on the drug-associated lever. Finally, MDMA but not cocaine decreased food-reinforced responding, providing evidence for potential differences between the drugs. These results demonstrate that under concurrent food-drug reinforcement schedules, response rates on the drug-associated lever are independent of measures of reinforcement, whereas disruptions in food-maintained responding may be inversely related to abuse liability. PMID:18622187

  14. Large Cohort Dose-Volume Response Analysis of Parotid Gland Function After Radiotherapy: Intensity-Modulated Versus Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkema, Tim Terhaard, Chris H.J.; Roesink, Judith M.; Braam, Petra M.; Gils, Carla H. van; Moerland, Marinus A.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To compare parotid gland dose-volume response relationships in a large cohort of patients treated with intensity-modulated (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and materials: A total of 221 patients (64 treated with IMRT, 157 with CRT) with various head-and-neck malignancies were prospectively evaluated. The distribution of tumor subsites in both groups was unbalanced. Stimulated parotid flow rates were measured before and 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy. Parotid gland dose-volume histograms were derived from computed tomography-based treatment planning. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model proposed by Lyman was fit to the data. A complication was defined as stimulated parotid flow ratio <25% of the pretreatment flow rate. The relative risk of complications was determined for IMRT vs. CRT and adjusted for the mean parotid gland dose using Poisson regression modeling. Results: One year after radiotherapy, NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT were comparable with a TD{sub 50} (uniform dose leading to a 50% complication probability) of 38 and 40 Gy, respectively. Until 6 months after RT, corrected for mean dose, different complication probabilities existed for IMRT vs. CRT. The relative risk of a complication for IMRT vs. CRT after 6 weeks was 1.42 (95% CI 1.21-1.67), after 6 months 1.41 (95% CI; 1.12-1.77), and at 1 year 1.21 (95% CI 0.87-1.68), after correcting for mean dose. Conclusions: One year after radiotherapy, no difference existed in the mean dose-based NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT. Early after radiotherapy (up to 6 months) mean dose based (Lyman) models failed to fully describe the effects of radiotherapy on the parotid glands.

  15. Comparison of particulate matter dose and acute heart rate variability response in cyclists, pedestrians, bus and train passengers.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, Marguerite; McNabola, Aonghus; Misstear, Bruce

    2014-01-15

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) has been linked to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of the change in cardiac autonomic function, and consistent links between PM exposure and decreased HRV have been documented in studies. This study quantitatively assesses the acute relative variation of HRV with predicted PM dose in the lungs of commuters. Personal PM exposure, HR and HRV were monitored in 32 young healthy cyclists, pedestrians, bus and train passengers. Inhaled and lung deposited PM doses were determined using a numerical model of the human respiratory tract which accounted for varying ventilation rates between subjects and during commutes. Linear mixed models were used to examine air pollution dose and HRV response relationships in 122 commutes sampled. Elevated PM2.5 and PM10 inhaled and lung deposited doses were significantly (p<0.05) associated with decreased HRV indices. Percent declines in SDNN (standard deviation of normal RR intervals) relative to resting, due to an inter-quartile range increase in PM10 lung deposited dose were stronger in cyclists (-6.4%, 95% CI: -11.7, -1.3) and pedestrians (-5.8%, 95% CI: -11.3, -0.5), in comparison to bus (-3.2%, 95% CI: -6.4, -0.1) and train (-1.8%, -7.5, 3.8) passengers. A similar trend was observed in the case of PM2.5 lung deposited dose and results for rMSSD (the square root of the squared differences of successive normal RR intervals) followed similar trends to SDNN. Inhaled and lung deposited doses accounting for varying ventilation rates between modes, individuals and during commutes have been neglected in other studies relating PM to HRV. The findings here indicate that exercise whilst commuting has an influence on inhaled PM and PM lung deposited dose, and these were significantly associated with acute declines in HRV, especially in pedestrians and cyclists.

  16. Joint detection of important biomarkers and optimal dose-response model using penalties.

    PubMed

    Vandenhende, F; Eilers, P; Ledent, E; Renard, D; Tibaldi, F

    2007-11-30

    We propose a method to jointly detect influential biomarkers and estimate how they change with dose. The assessment is made in dose-ranging trials collecting multiple outcomes for efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics. We regress all these outcomes versus a non-parametric transformation of the dose. The regression coefficients and the parameters from the dose-response model are simultaneously estimated using a penalized alternating least-squares method. We illustrate the technique with a phase I clinical trial and a metabonomic experiment in rats. PMID:17579922

  17. Low-level microwave irradiation and central cholinergic activity: a dose-response study

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    Rats were irradiated with circularly polarized, 2,450-MHz pulsed microwaves (2-microseconds pulses, 500 pulses per second (pps)) for 45 min in the cylindrical waveguide system of Guy et al. Immediately after exposure, sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake, an indicator of cholinergic activity in neural tissue, was measured in the striatum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. The power density was set to give average whole-body specific absorption rates (SAR) of 0.3, 0.45, 0.6, 0.75, 0.9, or 1.2 W/kg to study the dose-response relationship between the rate of microwave energy absorption and cholinergic activity in the different areas of the brain. Decrease in choline uptake was observed in the striatum at a SAR of 0.75 W/kg and above, whereas for the frontal cortex and hippocampus, decreases in choline uptake were observed at a SAR of 0.45 W/kg and above. No significant effect was observed in the hypothalamus at the irradiation power densities studied. The probit analysis was used to determine the SAR50 in each brain area, i.e., the SAR at which 50% of maximum response was elicited. SAR50 values for the striatum, frontal cortex, and hippocampus were 0.65, 0.38, and 0.44 W/kg, respectively.

  18. DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC ASTHMA RESPONSES TO PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Indoor mold has been associated with development of allergic asthma. Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and its viable conidia can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. The hypothesis o...

  19. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects: Evidence for an Adaptive Response to Low Dose Exposures?

    PubMed Central

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the induction of bystander effects by low dose, low-LET ionizing radiation and discusses how they may be related to observed adaptive responses or other protective effects of low dose exposures. Bystander effects appear to be the result of a generalized stress response in tissues or cells. The signals may be produced by all exposed cells, but the response appears to require a quorum in order to be expressed. The major response involving low LET radiation exposure discussed in the existing literature is a death response. This has many characteristics of apoptosis but is p53 independent. While a death response might appear to be adverse, the position is argued in this paper that it is in fact protective and removes damaged cells from the population. Since many cell populations carry damaged cells without being exposed to radiation, so called “background damage”, it is possible that low doses exposures cause removal of cells damaged by agents other than the test dose of radiation. This mechanism would lead to the production of “U-shaped” dose response curves. In this scenario, the level of “adaptive” or beneficial response will be related to the background damage carried by the cell population. This model may be important when attempting to predict the consequences of mixed exposures involving radiation and other environmental stressors. PMID:18648593

  20. A Comparison of Dose-Response Models for the Parotid Gland in a Large Group of Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Houweling, Antonetta C.; Philippens, Marielle E.P.; Dijkema, Tim; Roesink, Judith M.; Terhaard, Chris H.J.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: The dose-response relationship of the parotid gland has been described most frequently using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model. However, various other normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models exist. We evaluated in a large group of patients the value of six NTCP models that describe the parotid gland dose response 1 year after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 347 patients with head-and-neck tumors were included in this prospective parotid gland dose-response study. The patients were treated with either conventional radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Dose-volume histograms for the parotid glands were derived from three-dimensional dose calculations using computed tomography scans. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured before and 1 year after radiotherapy. A threshold of 25% of the pretreatment flow rate was used to define a complication. The evaluated models included the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model, the mean dose model, the relative seriality model, the critical volume model, the parallel functional subunit model, and the dose-threshold model. The goodness of fit (GOF) was determined by the deviance and a Monte Carlo hypothesis test. Ranking of the models was based on Akaike's information criterion (AIC). Results: None of the models was rejected based on the evaluation of the GOF. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model based on the AIC. The TD{sub 50} in these models was approximately 39 Gy. Conclusions: The mean dose model was preferred for describing the dose-response relationship of the parotid gland.

  1. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Agglomeration Influences Dose-Rates and Modulates Oxidative Stress Mediated Dose-Response Profiles In Vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Wang, Wei; Minard, Kevin R.; Karin, Norman J.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-07-31

    Spontaneous agglomeration of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is a common problem in cell culture media which can confound interpretation of in vitro nanotoxicity studies. The authors created stable agglomerates of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in conventional culture medium, which varied in hydrodynamic size (276 nm-1.5 μm) but were composed of identical primary particles with similar surface potentials and protein coatings. Studies using C10 lung epithelial cells show that the dose rate effects of agglomeration can be substantial, varying by over an order of magnitude difference in cellular dose in some cases. Quantification by magnetic particle detection showed that small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs induced greater cytotoxicity and redox-regulated gene expression when compared with large agglomerates on an equivalent total cellular IONP mass dose basis, whereas agglomerates of amine-modified IONPs failed to induce cytotoxicity or redox-regulated gene expression despite delivery of similar cellular doses. Dosimetry modelling and experimental measurements reveal that on a delivered surface area basis, large and small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs have similar inherent potency for the generation of ROS, induction of stress-related genes and eventual cytotoxicity. The results suggest that reactive moieties on the agglomerate surface are more efficient in catalysing cellular ROS production than molecules buried within the agglomerate core. Because of the dynamic, size and density-dependent nature of ENP delivery to cells in vitro, the biological consequences of agglomeration are not discernible from static measures of exposure concentration (μg/ml) alone, highlighting the central importance of integrated physical characterisation and quantitative dosimetry for in vitro studies. The combined experimental and computational approach provides a quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between the biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their

  2. A dose-response study of triclosan mouthrinses on plaque regrowth.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, S; Addy, M; Newcombe, R J

    1993-09-01

    Triclosan is used in toothpastes and mouthrinses as a plaque inhibitory agent. The concentrations used and therefore the dose of triclosan varies between products and there is, as with most plaque inhibitory agents, little information on the dose response of this agent. The purpose of this investigation was to measure the plaque inhibitory properties of triclosan in a simple mouthrinse formulation over a range of concentrations and therefore doses. The study was a 5 treatment, double-blind, Latin-square randomised, minus-active controlled design balanced for residual effects. The formulations were 0.01%, 0.05%, 0.1% and 0.2% triclosan in 0.5% sodium carbonate and 5% alcohol aqueous solutions, used as 10 ml, 1-min rinses 2 x daily, without tooth-brushing. 2 groups each of 15 healthy volunteers rinsed during alternate 4-day treatment, 1-week washout periods with the allocated rinses. From a zero-plaque baseline on Day 1, plaque was scored by index and area on Day 5. A dose response pattern of decreasing plaque indices and particularly areas, with increasing triclosan dose was observed. However, by far the largest sequential drop in plaque scores occurred between 0.1% and 0.2% triclosan treatments. Extending the dose-response study to higher concentrations is considered impractical if not unjustifiable, because of potential harmful local side-effects and compliance difficulties. Dose-response studies to assess the agents thought to potentiate triclosan would seem warranted.

  3. Dose-response measurement in gel dosimeter using various imaging modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujibuchi, T.; Kawamura, H.; Yamanashi, K.; Hiroki, A.; Yamashita, S.; Taguchi, M.; Sato, Y.; Mimura, K.; Ushiba, H.; Okihara, T.

    2013-06-01

    Measurement methods that accurately measure radiation dose distribution in a three dimensional manner in order to allow comparisons of treatment plans are needed for quality assurance. One such measurement method involves the use of a polymer gel dosimeter to measure the dose distribution in three dimensions. During irradiation, a polymerization reaction makes new chemical bonds and induces changes of the chemical structure of the gel of the gel dosimeter. In the present study, dose-response measurement of an environment-friendly material used in the gel dosimeter was performed by imaging with computed tomography (CT) and R1, R2, and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) under various imaging conditions. Dose-response characteristics in the gel dosimeter used in the experiment were observed at doses of 5-20 Gy administered by X-ray CT and MRI. Although the FLAIR signal was a relative value, the dose-response values with FLAIR were excellent compared to those with R1, R2, and CT. Determination of more appropriate imaging conditions could help expand the dose-response parameters of each measurement method.

  4. Bystander responses in low dose irradiated cells treated with plasma from gamma irradiated blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acheva, A.; Georgieva, R.; Rupova, I.; Boteva, R.; Lyng, F.

    2008-02-01

    There are two specific low-dose radiation-induced responses that have been the focus of radiobiologists' interest in recent years. These are the bystander effect in non-irradiated cells and the adaptive response to a challenge dose after prior low dose irradiation. In the present study we have investigated if plasma from irradiated blood can act as a 'challenge dose' on low dose irradiated reporter epithelial cells (HaCaT cell line). The main aim was to evaluate the overall effect of low dose irradiation (0.05 Gy) of reporter cells and the influence of bystander factors in plasma from 0.5 Gy gamma irradiated blood on these cells. The effects were estimated by clonogenic survival of the reporter cells. We also investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as potential factors involved in the bystander signaling. Calcium fluxes and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) depolarization were also examined as a marker for initiation of apoptosis in the reporter cells. The results show that there are large individual differences in the production of bystander effects and adaptive responses between different donors. These may be due to the specific composition of the donor plasma. The observed effects generally could be divided into two groups: adaptive responses and additive effects. ROS appeared to be involved in the responses of the low dose pretreated reporter cells. In all cases there was a significant decrease in MMP which may be an early event in the apoptotic process. Calcium signaling also appeared to be involved in triggering apoptosis in the low dose pretreated reporter cells. The heterogeneity of the bystander responses makes them difficult to be modulated for medical uses. Specific plasma characteristics that cause these large differences in the responses would need to be identified to make them useful for radiotherapy.

  5. Characterization of cure in model photocrosslinking acrylate systems: Relationships among tensile properties, Tg and ultraviolet dose

    SciTech Connect

    Rakas, M.A.

    1996-10-01

    The extent of cure of a thermosetting polymer is governed largely by polymerization kinetics and the difference between the polymerization temperature and the material`s ultimate glass transition temperature (Tg). For prepolymers which cure when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, other factors which strongly determine the extent of cure are the UV intensity and exposure time, and the interrelationship between the optical absorbance of the photoinitiator (PI) and the rate of formation of excited state PI radicals. Beers` Law can be used to understand the relationship between the PI`s molar absorptivity, its concentration, and adhesive film thickness. Many adhesives users are more concerned with bulk properties such as tensile modulus and Tg rather than a numerical measurement of degree of cure. Therefore, this research employed model acrylate formulations and determined changes in tensile properties and Tg as a function of film thickness and UV dose. These results enabled correlation of bulk and photoinitiator properties.

  6. Cognition-Enhancing Doses of Methylphenidate Preferentially Increase Prefrontal Cortical Neuronal Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Devilbiss, David M.; Berridge, Craig W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite widespread use of low-dose psychostimulants for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the neural basis for the therapeutic actions of these drugs are not well-understood. We recently demonstrated that low-dose methylphenidate (MPH) increases catecholamine efflux preferentially within the prefrontal cortex (PFC), suggesting the PFC is a principal site of action in the behavioral-calming and cognition-enhancing effects of low-dose psychostimulants. To better understand the neural mechanisms involved in the behavioral actions of low-dose stimulants, the current study examined the effects of low-dose MPH on the discharge properties of individual and ensembles of PFC neurons. Methods Extracellular activity of multiple individual PFC neurons was recorded in freely moving rats using multi-channel recording techniques. Behavioral studies identified optimal, working memory-enhancing doses of intraperitoneal MPH. The effects of these low-doses of MPH on PFC neuronal discharge properties were compared to: 1) the effects of high-dose MPH on PFC neuronal discharge; 2) the effects of low-dose MPH on neuronal discharge within the somatosensory cortex. Results Only working memory-enhancing doses of MPH increased the responsivity of individual PFC neurons and altered neuronal ensemble responses within the PFC. These effects were not observed outside the PFC (i.e. within somatosensory cortex). In contrast, high-dose MPH profoundly suppressed evoked discharge of PFC neurons. Conclusions These observations suggest that preferential enhancement of signal processing within the PFC, including alterations in the discharge properties of individual PFC neurons and PFC neuronal ensembles, underlie the behavioral/cognitive actions of low-dose psychostimulants. PMID:18585681

  7. Recognizing the importance of exposure-dose-response dynamics for ecotoxicity assessment: nitrofurazone-induced antioxidase activity and mRNA expression in model protozoan Euplotes vannus.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yazhen; Liu, Shuxing; Lin, Xiaofeng; Li, Jiqiu; Yi, Zhenzhen; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S

    2015-06-01

    The equivocality of dose-response relationships has, in practice, hampered the application of biomarkers as a means to evaluate environmental risk, yet this important issue has not yet been fully recognized or explored. This paper evaluates the potential of antioxidant enzymes in the ciliated protozoan Euplotes vannus for use as biomarkers. Dose-response dynamics, together with both the enzyme activity and the gene expression of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, were investigated when E. vannus were exposed to graded doses of nitrofurazone for several discrete durations. Mathematical models were explored to characterize the dose-response profiles and, specifically, to identify any equivocality in terms of endpoint. Significant differences were found in both enzyme activity and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in the E. vannus treated with nitrofurazone, and the interactions between exposure dosage and duration were significant. Correlations between enzyme activity, mRNA expression, and nitrofurazone dose varied with exposure duration. Particularly, the dose-responses showed different dynamics depending on either endpoint or exposure duration. Our findings suggest that both the enzyme activity and the gene expression of the tested antioxidant enzymes can be used as biomarkers for ecotoxicological assessment on the premise of ascertaining appropriate dosage scope, exposure duration, endpoint, etc., which can be achieved by using dose-response dynamics.

  8. Dose-injury relationships for cryoprotective agent injury to human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, M D; Almansoori, K A; Laouar, L; Prasad, V; McGann, L E; Elliott, J A W; Jomha, N M

    2014-02-01

    Vitrification of articular cartilage (AC) could enhance tissue availability but requires high concentrations of cyroprotective agents (CPAs). This study investigated relative injuries caused by commonly used CPAs. We hypothesized that the in situ chondrocyte dose-injury relationships of five commonly used CPAs are nonlinear and that relative injuries could be determined by comparing cell death after exposure at increasing concentrations. Human AC samples were used from four patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty surgery. Seventy μm slices were exposed in a stepwise protocol to increasing concentrations of 5 CPAs (max = 8 M); dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO), glycerol (Gly), propylene glycol (PG), ethylene glycol (EG), and formamide (FM). Chondrocyte viability was determined by membrane integrity stains. Statistical analysis included t-tests and nonlinear least squares estimation methods. The dose-injury to chondrocytes relationships for all CPAs were found to be nonlinear (sigmoidal best fit). For the particular loading protocol in this study, the data identified the following CPA concentrations at which chondrocyte recoveries statistically deviated significantly from the control recovery; 1 M for Gly, 4 M for FM and PG, 6 M for Me(2)SO, and 7 M for EG. Comparison of individual means demonstrated that Gly exposure resulted in the lowest recovery, followed by PG, and then Me(2)SO, FM and EG in no specific order. The information from this study provides an order of damage to human chondrocytes in situ of commonly used CPAs for vitrification of AC and identifies threshold CPA concentrations for a stepwise loading protocol at which chondrocyte recovery is significantly decreased. In general, Gly and PG were the most damaging while DMSO and EG were among the least damaging. PMID:24269869

  9. Dose and developmental responses of Anopheles merus larvae to salinity.

    PubMed

    White, Bradley J; Kundert, Peter N; Turissini, David A; Van Ekeris, Leslie; Linser, Paul J; Besansky, Nora J

    2013-09-15

    Saltwater tolerance is a trait that carries both ecological and epidemiological significance for Anopheles mosquitoes that transmit human malaria, as it plays a key role in determining their habitat use and ecological distribution, and thus their local contribution to malaria transmission. Here, we lay the groundwork for genetic dissection of this trait by quantifying saltwater tolerance in three closely related cryptic species and malaria vectors from the Afrotropical Anopheles gambiae complex that are known to differ starkly in their tolerance to salinity: the obligate freshwater species A. gambiae and A. coluzzii, and the saltwater-tolerant species A. merus. We performed detailed comparisons of survivorship under varying salinities, using multiple strains of A. gambiae, A. coluzzii and A. merus, as well as F1 progeny from reciprocal crosses of A. merus and A. coluzzii. Additionally, using immunohistochemistry, we compared the location of three ion regulatory proteins (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, carbonic anhydrase and Na(+)/H(+)-antiporter) in the recta of A. coluzzii and A. merus reared in freshwater or saline water. As expected, we found that A. merus survives exposure to high salinities better than A. gambiae and A. coluzzii. Further, we found that exposure to a salinity level of 15.85 g NaCl l(-1) is a discriminating dose that kills all A. gambiae, A. coluzzii and A. coluzzii-A. merus F1 larvae, but does not negatively impact the survival of A. merus. Importantly, phenotypic expression of saltwater tolerance by A. merus is highly dependent upon the developmental time of exposure, and based on immunohistochemistry, salt tolerance appears to involve a major shift in Na(+)/K+-ATPase localization in the rectum, as observed previously for the distantly related saline-tolerant species A. albimanus. PMID:23966587

  10. Evidence for curvilinearity in the cancer incidence dose-response in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Little, M P; Muirhead, C R

    1996-07-01

    The recently released data on cancer incidence in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors are analysed using a variety of relative risk models which take account of errors in estimates of dose to assess the dose-response at low doses. For all solid cancers analysed together there is a significant positive dose-response (at the one-sided 2.5% significance level) if all survivors who received < 0.5 Sv are considered, but the significance vanishes if doses of < 0.2 Sv are considered. If a relative risk model with a threshold (the dose-response being assumed linear above the threshold) is fitted to the solid cancer data, a threshold of more than about 0.2 Sv is inconsistent with the data, whereas these data are consistent with there being no threshold. Linear-quadratic models and linear-quadratic models with an exponential cell-sterilization term provide no better fit than the linear model. For the three main radiation-inducible leukaemia subtypes analysed together (acute lymphatic leukaemia, acute myeloid leukaemia and chronic myeloid leukaemia) there is a significant positive dose-response (at the one-sided 2.5% significance level) if all survivors who received < 0.5 Sv are considered, but the significance vanishes if doses of < 0.2 Sv are considered. If a relative risk model with a threshold (the dose-response being assumed linear above the threshold) is fitted to the leukaemia data, a thresh-old of more than about 0.3 Sv is inconsistent with the data. In contrast with the solid cancer data, the best estimate for the threshold level in the leukaemia data is significantly different from zero, even when allowance is made for a possible quadratic term in the dose-response, albeit at borderline levels of statistical significance (p = 0.04). There is little evidence for curvature in the leukaemia dose-response from 0.2 Sv upwards. However, the possible underestimation of the errors in the estimates of the dose threshold as a result of confounding and uncertainties not taken

  11. Cancer risk assessment: Optimizing human health through linear dose-response models.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J; Shamoun, Dima Yazji; Hanekamp, Jaap C

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes that generic cancer risk assessments be based on the integration of the Linear Non-Threshold (LNT) and hormetic dose-responses since optimal hormetic beneficial responses are estimated to occur at the dose associated with a 10(-4) risk level based on the use of a LNT model as applied to animal cancer studies. The adoption of the 10(-4) risk estimate provides a theoretical and practical integration of two competing risk assessment models whose predictions cannot be validated in human population studies or with standard chronic animal bioassay data. This model-integration reveals both substantial protection of the population from cancer effects (i.e. functional utility of the LNT model) while offering the possibility of significant reductions in cancer incidence should the hormetic dose-response model predictions be correct. The dose yielding the 10(-4) cancer risk therefore yields the optimized toxicologically based "regulatory sweet spot". PMID:25916915

  12. Dose-response investigation into glucose facilitation of memory performance and mood in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Sünram-Lea, Sandra I; Owen, Lauren; Finnegan, Yvonne; Hu, Henglong

    2011-08-01

    It has been suggested that the memory enhancing effect of glucose follows an inverted U-shaped curve, with 25 g resulting in optimal facilitation in healthy young adults. The aim of this study was to further investigate the dose dependency of the glucose facilitation effect in this population across different memory domains and to assess moderation by interindividual differences in glucose regulation and weight. Following a double-blind, repeated measures design, 30 participants were administered drinks containing five different doses of glucose (0 g, 15 g, 25 g, 50 g, and 60 g) and were tested across a range of memory tasks. Glycaemic response and changes in mood state were assessed following drink administration. Analysis of the data showed that glucose administration did not affect mood, but significant glucose facilitation of several memory tasks was observed. However, dose-response curves differed depending on the memory task with only performance on the long-term memory tasks adhering largely to the previously observed inverted U-shaped dose-response curve. Moderation of the response profiles by interindividual differences in glucose regulation and weight was observed. The current data suggest that dose-response function and optimal dose might depend on cognitive domain and are moderated by interindividual differences in glucose regulation and weight.

  13. The road to embryologically based dose-response models.

    PubMed Central

    Kavlock, R J; Setzer, R W

    1996-01-01

    The goal of researchers working in the area of developmental toxicology is to prevent adverse reproductive outcomes (early pregnancy loss, birth defects, reduced birth weight, and altered functional development) in humans due to exposures to environmental contaminants, therapeutic drugs, and other factors. To best achieve that goal, it is important that relevant information be gathered and assimilated in the risk assessment process. One of the major challenges of improved risk assessment is to better use all pertinent biological and mechanistic information. This may be done qualitatively (e.g., demonstrating that the experimental model is not appropriate for extrapolation purposes); semiquantitatively (using information to reduce the degree of uncertainty present under default extrapolation procedures), or quantitatively (formally describing the relationships between exposure and adverse outcome in mathematical forms, including components that directly reflect individual steps in the overall progression of toxicity). In this paper we review the recent advances in the risk assessment process for developmental toxicants and hypothesize on future directions that may revolutionize our thinking in this area. The road to these changes sometimes appears to be a well-mapped course on a relatively smooth surface; at other times the path is bumpy and obscure, while at still other times it is only a wish in the eye of the engineer to cross an uncharted and rugged environment. Images Figure 11. A Figure 11. B PMID:8722115

  14. Characterizing dose-responses of catalase to nitrofurazone exposure in model ciliated protozoan Euplotes vannus for ecotoxicity assessment: enzyme activity and mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiqiu; Zhou, Liang; Lin, Xiaofeng; Yi, Zhenzhen; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S

    2014-02-01

    In environmental studies, some biological responses, known as biomarkers, have been used as a powerful bioassay tool for more than four decades. Disparity between enzyme activity and mRNA abundance leads to correlation equivocality, which makes the application of biomarkers for environmental risk assessment more complicated. This study investigates this disparity in the case of catalase when used as a biomarker for detecting ecotoxicity induced by antibiotics in aquatic ecosystems. In particular, dose-responses for catalase activity and mRNA expression abundance were investigated in Euplotes vannus which were exposed to graded doses of nitrofurazone for several discrete durations, and dose-response models were developed to characterize the dose-response dynamics. Significant differences were found in both catalase activity and mRNA expression abundance among the E. vannus treated with nitrofurazone. Catalase activity showed a hormetic-like effect in terms of dose-response, characterized by a biphasic relationship which was more clearly evident after a longer exposure period, while mRNA expression abundance increased linearly with the exposure duration. Additionally, the correlation between catalase activity and mRNA expression abundance reversed along with the duration of exposure to nitrofurazone. Taken together, our results demonstrate that catalase mRNA expression offers a more straightforward dose-response model than enzyme activity. Our findings suggest that both catalase enzyme activity and mRNA expression abundance can be used jointly as bioassay tools for detecting ecotoxicity induced by nitrofurazone in aquatic ecosystems.

  15. Dose-Response Evaluation of Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebert, Douglas; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Ham, David; Hamilton, Douglas; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Braslet-M is a set of special elasticized thigh cuffs used by the Russian space agency to reduce the effects of the head-ward fluid shift during early adaptation to microgravity by sequestering fluid in the lower extremities. Currently, no imaging modalities are used in the calibration of the device, and the pressure required to produce a predictable physiological response is unknown. This investigation intends to relate the pressure exerted by the cuffs to the extent of fluid redistribution and commensurate physiological effects. Materials and Methods: Ten healthy subjects with standardized fluid intake participated in the study. Data collection included femoral and internal jugular vein imaging in two orthogonal planes, pulsed Doppler of cervical and femoral vessels and middle cerebral artery, optic nerve imaging, and echocardiography. Braslet-M cuff pressure was monitored at the skin interface using pre-calibrated pressure sensors. Using 6 and 30 head-down tilt in two separate sessions, the effect of Braslet-M was assessed while incrementally tightening the cuffs. Cuffs were then simultaneously released to document the resulting hemodynamic change. Results: Preliminary analysis shows correlation between physical pressure exerted by the Braslet-M device and several parameters such as jugular and femoral vein cross-sections, resistivity of the lower extremity vascular bed, and others. A number of parameters reflect blood redistribution and will be used to determine the therapeutic range of the device and to prevent unsafe application. Conclusion: Braslet-M exerts a physical effect that can be measured and correlated with many changes in central and peripheral hemodynamics. Analysis of the full data set will be required to make definitive recommendations regarding the range of safe therapeutic application. Objective data and subjective responses suggest that a safer and equally effective use of Braslet can be achieved when compared with the current

  16. Low Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Barry D. Michael; Kathryn Held; Kevin Prise

    2002-12-19

    of the relationship between high- and low-dose exposures. The targeting approach also allows us to study very clearly a newly recognized effect of radiation, the ''bystander effect'', which appears to dominate some low-dose responses and therefore may have a significant role in low-dose risk mechanisms. Our project also addresses the concept that the background of naturally occurring oxidative damage that takes place continually in cells due to byproducts of metabolism may play a role in treatments that modify the levels of oxidative damage, either alone or in combination with low-dose irradiation. In this project, we have used human and rodent cell lines and each set of experiments has been carried out on a single cell type. However, low-dose research has to extend into tissues because signaling between cells of different types is likely to influence the responses. Our studies have therefore also included microbeam experiments using a model tissue system that consists of an explant of a small piece of pig ureter grown in culture. The structure of this tissue is similar to that of epithelium and there it relates to the tissues in which carcinoma arises. Our studies have been able to measure bystander-induced changes in the cells growing out from the tissue fragment after it has been targeted with a few radiation tracks to mimic a low-dose exposure.

  17. Dose response of selected solid state detectors in applied homogeneous transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, M.; Fallone, B. G.; Rathee, S.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: MR-Linac devices under development worldwide will require standard calibration, commissioning, and quality assurance. Solid state radiation detectors are often used for dose profiles and percent depth dose measurements. The dose response of selected solid state detectors is therefore evaluated in varying transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields for this purpose. Methods: The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to model irradiation of a PTW 60003 diamond detector and IBA PFD diode detector in the presence of a magnetic field. The field itself was varied in strength, and oriented both transversely and longitudinally with respect to the incident photon beam. The long axis of the detectors was oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the photon beam. The dose to the active volume of each detector in air was scored, and its ratio to dose with zero magnetic field strength was determined as the “dose response” in magnetic field. Measurements at low fields for both detectors in transverse magnetic fields were taken to evaluate the accuracy of the simulations. Additional simulations were performed in a water phantom to obtain few representative points for beam profile and percent depth dose measurements. Results: Simulations show significant dose response as a function of magnetic field in transverse field geometries. This response can be near 20% at 1.5 T, and it is highly dependent on the detectors’ relative orientation to the magnetic field, the energy of the photon beam, and detector composition. Measurements at low transverse magnetic fields verify the simulations for both detectors in their relative orientations to radiation beam. Longitudinal magnetic fields, in contrast, show little dose response, rising slowly with magnetic field, and reaching 0.5%–1% at 1.5 T regardless of detector orientation. Water tank and in air simulation results were the same within simulation uncertainty where lateral electronic equilibrium is present and expectedly

  18. In situ protocol for the determination of dose-response effect of low-fluoride dentifrices on enamel remineralization

    PubMed Central

    AFONSO, Rebeca Lima; PESSAN, Juliano Pelim; IGREJA, Bruna Babler; CANTAGALLO, Camila Fernandes; DANELON, Marcelle; DELBEM, Alberto Carlos Botazzo

    2013-01-01

    No in situ protocol has assessed the dose-response effects of fluoride dentifrices involving low-fluoride formulations. Objective To assess the ability of an in situ remineralization model in determining dose-response effects of dentifrices containing low fluoride concentrations ([F]) on bovine enamel. Material and Methods Volunteers wore palatal appliances containing demineralized enamel blocks and brushed their teeth and devices with the dentifrices supplied (double-blind, crossover protocol) separately for 3 and 7 days. Surface hardness (SH), integrated subsurface hardness (ΔKHN) and [F] in enamel were determined. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey's test and Pearson's correlation (p<0.05). Results Dose-response relationships were verified between [F] in dentifrices and SH, ΔKHN and enamel [F]. Higher correlation coefficients between enamel [F] and SH and ΔKHN were obtained for the 3-day period. Significant differences in SH and ΔKHN were observed among all groups for the 3-day period, but not between 0-275, 275-550, and 550-1,100 µg F/g dentifrices for the 7-day period, nor between 3- and 7-day periods for the 1,100 µg F/g groups. Conclusions Considering that the peak remineralization capacity of the conventional dentifrice (1,100 µg F/g) was achieved in 3 days, this experimental period could be used in future studies assessing new dentifrice formulations, especially at low-fluoride concentrations. PMID:24473718

  19. Dose-Responsive Gene Expression in Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) Treated Resting CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Brian; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Spina, Celsa A.; Singhania, Akul; Margolis, David M.; Richman, Douglas R.; Woelk, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Design Persistent latently infected CD4+ T cells represent a major obstacle to HIV eradication. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) are a proposed activation therapy. However, off-target effects on expression in host immune cells are poorly understood. We hypothesized that HDACi-modulated genes would be best identified with dose-response analysis. Methods Resting primary CD4+ T cells were treated with 0.34, 1, 3, or 10 μM of the HDACi, SAHA, for 24 hours and subjected to microarray gene expression analysis. Genes with dose-correlated expression were filtered to identify a subset with consistent up or downregulation at each SAHA dose. Histone modifications were characterized in 6 SAHA dose-responsive genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-RT-qPCR). Results A large number of genes were shown to be up (N=657) or downregulated (N=725) by SAHA in a dose-responsive manner (FDR p-value < 0.05, fold change ≥ |2|). Several genes (CTNNAL1, DPEP2, H1F0, IRGM, PHF15, and SELL) are potential in vivo biomarkers of SAHA activity. SAHA dose-responsive genes included transcription factors, HIV restriction factors, histone methyltransferases, and host proteins that interact with HIV. Pathway analysis suggested net downregulation of T cell activation with increasing SAHA dose. Histone acetylation was not correlated with host gene expression, but plausible alternative mechanisms for SAHA-modulated gene expression were identified. Conclusions Numerous genes in CD4+ T cells are modulated by SAHA in a dose-responsive manner, including genes that may negatively influence HIV activation from latency. Our study suggests that SAHA influences gene expression through a confluence of several mechanisms, including histone modification, and altered expression and activity of transcription factors. PMID:26258524

  20. The relationship between neuroleptic drug dose and the performance of psychiatric patients in a maximum security token economy program.

    PubMed

    Harris, G T

    1989-03-01

    This study examined the relationship between neuroleptic medication dose and performance in a token economy program on two maximum security psychiatric wards. Patients receiving higher than average doses exhibited poorer than average program performance but there was a small but statistically significant positive relationship between neuroleptic drug dose (measured in CPZ units/kg) and program performance. However, this positive relationship existed only for the first few weeks of patients' hospital stays, and there was a delay (approximately 2 weeks) between the administration of the drug and the maximal positive effect on program performance. Only a very small minority of medication changes were ever followed by improvements in program performance. The results are discussed in terms of what is a rational strategy for the provision of psychiatric medication and other forms of treatment in institutional settings.

  1. Pharmacogenetic Predictors of Methylphenidate Dose-Response in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehlich, Tanya E.; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Nick, Todd G.; Melguizo Castro, Maria S.; Stein, Mark A.; Brinkman, William B.; Graham, Amanda J.; Langberg, Joshua M.; Kahn, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Because of significant individual variability in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medication response, there is increasing interest in identifying genetic predictors of treatment effects. This study examined the role of four catecholamine-related candidate genes in moderating methylphenidate (MPH) dose-response. Method:…

  2. AN EXTRACT OF PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM INDUCES DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC ASTHMA RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. Our hypothesis is that soluble components of P. chrysogenum (PCE) can dose-dependently induce responses typ...

  3. Modeling and regression analysis of semiochemical dose-response curves of insect antennal reception and behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dose-response curves with semiochemicals are reported in many articles in insect chemical ecology regarding neurophysiology and behavioral bioassays. Most such curves are shown in figures where the x-axis has order of magnitude increases in dosages versus responses on the y-axis represented by point...

  4. CCL2 mediates the circadian response to low dose endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Duhart, José M; Brocardo, Lucila; Mul Fedele, Malena L; Guglielmotti, Angelo; Golombek, Diego A

    2016-09-01

    The mammalian circadian system is mainly originated in a master oscillator located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the hypothalamus. Previous reports from our and other groups have shown that the SCN are sensitive to systemic immune activation during the early night, through a mechanism that relies on the action of proinflammatory factors within this structure. Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) is induced in the brain upon peripheral immune activation, and it has been shown to modulate neuronal physiology. In the present work we tested whether CCL2 might be involved in the response of the circadian clock to peripheral endotoxin administration. The CCL2 receptor, C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2), was detected in the SCN of mice, with higher levels of expression during the early night, when the clock is sensitive to immune activation. Ccl2 was induced in the SCN upon intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. Furthermore, mice receiving an intracerebroventricular (Icv) administration of a CCL2 synthesis inhibitor (Bindarit), showed a reduction LPS-induced circadian phase changes and Icv delivery of CCL2 led to phase delays in the circadian clock. In addition, we tested the possibility that CCL2 might also be involved in the photic regulation of the clock. Icv administration of Bindarit did not modify the effects of light pulses on the circadian clock. In summary, we found that CCL2, acting at the SCN level is important for the circadian effects of immune activation.

  5. A study of the shape of dose-response curves for acute lethality at low response: a megadaphnia study'

    SciTech Connect

    Sebaugh, J.L.; Wilson, J.D.; Tucker, M.W.; Adams, W.J. )

    1991-12-01

    Dose-response curves were developed for the immobilization response in Daphnia magna to four toxicants. The purpose of this work was to study the effect of the form of the model and the number of concentration levels used on the estimates of typical low-dose effective concentrations (1%, 5%, 10%). The generalized four-parameter logistic model was used as the reference. When using 12 concentration levels, one of the logistic family two- or three-parameter models was shown reliably to represent each of these various sets of dose-response data, and to provide adequate estimates of EC01 and EC05, as well as EC10 and EC50. For two of the toxicants, an asymmetric model was required. When reducing the number of concentrations to five, the EC10 and EC50 were well estimated by the probit model, with acceptable results at the EC05 level.

  6. Intramuscular relative dose response (RDR) determination of liver vitamin A stores in rats.

    PubMed

    Zachman, R D; Chen, X M

    1991-02-01

    This study questioned whether the relative dose response (RDR) method to detect liver stores of vitamin A could be used by intramuscular administration of the vitamin. Vitamin A-deficient and reference rat serum retinol levels were determined by HPLC at zero time and then again 5 h after an intramuscular injection of 5.25 mumol/kg retinyl palmitate. The RDR percentage was calculated: [(A5-A0)/(A5)] x 100. The 5-h RDR was determined in 20 deficient and 16 reference diet rats and a clear relationship to liver retinyl palmitate concentration was demonstrated. At a liver retinyl palmitate concentration of less than 0.105 mumol/g, all RDR values were greater than 20%. When the liver retinyl palmitate was greater than 0.122 mumol/g the RDR was less than 20%. This study suggests that the intramuscular RDR is a valid tool for estimating liver retinyl palmitate in populations in which the oral RDR cannot be administered. PMID:1825326

  7. Parity and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: a Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Lv, Haichen; Wu, Hongyi; Yin, Jiasheng; Qian, Juying; Ge, Junbo

    2015-08-24

    Parity has been shown to inversely associate with cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, but the evidence of epidemiological studies is still controversial. Therefore, we quantitatively assessed the relationship between parity and CVD mortality by summarizing the evidence from prospective studies. We searched MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE and ISI Web of Science databases for relevant prospective studies of parity and CVD mortality through the end of March 2015. Fixed- or random-effects models were used to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity among studies was assessed using the I(2) statistics. All statistical tests were two-sided. Ten prospective studies were included with a total of 994,810 participants and 16,601 CVD events. A borderline significant inverse association was observed while comparing parity with nulliparous, with summarized RR = 0.79 (95% CI: 0.60-1.06; I(2) = 90.9%, P < 0.001). In dose-response analysis, we observed a significant nonlinear association between parity number and CVD mortality. The greatest risk reduction appeared when the parity number reached four. The findings of this meta-analysis suggests that ever parity is inversely related to CVD mortality. Furthermore, there is a statistically significant nonlinear inverse association between parity number and CVD mortality.

  8. The alanine detector in BNCT dosimetry: Dose response in thermal and epithermal neutron fields

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, T.; Bassler, N.; Blaickner, M.; Ziegner, M.; Hsiao, M. C.; Liu, Y. H.; Koivunoro, H.; Auterinen, I.; Serén, T.; Kotiluoto, P.; Palmans, H.; Sharpe, P.; Langguth, P.; Hampel, G.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The response of alanine solid state dosimeters to ionizing radiation strongly depends on particle type and energy. Due to nuclear interactions, neutron fields usually also consist of secondary particles such as photons and protons of diverse energies. Various experiments have been carried out in three different neutron beams to explore the alanine dose response behavior and to validate model predictions. Additionally, application in medical neutron fields for boron neutron capture therapy is discussed. Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz, Germany, in five experimental conditions, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been made in the epithermal neutron beams at the research reactors FiR 1 in Helsinki, Finland, and Tsing Hua open pool reactor in HsinChu, Taiwan ROC. Readout has been performed with electron spin resonance spectrometry with reference to an absorbed dose standard in a {sup 60}Co gamma ray beam. Absorbed doses and dose components have been calculated using the Monte Carlo codes FLUKA and MCNP. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using the Hansen and Olsen alanine response model. Results: The measured dose response of the alanine detector in the different experiments has been evaluated and compared to model predictions. Therefore, a relative effectiveness has been calculated for each dose component, accounting for its dependence on particle type and energy. Agreement within 5% between model and measurement has been achieved for most irradiated detectors. Significant differences have been observed in response behavior between thermal and epithermal neutron fields, especially regarding dose composition and depth dose curves. The calculated dose components could be verified with the experimental results in the different primary and secondary particle fields. Conclusions: The

  9. The relationship between thyroid dose and diagnosis of primary hypothyroidism in pediatric brain tumor patients receiving craniospinal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lauro, Christine; Macy, Margaret E.; Zeitler, Philip; Backus, Jennifer; Mettler, Pamela; Foreman, Nicholas; Liu, Arthur K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this work is to determine if a relationship exists between thyroid dose and incidence of primary hypothyroidism (PH) in children undergoing craniospinal irradiation (CSI). Methods A total of 22 patients received CSI with evaluable thyroid dose information. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy and 21 patients (95%) received adjuvant chemotherapy. Median follow-up was 42.9 months. Results The incidence of PH in our cohort was 59% at a median time after radiotherapy of 3.5 years (range: 8 months to 7.5 years). Mean thyroid dose appeared to best predict for PH, with a median of 2080 cGy for patients with PH versus 1736 cGy for children without PH (p=0.057). There was no association between the rate of PH and sex, age, CSI dose, minimum thyroid dose and maximum thyroid dose. Conclusions A relationship may exist between the mean thyroid dose and incidence of PH in patients undergoing CSI. Thus, new strategies to protect the thyroid gland may be warranted. PMID:24057590

  10. Analysis of Dose Response for Circulatory Disease After Radiotherapy for Benign Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Mark P.; Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose-response for various circulatory disease endpoints, and modifiers by age and time since exposure. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of the US peptic ulcer data testing for heterogeneity of radiogenic risk by circulatory disease endpoint (ischemic heart, cerebrovascular, other circulatory disease). Results: There were significant excess risks for all circulatory disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.082 (95% CI 0.031-0.140), and ischemic heart disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.102 (95% CI 0.039-0.174) (both p = 0.01), and indications of excess risk for stroke. There were no statistically significant (p > 0.2) differences between risks by endpoint, and few indications of curvature in the dose-response. There were significant (p < 0.001) modifications of relative risk by time since exposure, the magnitude of which did not vary between endpoints (p > 0.2). Risk modifications were similar if analysis was restricted to patients receiving radiation, although the relative risks were slightly larger and the risk of stroke failed to be significant. The slopes of the dose-response were generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in occupationally and medically exposed groups. Conclusions: There were excess risks for a variety of circulatory diseases in this dataset, with significant modification of risk by time since exposure. The consistency of the dose-response slopes with those observed in radiotherapeutically treated groups at much higher dose, as well as in lower dose-exposed cohorts such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and nuclear workers, implies that there may be little sparing effect of fractionation of dose or low-dose-rate exposure.

  11. Time and dose-response effects of honokiol on UVB-induced skin cancer development.

    PubMed

    Guillermo, Ruth F; Chilampalli, Chandeshwari; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zeman, David; Fahmy, Hesham; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2012-06-01

    Honokiol has shown chemopreventive effects in chemically-induced and UVB-induced skin cancer in mice. In this investigation, we assessed the time-effects of a topical low dose of honokiol (30 μg), and then the effects of different honokiol doses (30, 45, and 60 μg) on a UVB-induced skin cancer model to find an optimal dose and time for desirable chemopreventive effects. UVB radiation (30 mJ/cm(2), 5 days/week for 25 or 27 weeks) was used to induce skin carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice. For the time-response experiment 30 μg honokiol in acetone was applied topically to the animals before the UVB exposure (30 min, 1 h, and 2 h) and after the UVB exposure (immediately, 30 min, and 1 h). Control groups were treated with acetone. For the dose-response study, animals were treated topically with acetone or honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) one hour before the UVB exposure. In the time-response experiment, honokiol inhibited skin tumor multiplicity by 49-58% while reducing tumor volumes by 70-89%. In the dose-response study, honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) significantly decreased skin tumor multiplicity by 36-78% in a dose-dependent manner, while tumor area was reduced by 76-94%. Honokiol (60 μg) significantly reduced tumor incidence by 40% as compared to control group. Honokiol applied in very low doses (30 μg) either before or after UVB radiation shows chemopreventive effects. Honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) prevents UVB-induced skin cancer in a dose-dependent manner. Honokiol can be an effective chemopreventive agent against skin cancer.

  12. Relationships between exposure and dose in aquatic toxicity tests for organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Donald; McCarty, Lynn S; Arnot, Jon A

    2014-09-01

    There is continuing debate about the merits of exposure-based toxicity metrics such as median lethal concentration (LC50) versus organism-based metrics such as critical body residue (CBR) as indicators of chemical toxicity to aquatic organisms. To demonstrate relationships and differences between these 2 metrics, the authors applied a simple one-compartment toxicokinetic mass-balance model for water-exposed fish for a series of hypothetical organic chemicals exhibiting baseline narcotic toxicity. The authors also considered the influence of several toxicity-modifying factors. The results showed that the results of standard toxicity tests, such as the LC50, are strongly influenced by several modifying factors, including chemical and organism characteristics such as hydrophobicity, body size, lipid content, metabolic biotransformation, and exposure durations. Consequently, reported LC50s may not represent consistent dose surrogates and may be inappropriate for comparing the relative toxicity of chemicals. For comparisons of toxicity between chemicals, it is preferable to employ a delivered dose metric, such as the CBR. Reproducible toxicity data for a specific combination of chemical, exposure conditions, and organism can be obtained only if the extent of approach to steady state is known. Suggestions are made for revisions in test protocols, including the use of models in advance of empirical testing, to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of tests and reduce the confounding influences of toxicity-modifying factors, especially exposure duration and metabolic biotransformation. This will assist in linking empirical measurements of LC50s and CBRs, 2 different but related indicators of aquatic toxicity, and thereby improve understanding of the large existing database of aquatic toxicity test results.

  13. Accumulation of cocaine in maternal and fetal hair; the dose response curve.

    PubMed

    Forman, R; Schneiderman, J; Klein, J; Graham, K; Greenwald, M; Koren, G

    1992-01-01

    Cocaine and its major metabolites are incorporated into hair during the growth of the shaft and stay there for the whole life of the hair. Cocaine crosses the placenta and its metabolites for example Benzoylecgonine (BZ), have been found in neonatal urine, meconium and hair. In order to utilize hair measurements of cocaine as a biological marker of systemic exposure, we conducted both animal and human investigations on the dose response characteristics of this phenomenon. Our data suggest that both maternal and fetal accumulation of cocaine and its metabolite follow a linear pattern within the clinically used doses. Similarly, a good correlation was observed in animals between maternal dose and fetal hair accumulation.

  14. Responses of criterion variables to different supplemental doses of L-carnitine L-tartrate.

    PubMed

    Spiering, Barry A; Kraemer, William J; Vingren, Jakob L; Hatfield, Disa L; Fragala, Maren S; Ho, Jen-Yu; Maresh, Carl M; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Volek, Jeff S

    2007-02-01

    L-carnitine L-tartrate (LCLT) supplementation beneficially affects markers of postexercise metabolic stress and muscle damage. However, to date, no study has determined the dose response of LCLT to elicit such responses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of different doses of LCLT on criterion variables previously shown to be responsive to LCLT supplementation. Eight healthy men (22 +/- 3 y, 174 +/- 5 cm, 83.0 +/- 15.3 kg) were supplemented with 0 g, 1 g, and 2 g of LCLT for 3 weeks and then performed a bout of resistance exercise (5 sets of 15-20 repetition maximum with a 2-min rest between sets) with associated blood draws. This procedure was performed in a balanced, randomized, repeated measures design. Serum carnitine concentrations increased (p < or = 0.05) following the 1 g and 2 g doses, with the 2-g dose providing the highest carnitine concentrations. The 1- and 2-g doses reduced postexercise serum hypoxanthine, serum xanthine oxidase, serum myoglobin, and perceived muscle soreness. In conclusion, both the 1- and 2-g doses were effective in mediating various markers of metabolic stress and of muscle soreness. Use of LCLT appears to attenuate metabolic stress and the hypoxic chain of events leading to muscle damage after exercise.

  15. Nonmonotonic dose response curves (NMDRCs) are common after Estrogen or Androgen signaling pathway disruption. Fact or Falderal?##

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonmonotonic dose response curves (NMDRCs) are common after Estrogen or Androgen signaling pathway disruption. Fact or Falderal? Leon Earl Gray Jr, USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, TAD, RTB. RTP, NC, USA The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since th...

  16. Nonmonotonic dose response curves (NMDRCs) are common after Estrogen or Androgen signaling pathway disruption. Fact or Falderal? ###SETAC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the late 1940s. The debate originally focused on linear no threshold (LNT) vs threshold responses in the low dose range for cancer and noncancer related effects. Recently, claims have arisen tha...

  17. Induction of IgG memory responses with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is antigen dose dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Lite, H.S.; Braley-Mullen, H.

    1981-03-01

    Irradiated recipients of spleen cells from mice primed with a very low dose (0.0025 ..mu../g) of the thymus-independent (TI) antigen polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) produced PVP-specific IgG memory responses after secondary challenge with a T-dependent (TD) form of PVP, PVP-HRBC. The IgG memory responses induced by low doses of PVP were similar in magnitude to those induced by the TD antigen PVP-HRBC. The induction of IgG memory by the TI form of antigen was markedly dependent on the dose of PVP used to prime donor mice. Spleen cells from mice primed with an amount of PVP (0.25 ..mu..g) that induces an optimal primary IgM response did not produce significant IgG antibody after challenge with PVP-HRBC. The inability of higher doses of PVP to induce IgG memory may be due, at least in part, to the fact that such doses of PVP were found to induce tolerance in PVP-specific B cells and could suppress the induction of memory induced by PVP-HRBC. Low doses of PVP did not interfere with the induction of memory by PVP-HRBC. Expression of IgG memory responses in recipients of PVP-HRBC or low-dose PVP-primed cells was found to be T cell dependent. Moreover, only primed T cells could reconstitute the respnse of recipients of primed B cells, suggesting that the ability of PVP to induce IgG memory may be related to its ability to prime T helper cells. Expression of the IgG memory response in recipient mice also required the use of a TD antigen for secondary challenge, i.e., mice challenged with PVP did not develop IgG.

  18. Beneficial effects of low dose radiation in response to the oncogenic KRAS induced cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Rae-Kwon; Kim, Min-Jung; Seong, Ki Moon; Kaushik, Neha; Suh, Yongjoon; Yoo, Ki-Chun; Cui, Yan-Hong; Jin, Young Woo; Nam, Seon Young; Lee, Su-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Recently low dose irradiation has gained attention in the field of radiotherapy. For lack of understanding of the molecular consequences of low dose irradiation, there is much doubt concerning its risks on human beings. In this article, we report that low dose irradiation is capable of blocking the oncogenic KRAS-induced malignant transformation. To address this hypothesis, we showed that low dose irradiation, at doses of 0.1 Gray (Gy); predominantly provide defensive response against oncogenic KRAS -induced malignant transformation in human cells through the induction of antioxidants without causing cell death and acts as a critical regulator for the attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Importantly, we elucidated that knockdown of antioxidants significantly enhanced ROS generation, invasive and migratory properties and abnormal acini formation in KRAS transformed normal as well as cancer cells. Taken together, this study demonstrates that low dose irradiation reduces the KRAS induced malignant cellular transformation through diminution of ROS. This interesting phenomenon illuminates the beneficial effects of low dose irradiation, suggesting one of contributory mechanisms for reducing the oncogene induced carcinogenesis that intensify the potential use of low dose irradiation as a standard regimen. PMID:26515758

  19. Low-Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Barry D.; Held, Kathryn D.

    2002-06-01

    This project is part of the DOE research program on the biological effects of low dose and dose rate ionizing radiation. This DOE program is designed to support and conduct science that can impact the subsequent development of health risk policy for low dose radiation exposures in the US. The overall, long-term goal of this project is to increase understanding of the responses of cells to the low doses of ionizing radiation typically encountered in environmental level exposures. To achieve this objective, we couple use of a unique focused soft X-ray facility for low dose irradiation of individual cells or irradiation of specific subcellular regions of cells with studies of the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in cells. The project includes seven specific goals: (1) Determine the response of individual cells to low doses of ionizing radiation from a focused soft X-ray beam with a 250 nm diameter beam spot. (2) Determine the response of cells to ROS generated by chemical agents in a fashion that mimics the endogenous cellular generation of ROS. (3) Study the interaction between cellular oxidative processes and ionizing radiation. (4) Determine the importance of the subcellular distribution of ROS from focused soft X-rays on cellular response. (5) Determine whether damage deposited in individual cells by focused soft X-rays or by chemically-generated ROS can elicit a response in other, surrounding, untreated cells, a ''bystander'' effect. (6) Quantify the low dose response and the targets involved in the genomic instability phenotype in cells exposed to low LET radiation and the relationship with the bystander response. (7) Develop tissue explant systems for the measurement of low dose effects in multicellular systems.

  20. Radiation dose response estimation with emphasis on low dose range using restricted cubic splines: application to all solid cancer mortality data, 1950-2003, in atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Eiji

    2015-07-01

    Using the all solid cancer mortality data set of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort from 1950 to 2003 (LSS Report 14) data among atomic bomb survivors, excess relative risk (ERR) statistical analyses were performed using the second degree polynomial and the threshold and restricted cubic spline (RCS) dose response models. For the RCS models with 3 to 7 knots of equally spaced percentiles with margins in the dose range greater than 50 mGy, the dose response was assumed to be linear at less than 70 to 90 mGy. Due to the skewed dose distribution of atomic bomb survivors, the current knot system for the RCS analysis results in a detailed depiction of the dose response as less than approximately 0.5 Gy. The 6 knot RCS models for the all-solid cancer mortality dose response of the whole dose or less than 2 Gy were selected with the AIC model selection criterion and fit significantly better (p < 0.05) than the linear (L) model. The usual RCS includes the L-global model but not the quadratic (Q) nor linear-quadratic (LQ) global models. The authors extended the RCS to include L or LQ global models by putting L or LQ constraints on the cubic spline in the lower and upper tails, and the best RCS model selected with AIC criterion was the usual RCS with L-constraints in both the lower and upper tails. The selected RCS had a linear dose-response model in the lower dose range (i.e., < 0.2-0.3 Gy) and was compatible with the linear no-threshold (LNT) model in this dose range. The proposed method is also useful in describing the dose response of a specific cancer or non-cancer disease incidence/mortality.

  1. Poster — Thur Eve — 27: Flattening Filter Free VMAT Quality Assurance: Dose Rate Considerations for Detector Response

    SciTech Connect

    Viel, Francis; Duzenli, Cheryl; Camborde, Marie-Laure; Strgar, Vincent; Horwood, Ron; Atwal, Parmveer; Gete, Ermias; Karan, Tania

    2014-08-15

    Introduction: Radiation detector responses can be affected by dose rate. Due to higher dose per pulse and wider range of mu rates in FFF beams, detector responses should be characterized prior to implementation of QA protocols for FFF beams. During VMAT delivery, the MU rate may also vary dramatically within a treatment fraction. This study looks at the dose per pulse variation throughout a 3D volume for typical VMAT plans and the response characteristics for a variety of detectors, and makes recommendations on the design of QA protocols for FFF VMAT QA. Materials and Methods: Linac log file data and a simplified dose calculation algorithm are used to calculate dose per pulse for a variety of clinical VMAT plans, on a voxel by voxel basis, as a function of time in a cylindrical phantom. Diode and ion chamber array responses are characterized over the relevant range of dose per pulse and dose rate. Results: Dose per pulse ranges from <0.1 mGy/pulse to 1.5 mGy/pulse in a typical VMAT treatment delivery using the 10XFFF beam. Diode detector arrays demonstrate increased sensitivity to dose (+./− 3%) with increasing dose per pulse over this range. Ion chamber arrays demonstrate decreased sensitivity to dose (+/− 1%) with increasing dose rate over this range. Conclusions: QA protocols should be designed taking into consideration inherent changes in detector sensitivity with dose rate. Neglecting to account for changes in detector response with dose per pulse can lead to skewed QA results.

  2. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low dose/low LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Munira A Kadhim

    2010-03-05

    To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e., less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these “non-targeted” responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander responses in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/H and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition on two non-targeted radiation responses in these models; the bystander effect and genomic instability, which we believe are closely related. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to doses approaching a single electron traversal. Using conventional X-ray and γ-ray sources, novel dish separation and targeted irradiation approaches, we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various bystander conditions at doses down to a few electron tracks. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for bystander targeted studies. Mechanistic studies of instability and the bystander response in different cell lineages will focus initially on the role of cytokines which have been shown to be involved in bystander signaling and the initiation of instability. These studies also aim

  3. Hematopoietic responses under protracted exposures to low daily dose gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seed, T. M.; Fritz, T. E.; Tolle, D. V.; Jackson, W. E.

    In attempting to evaluate the possible health consequences of chronic ionizing radiation exposure during extended space travel (e.g., Mars Mission), ground-based experimental studies of the clinical and pathological responses of canines under low daily doses of 60Co gamma irradiation (0.3-26.3 cGy d -1) have been examined. Specific reference was given to responses of the blood forming system. Results suggest that the daily dose rate of 7.5 cGy d -1 represents a threshold below which the hematopoietic system can retain either partial or full trilineal cell-producing capacity (erythropoiesis, myelopoiesis, and megakaryopoiesis) for extended periods of exposure (> 1yr). Trilineal capacity was fully retained for several years of exposure at the lowest dose-rate tested (0.3 cGy d -1) but was completely lost within several hundred days at the highest dose-rate (26.3 cGy d -1). Retention of hematopoietic capacity under chronic exposure has been demonstrated to be mediated by hematopoietic progenitors with acquired radioresistance and repair functions, altered cytogenetics, and cell-cycle characteristics. Radiological, biological, and temporal parameters responsible for these vital acquisitions by hematopoietic progenitors have been partially characterized. These parameters, along with threshold responses, are described and discussed in relation to potential health risks of the space traveler under chronic stress of low-dose irradiation.

  4. Dose-response analyses of the carcinogenic effects of trichloroethylene in experimental animals.

    PubMed Central

    Rhomberg, L R

    2000-01-01

    In lifetime bioassays, trichloroethylene (TCE, CAS No. 79-01-6) causes liver tumors in mice following gavage, liver and lung tumors in mice following inhalation, and kidney tumors in rats following gavage or inhalation. Recently developed pharmacokinetic models provide estimates of internal, target-organ doses of the TCE metabolites thought responsible for these tumor responses. Dose-response analyses following recently proposed methods for carcinogen risk assessment from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) are conducted on the animal tumor data using the pharmacokinetic dosimeters to derive a series of alternative projections of the potential carcinogenic potency of TCE in humans exposed to low environmental concentrations. Although mechanistic considerations suggest action of possibly nonlinear processes, dose-response shapes in the observable range of tumor incidence evince little sign of such patterns. Results depend on which of several alternative pharmacokinetic analyses are used to define target-organ doses. Human potency projections under the U.S. EPA linear method based on mouse liver tumors and internal dosimetry equal or somewhat exceed calculations based on administered dose, and projections based on mouse liver tumors exceed those from mouse lung or rat kidney tumors. Estimates of the carcinogenic potency of the two primary oxidative metabolites of TCE--trichloroacetic acid and dichloroacetic acid, which are mouse liver carcinogens in their own right--are also made, but it is not clear whether the carcinogenic potency of TCE can be quantitatively ascribed to metabolic generation of these metabolites. PMID:10807564

  5. Hematopoietic responses under protracted exposures to low daily dose gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Seed, T M; Fritz, T E; Tolle, D V; Jackson, W E

    2002-01-01

    In attempting to evaluate the possible health consequences of chronic ionizing radiation exposure during extended space travel (e.g., Mars Mission), ground-based experimental studies of the clinical and pathological responses of canines under low daily doses of 60Co gamma irradiation (0.3-26.3 cGy d-1) have been examined. Specific reference was given to responses of the blood forming system. Results suggest that the daily dose rate of 7.5 cGy d-1 represents a threshold below which the hematopoietic system can retain either partial or full trilineal cell-producing capacity (erythropoiesis, myelopoiesis, and megakaryopoiesis) for extended periods of exposure (>1 yr). Trilineal capacity was fully retained for several years of exposure at the lowest dose-rate tested (0.3 cGy d-1) but was completely lost within several hundred days at the highest dose-rate (26.3 cGy d-1). Retention of hematopoietic capacity under chronic exposure has been demonstrated to be mediated by hematopoietic progenitors with acquired radioresistance and repair functions, altered cytogenetics, and cell-cycle characteristics. Radiological, biological, and temporal parameters responsible for these vital acquisitions by hematopoietic progenitors have been partially characterized. These parameters, along with threshold responses, are described and discussed in relation to potential health risks of the space traveler under chronic stress of low-dose irradiation.

  6. Immunological responses following experimental endobronchial infection of badgers (Meles meles) with different doses of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Lesellier, Sandrine; Corner, Leigh; Costello, Eamon; Sleeman, Paddy; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; Glyn Hewinson, R; Chambers, Mark; Gormley, Eamonn

    2009-01-15

    The Eurasian badger (Meles meles) is a wildlife reservoir for Mycobacterium bovis infection in Ireland and Great Britain and has been implicated in the transmission of tuberculosis to cattle. Vaccination of badgers is an option that could be used as part of a strategy to control the disease. In this study we used an endobronchial infection procedure to inoculate groups of badgers with three different doses (3x10(3), 2x10(2) and <10 Colony Forming Units (CFUs)) of M. bovis. After 17 weeks the disease status of each animal was determined by post-mortem pathology and culture for M. bovis. Each of the inoculum doses resulted in establishment of infection in the badgers. The cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were measured by lymphocyte transformation assay (LTA) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cultured with bovine tuberculin (PPD-B). In each infected group the CMI responses increased with a kinetic profile corresponding to the delivered dose and the post-mortem pathology. The serological responses were measured by ELISA and a multi-antigen print immunoassay (MAPIA) in order to investigate any changes in the antigenic repertoire associated with different infective doses. In contrast to the CMI responses, the ELISA and MAPIA showed that the recognition of antigens by the badgers was intermittent and not strongly influenced by the dose of M. bovis.

  7. Probiotics reduce symptoms of antibiotic use in a hospital setting: a randomized dose response study.

    PubMed

    Ouwehand, Arthur C; DongLian, Cai; Weijian, Xu; Stewart, Morgan; Ni, Jiayi; Stewart, Tad; Miller, Larry E

    2014-01-16

    Probiotics are known to reduce antibiotic associated diarrhea (AAD) and Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) risk in a strain-specific manner. The aim of this study was to determine the dose-response effect of a four strain probiotic combination (HOWARU(®) Restore) on the incidence of AAD and CDAD and severity of gastrointestinal symptoms in adult in-patients requiring antibiotic therapy. Patients (n=503) were randomized among three study groups: HOWARU(®) Restore probiotic 1.70×10(10) CFU (high-dose, n=168), HOWARU(®) Restore probiotic 4.17×10(9) CFU (low-dose, n=168), or placebo (n=167). Subjects were stratified by gender, age, and duration of antibiotic treatment. Study products were administered daily up to 7 days after the final antibiotic dose. The primary endpoint of the study was the incidence of AAD. Secondary endpoints included incidence of CDAD, diarrhea duration, stools per day, bloody stools, fever, abdominal cramping, and bloating. A significant dose-response effect on AAD was observed with incidences of 12.5, 19.6, and 24.6% with high-dose, low-dose, and placebo, respectively (p=0.02). CDAD was the same in both probiotic groups (1.8%) but different from the placebo group (4.8%; p=0.04). Incidences of fever, abdominal pain, and bloating were lower with increasing probiotic dose. The number of daily liquid stools and average duration of diarrhea decreased with higher probiotic dosage. The tested four strain probiotic combination appears to lower the risk of AAD, CDAD, and gastrointestinal symptoms in a dose-dependent manner in adult in-patients.

  8. Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

    2011-03-24

    It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the

  9. Dose-Response Analysis of Chemotactic Signaling Response in Salmonella typhimurium LT2 upon Exposure to Cysteine / Cystine Redox Pair

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The chemotaxis system enables motile bacteria to search for an optimum level of environmental factors. Salmonella typhimurium senses the amino acid cysteine as an attractant and its oxidized dimeric form, cystine, as a repellent. We investigated the dose-response dependence of changes in chemotactic signaling activity upon exposure to cysteine and cystine of S. typhimurium LT2 using in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. The dose-response curve of the attractant response to cysteine had a sigmoidal shape, typical for receptor-ligand interactions. However, in a knockout strain of the chemoreceptor genes tsr and tar, we detected a repellent response to cysteine solutions, scaling linearly with the logarithm of the cysteine concentration. Interestingly, the magnitude of the repellent response to cystine also showed linear dependence to the logarithm of the cystine concentration. This linear dependence was observed over more than four orders of magnitude, where detection started at nanomolar concentrations. Notably, low concentrations of another oxidized compound, benzoquinone, triggered similar responses. In contrast to S. typhimurium 14028, where no response to cystine was observed in a knockout strain of chemoreceptor genes mcpB and mcpC, here we showed that McpB / McpC-independent responses to cystine existed in the strain S. typhimurium LT2 even at nanomolar concentrations. Additionally, knocking out mcpB and mcpC did not affect the linear dose-response dependence, whereas enhanced responses were only observed to solutions that where not pH neutral (>100 μM cystine) in the case of McpC overexpression. We discuss that the linear dependence of the response on the logarithm of cystine concentrations could be a result of a McpB / C-independent redox-sensing pathway that exists in S. typhimurium LT2. We supported this hypothesis with experiments with defined cysteine / cystine mixed solutions, where a transition from repellent to

  10. Comparison of the modified relative dose response (MRDR) and the relative dose response (RDR) in the assessment of vitamin A status in malnourished children.

    PubMed

    Wahed, M A; Alvarez, J O; Khaled, M A; Mahalanabis, D; Rahman, M M; Habte, D

    1995-06-01

    The modified-relative-dose-response (MRDR) test and the relative-dose-response (RDR) test were compared in 49 mildly to moderately malnourished Bangladeshi children. The MRDR test had a significantly lower sensitivity, detecting only 71% of children with very low serum retinol (< or = 0.35 mumol/L) and 33% of children with low serum retinol (0.355-0.70 mumol/L) compared with 100% and 80% for the RDR test, respectively. The MRDR test showed a very strong dependency on retinol-binding protein (RBP) saturation (ie, percent saturation of RBP with retinol) compared with the RDR test. Only 3 (23%) of 13 children with RBP saturation > or = 55% but low vitamin A stores were diagnosed as abnormal by the MRDR test. This suggests that when apo-RBP concentration is limiting, as it is in malnourished children, didehydroretinol, the analog used in the MRDR test cannot effectively compete with retinol for binding to apo-RBP. Under these circumstances, the MRDR test is rendered ineffective. The possibility of increasing the sensitivity of the test by using a high dose of didehydroretinol needs to be investigated. PMID:7762526

  11. Pilot study about dose-effect relationship of ocular injury in argon laser photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Zhang, C. P.; Fu, X. B.; Zhang, T. M.; Wang, C. Z.; Qian, H. W.; San, Q.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this article was to study the injury effect of either convergent or parallel argon laser beam on rabbit retina, get the dose-effect relationship for the two types of laser beams, and calculate the damage threshold of argon laser for human retinas. An argon laser therapeutic instrument for ophthalmology was used in this study. A total of 80 rabbit eyes were irradiated for 600 lesions, half of which were treated by convergent laser and the other half were done with parallel laser beam. After irradiation, slit lamp microscope and fundus photography were used to observe the lesions, change and the incidence of injury was processed statistically to get the damage threshold of rabbit retina. Based on results from the experiments on animals and the data from clinical cases of laser treatment, the photocoagulation damage thresholds of human retinas for convergent and parallel argon laser were calculated to be 0.464 and 0.285 mJ respectively. These data provided biological reference for safely operation when employing laser photocoagulation in clinical practice and other fields.

  12. Relationship between size and thiazole orange fluorescence of platelets in patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Balduini, C L; Noris, P; Spedini, P; Belletti, S; Zambelli, A; Da Prada, G A

    1999-07-01

    The reticulated platelet count relies upon the assumption that newly formed platelets contain a residual amount of RNA which selectively binds the dye thiazole orange (TO) and greatly enhances its fluorescence signal. It has, however, recently been shown that almost half of the platelet TO-signal is derived from the labelling of dense-granule nucleotides. It is therefore possible that the higher TO fluorescence of young platelets partially derives from the higher granule content due to their larger volume. To investigate the relationship between platelet size and TO fluorescence we studied 13 patients with high-risk breast cancer undergoing high-dose chemotherapy. Mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width, platelet-large cell ratio, membrane content of glycoprotein Ib and IIb-IIIa and platelet aggregation were significantly greater during resolution than during development of thrombocytopenia, suggesting a prevalence of young and old platelets respectively. Mean TO fluorescence per cell was higher in the platelet population enriched in young cells than in that enriched in old cells, but this difference was no longer observed when the ratio TO signal/platelet size was examined. Moreover, RNase treatment and platelet degranulation reduced TO fluorescence to a similar extent in platelet populations enriched in young or old cells. Therefore our data suggest that the higher TO signal of young platelets is derived, to a significant extent, from their larger volume and granule content.

  13. Dietary magnesium intake and metabolic syndrome in the adult population: dose-response meta-analysis and meta-regression.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sang-Yhun; Choi, Whan-Seok; Ock, Sun-Myeong; Kim, Chul-Min; Kim, Do-Hoon

    2014-12-22

    ncreasing evidence has suggested an association between dietary magnesium intake and metabolic syndrome. However, previous research examining dietary magnesium intake and metabolic syndrome has produced mixed results. Our objective was to determine the relationship between dietary magnesium intake and metabolic syndrome in the adult population using a dose-response meta-analysis. We searched the PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library databases from August, 1965, to May, 2014. Observational studies reporting risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for metabolic syndrome in ≥ 3 categories of dietary magnesium intake levels were selected. The data extraction was performed independently by two authors, and the quality of the studies was evaluated using the Risk of Bias Assessment Tool for Nonrandomized Studies (RoBANS). Based on eight cross-sectional studies and two prospective cohort studies, the pooled relative risks of metabolic syndrome per 150 mg/day increment in magnesium intake was 0.88 (95% CI, 0.84-0.93; I(2) = 36.3%). The meta-regression model showed a generally linear, inverse relationship between magnesium intake (mg/day) and metabolic syndrome. This dose-response meta-analysis indicates that dietary magnesium intake is significantly and inversely associated with the risk of metabolic syndrome. However, randomized clinical trials will be necessary to address the issue of causality and to determine whether magnesium supplementation is effective for the prevention of metabolic syndrome.

  14. Defining the Optimal Selenium Dose for Prostate Cancer Risk Reduction: Insights from the U-Shaped Relationship between Selenium Status, DNA Damage, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Emily C.; Shen, Shuren; Kengeri, Seema S.; Xu, Huiping; Combs, Gerald F.; Morris, J. Steven; Bostwick, David G.; Waters, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Our work in dogs has revealed a U-shaped dose response between selenium status and prostatic DNA damage that remarkably parallels the relationship between dietary selenium and prostate cancer risk in men, suggesting that more selenium is not necessarily better. Herein, we extend this canine work to show that the selenium dose that minimizes prostatic DNA damage also maximizes apoptosis—a cancer-suppressing death switch used by prostatic epithelial cells. These provocative findings suggest a new line of thinking about how selenium can reduce cancer risk. Mid-range selenium status (.67–.92 ppm in toenails) favors a process we call “homeostatic housecleaning”—an upregulated apoptosis that preferentially purges damaged prostatic cells. Also, the U-shaped relationship provides valuable insight into stratifying individuals as selenium-responsive or selenium-refractory, based upon the likelihood of reducing their cancer risk by additional selenium. By studying elderly dogs, the only non-human animal model of spontaneous prostate cancer, we have established a robust experimental approach bridging the gap between laboratory and human studies that can help to define the optimal doses of cancer preventives for large-scale human trials. Moreover, our observations bring much needed clarity to the null results of the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) and set a new research priority: testing whether men with low, suboptimal selenium levels less than 0.8 ppm in toenails can achieve cancer risk reduction through daily supplementation. PMID:20877485

  15. Prediction analysis of dose equivalent responses of neutron dosemeters used at a MOX fuel facility.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, N; Yoshida, T; Takada, C

    2011-07-01

    To predict how accurately neutron dosemeters can measure the neutron dose equivalent (rate) in MOX fuel fabrication facility work environments, the dose equivalent responses of neutron dosemeters were calculated by the spectral folding method. The dosemeters selected included two types of personal dosemeter, namely a thermoluminescent albedo neutron dosemeter and an electronic neutron dosemeter, three moderator-based neutron survey meters, and one special instrument called an H(p)(10) monitor. The calculations revealed the energy dependences of the responses expected within the entire range of neutron spectral variations observed in neutron fields at workplaces. PMID:21498409

  16. Exposure-response analysis to assess the concentration-QTc relationship of CC-122.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Carayannopoulos, Leonidas N; Thomas, Michael; Palmisano, Maria; Zhou, Simon

    2016-01-01

    CC-122 hydrochloride is a novel pleiotropic pathway modifier compound that binds cereblon, a substrate receptor of the Cullin 4 RING E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. CC-122 has multiple activities including modulation of immune cells, antiproliferative activity of multiple myeloma and lymphoma cells, and antiangiogenic activity. CC-122 is being developed as an oncology treatment for hematologic malignancies and advanced solid tumors. Cardiovascular and vital sign assessments of CC-122 have been conducted in hERG assays in vitro and in a 28-day good laboratory practice monkey study with negative signals. To assess the potential concentration-QTc relationship in humans and to ascertain or exclude a small QT effect by CC-122, a plasma concentration exposure- and ΔQTcF-response model of CC-122 was developed. Intensive CC-122 concentration and paired triplicate electrocardiogram data from a single ascending dose study were included in the analysis. The parameters included in the final linear exposure-response model are intercept, slope, and treatment effect. The slope estimate of 0.0201 with 90% CI of (0.009, 0.035) indicates a weak relationship between ΔQTcF and CC-122 concentration. The upper bounds of the 90% CI of the model-predicted ΔΔQTcF effect at C max from the 4 mg clinical dose and the supratherapeutic dose of 15 mg (1.18 ms and 8.76 ms, respectively) are <10 ms threshold, suggesting that the risk of CC-122 QT prolongation effect at the relevant therapeutic dose range from 1 mg to 4 mg is low.

  17. Exposure-response analysis to assess the concentration-QTc relationship of CC-122.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Carayannopoulos, Leonidas N; Thomas, Michael; Palmisano, Maria; Zhou, Simon

    2016-01-01

    CC-122 hydrochloride is a novel pleiotropic pathway modifier compound that binds cereblon, a substrate receptor of the Cullin 4 RING E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. CC-122 has multiple activities including modulation of immune cells, antiproliferative activity of multiple myeloma and lymphoma cells, and antiangiogenic activity. CC-122 is being developed as an oncology treatment for hematologic malignancies and advanced solid tumors. Cardiovascular and vital sign assessments of CC-122 have been conducted in hERG assays in vitro and in a 28-day good laboratory practice monkey study with negative signals. To assess the potential concentration-QTc relationship in humans and to ascertain or exclude a small QT effect by CC-122, a plasma concentration exposure- and ΔQTcF-response model of CC-122 was developed. Intensive CC-122 concentration and paired triplicate electrocardiogram data from a single ascending dose study were included in the analysis. The parameters included in the final linear exposure-response model are intercept, slope, and treatment effect. The slope estimate of 0.0201 with 90% CI of (0.009, 0.035) indicates a weak relationship between ΔQTcF and CC-122 concentration. The upper bounds of the 90% CI of the model-predicted ΔΔQTcF effect at C max from the 4 mg clinical dose and the supratherapeutic dose of 15 mg (1.18 ms and 8.76 ms, respectively) are <10 ms threshold, suggesting that the risk of CC-122 QT prolongation effect at the relevant therapeutic dose range from 1 mg to 4 mg is low. PMID:27672344

  18. Exposure-response analysis to assess the concentration–QTc relationship of CC-122

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Carayannopoulos, Leonidas N; Thomas, Michael; Palmisano, Maria; Zhou, Simon

    2016-01-01

    CC-122 hydrochloride is a novel pleiotropic pathway modifier compound that binds cereblon, a substrate receptor of the Cullin 4 RING E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. CC-122 has multiple activities including modulation of immune cells, antiproliferative activity of multiple myeloma and lymphoma cells, and antiangiogenic activity. CC-122 is being developed as an oncology treatment for hematologic malignancies and advanced solid tumors. Cardiovascular and vital sign assessments of CC-122 have been conducted in hERG assays in vitro and in a 28-day good laboratory practice monkey study with negative signals. To assess the potential concentration–QTc relationship in humans and to ascertain or exclude a small QT effect by CC-122, a plasma concentration exposure- and ΔQTcF-response model of CC-122 was developed. Intensive CC-122 concentration and paired triplicate electrocardiogram data from a single ascending dose study were included in the analysis. The parameters included in the final linear exposure-response model are intercept, slope, and treatment effect. The slope estimate of 0.0201 with 90% CI of (0.009, 0.035) indicates a weak relationship between ΔQTcF and CC-122 concentration. The upper bounds of the 90% CI of the model-predicted ΔΔQTcF effect at Cmax from the 4 mg clinical dose and the supratherapeutic dose of 15 mg (1.18 ms and 8.76 ms, respectively) are <10 ms threshold, suggesting that the risk of CC-122 QT prolongation effect at the relevant therapeutic dose range from 1 mg to 4 mg is low.

  19. Exposure-response analysis to assess the concentration–QTc relationship of CC-122

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Carayannopoulos, Leonidas N; Thomas, Michael; Palmisano, Maria; Zhou, Simon

    2016-01-01

    CC-122 hydrochloride is a novel pleiotropic pathway modifier compound that binds cereblon, a substrate receptor of the Cullin 4 RING E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. CC-122 has multiple activities including modulation of immune cells, antiproliferative activity of multiple myeloma and lymphoma cells, and antiangiogenic activity. CC-122 is being developed as an oncology treatment for hematologic malignancies and advanced solid tumors. Cardiovascular and vital sign assessments of CC-122 have been conducted in hERG assays in vitro and in a 28-day good laboratory practice monkey study with negative signals. To assess the potential concentration–QTc relationship in humans and to ascertain or exclude a small QT effect by CC-122, a plasma concentration exposure- and ΔQTcF-response model of CC-122 was developed. Intensive CC-122 concentration and paired triplicate electrocardiogram data from a single ascending dose study were included in the analysis. The parameters included in the final linear exposure-response model are intercept, slope, and treatment effect. The slope estimate of 0.0201 with 90% CI of (0.009, 0.035) indicates a weak relationship between ΔQTcF and CC-122 concentration. The upper bounds of the 90% CI of the model-predicted ΔΔQTcF effect at Cmax from the 4 mg clinical dose and the supratherapeutic dose of 15 mg (1.18 ms and 8.76 ms, respectively) are <10 ms threshold, suggesting that the risk of CC-122 QT prolongation effect at the relevant therapeutic dose range from 1 mg to 4 mg is low. PMID:27672344

  20. Qualitative and quantitative approaches in the dose-response assessment of genotoxic carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Shoji; Gi, Min; Kakehashi, Anna; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Matsumoto, Michiharu

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative approaches are important issues in field of carcinogenic risk assessment of the genotoxic carcinogens. Herein, we provide quantitative data on low-dose hepatocarcinogenicity studies for three genotoxic hepatocarcinogens: 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN). Hepatocarcinogenicity was examined by quantitative analysis of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci, which are the preneoplastic lesions in rat hepatocarcinogenesis and the endpoint carcinogenic marker in the rat liver medium-term carcinogenicity bioassay. We also examined DNA damage and gene mutations which occurred through the initiation stage of carcinogenesis. For the establishment of points of departure (PoD) from which the cancer-related risk can be estimated, we analyzed the above events by quantitative no-observed-effect level and benchmark dose approaches. MeIQx at low doses induced formation of DNA-MeIQx adducts; somewhat higher doses caused elevation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyquanosine levels; at still higher doses gene mutations occurred; and the highest dose induced formation of GST-P positive foci. These data indicate that early genotoxic events in the pathway to carcinogenesis showed the expected trend of lower PoDs for earlier events in the carcinogenic process. Similarly, only the highest dose of IQ caused an increase in the number of GST-P positive foci in the liver, while IQ-DNA adduct formation was observed with low doses. Moreover, treatment with DEN at low doses had no effect on development of GST-P positive foci in the liver. These data on PoDs for the markers contribute to understand whether genotoxic carcinogens have a threshold for their carcinogenicity. The most appropriate approach to use in low dose-response assessment must be approved on the basis of scientific judgment.

  1. A Response Surface Model Exploration of Dosing Strategies in Gastrointestinal Endoscopies Using Midazolam and Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Jing-Yang; Ting, Chien-Kun; Hou, Ming-Chih; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Classical midazolam–opioid combination for gastrointestinal endoscopy sedation has been adopted for decades. Dosing regimens have been studied but most require fixed dosing intervals. We intend to use a sophisticated pharmacodynamic tool, response surface model (RSM), to simulate sedation using different regimens. RSM can predict patient's response during different phases of the examination and predict patient's wake-up time with precision and without the need for fixed dosing intervals. We believe it will aid physicians in guiding their dosing strategy and timing. The study is divided into 2 parts. The first part is the full Greco RSMs development for 3 distinct phases: esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), colonoscopy, and intersession (the time lapse between procedures). Observer's Assessment of Alertness Score (OAA/S) is used to assess patient response. The second part simulates 6 regimens with different characteristics using the RSMs: midazolam only, balanced midazolam and opioids, high-dose opioids and midazolam, low-dose midazolam with high-dose opioids, high-dose midazolam and low-dose opioids, and finally midazolam with continuous opioid infusion. Loss of response at 95% probability for adequate anesthesia during examination and return of consciousness at 50% probability during intersession was selected for simulation purposes. The average age of the patient population is 49.3 years. Mean BMI is 21.9 ± 2.3 kg/m2. About 56.7% were females and none received prior abdominal surgery. The cecal intubation rate was 100%. Only 1 patient (3%) developed temporary hypoxemia, which was promptly managed with simple measures. The RSMs for each phase showed significant synergy between midazolam and alfentanil. The balanced midazolam and alfentanil combination provided adequate anesthesia and most rapid return of consciousness. The awakening time from the final drug bolus was 7.4 minutes during EGD and colonoscopy stimulation, and 9.1 minutes during EGD

  2. Effect of increased CRM₁₉₇ carrier protein dose on meningococcal C bactericidal antibody response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lucia H; Blake, Milan S

    2012-04-01

    New multivalent CRM(197)-based conjugate vaccines are available for childhood immunization. Clinical studies were reviewed to assess meningococcal group C (MenC) antibody responses following MenC-CRM(197) coadministration with CRM(197)-based pneumococcal or Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines. Infants receiving a total CRM(197) carrier protein dose of ∼50 μg and concomitant diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP)-containing vaccine tended to have lower MenC geometric mean antibody titers and continued to have low titers after the toddler dose. Nevertheless, at least 95% of children in the reported studies achieved a MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titer of ≥ 1:8 after the last infant or toddler dose. SBA was measured using an assay with a baby rabbit or human complement source. Additional studies are needed to assess long-term antibody persistence and MenC CRM(197) conjugate vaccine immunogenicity using alternative dosing schedules.

  3. Prediction of multidimensional drug dose responses based on measurements of drug pairs

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Anat; Katzir, Itay; Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Finding potent multidrug combinations against cancer and infections is a pressing therapeutic challenge; however, screening all combinations is difficult because the number of experiments grows exponentially with the number of drugs and doses. To address this, we present a mathematical model that predicts the effects of three or more antibiotics or anticancer drugs at all doses based only on measurements of drug pairs at a few doses, without need for mechanistic information. The model provides accurate predictions on available data for antibiotic combinations, and on experiments presented here on the response matrix of three cancer drugs at eight doses per drug. This approach offers a way to search for effective multidrug combinations using a small number of experiments. PMID:27562164

  4. Dose response of xylitol and sorbitol for EPR retrospective dosimetry with applications to chewing gum.

    PubMed

    Israelsson, A; Gustafsson, H; Lund, E

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the radiation-induced electron paramagnetic resonance signal in sweeteners xylitol and sorbitol for use in retrospective dosimetry. For both sweeteners and chewing gum, the signal changed at an interval of 1-84 d after irradiation with minimal changes after 4-8 d. A dependence on storage conditions was noticed and the exposure of the samples to light and humidity was therefore minimised. Both the xylitol and sorbitol signals showed linearity with dose in the measured dose interval, 0-20 Gy. The dose-response measurements for the chewing gum resulted in a decision threshold of 0.38 Gy and a detection limit of 0.78 Gy. A blind test illustrated the possibility of using chewing gums as a retrospective dosemeter with an uncertainty in the dose determination of 0.17 Gy (1 SD).

  5. Differences in clinical disease and immune response of pigs challenged with a high-dose versus low-dose inoculum of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Loving, Crystal L; Brockmeier, Susan L; Vincent, Amy L; Lager, Kelly M; Sacco, Randy E

    2008-09-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) continues to be an economically important infectious disease of swine. Mechanisms governing activation of the innate immune response to PRRSV remain to be elucidated. Virulence differences observed between PRRSV isolates have been attributed to replication ability in vivo, though immunogenic differences likely contribute to virulence also. The current study utilized a single PRRSV isolate given at two different challenge doses to investigate the effect of viral replication and load on immune responses, including type I interferon activation. Body temperature, viral load, antibody levels, cellular infiltration into pulmonary tissue, and the interferon response were measured in animals receiving either a low (10(2) CCID(50)) or high (10(6) CCID(50)) dose of inoculum to understand the role of challenge dose in acute immune responses. Initial PRRSV dose did not correlate with serum levels of PRRSV vRNA or antibody titers during the acute stage of infection (days 2-12 PI), but did have an effect on the immune response and mortality. Type I interferon responses, measured by transcriptional changes in IFN-beta, IFN-alpha, Mx, and PKR, were uniquely different when assessed relative to viral dose or cell type, but no overall trend existed to discern responses based on challenge dose. Serum IFN-gamma levels correlated with serum viral RNA load at day 19 PI. Overall, between days 2 and 12 PI, serum vRNA load was not significantly different between pigs challenged with a low or high dose of PRRSV. Animals receiving high-dose inoculum were viremic longer and eventually succumbed to respiratory disease. IFN-gamma may play a role in PRRSV pathogenesis, as serum levels increased significantly in pigs challenged with the high dose of PRRSV.

  6. Linearization of dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Aldelaijan, Saad; DeBlois, Francois; Seuntjens, Jan; Chan, Maria F.; Lewis, Dave

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Despite numerous advantages of radiochromic film dosimeter (high spatial resolution, near tissue equivalence, low energy dependence) to measure a relative dose distribution with film, one needs to first measure an absolute dose (following previously established reference dosimetry protocol) and then convert measured absolute dose values into relative doses. In this work, we present result of our efforts to obtain a functional form that would linearize the inherently nonlinear dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system. Methods: Functional form [{zeta}= (-1){center_dot}netOD{sup (2/3)}/ln(netOD)] was derived from calibration curves of various previously established radiochromic film dosimetry systems. In order to test the invariance of the proposed functional form with respect to the film model used we tested it with three different GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign film models (EBT, EBT2, and EBT3) irradiated to various doses and scanned on a same scanner. For one of the film models (EBT2), we tested the invariance of the functional form to the scanner model used by scanning irradiated film pieces with three different flatbed scanner models (Epson V700, 1680, and 10000XL). To test our hypothesis that the proposed functional argument linearizes the response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system, verification tests have been performed in clinical applications: percent depth dose measurements, IMRT quality assurance (QA), and brachytherapy QA. Results: Obtained R{sup 2} values indicate that the choice of the functional form of the new argument appropriately linearizes the dose response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system we used. The linear behavior was insensitive to both film model and flatbed scanner model used. Measured PDD values using the green channel response of the GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign EBT3 film model are well within {+-}2% window of the local relative dose value when compared to the tabulated Cobalt-60 data. It was also

  7. 'Omics analysis of low dose acetaminophen intake demonstrates novel response pathways in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Jetten, Marlon J.A.; Gaj, Stan; Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa; Kok, Theo M. de; Delft, Joost H.M. van; Lommen, Arjen; Someren, Eugene P. van; Jennen, Danyel G.J.; Claessen, Sandra M.; Peijnenburg, Ad A.C.M.; Stierum, Rob H.; Kleinjans, Jos C.S.

    2012-03-15

    Acetaminophen is the primary cause of acute liver toxicity in Europe/USA, which led the FDA to reconsider recommendations concerning safe acetaminophen dosage/use. Unfortunately, the current tests for liver toxicity are no ideal predictive markers for liver injury, i.e. they only measure acetaminophen exposure after profound liver toxicity has already occurred. Furthermore, these tests do not provide mechanistic information. Here, 'omics techniques (global analysis of metabolomic/gene-expression responses) may provide additional insight. To better understand acetaminophen-induced responses at low doses, we evaluated the effects of (sub-)therapeutic acetaminophen doses on metabolite formation and global gene-expression changes (including, for the first time, full-genome human miRNA expression changes) in blood/urine samples from healthy human volunteers. Many known and several new acetaminophen-metabolites were detected, in particular in relation to hepatotoxicity-linked, oxidative metabolism of acetaminophen. Transcriptomic changes indicated immune-modulating effects (2 g dose) and oxidative stress responses (4 g dose). For the first time, effects of acetaminophen on full-genome human miRNA expression have been considered and confirmed the findings on mRNA level. 'Omics techniques outperformed clinical chemistry tests and revealed novel response pathways to acetaminophen in humans. Although no definitive conclusion about potential immunotoxic effects of acetaminophen can be drawn from this study, there are clear indications that the immune system is triggered even after intake of low doses of acetaminophen. Also, oxidative stress-related gene responses, similar to those seen after high dose acetaminophen exposure, suggest the occurrence of possible pre-toxic effects of therapeutic acetaminophen doses. Possibly, these effects are related to dose-dependent increases in levels of hepatotoxicity-related metabolites. -- Highlights: ► 'Omics techniques outperformed

  8. Dose-response characteristics of nebulized albuterol in the treatment of acutely ill, hospitalized asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Ciccolella, D E; Brennan, K; Kelsen, S G; Criner, G J

    1999-09-01

    We investigated the bronchodilator dose-response to nebulized albuterol and the dose of albuterol which produces maximal bronchodilation in the acutely ill, hospitalized asthmatic. Consecutively admitted patients from the emergency room in status asthmaticus who fulfilled the inclusion criteria (age <41 years old and <12 pack-years of smoking) were studied. Albuterol was administered by nebulizer (Puritan-Bennett Raindrop) in repeated 2.5-mg treatments up to a total dose of 10 mg and the bronchodilator response was measured by a computerized spirometer. Twenty-two patients were studied. Baseline spirometry showed a (mean +/- SE) forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) of 1.26 +/- 0.14 L (42 +/- 4.0% predicted), which increased significantly (p < 0.05) during albuterol titration to a maximum FEV1 of 1.70 +/- 0.19 L (57 +/- 5% of predicted). After cumulative doses of 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 mg of nebulized albuterol, 27%, 45%, 72%, and 77% of patients, respectively, attained maximum bronchodilation. The remaining 23% of patients did not respond to doses up to 10 mg of albuterol. The maximum FEV1 response to albuterol did not correlate with the initial severity of airflow obstruction (r = 0.36, p > 0.05). Pulse rate and arterial oxygen saturation were not significantly affected by nebulized albuterol up to a total dose of 10 mg. No arrhythmias were noted. In summary, most hospitalized asthmatics (72%) required a cumulative dose of 7.5 mg of nebulized albuterol to achieve maximum bronchodilation and a large fraction (50%) required higher albuterol doses than the standard 2.5 mg. The bronchodilatory response to nebulized albuterol varied widely among patients in status asthmaticus and could not be predicted from the initial severity of airflow obstruction. Because side effects were minimal, it would be reasonable to use 7.5 mg of nebulized albuterol as initial therapy. Alternatively, dose-response titration with albuterol would be advantageous.

  9. Community response to noise in Vietnam: exposure-response relationships based on the community tolerance level.

    PubMed

    Gjestland, Truls; Nguyen, Thu Lan; Yano, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Social surveys on noise annoyance have been conducted in five different cities in Vietnam. The surveys included both aircraft noise (three airports) and road traffic noise (five cities). The main objective for these studies was to establish dose-response functions that were representative for Vietnam. The results have been compared with results from similar surveys from other regions. Dose-response functions for aircraft noise in Vietnam showing the percentage of highly annoyed people versus the noise level are nearly identical to those presented in the European Noise Directive [European Commission (2002). http://ec.europa.eu/environment/noise/directive.htm]. For road traffic noise, however, the results indicate that people in Vietnam are more tolerant. The noise levels can be increased by 5-10 dB in order to have a response similar to the curve recommended by the European Commission.

  10. Community response to noise in Vietnam: exposure-response relationships based on the community tolerance level.

    PubMed

    Gjestland, Truls; Nguyen, Thu Lan; Yano, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Social surveys on noise annoyance have been conducted in five different cities in Vietnam. The surveys included both aircraft noise (three airports) and road traffic noise (five cities). The main objective for these studies was to establish dose-response functions that were representative for Vietnam. The results have been compared with results from similar surveys from other regions. Dose-response functions for aircraft noise in Vietnam showing the percentage of highly annoyed people versus the noise level are nearly identical to those presented in the European Noise Directive [European Commission (2002). http://ec.europa.eu/environment/noise/directive.htm]. For road traffic noise, however, the results indicate that people in Vietnam are more tolerant. The noise levels can be increased by 5-10 dB in order to have a response similar to the curve recommended by the European Commission. PMID:25994692

  11. Low-Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Barry D.; Held, Kathryn D.

    2001-06-01

    This project is part of the DOE research program on the biological effects of low dose and dose rate ionizing radiation. This DOE program is designed to support and conduct science that can impact the subsequent development of health risk policy for low dose radiation exposures in the US. The overall, long-term goal of this project is to increase understanding of the responses of cells to the low doses of ionizing radiation typically encountered in environmental level exposures. To achieve this objective, we couple use of a unique focused soft X-ray facility for low dose irradiation of individual cells or irradiation of specific subcellular regions of cells with studies of the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in cells. The project includes seven specific goals: (1) Determine the response of individual cells to low doses of ionizing radiation from a focused soft X-ray beam with a 250 nm diameter beam spot. (2) Determine the response of cells to ROS generated by chemical agents in a fashion that mimics the endogenous cellular generation of ROS. (3) Study the interaction between cellular oxidative processes and ionizing radiation. (4) Determine the importance of the subcellular distribution of ROS from focused soft X-rays on cellular response. (5) Determine whether damage deposited in individual cells by focused soft X-rays or by chemically-generated ROS can elicit a response in other, surrounding, untreated cells, a ''bystander'' effect. (6) Quantify the low dose response and the targets involved in the genomic instability phenotype in cells exposed to low LET radiation and the relationship with the bystander response.

  12. Response of osteosarcoma to preoperative intravenous high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Mail, J.T.; Cohen, M.D.; Mirkin, L.D.; Provisor, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The histologic response of an osteosarcoma to preamputation high-dose methotrexate therapy can be used to determine the optimum maintenance chemotherapy regimen to be administered after amputation. This study evaluates computed tomography (CT) as a method of assessing the response of the tumor to the methotrexate therapy. Nine patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of an extremity had a CT scan of the tumor at initial presentation. This was compared with a second CT scan after four courses of high-dose intravenous methotrexate. Each set of scans was evaluated for changes in bony destruction, soft-tissue mass, pattern of calcification, and extent of tumor involvement of the marrow cavity. These findings were correlated with the histologic response of the tumor as measured by the degree of tumor necrosis. The changes seen on CT correlated well with the degree of the histologic response in seven of the nine patients.

  13. Radiation response of industrial materials: Dose-rate and morphology implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berejka, Anthony J.

    2007-08-01

    Industrial uses of ionizing radiation mostly rely upon high current, high dose-rate (100 kGy/s) electron beam (EB) accelerators. To a lesser extent, industry uses low dose-rate (2.8 × 10-3 kGy/s) radioactive Cobalt-60 as a gamma source, generally for some rather specific purposes, as medical device sterilization and the treatment of food and foodstuffs. There are nearly nine times as many (∼1400) high current EB units in commercial operation than gamma sources (∼160). However, gamma sources can be easily scaled-down so that much research on materials effects is conducted using gamma radiation. Likewise, laboratories are more likely to have very low beam current and consequently low dose-rate accelerators such as Van de Graaff generators and linear accelerators. With the advent of very high current EB accelerators, X-ray processing has become an industrially viable option. With X-rays from high power sources, dose-rates can be modulated based upon accelerator power and the attenuation of the X-ray by the distance of the material from the X-ray target. Dose and dose-rate dependence has been found to be of consequence in several commercial applications which can employ the use of ionizing radiation. The combination of dose and dose-rate dependence of the polymerization and crosslinking of wood impregnants and of fiber composite matrix materials can yield more economically viable results which have promising commercial potential. Monomer and oligomer structure also play an important role in attaining these desirable results. The influence of morphology is shown on the radiation response of olefin polymers, such as ethylene, propylene and isobutylene polymers and their copolymers. Both controlled morphology and controlled dose-rate have commercial consequences. These are also impacted both by the adroit selection of materials and through the possible use of X-ray processing.

  14. EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICALLY BASED DOSE-RESPONSE MODELING FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: A WORKSHOP REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of biologically based dose-response modeling for developmental toxicity: a workshop report.

    Lau C, Andersen ME, Crawford-Brown DJ, Kavlock RJ, Kimmel CA, Knudsen TB, Muneoka K, Rogers JM, Setzer RW, Smith G, Tyl R.

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL...

  15. THYROID INSUFFICIENCY AND GENE EXPRESSION IN DEVELOPING RAT BRAIN: A DOSE RESPONSE STUDY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid Insufficiency and Gene Expression in Developing Rat Brain: A Dose Response Study. JE Royland and ME Gilbert, Neurotox. Div., U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, USA. Endocrine disruption is an area of major concern in environmental neurotoxicity. Deficits in thyroid hormone (TH) levels h...

  16. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF NOVEL DOSE-RESPONSE MODELS FOR USE IN MICROBIAL RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document contains a description of dose-response modeling methods designed to provide a robust approach under uncertainty for predicting human population risk from exposure to pathogens in drinking water.

    The purpose of this document is to describe a body of literatu...

  17. RISK ASSESSMENT FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM: A HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN ANALYSIS OF HUMAN DOSE-RESPONSE DATA. (R829180)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three dose–response studies were conducted with healthy volunteers using different Cryptosporidium parvum isolates (IOWA, TAMU, and UCP). The study data were previously analyzed for median infectious dose (ID50) using a simple cumulative percent endpoi...

  18. QUANTITATION OF MOLECULAR ENDPOINTS FOR THE DOSE-RESPONSE COMPONENT OF CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer risk assessment involves the steps of hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment and risk characterization. The rapid advances in the use of molecular biology approaches has had an impact on all four components, but the greatest overall current...

  19. Toxicokinetics to identify nonlinearities in dose-response and implications for risk assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    For presentation at the 45th Annual Symposium of the Society of Toxicology of Canada. The meeting will be held on 4-5 December 2013 at the Ottawa Convention Centre. Toxicokinetics to identify nonlinearities in dose-response and implications for risk assessment. Rory Conolly, Offi...

  20. Exposure-response relationship for vibration-induced white finger among forestry workers.

    PubMed

    Bovenzi, M; Franzinelli, A; Mancini, R; Cannava, M G; Maiorano, M; Ceccarelli, F

    1996-02-01

    The relation between the occurrence of white finger and vibration exposure was investigated in a group of 222 forestry workers using chain saws. The forestry workers and 195 controls never exposed to hand-transmitted vibration were interviewed by occupational health physicians. The diagnosis of vibration-induced white finger (VWF) was made on the basis of subjective symptoms of finger blanching and the results of a cold test with plethysmographic measurement of finger systolic blood pressure. Vibration was measured on a representative sample of AV and non-AV chain saws. Daily vibration exposure was assessed in terms of 8 h energy-equivalent frequency-weighted acceleration [A(8)]. A lifetime vibration dose was estimated for each of the forestry workers. The overall prevalence of VWF among the forestry workers was 23.4%. Raynaud's phenomenon was discovered in 2.6% of the controls. In the forestry workers, the risk of VWF showed positive increments with each increment of vibration dose, suggesting a monotonic dose-response relationship. The responsiveness to cold in the digital arteries of the forestry workers was also found to increase with increasing vibration dose. The estimated relation between VWF and vibration exposure showed that the expected occurrence of VWF increased in approximately linear proportion to either A(8) (with exposure duration unchanged) or the number of years of exposure (with equivalent acceleration unchanged). In this study of VWF among forestry workers the estimated exposure-response relation showed that if the magnitude of vibration acceleration is doubled, the total duration of exposure should be halved to produce an equivalent effect. On the basis of the assessment of vibration exposure, the estimated risk for VWF in the study population was found to be lower than that predicted by the International Standard ISO 5349. The results of this study tend to support the vibration exposure levels currently under discussion within the European

  1. Dose response and factors related to interstitial pneumonitis after bone marrow transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Sagus; Schultheiss, Timothy E. . E-mail: schultheiss@coh.org; Wong, Jeffrey

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) and chemotherapy are common components of conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation. Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) is a known regimen-related complication. Using published data of IP in a multivariate logistic regression, this study sought to identify the parameters in the bone marrow transplantation conditioning regimen that were significantly associated with IP and to establish a radiation dose-response function. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of articles that reported IP incidence along with lung dose, fractionation, dose rate, and chemotherapy regimen. In the final analysis, 20 articles (n = 1090 patients), consisting of 26 distinct TBI/chemotherapy regimens, were included in the analysis. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors that influenced the incidence of IP. Results: A logistic model was generated from patients receiving daily fractions of radiation. In this model, lung dose, cyclophosphamide dose, and the addition of busulfan were significantly associated with IP. An incidence of 3%-4% with chemotherapy-only conditioning regimens is estimated from the models. The {alpha}/{beta} value of the linear-quadratic model was estimated to be 2.8 Gy. The dose eliciting a 50% incidence, D {sub 50}, for IP after 120 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide was 8.8 Gy; in the absence of chemotherapy, the estimated D {sub 50} is 10.6 Gy. No dose rate effect was observed. The use of busulfan as a substitute for radiation is equivalent to treating with 14.8 Gy in 4 fractions with 50% transmission blocks shielding the lung. The logistic regression failed to find a model that adequately fit the multiple-fraction-per-day data. Conclusions: Dose responses for both lung radiation dose and cyclophosphamide dose were identified. A conditioning regimen of 12 Gy TBI in 6 daily fractions induces an IP incidence of about 11% in the absence of lung shielding

  2. Dose response effects of dermally applied diethanolamine on neurogenesis in fetal mouse hippocampus and potential exposure of humans.

    PubMed

    Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Niculescu, Mihai D; Guo, Zhong; Johnson, Amy R; Fischer, Leslie; Zeisel, Steven H

    2009-01-01

    Diethanolamine (DEA) is a common ingredient of personal care products. Dermal administration of DEA diminishes hepatic stores of the essential nutrient choline and alters brain development. We previously reported that 80 mg/kg/day of DEA during pregnancy in mice reduced neurogenesis and increased apoptosis in the fetal hippocampus. This study was designed to establish the dose-response relationships for this effect of DEA. Timed-pregnant C57BL/6 mouse dams were dosed dermally from gestation day 7-17 with DEA at 0 (controls), 5, 40, 60, and 80 mg/kg body/day. Fetuses (embryonic day 17 [E17]) from dams treated dermally with 80 mg/kg body/day DEA had decreased neural progenitor cell mitosis at the ventricular surface of the ventricular zone (hippocampus, 54.1 +/- 5.5%; cortex, 58.9 +/- 6.8%; compared to controls; p < 0.01). Also, this dose of DEA to dams increased rates of apoptosis in E17 fetal hippocampus (to 177.2 +/- 21.5% of control; measured using activated caspase-3; p < 0.01). This dose of DEA resulted in accumulation of DEA and its metabolites in liver and in plasma. At doses of DEA less than 80 mg/kg body/day to dams, there were no differences between treated and control groups. In a small group of human subjects, dermal treatment for 1 month with a commercially available skin lotion containing 1.8 mg DEA per gram resulted in detectable plasma concentrations of DEA and dimethyldiethanolamine, but these were far below those concentrations associated with perturbed brain development in the mouse.

  3. Diethylene glycol-induced toxicities show marked threshold dose response in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Greg M.; Dunning, Cody L.; Abreo, Fleurette; Latimer, Brian; Orchard, Elysse; McMartin, Kenneth E.

    2015-02-01

    Diethylene glycol (DEG) exposure poses risks to human health because of widespread industrial use and accidental exposures from contaminated products. To enhance the understanding of the mechanistic role of metabolites in DEG toxicity, this study used a dose response paradigm to determine a rat model that would best mimic DEG exposure in humans. Wistar and Fischer-344 (F-344) rats were treated by oral gavage with 0, 2, 5, or 10 g/kg DEG and blood, kidney and liver tissues were collected at 48 h. Both rat strains treated with 10 g/kg DEG had equivalent degrees of metabolic acidosis, renal toxicity (increased BUN and creatinine and cortical necrosis) and liver toxicity (increased serum enzyme levels, centrilobular necrosis and severe glycogen depletion). There was no liver or kidney toxicity at the lower DEG doses (2 and 5 g/kg) regardless of strain, demonstrating a steep threshold dose response. Kidney diglycolic acid (DGA), the presumed nephrotoxic metabolite of DEG, was markedly elevated in both rat strains administered 10 g/kg DEG, but no DGA was present at 2 or 5 g/kg, asserting its necessary role in DEG-induced toxicity. These results indicate that mechanistically in order to produce toxicity, metabolism to and significant target organ accumulation of DGA are required and that both strains would be useful for DEG risk assessments. - Highlights: • DEG produces a steep threshold dose response for kidney injury in rats. • Wistar and F-344 rats do not differ in response to DEG-induced renal injury. • The dose response for renal injury closely mirrors that for renal DGA accumulation. • Results demonstrate the importance of DGA accumulation in producing kidney injury.

  4. Fetal dexamethasone exposure accelerates development of renal function: relationship to dose, cell differentiation and growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, T A; Seidler, F J; Kavlock, R J; Gray, J A

    1992-02-01

    Fetal exposure to high doses of glucocorticoids slows cellular development and impairs organ performance, in association with growth retardation. Nevertheless, low doses of glucocorticoids may enhance cell differentiation and accelerate specific functions. The current study examined this apparent paradox in the developing rat kidney, using doses of dexamethasone that span the threshold for growth impairment: 0.05 or 0.2 mg/kg given on gestational days 17, 18 and 19. At the lower dose, which did not significantly retard body growth, the postnatal development of tubular reabsorptive capabilities for sodium, potassium, osmotic particles, water and urea was accelerated. These effects were less notable at the higher dose, which caused initial body growth impairment. The selectivity toward promotion of tubular function was evidenced by the absence of effect of either dose of dexamethasone on development of glomerular filtration rate. Because of the wide spectrum of dexamethasone's effects on tubular function, we also assessed fetal kidney adenylate cyclase as a means of detecting altered cell differentiation in the prenatal period during which dexamethasone was given. Either glucocorticoid dose increased the total adenylate cyclase catalytic activity (assessed with forskolin). Thus, the net effect of fetal dexamethasone exposure on development of renal excretory capabilities probably represents the summation of promoted cell differentiation and slowed development consequent to growth retardation. At low dose levels, the former effect predominates, leading to enhanced functional development, whereas higher doses that interfere with general growth and development can offset the direct promotional effect.

  5. Dose-Effect Relationships for Adverse Events After Cranial Radiation Therapy in Long-term Childhood Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Dijk, Irma W.E.M. van; Cardous-Ubbink, Mathilde C.; Pal, Helena J.H. van der; Oldenburger, Foppe; Os, Rob M. van; Ronckers, Cécile M.; Schouten–van Meeteren, Antoinette Y.N.; Kremer, Leontien C.M.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence and severity of clinical adverse events (AEs) and treatment-related risk factors in childhood cancer survivors treated with cranial radiation therapy (CRT), with the aim of assessing dose-effect relationships. Methods and Materials: The retrospective study cohort consisted of 1362 Dutch childhood cancer survivors, of whom 285 were treated with CRT delivered as brain irradiation (BI), as part of craniospinal irradiation (CSI), and as total body irradiation (TBI). Individual CRT doses were converted into the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). Survivors had received their diagnoses between 1966 and 1996 and survived at least 5 years after diagnosis. A complete inventory of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 3.0 AEs was available from our hospital-based late-effect follow-up program. We used multivariable logistic and Cox regression analyses to examine the EQD{sub 2} in relation to the prevalence and severity of AEs, correcting for sex, age at diagnosis, follow-up time, and the treatment-related risk factors surgery and chemotherapy. Results: There was a high prevalence of AEs in the CRT group; over 80% of survivors had more than 1 AE, and almost half had at least 5 AEs, both representing significant increases in number of AEs compared with survivors not treated with CRT. Additionally, the proportion of severe, life-threatening, or disabling AEs was significantly higher in the CRT group. The most frequent AEs were alopecia and cognitive, endocrine, metabolic, and neurologic events. Using the EQD{sub 2}, we found significant dose-effect relationships for these and other AEs. Conclusion: Our results confirm that CRT increases the prevalence and severity of AEs in childhood cancer survivors. Furthermore, analyzing dose-effect relationships with the cumulative EQD{sub 2} instead of total physical dose connects the knowledge from radiation therapy and radiobiology with the clinical experience.

  6. Fixed-dose combination ezetimibe+atorvastatin lowers LDL-C equivalent to co-administered components in randomized trials: use of a dose-response model.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E; Chen, Erluo; Tomassini, Joanne E; McPeters, Gail; Polis, Adam B; Triscari, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Co-administration of ezetimibe with atorvastatin is a generally well-tolerated treatment option that reduces LDL-C levels and improves other lipids with greater efficacy than doubling the atorvastatin dose. The objective of the study was to demonstrate the equivalent lipid-modifying efficacy of fixed-dose combination (FDC) ezetimibe/atorvastatin compared with the component agents co-administered individually in support of regulatory filing. Two randomized, 6-week, double-blind cross-over trials compared the lipid-modifying efficacy of ezetimibe/atorvastatin 10/20 mg (n = 353) or 10/40 mg (n = 280) vs. separate co-administration of ezetimibe 10 mg plus atorvastatin 20 mg (n = 346) or 40 mg (n = 280), respectively, in hypercholesterolemic patients. Percent changes from baseline in LDL-C (primary endpoint) and other lipids (secondary endpoints) were assessed by analysis of covariance; triglycerides were evaluated by longitudinal-data analysis. Expected differences between FDC and the corresponding co-administered doses were predicted from a dose-response relationship model; sample size was estimated given the expected difference and equivalence margins (±4%). LDL-C-lowering equivalence was based on 97.5% expanded confidence intervals (CI) for the difference contained within the margins; equivalence margins for other lipids were not prespecified. Ezetimibe/atorvastatin FDC 10/20 mg was equivalent to co-administered ezetimibe+atorvastatin 20 mg in reducing LDL-C levels (54.0% vs. 53.8%) as was FDC 10/40 mg and ezetimibe+atorvastatin 40 mg (58.9% vs. 58.7%), as predicted by the model. Changes in other lipids were consistent with equivalence (97.5% expanded CIs <±3%, included 0); triglyceride changes varied more. All treatments were generally well tolerated. Hypercholesterolemic patients administered ezetimibe/atorvastatin 10/20 and 10/40 mg FDC had equivalent LDL-C lowering. This FDC formulation proved to be an efficacious and generally well

  7. Antipsychotic dose modulates behavioral and neural responses to feedback during reinforcement learning in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Insel, Catherine; Reinen, Jenna; Weber, Jochen; Wager, Tor D; Jarskog, L Fredrik; Shohamy, Daphna; Smith, Edward E

    2014-03-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by an abnormal dopamine system, and dopamine blockade is the primary mechanism of antipsychotic treatment. Consistent with the known role of dopamine in reward processing, prior research has demonstrated that patients with schizophrenia exhibit impairments in reward-based learning. However, it remains unknown how treatment with antipsychotic medication impacts the behavioral and neural signatures of reinforcement learning in schizophrenia. The goal of this study was to examine whether antipsychotic medication modulates behavioral and neural responses to prediction error coding during reinforcement learning. Patients with schizophrenia completed a reinforcement learning task while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. The task consisted of two separate conditions in which participants accumulated monetary gain or avoided monetary loss. Behavioral results indicated that antipsychotic medication dose was associated with altered behavioral approaches to learning, such that patients taking higher doses of medication showed increased sensitivity to negative reinforcement. Higher doses of antipsychotic medication were also associated with higher learning rates (LRs), suggesting that medication enhanced sensitivity to trial-by-trial feedback. Neuroimaging data demonstrated that antipsychotic dose was related to differences in neural signatures of feedback prediction error during the loss condition. Specifically, patients taking higher doses of medication showed attenuated prediction error responses in the striatum and the medial prefrontal cortex. These findings indicate that antipsychotic medication treatment may influence motivational processes in patients with schizophrenia.

  8. Relationship between Arousal Intensity and Heart Rate Response to Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Azarbarzin, Ali; Ostrowski, Michele; Hanly, Patrick; Younes, Magdy

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: The visual appearance of cortical arousals varies considerably, from barely meeting scoring criteria to very intense arousals. Arousal from sleep is associated with an increase in heart rate (HR). Our objective was to quantify the intensity of arousals in an objective manner using the time and frequency characteristics of the electroencephalogram (EEG) and to determine whether HR response to arousal correlates with arousal intensity so determined. Design: Post hoc analysis of 20 preexisting polysomnography (PSG) files. Setting: Research and Development Laboratory (YRT Limited). Participants: N/A. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Arousals were scored using the American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. The EEG signals' time and frequency characteristics were determined using wavelet analysis. An automatic algorithm was developed to scale arousal intensity based on the change in wavelet features and data from a training set obtained from 271 arousals visually scaled between zero and nine (most intense). There were 2,695 arousals in 20 PSGs that were scaled. HR response (ΔHR) was defined as the difference between the highest HR in the interval [arousal-onset to (arousal-end +8 sec)] and the highest HR between 2 and 12 sec preceding arousal onset. There was a strong correlation between arousal scale and ΔHR within each subject (average r: 0.95 ± 0.04). The slope of the relationship varied among subjects (0.7-2.4 min-1/unit scale). Conclusions: Arousal intensity, quantified by wavelet transform, is strongly associated with arousal-related tachycardia, and the gain of the relationship varies among subjects. Quantifying arousal intensity in PSGs provides additional information that may be clinically relevant. Citation: Azarbarzin A; Ostrowski M; Hanly P; Younes M. Relationship between arousal intensity and heart rate response to arousal. SLEEP 2014;37(4):645-653. PMID:24899756

  9. Acute small bowel toxicity and preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: Investigating dose-volume relationships and role for inverse planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tho, Lye Mun . E-mail: l.tho@beatson.gla.ac.uk; Glegg, Martin; Paterson, Jennifer; Yap, Christina; MacLeod, Alice; McCabe, Marie; McDonald, Alexander C.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The relationship between volume of irradiated small bowel (VSB) and acute toxicity in rectal cancer radiotherapy is poorly quantified, particularly in patients receiving concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Using treatment planning data, we studied a series of such patients. Methods and Materials: Details of 41 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were reviewed. All received 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, 3-4 fields three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with daily 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid during Weeks 1 and 5. Toxicity was assessed prospectively in a weekly clinic. Using computed tomography planning software, the VSB was determined at 5 Gy dose intervals (V{sub 5}, V{sub 1}, etc.). Eight patients with maximal VSB had dosimetry and radiobiological modeling outcomes compared between inverse and conformal three-dimensional planning. Results: VSB correlated strongly with diarrheal severity at every dose level (p < 0.03), with strongest correlation at lowest doses. Median VSB differed significantly between patients experiencing Grade 0-1 and Grade 2-4 diarrhea (p {<=} 0.05). No correlation was found with anorexia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, age, body mass index, sex,