Science.gov

Sample records for dose response studies

  1. Bayesian multimodel inference for dose-response studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Albers, P.H.

    2007-01-01

    Statistical inference in dose?response studies is model-based: The analyst posits a mathematical model of the relation between exposure and response, estimates parameters of the model, and reports conclusions conditional on the model. Such analyses rarely include any accounting for the uncertainties associated with model selection. The Bayesian inferential system provides a convenient framework for model selection and multimodel inference. In this paper we briefly describe the Bayesian paradigm and Bayesian multimodel inference. We then present a family of models for multinomial dose?response data and apply Bayesian multimodel inferential methods to the analysis of data on the reproductive success of American kestrels (Falco sparveriuss) exposed to various sublethal dietary concentrations of methylmercury.

  2. Bayesian dose-response analysis for epidemiological studies with complex uncertainty in dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Deukwoo; Hoffman, F Owen; Moroz, Brian E; Simon, Steven L

    2016-02-10

    Most conventional risk analysis methods rely on a single best estimate of exposure per person, which does not allow for adjustment for exposure-related uncertainty. Here, we propose a Bayesian model averaging method to properly quantify the relationship between radiation dose and disease outcomes by accounting for shared and unshared uncertainty in estimated dose. Our Bayesian risk analysis method utilizes multiple realizations of sets (vectors) of doses generated by a two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation method that properly separates shared and unshared errors in dose estimation. The exposure model used in this work is taken from a study of the risk of thyroid nodules among a cohort of 2376 subjects who were exposed to fallout from nuclear testing in Kazakhstan. We assessed the performance of our method through an extensive series of simulations and comparisons against conventional regression risk analysis methods. When the estimated doses contain relatively small amounts of uncertainty, the Bayesian method using multiple a priori plausible draws of dose vectors gave similar results to the conventional regression-based methods of dose-response analysis. However, when large and complex mixtures of shared and unshared uncertainties are present, the Bayesian method using multiple dose vectors had significantly lower relative bias than conventional regression-based risk analysis methods and better coverage, that is, a markedly increased capability to include the true risk coefficient within the 95% credible interval of the Bayesian-based risk estimate. An evaluation of the dose-response using our method is presented for an epidemiological study of thyroid disease following radiation exposure.

  3. Modeling Effective Dosages in Hormetic Dose-Response Studies

    PubMed Central

    Belz, Regina G.; Piepho, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Two hormetic modifications of a monotonically decreasing log-logistic dose-response function are most often used to model stimulatory effects of low dosages of a toxicant in plant biology. As just one of these empirical models is yet properly parameterized to allow inference about quantities of interest, this study contributes the parameterized functions for the second hormetic model and compares the estimates of effective dosages between both models based on 23 hormetic data sets. Based on this, the impact on effective dosage estimations was evaluated, especially in case of a substantially inferior fit by one of the two models. Methodology/Principal Findings The data sets evaluated described the hormetic responses of four different test plant species exposed to 15 different chemical stressors in two different experimental dose-response test designs. Out of the 23 data sets, one could not be described by any of the two models, 14 could be better described by one of the two models, and eight could be equally described by both models. In cases of misspecification by any of the two models, the differences between effective dosages estimates (0–1768%) greatly exceeded the differences observed when both models provided a satisfactory fit (0–26%). This suggests that the conclusions drawn depending on the model used may diverge considerably when using an improper hormetic model especially regarding effective dosages quantifying hormesis. Conclusions/Significance The study showed that hormetic dose responses can take on many shapes and that this diversity can not be captured by a single model without risking considerable misinterpretation. However, the two empirical models considered in this paper together provide a powerful means to model, prove, and now also to quantify a wide range of hormetic responses by reparameterization. Despite this, they should not be applied uncritically, but after statistical and graphical assessment of their adequacy. PMID

  4. Photobacterial Response to Cadmium Chloride, Mercuric Chloride, and Selenium Dioxide: Dose-Response and Interaction Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    activity) and producing a dose - response curve by adding different concentrations of the second compound. The EC50 values from such paired compounds...fixing the dose of the first metal at its ECIo concentra- tion and varying the concentration of the second to produce a dose - response curve . The EC5 0...concentration of one metal at approximately its EC10 and varying the concentration of the second metal to produce a dose - response curve . The six possible

  5. Severity of killer whale behavioral responses to ship noise: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rob; Erbe, Christine; Ashe, Erin; Beerman, Amber; Smith, Jodi

    2014-02-15

    Critical habitats of at-risk populations of northeast Pacific "resident" killer whales can be heavily trafficked by large ships, with transits occurring on average once every hour in busy shipping lanes. We modeled behavioral responses of killer whales to ship transits during 35 "natural experiments" as a dose-response function of estimated received noise levels in both broadband and audiogram-weighted terms. Interpreting effects is contingent on a subjective and seemingly arbitrary decision about severity threshold indicating a response. Subtle responses were observed around broadband received levels of 130 dB re 1 μPa (rms); more severe responses are hypothesized to occur at received levels beyond 150 dB re 1 μPa, where our study lacked data. Avoidance responses are expected to carry minor energetic costs in terms of increased energy expenditure, but future research must assess the potential for reduced prey acquisition, and potential population consequences, under these noise levels.

  6. Emesis in Ferrets Following Exposure to Different Types of Radiation: A Dose-Response Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    SR92-34 Emesis in Ferrets Following Exposure to Different Types of Radiation: N A Dose -Response Study L51 BERNARD M. RABIN, Ph.D., WALTER A. HUNT...fission neutrons (1500-2000 following exposure to different types o" radiation: a dose -response cGy), Young (13) reported that increasing the propor...order to establish the dose -response relationships monkey, but did not produce an increase in the total for emesis following exposure to different types

  7. Prenatal intravenous cocaine and the heart rate-orienting response: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Tara L; Snow, Diane M; Strupp, Barbara J; Booze, Rosemarie M; Mactutus, Charles F

    2004-01-01

    Attentional dysfunction is a persistent behavioral abnormality that is emerging as one of the cardinal features in the investigations of the teratogenic effects of cocaine in humans and rodents. The present study sought to extend this work by using a dose-response design with an alternate strain of rat. Virgin Long-Evans female rats, implanted with an IV access port prior to breeding were administered saline, 0.5, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg of cocaine HCl from gestational day (GD) GD8-21 (1x per day-GD8-14, 2x per day-GD15-21). Cocaine had no significant effect on maternal or litter parameters. At 14-15 days of age, 1 male and 1 female from each litter were tested to evaluate the heart rate orienting response (HR-OR). Following 20 min for acclimation, pups were presented an olfactory stimulus for 20s per trial, across four trials, and with an intertrial interval of 2 min. The initial baseline HR was not significantly different across the treatment groups, although cocaine did alter the stability of the QRS complex duration. The magnitude of the HR-OR averaged across trials increased as a linear function of dosage of cocaine. A more complex (quadratic) interaction between cocaine dose and sex of the offspring was also noted. When examined across trials, the controls failed to display any significant within-session variation in the HR-OR; in contrast all of the prenatal cocaine treated groups displayed either sensitization (low and high dose) or habituation of the response (middle dose). Analysis of the peak HR-OR confirmed that the controls were indeed displaying the response on at least one trial of the session, albeit not consistently on any specific trial. The more vigorous HR-OR of the prenatal cocaine groups, relative to vehicle controls, most likely reflects an alteration in development of the neural basis of response; as previously shown, the most vigorous response to the olfactory stimulus is seen early (12 days of age) and progressively decreases across the

  8. LARGE SCALE CARCINOGEN DOSE RESPONSE STUDIES WITH JAPANESE MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To investigate the responses to low carcinogen doses in animal models, large sample sizes are needed and it is an advantage if the model has a low spontaneous tumor rate. Three large scale dose response studies were conducted using Japanese medaka and the carcinogen diethylnitros...

  9. A study of the shape of dose-response curves for acute lethality at low response: a megadaphnia study'

    SciTech Connect

    Sebaugh, J.L.; Wilson, J.D.; Tucker, M.W.; Adams, W.J. )

    1991-12-01

    Dose-response curves were developed for the immobilization response in Daphnia magna to four toxicants. The purpose of this work was to study the effect of the form of the model and the number of concentration levels used on the estimates of typical low-dose effective concentrations (1%, 5%, 10%). The generalized four-parameter logistic model was used as the reference. When using 12 concentration levels, one of the logistic family two- or three-parameter models was shown reliably to represent each of these various sets of dose-response data, and to provide adequate estimates of EC01 and EC05, as well as EC10 and EC50. For two of the toxicants, an asymmetric model was required. When reducing the number of concentrations to five, the EC10 and EC50 were well estimated by the probit model, with acceptable results at the EC05 level.

  10. NOTE: Study of Gafchromic® EBT film response over a large dose range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martišíková, Mária; Jäkel, Oliver

    2010-05-01

    Presently Gafchromic EBT films are widely used for relative dose verification in standard radiation therapy using high-energy photons, inclusive IMRT. The use of films for dosimetry in medical ion beams is more complicated due to the strongly inhomogeneous dose deposition by ions on microscopic level. Track structure models, presently used to describe dosimeter response as a function of the ion field properties, are based on input information which can be obtained from the film response in photon beams. We therefore studied the performance of Gafchromic EBT films, ancestors of currently available EBT2 films, in 60Co photon beams. The dose-response curve was measured from 7.5 × 10-2 Gy to 3 × 104 Gy. The dynamic range, linearity and dose rate dependence of this calibration curve were studied. A high saturation dose of 3 × 103 Gy, and thus a large dynamic range, was observed. No signs of supralinearity and bleaching due to radiation were found. No dependence of the response on the dose rate at high dose rates and high doses was found. All those properties justify the use of simplified models of the film response to ions. Furthermore, fits of the calibration data by predictions of different models for signal creation mechanism of dosimetric materials were performed. The best description was found for the recently published gamma-distributed single-hit model which takes into account different sizes of the active centres.

  11. Dose Response Effects of Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate Treatment in Adults with ADHD: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faraone, Stephen V.; Spencer, Thomas J.; Kollins, Scott H.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Goodman, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore dose-response effects of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) treatment for ADHD. Method: This was a 4-week, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, forced-dose titration study in adult participants, aged 18 to 55 years, meeting "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.)…

  12. Dose-response studies with ethylene dibromide. [Hydra oligactis

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.A.

    1987-04-01

    This study represents the first of a series of Descriptive-Reproductive-Toxicology Studies currently underway in the authors laboratory. Ethylene Dibromide (EDB) is suspected of causing infertility (especially in males), carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, and possibly teratogenesis. Coupling the suspected undesirable effects of EDB exposure with the fact that the chemical has broad utility (soil fumigant, fruit and grain fumigant, gasoline additive, etc.), EDB is an important agricultural and industrial toxin. In this study Hydra oligactis are exposed to EDB in an attempt to determine the acute toxicity of the chemical. Since Hydra is organized at the tissue level only, the toxin can be applied as a component of an artificial pond water (APW) medium. The EDB stock solution is 19:1 Acetone (emulsifier): EDB. Direct dilutions are made and exposures are continuous. The medium is exchanged daily after feeding. The LC50 at 48 hours incubation with EDb is 70 mgL . Compared to the LC50's for two common commercial PCB mixtures, Aroclors 1254 and 1016, EDb is shown to be a highly toxic chemical. The respective LC50's for the PCB's are 20 mgL (Aroclor 1254) and 5 mgL (Aroclor 1016) at 72 hrs. Sublethal EDB toxicity is currently being studied.

  13. Development of Noise Dose/Visitor Response Relationships for the National Parks Overflight Rule: Bryce Canyon National Park Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    National Rule). The foundation of the research program for the National Rule is the performance of noise dose/visitor response ( dose - response ) studies in...several National Parks. This document summarizes the results of a dose - response study conducted along two separate segments of a frontcountry, short

  14. Optimal experimental designs for dose-response studies with continuous endpoints.

    PubMed

    Holland-Letz, Tim; Kopp-Schneider, Annette

    2015-11-01

    In most areas of clinical and preclinical research, the required sample size determines the costs and effort for any project, and thus, optimizing sample size is of primary importance. An experimental design of dose-response studies is determined by the number and choice of dose levels as well as the allocation of sample size to each level. The experimental design of toxicological studies tends to be motivated by convention. Statistical optimal design theory, however, allows the setting of experimental conditions (dose levels, measurement times, etc.) in a way which minimizes the number of required measurements and subjects to obtain the desired precision of the results. While the general theory is well established, the mathematical complexity of the problem so far prevents widespread use of these techniques in practical studies. The paper explains the concepts of statistical optimal design theory with a minimum of mathematical terminology and uses these concepts to generate concrete usable D-optimal experimental designs for dose-response studies on the basis of three common dose-response functions in toxicology: log-logistic, log-normal and Weibull functions with four parameters each. The resulting designs usually require control plus only three dose levels and are quite intuitively plausible. The optimal designs are compared to traditional designs such as the typical setup of cytotoxicity studies for 96-well plates. As the optimal design depends on prior estimates of the dose-response function parameters, it is shown what loss of efficiency occurs if the parameters for design determination are misspecified, and how Bayes optimal designs can improve the situation.

  15. Probiotics reduce symptoms of antibiotic use in a hospital setting: a randomized dose response study.

    PubMed

    Ouwehand, Arthur C; DongLian, Cai; Weijian, Xu; Stewart, Morgan; Ni, Jiayi; Stewart, Tad; Miller, Larry E

    2014-01-16

    Probiotics are known to reduce antibiotic associated diarrhea (AAD) and Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) risk in a strain-specific manner. The aim of this study was to determine the dose-response effect of a four strain probiotic combination (HOWARU(®) Restore) on the incidence of AAD and CDAD and severity of gastrointestinal symptoms in adult in-patients requiring antibiotic therapy. Patients (n=503) were randomized among three study groups: HOWARU(®) Restore probiotic 1.70×10(10) CFU (high-dose, n=168), HOWARU(®) Restore probiotic 4.17×10(9) CFU (low-dose, n=168), or placebo (n=167). Subjects were stratified by gender, age, and duration of antibiotic treatment. Study products were administered daily up to 7 days after the final antibiotic dose. The primary endpoint of the study was the incidence of AAD. Secondary endpoints included incidence of CDAD, diarrhea duration, stools per day, bloody stools, fever, abdominal cramping, and bloating. A significant dose-response effect on AAD was observed with incidences of 12.5, 19.6, and 24.6% with high-dose, low-dose, and placebo, respectively (p=0.02). CDAD was the same in both probiotic groups (1.8%) but different from the placebo group (4.8%; p=0.04). Incidences of fever, abdominal pain, and bloating were lower with increasing probiotic dose. The number of daily liquid stools and average duration of diarrhea decreased with higher probiotic dosage. The tested four strain probiotic combination appears to lower the risk of AAD, CDAD, and gastrointestinal symptoms in a dose-dependent manner in adult in-patients.

  16. Dose-Response Modeling with Summary Data from Developmental Toxicity Studies.

    PubMed

    Fox, John F; Hogan, Karen A; Davis, Allen

    2016-08-27

    Dose-response analysis of binary developmental data (e.g., implant loss, fetal abnormalities) is best done using individual fetus data (identified to litter) or litter-specific statistics such as number of offspring per litter and proportion abnormal. However, such data are not often available to risk assessors. Scientific articles usually present only dose-group summaries for the number or average proportion abnormal and the total number of fetuses. Without litter-specific data, it is not possible to estimate variances correctly (often characterized as a problem of overdispersion, intralitter correlation, or "litter effect"). However, it is possible to use group summary data when the design effect has been estimated for each dose group. Previous studies have demonstrated useful dose-response and trend test analyses based on design effect estimates using litter-specific data from the same study. This simplifies the analysis but does not help when litter-specific data are unavailable. In the present study, we show that summary data on fetal malformations can be adjusted satisfactorily using estimates of the design effect based on historical data. When adjusted data are then analyzed with models designed for binomial responses, the resulting benchmark doses are similar to those obtained from analyzing litter-level data with nested dichotomous models.

  17. THYROID INSUFFICIENCY AND GENE EXPRESSION IN DEVELOPING RAT BRAIN: A DOSE RESPONSE STUDY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid Insufficiency and Gene Expression in Developing Rat Brain: A Dose Response Study. JE Royland and ME Gilbert, Neurotox. Div., U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, USA. Endocrine disruption is an area of major concern in environmental neurotoxicity. Deficits in thyroid hormone (TH) levels h...

  18. Dose dependence of mass and microcalcification detection in digital mammography: free response human observer studies.

    PubMed

    Ruschin, Mark; Timberg, Pontus; Båth, Magnus; Hemdal, Bengt; Svahn, Tony; Saunders, Rob S; Samei, Ehsan; Andersson, Ingvar; Mattsson, Soren; Chakrabort, Dev P; Tingber, Anders

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dose reduction in digital mammography on the detection of two lesion types-malignant masses and clusters of microcalcifications. Two free-response observer studies were performed-one for each lesion type. Ninety screening images were retrospectively selected; each image was originally acquired under automatic exposure conditions, corresponding to an average glandular dose of 1.3 mGy for a standard breast (50 mm compressed breast thickness with 50% glandularity). For each study, one to three simulated lesions were added to each of 40 images (abnormals) while 50 were kept without lesions (normals). Two levels of simulated system noise were added to the images yielding two new image sets, corresponding to simulated dose levels of 50% and 30% of the original images (100%). The manufacturer's standard display processing was subsequently applied to all images. Four radiologists experienced in mammography evaluated the images by searching for lesions and marking and assigning confidence levels to suspicious regions. The search data were analyzed using jackknife free-response (JA-FROC) methodology. For the detection of masses, the mean figure-of-merit (FOM) averaged over all readers was 0.74, 0.71, and 0.68 corresponding to dose levels of 100%, 50%, and 30%, respectively. These values were not statistically different from each other (F= 1.67, p=0.19) but showed a decreasing trend. In contrast, in the microcalcification study the mean FOM was 0.93, 0.67, and 0.38 for the same dose levels and these values were all significantly different from each other (F = 109.84, p < 0.0001). The results indicate that lowering the present dose level by a factor of two compromised the detection of microcalcifications but had a weaker effect on mass detection.

  19. Dose dependence of mass and microcalcification detection in digital mammography: Free response human observer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ruschin, Mark; Timberg, Pontus; Ba ring th, Magnus; Hemdal, Bengt; Svahn, Tony; Saunders, Rob S.; Samei, Ehsan; Andersson, Ingvar; Mattsson, Soeren; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Tingberg, Anders

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dose reduction in digital mammography on the detection of two lesion types--malignant masses and clusters of microcalcifications. Two free-response observer studies were performed--one for each lesion type. Ninety screening images were retrospectively selected; each image was originally acquired under automatic exposure conditions, corresponding to an average glandular dose of 1.3 mGy for a standard breast (50 mm compressed breast thickness with 50% glandularity). For each study, one to three simulated lesions were added to each of 40 images (abnormals) while 50 were kept without lesions (normals). Two levels of simulated system noise were added to the images yielding two new image sets, corresponding to simulated dose levels of 50% and 30% of the original images (100%). The manufacturer's standard display processing was subsequently applied to all images. Four radiologists experienced in mammography evaluated the images by searching for lesions and marking and assigning confidence levels to suspicious regions. The search data were analyzed using jackknife free-response (JAFROC) methodology. For the detection of masses, the mean figure-of-merit (FOM) averaged over all readers was 0.74, 0.71, and 0.68 corresponding to dose levels of 100%, 50%, and 30%, respectively. These values were not statistically different from each other (F=1.67, p=0.19) but showed a decreasing trend. In contrast, in the microcalcification study the mean FOM was 0.93, 0.67, and 0.38 for the same dose levels and these values were all significantly different from each other (F=109.84, p<0.0001). The results indicate that lowering the present dose level by a factor of two compromised the detection of microcalcifications but had a weaker effect on mass detection.

  20. Clinical application of Chamomilla recutita in phlebitis: dose response curve study.

    PubMed

    Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz Dos; Carvalho, Emilia Campos de; Bueno, Paula Carolina Pires; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp

    2011-01-01

    This experimental and dose-response curve study aimed to carry out the quality control of the Chamomilla recutita sample, as well as to estimate the ideal dose, for anti-inflammatory effect, of the extract of its capitula, in patients with phlebitis due to peripheral intravenous infusion of antineoplastic chemotherapy and to evaluate the toxicity of this extract in human beings. The therapeutic efficacy, concerning the anti-inflammatory potential, of different doses of Chamomilla recutita extract were analyzed and compared in 25 patients. The time of regression of phlebitis was shorter for groups with 2.5% concentration (mean=29.2h, standard deviation = 8.98) and 5% concentration (mean = 38.8h, standard deviation = 17.47). Local toxicity was almost not observed. This research contributes to the innovation of the nursing clinical practice, since it suggests an alternative for the treatment of phlebitis through the clinical use of phytotherapeutic drugs.

  1. Probabilistic dose-response modeling: case study using dichloromethane PBPK model results.

    PubMed

    Marino, Dale J; Starr, Thomas B

    2007-12-01

    A revised assessment of dichloromethane (DCM) has recently been reported that examines the influence of human genetic polymorphisms on cancer risks using deterministic PBPK and dose-response modeling in the mouse combined with probabilistic PBPK modeling in humans. This assessment utilized Bayesian techniques to optimize kinetic variables in mice and humans with mean values from posterior distributions used in the deterministic modeling in the mouse. To supplement this research, a case study was undertaken to examine the potential impact of probabilistic rather than deterministic PBPK and dose-response modeling in mice on subsequent unit risk factor (URF) determinations. Four separate PBPK cases were examined based on the exposure regimen of the NTP DCM bioassay. These were (a) Same Mouse (single draw of all PBPK inputs for both treatment groups); (b) Correlated BW-Same Inputs (single draw of all PBPK inputs for both treatment groups except for bodyweights (BWs), which were entered as correlated variables); (c) Correlated BW-Different Inputs (separate draws of all PBPK inputs for both treatment groups except that BWs were entered as correlated variables); and (d) Different Mouse (separate draws of all PBPK inputs for both treatment groups). Monte Carlo PBPK inputs reflect posterior distributions from Bayesian calibration in the mouse that had been previously reported. A minimum of 12,500 PBPK iterations were undertaken, in which dose metrics, i.e., mg DCM metabolized by the GST pathway/L tissue/day for lung and liver were determined. For dose-response modeling, these metrics were combined with NTP tumor incidence data that were randomly selected from binomial distributions. Resultant potency factors (0.1/ED(10)) were coupled with probabilistic PBPK modeling in humans that incorporated genetic polymorphisms to derive URFs. Results show that there was relatively little difference, i.e., <10% in central tendency and upper percentile URFs, regardless of the case

  2. Nut intake and stroke risk: A dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chuan; Tang, Hui; Zhao, Wei; He, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    We aim to quantify the effects of nut intake on risk of stroke by a dose-response meta-analysis with a random-effects model. Two databases (PubMed and Emabse) were searched for prospective cohort studies regarding nut intake and stroke risk. Studies were included if they fulfilled the predefined criteria. Eleven articles encompassing fourteen cohort studies were included in final analysis. The pooled relative risk (RR) of stroke for the highest versus (vs.) lowest category of nut intake was 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-0.97). The power to detect a RR of 0.88 for the highest versus vs. lowest category of nut intake was 86.2%. In multiple subset analyses by gender, location, and stroke subtype, the inverse association was only found in women (RR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.73–0.96) and Asia (RR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.67–0.93). In the dose-response meta-analysis, evidence for a nonlinear association between nut intake and stroke risk was observed and a RR of 0.86 was conferred for 12 g/day. Based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system, the quality of evidence was moderate. In conclusions, finding from current meta-analysis of fourteen cohort studies indicates that nut intake may be related to decreased risk of stroke. PMID:27469072

  3. Exploring the dose response of radiochromic dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skyt, P. S.; Wahlstedt, I.; Yates, E. S.; Muren, L. P.; Petersen, J. B. B.; Balling, P.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the dose response of a newly developed radio-chromic hydrogel dosimeter based on leuco malachite green dye in a gelatine matrix. The original dosimeter composition was first investigated in terms of dose response and dose-rate dependence. In addition, the initiating compounds producing chlorine radicals were substituted with compounds producing fluorine radicals, oxygen-centered radicals, carbon-centered radicals and bromine radicals. Also the surfactant was substituted by other compounds of different molecular size and charge. The original composition gave a dose response of 3.5·10-3 Gy-1cm-1 at 6 Gy/min with a dose rate dependence giving a 27 % increase when decreasing the dose rate to 1 Gy/min. None of the substituted initiating components contributed to an increase in dose response while only one surfactant increased the dose response slightly.

  4. Non-monotonic dose responses in studies of endocrine disrupting chemicals: bisphenol a as a case study.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-05-01

    Non-monotonic dose response curves (NMDRCs) have been demonstrated for natural hormones and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in a variety of biological systems including cultured cells, whole organ cultures, laboratory animals and human populations. The mechanisms responsible for these NMDRCs are well known, typically related to the interactions between the ligand (hormone or EDC) and a hormone receptor. Although there are hundreds of examples of NMDRCs in the EDC literature, there are claims that they are not 'common enough' to influence the use of high-to-low dose extrapolations in risk assessments. Here, we chose bisphenol A (BPA), a well-studied EDC, to assess the frequency of non-monotonic responses. Our results indicate that NMDRCs are common in the BPA literature, occurring in greater than 20% of all experiments and in at least one endpoint in more than 30% of all studies we examined. We also analyzed the types of endpoints that produce NMDRCs in vitro and factors related to study design that influence the ability to detect these kinds of responses. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence for NMDRCs in the EDC literature, specifically for BPA, and question the current risk assessment practice where 'safe' low doses are predicted from high dose exposures.

  5. Non-Monotonic Dose Responses in Studies of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals: Bisphenol A as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, Laura N.

    2014-01-01

    Non-monotonic dose response curves (NMDRCs) have been demonstrated for natural hormones and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in a variety of biological systems including cultured cells, whole organ cultures, laboratory animals and human populations. The mechanisms responsible for these NMDRCs are well known, typically related to the interactions between the ligand (hormone or EDC) and a hormone receptor. Although there are hundreds of examples of NMDRCs in the EDC literature, there are claims that they are not ‘common enough’ to influence the use of high-to-low dose extrapolations in risk assessments. Here, we chose bisphenol A (BPA), a well-studied EDC, to assess the frequency of non-monotonic responses. Our results indicate that NMDRCs are common in the BPA literature, occurring in greater than 20% of all experiments and in at least one endpoint in more than 30% of all studies we examined. We also analyzed the types of endpoints that produce NMDRCs in vitro and factors related to study design that influence the ability to detect these kinds of responses. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence for NMDRCs in the EDC literature, specifically for BPA, and question the current risk assessment practice where ‘safe’ low doses are predicted from high dose exposures. PMID:24910584

  6. Dosing study of massage for chronic neck pain: protocol for the dose response evaluation and analysis of massage [DREAM] trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the growing popularity of massage, its effectiveness for treating neck pain remains unclear, largely because of the poor quality of research. A major deficiency of previous studies has been their use of low “doses” of massage that massage therapists consider inadequate. Unfortunately, the number of minutes per massage session, sessions per week, or weeks of treatment necessary for massage to have beneficial or optimal effects are not known. This study is designed to address these gaps in our knowledge by determining, for persons with chronic neck pain: 1) the optimal combination of number of treatments per week and length of individual treatment session, and 2) the optimal number of weeks of treatment. Methods/design In this study, 228 persons with chronic non-specific neck pain will be recruited from primary health care clinics in a large health care system in the Seattle area. Participants will be randomized to a wait list control group or 4 weeks of treatment with one of 5 different dosing combinations (2 or 3 30-min treatments per week or 1, 2, or 3 60-min treatments per week). At the end of this 4-week primary treatment period, participants initially receiving each of the 5 dosing combinations will be randomized to a secondary treatment period of either no additional treatment or 6 weekly 60-min massages. The primary outcomes, neck-related dysfunction and pain, will be assessed by blinded telephone interviewers 5, 12, and 26 weeks post-randomization. To better characterize the trajectory of treatment effects, these interview data will be supplemented with outcomes data collected by internet questionnaire at 10, 16, 20 and 39 weeks. Comparisons of outcomes for the 6 groups during the primary treatment period will identify the optimal weekly dose, while comparisons of outcomes during the secondary treatment period will determine if 10 weeks of treatment is superior to 4 weeks. Discussion A broad dosing schedule was included in this trial

  7. An Exploratory Study of Responses to Low-Dose Lithium in African Americans and Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Jodi Gonzalez; Salcedo, Stephanie; Ketter, Terrence A.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Rabideau, Dustin J.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Bazan, Melissa; Leon, Andrew C.; Friedman, Edward S.; Iosifescu, Dan; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Ostacher, Michael; Thase, Michael; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Bowden, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Few prospective studies examine the impact of ethnicity or race on outcomes with lithium for bipolar disorder. This exploratory study examines differences in lithium response and treatment outcomes in Hispanics, African Americans, and non-Hispanic Whites with bipolar disorder in the Lithium Treatment Moderate Dose Use Study (LiTMUS). Methods LiTMUS was a six-site randomized controlled trial of low-dose lithium added to optimized treatment (OPT; personalized, evidence-based pharmacotherapy) versus OPT alone in outpatients with bipolar disorder. Of 283 participants, 47 African Americans, 39 Hispanics, and 175 non-Hispanic whites were examined. We predicted minority groups would have more negative medication attitudes and higher attrition rates, but better clinical outcomes. Results African Americans in the lithium group improved more on depression and life functioning compared to whites over the 6 month study. African Americans in the OPT only group had marginal improvement on depression symptoms. For Hispanics, satisfaction with life did not significantly improve in the OPT only group, in contrast to whites and African Americans who improved over time on all measures. Attitudes toward medications did not differ across ethnic/racial groups. Conclusions African Americans show some greater improvements with lithium than non-Hispanic whites, and Hispanics showed more consistent improvements in the lithium group. The impact of low-dose lithium should be studied in a larger sample as there may be particular benefit for African Americans and Hispanics. Given that the control group (regardless of ethnicity/race) had significant improvements, optimized treatment may be beneficial for any ethnic group. PMID:25827507

  8. Alcohol consumption and dementia risk: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Huifu; Wan, Yu; Tan, Chenchen; Li, Jieqiong; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2017-01-01

    It is widely believed that light-to-moderate alcohol intake may protect against dementia while excessive drinking may instead increase the risk. Nonetheless, these findings need cautious interpretations due to varying methodologies and lack of standard definition, which hindered our transferring into preventative practice. The objective of this study is to investigate the potential dose-response association between alcohol consumption and risk of dementia. A systematic search was conducted in electronic databases to identify relevant studies. Risk estimates were combined using a random-effect model. Eleven studies with 73,330 participants and 4586 cases for all-cause dementia (ACD), five studies with 52,715 participants and 1267 cases for Alzheimer's dementia (AD) and four studies with 49,535 participants and 542 cases for vascular dementia were included. We observed a nonlinear association between alcohol consumption and ACD risk (p nonlinearity < 0.05). The alcohol dose associated with lower risk of dementia was confined to at most 12.5 g/day, with the risk hitting bottom (RR ≈ 0.9) at roughly 6 g/day. Of note, the ACD risk seemed to be elevated (≈10%) when the dose surpasses certain levels: 23 drinks/week or 38 g/day. For the alcohol type, recommendation for wine is prioritized. The subgroup analysis further indicated that the effect of alcohol may be greater in younger adults (<60 years old) with regard to fighting against dementia. Modest alcohol consumption (≤12.5 g/day) is associated with a reduced risk of dementia with 6 g/day of alcohol conferring a lower risk than other levels while excessive drinking (≥38 g/day) may instead elevate the risk.

  9. Dose-response fallacy in human reproductive studies of toxic exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Selevan, S.G.; Lemasters, G.K.

    1987-05-01

    The manner in which exposure is defined can affect the findings of reproductive studies of toxic exposures. The individual end points potentially examined, such as fetal loss, subfertility, and congenital malformations observed at birth, are on a continuum by severity of effect: The most extreme effect of the three being infertility because no pregnancy is possible, and the least extreme, congenital malformations recognized at birth. End points observed at birth are survivors of a long and complex process. The process yielding one of these adverse end points may result from a number of factors, including level of exposure. For example, a very high exposure could result in early fetal loss, whereas a lower one might result in a congenital malformation observed at birth. If the probability of a less severe end point falls due to increasing probability of more severe end points with increasing exposure, then a nontraditional dose-response relationship may be observed in the study of one type of outcome.

  10. Dose-response fallacy in human reproductive studies of toxic exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Selevan, S.G.; Lemasters, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    The manner in which exposure is defined can affect the findings of reproductive studies of toxic exposures. The individual end points potentially examined, such as fetal loss, subfertility, and congenital malformations observed at birth, are on a continuum by severity of effect: the most extreme effects of the three being infertility because no pregnancy is possible, and the least extreme, congenital malformations recognized at birth. End points observed at birth are survivors of a long and complex process. The process yielding one of these adverse end points may result from a number of factors, including level of exposure could result in early fetal loss, whereas a lower one might result in a congenital malformation observed at birth. If the probability of a less-severe end point falls due to increasing probability of more-severe end points with increasing exposure, then a nontraditional dose-response relationship may be observed in the study of one type of outcome.

  11. Bayesian penalized log-likelihood ratio approach for dose response clinical trial studies.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuanyuan; Cai, Chunyan; Sun, Liangrui; He, Jianghua

    2017-02-13

    In literature, there are a few unified approaches to test proof of concept and estimate a target dose, including the multiple comparison procedure using modeling approach, and the permutation approach proposed by Klingenberg. We discuss and compare the operating characteristics of these unified approaches and further develop an alternative approach in a Bayesian framework based on the posterior distribution of a penalized log-likelihood ratio test statistic. Our Bayesian approach is much more flexible to handle linear or nonlinear dose-response relationships and is more efficient than the permutation approach. The operating characteristics of our Bayesian approach are comparable to and sometimes better than both approaches in a wide range of dose-response relationships. It yields credible intervals as well as predictive distribution for the response rate at a specific dose level for the target dose estimation. Our Bayesian approach can be easily extended to continuous, categorical, and time-to-event responses. We illustrate the performance of our proposed method with extensive simulations and Phase II clinical trial data examples.

  12. Treatment of tattoos by Q-switched ruby laser. A dose-response study

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.R.; Gange, R.W.; Dover, J.S.; Flotte, T.J.; Gonzalez, E.; Michaud, N.; Anderson, R.R. )

    1990-07-01

    Tattoo treatment with Q-switched ruby laser pulses (694 nm, 40 to 80 nanoseconds) was studied by clinical assessment and light and electron microscopy. Fifty-seven blue-black tattoos or portions thereof (35 amateur and 22 professional) were irradiated with 1.5 to 8.0 J/cm2 at a mean interval of 3 weeks. Substantial lightening or total clearing occurred in 18 (78%) of 23 amateur tattoos and 3 (23%) of 13 professional tattoos in which the protocol was completed. Response was related to exposure dose. Scarring occurred in one case, and persistent confettilike hypopigmentation was frequent. Optimal fluence was 4 to 8 J/cm2. Clinicohistologic correlation was poor. Q-switched ruby laser pulses can provide an effective treatment for tattoos.

  13. Coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer: a dose-response analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Tian, Changwei; Wang, Wenming; Hong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xingliang

    2013-06-01

    Coffee consumption has been linked to risk of colorectal cancer theoretically, but the findings were conflicting from observational studies. Results from the recent meta-analysis suggested a moderate favorable effect of coffee consumption on colorectal cancer risk, especially for colon cancer. However, the relationship, if exists, between coffee consumption and colorectal cancer risk is unclear. Thus, the dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline model and multivariate random-effect meta-regression. The results suggested that a significant association was found between coffee consumption and decreased risk of colorectal and colon cancer among subjects consuming ≥4 cups of coffee per day. A potential nonlinear relationship should be assessed before assuming a linear relationship.

  14. Recombinant human erythropoietin therapy in critically ill patients: a dose-response study [ISRCTN48523317

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Matamis, Dimitris; Routsi, Christina; Michalopoulos, Argiris; Maggina, Nina; Dimopoulos, George; Zakynthinos, Epaminondas; Nakos, George; Thomopoulos, George; Mandragos, Kostas; Maniatis, Alice

    2005-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of two dosing schedules of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) in increasing haematocrit (Hct) and haemoglobin (Hb) and reducing exposure to allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in critically ill patients. Method This was a prospective, randomized, multicentre trial. A total of 13 intensive care units participated, and a total of 148 patients who met eligibility criteria were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to receive intravenous iron saccharate alone (control group), intravenous iron saccharate and subcutaneous rHuEPO 40,000 units once per week (group A), or intravenous iron saccharate and subcutaneous rHuEPO 40,000 units three times per week (group B). rHuEPO was given for a minimum of 2 weeks or until discharge from the intensive care unit or death. The maximum duration of therapy was 3 weeks. Results The cumulative number of RBC units transfused, the average numbers of RBC units transfused per patient and per transfused patient, the average volume of RBCs transfused per day, and the percentage of transfused patients were significantly higher in the control group than in groups A and B. No significant difference was observed between group A and B. The mean increases in Hct and Hb from baseline to final measurement were significantly greater in group B than in the control group. The mean increase in Hct was significantly greater in group B than in group A. The mean increase in Hct in group A was significantly greater than that in control individuals, whereas the mean increase in Hb did not differ significantly between the control group and group A. Conclusion Administration of rHuEPO to critically ill patients significantly reduced the need for RBC transfusion. The magnitude of the reduction did not differ between the two dosing schedules, although there was a dose response for Hct and Hb to rHuEPO in these patients. PMID:16277712

  15. Second Solid Cancers After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Studies of the Radiation Dose-Response Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P.

    2013-06-01

    Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ≥60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

  16. Methods for meta-analysis of pharmacodynamic dose-response data with application to multi-arm studies of alogliptin.

    PubMed

    Langford, Oliver; Aronson, Jeffrey K; van Valkenhoef, Gert; Stevens, Richard J

    2016-03-17

    Standard methods for meta-analysis of dose-response data in epidemiology assume a model with a single scalar parameter, such as log-linear relationships between exposure and outcome; such models are implicitly unbounded. In contrast, in pharmacology, multi-parameter models, such as the widely used Emax model, are used to describe relationships that are bounded above and below. We propose methods for estimating the parameters of a dose-response model by meta-analysis of summary data from the results of randomized controlled trials of a drug, in which each trial uses multiple doses of the drug of interest (possibly including dose 0 or placebo). We assume that, for each randomized arm of each trial, the mean and standard error of a continuous response measure and the corresponding allocated dose are available. We consider weighted least squares fitting of the model to the mean and dose pairs from all arms of all studies, and a two-stage procedure in which scalar inverse-variance meta-analysis is performed at each dose, and the dose-response model is fitted to the results by weighted least squares. We then compare these with two further methods inspired by network meta-analysis that fit the model to the contrasts between doses. We illustrate the methods by estimating the parameters of the Emax model to a collection of multi-arm, multiple-dose, randomized controlled trials of alogliptin, a drug for the management of diabetes mellitus, and further examine the properties of the four methods with sensitivity analyses and a simulation study. We find that all four methods produce broadly comparable point estimates for the parameters of most interest, but a single-stage method based on contrasts between doses produces the most appropriate confidence intervals. Although simpler methods may have pragmatic advantages, such as the use of standard software for scalar meta-analysis, more sophisticated methods are nevertheless preferable for their advantages in estimation.

  17. Parity and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: a Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Lv, Haichen; Wu, Hongyi; Yin, Jiasheng; Qian, Juying; Ge, Junbo

    2015-08-24

    Parity has been shown to inversely associate with cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, but the evidence of epidemiological studies is still controversial. Therefore, we quantitatively assessed the relationship between parity and CVD mortality by summarizing the evidence from prospective studies. We searched MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE and ISI Web of Science databases for relevant prospective studies of parity and CVD mortality through the end of March 2015. Fixed- or random-effects models were used to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity among studies was assessed using the I(2) statistics. All statistical tests were two-sided. Ten prospective studies were included with a total of 994,810 participants and 16,601 CVD events. A borderline significant inverse association was observed while comparing parity with nulliparous, with summarized RR = 0.79 (95% CI: 0.60-1.06; I(2) = 90.9%, P < 0.001). In dose-response analysis, we observed a significant nonlinear association between parity number and CVD mortality. The greatest risk reduction appeared when the parity number reached four. The findings of this meta-analysis suggests that ever parity is inversely related to CVD mortality. Furthermore, there is a statistically significant nonlinear inverse association between parity number and CVD mortality.

  18. Ecological versus case-control studies for testing a linear-no threshold dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B L

    1990-09-01

    The two basic problems with ecological studies are (A) individuals studied are not necessarily the individuals who are at risk, and (B) they are very vulnerable to confounding factors. It is shown that where the study is designed to test a linear-no threshold dose-response theory, (A) does not apply. Where the ecological study deals with the average dose and response in a large number of US counties, the available data and computer capability for reducing effects of confounders are so powerful that (B) may be no more important for the ecological than for a case-control study. The migration problem is treated and found to be relatively unimportant.

  19. Results of animal studies suggest a nonlinear dose-response relationship for benzene effects

    SciTech Connect

    Parodi, S.; Taningher, M. ); Lutz, W.K. ); Colacci, A.; Mazzullo, M.; Grilli, S. )

    1989-07-01

    Considering the very large industrial usage of benzene, studies in risk assessment aimed at the evaluation of carcinogenic risk at low levels of exposure are important. Animal data can offer indications about what could happen in humans and provide more diverse information than epidemiological data with respect to dose-response consideration. The authors have considered experiments investigating metabolism, short-term genotoxicity tests, DNA adduct formation, and carcinogenicity long-term tests. According to the different experiments, a saturation of benzene metabolism and benzene effects in terms of genotoxicity seems evident above 30 to 100 ppm. Below 30 to 60 ppm the initiating effect of benzene seems to be linear for a large interval of dosages, at least judging from DNA adduct formation. Potential lack of a promoting effect of benzene (below 10 ppm) could generate a sublinear response at nontoxic levels of exposure. This possibility was suggested by epidemiological data in humans and is not confirmed or excluded by their observations with animals.

  20. Dose-response study of sodium cromoglycate in exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K R; Berkin, K E; Kerr, J W

    1982-01-01

    Ten patients with exercise-induced asthma participated in a single-blind dose-response study comparing the protective effect of inhaled sodium cromoglycate in increasing concentrations from 2 to 40 mg/ml. Saline was used as a control. Effects were assessed from the mean maximal percentage fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) after the patients had run on a treadmill for eight minutes. There was slight bronchodilation evident from the increase in baseline FEV1 after inhalation of sodium cromoglycate, the difference reaching statistical significance with the highest concentration (5.7%, p less than 0.05). After exercise the maximal percentage falls in FEV1 (means and SEM) after saline and after sodium cromoglycate at 2, 10, 20, and 40 mg/ml were 37.3 +/- 4.7, 17.3 +/- 4.1, 10 +/- 3.3, 7.6 +/- 2.4, and 12 +/- 2.9. Sodium cromoglycate inhibited the exercise-induced fall in FEV1 at all the concentrations used in the study (p less than 0.001) and its inhibitory effect increased from 2 to 20 mg/ml. The mean FEV1 returned to baseline values within 15 minutes at higher concentrations of sodium cromoglycate (20 and 40 mg/ml) and a small bronchodilator effect was noted at 30 minutes. The findings suggest that the protective effect of sodium cromoglycate in exercise asthma is dose related. At higher concentration the drug suppresses chemical mediator release from the lung mast cells and may also modify the bronchial reactivity to release mediators. PMID:6818707

  1. Modeling dose-dependent neural processing responses using mixed effects spline models: with application to a PET study of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Bowman, F DuBois

    2008-04-01

    For functional neuroimaging studies that involve experimental stimuli measuring dose levels, e.g. of an anesthetic agent, typical statistical techniques include correlation analysis, analysis of variance or polynomial regression models. These standard approaches have limitations: correlation analysis only provides a crude estimate of the linear relationship between dose levels and brain activity; ANOVA is designed to accommodate a few specified dose levels; polynomial regression models have limited capacity to model varying patterns of association between dose levels and measured activity across the brain. These shortcomings prompt the need to develop methods that more effectively capture dose-dependent neural processing responses. We propose a class of mixed effects spline models that analyze the dose-dependent effect using either regression or smoothing splines. Our method offers flexible accommodation of different response patterns across various brain regions, controls for potential confounding factors, and accounts for subject variability in brain function. The estimates from the mixed effects spline model can be readily incorporated into secondary analyses, for instance, targeting spatial classifications of brain regions according to their modeled response profiles. The proposed spline models are also extended to incorporate interaction effects between the dose-dependent response function and other factors. We illustrate our proposed statistical methodology using data from a PET study of the effect of ethanol on brain function. A simulation study is conducted to compare the performance of the proposed mixed effects spline models and a polynomial regression model. Results show that the proposed spline models more accurately capture varying response patterns across voxels, especially at voxels with complex response shapes. Finally, the proposed spline models can be used in more general settings as a flexible modeling tool for investigating the effects of any

  2. Dose Response Data for Hormonally Active Chemicals ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the late 1940s. The debate originally focused on linear no threshold (LNT) vs threshold responses in the low dose range for cancer and noncancer related effects. For noncancer effects the default assumption is that noncancer effects generally display threshold rather than LNT responses. More recently, claims have arisen that the chemicals, like endocrine disrupters (EDS), which act via high affinity, low capacity nuclear receptors, may display LNT or nonmonotonic low dose responses: responses that could be missed in multigenerational guideline toxicity testing. This presentation will discuss LNT, threshold and nonmonotonic dose response relationships from case studies of chemicals that disrupt reproductive development and function via the ER, AR and AhR pathways and will include in vitro and in vivo multigenerational data. The in vivo studies in this discussion include only robust, well designed, comprehensive studies that administered the chemical via a relevant route(s) of exposure over a broad dose response range, including low dose(s) in the microgram/kg/d range. The chemicals include ethinyl estradiol, estradiol, genistein, bisphenol a, trenbolone, finasteride, flutamide, phthalate esters and 2,3,7,8 TCDD. The objective is to critically evaluate the data from well done studies in this field to address concerns that current multigenerational reproductive test gui

  3. Dose-response studies on the spermatogonial stem cells of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    van Alphen, M.M.; van de Kant, H.J.; Davids, J.A.; Warmer, C.J.; Bootsma, A.L.; de Rooij, D.G. )

    1989-09-01

    Studies of the dose response of the spermatogonial stem cells in the rhesus monkey were performed at intervals of 130 and 160 days after graded doses of X irradiation. The D0 of the spermatogonial stem cells was established using the total numbers of the type A spermatogonia that were present at 130 and 160 days after irradiation and was found to be 1.07 Gy; the 95% confidence interval was 0.90-1.34 Gy.

  4. Mechanistic and quantitative studies of bystander response in 3D tissues for low-dose radiation risk estimations

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, Sally A.

    2013-06-12

    We have used the MatTek 3-dimensional human skin model to study the gene expression response of a 3D model to low and high dose low LET radiation, and to study the radiation bystander effect as a function of distance from the site of irradiation with either alpha particles or low LET protons. We have found response pathways that appear to be specific for low dose exposures, that could not have been predicted from high dose studies. We also report the time and distance dependent expression of a large number of genes in bystander tissue. the bystander response in 3D tissues showed many similarities to that described previously in 2D cultured cells, but also showed some differences.

  5. Dose-Response Relation between Work Hours and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Findings from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Sadie H.; Pompeii, Lisa A.; Roberts, Robert E.; Follis, Jack L.; Gimeno, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the presence of a dose-response relationship between work hours and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a representative sample of U.S. workers. Methods Retrospective cohort study of 1,926 individuals from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (1986–2011) employed for at least 10 years. Restricted cubic spline regression was used to estimate the dose-response relationship of work hours with CVD. Results A dose-response relationship was observed in which an average workweek of 46 hours or more for at least 10 years was associated with increased risk of CVD. Compared to working 45 hours per week, working an additional 10 hours per week or more for at least 10 years increased CVD risk by at least 16%. Conclusions Working more than 45 work hours per week for at least 10 years may be an independent risk factor for CVD. PMID:26949870

  6. Study of dose-response and radical decay curves of gamma irradiated norfloxacin using EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sütçü, Kerem; Osmanoǧlu, Yunus Emre

    2017-02-01

    In this study, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectra of unirradiated and γ-irradiated at doses of 1, 5, 10, 12 and 15 kGy norfloxacin (NOF) were investigated. Before irradiation no EPR signal were observed. After irradiation a weak singlet signal at g = 2.0039 were obtained at room temperature. In order to describe the variation of EPR signal intensity with absorbed radiation dose, several mathematical equations were tried. Increasing irradiation dose up to 15 kGy has increased the signal intensity of the central signal however, no significant changes were observed in g spectroscopic splitting factor. The stability of signal intensity of irradiated NOF was studied over a storage period of 200 days. According to analyses conducted, EPR spectroscopy can be used to distinguish irradiated and unirradiated samples from each other.

  7. Acute Effects of Classroom Exercise Breaks on Executive Function and Math Performance: A Dose-Response Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, Erin K.; Schatz, Jeffrey; Pate, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the acute dose-response relationship of classroom exercise breaks with executive function and math performance in 9- to 12-year-old children by comparing 5-min, 10-min, or 20-min classroom exercise breaks to 10 min of sedentary classroom activity. Method: This study used a within-subjects…

  8. Immune response to a new hepatitis B vaccine in healthcare workers who had not responded to standard vaccine: randomised double blind dose-response study.

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, J. N.; Sabin, C.; Craig, F. M.; Williams, A.; Zuckerman, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of a new triple S recombinant hepatitis B vaccine in a cohort of healthy people in whom currently licensed hepatitis B vaccines had persistently not induced an immune response. DESIGN: Single centre, randomised, double blind, dose-response study. SETTING: Research vaccine evaluation centre at a teaching hospital. SUBJECTS: 100 healthcare workers aged 18-70 years with a history of failure to seroconvert after at least four doses of a licensed hepatitis B vaccine containing the S component. INTERVENTION: Each subject was randomly allocated two doses of 5, 10, 20, or 40 micrograms of a new hepatitis B vaccine two months apart. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Immunogenicity of the four doses. Seroconversion and seroprotection were defined as an antibody tire > 10 IU/l and > 100 IU/l respectively against an international antibody standard. RESULTS: 69 subjects seroconverted after a single dose of the vaccine. After the booster vaccination one other subject seroconverted, bringing the overall seroconversion rate to 70%. Fifteen subjects given 5 micrograms of vaccine, 19 given 10 micrograms, 16 given 20 micrograms, and 20 given 40 micrograms seroconverted. Seroconversion rates in the four antigen dose groups were 60% (15/25), 76% (19/25), 64% (16/25), and 80% (20/25). After the booster dose there was no significant dose-response effect on the overall seroconversion rate, although the small sample size meant that a clinically important dose-response could not be ruled out. CONCLUSION: A single dose of 20 micrograms of the vaccine was as effective as two doses of either 40 micrograms or 20 micrograms of this vaccine formulation in terms of seroconversion, seroprotection, and geometric mean titres. PMID:9040320

  9. EFFECTS OF PRENATAL TESTOSTERONE PROPIONATE ON THE SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT OF MALE AND FEMALE RATS: A DOSE-RESPONSE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Prenatal Testosterone Propionate on the Sexual Development of Male and Female Rats: A Dose-Response Study
    Cynthia J. Wolf1,2, Andrew Hotchkiss3, Joseph S. Ostby1, Gerald A. LeBlanc2 and
    L. Earl Gray1,4, Jr.

    ABSTRACT
    Testosterone plays a major role in ...

  10. EFFECTS OF PRENATAL TESTOSTERONE PROPIONATE ON SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT OF MALE AND FEMALE RATS: A DOSE-RESPONSE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Prenatal Testosterone Propionate on Sexual Development of Male and Female Rats: A Dose-Response Study
    Cynthia Wolf1,2, Joe Ostby1*, Andrew Hotchkiss3, Gerald LeBlanc2, and L. Earl Gray, Jr.1
    1USEPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC; 2Dept. of To...

  11. 28-day repeated dose response study of diglycolic acid: Renal and hepatic effects.

    PubMed

    Sprando, Robert L; Mossoba, Miriam E; Black, Thomas; Keltner, Zachary; Vohra, Sanah; Olejnik, Nicholas; Toomer, Howard; Stine, Cynthia; Evans, Eric; Sprando, Jessica L; Ferguson, Martine

    2017-03-25

    The acute oral toxicity of diglycolic acid (DGA) was evaluated. Groups of female rats (n = 8 rats/group) received 28 consecutive daily single doses of 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, 10.0, 30.0, 100.0 or 300.0 mg DGA/kg body weight by gastric intubation. One group of animals served as vehicle control. Tissues and blood serum were collected at necropsy on day 29. Select organs were weighed and fixed in formalin for histopathological analysis. Animals from the 300 mg/kg bw dose group were removed from the study after 5 consecutive days of treatment as a consequence of adverse treatment related effects. The animals in the remaining treatment groups survived the exposure period. No adverse clinical signs were observed throughout the exposure period in the surviving animals. No significant differences from controls were observed for feed and fluid consumption or body weight gain in the surviving animals. Lesions were observed in the kidneys, liver, stomach, intestine, thymus, spleen and bone marrow in animals from the 300 mg/kg dose group and signs of renal tubular regeneration were observed only in the 100 mg/kg dose group. These results suggest that high levels of pure DGA would need to be consumed before renal and other forms of organ toxicity are observed.

  12. Household physical activity and cancer risk: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yun; Li, Tingting; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Lingling; Qin, Qin; Yin, Jieyun; Wei, Sheng; Liu, Li; Nie, Shaofa

    2015-10-07

    Controversial results of the association between household physical activity and cancer risk were reported among previous epidemiological studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the relationship of household physical activity and cancer risk quantitatively, especially in dose-response manner. PubMed, Embase, Web of science and the Cochrane Library were searched for cohort or case-control studies that examined the association between household physical activity and cancer risks. Random-effect models were conducted to estimate the summary relative risks (RRs), nonlinear or linear dose-response meta-analyses were performed to estimate the trend from the correlated log RR estimates across levels of household physical activity quantitatively. Totally, 30 studies including 41 comparisons met the inclusion criteria. Total cancer risks were reduced 16% among the people with highest household physical activity compared to those with lowest household physical activity (RR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.76-0.93). The dose-response analyses indicated an inverse linear association between household physical activity and cancer risk. The relative risk was 0.98 (95% CI = 0.97-1.00) for per additional 10 MET-hours/week and it was 0.99 (95% CI = 0.98-0.99) for per 1 hour/week increase. These findings provide quantitative data supporting household physical activity is associated with decreased cancer risk in dose-response effect.

  13. Body Mass Index and Risk of Breast Cancer: A Nonlinear Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei; Li, Jiaoyuan; Chen, Xueqin; Rui, Rui; Liu, Cheng; Sun, Yu; Liu, Li; Gong, Jing; Yuan, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The role of Body Mass Index (BMI) for Breast Cancer (BC) remains to be great interest for a long time. However, the precise effect of nonlinear dose-response for BMI and BC risk is still unclear. We conducted a dose-response meta-analysis to quantitatively assess the effect of BMI on BC risk. Twelve prospective studies with 4,699 cases identified among 426,199 participants and 25 studies of 22,809 cases identified among 1,155,110 participants in premenopausal and postmenopausal groups, respectively, were included in this meta-analysis. Significant non-linear dose-response (P < 0.001) association was identified between BMI and BC risk in postmenopausal women. Individuals with BMI of 25, 30, and 35 kg/m2 yielded relative risks (RRs) of 1.02 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.98–1.06], 1.12 (95% CI: 1.01–1.24), and 1.26 (95% CI: 1.07–1.50), respectively, when compared to the mean level of the normal BMI range. However, inverse result though not significant was observed in premenopausal women. In conclusion, the results of this meta-analysis highlighted that obesity contributed to increased BC risk in a nonlinear dose-response manner in postmenopausal women, and it is important to realize that body weight control may be a crucial process to reduce BC susceptibility. PMID:25504309

  14. Low Dose Studies with Focused X-Rays in cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kathy Held; Kevin Prise; Barry Michael; Melvyn Folkard

    2002-12-14

    the relationship between high- and low-dose exposures. The targeting approach also allows us to study very clearly a newly recognized effect of radiation, the ''bystander effect'', which appears to dominate some low-dose responses and therefore may have a significant role in low-dose risk mechanisms. Our project also addresses the concept that the background of naturally occurring oxidative damage that takes place continually in cells due to byproducts of metabolism may play a role in low-dose radiation risk. This project therefore also examines how cells are damaged by treatments that modify the levels of oxidative damage, either alone or in combination with low-dose irradiation. In this project, we have used human and rodent cell lines and each set of experiments has been carried out on a single cell type. However, low-dose research has to extend into tissues because signaling between cells of different types is likely to influence the responses. Our studies have therefore also included microbeam experiments using a model tissue system that consists of an explant of a small piece of pig ureter grown in culture. The structure of this tissue is similar to that of epithelium and therefore it relates to the tissues in which carcinoma arises. Our studies have been able to measure bystander-induced changes in the cells growing out from the tissue fragment after it has been targeted with a few radiation tracks to mimic a low-dose exposure.

  15. Low Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Barry D. Michael; Kathryn Held; Kevin Prise

    2002-12-19

    of the relationship between high- and low-dose exposures. The targeting approach also allows us to study very clearly a newly recognized effect of radiation, the ''bystander effect'', which appears to dominate some low-dose responses and therefore may have a significant role in low-dose risk mechanisms. Our project also addresses the concept that the background of naturally occurring oxidative damage that takes place continually in cells due to byproducts of metabolism may play a role in treatments that modify the levels of oxidative damage, either alone or in combination with low-dose irradiation. In this project, we have used human and rodent cell lines and each set of experiments has been carried out on a single cell type. However, low-dose research has to extend into tissues because signaling between cells of different types is likely to influence the responses. Our studies have therefore also included microbeam experiments using a model tissue system that consists of an explant of a small piece of pig ureter grown in culture. The structure of this tissue is similar to that of epithelium and there it relates to the tissues in which carcinoma arises. Our studies have been able to measure bystander-induced changes in the cells growing out from the tissue fragment after it has been targeted with a few radiation tracks to mimic a low-dose exposure.

  16. [Dose-response curve in the study of the effects of exposure to crystalline silica].

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, L; Cassano, F

    2003-01-01

    The cumulative exposure to crystalline silica (SiO2) implies a linear relation between duration of exposure and SiO2 concentration, not always suitable to working situations of the last decades. A more correct definition of dose-response curve has currently to consider also different characteristics of SiO2, specifically: possible short-term increases in environmental SiO2 concentration, different mineralogical and surface properties of natural silica polymorphs, age of SiO2 particles, presence of contaminants on the surface of silica particles or even in the respirable fraction of total dust, respirable dust concentration in which SiO2 is diluted and other conditions, also affecting the host, able to slow alveolar clearance and lengthen permanence time of particles in the lung. Many models of definition of cumulative exposure so conceived have been proposed. However, to define the occupational risk threshold to contract silicosis and other silica-related diseases a number of models of cumulative exposure, i.e. biologically effective dose of SiO2, are likely to be delineated that take into account only factors specifically present in different occupational situations.

  17. SnET2 for the treatment of vascular disease: dose/response study in New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narciso, Hugh L., Jr.; Anderson, Steven C.; DeHoratius, Sandra L.; Guerrero, Jan; Wang, T.; Spears, J. Richard

    1995-05-01

    Tin ethyl etiopurpurin, SnET2, is presently undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of cutaneous cancers and AIDS related Kaposi's sarcoma. Extensive pre-clinical work has been performed investigating the uptake, localization, and retention of SnET2 in catheter induced atheromatous plaques in New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits and juvenile female swine. The ultimate goal is to employ SnET2 for the prevention of intimal hyperplasia following various forms of angioplasty, thus enabling the prevention of a significant cause of restenosis. To that end, a dose/response study was undertaken to investigate the effect of varying total light dose (200, 100, and 50 J/cm2) and light dose rate (637, 318, 159 mW/cm2) during SnET2-Photodynamic Therapy, SnET2-PDT, of catheter induced plaque in a NZW rabbit iliac artery model. The SnET2 dose was held constant at 1.0 mg/kg b.w. and light was delivered intraluminally via a guidewire compatible light diffusing balloon catheter. The greatest light dose of those tested without inducing thermal damage was found to be 318 mW/cm2 while the total light dose of 50 J/cm2 produced PDT effect which was limited to the neo-intima. A relatively substantial total light dose of 200 J/cm2 was shown to produce a transmural PDT effect. This study demonstrated that the depth of PDT effect can be modulated by varying the total light dose.

  18. Phase II dose-response trials: A simulation study to compare analysis method performance under design considerations.

    PubMed

    Rekowski, Jan; Köllmann, Claudia; Bornkamp, Björn; Ickstadt, Katja; Scherag, André

    2017-02-21

    Phase II trials are intended to provide information about the dose-response relationship and to support the choice of doses for a pivotal phase III trial. Recently, new analysis methods have been proposed to address these objectives, and guidance is needed to select the most appropriate analysis method in specific situations. We set up a simulation study to evaluate multiple performance measures of one traditional and three more recent dose-finding approaches under four design options and illustrate the investigated analysis methods with an example from clinical practice. Our results reveal no general recommendation for a particular analysis method across all design options and performance measures. However, we also demonstrate that the new analysis methods are worth the effort compared to the traditional ANOVA-based approach.

  19. Light exposure at night, sleep duration, melatonin, and breast cancer: a dose-response analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan-Shui; Deng, Qin; Fan, Wen-Yan; Wang, Wei-Ye; Wang, Xin

    2014-07-01

    Evidence from observational studies on light at night (LAN) exposure, sleep duration, endogenous melatonin levels, and risk for breast cancer in women is conflicting. This led us to conduct a dose-response analysis of published observational data. Pertinent studies were identified by searching Medline, Web of Science, and EMBASE through April 2013. The dose-response relationship between sleep duration, urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin levels, and breast cancer was assessed using the restricted cubic spline model and by multivariate random-effects metaregression. A separate meta-analysis was also carried out to calculate the relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer for the comparable categories or highest levels of exposure versus the lowest levels. Twelve case-control and four cohort studies were included in the analysis. High artificial LAN exposure is associated with an increased risk for breast cancer (RR=1.17, 95% CI: 1.11-1.23), but not ambient LAN exposure (RR=0.91, 95% CI: 0.78-1.07). The summary RR for breast cancer is 1.00 (95% CI: 0.995-1.01) for an increment of 1 h of sleep per night. No significant dose-response relationship between sleep duration and breast cancer was found either for the linearity test (Ptrend=0.725) or for the nonlinearity (Ptrend=0.091) test. An increasein of 15 ng/mg creatinine in urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin is associated with a 14% reduced risk for breast cancer (RR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.78-0.95), with a linear dose-response trend (Ptrend=0.003). There was no evidence of substantial heterogeneity or publication bias in the analysis. Our study adds to the evidence of LAN breast cancer theory. Further research in this area is warranted.

  20. Dose-response-a challenge for allelopathy?

    PubMed

    Belz, Regina G; Hurle, Karl; Duke, Stephen O

    2005-04-01

    The response of an organism to a chemical depends, among other things, on the dose. Nonlinear dose-response relationships occur across a broad range of research fields, and are a well established tool to describe the basic mechanisms of phytotoxicity. The responses of plants to allelochemicals as biosynthesized phytotoxins, relate as well to nonlinearity and, thus, allelopathic effects can be adequately quantified by nonlinear mathematical modeling. The current paper applies the concept of nonlinearity to assorted aspects of allelopathy within several bioassays and reveals their analysis by nonlinear regression models. Procedures for a valid comparison of effective doses between different allelopathic interactions are presented for both, inhibitory and stimulatory effects. The dose-response applications measure and compare the responses produced by pure allelochemicals [scopoletin (7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one); DIBOA (2,4-dihydroxy-2H-1,4-benzoxaxin-3(4H)-one); BOA (benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one); MBOA (6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one)], involved in allelopathy of grain crops, to demonstrate how some general principles of dose responses also relate to allelopathy. Hereupon, dose-response applications with living donor plants demonstrate the validity of these principles for density-dependent phytotoxicity of allelochemicals produced and released by living plants (Avena sativa L., Secale cereale L., Triticum L. spp.), and reveal the use of such experiments for initial considerations about basic principles of allelopathy. Results confirm that nonlinearity applies to allelopathy, and the study of allelopathic effects in dose-response experiments allows for new and challenging insights into allelopathic interactions.

  1. Resting heart rate and risk of metabolic syndrome in adults: a dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejiao; Luo, Xinping; Liu, Yu; Sun, Xizhuo; Han, Chengyi; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Bingyuan; Ren, Yongcheng; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Dongdong; Hu, Dongsheng; Zhang, Ming

    2017-03-01

    The magnitude of the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) with increased resting heart rate (RHR) has been inconsistently reported in some observational studies, and whether a dose-response relationship exists between RHR and MetS is unclear. We performed a meta-analysis including dose-response analysis to quantitatively evaluate this association in adults. We searched PubMed, Web of Knowledge, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and WanFang databases for articles published up to April 2, 2016. A random-effects model was used to pool relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs); restricted cubic spline function was used to assess the dose-response relationship. Seven prospective cohort studies and 10 cross-sectional studies with a total of 169,786 participants were included. The pooled RR was 2.10 (95% CI 1.80-2.46, I (2) = 79.8%, n = 13) for the highest versus reference RHR category and 1.28 (95% CI 1.23-1.34, I (2) = 87.7%, n = 15) for each 10 beats per minute (bpm) increment in RHR. We found no evidence of a nonlinear dose-response association between RHR and MetS (P nonlinearity = 0.201). The relationship was consistent in most subgroup analyses and robust on sensitivity analysis. No significant publication bias was observed. This meta-analysis suggests that risk of MetS may be increased with elevated RHR.

  2. A Dose-Response Study of Arsenic Exposure and Markers of Oxidative Damage in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Kristin N.; Liu, Xinhua; Hall, Megan N.; Ilievski, Vesna; Oka, Julie; Calancie, Larissa; Slavkovich, Vesna; Levy, Diane; Siddique, Abu; Alam, Shafiul; Mey, Jacob L.; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H.; Gamble, Mary V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and markers of oxidative damage in Bangladeshi adults. Methods We recruited 378 participants drinking from wells assigned to five water arsenic exposure categories; the distribution of subjects was as follows: 1) <10 μg/L (n=76); 2) 10–100 μg/L (n=104); 3) 101–200 μg/L (n=86); 4) 201–300 μg/L (n=67); and 5) > 300 μg/L (n=45). Arsenic concentrations were measured in well water, as well as in urine and blood. Urinary 8-oxo-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) and plasma protein carbonyls were measured to assess oxidative damage. Results None of our measures of arsenic exposure were significantly associated with protein carbonyl or 8-oxo-dG levels. Conclusions We found no evidence to support a significant relationship between chronic exposure to arsenic-contaminated drinking water and biomarkers of oxidative damage among Bangladeshi adults. PMID:24854259

  3. Response to low-dose intrathecal clonidine in septuagenarians undergoing sub-umbilical surgeries: A study

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Jayashree; Sen, Bitan

    2015-01-01

    Clonidine, an alpha-2-adrenergic agonist, may have a clinically relevant analgesic action but also a hypotensive action, when administered spinally. Aim: To evaluate the analgesic and circulatory effects of low-dose intrathecal clonidine co-administered with hyperbaric bupivacaine in septuagenarian patients undergoing sub-umbilical surgeries. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 patients within the age group of 70-80 years of either sex, enrolled in this study, were randomly divided into groups of 10 each. Group I received clonidine 7.5 μg as an adjuvant to 15 mg of hyperbaric bupivacaine and Group II (control group) received 15 mg of bupivacaine with saline to make volume in the two solutions equal. Result: The level of subarachnoid block was comparable in the two groups. Duration of motor blockade was longer in the clonidine group (221.4 ± 35.92 min) compared with the control group (112.3 ± 12.45 min). Request for 1st dose of analgesic was earlier in the control group (135.5 ± 28.52 min) than the clonidine group (295 ± 18.85 min). Mean arterial pressure (clonidine 77.67 ± 6.47 vs. control 93.87 ± 3.03, P = 0.0002) and heart rate (clonidine 65.2 ± 5.20 vs. control 77.4 ± 6.06, P = 0.003) were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the clonidine group compared with the control group from 20 mins after the block to the end of 3 h. In the clonidine group, 3 patients had postoperative headache, 4 had intra-operative shivering. 2 patients in the clonidine group also developed hypotension and 1 bradycardia and 1 of them developed bradyapnea along with acute hypotension 5 min after shifting to the postoperative ward and later recovered on resuscitation. In the control group 2 patients had bradycardia, 6 had intra-operative shivering and 3 had postoperative headache. Conclusion: We conclude that addition of clonidine in the dose of 7.5 μg to bupivacaine significantly increases the duration of spinal analgesia with clinically insignificant influence on hemodynamic

  4. Augmentation index (AI) in a dose-response relationship with smoking habits in males: The Tanushimaru study.

    PubMed

    Tsuru, Tomoko; Adachi, Hisashi; Enomoto, Mika; Fukami, Ako; Kumagai, Eita; Nakamura, Sachiko; Nohara, Yume; Kono, Shoko; Nakao, Erika; Sakaue, Akiko; Morikawa, Nagisa; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the relationship between augmentation index (AI) and smoking habits in community-dwelling Japanese.This cross-sectional study enrolled 1926 subjects (769 males and 1157 females) aged 40 to 95 years who underwent a health check-up in a Japanese cohort of the Seven Countries Study, in Tanushimaru, a typical farming town in Kyushu Island in 2009. The subjects' medical history, alcohol intake, smoking habit, and current medications for hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes were ascertained by questionnaire. Radial arterial pressure wave analysis was used to obtain AI. We analyzed the data stratified by gender.Age-adjusted means of AI in males showed a clear dose-response relationship in 4 categories of smoking habits (P = 0.010). There was no significant relationship between AI and smoking habits in females (P = 0.127). The significant dose-response relationship (P = 0.036) in males between AI and 4 categories of smoking habits still remained even after adjustment for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration rate, glucose, hypertensive medication, and alcohol intake.The present study demonstrated that AI values were significantly associated with smoking habits in a dose-dependent manner in Japanese males.

  5. Toluene Dose-Response and Preliminary Study of Proteomics for Neuronal Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    media and vapor exposure in glass chambers. To better define the complex signaling response to toluene, the two exposure models are characterized by...authors would like to acknowledge Dr. Schubert of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla CA, for the generous gift of the HT22 immortalized... model (various concentrations of toluene in a dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) vehicle were added in cell culture medium), and 2) a vapor exposure model

  6. Effect of egg ingestion on trimethylamine-N-oxide production in humans: a randomized, controlled, dose-response study1234

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Carolyn A; Corbin, Karen D; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Zhang, Shucha; Zhao, Xueqing; Galanko, Joseph A; Blevins, Tondra; Bennett, Brian J; O'Connor, Annalouise; Zeisel, Steven H

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is important to understand whether eating eggs, which are a major source of dietary choline, results in increased exposure to trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), which is purported to be a risk factor for developing heart disease. Objective: We determined whether humans eating eggs generate TMAO and, if so, whether there is an associated increase in a marker for inflammation [ie, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP)] or increased oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Design: In a longitudinal, double-blind, randomized dietary intervention, 6 volunteers were fed breakfast doses of 0, 1, 2, 4, or 6 egg yolks. Diets were otherwise controlled on the day before and day of each egg dose with a standardized low-choline menu. Plasma TMAO at timed intervals (immediately before and 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 h after each dose), 24-h urine TMAO, predose and 24-h postdose serum hsCRP, and plasma oxidized LDL were measured. Volunteers received all 5 doses with each dose separated by >2-wk washout periods. Results: The consumption of eggs was associated with increased plasma and urine TMAO concentrations (P < 0.01), with ∼14% of the total choline in eggs having been converted to TMAO. There was considerable variation between individuals in the TMAO response. There was no difference in hsCRP or oxidized LDL concentrations after egg doses. Conclusions: The consumption of ≥2 eggs results in an increased formation of TMAO. Choline is an essential nutrient that is required for normal human liver and muscle functions and important for normal fetal development. Additional study is needed to both confirm the association between TMAO and atherosclerosis and identify factors, microbiota and genetic, that influence the generation of TMAO before policy and medical recommendations are made that suggest reduced dietary choline intake. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01906554. PMID:24944063

  7. Assessment of Cardiac Troponin I Responses in Nonhuman Primates during Restraint, Blood Collection, and Dosing in Preclinical Safety Studies.

    PubMed

    Reagan, William J; Barnes, Robert; Harris, Peter; Summers, Sandy; Lopes, Sarah; Stubbs, Makeida; Blackwell, David; Steidl-Nichols, Jill

    2017-02-01

    Limited information has been published on the use of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) as a biomarker of cardiac injury in monkeys. The purpose of these studies was to characterize the cTnI response seen in cynomolgus macaques during routine dosing and blood collection procedures typically used in preclinical safety studies and to better understand the pathogenesis of this response. We measured cTnI using two different methods, the Siemens Immulite cTnI assay and the more sensitive Siemens Troponin I-Ultra assay. We were able to demonstrate that after oral, subcutaneous, or intravenous dosing of common vehicles, as well as serial chair restraint for venipuncture blood collection, that minimal to mild transient increases in cTnI could be detected in monkeys with both assays. cTnI values typically peaked at 2, 3, 4, or 6 hr after sham dosing and returned to baseline at 22 or 24 hr. In addition, marked increases in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) occurred in monkeys during the restraint procedures, which likely initiated the cTnI release in these animals. Monkeys that were very well acclimated to the chairing procedures and had vascular access ports for blood sampling did not have marked increases in HRs and BP or increases in cTnI.

  8. Comparison study of in vivo dose response to laser-driven versus conventional electron beam.

    PubMed

    Oppelt, Melanie; Baumann, Michael; Bergmann, Ralf; Beyreuther, Elke; Brüchner, Kerstin; Hartmann, Josefin; Karsch, Leonhard; Krause, Mechthild; Laschinsky, Lydia; Leßmann, Elisabeth; Nicolai, Maria; Reuter, Maria; Richter, Christian; Sävert, Alexander; Schnell, Michael; Schürer, Michael; Woithe, Julia; Kaluza, Malte; Pawelke, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The long-term goal to integrate laser-based particle accelerators into radiotherapy clinics not only requires technological development of high-intensity lasers and new techniques for beam detection and dose delivery, but also characterization of the biological consequences of this new particle beam quality, i.e. ultra-short, ultra-intense pulses. In the present work, we describe successful in vivo experiments with laser-driven electron pulses by utilization of a small tumour model on the mouse ear for the human squamous cell carcinoma model FaDu. The already established in vitro irradiation technology at the laser system JETI was further enhanced for 3D tumour irradiation in vivo in terms of beam transport, beam monitoring, dose delivery and dosimetry in order to precisely apply a prescribed dose to each tumour in full-scale radiobiological experiments. Tumour growth delay was determined after irradiation with doses of 3 and 6 Gy by laser-accelerated electrons. Reference irradiation was performed with continuous electron beams at a clinical linear accelerator in order to both validate the dedicated dosimetry employed for laser-accelerated JETI electrons and above all review the biological results. No significant difference in radiation-induced tumour growth delay was revealed for the two investigated electron beams. These data provide evidence that the ultra-high dose rate generated by laser acceleration does not impact the biological effectiveness of the particles.

  9. Assessment of microvascular function by study of the dose-response effects of iontophoretically applied drugs (acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside)--methods and comparison with in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Henricson, Joakim; Tesselaar, Erik; Persson, Karin; Nilsson, Gert; Sjöberg, Folke

    2007-03-01

    Current knowledge about vascular function stems mainly from pharmacological in vitro studies using mounted vascular strips on a strain gauge. We know of no paper that has systematically examined the possibility of assessing the conventional dose-response effects of iontophoresis and laser Doppler investigation of vasoactive substances and compared those relations to data obtained from strips mounted on a strain gauge. We used the vasoactive substances acetylcholine (endothelium dependent) and sodium nitroprusside (endothelium independent) and an antagonist (atropine) to enable further investigations in the receptor physiology of iontophoresis. Dose-response curves from the iontophoresis experiments showed close similarity to those obtained by vascular strips mounted on a strain gauge. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the dose-response factors found in iontophoresis (both inter and intra experimental variability) was low. The iontophoretic effective dose of 50% (ED50) for acetylcholine and nitroprusside had only CVs of 25% and 26%, respectively, compared with 71% and 77% for the vascular strips. Acetylcholine-induced response was antagonized by iontophoresis of atropine. Contrary to expectations, this antagonism was not competitive. The results show that iontophoresis in combination with laser Doppler technology produces reproducible and reliable dose-response curves that picture the vascular effects of vasoactive drugs.

  10. Dose-response studies with nitrosoheptamethyleneimine and its alpha-deuterium-labeled derivative in F344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lijinsky, W.; Reuber, M.D.; Davies, T.S.; Riggs, C.W.

    1982-11-01

    A dose-response study of the carcinogenicity of nitrosoheptamethyleneimine (N-HEP) in inbred F344 male and female rats was performed by administration of the nitrosamine at several concentrations in drinking water to groups of 20 rats. The concentrations differed by a factor of nearly 2.5 and ranged from 1.0 to 100 mg/liter. The duration of treatment was 13, 25, 50, or 100 weeks, after which the animals were allowed to die naturally of tumors induced. In most treated groups the incidence of tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract approached 100%. However, at the higher doses there was an inverse relationship between total dose and survival time of the rats. Matched treatment of groups of rat with N-HEP labeled with deuterium in the alpha positions resulted in longer survival. The slower action of the deuterium-labeled compound, as measured by a lower rate of death from tumors, suggests that cleavage of a carbon-hydrogen bond at an alpha position is a rate-limiting step in carcinogenesis by N-HEP in rats.

  11. Rats avoid exposure to HVdc electric fields: a dose response study.

    PubMed

    Creim, J A; Lovely, R H; Weigel, R J; Forsythe, W C; Anderson, L E

    1993-01-01

    Rats, given the choice, avoid exposure to alternating current (ac) 60-Hz electric fields at intensities > or = 75 kV/m. This study investigated the generality of this behavior by studying the response of rats when exposed to high voltage direct current (HVdc) electric fields. Three hundred eighty male Long Evans rats were studied in 9 experiments with 40 rats per experiment and in one experiment with 20 rats to determine 1) if rats avoid exposure to HVdc electric fields of varying field strengths, and 2) if avoidance did occur, what role, if any, the concentration of air ions would have on the avoidance behavior. In all experiments a three-compartment glass shuttlebox was used; either the left or right compartment could be exposed to a combination of HVdc electric fields and air ions while the other compartment remained sham-exposed. The third, center compartment was a transition zone between exposure and sham-exposure. In each experiment, the rats were individually assessed in 1-h sessions where half of the rats (n = 20) had the choice to locomote between the two sides being exposed or sham-exposed, while the other half of the rats (n = 20) were sham-exposed regardless of their location, except in one experiment where there was no sham-exposed group. The exposure levels for the first six experiments were 80, 55, 42.5, 30, -36, and -55 kV/m, respectively. The air ion concentration was constant at 1.4 x 10(6) ions/cc for the four positive exposure levels and -1.4 x 10(6) ions/cc for the two negative exposure levels. Rats having a choice between exposure and non-exposure relative to always sham-exposed control animals significantly reduced the amount of time spent on the exposed side at 80 kV/m (P < .002) as they did at both 55 and -55 kV/m (P < .005). No significant differences between groups were observed at 42.5, 30, or -36 kV/m. To determine what role the air ion concentration might have had on the avoidance behavior at field strengths of 55 kV/m or greater, four

  12. Red Meat and Processed Meat Consumption and Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Risk: A Dose-response Meta-analysis of Observational Studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuqin; Duan, Fujiao; Zhao, Xia; Song, Chunhua; Cui, Shuli; Dai, Liping

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify and quantify the potential dose-response association between the intake of total red and total processed meat and risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Relevant studies were identified by searching PubMed, EMBASE, and Chinese databases (CNKI and Wanfang). The summary relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (95%CI) was calculated. A total of 15 independent studies with 12,735 subjects were identified. Compared with the low-rank intake, the summary RR of NPC was 1.35 (95%CI, 1.21-1.51) for total red meat and 1.46 (95%CI, 1.34-1.64) for total processed meat. For the moderate-rank intake, the summary RR of NPC was 1.54 (95%CI, 1.36-1.79) for total red meat and 1.59 (95%CI, 1.3-1.90) for total processed meat. The summary RR for high-rank intake was 1.71 (95%CI, 1.14-2.55) for total red meat and 2.11 (95%CI, 1.31-3.42) for total processed meat. The combined estimates showed obvious evidence of statistically significant association between total red and total processed meat consumption dose and risk of NPC (Ptrend< 0.01). In conclusion, our data suggest that a high intake of total red or total processed meat is associated with a significantly increased risk of NPC.

  13. Dose-response study and threshold estimation of griseofulvin-induced aneuploidy during female mouse meiosis I and II.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, F; Mailhes, J B; Bairnsfather, L; Nandy, I; London, S N

    1996-03-01

    The relative sensitivity of the two meiotic divisions of mouse oogenesis to griseofulvin (GF)-induced aneuploidy was investigated. The first meiotic division was studied by administering GF 4 h after human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) injection and analyzing metaphase II (MII) oocytes, whereas study of the second meiotic division involved treating the females 10 h after HCG and analyzing one-cell (1-Cl) zygotes. Data from previous studies have shown that these treatment times represented the most sensitive times for aneuploidy induction during meioses I and II. The statistical analyses of the data showed that the dose-response curves for aneuploidy induction did not differ quantitatively or qualitatively between the two meiotic divisions. The percentages of hyperploid MII oocytes and 1-Cl zygotes were significantly higher (P < 0.001) than in the controls for all doses except 125 mg/kg GF. The highest percentages of hyperploid cells were found after administering 1500 mg/kg GF. However, these percentages were not different (P > 0.05) from those observed after 500 or 1000 mg/kg GF, suggesting saturation of the GF aneuploid target(s). These results suggest that the relative sensitivity to GF-induced aneuploidy between the two meiotic divisions of oogenesis are similar. They also suggest the presence of a lower (125 mg/kg) and an upper 500 mg/kg) threshold for GF-induced aneuploidy.

  14. Parity and All-cause Mortality in Women and Men: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yun; Ni, Ze-min; Liu, Shu-yun; Gu, Xue; Huang, Qin; Liu, Jun-an; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-13

    To quantitatively assess the association between parity and all-cause mortality, we conducted a meta-analysis of cohort studies. Relevant reports were identified from PubMed and Embase databases. Cohort studies with relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of all-cause mortality in three or more categories of parity were eligible. Eighteen articles with 2,813,418 participants were included. Results showed that participants with no live birth had higher risk of all-cause mortality (RR= 1.19, 95% CI = 1.03-1.38; I(2) = 96.7%, P < 0.001) compared with participants with one or more live births. Nonlinear dose-response association was found between parity and all-cause mortality (P for non-linearity < 0.0001). Our findings suggest that moderate-level parity is inversely associated with all-cause mortality.

  15. Association between physical activity and all cancer mortality: Dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingjun; Gu, Mengjia; Jing, Fangyuan; Cai, Shaofang; Bao, Chengzhen; Wang, Jianbing; Jin, Mingjuan; Chen, Kun

    2016-02-15

    The relationship between physical activity (PA) before cancer diagnosis and all cancer mortality among the general population is not well defined because of inconsistent results from published studies. Thus, the lack of a meta-analysis that addresses that issue prompted the current report. We conducted a literature search of PubMed and Web of Science to identify all relevant epidemiological studies published before February 28, 2015. We performed categorical and dose-response meta-analyses to evaluate and quantify the association between pre-diagnosis PA and all cancer mortality. A total of 32 prospective cohort studies involving 59,362 cancer deaths were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled relative risks (RRs) of all cancer mortality were 0.80 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.76-0.85)] for highest versus lowest PA group and 0.85 (95% CI = 0.82-0.88) for PA versus non/occasional PA group. Dose-response analysis showed that the increment in pre-diagnosis PA level was associated with a decreased risk of cancer death continuously. Moreover, an increment of 10 MET-h/week was related to a 7% lower risk for all cancer mortality (RR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.91-0.95). In conclusion, the present meta-analysis provides evidence of an inverse association between pre-diagnosis PA and all cancer mortality among the general population. High-quality epidemiological studies that employ standardized PA assessments and unified definitions of PA levels should be developed in future.

  16. Adaptive dose finding based on t-statistic for dose-response trials.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Bolognese, James A; Perevozskaya, Inna

    2008-05-10

    The goals of phase II dose-response studies are to prove that the treatment is effective and to choose the dose for further development. Randomized designs with equal allocation to either a high dose and placebo or to each of several doses and placebo are typically used. However, in trials where response is observed relatively quickly, adaptive designs might offer an advantage over equal allocation. We propose an adaptive design for dose-response trials that concentrates the allocation of subjects in one or more areas of interest, for example, near a minimum clinically important effect level, or near some maximal effect level, and also allows for the possibility to stop the trial early if needed. The proposed adaptive design yields higher power to detect a dose-response relationship, higher power in comparison with placebo, and selects the correct dose more frequently compared with a corresponding randomized design with equal allocation to doses.

  17. Occupational Exposure to Diesel Motor Exhaust and Lung Cancer: A Dose-Response Relationship Hidden by Asbestos Exposure Adjustment? The ICARE Study

    PubMed Central

    Matrat, Mireille; Guida, Florence; Cénée, Sylvie; Févotte, Joelle; Carton, Matthieu; Cyr, Diane; Menvielle, Gwenn; Paget-Bailly, Sophie; Radoï, Loredana; Schmaus, Annie; Bara, Simona; Velten, Michel; Luce, Danièle; Stücker, Isabelle; The Icare Study Group

    2015-01-01

    Background. In a French large population-based case-control study we investigated the dose-response relationship between lung cancer and occupational exposure to diesel motor exhaust (DME), taking into account asbestos exposure. Methods. Exposure to DME was assessed by questionnaire. Asbestos was taken into account through a global indicator of exposure to occupational carcinogens or by a specific JEM. Results. We found a crude dose response relationship with most of the indicators of DME exposure, including with the cumulative exposure index. All results were affected by adjustment for asbestos exposure. The dose response relationships between DME and lung cancer were observed among subjects never exposed to asbestos. Conclusions. Exposure to DME and to asbestos is frequently found among the same subjects, which may explain why dose-response relationships in previous studies that adjusted for asbestos exposure were inconsistent. PMID:26425123

  18. Coffee and tea consumption and risk of lung cancer: a dose-response analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaopeng; Yu, Xuyi; Wu, Yili; Zhang, Dongfeng

    2012-11-01

    Results from the recent meta-analysis suggested a favorable effect of green tea consumption and risk of lung cancer, while no significant association was found between black tea consumption and risk of lung cancer. Besides, a significantly positive association was found between coffee consumption and risk of lung cancer. However, the relationship of green tea and coffee consumption is unclear. Thus the dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline model and multivariate random-effect meta-regression. Results suggested that a linear dose-response relationship exists between coffee consumption and risk of lung cancer, while the dose-response relationship is nonlinear between green tea consumption and risk of lung cancer.

  19. On the combination of c- and D-optimal designs: General approaches and applications in dose-response studies.

    PubMed

    Holland-Letz, Tim

    2017-03-01

    Dose-response modeling in areas such as toxicology is often conducted using a parametric approach. While estimation of parameters is usually one of the goals, often the main aim of the study is the estimation of quantities derived from the parameters, such as the ED50 dose. From the view of statistical optimal design theory such an objective corresponds to a c-optimal design criterion. Unfortunately, c-optimal designs often create practical problems, and furthermore commonly do not allow actual estimation of the parameters. It is therefore useful to consider alternative designs which show good c-performance, while still being applicable in practice and allowing reasonably good general parameter estimation. In effect, using optimal design terminology this means that a reasonable performance regarding the D-criterion is expected as well. In this article, we propose several approaches to the task of combining c- and D-efficient designs, such as using mixed information functions or setting minimum requirements regarding either c- or D-efficiency, and show how to algorithmically determine optimal designs in each case. We apply all approaches to a standard situation from toxicology, and obtain a much better balance between c- and D-performance. Next, we investigate how to adapt the designs to different parameter values. Finally, we show that the methodology used here is not just limited to the combination of c- and D-designs, but can also be used to handle more general constraint situations such as limits on the cost of an experiment.

  20. Gamma-glutamyltransferase and risk of cardiovascular mortality: A dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongzhong; Li, Xingsheng; Huang, Wenxiang

    2017-01-01

    Background Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) elevation likely contributes to cardiovascular (CV) mortality, however it has remained unknown whether a dose-response relationship exists between serum GGT and CV mortality. Methods We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases for prospective cohort studies published up to October 2, 2016. Summary hazard ratios (HRs) with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a fixed effects model. Findings Nine prospective studies, including 527,589 participants and more than 7,011 cases, were included in this meta-analysis. For the moderate, high, and highest levels of GGT, the pooled HRs of CV mortality were 1.11 (95% CI = 1.04–1.19), 1.29 (95% CI = 1.21–1.38) and 1.59 (95% CI = 1.47–1.72), respectively (all p < 0.05 as compared to the lowest levels of GGT). Additionally, the HR per incremental increase of GGT by 10 U/L was 1.10 (95% CI = 1.08–1.11). Evidence of a positive relationship with nonlinear trend for GGT elevation with CV mortality in females was found (P = 0.04 for nonlinearity). However, a linear model was better fit to illustrate the GGT-CV mortality among males (P = 0.304 for nonlinearity). Conclusions These findings indicate that serum GGT activity within the reference interval is positively associated with increased risk of CV mortality in a dose-response manner. PMID:28231268

  1. Meta-Analytic Approaches for Multistressor Dose-Response Function Development: Strengths, Limitations, and Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jonathan I; Fabian, M Patricia; Peters, Junenette L

    2015-06-01

    For many policy analyses, including but not limited to cumulative risk assessments, it is important to characterize the individual and joint health effects of multiple stressors. With an increasing focus on psychosocial and other nonchemical stressors, this often includes epidemiological meta-analysis. Meta-analysis has limitations if epidemiological studies do not include all of the stressors of interest or do not provide multivariable outputs in a format necessary for risk assessment. Given these limitations, novel analytical methods are often needed to synthesize the published literature or to build upon available evidence. In this article, we discuss three recent case studies that highlight the strengths and limitations of meta-analytic approaches and other research synthesis techniques for human health risk assessment applications. First, a literature-based meta-analysis within a risk assessment context informed the design of a new epidemiological investigation of the differential toxicity of fine particulate matter constituents. Second, a literature synthesis for an effects-based cumulative risk assessment of hypertension risk factors led to a decision to develop new epidemiological associations using structural equation modeling. Third, discrete event simulation modeling was used to simulate the impact of changes in the built environment on environmental exposures and associated asthma outcomes, linking literature meta-analyses for key associations with a simulation model to synthesize all of the model components. These case studies emphasize the importance of conducting epidemiology with a risk assessment application in mind, the need for interdisciplinary collaboration, and the value of advanced analytical methods to synthesize epidemiological and other evidence for risk assessment applications.

  2. Dose-Response Relationship between Dietary Magnesium Intake and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xin; Han, Hedong; Li, Mei; Liang, Chun; Fan, Zhongjie; Aaseth, Jan; He, Jia; Montgomery, Scott; Cao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological evidence for a dose-response relationship between magnesium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is sparse. The aim of the study was to summarize the evidence for the association of dietary magnesium intake with risk of T2D and evaluate the dose-response relationship. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies that reported dietary magnesium intake and risk of incident T2D. We identified relevant studies by searching major scientific literature databases and grey literature resources from their inception to February 2016. We included cohort studies that provided risk ratios, i.e., relative risks (RRs), odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios (HRs), for T2D. Linear dose-response relationships were assessed using random-effects meta-regression. Potential nonlinear associations were evaluated using restricted cubic splines. A total of 25 studies met the eligibility criteria. These studies comprised 637,922 individuals including 26,828 with a T2D diagnosis. Compared with the lowest magnesium consumption group in the population, the risk of T2D was reduced by 17% across all the studies; 19% in women and 16% in men. A statistically significant linear dose-response relationship was found between incremental magnesium intake and T2D risk. After adjusting for age and body mass index, the risk of T2D incidence was reduced by 8%–13% for per 100 mg/day increment in dietary magnesium intake. There was no evidence to support a nonlinear dose-response relationship between dietary magnesium intake and T2D risk. The combined data supports a role for magnesium in reducing risk of T2D, with a statistically significant linear dose-response pattern within the reference dose range of dietary intake among Asian and US populations. The evidence from Europe and black people is limited and more prospective studies are needed for the two subgroups. PMID:27869762

  3. Low-Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Barry D.; Held, Kathryn D.

    2002-06-01

    This project is part of the DOE research program on the biological effects of low dose and dose rate ionizing radiation. This DOE program is designed to support and conduct science that can impact the subsequent development of health risk policy for low dose radiation exposures in the US. The overall, long-term goal of this project is to increase understanding of the responses of cells to the low doses of ionizing radiation typically encountered in environmental level exposures. To achieve this objective, we couple use of a unique focused soft X-ray facility for low dose irradiation of individual cells or irradiation of specific subcellular regions of cells with studies of the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in cells. The project includes seven specific goals: (1) Determine the response of individual cells to low doses of ionizing radiation from a focused soft X-ray beam with a 250 nm diameter beam spot. (2) Determine the response of cells to ROS generated by chemical agents in a fashion that mimics the endogenous cellular generation of ROS. (3) Study the interaction between cellular oxidative processes and ionizing radiation. (4) Determine the importance of the subcellular distribution of ROS from focused soft X-rays on cellular response. (5) Determine whether damage deposited in individual cells by focused soft X-rays or by chemically-generated ROS can elicit a response in other, surrounding, untreated cells, a ''bystander'' effect. (6) Quantify the low dose response and the targets involved in the genomic instability phenotype in cells exposed to low LET radiation and the relationship with the bystander response. (7) Develop tissue explant systems for the measurement of low dose effects in multicellular systems.

  4. Low-Dose Carcinogenicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the major deficiencies of cancer risk assessments is the lack of low-dose carcinogenicity data. Most assessments require extrapolation from high to low doses, which is subject to various uncertainties. Only 4 low-dose carcinogenicity studies and 5 low-dose biomarker/pre-n...

  5. Application of a key events dose-response analysis to nutrients: a case study with vitamin A (retinol).

    PubMed

    Ross, A Catharine; Russell, Robert M; Miller, Sanford A; Munro, Ian C; Rodricks, Joseph V; Yetley, Elizabeth A; Julien, Elizabeth

    2009-09-01

    The methodology used to establish tolerable upper intake levels (UL) for nutrients borrows heavily from risk assessment methods used by toxicologists. Empirical data are used to identify intake levels associated with adverse effects, and Uncertainty Factors (UF) are applied to establish ULs, which in turn inform public health decisions and standards. Use of UFs reflects lack of knowledge regarding the biological events that underlie response to the intake of a given nutrient, and also regarding the sources of variability in that response. In this paper, the Key Events Dose-Response Framework (KEDRF) is used to systematically consider the major biological steps that lead from the intake of the preformed vitamin A to excess systemic levels, and subsequently to increased risk of adverse effects. Each step is examined with regard to factors that influence whether there is progression toward the adverse effect of concern. The role of homeostatic mechanisms is discussed, along with the types of research needed to improve understanding of dose-response for vitamin A. This initial analysis illustrates the potential of the KEDRF as a useful analytical tool for integrating current knowledge regarding dose-response, generating questions that will focus future research efforts, and clarifying how improved knowledge and data could be used to reduce reliance on UFs.

  6. Application of a Key Events Dose-Response Analysis to Nutrients: A Case Study with Vitamin A (Retinol)

    PubMed Central

    ROSS, A. CATHARINE; RUSSELL, ROBERT M.; MILLER, SANFORD A.; MUNRO, IAN C.; RODRICKS, JOSEPH V.; YETLEY, ELIZABETH A.; JULIEN, ELIZABETH

    2009-01-01

    The methodology used to establish tolerable upper intake levels (UL) for nutrients borrows heavily from risk assessment methods used by toxicologists. Empirical data are used to identify intake levels associated with adverse effects, and Uncertainty Factors (UF) are applied to establish ULs, which in turn inform public health decisions and standards. Use of UFs reflects lack of knowledge regarding the biological events that underlie response to the intake of a given nutrient, and also regarding the sources of variability in that response. In this paper, the Key Events Dose-Response Framework (KEDRF) is used to systematically consider the major biological steps that lead from the intake of the preformed vitamin A to excess systemic levels, and subsequently to increased risk of adverse effects. Each step is examined with regard to factors that influence whether there is progression toward the adverse effect of concern. The role of homeostatic mechanisms is discussed, along with the types of research needed to improve understanding of dose-response for vitamin A. This initial analysis illustrates the potential of the KEDRF as a useful analytical tool for integrating current knowledge regarding dose-response, generating questions that will focus future research efforts, and clarifying how improved knowledge and data could be used to reduce reliance on UFs. PMID:19690996

  7. Hormones and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Low-Dose Effects and Nonmonotonic Dose Responses

    PubMed Central

    Colborn, Theo; Hayes, Tyrone B.; Heindel, Jerrold J.; Jacobs, David R.; Lee, Duk-Hee; Shioda, Toshi; Soto, Ana M.; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Welshons, Wade V.; Zoeller, R. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    For decades, studies of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have challenged traditional concepts in toxicology, in particular the dogma of “the dose makes the poison,” because EDCs can have effects at low doses that are not predicted by effects at higher doses. Here, we review two major concepts in EDC studies: low dose and nonmonotonicity. Low-dose effects were defined by the National Toxicology Program as those that occur in the range of human exposures or effects observed at doses below those used for traditional toxicological studies. We review the mechanistic data for low-dose effects and use a weight-of-evidence approach to analyze five examples from the EDC literature. Additionally, we explore nonmonotonic dose-response curves, defined as a nonlinear relationship between dose and effect where the slope of the curve changes sign somewhere within the range of doses examined. We provide a detailed discussion of the mechanisms responsible for generating these phenomena, plus hundreds of examples from the cell culture, animal, and epidemiology literature. We illustrate that nonmonotonic responses and low-dose effects are remarkably common in studies of natural hormones and EDCs. Whether low doses of EDCs influence certain human disorders is no longer conjecture, because epidemiological studies show that environmental exposures to EDCs are associated with human diseases and disabilities. We conclude that when nonmonotonic dose-response curves occur, the effects of low doses cannot be predicted by the effects observed at high doses. Thus, fundamental changes in chemical testing and safety determination are needed to protect human health. PMID:22419778

  8. Low-Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Barry D.; Held, Kathryn D.

    2001-06-01

    This project is part of the DOE research program on the biological effects of low dose and dose rate ionizing radiation. This DOE program is designed to support and conduct science that can impact the subsequent development of health risk policy for low dose radiation exposures in the US. The overall, long-term goal of this project is to increase understanding of the responses of cells to the low doses of ionizing radiation typically encountered in environmental level exposures. To achieve this objective, we couple use of a unique focused soft X-ray facility for low dose irradiation of individual cells or irradiation of specific subcellular regions of cells with studies of the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in cells. The project includes seven specific goals: (1) Determine the response of individual cells to low doses of ionizing radiation from a focused soft X-ray beam with a 250 nm diameter beam spot. (2) Determine the response of cells to ROS generated by chemical agents in a fashion that mimics the endogenous cellular generation of ROS. (3) Study the interaction between cellular oxidative processes and ionizing radiation. (4) Determine the importance of the subcellular distribution of ROS from focused soft X-rays on cellular response. (5) Determine whether damage deposited in individual cells by focused soft X-rays or by chemically-generated ROS can elicit a response in other, surrounding, untreated cells, a ''bystander'' effect. (6) Quantify the low dose response and the targets involved in the genomic instability phenotype in cells exposed to low LET radiation and the relationship with the bystander response.

  9. Dose response, coasting, and differential fiber vulnerability in human toxic neuropathy: a prospective study of pyridoxine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Berger, A R; Schaumburg, H H; Schroeder, C; Apfel, S; Reynolds, R

    1992-07-01

    We administered either 1 or 3 g/d of pyridoxine (vitamin B6) to five healthy volunteers and repeatedly followed serum pyridoxal phosphate levels, clinical symptoms and signs, quantitative sensory thresholds (QSTs), and sural nerve electrophysiology. Pyridoxine was discontinued at the first sign of either clinical or laboratory abnormality. In all subjects, sensory symptoms and QST abnormalities occurred concurrently. Subjects receiving higher doses became symptomatic earlier than low-dose subjects. Elevation of thermal QSTs preceded or exceeded that for vibration in the three low-dose subjects; vibration and thermal QST became abnormal simultaneously in the higher-dose subjects. A reduction in the amplitude of the sural sensory potential lagged behind QST changes in two of three subjects. Symptoms continued to progress ("coasting") for 2 to 3 weeks despite stopping pyridoxine administration and the return of serum pyridoxal phosphate levels to normal. This study suggests that (1) there is a clear dose-percent relationship for pyridoxine-induced neuropathy, (2) QST is a sensitive measurement for detecting early peripheral neuropathy; QST abnormalities may precede changes in nerve conduction studies, (3) coasting appears unrelated to persistently elevated blood levels of the toxin, and (4) a dose-dependent vulnerability may exist among nerve fibers of different caliber when exposed to an axonal toxin, such as pyridoxine.

  10. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the risk of cardiovascular disease: dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Runhua; Li, Bohong; Gao, Xiang; Tian, Rui; Pan, Yuesong; Jiang, Yong; Gu, Hongqiu; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Gaifen

    2017-03-01

    Background: During the past decade, an increasing number of prospective studies have focused on the association between vitamin D and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the evidence on the relation between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and the risk of overt CVD is inconclusive.Objective: We performed a dose-response meta-analysis to summarize and prospectively quantify the RR of low serum 25(OH)D concentration and total CVD (events and mortality).Design: We identified relevant studies by searching PubMed and EMBASE up to December 2015 and by hand-searching reference lists. Prospective studies based on the general population and reported RRs and 95% CIs were included. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled RRs. Nonlinear association was assessed by using restricted cubic spline analyses.Results: A total of 34 publications with 180,667 participants were eligible for the meta-analysis. We included 32 publications (27 independent studies) for total CVD events and 17 publications (17 independent studies) for CVD mortality. We observed an inverse association between serum 25(OH)D and total CVD events and CVD mortality, and the pooled RRs per 10-ng/mL increment were 0.90 (95% CI: 0.86, 0.94) for total CVD events and 0.88 (95% CI: 0.80, 0.96) for CVD mortality. A nonlinear association was detected for total CVD events (P-nonlinear < 0.001) and CVD mortality (P-nonlinear = 0.022).Conclusion: Serum 25(OH)D concentration was inversely associated with total CVD events and CVD mortality from the observed studies.

  11. Dietary fiber intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: a dose-response analysis of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Yao, Baodong; Fang, Hong; Xu, Wanghong; Yan, Yujie; Xu, Huilin; Liu, Yinan; Mo, Miao; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Yanping

    2014-02-01

    Observational studies suggest an association between dietary fiber intake and risk of type 2 diabetes, but the results are inconclusive. We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies evaluating the associations of dietary fiber intake and risk of type 2 diabetes. Relevant studies were identified by searching EMBASE (from 1974 to April 2013) and PubMed (from 1966 to April 2013). The fixed or random-effect model was selected based on the homogeneity test among studies. In addition, a 2-stage random-effects dose-response meta-analysis was performed. We identified 17 prospective cohort studies of dietary fiber intake and risk of type 2 diabetes involving 19,033 cases and 488,293 participants. The combined RR (95 % CI) of type 2 diabetes for intake of total dietary fiber, cereal fiber, fruit fiber and insoluble fiber was 0.81 (0.73-0.90), 0.77 (0.69-0.85), 0.94 (0.88-0.99) and 0.75 (0.63-0.89), respectively. A nonlinear relationship was found of total dietary fiber intake with risk of type 2 diabetes (P for nonlinearity < 0.01), and the RRs (95 % CI) of type 2 diabetes were 0.98 (0.90-1.06), 0.97 (0.87-1.07), 0.89 (0.80-0.99), 0.76 (0.65-0.88), and 0.66 (0.53-0.82) for 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 g/day. The departure from nonlinear relationship was not significant (P for nonlinearity = 0.72), and the risk of type 2 diabetes decreased by 6 % (RR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.93-0.96) for 2 g/day increment in cereal fiber intake. Findings from this meta-analysis indicate that the intakes of dietary fiber may be inversely associated with risk of type 2 diabetes.

  12. Dose response signal detection under model uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Dette, Holger; Titoff, Stefanie; Volgushev, Stanislav; Bretz, Frank

    2015-12-01

    We investigate likelihood ratio contrast tests for dose response signal detection under model uncertainty, when several competing regression models are available to describe the dose response relationship. The proposed approach uses the complete structure of the regression models, but does not require knowledge of the parameters of the competing models. Standard likelihood ratio test theory is applicable in linear models as well as in nonlinear regression models with identifiable parameters. However, for many commonly used nonlinear dose response models the regression parameters are not identifiable under the null hypothesis of no dose response and standard arguments cannot be used to obtain critical values. We thus derive the asymptotic distribution of likelihood ratio contrast tests in regression models with a lack of identifiability and use this result to simulate the quantiles based on Gaussian processes. The new method is illustrated with a real data example and compared to existing procedures using theoretical investigations as well as simulations.

  13. Phototherapy in Gunn rats. A study to assess the photobiologically most effective radiant energy and dose/response relationships.

    PubMed

    Ballowitz, L; Geutler, G; Krochmann, J; Pannitschka, R; Roemer, G; Roemer, I

    1977-01-01

    In order to get a more realistic spectral efficiency curve and to evaluate dose/response relationships in phototherapy, homozygous weanling Gunn rats -- nondepilated, with fur -- were illuminated under standardized conditions with 8 different fluorescent tubes. Some of the tubes were operated with different electric power. Clear spectal differences in the extent and the rapidity of the bilirubin decay could be ascertained. Furthermore, the sharpness of the bilirubin decrease depended on the baseline concentration. For the calculations the animals were therefore divided into 3 groups with starting levels of larger than or equal to 8 mg%, 6.5--7.9 mg% and less than 6.5 mg%. Correlating the spectral power distribution of the lamps with the bilirubin decomposition found in the experiment, the spectral response function s(lambda)bili, rel was calculated by an integral method. A comparison of our results with data from the literature shows that so far near UV radiation was evaluated too high. A new radiometer for digital measuring the effective irradiance Ebili was developed. On a logarithmic scale a comparatively sharp dose/response relationship could be demonstrated in dependence on the measured effective radiant exposure. Serum bilirubin decrease is directly proportional to log Ebili. A dose of about 2.5 mW - h/cm2 is necessary to achieve a constant serum bilirubin decrease at all. Good results were obtained at doses of about 35 mW - h/cm2 with the most efficient being at 160 mW - h/cm2. Highly effective doses can be applied with different types of lamps. However, there are great differences in the time of illumination required. 24 h are necessary with daylight tubes (Osram L 20 W/19) to apply 20 mW - h/cm2, whereas the same dose is already attained after 4 h with BAM blue tubes (Philips). The accuracy of the radiometer was finally controlled by screening Westinghouse special blue and Osram standard blue tubes with black tapes, so that the effective irradiance (Ebili

  14. Dose-Response Calculator for ArcGIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanser, Steven E.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Leu, Matthias; Nielsen, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    The Dose-Response Calculator for ArcGIS is a tool that extends the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS 10 Desktop application to aid with the visualization of relationships between two raster GIS datasets. A dose-response curve is a line graph commonly used in medical research to examine the effects of different dosage rates of a drug or chemical (for example, carcinogen) on an outcome of interest (for example, cell mutations) (Russell and others, 1982). Dose-response curves have recently been used in ecological studies to examine the influence of an explanatory dose variable (for example, percentage of habitat cover, distance to disturbance) on a predicted response (for example, survival, probability of occurrence, abundance) (Aldridge and others, 2008). These dose curves have been created by calculating the predicted response value from a statistical model at different levels of the explanatory dose variable while holding values of other explanatory variables constant. Curves (plots) developed using the Dose-Response Calculator overcome the need to hold variables constant by using values extracted from the predicted response surface of a spatially explicit statistical model fit in a GIS, which include the variation of all explanatory variables, to visualize the univariate response to the dose variable. Application of the Dose-Response Calculator can be extended beyond the assessment of statistical model predictions and may be used to visualize the relationship between any two raster GIS datasets (see example in tool instructions). This tool generates tabular data for use in further exploration of dose-response relationships and a graph of the dose-response curve.

  15. A review of uncertainties in radiotherapy dose reconstruction and their impacts on dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Vũ Bezin, Jérémi; Allodji, Rodrigue S; Mège, Jean-Pierre; Beldjoudi, Guillaume; Saunier, Fleur; Chavaudra, Jean; Deutsch, Eric; de Vathaire, Florent; Bernier, Valérie; Carrie, Christian; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2017-03-20

    Proper understanding of the risk of radiation-induced late effects for patients receiving external photon beam radiotherapy requires the determination of reliable dose-response relationships. Although significant efforts have been devoted to improving dose estimates for the study of late effects, the most often questioned explanatory variable is still the dose. In this work, based on a literature review, we provide an in-depth description of the radiotherapy dose reconstruction process for the study of late effects. In particular, we focus on the identification of the main sources of dose uncertainty involved in this process and summarise their impacts on the dose-response relationship for radiotherapy late effects. We provide a number of recommendations for making progress in estimating the uncertainties in current studies of radiotherapy late effects and reducing these uncertainties in future studies.

  16. A Bayesian Semiparametric Model for Radiation Dose-Response Estimation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Misumi, Munechika; Cologne, John B; Cullings, Harry M

    2016-06-01

    In evaluating the risk of exposure to health hazards, characterizing the dose-response relationship and estimating acceptable exposure levels are the primary goals. In analyses of health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, while there is a clear agreement that moderate to high radiation doses cause harmful effects in humans, little has been known about the possible biological effects at low doses, for example, below 0.1 Gy, which is the dose range relevant to most radiation exposures of concern today. A conventional approach to radiation dose-response estimation based on simple parametric forms, such as the linear nonthreshold model, can be misleading in evaluating the risk and, in particular, its uncertainty at low doses. As an alternative approach, we consider a Bayesian semiparametric model that has a connected piece-wise-linear dose-response function with prior distributions having an autoregressive structure among the random slope coefficients defined over closely spaced dose categories. With a simulation study and application to analysis of cancer incidence data among Japanese atomic bomb survivors, we show that this approach can produce smooth and flexible dose-response estimation while reasonably handling the risk uncertainty at low doses and elsewhere. With relatively few assumptions and modeling options to be made by the analyst, the method can be particularly useful in assessing risks associated with low-dose radiation exposures.

  17. The Dose Response Relationship for Radiation Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Eric

    2008-03-01

    Recent surveys show that the collective population radiation dose from medical procedures in the U.S. has increased by 750% in the past two decades. It would be impossible to imagine the practice of medicine today without diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, but nevertheless the widespread and rapidly increasing use of a modality which is a known human carcinogen is a cause for concern. To assess the magnitude of the problem it is necessary to establish the shape of the dose response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis. Information on radiation carcinogenesis comes from the A-bomb survivors, from occupationally exposed individuals and from radiotherapy patients. The A-bomb survivor data indicates a linear relationship between dose and the risk of solid cancers up to a dose of about 2.5 Sv. The lowest dose at which there is a significant excess cancer risk is debatable, but it would appear to be between 40 and 100 mSv. Data from the occupation exposure of nuclear workers shows an excess cancer risk at an average dose of 19.4 mSv. At the other end of the dose scale, data on second cancers in radiotherapy patients indicates that cancer risk does not continue to rise as a linear function of dose, but tends towards a plateau of 40 to 60 Gy, delivered in a fractionated regime. These data can be used to estimate the impact of diagnostic radiology at the low dose end of the dose response relationship, and the impact of new radiotherapy modalities at the high end of the dose response relationship. In the case of diagnostic radiology about 90% of the collective population dose comes from procedures (principally CT scans) which involve doses at which there is credible evidence of an excess cancer incidence. While the risk to the individual is small and justified in a symptomatic patient, the same is not true of some screening procedures is asymptomatic individuals, and in any case the huge number of procedures must add up to a potential public health problem. In the

  18. Study of the dose response of the system ferrous ammonium sulfate-sucrose-xylenol orange in acid aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez-Calderon, J. M.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2014-11-01

    An aqueous solution of ammonium ferrous sulfate-sucrose-xylenol orange in sulfuric acid (FSX) is proposed as a dosimetric system for the processes of gamma irradiation in a range between 0.3 and 6 Gy. This system is based on the indirect oxidation of ferrous ion by an organic compound (sucrose) to ferric ion and on the formation of a color complex of Fe3+ in an acidic medium with xylenol orange (a dye). After gamma radiation, an observable change occurs in the color of the system. Irradiation was executed at three different temperatures (13 °C, 22 °C, and 40 °C). A spectrometric readout method at 585 nm was employed to evaluate the system's dose response. In all of the cases analyzed, the responses had a linear behavior, and a slight effect of irradiation temperature was observed. Post-irradiation response was also evaluated and showed the stability of the solutions 24 h after the irradiation. The results obtained suggest that FSX might be used as a dosimeter for low doses of gamma irradiation because it provides a stable signal, good reproducibility, and an accessible technique for analysis.

  19. Overt behavior and ultrasonic vocalization in a fear conditioning paradigm: a dose-response study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wöhr, Markus; Borta, Andreas; Schwarting, Rainer K W

    2005-11-01

    The behavioral analysis of laboratory rats is usually confined to the level of overt behavior, like locomotion, behavioral inhibition, instrumental responses, and others. Apart from such visible outcome, however, behaviorally relevant information can also be obtained when analyzing the animals' ultrasonic vocalization, which is typically emitted in highly motivational situations, like 22-kHz calls in response to acute or conditioned threat. To further investigate such vocalizations and their relationship with overt behavior, we tested male Wistar rats in a paradigm of Pavlovian fear conditioning, where a tone stimulus (CS) was preceding an aversive foot-shock (US) in a distinct environment. Importantly, the shock dose was varied between groups (0-1.1 mA), and its acute and conditioned outcome were determined. The analysis of visible behavior confirms the usefulness of immobility as a measure of fear conditioning, especially when higher shock doses were used. Rearing and grooming, on the other hand, were more useful to detect conditioned effects with lower shock levels. Ultrasonic vocalization occurred less consistently than changes in overt behavior; however, dose-response relationships were also observed during the phase of conditioning, for example, in latency, call rate and lengths, intervals between calls, and sound amplitude. Furthermore, total calling time (and rate) were highly correlated with overt behavior, namely behavioral inhibition as measured through immobility. These correlations were observed during the phase of fear conditioning, and the subsequent tests. Importantly, conditioned effects in overt behavior were observed, both, to the context and to the CS presented in this context, whereas conditioned vocalization to the context was not observed (except for one rat). In support and extent of previous results, the present data show that a detailed analysis of ultrasonic vocalization can substantially broaden and refine the spectrum of analysis in

  20. Dietary Protein Sources and Incidence of Breast Cancer: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Zeng, Rong; Huang, Junpeng; Li, Xufeng; Zhang, Jiren; Ho, James Chung-Man; Zheng, Yanfang

    2016-01-01

    Protein is important to the human body, and different sources of protein may have different effects on the risk of breast cancer. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the association between different dietary protein sources and breast cancer risk. PubMed and several databases were searched until December 2015. Relevant articles were retrieved according to specific searching criteria. Forty-six prospective studies were included. The summary relative risk (RR) for highest versus lowest intake was 1.07 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01–1.14, I2 = 34.6%) for processed meat, 0.92 (95% CI 0.84–1.00, I2 = 0%) for soy food, 0.93 (95% CI 0.85–1.00, I2 = 40.1%) for skim milk, and 0.90 (95% CI 0.82–1.00, I2 = 0%) for yogurt. Similar conclusions were obtained in dose-response association for each serving increase: total red meat (RR: 1.07; 95% CI 1.01–1.14, I2 = 7.1%), fresh red meat (RR: 1.13; 95% CI 1.01–1.26, I2 = 56.4%), processed meat (RR: 1.09; 95% CI 1.02–1.17, I2 = 11.8%), soy food (RR: 0.91; 95% CI 0.84–1.00, I2 = 0%), and skim milk (RR: 0.96; 95% CI 0.92–1.00, I2 = 11.9%). There was a null association between poultry, fish, egg, nuts, total milk, and whole milk intake and breast cancer risk. Higher total red meat, fresh red meat, and processed meat intake may be risk factors for breast cancer, whereas higher soy food and skim milk intake may reduce the risk of breast cancer. PMID:27869663

  1. [Constipation after tilidine/naloxone and tramadol in comparison to codeine. A dose response study in human volunteers].

    PubMed

    Freye, E; Rosenkranz, B; Neruda, B

    1996-10-28

    Tramadol, a mixed mu-opioid agonist and a monoamine-reuptake blocking analgesic, has been supposed to have little effect on propulsive gastrointestinal motility. However, this has not been specifically studied in man. Following institutional approval, 18 human volunteers were given 50 mg of tramadol, tilidine/naloxone, and codeine, respectively, in a double-blind randomised cross-over design. Additionally, 12 further volunteers were given 100 mg of each opioid in a double-blind, randomised fashion, followed by measurement of gastrocoecal transit time. Gastrointestinal transit time was measured using the lactulose H(2)-breath test. A threefold increase in end-expiratory hydrogen when compared to the control value was considered the end point of gastrocoecal transit. At the low dose (50 mg) the three opioids did not differ significantly with regard to their effect on gastrointestinal motility. Gastrocoecal transit time was 90.8 (+/- 10.1 SEM) min for tramadol, 100.6 (+/- 9.8 SEM) min for tilidine/naloxone, and 104.2 (+/- 8.7 SEM) min for codeine. Doubling the dose of each opioid resulted in an increase in mean gastrocoecal transit, namely 97.8 (+/- 11.2 SEM) min for tramadol, 129.2 (+/- 12.2 SEM) min for tilidine/naloxone and 135.9 (+/- 9.2 SEM) min for codeine. The increase in gastrocoecal transit time was significant (P < 0.01) for high doses of tilidine/naloxone and codeine in contrast to the effect of the low doses. This lesser constipation effect may be due to the reduced affinity of tramadol to the mu-opioid receptor. Sedation was significantly higher for codeine after 50 mg (P < 0.05) and 100 mg (P < 0.005) than for tilidine/naloxone and tramadol. Vertigo was significantly higher after 50 mg (P < 0.05) and 100 mg (P < 0.005) of tilidine/naloxone and codeine than after tramadol. Perspiration was significantly higher after tramadol 100 mg (P < 0.005) than after tilidine/naloxone and codeine. Sedation is considered a typical symptom of analgesics interacting with

  2. Simplified Warfarin Dose-response Pharmacodynamic Models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongho; Gaweda, Adam E.; Wu, Dongfeng; Li, Lang; Rai, Shesh N.; Brier, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin is a frequently used oral anticoagulant for long-term prevention and treatment of thromboembolic events. Due to its narrow therapeutic range and large inter-individual dose-response variability, it is highly desirable to personalize warfarin dosing. However, the complexity of the conventional kinetic-pharmacodynamic (K-PD) models hampers the development of the personalized dose management. To avert this challenge, we propose simplified PD models for warfarin dose-response relationship, which is motivated by ideas from control theory. The simplified models were further applied to longitudinal data of 37 patients undergoing anticoagulation treatment using the standard two-stage approach and then compared with the conventional K-PD models. Data analysis shows that all models have a similar predictive ability, but the simplified models are most parsimonious. PMID:25750489

  3. Modeling and simulation of bone mineral density response from a phase 2 study of ONO-5334, a new cathepsin K inhibitor, to support dose selection in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Chihiro; Kastrissios, Helen; Monteleone, Jonathan; Ohno, Tomoya; Umemura, Takeo; Ohyama, Michiyo; Nagase, Shinichi; Small, Maria; Deacon, Steve; Ogawa, Mikio; Ieiri, Ichiro

    2014-08-01

    ONO-5334, a selective inhibitor of cathepsin K, is a potential new treatment for osteoporosis. The objectives of this modeling study were to (1) develop exposure-response (E-R) models to relate ONO-5334 exposure to bone mineral density (BMD), (2) predict BMD responses to various doses of ONO-5334 for both immediate release tablet (IRT) and sustained release tablet (SRT) formulations where only BMD response after administration of IRT had been studied to date, (3) inform selection of appropriate formulation/dose using simulation for future clinical trials. A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model was developed to simultaneously analyze data for both IRT and SRT. The exposure metrics at steady state were estimated by post hoc Bayesian prediction using the final population PK model. E-R models were developed using dose-ranging data with only IRT from postmenopausal females with osteoporosis. Based on the developed model, lumbar spine and total hip BMD after administration of ONO-5334 SRT as well as IRT were simulated. The simulation results showed that ONO-5334 SRT should provide comparable BMD responses at a lower dose relative to IRT (a finding consistent with the results from a previous population PK-PD modeling study with bone resorption markers).

  4. Dose-response model for teratological experiments involving quantal responses

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, K.; Van Ryzin, J.

    1985-03-01

    This paper introduces a dose-response model for teratological quantal response data where the probability of response for an offspring from a female at a given dose varies with the litter size. The maximum likelihood estimators for the parameters of the model are given as the solution of a nonlinear iterative algorithm. Two methods of low-dose extrapolation are presented, one based on the litter size distribution and the other a conservative method. The resulting procedures are then applied to a teratological data set from the literature.

  5. Microwave attenuation of ethanol-induced hypothermia: ethanol tolerance, time course, exposure duration, and dose response studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hjeresen, D.L.; Francendese, A.; O'Donnell, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to quantify the reported attenuation by microwave (MW) irradiation of ethanol-induced hypothermia. In one experiment rats were irradiated (continuous wave 2.45 GHz, specific absorption rate = 0.3 W/kg) or sham irradiated for 45 min, injected with 3.6 g/kg, 20% (v/v) ethanol (EtOH) or saline (NaCl) i.p.. Colonic temperature was monitored at 20-min intervals for 2 h. This procedure was repeated for 8 days to determine the rate of tolerance development to the hypothermic effect of ethanol. While MW irradiation did significantly attenuate EtOH-induced hypothermia, it did not enhance or retard the rate of tolerance development. To determine the duration of irradiation necessary to attenuate EtOH-induced hypothermia, groups of rats were irradiated or sham irradiated for 5, 15, 30, or 60 min prior to EtOH injection and subsequent temperature measurements. The attenuation was apparent only after 60 min of irradiation. To determine the duration of the attenuation effect after irradiation, rats were injected with EtOH or NaCl at 0, 30, 60, 120, or 480 min after 45 min of irradiation or sham irradiation. The attenuation effect was apparent among rats injected 0 to 30 min after irradiation and for the first 40 min for groups injected at 120 min. Additional rats were injected with NaCl or 0.9, 1.8, or 2.7 g/kg of EtOH i.p. following 45 min of irradiation or sham irradiation to determine if the attenuation effect depends on the dose of EtOH administered. Attenuation of EtOH-induced hypothermia was more apparent at lower doses of EtOH than at higher doses. These results indicate that the effect is an acute response to irradiation, and rule out several other potential explanations.

  6. A dose-response study in animals to evaluate the anticoagulant effect of the stage 2 unfractionated heparin USP monograph change.

    PubMed

    Honchel, R; Carraway, J; Gopee, N; Callicott, R; Chen, J; Patton, R; Xu, Q; Zalkkar, J; Laniyonu, A; Krefting, I; Cato, M; Robie-Suh, K; Rieves, R

    2011-08-01

    The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) monograph for unfractionated heparin (UFH) was revised in October 2009. This revision was anticipated, based upon in vitro tests, to reduce UFH potency by approximately 10%. To study the potential in vivo consequences of the monograph change, we evaluated activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and activated clotting time (ACT) responses in animals. Female mini-pigs and monkeys (n=8/species) were administered intravenously 60, 54, 48, or 42 U/kg and 50, 45, 40, or 35 U/kg "old" (pre-USP revision) UFH, respectively, in a Williams 4×4 crossover design. Blood samples for aPTT and ACT were collected at 15 min after dosing. The same study design was then repeated using "new" (post-USP revision) UFH. Mean "new" UFH aPTT and ACT values were generally lower than those for "old" UFH although individual animal responses varied considerably. The aPTT and ACT response was generally dose-proportional for both "old" and "new" UFH. These studies indicate that the USP monograph alteration for UFH may result in a modest reduction in the anticoagulant response across a population, but the variability in animal responses underscores the importance of individualization of clinical UFH dosing and the importance of anticoagulant test monitoring.

  7. A Dose-Response Study on the Effects of Purified Lycopene Supplementation on Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, Sridevi; Mathur, Surekha; Basu, Arpita; Aung, Hnin H.; Vasu, Vihas T.; Meyers, Stuart; Jialal, Ishwarlal

    2009-01-01

    Objective While tomato product supplementation, containing antioxidant carotenoids, including lycopene, decreases oxidative stress, the role of purified lycopene as an antioxidant remains unclear. Thus, we tested the effects of different doses of purified lycopene supplementation on biomarkers of oxidative stress in healthy volunteers. Methods This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, examining the effects of 8-week supplementation of purified lycopene, on plasma lycopene levels, biomarkers of lipid peroxidation {LDL oxidizability, malondialdehyde & hydroxynonenals (MDA & HNE), urinary F2-isoprostanes}, and markers of DNA damage in urine and lymphocytes. Healthy adults (n = 77, age ≥ 40 years), consumed a lycopene-restricted diet for 2 weeks, and were then randomized to receive 0, 6.5, 15, or 30 mg lycopene/day for 8 weeks, while on the lycopene-restricted diet. Blood and urine samples were collected at the beginning and end of Week 2 of lycopene-restricted diet, and at end of Week 10 of the study. Results Independent of the dose, plasma lycopene levels significantly increased in all lycopene supplemented groups versus placebo (p < 0.05). ANOVA revealed a significant decrease in DNA damage by the comet assay (p = 0.007), and a significant decrease in urinary 8-hydroxy deoxoguanosine (8-OHdG) at 8 weeks versus baseline (p = 0.0002), with 30 mg lycopene/day. No significant inter- or intra-group differences were noted for glucose, lipid profile, or other biomarkers of lipid peroxidation at any dose/time point. Conclusions Thus, purified lycopene was bioavailable and was shown to decrease DNA oxidative damage and urinary 8-OHdG at the high dose. PMID:18689558

  8. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-P-Dioxin (Tcdd) Dose-Response Studies: Preliminary Literature Search Results and Request for Additional Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA invited the public to comment on the preliminary list of in vivo mammalian dose-response citations for 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). This list was compiled as a first step in the development of EPA’s response to the National Academy of Sciences comments (NAS, 2...

  9. [Dose-response relation: relevance for clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Klinkhardt, U; Harder, S

    1998-12-15

    Dose-finding studies are performed routinely in patients and--if appropriate surrogate models exist--also in healthy volunteers. Such studies aim at establishing the optimal dose range for further clinical studies on the efficacy and the risk-benefit ratio of a new drug. The dose-response relationship of a drug is most often described by a sigmoidal curve. Its parameters include the mean effective dose, the maximal effect and the steepness. Interpretation of such curves should be done in the context of the intended clinical indications of the drug. The risk-benefit ratio of a drug can be assessed by overlapping the dose-response curve of wanted and unwanted clinical effects, again, any overlapping (which can be described e.g. by the therapeutic index) should be seen in the context of the indication and available therapeutic alternatives.

  10. [Dose-response relationship: relevance for medical practice].

    PubMed

    Klinkhardt, U; Harder, S

    2000-05-01

    Dose-finding studies are performed routinely in patients and--if appropriate surrogate models exist--also in healthy volunteers. Such studies aim at establishing the optimal dose range for further clinical studies on the efficacy and the risk-benefit ratio of a new drug. The dose-response relationship of a drug is most often described by a sigmoidal curve. Its parameters include the mean effective dose, the maximal effect and the steepness. Interpretation of such curves should be done in the context of the intended clinical indications of the drug. The risk-benefit ratio of a drug can be assessed by overlapping the dose-response curve of wanted and unwanted clinical effects, again, any overlapping (which can be described e.g. by the therapeutic index) should be seen in the context of the indication and available therapeutic alternatives.

  11. Characterization of nanomaterial test solutions for terrestrial plant dose-response studies: A comparative study of DLS and SAXS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Industrial applications of nanomaterials have expanded at an increasing rate in recent years, accompanied by the need for comprehensive toxicological assessments to establish environmental health and safety standards. Relatively few studies have examined the effects of nanoparti...

  12. Health risk characterization of chlorpyrifos using epidemiological dose-response data and probabilistic techniques: a case study with rice farmers in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Phung, Dung Tri; Connell, Des; Yu, Qiming; Chu, Cordia

    2013-09-01

    Various methods for risk characterization have been developed using probabilistic approaches. Data on Vietnamese farmers are available for the comparison of outcomes for risk characterization using different probabilistic methods. This article addresses the health risk characterization of chlorpyrifos using epidemiological dose-response data and probabilistic techniques obtained from a case study with rice farmers in Vietnam. Urine samples were collected from farmers and analyzed for trichloropyridinol (TCP), which was converted into absorbed daily dose of chlorpyrifos. Adverse health response doses due to chlorpyrifos exposure were collected from epidemiological studies to develop dose-adverse health response relationships. The health risk of chlorpyrifos was quantified using hazard quotient (HQ), Monte Carlo simulation (MCS), and overall risk probability (ORP) methods. With baseline (prior to pesticide spraying) and lifetime exposure levels (over a lifetime of pesticide spraying events), the HQ ranged from 0.06 to 7.1. The MCS method indicated less than 0.05% of the population would be affected while the ORP method indicated that less than 1.5% of the population would be adversely affected. With postapplication exposure levels, the HQ ranged from 1 to 32.5. The risk calculated by the MCS method was that 29% of the population would be affected, and the risk calculated by ORP method was 33%. The MCS and ORP methods have advantages in risk characterization due to use of the full distribution of data exposure as well as dose response, whereas HQ methods only used the exposure data distribution. These evaluations indicated that single-event spraying is likely to have adverse effects on Vietnamese rice farmers.

  13. Dose finding when the target dose is on a plateau of a dose-response curve: comparison of fully sequential designs.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Xiao, Changfu

    2013-01-01

    Consider the problem of estimating a dose with a certain response rate. Many multistage dose-finding designs for this problem were originally developed for oncology studies where the mean dose-response is strictly increasing in dose. In non-oncology phase II dose-finding studies, the dose-response curve often plateaus in the range of interest, and there are several doses with the mean response equal to the target. In this case, it is usually of interest to find the lowest of these doses because higher doses might have higher adverse event rates. It is often desirable to compare the response rate at the estimated target dose with a placebo and/or active control. We investigate which of the several known dose-finding methods developed for oncology phase I trials is the most suitable when the dose-response curve plateaus. Some of the designs tend to spread the allocation among the doses on the plateau. Others, such as the continual reassessment method and the t-statistic design, concentrate allocation at one of the doses with the t-statistic design selecting the lowest dose on the plateau more frequently.

  14. Dose-time-response modeling using negative binomial distribution.

    PubMed

    Roy, Munmun; Choudhury, Kanak; Islam, M M; Matin, M A

    2013-01-01

    People exposed to certain diseases are required to be treated with a safe and effective dose level of a drug. In epidemiological studies to find out an effective dose level, different dose levels are applied to the exposed and a certain number of cures is observed. Negative binomial distribution is considered to fit overdispersed Poisson count data. This study investigates the time effect on the response at different time points as well as at different dose levels. The point estimation and confidence bands for ED(100p)(t) and LT(100p)(d) are formulated in closed form for the proposed dose-time-response model with the negative binomial distribution. Numerical illustrations are carried out in order to check the performance level of the proposed model.

  15. Red and processed meat consumption and the risk of lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of 33 published studies.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiu-Juan; Gao, Qing; Qiao, Jian-Hong; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Cui-Ping; Liu, Ju

    2014-01-01

    This meta-analysis was to summarize the published studies about the association between red/processed meat consumption and the risk of lung cancer. 5 databases were systematically reviewed, and random-effect model was used to pool the study results and to assess dose-response relationships. Results shown that six cohort studies and twenty eight case-control studies were included in this meat-analysis. The pooled Risk Radios (RR) for total red meat and processed meat were 1.44 (95% CI, 1.29-1.61) and 1.23 (95% CI, 1.10-1.37), respectively. Dose-response analysis revealed that for every increment of 120 grams red meat per day the risk of lung cancer increases 35% and for every increment of 50 grams red meat per day the risk of lung cancer increases 20%. The present dose-response meta-analysis suggested that both red and processed meat consumption showed a positive effect on lung cancer risk.

  16. Does beer, wine or liquor consumption correlate with the risk of renal cell carcinoma? A dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Zhu, Yi; Zheng, Xiangyi; Xie, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Despite plenty of evidence supports an inverse association between alcohol drinking and risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), sex-specific and beverage-specific dose-response relationships have not been well established. We examined this association by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies. Studies were identified by comprehensively searching PubMed and EMBASE databases through February 21, 2015. Categorical and dose-response meta-analyses were conducted to identify the effects of alcohol on RCC. A total of eight publications (including seven cohort studies and one pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies) were eligible for this meta-analysis. Dose-response analysis showed that each 5 g/day increment of alcohol intake corresponded to a 5% decrease in risk of RCC for males and 9% for females. Alcohol intakes from wine, beer, and liquor were each associated with a reduced risk of RCC. When these associations were examined separately by gender, statistically significant inverse associations were restricted to alcohol from wine among females (RR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.73–0.91) and to alcohol from beer and from liquor among males (RR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.83–0.91 and RR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.92–0.99, respectively). In conclusion, there exist gender-specific and beverage-specific differences in the association between alcohol intake and RCC risk. PMID:25965820

  17. Does beer, wine or liquor consumption correlate with the risk of renal cell carcinoma? A dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Zhu, Yi; Zheng, Xiangyi; Xie, Liping

    2015-05-30

    Despite plenty of evidence supports an inverse association between alcohol drinking and risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), sex-specific and beverage-specific dose-response relationships have not been well established. We examined this association by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies. Studies were identified by comprehensively searching PubMed and EMBASE databases through February 21, 2015. Categorical and dose-response meta-analyses were conducted to identify the effects of alcohol on RCC. A total of eight publications (including seven cohort studies and one pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies) were eligible for this meta-analysis. Dose-response analysis showed that each 5 g/day increment of alcohol intake corresponded to a 5% decrease in risk of RCC for males and 9% for females. Alcohol intakes from wine, beer, and liquor were each associated with a reduced risk of RCC. When these associations were examined separately by gender, statistically significant inverse associations were restricted to alcohol from wine among females (RR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.73-0.91) and to alcohol from beer and from liquor among males (RR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.83-0.91 and RR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.92-0.99, respectively). In conclusion, there exist gender-specific and beverage-specific differences in the association between alcohol intake and RCC risk.

  18. Bayesian Isotonic Regression Dose-response (BIRD) Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Fu, Haoda

    2016-12-21

    Understanding dose-response relationship is a crucial step in drug development. There are a few parametric methods to estimate dose-response curves, such as the Emax model and the logistic model. These parametric models are easy to interpret and, hence, widely used. However, these models often require the inclusion of patients on high-dose levels; otherwise, the model parameters cannot be reliably estimated. To have robust estimation, nonparametric models are used. However, these models are not able to estimate certain important clinical parameters, such as ED50 and Emax. Furthermore, in many therapeutic areas, dose-response curves can be assumed as non-decreasing functions. This creates an additional challenge for nonparametric methods. In this paper, we propose a new Bayesian isotonic regression dose-response model which features advantages from both parametric and nonparametric models. The ED50 and Emax can be derived from this model. Simulations are provided to evaluate the Bayesian isotonic regression dose-response model performance against two parametric models. We apply this model to a data set from a diabetes dose-finding study.

  19. Shared Dosimetry Error in Epidemiological Dose-Response Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed. PMID:25799311

  20. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses

    DOE PAGES

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; ...

    2015-03-23

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takesmore » up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.« less

  1. Shared Dosimetry Error in Epidemiological Dose-Response Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre; Zeeb, Hajo

    2015-03-23

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. Use of these methods for several studies, including the Mayak Worker Cohort and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.

  2. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre; Zeeb, Hajo

    2015-03-23

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.

  3. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses.

    PubMed

    Stram, Daniel O; Preston, Dale L; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.

  4. Coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Luo, Mei-Ling; Li, Hui; Li, Min; Zhou, Jian-Guo

    2015-01-01

    This is a dose-response (DR) meta-analysis to evaluate the association of coffee consumption on endometrial cancer (EC) risk. A total 1,534,039 participants from 13 published articles were added in this meta-analysis. The RR of total coffee consumption and EC were 0.80 (95% CI: 0.74–0.86). A stronger association between coffee intake and EC incidence was found in patients who were never treated with hormones, 0.60 (95% CI: 0.50–0.72), and subjects with a BMI ≥25 kg/m2, 0.57 (95% CI: 0.46–0.71). The overall RRs for caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee were 0.66 (95% CI: 0.52–0.84) and 0.77 (95% CI: 0.63–0.94), respectively. A linear DR relationship was seen in coffee, caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee and caffeine intake. The EC risk decreased by 5% for every 1 cup per day of coffee intake, 7% for every 1 cup per day of caffeinated coffee intake, 4% for every 1 cup per day of decaffeinated intake of coffee, and 4% for every 100 mg of caffeine intake per day. In conclusion, coffee and intake of caffeine might significantly reduce the incidence of EC, and these effects may be modified by BMI and history of hormone therapy. PMID:26302813

  5. Coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Quan; Luo, Mei-Ling; Li, Hui; Li, Min; Zhou, Jian-Guo

    2015-08-25

    This is a dose-response (DR) meta-analysis to evaluate the association of coffee consumption on endometrial cancer (EC) risk. A total 1,534,039 participants from 13 published articles were added in this meta-analysis. The RR of total coffee consumption and EC were 0.80 (95% CI: 0.74-0.86). A stronger association between coffee intake and EC incidence was found in patients who were never treated with hormones, 0.60 (95% CI: 0.50-0.72), and subjects with a BMI ≥25 kg/m(2), 0.57 (95% CI: 0.46-0.71). The overall RRs for caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee were 0.66 (95% CI: 0.52-0.84) and 0.77 (95% CI: 0.63-0.94), respectively. A linear DR relationship was seen in coffee, caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee and caffeine intake. The EC risk decreased by 5% for every 1 cup per day of coffee intake, 7% for every 1 cup per day of caffeinated coffee intake, 4% for every 1 cup per day of decaffeinated intake of coffee, and 4% for every 100 mg of caffeine intake per day. In conclusion, coffee and intake of caffeine might significantly reduce the incidence of EC, and these effects may be modified by BMI and history of hormone therapy.

  6. Human muscle protein synthesis is modulated by extracellular, not intramuscular amino acid availability: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Bohé, Julien; Low, Aili; Wolfe, Robert R; Rennie, Michael J

    2003-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that muscle protein synthesis (MPS) is regulated by the concentration of extracellular amino acids, we investigated the dose-response relationship between the rate of human MPS and the concentrations of blood and intramuscular amino acids. We increased blood mixed amino acid concentrations by up to 240 % above basal levels by infusion of mixed amino acids (Aminosyn 15, 44-261 mg kg-1 h-1) in 21 healthy subjects, (11 men 10 women, aged 29 +/- 2 years) and measured the rate of incorporation of D5-phenylalanine or D3-leucine into muscle protein and blood and intramuscular amino acid concentrations. The relationship between the fold increase in MPS and blood essential amino acid concentration ([EAA], mM) was hyperbolic and fitted the equation MPS = (2.68 x [EAA])/(1.51 + [EAA]) (P < 0.01). The pattern of stimulation of myofibrillar, sarcoplasmic and mitochondrial protein was similar. There was no clear relationship between the rate of MPS and the concentration of intramuscular EAAs; indeed, when MPS was increasing most rapidly, the concentration of intramuscular EAAs was below basal levels. We conclude that the rates of synthesis of all classes of muscle proteins are acutely regulated by the blood [EAA] over their normal diurnal range, but become saturated at high concentrations. We propose that the stimulation of protein synthesis depends on the sensing of the concentration of extracellular, rather than intramuscular EAAs.

  7. Human Muscle Protein Synthesis is Modulated by Extracellular, Not Intramuscular Amino Acid Availability: A Dose-Response Study

    PubMed Central

    Bohé, Julien; Low, Aili; Wolfe, Robert R; Rennie, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that muscle protein synthesis (MPS) is regulated by the concentration of extracellular amino acids, we investigated the dose-response relationship between the rate of human MPS and the concentrations of blood and intramuscular amino acids. We increased blood mixed amino acid concentrations by up to 240 % above basal levels by infusion of mixed amino acids (Aminosyn 15, 44-261 mg kg−1 h−1) in 21 healthy subjects, (11 men 10 women, aged 29 ± 2 years) and measured the rate of incorporation of D5-phenylalanine or D3-leucine into muscle protein and blood and intramuscular amino acid concentrations. The relationship between the fold increase in MPS and blood essential amino acid concentration ([EAA], mM) was hyperbolic and fitted the equation MPS = (2.68 × [EAA])/(1.51 + [EAA]) (P < 0.01). The pattern of stimulation of myofibrillar, sarcoplasmic and mitochondrial protein was similar. There was no clear relationship between the rate of MPS and the concentration of intramuscular EAAs; indeed, when MPS was increasing most rapidly, the concentration of intramuscular EAAs was below basal levels. We conclude that the rates of synthesis of all classes of muscle proteins are acutely regulated by the blood [EAA] over their normal diurnal range, but become saturated at high concentrations. We propose that the stimulation of protein synthesis depends on the sensing of the concentration of extracellular, rather than intramuscular EAAs. PMID:12909668

  8. Radiation-related New Primary Solid Cancers in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: Comparative Radiation Dose-response and Modification of Treatment Effects

    PubMed Central

    Inskip, Peter D.; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Veiga, Lene; Bhatti, Parveen; Ronckers, Cécile; Rajaraman, Preetha; Boukheris, Houda; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan; Hammond, Sue; Henderson, Tara O.; Watt, Tanya C.; Mertens, Ann C.; Leisenring, Wendy; Stratton, Kayla; Whitton, John; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Robison, Leslie L.; Neglia, Joseph P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The majority of childhood cancer patients now achieve long-term survival, but the treatments that cured their malignancy often put them at risk of adverse health outcomes years later. New cancers are among the most serious of these late effects. The aims of this review are to compare and contrast radiation dose-response relationships for new solid cancers in a large cohort of childhood cancer survivors and to discuss interactions among treatment and host factors. Methods This review is based on previously published site-specific analyses for subsequent primary cancers of the brain, breast, thyroid gland, bone and soft tissue, salivary glands and skin among 12,268 five-year childhood cancer survivors in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Analyses included tumor site-specific, individual radiation dose reconstruction based on radiotherapy records. Radiation-related second cancer risks were estimated using conditional logistic or Poisson regression models for excess relative risk (ERR). Results Linear dose-response relationships over a wide range of radiation dose (0–50 Gy) were seen for all cancer sites except the thyroid gland. The steepest slopes occurred for sarcoma, meningioma and non-melanoma skin cancer (ERR/Gy > 1.00), with glioma and cancers of the breast and salivary glands forming a second group (ERR/Gy=0.27–0.36). The relative risk for thyroid cancer increased up to 15–20 Gy and then decreased with increasing dose. Risk of thyroid cancer also was positively associated with chemotherapy, but the chemotherapy effect was not seen among those who also received very high doses of radiation to the thyroid. Excess risk of radiation-related breast cancer was sharply reduced among women who received 5 Gy or more to the ovaries. Conclusions Results suggest that the effect of high-dose irradiation is consistent with a linear dose-response for most organs but also reveal important organ- and host-specific differences in susceptibility and

  9. TESS-based dose-response using pediatric clonidine exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Blaine E. . E-mail: jebenson@salud.unm.edu; Spyker, Daniel A.; Troutman, William G.; Watson, William A. . E-mail: http://www.aapcc.org/

    2006-06-01

    Objective: The toxic and lethal doses of clonidine in children are unclear. This study was designed to determine whether data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS) could be utilized to determine a dose-response relationship for pediatric clonidine exposure. Methods: 3458 single-substance clonidine exposures in children <6 years of age reported to TESS from January 2000 through December 2003 were examined. Dose ingested, age, and medical outcome were available for 1550 cases. Respiratory arrest cases (n = 8) were classified as the most severe of the medical outcome categories (Arrest, Major, Moderate, Mild, and No effect). Exposures reported as a 'taste or lick' (n = 51) were included as a dose of 1/10 of the dosage form involved. Dose ranged from 0.4 to 1980 (median 13) {mu}g/kg. Weight was imputed based on a quadratic estimate of weight for age. Dose certainty was coded as exact (26% of cases) or not exact (74%). Medical outcome (response) was examined via logistic regression using SAS JMP (release 5.1). Results: The logistic model describing medical outcome (P < 0.0001) included Log dose/kg (P 0.0000) and Certainty (P = 0.045). Conclusion: TESS data can provide the basis for a statistically sound description of dose-response for pediatric clonidine poisoning exposures.

  10. A dose-response study of orally administered clonidine as premedication in the elderly: evaluating hemodynamic safety.

    PubMed

    Filos, K S; Patroni, O; Goudas, L C; Bosas, O; Kassaras, A; Gartaganis, S

    1993-12-01

    Clonidine premedication in a dose of 5 micrograms/kg may be particularly well suited for elderly patients. To pursue this approach, sedation, intraocular pressure (IOP), and the hemodynamic profile of two doses of oral clonidine premedication were compared in 60 elderly patients, aged 65-82 yr, who underwent elective ophthalmic surgery under local anesthesia. Group 1 (n = 20) received placebo, Group 2 (n = 20) 150 micrograms of clonidine (2-2.5 micrograms/kg), and Group 3 (n = 20) 300 micrograms of clonidine (4-4.5 micrograms/kg) in a randomized, double-blind fashion. Decreases in mean arterial blood pressure were more pronounced and occurred earlier after 300 micrograms of clonidine (31.4 +/- 12.1%, P < 0.001) as compared to 150 micrograms of clonidine (18.1 +/- 10.9%, P < 0.001). Throughout the study, six patients (30%) in Group 3 (300 micrograms clonidine-treated group), but no patient in Groups 1 or 2, were treated at least once for hypotension (P < 0.05). Heart rate decreased significantly 18.5 +/- 8.1% (P < 0.001) only after 300 micrograms of clonidine. Clonidine 150 micrograms and 300 micrograms decreased IOP 32.1 +/- 14.3% (P < 0.001) and 47.8 +/- 17.2% (P < 0.001), respectively. After 150 micrograms of clonidine patients were significantly more sedated as compared to those given placebo (P < 0.01) but significantly less sedated than after 300 micrograms of clonidine (P < 0.01), where sedation persisted more than 6 h postoperatively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Dose-response study of healthy, heavily exercising men exposed to ozone at concentrations near the ambient air quality standard

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, W.S.; Avol, E.L.; Shamoo, D.A.; Spier, C.E.; Valencia, L.M.; Venet, T.G.; Fischer, D.A.; Hackney, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    Twenty-four healthy, well-conditioned young adult male volunteers, free of asthma or clinical respiratory allergies, were exposed to purified air containing ozone (O3) at 0.16, 0.14, 0.12, 0.10, 0.08, and 0.00 part per million (ppm). Exposures were separated by 2-week intervals, occurred in random order, and lasted 2 hours each. Temperature was 32 +/- 1/sup 0/C and relative humidity was 38 +/- 3%, simulating Los Angeles area smog conditions. Subjects exercised 15 minutes of each half hour, attaining ventilation rates averaging 68 L/min (approximately 35 L/min per m2 body surface area). Lung function was measured pre-exposure and after 1 hr and 2 hr of exposure. Airway responsiveness to a cold-air challenge was measured immediately following the 2-hr exposure. Symptoms were recorded before, during, and for one-week periods following exposures. For the group as a whole, no meaningful untoward effects were found except for a mild typical respiratory irritant response after 2 hr exposure to 0.16 ppm O3. Two individual subjects showed possible responses at 0.14 ppm, and one of them also at 0.12 ppm. In comparison to some previous investigations, this study showed generally less response to O3. The comparative lack of response may relate to the favorable clinical status of the subjects, the pattern of exercise during exposure, or some other factor not yet identified.

  12. Protein adducts of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal contribute to trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity via activating Th17 cells: Dose- and time-response studies in female MRL+/+ mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gangduo; Wang, Jianling; Fan, Xiuzhen; Ansari, G. A. S.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2011-01-01

    Trichloroethene (TCE), a common occupational and environmental toxicant, is known to induce autoimmunity. Previous studies in our laboratory showed increased oxidative stress in TCE-mediated autoimmunity. To further establish the role of oxidative stress and to investigate the mechanisms of TCE-mediated autoimmunity, dose- and time- response studies were conducted in MRL+/+ mice by treating them with TCE via drinking water at doses of 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/ml for 12, 24 or 36 weeks. TCE exposure led to dose-related increases in malondialdehyde (MDA)-/hydroxynonenal (HNE)-protein adducts and their corresponding antibodies in the sera and decreases in GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio in the kidneys at 24 and 36 weeks, with greater changes at 36 weeks. The increases in these protein adducts and decreases in GSH/GSSG ratio were associated with significant elevation in serum anti-nuclear- and anti-ssDNA-antibodies, suggesting an association between TCE-induced oxidative stress and autoimmune response. Interestingly, splenocytes from mice treated with TCE for 24 weeks secreted significantly higher levels of IL-17 and IL-21 than did splenocytes from controls after stimulation with MDA-mouse serum albumin (MSA) or HNE-MSA adducts. The increased release of these cytokines showed a dose-related response and was more pronounced in mice treated with TCE for 36 weeks. These studies provide evidence that MDA- and or HNE-protein adducts contribute to TCE-mediated autoimmunity, which may be via activation of Th17 cells. PMID:22178267

  13. Fewer Doses of HPV Vaccine Result in Immune Response Similar to Three-Dose Regimen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Releases NCI News Note Fewer doses of HPV vaccine result in immune response similar to three-dose ... that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum antibody ...

  14. Analytical modelling of regional radiotherapy dose response of lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangkyu; Stroian, Gabriela; Kopek, Neil; AlBahhar, Mahmood; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of the dose-response of radiation-induced lung disease (RILD) is necessary for optimization of radiotherapy (RT) treatment plans involving thoracic cavity irradiation. This study models the time-dependent relationship between local radiation dose and post-treatment lung tissue damage measured by computed tomography (CT) imaging. Fifty-eight follow-up diagnostic CT scans from 21 non-small-cell lung cancer patients were examined. The extent of RILD was segmented on the follow-up CT images based on the increase of physical density relative to the pre-treatment CT image. The segmented RILD was locally correlated with dose distribution calculated by analytical anisotropic algorithm and the Monte Carlo method to generate the corresponding dose-response curves. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model was fit to the dose-response curves at six post-RT time periods, and temporal change in the LKB parameters was recorded. In this study, we observed significant correlation between the probability of lung tissue damage and the local dose for 96% of the follow-up studies. Dose-injury correlation at the first three months after RT was significantly different from later follow-up periods in terms of steepness and threshold dose as estimated from the LKB model. Dependence of dose response on superior-inferior tumour position was also observed. The time-dependent analytical modelling of RILD might provide better understanding of the long-term behaviour of the disease and could potentially be applied to improve inverse treatment planning optimization.

  15. Curious cases: Altered dose-response relationships in addiction genetics.

    PubMed

    Uhl, George R; Drgonova, Jana; Hall, F Scott

    2014-03-01

    Dose-response relationships for most addictive substances are "inverted U"-shaped. Addictive substances produce both positive features that include reward, euphoria, anxiolysis, withdrawal-relief, and negative features that include aversion, dysphoria, anxiety and withdrawal symptoms. A simple model differentially associates ascending and descending limbs of dose-response curves with rewarding and aversive influences, respectively. However, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) diagnoses of substance dependence fail to incorporate dose-response criteria and don't directly consider balances between euphoric and dysphoric drug effects. Classical genetic studies document substantial heritable influences on DSM substance dependence. Linkage and genome-wide association studies identify modest-sized effects at any locus. Nevertheless, clusters of SNPs within selected genes display 10(-2)>p>10(-8) associations with dependence in many independent samples. For several of these genes, evidence for cis-regulatory, level-of-expression differences supports the validity of mouse models in which levels of expression are also altered. This review documents surprising, recently defined cases in which convergent evidence from humans and mouse models supports central influences of altered dose-response relationships in mediating the impact of relevant genomic variation on addiction phenotypes. For variation at loci for the α5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, cadherin 13, receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase Δ and neuronal cell adhesion molecule genes, changed dose-response relationships conferred by gene knockouts in mice are accompanied by supporting human data. These observations emphasize desirability of carefully elucidating dose-response relationships for both rewarding and aversive features of abused substances wherever possible. They motivate consideration of individual differences in dose-response relationships in addiction nosology and therapeutics.

  16. Nonlinear dose-response relationship between radon exposure and the risk of lung cancer: evidence from a meta-analysis of published observational studies.

    PubMed

    Duan, Peng; Quan, Chao; Hu, Chunhui; Zhang, Jicai; Xie, Fei; Hu, Xiuxue; Yu, Zongtao; Gao, Bo; Liu, Zhixiang; Zheng, Hong; Liu, Changjiang; Wang, Chengmin; Yu, Tingting; Qi, Suqin; Fu, Wenjuan; Kourouma, Ansoumane; Yang, Kedi

    2015-07-01

    Although radon exposure (RE) has been confirmed to increase the risk of lung cancer (LC), questions remain about the shape of the dose-response relationship between RE and the risk of LC. We carried out a dose-response meta-analysis to investigate and quantify the potential dose-response association between residential and occupational exposure to radon and the risk of LC. All cohort and case-control studies published in English and Chinese on Embase, PubMed, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) digital databases through November 2013 were identified systematically. We extracted effect measures (relative risk, odds ratio, standardized mortality ratio, standardized incidence ratio, or standardized rate ratio) from individual studies to generate pooled results using meta-analysis approaches. We derived meta-analytic estimates using random-effects models taking into account the correlation between estimates. Restricted cubic splines and generalized least-squares regression methods were used to model a potential curvilinear relationship and to carry out a dose-response meta-analysis. Stratified analysis, sensitivity analysis, and assessment of bias were performed in our meta-analysis. Sixty publications fulfilling the inclusion criteria for this meta-analysis were finally included. Occupational RE was associated with LC [risk ratio 1.86, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.67-2.09; I²=92.2%; 27 prospective studies], for pooled risk estimate of the: standardized mortality ratio [2.00 (95% CI=1.82-2.32)]; standardized incidence ratio [1.45 (95% CI=1.20-1.74)]; relative risk [2.10 (95% CI=1.64-2.69)]. In a subgroup analysis of uranium miners and residents exposed to occupational uranium, the summary risk was 2.23 (95% CI=1.86-2.68) and 1.23 (95% CI=1.05-1.44). The overall meta-analysis showed evidence of a nonlinear association between RE and the risk of LC (P(nonlinearity)<0.014); in addition, the point value of residential radon also improved the results

  17. Dose-effect study of Gelsemium sempervirens in high dilutions on anxiety-related responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Paolo; Conforti, Anita; Zanolin, Elisabetta; Marzotto, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This study was designed to investigate the putative anxiolytic-like activity of ultra-low doses of Gelsemium sempervirens (G. sempervirens), produced according to the homeopathic pharmacopeia. Methods Five different centesimal (C) dilutions of G. sempervirens (4C, 5C, 7C, 9C and 30C), the drug buspirone (5 mg/kg) and solvent vehicle were delivered intraperitoneally to groups of ICR-CD1 mice over a period of 9 days. The behavioral effects were assessed in the open-field (OF) and light–dark (LD) tests in blind and randomized fashion. Results Most G. sempervirens dilutions did not affect the total distance traveled in the OF (only the 5C had an almost significant stimulatory effect on this parameter), indicating that the medicine caused no sedation effects or unspecific changes in locomotor activity. In the same test, buspirone induced a slight but statistically significant decrease in locomotion. G. sempervirens showed little stimulatory activity on the time spent and distance traveled in the central zone of the OF, but this effect was not statistically significant. In the LD test, G. sempervirens increased the % time spent in the light compartment, an indicator of anxiolytic-like activity, with a statistically significant effect using the 5C, 9C and 30C dilutions. These effects were comparable to those of buspirone. The number of transitions between the compartments of the LD test markedly increased with G. sempervirens 5C, 9C and 30C dilutions. Conclusion The overall pattern of results provides evidence that G. sempervirens acts on the emotional reactivity of mice, and that its anxiolytic-like effects are apparent, with a non-linear relationship, even at high dilutions. PMID:20401745

  18. A Generalized QMRA Beta-Poisson Dose-Response Model.

    PubMed

    Xie, Gang; Roiko, Anne; Stratton, Helen; Lemckert, Charles; Dunn, Peter K; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) is widely accepted for characterizing the microbial risks associated with food, water, and wastewater. Single-hit dose-response models are the most commonly used dose-response models in QMRA. Denoting PI(d) as the probability of infection at a given mean dose d, a three-parameter generalized QMRA beta-Poisson dose-response model, PI(d|α,β,r*), is proposed in which the minimum number of organisms required for causing infection, Kmin , is not fixed, but a random variable following a geometric distribution with parameter 0dose-response mechanism. Since a maximum likelihood solution is not easily available, a likelihood-free approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) algorithm is employed for parameter estimation. By fitting the generalized model to four experimental data sets from the literature, this study reveals that the posterior median r* estimates produced fall short of meeting the required condition of r* = 1 for single-hit assumption. However, three out of four data sets fitted by the generalized models could not achieve an improvement in goodness of fit. These combined results imply that, at least in some cases, a single-hit assumption for characterizing the dose-response process may not be appropriate, but that the more complex models may be difficult to support especially if the sample size is small. The three-parameter generalized model provides a possibility to investigate the mechanism of a dose-response process in greater detail than is possible under a single-hit model.

  19. SU-D-16A-02: A Novel Methodology for Accurate, Semi-Automated Delineation of Oral Mucosa for Radiation Therapy Dose-Response Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J; Welsh, L; Gulliford, S; Harrington, K; Nutting, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The significant morbidity caused by radiation-induced acute oral mucositis means that studies aiming to elucidate dose-response relationships in this tissue are a high priority. However, there is currently no standardized method for delineating the mucosal structures within the oral cavity. This report describes the development of a methodology to delineate the oral mucosa accurately on CT scans in a semi-automated manner. Methods: An oral mucosa atlas for automated segmentation was constructed using the RayStation Atlas-Based Segmentation (ABS) module. A radiation oncologist manually delineated the full surface of the oral mucosa on a planning CT scan of a patient receiving radiotherapy (RT) to the head and neck region. A 3mm fixed annulus was added to incorporate the mucosal wall thickness. This structure was saved as an atlas template. ABS followed by model-based segmentation was performed on four further patients sequentially, adding each patient to the atlas. Manual editing of the automatically segmented structure was performed. A dose comparison between these contours and previously used oral cavity volume contours was performed. Results: The new approach was successful in delineating the mucosa, as assessed by an experienced radiation oncologist, when applied to a new series of patients receiving head and neck RT. Reductions in the mean doses obtained when using the new delineation approach, compared with the previously used technique, were demonstrated for all patients (median: 36.0%, range: 25.6% – 39.6%) and were of a magnitude that might be expected to be clinically significant. Differences in the maximum dose that might reasonably be expected to be clinically significant were observed for two patients. Conclusion: The method developed provides a means of obtaining the dose distribution delivered to the oral mucosa more accurately than has previously been achieved. This will enable the acquisition of high quality dosimetric data for use in

  20. Single toxin dose-response models revisited

    PubMed Central

    Glaholt, SP; Kyker-Snowman, E; Shaw, JR; Chen, CY

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to offer a rigorous analysis of the sigmoid shape single toxin dose-response relationship. The toxin efficacy function is introduced and four special points, including maximum toxin efficacy and inflection points, on the dose-response curve are defined. The special points define three phases of the toxin effect on mortality: (1) toxin concentrations smaller than the first inflection point or (2) larger then the second inflection point imply low mortality rate, and (3) concentrations between the first and the second inflection points imply high mortality rate. Probabilistic interpretation and mathematical analysis for each of four models, Hill, logit, probit, and Weibull is provided. Two general model extensions are introduced: (1) the multi-target hit model that accounts for the existence of several vital receptors affected by the toxin, and (2) model with a nonzero mortality at zero concentration to account for natural mortality. Special attention is given to statistical estimation in the framework of the generalized linear model with the binomial dependent variable as the mortality count in each experiment, contrary to the widespread nonlinear regression treating the mortality rate as continuous variable. The models are illustrated using standard EPA Daphnia acute (48 hours) toxicity tests with mortality as a function of NiCl or CuSO4 toxin. PMID:27847315

  1. DOSE-RESPONSE Relationships Between Whole-Body Vibration and Lumbar Disk DISEASE—A Field Study on 388 Drivers of Different Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, S.; Notbohm, G.; Dupuis, H.; Hartung, E.

    1998-08-01

    In a longitudinal study, the dose-response relationships between long term occupational exposure to whole-body vibration and degenerative processes in the lumbar spine caused by the lumbar disks were examined. From 1990 to 1992, 388 vibration-exposed workers from different driving jobs were examined medically and by lumbar X-ray. For each individual, a history of all exposure conditions was recorded, and a cumulative vibration dose was calculated allowing comparisons between groups of low, middle, and high intensity of exposure. 310 subjects were selected for a follow-up four years later, of whom 90·6% (n=281) agreed to participate. In comparing the exposure groups, the results indicate that the limit value ofazw(8h)=0·8 m/s2should be reviewed. The best fit between the lifelong vibration dose and the occurrence of a lumbar syndrome was obtained by applying a daily reference ofazw(8h)=0·6 ms2as a limit value. The results became more distinct still when only those subjects were included in the statistical analysis who had had no lumbar symptoms up to the end of the first year of exposure. The prevalence of lumbar syndrome is 1·55 times higher in the highly exposed group when compared to the reference group with low exposure (CI95%=1·24/1·95). Calculating the cumulative incidence of new cases of lumbar syndrome in the follow-up period yields a relative risk ofRRMH=1·37 (CI95%=0·86/2·17) for the highly exposed group. It is concluded that the limit value for the calculation of an individual lifelong vibration dose should be based on a daily reference exposure ofazw(8h)=0·6 m/s2. With increasing dose it is more and more probable that cases of lumbar syndrome are caused by exposure to vibration.

  2. Dose-Response Relationship between Cumulative Occupational Lead Exposure and the Associated Health Damages: A 20-Year Cohort Study of a Smelter in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yue; Gu, Jun-Ming; Huang, Yun; Duan, Yan-Ying; Huang, Rui-Xue; Hu, Jian-An

    2016-01-01

    Long-term airborne lead exposure, even below official occupational limits, has been found to cause lead poisoning at higher frequencies than expected, which suggests that China’s existing occupational exposure limits should be reexamined. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 1832 smelting workers from 1988 to 2008 in China. These were individuals who entered the plant and came into continuous contact with lead at work for longer than 3 months. The dose-response relationship between occupational cumulative lead exposure and lead poisoning, abnormal blood lead, urinary lead and erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) were analyzed and the benchmark dose lower bound confidence limits (BMDLs) were calculated. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between cumulative lead dust and lead fumes exposures and workplace seniority, blood lead, urinary lead and ZPP values. A dose-response relationship was observed between cumulative lead dust or lead fumes exposure and lead poisoning (p < 0.01). The BMDLs of the cumulative occupational lead dust and fumes doses were 0.68 mg-year/m3 and 0.30 mg-year/m3 for lead poisoning, respectively. The BMDLs of workplace airborne lead concentrations associated with lead poisoning were 0.02 mg/m3 and 0.01 mg/m3 for occupational exposure lead dust and lead fume, respectively. In conclusion, BMDLs for airborne lead were lower than occupational exposure limits, suggesting that the occupational lead exposure limits need re-examination and adjustment. Occupational cumulative exposure limits (OCELs) should be established to better prevent occupational lead poisoning. PMID:26999177

  3. Dose-Response Relationship between Cumulative Occupational Lead Exposure and the Associated Health Damages: A 20-Year Cohort Study of a Smelter in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Gu, Jun-Ming; Huang, Yun; Duan, Yan-Ying; Huang, Rui-Xue; Hu, Jian-An

    2016-03-16

    Long-term airborne lead exposure, even below official occupational limits, has been found to cause lead poisoning at higher frequencies than expected, which suggests that China's existing occupational exposure limits should be reexamined. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 1832 smelting workers from 1988 to 2008 in China. These were individuals who entered the plant and came into continuous contact with lead at work for longer than 3 months. The dose-response relationship between occupational cumulative lead exposure and lead poisoning, abnormal blood lead, urinary lead and erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) were analyzed and the benchmark dose lower bound confidence limits (BMDLs) were calculated. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between cumulative lead dust and lead fumes exposures and workplace seniority, blood lead, urinary lead and ZPP values. A dose-response relationship was observed between cumulative lead dust or lead fumes exposure and lead poisoning (p < 0.01). The BMDLs of the cumulative occupational lead dust and fumes doses were 0.68 mg-year/m³ and 0.30 mg-year/m³ for lead poisoning, respectively. The BMDLs of workplace airborne lead concentrations associated with lead poisoning were 0.02 mg/m³ and 0.01 mg/m³ for occupational exposure lead dust and lead fume, respectively. In conclusion, BMDLs for airborne lead were lower than occupational exposure limits, suggesting that the occupational lead exposure limits need re-examination and adjustment. Occupational cumulative exposure limits (OCELs) should be established to better prevent occupational lead poisoning.

  4. Maternal Caffeine Consumption during Pregnancy and Risk of Low Birth Weight: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jongeun; Kim, Rockli; Kim, Yongjoo; Tam, Melanie; Lai, Yizhen; Keum, NaNa; Oldenburg, Catherine Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown inconsistent conclusions about the effect of caffeine intake during pregnancy on the risk of low birth weight (LBW). We performed a meta-analysis and linear-dose response analysis examining the association between caffeine consumption during pregnancy and risk of LBW. PubMed and EMBASE were searched for relevant articles published up to March 2014. Eight cohort and four case-control studies met all inclusion criteria. Using a random-effects model of the twelve studies, the pooled odds ratio (OR) for the risk of LBW comparing the highest versus lowest level of caffeine intake during pregnancy was 1.38 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.73). Linear dose-response analysis showed that every additional 100 mg of caffeine intake (1 cup of coffee or 2 cups of tea) per day during pregnancy was associated with a 3.0% increase in OR for LBW. There was a moderate level of overall heterogeneity with an I-squared value of 55% (95% CI: 13, 76%), and no evidence of publication bias based on Egger's test (P = 0.20) and the funnel plot. Thus, high caffeine intake during pregnancy is associated with a significant increase in the risk of LBW, and this risk appears to increase linearly as caffeine intake increases.

  5. Applications of omics approaches to the development of microbiological risk assessment using RNA virus dose-response models as a case study.

    PubMed

    Gale, P; Hill, A; Kelly, L; Bassett, J; McClure, P; Le Marc, Y; Soumpasis, I

    2014-12-01

    The last decade has seen a huge increase in the amount of 'omics' data available and in our ability to interpret those data. The aim of this paper was to consider how omics techniques can be used to improve and refine microbiological risk assessment, using dose-response models for RNA viruses, with particular reference to norovirus through the oral route as the case study. The dose-response model for initial infection in the gastrointestinal tract is broken down into the component steps at the molecular level and the feasibility of assigning probabilities to each step assessed. The molecular mechanisms are not sufficiently well understood at present to enable quantitative estimation of probabilities on the basis of omics data. At present, the great strength of gene sequence data appears to be in giving information on the distribution and proportion of susceptible genotypes (for example due to the presence of the appropriate pathogen-binding receptor) in the host population rather than in predicting specificities from the amino acid sequences concurrently obtained. The nature of the mutant spectrum in RNA viruses greatly complicates the application of omics approaches to the development of mechanistic dose-response models and prevents prediction of risks of disease progression (given infection has occurred) at the level of the individual host. However, molecular markers in the host and virus may enable more broad predictions to be made about the consequences of exposure in a population. In an alternative approach, comparing the results of deep sequencing of RNA viruses in the faeces/vomitus from donor humans with those from their infected recipients may enable direct estimates of the average probability of infection per virion to be made.

  6. Adjunctive aripiprazole in the treatment of risperidone-induced hyperprolactinemia: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Xu; Su, Yun-Ai; Bian, Qing-Tao; Wei, Li-He; Zhang, Rong-Zhen; Liu, Yan-Hong; Correll, Christoph; Soares, Jair C; Yang, Fu-De; Wang, Shao-Li; Zhang, Xiang-Yang

    2015-08-01

    Hyperprolactinemia is an unwanted adverse effect associated with several antipsychotics. The addition of partial dopamine receptor agonist aripiprazole may attenuate antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia effectively. However, the ideal dosing regimen for this purpose is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the dose effects of adjunctive treatment with aripiprazole on prolactin levels and hyperprolactinemia in schizophrenia patients. Stable subjects 18-45 years old with schizophrenia and hyperprolactinemia (i.e., >24 ng/ml for females and >20 ng/ml for males) were randomly assigned to receive 8 weeks of placebo (n=30) or oral aripiprazole 5mg/day (n=30), 10mg/day (n=29), or 20mg/day (n=30) added on to fixed dose risperidone treatment. Serum prolactin levels were measured at baseline and after 2, 4 and 8 weeks; clinical symptoms and side effects were assessed at baseline and week 8 using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Clinical Global Impressions Severity scale, Barnes Akathisia Scale, Simpson-Angus Scale and UKU Side Effects Rating Scale. Of 119 randomized patients, 107 (89.9%) completed the 8-week study. At study end, all three aripiprazole doses resulted in significantly lower prolactin levels (beginning at week 2), higher response rates (≥30% prolactin reduction) and higher prolactin normalization rates than placebo. Effects were significantly greater in the 10 and 20mg/day groups than the 5mg/day group. No significant changes were observed in any treatment groups regarding psychopathology and adverse effect ratings. Adjunctive aripiprazole treatment was effective and safe for resolving risperidone-induced hyperprolactinemia, producing significant and almost maximal improvements by week 2 without significant effects on psychopathology and side effects.

  7. Dose-dependent changes in the locomotor responses to methamphetamine in BALB/c mice: low doses induce hypolocomotion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rana A K; Kosten, Therese A; Kinsey, Berma M; Shen, Xiaoyun; Lopez, Angel Y; Kosten, Thomas R; Orson, Frank M

    2012-12-01

    The overall goal of the present study was to determine the effects of different doses of (+)-methamphetamine (meth) on locomotor activity of Balb/C mice. Four experiments were designed to test a wide range of meth doses in BALB/c female mice. In Experiment 1, we examined locomotor activity induced by an acute administration of low doses of meth (0.01 and 0.03mg/kg) in a 90-min session. Experiment 2 was conducted to test higher meth doses (0.3-10mg/kg). In Experiment 3, separate sets of mice were pre-treated with various meth doses once or twice (one injection/week) prior to a locomotor challenge with a low meth dose. Finally, in Experiment 4, we tested whether locomotor activation would be affected by pretreatment with a low or moderate dose of meth one month prior to the low meth dose challenge. Results show that low doses of meth induce hypolocomotion whereas moderate to high doses induce hyperlocomotion. Prior exposure to either one moderate or high dose of meth or to two, low doses of meth attenuated the hypolocomotor effect of a low meth dose one week later. This effect was also attenuated in mice tested one month after administration of a moderate meth dose. These results show that low and high doses of meth can have opposing effects on locomotor activity. Further, prior exposure to the drug leads to tolerance, rather than sensitization, of the hypolocomotor response to low meth doses.

  8. Use of a Dose-Response Model to Study Temporal Trends in Spatial Exposure to Coxiella burnetii: Analysis of a Multiyear Outbreak of Q Fever.

    PubMed

    Brooke, R J; Teunis, P F M; Kretzschmar, M E E; Wielders, C C H; Schneeberger, P M; Waller, L A

    2017-03-01

    The Netherlands underwent a large Q fever outbreak between 2007 and 2009. In this paper, we study spatial and temporal Coxiella burnetii exposure trends during this large outbreak as well as validate outcomes against other published studies and provide evidence to support hypotheses on the causes of the outbreak. To achieve this, we develop a framework using a dose-response model to translate acute Q fever case incidence into exposure estimates. More specifically, we incorporate a geostatistical model that accounts for spatial and temporal correlation of exposure estimates from a human Q fever dose-response model to quantify exposure trends during the outbreak. The 2051 cases, with the corresponding age, gender and residential addresses, reside in the region with the highest attack rates during the outbreak in the Netherlands between 2006 and 2009. We conclude that the multiyear outbreak in the Netherlands is caused by sustained release of infectious bacteria from the same sources, which suggests that earlier implementation of interventions may have prevented many of the cases. The model predicts the risk of infection and acute symptomatic Q fever from multiple exposure sources during a multiple-year outbreak providing a robust, evidence-based methodology to support decision-making and intervention design.

  9. The Radiation Dose-Response of the Human Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To characterize the radiation dose-response of the human spinal cord. Methods and Materials: Because no single institution has sufficient data to establish a dose-response function for the human spinal cord, published reports were combined. Requisite data were dose and fractionation, number of patients at risk, number of myelopathy cases, and survival experience of the population. Eight data points for cervical myelopathy were obtained from five reports. Using maximum likelihood estimation correcting for the survival experience of the population, estimates were obtained for the median tolerance dose, slope parameter, and {alpha}/{beta} ratio in a logistic dose-response function. An adequate fit to thoracic data was not possible. Hyperbaric oxygen treatments involving the cervical cord were also analyzed. Results: The estimate of the median tolerance dose (cervical cord) was 69.4 Gy (95% confidence interval, 66.4-72.6). The {alpha}/{beta} = 0.87 Gy. At 45 Gy, the (extrapolated) probability of myelopathy is 0.03%; and at 50 Gy, 0.2%. The dose for a 5% myelopathy rate is 59.3 Gy. Graphical analysis indicates that the sensitivity of the thoracic cord is less than that of the cervical cord. There appears to be a sensitizing effect from hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Conclusions: The estimate of {alpha}/{beta} is smaller than usually quoted, but values this small were found in some studies. Using {alpha}/{beta} = 0.87 Gy, one would expect a considerable advantage by decreasing the dose/fraction to less than 2 Gy. These results were obtained from only single fractions/day and should not be applied uncritically to hyperfractionation.

  10. Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Low-Dose and LET Response.

    PubMed

    Chang, Polly Y; Cucinotta, Francis A; Bjornstad, Kathleen A; Bakke, James; Rosen, Chris J; Du, Nicholas; Fairchild, David G; Cacao, Eliedonna; Blakely, Eleanor A

    2016-05-01

    Increased cancer risk remains a primary concern for travel into deep space and may preclude manned missions to Mars due to large uncertainties that currently exist in estimating cancer risk from the spectrum of radiations found in space with the very limited available human epidemiological radiation-induced cancer data. Existing data on human risk of cancer from X-ray and gamma-ray exposure must be scaled to the many types and fluences of radiations found in space using radiation quality factors and dose-rate modification factors, and assuming linearity of response since the shapes of the dose responses at low doses below 100 mSv are unknown. The goal of this work was to reduce uncertainties in the relative biological effect (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) relationship for space-relevant doses of charged-particle radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The historical data from the studies of Fry et al. and Alpen et al. for Harderian gland (HG) tumors in the female CB6F1 strain of mouse represent the most complete set of experimental observations, including dose dependence, available on a specific radiation-induced tumor in an experimental animal using heavy ion beams that are found in the cosmic radiation spectrum. However, these data lack complete information on low-dose responses below 0.1 Gy, and for chronic low-dose-rate exposures, and there are gaps in the LET region between 25 and 190 keV/μm. In this study, we used the historical HG tumorigenesis data as reference, and obtained HG tumor data for 260 MeV/u silicon (LET ∼70 keV/μm) and 1,000 MeV/u titanium (LET ∼100 keV/μm) to fill existing gaps of data in this LET range to improve our understanding of the dose-response curve at low doses, to test for deviations from linearity and to provide RBE estimates. Animals were also exposed to five daily fractions of 0.026 or 0.052 Gy of 1,000 MeV/u titanium ions to simulate chronic exposure, and HG tumorigenesis from this fractionated study were compared to the

  11. Milk and dairy consumption and risk of cardiovascular diseases and all-cause mortality: dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Astrup, Arne; Lovegrove, Julie A; Gijsbers, Lieke; Givens, David I; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S

    2017-04-03

    With a growing number of prospective cohort studies, an updated dose-response meta-analysis of milk and dairy products with all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease (CHD) or cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been conducted. PubMed, Embase and Scopus were searched for articles published up to September 2016. Random-effect meta-analyses with summarised dose-response data were performed for total (high-fat/low-fat) dairy, milk, fermented dairy, cheese and yogurt. Non-linear associations were investigated using the spine models and heterogeneity by subgroup analyses. A total of 29 cohort studies were available for meta-analysis, with 938,465 participants and 93,158 mortality, 28,419 CHD and 25,416 CVD cases. No associations were found for total (high-fat/low-fat) dairy, and milk with the health outcomes of mortality, CHD or CVD. Inverse associations were found between total fermented dairy (included sour milk products, cheese or yogurt; per 20 g/day) with mortality (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.99; I(2) = 94.4%) and CVD risk (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.99; I(2) = 87.5%). Further analyses of individual fermented dairy of cheese and yogurt showed cheese to have a 2% lower risk of CVD (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.95-1.00; I(2) = 82.6%) per 10 g/day, but not yogurt. All of these marginally inverse associations of totally fermented dairy and cheese were attenuated in sensitivity analyses by removing one large Swedish study. This meta-analysis combining data from 29 prospective cohort studies demonstrated neutral associations between dairy products and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. For future studies it is important to investigate in more detail how dairy products can be replaced by other foods.

  12. A dose error evaluation study for 4D dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milz, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.; Ullrich, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that respiration induced motion is not negligible for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. The intrafractional breathing induced motion influences the delivered dose distribution on the underlying patient geometry such as the lung or the abdomen. If a static geometry is used, a planning process for these indications does not represent the entire dynamic process. The quality of a full 4D dose calculation approach depends on the dose coordinate transformation process between deformable geometries. This article provides an evaluation study that introduces an advanced method to verify the quality of numerical dose transformation generated by four different algorithms. The used transformation metric value is based on the deviation of the dose mass histogram (DMH) and the mean dose throughout dose transformation. The study compares the results of four algorithms. In general, two elementary approaches are used: dose mapping and energy transformation. Dose interpolation (DIM) and an advanced concept, so called divergent dose mapping model (dDMM), are used for dose mapping. The algorithms are compared to the basic energy transformation model (bETM) and the energy mass congruent mapping (EMCM). For evaluation 900 small sample regions of interest (ROI) are generated inside an exemplary lung geometry (4DCT). A homogeneous fluence distribution is assumed for dose calculation inside the ROIs. The dose transformations are performed with the four different algorithms. The study investigates the DMH-metric and the mean dose metric for different scenarios (voxel sizes: 8 mm, 4 mm, 2 mm, 1 mm 9 different breathing phases). dDMM achieves the best transformation accuracy in all measured test cases with 3-5% lower errors than the other models. The results of dDMM are reasonable and most efficient in this study, although the model is simple and easy to implement. The EMCM model also achieved suitable results, but the approach requires a more complex

  13. Association between sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened soft drinks and type 2 diabetes: systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, D C; Threapleton, D E; Evans, C E L; Cleghorn, C L; Nykjaer, C; Woodhead, C; Burley, V J

    2014-09-14

    The intake of sugar-sweetened soft drinks has been reported to be associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, but it is unclear whether this is because of the sugar content or related lifestyle factors, whether similar associations hold for artificially sweetened soft drinks, and how these associations are related to BMI. We aimed to conduct a systematic literature review and dose-response meta-analysis of evidence from prospective cohorts to explore these issues. We searched multiple sources for prospective studies on sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened soft drinks in relation to the risk of type 2 diabetes. Data were extracted from eleven publications on nine cohorts. Consumption values were converted to ml/d, permitting the exploration of linear and non-linear dose-response trends. Summary relative risks (RR) were estimated using a random-effects meta-analysis. The summary RR for sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened soft drinks were 1·20/330 ml per d (95 % CI 1·12, 1·29, P< 0·001) and 1·13/330 ml per d (95 % CI 1·02, 1·25, P= 0·02), respectively. The association with sugar-sweetened soft drinks was slightly lower in studies adjusting for BMI, consistent with BMI being involved in the causal pathway. There was no evidence of effect modification, though both these comparisons lacked power. Overall between-study heterogeneity was high. The included studies were observational, so their results should be interpreted cautiously, but findings indicate a positive association between sugar-sweetened soft drink intake and type 2 diabetes risk, attenuated by adjustment for BMI. The trend was less consistent for artificially sweetened soft drinks. This may indicate an alternative explanation, such as lifestyle factors or reverse causality. Future research should focus on the temporal nature of the association and whether BMI modifies or mediates the association.

  14. Dexmedetomidine in Attenuation of Haemodynamic Response and Dose Sparing Effect on Opioid and Anaesthetic Agents in Patients undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy- A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Nandlal; Karim, Habib Md Reazaul; Hajong, Ranendra; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis; Singh, Manorama

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Perioperative procedures are stressful and lead to haemodynamic instability with potentially devastating consequences. Dexmedetomidine is found to have many of the desired characteristics that are required in perioperative period. Aim To evaluate the ability of pre and intraoperative dexmedetomidine to attenuate stress induced haemodynamic responses, quantifying the anaesthetic agents sparing as well as its cost-effectiveness in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods The present single blind randomized study was conducted with 120 ASA I and II consented patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups (i.e., group D and group N). Prior to induction, group D received 1 μg/kg of Dexmedetomidine and group N received Normal saline infusion over 20 minutes. Group D also received maintenance Dexmedetomidine intraoperatively. Bispectral index and minimum alveolar concentration monitoring was done in both the groups. Haemodynamic parameters were noted till 100 minutes post laryngoscopy. Opioid and anaesthetic agent consumptions were also noted and cost analysis was done. Medcalc–Version 12.5.0.0 software was used for statistics and p <0.05 was considered significant. Results Dexmedetomidine attenuated the stress induced haemodynamics responses and produced stable, relatively non fluctuating haemodynamics throughout. The Minimum Alveolar Concentration (MAC) requirement and the consumptions of Fentanyl and Isoflurane were significantly less in the Dexmedetomidine group (p<0.0001). However, despite anaesthetic dose sparing effect the anaesthetic technique was not cost-effective. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine is effective in attenuating haemodynamic responses in laparoscopic surgery and having dose sparing effect on Fentanyl, Propofol and Isoflurane. However, overall this technique is not cost-effective. PMID:28050479

  15. Steroid dose sparing: pharmacodynamic responses to single versus divided doses of methylprednisolone in man.

    PubMed

    Reiss, W G; Slaughter, R L; Ludwig, E A; Middleton, E; Jusko, W J

    1990-06-01

    Inhibitory drug interactions affecting the metabolism of methylprednisolone (MP) may produce either steroid sparing or adverse effects partly by increasing the exposure time to the steroid. This phenomenon can be mimicked by administering MP in divided doses. Two types of responses were compared after a single MP dose (40 mg bolus) and a divided regimen (20 mg bolus and a 5 mg bolus 8 hours later) in six healthy male volunteers. The suppression of basophils measured as whole blood histamine and plasma cortisol concentrations was assessed during 32 hours. The 37.5% reduction in dose produced a 23% overall decreased blood histamine response. A pharmacodynamic model for basophil cell distribution to and from an extravascular compartment describes the effects of MP after both regimens. A slower initial decline in blood histamine after the divided regimen may be related to incomplete suppression of basophil cell return to blood. The 50% inhibitory concentrations of MP of about 5 ng/ml were similar for both regimens. The decline and return of cortisol concentrations were similar between MP treatments with suppression continuing for 24 hours. The 50% inhibitory concentrations of MP values for adrenal suppression were about 1 ng/ml. Pharmacodynamic modeling is useful in quantitating corticosteroid responses and generally predicted the "dose-sparing" effects that were achieved by prolonging MP plasma concentrations. This study supports previous clinical observations that patients may require morning through evening exposure to MP to optimize efficacy while adrenal suppression is being minimized.

  16. A dose-response study of consuming high-fructose corn syrup–sweetened beverages on lipid/lipoprotein risk factors for cardiovascular disease in young adults123456

    PubMed Central

    Medici, Valentina; Bremer, Andrew A; Lee, Vivien; Lam, Hazel D; Nunez, Marinelle V; Chen, Guoxia X; Keim, Nancy L; Havel, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Background: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data show an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality with an increased intake of added sugar. Objective: We determined the dose-response effects of consuming beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) at zero, low, medium, and high proportions of energy requirements (Ereq) on circulating lipid/lipoprotein risk factors for CVD and uric acid in adults [age: 18–40 y; body mass index (in kg/m2): 18–35]. Design: We conducted a parallel-arm, nonrandomized, double-blinded intervention study in which adults participated in 3.5 inpatient days of baseline testing at the University of California Davis Clinical and Translational Science Center’s Clinical Research Center. Participants then consumed beverages sweetened with HFCS at 0% (aspartame sweetened, n = 23), 10% (n = 18), 17.5% (n = 16), or 25% (n = 28) of Ereq during 13 outpatient days and during 3.5 inpatient days of intervention testing at the research center. We conducted 24-h serial blood collections during the baseline and intervention testing periods. Results: Consuming beverages containing 10%, 17.5%, or 25% Ereq from HFCS produced significant linear dose-response increases of lipid/lipoprotein risk factors for CVD and uric acid: postprandial triglyceride (0%: 0 ± 4; 10%: 22 ± 8; 17.5%: 25 ± 5: 25%: 37 ± 5 mg/dL, mean of Δ ± SE, P < 0.0001 effect of HFCS-dose), fasting LDL cholesterol (0%: −1.0 ± 3.1; 10%: 7.4 ± 3.2; 17.5%: 8.2 ± 3.1; 25%: 15.9 ± 3.1 mg/dL, P < 0.0001), and 24-h mean uric acid concentrations (0%: −0.13 ± 0.07; 10%: 0.15 ± 0.06; 17.5%: 0.30 ± 0.07; 25%: 0.59 ± 0.09 mg/dL, P < 0.0001). Compared with beverages containing 0% HFCS, all 3 doses of HFCS-containing beverages increased concentrations of postprandial triglyceride, and the 2 higher doses increased fasting and/or postprandial concentrations of non–HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein CIII, and

  17. Parity and gastric cancer risk: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Gong, Ting-Ting; Wu, Qi-Jun

    2016-01-04

    We performed this meta-analysis of epidemiological studies to comprehensively assess the association between parity and gastric cancer risk, because previous studies have shown conflicting results regarding this topic. Relevant prospective studies were identified by searching the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science, and random-effects models were used to estimate summary relative risks (SRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Our search yielded 10 prospective cohort studies involving a total of 6624 gastric cancer cases and 5,559,695 non-cases. The SRRs for ever parity vs. nulliparous and highest vs. lowest parity number were 0.96 (95%CI = 0.87-1.05, I(2) = 0%) and 1.03 (95%CI = 0.94-1.13, I(2) = 0%), respectively. Additionally, the SRR for an increment of one live birth was 1.00 (95%CI = 0.97-1.03, I(2) = 18.6%). These non-significant associations were observed in all subgroups as stratified by the number of gastric cases, follow-up years, geographic location, menopausal status, anatomic subsite of gastric cancer, and adjustment for potential confounders, as well as in sensitivity analyses. Our meta-analysis found no significant association between parity and gastric cancer risk. However, further studies should be conducted to validate our findings and could provide more detailed results by stratifying their findings by Lauren's subtype, histology, and anatomic site, as well as fully adjusting for potential confounding factors.

  18. Body Mass Index-Related Mortality in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Heterogeneity in Obesity Paradox Studies: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yeongkeun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Park, Sungsoo; Park, Yong-Gyu; Cho, Kyung-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Objective We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies to quantify the association between body mass index (BMI) and the risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods We included studies assessing the impact of BMI on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Data were combined using a random-effects dose-response model. Results Sixteen cohort studies on all-cause mortality (n = 445,125) and two studies on cardiovascular mortality (n = 92,841) were evaluated in the meta-analysis. A non-linear association was observed between BMI and all-cause mortality among patients with type 2 diabetes. With a BMI nadir of 28–30 kg/m2, the risk of all-cause mortality displayed a U-shaped increase. With a BMI nadir of 29–31 kg/m2, the risk of cardiovascular mortality exhibited a gradual non-linear increase for BMI > 31 kg/m2. Subgroup analyses suggested that study location, diabetes duration, and smoking history may have contributed to heterogeneity among the studies. Conclusions An obesity paradox exists for patients with type 2 diabetes with respect to all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Study location, diabetes duration, and smoking history might contribute to heterogeneity among obesity paradox studies of patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:28046128

  19. Association between adult weight gain and colorectal cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Wang, Jing; Yang, Jinghui; Jin, Zhichao; Shi, Wentao; Qin, Yingyi; Yu, Feifei; He, Jia

    2015-06-15

    This study investigated the association between adult weight gain and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Using terms related to weight gain and CRC, we searched PubMed, Embase and Web of Science for relevant studies published before June 2014. Two evaluators independently selected studies according to the selection criteria, and eight studies were included (three case-control and five cohort studies). Summary estimates were obtained using fixed- or random-effects models. The relative risk (RR) of the association between adult weight gain and CRC was 1.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.43); the RR was 1.30 (95% CI, 1.14-1.49) for colon cancer (CC) and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.02-1.58) for rectal cancer (RC) for the highest versus lowest category. For every 5-kg increase in adult weight, the risk increased by 5% (RR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02-1.09) for CRC, 6% (RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02-1.11) for CC and 6% (RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.03-1.08) for RC. The subgroup analyses showed a positive association between adult weight gain and risk of CRC only in men, and the RR was 1.65 (95% CI, 1.42-1.92) for the highest versus lowest category of adult weight gain and 1.10 (95% CI, 1.06-1.15) for a 5-kg increase in adult weight. In conclusion, there is evidence that adult weight gain is associated with an increased risk of CRC. However, the positive association between adult weight gain and risk of CRC is stronger among men than among women.

  20. Dose-response relationships for carcinogens: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Zeise, L.; Wilson, R.; Crouch, E.A.C.

    1987-08-01

    The authors review the experimental evidence for various shapes of dose-response relationships for carcinogens and summarize those experiments that give the most information on relatively low doses. A brief review of some models is given to illustrate the shapes of dose-response curve expected from them. Their major interest is in the use of dose-response relationships to estimate risks to humans at low doses, and so they pay special attention to experimentally observed and theoretically expected nonlinearities. There are few experimental examples of nonlinear dose-response relations in humans, but this may simply be due to the limitations in the data. The several examples in rodents, even though for high dose data, suggest that nonlinearity is common. In some cases such nonlinearities may be rationalized on the basis of the pharmacokinetics of the test compound or its metabolites.

  1. Dose-response relationships for carcinogens: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Zeise, L; Wilson, R; Crouch, E A

    1987-01-01

    We review the experimental evidence for various shapes of dose-response relationships for carcinogens and summarize those experiments that give the most information on relatively low doses. A brief review of some models is given to illustrate the shapes of dose-response curve expected from them. Our major interest is in the use of dose-response relationships to estimate risks to humans at low doses, and so we pay special attention to experimentally observed and theoretically expected nonlinearities. There are few experimental examples of nonlinear dose-response relations in humans, but this may simply be due to the limitations in the data. The several examples in rodents, even though for high dose data, suggest that nonlinearity is common. In some cases such nonlinearities may be rationalized on the basis of the pharmacokinetics of the test compound or its metabolites. PMID:3311725

  2. Biphasic dose response in low level light therapy - an update.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K; Carroll, James; Hamblin, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been known since 1967 but still remains controversial due to incomplete understanding of the basic mechanisms and the selection of inappropriate dosimetric parameters that led to negative studies. The biphasic dose-response or Arndt-Schulz curve in LLLT has been shown both in vitro studies and in animal experiments. This review will provide an update to our previous (Huang et al. 2009) coverage of this topic. In vitro mediators of LLLT such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial membrane potential show biphasic patterns, while others such as mitochondrial reactive oxygen species show a triphasic dose-response with two distinct peaks. The Janus nature of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may act as a beneficial signaling molecule at low concentrations and a harmful cytotoxic agent at high concentrations, may partly explain the observed responses in vivo. Transcranial LLLT for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice shows a distinct biphasic pattern with peaks in beneficial neurological effects observed when the number of treatments is varied, and when the energy density of an individual treatment is varied. Further understanding of the extent to which biphasic dose responses apply in LLLT will be necessary to optimize clinical treatments.

  3. Characterization of Statin Dose-response within Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei-Qi; Feng, Qiping; Jiang, Lan; Waitara, Magarya S.; Iwuchukwu, Otito F.; Roden, Dan M.; Jiang, Min; Xu, Hua; Krauss, Ronald M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Davis, Robert L.; Berg, Richard L.; Peissig, Peggy L.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Wilke, Russell A.; Denny, Joshua C.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to define the genetic architecture underlying variable statin response have met with limited success possibly because previous studies were limited to effect based on one-single-dose. We leveraged electronic medical records (EMRs) to extract potency (ED50) and efficacy (Emax) of statin dose-response curves and tested them for association with 144 pre-selected variants. Two large biobanks were used to construct dose-response curves for 2,026 (simvastatin) and 2,252 subjects (atorvastatin). Atorvastatin was more efficacious, more potent, and demonstrated less inter-individual variability than simvastatin. A pharmacodynamic variant emerging from randomized trials (PRDM16) was associated with Emax for both. For atorvastatin, Emax was 51.7 mg/dl in homozygous for the minor allele versus 75.0 mg/dl for those homozygous for the major allele. We also identified several loci associated with ED50. The extraction of rigorously defined traits from EMRs for pharmacogenetic studies represents a promising approach to further understand of genetic factors contributing to drug response. PMID:24096969

  4. Prediction of the mortality dose-response relationship in man

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.D.; Jones, T.D.

    1987-01-01

    Based upon an extensive data base including 100 separate animal studies, an estimate of the mortality dose-response relationship due to continuous photon radiation is predicted for 70 kg man. The model used in this prediction exercise includes fixed terms accounting for effects of body weight and dose rate, and random terms accounting for inter- and intra-species variation and experimental error. Point predictions and 95% prediction intervals are given for the LD/sub 05/, LD/sub 10/, LD/sub 25/, LD/sub 50/, LD/sub 75/, LD/sub 90/, and LD/sub 95/, for dose rates ranging from 1 to 50 R/min. 6 refs., 5 tabs.

  5. Absorption, Metabolism and Excretion of Cranberry (Poly)phenols in Humans: A Dose Response Study and Assessment of Inter-Individual Variability

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Rodrigo P.; Mills, Charlotte E.; Istas, Geoffrey; Heiss, Christian; Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana

    2017-01-01

    The beneficial health effects of cranberries have been attributed to their (poly)phenol content. Recent studies have investigated the absorption, metabolism and excretion of cranberry (poly)phenols; however, little is known about whether they follow a dose response in vivo at different levels of intake. An acute double-blind randomized controlled trial in 10 healthy men with cranberry juices containing 409, 787, 1238, 1534 and 1910 mg total (poly)phenols was performed. Blood and urine were analyzed by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS. Sixty metabolites were identified in plasma and urine including cinnamic acids, dihydrocinnamic, flavonols, benzoic acids, phenylacetic acids, benzaldehydes, valerolactones, hippuric acids, catechols, and pyrogallols. Total plasma, but not excreted urinary (poly)phenol metabolites, exhibited a linear dose response (r2 = 0.74, p < 0.05), driven by caffeic acid 4-O-ß-d-glucuronide, quercetin-3-O-ß-d-glucuronide, ferulic acid 4-O-ß-d-glucuronide, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid 3-O-ß-d-glucuronide, sinapic acid, ferulic acid 4-O-sulfate, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, syringic acid, vanillic acid-4-O-sulfate, (4R)-5-(3′-hydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone-4′-O-sulfate, 4-methylgallic acid-3-O-sulfate, and isoferulic acid 3-O-sulfate (all r2 ≥ 0.89, p < 0.05). Inter-individual variability of the plasma metabolite concentration was broad and dependent on the metabolite. Herein, we show that specific plasma (poly)phenol metabolites are linearly related to the amount of (poly)phenols consumed in cranberry juice. The large inter-individual variation in metabolite profile may be due to variations in the gut microbiome. PMID:28287476

  6. Role of heme Oxygenase-1 in low dose Radioadaptive response

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lingzhi; Ma, Jie; Chen, Guodong; Hou, Jue; Hei, Tom K.; Yu, K.N.; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Radioadaptive response (RAR) is an important phenomenon induced by low dose radiation. However, the molecular mechanism of RAR is obscure. In this study, we focused on the possible role of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in RAR. Consistent with previous studies, priming dose of X-ray radiation (1–10 cGy) induced significant RAR in normal human skin fibroblasts (AG 1522 cells). Transcription and translation of HO-1 was up-regulated more than two fold by a priming dose of radiation (5 cGy). Zinc protoporphyrin Ⅸ, a specific competitive inhibitor of HO-1, efficiently inhibited RAR whereas hemin, an inducer of HO-1, could mimic priming dose of X-rays to induce RAR. Knocking down of HO-1 by transfection of HO-1 siRNA significantly attenuated RAR. Furthermore, the expression of HO-1 gene was modulated by the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), which translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus after priming dose radiation and enhance the antioxidant level of cells. PMID:26966892

  7. Modeling Dose-response at Low Dose: A Systems Biology Approach for Ionization Radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuchao; Ricci, Paolo F

    2010-03-18

    For ionization radiation (IR) induced cancer, a linear non-threshold (LNT) model at very low doses is the default used by a number of national and international organizations and in regulatory law. This default denies any positive benefit from any level of exposure. However, experimental observations and theoretical biology have found that both linear and J-shaped IR dose-response curves can exist at those very low doses. We develop low dose J-shaped dose-response, based on systems biology, and thus justify its use regarding exposure to IR. This approach incorporates detailed, molecular and cellular descriptions of biological/toxicological mechanisms to develop a dose-response model through a set of nonlinear, differential equations describing the signaling pathways and biochemical mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, and tumor incidence due to IR. This approach yields a J-shaped dose response curve while showing where LNT behaviors are likely to occur. The results confirm the hypothesis of the J-shaped dose response curve: the main reason is that, at low-doses of IR, cells stimulate protective systems through a longer cell arrest time per unit of IR dose. We suggest that the policy implications of this approach are an increasingly correct way to deal with precautionary measures in public health.

  8. Plasma adrenocorticotropin responses to opioid blockade with naloxone: generating a dose-response curve in a single session.

    PubMed

    Mangold, D; McCaul, M E; Ali, M; Wand, G S

    2000-08-15

    We examined two methods of generating a dose-response curve to the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. In 15 healthy male subjects (18-25 years) plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) responses to five doses of naloxone studied over 5 separate days were compared to plasma ACTH responses to five incremental doses of naloxone studied within a single session. There was a statistically significant positive correlation in ACTH responses (area under the curve and peak) between dosing methods. Furthermore, the doses of naloxone that produced half-maximal and maximal ACTH response were similar. The comparability of ACTH responses between the two naloxone dosing techniques, combined with the safety and ease associated with the single-session methodology, underscores the usefulness of the single-session technique for future investigations.

  9. Dose-response study of sajabalssuk ethanol extract from Artemisia princeps Pampanini on blood glucose in subjects with impaired fasting glucose or mild type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji-Young; Shin, Su-Kyung; Jeon, Seon-Min; Baek, Nam-In; Chung, Hae-Gon; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Lee, Kyung Tae; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2011-01-01

    Previously we reported that an ethanol extract from Artemisia princeps Pampanini lowered blood glucose in db/db mice. Here we report a preliminary study in which the blood glucose-lowering effects of two different doses of sajabalssuk ethanol extract (SBE), containing eupatilin and jaseocidin, were examined in hyperglycemic subjects with fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels of 100-150 mg/dL. Subjects were randomized into four groups: negative control (2,000 mg of lactose /day), positive control (1,140 mg of pinitol/day), low-dose SBE (2,000 mg of SBE/day), and high-dose SBE (4,000 mg of SBE/day). After 8 weeks of supplementation, FBG and glycosylated hemoglobin levels were significantly lowered in low-and high-dose SBE groups compared to the baseline values; high-dose SBE also resulted in significantly lower plasma free fatty acid levels and systolic blood pressure. This study demonstrated that supplementation of 2 g or 4 g of SBE daily can significantly reduce blood glucose in hyperglycemic subjects, although high-dose SBE seemed to be more effective than low-dose SBE for lowering plasma free fatty acid level and systolic blood pressure.

  10. Myocardial adrenergic responsiveness after lethal and nonlethal doses of endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R.E.; Lang, C.H.; McDonough, K.H.

    1987-02-01

    A dose-dependent impairment of intrinsic myocardial performance has been observed following in vivo administration of endotoxin. The present study reports a dose-dependent increase in plasma catecholamines following endotoxin (ET) that may impair ..beta..-adrenergic responsiveness. Hearts were removed from pentobarbital-anesthetized rats 4 h after a bolus injection of saline or ET and were studied as isolated cell preparations following collagenase digestion. Responsiveness of isoproterenol-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in myocytes prepared from hearts of animals injected with 10 and 100 ..mu..g ET was decreased when compared with control rats and was significantly blunted in myocytes prepared from animals receiving 1000 ..mu..g ET. Similar sensitivities of the cAMP system existed, as judged by similar half-maximum effective concentration values. cAMP accumulation in the presence of 1 ..mu..M forskolin was depressed in myocytes from the 1000-..mu..g ET animals; ..beta..-adrenergic receptor density was decreased 25% in myocytes from high-dose ET animals when compared with control animals. This was accompanied by a nonsignificant reduction in the affinity of binding sites for (+/-)(/sup 3/H)CGP 12177. The blunted myocyte hormonal responsiveness following ET challenge appears to be related to the decreased activity of the adenylate cyclase that may be attributed to alterations in both receptor density and in the adenylate cyclase itself.

  11. The OECD program to validate the rat Hershberger bioassay to screen compounds for in vivo and androgen and antiandrogen responses: Phase-2 dose-response studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    DESIGN: The Hershberger bioassay is designed to identify suspected androgens and antiandrogens based on changes in the weights of five androgen-responsive tissues (ventral prostate, paired seminal vesicles and coagulating glands, the levator ani and bulbocavernosus muscles, the g...

  12. The use of mode of action information in risk assessment: quantitative key events/dose-response framework for modeling the dose-response for key events.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ted W; Simons, S Stoney; Preston, R Julian; Boobis, Alan R; Cohen, Samuel M; Doerrer, Nancy G; Fenner-Crisp, Penelope A; McMullin, Tami S; McQueen, Charlene A; Rowlands, J Craig

    2014-08-01

    The HESI RISK21 project formed the Dose-Response/Mode-of-Action Subteam to develop strategies for using all available data (in vitro, in vivo, and in silico) to advance the next-generation of chemical risk assessments. A goal of the Subteam is to enhance the existing Mode of Action/Human Relevance Framework and Key Events/Dose Response Framework (KEDRF) to make the best use of quantitative dose-response and timing information for Key Events (KEs). The resulting Quantitative Key Events/Dose-Response Framework (Q-KEDRF) provides a structured quantitative approach for systematic examination of the dose-response and timing of KEs resulting from a dose of a bioactive agent that causes a potential adverse outcome. Two concepts are described as aids to increasing the understanding of mode of action-Associative Events and Modulating Factors. These concepts are illustrated in two case studies; 1) cholinesterase inhibition by the pesticide chlorpyrifos, which illustrates the necessity of considering quantitative dose-response information when assessing the effect of a Modulating Factor, that is, enzyme polymorphisms in humans, and 2) estrogen-induced uterotrophic responses in rodents, which demonstrate how quantitative dose-response modeling for KE, the understanding of temporal relationships between KEs and a counterfactual examination of hypothesized KEs can determine whether they are Associative Events or true KEs.

  13. Prevalence of Hyperthyroidism Following Exposure During Childhood or Adolescence to Radioiodines from the Chornobyl Nuclear Accident: Dose-Response Results from the Ukrainian-American Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, M.; Furukawa, K.; Brenner, A.; Olinjyk, V.; Ron, E.; Zablotska, L.; Terekhova, G.; McConnell, R.; Markov, V.; Shpak, V.; Ostroumova, E.; Bouville, A.; Tronko, M.

    2013-01-01

    Relatively few data are available on the prevalence of hyperthyroidism (TSH concentrations of < 0.3 mIU/L, with normal or elevated concentrations of free T4) in individuals exposed to radioiodines at low levels. The accident at the Chornobyl (Chernobyl) nuclear plant in Ukraine on April 26, 1986 exposed large numbers of residents to radioactive fallout, principally to iodine-131 (I-131) (mean and median doses = 0.6 Gray (Gy) and 0.2 Gy). We investigated the relationship of I-131 and prevalent hyperthyroidism among 11,853 individuals exposed as children or adolescents in Ukraine who underwent an in-depth, standardized thyroid gland screening examination 12–14 years later. Radioactivity measurements taken shortly after the accident were available for all subjects and were used to estimate individual thyroid doses. We identified 76 cases of hyperthyroidism (11 overt, 65 subclinical). Using logistic regression, we tested a variety of continuous risk models and conducted categorical analyses for all subjects combined and for females (53 cases, n=5,767) and males (23 cases, n=6,086) separately, but found no convincing evidence of a dose response relationship between I-131 and hyperthyroidism. There was some suggestion of elevated risk among females in an analysis based on a dichotomous dose model with a threshold of 0.5 Gy chosen empirically (OR=1.86, P=0.06), but the statistical significance level was reduced (P=0.13) in a formal analysis with an estimated threshold. In summary, after a thorough exploration of the data, we found no statistically significant dose response relationship between individual I-131 thyroid doses and prevalent hyperthyroidism. PMID:21128800

  14. Bayesian Dose-Response Modeling in Sparse Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Steven B.

    This book discusses Bayesian dose-response modeling in small samples applied to two different settings. The first setting is early phase clinical trials, and the second setting is toxicology studies in cancer risk assessment. In early phase clinical trials, experimental units are humans who are actual patients. Prior to a clinical trial, opinions from multiple subject area experts are generally more informative than the opinion of a single expert, but we may face a dilemma when they have disagreeing prior opinions. In this regard, we consider compromising the disagreement and compare two different approaches for making a decision. In addition to combining multiple opinions, we also address balancing two levels of ethics in early phase clinical trials. The first level is individual-level ethics which reflects the perspective of trial participants. The second level is population-level ethics which reflects the perspective of future patients. We extensively compare two existing statistical methods which focus on each perspective and propose a new method which balances the two conflicting perspectives. In toxicology studies, experimental units are living animals. Here we focus on a potential non-monotonic dose-response relationship which is known as hormesis. Briefly, hormesis is a phenomenon which can be characterized by a beneficial effect at low doses and a harmful effect at high doses. In cancer risk assessments, the estimation of a parameter, which is known as a benchmark dose, can be highly sensitive to a class of assumptions, monotonicity or hormesis. In this regard, we propose a robust approach which considers both monotonicity and hormesis as a possibility. In addition, We discuss statistical hypothesis testing for hormesis and consider various experimental designs for detecting hormesis based on Bayesian decision theory. Past experiments have not been optimally designed for testing for hormesis, and some Bayesian optimal designs may not be optimal under a

  15. Biphasic dose response in low level light therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Chen, Aaron C-H; Carroll, James D; Hamblin, Michael R

    2009-09-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing cell death and tissue damage has been known for over forty years since the invention of lasers. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial in mainstream medicine. The biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and the complexity of rationally choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters such as wavelength, fluence, power density, pulse structure and treatment timing has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. A biphasic dose response has been frequently observed where low levels of light have a much better effect on stimulating and repairing tissues than higher levels of light. The so-called Arndt-Schulz curve is frequently used to describe this biphasic dose response. This review will cover the molecular and cellular mechanisms in LLLT, and describe some of our recent results in vitro and in vivo that provide scientific explanations for this biphasic dose response.

  16. Biphasic Dose Response in Low Level Light Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Carroll, James D.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing cell death and tissue damage has been known for over forty years since the invention of lasers. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial in mainstream medicine. The biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and the complexity of rationally choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters such as wavelength, fluence, power density, pulse structure and treatment timing has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. A biphasic dose response has been frequently observed where low levels of light have a much better effect on stimulating and repairing tissues than higher levels of light. The so-called Arndt-Schulz curve is frequently used to describe this biphasic dose response. This review will cover the molecular and cellular mechanisms in LLLT, and describe some of our recent results in vitro and in vivo that provide scientific explanations for this biphasic dose response. PMID:20011653

  17. Carotenoid intake and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feifei; Hu, Jiyi; Liu, Ping; Li, Jing; Wei, Zheng; Liu, Peng

    2016-12-24

    Carotenoids may play a protective role in the development of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but findings from epidemiological studies on the associations between carotenoid intake and NHL risk are inconsistent. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to systemically evaluate the associations. Eligible studies were identified by a search of PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and article reference lists. We pooled risk estimates from individual studies using a random-effect model to quantify the associations between intakes of specific carotenoids and NHL risk. A total of 10 (7 case-control and 3 cohort) studies met our inclusion criteria. In the highest versus lowest analyses, intakes of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and lutein/zeaxanthin, but not lycopene or beta-cryptoxanthin, were associated with a significant reduced risk of NHL. The estimated summary relative risks (95% confidence intervals) for alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and lutein/zeaxanthin were 0.87 (0.78-0.97), 0.80 (0.68-0.94), and 0.82 (0.69-0.97), respectively. Subgroup analyses showed that evidence supporting these protective associations was mostly based on studies with a case-control design. In addition, intakes of alpha-carotene and beta-carotene were associated with a significant decreased risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, but not follicular lymphoma or small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia. There was a significant inverse dose-response relationship between alpha-carotene intake and NHL risk (13% lower risk per 1000 μg/day increment of intake). In conclusion, our findings suggest that higher intakes of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and lutein/zeaxanthin might protect against NHL development. Further cohort studies with a control of plausible confounding are needed to confirm these associations.

  18. Methodology for Estimating Ingestion Dose for Emergency Response at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, A.A.

    2003-07-21

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), emergency response computer models are used to estimate dose following releases of radioactive materials to the environment. Downwind air and ground concentrations and their associated doses from inhalation and ground shine pathways are estimated. The emergency response model (PUFF-PLUME) uses real-time data to track either instantaneous (puff) or continuous (plume) releases. A site-specific ingestion dose model was developed for use with PUFF-PLUME that includes the following ingestion dose pathways pertinent to the surrounding SRS area: milk, beef, water, and fish. The model is simplistic and can be used with existing code output.

  19. Whole grain and refined grain consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Aune, Dagfinn; Norat, Teresa; Romundstad, Pål; Vatten, Lars J

    2013-11-01

    Several studies have suggested a protective effect of intake of whole grains, but not refined grains on type 2 diabetes risk, but the dose-response relationship between different types of grains and type 2 diabetes has not been established. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies of grain intake and type 2 diabetes. We searched the PubMed database for studies of grain intake and risk of type 2 diabetes, up to June 5th, 2013. Summary relative risks were calculated using a random effects model. Sixteen cohort studies were included in the analyses. The summary relative risk per 3 servings per day was 0.68 (95% CI 0.58-0.81, I(2) = 82%, n = 10) for whole grains and 0.95 (95% CI 0.88-1.04, I(2) = 53%, n = 6) for refined grains. A nonlinear association was observed for whole grains, p nonlinearity < 0.0001, but not for refined grains, p nonlinearity = 0.10. Inverse associations were observed for subtypes of whole grains including whole grain bread, whole grain cereals, wheat bran and brown rice, but these results were based on few studies, while white rice was associated with increased risk. Our meta-analysis suggests that a high whole grain intake, but not refined grains, is associated with reduced type 2 diabetes risk. However, a positive association with intake of white rice and inverse associations between several specific types of whole grains and type 2 diabetes warrant further investigations. Our results support public health recommendations to replace refined grains with whole grains and suggest that at least two servings of whole grains per day should be consumed to reduce type 2 diabetes risk.

  20. Dose response relationship in anti-stress gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E

    2007-03-02

    To maintain a stable intracellular environment, cells utilize complex and specialized defense systems against a variety of external perturbations, such as electrophilic stress, heat shock, and hypoxia, etc. Irrespective of the type of stress, many adaptive mechanisms contributing to cellular homeostasis appear to operate through gene regulatory networks that are organized into negative feedback loops. In general, the degree of deviation of the controlled variables, such as electrophiles, misfolded proteins, and O2, is first detected by specialized sensor molecules, then the signal is transduced to specific transcription factors. Transcription factors can regulate the expression of a suite of anti-stress genes, many of which encode enzymes functioning to counteract the perturbed variables. The objective of this study was to explore, using control theory and computational approaches, the theoretical basis that underlies the steady-state dose response relationship between cellular stressors and intracellular biochemical species (controlled variables, transcription factors, and gene products) in these gene regulatory networks. Our work indicated that the shape of dose response curves (linear, superlinear, or sublinear) depends on changes in the specific values of local response coefficients (gains) distributed in the feedback loop. Multimerization of anti-stress enzymes and transcription factors into homodimers, homotrimers, or even higher-order multimers, play a significant role in maintaining robust homeostasis. Moreover, our simulation noted that dose response curves for the controlled variables can transition sequentially through four distinct phases as stressor level increases: initial superlinear with lesser control, superlinear more highly controlled, linear uncontrolled, and sublinear catastrophic. Each phase relies on specific gain-changing events that come into play as stressor level increases. The low-dose region is intrinsically nonlinear, and depending on

  1. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute {gamma}-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain.

  2. Multiple comparison procedure and modeling: a versatile tool for evaluating dose-response relationships in veterinary pharmacology - a case study with furosemide.

    PubMed

    Bieth, B; Bornkamp, B; Toutain, C; Garcia, R; Mochel, J P

    2016-12-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a leading cause of mortality with an increasing prevalence in human and canine populations. While furosemide is a loop diuretic prescribed for the majority of CHF patients to reduce fluid retention, it also activates the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) which further contributes to the accelerated progression of heart failure. Our objective was to quantify the effect of furosemide on diuresis, renin activity (RA), and aldosterone (AL) in dogs, using a combined multiple comparisons and model-based approach (MCP-Mod). Twenty-four healthy beagle dogs were allocated to four treatment groups (saline vs. furosemide 1, 2, and 4 mg/kg i.m., q12 h for 5 days). Data from RA and AL values at furosemide trough concentrations, as well as 24-h Diuresis, were analyzed using the MCP-Mod procedure. A combination of Emax models adequately described the dose-response relationships of furosemide for the various endpoints. The dose-response curves of RA and AL were found to be well in agreement, with an apparent shallower slope compared with 24-h Diuresis. The research presented herein constitutes the first application of MCP-Mod in Veterinary Medicine. Our data show that furosemide produces a submaximal effect on diuresis at doses lower than those identified to activate the circulating RAAS.

  3. Is There a Dose-Response Relationship for Heart Disease With Low-Dose Radiation Therapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Corbett, James R.; Moran, Jean M.; Griffith, Kent A.; Marsh, Robin B.; Feng, Mary; Jagsi, Reshma; Kessler, Marc L.; Ficaro, Edward C.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify cardiac radiation therapy (RT) exposure using sensitive measures of cardiac dysfunction; and to correlate dysfunction with heart doses, in the setting of adjuvant RT for left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: On a randomized trial, 32 women with node-positive left-sided breast cancer underwent pre-RT stress single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT-CT) myocardial perfusion scans. Patients received RT to the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes to doses of 50 to 52.2 Gy. Repeat SPECT-CT scans were performed 1 year after RT. Perfusion defects (PD), summed stress defects scores (SSS), and ejection fractions (EF) were evaluated. Doses to the heart and coronary arteries were quantified. Results: The mean difference in pre- and post-RT PD was −0.38% ± 3.20% (P=.68), with no clinically significant defects. To assess for subclinical effects, PD were also examined using a 1.5-SD below the normal mean threshold, with a mean difference of 2.53% ± 12.57% (P=.38). The mean differences in SSS and EF before and after RT were 0.78% ± 2.50% (P=.08) and 1.75% ± 7.29% (P=.39), respectively. The average heart Dmean and D95 were 2.82 Gy (range, 1.11-6.06 Gy) and 0.90 Gy (range, 0.13-2.17 Gy), respectively. The average Dmean and D95 to the left anterior descending artery were 7.22 Gy (range, 2.58-18.05 Gy) and 3.22 Gy (range, 1.23-6.86 Gy), respectively. No correlations were found between cardiac doses and changes in PD, SSS, and EF. Conclusions: Using sensitive measures of cardiac function, no clinically significant defects were found after RT, with the average heart Dmean <5 Gy. Although a dose response may exist for measures of cardiac dysfunction at higher doses, no correlation was found in the present study for low doses delivered to cardiac structures and perfusion, SSS, or EF.

  4. The Dose Window for Radiation-Induced Protective Adaptive Responses

    PubMed Central

    Mitchel, Ronald E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive responses to low doses of low LET radiation occur in all organisms thus far examined, from single cell lower eukaryotes to mammals. These responses reduce the deleterious consequences of DNA damaging events, including radiation-induced or spontaneous cancer and non-cancer diseases in mice. The adaptive response in mammalian cells and mammals operates within a certain window that can be defined by upper and lower dose thresholds, typically between about 1 and 100 mGy for a single low dose rate exposure. However, these thresholds for protection are not a fixed function of total dose, but also vary with dose rate, additional radiation or non-radiation stressors, tissue type and p53 functional status. Exposures above the upper threshold are generally detrimental, while exposures below the lower threshold may or may not increase either cancer or non-cancer disease risk. PMID:20585438

  5. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts After Exposure to Very Low Dose of High Let Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, K.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivor with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (0.01 - 0.20 Gy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28 ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56 ions, including doses where on average less than one direct ion traversal per cell nucleus occurs. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The responses for doses above 0.1 Gy (more than one ion traverses a cell) showed linear dose responses. However, for doses less than 0.1 Gy, both Si-28 ions and Fe-56 ions showed a dose independent response above background chromosome aberrations frequencies. Possible explanations for our results are non-targeted effects due to aberrant cell signaling [1], or delta-ray dose fluctuations [2] where a fraction of cells receive significant delta-ray doses due to the contributions of multiple ion tracks that do not directly traverse cell nuclei where chromosome aberrations are scored.

  6. Cryptosporidium Infection Risk: Results of New Dose-Response Modeling.

    PubMed

    Messner, Michael J; Berger, Philip

    2016-10-01

    Cryptosporidium human dose-response data from seven species/isolates are used to investigate six models of varying complexity that estimate infection probability as a function of dose. Previous models attempt to explicitly account for virulence differences among C. parvum isolates, using three or six species/isolates. Four (two new) models assume species/isolate differences are insignificant and three of these (all but exponential) allow for variable human susceptibility. These three human-focused models (fractional Poisson, exponential with immunity and beta-Poisson) are relatively simple yet fit the data significantly better than the more complex isolate-focused models. Among these three, the one-parameter fractional Poisson model is the simplest but assumes that all Cryptosporidium oocysts used in the studies were capable of initiating infection. The exponential with immunity model does not require such an assumption and includes the fractional Poisson as a special case. The fractional Poisson model is an upper bound of the exponential with immunity model and applies when all oocysts are capable of initiating infection. The beta Poisson model does not allow an immune human subpopulation; thus infection probability approaches 100% as dose becomes huge. All three of these models predict significantly (>10x) greater risk at the low doses that consumers might receive if exposed through drinking water or other environmental exposure (e.g., 72% vs. 4% infection probability for a one oocyst dose) than previously predicted. This new insight into Cryptosporidium risk suggests additional inactivation and removal via treatment may be needed to meet any specified risk target, such as a suggested 10(-4) annual risk of Cryptosporidium infection.

  7. An open label, dose response study to determine the effect of a dietary supplement on dihydrotestosterone, testosterone and estradiol levels in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Angwafor, Fru; Anderson, Mark L

    2008-01-01

    Background Maintaining endogenous testosterone (T) levels as men age may slow the symptoms of sarcopenia, andropause and decline in physical performance. Drugs inhibiting the enzyme 5α-reductase (5AR) produce increased blood levels of T and decreased levels of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, symptoms of gynecomastia have been reported due to the aromatase (AER) enzyme converting excess T to estradiol (ES). The carotenoid astaxanthin (AX) from Haematococcus pluvialis, Saw Palmetto berry lipid extract (SPLE) from Serenoa repens and the precise combination of these dietary supplements, Alphastat® (Mytosterone(™)), have been reported to have inhibitory effects on both 5AR and AER in-vitro. Concomitant regulation of both enzymes in-vivo would cause DHT and ES blood levels to decrease and T levels to increase. The purpose of this clinical study was to determine if patented Alphastat® (Mytosterone(™)) could produce these effects in a dose dependent manner. Methods To investigate this clinically, 42 healthy males ages 37 to 70 years were divided into two groups of twenty-one and dosed with either 800 mg/day or 2000 mg/day of Alphastat® (Mytosterone(™)) for fourteen days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 3, 7 and 14 and assayed for T, DHT and ES. Body weight and blood pressure data were collected prior to blood collection. One-way, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA-RM) was performed at a significance level of alpha = 0.05 to determine differences from baseline within each group. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA-2) was performed after baseline subtraction, at a significance level of alpha = 0.05 to determine differences between dose groups. Results are expressed as means ± SEM. Results ANOVA-RM showed significant within group increases in serum total T and significant decreases in serum DHT from baseline in both dose groups at a significance level of alpha = 0.05. Significant decreases in serum ES are reported for the 2000 mg/day dose

  8. Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chuan-Yaun

    2009-01-27

    “Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation " was started on 09/01/03 and ended on 08/31/07. The primary objective of the project was to carry out mechanistic studies of the roles of the anti-oxidant SOD genes in mammalian cellular response to low dose ionizing radiation.

  9. Model selection versus model averaging in dose finding studies.

    PubMed

    Schorning, Kirsten; Bornkamp, Björn; Bretz, Frank; Dette, Holger

    2016-09-30

    A key objective of Phase II dose finding studies in clinical drug development is to adequately characterize the dose response relationship of a new drug. An important decision is then on the choice of a suitable dose response function to support dose selection for the subsequent Phase III studies. In this paper, we compare different approaches for model selection and model averaging using mathematical properties as well as simulations. We review and illustrate asymptotic properties of model selection criteria and investigate their behavior when changing the sample size but keeping the effect size constant. In a simulation study, we investigate how the various approaches perform in realistically chosen settings. Finally, the different methods are illustrated with a recently conducted Phase II dose finding study in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Long-term dose-response studies of inhaled or injected radionuclides. Biennial report, 1 October 1991--30 September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Boecker, B.B.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Miller, S.C.; Bradley, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the scientific progress in, and current status of, life-span studies of the long-term health risks in Beagle dogs of chronic irradiation from internally deposited radionuclides or from an external source. The reporting period for this document is the 2-year period from October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1993. Studies that were initiated at three different laboratories (Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, ITRI, University of Utah, and Argonne National Laboratory, ANL) are presented here because they are being completed at ITRI. All living dogs in the Utah-initiated studies were transferred to the ITRI facility for the remainder of their life-span observations and measurements in September 1987. This report is the fourth in a series of reports dealing with the current status and progress of both the Utah and ITRI studies. Other life-span studies involving dogs exposed to gamma radiation from an external source were initiated and conducted for many years at ANL. In 1991, the decision was made to discontinue the chronic irradiation of the remaining living dogs and to transfer all remaining dogs to ITRI for care, clinical observations, and pathological observations at death or euthanasia. This report provides the current status of these dogs. Status reports on the Utah and ITRI studies comprise most of this report. The ITRI-related section presents brief statements of project objectives, the general procedures used in these studies, and some study-specific features for each of the 19 studies being conducted with either beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclides. Dose- and effect-modifying factors being addressed in these studies include total dose, dose rate, LET, solubility, nonuniformity of dose, species, age, sex, health status, and mode of exposure. Recent additions to experimental protocols for studies in which dogs are still alive involve the collection and analysis of tumor tissues using currently available molecular biology techniques.

  11. Effect of aspirin dose, preparation, and withdrawal on platelet response in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jacqueline L; Alberts, Mark J

    2006-09-15

    A significant difference in individual response to aspirin therapy has been described, and studies have shown that a minimal response to aspirin may be associated with increased risk for some cardiovascular events. However, it remains unclear if aspirin dose, coating, or termination alters the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Normal volunteers were randomly assigned to enteric-coated or uncoated aspirin 81 or 325 mg and monitored over 12 days with a point-of-care aspirin assay that incorporates the platelet agonist arachidonic acid. The antiplatelet response was greater with a 325-mg dose than with an 81-mg dose. A coating slowed the antiplatelet response to the 81-mg dose only. There were no differences among the groups after maximum response was achieved between days 4 and 7. There was significant recovery of platelet aggregation <48 hours after the cessation of aspirin, with a return to baseline values by the fifth day. A significant interpatient variation in response to the 4 dosing regimes was observed. In conclusion, the antiplatelet response was more rapid to a 325-mg/day dose of aspirin compared with an 81-mg/day dose. An enteric-coated preparation delayed the time of response to an 81-mg/day dose. These results suggest that aspirin dose and preparation may be important mediators of the antiplatelet effects of aspirin in some patients.

  12. Modulation of advanced glycation end products by candesartan in patients with diabetic kidney disease--a dose-response relationship study.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sandeep A; LaSalle, Brian K; Clifton, G Dennis; Short, Robert A; Tuttle, Katherine R

    2010-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are proinflammatory mediators implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). In this study, dose-dependent effects of angiotensin receptor blockade on urinary AGEs were evaluated in patients with DKD. Patients with type 2 diabetes and proteinuria ≥500 mg/d (n = 11) were compared with diabetic controls without DKD (n = 10) and normal controls (n = 11). After a 2-week washout period, DKD participants were treated with candesartan doses progressively increasing from 8, 16, 32, to 64 mg/d every 3 weeks for a total of 12 weeks. Other antihypertensive agents were adjusted to maintain stable blood pressure. At baseline and after each dosing period, blood pressure measurements and 24-hour urine collections were obtained. Urinary carboxymethyl lysine, an AGE biomarker, was reduced over the 12-week dose escalation protocol (r = 0.38, P = 0.01) in DKD participants. Creatinine clearance increased slightly, but albuminuria was unaffected by candesartan administration. Baseline urinary transforming growth factor-β₁ excretion was lower in DKD participants than in controls and did not change during the study period. Reducing kidney exposure to AGEs may be a mechanism of protection by angiotensin receptor blockade in DKD. AGEs may also impact the diabetic kidney through mechanisms independent of transforming growth factor-β₁.

  13. The relationship between dietary protein consumption and risk of fracture: a subgroup and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ai-Min; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Lv, Qing-Bo; Zhou, Yong; Xia, Dong-Dong; Xu, Hua-Zi; Huang, Qi-Shan; Chi, Yong-Long

    2015-03-16

    It is still debate of the relationship between the dietary protein consumption and risk of fracture. We searched Medline and Embase to assess the effects of dietary protein consumption on risk of fracture. Twelve prospective cohort studies with 407,104 participants were included, higher total protein consumption may be decrease 11% risk of hip fractures, with adj. RR of 0.89 (0.82, 0.97), no significant difference was found for total protein and risk of all fractures and limb fracture; for animal protein consumption and risk of all fractures and hip fracture, with adj.RR of 0.79 (032, 1.96) and 1.04 (0.70, 1.54); for vegetable protein consumption and risk of all fractures, hip fracture and limb fractures with adj.RR of 0.77 (0.52, 1.12), 1.00 (0.53, 1.91), and 0.94 (0.40, 2.22), the subgroup of vegetable protein consumption and risk of all fractures of postmenopausal women with adj.RR of 0.78(0.52,1.16). Dose-response meta-analysis the relationship of total/animal/vegetable protein and hip fracture was consistent to the results of forest plot, the line of total protein and hip fracture was below the Y = 1.0 line. This meta-analysis showed that total dietary protein consumption may be decrease the risk of hip fracture, but not for animal or vegetable protein.

  14. The Relationship between Dietary Protein Consumption and Risk of Fracture: a subgroup and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ai-Min; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Lv, Qing-Bo; Zhou, Yong; Xia, Dong-Dong; Xu, Hua-Zi; Huang, Qi-Shan; Chi, Yong-Long

    2015-01-01

    It is still debate of the relationship between the dietary protein consumption and risk of fracture. We searched Medline and Embase to assess the effects of dietary protein consumption on risk of fracture. Twelve prospective cohort studies with 407,104 participants were included, higher total protein consumption may be decrease 11% risk of hip fractures, with adj. RR of 0.89 (0.82, 0.97), no significant difference was found for total protein and risk of all fractures and limb fracture; for animal protein consumption and risk of all fractures and hip fracture, with adj.RR of 0.79 (032, 1.96) and 1.04 (0.70, 1.54); for vegetable protein consumption and risk of all fractures, hip fracture and limb fractures with adj.RR of 0.77 (0.52, 1.12), 1.00 (0.53, 1.91), and 0.94 (0.40, 2.22), the subgroup of vegetable protein consumption and risk of all fractures of postmenopausal women with adj.RR of 0.78(0.52,1.16). Dose-response meta-analysis the relationship of total/animal/vegetable protein and hip fracture was consistent to the results of forest plot, the line of total protein and hip fracture was below the Y = 1.0 line. This meta-analysis showed that total dietary protein consumption may be decrease the risk of hip fracture, but not for animal or vegetable protein. PMID:25779888

  15. Updating Dosimetry for Emergency Response Dose Projections.

    PubMed

    DeCair, Sara

    2016-02-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed an update to the 1992 Protective Action Guides (PAG) Manual. The PAG Manual provides guidance to state and local officials planning for radiological emergencies. EPA requested public comment on the proposed revisions, while making them available for interim use by officials faced with an emergency situation. Developed with interagency partners, EPA's proposal incorporates newer dosimetric methods, identifies tools and guidelines developed since the current document was issued, and extends the scope of the PAGs to all significant radiological incidents, including radiological dispersal devices or improvised nuclear devices. In order to best serve the emergency management community, scientific policy direction had to be set on how to use International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 60 age groups in dose assessment when implementing emergency guidelines. Certain guidelines that lend themselves to different PAGs for different subpopulations are the PAGs for potassium iodide (KI), food, and water. These guidelines provide age-specific recommendations because of the radiosensitivity of the thyroid and young children with respect to ingestion and inhalation doses in particular. Taking protective actions like using KI, avoiding certain foods or using alternative sources of drinking water can be relatively simple to implement by the parents of young children. Clear public messages can convey which age groups should take which action, unlike how an evacuation or relocation order should apply to entire households or neighborhoods. New in the PAG Manual is planning guidance for the late phase of an incident, after the situation is stabilized and efforts turn toward recovery. Because the late phase can take years to complete, decision makers are faced with managing public exposures in areas not fully remediated. The proposal includes quick-reference operational guidelines to inform re-entry to

  16. Radiation Dose-Response Relationships and Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-07-05

    The notion of a dose-response relationship was probably invented shortly after the discovery of poisons, the invention of alcoholic beverages, and the bringing of fire into a confined space in the forgotten depths of ancient prehistory. The amount of poison or medicine ingested can easily be observed to affect the behavior, health, or sickness outcome. Threshold effects, such as death, could be easily understood for intoxicants, medicine, and poisons. As Paracelsus (1493-1541), the 'father' of modern toxicology said, 'It is the dose that makes the poison.' Perhaps less obvious is the fact that implicit in such dose-response relationships is also the notion of dose rate. Usually, the dose is administered fairly acutely, in a single injection, pill, or swallow; a few puffs on a pipe; or a meal of eating or drinking. The same amount of intoxicants, medicine, or poisons administered over a week or month might have little or no observable effect. Thus, before the discovery of ionizing radiation in the late 19th century, toxicology ('the science of poisons') and pharmacology had deeply ingrained notions of dose-response relationships. This chapter demonstrates that the notion of a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation is hopelessly simplistic from a scientific standpoint. While useful from a policy or regulatory standpoint, dose-response relationships cannot possibly convey enough information to describe the problem from a quantitative view of radiation biology, nor can they address societal values. Three sections of this chapter address the concepts, observations, and theories that contribute to the scientific input to the practice of managing risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. The presentation begins with irradiation regimes, followed by responses to high and low doses of ionizing radiation, and a discussion of how all of this can inform radiation risk management. The knowledge that is really needed for prediction of individual risk is presented

  17. Long-Term Coffee Consumption and Risk of Gastric Cancer: A PRISMA-Compliant Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Shao-Bo; Weng, Hong; Zhou, Meng; Duan, Xiao-Li; Shen, Xian-Feng; Zeng, Xian-Tao

    2015-09-01

    Association between coffee consumption and gastric cancer risk remains controversial. Hence, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate and quantify the potential dose-response association between long-term coffee consumption and risk of gastric cancer.Pertinent studies were identified by searching PubMed and Embase from January 1996 through February 10, 2015 and by reviewing the reference lists of retrieved publications. Prospective cohort studies in which authors reported effect sizes and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of gastric cancer for 3 or more categories of coffee consumption were eligible. Results from eligible studies were aggregated using a random effect model. All analyses were carried out using the STATA 12.0 software.Nine studies involving 15 independent prospective cohorts were finally included. A total of 2019 incident cases of gastric cancer were ascertained among 1,289,314 participants with mean follow-up periods ranging from 8 to 18 years. No nonlinear relationship of coffee consumption with gastric cancer risk was indentified (P for nonlinearity = 0.53; P for heterogeneity = 0.004). The linear regression model showed that the combined relative risk (RR) of every 3 cups/day increment of total coffee consumption was 1.07 (95% CI = 0.95-1.21). Compared with the lowest category of coffee consumption, the RR of gastric cancer was 1.18 (95% CI = 0.90-1.55) for the highest (median 6.5 cups/day) category, 1.06 (95% CI = 0.85-1.32) for the second highest category (median 3.5 cups/day), and 0.97 (95% CI = 0.79-1.20) for the third highest category (median 1.5 cups/day). Subgroup analysis showed an elevated risk in the US population (RR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.06-1.75) and no adjustment for smoking (RR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.08-2.59) for 6.5 cups/day.Current evidence indicated there was no nonlinear association between coffee consumption and gastric cancer risk. However, high coffee consumption (more

  18. Evaluation of the Emergency Response Dose Assessment System(ERDAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Randolph J.; Lambert, Winifred C.; Manobianco, John T.; Taylor, Gregory E.; Wheeler, Mark M.; Yersavich, Ann M.

    1996-01-01

    The emergency response dose assessment system (ERDAS) is a protype software and hardware system configured to produce routine mesoscale meteorological forecasts and enhanced dispersion estimates on an operational basis for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)/Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) region. ERDAS provides emergency response guidance to operations at KSC/CCAS in the case of an accidental hazardous material release or an aborted vehicle launch. This report describes the evaluation of ERDAS including: evaluation of sea breeze predictions, comparison of launch plume location and concentration predictions, case study of a toxic release, evaluation of model sensitivity to varying input parameters, evaluation of the user interface, assessment of ERDA's operational capabilities, and a comparison of ERDAS models to the ocean breeze dry gultch diffusion model.

  19. [Mechanism of cytogenetic adaptive response induced by low dose radiation].

    PubMed

    Cai, L; Liu, S

    1990-11-01

    Cytogenetic observation on human lymphocytes indicated that pre-exposure of 10, 50 and 75 mGy X-rays could induced the adaptive response. Experimental results with different temperature treatment showed that the adaptive response induced by low dose radiation could be enhanced by 41 degrees C and 43 degrees C, but inhibited by 4 degrees C in addition the treatment by 41 degrees C for one hour could also cause the adaptive response as did low dose radiation. Results showed that adaptive response induced by low dose radiation (10 or 50 mGy X-rays) could be eliminated by the protein synthesis inhibitor, implying that the adaptive response is related with the metabolism of cells, especially with the production of certain protective proteins.

  20. Bayesian designs of phase II oncology trials to select maximum effective dose assuming monotonic dose-response relationship

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background For many molecularly targeted agents, the probability of response may be assumed to either increase or increase and then plateau in the tested dose range. Therefore, identifying the maximum effective dose, defined as the lowest dose that achieves a pre-specified target response and beyond which improvement in the response is unlikely, becomes increasingly important. Recently, a class of Bayesian designs for single-arm phase II clinical trials based on hypothesis tests and nonlocal alternative prior densities has been proposed and shown to outperform common Bayesian designs based on posterior credible intervals and common frequentist designs. We extend this and related approaches to the design of phase II oncology trials, with the goal of identifying the maximum effective dose among a small number of pre-specified doses. Methods We propose two new Bayesian designs with continuous monitoring of response rates across doses to identify the maximum effective dose, assuming monotonicity of the response rate across doses. The first design is based on Bayesian hypothesis tests. To determine whether each dose level achieves a pre-specified target response rate and whether the response rates between doses are equal, multiple statistical hypotheses are defined using nonlocal alternative prior densities. The second design is based on Bayesian model averaging and also uses nonlocal alternative priors. We conduct simulation studies to evaluate the operating characteristics of the proposed designs, and compare them with three alternative designs. Results In terms of the likelihood of drawing a correct conclusion using similar between-design average sample sizes, the performance of our proposed design based on Bayesian hypothesis tests and nonlocal alternative priors is more robust than that of the other designs. Specifically, the proposed Bayesian hypothesis test-based design has the largest probability of being the best design among all designs under comparison and

  1. The Model Averaging for Dichotomous Response Benchmark Dose (MADr-BMD) Tool

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Providing quantal response models, which are also used in the U.S. EPA benchmark dose software suite, and generates a model-averaged dose response model to generate benchmark dose and benchmark dose lower bound estimates.

  2. Dose Response Effects of Hypertonic Saline and Dextran on Cardiovascular Responses in Sheep

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-02-01

    137-144, 1995 DOSE RESPONSE EFFECTS OF HYPERTONIC SALINE AND DEXTRAN ON CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSES AND PLASMA VOLUME EXPANSION IN SHEEP Michael A...addressed the dose - response effects of HS or D-70 solutions or their possible synergistic combinations to evaluate optimal concentrations of the HS and D...205-217, 1989. 13. Halvorsen L, Günther RA, Dubick MA, Holcroft JW: Dose response characteristics of hypertonic saline dextran solution. J Trauma

  3. A strategy to model nonmonotonic dose-response curve and estimate IC50.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Holden-Wiltse, Jeanne; Wang, Jiong; Liang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC[Formula: see text] is an important pharmacodynamic index of drug effectiveness. To estimate this value, the dose response relationship needs to be established, which is generally achieved by fitting monotonic sigmoidal models. However, recent studies on Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) mutants developing resistance to antiviral drugs show that the dose response curve may not be monotonic. Traditional models can fail for nonmonotonic data and ignore observations that may be of biologic significance. Therefore, we propose a nonparametric model to describe the dose response relationship and fit the curve using local polynomial regression. The nonparametric approach is shown to be promising especially for estimating the IC[Formula: see text] of some HIV inhibitory drugs, in which there is a dose-dependent stimulation of response for mutant strains. This model strategy may be applicable to general pharmacologic, toxicologic, or other biomedical data that exhibits a nonmonotonic dose response relationship for which traditional parametric models fail.

  4. Statistical strategies for averaging EC50 from multiple dose-response experiments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoqi; Kopp-Schneider, Annette

    2015-11-01

    In most dose-response studies, repeated experiments are conducted to determine the EC50 value for a chemical, requiring averaging EC50 estimates from a series of experiments. Two statistical strategies, the mixed-effect modeling and the meta-analysis approach, can be applied to estimate average behavior of EC50 values over all experiments by considering the variabilities within and among experiments. We investigated these two strategies in two common cases of multiple dose-response experiments in (a) complete and explicit dose-response relationships are observed in all experiments and in (b) only in a subset of experiments. In case (a), the meta-analysis strategy is a simple and robust method to average EC50 estimates. In case (b), all experimental data sets can be first screened using the dose-response screening plot, which allows visualization and comparison of multiple dose-response experimental results. As long as more than three experiments provide information about complete dose-response relationships, the experiments that cover incomplete relationships can be excluded from the meta-analysis strategy of averaging EC50 estimates. If there are only two experiments containing complete dose-response information, the mixed-effects model approach is suggested. We subsequently provided a web application for non-statisticians to implement the proposed meta-analysis strategy of averaging EC50 estimates from multiple dose-response experiments.

  5. Comparison of two different doses of dexmedetomidine in attenuating cardiovascular responses during laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation: A double blind, randomized, clinical trial study.

    PubMed

    Jarineshin, H; Abdolahzade Baghaei, A; Fekrat, F; Kargar, A; Abdi, N; Navabipour, S; Zare, A; Akhlaghi, H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Secure airway for proper ventilation during anesthesia is one important component of a successful surgery. Endotracheal intubation is one of the most important methods in this context. Intubation method and used medication are considerably important in attenuating complications. This research aimed to investigate the impact of two different doses of dexmedetomidine in mitigating cardiovascular responses to endotracheal intubation in candidate cases supporting voluntary operation. Methods. The current research contained 90 cases in the range of 18 and 50 old, with ASA I,II supporting voluntary operation, who were randomly classified into three teams, each group consisting of 30 cases. The first set (A) got 0.5 μg/ kg dexmedetomidine, the second set (B) got 1 μg/ kg dexmedetomidine and the third set (C) got an equal volume of saline as placebo, 600 seconds earlier the initiation of anesthesia. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded at baseline (T0), then after the injection and the earlier initiation of anesthesia (T1), after the induction of anesthesia and before the endotracheal intubation (T2), promptly after tracheal intubation, 180, and 300 after endotracheal intubation (T4, T5). Data was analyzed and p < 0.05 was supposed notable. Findings. In this research, 3 teams were similar regarding weight, age, height, sex and duration of laryngoscopy. The diastolic mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and systolic arterial pressure were significantly lower in dexmedetomidine teams (A,B) at all times after the endotracheal intubation compared to group C. There were no significant differences in hemodynamic factors among group A, B. Conclusion. Dexmedetomidine effectively and significantly attenuates cardiovascular and hemodynamic responses during endotracheal intubation. In addition, different doses of dexmedetomidine did not cause any significant distinct result in mitigating cardiovascular responses.

  6. A placebo-controlled dose response study of the reactogenicity and immunogenicity of a live cold-recombinant influenza B virus vaccine in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ganzinger, U; Bachmayer, H; Liehl, E; Martindale, J J; Hamilton, F; Kuwert, E K

    1988-06-01

    A live cold-recombinant influenza B virus vaccine (RB77) was given intranasally in a placebo-controlled, double blind study to volunteers in dosages of 10(7.9) EID50/ml, 10(7.25) EID50/ml, 10(5.7) EID50/ml. The tolerability, safety, and immunogenicity of the vaccine were investigated. No revertant virus was found in nasal swabs taken after immunisation. Local reactions were mild and showed a significant increase over the placebo only in the highest dose group. Systemic reactions were not different from the placebo. A significant increase in haemagglutinin inhibition titre was found in the highest dose group against the immunising strain (RB77) and the two wild strains B/TEC and B/Sing.

  7. Dose convolution filter: Incorporating spatial dose information into tissue response modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yimei; Joiner, Michael; Zhao Bo; Liao Yixiang; Burmeister, Jay

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: A model is introduced to integrate biological factors such as cell migration and bystander effects into physical dose distributions, and to incorporate spatial dose information in plan analysis and optimization. Methods: The model consists of a dose convolution filter (DCF) with single parameter {sigma}. Tissue response is calculated by an existing NTCP model with DCF-applied dose distribution as input. The authors determined {sigma} of rat spinal cord from published data. The authors also simulated the GRID technique, in which an open field is collimated into many pencil beams. Results: After applying the DCF, the NTCP model successfully fits the rat spinal cord data with a predicted value of {sigma}=2.6{+-}0.5 mm, consistent with 2 mm migration distances of remyelinating cells. Moreover, it enables the appropriate prediction of a high relative seriality for spinal cord. The model also predicts the sparing of normal tissues by the GRID technique when the size of each pencil beam becomes comparable to {sigma}. Conclusions: The DCF model incorporates spatial dose information and offers an improved way to estimate tissue response from complex radiotherapy dose distributions. It does not alter the prediction of tissue response in large homogenous fields, but successfully predicts increased tissue tolerance in small or highly nonuniform fields.

  8. Appropriate statistical methods to compare dose responses of methionine sources.

    PubMed

    Kratzer, D D; Littell, R C

    2006-05-01

    Two sources of methionine (Met) activity are frequently used in commercial feed formulation: DL-2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio) butanoic acid (HMTBA), most commonly available as an 88% solution with 12% water; and DL-methionine (DLM, 99% powder). Despite the fact that both compounds have been in commercial use for over 50 yr, controversy and confusion remain with respect to their relative bioefficacy (RBE). This paper presents a review of the use of a nonlinear common plateau asymptotic regression technique (NLCPAR) that has been used to compare the 2 Met sources with particular emphasis on the validity of the basic assumptions of that model. The thesis of this paper is that the controversy is due, at least in part, to the misapplication of this regression technique to estimate the RBE of HMTBA and DLM. The NLCPAR model is a bioassay with the key dependent assumptions that HMTBA is a dilution of DLM, and that each follows dose-response curves of the same form and approach a common plateau. Because both provide Met activity, it may be considered reasonable to accept these assumptions; however, specifically testing them demonstrated that the assumption of a common dose-response is not supported by data. The common plateau assumption was tested with an alternative approach of fitting nonlinear separate plateaus asymptotic regression (NLSPAR) to a set of 13 published broiler studies in which the NLCPAR model had been used to estimate RBE of HMTBA and DLM. The hypothesis of a common plateau was rejected (P < 0.01), meaning that the conclusion that HMTBA had lower bioefficacy than DLM based on the NLCPAR methodology was not valid. An example using published data demonstrated that the NLSPAR model was a significantly better fit than the NLCPAR model, and showed that HMTBA and DLM followed different dose responses. Consequently, there was no single value for RBE for the entire dose range; rather, the RBE of the 2 compounds varied with use level. The evidence presented here

  9. Computer Simulation of Quantal Dose-Response Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGilliard, Kip L.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a program which simulates animal pharmacology experiments involving "all-or-none" responses. Use of the Applesoft BASIC program in the pharmacology teaching laboratory provides students with a rapid and economical way to gain experience in the design and statistical analysis of quantal dose-response experiments. Information on…

  10. A broadly applicable function for describing luminescence dose response

    SciTech Connect

    Burbidge, C. I.

    2015-07-28

    The basic form of luminescence dose response is investigated, with the aim of developing a single function to account for the appearance of linear, superlinear, sublinear, and supralinear behaviors and variations in saturation signal level and rate. A function is assembled based on the assumption of first order behavior in different major factors contributing to measured luminescence-dosimetric signals. Different versions of the function are developed for standardized and non-dose-normalized responses. Data generated using a two trap two recombination center model and experimental data for natural quartz are analyzed to compare results obtained using different signals, measurement protocols, pretreatment conditions, and radiation qualities. The function well describes a range of dose dependent behavior, including sublinear, superlinear, supralinear, and non-monotonic responses and relative response to α and β radiation, based on change in relative recombination and trapping probability affecting signals sourced from a single electron trap.

  11. Combination with intravenous iron supplementation or doubling erythropoietin dose for patients with chemotherapy-induced anaemia inadequately responsive to initial erythropoietin treatment alone: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Jiang, Hong; Gao, Wei; Tu, Ye; Zhou, Ying; Li, Xi; Zhu, Zhe; Jiang, Qixin; Zhan, Haifeng; Yu, Jiangming; Fu, Chuangang; Gao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Erythropoietin (EPO) is a commonly used option in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anaemia (CIA). However, ∼30–50% of patients fail to achieve an adequate response after initial treatment. Prior studies have demonstrated that intravenous iron might synergistically improve therapeutic response to EPO treatment in this patient population. Methods and analysis We will perform this multicentre, randomised, open-label, parallel-group, active controlled non-inferiority study to compare the two combination therapies of EPO plus intravenous iron regimen versus doubling the dose of EPO in patients with CIA who have an inadequate response to initial EPO treatment at a routine dose. A total of 603 patients with an increase in haemoglobin (Hb) <1 g/dL will be enrolled and randomised to one of the three study treatment groups at a 1:1:1 ratio Group 1: EPO treatment at the original dose plus intravenous iron dextran 200 mg every 3 weeks (Q3W) for 15 weeks; Group 2: EPO treatment at the original dose plus intravenous iron dextran 100 mg, twice a week for 5 weeks; Group 3: the control group, doubling the EPO dose without preplanned iron supplementation. The primary outcome measure to compare is the Hb response rate at week 15 and the secondary end points involve therapeutic blood transfusions. Time-to-progression, adverse events and quality of life will also be evaluated. Ethics and dissemination All participants will provide informed consent; the study protocol has been approved by the independent ethics committee of Shanghai East Hospital. This study would clearly demonstrate the potential benefit of combining epoetin treatment with intravenous iron supplementation. Findings will be shared with participating hospitals, policymakers and the academic community to promote the clinical management of CIA in China. Trial registration number NCT02731378. PMID:27855097

  12. RISK ASSESSMENT FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM: A HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN ANALYSIS OF HUMAN DOSE-RESPONSE DATA. (R828035)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three dose¯response studies were conducted with healthy volunteers using different Cryptosporidium parvum isolates (IOWA, TAMU, and UCP). The study data were previously analyzed for median infectious dose (ID50) using a simple cumulative perce...

  13. Non-Targeted Effects and the Dose Response for Heavy Ion Tumorigenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Lori J.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    There is no human epidemiology data available to estimate the heavy ion cancer risks experienced by astronauts in space. Studies of tumor induction in mice are a necessary step to estimate risks to astronauts. Previous experimental data can be better utilized to model dose response for heavy ion tumorigenesis and plan future low dose studies.

  14. Chemopreventive efficacy of Phyllanthus emblica L. (amla) fruit extract on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene induced oral carcinogenesis--a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Krishnaveni, Mani; Mirunalini, Sankaran

    2012-11-01

    Phyllanthus emblica L. (Euphorbiaceae), a novel natural fruit has long been used as a home remedy by the medical practitioners. In this report, we investigated the chemopreventive effect of P. emblica fruit methanolic extract (PFMet) on oxidant-antioxidant status in hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis. Buccal pouch carcinoma was induced in hamsters by painting with DMBA (0.5% in mineral oil) on the left buccal pouch three times a week for 14 weeks. By means of HPLC analysis, ascorbic acid (24.13%), gallic acid (10.45%), ellagic acid (1.74%) and quercetin (0.009%) were identified and quantified in the PFMet. The results showed that depleted activities of SOD, CAT and TBARS level and significant elevation were observed in the levels of GSH, vitamin E and activity of GPx in DMBA group of buccal pouch. The level of TBARS was significantly enhanced and the activities of enzymatic (SOD, CAT and GPx) and non-enzymatic (vitamin E, vitamin C and GSH) antioxidants were diminished significantly in plasma of tumor bearing animals. The effects were dose dependent and the above noted parameters were renovated to near normal after supplementation with different doses of PFMet (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg BW). The data obtained in this study clearly indicate that PFMet at a dose of 200mg/kg BW possesses optimum chemopreventive effect against DMBA-induced buccal pouch carcinogenesis.

  15. Low-dose radiation epidemiology studies: status and issues.

    PubMed

    Shore, Roy E

    2009-11-01

    Although the Japanese atomic bomb study and radiotherapy studies have clearly documented cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposures, radiation risk assessment groups have long recognized that protracted or low exposures to low-linear energy transfer radiations are key radiation protection concerns because these are far more common than high-exposure scenarios. Epidemiologic studies of human populations with low-dose or low dose-rate exposures are one approach to addressing those concerns. A number of large studies of radiation workers (Chernobyl clean-up workers, U.S. and Chinese radiological technologists, and the 15-country worker study) or of persons exposed to environmental radiation at moderate to low levels (residents near Techa River, Semipalatinsk, Chernobyl, or nuclear facilities) have been conducted. A variety of studies of medical radiation exposures (multiple-fluoroscopy, diagnostic (131)I, scatter radiation doses from radiotherapy, etc.) also are of interest. Key results from these studies are summarized and compared with risk estimates from the Japanese atomic bomb study. Ideally, one would like the low-dose and low dose-rate studies to guide radiation risk estimation regarding the shape of the dose-response curve, DDREF (dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor), and risk at low doses. However, the degree to which low-dose studies can do so is subject to various limitations, especially those pertaining to dosimetric uncertainties and limited statistical power. The identification of individuals who are particularly susceptible to radiation cancer induction also is of high interest in terms of occupational and medical radiation protection. Several examples of studies of radiation-related cancer susceptibility are discussed, but none thus far have clearly identified radiation-susceptible genotypes.

  16. Physical activity and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Aune, Dagfinn; Sen, Abhijit; Henriksen, Tore; Saugstad, Ola Didrik; Tonstad, Serena

    2016-10-01

    Physical activity has been inconsistently associated with risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in epidemiological studies, and questions remain about the strength and shape of the dose-response relationship between the two. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies and randomized trials on physical activity and gestational diabetes mellitus. PubMed, Embase and Ovid databases were searched for cohort studies, and randomized controlled trials of physical activity and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus, up to August 5th 2015. Summary relative risks (RRs) were estimated using a random effects model. Twenty-five studies (26 publications) were included. For total physical activity the summary RR for high versus low activity was 0.62 (95 % CI 0.41-0.94, I(2) = 0 %, n = 4) before pregnancy, and 0.66 (95 % CI 0.36-1.21, I(2) = 0 %, n = 3) during pregnancy. For leisure-time physical activity the respective summary RRs for high versus low activity was 0.78 (95 % CI 0.61-1.00, I(2) = 47 %, n = 8) before pregnancy, and it was 0.80 (95 % CI 0.64-1.00, I(2) = 17 %, n = 17) during pregnancy. The summary RR for pre-pregnancy activity was 0.70 (95 % CI 0.49-1.01, I(2) = 72.6 %, n = 3) per increment of 5 h/week and for activity during pregnancy was 0.98 (95 % CI 0.87-1.09, I(2) = 0 %, n = 3) per 5 h/week. There was evidence of a nonlinear association between physical activity before pregnancy and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus, pnonlinearity = 0.005, with a slightly steeper association at lower levels of activity although further reductions in risk were observed up to 10 h/week. There was also evidence of nonlinearity for physical activity in early pregnancy, pnonlinearity = 0.008, with no further reduction in risk above 8 h/week. There was some indication of inverse associations between walking (before and during pregnancy) and vigorous activity (before pregnancy) and the risk of

  17. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, E.L.; DuFrain, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes are exposed to low-LET radiation, and the resulting dicentric chromosome aberrations follow the Poisson distribution. The expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been presented by Kellerer and Rossi (1972, Current Topics on Radiation Research Quarterly 8, 85-158; 1978, Radiation Research 75, 471-488) using the theory of dual radiation action. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting dose-time-response models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general-purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described, and estimation for the nonlinear models is illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure.

  18. High to Low Dose Extrapolation of Experimental Animal Carcinogenesis Studies,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    with its inherent limitations. A number of commonly used mathematical models of dose - response necessary for this extrapolation, will be discussed...thresholds; incorporation of background, or spontaneous responses; modification of the dose - response by pharmacokinetic processes. (Author)

  19. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay: dose-response calibration curve, background frequency in the population and dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Rastkhah, E; Zakeri, F; Ghoranneviss, M; Rajabpour, M R; Farshidpour, M R; Mianji, F; Bayat, M

    2016-03-01

    An in vitro study of the dose responses of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was conducted with the aim of creating calibrated dose-response curves for biodosimetry measuring up to 4 Gy (0.25-4 Gy) of gamma radiation. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay was employed to obtain the frequencies of micronuclei (MN) per binucleated cell in blood samples from 16 healthy donors (eight males and eight females) in two age ranges of 20-34 and 35-50 years. The data were used to construct the calibration curves for men and women in two age groups, separately. An increase in micronuclei yield with the dose in a linear-quadratic way was observed in all groups. To verify the applicability of the constructed calibration curve, MN yields were measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes of two real overexposed subjects and three irradiated samples with unknown dose, and the results were compared with dose values obtained from measuring dicentric chromosomes. The comparison of the results obtained by the two techniques indicated a good agreement between dose estimates. The average baseline frequency of MN for the 130 healthy non-exposed donors (77 men and 55 women, 20-60 years old divided into four age groups) ranged from 6 to 21 micronuclei per 1000 binucleated cells. Baseline MN frequencies were higher for women and for the older age group. The results presented in this study point out that the CBMN assay is a reliable, easier and valuable alternative method for biological dosimetry.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa dose response and bathing water infection.

    PubMed

    Roser, D J; van den Akker, B; Boase, S; Haas, C N; Ashbolt, N J; Rice, S A

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the opportunistic pathogen mostly implicated in folliculitis and acute otitis externa in pools and hot tubs. Nevertheless, infection risks remain poorly quantified. This paper reviews disease aetiologies and bacterial skin colonization science to advance dose-response theory development. Three model forms are identified for predicting disease likelihood from pathogen density. Two are based on Furumoto & Mickey's exponential 'single-hit' model and predict infection likelihood and severity (lesions/m2), respectively. 'Third-generation', mechanistic, dose-response algorithm development is additionally scoped. The proposed formulation integrates dispersion, epidermal interaction, and follicle invasion. The review also details uncertainties needing consideration which pertain to water quality, outbreaks, exposure time, infection sites, biofilms, cerumen, environmental factors (e.g. skin saturation, hydrodynamics), and whether P. aeruginosa is endogenous or exogenous. The review's findings are used to propose a conceptual infection model and identify research priorities including pool dose-response modelling, epidermis ecology and infection likelihood-based hygiene management.

  1. Differential Response and Priming Dose Effect on the Proteome of Human Fibroblast and Stem Cells Induced by Exposure to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, Monika; Haghdoost, Siamak; Gomolka, Maria; Sarioglu, Hakan; Ueffing, Marius; Dietz, Anne; Kulka, Ulrike; Unger, Kristian; Babini, Gabriele; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Hornhardt, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    It has been suggested that a mechanistic understanding of the cellular responses to low dose and dose rate may be valuable in reducing some of the uncertainties involved in current risk estimates for cancer- and non-cancer-related radiation effects that are inherited in the linear no-threshold hypothesis. In this study, the effects of low-dose radiation on the proteome in both human fibroblasts and stem cells were investigated. Particular emphasis was placed on examining: 1. the dose-response relationships for the differential expression of proteins in the low-dose range (40-140 mGy) of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation; and 2. the effect on differential expression of proteins of a priming dose given prior to a challenge dose (adaptive response effects). These studies were performed on cultured human fibroblasts (VH10) and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC). The results from the VH10 cell experiments demonstrated that low-doses of low-LET radiation induced unique patterns of differentially expressed proteins for each dose investigated. In addition, a low priming radiation dose significantly changed the protein expression induced by the subsequent challenge exposure. In the ADSC the number of differentially expressed proteins was markedly less compared to VH10 cells, indicating that ADSC differ in their intrinsic response to low doses of radiation. The proteomic results are further discussed in terms of possible pathways influenced by low-dose irradiation.

  2. Dose-response curve estimation: a semiparametric mixture approach.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Yin, Guosheng

    2011-12-01

    In the estimation of a dose-response curve, parametric models are straightforward and efficient but subject to model misspecifications; nonparametric methods are robust but less efficient. As a compromise, we propose a semiparametric approach that combines the advantages of parametric and nonparametric curve estimates. In a mixture form, our estimator takes a weighted average of the parametric and nonparametric curve estimates, in which a higher weight is assigned to the estimate with a better model fit. When the parametric model assumption holds, the semiparametric curve estimate converges to the parametric estimate and thus achieves high efficiency; when the parametric model is misspecified, the semiparametric estimate converges to the nonparametric estimate and remains consistent. We also consider an adaptive weighting scheme to allow the weight to vary according to the local fit of the models. We conduct extensive simulation studies to investigate the performance of the proposed methods and illustrate them with two real examples.

  3. Dose Response of MARV/Angola Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques following IM or Aerosol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Sara C.; Lin, Kenny L.; Twenhafel, Nancy A.; Raymond, Jo Lynne W.; Shamblin, Joshua D.; Wollen, Suzanne E.; Wlazlowski, Carly B.; Wilkinson, Eric R.; Botto, Miriam A.; Goff, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    Marburg virus infection in humans causes a hemorrhagic disease with a high case fatality rate. Countermeasure development requires the use of well-characterized animal models that mimic human disease. To further characterize the cynomolgus macaque model of MARV/Angola, two independent dose response studies were performed using the intramuscular or aerosol routes of exposure. All animals succumbed at the lowest target dose; therefore, a dose effect could not be determined. For intramuscular-exposed animals, 100 PFU was the first target dose that was not significantly different than higher target doses in terms of time to disposition, clinical pathology, and histopathology. Although a significant difference was not observed between aerosol-exposed animals in the 10 PFU and 100 PFU target dose groups, 100 PFU was determined to be the lowest target dose that could be consistently obtained and accurately titrated in aerosol studies. PMID:26413900

  4. Relative contribution of glycogen synthesis and glycolysis to insulin-mediated glucose uptake. A dose-response euglycemic clamp study in normal and diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, L; Giaccari, A

    1990-01-01

    To examine the relationship between plasma insulin concentration and intracellular glucose metabolism in control and diabetic rats, we measured endogenous glucose production, glucose uptake, whole body glycolysis, muscle and liver glycogen synthesis, and rectus muscle glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) concentration basally and during the infusion of 2, 3, 4, 12, and 18 mU/kg.min of insulin. The contribution of glycolysis decreased and that of muscle glycogen synthesis increased as the insulin levels rose. Insulin-mediated glucose disposal was decreased by 20-30% throughout the insulin dose-response curve in diabetics compared with controls. While at low insulin infusions (2 and 3 mU/kg.min) reductions in both the glycolytic and glycogenic fluxes contributed to the defective tissue glucose uptake in diabetic rats, at the three higher insulin doses the impairment in muscle glycogen repletion accounted for all of the difference between diabetic and control rats. The muscle G-6-P concentration was decreased (208 +/- 11 vs. 267 +/- 18 nmol/g wet wt; P less than 0.01) compared with saline at the lower insulin infusion, but was gradually increased twofold (530 +/- 16; P less than 0.01 vs. basal) as the insulin concentration rose. The G-6-P concentration in diabetic rats was similar to control despite the reduction in glucose uptake. These data suggest that (a) glucose transport is the major determinant of glucose disposal at low insulin concentration, while the rate-limiting step shifts to an intracellular site at high physiological insulin concentration; and (b) prolonged moderate hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia determine two distinct cellular defects in skeletal muscle at the levels of glucose transport/phosphorylation and glycogen synthesis. PMID:2189891

  5. Dose-response relationship for rat liver DNA damage caused by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Kitchin, K T; Brown, J L

    1996-12-02

    An experimental approach was taken to the question of dose-response curves for chemical carcinogenesis, using DNA damage as a biomarker. Female rats were give 13 different doses of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (from 1.4 to 135,000 micrograms/kg) and the subsequent hepatic DNA damage was determined by the alkaline elution technique. DMH doses below 450 micrograms/kg did not significantly damage DNA; all DMH doses of 1000 micrograms/kg or higher damaged rat hepatic DNA (P < 0.05). In this study the x values (dose) ranged over five orders of magnitude and the y values (DNA damage) ranged 30-fold. Ten different regression models (linear, quadratic, cubic, power, and six nonlinear transition models) were compared in their ability to fit the experimental data. With respect to log transformed dose, the six nonlinear transition equations fit the data considerably better than the four power type of equations. A sigmoid model fit to the log transformed dose of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine had an r2 of 0.9979, a degree of freedom adjusted r2 of 0.9969, a F-statistic of 1,457, and a fit standard error of 0.50. With respect to untransformed dose, only three equations (sigmoid, cascade and gaussian cumulative) could creditably fit the DMH data. The experimental results are interpreted with respect to hormesis, use of log transformed dose, sigmoid dose-response models, thresholds of biological response and cancer risk assessment.

  6. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts after Exposure to Very Low Doses of High LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (1-20 cGy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28- ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56-ions. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving greater than 2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The curves for doses above 10 cGy were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. For Si-28- ions no dose response was observed in the 2-10 cGy dose range, suggesting a non-target effect in this range.

  7. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations.

  8. Response of human fibroblasts to low dose rate gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dritschilo, A.; Brennan, T.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Mossman, K.L.

    1984-11-01

    Cells from 11 human strains, including fibroblasts from patients with the genetic diseases of ataxia telangiectasia (AT), xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), and Fanconi's anemia (FA), were exposed to ..gamma.. radiation at high (1.6-2.2 Gy/min) and at low (0.03-0.07 Gy/min) dose rates. Survival curves reveal an increase inthe terminal slope (D/sub 0/) when cells are irradiated at low dose rates compared to high dose rates. This was true for all cell lines tested, although the AT, FA, and XP cells are reported or postulated to have radiation repair deficiencies. From the response of these cells, it is apparent that radiation sensitivities differ; however, at low dose rate, all tested human cells are able to repair injury.

  9. Behavioral toxicity and physiological changes from repeated exposure to fluorene administered orally or intraperitoneally to adult male Wistar rats: A dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, Julie; Grova, Nathalie; Hidalgo, Sophie; Salquèbre, Guillaume; Rychen, Guido; Bisson, Jean-François; Appenzeller, Brice M R; Schroeder, Henri

    2016-03-01

    Fluorene is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment by reason of its high volatility. Demonstrated to be a neurotoxicant through inhalation, it was also identified as a contributive PAH to food contamination. Since no data are available on its oral neurotoxicity, the purpose of the present study was to assess the behavioral and physiological toxicity of repeated oral administration of fluorene to adult Wistar male rats. Animals were daily treated with fluorene at 1, 10 or 100mg/kg/day for 28 consecutive days. Administration was intraperitoneal (i.p.) or oral (p.o.) to evaluate the influence of the route of exposure on fluorene toxicity. Following this period of treatment, animals in both groups were subjected to similar cognitive evaluations, namely anxiety (elevated-plus maze), locomotor activity (open-field) and learning and memory abilities (eight-arm maze and avoidance test of an aversive light stimulus), as well as physiological measurements. The behavioral testing occurred from the 28th to the 60th day of the experiment during which fluorene treatment continued uninterrupted. At the end of this period, the concentration levels of fluorene and of three of its monohydroxylated metabolites in blood and brain were determined using a GC-MS/MS method. The results demonstrated a reduction in rat anxiety level at the lowest doses administered (1 and 10mg/kg/day) regardless of the treatment route, whereas locomotor activity and learning abilities remained unchanged. Moreover, a less significant weight gain was noticed in animals i.p.- and p.o.-treated with 100mg/kg/day during the 28-day period of treatment, which, upon comparison with the three other groups, induced a body weight gap that was maintained throughout the experiment. Significant increases in relative liver weight were also observed in a dose-dependent manner in orally treated rats and only in animal treated i.p. with 100mg/kg/day. According to the dose, higher

  10. The Inhibitory Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation in IgE-Mediated Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seon Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Cha Soon; Lee, In Kyung; Kim, Ji Young

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has different biological effects according to dose and dose rate. In particular, the biological effect of low-dose radiation is unclear. Low-dose whole-body gamma irradiation activates immune responses in several ways. However, the effects and mechanism of low-dose radiation on allergic responses remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that low-dose ionizing radiation inhibits mediator release in IgE-mediated RBL-2H3 mast cell activation. In this study, to have any physiological relevance, we investigated whether low-dose radiation inhibits allergic responses in activated human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6) and LAD2 cells), mouse models of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and the late-phase cutaneous response. High-dose radiation induced cell death, but low-dose ionizing radiation of <0.5 Gy did not induce mast cell death. Low-dose ionizing radiation that did not induce cell death significantly suppressed mediator release from human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6) and LAD2 cells) that were activated by antigen-antibody reaction. To determine the inhibitory mechanism of mediator released by low-dose ionizing radiation, we examined the phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules such as Lyn, Syk, phospholipase Cγ, and protein kinase C, as well as the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). The phosphorylation of signaling molecules and [Ca2+]i following stimulation of FcεRI receptors was inhibited by low dose ionizing radiation. In agreement with its in vitro effect, ionizing radiation also significantly inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration, cytokine mRNA expression (TNF-α, IL-4, IL-13), and symptoms of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction and the late-phase cutaneous response in anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-sensitized mice. These results indicate that ionizing radiation inhibits both mast cell-mediated immediate- and delayed-type allergic reactions in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26317642

  11. Safety and persistence of the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by 2 doses of an AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza vaccine administered to infants, children and adolescents: Two open, uncontrolled studies.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sicilia, José; Arístegui, Javier; Omeñaca, Félix; Carmona, Alfonso; Tejedor, Juan C; Merino, José M; García-Corbeira, Pilar; Walravens, Karl; Bambure, Vinod; Moris, Philippe; Caplanusi, Adrian; Gillard, Paul; Dieussaert, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    In children, 2 AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine doses given 21 days apart were previously shown to induce a high humoral immune response and to have an acceptable safety profile up to 42 days following the first vaccination. Here, we analyzed the persistence data from 2 open-label studies, which assessed the safety, and humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by 2 doses of this vaccine. The first study was a phase II, randomized trial conducted in 104 children aged 6-35 months vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 1.9 µg haemagglutinin antigen (HA) and AS03B (5.93 mg tocopherol) and the second study, a phase III, non-randomized trial conducted in 210 children and adolescents aged 3-17 years vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 3.75 µg HA and AS03A (11.86 mg tocopherol). Approximately one year after the first dose, all children with available data were seropositive for haemagglutinin inhibition and neutralising antibody titres, but a decline in geometric mean antibody titres was noted. The vaccine induced a cell-mediated immune response in terms of antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cells, which persisted up to one year post-vaccination. The vaccine did not raise any safety concern, though these trials were not designed to detect rare events. In conclusion, 2 doses of the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 2 different dosages had a clinically acceptable safety profile, and induced high and persistent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in children aged 6-35 months and 3-17 years. These studies have been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00971321 and NCT00964158.

  12. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Parallel Study to Evaluate the Dose-Response of Three Different Vitamin D Treatment Schemes on the 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Serum Concentration in Patients with Vitamin D Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schleck, Marie-Louise; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Jandrain, Bernard; Da Silva, Stéphanie; De Niet, Sophie; Vanderbist, Francis; Scheen, André; Cavalier, Etienne

    2015-07-03

    Many people worldwide are vitamin D (VTD) deficient or insufficient, and there is still no consensus on the dose of VTD that should be administered to achieve a 25(OH)D concentration of 20 or 30 ng/mL. In this study, we aimed to determine an adapted supplementation of VTD able to quickly and safely increase the vitamin D status of healthy adults with low 25(OH)D. One hundred and fifty (150) subjects were randomized into three groups, each to receive, orally, a loading dose of 50,000, 100,000 or 200,000 IU of VTD3 at Week 0, followed by 25,000, 50,000 or 100,000 IU at Week 4 and Week 8. Whereas 25(OH)D baseline values were not different between groups (p = 0.42), a significant increase was observed at Week 12 (p < 0.0001) with a mean change from baseline of 7.72 ± 5.08, 13.3 ± 5.88 and 20.12 ± 7.79 ng/mL. A plateau was reached after eight weeks. No related adverse event was recorded. This study demonstrated a linear dose-response relationship with an increase in 25(OH)D levels proportional to the dose administered. In conclusion, a loading dose of 200,000 IU VTD3 followed by a monthly dose of 100,000 IU is the best dosing schedule to quickly and safely correct the VTD status.

  13. DOSE-RESPONSE BEHAVIOR OF ANDROGENIC AND ANTIANDROGENIC CHEMICALS: IMPLICATIONS FOR LOW-DOSE EXTRAPOLATION AND CUMULATIVE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    DOSE-RESPONSE BEHAVIOR OF ANDROGENIC AND ANTIANDROGENIC CHEMICALS: IMPLICATIONS FOR LOW-DOSE EXTRAPOLATION AND CUMULATIVE TOXICITY. LE Gray Jr, C Wolf, J Furr, M Price, C Lambright, VS Wilson and J Ostby. USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, EB, RTD, RTP, NC, USA.
    Dose-response behavior of a...

  14. Usability of tartaric acid in dose measurements: an ESR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkmaz, Güney; Polat, Mustafa; Korkmaz, Mustafa

    2010-03-01

    Unirradiated tartaric acid samples do not exhibit any ESR signal. However, the ESR spectra of irradiated samples contain many resonance signals. The dose-responce curves of the resonance signals, denoted as I 1, I 2, I 3 and I 4 in the present study, were found to increase linearly with the applied radiation dose in the range of 0.04-25 kGy. Adjusting the microvawe power and modulation amplitudes of 1.0 mW and 1.0 mT, respectively, was found to increase the sensitivity of tartaric acid. From the dose-response curves and room temperature decay data, it was concluded that the I 3 resonance signal of tartaric acid can be used for dose measurements at intermediate (0.04-0.4 kGy) and high dose (0.5-25 kGy) levels.

  15. A Framework for "Fit for Purpose" Dose Response Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NRC report Science and Decisions: Advancing Risk Assessment made several recommendations to improve chemical risk assessment, with a focus on in-depth chronic dose-response assessments conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The recommendations addressed two ...

  16. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man - I. Gustatory tissues response during photon and neutron radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1982-08-01

    Quantitative radiation dose-response curves for normal gustatory tissue in man were studied. Taste function, expressed as taste loss, was evaluated in 84 patients who were given either photon or neutron radiotherapy for tumors in the head and neck region. Patients were treated to average tumor doses of 6600 cGy (photon) or 2200 cGy intervals for photon patients and 320-cGy intervals for neutron patients during radiotherapy. The dose-response curves for photons and neutrons were analyzed by fitting a four-parameter logistic equation to the data. Photon and neutron curves differed principally in their relative position along the dose axis. Comparison of the dose-response curves were made by determination of RBE. At 320 cGy, the lowest neutron dose at which taste measurements were made, RBE = 5.7. If this RBE is correct, then the therapeutic gain factor may be equal to or less than 1, indicating no biological advantage in using neutrons over photons for this normal tissue. These studies suggest measurements of taste function and evaluation of dose-response relationships may also be useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficacy of chemical modifiers of radiation response such as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and radioprotectors.

  17. Steepness of the radiation dose-response curve for dose-per-fraction escalation keeping the number of fractions fixed.

    PubMed

    Bentzen, Søren M

    2005-01-01

    Clinically, there is growing interest in strategies for intensifying radiation therapy by escalating the dose per fraction. This paper considers the steepness of the dose-response curve in this case. The steepness of a radiation dose-response curve is most conveniently quantified by the normalized dose-response gradient, gamma. Under the assumption of a linear-quadratic dose-effect model, a simple analytical relationship is derived between the gamma-value for a dose-response curve generated by varying the total dose while keeping the number of fractions constant, i.e. escalating the dose per fraction, and the gamma-value for a dose-response curve generated by varying the total dose while keeping the dose per fraction constant. This formulation is compared with clinical dose-response data from the literature and shown to be in good agreement with the observations. Some implications of this formulation for non-uniform dose distributions delivered using 3D conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are briefly discussed.

  18. Parameterizing dose-response models to estimate relative potency functions directly.

    PubMed

    Dinse, Gregg E; Umbach, David M

    2012-10-01

    Many comparative analyses of toxicity assume that the potency of a test chemical relative to a reference chemical is constant, but employing such a restrictive assumption uncritically may generate misleading conclusions. Recent efforts to characterize non-constant relative potency rely on relative potency functions and estimate them secondarily after fitting dose-response models for the test and reference chemicals. We study an alternative approach of specifying a relative potency model a priori and estimating it directly using the dose-response data from both chemicals. We consider a power function in dose as a relative potency model and find that it keeps the two chemicals' dose-response functions within the same family of models for families typically used in toxicology. When differences in the response limits for the test and reference chemicals are attributable to the chemicals themselves, the older two-stage approach is the more convenient. When differences in response limits are attributable to other features of the experimental protocol or when response limits do not differ, the direct approach is straightforward to apply with nonlinear regression methods and simplifies calculation of simultaneous confidence bands. We illustrate the proposed approach using Hill models with dose-response data from U.S. National Toxicology Program bioassays. Though not universally applicable, this method of estimating relative potency functions directly can be profitably applied to a broad family of dose-response models commonly used in toxicology.

  19. Two learning tasks provide evidence for disrupted behavioural flexibility in an animal model of schizophrenia-like behaviour induced by acute MK-801: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Lobellova, Veronika; Entlerova, Marie; Svojanovska, Barbora; Hatalova, Hana; Prokopova, Iva; Petrasek, Tomas; Vales, Karel; Kubik, Stepan; Fajnerova, Iveta; Stuchlik, Ales

    2013-06-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic and devastating illness. Exact causes of the disease remain elusive; however, neurodevelopmental changes in the brain glutamate system are recognized to play an important role. Several animal models of the disease are induced by a systemic blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. This study examined the animal model of schizophrenia-like behaviours induced by acute treatment with MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA-receptor antagonist. Behavioural flexibility is an ability to adapt to the changes in environment, and schizophrenia is often accompanied by its decrease. The study tested the effect of MK-801 on behavioural flexibility in an active place avoidance task and the Morris water maze (MWM). Flexibility was tested under reversal conditions, i.e., after changing the location of the target. Each spatial task addressed different functions; continuous coordinate-frame segregation was present in the active place avoidance and precise place representation in the MWM. Results showed that reversal was altered in both tasks by MK-801 at doses of 0.10-0.15 mgkg(-1). Some impairment was observed in the active place avoidance task at 0.08 mgkg(-1). Swimming towards a visible platform was impaired only by the highest dose (0.15 mgkg(-1)). The results demonstrate that a significant impairment of behavioural flexibility accompanies this acute animal model of schizophrenia-like behaviours, and that active place avoidance had higher sensitivity for such deficits than the MWM. This suggests the usefulness of the reversal paradigm in both tasks for examining novel drugs with antipsychotic and procognitive actions.

  20. The relationship between terazosin dose and blood pressure response in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Achari, R; Hosmane, B; Bonacci, E; O'Dea, R

    2000-10-01

    A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter study was conducted to describe the dose-response curve for terazosin on blood pressure. A total of 128 patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension (supine diastolic blood pressure, 100 to 114 mmHg) participated in the study. The study consisted of a 4-week single-blind placebo lead-in period and a 14-week double-blind treatment period. Patients were randomized in equal numbers to four parallel treatment groups: terazosin 1, 2, and 5 mg; terazosin 2, 5, and 10 mg; terazosin 20, 40, and 80 mg; and placebo. The 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurements were performed at the end of the placebo lead-in period and at the end of each 4-week fixed-dose period. The nonlinear, mixed-effect model computer program was used to analyze the dose-response relationship. There was a strong dose-response relationship between fall in blood pressure and the 1 to 10 mg terazosin dose, as well as a plateauing of response for terazosin doses above 10 mg. The maximum antihypertensive response (Emax) to terazosin was 10.7 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and 8.0 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure. The daily dose of terazosin, which produced 50% of the maximum response (ED50), was 3.0 mg for systolic blood pressure and 1.5 mg for diastolic blood pressure. The results of this study suggest that although some patients may benefit from terazosin doses of greater than 10 mg, doses up to 10 mg will maximize therapeutic benefit for most patients, with acceptable side effects.

  1. Cytogenetic dose-response in vitro for biological dosimetry after exposure to high doses of gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr A; Maznyk, Nataliya A

    2013-04-01

    The dose response for dicentrics plus centric rings and total unstable chromosome-type aberrations was studied in the first mitoses of cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro to doses of ∼2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 16 and 20 Gy of acute (60)Со gamma-rays. A dose-dependent increase of aberration yield was accompanied by a tendency to the underdispersion of dicentrics and centric rings among cells distributions compared with Poisson statistics at doses ≥6 Gy. The formal fitting of the data to a linear-quadratic model resulted in an equation with the linear and quadratic coefficients ranged 0.098-0.129×cell(-1)×Gy(-1) and 0.039-0.034×cell(-1)×Gy(-2), respectively, depending on the fitting method. The actual radiation-induced aberration yield was markedly lower than expected from a calibration curve, generated earlier within a lower dose range. Interlaboratory variations in reported dicentric yields induced by medium-to-high radiation doses in vitro are discussed.

  2. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on

  3. Poster — Thur Eve — 27: Flattening Filter Free VMAT Quality Assurance: Dose Rate Considerations for Detector Response

    SciTech Connect

    Viel, Francis; Duzenli, Cheryl; Camborde, Marie-Laure; Strgar, Vincent; Horwood, Ron; Atwal, Parmveer; Gete, Ermias; Karan, Tania

    2014-08-15

    Introduction: Radiation detector responses can be affected by dose rate. Due to higher dose per pulse and wider range of mu rates in FFF beams, detector responses should be characterized prior to implementation of QA protocols for FFF beams. During VMAT delivery, the MU rate may also vary dramatically within a treatment fraction. This study looks at the dose per pulse variation throughout a 3D volume for typical VMAT plans and the response characteristics for a variety of detectors, and makes recommendations on the design of QA protocols for FFF VMAT QA. Materials and Methods: Linac log file data and a simplified dose calculation algorithm are used to calculate dose per pulse for a variety of clinical VMAT plans, on a voxel by voxel basis, as a function of time in a cylindrical phantom. Diode and ion chamber array responses are characterized over the relevant range of dose per pulse and dose rate. Results: Dose per pulse ranges from <0.1 mGy/pulse to 1.5 mGy/pulse in a typical VMAT treatment delivery using the 10XFFF beam. Diode detector arrays demonstrate increased sensitivity to dose (+./− 3%) with increasing dose per pulse over this range. Ion chamber arrays demonstrate decreased sensitivity to dose (+/− 1%) with increasing dose rate over this range. Conclusions: QA protocols should be designed taking into consideration inherent changes in detector sensitivity with dose rate. Neglecting to account for changes in detector response with dose per pulse can lead to skewed QA results.

  4. An ultra-high dose of electron radiation response of Germanium Flat Fiber and TLD-100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawiah, A.; Amin, Y. M.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Abdullah, W. S. Wan; Maah, M. J.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) response of Germanium Flat Fiber (GFF) and TLD-100 irradiated with 2.5 MeV electrons for the doses up to 1 MGy were studied and compared. The aim was to evaluate the TL supralinearity response at an ultra-high dose (UHD) range and to investigate the change in kinetic parameters of the glow peaks, as the doses increases up to 1 MGy. It is found that the critical dose limit (CDL) of GFF is 5 times higher as compared to TLD-100. CDL is determined by the dose at the maximum supralinearity, f(D)max. It is also found that annealing the TLD-100 and GFF with temperature more than 400 °C is required to reset it back to its original condition, following radiation doses up to 1 MGy. It is also noticed the strange behavior of Peak 4 (TLD-100), which tends to be invisible at the lower dose (<10 kGy) and starts to be appeared at the critical dose limit of 10 kGy. This result might be an important clue to understand the behavior of TLD-100 at extremely high dose range. For both samples, it is observed that the TL intensity is not saturated within the UHD range studied.

  5. Effect of hydroalcoholic fruit extract of Persea americana Mill. on high fat diet induced obesity: A dose response study in rats.

    PubMed

    Monika, Padmanabhan; Geetha, Arumugam

    2016-06-01

    The fruits of Persea Americana Mill., commonly known as Avocado, are traditionally consumed for various health benefits including weight reduction. Here, we studied the effect of hydroalcoholic fruit extract of Persea americana (HAEPA) on high fat diet (HFD) induced obesity in rats. Obesity was induced in male Sprague Dawley rats by feeding HFD for 14 wk. The hypolipidemic effect was evaluated by co-administering 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body wt. of HAEPA. There was a significant increase in weight gain, body mass index (BMI), blood lipids, low density lipoproteins (LDL), lipid peroxides (LPO) and serum transaminases in HFD fed rats. HFD+HAEPA fed rats showed a significant decrease in blood lipids, LPO, liver lipids and increase in antioxidant status when compared to HFD control rats. The activity of lipid metabolic key enzymes such as fatty acid synthase and HMG CoA reductase in liver were also found to be decreased significantly in HAEPA co-administered rats. Lipoprotein lipase activity was found increased in HFD+HAEPA rats. Among the 4 doses studied, 100 mg of HAEPA/kg body wt. exhibited optimum hypolipidemic activity. Histopathological observations in liver and visceral adipose tissue added more evidence for the lipid lowering effect of HAEPA. It can be concluded that avocado fruit extract can act as hypolipidemic agent probably by modulating the activities of HMG CoA reductase and fatty acid synthase in liver.

  6. Dose-dependent hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to sublethal doses of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Song, You; Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian; Heier, Lene Sørlie; Rosseland, Bjørn Olav; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2014-11-01

    Due to the production of free radicals, gamma radiation may pose a hazard to living organisms. The high-dose radiation effects have been extensively studied, whereas the ecotoxicity data on low-dose gamma radiation is still limited. The present study was therefore performed using Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to characterize effects of low-dose (15, 70 and 280 mGy) gamma radiation after short-term (48h) exposure. Global transcriptional changes were studied using a combination of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs; in this article the phrase gene expression is taken as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression can also be regulated, e.g., at protein stability and translational level) were determined and linked to their biological meanings predicted using both Gene Ontology (GO) and mammalian ortholog-based functional analyses. The plasma glucose level was also measured as a general stress biomarker at the organism level. Results from the microarray analysis revealed a dose-dependent pattern of global transcriptional responses, with 222, 495 and 909 DEGs regulated by 15, 70 and 280 mGy gamma radiation, respectively. Among these DEGs, only 34 were commonly regulated by all radiation doses, whereas the majority of differences were dose-specific. No GO functions were identified at low or medium doses, but repression of DEGs associated with GO functions such as DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed after 280mGy gamma exposure. Ortholog-based toxicity pathway analysis further showed that 15mGy radiation affected DEGs associated with cellular signaling and immune response; 70mGy radiation affected cell cycle regulation and DNA damage repair, cellular energy production; and 280mGy radiation affected pathways related to cell cycle regulation and DNA

  7. External beam radiotherapy for palliation of painful bone metastases: pooled data bioeffect dose response analysis of dose fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveen, T.; Supe, Sanjay S.; Ganesh, K. M.; Samuel, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Bone metastases develop in up to 70% of newly diagnosed cancer patients and result in immobility, anxiety, and depression, severely diminishing the patients quality of life. Radiotherapy is a frequently used modality for bone metastasis and has been shown to be effective in reducing metastatic bone pain and in some instances, causing tumor shrinkage or growth inhibition. There is controversy surrounding the optimal fractionation schedule and total dose of external beam radiotherapy, despite many randomized trials and overviews addressing the issue. This study was undertaken to apply BED to clinical fractionation data of radiotherapeutic management of bone metastases in order to arrive at optimum BED values for acceptable level of response rate. A computerised literature search was conducted to identify all prospective clinical studies that addressed the issue of fractionation for the treatment of bone metastasis. The results of these studies were pooled together to form the database for the analysis. A total of 4111 number of patients received radiation dose ranging from 4 to 40.5 Gy in 1 to 15 fractions with dose per fraction ranging from 2 to 10 Gy. Single fraction treatments were delivered in 2013 patients and the dose varied from 4 to 10 Gy. Multifraction treatments were delivered in 2098 patients and the dose varied from 15 to 40.5 Gy. The biological effective dose (BED) was evaluated for each fractionation schedule using the linear quadratic model and an α/β value of 10 Gy. Response rate increased significantly beyond a BED value of 14.4 Gy (p < 0.01). Based on our analysis and indications from the literature about higher retreatment and fracture rate of single fraction treatments, minimum BED value of 14.4 Gy is recommended.

  8. Stage specificity, dose response, and doubling dose for mouse minisatellite germ-line mutation induced by acute radiation.

    PubMed

    Dubrova, Y E; Plumb, M; Brown, J; Fennelly, J; Bois, P; Goodhead, D; Jeffreys, A J

    1998-05-26

    Germ-line mutation induction at mouse minisatellite loci by acute irradiation with x-rays was studied at premeiotic and postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis. An elevated paternal mutation rate was found after irradiation of premeiotic spermatogonia and stem cells, whereas the frequency of minisatellite mutation after postmeiotic irradiation of spermatids was similar to that in control litters. In contrast, paternal irradiation did not affect the maternal mutation rate. A linear dose-response curve for paternal mutation induced at premeiotic stages was found, with a doubling dose of 0.33 Gy, a value close to those obtained in mice after acute spermatogonia irradiation using other systems for mutation detection. High frequencies of spontaneous and induced mutations at minisatellite loci allow mutation induction to be evaluated at low doses of exposure in very small population samples, which currently makes minisatellite DNA the most powerful tool for monitoring radiation-induced germ-line mutation.

  9. Dose-response characteristics of ketamine effect on locomotion, cognitive function and central neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Imre, Gabor; Fokkema, Dirk S; Den Boer, Johan A; Ter Horst, Gert J

    2006-04-14

    The present dose-response study sought to determine the effects of subanesthetic dosages (4-16 mg/kg) of ketamine on locomotion, sensorimotor gating (PPI), working memory, as well as c-fos expression in various limbic regions implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In addition, we examined whether ketamine-induced locomotion was influenced by the dark/light cycle. We found that ketamine increased locomotor activity in a dose dependent manner, but found no influence of the dark-light cycle. Additionally, ketamine dose-dependently interrupted PPI, resulting in prepulse facilitation at doses of 8 and 12 mg/kg. The dose of 12 mg/kg also induced impairments in working memory assessed by the discrete-trial delayed-alternation task. C-fos expression indicated that the dose-dependent behavioral effects of ketamine might be related to changes in the activity of limbic regions, notably hippocampus and amygdala.

  10. Improved anamnestic response among adolescents boosted with a higher dose of the hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Sandra S; Groeger, Justina; Helgenberger, Louisa; Auerbach, Steven B; Bialek, Stephanie R; Hu, Dale J; Drobeniuc, Jan

    2010-04-01

    Some hepatitis B vaccine booster studies have suggested waning of vaccine-induced immunity in adolescents vaccinated starting at birth. Those studies, however, used a pediatric formulation of the hepatitis B vaccine as a booster to detect anamnestic response. We compared adolescents boosted with an adult dose of hepatitis B vaccine with those boosted with a pediatric dose. Among adolescents who had lost protective antibody levels against hepatitis B, a higher proportion had an anamnestic response when boosted with the adult dose (60.0% vs. 43.8%). Thus, higher antigen concentrations may be required to elicit an adequate immune memory response. Despite improved anamnestic response, our study still raises concerns about whether children immunized in early infancy will remain protected from hepatitis B as they age into adulthood.

  11. High dose and low dose Lactobacilli acidophilus exerted differential immune modulating effects on T cell immune responses induced by an oral human rotavirus vaccine in gnotobiotic pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ke; Li, Guohua; Bui, Tammy; Liu, Fangning; Li, Yanru; Kocher, Jacob; Lin, Lin; Yang, Xingdong; Yuan, Lijuan

    2011-01-01

    Background Strain-specific effects of probiotics in pro- or anti-inflammatory immune responses have been well recognized. Several proinflammatory Lactobacillus strains have been shown to act as adjuvants to enhance the immunogenicity of vaccines. However, dose effects of probiotics in modulating immune responses are not clearly understood. This study examined the dose effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA) NCFM strain on T cell immune responses to rotavirus vaccination in a gnotobiotic (Gn) pig model. Methods Frequencies of IFN-γ producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cell and IL-10 and TGF-β producing CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD25- regulatory T (Treg) cell responses were determined in the intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues of Gn pigs vaccinated with an oral human rotavirus vaccine in conjunction with low dose (5 feedings; up to 106 colony forming units [CFU]/dose) or high dose (14 feedings; up to 109 CFU/dose) or without LA feeding. Results Low dose LA significantly promoted IFN-γ producing T cell responses and down-regulated Treg cell responses and their TGF-β and IL-10 productions in all the tissues compared to the high dose LA and control groups. To the contrary, high dose LA increased the frequencies of Treg cells in most of the tissues compared to the control groups. The dose effects of LA on IFN-γ producing T cell and CD4+CD25- Treg cell immune responses were similar in the intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues and were independent from the vaccination. Conclusion Thus the same probiotic strain in different doses can either promote or suppress IFN-γ producing T cell or Treg cell immune responses. These findings have significant implications in the use of probiotic lactobacilli as immunostimulatory versus immunoregulatory agents. Probiotics can be ineffective or even detrimental if not used at the optimal dosage for the appropriate purposes. PMID:22178726

  12. Pharmacogenetic Predictors of Methylphenidate Dose-Response in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehlich, Tanya E.; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Nick, Todd G.; Melguizo Castro, Maria S.; Stein, Mark A.; Brinkman, William B.; Graham, Amanda J.; Langberg, Joshua M.; Kahn, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Because of significant individual variability in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medication response, there is increasing interest in identifying genetic predictors of treatment effects. This study examined the role of four catecholamine-related candidate genes in moderating methylphenidate (MPH) dose-response. Method:…

  13. Antibody response of an elderly population to a supplemental dose of influenza B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Peters, N L; Meiklejohn, G; Jahnigen, D W

    1988-07-01

    Recent reports have suggested that the antibody response of elderly persons to standard doses of influenza vaccine is depressed. We examined the effect of an additional threefold dose of influenza B vaccine on the antibody response in elderly, ambulatory veterans. One hundred thirty-one male subjects aged 70 years and older were randomized to receive one of three influenza vaccine regimens: Group I received standard trivalent influenza vaccine containing 15 micrograms of B/USSR/100/83 in one arm and placebo in the other; Group II received standard trivalent vaccine in one arm and a supplemental dose of 45 micrograms of B/USSR in the other; Group III received the same dose as group II combined in one arm with a placebo in the other. Antibody levels were measured at baseline, 1 month, and 5 months. Nearly 80% of the participants achieved levels of antibody to B/USSR considered protective; seroconversion rates varied from 40% to 61%. No significant differences in antibody response to B/USSR occurred among the vaccine groups, and there were more side effects at higher doses. The higher dose groups did, however, achieve greater antibody levels to the drifted influenza B virus which circulated during the year of the study. Response to the influenza A components of the vaccine, however, may have been blunted in Group III which received a large dose of A and B antigens all at one site.

  14. Bystander responses in low dose irradiated cells treated with plasma from gamma irradiated blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acheva, A.; Georgieva, R.; Rupova, I.; Boteva, R.; Lyng, F.

    2008-02-01

    There are two specific low-dose radiation-induced responses that have been the focus of radiobiologists' interest in recent years. These are the bystander effect in non-irradiated cells and the adaptive response to a challenge dose after prior low dose irradiation. In the present study we have investigated if plasma from irradiated blood can act as a 'challenge dose' on low dose irradiated reporter epithelial cells (HaCaT cell line). The main aim was to evaluate the overall effect of low dose irradiation (0.05 Gy) of reporter cells and the influence of bystander factors in plasma from 0.5 Gy gamma irradiated blood on these cells. The effects were estimated by clonogenic survival of the reporter cells. We also investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as potential factors involved in the bystander signaling. Calcium fluxes and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) depolarization were also examined as a marker for initiation of apoptosis in the reporter cells. The results show that there are large individual differences in the production of bystander effects and adaptive responses between different donors. These may be due to the specific composition of the donor plasma. The observed effects generally could be divided into two groups: adaptive responses and additive effects. ROS appeared to be involved in the responses of the low dose pretreated reporter cells. In all cases there was a significant decrease in MMP which may be an early event in the apoptotic process. Calcium signaling also appeared to be involved in triggering apoptosis in the low dose pretreated reporter cells. The heterogeneity of the bystander responses makes them difficult to be modulated for medical uses. Specific plasma characteristics that cause these large differences in the responses would need to be identified to make them useful for radiotherapy.

  15. BYSTANDERS, ADAPTIVE RESPONSES AND GENOMIC INSTABILITY - POTENTIAL MODIFIERS OF LOW-DOSE CANCER RESPONSES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bystanders, Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability -Potential Modifiers ofLow-Dose
    Cancer Responses
    .
    There has been a concerted effort in the field of radiation biology to better understand cellular
    responses that could have an impact on the estin1ation of cancer...

  16. Chernobyl Doses. Volume 1. Analysis of Forest Canopy Radiation Response from Multispectral Imagery and the Relationship to Doses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    AD-A284 746 Defense Nuclear Agency Alexandria, VA 22310-3398 DNA-TR-92-37-V1 Chernobyl Doses Volume 1-Analysis of Forest Canopy Radiation Response...REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 940901 Technical 870929- 930930 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Chernobyl Doses Volume 1-Analysis of...volume of the report Chernobyl Doses presents details of a new, quantitative method for remotely sensing ionizing radiation dose to vegetation

  17. Radiation-induced genomic instability: radiation quality and dose response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie E.; Nagar, Shruti; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a term used to describe a phenomenon that results in the accumulation of multiple changes required to convert a stable genome of a normal cell to an unstable genome characteristic of a tumor. There has been considerable recent debate concerning the importance of genomic instability in human cancer and its temporal occurrence in the carcinogenic process. Radiation is capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells and instability is thought to be the driving force responsible for radiation carcinogenesis. Genomic instability is characterized by a large collection of diverse endpoints that include large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and aberrations, amplification of genetic material, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, microsatellite instability, and gene mutation. The capacity of radiation to induce genomic instability depends to a large extent on radiation quality or linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. There appears to be a low dose threshold effect with low LET, beyond which no additional genomic instability is induced. Low doses of both high and low LET radiation are capable of inducing this phenomenon. This report reviews data concerning dose rate effects of high and low LET radiation and their capacity to induce genomic instability assayed by chromosomal aberrations, delayed lethal mutations, micronuclei and apoptosis.

  18. Multiple confidence intervals for selected parameters adjusted for the false coverage rate in monotone dose-response microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jianan; Liu, Wei; Bretz, Frank; Shkedy, Ziv

    2016-12-26

    Benjamini and Yekutieli () introduced the concept of the false coverage-statement rate (FCR) to account for selection when the confidence intervals (CIs) are constructed only for the selected parameters. Dose-response analysis in dose-response microarray experiments is conducted only for genes having monotone dose-response relationship, which is a selection problem. In this paper, we consider multiple CIs for the mean gene expression difference between the highest dose and control in monotone dose-response microarray experiments for selected parameters adjusted for the FCR. A simulation study is conducted to study the performance of the method proposed. The method is applied to a real dose-response microarray experiment with 16, 998 genes for illustration.

  19. Confidence bounds for nonlinear dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Baayen, C; Hougaard, P

    2015-11-30

    An important aim of drug trials is to characterize the dose-response relationship of a new compound. Such a relationship can often be described by a parametric (nonlinear) function that is monotone in dose. If such a model is fitted, it is useful to know the uncertainty of the fitted curve. It is well known that Wald confidence intervals are based on linear approximations and are often unsatisfactory in nonlinear models. Apart from incorrect coverage rates, they can be unreasonable in the sense that the lower confidence limit of the difference to placebo can be negative, even when an overall test shows a significant positive effect. Bootstrap confidence intervals solve many of the problems of the Wald confidence intervals but are computationally intensive and prone to undercoverage for small sample sizes. In this work, we propose a profile likelihood approach to compute confidence intervals for the dose-response curve. These confidence bounds have better coverage than Wald intervals and are more precise and generally faster than bootstrap methods. Moreover, if monotonicity is assumed, the profile likelihood approach takes this automatically into account. The approach is illustrated using a public dataset and simulations based on the Emax and sigmoid Emax models.

  20. CALUX measurements: statistical inferences for the dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Elskens, M; Baston, D S; Stumpf, C; Haedrich, J; Keupers, I; Croes, K; Denison, M S; Baeyens, W; Goeyens, L

    2011-09-30

    Chemical Activated LUciferase gene eXpression [CALUX] is a reporter gene mammalian cell bioassay used for detection and semi-quantitative analyses of dioxin-like compounds. CALUX dose-response curves for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin [TCDD] are typically smooth and sigmoidal when the dose is portrayed on a logarithmic scale. Non-linear regression models are used to calibrate the CALUX response versus TCDD standards and to convert the sample response into Bioanalytical EQuivalents (BEQs). Several complications may arise in terms of statistical inference, specifically and most important is the uncertainty assessment of the predicted BEQ. This paper presents the use of linear calibration functions based on Box-Cox transformations to overcome the issue of uncertainty assessment. Main issues being addressed are (i) confidence and prediction intervals for the CALUX response, (ii) confidence and prediction intervals for the predicted BEQ-value, and (iii) detection/estimation capabilities for the sigmoid and linearized models. Statistical comparisons between different calculation methods involving inverse prediction, effective concentration ratios (ECR(20-50-80)) and slope ratio were achieved with example datasets in order to provide guidance for optimizing BEQ determinations and expand assay performance with the recombinant mouse hepatoma CALUX cell line H1L6.1c3.

  1. Obstetric Pharmacokinetic Dosing Studies are Urgently Needed

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Shelley A.; Best, Brookie M.

    2014-01-01

    Use of pharmacotherapy during pregnancy is common and increasing. Physiologic changes during pregnancy may significantly alter the overall systemic drug exposure, necessitating dose changes. A search of PubMed for pharmacokinetic clinical trials showed 494 publications during pregnancy out of 35,921 total pharmacokinetic published studies (1.29%), from the late 1960s through August 31, 2013. Closer examination of pharmacokinetic studies in pregnant women published since 2008 (81 studies) revealed that about a third of the trials were for treatment of acute labor and delivery issues, a third included studies of infectious disease treatment during pregnancy, and the remaining third were for varied ante-partum indications. Approximately, two-thirds of these recent studies were primarily funded by government agencies worldwide, one-quarter were supported by private non-profit foundations or combinations of government and private funding, and slightly <10% were supported by pharmaceutical industry. As highlighted in this review, vast gaps exist in pharmacology information and evidence for appropriate dosing of medications in pregnant women. This lack of knowledge and understanding of drug disposition throughout pregnancy place both the mother and the fetus at risk for avoidable therapeutic misadventures – suboptimal efficacy or excess toxicity – with medication use in pregnancy. Increased efforts to perform and support obstetric dosing and pharmacokinetic studies are greatly needed. PMID:24575394

  2. Safety and persistence of the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by 2 doses of an AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza vaccine administered to infants, children and adolescents: Two open, uncontrolled studies

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Sicilia, José; Arístegui, Javier; Omeñaca, Félix; Carmona, Alfonso; Tejedor, Juan C; Merino, José M; García-Corbeira, Pilar; Walravens, Karl; Bambure, Vinod; Moris, Philippe; Caplanusi, Adrian; Gillard, Paul; Dieussaert, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    In children, 2 AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine doses given 21 days apart were previously shown to induce a high humoral immune response and to have an acceptable safety profile up to 42 days following the first vaccination. Here, we analyzed the persistence data from 2 open-label studies, which assessed the safety, and humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by 2 doses of this vaccine. The first study was a phase II, randomized trial conducted in 104 children aged 6–35 months vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 1.9 µg haemagglutinin antigen (HA) and AS03B (5.93 mg tocopherol) and the second study, a phase III, non-randomized trial conducted in 210 children and adolescents aged 3–17 years vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 3.75 µg HA and AS03A (11.86 mg tocopherol). Approximately one year after the first dose, all children with available data were seropositive for haemagglutinin inhibition and neutralising antibody titres, but a decline in geometric mean antibody titres was noted. The vaccine induced a cell-mediated immune response in terms of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells, which persisted up to one year post-vaccination. The vaccine did not raise any safety concern, though these trials were not designed to detect rare events. In conclusion, 2 doses of the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 2 different dosages had a clinically acceptable safety profile, and induced high and persistent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in children aged 6–35 months and 3–17 years. These studies have been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00971321 and NCT00964158. PMID:26176592

  3. Subchronic effects following a single sarin exposure on blood-brain and blood-testes barrier permeability, acetylcholinesterase, and acetylcholine receptors in the central nervous system of rat: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Jones, K H; Dechkovskaia, A M; Herrick, E A; Abdel-Rahman, A A; Khan, W A; Abou-Donia, M B

    2000-12-29

    Subchronic neurotoxic effects of sarin (O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) treatment at various doses in male Sprague Dawley rats were studied. The animals were treated with a single intramuscular (im) injection of 0.01, 0.1, 0.5, or 1 x LD50 (100 microg/kg). The animals were maintained for 90 d thereafter. [3H]Hexamethonium iodide was used to monitor the changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in cortex, brainstem, midbrain, and cerebellum. Brainstem exhibited a significant decrease (approximately 58% of control) in uptake of [3H]hexamethonium iodide at 1 x LD50 dose. No significant changes were observed in BBB permeability in cortex, midbrain, and cerebellum at any dose. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity remained unchanged, reflecting recovery of the enzyme activity from the initial inhibition following single exposure of 1 x LD50 sarin. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the cortex remained inhibited (approximately 29%), whereas in the brainstem there was an increase (approximately 20%) at 1 x LD50 dose of sarin. The m2-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m2-mAChR) ligand binding was inhibited significantly at 1 x LD50 in the cortex, whereas brainstem showed significantly increased (approximately 45%) ligand binding at 1 x LD50 dose. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), on the other hand, showed a biphasic response in ligand binding in the cortex with a decrease (approximately 30%) at 0.01 x LD50 but an increase (approximately 40%) at 1 x LD5O. Brainstem did not show any significant change in nAChR ligand binding. These results suggest that single exposure of sarin could lead to changes that may play an important role in neuropathological abnormalities in the central nervous system.

  4. The effect of measurement error on the dose-response curve

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, I. )

    1990-07-01

    In epidemiological studies for an environmental risk assessment, doses are often observed with errors. However, they have received little attention in data analysis. This paper studies the effect of measurement errors on the observed dose-response curve. Under the assumptions of the monotone likelihood ratio on errors and a monotone increasing dose-response curve, it is verified that the slope of the observed dose-response curve is likely to be gentler than the true one. The observed variance of responses are not so homogeneous as to be expected under models without errors. The estimation of parameters in a hockey-stick type dose-response curve with a threshold is considered on line of the maximum likelihood method for a functional relationship model. Numerical examples adaptable to the data in a 1986 study of the effect of air pollution that was conducted in Japan are also presented. The proposed model is proved to be suitable to the data in the example cited in this paper.

  5. Empirical Evaluation of Meta-Analytic Approaches for Nutrient and Health Outcome Dose-Response Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Winifred W.; Schmid, Christopher H.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.; Lau, Joseph; Trikalinos, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to empirically compare alternative meta-analytic methods for combining dose-response data from epidemiological studies. We identified meta-analyses of epidemiological studies that analyzed the association between a single nutrient and a dichotomous outcome. For each topic, we performed meta-analyses of odds ratios…

  6. Maternal Parity and the Risk of Congenital Heart Defects in Offspring: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Epidemiological Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Liu, Jin; Tong, Xing; Yang, Lei; Da, Min; Shen, Shutong; Fan, Changfeng; Wang, Song; Mo, Xuming

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have reported conflicting results regarding maternal parity and the risk of congenital heart defects (CHDs). However, a meta-analysis of the association between maternal parity and CHDs in offspring has not been conducted. Methods We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles catalogued between their inception and March 8, 2014; we identified relevant published studies that assessed the association between maternal parity and CHD risk. Two authors independently assessed the eligibility of the retrieved articles and extracted data from them. Study-specific relative risk estimates were pooled by random-effects or fixed-effects models. From the 11272 references, a total of 16 case-control studies and 3 cohort studies were enrolled in this meta-analysis. Results The overall relative risk of CHD in parous versus nulliparous women was 1.01 (95% CI, 0.97–1.06; Q = 32.34; P = 0.006; I2 = 53.6%). Furthermore, we observed a significant association between the highest versus lowest parity number, with an overall RR = 1.20 (95% CI, 1.10–1.31; (Q = 74.61, P<0.001, I2 = 82.6%). A dose–response analysis also indicated a positive effect of maternal parity on CHD risk, and the overall increase in relative risk per one live birth was 1.06 (95% CI, 1.02–1.09); Q = 68.09; P<0.001; I2 = 80.9%). We conducted stratified and meta-regression analyses to identify the origin of the heterogeneity among studies. A Galbraith plot was created to graphically assess the sources of heterogeneity. Conclusion In summary, this meta-analysis provided a robust estimate of the positive association between maternal parity and risk of CHD. PMID:25295723

  7. Radiation dose response estimation with emphasis on low dose range using restricted cubic splines: application to all solid cancer mortality data, 1950-2003, in atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Eiji

    2015-07-01

    Using the all solid cancer mortality data set of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort from 1950 to 2003 (LSS Report 14) data among atomic bomb survivors, excess relative risk (ERR) statistical analyses were performed using the second degree polynomial and the threshold and restricted cubic spline (RCS) dose response models. For the RCS models with 3 to 7 knots of equally spaced percentiles with margins in the dose range greater than 50 mGy, the dose response was assumed to be linear at less than 70 to 90 mGy. Due to the skewed dose distribution of atomic bomb survivors, the current knot system for the RCS analysis results in a detailed depiction of the dose response as less than approximately 0.5 Gy. The 6 knot RCS models for the all-solid cancer mortality dose response of the whole dose or less than 2 Gy were selected with the AIC model selection criterion and fit significantly better (p < 0.05) than the linear (L) model. The usual RCS includes the L-global model but not the quadratic (Q) nor linear-quadratic (LQ) global models. The authors extended the RCS to include L or LQ global models by putting L or LQ constraints on the cubic spline in the lower and upper tails, and the best RCS model selected with AIC criterion was the usual RCS with L-constraints in both the lower and upper tails. The selected RCS had a linear dose-response model in the lower dose range (i.e., < 0.2-0.3 Gy) and was compatible with the linear no-threshold (LNT) model in this dose range. The proposed method is also useful in describing the dose response of a specific cancer or non-cancer disease incidence/mortality.

  8. Chronic periodontitis and smoking Prevalence and dose-response relationship

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahrukh; Khalid, Taimur; Awan, Kamran H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence and dose-response relationship of chronic periodontitis among smokers in Pakistan. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study among participants seeking dental care in Karachi Medical and Dental College, Karachi, Pakistan. A total of 443 participants with a mean age of 44.3 (±6.5) participated in the study from April 2011 to December 2011. Males comprised 64.7%, and females comprised 35.2%. Participants were interviewed on social demographics and oral habits. Participants with shallow pockets (3.5-5.5 mm) and deep pockets (>5.5 mm) were considered suffering from chronic periodontitis. The characteristics of participants were assessed using frequency distribution for categorical variables and mean (standard deviation) for continuous variables. Results: Among 443 participants, smokers were distributed as 55.1% and non-smokers as 44.9%. Smoking was found to be significantly related to young adults (p<0.007), male gender (p<0.001), and lower education level (p<0.01). Overall prevalence of chronic periodontitis among smokers was estimated at 81.6%. Heavy smoking was found to have significantly high prevalence (p<0.001) and severity (p<0.001) of periodontitis as compared with moderate and light smokers. The multivariate unadjusted model depicted 3.5 times higher risk of chronic periodontitis among smokers (p<0.001). Conclusion: Chronic periodontitis had a high prevalence among smokers. Heavy smoking was found to have a higher risk for having periodontitis. PMID:27464867

  9. Estimating the predictive quality of dose-response after model selection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuanpu; Dong, Yingwen

    2007-07-20

    Prediction of dose-response is important in dose selection in drug development. As the true dose-response shape is generally unknown, model selection is frequently used, and predictions based on the final selected model. Correctly assessing the quality of the predictions requires accounting for the uncertainties caused by the model selection process, which has been difficult. Recently, a new approach called data perturbation has emerged. It allows important predictive characteristics be computed while taking model selection into consideration. We study, through simulation, the performance of data perturbation in estimating standard error of parameter estimates and prediction errors. Data perturbation was found to give excellent prediction error estimates, although at times large Monte Carlo sizes were needed to obtain good standard error estimates. Overall, it is a useful tool to characterize uncertainties in dose-response predictions, with the potential of allowing more accurate dose selection in drug development. We also look at the influence of model selection on estimation bias. This leads to insights into candidate model choices that enable good dose-response prediction.

  10. Biological stress response terminology: Integrating the concepts of adaptive response and preconditioning stress within a hormetic dose-response framework.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J; Bachmann, Kenneth A; Bailer, A John; Bolger, P Michael; Borak, Jonathan; Cai, Lu; Cedergreen, Nina; Cherian, M George; Chiueh, Chuang C; Clarkson, Thomas W; Cook, Ralph R; Diamond, David M; Doolittle, David J; Dorato, Michael A; Duke, Stephen O; Feinendegen, Ludwig; Gardner, Donald E; Hart, Ronald W; Hastings, Kenneth L; Hayes, A Wallace; Hoffmann, George R; Ives, John A; Jaworowski, Zbigniew; Johnson, Thomas E; Jonas, Wayne B; Kaminski, Norbert E; Keller, John G; Klaunig, James E; Knudsen, Thomas B; Kozumbo, Walter J; Lettieri, Teresa; Liu, Shu-Zheng; Maisseu, Andre; Maynard, Kenneth I; Masoro, Edward J; McClellan, Roger O; Mehendale, Harihara M; Mothersill, Carmel; Newlin, David B; Nigg, Herbert N; Oehme, Frederick W; Phalen, Robert F; Philbert, Martin A; Rattan, Suresh I S; Riviere, Jim E; Rodricks, Joseph; Sapolsky, Robert M; Scott, Bobby R; Seymour, Colin; Sinclair, David A; Smith-Sonneborn, Joan; Snow, Elizabeth T; Spear, Linda; Stevenson, Donald E; Thomas, Yolene; Tubiana, Maurice; Williams, Gary M; Mattson, Mark P

    2007-07-01

    Many biological subdisciplines that regularly assess dose-response relationships have identified an evolutionarily conserved process in which a low dose of a stressful stimulus activates an adaptive response that increases the resistance of the cell or organism to a moderate to severe level of stress. Due to a lack of frequent interaction among scientists in these many areas, there has emerged a broad range of terms that describe such dose-response relationships. This situation has become problematic because the different terms describe a family of similar biological responses (e.g., adaptive response, preconditioning, hormesis), adversely affecting interdisciplinary communication, and possibly even obscuring generalizable features and central biological concepts. With support from scientists in a broad range of disciplines, this article offers a set of recommendations we believe can achieve greater conceptual harmony in dose-response terminology, as well as better understanding and communication across the broad spectrum of biological disciplines.

  11. Biological stress response terminology: Integrating the concepts of adaptive response and preconditioning stress within a hormetic dose-response framework

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Edward J. . E-mail: edwardc@schoolph.umass.edu; Bachmann, Kenneth A.; Bailer, A. John; Bolger, P. Michael; Borak, Jonathan; Cai, Lu; Cedergreen, Nina; Cherian, M. George; Chiueh, Chuang C.; Clarkson, Thomas W.; Cook, Ralph R.; Diamond, David M.; Doolittle, David J.; Dorato, Michael A.; Duke, Stephen O.; Feinendegen, Ludwig; Gardner, Donald E.; Hart, Ronald W.; Hastings, Kenneth L.; Hayes, A. Wallace; Hoffmann, George R.; Ives, John A.; Jaworowski, Zbigniew; Johnson, Thomas E.; Jonas, Wayne B.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2007-07-01

    Many biological subdisciplines that regularly assess dose-response relationships have identified an evolutionarily conserved process in which a low dose of a stressful stimulus activates an adaptive response that increases the resistance of the cell or organism to a moderate to severe level of stress. Due to a lack of frequent interaction among scientists in these many areas, there has emerged a broad range of terms that describe such dose-response relationships. This situation has become problematic because the different terms describe a family of similar biological responses (e.g., adaptive response, preconditioning, hormesis), adversely affecting interdisciplinary communication, and possibly even obscuring generalizable features and central biological concepts. With support from scientists in a broad range of disciplines, this article offers a set of recommendations we believe can achieve greater conceptual harmony in dose-response terminology, as well as better understanding and communication across the broad spectrum of biological disciplines.

  12. Effects of glycerol co-solvent on the rate and form of polymer gel dose response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirasek, A.; Hilts, M.; Berman, A.; McAuley, K. B.

    2009-02-01

    A factor currently limiting the clinical utility of x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry is the overall low dose sensitivity (and hence low dose resolution) of the system. Hence, active research remains in the investigation of polymer gel formulations with increased CT dose response. An ideal polymer gel dosimeter will exhibit a sensitive CT response which is linear over a suitable dose range, making clinical implementation reasonably straightforward. This study reports on the variations in rate and form of the CT dose response of irradiated polymer gels manufactured with glycerol, which is a co-solvent that permits dissolution of additional bisacrylamide above its water solubility limit (3% by weight). This study focuses on situations where the concentration of bisacrylamide is kept at or below its water solubility limit so that the influence of the co-solvent on the dose response can be explored separately from the effects of increased cross-linker concentration. CT imaging and Raman spectroscopy are used to construct dose-response curves for irradiated gels varying in (i) initial total monomer (%T) and (ii) initial co-solvent concentration. Results indicate that: (i) for a fixed glycerol concentration, gel response increases linearly with %T. Furthermore, the functional form of the dose response remains constant, in agreement with a previous model of polymer formation. (ii) Polymer gels with constant %T and increasing co-solvent concentrations also show enhanced CT response. In addition, the functional form of the response is altered in these gels as co-solvent concentration is increased. Raman data indicate that the fraction of bis-acrylamide incorporated into polymerization, as opposed to cyclization, increases as co-solvent concentration increases. The changes in functional form indicate varying polymer yields (per unit dose), akin to relative fractional monomer/cross-linker (i.e. %C) changes in earlier studies. These results are put into context of the model of

  13. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low dose/low LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Munira A Kadhim

    2010-03-05

    To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e., less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these “non-targeted” responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander responses in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/H and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition on two non-targeted radiation responses in these models; the bystander effect and genomic instability, which we believe are closely related. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to doses approaching a single electron traversal. Using conventional X-ray and γ-ray sources, novel dish separation and targeted irradiation approaches, we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various bystander conditions at doses down to a few electron tracks. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for bystander targeted studies. Mechanistic studies of instability and the bystander response in different cell lineages will focus initially on the role of cytokines which have been shown to be involved in bystander signaling and the initiation of instability. These studies also aim

  14. Beetroot juice and exercise: pharmacodynamic and dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Lee J; Kelly, James; Bailey, Stephen J; Blackwell, Jamie R; Skiba, Philip F; Winyard, Paul G; Jeukendrup, Asker E; Vanhatalo, Anni; Jones, Andrew M

    2013-08-01

    Dietary supplementation with beetroot juice (BR), containing approximately 5-8 mmol inorganic nitrate (NO3(-)), increases plasma nitrite concentration ([NO2(-)]), reduces blood pressure, and may positively influence the physiological responses to exercise. However, the dose-response relationship between the volume of BR ingested and the physiological effects invoked has not been investigated. In a balanced crossover design, 10 healthy men ingested 70, 140, or 280 ml concentrated BR (containing 4.2, 8.4, and 16.8 mmol NO3(-), respectively) or no supplement to establish the effects of BR on resting plasma [NO3(-)] and [NO2(-)] over 24 h. Subsequently, on six separate occasions, 10 subjects completed moderate-intensity and severe-intensity cycle exercise tests, 2.5 h postingestion of 70, 140, and 280 ml BR or NO3(-)-depleted BR as placebo (PL). Following acute BR ingestion, plasma [NO2(-)] increased in a dose-dependent manner, with the peak changes occurring at approximately 2-3 h. Compared with PL, 70 ml BR did not alter the physiological responses to exercise. However, 140 and 280 ml BR reduced the steady-state oxygen (O2) uptake during moderate-intensity exercise by 1.7% (P = 0.06) and 3.0% (P < 0.05), whereas time-to-task failure was extended by 14% and 12% (both P < 0.05), respectively, compared with PL. The results indicate that whereas plasma [NO2(-)] and the O2 cost of moderate-intensity exercise are altered dose dependently with NO3(-)-rich BR, there is no additional improvement in exercise tolerance after ingesting BR containing 16.8 compared with 8.4 mmol NO3(-). These findings have important implications for the use of BR to enhance cardiovascular health and exercise performance in young adults.

  15. Dose-Responsive Gene Expression in Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) Treated Resting CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Brian; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Spina, Celsa A.; Singhania, Akul; Margolis, David M.; Richman, Douglas R.; Woelk, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Design Persistent latently infected CD4+ T cells represent a major obstacle to HIV eradication. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) are a proposed activation therapy. However, off-target effects on expression in host immune cells are poorly understood. We hypothesized that HDACi-modulated genes would be best identified with dose-response analysis. Methods Resting primary CD4+ T cells were treated with 0.34, 1, 3, or 10 μM of the HDACi, SAHA, for 24 hours and subjected to microarray gene expression analysis. Genes with dose-correlated expression were filtered to identify a subset with consistent up or downregulation at each SAHA dose. Histone modifications were characterized in 6 SAHA dose-responsive genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-RT-qPCR). Results A large number of genes were shown to be up (N=657) or downregulated (N=725) by SAHA in a dose-responsive manner (FDR p-value < 0.05, fold change ≥ |2|). Several genes (CTNNAL1, DPEP2, H1F0, IRGM, PHF15, and SELL) are potential in vivo biomarkers of SAHA activity. SAHA dose-responsive genes included transcription factors, HIV restriction factors, histone methyltransferases, and host proteins that interact with HIV. Pathway analysis suggested net downregulation of T cell activation with increasing SAHA dose. Histone acetylation was not correlated with host gene expression, but plausible alternative mechanisms for SAHA-modulated gene expression were identified. Conclusions Numerous genes in CD4+ T cells are modulated by SAHA in a dose-responsive manner, including genes that may negatively influence HIV activation from latency. Our study suggests that SAHA influences gene expression through a confluence of several mechanisms, including histone modification, and altered expression and activity of transcription factors. PMID:26258524

  16. Dose-time pattern of the hypercalcemic response to calcium infusion in the dog.

    PubMed

    Verine, H J; Pastor, J; Pauli, A M; Durbec, J P

    1977-04-01

    Forty-five tests were performed to study blood total [Ca] response to a 2-hours IV calcium gluconate infusion, in five conscious dogs. Calcium doses were : 2.45 ; 4.50;6.19 and 9.00 mumole kg--u min-1 ; saline was used as control. Blood samples were collected every 20 minutes and calcaemia determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry at 422.7 nm. No plateau was reached except with lowest dose. At each Ca dose, successive calcaemia levels can be fitted by a straight line and the regression calculated. With studied doses, calculated slopes were : 3.6 ; 8.3 ; 11.8 and 19.1 mumole l--1 min--1 respectively ; these slopes were found to be significantly different from each other. A linear dose-response relationship was calculated between blood [Ca] increase rate and Ca dose : Y = --3.01 + 2.44 X (mumole l--1 min-1 increase rate per mumole kg--1 min-1 Ca dose). Correspondence analysis emphazises the influence of zero time calcaemia.

  17. Cell cycle alterations, apoptosis, and response to low-dose-rate radioimmunotherapy in lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Macklis, R.M.; Beresford, B.A.; Palayoor, S.; Sweeney, S.; Humm, J.L.

    1993-10-20

    In an attempt to elucidate some aspects of the radiobiological basis of radioimmunotherapy, we have evaluated the in vitro cellular response patterns for malignant lymphoma cell lines exposed to high- and low-dose-rate radiation administered within the physiological context of antibody cell-surface binding. We used two different malignant lymphoma cell lines, a Thy1.2{sup +} murine T-lymphoma line called EL-4 and a CD20{sup +} human B-lymphoma line called Raji. Irradiated cells were evaluated for viability, cell-cycle changes, patterns of post-radiation morphologic changes, and biochemical hallmarks of radiation-associated necrosis and programmed cell death. The EL-4 line was sensitive to both high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate irradiation, while the Raji showed efficient cell kill only after high-dose-rate irradiation. Studies of radiation-induced cell cycle changes demonstrated that both cell lines were efficiently blocked at the G2/M interface by high-dose-rate irradiation, with the Raji cells appearing somewhat more susceptible than the EL-4 cells to low-dose-rate radiation-induced G2/M block. Electron microscopy and DNA gel electrophoresis studies showed that a significant proportion of the EL-4 cells appeared to be dying by radiation-induced programmed cell death (apoptosis) while the Raji cells appeared to be dying primarily by classical radiation-induced cellular necrosis. We propose that the unusual clinical responsiveness of some high and low grade lymphomas to modest doses of low-dose-rate radioimmunotherapy may be explained in part by the induction of apoptosis. The unusual dose-response characteristics observed in some experimental models of radiation-induced apoptosis may require a reappraisal of standard linear quadratic and alpha/beta algorithms used to predict target tissue cytoreduction after radioimmunotheraphy. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Immune response to 1 and 2 dose regimens of measles vaccine in Pakistani children.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Hamidah; Akram, Dure Samin; Chandir, Subhash; Khan, Aamir J; Memon, Ashraf; Halsey, Neal A

    2013-12-01

    Measles is a significant problem in Pakistan despite vaccine coverage rates reported at 80%. The purpose of this study was to determine the serologic response in children after one dose of measles vaccine at 9 mo versus two doses at 9 and 15 mo of age. From March through December 2006, children were enrolled from immunization clinics and squatter settlements in Karachi. Blood samples were taken from children in Group A at 9-10 mo of age prior to measles vaccine and 8 to 11 weeks later; from children in Group B at 16-17 mo of age after receiving 2 doses of measles vaccine; and from children in Group C who had received at least one dose of measles vaccine by 5 y of age. After the first dose of measles vaccine, 107/147 (73%) of children in Group A were seropositive, 157/180 (87%) of children in Group B were seropositive after two doses and 126/200 (63%) of children in Group C were seropositive at 5 y of age. The post-vaccination geometric mean antibody concentrations were higher in females than males in groups A (irrespective of pre-vaccination antibody levels) and B. The serologic response to one and two doses of measles vaccine was lower in children in Karachi than has been reported in many other countries. Two doses of vaccine were significantly better than one dose. An in-depth investigation is needed to determine the reason for the lower-than-expected protection rates. Differences in immunogenicity between genders need to be further studied. Recent introduction of supplemental measles vaccine doses should help control measles in Pakistan.

  19. A normal tissue dose response model of dynamic repair processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Markus; Belka, Claus

    2006-01-01

    A model is presented for serial, critical element complication mechanisms for irradiated volumes from length scales of a few millimetres up to the entire organ. The central element of the model is the description of radiation complication as the failure of a dynamic repair process. The nature of the repair process is seen as reestablishing the structural organization of the tissue, rather than mere replenishment of lost cells. The interactions between the cells, such as migration, involved in the repair process are assumed to have finite ranges, which limits the repair capacity and is the defining property of a finite-sized reconstruction unit. Since the details of the repair processes are largely unknown, the development aims to make the most general assumptions about them. The model employs analogies and methods from thermodynamics and statistical physics. An explicit analytical form of the dose response of the reconstruction unit for total, partial and inhomogeneous irradiation is derived. The use of the model is demonstrated with data from animal spinal cord experiments and clinical data about heart, lung and rectum. The three-parameter model lends a new perspective to the equivalent uniform dose formalism and the established serial and parallel complication models. Its implications for dose optimization are discussed.

  20. Construction of a cytogenetic dose-response curve for low-dose range gamma-irradiation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using three-color FISH.

    PubMed

    Suto, Yumiko; Akiyama, Miho; Noda, Takashi; Hirai, Momoki

    2015-12-01

    In order to estimate biological doses after low-dose ionizing radiation exposure, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using three differentially colored chromosome painting probes was employed to detect exchange-type chromosome aberrations. A reference dose response curve was constructed using blood samples from a female donor whose lymphocytes consistently exhibited a low frequency of cells at the second mitosis under routine culture conditions. Aberration yields were studied for a total of about 155 thousand metaphases obtained from seven dose-points of gamma irradiations (0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300mGy). In situ hybridization was performed using commercially available painting probes for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4. With the aid of an automated image-capturing method, exchange-type aberrations involving painted chromosomes were detected with considerable accuracy and speed. The results on the exchange-type aberrations (dicentrics plus translocations) at the seven dose-points showed a good fit to the linear-quadratic model (y=0.0023+0.0015x+0.0819x(2), P=0.83). A blind test proved the reproducibility of the reference dose-response relationship. In the control experiments using blood samples from another donor, the estimated doses calculated on the basis of the present reference curve were proved to be in good agreement with the actual physical doses applied. The present dose-response curve may serve as a means to assess the individual differences in cytogenetical radio-sensitivities.

  1. Dose-response trend tests for tumorigenesis, adjusted for body weight.

    PubMed

    Gaylor, D W; Kodell, R L

    1999-06-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a relationship between rodent body weight and tumor incidence for some tissue/organ sites. It is not uncommon for a chemical tested for carcinogenicity to also affect body weight. In such cases, comparisons of tumor incidence may be biased by body-weight differences across dose groups. A simple procedure was investigated for reducing this bias. This procedure divides the animals into a few groups based on body weight. Body weight at 12 months was used, before the appearance of a tumor was likely to affect body weight. Statistics for dose-response trend tests are calculated within body weight strata and pooled to obtain an overall dose-response trend test. This procedure is analogous to that currently used, of stratifying animals, based on their age at the time of removal from a study. Age stratification is used to account for differences in animal age across dose groups, which can affect comparisons of tumor incidence. Several examples were investigated where the high-dose group had reduced body weights and associated reductions in tumor incidence. When the data were analyzed by body-weight strata, some positive dose-response trends for tumor incidence were demonstrated. In one case, the weight-adjusted analysis indicated that a negative dose-response trend in tumor incidence was a real effect, in addition to a body weight reduction. These examples indicate that it is important to consider the effects of body weight changes as low as 10%, and perhaps below, that were caused by chemicals in 2-year bioassays for carcinogenesis. The simple procedure of analyzing tumor incidence within body-weight strata can reduce the bias introduced by weight differences across dose groups.

  2. Time and dose-response effects of honokiol on UVB-induced skin cancer development.

    PubMed

    Guillermo, Ruth F; Chilampalli, Chandeshwari; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zeman, David; Fahmy, Hesham; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2012-06-01

    Honokiol has shown chemopreventive effects in chemically-induced and UVB-induced skin cancer in mice. In this investigation, we assessed the time-effects of a topical low dose of honokiol (30 μg), and then the effects of different honokiol doses (30, 45, and 60 μg) on a UVB-induced skin cancer model to find an optimal dose and time for desirable chemopreventive effects. UVB radiation (30 mJ/cm(2), 5 days/week for 25 or 27 weeks) was used to induce skin carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice. For the time-response experiment 30 μg honokiol in acetone was applied topically to the animals before the UVB exposure (30 min, 1 h, and 2 h) and after the UVB exposure (immediately, 30 min, and 1 h). Control groups were treated with acetone. For the dose-response study, animals were treated topically with acetone or honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) one hour before the UVB exposure. In the time-response experiment, honokiol inhibited skin tumor multiplicity by 49-58% while reducing tumor volumes by 70-89%. In the dose-response study, honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) significantly decreased skin tumor multiplicity by 36-78% in a dose-dependent manner, while tumor area was reduced by 76-94%. Honokiol (60 μg) significantly reduced tumor incidence by 40% as compared to control group. Honokiol applied in very low doses (30 μg) either before or after UVB radiation shows chemopreventive effects. Honokiol (30, 45, and 60 μg) prevents UVB-induced skin cancer in a dose-dependent manner. Honokiol can be an effective chemopreventive agent against skin cancer.

  3. Adaptive Responses to Prochloraz Exposure That Alter Dose-Response and Time-Course Behaviors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose response and time-course (DRTC) are, along with exposure, the major determinants of health risk. Adaptive changes within exposed organisms in response to environmental stress are common, and alter DRTC behaviors to minimize the effects caused by stressors. In this project, ...

  4. The importance of carcinogen dose in chemoprevention studies: quantitative interrelationships between, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene dose, chlorophyllin dose, target organ DNA adduct biomarkers and final tumor outcome.

    PubMed

    Pratt, M Margaret; Reddy, Ashok P; Hendricks, Jerry D; Pereira, Cliff; Kensler, Thomas W; Bailey, George S

    2007-03-01

    Chlorophyllin (CHL) is a potent antimutagen in vitro, an effective anti-carcinogen in several animal models, and significantly reduced urinary biomarkers of aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) exposure in a human population. Here we report an expanded analysis of CHL chemoprevention using the potent environmental hydrocarbon dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP). A dose-dose matrix design employed over 12 000 rainbow trout to evaluate the interrelationships among dietary carcinogen dose, anti-carcinogen dose, carcinogen-DNA adduct levels at exposure and eventual tumor outcome in two target organs. Included was an evaluation of the pharmaceutical CHL preparation (Derifil), used previously in a study of individuals chronically exposed to AFB(1). CHL was pre-, co- and post-fed at doses of 0-6000 p.p.m. and co-fed with DBP at doses of 0-371.5 p.p.m. for 4 weeks. This protocol generated a total of 21 dose-dose treatment groups, each evaluated with three or more replicates of 100 animals. The DBP-only treatment produced dose-responsive increases in liver and stomach DBP-DNA adducts, whereas increasing CHL co-treatment doses produced successive inhibition in liver (49-83%) and stomach (47-75%) adduct levels at each DBP dose examined. The remaining 8711 trout were necropsied, 10 months later. DBP treatment alone produced a logit incidence versus log [DBP] dose-response curve in stomach that was linear; CHL co-treatment provided dose-dependent tumor inhibition which ranged from 30 to 68% and was predictable from the adduct response. The Derifil CHL preparation was also found to effectively reduce DNA adduction and final tumor incidence in stomach (as well as liver), with a potency compatible with its total chlorin content. Liver tumor incidence in the DBP-only groups appeared to plateau near 60%. At DBP doses of doses generally reduced tumor incidence and multiplicity consistent with early DNA adducts as biomarkers. At 225 p.p.m. DBP, however, very high CHL doses were

  5. [Dose response curve of paclitaxel measured by histoculture drug response assay].

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Tatsuya; Oura, Shoji; Hirai, Issei; Kokawa, Yozo; Okamura, Yoshitaka; Furukawa, Tomoko

    2005-04-01

    Dose response curves of paclitaxel were measured by histoculture drug response assay (HDRA) in 11 lung cancer patients. Inhibition rates of paclitaxel at several concentrations were measured and fitted to the sigmoid dose response curve, using non-linear least square analysis, with fitting equation y=A (1-1/(1+exp (b (x-log (ED50)). Parameters A, b, and ED50 were 88.3+/-6.0 (80.0-100.0) %, 9.57+/-4.32 (2.25-15.0), and 26.8+/-8.1 (15.0-41.0) microg/ml, respectively. The parameter b was lower in well-differentiated tumors compared with moderately and poorly-differentiated tumors. Dose response curves of paclitaxel could be measured by HDRA in lung cancer. This method provides us more information for drug sensitivity than the usual HDRA method. This may lead to the improved accuracy of HDRA.

  6. RISK ASSESSMENT FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM: A HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN ANALYSIS OF HUMAN DOSE-RESPONSE DATA. (R829180)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three dose–response studies were conducted with healthy volunteers using different Cryptosporidium parvum isolates (IOWA, TAMU, and UCP). The study data were previously analyzed for median infectious dose (ID50) using a simple cumulative percent endpoi...

  7. [DNA double-strand breaks in human lymphocytes after single irradiation by low doses of pulsed X-rays: non-linear dose-response relationship].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, S A; Stepanova, E Iu; Kutenkov, O P; Belenko, A A; Zharkova, L P; Bol'shakov, M A; Lebedev, I N; Rostov, V V

    2012-01-01

    Effects of ionizing radiation registered in cells after low dose irradiation are still poorly understood. A pulsed mode of irradiation is even more problematic in terms of predicting the radiation-induced response in cells. Thus, the aim of this paper was to study and analyze the effects of dose and frequency of pulsed X-rays on the frequency of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks and their repair kinetics in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. Analysis of radiation-induced gammaH2AX and 53BP1 repair foci was used to assess the DNA damage in these cells. The dose-response curve of radiation-induced foci of both proteins has shown deviations from linearity to a higher effect in the 12-32 mGy dose range and a lower effect at 72 mGy. The dose-response curve was linear at doses higher than 100 mGy. The number of radiation-induced gammaH2AX and 53BP1 foci depended on the frequency of X-ray pulses: the highest effect was registered at 13 pulses per second. Moreover, slower repair kinetics was observed for those foci induced by very low doses with a nonlinear dose-response relationship.

  8. PHYSIOLOCIGALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODELING AND MODE OF ACTION IN DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODELING AND MODE OF ACTION IN DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT. Barton HA. Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA
    Dose-response analysis requires quantitatively linking infor...

  9. Dose-response relationships and extrapolation in toxicology - Mechanistic and statistical considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Controversy on toxicological dose-response relationships and low-dose extrapolation of respective risks is often the consequence of misleading data presentation, lack of differentiation between types of response variables, and diverging mechanistic interpretation. In this chapter...

  10. Effect of increased CRM₁₉₇ carrier protein dose on meningococcal C bactericidal antibody response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lucia H; Blake, Milan S

    2012-04-01

    New multivalent CRM(197)-based conjugate vaccines are available for childhood immunization. Clinical studies were reviewed to assess meningococcal group C (MenC) antibody responses following MenC-CRM(197) coadministration with CRM(197)-based pneumococcal or Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines. Infants receiving a total CRM(197) carrier protein dose of ∼50 μg and concomitant diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP)-containing vaccine tended to have lower MenC geometric mean antibody titers and continued to have low titers after the toddler dose. Nevertheless, at least 95% of children in the reported studies achieved a MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titer of ≥ 1:8 after the last infant or toddler dose. SBA was measured using an assay with a baby rabbit or human complement source. Additional studies are needed to assess long-term antibody persistence and MenC CRM(197) conjugate vaccine immunogenicity using alternative dosing schedules.

  11. Low-dose total-body γ irradiation modulates immune response to acute proton radiation.

    PubMed

    Luo-Owen, Xian; Pecaut, Michael J; Rizvi, Asma; Gridley, Daila S

    2012-03-01

    Health risks due to exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate radiation alone or when combined with acute irradiation are not yet clearly defined. This study quantified the effects of protracted exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays with and without acute exposure to protons on the response of immune and other cell populations. C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with ⁵⁷Co (0.05 Gy at 0.025 cGy/h); subsets were subsequently exposed to high-dose/high-dose-rate proton radiation (250 MeV; 2 or 3 Gy at 0.5 Gy/min). Analyses were performed at 4 and 17 days postexposure. Spleen and thymus masses relative to body mass were decreased on day 4 after proton irradiation with or without pre-exposure to γ rays; by day 17, however, the decrease was attenuated by the priming dose. Proton dose-dependent decreases, either with or without pre-exposure to γ rays, occurred in white blood cell, lymphocyte and granulocyte counts in blood but not in spleen. A similar pattern was found for lymphocyte subpopulations, including CD3+ T, CD19+ B, CD4+ T, CD8+ T and NK1.1+ natural killer (NK) cells. Spontaneous DNA synthesis by leukocytes after proton irradiation was high in blood on day 4 and high in spleen on day 17; priming with γ radiation attenuated the effect of 3 Gy in both body compartments. Some differences were also noted among groups in erythrocyte and thrombocyte characteristics. Analysis of splenocytes activated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies showed changes in T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines. Overall, the data demonstrate that pre-exposure of an intact mammal to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays can attenuate the response to acute exposure to proton radiation with respect to at least some cell populations.

  12. Cerebral radioprotection by pentobarbital: Dose-response characteristics and association with GABA agonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Orr, K.; Delaney, T.; Oldfield, E.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Pentobarbital reduces cerebral radiation toxicity; however, the mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. As an anesthetic and depressant of cerebral metabolism, pentobarbital induces its effects on the central nervous system by stimulating the binding of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to its receptor and by inhibiting postsynaptic excitatory amino acid activity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of these actions as well as other aspects of the radioprotective activity of pentobarbital. Fischer 344 rats were separated into multiple groups and underwent two dose-response evaluations. In one set of experiments to examine the relationship of radioprotection to pentobarbital dose, a range of pentobarbital doses (0 to 75 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally prior to a constant-level radiation dose (70 Gy). In a second series of experiments to determine the dose-response relationship of radiation protection to radiation dose, a range of radiation doses (10 to 90 Gy) were given with a single pentobarbital dose. Further groups of animals were used to evaluate the importance of the timing of pentobarbital administration, the function of the (+) and (-) isomers of pentobarbital, and the role of an alternative GABA agonist (diazepam). In addition, the potential protective effects of alternative methods of anesthesia (ketamine) and induction of cerebral hypometabolism (hypothermia) were examined. Enhancement of survival time from acute radiation injury due to high-dose single-fraction whole-brain irradiation was maximal with 60 mg/kg of pentobarbital, and occurred over the range of all doses examined between 30 to 90 Gy. Protection was seen only in animals that received the pentobarbital before irradiation. Administration of other compounds that enhance GABA binding (Saffan and diazepam) also significantly enhanced survival time.

  13. Optimal design of clinical trials with biologics using dose-time-response models.

    PubMed

    Lange, Markus R; Schmidli, Heinz

    2014-12-30

    Biologics, in particular monoclonal antibodies, are important therapies in serious diseases such as cancer, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, or rheumatoid arthritis. While most conventional drugs are given daily, the effect of monoclonal antibodies often lasts for months, and hence, these biologics require less frequent dosing. A good understanding of the time-changing effect of the biologic for different doses is needed to determine both an adequate dose and an appropriate time-interval between doses. Clinical trials provide data to estimate the dose-time-response relationship with semi-mechanistic nonlinear regression models. We investigate how to best choose the doses and corresponding sample size allocations in such clinical trials, so that the nonlinear dose-time-response model can be precisely estimated. We consider both local and conservative Bayesian D-optimality criteria for the design of clinical trials with biologics. For determining the optimal designs, computer-intensive numerical methods are needed, and we focus here on the particle swarm optimization algorithm. This metaheuristic optimizer has been successfully used in various areas but has only recently been applied in the optimal design context. The equivalence theorem is used to verify the optimality of the designs. The methodology is illustrated based on results from a clinical study in patients with gout, treated by a monoclonal antibody.

  14. The effect of endocrine responsiveness on high-risk breast cancer treated with dose-intensive chemotherapy: results of International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial 15-95 after prolonged follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Colleoni, M.; Sun, Z.; Martinelli, G.; Basser, R. L.; Coates, A. S.; Gelber, R. D.; Green, M. D.; Peccatori, F.; Cinieri, S.; Aebi, S.; Viale, G.; Price, K. N.; Goldhirsch, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The role of adjuvant dose-intensive chemotherapy and its efficacy according to baseline features has not yet been established. Patients and methods: Three hundred and forty-four patients were randomized to receive seven courses of standard-dose chemotherapy (SD-CT) or three cycles of dose-intensive epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (epirubicin 200 mg/m2 plus cyclophosphamide 4 mg/m2 with filgrastim and progenitor cell support). All patients were assigned tamoxifen at the completion of chemotherapy. The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS). This paper updates the results and explores patterns of recurrence according to predicting baseline features. Results: At 8.3-years median follow-up, patients assigned DI-EC had a significantly better DFS compared with those assigned SD-CT [8-year DFS percent 47% and 37%, respectively, hazard ratio (HR) 0.76; 95% confidence interval 0.58–1.00; P = 0.05]. Only patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease benefited from the DI-EC (HR 0.61; 95% confidence interval 0.39, 0.95; P = 0.03). Conclusions: After prolonged follow-up, DI-EC significantly improved DFS, but the effect was observed only in patients with ER-positive disease, leading to the hypothesis that efficacy of DI-EC may relate to its endocrine effects. Further studies designed to confirm the importance of endocrine responsiveness in patients treated with dose-intensive chemotherapy are encouraged. PMID:19468030

  15. Dose-response curve and optimal dosing regimen of cyclosporin A after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, P G; Rabchevsky, A G; Hicks, R R; Gibson, T R; Fletcher-Turner, A; Scheff, S W

    2000-01-01

    Acute neuropathology following experimental traumatic brain injury results in the rapid necrosis of cortical tissue at the site of injury. This primary injury is exacerbated in the ensuing hours and days via the progression of secondary injury mechanism(s) leading to significant neurological dysfunction. Recent evidence from our laboratory demonstrates that the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A significantly ameliorates cortical damage following traumatic brain injury. The present study extends the previous findings utilizing a unilateral controlled cortical impact model of traumatic brain injury in order to establish a dose-response curve and optimal dosing regimen of cyclosporin A. Following injury to adult rats, cyclosporin A was administrated at various dosages and the therapy was initiated at different times post-injury. In addition to examining the effect of cyclosporin A on the acute disruption of the blood-brain barrier following controlled cortical impact, we also assessed the efficacy of cyclosporin A to reduce tissue damage utilizing the fluid percussion model of traumatic brain injury. The findings demonstrate that the neuroprotection afforded by cyclosporin A is dose-dependent and that a therapeutic window exists up to 24h post-injury. Furthermore, the optimal cyclosporin dosage and regimen markedly reduces disruption of the blood-brain barrier acutely following a cortical contusion injury, and similarly affords significant neuroprotection following fluid percussion injury. These findings clearly suggest that the mechanisms responsible for tissue necrosis following traumatic brain injury are amenable to pharmacological intervention.

  16. A study on the total-dose response for modified silicon-on-insulator materials with the pseudo-MOS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Enxia; Sun, Jiayin; Zhang, Zhengxuan; Qian, Cong; Jiang, Jun; Wang, Xi; En, Yunfei; Luo, Hongwei; Shi, Qian; Zhang, Xiaowen

    2006-03-01

    In this work, silicon-on-insulator wafers fabricated by the separation-by-implantation-of-oxygen method were modified by Si ion implantation to improve their total-dose radiation hardness. The chemical bonds of Si in the buried oxide layer were investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results of Si 2p were presented to demonstrate the mechanism of radiation hardness with the formation of Si nanocrystals by ion implantation with the post anneal process. The pseudo-MOS method was used to test the ID-VG characteristics of the wafers before and after irradiation. The results showed that the processes of the buried oxide affected the character of the I-V curves of the pseudo-MOS, and a proper modification technology could improve the radiation hardness of the material remarkably.

  17. Effect of prebiotic fibre supplementation on hepatic gene expression and serum lipids: a dose-response study in JCR:LA-cp rats.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Jill A; Reimer, Raylene A

    2010-06-01

    Prebiotic fibres have been proposed to promote weight loss and lower serum cholesterol; however, the mechanisms are not fully understood. The aim of the present research was to identify possible mechanisms through which prebiotic fibres improve serum lipids. Lean and obese JCR:La-cp rats aged 8 weeks consumed one of three diets supplemented with 0, 10 or 20 % prebiotic fibre for 10 weeks. Rats were anaesthetised and a fasting blood sample was taken for lipid analysis. Real-time PCR was used to determine gene expression for cholesterol and fatty acid regulatory genes in liver tissue. Liver and caecal digesta cholesterol and TAG content were quantified. Both doses of prebiotic fibre lowered serum cholesterol levels by 24 % in the obese hyperlipidaemic rats (P < 0.05). This change was associated with an increase in caecal digesta as well as an up-regulation of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and bile production. Additionally, there was a 42 % reduction in TAG accumulation in the liver of the obese rats with 10 % prebiotic diet (P < 0.05); however, no change in liver fatty acid synthase (FAS). Prebiotic fibres appear to lower cholesterol levels through increased cholesterol excretion in the form of bile and inhibit the accumulation of TAG in the liver through a mechanism unrelated to FAS. These effects appear to be limited to the obese model and particularly the 10 % dose. The present work is significant as it provides insight into the mechanisms of action for prebiotic fibres on lipid metabolism and furthers the development of dietary treatments for hypercholesterolaemia.

  18. An adaptive two-stage dose-response design method for establishing Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Franchetti, Yoko; Anderson, Stewart J.; Sampson, Allan R.

    2013-01-01

    We propose an adaptive two-stage dose-response design where a pre-specified adaptation rule is used to add and/or drop treatment arms between the stages. We extend the multiple comparison procedures-modeling (MCP-Mod) approach into a two-stage design. In each stage, we use the same set of candidate dose-response models and test for a dose-response relationship or proof of concept (PoC) via model-associated statistics. The stage-wise test results are then combined to establish ‘global’ PoC using a conditional error function. Our simulation studies showed good and more robust power in our design method compared to conventional and fixed designs. PMID:23957520

  19. Responses of astrocytes in culture after low dose laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yew, D.T.; Zheng, D.R.; Au, C.; Li, W.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The effect of Helium-Neon low dose laser on astrocytes was investigated in cultures of isolated astrocytes from albino neonatal rats. The laser appeared to inhibit the growth of astrocytes as exemplified by the smaller sizes of the cells and the decreased leucine uptake in each cell after treatment. Temporary decrease in the number of mitoses was also observed, but this trend was reversed soon after. Electron microscopic studies revealed an increase in buddings from cell bodies and processes (branches) after irradiation.

  20. Effects of ozone on pulmonary function: the relationship of response to dose

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, M.T. )

    1991-07-01

    A dose-response relationship for the effects of ozone on pulmonary function in humans has been derived using the concept of internal thoracic dose. This quantity, which represents the dose of inhaled pollutant capable of reaching and affecting target sites in the lower respiratory tract, was estimated using a mathematical model derived in part from theory and in part from data obtained using human and animal subjects. The model was applied to ozone exposures of individuals ranging in age from infants to adults over age 65 and for exercise conditions ranging from rest to heavy exercise (greater than 6 times resting minute ventilation). The dose model was successfully used to compare results from clinical studies in which subjects were exposed under disparate conditions of exercise, exposure concentration and exposure duration. The model can also be applied to estimate doses to populations exposed to ambient pollution. The effects of ozone on pulmonary function in adults and children were evaluated using the model. On the basis of dose of ozone (micrograms O3 per kg body mass), children, aged 8 to 15 years, and adults were equally sensitive. When dose is analyzed as a function of age, the data suggest that children, under the age of 6 years, receive greater doses to respiratory tract tissues than do older children or adults, under equivalent conditions of exposure.

  1. Beneficial effects of low dose radiation in response to the oncogenic KRAS induced cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Rae-Kwon; Kim, Min-Jung; Seong, Ki Moon; Kaushik, Neha; Suh, Yongjoon; Yoo, Ki-Chun; Cui, Yan-Hong; Jin, Young Woo; Nam, Seon Young; Lee, Su-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Recently low dose irradiation has gained attention in the field of radiotherapy. For lack of understanding of the molecular consequences of low dose irradiation, there is much doubt concerning its risks on human beings. In this article, we report that low dose irradiation is capable of blocking the oncogenic KRAS-induced malignant transformation. To address this hypothesis, we showed that low dose irradiation, at doses of 0.1 Gray (Gy); predominantly provide defensive response against oncogenic KRAS -induced malignant transformation in human cells through the induction of antioxidants without causing cell death and acts as a critical regulator for the attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Importantly, we elucidated that knockdown of antioxidants significantly enhanced ROS generation, invasive and migratory properties and abnormal acini formation in KRAS transformed normal as well as cancer cells. Taken together, this study demonstrates that low dose irradiation reduces the KRAS induced malignant cellular transformation through diminution of ROS. This interesting phenomenon illuminates the beneficial effects of low dose irradiation, suggesting one of contributory mechanisms for reducing the oncogene induced carcinogenesis that intensify the potential use of low dose irradiation as a standard regimen. PMID:26515758

  2. Beneficial effects of low dose radiation in response to the oncogenic KRAS induced cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Rae-Kwon; Kim, Min-Jung; Seong, Ki Moon; Kaushik, Neha; Suh, Yongjoon; Yoo, Ki-Chun; Cui, Yan-Hong; Jin, Young Woo; Nam, Seon Young; Lee, Su-Jae

    2015-10-30

    Recently low dose irradiation has gained attention in the field of radiotherapy. For lack of understanding of the molecular consequences of low dose irradiation, there is much doubt concerning its risks on human beings. In this article, we report that low dose irradiation is capable of blocking the oncogenic KRAS-induced malignant transformation. To address this hypothesis, we showed that low dose irradiation, at doses of 0.1 Gray (Gy); predominantly provide defensive response against oncogenic KRAS -induced malignant transformation in human cells through the induction of antioxidants without causing cell death and acts as a critical regulator for the attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Importantly, we elucidated that knockdown of antioxidants significantly enhanced ROS generation, invasive and migratory properties and abnormal acini formation in KRAS transformed normal as well as cancer cells. Taken together, this study demonstrates that low dose irradiation reduces the KRAS induced malignant cellular transformation through diminution of ROS. This interesting phenomenon illuminates the beneficial effects of low dose irradiation, suggesting one of contributory mechanisms for reducing the oncogene induced carcinogenesis that intensify the potential use of low dose irradiation as a standard regimen.

  3. Perception and annoyance due to wind turbine noise--a dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Eja; Waye, Kerstin Persson

    2004-12-01

    Installed global wind power increased by 26% during 2003, with U.S and Europe accounting for 90% of the cumulative capacity. Little is known about wind turbines' impact on people living in their vicinity. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of annoyance due to wind turbine noise and to study dose-response relationships. Interrelationships between noise annoyance and sound characteristics, as well as the influence of subjective variables such as attitude and noise sensitivity, were also assessed. A cross-sectional study was performed in Sweden in 2000. Responses were obtained through questionnaires (n = 351; response rate 68.4%), and doses were calculated as A-weighted sound pressure levels for each respondent. A statistically significant dose-response relationship was found, showing higher proportion of people reporting perception and annoyance than expected from the present dose-response relationships for transportation noise. The unexpected high proportion of annoyance could be due to visual interference, influencing noise annoyance, as well as the presence of intrusive sound characteristics. The respondents' attitude to the visual impact of wind turbines on the landscape scenery was found to influence noise annoyance.

  4. Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal?**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal? The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the 1940s, originally focusing on linear no threshold (LNT) versus threshold responses for cancer and noncanc...

  5. Testing the dose-response specification in epidemiology: public health and policy consequences for lead.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Stephen J; Rothenberg, Jesse C

    2005-09-01

    Statistical evaluation of the dose-response function in lead epidemiology is rarely attempted. Economic evaluation of health benefits of lead reduction usually assumes a linear dose-response function, regardless of the outcome measure used. We reanalyzed a previously published study, an international pooled data set combining data from seven prospective lead studies examining contemporaneous blood lead effect on IQ (intelligence quotient) of 7-year-old children (n = 1,333). We constructed alternative linear multiple regression models with linear blood lead terms (linear-linear dose response) and natural-log-transformed blood lead terms (log-linear dose response). We tested the two lead specifications for nonlinearity in the models, compared the two lead specifications for significantly better fit to the data, and examined the effects of possible residual confounding on the functional form of the dose-response relationship. We found that a log-linear lead-IQ relationship was a significantly better fit than was a linear-linear relationship for IQ (p = 0.009), with little evidence of residual confounding of included model variables. We substituted the log-linear lead-IQ effect in a previously published health benefits model and found that the economic savings due to U.S. population lead decrease between 1976 and 1999 (from 17.1 microg/dL to 2.0 microg/dL) was 2.2 times (319 billion dollars) that calculated using a linear-linear dose-response function (149 billion dollars). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention action limit of 10 microg/dL for children fails to protect against most damage and economic cost attributable to lead exposure.

  6. Tissue repair response as a function of dose in thioacetamide hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Mangipudy, R S; Chanda, S; Mehendale, H M

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to establish a dose-response relationship for thioacetamide (TA), where tissue regeneration as well as liver injury were two simultaneous but opposing responses. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intraperitioneally with a 12-fold dose range of TA, and both liver injury and tissue repair were measured. Liver injury was assessed by serum enzyme elevations. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation did not show any dose response over a 12-fold dose range up to 24 hr. A dramatic ALT elevation was evident after 24 hr and only for the highest dose (600 mg/kg). Tissue regeneration response was measured by 3H-thymidine (3H-T) incorporation into hepatocellular DNA and by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) procedure during a time course (6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 hr). Tissue regeneration, as indicated by 3H-T incorporation, peaked at 36 hr after administration of a low dose of TA (50 mg/kg). With increasing doses, a greater but delayed stimulation of cell division was observed until a threshold was reached (300 mg/kg). Above the tissue repair threshold (600 mg/kg), because stimulated tissue repair as revealed by 3H-T incorporation in hepatonuclear DNA was significantly delayed and attenuated, injury assessed by serum enzyme elevations was remarkably accelerated, indicating unrestrained progression of injury leading to animal death. These findings suggest that, in addition to the magnitude of tissue repair response, the time at which this occurs is critical in restraining the progression of injury, thereby determining the ultimate outcome of toxicity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 3. C Figure 3. D Figure 3. E Figure 3. F Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. A Figure 6. B Figure 6. C Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 7. C Figure 7. D Figure 7. E Figure 7. F PMID:7768227

  7. Immunological responses following experimental endobronchial infection of badgers (Meles meles) with different doses of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Lesellier, Sandrine; Corner, Leigh; Costello, Eamon; Sleeman, Paddy; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; Glyn Hewinson, R; Chambers, Mark; Gormley, Eamonn

    2009-01-15

    The Eurasian badger (Meles meles) is a wildlife reservoir for Mycobacterium bovis infection in Ireland and Great Britain and has been implicated in the transmission of tuberculosis to cattle. Vaccination of badgers is an option that could be used as part of a strategy to control the disease. In this study we used an endobronchial infection procedure to inoculate groups of badgers with three different doses (3x10(3), 2x10(2) and <10 Colony Forming Units (CFUs)) of M. bovis. After 17 weeks the disease status of each animal was determined by post-mortem pathology and culture for M. bovis. Each of the inoculum doses resulted in establishment of infection in the badgers. The cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were measured by lymphocyte transformation assay (LTA) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cultured with bovine tuberculin (PPD-B). In each infected group the CMI responses increased with a kinetic profile corresponding to the delivered dose and the post-mortem pathology. The serological responses were measured by ELISA and a multi-antigen print immunoassay (MAPIA) in order to investigate any changes in the antigenic repertoire associated with different infective doses. In contrast to the CMI responses, the ELISA and MAPIA showed that the recognition of antigens by the badgers was intermittent and not strongly influenced by the dose of M. bovis.

  8. Hematopoietic responses under protracted exposures to low daily dose gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Seed, T M; Fritz, T E; Tolle, D V; Jackson, W E

    2002-01-01

    In attempting to evaluate the possible health consequences of chronic ionizing radiation exposure during extended space travel (e.g., Mars Mission), ground-based experimental studies of the clinical and pathological responses of canines under low daily doses of 60Co gamma irradiation (0.3-26.3 cGy d-1) have been examined. Specific reference was given to responses of the blood forming system. Results suggest that the daily dose rate of 7.5 cGy d-1 represents a threshold below which the hematopoietic system can retain either partial or full trilineal cell-producing capacity (erythropoiesis, myelopoiesis, and megakaryopoiesis) for extended periods of exposure (>1 yr). Trilineal capacity was fully retained for several years of exposure at the lowest dose-rate tested (0.3 cGy d-1) but was completely lost within several hundred days at the highest dose-rate (26.3 cGy d-1). Retention of hematopoietic capacity under chronic exposure has been demonstrated to be mediated by hematopoietic progenitors with acquired radioresistance and repair functions, altered cytogenetics, and cell-cycle characteristics. Radiological, biological, and temporal parameters responsible for these vital acquisitions by hematopoietic progenitors have been partially characterized. These parameters, along with threshold responses, are described and discussed in relation to potential health risks of the space traveler under chronic stress of low-dose irradiation.

  9. A comparison of linaclotide and lubiprostone dosing regimens on ion transport responses in human colonic mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang Bum; Marchelletta, Ronald R; Penrose, Harrison; Docherty, Michael J; McCole, Declan F

    2015-01-01

    Linaclotide, a synthetic guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) agonist, and the prostone analog, Lubiprostone, are approved to manage chronic idiopathic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Lubiprostone also protects intestinal mucosal barrier function in ischemia. GC-C signaling regulates local fluid balance and other components of intestinal mucosal homeostasis including epithelial barrier function. The aim of this study was to compare if select dosing regimens differentially affect linaclotide and lubiprostone modulation of ion transport and barrier properties of normal human colonic mucosa. Normal sigmoid colon biopsies from healthy subjects were mounted in Ussing chambers. Tissues were treated with linaclotide, lubiprostone, or vehicle to determine effects on short-circuit current (Isc). Subsequent Isc responses to the cAMP agonist, forskolin, and the calcium agonist, carbachol, were also measured to assess if either drug caused desensitization. Barrier properties were assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance. Isc responses to linaclotide and lubiprostone were significantly higher than vehicle control when administered bilaterally or to the mucosal side only. Single versus cumulative concentrations of linaclotide showed differences in efficacy while cumulative but not single dosing caused desensitization to forskolin. Lubiprostone reduced forskolin responses under all conditions. Linaclotide and lubiprostone exerted a positive effect on TER that was dependent on the dosing regimen. Linaclotide and lubiprostone increase ion transport responses across normal human colon but linaclotide displays increased sensitivity to the dosing regimen used. These findings may have implications for dosing protocols of these agents in patients with constipation. PMID:26038704

  10. A comparison of linaclotide and lubiprostone dosing regimens on ion transport responses in human colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang Bum; Marchelletta, Ronald R; Penrose, Harrison; Docherty, Michael J; McCole, Declan F

    2015-03-01

    Linaclotide, a synthetic guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) agonist, and the prostone analog, Lubiprostone, are approved to manage chronic idiopathic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Lubiprostone also protects intestinal mucosal barrier function in ischemia. GC-C signaling regulates local fluid balance and other components of intestinal mucosal homeostasis including epithelial barrier function. The aim of this study was to compare if select dosing regimens differentially affect linaclotide and lubiprostone modulation of ion transport and barrier properties of normal human colonic mucosa. Normal sigmoid colon biopsies from healthy subjects were mounted in Ussing chambers. Tissues were treated with linaclotide, lubiprostone, or vehicle to determine effects on short-circuit current (I sc). Subsequent I sc responses to the cAMP agonist, forskolin, and the calcium agonist, carbachol, were also measured to assess if either drug caused desensitization. Barrier properties were assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance. I sc responses to linaclotide and lubiprostone were significantly higher than vehicle control when administered bilaterally or to the mucosal side only. Single versus cumulative concentrations of linaclotide showed differences in efficacy while cumulative but not single dosing caused desensitization to forskolin. Lubiprostone reduced forskolin responses under all conditions. Linaclotide and lubiprostone exerted a positive effect on TER that was dependent on the dosing regimen. Linaclotide and lubiprostone increase ion transport responses across normal human colon but linaclotide displays increased sensitivity to the dosing regimen used. These findings may have implications for dosing protocols of these agents in patients with constipation.

  11. Dose-response relationship between light exposure and cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Knaier, R; Meister, S; Aeschbacher, T; Gemperle, D; Rossmeissl, A; Cajochen, C; Schmidt-Trucksäss, A

    2016-07-01

    Light has a stimulating effect on physical performance if scheduled according to the chronotype, but dose-dependent effects on performance have not yet been examined. Three groups of healthy men (25.1 ± 3.1 years) were exposed to light for different durations in a parallel group design before a 40-min time-trial. In each group, subjects were exposed to either bright light (BL, 4420 lx) or moderate light (ML, 230 lx) in a randomized order in a crossover design. The durations of light exposure were 120 min prior to and during exercise (2HEX; n = 16), 60 min prior to and during exercise (1HEX; n = 10), or only for 60 min prior to exercise (1H; n = 15). Total work performed during the time-trial in kJ in the 2HEX group was significantly higher in the BL setting (527 kJ) than in ML (512 kJ) (P = 0.002), but not in 1HEX (BL: 485 kJ; ML: 498 kJ) or 1H (BL: 519 kJ; ML: 514 kJ) (P = 0.770; P = 0.485). There was a significant (P = 0.006) positive dose-response relationship between the duration of light exposure and the work performed over the three doses of light exposure. A long duration light exposure is an effective tool to increase total work in a medium length time-trial in subjects normalized for their individual chronotype.

  12. A Meta-Analysis To Determine the Dose Response for Strength Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, Matthew R.; Alvar, Brent A.; Burkett, Lee N.; Ball, Stephen D.

    2003-01-01

    Examined the quantitative dose-response relationship for strength development by calculating the magnitude of gains elicited by various levels of training intensity, frequency, and volume; thus clarifying the effort to benefit ratio. A meta-analysis of 140 studies with 1,433 effect sizes (ES) was conducted. ES demonstrated different responses…

  13. DOSE -RESPONSE RELATIONSHIP OF CRUDE COBRA VENOM (NAJA JANA) IN THE DOG

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The study was conducted to determine the dose - response effects of crude cobra venom (Naja naja) in the anesthetized dog. It was concluded that the LD50 is about 0.105 mg/kg, and the LD99 is 0.148 mg/kg.

  14. Duration of Exposure and the Dose-Response Model of PTSD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaysen, Debra; Rosen, Gerald; Bowman, Marilyn; Resick, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    A dose-response model underlies posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and posits a relationship between event magnitude and clinical outcome. The present study examines whether one index of event magnitude--duration of exposure--contributes to risk of PTSD among female victims of sexual assault. Findings support a small but significant contribution…

  15. What can be learned from epidemiologic studies of persons exposed to low doses of radiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1993-04-01

    The main objective of radiation risk assessment is to determine the risk of various adverse health effects associated with exposure to low doses and low dose rates. Extrapolation of risks from studies of persons exposed at high doses (generally exceeding 1 Sv) and dose rates has been the primary approach used to achieve this objective. The study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has played an especially important role in risk assessment efforts. A direct assessment of the dose-response function based on studies of persons exposed at low doses and dose rates is obviously desirable. This paper focuses on the potential of both current and future nuclear workers studies for investigating the dose-response functions at low doses, and also discusses analyses making use of the low dose portion of the atomic bomb survivor data. Difficulties in using these data are the statistical imprecision of estimated dose-response parameters, and potential bias resulting from confounding factors and from uncertainties in dose estimates.

  16. Biological profiling and dose-response modeling tools ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Through its ToxCast project, the U.S. EPA has developed a battery of in vitro high throughput screening (HTS) assays designed to assess the potential toxicity of environmental chemicals. At present, over 1800 chemicals have been tested in up to 600 assays, yielding a large number of concentration-response data sets. Standard processing of these data sets involves finding a best fitting mathematical model and set of model parameters that specify this model. The model parameters include quantities such as the half-maximal activity concentration (or “AC50”) that have biological significance and can be used to inform the efficacy or potency of a given chemical with respect to a given assay. All of this data is processed and stored in an online-accessible database and website: http://actor.epa.gov/dashboard2. Results from these in vitro assays are used in a multitude of ways. New pathways and targets can be identified and incorporated into new or existing adverse outcome pathways (AOPs). Pharmacokinetic models such as those implemented EPA’s HTTK R package can be used to translate an in vitro concentration into an in vivo dose; i.e., one can predict the oral equivalent dose that might be expected to activate a specific biological pathway. Such predicted values can then be compared with estimated actual human exposures prioritize chemicals for further testing.Any quantitative examination should be accompanied by estimation of uncertainty. We are developing met

  17. Critical target and dose and dose-rate responses for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Corcoran, J. J.; Milligan, J. R.; Ward, J. F.; Morgan, W. F.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the critical target, dose response and dose-rate response for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-substituted and unsubstituted GM10115 cells were exposed to a range of doses (0.1-10 Gy) and different dose rates (0.092-17.45 Gy min(-1)). The status of chromosomal stability was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization approximately 20 generations after irradiation in clonal populations derived from single progenitor cells surviving acute exposure. Overall, nearly 700 individual clones representing over 140,000 metaphases were analyzed. In cells unsubstituted with BrdU, a dose response was found, where the probability of observing delayed chromosomal instability in any given clone was 3% per gray of X rays. For cells substituted with 25-66% BrdU, however, a dose response was observed only at low doses (<1.0 Gy); at higher doses (>1.0 Gy), the incidence of chromosomal instability leveled off. There was an increase in the frequency and complexity of chromosomal instability per unit dose compared to cells unsubstituted with BrdU. The frequency of chromosomal instability appeared to saturate around approximately 30%, an effect which occurred at much lower doses in the presence of BrdU. Changing the gamma-ray dose rate by a factor of 190 (0.092 to 17.45 Gy min(-1)) produced no significant differences in the frequency of chromosomal instability. The enhancement of chromosomal instability promoted by the presence of the BrdU argues that DNA comprises at least one of the critical targets important for the induction of this end point of genomic instability.

  18. Patients who do not respond to the "usual" dose: why Terry fell off the dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Preskorn, Sheldon H

    2009-11-01

    Clinical trials are aimed at determining what happens in the "usual" patient; however, clinicians are interested in what happens in their patients even if they are not usual. The usual dose-response relationship is determined as part of the drug development process required for approval of a new drug. However, clinicians are likely to encounter patients who "fall off" the usual dose-response curve because they are either sensitive or resistant to the beneficial (efficacy) or adverse effects of a drug. This column is the first in a series that will examine why specific patients fall off the usual dose-response curve and how clinicians can manage such patients when they encounter them. This column discusses what a dose-response curve is, how it is determined, and why it is clinically important.

  19. Global Gene Expression Responses to Low- or High-Dose Radiation in a Human Three-Dimensional Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Mezentsev, Alexandre; Amundson, Sally A.

    2011-01-01

    Accumulating data suggest that the biological responses to high and low doses of radiation are qualitatively different, necessitating the direct study of low-dose responses to better understand potential risks. Most such studies have used two-dimensional culture systems, which may not fully represent responses in three-dimensional tissues. To gain insight into low-dose responses in tissue, we have profiled global gene expression in EPI-200, a three-dimensional tissue model that imitates the structure and function of human epidermis, at 4, 16 and 24 h after exposure to high (2.5 Gy) and low (0.1 Gy) doses of low-LET protons. The most significant gene ontology groups among genes altered in expression were consistent with effects observed at the tissue level, where the low dose was associated with recovery and tissue repair, while the high dose resulted in loss of structural integrity and terminal differentiation. Network analysis of the significantly responding genes suggested that TP53 dominated the response to 2.5 Gy, while HNF4A, a novel transcription factor not previously associated with radiation response, was most prominent in the low-dose response. HNF4A protein levels and phosphorylation were found to increase in tissues and cells after low- but not high-dose irradiation. PMID:21486161

  20. Dose response on the 110 °C thermoluminescence peak of un-heated, synthetic Merck quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya Keleş, Şule; Meriç, Niyazi; Polymeris, George S.

    2016-07-01

    Studies on 110 °C TL peak have been carried out using natural quartz from different origins and synthetic quartz produced by different suppliers. The interest in quartz is due to its usage in dating and retrospective dosimetry as a main material; both synthetic and natural types of quartz yield the 110 °C TL peak in their glow curve. In most studies to understand the physical mechanism behind the TL system, synthetic quartz samples are used and there are many investigations about dose response, in both low and high radiation dose region. In these studies generally synthetic quartz samples produced by Sawyer Research Products are used and the studies showed that both heated and un-heated synthetic quartz samples have intense supra-linear responses. Supra-linearity was enhanced by applying a pre-irradiation while several models have been developed towards an explanation to these supra-linearity effects. In this study commercially available synthetic Merck quartz was used. Different combinations of optical filters were used to obtain dose response curves upto 266 Gy and the effect of pre-dose to these dose response curves was studied. Un-pre-dosed Merck quartz samples dose supra-linearity index is below 1 independently on the optical filters; so Merck quartz showed linear or sub-linear dose response.

  1. Fewer doses of HPV vaccine result in immune response similar to three-dose regimen

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists report that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum antibody levels against two of the most carcinogenic types of HPV (16 and 18), compared to a standard three dose regimen.

  2. Smoking increases risks of all-cause and breast cancer specific mortality in breast cancer individuals: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies involving 39725 breast cancer cases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kang; Li, Feng; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Zhuyue; Li, Hongyuan

    2016-12-13

    Smoking is associated with the risks of mortality from breast cancer (BC) or all causes in BC survivors. Two-stage dose-response meta-analysis was conducted. A search of PubMed and Embase was performed, and a random-effect model was used to yield summary hazard ratios (HRs). Eleven prospective cohort studies were included. The summary HR per 10 cigarettes/day, 10 pack-years, 10 years increase were 1.10 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-1.16), 1.09 (95% CI = 1.06-1.12), 1.10 (95% CI = 1.06-1.14) for BC specific mortality, and 1.15 (95% CI = 1.10-1.19), 1.15 (95% CI = 1.10-1.20), 1.17 (95% CI = 1.11-1.23) for all-cause mortality, respectively. The linear or non-linear associations between smoking and risks of mortality from BC or all causes were revealed. Subgroup analyses suggested a positive association between ever or former smoking and the risk of all-cause mortality in BC patients, especially in high doses consumption. In conclusion, higher smoking intensity, more cumulative amount of cigarettes consumption and longer time for smoking is associated with elevated risk of mortality from BC and all causes in BC individuals. The results regarding smoking cessation and "ever or former" smokers should be treated with caution due to limited studies.

  3. Low-Dose Gamma Radiation Does Not Induce an Adaptive Response for Micronucleus Induction in Mouse Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Bannister, L A; Serran, M L; Mantha, R R

    2015-11-01

    Low-dose ionizing radiation is known to induce radioadaptive responses in cells in vitro as well as in mice in vivo. Low-dose radiation decreases the incidence and increases latency for spontaneous and radiation-induced tumors in mice, potentially as a result of enhanced cellular DNA repair efficiency or a reduction in genomic instability. In this study, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was used to examine dose response and potential radioadaptive response for cytogenetic damage and cell survival in C57BL/6 and BALB/c spleen cells exposed in vitro or in vivo to low-dose 60Co gamma radiation. The effects of genetic background, radiation dose and dose rate, sampling time and cell cycle were investigated with respect to dose response and radioadaptive response. In C57BL/6 mice, a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for the induction of micronuclei (MN) was observed for doses between 100 mGy and 2 Gy. BALB/c mice exhibited increased radiosensitivity for MN induction compared to C57BL/6 mice. A 20 mGy dose had no effect on MN frequencies in splenocytes of either mouse strain, however, increased spleen weight and a reduced number of dead cells were noted in the C57BL/6 strain only. Multiple experimental parameters were investigated in radioadaptive response studies, including dose and dose rate of the priming dose (20 mGy at 0.5 mGy/min and 100 mGy at 10 mGy/min), time interval (4 and 24 h) between priming and challenge doses, cell cycle stage (resting or proliferating) at exposure and kinetics after the challenge dose. Radioadaptive responses were not observed for MN induction for either mouse strain under any of the experimental conditions investigated. In contrast, a synergistic response for radiation-induced micronuclei in C57BL/6 spleen was detected after in vivo 20 mGy irradiation. This increase in the percentage of cells with cytogenetic damage was associated with a reduction in the number of nonviable spleen cells, suggesting that low-dose

  4. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF DOSE-EFFECT AND DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT In 2003, the International Union of Pure and Applied chemistry (IUPAC) issued a glossary of terms that included the defi nition of dose-effect and doseresponse relationships (Nordberg et al., 2004). Dose effect relationship is defined as an association between dose and...

  5. Qualitative and quantitative approaches in the dose-response assessment of genotoxic carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Shoji; Gi, Min; Kakehashi, Anna; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Matsumoto, Michiharu

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative approaches are important issues in field of carcinogenic risk assessment of the genotoxic carcinogens. Herein, we provide quantitative data on low-dose hepatocarcinogenicity studies for three genotoxic hepatocarcinogens: 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN). Hepatocarcinogenicity was examined by quantitative analysis of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci, which are the preneoplastic lesions in rat hepatocarcinogenesis and the endpoint carcinogenic marker in the rat liver medium-term carcinogenicity bioassay. We also examined DNA damage and gene mutations which occurred through the initiation stage of carcinogenesis. For the establishment of points of departure (PoD) from which the cancer-related risk can be estimated, we analyzed the above events by quantitative no-observed-effect level and benchmark dose approaches. MeIQx at low doses induced formation of DNA-MeIQx adducts; somewhat higher doses caused elevation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyquanosine levels; at still higher doses gene mutations occurred; and the highest dose induced formation of GST-P positive foci. These data indicate that early genotoxic events in the pathway to carcinogenesis showed the expected trend of lower PoDs for earlier events in the carcinogenic process. Similarly, only the highest dose of IQ caused an increase in the number of GST-P positive foci in the liver, while IQ-DNA adduct formation was observed with low doses. Moreover, treatment with DEN at low doses had no effect on development of GST-P positive foci in the liver. These data on PoDs for the markers contribute to understand whether genotoxic carcinogens have a threshold for their carcinogenicity. The most appropriate approach to use in low dose-response assessment must be approved on the basis of scientific judgment.

  6. Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

    2011-03-24

    differences in cellular defense mechanisms between low and high doses of low LET radiation and to define the radiation doses where the cellular DNA damage signaling and repair mechanisms tend to shift. This information is critically important to address and advance some of the low dose research program objectives of DOE. The results of this proposed study will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms for the cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation. Further, systematic analysis of the role of PIKK signaling pathways as a function of radiation dose in tissue microenvironment will provide useful mechanistic information for improving the accuracy of radiation risk assessment for low doses. Knowledge of radiation responses in tissue microenvironment is important for the accurate prediction of ionizing radiation risks associated with cancer and tissue degeneration in humans.

  7. Acidobacteria Community Responses to Nitrogen Dose and Form in Chinese Fir Plantations in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Caixia; Dong, Yuhong; Hou, Lingyu; Deng, Nan; Jiao, Ruzhen

    2017-03-01

    Acidobacteria is a new bacterial group, identified by molecular research, which is widely distributed and has specific ecological functions in forest soil. In this study, we investigated Acidobacteria response to N input, and the effects were related to N form and dose. The experimental design included two N forms (NH4(+)-N and NO3(-)-N) and five levels of N deposition (0, 20, 40, 60, 80 kg N ha(-1)) for 2 years. Research into the Acidobacteria community was conducted using 16Sr RNA gene-based high-throughput pyrosequencing methods. Acidobacteria OTUs and N had a negative relationship in 0-60 kg ha(-1) year(-1); however, at N doses beyond a certain size, nitrogen might promote an increase in Acidobacteria OTUs. The Acidobacteria relative abundance under NH4(+)-N treatment was higher than under NO3(-)-N treatment. Acidobacteria relative abundance decreased with increasing of NH4(+)-N dose, but increased with increasing NO3(-)-N dose. Overall, 13 different Acidobacteria subgroups were identified, with Gp1, Gp2, and Gp3 being dominant. Significant differences in Acidobacteria distribution were primarily caused by N input and pH value. The environmental factors of N were all negatively related to Acidobacteria distribution in low N dose treatments (0-20 kg ha(-1) year(-1)), but were positively related in response to N dose treatments (40-80 kg ha(-1) year(-1)).

  8. Arsenite Effects on Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Human and Mouse Primary Hepatocytes Follow a Nonlinear Dose Response

    PubMed Central

    Christudoss, Pamela; Mickey, Kristen; Tessman, Robert; Ni, Hong-min; Swerdlow, Russell

    2017-01-01

    Arsenite is a known carcinogen and its exposure has been implicated in a variety of noncarcinogenic health concerns. Increased oxidative stress is thought to be the primary cause of arsenite toxicity and the toxic effect is thought to be linear with detrimental effects reported at all concentrations of arsenite. But the paradigm of linear dose response in arsenite toxicity is shifting. In the present study we demonstrate that arsenite effects on mitochondrial respiration in primary hepatocytes follow a nonlinear dose response. In vitro exposure of primary hepatocytes to an environmentally relevant, moderate level of arsenite results in increased oxidant production that appears to arise from changes in the expression and activity of respiratory Complex I of the mitochondrial proton circuit. In primary hepatocytes the excess oxidant production appears to elicit adaptive responses that promote resistance to oxidative stress and a propensity to increased proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest a nonlinear dose-response characteristic of arsenite with low-dose arsenite promoting adaptive responses in a process known as mitohormesis, with transient increase in ROS levels acting as transducers of arsenite-induced mitohormesis. PMID:28163822

  9. Biologically Based Dose-Response Modeling. What is the potential for accurate description of the biological linkages in the applied dose - tissue dose-health effect continuum?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Given knowledge of exposure, the shape of the dose response curve is the key to predicting health risk, which in turn determines allowable levels of exposure and the associated economic costs of compliance.

  10. A Response Surface Model Exploration of Dosing Strategies in Gastrointestinal Endoscopies Using Midazolam and Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Jing-Yang; Ting, Chien-Kun; Hou, Ming-Chih; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Classical midazolam–opioid combination for gastrointestinal endoscopy sedation has been adopted for decades. Dosing regimens have been studied but most require fixed dosing intervals. We intend to use a sophisticated pharmacodynamic tool, response surface model (RSM), to simulate sedation using different regimens. RSM can predict patient's response during different phases of the examination and predict patient's wake-up time with precision and without the need for fixed dosing intervals. We believe it will aid physicians in guiding their dosing strategy and timing. The study is divided into 2 parts. The first part is the full Greco RSMs development for 3 distinct phases: esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), colonoscopy, and intersession (the time lapse between procedures). Observer's Assessment of Alertness Score (OAA/S) is used to assess patient response. The second part simulates 6 regimens with different characteristics using the RSMs: midazolam only, balanced midazolam and opioids, high-dose opioids and midazolam, low-dose midazolam with high-dose opioids, high-dose midazolam and low-dose opioids, and finally midazolam with continuous opioid infusion. Loss of response at 95% probability for adequate anesthesia during examination and return of consciousness at 50% probability during intersession was selected for simulation purposes. The average age of the patient population is 49.3 years. Mean BMI is 21.9 ± 2.3 kg/m2. About 56.7% were females and none received prior abdominal surgery. The cecal intubation rate was 100%. Only 1 patient (3%) developed temporary hypoxemia, which was promptly managed with simple measures. The RSMs for each phase showed significant synergy between midazolam and alfentanil. The balanced midazolam and alfentanil combination provided adequate anesthesia and most rapid return of consciousness. The awakening time from the final drug bolus was 7.4 minutes during EGD and colonoscopy stimulation, and 9.1 minutes during EGD

  11. Application of Dempster-Shafer theory in dose response outcome analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenzhou; Cui, Yunfeng; He, Yanyan; Yu, Yan; Galvin, James; Hussaini, Yousuff M.; Xiao, Ying

    2012-09-01

    The Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) reviews summarize the currently available three-dimensional dose/volume/outcome data from multi-institutions and numerous articles to update and refine the normal tissue dose/volume tolerance guidelines. As pointed out in the review, the data have limitations and even some inconsistency. However, with the help of new physical and statistical techniques, the information in the review could be updated so that patient care can be continually improved. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the application of a mathematical theory, the Dempster-Shafer theory, in dose/volume/outcome data analysis. We applied this theory to the original data obtained from published clinical studies describing dose response for radiation pneumonitis. Belief and plausibility concepts were introduced for dose response evaluation. We were also able to consider the uncertainty and inconsistency of the data from these studies with Yager's combination rule, a special methodology of Dempster-Shafer theory, to fuse the data at several specific doses. The values of belief and plausibility functions were obtained at the corresponding doses. Then we applied the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model to fit these values and a belief-plausibility range was obtained. This range could be considered as a probability range to assist physicians and treatment planners in determining acceptable dose-volume constraints. Finally, the parameters obtained from the LKB model fitting were compared with those in Emami and Burman's papers and those from other frequentist statistics methods. We found that Emami and Burman's parameters are within the belief-plausibility range we calculated by the Dempster-Shafer theory.

  12. DOSE-DEPENDENT TRANSITIONS IN MECHANISMS OF TOXICITY: CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experience with dose response and mechanisms of toxicity has shown that multiple mechanisms may exist for a single agent along the continuum of the full dose-response curve. It is highly likely that critical, limiting steps in any given mechanistic pathway may become overwhelmed ...

  13. Influence of Dose Rate on the Cellular Response to Low- and High-LET Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Wozny, Anne-Sophie; Alphonse, Gersende; Battiston-Montagne, Priscillia; Simonet, Stéphanie; Poncet, Delphine; Testa, Etienne; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Rancoule, Chloé; Magné, Nicolas; Beuve, Michael; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treatment failure is mostly explained by locoregional progression or intrinsic radioresistance. Radiotherapy (RT) has recently evolved with the emergence of heavy ion radiations or new fractionation schemes of photon therapy, which modify the dose rate of treatment delivery. The aim of the present study was then to evaluate the in vitro influence of a dose rate variation during conventional RT or carbon ion hadrontherapy treatment in order to improve the therapeutic care of patient. In this regard, two HNSCC cell lines were irradiated with photons or 72 MeV/n carbon ions at a dose rate of 0.5, 2, or 10 Gy/min. For both radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, the change in dose rate significantly affected cell survival in response to photon exposure. This variation of radiosensitivity was associated with the number of initial and residual DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By contrast, the dose rate change did not affect neither cell survival nor the residual DNA DSBs after carbon ion irradiation. As a result, the relative biological efficiency at 10% survival increased when the dose rate decreased. In conclusion, in the RT treatment of HNSCC, it is advised to remain very careful when modifying the classical schemes toward altered fractionation. At the opposite, as the dose rate does not seem to have any effects after carbon ion exposure, there is less need to adapt hadrontherapy treatment planning during active system irradiation. PMID:27014633

  14. Influence of Dose Rate on the Cellular Response to Low- and High-LET Radiations.

    PubMed

    Wozny, Anne-Sophie; Alphonse, Gersende; Battiston-Montagne, Priscillia; Simonet, Stéphanie; Poncet, Delphine; Testa, Etienne; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Rancoule, Chloé; Magné, Nicolas; Beuve, Michael; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treatment failure is mostly explained by locoregional progression or intrinsic radioresistance. Radiotherapy (RT) has recently evolved with the emergence of heavy ion radiations or new fractionation schemes of photon therapy, which modify the dose rate of treatment delivery. The aim of the present study was then to evaluate the in vitro influence of a dose rate variation during conventional RT or carbon ion hadrontherapy treatment in order to improve the therapeutic care of patient. In this regard, two HNSCC cell lines were irradiated with photons or 72 MeV/n carbon ions at a dose rate of 0.5, 2, or 10 Gy/min. For both radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, the change in dose rate significantly affected cell survival in response to photon exposure. This variation of radiosensitivity was associated with the number of initial and residual DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By contrast, the dose rate change did not affect neither cell survival nor the residual DNA DSBs after carbon ion irradiation. As a result, the relative biological efficiency at 10% survival increased when the dose rate decreased. In conclusion, in the RT treatment of HNSCC, it is advised to remain very careful when modifying the classical schemes toward altered fractionation. At the opposite, as the dose rate does not seem to have any effects after carbon ion exposure, there is less need to adapt hadrontherapy treatment planning during active system irradiation.

  15. Non-parametric estimators of a monotonic dose-response curve and bootstrap confidence intervals.

    PubMed

    Dilleen, Maria; Heimann, Günter; Hirsch, Ian

    2003-03-30

    In this paper we consider study designs which include a placebo and an active control group as well as several dose groups of a new drug. A monotonically increasing dose-response function is assumed, and the objective is to estimate a dose with equivalent response to the active control group, including a confidence interval for this dose. We present different non-parametric methods to estimate the monotonic dose-response curve. These are derived from the isotonic regression estimator, a non-negative least squares estimator, and a bias adjusted non-negative least squares estimator using linear interpolation. The different confidence intervals are based upon an approach described by Korn, and upon two different bootstrap approaches. One of these bootstrap approaches is standard, and the second ensures that resampling is done from empiric distributions which comply with the order restrictions imposed. In our simulations we did not find any differences between the two bootstrap methods, and both clearly outperform Korn's confidence intervals. The non-negative least squares estimator yields biased results for moderate sample sizes. The bias adjustment for this estimator works well, even for small and moderate sample sizes, and surprisingly outperforms the isotonic regression method in certain situations.

  16. Concord Grape Juice Polyphenols and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Dose-Response Relationships.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Vita, Joseph A; Chen, C-Y Oliver

    2015-12-02

    Pure fruit juices provide nutritional value with evidence suggesting some of their benefits on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk may be derived from their constituent polyphenols, particularly flavonoids. However, few data from clinical trials are available on the dose-response relationship of fruit juice flavonoids to these outcomes. Utilizing the results of clinical trials testing single doses, we have analyzed data from studies of 100% Concord grape juice by placing its flavonoid content in the context of results from randomized clinical trials of other polyphenol-rich foods and beverages describing the same outcomes but covering a broader range of intake. We selected established biomarkers determined by similar methods for measuring flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), blood pressure, platelet aggregation, and the resistance of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) to oxidation. Despite differences among the clinical trials in the treatment, subjects, and duration, correlations were observed between the dose and FMD. Inverse dose-response relationships, albeit with lower correlation coefficients, were also noted for the other outcomes. These results suggest a clear relationship between consumption of even modest serving sizes of Concord grape juice, flavonoid intake, and effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This approach to dose-response relationships may prove useful for testing other individual foods and beverages.

  17. Concord Grape Juice Polyphenols and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Dose-Response Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, Jeffrey B.; Vita, Joseph A.; Chen, C. -Y. Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Pure fruit juices provide nutritional value with evidence suggesting some of their benefits on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk may be derived from their constituent polyphenols, particularly flavonoids. However, few data from clinical trials are available on the dose-response relationship of fruit juice flavonoids to these outcomes. Utilizing the results of clinical trials testing single doses, we have analyzed data from studies of 100% Concord grape juice by placing its flavonoid content in the context of results from randomized clinical trials of other polyphenol-rich foods and beverages describing the same outcomes but covering a broader range of intake. We selected established biomarkers determined by similar methods for measuring flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), blood pressure, platelet aggregation, and the resistance of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) to oxidation. Despite differences among the clinical trials in the treatment, subjects, and duration, correlations were observed between the dose and FMD. Inverse dose-response relationships, albeit with lower correlation coefficients, were also noted for the other outcomes. These results suggest a clear relationship between consumption of even modest serving sizes of Concord grape juice, flavonoid intake, and effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This approach to dose-response relationships may prove useful for testing other individual foods and beverages. PMID:26633488

  18. Applicability of convex hull in multiple detector response space for neutron dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2009-08-01

    A novel neutron dose measurement method that flexibly responds to variations in the neutron field is being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency. This is an implementation of the multi-detector method (first introduced in 1960s) for neutron dose evaluation using a convex hull in the response space defined for multiple detectors. The convex hull provides a range of possible neutron dose corresponding to the incident neutron spectrum. Feasibility of the method was studied using a simulated response of mixed gas proportional counter. Monochromatic neutrons are shown to be fundamentally suitable for mapping the convex. The convex hull can be further reduced taking into consideration a priori information about physically possible incident neutron spectra, for example, theoretically derived moderated neutron spectra originated from a fission neutron source.

  19. Analysis of clinical trials with biologics using dose-time-response models.

    PubMed

    Lange, Markus R; Schmidli, Heinz

    2015-09-30

    Biologics such as monoclonal antibodies are increasingly and successfully used for the treatment of many chronic diseases. Unlike conventional small drug molecules, which are commonly given as tablets once daily, biologics are typically injected at much longer time intervals, that is, weeks or months. Hence, both the dose and the time interval have to be optimized during the drug development process for biologics. To identify an adequate regimen for the investigated biologic, the dose-time-response relationship must be well characterized, based on clinical trial data. The proposed approach uses semi-mechanistic nonlinear regression models to describe and predict the time-changing response for complex dosing regimens. Both likelihood-based and Bayesian methods for inference and prediction are discussed. The methodology is illustrated with data from a clinical study in an auto-immune disease.

  20. Response of osteosarcoma to preoperative intravenous high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Mail, J.T.; Cohen, M.D.; Mirkin, L.D.; Provisor, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The histologic response of an osteosarcoma to preamputation high-dose methotrexate therapy can be used to determine the optimum maintenance chemotherapy regimen to be administered after amputation. This study evaluates computed tomography (CT) as a method of assessing the response of the tumor to the methotrexate therapy. Nine patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of an extremity had a CT scan of the tumor at initial presentation. This was compared with a second CT scan after four courses of high-dose intravenous methotrexate. Each set of scans was evaluated for changes in bony destruction, soft-tissue mass, pattern of calcification, and extent of tumor involvement of the marrow cavity. These findings were correlated with the histologic response of the tumor as measured by the degree of tumor necrosis. The changes seen on CT correlated well with the degree of the histologic response in seven of the nine patients.

  1. Induction of MRSA Biofilm by Low-Dose β-Lactam Antibiotics: Specificity, Prevalence and Dose-Response Effects.

    PubMed

    Ng, Mandy; Epstein, Samuel B; Callahan, Mary T; Piotrowski, Brian O; Simon, Gary L; Roberts, Afsoon D; Keiser, John F; Kaplan, Jeffrey B

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a leading cause of hospital- and community-associated infections. The formation of adherent clusters of cells known as biofilms is an important virulence factor in MRSA pathogenesis. Previous studies showed that subminimal inhibitory (sub-MIC) concentrations of methicillin induce biofilm formation in the community-associated MRSA strain LAC. In this study we measured the ability sub-MIC concentrations of eight other β-lactam antibiotics and six non-β-lactam antibiotics to induce LAC biofilm. All eight β-lactam antibiotics, but none of the non-β-lactam antibiotics, induced LAC biofilm. The dose-response effects of the eight β-lactam antibiotics on LAC biofilm varied from biphasic and bimodal to near-linear. We also found that sub-MIC methicillin induced biofilm in 33 out of 39 additional MRSA clinical isolates, which also exhibited biphasic, bimodal and linear dose-response curves. The amount of biofilm formation induced by sub-MIC methicillin was inversely proportional to the susceptibility of each strain to methicillin. Our results demonstrate that induction of biofilm by sub-MIC antibiotics is a common phenotype among MRSA clinical strains and is specific for β-lactam antibiotics. These findings may have relevance to the use of β-lactam antibiotics in clinical and agricultural settings.

  2. A DOSE-RESPONSE STUDY OF THE TOXICITY OF A MIXTURE OF 7N-METHYL CARBAMATE PESTICIDES IN ADULT, MALE RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is scarce knowledge regarding the toxicity of pesticide mixtures, especially mixtures of the anticholinesterase N-methyl carbamates. A mixture study was conducted using 7 N-methyl carbamates (carbaryl, carbofuran, formetanate HCl, methiocarb, methomyl, oxamyl, and propoxur...

  3. Ozone as U-Shaped Dose Responses Molecules (Hormetins)

    PubMed Central

    Martínez- Sánchez, G.; Pérez-Davison, G.; Re, L.; Giuliani, A.

    2010-01-01

    Redox environment involves a broad network of pro-oxidant and antioxidant components. Health benefit or damage can be induced as a consequence of an adaptive cellular stress response. A consequence of hormetic amplification is an increase in the homeodynamic space of a living system in terms of an increased defense capacity and a reduced load of damaged macromolecules. Ozone, when used at appropriate doses, promotes the formation of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxides allows them to become late and long-lasting messengers. Healthy aging may be achieved by hormesis through mild and periodic, but not severe or chronic, physical and mental challenges, and by the use of nutritional hormesis incorporating mild stress-inducing molecules called hormetins. The paradoxical concept that ozone eventually induces an antioxidant response capable of reversing a chronic oxidative stress is common in the animal and vegetal kingdom; it is already supported by findings of an increased level of antioxidant enzymes during ozone therapy. Those facts can include ozone as a hormetin. The established scientific foundations of hormesis are ready to pave the way for new and effective approaches in redox-related disease research and intervention; ozone therapy can be a good candidate. PMID:21431076

  4. Ozone as u-shaped dose responses molecules (hormetins).

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sánchez, G; Pérez-Davison, G; Re, L; Giuliani, A

    2010-05-10

    Redox environment involves a broad network of pro-oxidant and antioxidant components. Health benefit or damage can be induced as a consequence of an adaptive cellular stress response. A consequence of hormetic amplification is an increase in the homeodynamic space of a living system in terms of an increased defense capacity and a reduced load of damaged macromolecules. Ozone, when used at appropriate doses, promotes the formation of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxides allows them to become late and long-lasting messengers. Healthy aging may be achieved by hormesis through mild and periodic, but not severe or chronic, physical and mental challenges, and by the use of nutritional hormesis incorporating mild stress-inducing molecules called hormetins. The paradoxical concept that ozone eventually induces an antioxidant response capable of reversing a chronic oxidative stress is common in the animal and vegetal kingdom; it is already supported by findings of an increased level of antioxidant enzymes during ozone therapy. Those facts can include ozone as a hormetin. The established scientific foundations of hormesis are ready to pave the way for new and effective approaches in redox-related disease research and intervention; ozone therapy can be a good candidate.

  5. Continuous Toxicological Dose-Response Relationships Are Pretty Homogeneous (Society for Risk Analysis Annual Meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-response relationships for a wide range of in vivo and in vitro continuous datasets are well-described by a four-parameter exponential or Hill model, based on a recent analysis of multiple historical dose-response datasets, mostly with more than five dose groups (Slob and Se...

  6. Dose Response Data for Hormonally Active Chemicals: Estrogens, Antiandrogens and Androgens

    EPA Science Inventory

    The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the late 1940s. The debate originally focused on linear no threshold (LNT) vs threshold responses in the low dose range for cancer and noncancer related effects. For noncancer effects the defaul...

  7. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  8. 'Omics analysis of low dose acetaminophen intake demonstrates novel response pathways in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Jetten, Marlon J.A.; Gaj, Stan; Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa; Kok, Theo M. de; Delft, Joost H.M. van; Lommen, Arjen; Someren, Eugene P. van; Jennen, Danyel G.J.; Claessen, Sandra M.; Peijnenburg, Ad A.C.M.; Stierum, Rob H.; Kleinjans, Jos C.S.

    2012-03-15

    Acetaminophen is the primary cause of acute liver toxicity in Europe/USA, which led the FDA to reconsider recommendations concerning safe acetaminophen dosage/use. Unfortunately, the current tests for liver toxicity are no ideal predictive markers for liver injury, i.e. they only measure acetaminophen exposure after profound liver toxicity has already occurred. Furthermore, these tests do not provide mechanistic information. Here, 'omics techniques (global analysis of metabolomic/gene-expression responses) may provide additional insight. To better understand acetaminophen-induced responses at low doses, we evaluated the effects of (sub-)therapeutic acetaminophen doses on metabolite formation and global gene-expression changes (including, for the first time, full-genome human miRNA expression changes) in blood/urine samples from healthy human volunteers. Many known and several new acetaminophen-metabolites were detected, in particular in relation to hepatotoxicity-linked, oxidative metabolism of acetaminophen. Transcriptomic changes indicated immune-modulating effects (2 g dose) and oxidative stress responses (4 g dose). For the first time, effects of acetaminophen on full-genome human miRNA expression have been considered and confirmed the findings on mRNA level. 'Omics techniques outperformed clinical chemistry tests and revealed novel response pathways to acetaminophen in humans. Although no definitive conclusion about potential immunotoxic effects of acetaminophen can be drawn from this study, there are clear indications that the immune system is triggered even after intake of low doses of acetaminophen. Also, oxidative stress-related gene responses, similar to those seen after high dose acetaminophen exposure, suggest the occurrence of possible pre-toxic effects of therapeutic acetaminophen doses. Possibly, these effects are related to dose-dependent increases in levels of hepatotoxicity-related metabolites. -- Highlights: ► 'Omics techniques outperformed

  9. The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

    2012-12-01

    Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1α, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, TNF α, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

  10. Habitual Sleep Duration and Risk of Childhood Obesity: Systematic Review and Dose-response Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Huijuan; Xun, Pengcheng; Cai, Wei; He, Ka; Tang, Qingya

    2015-11-05

    A meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies found that shorter-time sleep was correlated with increased risk of obesity in children. However, findings from prospective cohort studies were inconsistent. PubMed and other data resources were searched through May 2015. Twenty-five eligible studies were identified including 56,584 children and adolescents with an average 3.4-year follow-up. Compared with children having the longest sleep duration (~12.2 hours), kids with the shortest sleep duration (~10.0 hours) were 76% more likely to be overweight/obese (pooled odds ratio [OR]: 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.39, 2.23); and had relatively larger annual BMI gain (pooled β coefficient: 0.13; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.25 kg/m(2)). With every 1 hour/day increment in sleep duration, the risk of overweight/obesity was reduced by 21% (OR: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.70, 0.89); and the annual BMI gain declined by 0.05 kg/m(2) (β = -0.05; 95% CI: -0.09, -0.01). The observed associations were not appreciably modified by region, baseline age or the length of follow-up. Accumulated literature indicates a modest inverse association between sleep duration and the risk of childhood overweight/obesity. Further research is needed to determine the age and gender specified optimal hours of sleep and ideal sleep pattern with respect to obesity prevention in children.

  11. The Key Events Dose-Response Framework: Its Potential for Application to Foodborne Pathogenic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    BUCHANAN, ROBERT L.; HAVELAAR, ARIE H.; SMITH, MARY ALICE; WHITING, RICHARD C.; JULIEN, ELIZABETH

    2009-01-01

    The Key Events Dose-Response Framework (KEDRF) is an analytical approach that facilitates the use of currently available data to gain insight regarding dose-response relationships. The use of the KEDRF also helps identify critical knowledge gaps that once filled, will reduce reliance on assumptions. The present study considers how the KEDRF might be applied to pathogenic microorganisms, using fetal listeriosis resulting from maternal ingestion of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes as an initial example. Major biological events along the pathway between food ingestion and the endpoint of concern are systematically considered with regard to dose (i.e., number of organisms), pathogen factors (e.g., virulence), and protective host mechanisms (e.g., immune response or other homeostatic mechanisms). It is concluded that the KEDRF provides a useful structure for systematically evaluating the complex array of host and pathogen factors that influence the dose-response relationship. In particular, the KEDRF supports efforts to specify and quantify the sources of variability, a prerequisite to strengthening the scientific basis for food safety decision making. PMID:19690997

  12. Whole-Grain Intake and Mortality from All Causes, Cardiovascular Disease, and Cancer: A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Benisi-Kohansal, Sanaz; Saneei, Parvane; Salehi-Marzijarani, Mohammad; Larijani, Bagher; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    No conclusive information is available about the relation between the consumption of whole grains and the risk of mortality. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to summarize the relation between whole-grain intake and risk of mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and total and specific cancers. A systematic search of the literature published earlier than March 2015 was conducted in Medline and PubMed, SCOPUS, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library to identify relevant articles. Prospective cohort studies that examined the association of total whole-grain intake or specific whole-grain foods with risk of mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and total and specific cancers were considered. Twenty prospective cohort studies were included in the systematic review: 9 studies reported total whole-grain intake and 11 others reported specific whole-grain food intake. In a follow-up period of 5.5 to 26 y, there were 191,979 deaths (25,595 from cardiovascular disease, 32,746 from total cancers, and 2671 from specific cancers) in 2,282,603 participants. A greater intake of both total whole grains and specific whole-grain foods was significantly associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality in the meta-analysis. The pooled RR for all-cause mortality for an increase of 3 servings total whole grains/d (90 g/d) was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.79, 0.88). Total whole-grain intake (0.84; 95% CI: 0.76, 0.93) and specific whole-grain foods (0.82; 95% CI: 0.75, 0.90) were also associated with a reduced risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease. Each additional 3 servings total whole grains/d was associated with a 25% lower risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease. An inverse association was observed between whole-grain intake and risk of mortality from total cancers (0.94; 95% CI: 0.91, 0.98). We found an inverse association between whole-grain intake and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and total cancers.

  13. West Nile virus infection in American Robins: new insights on dose response.

    PubMed

    VanDalen, Kaci K; Hall, Jeffrey S; Clark, Larry; McLean, Robert G; Smeraski, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a vector-borne pathogen that was first detected in the United States in 1999. The natural transmission cycle of WNV involves mosquito vectors and avian hosts, which vary in their competency to transmit the virus. American robins are an abundant backyard species in the United States and appear to have an important role in the amplification and dissemination of WNV. In this study we examine the response of American robins to infection with various WNV doses within the range of those administered by some natural mosquito vectors. Thirty American robins were assigned a WNV dosage treatment and needle inoculated with 10(0.95) PFU, 10(1.26) PFU, 10(2.15) PFU, or 10(3.15) PFU. Serum samples were tested for the presence of infectious WNV and/or antibodies, while oral swabs were tested for the presence of WNV RNA. Five of the 30 (17%) robins had neutralizing antibodies to WNV prior to the experiment and none developed viremia or shed WNV RNA. The proportion of WNV-seronegative birds that became viremic after WNV inoculation increased in a dose dependent manner. At the lowest dose, only 40% (2/5) of the inoculated birds developed productive infections while at the highest dose, 100% (7/7) of the birds became viremic. Oral shedding of WNV RNA followed a similar trend where robins inoculated with the lower two doses were less likely to shed viral RNA (25%) than robins inoculated with one of the higher doses (92%). Viremia titers and morbidity did not increase in a dose dependent manner; only two birds succumbed to infection and, interestingly, both were inoculated with the lowest dose of WNV. It is clear that the disease ecology of WNV is a complex interplay of hosts, vectors, and viral dose delivered.

  14. Low-dose neutron dose response of zebrafish embryos obtained from the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Konishi, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Cheng, S. H.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-09-01

    The dose response of embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, irradiated at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) by 2-MeV neutrons with ≤100 mGy was determined. The neutron irradiations were made at the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. A total of 10 neutron doses ranging from 0.6 to 100 mGy were employed (with a gamma-ray contribution of 14% to the total dose), and the biological effects were studied through quantification of apoptosis at 25 hpf. The responses for neutron doses of 10, 20, 25, and 50 mGy approximately fitted on a straight line, while those for neutron doses of 0.6, 1 and 2.5 mGy exhibited neutron hormetic effects. As such, hormetic responses were generically developed by different kinds of ionizing radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) values. The responses for neutron doses of 70 and 100 mGy were significantly below the lower 95% confidence band of the best-fit line, which strongly suggested the presence of gamma-ray hormesis.

  15. Dose-response feeding study of short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) in laying hens: effects on laying performance and tissue distribution, accumulation and elimination kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ueberschär, Karl-Heinz; Dänicke, Sven; Matthes, Siegfried

    2007-02-01

    Technical short chain chlorinated paraffins (C10-C13 with 60% chlorine) were fed to 93 laying hens from 24 to 32 weeks of age in increasing concentrations of up to 100 mg/kg feed. No significant influence on health, relative organ weights or performance (laying intensity, egg weight, feed consumption) was noted. The chlorinated paraffin content of the tissues was linearly related to the concentration of short chain paraffins of the feed. The highest concentrations were found in abdominal fat, egg yolk and fatty tissues. Breast muscle, egg albumen and bile fluid contained minimal or no residues. Less than 1% of the chlorinated paraffins ingested were incorporated into the body (without head, feet, gut and feathers), whereas about 1.5% were eliminated with the egg yolk and 30% were excreted with urine and faeces. A six-week kinetic depuration study revealed a biphasic elimination with half-lifes of 4-40 min (liver, kidneys, legs, fat, blood) for the initial rapid phase, and 15-30 days (blood, fat, liver, yolk, kidneys, legs) for the terminal slow phase.

  16. Dose calculation and in-phantom measurement in BNCT using response matrix method.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Faezeh; Shahriari, Majid

    2011-12-01

    In-phantom measurement of physical dose distribution is very important for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) planning validation. If any changes take place in therapeutic neutron beam due to the beam shaping assembly (BSA) change, the dose will be changed so another group of simulations should be carried out for dose calculation. To avoid this time consuming procedure and speed up the dose calculation to help patients not wait for a long time, response matrix method was used. This procedure was performed for neutron beam of the optimized BSA as a reference beam. These calculations were carried out using the MCNPX, Monte Carlo code. The calculated beam parameters were measured for a SNYDER head phantom placed 10 cm away from beam the exit of the BSA. The head phantom can be assumed as a linear system and neutron beam and dose distribution can be assumed as an input and a response of this system (head phantom), respectively. Neutron spectrum energy was digitized into 27 groups. Dose response of each group was calculated. Summation of these dose responses is equal to a total dose of the whole neutron/gamma spectrum. Response matrix is the double dimension matrix (energy/dose) in which each parameter represents a depth-dose resulted from specific energy. If the spectrum is changed, response of each energy group may be differed. By considering response matrix and energy vector, dose response can be calculated. This method was tested for some BSA, and calculations show statistical errors less than 10%.

  17. Dose response of multiple parameters for calyculin A-induced premature chromosome condensation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to high doses of cobalt-60 gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xue; Zhao, Hua; Feng, Jiang-Bin; Zhao, Xiao-Tao; Chen, De-Qing; Liu, Qing-Jie

    2016-09-01

    Many studies have investigated exposure biomarkers for high dose radiation. However, no systematic study on which biomarkers can be used in dose estimation through premature chromosome condensation (PCC) analysis has been conducted. The present study aims to screen the high-dose radiation exposure indicator in calyculin A-induced PCC. The dose response of multiple biological endpoints, including G2/A-PCC (G2/M and M/A-PCC) index, PCC ring (PCC-R), ratio of the longest/shortest length (L/L ratio), and length and width ratio of the longest chromosome (L/B ratio), were investigated in calyculin A-induced G2/A-PCC spreads in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to 0-20Gy (dose-rate of 1Gy/min) cobalt-60 gamma-rays. The G2/A-PCC index was decreased with enhanced absorbed doses of 4-20Gy gamma-rays. The G2/A PCC-R at 0-12Gy gamma-rays conformed to Poisson distribution. Three types of PCC-R were scored according to their shape and their solidity or hollowness. The frequencies of hollow PCC-R and PCC-R including or excluding solid ring in G2/A-PCC spreads were enhanced with increased doses. The length and width of the longest chromosome, as well as the length of the shortest chromosome in each G2/M-PCC or M/A-PCC spread, were measured. All L/L or L/B ratios in G2/M-PCC or M/A-PCC spread increased with enhanced doses. A blind test with two new irradiated doses was conducted to validate which biomarker could be used in dose estimation. Results showed that hollow PCC-R and PCC-R including solid ring can be utilized for accurate dose estimation, and that hollow PCC-R was optimal for practical application.

  18. Dose response and factors related to interstitial pneumonitis after bone marrow transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Sagus; Schultheiss, Timothy E. . E-mail: schultheiss@coh.org; Wong, Jeffrey

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) and chemotherapy are common components of conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation. Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) is a known regimen-related complication. Using published data of IP in a multivariate logistic regression, this study sought to identify the parameters in the bone marrow transplantation conditioning regimen that were significantly associated with IP and to establish a radiation dose-response function. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of articles that reported IP incidence along with lung dose, fractionation, dose rate, and chemotherapy regimen. In the final analysis, 20 articles (n = 1090 patients), consisting of 26 distinct TBI/chemotherapy regimens, were included in the analysis. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors that influenced the incidence of IP. Results: A logistic model was generated from patients receiving daily fractions of radiation. In this model, lung dose, cyclophosphamide dose, and the addition of busulfan were significantly associated with IP. An incidence of 3%-4% with chemotherapy-only conditioning regimens is estimated from the models. The {alpha}/{beta} value of the linear-quadratic model was estimated to be 2.8 Gy. The dose eliciting a 50% incidence, D {sub 50}, for IP after 120 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide was 8.8 Gy; in the absence of chemotherapy, the estimated D {sub 50} is 10.6 Gy. No dose rate effect was observed. The use of busulfan as a substitute for radiation is equivalent to treating with 14.8 Gy in 4 fractions with 50% transmission blocks shielding the lung. The logistic regression failed to find a model that adequately fit the multiple-fraction-per-day data. Conclusions: Dose responses for both lung radiation dose and cyclophosphamide dose were identified. A conditioning regimen of 12 Gy TBI in 6 daily fractions induces an IP incidence of about 11% in the absence of lung shielding

  19. Mutations induced in Tradescantia by small doses of X-rays and neutrons - Analysis of dose-response curves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, A. H.; Underbrink, A. G.; Rossi, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    Dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs were analyzed after neutron and X-ray irradiation with doses ranging from a fraction of a rad to the region of saturation. The dose-effect relation for neutrons indicates a linear dependence from 0.01 to 8 rads; between 0.25 and 5 rads, a linear dependence is indicated for X-rays also. As a consequence the relative biological effectiveness reaches a constant value (about 50) at low doses. The observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the theory of dual radiation action and support its interpretation of the effects of radiation on higher organisms. The doubling dose of X-rays was found to be nearly 1 rad.

  20. High-Dose Atomoxetine Treatment of ADHD in Youths with Limited Response to Standard Doses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Michelson, David; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Weiss, Margaret D.; Busner, Joan; Moore, Rodney J.; Ruff, Dustin D.; Ramsey, Janet; Dickson, Ruth; Turgay, Atilla; Saylor, Keith E.; Luber, Stephen; Vaughan, Brigette; Allen, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the utility and tolerability of higher than standard atomoxetine doses to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Two randomized, double-blind trials of atomoxetine nonresponders ages 6 to 16 years were conducted comparing continued treatment with same-dose atomoxetine to treatment using greater than…

  1. Antipsychotic dose modulates behavioral and neural responses to feedback during reinforcement learning in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Insel, Catherine; Reinen, Jenna; Weber, Jochen; Wager, Tor D; Jarskog, L Fredrik; Shohamy, Daphna; Smith, Edward E

    2014-03-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by an abnormal dopamine system, and dopamine blockade is the primary mechanism of antipsychotic treatment. Consistent with the known role of dopamine in reward processing, prior research has demonstrated that patients with schizophrenia exhibit impairments in reward-based learning. However, it remains unknown how treatment with antipsychotic medication impacts the behavioral and neural signatures of reinforcement learning in schizophrenia. The goal of this study was to examine whether antipsychotic medication modulates behavioral and neural responses to prediction error coding during reinforcement learning. Patients with schizophrenia completed a reinforcement learning task while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. The task consisted of two separate conditions in which participants accumulated monetary gain or avoided monetary loss. Behavioral results indicated that antipsychotic medication dose was associated with altered behavioral approaches to learning, such that patients taking higher doses of medication showed increased sensitivity to negative reinforcement. Higher doses of antipsychotic medication were also associated with higher learning rates (LRs), suggesting that medication enhanced sensitivity to trial-by-trial feedback. Neuroimaging data demonstrated that antipsychotic dose was related to differences in neural signatures of feedback prediction error during the loss condition. Specifically, patients taking higher doses of medication showed attenuated prediction error responses in the striatum and the medial prefrontal cortex. These findings indicate that antipsychotic medication treatment may influence motivational processes in patients with schizophrenia.

  2. The peripheral vascular effects of diltiazem--dose-response characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Finch, M B; Johnston, G D

    1985-01-01

    The acute effects of increasing doses of diltiazem on peripheral blood flow were observed in six subjects. Each subject received, in random order, a single oral dose of placebo or diltiazem 60, 120 or 180 mg. Supine heart rate, blood pressure, skin temperature, digital systolic pressure, forearm and digital blood flow were recorded before and at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 h post-dosing. Plasma diltiazem concentrations were measured at each time interval and at 12 and 24 h after the 120 mg dose. At doses of 120 and 180 mg, diltiazem significantly increased digital blood flow at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 h post-dosing and forearm blood flow at 2 and 3 h following 180 mg and 3 h following 120 mg. No correlation was observed between plasma diltiazem concentration and changes in peripheral blood flow. PMID:4074614

  3. Diethylene glycol-induced toxicities show marked threshold dose response in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Greg M.; Dunning, Cody L.; Abreo, Fleurette; Latimer, Brian; Orchard, Elysse; McMartin, Kenneth E.

    2015-02-01

    Diethylene glycol (DEG) exposure poses risks to human health because of widespread industrial use and accidental exposures from contaminated products. To enhance the understanding of the mechanistic role of metabolites in DEG toxicity, this study used a dose response paradigm to determine a rat model that would best mimic DEG exposure in humans. Wistar and Fischer-344 (F-344) rats were treated by oral gavage with 0, 2, 5, or 10 g/kg DEG and blood, kidney and liver tissues were collected at 48 h. Both rat strains treated with 10 g/kg DEG had equivalent degrees of metabolic acidosis, renal toxicity (increased BUN and creatinine and cortical necrosis) and liver toxicity (increased serum enzyme levels, centrilobular necrosis and severe glycogen depletion). There was no liver or kidney toxicity at the lower DEG doses (2 and 5 g/kg) regardless of strain, demonstrating a steep threshold dose response. Kidney diglycolic acid (DGA), the presumed nephrotoxic metabolite of DEG, was markedly elevated in both rat strains administered 10 g/kg DEG, but no DGA was present at 2 or 5 g/kg, asserting its necessary role in DEG-induced toxicity. These results indicate that mechanistically in order to produce toxicity, metabolism to and significant target organ accumulation of DGA are required and that both strains would be useful for DEG risk assessments. - Highlights: • DEG produces a steep threshold dose response for kidney injury in rats. • Wistar and F-344 rats do not differ in response to DEG-induced renal injury. • The dose response for renal injury closely mirrors that for renal DGA accumulation. • Results demonstrate the importance of DGA accumulation in producing kidney injury.

  4. Construction and validation of a dose-response curve using the comet assay to determine human radiosensitivity to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Güerci, A; Zúñiga, L; Marcos, R

    2011-01-01

    Individual radiosensitivity is an individual characteristic associated with an increased reaction to ionizing radiation. The purpose of our work is to establish a dose-response curve useful to classify individuals as radiosensitive or radioresistant. Thus, a dose-response curve was constructed by measuring in vitro responses to increasing doses (0 to 8 Gy) of gamma radiation in the comet assay. The obtained curve fit well with a linear equation in the range of 0 to 8 Gy. The overall dose-response curve was constructed for percent DNA in tail, as a measure of the genetic damage induced by irradiation. To probe the goodness of the constructed curve, a validation study was carried out with whole blood from two donors in a blind study. Results show that, for the two applied doses (2 and 6 Gy), the obtained values fit well inside the interval of confidence of the curve. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the usefulness of the comet assay in determining individual responses to defined doses of gamma radiation. The standard dose-response curve constructed may be used to detect individuals departing from reference values.

  5. Smoking increases risks of all-cause and breast cancer specific mortality in breast cancer individuals: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies involving 39725 breast cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kang; Li, Feng; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Zhuyue; Li, Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is associated with the risks of mortality from breast cancer (BC) or all causes in BC survivors. Two-stage dose-response meta-analysis was conducted. A search of PubMed and Embase was performed, and a random-effect model was used to yield summary hazard ratios (HRs). Eleven prospective cohort studies were included. The summary HR per 10 cigarettes/day, 10 pack-years, 10 years increase were 1.10 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04–1.16), 1.09 (95% CI = 1.06–1.12), 1.10 (95% CI = 1.06–1.14) for BC specific mortality, and 1.15 (95% CI = 1.10–1.19), 1.15 (95% CI = 1.10–1.20), 1.17 (95% CI = 1.11–1.23) for all-cause mortality, respectively. The linear or non-linear associations between smoking and risks of mortality from BC or all causes were revealed. Subgroup analyses suggested a positive association between ever or former smoking and the risk of all-cause mortality in BC patients, especially in high doses consumption. In conclusion, higher smoking intensity, more cumulative amount of cigarettes consumption and longer time for smoking is associated with elevated risk of mortality from BC and all causes in BC individuals. The results regarding smoking cessation and “ever or former” smokers should be treated with caution due to limited studies. PMID:27863414

  6. Dose response of micronuclei induced by combination radiation of α-particles and γ-rays in human lymphoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ruiping; He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Xie, Yuexia; Ye, Shuang; Yuan, Dexiao; Shao, Chunlin

    2013-01-01

    Combination radiation is a real situation of both nuclear accident exposure and space radiation environment, but its biological dosimetry is still not established. This study investigated the dose-response of micronuclei (MN) induction in lymphocyte by irradiating HMy2.CIR lymphoblast cells with α-particles, γ-rays, and their combinations. Results showed that the dose-response of MN induced by γ-rays was well-fitted with the linear-quadratic model. But for α-particle irradiation, the MN induction had a biphasic phenomenon containing a low dose hypersensitivity characteristic and its dose response could be well-stimulated with a state vector model where radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was involved. For the combination exposure, the dose response of MN was similar to that of α-irradiation. However, the yield of MN was closely related to the sequence of irradiations. When the cells were irradiated with α-particles at first and then γ-rays, a synergistic effect of MN induction was observed. But when the cells were irradiated with γ-rays followed by α-particles, an antagonistic effect of MN was observed in the low dose range although this combination radiation also yielded a synergistic effect at high doses. When the interval between two irradiations was extended to 4h, a cross-adaptive response against the other irradiation was induced by a low dose of γ-rays but not α-particles.

  7. Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Daila S. Gridley, PhD

    2012-03-30

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findings remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide information

  8. Peanut Allergen Threshold Study (PATS): validation of eliciting doses using a novel single-dose challenge protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The eliciting dose (ED) for a peanut allergic reaction in 5% of the peanut allergic population, the ED05, is 1.5 mg of peanut protein. This ED05 was derived from oral food challenges (OFC) that use graded, incremental doses administered at fixed time intervals. Individual patients’ threshold doses were used to generate population dose-distribution curves using probability distributions from which the ED05 was then determined. It is important to clinically validate that this dose is predictive of the allergenic response in a further unselected group of peanut-allergic individuals. Methods/Aims This is a multi-centre study involving three national level referral and teaching centres. (Cork University Hospital, Ireland, Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne, Australia and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, U.S.A.) The study is now in process and will continue to run until all centres have recruited 125 participates in each respective centre. A total of 375 participants, aged 1–18 years will be recruited during routine Allergy appointments in the centres. The aim is to assess the precision of the predicted ED05 using a single dose (6 mg peanut = 1.5 mg of peanut protein) in the form of a cookie. Validated Food Allergy related Quality of Life Questionnaires-(FAQLQ) will be self-administered prior to OFC and 1 month after challenge to assess the impact of a single dose OFC on FAQL. Serological and cell based in vitro studies will be performed. Conclusion The validation of the ED05 threshold for allergic reactions in peanut allergic subjects has potential value for public health measures. The single dose OFC, based upon the statistical dose-distribution analysis of past challenge trials, promises an efficient approach to identify the most highly sensitive patients within any given food-allergic population. PMID:24028324

  9. Dose response of commercially available optically stimulated luminescent detector, Al2O3:C for megavoltage photons and electrons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Chung, Weon Kuu; Shin, Dong Oh; Yoon, Myonggeun; Hwang, Ui-Jung; Rah, Jeong-Eun; Jeong, Hojin; Lee, Sang Yeob; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong

    2012-04-01

    This study examined the dose response of an optically stimulated luminescence dosemeter (OSLD) to megavoltage photon and electron beams. A nanoDot™ dosemeter was used to measure the dose response of the OSLD. Photons of 6-15 MV and electrons of 9-20 MeV were delivered by a Varian 21iX machine (Varian Medical System, Inc. Milpitas, CA, USA). The energy dependency was <1 %. For the 6-MV photons, the dose was linear until 200 cGy. The superficial dose measurements revealed photon irradiation to have an angular dependency. The nanoDot™ dosemeter has potential use as an in vivo dosimetric tool that is independent of the energy, has dose linearity and a rapid response compared with normal in vivo dosimetric tools, such as thermoluminescence detectors. However, the OSLD must be treated very carefully due to the high angular dependency of the photon beam.

  10. Drug development and hormesis: changing conceptual understanding of the dose response creates new challenges and opportunities for more effective drugs.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J; Staudenmayer, John W; Stanek, Edward J

    2006-01-01

    This review proposes that the emerging acceptance of the hormetic dose-response model in toxicology and pharmacology has the potential to significantly change important aspects of drug development. Two situations where the hormesis concept may affect drug development are considered: one in which low-dose stimulation may represent an adverse/unwanted effect (eg, stimulation of tumor cell proliferation by antitumor drugs), the other in which low-dose stimulation defines the therapeutic zone (ie, a beneficial or intended effect; eg, cognition enhancement in Alzheimer's disease treatment). Examples are used to demonstrate that the hormetic dose-response model has implications for the definition of an ideal candidate for a therapeutic agent, as well as implications for study designs needed to assess the quantitative features of the dose-response relationship.

  11. Energy crop (Sida hermaphrodita) fertilization using digestate under marginal soil conditions: A dose-response experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Moritz; Bueno Piaz Barbosa, Daniela; Horsch, David; Jablonowski, Nicolai David

    2014-05-01

    The global demand for energy security and the mitigation of climate change are the main drivers pushing energy-plant production in Germany. However, the cultivation of these plants can cause land use conflicts since agricultural soil is mostly used for plant production. A sustainable alternative to the conventional cultivation of food-based energy-crops is the cultivation of special adopted energy-plants on marginal lands. To further increase the sustainability of energy-plant cultivation systems the dependency on synthetic fertilizers needs to be reduced via closed nutrient loops. In the presented study the energy-plant Sida hermaphrodita (Malvaceae) will be used to evaluate the potential to grow this high potential energy-crop on a marginal sandy soil in combination with fertilization via digestate from biogas production. With this dose-response experiment we will further identify an optimum dose, which will be compared to equivalent doses of NPK-fertilizer. Further, lethal doses and deficiency doses will be observed. Two weeks old Sida seedlings were transplanted to 1L pots and fertilized with six doses of digestate (equivalent to a field application of 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, 160t/ha) and three equivalent doses of NPK-fertilizer. Control plants were left untreated. Sida plants will grow for 45 days under greenhouse conditions. We hypothesize that the nutrient status of the marginal soil can be increased and maintained by defined digestate applications, compared to control plants suffering of nutrient deficiency due to the low nutrient status in the marginal substrate. The dose of 40t/ha is expected to give a maximum biomass yield without causing toxicity symptoms. Results shall be used as basis for further experiments on the field scale in a field trial that was set up to investigate sustainable production systems for energy crop production under marginal soil conditions.

  12. Shape and Steepness of Toxicological Dose-Response Relationships of Continuous Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    A re-analysis of a large number of historical dose-response data for continuous endpoints indicates that an exponential or a Hill model with four parameters both adequately describe toxicological dose-responses. The four parameters relate to the background response, the potency o...

  13. The influences of nitric oxide, epinephrine, and dopamine on vascular tone: dose-response modeling and simulations

    PubMed Central

    Eugene, Andy R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sodium Nitroprusside has successfully been an excellent choice when considering a decrease in systemic vascular resistance in the critical care setting. However, reflex tachycardia and ventilation-perfusion mismatch are possible side effects of this agent. To maintaining cardiac output, cerebral perfusion pressure, and concurrently drop SVR, low-dose epinephrine or dopamine are viable options. The aim of this paper is to conduct dose-response simulations to identify the equivalent dopamine, epinephrine, and nitroprusside infusion doses to decrease the systemic vascular resistance by 20% and by 40% from baseline resting values. Methods Three studies were identified in the literature with reported epinephrine, dopamine, and sodium nitroprusside infusion doses with corresponding systemic vascular resistance responses. Infusion doses were normalized to mcg/kg/min and SVR values were normalized and scaled to the percent decrease (%SVR) in SVR from baseline resting values. The original published studies were mathematically modeled and the Hill equation parameters used for further dose-response simulations of a virtual population. One-hundred patients were simulated various doses resulting in corresponding %SVR responses for each of the three drugs. Results Equivalent infusion doses achieving in an approximate 20-25% decrease in SVR, from baseline, were identified for epinephrine, dopamine, and sodium nitroprusside. Moreover, equivalent infusion doses were identified for epinephrine and nitroprusside to decrease the SVR by 40% from baseline. Conclusion Even though sodium nitroprusside is traditionally used in decreasing SVR, low doses of dopamine or epinephrine are viable alternatives to patients with contraindications to nitroprusside infusions or who will require prolonged infusions to avoid toxicity. The multiple comparisons procedure-modeling approach is an excellent methodology for dose-finding exercises and has enabled identification of equivalent

  14. The pattern of methacholine responsiveness in mice is dependent on antigen challenge dose

    PubMed Central

    Zosky, Graeme R; von Garnier, Christophe; Stumbles, Philip A; Holt, Patrick G; Sly, Peter D; Turner, Debra J

    2004-01-01

    Background Considerable variation exists in the protocols used to induce hyperresponsiveness in murine models of allergic sensitisation. We examined the effect of varying the number of antigen exposures at challenge on the development of methacholine responsiveness in systemically sensitised mice. Methods BALB/c mice were sensitised with ovalbumin (OVA), challenged with 1, 3 or 6 OVA aerosols. Lung function was measured using low frequency forced oscillations and partitioned into components representing the airways (Raw) and lung parenchyma (tissue damping (G) and tissue elastance (H)). Responsiveness to inhaled methacholine (MCh), inflammatory cell profile and circulating IgE were assessed 24 and 48 hours after challenge. The threshold dose of MCh required to elicit a detectable response (sensitivity) and response to 30 mg.mL-1 (maximal response) were determined for each compartment. Results Sensitivity; All three OVA protocols resulted in an increased sensitivity to MCh in Raw but not in G or H. These responses where present at 24 and 48 hrs, except 1 OVA aerosol in which changes had resolved by 48 hrs. Maximal response; 1 OVA aerosol increased maximal responses in Raw, G and H at 24 hrs, which was gone by 48 hrs. Three OVA aerosols increased responses in H at 48 hrs only. Six OVA challenges caused increases in Raw, G and H at both 24 and 48 hrs. Eosinophils increased with increasing antigen challenges. IgE was elevated by OVA sensitisation but not boosted by OVA aerosol challenge. Conclusions The pattern of eosinophilia, IgE and MCh responsiveness in mice was determined by antigen dose at challenge. In this study, increased sensitivity to MCh was confined to the airways whereas increases in maximal responses occurred in both the airway and parenchymal compartments. The presence of eosinophilia and IgE did not always coincide with increased responsiveness to inhaled MCh. These findings require further systematic study to determine whether different mechanisms

  15. Dose-Response Analysis of RNA-Seq Profiles in Archival ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Use of archival resources has been limited to date by inconsistent methods for genomic profiling of degraded RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. RNA-sequencing offers a promising way to address this problem. Here we evaluated transcriptomic dose responses using RNA-sequencing in paired FFPE and frozen (FROZ) samples from two archival studies in mice, one 20 years old. Experimental treatments included 3 different doses of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate or dichloroacetic acid for the recently archived and older studies, respectively. Total RNA was ribo-depleted and sequenced using the Illumina HiSeq platform. In the recently archived study, FFPE samples had 35% lower total counts compared to FROZ samples but high concordance in fold-change values of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (r2 = 0.99), highly enriched pathways (90% overlap with FROZ), and benchmark dose estimates for preselected target genes (2% difference vs FROZ). In contrast, older FFPE samples had markedly lower total counts (3% of FROZ) and poor concordance in global DEGs and pathways. However, counts from FFPE and FROZ samples still positively correlated (r2 = 0.84 across all transcripts) and showed comparable dose responses for more highly expressed target genes. These findings highlight potential applications and issues in using RNA-sequencing data from FFPE samples. Recently archived FFPE samples were highly similar to FROZ samples in sequencing q

  16. Biphasic Dose Response in Low Level Light Therapy – An Update

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K; Carroll, James; Hamblin, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been known since 1967 but still remains controversial due to incomplete understanding of the basic mechanisms and the selection of inappropriate dosimetric parameters that led to negative studies. The biphasic dose-response or Arndt-Schulz curve in LLLT has been shown both in vitro studies and in animal experiments. This review will provide an update to our previous (Huang et al. 2009) coverage of this topic. In vitro mediators of LLLT such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial membrane potential show biphasic patterns, while others such as mitochondrial reactive oxygen species show a triphasic dose-response with two distinct peaks. The Janus nature of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may act as a beneficial signaling molecule at low concentrations and a harmful cytotoxic agent at high concentrations, may partly explain the observed responses in vivo. Transcranial LLLT for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice shows a distinct biphasic pattern with peaks in beneficial neurological effects observed when the number of treatments is varied, and when the energy density of an individual treatment is varied. Further understanding of the extent to which biphasic dose responses apply in LLLT will be necessary to optimize clinical treatments. PMID:22461763

  17. Design and sample size for evaluating combinations of drugs of linear and loglinear dose-response curves.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hong-Bin; Tian, Guo-Liang; Li, Wei; Tan, Ming

    2009-07-01

    The study of drug combinations has become important in drug development due to its potential for efficacy at lower, less toxic doses and the need to move new therapies rapidly into clinical trials. The goal is to identify which combinations are additive, synergistic, or antagonistic. Although there exists statistical framework for finding doses and sample sizes needed to detect departure from additivity, e.g., the power maximized F-test, different classes of drugs of different does-response shapes require different derivation for calculating sample size and finding doses. Motivated by two anticancer combination studies that we are involved with, this article proposes dose-finding and sample size method for detecting departures from additivity of two drugs with linear and log-linear single dose-response curves. The first study involves combination of two drugs, where one single drug dose-response curve is linear and the other is log-linear. The second study involves combinations of drugs whose single drug dose-response curves are linear. The experiment had been planned with the common fixed ratio design before we were consulted, but the resulting data missed the synergistic combinations. However, the experiment based on the proposed design was able to identify the synergistic combinations as anticipated. Thus we shall summarize the analysis of the data collected according to the proposed design and discuss why the commonly used fixed ratio method failed and the implications of the proposed method for other combination studies.

  18. Hormetic Response to Low-Dose Radiation: Focus on the Immune System and Its Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jiuwei; Yang, Guozi; Pan, Zhenyu; Zhao, Yuguang; Liang, Xinyue; Li, Wei; Cai, Lu

    2017-01-01

    The interrelationship between ionizing radiation and the immune system is complex, multifactorial, and dependent on radiation dose/quality and immune cell type. High-dose radiation usually results in immune suppression. On the contrary, low-dose radiation (LDR) modulates a variety of immune responses that have exhibited the properties of immune hormesis. Although the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood yet, LDR has been used clinically for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and malignant tumors. These advancements in preclinical and clinical studies suggest that LDR-mediated immune modulation is a well-orchestrated phenomenon with clinical potential. We summarize recent developments in the understanding of LDR-mediated immune modulation, with an emphasis on its potential clinical applications. PMID:28134809

  19. Hormetic Response to Low-Dose Radiation: Focus on the Immune System and Its Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiuwei; Yang, Guozi; Pan, Zhenyu; Zhao, Yuguang; Liang, Xinyue; Li, Wei; Cai, Lu

    2017-01-27

    The interrelationship between ionizing radiation and the immune system is complex, multifactorial, and dependent on radiation dose/quality and immune cell type. High-dose radiation usually results in immune suppression. On the contrary, low-dose radiation (LDR) modulates a variety of immune responses that have exhibited the properties of immune hormesis. Although the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood yet, LDR has been used clinically for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and malignant tumors. These advancements in preclinical and clinical studies suggest that LDR-mediated immune modulation is a well-orchestrated phenomenon with clinical potential. We summarize recent developments in the understanding of LDR-mediated immune modulation, with an emphasis on its potential clinical applications.

  20. Effects of single therapeutic doses of promethazine, fexofenadine and olopatadine on psychomotor function and histamine-induced wheal- and flare-responses: a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Hiroyuki; Isaji, Ami; Noda, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Kazuhiro; Senzaki, Koji; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Tomita, Yasushi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2012-05-01

    Since most first-generation antihistamines have undesirable sedative effects on the central nervous systems (CNS), newer (second-generation) antihistamines have been developed to improve patients' quality of life. However, there are few reports that directly compare the antihistaminic efficacy and impairment of psychomotor functions. We designed a double-blind, placebo controlled, crossover study to concurrently compare the clinical effectiveness of promethazine, a first-generation antihistamine, and fexofenadine and olopatadine, second-generation antihistamines, by measuring their potency as peripheral inhibitors of histamine-induced wheal and flare. Further, we investigated their sedative effects on the CNS using a battery of psychomotor tests. When single therapeutic doses of fexofenadine (60 mg), olopatadine (5 mg) and promethazine (25 mg) were given in a double-blind manner to 24 healthy volunteers, all antihistamines produced a significant reduction in the wheal and flare responses induced by histamine. In the comparison among antihistamines, olopatadine showed a rapid inhibitory effect compared with fexofenadine and promethazine, and had a potent effect compared with promethazine. In a battery of psychomotor assessments using critical flicker fusion, choice reaction time, compensatory tracking, rapid visual information processing and a line analogue rating scale as a subjective assessment of sedation, promethazine significantly impaired psychomotor function. Fexofenadine and olopatadine had no significant effect in any of the psychomotor tests. Promethazine, fexofenadine and olopatadine did not affect behavioral activity, as measured by wrist actigraphy. These results suggest that olopatadine at a therapeutic dose has greater antihistaminergic activity than promethazine, and olopatadine and fexofenadine did not cause cognitive or psychomotor impairment.

  1. Population variability in biological adaptive responses to DNA damage and the shapes of carcinogen dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Conolly, Rory B. . E-mail: Conolly.Rory@epa.gov; Gaylor, David W.; Lutz, Werner K.

    2005-09-01

    Carcinogen dose-response curves for both ionizing radiation and chemicals are typically assumed to be linear at environmentally relevant doses. This assumption is used to ensure protection of the public health in the absence of relevant dose-response data. A theoretical justification for the assumption has been provided by the argument that low dose linearity is expected when an exogenous agent adds to an ongoing endogenous process. Here, we use computational modeling to evaluate (1) how two biological adaptive processes, induction of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, may affect the shapes of dose-response curves for DNA-damaging carcinogens and (2) how the resulting dose-response behaviors may vary within a population. Each model incorporating an adaptive process was capable of generating not only monotonic dose-responses but also nonmonotonic (J-shaped) and threshold responses. Monte Carlo analysis suggested that all these dose-response behaviors could coexist within a population, as the spectrum of qualitative differences arose from quantitative changes in parameter values. While this analysis is largely theoretical, it suggests that (a) accurate prediction of the qualitative form of the dose-response requires a quantitative understanding of the mechanism (b) significant uncertainty is associated with human health risk prediction in the absence of such quantitative understanding and (c) a stronger experimental and regulatory focus on biological mechanisms and interindividual variability would allow flexibility in regulatory treatment of environmental carcinogens without compromising human health.

  2. Effects of chewing gum on stress and health: a replication and investigation of dose-response.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Research suggests that chewing gum may be associated with reduced stress, depression and a reduced likelihood of having high cholesterol and blood pressure. The present study aimed to replicate these findings and extend them by examining dose-response. A web-based survey was completed by a sample of 388 workers from public sector organisations (68.5% female; mean age: 42 years, range 17-64 years). The results showed that chewing gum was associated in a linear dose-response manner with lower levels of perceived stress (both at work and life in general), anxiety and depression. Occasional gum chewers also reported a reduced risk of high cholesterol and blood pressure. Intervention studies are now required to extend these findings, and the mechanisms underlying the effects reported here need further investigation.

  3. Guidelines for Use of the Approximate Beta-Poisson Dose-Response Model.

    PubMed

    Xie, Gang; Roiko, Anne; Stratton, Helen; Lemckert, Charles; Dunn, Peter K; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2016-10-05

    For dose-response analysis in quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA), the exact beta-Poisson model is a two-parameter mechanistic dose-response model with parameters α>0 and β>0, which involves the Kummer confluent hypergeometric function. Evaluation of a hypergeometric function is a computational challenge. Denoting PI(d) as the probability of infection at a given mean dose d, the widely used dose-response model PI(d)=1-(1+dβ)-α is an approximate formula for the exact beta-Poisson model. Notwithstanding the required conditions α<β and β>1, issues related to the validity and approximation accuracy of this approximate formula have remained largely ignored in practice, partly because these conditions are too general to provide clear guidance. Consequently, this study proposes a probability measure Pr(0 < r < 1 | α̂, β̂) as a validity measure (r is a random variable that follows a gamma distribution; α̂ and β̂ are the maximum likelihood estimates of α and β in the approximate model); and the constraint conditions β̂>(22α̂)0.50 for 0.02<α̂<2 as a rule of thumb to ensure an accurate approximation (e.g., Pr(0 < r < 1 | α̂, β̂) >0.99) . This validity measure and rule of thumb were validated by application to all the completed beta-Poisson models (related to 85 data sets) from the QMRA community portal (QMRA Wiki). The results showed that the higher the probability Pr(0 < r < 1 | α̂, β̂), the better the approximation. The results further showed that, among the total 85 models examined, 68 models were identified as valid approximate model applications, which all had a near perfect match to the corresponding exact beta-Poisson model dose-response curve.

  4. Response of phytoplankton community to low-dose atrazine exposure combined with phosphorus fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Pannard, Alexandrine; Le Rouzic, Bertrand; Binet, Françoise

    2009-07-01

    The effects of atrazine on a controlled phytoplankton community derived from a natural freshwater wetland exposed to low doses of this photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicide were examined. The community was exposed for 7 weeks to doses of 0.1, 1, and 10 microg L(-1) atrazine, combined with changes in nutrient concentration, and the photosynthetic activity, biomass, and community structure were noted during the experiment. Responses of the phytoplankton community were examined in terms of photosynthetic activity, biomass, and community structure. Significant effects of atrazine on the phytoplankton assemblage, in terms of primary production and community structure, were highlighted, even at doses as low as 1 and 0.1 microg L(-1), when associated with phosphorus fluctuations. The most abundant Chlorophyceae decreased in concentration with increasing atrazine dose, whereas cyanobacteria were more tolerant to atrazine, particularly with increased nutrient supply. The subinhibitory doses of atrazine used in the present study confirmed the higher sensitivity of long-term exposure of multispecies assemblages under resource competition. Our study supports the emerging hypothesis that the increasing prevalence of cyanobacterial blooms in European aquatic systems may result from a combination of unbalanced nutrient enrichment and selective pressures from multiple toxicants.

  5. The Importance of Carotenoid Dose in Supplementation Studies with Songbirds.

    PubMed

    Koch, Rebecca E; Wilson, Alan E; Hill, Geoffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoid coloration is the one of the most frequently studied ornamental traits in animals. Many studies of carotenoid coloration test the associations between carotenoid coloration and measures of performance, such as immunocompetence and oxidative state, proceeding from the premise that carotenoids are limited resources. Such studies commonly involve supplementing the diets of captive birds with carotenoids. In many cases, however, the amount of carotenoid administered is poorly justified, and even supposedly carotenoid-limited diets may saturate birds' systems. To quantify the relationships among the amount of carotenoids administered in experiments, levels of circulating carotenoids, and quantities of carotenoids deposited into colored ornaments, we performed a meta-analysis of 15 published studies that supplemented carotenoids to one of seven songbird species. We used allometric scaling equations to estimate the per-gram carotenoid consumption of each study's subjects, and we used meta-regression to evaluate the effects of this carotenoid dose on differences in coloration and plasma carotenoid levels between supplemented and control groups of birds. After accounting for supplementation duration and species, we observed a significant positive correlation between carotenoid intake and response of plasma carotenoid level to supplementation. The presence of supplemental carotenoids also tended to increase the expression of ornamental coloration, but the magnitude of the carotenoid dose did not significantly affect how strongly coloration changed with supplementation. Further, coloration effect sizes had no significant relationship with plasma carotenoid effect sizes. We also found significant heterogeneity in responses among studies and species, and the parameters used to measure color significantly affected response to supplementation. Our results emphasize the importance of performing dosage trials to determine what supplementation levels provide limited

  6. Bayesian fitting of a logistic dose-response curve with numerically derived priors.

    PubMed

    Huson, L W; Kinnersley, N

    2009-01-01

    In this report we describe the Bayesian analysis of a logistic dose-response curve in a Phase I study, and we present two simple and intuitive numerical approaches to construction of prior probability distributions for the model parameters. We combine these priors with the expert prior opinion and compare the results of the analyses with those obtained from the use of alternative prior formulations.

  7. Adaptive response to hydrogen peroxide in yeast: induction, time course, and relationship to dose-response models.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, George R; Moczula, Andrew V; Laterza, Amanda M; Macneil, Lindsey K; Tartaglione, Jason P

    2013-07-01

    The assay for trp5 gene conversion and ilv1-92 reversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain D7 was used to characterize the induction of an adaptive response by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Effects of a small priming dose on the genotoxic effects of a larger challenge dose were measured in exponential cultures and in early stationary phase. An adaptive response, indicated by smaller convertant and revertant frequencies after the priming dose, occurred at lower priming and challenge doses in young, well-aerated cultures. Closely spaced priming doses from 0.000975 to 2 mM, followed by a 1 mM challenge, showed that the induction of the adaptive response is biphasic. In exponential cultures it was maximal with a priming dose of 0.125-0.25 mM. Very small priming doses were insufficient to induce the adaptive response, whereas higher doses contributed to damage. A significant adaptive response was detected when the challenge dose was administered 10-20 min after the priming exposure. It was fully expressed within 45 min, and the yeast began to return to the nonadapted state after 4-6 hr. Because of the similarity of the biphasic induction to hormetic curves and the proposal that adaptive responses are a manifestation of hormesis, we evaluated whether the low doses of H(2)O(2) that induce the adaptive response show a clear hormetic response without a subsequent challenge dose. Hormesis was not evident, but there was an apparent threshold for genotoxicity at or slightly below 0.125 mM. The results are discussed with respect to linear, threshold, and hormesis dose-response models.

  8. Idiorrhythmic dose-rate variability in dietary zinc intake generates a different response pattern of zinc metabolism than conventional dose-response feeding.

    PubMed

    Momcilović, B; Reeves, P G; Blake, M J

    1997-07-01

    We compared the effects of idiorrhythmic dose-rate feeding and conventional dose-response on the induction of intestinal metallothionein (iMT), expression of aortal heat-shock protein mRNA (HSP70mRNA) induced by restraint stress, and accumulation of Zn in the femur and incisor of young growing male rats. An idiorrhythmic approach requires that the average dietary Zn concentration (modulo, M) over the whole experiment (epoch, E) is kept constant across different groups. This is done by adjusting the Zn concentration of the supplemented diet supplied to compensate for the reduction in the number of days on which Zn-supplemented diet is fed, the latter being spread evenly over the experiment. Idiorrhythms involve offering the diet with n times the overall Zn concentration (M) only every nth day with Zn-deficient diet offered on other days. Idiorrythmic Zn dose-rate feeding changed Zn accumulation in the femur and incisor in a complex bi-modal fashion, indicating that metabolic efficiency of dietary Zn is not constant but depends on Zn dose-rate. In contrast to feeding Zn in the conventional dose-response scheme, iMT and HSP70mRNA were not affected by idiorrhythmic dose-rate feeding. Idiorrhythmic cycling in dietary Zn load posed no risk of a biochemical overload nor caused the animals to be stressed. Idiorrhythmic dose-rate feeding brings the dimension of time to the conventional dose-response model.

  9. Fractional poisson--a simple dose-response model for human norovirus.

    PubMed

    Messner, Michael J; Berger, Philip; Nappier, Sharon P

    2014-10-01

    This study utilizes old and new Norovirus (NoV) human challenge data to model the dose-response relationship for human NoV infection. The combined data set is used to update estimates from a previously published beta-Poisson dose-response model that includes parameters for virus aggregation and for a beta-distribution that describes variable susceptibility among hosts. The quality of the beta-Poisson model is examined and a simpler model is proposed. The new model (fractional Poisson) characterizes hosts as either perfectly susceptible or perfectly immune, requiring a single parameter (the fraction of perfectly susceptible hosts) in place of the two-parameter beta-distribution. A second parameter is included to account for virus aggregation in the same fashion as it is added to the beta-Poisson model. Infection probability is simply the product of the probability of nonzero exposure (at least one virus or aggregate is ingested) and the fraction of susceptible hosts. The model is computationally simple and appears to be well suited to the data from the NoV human challenge studies. The model's deviance is similar to that of the beta-Poisson, but with one parameter, rather than two. As a result, the Akaike information criterion favors the fractional Poisson over the beta-Poisson model. At low, environmentally relevant exposure levels (<100), estimation error is small for the fractional Poisson model; however, caution is advised because no subjects were challenged at such a low dose. New low-dose data would be of great value to further clarify the NoV dose-response relationship and to support improved risk assessment for environmentally relevant exposures.

  10. Complex, non-monotonic dose-response curves with multiple maxima: Do we (ever) sample densely enough?

    PubMed Central

    Cvrčková, Fatima; Luštinec, Jiří; Žárský, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    We usually expect the dose-response curves of biological responses to quantifiable stimuli to be simple, either monotonic or exhibiting a single maximum or minimum. Deviations are often viewed as experimental noise. However, detailed measurements in plant primary tissue cultures (stem pith explants of kale and tobacco) exposed to varying doses of sucrose, cytokinins (BA or kinetin) or auxins (IAA or NAA) revealed that growth and several biochemical parameters exhibit multiple reproducible, statistically significant maxima over a wide range of exogenous substance concentrations. This results in complex, non-monotonic dose-response curves, reminiscent of previous reports of analogous observations in both metazoan and plant systems responding to diverse pharmacological treatments. These findings suggest the existence of a hitherto neglected class of biological phenomena resulting in dose-response curves exhibiting periodic patterns of maxima and minima, whose causes remain so far uncharacterized, partly due to insufficient sampling frequency used in many studies. PMID:26336980

  11. GLP-1-induced alterations in the glucose-stimulated insulin secretory dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Brandt, A; Katschinski, M; Arnold, R; Polonsky, K S; Göke, B; Byrne, M M

    2001-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to establish in normal volunteers the alterations in beta-cell responsiveness to glucose associated with a constant infusion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or a pretreatment infusion for 60 min. A high-dose graded glucose infusion protocol was used to explore the dose-response relationship between glucose and insulin secretion. Studies were performed in 10 normal volunteers, and insulin secretion rates (ISR) were calculated by deconvolution of peripheral C-peptide levels by use of a two-compartmental model that utilized mean kinetic parameters. During the saline study, from 5 to 15 mM glucose, the relationship between glucose and ISR was linear. Constant GLP-1 infusion (0.4 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1)) shifted the dose-response curve to the left, with an increase in the slope of this curve from 5 to 9 mM glucose from 71.0 +/- 12.4 pmol x min(-1) x mM(-1) during the saline study to 241.7 +/- 36.6 pmol x min(-1) x mM(-1) during the constant GLP-1 infusion (P < 0.0001). GLP-1 consistently stimulated a >200% increase in ISR at each 1 mM glucose interval, maintaining plasma glucose at <10 mM (P < 0.0007). Pretreatment with GLP-1 for 60 min resulted in no significant priming of the beta-cell response to glucose (P = 0.2). Insulin clearance rates were similar in all three studies at corresponding insulin levels. These studies demonstrate that physiological levels of GLP-1 stimulate glucose-induced insulin secretion in a linear manner, with a consistent increase in ISR at each 1 mM glucose interval, and that they have no independent effect on insulin clearance and no priming effect on subsequent insulin secretory response to glucose.

  12. Low dose radiation and cancer in A-bomb survivors: latency and non-linear dose-response in the 1950–90 mortality cohort

    PubMed Central

    Dropkin, Greg

    2007-01-01

    Background Analyses of Japanese A-bomb survivors' cancer mortality risks are used to establish recommended annual dose limits, currently set at 1 mSv (public) and 20 mSv (occupational). Do radiation doses below 20 mSv have significant impact on cancer mortality in Japanese A-bomb survivors, and is the dose-response linear? Methods I analyse stomach, liver, lung, colon, uterus, and all-solid cancer mortality in the 0 – 20 mSv colon dose subcohort of the 1950–90 (grouped) mortality cohort, by Poisson regression using a time-lagged colon dose to detect latency, while controlling for gender, attained age, and age-at-exposure. I compare linear and non-linear models, including one adapted from the cellular bystander effect for α particles. Results With a lagged linear model, Excess Relative Risk (ERR) for the liver and all-solid cancers is significantly positive and several orders of magnitude above extrapolations from the Life Span Study Report 12 analysis of the full cohort. Non-linear models are strongly superior to the linear model for the stomach (latency 11.89 years), liver (36.90), lung (13.60) and all-solid (43.86) in fitting the 0 – 20 mSv data and show significant positive ERR at 0.25 mSv and 10 mSv lagged dose. The slope of the dose-response near zero is several orders of magnitude above the slope at high doses. Conclusion The standard linear model applied to the full 1950–90 cohort greatly underestimates the risks at low doses, which are significant when the 0 – 20 mSv subcohort is modelled with latency. Non-linear models give a much better fit and are compatible with a bystander effect. PMID:17233918

  13. EPA’s Nonmonotonic Dose Response Curve Workplan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA’s standard guidelines for reproductive and developmental toxicity testing and risk assessment are needed in order to detect and characterize low-dose adverse effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs).

  14. Dose-response relationships of FMISO between trace dose and various macro-doses in rat by ultra-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry and radioactivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Du, Jinglei; Zhu, Lin; Zhou, Xue; Yin, Wei; Deng, Aifang; Qiao, Jinping

    2012-11-01

    Screening the pharmacokinetics of candidates using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) may be efficacious and safe for the research and development of new PET imaging agents. However, the PET imaging agent is administered as trace dose and the sensitivity of LC-MS/MS is often insufficient. If the dose was increased to be quantifiable, it should be necessary to prove whether the pharmacokinetics between trace and macro-doses is consistent or not. In this paper, fluoromisonidazole (FMISO), a tumor PET imaging agent, was chosen to evaluate the dose-response pharmacokinetics by administering various single intravenous doses (0.1, 0.4, 1.6 and 6.4 mg/kg) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The plasma concentration of FMISO was determined by an ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (UPLC-MS/MS) method, and the blood radioactivity of [(18)F]FMISO was detected by a gamma counter. By calculating and comparing the pharmacokinetic parameters, the total area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC(0-∞)) and peak plasma concentration (C(max)) values increased with the selected FMISO doses, and showing linear dose-dependent. On the other hand, some parameters related to time, such as the elimination half-lives (t(1/2)) and elimination rate constant (K(e)) were dose-independent, and there is no significant deference between trace dose and various macro-doses. The data should be useful to evaluate the novel 2-nitroimidazole derivatives as potential PET tumor imaging agents.

  15. Influence of different doses of coffee on post-exercise blood pressure response

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Alesandra A; Silva, Raquel SB; Silva, Tais F; Tavares, Renata L; Silva, Alexandre S

    2016-01-01

    The reduction in blood pressure after the physical exercise practice is called postexercise hypotension (PEH). Previous studies have demonstrated that the ingestion of caffeine at levels corresponding to three doses of coffee eliminates this phenomenon. Thus, we evaluated the influence of different doses of coffee in the PEH in twelve hypertensives, who performed four experimental sessions of aerobic exercise on a cycle ergometer (lasting 40 minutes, with intensity between 60% and 80% of maximum heart rate), followed by the ingestion of one (CAF-1), two (CAF-2), or three (CAF-3) doses of caffeinated coffee, or three doses of decaffeinated coffee (DESC). The blood pressure was measured at rest and at 10-minute intervals during 120 minutes of recovery post exercise. DESC resulted in systolic PEH at all moments of measurement, with averages of -4.1±1.2 mmHg and -1.8±1.3 mmHg on the 1st and 2nd hours post exercise, respectively. In CAF-1, both systolic hypotensive and hypertensive responses to the exercise were identified, with averages of -1.2±1.7 and 0.5±0.4 mmHg after one and two hours of recovery. Conversely, hypertensive systolic response occurred in all measurements compared rest blood pressure. The 1st and 2nd hours post exercise was 4.5±1.1 and 6.5+1.1 mmHg in CAF-2 and 5.1+0.9 and 6.5+1.0 mmHg to CAF-3. Diastolic PEH was not found in any of the experimental sessions. Therefore, the ingestion of two and three doses of caffeinated coffee completely blunts the PEH, while one dose results in partial elimination of the PEH. PMID:28078174

  16. Comparative haemodynamic dose response effects of propranolol and labetalol in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Silke, B; Nelson, G I; Ahuja, R C; Taylor, S H

    1982-01-01

    The immediate haemodynamic dose response effects of beta blockade (propranolol: 2 to 16 mg) were compared with those of combined alpha beta blockade (labetalol: 10 to 80 mg) in a randomised study of 20 patients with stable angina pectoris. After control measurements, the circulatory changes induced by four logarithmically cumulative intravenous boluses of each drug in equivalent beta blocking doses were evaluated at rest, after which comparison of the effects of the maximum cumulative dose of each was undertaken during a four minute period of supine bicycle exercise. Propranolol, at rest, induced significant dose related reductions in heart rate and cardiac output, with reciprocal increases in the systemic vascular resistance and pulmonary artery occluded pressure; systemic arterial pressure was unchanged. Labetalol was followed by significant dose related decreases in systemic blood pressure and vascular resistance associated with a significant increase in cardiac output; heart rate and pulmonary artery occluded pressure were unchanged. The slope of the left ventricular pumping function curve relating output to filling pressure from rest to exercise was significantly depressed by propranolol but unchanged after labetalol. The less deleterious effects on left ventricular haemodynamic performance after alpha beta blockade in contrast to beta blockade alone in ischaemic heart disease may be attributable to the concomitant reduction in left ventricular afterload associated with the alpha blocking activity of labetalol. PMID:7126388

  17. Dose response of surfactants to attenuate gas embolism related platelet aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckmann, David M.; Eckmann, Yonaton Y.; Tomczyk, Nancy

    2014-03-01

    Intravascular gas embolism promotes blood clot formation, cellular activation, and adhesion events, particularly with platelets. Populating the interface with surfactants is a chemical-based intervention to reduce injury from gas embolism. We studied platelet activation and platelet aggregation, prominent adverse responses to blood contact with bubbles. We examined dose-response relationships for two chemically distinct surfactants to attenuate the rise in platelet function stimulated by exposure to microbubbles. Significant reduction in platelet aggregation and platelet activation occurred with increasing concentration of the surfactants, indicating presence of a saturable system. A population balance model for platelet aggregation in the presence of embolism bubbles and surfactants was developed. Monte Carlo simulations for platelet aggregation were performed. Results agree qualitatively with experimental findings. Surfactant dose-dependent reductions in platelet activation and aggregation indicate inhibition of the gas/liquid interface's ability to stimulate cellular activation mechanically.

  18. Exploring the dose-response relationship between resistance exercise intensity and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Etnier, Jennifer L

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the dose-response relationship between resistance exercise intensity and cognitive performance. Sixty-eight participants were randomly assigned into control, 40%, 70%, or 100% of 10-repetition maximal resistance exercise groups. Participants were tested on Day 1 (baseline) and on Day 2 (measures were taken relative to performance of the treatment). Heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion, self-reported arousal, and affect were assessed on both days. Cognitive performance was assessed on Day 1 and before and following treatment on Day 2. Results from regression analyses indicated that there is a significant linear effect of exercise intensity on information processing speed, and a significant quadratic trend for exercise intensity on executive function. Thus, there is a dose-response relationship between the intensity of resistance exercise and cognitive performance such that high-intensity exercise benefits speed of processing, but moderate intensity exercise is most beneficial for executive function.

  19. Platelet response to increased aspirin dose in patients with persistent platelet aggregation while treated with aspirin 81 mg.

    PubMed

    Gengo, Fran; Westphal, Erica S; Rainka, Michelle M; Janda, Maria; Robson, Matthew J; Hourihane, J Maurice; Bates, Vernice

    2016-04-01

    This study demonstrates that patients who are taking 81 mg of aspirin and are nonresponsive benefit from a dose of 162 mg or greater vs a different antiplatelet therapy. We identified 100 patients who were nonresponsive to aspirin 81 mg via whole blood aggregometry and observed how many patients became responsive at a dose of 162 mg or greater. Platelet nonresponsiveness was defined as >10 Ω of resistance to collagen 1 µg/mL and/or an ohms ratio of collagen 1 µg/mL to collagen 5 µg/mL >0.5 and/or >6 Ω to arachidonate. Borderline response was defined as an improvement in 1 but not both of the above criteria. Of the initial 100 patients who were nonresponsive to an aspirin dose of 81 mg, 79% became responsive at a dose of 162 mg or >162 mg. Only 6% did not respond to any increase in dose. We believe that patients treated with low-dose aspirin who have significant risk for secondary vascular events should be individually assessed to determine their antiplatelet response. Those found to have persistent platelet aggregation despite treatment with 81 mg of aspirin have a higher likelihood of obtaining an adequate antiplatelet response at a higher aspirin dose.

  20. Melatonin entrains free-running blind people according to a physiological dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Lewy, Alfred J; Emens, Jonathan S; Lefler, Bryan J; Yuhas, Krista; Jackman, Angela R

    2005-01-01

    The specific circadian role proposed for endogenous melatonin production was based on a study of sighted people who took low pharmacological doses (500 microg) of this chemical signal for the "biological night": the magnitude and direction of the induced phase shifts were dependent on what time of day exogenous melatonin was administered and were described by a phase-response curve that turned out to be the opposite of that for light. We now report that lower (physiological) doses of up to 300 microg can entrain (synchronize) free-running circadian rhythms of 10 totally blind subjects that would otherwise drift later each day. The resulting log-linear dose-response curve in the physiological range adds support for a circadian function of endogenous melatonin in humans. Efficacy of exogenous doses in the physiological range are of clinical significance for totally blind people who will need to take melatonin daily over their entire lifetimes in order to remain entrained to the 24 h day. Left untreated, their free-running endocrine, metabolic, behavioral, and sleep/wake cycles can be almost as burdensome as not having vision.

  1. Adaptive urn designs for estimating several percentiles of a dose--response curve.

    PubMed

    Mugno, Raymond; Zhus, Wei; Rosenberger, William F

    2004-07-15

    Dose--response experiments are crucial in biomedical studies. There are usually multiple objectives in such experiments and among the goals is the estimation of several percentiles on the dose--response curve. Here we present the first non-parametric adaptive design approach to estimate several percentiles simultaneously via generalized Pólya urns. Theoretical properties of these designs are investigated and their performance is gaged by the locally compound optimal designs. As an example, we re-investigated a psychophysical experiment where one of the goals was to estimate the three quartiles. We show that these multiple-objective adaptive designs are more efficient than the original single-objective adaptive design targeting the median only. We also show that urn designs which target the optimal designs are slightly more efficient than those which target the desired percentiles directly. Guidelines are given as to when to use which type of design. Overall we are pleased with the efficiency results and hope compound adaptive designs proposed in this work or their variants may prove to be a viable non-parametric alternative in multiple-objective dose--response studies.

  2. Interpreting Frequency Responses to Dose-Conserved Pulsatile Input Signals in Simple Cell Signaling Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Patrick A.; Clément, Frédérique; Vidal, Alexandre; Tabak, Joel; Bertram, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Many hormones are released in pulsatile patterns. This pattern can be modified, for instance by changing pulse frequency, to encode relevant physiological information. Often other properties of the pulse pattern will also change with frequency. How do signaling pathways of cells targeted by these hormones respond to different input patterns? In this study, we examine how a given dose of hormone can induce different outputs from the target system, depending on how this dose is distributed in time. We use simple mathematical models of feedforward signaling motifs to understand how the properties of the target system give rise to preferences in input pulse pattern. We frame these problems in terms of frequency responses to pulsatile inputs, where the amplitude or duration of the pulses is varied along with frequency to conserve input dose. We find that the form of the nonlinearity in the steady state input-output function of the system predicts the optimal input pattern. It does so by selecting an optimal input signal amplitude. Our results predict the behavior of common signaling motifs such as receptor binding with dimerization, and protein phosphorylation. The findings have implications for experiments aimed at studying the frequency response to pulsatile inputs, as well as for understanding how pulsatile patterns drive biological responses via feedforward signaling pathways. PMID:24748217

  3. Quality control procedures for dose-response curve generation using nanoliter dispense technologies.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Catherine; Rosenstein, Craig; Hughes, Bethany; Middleton, Richard; Kariv, Ilona

    2007-09-01

    With the advancement of high-throughput biomolecular screening techniques to the lead optimization stage, there is a critical need to quality control (QC) dose-response curves generated by robotic liquid handlers to ensure accurate affinity determinations. One challenge in evaluating the performance of liquid handlers is identifying and validating a robust method for testing dispense volumes across different instruments. Although traditional automated liquid handlers are still considered the standard platform in many laboratories, nanoliter dispensers are becoming more common and pose new challenges for routine quality control procedures. For example, standard gravimetric measurements are unreliable for testing the accuracy of nanoliter liquid dispenses. However, nanoliter dispensing technology allows for the conservation of compound, reduces compound carryover from well to well through discrete dispenses, and eliminates the need for intermediate compound dilution steps to achieve a low final DMSO assay concentration. Moreover, an intermediate dilution step in aqueous solution might result in compound precipitation at high concentrations. This study compared representative automation procedures done on a variety of liquid dispensers, including manual, traditional, and nanodispense volumes. The data confirmed the importance of establishing robust QC procedures for dose-response generation in addition to accuracy and precision determinations for each instrument, and they validated the use of nanoliter pipettors for dose-response testing. The results of this study also support the requirement for thorough mixing during serial compound dilutions prepared for high-throughput lead optimization strategies using traditional liquid handlers.

  4. Personal dose equivalent angular response factors for photons with energies up to 1 GeV.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G

    2013-04-01

    When performing personal dosemeter calibrations, the dosemeters are typically irradiated while mounted on slab-type phantoms and oriented facing the source. Performance testing standards or intercomparison studies may also specify various rotational angles to test the response of the dosemeter and associated algorithm as this rotation introduces changes in the quantity of delivered dose. Correction factors for rotational effects are available, but many have not been updated in recent years and were typically calculated using the kerma approximation. The personal dose equivalent, Hp(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity effective dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body, but typically the location of interest is the trunk where personal dosemeters are worn and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 cm × 30 cm × 15 cm slab-type phantom. In this work personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for photons with energies up to 1 GeV have been calculated for depths of 0.007, 0.3 and 1.0 cm in the slab phantom for rotational angles ranging from 15° to 75°. Angular response factors have been determined by comparing the conversion coefficients for each angle and energy to those reported in an earlier work for a non-rotational (e.g. perpendicular to the phantom face) geometry. The angular response factors were determined for discrete angles, but fits of the factors are provided.

  5. Mathematical Modeling of Allelopathy. III. A Model for Curve-Fitting Allelochemical Dose Responses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, De Li; An, Min; Johnson, Ian R.; Lovett, John V.

    2003-01-01

    Bioassay techniques are often used to study the effects of allelochemicals on plant processes, and it is generally observed that the processes are stimulated at low allelochemical concentrations and inhibited as the concentrations increase. A simple empirical model is presented to analyze this type of response. The stimulation-inhibition properties of allelochemical-dose responses can be described by the parameters in the model. The indices, p% reductions, are calculated to assess the allelochemical effects. The model is compared with experimental data for the response of lettuce seedling growth to Centaurepensin, the olfactory response of weevil larvae to α-terpineol, and the responses of annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), creeping red fescue (Festuca rubra L., cv. Ensylva), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L., cv. Kenblue), perennial ryegrass (L. perenne L., cv. Manhattan), and Rebel tall fescue (F. arundinacea Schreb) seedling growth to leachates of Rebel and Kentucky 31 tall fescue. The results show that the model gives a good description to observations and can be used to fit a wide range of dose responses. Assessments of the effects of leachates of Rebel and Kentucky 31 tall fescue clearly differentiate the properties of the allelopathic sources and the relative sensitivities of indicators such as the length of root and leaf. PMID:19330111

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Allelopathy. III. A Model for Curve-Fitting Allelochemical Dose Responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, De Li; An, Min; Johnson, Ian R; Lovett, John V

    2003-01-01

    Bioassay techniques are often used to study the effects of allelochemicals on plant processes, and it is generally observed that the processes are stimulated at low allelochemical concentrations and inhibited as the concentrations increase. A simple empirical model is presented to analyze this type of response. The stimulation-inhibition properties of allelochemical-dose responses can be described by the parameters in the model. The indices, p% reductions, are calculated to assess the allelochemical effects. The model is compared with experimental data for the response of lettuce seedling growth to Centaurepensin, the olfactory response of weevil larvae to alpha-terpineol, and the responses of annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), creeping red fescue (Festuca rubra L., cv. Ensylva), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L., cv. Kenblue), perennial ryegrass (L. perenne L., cv. Manhattan), and Rebel tall fescue (F. arundinacea Schreb) seedling growth to leachates of Rebel and Kentucky 31 tall fescue. The results show that the model gives a good description to observations and can be used to fit a wide range of dose responses. Assessments of the effects of leachates of Rebel and Kentucky 31 tall fescue clearly differentiate the properties of the allelopathic sources and the relative sensitivities of indicators such as the length of root and leaf.

  7. Single-dose desloratadine and montelukast and allergen-induced late airway responses.

    PubMed

    Davis, B E; Illamperuma, C; Gauvreau, G M; Watson, R M; O'Byrne, P M; Deschesnes, F; Boulet, L P; Cockcroft, D W

    2009-06-01

    Montelukast and desloratadine synergistically inhibit the allergen-induced early asthmatic response. Montelukast also suppresses the allergen-induced late asthmatic response, but there are no reports on the effect of desloratadine or the combination on the allergen-induced late asthmatic response. Atopic asthmatics (n = 10) completed a multicentric randomised double-blind crossover study comparing single-dose placebo, 5 mg desloratadine, 10 mg montelukast and the combination administered 2 h prior to allergen inhalation challenge. Methacholine challenges were performed 24 h before and after allergen challenge. Exhaled nitric oxide measurements and sputum inflammatory cell counts were also carried out. All active treatments significantly decreased the late asthmatic response area under the curve. Combination therapy provided the greatest inhibition compared to desloratadine and montelukast. Montelukast was nonsignificantly better than desloratadine but not as effective as the combination. There was a trend towards a decrease in airway responsiveness following montelukast and combination. Montelukast, but not desloratadine or the combination, decreased exhaled NO levels 24 h after allergen. The allergen-induced increase in sputum eosinophil numbers was significantly suppressed at 7 h with desloratadine and combination therapy, and at 24 h with montelukast and combination therapy. Single-dose co-administration of desloratadine and montelukast 2 h prior to allergen inhalation clinically abolished the late asthmatic response and eosinophil recruitment.

  8. Biphasic and triphasic dose responses in zebrafish embryos to low-dose 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Eva Yi; Cheng, Shuk Han; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo low-dose responses of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness were examined through the number of apoptotic events revealed at 24 h post fertilization by vital dye acridine orange staining. Our results suggested that a triphasic dose response was likely a common phenomenon in living organisms irradiated by X-rays, which comprised an ultra-low-dose inhibition, low-dose stimulation and high-dose inhibition. Our results also suggested that the hormetic zone (or the stimulation zone) was shifted towards lower doses with application of filters. The non-detection of a triphasic dose response in previous experiments could likely be attributed to the use of hard X-rays, which shifted the hormetic zone into an unmonitored ultra-low-dose region. In such cases where the subhormetic zone was missed, a biphasic dose response would be reported instead. PMID:26951078

  9. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay: dose estimation and inter-individual differences in the response to γ-radiation.

    PubMed

    Antunes, A C; Martins, V; Cardoso, J; Santos, L; Monteiro Gil, O

    2014-01-15

    Biological dosimetry plays an important role in case of a radiation accident or incident, either when it is the only way to estimate the dose or when it is used to complement physical dosimetry. A cytogenetic study was conducted in a group of 16 Portuguese individuals by use of the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay. A dose-response curve for micronuclei yield was established with a linear-quadratic model: Y=(0.0122±0.0010)+(0.0241±0.0023)D+(0.0193±0.0007)D(2). Also, baseline values for the micronucleus formation in the 16 donors were analyzed, with results in close agreement with those from other laboratories. A validation experiment was carried out with three individuals. The real and the estimated doses obtained with the dose-response curve were in very good agreement, allowing the use of the micronucleus dose-response calibration curve in biological dosimetry for estimation of radiation dose in case of overexposure. The results obtained for the cytogenetic endpoints, studied in the same group of 16 individuals, were also analyzed as a function of age and gender. A higher inter-variability was observed for the higher dose points and differences in response were identified between genders, above 2Gy, for all endpoints.

  10. Non-Targeted Effects and the Dose Response for Heavy Ion Tumorigenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelli, Lori J.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no human epidemiology data available to estimate the heavy ion cancer risks experienced by astronauts in space. Studies of tumor induction in mice are a necessary step to estimate risks to astronauts. Previous experimental data can be better utilized to model dose response for heavy ion tumorigenesis and plan future low dose studies. DOSE RESPONSE MODELS: The Harderian Gland data of Alpen et al.[1-3] was re-analyzed [4] using non-linear least square regression. The data set measured the induction of Harderian gland tumors in mice by high-energy protons, helium, neon, iron, niobium and lanthanum with LET s ranging from 0.4 to 950 keV/micron. We were able to strengthen the individual ion models by combining data for all ions into a model that relates both radiation dose and LET for the ion to tumor prevalence. We compared models based on Targeted Effects (TE) to one motivated by Non-targeted Effects (NTE) that included a bystander term that increased tumor induction at low doses non-linearly. When comparing fitted models to the experimental data, we considered the adjusted R2, the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), and the Bayesian Information Criteria (BIC) to test for Goodness of fit.In the adjusted R2test, the model with the highest R2values provides a better fit to the available data. In the AIC and BIC tests, the model with the smaller values of the summary value provides the better fit. The non-linear NTE models fit the combined data better than the TE models that are linear at low doses. We evaluated the differences in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and found the NTE model provides a higher RBE at low dose compared to the TE model. POWER ANALYSIS: The final NTE model estimates were used to simulate example data to consider the design of new experiments to detect NTE at low dose for validation. Power and sample sizes were calculated for a variety of radiation qualities including some not considered in the Harderian Gland data

  11. ENDOCRINE ACTIVE SUBSTANCES AND DOSE-RESPONSE FOR INDIVIDUALS AND POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine Active Substances and Dose-Response for Individuals and Populations
    Hugh A. Barton

    Abstract for IUPAC-SCOPE article

    Dose-response characteristics for endocrine disruption have been major focuses in efforts to understand potential impacts on human and ec...

  12. EVALUATING QUANTITATIVE FORMULAS FOR DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessment formulas are often distinguished from dose-response models by being rough but necessary. The evaluation of these rough formulas is described here, using the example of mixture risk assessment. Two conditions make the dose-response part of mixture risk assessment d...

  13. BY HOW MUCH DO SHAPES OF TOXICOLOGICAL DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS VARY? (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A re-analysis of a large number of historical dose-response data for continuous endpoints showed that the shapes of the dose-response relationships were surprisingly homogenous. The datasets were selected on the sole criterion that they were expected to provide relatively good in...

  14. Kalman Filter Models for Extrapolations in Dose-Response Experiments and Accelerated Life-Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-09

    Kalman-Filter models with Gaussian innovations provide a useful and easy to implement tool for inference from dose - response experiments and...proposed dose - response relationship. This is in contrast to the currently used approaches wherein there is an implicit commitment to the validity of

  15. Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationships in Biology, Toxicology and Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The purpose of the conference was to attract researchers from diverse backgrounds who are working in the common area of non-linear dose - response relationships...This unique interdisciplinary conference represents an important step in furthering the understanding of the occurrence, origin, mechanisms, significance and practical applications of non-linear dose - response relationships.

  16. NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS: DATA GAPS THAT CHALLENGE DOSE-RESPONSE ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxic effects of environmental agents: Data gaps that challenge dose-response estimation
    S Gutter*, P Mendola+, SG Selevan**, D Rice** (*UNC Chapel Hill; +US EPA, NHEERL; **US EPA, NCEA)

    Dose-response estimation is a critical feature of risk assessment. It can be...

  17. USE OF MECHANISTIC DATA TO HELP DEFINE DOSE-RESPONSE CURVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of Mechanistic Data to Help Define Dose-Response Curves

    The cancer risk assessment process described by the U.S. EPA necessitates a description of the dose-response curve for tumors in humans at low (environmental) exposures. This description can either be a default l...

  18. Estimation of dose-response models for discrete and continuous data in weed science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dose-response analysis is widely used in biological sciences and has application to a variety of risk assessment, bioassay, and calibration problems. In weed science, dose-response methodologies have typically relied on least squares estimation under an assumption of normality. Advances in computati...

  19. Testing the Capacity of the National Biological Dose Response Plan (NBDRP) EX40801

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    Testing the capacity of the National Biological Dose Response Plan (NBDRP) EX40801 Ruth Wilkins, James McNamee, Hillary...2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Testing the capacity of the National Biological Dose Response Plan (NBDRP) EX40801 5a...Report July 2009 Page 2 of 11 Testing the capacity of the NBDRP

  20. Effect of Increased CRM197 Carrier Protein Dose on Meningococcal C Bactericidal Antibody Response

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Milan S.

    2012-01-01

    New multivalent CRM197-based conjugate vaccines are available for childhood immunization. Clinical studies were reviewed to assess meningococcal group C (MenC) antibody responses following MenC-CRM197 coadministration with CRM197-based pneumococcal or Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines. Infants receiving a total CRM197 carrier protein dose of ∼50 μg and concomitant diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP)-containing vaccine tended to have lower MenC geometric mean antibody titers and continued to have low titers after the toddler dose. Nevertheless, at least 95% of children in the reported studies achieved a MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titer of ≥1:8 after the last infant or toddler dose. SBA was measured using an assay with a baby rabbit or human complement source. Additional studies are needed to assess long-term antibody persistence and MenC CRM197 conjugate vaccine immunogenicity using alternative dosing schedules. PMID:22336285

  1. Dose-Response Effects of the Text4baby Mobile Health Program: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Peter E; Szekely, Daniel R; Bihm, Jasmine W; Murray, Elizabeth A; Snider, Jeremy; Abroms, Lorien C

    2015-01-01

    Background Mobile health (mHealth) is growing rapidly, but more studies are needed on how to optimize programs, including optimal timing of messaging, dose of exposure, and value of interactive features. This study evaluates final outcomes of text4baby (a text message service for pregnant and postpartum women) from a randomized trial performed in a population of pregnant female soldiers and family members. Objective The study aims were to evaluate (1) treatment effects and (2) dose-response effects of text4baby on behavioral outcomes compared to control (no text4baby) condition. Methods The study was a randomized trial of text4baby at Madigan Army Medical Center. Female military health beneficiaries who met inclusion criteria were eligible for the study. Participants provided consent, completed a baseline questionnaire, and then were randomized to enroll in text4baby or not. They were followed up at 3 time points thereafter through delivery of their baby. Generalized estimating equation models were used to evaluate outcomes. We examined treatment effects and the effects of higher doses of text4baby messages on outcomes. Results We report descriptive statistics including dosage of text messages delivered. The main finding was a significant effect of high exposure to text4baby on self-reported alcohol consumption postpartum (OR 0.212, 95% CI 0.046-0.973, P=.046), as measured by the question “Since you found out about your pregnancy, have you consumed alcoholic beverages?” The text4baby participants also reported lower quantities of alcohol consumed postpartum. Conclusions Studies of text4baby have helped to build the mHealth evidence base. The effects of text4baby offer lessons for future scalable mHealth programs and suggest the need to study dose-response effects of these interventions. PMID:25630361

  2. Out-of-field doses in radiotherapy: Input to epidemiological studies and dose-risk models.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Roger

    2017-04-06

    Out-of-field doses in radiotherapy have been increasingly studied in recent years because of the generally improved survival of patients who have received radiotherapy as part of their treatment for cancer and their subsequent risk of a second malignancy. This short article attempts to identify some current problems, challenges and opportunities for dosimetry developments in this field. Out-of-field doses and derived risk estimates contribute to general knowledge about radiation effects on humans as well as contributing to risk-benefit considerations for the individual patient. It is suggested that for input into epidemiological studies, the complete dose description (i.e. the synthesis of therapy and imaging doses from all the treatment and imaging modalities) is ideally required, although there is currently no common dosimetry framework which easily covers all modalities. A general strategy for out-of-field dose estimation requires development and improvement in several areas including (i) dosimetry in regions of steep dose gradient close to the field edge (ii) experimentally verified analytical and Monte Carlo models for out-of-field doses (iii) the validity of treatment planning system algorithms outside the field edge (iv) dosimetry of critical sub-structures in organs at risk (v) mixed field (including neutron) dosimetry in proton and ion radiotherapy and photoneutron production in high energy photon beams (vi) the most appropriate quantities to use in neutron dosimetry in a radiotherapy context and (vii) simplification of measurement methods in regions distant from the target volume.

  3. Influences of mechanical exposure biographies on physical capabilities of workers from automotive industry - a study on possible dose-response relationships and consequences for short and long term job rotation.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, Holger; Bruder, Ralph; Sinn-Behrendt, Andrea; Landau, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a field study in production areas of a vehicle manufacturing plant, where 106 male workers (aged from 20 to 63 years) were examined and interviewed by the authors. Aim of study was to identify relationships between specific physical worker capabilities and doses of mechanical exposures using self-developed standardized questionnaires as well as a battery of work-specific tests. The dependent variables are different "physical capabilities", classified using a five-point rating scale with regard to the grade of limitation of the respective capability. Independent variables are "age" and specific "mechanical exposures". Several exposures were combined and multiplied with their respective durations in order to determine doses on three different body regions - back, shoulder-neck and upper limbs. There are significant positive correlations between "age" and "dose of mechanical exposure on back/shoulder-neck/upper limbs region". The analysis of the relationship between dose of exposure and different capabilities to lift or reposition loads (with variable weight) shows weak significant correlations for all three body regions. Data analysis shows no significant correlations between any dose of mechanical exposure and capabilities to work in awkward body postures.These results should be considered in age management programs when scheduling future employee assignments to workplaces, especially for production systems where manual handling tasks are dominant.

  4. Misonidazole with dexamethasone rescue: an escalating dose toxicity study

    SciTech Connect

    Tanasichuk, H.; Urtasun, R.C.; Fulton, D.S.; Raleigh, J.

    1984-09-01

    Neurotoxicity induced by misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) has become the dose limiting factor in clinical work. In 1981, the authors reported a preliminary study suggestive that Dexamethasone (DEXA) does have a protective effect against peripheral neuropathies (PN) resulting from toxicity of misonidazole. The authors are presently investigating the use of DEXA, with escalating doses of MISO in an attempt to modify its neurotoxicity. To date, 16 patients have been registered to receive total doses of MISO given in 9 equally divided doses over 3 weeks. DEXA is given 3 days prior to the first dose and continues for the duration of therapy. All patients receive palliative radiation. No toxicity was seen at the total dose of 13.5 gm/M/sub 2/. One grade I PN occurred in the first four patients receiving 15.5 gm/M/sub 2/. Six additional patients were entered at this dose level and no further incidence of PN was observed.

  5. The energy dependence of the lateral dose response functions of detectors with various densities in photon-beam dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khee Looe, Hui; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2017-02-01

    The lateral dose response function is a general characteristic of the volume effect of a detector used for photon dosimetry in a water phantom. It serves as the convolution kernel transforming the true absorbed dose to water profile, which would be produced within the undisturbed water phantom, into the detector-measured signal profile. The shape of the lateral dose response function characterizes (i) the volume averaging attributable to the detector’s size and (ii) the disturbance of the secondary electron field associated with the deviation of the electron density of the detector material from the surrounding water. In previous work, the characteristic dependence of the shape of the lateral dose response function upon the electron density of the detector material was studied for 6 MV photons by Monte Carlo simulation of a wall-less voxel-sized detector (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-07). This study is here continued for 60Co gamma rays and 15 MV photons in comparison with 6 MV photons. It is found (1) that throughout these photon spectra the shapes of the lateral dose response functions are retaining their characteristic dependence on the detector’s electron density, and (2) that their energy-dependent changes are only moderate. This appears as a practical advantage because the lateral dose response function can then be treated as practically invariant across a clinical photon beam in spite of the known changes of the photon spectrum with increasing distance from the beam axis.

  6. Dose-response effects for disease management programs on hospital utilization in Illinois Medicaid.

    PubMed

    Berg, Gregory D; Donnelly, Shawn; Miller, Mary; Medina, Wendie; Warnick, Kathleen

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate a dose-response impact of disease management contacts on inpatient admissions. Multivariate regression analysis of panel data was used to test the hypothesis that increased disease management contacts lower the odds of an inpatient admission. Subjects were 40,452 members of Illinois' noninstitutionalized Medicaid-only aged, blind, or disabled population diagnosed with asthma, coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and/or heart failure. All members are also in the state's Illinois Health Connect program, a medical home strategy in place for most of the 2.4 million Illinois Medicaid beneficiaries. The statistical measure is the odds ratio, which is a measure of association between the monthly inpatient admission indicator and the number of contacts (doses) a member has had for each particular disease management intervention. Statistically significant contacts are between 8 and 12 for heart failure, between 4 and 12 contacts for diabetes, and between 8 and 13 contacts for asthma. Total inpatient savings during the study period is estimated to be $12.4 million. This study shows the dose-response pattern of inpatient utilization improvements through the number of disease management contacts.

  7. Low Dose Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Hemodynamic Response to Skull Pin Holder Application

    PubMed Central

    Kondavagilu, Shwethashri Ramaprasannakumar; Pujari, Vinayak Seenappa; Chadalawada, Mohan V. R.; Bevinguddaiah, Yatish

    2017-01-01

    Background: The application of skull pin holder elicits an adverse hemodynamic response that can be deleterious; there are many drugs that have been used to attenuate this response. We have conducted this study to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (i.v.) dexmedetomidine on attenuation of hemodynamic responses to skull pin head holder application and to compare the effectiveness of two doses of i.v. dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg and 0.5 μg/kg bolus). Materials and Methods: Ninety American Society of Anesthesiologists physical Status I–III patients undergoing craniotomy were randomized into three groups of thirty each. After intubation, patients in Group A received 1 μg/kg of i.v. dexmedetomidine, Group B received 0.5 μg/kg of i.v. dexmedetomidine, whereas Group C received an equivalent quantity of normal saline. Hemodynamic parameters were monitored regularly after skull pin insertion. Results: There was no significant difference in the monitored hemodynamic parameters among the three groups from baseline until intubation. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased significantly at skull pin insertion and subsequent points in Group C, whereas the values decreased in Groups A and B (P < 0.05). Patients in Group A showed a higher and sustained attenuation of MAP. Patients in Group C had a higher incidence of tachycardia and hypertension requiring additional measures to attenuate the response. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine in either dosage (1 μg/kg or 0.5 μg/kg) was effective in attenuating hemodynamic response to skull pin insertion. Dexmedetomidine in doses of 0.5 μg/kg was as effective in attenuating the HR and MAP response to skull pin insertion as compared to a dose of 1 μg/kg. PMID:28298757

  8. An automated fitting procedure and software for dose-response curves with multiphasic features

    PubMed Central

    Veroli, Giovanni Y. Di; Fornari, Chiara; Goldlust, Ian; Mills, Graham; Koh, Siang Boon; Bramhall, Jo L; Richards, Frances M.; Jodrell, Duncan I.

    2015-01-01

    In cancer pharmacology (and many other areas), most dose-response curves are satisfactorily described by a classical Hill equation (i.e. 4 parameters logistical). Nevertheless, there are instances where the marked presence of more than one point of inflection, or the presence of combined agonist and antagonist effects, prevents straight-forward modelling of the data via a standard Hill equation. Here we propose a modified model and automated fitting procedure to describe dose-response curves with multiphasic features. The resulting general model enables interpreting each phase of the dose-response as an independent dose-dependent process. We developed an algorithm which automatically generates and ranks dose-response models with varying degrees of multiphasic features. The algorithm was implemented in new freely available Dr Fit software (sourceforge.net/projects/drfit/). We show how our approach is successful in describing dose-response curves with multiphasic features. Additionally, we analysed a large cancer cell viability screen involving 11650 dose-response curves. Based on our algorithm, we found that 28% of cases were better described by a multiphasic model than by the Hill model. We thus provide a robust approach to fit dose-response curves with various degrees of complexity, which, together with the provided software implementation, should enable a wide audience to easily process their own data. PMID:26424192

  9. Transmission and dose-response experiments for social animals: a reappraisal of the colonization biology of Campylobacter jejuni in chickens.

    PubMed

    Conlan, Andrew J K; Line, John E; Hiett, Kelli; Coward, Chris; Van Diemen, Pauline M; Stevens, Mark P; Jones, Michael A; Gog, Julia R; Maskell, Duncan J

    2011-12-07

    Dose-response experiments characterize the relationship between infectious agents and their hosts. These experiments are routinely used to estimate the minimum effective infectious dose for an infectious agent, which is most commonly characterized by the dose at which 50 per cent of challenged hosts become infected-the ID(50). In turn, the ID(50) is often used to compare between different agents and quantify the effect of treatment regimes. The statistical analysis of dose-response data typically makes the assumption that hosts within a given dose group are independent. For social animals, in particular avian species, hosts are routinely housed together in groups during experimental studies. For experiments with non-infectious agents, this poses no practical or theoretical problems. However, transmission of infectious agents between co-housed animals will modify the observed dose-response relationship with implications for the estimation of the ID(50) and the comparison between different agents and treatments. We derive a simple correction to the likelihood for standard dose-response models that allows us to estimate dose-response and transmission parameters simultaneously. We use this model to show that: transmission between co-housed animals reduces the apparent value of the ID(50) and increases the variability between replicates leading to a distinctive all-or-nothing response; in terms of the total number of animals used, individual housing is always the most efficient experimental design for ascertaining dose-response relationships; estimates of transmission from previously published experimental data for Campylobacter spp. in chickens suggest that considerable transmission occurred, greatly increasing the uncertainty in the estimates of dose-response parameters reported in the literature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that accounting for transmission in the analysis of dose-response data for Campylobacter spp. challenges our current understanding of the

  10. A Novel Method of Estimating Dose Responses for Polymer Gels Using Texture Analysis of Scanning Electron Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Cheng-Ting; Hsu, Jui-Ting; Han, Rou-Ping; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung; Chang, Shu-Jun; Wu, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Polymer gels are regarded as a potential dosimeter for independent validation of absorbed doses in clinical radiotherapy. Several imaging modalities have been used to convert radiation-induced polymerization to absorbed doses from a macro-scale viewpoint. This study developed a novel dose conversion mechanism by texture analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. The modified N-isopropyl-acrylamide (NIPAM) gels were prepared under normoxic conditions, and were administered radiation doses from 5 to 20 Gy. After freeze drying, the gel samples were sliced for SEM scanning with 50×, 500×, and 3500× magnifications. Four texture indices were calculated based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). The results showed that entropy and homogeneity were more suitable than contrast and energy as dose indices for higher linearity and sensitivity of the dose response curves. After parameter optimization, an R2 value of 0.993 can be achieved for homogeneity using 500× magnified SEM images with 27 pixel offsets and no outlier exclusion. For dose verification, the percentage errors between the prescribed dose and the measured dose for 5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy were −7.60%, 5.80%, 2.53%, and −0.95%, respectively. We conclude that texture analysis can be applied to the SEM images of gel dosimeters to accurately convert micro-scale structural features to absorbed doses. The proposed method may extend the feasibility of applying gel dosimeters in the fields of diagnostic radiology and radiation protection. PMID:23843998

  11. A novel method of estimating dose responses for polymer gels using texture analysis of scanning electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cheng-Ting; Hsu, Jui-Ting; Han, Rou-Ping; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung; Chang, Shu-Jun; Wu, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Polymer gels are regarded as a potential dosimeter for independent validation of absorbed doses in clinical radiotherapy. Several imaging modalities have been used to convert radiation-induced polymerization to absorbed doses from a macro-scale viewpoint. This study developed a novel dose conversion mechanism by texture analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. The modified N-isopropyl-acrylamide (NIPAM) gels were prepared under normoxic conditions, and were administered radiation doses from 5 to 20 Gy. After freeze drying, the gel samples were sliced for SEM scanning with 50×, 500×, and 3500× magnifications. Four texture indices were calculated based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). The results showed that entropy and homogeneity were more suitable than contrast and energy as dose indices for higher linearity and sensitivity of the dose response curves. After parameter optimization, an R (2) value of 0.993 can be achieved for homogeneity using 500× magnified SEM images with 27 pixel offsets and no outlier exclusion. For dose verification, the percentage errors between the prescribed dose and the measured dose for 5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy were -7.60%, 5.80%, 2.53%, and -0.95%, respectively. We conclude that texture analysis can be applied to the SEM images of gel dosimeters to accurately convert micro-scale structural features to absorbed doses. The proposed method may extend the feasibility of applying gel dosimeters in the fields of diagnostic radiology and radiation protection.

  12. Hierarchical dose-response modeling for high-throughput toxicity screening of environmental chemicals.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ander; Reif, David M; Reich, Brian J

    2014-03-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of environmental chemicals is used to identify chemicals with high potential for adverse human health and environmental effects from among the thousands of untested chemicals. Predicting physiologically relevant activity with HTS data requires estimating the response of a large number of chemicals across a battery of screening assays based on sparse dose-response data for each chemical-assay combination. Many standard dose-response methods are inadequate because they treat each curve separately and under-perform when there are as few as 6-10 observations per curve. We propose a semiparametric Bayesian model that borrows strength across chemicals and assays. Our method directly parametrizes the efficacy and potency of the chemicals as well as the probability of response. We use the ToxCast data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as motivation. We demonstrate that our hierarchical method provides more accurate estimates of the probability of response, efficacy, and potency than separate curve estimation in a simulation study. We use our semiparametric method to compare the efficacy of chemicals in the ToxCast data to well-characterized reference chemicals on estrogen receptor α (ERα) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) assays, then estimate the probability that other chemicals are active at lower concentrations than the reference chemicals.

  13. DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN METHADONE DOSE AND ADHERENCE TO ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY AMONG HIV-POSITIVE PERSONS WHO USE ILLICIT OPIOIDS

    PubMed Central

    Lappalainen, Leslie; Nolan, Seonaid; Dobrer, Sabina; Puscas, Cathy; Montaner, Julio; Ahamad, Keith; Dong, Huiru; Kerr, Thomas; Wood, Evan; Milloy, M-J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims For HIV-positive individuals who use illicit opioids, engagement in methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) can contribute to improved HIV treatment outcomes. However, to our knowledge, the role of methadone dosing in adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has not yet been investigated. We sought to examine the relationship between methadone dose and ART adherence among a cohort of persons who use illicit opioids. Design and Setting We used data from the ACCESS study, an ongoing prospective observational cohort of HIV-positive persons who use illicit drugs in Vancouver, Canada, confidentially linked to comprehensive HIV treatment data in a setting of universal no-cost medical care including medications. We evaluated the longitudinal relationship between methadone dose and the likelihood of ≥ 95% adherence to ART among ART-exposed participants during periods of engagement in MMT. Participants 297 ART-exposed individuals on MMT were recruited between December 2005 and May 2013 and followed for a median of 42.1 months. Measurements We measured methadone dose at ≥ 100 vs < 100 mg/day and the likelihood of ≥ 95% adherence to ART. Findings In adjusted generalized estimating equation (GEE) analyses, MMT dose ≥ 100 mg/day was independently associated with optimal adherence to ART (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08 – 1.77, p = 0.010). In a sub-analysis, we observed a dose-response relationship between increasing MMT dose and ART adherence (AOR = 1.06 per 20 mg/day increase, 95% CI: 1.00 – 1.12, p = 0.041). Conclusion Among HIV-positive individuals in methadone maintenance therapy, those receiving higher doses of methadone (≥ 100 mg/day) are more likely to achieve ≥ 95% adherence to antiretroviral therapy than those receiving lower doses. PMID:25940906

  14. Low Doses of Traditional Nanophytomedicines for Clinical Treatment: Manufacturing Processes and Nonlinear Response Patterns.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Sarter, Barbara; Standish, Leanna J; Banerji, Prasanta; Banerji, Pratip

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to (a) summarize evidence for the nanoparticle nature and biological effects of traditional homeopathically-prepared medicines at low and ultralow doses; (b) provide details of historically-based homeopathic green manufacturing materials and methods, relating them to top-down mechanical attrition and plant-based biosynthetic processes in modern nanotechnology; (c) outline the potential roles of nonlinear dose-responses and dynamical interactions with complex adaptive systems in generating endogenous amplification processes during low dose treatment. Possible mechanisms of low dose effects, for which there is evidence involving nanoparticles and/or homeopathically-manufactured medicines, include hormesis, time-dependent sensitization, and stochastic resonance. All of the proposed mechanisms depend upon endogenous nonlinear amplification processes in the recipient organism in interaction with the salient, albeit weak signal properties of the medicine. Conventional ligand-receptor mechanisms relevant to higher doses are less likely involved. Effects, especially for homeopathically-prepared nanophytomedicines, include bidirectional host state-dependent changes in function. Homeopathic clinicians report successful treatment of serious infections and cancers. Preclinical biological evidence is consistent with such claims. Controlled biological data on homeopathically-prepared medicines indicate modulation of gene expression and biological signaling pathways regulating cell cycles, immune reactions, and central nervous system function from studies on cells, animals, and human subjects. As a 200-year old system of traditional medicine used by millions of people worldwide, homeopathy offers a pulsed low dose treatment strategy and strong safety record to facilitate progress in translational nanomedicine with plants and other natural products. In turn, modern nanotechnology methods can improve homeopathic manufacturing procedures

  15. Development of Dose-Response Models to Predict the Relationship for Human Toxoplasma gondii Infection Associated with Meat Consumption.

    PubMed

    Guo, Miao; Mishra, Abhinav; Buchanan, Robert L; Dubey, Jitender P; Hill, Dolores E; Gamble, H Ray; Jones, Jeffrey L; Du, Xianzhi; Pradhan, Abani K

    2016-05-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite that is responsible for approximately 24% of deaths attributed to foodborne pathogens in the United States. It is thought that a substantial portion of human T. gondii infections is acquired through the consumption of meats. The dose-response relationship for human exposures to T. gondii-infected meat is unknown because no human data are available. The goal of this study was to develop and validate dose-response models based on animal studies, and to compute scaling factors so that animal-derived models can predict T. gondii infection in humans. Relevant studies in literature were collected and appropriate studies were selected based on animal species, stage, genotype of T. gondii, and route of infection. Data were pooled and fitted to four sigmoidal-shaped mathematical models, and model parameters were estimated using maximum likelihood estimation. Data from a mouse study were selected to develop the dose-response relationship. Exponential and beta-Poisson models, which predicted similar responses, were selected as reasonable dose-response models based on their simplicity, biological plausibility, and goodness fit. A confidence interval of the parameter was determined by constructing 10,000 bootstrap samples. Scaling factors were computed by matching the predicted infection cases with the epidemiological data. Mouse-derived models were validated against data for the dose-infection relationship in rats. A human dose-response model was developed as P (d) = 1-exp (-0.0015 × 0.005 × d) or P (d) = 1-(1 + d × 0.003 / 582.414)(-1.479) . Both models predict the human response after consuming T. gondii-infected meats, and provide an enhanced risk characterization in a quantitative microbial risk assessment model for this pathogen.

  16. Study of Fricke-gel dosimeter calibration for attaining precise measurements of the absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Liosi, Giulia Maria; Benedini, Sara; Giacobbo, Francesca; Mariani, Mario; Gambarini, Grazia; Artuso, Emanuele; Gargano, Marco; Ludwig, Nicola; Carrara, Mauro; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2015-07-01

    A method has been studied for attaining, with good precision, absolute measurements of the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose by means of the Fricke gelatin Xylenol Orange dosimetric system. With this aim, the dose response to subsequent irradiations was analyzed. In fact, the proposed modality is based on a pre-irradiation of each single dosimeter in a uniform field with a known dose, in order to extrapolate a calibration image for a subsequent non-uniform irradiation with an un-known dose to be measured. (authors)

  17. Prenatal low-dose bisphenol A enhances behavioral responses induced by a predator odor.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Kubo, Kazuhiko; Nishikawa, Yasuo; Aou, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an environmental endocrine disrupter (EED). Previous studies by our group showed that pre- and postnatal administration of low-level BPA induced depression-like behavior in rats. In this study, we evaluated the effects of prenatal BPA on behavioral responses to a predator odor by using a novel cross-form apparatus consisting of 4 plastic chambers. On the first day, nothing was placed into the chambers (Session 1). On the second day, a predator odor (fox odor) was located in separate chambers at 2 opposite corners of the apparatus (Session 2). Pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to low-dose BPA (less than the reference dose) during the 7 days just before birth, and the offspring of the treated rats were evaluated as adults. The locomotor activity and avoidance response of each rat on both test days were compared. The control and BPA groups showed reduced locomotor activity in the presence of the predator odor, but the odor-avoidance response was significant only in the BPA rats. The BPA-exposed rats were obviously sensitive to the predator odor. These results suggest that prenatal BPA exposure has an amplifying effect on avoidance responses to predator odor stress.

  18. Dose-response relationship of autonomic nervous system responses to individualized training impulse in marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Vincenzo; Castagna, Carlo; Padua, Elvira; Lombardo, Mauro; D'Ottavio, Stefano; Massaro, Michele; Volterrani, Maurizio; Iellamo, Ferdinando

    2009-06-01

    In athletes, exercise training induces autonomic nervous system (ANS) adaptations that could be used to monitor training status. However, the relationship between training and ANS in athletes has been investigated without regard for individual training loads. We tested the hypothesis that in long-distance athletes, changes in ANS parameters are dose-response related to individual volume/intensity training load and could predict athletic performance. A spectral analysis of heart rate (HR), systolic arterial pressure variability, and baroreflex sensitivity by the sequences technique was investigated in eight recreational athletes during a 6-mo training period culminating with a marathon. Individualized training load responses were monitored by a modified training impulse (TRIMP(i)) method, which was determined in each athlete using the individual HR and lactate profiling determined during a treadmill test. Monthly TRIMP(i) steadily increased during the training period. All the ANS parameters were significantly and very highly correlated to the dose of exercise with a second-order regression model (r(2) ranged from 0.90 to 0.99; P < 0.001). Variance, high-frequency oscillations of HR variability (HRV), and baroreflex sensitivity resembled a bell-shaped curve with a minimum at the highest TRIMP(i), whereas low-frequency oscillations of HR and systolic arterial pressure variability and the low frequency (LF)-to-high frequency ratio resembled an U-shaped curve with a maximum at the highest TRIMP(i). The LF component of HRV assessed at the last recording session was significantly and inversely correlated to the time needed to complete the nearing marathon. These results suggest that in recreational athletes, ANS adaptations to exercise training are dose related on an individual basis, showing a progressive shift toward a sympathetic predominance, and that LF oscillations in HRV at peak training load could predict athletic achievement in this athlete population.

  19. Human Lymphocytes Response to Low Gamma-ray Doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; Manzanares-Acuña, Eduardo; Bañuelos-Valenzuela, Rómulo

    2002-08-01

    Radiation and non-radiation workers lymphocytes were exposed to a low strength gamma-ray field to determine heat shock protein expression in function of radiation dose. Protein identification was carried out using mAb raised against Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90; from these, only Hsp70 protein was detected before and after lymphocyte irradiation. In all cases, an increasing trend of relative amounts of Hsp70 in function to irradiation time was observed. After 70.5 uGy gamma-ray dose, radiation worker's lymphocytes expressed more Hsp70 protein, than non radiation workers' lymphocytes, indicating a larger tolerance to gamma rays (gammatolerance), due to an adaptation process developed by his labor condition.

  20. The Response of Rats to Cutaneous Dosing with Trichothecene Mycotoxins,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    without epidermis . Those which received DAS showed a similar result, but the crust which had formed by the fourth day broke up as scaly flakes and fell...off (7 to 11 days) revealing an apparently intact epidermis . The rats dosed with the mixture showed an intermediate condition, with some scaliness of...rats exhibited exactly the same lesions with destruction of the epidermis , as described in Table 1. There was no indication that the mixture of toxins

  1. Dose-Response Evaluation of Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebert, Douglas; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Ham, David; Hamilton, Douglas; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Braslet-M is a set of special elasticized thigh cuffs used by the Russian space agency to reduce the effects of the head-ward fluid shift during early adaptation to microgravity by sequestering fluid in the lower extremities. Currently, no imaging modalities are used in the calibration of the device, and the pressure required to produce a predictable physiological response is unknown. This investigation intends to relate the pressure exerted by the cuffs to the extent of fluid redistribution and commensurate physiological effects. Materials and Methods: Ten healthy subjects with standardized fluid intake participated in the study. Data collection included femoral and internal jugular vein imaging in two orthogonal planes, pulsed Doppler of cervical and femoral vessels and middle cerebral artery, optic nerve imaging, and echocardiography. Braslet-M cuff pressure was monitored at the skin interface using pre-calibrated pressure sensors. Using 6 and 30 head-down tilt in two separate sessions, the effect of Braslet-M was assessed while incrementally tightening the cuffs. Cuffs were then simultaneously released to document the resulting hemodynamic change. Results: Preliminary analysis shows correlation between physical pressure exerted by the Braslet-M device and several parameters such as jugular and femoral vein cross-sections, resistivity of the lower extremity vascular bed, and others. A number of parameters reflect blood redistribution and will be used to determine the therapeutic range of the device and to prevent unsafe application. Conclusion: Braslet-M exerts a physical effect that can be measured and correlated with many changes in central and peripheral hemodynamics. Analysis of the full data set will be required to make definitive recommendations regarding the range of safe therapeutic application. Objective data and subjective responses suggest that a safer and equally effective use of Braslet can be achieved when compared with the current

  2. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  3. Dose-response behavior of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri exposed to pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    PubMed

    Ortiz de García, Sheyla; García-Encina, Pedro A; Irusta-Mata, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    The presence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the environment has become a real and widespread concern in recent years. Therefore, the primary goal of this study was to investigate 20 common and widely used PPCPs to assess their individual and combined effect on an important species in one trophic level, i.e., bacteria. The ecotoxicological effects of PPCPs at two different concentration ranges were determined in the bacterium Vibrio fischeri using Microtox(®) and were statistically analyzed