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Sample records for dose statistics resulting

  1. Statistics of the doses absorbed by workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, A.

    1982-10-01

    A statistical analysis of the distribution of the doses by individual workers is presented to assess existing norms. A log-normal distribution is assumed for the individual doses. A reference distribution is introduced, characterized by log-normal distribution of annual doses, average 0,5 rem (10% of the limit) and 0.1% of the individuals that will absorb more than 5 rem. Expressions are given for the probability of finding a dose in a given interval and for the fraction of the collective dose due to doses from a given interval. An example using data from medical professions in the United States shows that the fraction of workers with annual doses larger than 5 rem is not contained within the 0.1% recommended limit, and that the level of risk is not uniform between professions.

  2. [Results of statistical analysis of the dynamics of ionizing radiation dose fields in the service module of the International Space Station in 2000-2012].

    PubMed

    Mitrikas, V G

    2014-01-01

    The on-going 24th solar cycle (SC) is distinguished from the previous ones by low activity. On the contrary, levels of proton fluxes from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are high, which increases the proton flow striking the Earth's radiation belts (ERB). Therefore, at present the absorbed dose from ERB protons should be calculated with consideration of the tangible increase of protons intensity built into the model descriptions based on experimental measurements during the minimum between cycles 19 and 20, and the cycle 21 maximum. The absorbed dose from GCR and ERB protons copies galactic protons dynamics, while the ERB electrons dose copies SC dynamics. The major factors that determine the absorbed dose value are SC phase, ISS orbital altitude and shielding of the dosimeter readings of which are used in analysis. The paper presents the results of dynamic analysis of absorbed doses measured by a variety of dosimeters, namely, R-16 (2 ionization chambers), DB8-1, DB8-2, DB8-3, DB8-4 as a function of ISS orbit altitude and SC phase. The existence of annual variation in the absorbed dose dynamics has been confirmed; several additional variations with the periods of 17 and 52 months have been detected. Modulation of absorbed dose variations by the SC and GCR amplitudes has been demonstrated.

  3. Ideas for Effective Communication of Statistical Results

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-03-01

    Effective presentation of statistical results to those with less statistical training, including managers and decision-makers requires planning, anticipation and thoughtful delivery. Here are several recommendations for effectively presenting statistical results.

  4. Statistical literacy and sample survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlevey, Lynn; Sullivan, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Sample surveys are widely used in the social sciences and business. The news media almost daily quote from them, yet they are widely misused. Using students with prior managerial experience embarking on an MBA course, we show that common sample survey results are misunderstood even by those managers who have previously done a statistics course. In general, they fare no better than managers who have never studied statistics. There are implications for teaching, especially in business schools, as well as for consulting.

  5. Statistical Literacy and Sample Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlevey, Lynn; Sullivan, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Sample surveys are widely used in the social sciences and business. The news media almost daily quote from them, yet they are widely misused. Using students with prior managerial experience embarking on an MBA course, we show that common sample survey results are misunderstood even by those managers who have previously done a statistics course. In…

  6. Statistical characterization of radiation doses from external exposures and relevant contributors in Fukushima prefecture.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Shogo; Abe, Tatsuya; Iijima, Masashi; Shimada, Kazumasa; Shiratori, Yoshitake

    2014-10-01

    In areas contaminated by radioactive materials, well designed dose assessment is necessary in order to protect people from radiation exposure and manage the exposure situation appropriately. Probabilistic dose assessment is a useful method for providing a more complete characterization of information on dose distributions in the population and requires statistically characterized data on pathway-relevant contributors. The objective of this paper is to determine statistical features of contributors to external exposures, as well as to identify causes of variabilities of individual doses to the populations living in areas contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. To achieve these objectives, measurements of individual doses and ambient dose rates, as well as surveys of behavioral patterns, were performed between February and April 2012. These were made with the cooperation of indoor workers, outdoor workers, and pensioners living in Fukushima prefecture. On the basis of these results, statistical analyses were performed in order to identify variabilities of contributors. In addition, a multi-regression analysis was done to explore a significant relationship between individual doses and relevant contributors. Results showed that the ambient dose equivalent rate also distributed with lognormal form, and it had variabilities attributable to the spatial distribution of deposited radionuclides. The distribution form of time spent outdoors depends on the characteristics of occupation, and the distributions for indoor workers and outdoor workers were lognormal and normal, respectively. Results of a multiple-regression analysis suggested that such variabilities of contributors give rise to significant differences in individual doses among the populations.

  7. Statistical characterization of radiation doses from external exposures and relevant contributors in Fukushima prefecture.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Shogo; Abe, Tatsuya; Iijima, Masashi; Shimada, Kazumasa; Shiratori, Yoshitake

    2014-10-01

    In areas contaminated by radioactive materials, well designed dose assessment is necessary in order to protect people from radiation exposure and manage the exposure situation appropriately. Probabilistic dose assessment is a useful method for providing a more complete characterization of information on dose distributions in the population and requires statistically characterized data on pathway-relevant contributors. The objective of this paper is to determine statistical features of contributors to external exposures, as well as to identify causes of variabilities of individual doses to the populations living in areas contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. To achieve these objectives, measurements of individual doses and ambient dose rates, as well as surveys of behavioral patterns, were performed between February and April 2012. These were made with the cooperation of indoor workers, outdoor workers, and pensioners living in Fukushima prefecture. On the basis of these results, statistical analyses were performed in order to identify variabilities of contributors. In addition, a multi-regression analysis was done to explore a significant relationship between individual doses and relevant contributors. Results showed that the ambient dose equivalent rate also distributed with lognormal form, and it had variabilities attributable to the spatial distribution of deposited radionuclides. The distribution form of time spent outdoors depends on the characteristics of occupation, and the distributions for indoor workers and outdoor workers were lognormal and normal, respectively. Results of a multiple-regression analysis suggested that such variabilities of contributors give rise to significant differences in individual doses among the populations. PMID:25162423

  8. Seismic moment distribution revisited: I. Statistical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Yan Y.

    2002-03-01

    systematic, and their dependence on earthquake size. The relative errors seem to decrease for larger events. The influence of moment uncertainties on the parameter estimates is studied. Whereas the β values do not appear to be significantly influenced by the errors, for the corner moment large errors can lead to substantially biased estimates. We compare the Harvard catalogue results with the earthquake data from instrumental catalogues in the first three-quarters of the 20th century. Several very large earthquakes (m >=9) occurred around the middle of the century. Their magnitude values cannot be fitted by a modified Gutenberg-Richter law with m c =8.0-8.5. Among other factors, this discrepancy can be explained by either substantially higher errors in the earlier magnitude values, or by m c being higher for some subduction zones. It is unlikely that data available presently or soon will be sufficient to determine the corner magnitude of 9 and above, with reasonable precision, using purely statistical methods.

  9. [Results of the new naturalization statistics, 1981].

    PubMed

    Fleischer, H

    1983-01-01

    Naturalization statistics for the Federal Republic of Germany are presented for 1981, and changes in the way these statistics are issued are briefly described. Information is included on trends in the number of naturalizations, previous nationality, age structure, and length of stay in Germany.

  10. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations.

  11. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations. PMID:26952004

  12. Ultralow dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric PET CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Samuel L.; Shulkin, Barry L.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To develop ultralow dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultralow doses (10–35 mA s). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for 11 tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% volume computed tomography dose index (0.39/3.64; mGy) from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUV{sub bw}) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the nondose reduced CTAC image for 90% dose reduction. No change in SUV{sub bw}, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols was found down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62% and 86% (3.2/8.3–0.9/6.2). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from predose-reduced patient images. Conclusions: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CT dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for colocalization of hybrid CT anatomy and PET radioisotope uptake.

  13. Fewer Doses of HPV Vaccine Result in Immune Response Similar to Three-Dose Regimen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Releases NCI News Note Fewer doses of HPV vaccine result in immune response similar to three-dose ... that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum antibody ...

  14. Dose impact in radiographic lung injury following lung SBRT: Statistical analysis and geometric interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Victoria; Kishan, Amar U.; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan

    2014-03-15

    been demonstrated. Bimodal behavior was observed in the dose distribution of lung injury after SBRT. Novel statistical and geometrical analysis has shown that the systematically quantified low-dose peak at approximately 35 Gy, or 70% prescription dose, is a good indication of a critical dose for injury. The determined critical dose of 35 Gy resembles the critical dose volume limit of 30 Gy for ipsilateral bronchus in RTOG 0618 and results from previous studies. The authors seek to further extend this improved analysis method to a larger cohort to better understand the interpatient variation in radiographic lung injury dose response post-SBRT.

  15. T1 VSAT Fade Compensation Statistical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sandra K.; Acosta, Roberto; Ugweje, Oke

    2000-01-01

    New satellite communication systems are steadily seeking to use higher frequency bands to accommodate the requirements for additional capacity. At these higher frequencies, propagation impairments that did not significantly affect the signal at lower frequencies begin to have considerable impact. In Ka-band. the next logical commercial frequency band to be used for satellite communication, attenuation of the signal due to rain is a primary concern. An experimental satellite built by NASA, the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS). launched in September 1993, is the first U.S. communication satellite operating in the Ka-band. In addition to higher carrier frequencies, a number of other new technologies, including on-board baseband processing. multiple beam antennas, and rain fade detection and compensation techniques, were designed into the ACTS. Verification experiments have been conducted since the launch to characterize the new technologies. The focus of this paper is to characterize the method used by the ACTS TI Very Small Aperture Terminal (TI VSAT) ground stations in detecting the presence of fade in the communication signal and to adaptively compensate for it by the addition of burst rate reduction and forward error correction. Measured data obtained from the ACTS program was used to validate the compensation technique. A software process was developed and demonstrated to statistically characterize the increased availability achieved by the compensation techniques in terms of the bit error rate time enhancement factor. Several improvements to the ACTS technique are discussed and possible implementations for future Ka band system are offered.

  16. Statistical strategies for averaging EC50 from multiple dose-response experiments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoqi; Kopp-Schneider, Annette

    2015-11-01

    In most dose-response studies, repeated experiments are conducted to determine the EC50 value for a chemical, requiring averaging EC50 estimates from a series of experiments. Two statistical strategies, the mixed-effect modeling and the meta-analysis approach, can be applied to estimate average behavior of EC50 values over all experiments by considering the variabilities within and among experiments. We investigated these two strategies in two common cases of multiple dose-response experiments in (a) complete and explicit dose-response relationships are observed in all experiments and in (b) only in a subset of experiments. In case (a), the meta-analysis strategy is a simple and robust method to average EC50 estimates. In case (b), all experimental data sets can be first screened using the dose-response screening plot, which allows visualization and comparison of multiple dose-response experimental results. As long as more than three experiments provide information about complete dose-response relationships, the experiments that cover incomplete relationships can be excluded from the meta-analysis strategy of averaging EC50 estimates. If there are only two experiments containing complete dose-response information, the mixed-effects model approach is suggested. We subsequently provided a web application for non-statisticians to implement the proposed meta-analysis strategy of averaging EC50 estimates from multiple dose-response experiments.

  17. A comprehensive analysis of the IMRT dose delivery process using statistical process control (SPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Gerard, Karine; Grandhaye, Jean-Pierre; Marchesi, Vincent; Kafrouni, Hanna; Husson, Francois; Aletti, Pierre

    2009-04-15

    The aim of this study is to introduce tools to improve the security of each IMRT patient treatment by determining action levels for the dose delivery process. To achieve this, the patient-specific quality control results performed with an ionization chamber--and which characterize the dose delivery process--have been retrospectively analyzed using a method borrowed from industry: Statistical process control (SPC). The latter consisted in fulfilling four principal well-structured steps. The authors first quantified the short term variability of ionization chamber measurements regarding the clinical tolerances used in the cancer center ({+-}4% of deviation between the calculated and measured doses) by calculating a control process capability (C{sub pc}) index. The C{sub pc} index was found superior to 4, which implies that the observed variability of the dose delivery process is not biased by the short term variability of the measurement. Then, the authors demonstrated using a normality test that the quality control results could be approximated by a normal distribution with two parameters (mean and standard deviation). Finally, the authors used two complementary tools--control charts and performance indices--to thoroughly analyze the IMRT dose delivery process. Control charts aim at monitoring the process over time using statistical control limits to distinguish random (natural) variations from significant changes in the process, whereas performance indices aim at quantifying the ability of the process to produce data that are within the clinical tolerances, at a precise moment. The authors retrospectively showed that the analysis of three selected control charts (individual value, moving-range, and EWMA control charts) allowed efficient drift detection of the dose delivery process for prostate and head-and-neck treatments before the quality controls were outside the clinical tolerances. Therefore, when analyzed in real time, during quality controls, they should

  18. A comprehensive analysis of the IMRT dose delivery process using statistical process control (SPC).

    PubMed

    Gérard, Karine; Grandhaye, Jean-Pierre; Marchesi, Vincent; Kafrouni, Hanna; Husson, François; Aletti, Pierre

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce tools to improve the security of each IMRT patient treatment by determining action levels for the dose delivery process. To achieve this, the patient-specific quality control results performed with an ionization chamber--and which characterize the dose delivery process--have been retrospectively analyzed using a method borrowed from industry: Statistical process control (SPC). The latter consisted in fulfilling four principal well-structured steps. The authors first quantified the short-term variability of ionization chamber measurements regarding the clinical tolerances used in the cancer center (+/- 4% of deviation between the calculated and measured doses) by calculating a control process capability (C(pc)) index. The C(pc) index was found superior to 4, which implies that the observed variability of the dose delivery process is not biased by the short-term variability of the measurement. Then, the authors demonstrated using a normality test that the quality control results could be approximated by a normal distribution with two parameters (mean and standard deviation). Finally, the authors used two complementary tools--control charts and performance indices--to thoroughly analyze the IMRT dose delivery process. Control charts aim at monitoring the process over time using statistical control limits to distinguish random (natural) variations from significant changes in the process, whereas performance indices aim at quantifying the ability of the process to produce data that are within the clinical tolerances, at a precise moment. The authors retrospectively showed that the analysis of three selected control charts (individual value, moving-range, and EWMA control charts) allowed efficient drift detection of the dose delivery process for prostate and head-and-neck treatments before the quality controls were outside the clinical tolerances. Therefore, when analyzed in real time, during quality controls, they should improve the

  19. Low dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging using a statistical iterative reconstruction method

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Yinghua; Chen, Guang-Hong; Hacker, Timothy A.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging has the potential to provide both functional and anatomical information regarding coronary artery stenosis. However, radiation dose can be potentially high due to repeated scanning of the same region. The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of statistical iterative reconstruction to improve parametric maps of myocardial perfusion derived from a low tube current dynamic CT acquisition. Methods: Four pigs underwent high (500 mA) and low (25 mA) dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion scans with and without coronary occlusion. To delineate the affected myocardial territory, an N-13 ammonia PET perfusion scan was performed for each animal in each occlusion state. Filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction was first applied to all CT data sets. Then, a statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) method was applied to data sets acquired at low dose. Image voxel noise was matched between the low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. CT perfusion maps were compared among the low dose FBP, low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. Numerical simulations of a dynamic CT scan at high and low dose (20:1 ratio) were performed to quantitatively evaluate SIR and FBP performance in terms of flow map accuracy, precision, dose efficiency, and spatial resolution. Results: Forin vivo studies, the 500 mA FBP maps gave −88.4%, −96.0%, −76.7%, and −65.8% flow change in the occluded anterior region compared to the open-coronary scans (four animals). The percent changes in the 25 mA SIR maps were in good agreement, measuring −94.7%, −81.6%, −84.0%, and −72.2%. The 25 mA FBP maps gave unreliable flow measurements due to streaks caused by photon starvation (percent changes of +137.4%, +71.0%, −11.8%, and −3.5%). Agreement between 25 mA SIR and 500 mA FBP global flow was −9.7%, 8.8%, −3.1%, and 26.4%. The average variability of flow measurements in a nonoccluded region was 16.3%, 24.1%, and 937

  20. Statistical approaches to forecast gamma dose rates by using measurements from the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyo-Joon; Hwang, Won-Tae; Kim, Eun-Han; Han, Moon-Hee

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the results obtained by inter-comparing several statistical techniques for estimating gamma dose rates, such as an exponential moving average model, a seasonal exponential smoothing model and an artificial neural networks model, are reported. Seven years of gamma dose rates data measured in Daejeon City, Korea, were divided into two parts to develop the models and validate the effectiveness of the generated predictions by the techniques mentioned above. Artificial neural networks model shows the best forecasting capability among the three statistical models. The reason why the artificial neural networks model provides a superior prediction to the other models would be its ability for a non-linear approximation. To replace the gamma dose rates when missing data for an environmental monitoring system occurs, the moving average model and the seasonal exponential smoothing model can be better because they are faster and easier for applicability than the artificial neural networks model. These kinds of statistical approaches will be helpful for a real-time control of radio emissions or for an environmental quality assessment.

  1. Fewer doses of HPV vaccine result in immune response similar to three-dose regimen

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists report that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum antibody levels against two of the most carcinogenic types of HPV (16 and 18), compared to a standard three dose regimen.

  2. Statistical variability and confidence intervals for planar dose QA pass rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Daniel W.; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Attwood, Kristopher; Kumaraswamy, Lalith; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2011-11-15

    techniques. Results: For the prostate and head/neck cases studied, the pass rates obtained with gamma analysis of high density dose planes were 2%-5% higher than respective %/DTA composite analysis on average (ranging as high as 11%), depending on tolerances and normalization. Meanwhile, the pass rates obtained via local normalization were 2%-12% lower than with global maximum normalization on average (ranging as high as 27%), depending on tolerances and calculation method. Repositioning of simulated low-density sampled grids leads to a distribution of possible pass rates for each measured/calculated dose plane pair. These distributions can be predicted using a binomial distribution in order to establish confidence intervals that depend largely on the sampling density and the observed pass rate (i.e., the degree of difference between measured and calculated dose). These results can be extended to apply to 3D arrays of detectors, as well. Conclusions: Dose plane QA analysis can be greatly affected by choice of calculation metric and user-defined parameters, and so all pass rates should be reported with a complete description of calculation method. Pass rates for low-density arrays are subject to statistical uncertainty (vs. the high-density pass rate), but these sampling errors can be modeled using statistical confidence intervals derived from the sampled pass rate and detector density. Thus, pass rates for low-density array measurements should be accompanied by a confidence interval indicating the uncertainty of each pass rate.

  3. Modern Statistical Graphs that Provide Insight in Research Results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modern statistical graphics offer insight in assessing the results of many common statistical analyses. These ideas, however, are rarely employed in agronomic research articles. This work presents several commonly used graphs, offers one or more alternatives for each, and provides the reasons for pr...

  4. The estimation of the measurement results with using statistical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velychko, O.; Gordiyenko, T.

    2015-02-01

    The row of international standards and guides describe various statistical methods that apply for a management, control and improvement of processes with the purpose of realization of analysis of the technical measurement results. The analysis of international standards and guides on statistical methods estimation of the measurement results recommendations for those applications in laboratories is described. For realization of analysis of standards and guides the cause-and-effect Ishikawa diagrams concerting to application of statistical methods for estimation of the measurement results are constructed.

  5. Statistical image reconstruction for low-dose CT using nonlocal means-based regularization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Ma, Jianhua; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yan; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-09-01

    Low-dose computed tomography (CT) imaging without sacrifice of clinical tasks is desirable due to the growing concerns about excessive radiation exposure to the patients. One common strategy to achieve low-dose CT imaging is to lower the milliampere-second (mAs) setting in data scanning protocol. However, the reconstructed CT images by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method from the low-mAs acquisitions may be severely degraded due to the excessive noise. Statistical image reconstruction (SIR) methods have shown potentials to significantly improve the reconstructed image quality from the low-mAs acquisitions, wherein the regularization plays a critical role and an established family of regularizations is based on the Markov random field (MRF) model. Inspired by the success of nonlocal means (NLM) in image processing applications, in this work, we propose to explore the NLM-based regularization for SIR to reconstruct low-dose CT images from low-mAs acquisitions. Experimental results with both digital and physical phantoms consistently demonstrated that SIR with the NLM-based regularization can achieve more gains than SIR with the well-known Gaussian MRF regularization or the generalized Gaussian MRF regularization and the conventional FBP method, in terms of image noise reduction and resolution preservation.

  6. Quality Control of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Treatment Delivery Analysis Using Statistical Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    Able, Charles M.; Bright, Megan; Frizzell, Bart

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Statistical process control (SPC) is a quality control method used to ensure that a process is well controlled and operates with little variation. This study determined whether SPC was a viable technique for evaluating the proper operation of a high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment delivery system. Methods and Materials: A surrogate prostate patient was developed using Vyse ordnance gelatin. A total of 10 metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) were placed from prostate base to apex. Computed tomography guidance was used to accurately position the first detector in each train at the base. The plan consisted of 12 needles with 129 dwell positions delivering a prescribed peripheral dose of 200 cGy. Sixteen accurate treatment trials were delivered as planned. Subsequently, a number of treatments were delivered with errors introduced, including wrong patient, wrong source calibration, wrong connection sequence, single needle displaced inferiorly 5 mm, and entire implant displaced 2 mm and 4 mm inferiorly. Two process behavior charts (PBC), an individual and a moving range chart, were developed for each dosimeter location. Results: There were 4 false positives resulting from 160 measurements from 16 accurately delivered treatments. For the inaccurately delivered treatments, the PBC indicated that measurements made at the periphery and apex (regions of high-dose gradient) were much more sensitive to treatment delivery errors. All errors introduced were correctly identified by either the individual or the moving range PBC in the apex region. Measurements at the urethra and base were less sensitive to errors. Conclusions: SPC is a viable method for assessing the quality of HDR treatment delivery. Further development is necessary to determine the most effective dose sampling, to ensure reproducible evaluation of treatment delivery accuracy.

  7. Characterization of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for dose reduction in CT: A pediatric oncology perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S. L.; Yee, B. S.; Kaufman, R. A.

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: This study demonstrates a means of implementing an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ) technique for dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) while maintaining similar noise levels in the reconstructed image. The effects of image quality and noise texture were assessed at all implementation levels of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign . Empirically derived dose reduction limits were established for ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for imaging of the trunk for a pediatric oncology population ranging from 1 yr old through adolescence/adulthood. Methods: Image quality was assessed using metrics established by the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation program. Each image quality metric was tested using the ACR CT phantom with 0%-100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign blended with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructed images. Additionally, the noise power spectrum (NPS) was calculated for three common reconstruction filters of the trunk. The empirically derived limitations on ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign implementation for dose reduction were assessed using (1, 5, 10) yr old and adolescent/adult anthropomorphic phantoms. To assess dose reduction limits, the phantoms were scanned in increments of increased noise index (decrementing mA using automatic tube current modulation) balanced with ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction to maintain noise equivalence of the 0% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign image. Results: The ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign algorithm did not produce any unfavorable effects on image quality as assessed by ACR criteria. Conversely, low-contrast resolution was found to improve due to the reduction of noise in the reconstructed images. NPS calculations demonstrated that images with lower frequency noise had lower noise variance and coarser graininess at progressively higher percentages of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction; and in spite of the similar magnitudes of noise, the image reconstructed with 50% or more ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign presented a more

  8. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 18F FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.

    2010-09-02

    Representative sampling has been completed for characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 18F as per the statistical sampling plan developed by Shine [1]. Samples from eight locations have been obtained from the tank floor and two of the samples were archived as a contingency. Six samples, referred to in this report as the current scrape samples, have been submitted to and analyzed by SRNL [2]. This report contains the statistical analysis of the floor sample analytical results to determine if further data are needed to reduce uncertainty. Included are comparisons with the prior Mantis samples results [3] to determine if they can be pooled with the current scrape samples to estimate the upper 95% confidence limits (UCL{sub 95%}) for concentration. Statistical analysis revealed that the Mantis and current scrape sample results are not compatible. Therefore, the Mantis sample results were not used to support the quantification of analytes in the residual material. Significant spatial variability among the current sample results was not found. Constituent concentrations were similar between the North and South hemispheres as well as between the inner and outer regions of the tank floor. The current scrape sample results from all six samples fall within their 3-sigma limits. In view of the results from numerous statistical tests, the data were pooled from all six current scrape samples. As such, an adequate sample size was provided for quantification of the residual material on the floor of Tank 18F. The uncertainty is quantified in this report by an upper 95% confidence limit (UCL{sub 95%}) on each analyte concentration. The uncertainty in analyte concentration was calculated as a function of the number of samples, the average, and the standard deviation of the analytical results. The UCL{sub 95%} was based entirely on the six current scrape sample results (each averaged across three analytical determinations).

  9. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 19F FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.

    2010-09-02

    Representative sampling has been completed for characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 19F as per the statistical sampling plan developed by Harris and Shine. Samples from eight locations have been obtained from the tank floor and two of the samples were archived as a contingency. Six samples, referred to in this report as the current scrape samples, have been submitted to and analyzed by SRNL. This report contains the statistical analysis of the floor sample analytical results to determine if further data are needed to reduce uncertainty. Included are comparisons with the prior Mantis samples results to determine if they can be pooled with the current scrape samples to estimate the upper 95% confidence limits (UCL95%) for concentration. Statistical analysis revealed that the Mantis and current scrape sample results are not compatible. Therefore, the Mantis sample results were not used to support the quantification of analytes in the residual material. Significant spatial variability among the current scrape sample results was not found. Constituent concentrations were similar between the North and South hemispheres as well as between the inner and outer regions of the tank floor. The current scrape sample results from all six samples fall within their 3-sigma limits. In view of the results from numerous statistical tests, the data were pooled from all six current scrape samples. As such, an adequate sample size was provided for quantification of the residual material on the floor of Tank 19F. The uncertainty is quantified in this report by an UCL95% on each analyte concentration. The uncertainty in analyte concentration was calculated as a function of the number of samples, the average, and the standard deviation of the analytical results. The UCL95% was based entirely on the six current scrape sample results (each averaged across three analytical determinations).

  10. Uncertainty resulting from multiple data usage in statistical downscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, S.; Ghosh, Subimal; Mishra, Vimal; Salvi, Kaustubh

    2014-06-01

    Statistical downscaling (SD), used for regional climate projections with coarse resolution general circulation model (GCM) outputs, is characterized by uncertainties resulting from multiple models. Here we observe another source of uncertainty resulting from the use of multiple observed and reanalysis data products in model calibration. In the training of SD, for Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR), we use two reanalysis data as predictors and three gridded data products for ISMR from different sources. We observe that the uncertainty resulting from six possible training options is comparable to that resulting from multiple GCMs. Though the original GCM simulations project spatially uniform increasing change of ISMR, at the end of 21st century, the same is not obtained with SD, which projects spatially heterogeneous and mixed changes of ISMR. This is due to the differences in statistical relationship between rainfall and predictors in GCM simulations and observed/reanalysis data, and SD considers the latter.

  11. Planck 2015 results. XVI. Isotropy and statistics of the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Aluri, P. K.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casaponsa, B.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Liu, H.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Pant, N.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2016-08-01

    We test the statistical isotropy and Gaussianity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies using observations made by the Planck satellite. Our results are based mainly on the full Planck mission for temperature, but also include some polarization measurements. In particular, we consider the CMB anisotropy maps derived from the multi-frequency Planck data by several component-separation methods. For the temperature anisotropies, we find excellent agreement between results based on these sky maps over both a very large fraction of the sky and a broad range of angular scales, establishing that potential foreground residuals do not affect our studies. Tests of skewness, kurtosis, multi-normality, N-point functions, and Minkowski functionals indicate consistency with Gaussianity, while a power deficit at large angular scales is manifested in several ways, for example low map variance. The results of a peak statistics analysis are consistent with the expectations of a Gaussian random field. The "Cold Spot" is detected with several methods, including map kurtosis, peak statistics, and mean temperature profile. We thoroughly probe the large-scale dipolar power asymmetry, detecting it with several independent tests, and address the subject of a posteriori correction. Tests of directionality suggest the presence of angular clustering from large to small scales, but at a significance that is dependent on the details of the approach. We perform the first examination of polarization data, finding the morphology of stacked peaks to be consistent with the expectations of statistically isotropic simulations. Where they overlap, these results are consistent with the Planck 2013 analysis based on the nominal mission data and provide our most thorough view of the statistics of the CMB fluctuations to date.

  12. Characterization of statistical prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS): II. Application to dose reduction

    PubMed Central

    Lauzier, Pascal Thériault; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The ionizing radiation imparted to patients during computed tomography exams is raising concerns. This paper studies the performance of a scheme called dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS). The purpose of this study is to characterize the effects of a statistical model of x-ray detection in the DR-PICCS framework and its impact on spatial resolution. Methods: Both numerical simulations with known ground truth and in vivo animal dataset were used in this study. In numerical simulations, a phantom was simulated with Poisson noise and with varying levels of eccentricity. Both the conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and the PICCS algorithms were used to reconstruct images. In PICCS reconstructions, the prior image was generated using two different denoising methods: a simple Gaussian blur and a more advanced diffusion filter. Due to the lack of shift-invariance in nonlinear image reconstruction such as the one studied in this paper, the concept of local spatial resolution was used to study the sharpness of a reconstructed image. Specifically, a directional metric of image sharpness, the so-called pseudopoint spread function (pseudo-PSF), was employed to investigate local spatial resolution. Results: In the numerical studies, the pseudo-PSF was reduced from twice the voxel width in the prior image down to less than 1.1 times the voxel width in DR-PICCS reconstructions when the statistical model was not included. At the same noise level, when statistical weighting was used, the pseudo-PSF width in DR-PICCS reconstructed images varied between 1.5 and 0.75 times the voxel width depending on the direction along which it was measured. However, this anisotropy was largely eliminated when the prior image was generated using diffusion filtering; the pseudo-PSF width was reduced to below one voxel width in that case. In the in vivo study, a fourfold improvement in CNR was achieved while qualitatively maintaining sharpness

  13. The adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V technique for radiation dose reduction in abdominal CT: comparison with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinhan; Oh, Jongyeong; Kim, Dongwon; Cho, Junghyun; Kim, Sanghyun; Lee, Sangyun; Lee, Jihyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether reduced radiation dose abdominal CT images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction V (ASIR-V) compromise the depiction of clinically competent features when compared with the currently used routine radiation dose CT images reconstructed with ASIR. Methods: 27 consecutive patients (mean body mass index: 23.55 kg m−2 underwent CT of the abdomen at two time points. At the first time point, abdominal CT was scanned at 21.45 noise index levels of automatic current modulation at 120 kV. Images were reconstructed with 40% ASIR, the routine protocol of Dong-A University Hospital. At the second time point, follow-up scans were performed at 30 noise index levels. Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), 40% ASIR, 30% ASIR-V, 50% ASIR-V and 70% ASIR-V for the reduced radiation dose. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses of image quality were conducted. The CT dose index was also recorded. Results: At the follow-up study, the mean dose reduction relative to the currently used common radiation dose was 35.37% (range: 19–49%). The overall subjective image quality and diagnostic acceptability of the 50% ASIR-V scores at the reduced radiation dose were nearly identical to those recorded when using the initial routine-dose CT with 40% ASIR. Subjective ratings of the qualitative analysis revealed that of all reduced radiation dose CT series reconstructed, 30% ASIR-V and 50% ASIR-V were associated with higher image quality with lower noise and artefacts as well as good sharpness when compared with 40% ASIR and FBP. However, the sharpness score at 70% ASIR-V was considered to be worse than that at 40% ASIR. Objective image noise for 50% ASIR-V was 34.24% and 46.34% which was lower than 40% ASIR and FBP. Conclusion: Abdominal CT images reconstructed with ASIR-V facilitate radiation dose reductions of to 35% when compared with the ASIR. Advances in knowledge: This study represents the first

  14. Statistical Analysis of NAS Parallel Benchmarks and LINPACK Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuer, Hans-Werner; Simon, Horst D.; Strohmeier, Erich; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In the last three years extensive performance data have been reported for parallel machines both based on the NAS Parallel Benchmarks, and on LINPACK. In this study we have used the reported benchmark results and performed a number of statistical experiments using factor, cluster, and regression analyses. In addition to the performance results of LINPACK and the eight NAS parallel benchmarks, we have also included peak performance of the machine, and the LINPACK n and n(sub 1/2) values. Some of the results and observations can be summarized as follows: 1) All benchmarks are strongly correlated with peak performance. 2) LINPACK and EP have each a unique signature. 3) The remaining NPB can grouped into three groups as follows: (CG and IS), (LU and SP), and (MG, FT, and BT). Hence three (or four with EP) benchmarks are sufficient to characterize the overall NPB performance. Our poster presentation will follow a standard poster format, and will present the data of our statistical analysis in detail.

  15. Ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon result from central muscarinic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Houze, Pascal; Pronzola, Laetita; Kayouka, Maya; Villa, Antoine; Debray, Marcel; Baud, Frederic J.

    2008-12-01

    Paraoxon induces respiratory toxicity. Atropine completely reversed parathion- and paraoxon-induced respiratory toxicity. The aim of this study was to assess the peripheral or central origin of ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given paraoxon 0.215 mg/kg subcutaneously and treated with either atropine (10 mg/kg sc) or ascending doses of methylatropine of 5.42 (equimolar to that of atropine), 54.2, and 542 mg/kg administered subcutaneously 30 min after paraoxon. Ventilation at rest was assessed using whole-body plethysmography and rat temperature using infra-red telemetry. Results are expressed as mean {+-} SE. Statistical analysis used two-way ANOVA for repeated measurements. Paraoxon induced a significant decrease in temperature 30 min after injection lasting the 90 min of the study period. This effect was partially corrected by atropine, but not by methylatropine whatever the dose. Paraoxon induced a decrease in respiratory rate resulting from an increase in expiratory time associated with an increase in tidal volume. Atropine completely reversed the ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon while the equimolar dose of methylatropine had no significant effects. The 54.2 and 542 mg/kg doses of methylatropine had no significant effects. Atropine crosses the blood-brain barrier and reverses peripheral and central muscarinic effects. In contrast, methylatropine does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Atropine completely reversed the ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon, while methylatropine had no significant effects at doses up to 100-fold the equimolar dose of atropine. We conclude that the ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon are mediated by disrupted muscarinic signaling in the central nervous system.

  16. Eye lens dosimetry in interventional cardiology: results of staff dose measurements and link to patient dose levels.

    PubMed

    Antic, V; Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Rehani, M; Aleksandric, S; Arandjic, D; Ostojic, M

    2013-01-01

    Workers involved in interventional cardiology procedures receive high eye lens dose if protection is not used. Currently, there is no suitable method for routine use for the measurement of eye dose. Since most angiography machines are equipped with suitable patient dosemeters, deriving factors linking staff eye doses to the patient doses can be helpful. In this study the patient kerma-area product, cumulative dose at an interventional reference point and eye dose in terms of Hp(3) of the cardiologists, nurses and radiographers for interventional cardiology procedures have been measured. Correlations between the patient dose and the staff eye dose were obtained. The mean eye dose was 121 µSv for the first operator, 33 µSv for the second operator/nurse and 12 µSv for radiographer. Normalised eye lens doses per unit kerma-area product were 0.94 µSv Gy⁻¹ cm⁻² for the first operator, 0.33 µSv Gy⁻¹ cm⁻² for the second operator/nurse and 0.16 µSv Gy⁻¹ cm⁻² for radiographers. Statistical analysis indicated that there is a weak but significant (p < 0.01) correlation between the eye dose and the kerma-area product for all three staff categories. These values are based on a local practice and may provide useful reference for other studies for validation and for wider utilisation in assessing the eye dose using patient dose values. PMID:23152146

  17. Extending the statistical analysis and graphical presentation of toxicity test results using standardized effect sizes.

    PubMed

    Festing, Michael F W

    2014-12-01

    The results of repeat-dose toxicity tests are usually presented as tables of means and standard deviations (SDs), with an indication of statistical significance for each biomarker. Interpretation is based mainly on the pattern of statistical significance rather than the magnitude of any response. Multiple statistical testing of many biomarkers leads to false-positive results and, with the exception of growth data, few graphical methods for showing the results are available. By converting means and SDs to standardized effect sizes, a range of graphical techniques including dot plots, line plots, box plots, and quantile-quantile plots become available to show the patterns of response. A bootstrap statistical test involving all biomarkers is proposed to compare the magnitudes of the response between treated groups. These methods are proposed as an extension rather than an alternative to current statistical analyses. They can be applied to published work retrospectively, as all that is required is tables of means and SDs. The methods are illustrated using published articles, where the results range from strong positive to completely negative responses to the test substances.

  18. Experimental Results on Statistical Approaches to Page Replacement Policies

    SciTech Connect

    LEUNG,VITUS J.; IRANI,SANDY

    2000-12-08

    This paper investigates the questions of what statistical information about a memory request sequence is useful to have in making page replacement decisions: Our starting point is the Markov Request Model for page request sequences. Although the utility of modeling page request sequences by the Markov model has been recently put into doubt, we find that two previously suggested algorithms (Maximum Hitting Time and Dominating Distribution) which are based on the Markov model work well on the trace data used in this study. Interestingly, both of these algorithms perform equally well despite the fact that the theoretical results for these two algorithms differ dramatically. We then develop succinct characteristics of memory access patterns in an attempt to approximate the simpler of the two algorithms. Finally, we investigate how to collect these characteristics in an online manner in order to have a purely online algorithm.

  19. Mapping the results of local statistics: Using geographically weighted regression

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Stephen A.; Yang, Tse-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    The application of geographically weighted regression (GWR) – a local spatial statistical technique used to test for spatial nonstationarity – has grown rapidly in the social, health and demographic sciences. GWR is a useful exploratory analytical tool that generates a set of location-specific parameter estimates which can be mapped and analysed to provide information on spatial nonstationarity in relationships between predictors and the outcome variable. A major challenge to GWR users, however, is how best to map these parameter estimates. This paper introduces a simple mapping technique that combines local parameter estimates and local t-values on one map. The resultant map can facilitate the exploration and interpretation of nonstationarity. PMID:25578024

  20. Statistics

    Cancer.gov

    Links to sources of cancer-related statistics, including the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program, SEER-Medicare datasets, cancer survivor prevalence data, and the Cancer Trends Progress Report.

  1. Statistical Analysis of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results

    SciTech Connect

    Shine, E. P.

    2013-01-31

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements

  2. Statistical Analysis Of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results

    SciTech Connect

    Shine, E. P.

    2012-08-01

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements

  3. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shine, E.

    2012-03-14

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, radionuclide, inorganic, and anion concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their

  4. Adaptive nonlocal means-based regularization for statistical image reconstruction of low-dose X-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Ma, Jianhua; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yan; Han, Hao; Li, Lihong; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2015-03-01

    To reduce radiation dose in X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging, one of the common strategies is to lower the milliampere-second (mAs) setting during projection data acquisition. However, this strategy would inevitably increase the projection data noise, and the resulting image by the filtered back-projection (FBP) method may suffer from excessive noise and streak artifacts. The edge-preserving nonlocal means (NLM) filtering can help to reduce the noise-induced artifacts in the FBP reconstructed image, but it sometimes cannot completely eliminate them, especially under very low-dose circumstance when the image is severely degraded. To deal with this situation, we proposed a statistical image reconstruction scheme using a NLM-based regularization, which can suppress the noise and streak artifacts more effectively. However, we noticed that using uniform filtering parameter in the NLM-based regularization was rarely optimal for the entire image. Therefore, in this study, we further developed a novel approach for designing adaptive filtering parameters by considering local characteristics of the image, and the resulting regularization is referred to as adaptive NLM-based regularization. Experimental results with physical phantom and clinical patient data validated the superiority of using the proposed adaptive NLM-regularized statistical image reconstruction method for low-dose X-ray CT, in terms of noise/streak artifacts suppression and edge/detail/contrast/texture preservation.

  5. Statistical methods for clinical verification of dose response parameters related to esophageal stricture and AVM obliteration from radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Lind, Bengt K.; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Laurell, Göran; Fernberg, Jan-Olof; Lefkopoulos, Dimitrios; Kappas, Constantin; Brahme, Anders

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to provide some statistical methods for evaluating the predictive strength of radiobiological models and the validity of dose-response parameters for tumour control and normal tissue complications. This is accomplished by associating the expected complication rates, which are calculated using different models, with the clinical follow-up records. These methods are applied to 77 patients who received radiation treatment for head and neck cancer and 85 patients who were treated for arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The three-dimensional dose distribution delivered to esophagus and AVM nidus and the clinical follow-up results were available for each patient. Dose-response parameters derived by a maximum likelihood fitting were used as a reference to evaluate their compatibility with the examined treatment methodologies. The impact of the parameter uncertainties on the dose-response curves is demonstrated. The clinical utilization of the radiobiological parameters is illustrated. The radiobiological models (relative seriality and linear Poisson) and the reference parameters are validated to prove their suitability in reproducing the treatment outcome pattern of the patient material studied (through the probability of finding a worse fit, area under the ROC curve and khgr2 test). The analysis was carried out for the upper 5 cm of the esophagus (proximal esophagus) where all the strictures are formed, and the total volume of AVM. The estimated confidence intervals of the dose-response curves appear to have a significant supporting role on their clinical implementation and use.

  6. Mediterranean Cyclones in a changing climate. First statistical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tous, M.; Genoves, A.; Campins, J.; Picornell, M. A.; Jansa, A.; Mizuta, R.

    2009-09-01

    The Mediterranean storms play an important role in weather and climate. Their influence in determining the local weather is known; heavy precipitation systems and strong wind cases are often related to the presence of a cyclone in the Mediterranean. From a large-scale point of view, the Mediterranean storm track has importance in the vertical and horizontal transfers of heat and water vapour towards the Eastern regions. For all of these reasons, any future change related to the intensity, frequency or tracks of these storms can be important for both the local weather and local climate, at least, in the countries around the basin. The Mediterranean cyclones constitute a study subject of increasing interest. Some climatologies from long series of re-analyses, like ERA15, NCEP/NCAR and ERA40, or from operational and high resolution analysis systems, like HIRLAM_INM and ECMWF, have allowed to define the main characteristics of these storms. Generally speaking, the Mediterranean storms have the characteristics of extratropical storms, showing smaller sizes and shorter life cycles than those ones developed in other maritime areas of the world. Moreover, the influence of the land areas and high mountains around the basin and the large-scale heat releases have been revealed as key factors for understanding their genesis and rates of development. In spite of the fact that probably the existing automatic procedures include some large scale assumptions, which may not the best for the correct detection and tracking the Mediterranean storms, these procedures can provide a first and almost necessary step, from a statistical/climatological point of view, specially taking into account both the current resolution of the existent global re-analysis series and global climatic models and the state-of-the art about Mediterranean cyclones. A cyclone detection and tracking procedure, originally designed for the description of Mediterranean storms, has been applied to the low resolution

  7. Comparison of Nine Statistical Model Based Warfarin Pharmacogenetic Dosing Algorithms Using the Racially Diverse International Warfarin Pharmacogenetic Consortium Cohort Database

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rong; Li, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Objective Multiple linear regression (MLR) and machine learning techniques in pharmacogenetic algorithm-based warfarin dosing have been reported. However, performances of these algorithms in racially diverse group have never been objectively evaluated and compared. In this literature-based study, we compared the performances of eight machine learning techniques with those of MLR in a large, racially-diverse cohort. Methods MLR, artificial neural network (ANN), regression tree (RT), multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), boosted regression tree (BRT), support vector regression (SVR), random forest regression (RFR), lasso regression (LAR) and Bayesian additive regression trees (BART) were applied in warfarin dose algorithms in a cohort from the International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium database. Covariates obtained by stepwise regression from 80% of randomly selected patients were used to develop algorithms. To compare the performances of these algorithms, the mean percentage of patients whose predicted dose fell within 20% of the actual dose (mean percentage within 20%) and the mean absolute error (MAE) were calculated in the remaining 20% of patients. The performances of these techniques in different races, as well as the dose ranges of therapeutic warfarin were compared. Robust results were obtained after 100 rounds of resampling. Results BART, MARS and SVR were statistically indistinguishable and significantly out performed all the other approaches in the whole cohort (MAE: 8.84–8.96 mg/week, mean percentage within 20%: 45.88%–46.35%). In the White population, MARS and BART showed higher mean percentage within 20% and lower mean MAE than those of MLR (all p values < 0.05). In the Asian population, SVR, BART, MARS and LAR performed the same as MLR. MLR and LAR optimally performed among the Black population. When patients were grouped in terms of warfarin dose range, all machine learning techniques except ANN and LAR showed significantly

  8. Patient-specific minimum-dose imaging protocols for statistical image reconstruction in C-arm cone-beam CT using correlated noise injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W.; Otake, Y.; Khanna, A. J.; Gallia, G. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: A new method for accurately portraying the impact of low-dose imaging techniques in C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) is presented and validated, allowing identification of minimum-dose protocols suitable to a given imaging task on a patient-specific basis in scenarios that require repeat intraoperative scans. Method: To accurately simulate lower-dose techniques and account for object-dependent noise levels (x-ray quantum noise and detector electronics noise) and correlations (detector blur), noise of the proper magnitude and correlation was injected into the projections from an initial CBCT acquired at the beginning of a procedure. The resulting noisy projections were then reconstructed to yield low-dose preview (LDP) images that accurately depict the image quality at any level of reduced dose in both filtered backprojection and statistical image reconstruction. Validation studies were conducted on a mobile C-arm, with the noise injection method applied to images of an anthropomorphic head phantom and cadaveric torso across a range of lower-dose techniques. Results: Comparison of preview and real CBCT images across a full range of techniques demonstrated accurate noise magnitude (within ~5%) and correlation (matching noise-power spectrum, NPS). Other image quality characteristics (e.g., spatial resolution, contrast, and artifacts associated with beam hardening and scatter) were also realistically presented at all levels of dose and across reconstruction methods, including statistical reconstruction. Conclusion: Generating low-dose preview images for a broad range of protocols gives a useful method to select minimum-dose techniques that accounts for complex factors of imaging task, patient-specific anatomy, and observer preference. The ability to accurately simulate the influence of low-dose acquisition in statistical reconstruction provides an especially valuable means of identifying low-dose limits in a manner that does not rely on a model for the nonlinear

  9. Austrian results from Matroshka poncho and organ dose determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajek, M.; Bergmann, R.; Fugger, M.; Vana, N.

    Cosmic rays in low-earth orbits LEO primarily consist of high-energy charged particles originating from galactic cosmic radiation GCR energetic solar particle events SPE and trapped radiation belts These radiations of high linear energy transfer LET generally inflict greater biological damage than that resulting from typical terrestrial radiation hazards Particle and energy spectra are attenuated in interaction processes within shielding structures and within the human body Reliable assessment of health risks to astronaut crews is pivotal in the design of future expeditions into interplanetary space and requires knowledge of absorbed radiation doses in critical radiosensitive organs and tissues The European Space Agency ESA Matroshka experiment---conducted under the aegis of the German Aerospace Center DLR ---is aimed at simulating an astronaut s body during extravehicular activities EVA Matroshka basically consists of a human phantom torso attached to a base structure and covered with a protective carbon-fibre container acting as a spacesuit model The phantom is divided into 33 tissue-equivalent polyurethane slices of specific density for tissue and organs Natural bones are embedded Channels and cut-outs enable accommodation of active and passive radiation monitors The torso is dressed by a skin-equivalent poncho which is also designed for dosimeter integration The phantom houses in total 7 active and more than 6000 passive radiation sensors Thereof the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities ATI provided more than

  10. Electron paramagnetic resonance radiation dose assessment in fingernails of the victim exposed to high dose as result of an accident.

    PubMed

    Romanyukha, Alexander; Trompier, François; Reyes, Ricardo A; Christensen, Doran M; Iddins, Carol J; Sugarman, Stephen L

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we report results of radiation dose measurements in fingernails of a worker who sustained a radiation injury to his right thumb while using 130 kVp X-ray for nondestructive testing. Clinically estimated absorbed dose was about 20-25 Gy. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dose assessment was independently carried out by two laboratories, the Naval Dosimetry Center (NDC) and French Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN). The laboratories used different equipments and protocols to estimate doses in the same fingernail samples. NDC used an X-band transportable EPR spectrometer, e-scan produced by Bruker BioSpin, and a universal dose calibration curve. In contrast, IRSN used a more sensitive Q-band stationary spectrometer (EMXplus) with a new approach for the dose assessment (dose saturation method), derived by additional dose irradiation to known doses. The protocol used by NDC is significantly faster than that used by IRSN, nondestructive, and could be done in field conditions, but it is probably less accurate and requires more sample for the measurements. The IRSN protocol, on the other hand, potentially is more accurate and requires very small amount of sample but requires more time and labor. In both EPR laboratories, the intense radiation-induced signal was measured in the accidentally irradiated fingernails and the resulting dose assessments were different. The dose on the fingernails from the right thumb was estimated as 14 ± 3 Gy at NDC and as 19 ± 6 Gy at IRSN. Both EPR dose assessments are given in terms of tissue kerma. This paper discusses the experience gained by using EPR for dose assessment in fingernails with a stationary spectrometer versus a portable one, the reasons for the observed discrepancies in dose, and potential advantages and disadvantages of each approach for EPR measurements in fingernails.

  11. Imprecision in predicted dose from /sup 137/Cs resulting from biological variability

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Schwarz, G.

    1981-01-01

    The variability of observed values of human metabolic and physiological characteristics which influence estimates of dose from ingestion of a unit of Cesium-137 activity, and the subsequent predicted total-body dose commitment is analyzed. The analysis is based on extensive literature review and statistical comparison of parameter variability, correlation and reliability. (PSB)

  12. Statistical microeconomics and commodity prices: theory and empirical results.

    PubMed

    Baaquie, Belal E

    2016-01-13

    A review is made of the statistical generalization of microeconomics by Baaquie (Baaquie 2013 Phys. A 392, 4400-4416. (doi:10.1016/j.physa.2013.05.008)), where the market price of every traded commodity, at each instant of time, is considered to be an independent random variable. The dynamics of commodity market prices is given by the unequal time correlation function and is modelled by the Feynman path integral based on an action functional. The correlation functions of the model are defined using the path integral. The existence of the action functional for commodity prices that was postulated to exist in Baaquie (Baaquie 2013 Phys. A 392, 4400-4416. (doi:10.1016/j.physa.2013.05.008)) has been empirically ascertained in Baaquie et al. (Baaquie et al. 2015 Phys. A 428, 19-37. (doi:10.1016/j.physa.2015.02.030)). The model's action functionals for different commodities has been empirically determined and calibrated using the unequal time correlation functions of the market commodity prices using a perturbation expansion (Baaquie et al. 2015 Phys. A 428, 19-37. (doi:10.1016/j.physa.2015.02.030)). Nine commodities drawn from the energy, metal and grain sectors are empirically studied and their auto-correlation for up to 300 days is described by the model to an accuracy of R(2)>0.90-using only six parameters. PMID:26621991

  13. SU-E-I-86: Ultra-Low Dose Computed Tomography Attenuation Correction for Pediatric PET CT Using Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASiR™)

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S; Shulkin, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop ultra-low dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultra-low doses (10–35 mAs). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for eleven tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% CTDIvol (0.39/3.64; mGy) radiation dose from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUVbw) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation organ dose, as derived from patient exam size specific dose estimate (SSDE), was converted to effective dose using the standard ICRP report 103 method. Effective dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative patient population dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the non-dose reduced CTAC image down to 90% dose reduction. No change in SUVbw, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols reconstructed with ASiR and down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62%–86% (3.2/8.3−0.9/6.2; mSv). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from pre dose-reduced patient images. Conclusion: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CTAC dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for co

  14. Evaluating Replicability of Regression Results Using the Jackknife Statistic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Jina

    Contrary to popular opinion, significance testing does not inform the researcher of the likelihood of the replication of results from current research findings. Result replicability has been ignored by researchers because of an overreliance on significance testing. Several alternatives have been offered to provide the researcher with more…

  15. Explanation of Two Anomalous Results in Statistical Mediation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, Matthew S.; Taylor, Aaron B.; MacKinnon, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of different methods of testing mediation models have consistently found two anomalous results. The first result is elevated Type I error rates for the bias-corrected and accelerated bias-corrected bootstrap tests not found in nonresampling tests or in resampling tests that did not include a bias correction. This is of special…

  16. Assessing the relative effectiveness of statistical downscaling and distribution mapping in reproducing rainfall statistics based on climate model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langousis, Andreas; Mamalakis, Antonios; Deidda, Roberto; Marrocu, Marino

    2016-01-01

    To improve the level skill of climate models (CMs) in reproducing the statistics of daily rainfall at a basin level, two types of statistical approaches have been suggested. One is statistical correction of CM rainfall outputs based on historical series of precipitation. The other, usually referred to as statistical rainfall downscaling, is the use of stochastic models to conditionally simulate rainfall series, based on large-scale atmospheric forcing from CMs. While promising, the latter approach attracted reduced attention in recent years, since the developed downscaling schemes involved complex weather identification procedures, while demonstrating limited success in reproducing several statistical features of rainfall. In a recent effort, Langousis and Kaleris () developed a statistical framework for simulation of daily rainfall intensities conditional on upper-air variables, which is simpler to implement and more accurately reproduces several statistical properties of actual rainfall records. Here we study the relative performance of: (a) direct statistical correction of CM rainfall outputs using nonparametric distribution mapping, and (b) the statistical downscaling scheme of Langousis and Kaleris (), in reproducing the historical rainfall statistics, including rainfall extremes, at a regional level. This is done for an intermediate-sized catchment in Italy, i.e., the Flumendosa catchment, using rainfall and atmospheric data from four CMs of the ENSEMBLES project. The obtained results are promising, since the proposed downscaling scheme is more accurate and robust in reproducing a number of historical rainfall statistics, independent of the CM used and the characteristics of the calibration period. This is particularly the case for yearly rainfall maxima.

  17. Attitudes toward Statistics and Their Relationship with Short- and Long-Term Exam Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanhoof, Stijn; Sotos, Ana Elisa Castro; Onghena, Patrick; Vershaffel, Lieven; Van Dooren, Wim; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Leuven, Katholieke Universiteit

    2006-01-01

    This study uses the Attitudes Toward Statistics (ATS) scale (Wise 1985) to investigate the attitudes toward statistics and the relationship of those attitudes with short- and long-term statistics exam results for university students taking statistics courses in a five year Educational Sciences curriculum. Compared to the findings from previous…

  18. An improvement in IMRT QA results and beam matching in linacs using statistical process control.

    PubMed

    Gagneur, Justin D; Ezzell, Gary A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to apply the principles of statistical process control (SPC) in the context of patient specific intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) QA to set clinic-specific action limits and evaluate the impact of changes to the multileaf collimator (MLC) calibrations on IMRT QA results. Ten months of IMRT QA data with 247 patient QAs collected on three beam-matched linacs were retrospectively analyzed with a focus on the gamma pass rate (GPR) and the average ratio between the measured and planned doses. Initial control charts and action limits were calculated. Based on this data, changes were made to the leaf gap parameter for the MLCs to improve the consistency between linacs. This leaf gap parameter is tested monthly using a MLC sweep test. A follow-up dataset with 424 unique QAs were used to evaluate the impact of the leaf gap parameter change. The initial data average GPR was 98.6% with an SPC action limit of 93.7%. The average ratio of doses was 1.003, with an upper action limit of 1.017 and a lower action limit of 0.989. The sweep test results for the linacs were -1.8%, 0%, and +1.2% from nominal. After the adjustment of the leaf gap parameter, all sweep test results were within 0.4% of nominal. Subsequently, the average GPR was 99.4% with an SPC action limit of 97.3%. The average ratio of doses was 0.997 with an upper action limit of 1.011 and a lower action limit of 0.981. Applying the principles of SPC to IMRT QA allowed small differences between closely matched linacs to be identified and reduced. Ongoing analysis will monitor the process and be used to refine the clinical action limits for IMRT QA. PMID:25207579

  19. Bronchoscopic phototherapy at comparable dose rates: Early results

    SciTech Connect

    Pass, H.I.; Delaney, T.; Smith, P.D.; Bonner, R.; Russo, A.

    1989-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a recently introduced treatment for surface malignancies. Since January 1987, 10 patients with endobronchial neoplasms have had bronchoscopic photodynamic therapy at similar dose rates (400 mW/cm) for total atelectasis (2), carinal narrowing with respiratory insufficiency (2), or partial obstruction without collapse (4). Two patients underwent photodynamic therapy as a preliminary to immunotherapy. Histologies included endobronchial metastases (colon, ovary, melanoma, and sarcoma, 1 each; and renal cell, 3) and primary lung cancer (3). The 2 patients with total atelectasis had complete reexpansion after photodynamic therapy, which permitted eventual sleeve lobectomy in 1. Carinal narrowing was ameliorated in the 2 patients seen with inspiratory stridor, thereby permitting hospital discharge. Endoscopically resected fragments after photodynamic therapy exhibited avascular necrosis. These data support further controlled studies of photodynamic therapy by thoracic surgical oncologists to define its limitations as well as to improve and expand its efficacy as a palliative or surgical adjuvant.

  20. CY 1995 radiation dose reconciliation report and resulting CY 1996 dose estimate for the 324 nuclear facility

    SciTech Connect

    Landsman, S.D.; Thornhill, R.E.; Peterson, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    In this report, the dose estimate for CY 1995 is reconciled by month wih actual doses received. Results of the reconciliation were used to revise estimates of worker dose for CY 1996. Resulting dose estimate for the facility is also included. Support for two major programs (B-Cell Cleanout and Surveillance and Maintenance) accounts for most of the exposure received by workers in the faility. Most of the expousre received by workers comes from work in the Radiochemical Engineering Complex airlock. In spite of schedule and work scope changes during CY 1995, dose estimates were close to actual exposures received. A number of ALARA measures were taken throughout the year; exposure reduction due to those was 20.6 Man-Rem, a 28% reduction from the CY 1995 estimate. Baseline estimates for various tasks in the facility were used to compile the CY 1996 dose estimate of 45.4 Man-Rem; facility goal for CY 1996 is to reduce worker dose by 20%, to 36.3 Man-Rem.

  1. 42 CFR 82.4 - How Will DOL Use the Results of the NIOSH Dose Reconstructions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER... Will DOL Use the Results of the NIOSH Dose Reconstructions? Under 42 CFR part 81, DOL will apply dose reconstruction results together with information on cancer diagnosis and other personal information provided...

  2. Dose-response relationships and extrapolation in toxicology - Mechanistic and statistical considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Controversy on toxicological dose-response relationships and low-dose extrapolation of respective risks is often the consequence of misleading data presentation, lack of differentiation between types of response variables, and diverging mechanistic interpretation. In this chapter...

  3. Combining Automatic Tube Current Modulation with Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction for Low-Dose Chest CT Screening

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang-Hong; Jin, Er-Hu; He, Wen; Zhao, Li-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To reduce radiation dose while maintaining image quality in low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) by combining adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and automatic tube current modulation (ATCM). Methods Patients undergoing cancer screening (n = 200) were subjected to 64-slice multidetector chest CT scanning with ASIR and ATCM. Patients were divided into groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 (n = 50 each), with a noise index (NI) of 15, 20, 30, and 40, respectively. Each image set was reconstructed with 4 ASIR levels (0% ASIR, 30% ASIR, 50% ASIR, and 80% ASIR) in each group. Two radiologists assessed subjective image noise, image artifacts, and visibility of the anatomical structures. Objective image noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured, and effective dose (ED) was recorded. Results Increased NI was associated with increased subjective and objective image noise results (P<0.001), and SNR decreased with increasing NI (P<0.001). These values improved with increased ASIR levels (P<0.001). Images from all 4 groups were clinically diagnosable. Images with NI = 30 and 50% ASIR had average subjective image noise scores and nearly average anatomical structure visibility scores, with a mean objective image noise of 23.42 HU. The EDs for groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 were 2.79±1.17, 1.69±0.59, 0.74±0.29, and 0.37±0.22 mSv, respectively. Compared to group 1 (NI = 15), the ED reductions were 39.43%, 73.48%, and 86.74% for groups 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Conclusions Using NI = 30 with 50% ASIR in the chest CT protocol, we obtained average or above-average image quality but a reduced ED. PMID:24691208

  4. An empirical approach to sufficient similarity in dose-responsiveness: Utilization of statistical distance as a similarity measure.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using statistical equivalence testing logic and mixed model theory an approach has been developed, that extends the work of Stork et al (JABES,2008), to define sufficient similarity in dose-response for chemical mixtures containing the same chemicals with different ratios ...

  5. Potential dose distributions at proposed surface radioactvity clearance levels resulting from occupational scenarios.

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.; Rabovsky, J.

    2011-08-02

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the potential dose distribution resulting from surface radioactivity, using occupational radiation exposure scenarios. The surface radioactivity clearance values considered in this analysis may ultimately replace those currently specified in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and guidance for radiological protection of workers, the public and the environment. The surface contamination values apply to radioactive contamination deposited on a surface (i.e., not incorporated into the interior of the material). For these calculations, the dose coefficients for intake of radionuclides were taken from ICRP Publication 68 (ICRP 1994), and external exposure dose coefficients were taken from the compact disc (CD) that accompanied Federal Guidance Report (FGR) 13 (Eckerman et al. 1999). The ICRP Publication 68 dose coefficients were based on ICRP Publication 60 (ICRP 1990) and were used specifically for worker dose calculations. The calculated dose in this analysis is the 'effective dose' (ED), rather than the 'effective dose equivalent' (EDE).

  6. Split-Dose Polyethylene Glycol Is Superior to Single Dose for Colonoscopy Preparation: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Rachid; Hilsden, Robert J.; Dube, Catherine; Rostom, Alaa

    2016-01-01

    Background. The efficacy of colonoscopy in detecting abnormalities within the colon is highly dependent on the adequacy of the bowel preparation. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of PEG lavage and split-dose PEG lavage with specific emphasis on the cleanliness of the right colon. Methods. The study was a prospective, randomized, two-arm, controlled trial of 237 patients. Patients between the age of 50 and 75 years were referred to an outpatient university screening clinic for colonoscopy. Patients were allocated to receive either a single 4 L PEG lavage or a split-dose PEG lavage. Results. Overall, the bowel preparation was superior in the split-dose group compared with the single-dose group (mean Ottawa score 3.50 ± 2.89 versus 5.96 ± 3.53; P < 0.05) and resulted in less overall fluid in the colon. This effect was observed across all segments of the colon assessed. Conclusions. The current study supports use of a split-dose PEG lavage over a single large volume lavage for superior bowel cleanliness, which may improve polyp detection. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01610856. PMID:27446836

  7. Dose-Volume Parameters of the Corpora Cavernosa Do Not Correlate With Erectile Dysfunction After External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From a Dose-Escalation Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wielen, Gerard J. van der Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Dohle, Gert R.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Incrocci, Luca

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze the correlation between dose-volume parameters of the corpora cavernosa and erectile dysfunction (ED) after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, a randomized dose-escalation trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy was conducted. Patients at our institute were asked to participate in an additional part of the trial evaluating sexual function. After exclusion of patients with less than 2 years of follow-up, ED at baseline, or treatment with hormonal therapy, 96 patients were eligible. The proximal corpora cavernosa (crura), the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, and the penile bulb were contoured on the planning computed tomography scan and dose-volume parameters were calculated. Results: Two years after EBRT, 35 of the 96 patients had developed ED. No statistically significant correlations between ED 2 years after EBRT and dose-volume parameters of the crura, the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, or the penile bulb were found. The few patients using potency aids typically indicated to have ED. Conclusion: No correlation was found between ED after EBRT for prostate cancer and radiation dose to the crura or penile bulb. The present study is the largest study evaluating the correlation between ED and radiation dose to the corpora cavernosa after EBRT for prostate cancer. Until there is clear evidence that sparing the penile bulb or crura will reduce ED after EBRT, we advise to be careful in sparing these structures, especially when this involves reducing treatment margins.

  8. Total Ionizing Dose Results and Displacement Damage Results for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Donna J.; Kniffin, Scott D.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; OBryan, Martha V.; Reed, Robert A.; Ladbury, Ray L.; Howard, James W., Jr.; Poivey, Christian; Buchner, Stephen P.; Marshall, Cheryl J.

    2003-01-01

    We present data on the vulnerability of a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to total ionizing dose and displacement damage. Devices tested include optoelectronics, digital, analog, linear bipolar devices, hybrid devices, Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADCs), and Digital-to-Analog Converters (DACs), among others.

  9. Current Total Ionizing Dose Results and Displacement Damage Results for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Donna J.; Kniffin, Scott D.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; OBryan, Martha V.; Reed, Robert A.; Ladbury, Ray L.; Howard, James W., Jr.; Poivey, Christian; Buchner, Stephen P.; Marshall, Cheryl J.

    2004-01-01

    We present data on the vulnerability of a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to total ionizing dose and displacement damage. Devices tested include optoelectronics, digital, analog, linear bipolar devices, hybrid devices, Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADCs), and Digital-to-Analog Converters (DACS), among others.

  10. Recent Total Ionizing Dose Results and Displacement Damage Results for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Donna J.; Buchner, Stephen P.; Irwin, Tim L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Marshall, Cheryl J.; Reed, Robert A.; Sanders, Anthony B.; Hawkins, Donald K.; Flanigan, Ryan J.; Cox, Stephen R.

    2005-01-01

    We present data on the vulnerability of a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to total ionizing dose and displacement damage. Devices tested include optoelectronics, digital, analog, linear bipolar devices, hybrid devices, Analog-to- Digital Converters (ADCs), and Digital-to-Analog Converters (DACs), among others. T

  11. Crop identification technology assessment for remote sensing. (CITARS) Volume 9: Statistical analysis of results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, B. J.; Feiveson, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of CITARS data processing in raw form. Tables of descriptive statistics are given along with descriptions and results of inferential analyses. The inferential results are organized by questions which CITARS was designed to answer.

  12. 42 CFR 82.4 - How Will DOL Use the Results of the NIOSH Dose Reconstructions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Will DOL Use the Results of the NIOSH Dose Reconstructions? Under 42 CFR part 81, DOL will apply dose reconstruction results together with information on cancer diagnosis and other personal information provided to... probability that the cancer of the covered employee was caused by radiation exposure at a covered facility...

  13. 42 CFR 82.4 - How Will DOL Use the Results of the NIOSH Dose Reconstructions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Will DOL Use the Results of the NIOSH Dose Reconstructions? Under 42 CFR part 81, DOL will apply dose reconstruction results together with information on cancer diagnosis and other personal information provided to... probability that the cancer of the covered employee was caused by radiation exposure at a covered facility...

  14. 42 CFR 82.4 - How Will DOL Use the Results of the NIOSH Dose Reconstructions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Will DOL Use the Results of the NIOSH Dose Reconstructions? Under 42 CFR part 81, DOL will apply dose reconstruction results together with information on cancer diagnosis and other personal information provided to... probability that the cancer of the covered employee was caused by radiation exposure at a covered facility...

  15. 42 CFR 82.4 - How Will DOL Use the Results of the NIOSH Dose Reconstructions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Will DOL Use the Results of the NIOSH Dose Reconstructions? Under 42 CFR part 81, DOL will apply dose reconstruction results together with information on cancer diagnosis and other personal information provided to... probability that the cancer of the covered employee was caused by radiation exposure at a covered facility...

  16. A method of estimating conceptus doses resulting from multidetector CT examinations during all stages of gestation

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, John; Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Current methods for the estimation of conceptus dose from multidetector CT (MDCT) examinations performed on the mother provide dose data for typical protocols with a fixed scan length. However, modified low-dose imaging protocols are frequently used during pregnancy. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for the estimation of conceptus dose from any MDCT examination of the trunk performed during all stages of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study to model the Siemens Sensation 16 and Sensation 64 MDCT scanners. Four mathematical phantoms were used, simulating women at 0, 3, 6, and 9 months of gestation. The contribution to the conceptus dose from single simulated scans was obtained at various positions across the phantoms. To investigate the effect of maternal body size and conceptus depth on conceptus dose, phantoms of different sizes were produced by adding layers of adipose tissue around the trunk of the mathematical phantoms. To verify MCNP results, conceptus dose measurements were carried out by means of three physical anthropomorphic phantoms, simulating pregnancy at 0, 3, and 6 months of gestation and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) crystals. Results: The results consist of Monte Carlo-generated normalized conceptus dose coefficients for single scans across the four mathematical phantoms. These coefficients were defined as the conceptus dose contribution from a single scan divided by the CTDI free-in-air measured with identical scanning parameters. Data have been produced to take into account the effect of maternal body size and conceptus position variations on conceptus dose. Conceptus doses measured with TLD crystals showed a difference of up to 19% compared to those estimated by mathematical simulations. Conclusions: Estimation of conceptus doses from MDCT examinations of the trunk performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be made

  17. Low dose alpha interferon therapy can be effective in chronic active hepatitis C. Results of a multicentre, randomised trial.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Tapias, J M; Forns, X; Ampurdanés, S; Titó, L; Planas, R; Viver, J M; Acero, D; Torres, M; Mas, P; Morillas, R; Forné, M; Espinós, J; Llovet, J M; Costa, J; Olmedo, E; López-Labrador, F X; Jiménez de Anta, M T; Rodés, J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--There is some controversy concerning the efficacy of low dose alpha interferon therapy in chronic hepatitis C. AIMS--To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with low doses of alpha interferon in chronic hepatitis C. PATIENTS--One hundred and forty one patients with anti-HCV positive chronic active hepatitis C from six hospitals were enrolled in the study. METHODS--Patients were randomised to treatment with 5 MU (group A) or 1.5 MU (group B) injections. The dose was reduced in responders from group A or increased in non-responders from group B to maintain treatment with the minimal effective dose. Patients were treated for 48 weeks and followed up for 24 additional weeks with no treatment. Normalisation of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was used to evaluate response. RESULTS--A sustained response was seen in eight patients from group A (12%) and in 15 (21%) from group B. This difference was not statistically significant. Increasing the dose of interferon led to sustained response in only five of 58 patients (9%) from group B who did not respond to 1.5 MU injections. In contrast, 15 of 21 patients (71%) in whom ALT remained normal with 1.5 MU injections developed a sustained response. By multivariate analysis sustained response seemed associated with young age and was more frequent in patients with genotype 3 HCV infection. Sustained response was preceded by a rapid normalisation of ALT and was inversely related to the amount of alpha interferon necessary to maintain ALT at low values during treatment. CONCLUSIONS--Some patients with chronic hepatitis C are very sensitive to alpha interferon and can be successfully treated with low doses. Treatment with higher doses may be effective in a minority of patients who do not respond to low doses. PMID:8707096

  18. Can use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction reduce radiation dose in unenhanced head CT? An analysis of qualitative and quantitative image quality

    PubMed Central

    Heggen, Kristin Livelten; Pedersen, Hans Kristian; Andersen, Hilde Kjernlie; Martinsen, Anne Catrine T

    2016-01-01

    Background Iterative reconstruction can reduce image noise and thereby facilitate dose reduction. Purpose To evaluate qualitative and quantitative image quality for full dose and dose reduced head computed tomography (CT) protocols reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Material and Methods Fourteen patients undergoing follow-up head CT were included. All patients underwent full dose (FD) exam and subsequent 15% dose reduced (DR) exam, reconstructed using FBP and 30% ASIR. Qualitative image quality was assessed using visual grading characteristics. Quantitative image quality was assessed using ROI measurements in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), white matter, peripheral and central gray matter. Additionally, quantitative image quality was measured in Catphan and vendor’s water phantom. Results There was no significant difference in qualitative image quality between FD FBP and DR ASIR. Comparing same scan FBP versus ASIR, a noise reduction of 28.6% in CSF and between −3.7 and 3.5% in brain parenchyma was observed. Comparing FD FBP versus DR ASIR, a noise reduction of 25.7% in CSF, and −7.5 and 6.3% in brain parenchyma was observed. Image contrast increased in ASIR reconstructions. Contrast-to-noise ratio was improved in DR ASIR compared to FD FBP. In phantoms, noise reduction was in the range of 3 to 28% with image content. Conclusion There was no significant difference in qualitative image quality between full dose FBP and dose reduced ASIR. CNR improved in DR ASIR compared to FD FBP mostly due to increased contrast, not reduced noise. Therefore, we recommend using caution if reducing dose and applying ASIR to maintain image quality. PMID:27583169

  19. Application of a statistical software package for analysis of large patient dose data sets obtained from RIS.

    PubMed

    Fazakerley, J; Charnock, P; Wilde, R; Jones, R; Ward, M

    2010-01-01

    For the purpose of patient dose audit, clinical audit and radiology workload analysis, data from Radiology Information Systems (RIS) at many hospitals are collected using a database and the analysis was automated using a statistical package and Visual Basic coding. The database is a Structured Query Language database, which can be queried using an off-the-shelf statistical package, Statistica. Macros were created to automatically format the data to a consistent format between different hospitals ready for analysis. These macros can also be used to automate further analysis such as detailing mean kV, mAs and entrance surface dose per room and per gender. Standard deviation and standard error of the mean are also generated. Graphs can also be generated to illustrate the trends in doses between different variables such as room and gender. Collectively, this information can be used to generate a report. A process that once could take up to 1 d to complete now takes around 1 h. A major benefit in providing the service to hospital trusts is that less resource is now required to report on RIS data, making the possibility of continuous dose audit more likely. Time that was spent on sorting through data can now be spent on improving the analysis to provide benefit to the customer. Using data sets from RIS is a good way to perform dose audits as the huge numbers of data available provide the bases for very accurate analysis. Using macros written in Statistica Visual Basic has helped sort and consistently analyse these data. Being able to analyse by exposure factors has provided a more detailed report to the customer.

  20. Test Results of Total Ionizing Dose Conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivas, Rosa M.; Johnston, Allan H.; Miyahira, Tetsuo F.; Rax, Bernard G.; Wiedeman, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports recent Total Ionizing Dose (TID) test results obtained at JPL. Several device samples were analyzed exhibiting significant failure levels and ELDRS effects under biased and unbiased condition.

  1. Dosimetric study of the effective doses resulting during dental X-ray and panoramic radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shousha, Hany A.; Abd-El Hafez, A. I.; Ahmad, Fawzia

    2011-01-01

    The panoramic image is one of the most commonly used radiographic examinations in dentistry, owing to its low dose and large area for evaluation, including bone and teeth in the same image. Although digital images are usually reported to deliver a lower radiation dose to the patient, conventional images are still available, especially in countries where digital systems are not widely economically available. Dentists should weigh the benefits of dental radiographs against the consequences of increasing a patient's exposure to radiation, the effects of which accumulate from multiple sources over time. The "as low as reasonably achievable" principle should be followed to minimize the exposure to radiation. The purpose of this investigation is to measure the absorbed radiation doses at 12 anatomical sites of a Rando-phantom and calculate the effective doses result from a full-mouth survey and panoramic radiography. Organ-absorbed doses are measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD 100) and effective organ doses (μ Sv) are estimated according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 2007. The total effective dose results from the panoramic imaging system have so far been below those obtained using the full-mouth survey technique used in intra-oral radiographic examination.

  2. A graphical user interface (GUI) toolkit for the calculation of three-dimensional (3D) multi-phase biological effective dose (BED) distributions including statistical analyses.

    PubMed

    Kauweloa, Kevin I; Gutierrez, Alonso N; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Niko; Mavroidis, Panayiotis

    2016-07-01

    A toolkit has been developed for calculating the 3-dimensional biological effective dose (BED) distributions in multi-phase, external beam radiotherapy treatments such as those applied in liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and in multi-prescription treatments. This toolkit also provides a wide range of statistical results related to dose and BED distributions. MATLAB 2010a, version 7.10 was used to create this GUI toolkit. The input data consist of the dose distribution matrices, organ contour coordinates, and treatment planning parameters from the treatment planning system (TPS). The toolkit has the capability of calculating the multi-phase BED distributions using different formulas (denoted as true and approximate). Following the calculations of the BED distributions, the dose and BED distributions can be viewed in different projections (e.g. coronal, sagittal and transverse). The different elements of this toolkit are presented and the important steps for the execution of its calculations are illustrated. The toolkit is applied on brain, head & neck and prostate cancer patients, who received primary and boost phases in order to demonstrate its capability in calculating BED distributions, as well as measuring the inaccuracy and imprecision of the approximate BED distributions. Finally, the clinical situations in which the use of the present toolkit would have a significant clinical impact are indicated.

  3. Interpreting Statistical Significance Test Results: A Proposed New "What If" Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieffer, Kevin M.; Thompson, Bruce

    As the 1994 publication manual of the American Psychological Association emphasized, "p" values are affected by sample size. As a result, it can be helpful to interpret the results of statistical significant tests in a sample size context by conducting so-called "what if" analyses. However, these methods can be inaccurate unless "corrected" effect…

  4. Measuring Classroom Management Expertise (CME) of Teachers: A Video-Based Assessment Approach and Statistical Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    König, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The study aims at developing and exploring a novel video-based assessment that captures classroom management expertise (CME) of teachers and for which statistical results are provided. CME measurement is conceptualized by using four video clips that refer to typical classroom management situations in which teachers are heavily challenged…

  5. Using the Descriptive Bootstrap to Evaluate Result Replicability (Because Statistical Significance Doesn't)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinella, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    As result replicability is essential to science and difficult to achieve through external replicability, the present paper notes the insufficiency of null hypothesis statistical significance testing (NHSST) and explains the bootstrap as a plausible alternative, with a heuristic example to illustrate the bootstrap method. The bootstrap relies on…

  6. Statistical evaluation of characteristic SDDLV-induced stress resultants to discriminate between undamaged and damaged elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, L. M.; Johansen, R. J.; Ulriksen, M. D.; Tcherniak, D.; Damkilde, L.

    2015-07-01

    The stochastic dynamic damage location vector (SDDLV) method utilizes the vectors from the kernel of a damaged-induced transfer function matrix change to localize damages in a structure. The kernel vectors associated with the lowest singular values are converted into static pseudo-loads and applied alternately to an undamaged reference model with known stiffness matrix, hereby, theoretically, yielding characteristic stress resultants approaching zero in the damaged elements. At present, the discrimination between potentially damaged elements and undamaged ones is typically conducted on the basis of modified characteristic stress resultants, which are compared to a pre-defined tolerance value, without any thorough statistical evaluation. In the present paper, it is tested whether three widely-used statistical pattern-recognition-based damage-detection methods can provide an effective statistical evaluation of the characteristic stress resultants, hence facilitating general discrimination between damaged and undamaged elements. The three detection methods in question enable outlier analysis on the basis of, respectively, Euclidian distance, Hotelling's T2 statistics, and Mahalanobis distance. The study of the applicability of these methods is based on experimentally obtained accelerations of a cantilevered residential-sized wind turbine blade subjected to an unmeasured multi-impulse load. The characteristic stress resultants are derived by applying the static pseudo-loads to a representative finite element (FE) model of the actual blade.

  7. Monte Carlo characterization of an ytterbium-169 high dose rate brachytherapy source with analysis of statistical uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Medich, David C; Tries, Mark A; Munro, John J

    2006-01-01

    An ytterbium-169 high dose rate brachytherapy source, distinguished by an intensity-weighted average photon energy of 92.7 keV and a 32.015 +/- 0.009 day half-life, is characterized in terms of the updated AAPM Task Group Report No. 43 specifications using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo computer code. In accordance with these specifications, the investigation included Monte Carlo simulations both in water and air with the in-air photon spectrum filtered to remove low-energy photons below 10 keV. TG-43 dosimetric data including S(K), D(r, lamda), lambda, gL(r), F(r, lamda), phi an(r), and phi(an) were calculated and statistical uncertainties in these parameters were derived and calculated in the appendix.

  8. Statistical power of MRI monitored trials in multiple sclerosis: new data and comparison with previous results

    PubMed Central

    Sormani, M; Molyneux, P; Gasperini, C; Barkhof, F; Yousry, T; Miller, D; Filippi, M

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate the durations of the follow up and the reference population sizes needed to achieve optimal and stable statistical powers for two period cross over and parallel group design clinical trials in multiple sclerosis, when using the numbers of new enhancing lesions and the numbers of active scans as end point variables.
METHODS—The statistical power was calculated by means of computer simulations performed using MRI data obtained from 65 untreated relapsing-remitting or secondary progressive patients who were scanned monthly for 9 months. The statistical power was calculated for follow up durations of 2, 3, 6, and 9 months and for sample sizes of 40-100 patients for parallel group and of 20-80 patients for two period cross over design studies. The stability of the estimated powers was evaluated by applying the same procedure on random subsets of the original data.
RESULTS—When using the number of new enhancing lesions as the end point, the statistical power increased for all the simulated treatment effects with the duration of the follow up until 3 months for the parallel group design and until 6 months for the two period cross over design. Using the number of active scans as the end point, the statistical power steadily increased until 6 months for the parallel group design and until 9 months for the two period cross over design. The power estimates in the present sample and the comparisons of these results with those obtained by previous studies with smaller patient cohorts suggest that statistical power is significantly overestimated when the size of the reference data set decreases for parallel group design studies or the duration of the follow up decreases for two period cross over studies.
CONCLUSIONS—These results should be used to determine the duration of the follow up and the sample size needed when planning MRI monitored clinical trials in multiple sclerosis.

 PMID:10201417

  9. Preliminary Results of Indoor Radon/thoron Concentrations and Terrestrial Gamma Doses in Gejiu, Yunnan, China

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Yoshinaga, Shinji; Sun Quafu; Min Xiangdong

    2008-08-07

    A preliminary survey on indoor radon/thoron and external gamma ray dose rate was conducted for houses in Gejiu city and its neighboring village in Yunnan Province, China. As a result of the radon/thoron measurements for about 50 houses, very high thoron concentrations were found in some hoses (maximum: 7,900 Bq/m{sup 3}). The mean annual dose from thoron decay products was estimated to be larger than that from radon decay products (2.9 mSv vs. 1.6 mSv). Further dosimetric and epidemiological studies are needed to investigate the possible effects of radon and thoron.

  10. 42 CFR 82.25 - When will NIOSH report dose reconstruction results, and to whom?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false When will NIOSH report dose reconstruction results, and to whom? 82.25 Section 82.25 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING...

  11. 42 CFR 82.25 - When will NIOSH report dose reconstruction results, and to whom?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false When will NIOSH report dose reconstruction results, and to whom? 82.25 Section 82.25 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING...

  12. 42 CFR 82.25 - When will NIOSH report dose reconstruction results, and to whom?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false When will NIOSH report dose reconstruction results, and to whom? 82.25 Section 82.25 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING...

  13. 42 CFR 82.25 - When will NIOSH report dose reconstruction results, and to whom?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false When will NIOSH report dose reconstruction results, and to whom? 82.25 Section 82.25 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING...

  14. 42 CFR 82.25 - When will NIOSH report dose reconstruction results, and to whom?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false When will NIOSH report dose reconstruction results, and to whom? 82.25 Section 82.25 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING...

  15. Optimisation of internal radiation dose assessment on uncertain dosimetric parameters in interpretation of bioassay results.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongil; Lee, Jaiki; Chang, Siyoung; Kim, Janglyul

    2013-07-01

    Estimates of the committed effective dose (E50) from an intake of a radionuclide strongly depends on several dosimetric parameters such as the intake pathway, f1 value, the absorption type, activity median aerodynamic diameter and the time after an intake. A misuse of the dosimetric parameters can result in a significant error in the evaluated value of a committed effective dose. In order to reduce the potential error and to get optimised values of E50, better bioassay methods and better (or worse) bioassay measurement times due to the uncertain dosimetric parameters were suggested for the various radionuclides, including (57)Co, (58)Co, (60)Co, (131)I, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (89)Sr, (90)Sr, (32)P and (235)U. This strategy was applied for the case of multiple unknown parameters as well as a single unknown parameter and provided the committed effective doses with the least potential error.

  16. Dose-response relationships and statistical performance of a battery of bacterial gene profiling assays.

    PubMed

    Dardenne, F; Nobels, I; De Coen, W; Blust, R

    2007-05-01

    Because of increasing awareness and legislative demands, there is a demand for the development and use of biological assays for the assessment of the toxicity of chemicals, environmental samples. Recently, a growing number of bacterial reporter assays have been developed and implemented. Nevertheless, little data is published on the performance of these assays in terms of analytical parameters. We present results on a battery of 14 transgenic Escherichia coli strains carrying different promoter::reporter fusions. Growth characteristics and basal expression levels were modeled and fitted, data show that growth curves should be taken into account during test development. Our study shows that the induction profiles reflect the mode of action, e.g., paraquat clearly induces the soxRS operon. The sensitivity of the assay compares well to that of whole organism tests, e.g., fish and Daphnia for polar organics. Metal toxicity is detected less efficiently, e.g., cadmium is detected near the LC50 of carp, considered a relatively insensitive species towards cadmium. The assay variability ranges from 10 to 40% depending on the strain, comparable to that of other bioassays. The variability was shown to be determined by the intrinsic traits of the promoter-strain combination, not by operating conditions. PMID:17225096

  17. Use of a statistical model to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity of dermally administered crude oil and relation to reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; Nicolich, Mark; Roy, Timothy; White, Russell; Daughtrey, Wayne C

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum (commonly called crude oil) is a complex substance primarily composed of hydrocarbon constituents. Based on the results of previous toxicological studies as well as occupational experience, the principal acute toxicological hazards are those associated with exposure by inhalation to volatile hydrocarbon constituents and hydrogen sulfide, and chronic hazards are associated with inhalation exposure to benzene and dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds. The current assessment was an attempt to characterize the potential for repeated dose and/or developmental effects of crude oils following dermal exposures and to generalize the conclusions across a broad range of crude oils from different sources. Statistical models were used to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity from compositional information. The model predictions indicated that the empirical data from previously tested crude oils approximated a "worst case" situation, and that the data from previously tested crude oils could be used as a reasonable basis for characterizing the repeated dose and developmental toxicological hazards of crude oils in general.

  18. New Statistical Results on the Angular Distribution of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Balazs, Lajos G.; Horvath, Istvan; Vavrek, Roland

    2008-05-22

    We presented the results of several statistical tests of the randomness in the angular sky-distribution of gamma-ray bursts in BATSE Catalog. Thirteen different tests were presented based on Voronoi tesselation, Minimal spanning tree and Multifractal spectrum for five classes (short1, short2, intermediate, long1, long2) of gamma-ray bursts, separately. The long1 and long2 classes are distributed randomly. The intermediate subclass, in accordance with the earlier results of the authors, is distributed non-randomly. Concerning the short subclass earlier statistical tests also suggested some departure from the random distribution, but not on a high enough confidence level. The new tests presented in this article suggest also non-randomness here.

  19. Results of Dose Control and Measurement Plans Appliedfor SPEAR3 Commissioning Year (FY04)

    SciTech Connect

    Khater, Hesham; Liu, James; Prinz, Alyssa; Allan, Jim; Rokni, Sayed; /SLAC

    2007-02-12

    Dose control and measurement plans for the SPEAR3 Booster and storage ring have taken place during the SPEAR3 commissioning. The initial commissioning period (SPEAR3 start-up) covered the time period from the beginning of November 2003 to the early part of March 2004. The period from the beginning of March to the beginning of August 2004 has been mostly dedicated to the scientific program. The initial commissioning period was characterized with frequent injection and significantly higher losses. In comparison, the scientific program period was characterized with more stable beam operation with limited number of injections per day and lower beam losses. Three types of dose measurements, passive, active and special measurements, were implemented around the SPEAR3 Booster and storage ring. Based on the expected radiation hazards, several dose control measures were adopted at several stages of the commissioning. In the early stages of commissioning, areas within 4.5 m from the walls of the Booster and storage ring were designated as Radiation Areas (RA). Areas outside RA were classified as Radiologically Controlled Area (RCA). Access to these areas required less training than the radiation areas. A monthly review of the accelerator operation conditions and radiation measurement results were used to determine the changes needed for the RA classification status and associated dose control measures.

  20. Higher Chest Wall Dose Results in Improved Locoregional Outcome in Patients Receiving Postmastectomy Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panoff, Joseph E.; Takita, Cristiane; Hurley, Judith; Reis, Isildinha M.; Zhao, Wei; Rodgers, Steven E.; Gunaseelan, Vijayalakshmi; Wright, Jean L.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Randomized trials demonstrating decreased locoregional recurrence (LRR) and improved overall survival (OS) in women receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) used up to 50 Gy to the chest wall (CW), but in practice, many centers boost the CW dose to {>=}60 Gy, despite lack of data supporting this approach. We evaluated the relationship between CW dose and clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 582 consecutively treated patients who received PMRT between January 1999 and December 2009. We collected data on patient, disease, treatment characteristics, and outcomes of LRR, progression-free survival (PFS) and OS. Results: Median follow-up from the date of diagnosis was 44.7 months. The cumulative 5-year incidence of LRR as first site of failure was 6.2%. CW dose for 7% (43 patients) was {<=}50.4 Gy (range, 41.4-50.4 Gy) and 93% received >50.4 Gy (range, 52.4-74.4 Gy). A CW dose of >50.4 Gy vs. {<=}50.4 Gy was associated with lower incidence of LRR, a 60-month rate of 5.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7-8.2) vs. 12.7% (95% CI, 4.5-25.3; p = 0.054). Multivariate hazard ratio (HR) for LRR controlling for race, receptor status, and stage was 2.62 (95% CI, 1.02-7.13; p = 0.042). All LRR in the low-dose group occurred in patients receiving 50 to 50.4 Gy. Lower CW dose was associated with worse PFS (multivariate HR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.64-4.56; p < 0.001) and OS (multivariate HR, 3.88; 95% CI, 2.16-6.99; p < 0.001). Conclusions: The addition of a CW boost above 50.4 Gy resulted in improved locoregional control and survival in this cohort patients treated with PMRT for stage II-III breast cancer. The addition of a CW boost to standard-dose PMRT is likely to benefit selected high-risk patients. The optimal technique, target volume, and patient selection criteria are unknown. The use of a CW boost should be studied prospectively, as has been done in the setting of breast conservation.

  1. SU-E-J-204: Radiation Dose to Patients Resulting From Image Guidance Procedures and AAPM TG-180 Update

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, G; Alaei, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is the new paradigm for patient positioning and target localization in radiotherapy. Daily imaging procedures add additional dose to the patient's treatment volume and normal tissues and may expose the organs at risk to unaccounted doses. This presentation is to update the progress of AAPM TG-180 which aims to provide strategies to quantify and account the dose from both MV and kV imaging in patient treatment planning. Methods: Our current knowledge on image guidance dose is presented. A summary of doses from image guidance procedures delivered to patients in relationship with therapeutic doses is given. Different techniques in reducing the image guidance dose are summarized. Typical organ doses resulting from different image acquisition procedures used in IGRT are tabulated. Results: Many techniques to reduce the imaging doses are available in clinical applications. There are large variations between dose to bone and dose to soft tissues for x-rays at kilovoltage energy range. Methods for clinical implementation of accounting for the imaging dose from an imaging procedure are available. Beam data from imaging systems can be generated by combining Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements for commissioning imaging beams in the treatment planning. Conclusion: The current treatment planning systems are not yet equipped to perform patient specific dose calculations resulting from kV imaging procedures. The imaging dose from current kV image devices has been significantly reduced and is generally much less than that resulting from MV. Because the magnitude of kV imaging dose is significantly low and the variation between patients is modest, it is feasible to estimate dose based on imaging producers or protocols using tabulated values which provides an alternative to accomplish the task of accounting and reporting imaging doses.

  2. Influence of Errors in Patient Positioning on Resulting Dose Distribution during IMRT Treatment for Head and Neck Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navrátil, Matěj

    2010-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) irradiation technique uses steep dose gradients to protect organs at risk (OAR) during treatment course. Therefore even small mistakes in patient positioning during treatment course may lead to significant changes in dose distribution. The influence of small errors (order of millimeters) in patient's positioning on resulting dose absorbed in OARs and target volume (PTV, GTV) was simulated in this work.

  3. No difference found in time to publication by statistical significance of trial results: a methodological review

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, L; Cooper, E; Hewitt, C; Torgerson, T; Cook, L; Tharmanathan, P; Cockayne, S; Torgerson, D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Time-lag from study completion to publication is a potential source of publication bias in randomised controlled trials. This study sought to update the evidence base by identifying the effect of the statistical significance of research findings on time to publication of trial results. Design Literature searches were carried out in four general medical journals from June 2013 to June 2014 inclusive (BMJ, JAMA, the Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine). Setting Methodological review of four general medical journals. Participants Original research articles presenting the primary analyses from phase 2, 3 and 4 parallel-group randomised controlled trials were included. Main outcome measures Time from trial completion to publication. Results The median time from trial completion to publication was 431 days (n = 208, interquartile range 278–618). A multivariable adjusted Cox model found no statistically significant difference in time to publication for trials reporting positive or negative results (hazard ratio: 0.86, 95% CI 0.64 to 1.16, p = 0.32). Conclusion In contrast to previous studies, this review did not demonstrate the presence of time-lag bias in time to publication. This may be a result of these articles being published in four high-impact general medical journals that may be more inclined to publish rapidly, whatever the findings. Further research is needed to explore the presence of time-lag bias in lower quality studies and lower impact journals. PMID:27757242

  4. Results of 1 year of clinical experience with independent dose calculation software for VMAT fields

    PubMed Central

    Colodro, Juan Fernando Mata; Berna, Alfredo Serna; Puchades, Vicente Puchades; Amores, David Ramos; Baños, Miguel Alcaraz

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that a redundant independent dose calculation (RIDC) must be included in any treatment planning verification procedure. Specifically, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique implies a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program in which RIDC should be included. In this paper, the results obtained in 1 year of clinical experience are presented. Eclipse from Varian is the treatment planning system (TPS), here in use. RIDC were performed with the commercial software; Diamond® (PTW) which is capable of calculating VMAT fields. Once the plan is clinically accepted, it is exported via Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) to RIDC, together with the body contour, and then a point dose calculation is performed, usually at the isocenter. A total of 459 plans were evaluated. The total average deviation was -0.3 ± 1.8% (one standard deviation (1SD)). For higher clearance the plans were grouped by location in: Prostate, pelvis, abdomen, chest, head and neck, brain, stereotactic radiosurgery, lung stereotactic body radiation therapy, and miscellaneous. The highest absolute deviation was -0.8 ± 1.5% corresponding to the prostate. A linear fit between doses calculated by RIDC and by TPS produced a correlation coefficient of 0.9991 and a slope of 1.0023. These results are very close to those obtained in the validation process. This agreement led us to consider this RIDC software as a valuable tool for QA in VMAT plans. PMID:25525309

  5. Variation in CT pediatric head examination radiation dose: results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Kanal, Kalpana M; Graves, Janessa M; Vavilala, Monica S; Applegate, Kimberly E; Jarvik, Jeffrey G; Rivara, Frederick P

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to examine the variation in radiation dose, CT dose index volume (CTDIvol), and dose-length product (DLP) for pediatric head CT examinations as a function of hospital characteristics across the United States. MATERIALS AND METHODS. A survey inquiring about hospital information, CT scanners, pediatric head examination protocol, CTDIvol, and DLP was mailed to a representative sample of U.S. hospitals. Follow-up mailings were sent to nonrespondents. Descriptive characteristics of respondents and nonrespondents were compared using design-based Pearson chi-square tests. Dose estimates were compared across hospital characteristics using Bonferroni-adjusted Wald test. Hospital-level factors associated with dose estimates were evaluated using multiple linear regressions and modified Poisson regression models. RESULTS. Surveys were sent out to 751 hospitals; 292 responded to the survey, of which 253 were eligible (35.5% response rate, calculated as number of hospitals who completed surveys [n = 253] divided by sum of number who were eligible and initially consented [n = 712] plus estimated number who were eligible among those who refused [n = 1]). Most respondents reported using MDCT scanners (99.2%) and having a dedicated pediatric head CT protocol (93%). Estimated mean reported CTDIvol values were 27.3 mGy (95% CI, 24.4-30.1 mGy), and DLP values were 390.9 mGy × cm (95% CI, 346.6-435.1 mGy × cm). These values did not vary significantly by region, trauma level, teaching status, CT accreditation, number of CT scanners, or report of a dedicated pediatric CT protocol. However, estimated CTDIvol reported by children's hospitals was 19% lower than that reported by general hospitals (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION. Most hospitals (82%) report doses that meet American College of Radiology accreditation levels. However, [corrected] the mean CTDI(vol) at children's hospitals was approximately 7 mGy (21%, adjusted for covariates), lower than that

  6. Statistical analysis of aquifer-test results for nine regional aquifers in Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Angel; Early, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This report, prepared as part of the Gulf Coast Regional Aquifer-System Analysis project, presents a compilation, summarization, and statistical analysis of aquifer-test results for nine regional aquifers in Louisiana. These are from youngest to oldest: The alluvial, Pleistocene, Evangeline, Jasper, Catahoula, Cockfield, Sparta, Carrizo, and Wilcox aquifers. Approximately 1,500 aquifer tests in U.S. Geological Survey files in Louisiana were examined and 1,001 were input to a computer file. Analysis of the aquifer test results and plots that describe aquifer hydraulic characteristics were made for each regional aquifer. Results indicate that, on the average, permeability (hydraulic conductivity) generally tends to decrease from the youngest aquifers to the oldest. The most permeable aquifers in Louisiana are the alluvial and Pleistocene aquifers; whereas, the least permeable are the Carrizo and Wilcox aquifers. (Author 's abstract)

  7. False-positive buprenorphine EIA urine toxicology results due to high dose morphine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tenore, Peter L

    2012-01-01

    In monitoring a patient with chronic pain who was taking high-dose morphine and oxycodone with weekly urine enzymatic immunoassay (EIA) toxicology testing, the authors noted consistent positives for buprenorphine. The patient was not taking buprenorphine, and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GCMS) testing on multiple samples revealed no buprenorphine, indicating a case of false-positive buprenorphine EIAs in a high-dose opiate case. The authors discontinued oxycodone for a period of time and then discontinued morphine. Urine monitoring with EIAs and GCMS revealed false-positive buprenorphine EIAs, which remained only when the patient was taking morphine. When taking only oxycodone and no morphine, urine samples became buprenorphine negative. When morphine was reintroduced, false-positive buprenorphine results resumed. Medical practitioners should be aware that high-dose morphine (with morphine urine levels turning positive within the 15,000 to 28,000 mg/mL range) may produce false-positive buprenorphine EIAs with standard urine EIA toxicology testing.

  8. Vibration dose, disturbance stage, and examination results and subjective symptoms in vibration syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Sakakibara, H; Futatsuka, M

    1995-03-01

    The 1973 national survey of 461 chainsaw operators in private forests was reexamined with respect to vibration exposure dose and the Stockholm Workshop Scale (CIRP and SN stages). Vibration dose (VD) was calculated by the formula "ahw(eq.4h) x D (days) x Y (years)". Vibration dose index (VDI) was calculated according to the level of VD. Subjects were divided into five VDI, for CIRP stage, and four SN stage groups. Examination results and prevalence of subjective symptoms were compared between VDI-1 and other VDI groups, CIRP-0 and other CIRP groups, and SN-0 and other SN groups. VD had higher values in CIRP-2 and 3, and SN-2 and 3 than CIRP-0 and SN-0, respectively. The most severe CIRP-3 and SN-3 appeared at higher rate in VDI-4 and 5 groups than in VDI-1 group. VDI had a correlation with mean value of prevalence of CIRP, vibrotactile perception, mean SN stage and fingertip pinch strength. A correlation was observed between skin temperature and CIRP stage, and between vibrotactile perception and SN stage. Decrease of muscle strength and difficulty in fine finger movement were associated with severe sensorineural disturbance.

  9. Theory, performance, and measured results with an improved absorbed dose water calorimeter. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Domen, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of this calorimeter is mainly the result of the low thermal diffusivity of water that retards a temperature change at a point along a temperature profile. The temperature change is sensed by two calibrated thermistors sandwiched between two polyethylene films that electrically insulate the thermistors from water. The product of the temperature rise and the specific heat of water gives the combined effect of the absorbed dose and any heat defect. Temperature drifts are quickly controlled by making slight changes in electrical power dissipated in the water. Compared to solid-bodied calorimeters requiring vacuum systems, it was easy to construct, to get into operation, and to operate.

  10. Automation of statistical analysis in the WIPP hazardous waste facility permit for analytical results from characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Shokes, T.; Einerson, J.

    2007-07-01

    One goal of characterizing, processing, and shipping waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is to make all activities as efficient as possible. Data management and repetitive calculations are a critical part of the process that can be automated, thereby increasing the accuracy and rate at which work is completed and reducing costs. This paper presents the tools developed to automate statistical analysis and other calculations required by the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP). Statistical analyses are performed on the analytical results on gas samples from the headspace of waste containers and solid samples from the core of the waste container. The calculations include determining the number of samples, test for the shape of the distribution of the analytical results, mean, standard deviation, upper 90-percent confidence limit of the mean, and the minimum required Waste Acceptance Plan (WAP) sample size. The input data for these calculations are from the batch data reports for headspace gas analytical results and solids analysis, which must also be obtained and collated for proper use. The most challenging component of the statistical analysis, if performed manually, is the determination of the distribution shape; therefore, the distribution testing is typically performed using a certified software tool. All other calculations can be completed manually, with a spreadsheet, custom developed software, and/or certified software tool. Out of the options available, manually performing the calculations or using a spreadsheet are the least desirable. These methods rely heavily on the availability of an expert, such as a statistician, to perform the calculation. These methods are also more open to human error such as transcription or 'cut and paste' errors. A SAS program is in the process of being developed to perform the calculations. Due to the potential size of the data input files and the need to archive the data in an accessible format, the SAS

  11. Determination of errors in derived magnetic field directions in geosynchronous orbit: results from a statistical approach

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Yue; Cunningham, Gregory; Henderson, Michael

    2016-09-21

    This study aims to statistically estimate the errors in local magnetic field directions that are derived from electron directional distributions measured by Los Alamos National Laboratory geosynchronous (LANL GEO) satellites. First, by comparing derived and measured magnetic field directions along the GEO orbit to those calculated from three selected empirical global magnetic field models (including a static Olson and Pfitzer 1977 quiet magnetic field model, a simple dynamic Tsyganenko 1989 model, and a sophisticated dynamic Tsyganenko 2001 storm model), it is shown that the errors in both derived and modeled directions are at least comparable. Second, using a newly developedmore » proxy method as well as comparing results from empirical models, we are able to provide for the first time circumstantial evidence showing that derived magnetic field directions should statistically match the real magnetic directions better, with averaged errors  < ∼ 2°, than those from the three empirical models with averaged errors  > ∼ 5°. In addition, our results suggest that the errors in derived magnetic field directions do not depend much on magnetospheric activity, in contrast to the empirical field models. Finally, as applications of the above conclusions, we show examples of electron pitch angle distributions observed by LANL GEO and also take the derived magnetic field directions as the real ones so as to test the performance of empirical field models along the GEO orbits, with results suggesting dependence on solar cycles as well as satellite locations. This study demonstrates the validity and value of the method that infers local magnetic field directions from particle spin-resolved distributions.« less

  12. Determination of errors in derived magnetic field directions in geosynchronous orbit: results from a statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yue; Cunningham, Gregory; Henderson, Michael

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to statistically estimate the errors in local magnetic field directions that are derived from electron directional distributions measured by Los Alamos National Laboratory geosynchronous (LANL GEO) satellites. First, by comparing derived and measured magnetic field directions along the GEO orbit to those calculated from three selected empirical global magnetic field models (including a static Olson and Pfitzer 1977 quiet magnetic field model, a simple dynamic Tsyganenko 1989 model, and a sophisticated dynamic Tsyganenko 2001 storm model), it is shown that the errors in both derived and modeled directions are at least comparable. Second, using a newly developed proxy method as well as comparing results from empirical models, we are able to provide for the first time circumstantial evidence showing that derived magnetic field directions should statistically match the real magnetic directions better, with averaged errors < ˜ 2°, than those from the three empirical models with averaged errors > ˜ 5°. In addition, our results suggest that the errors in derived magnetic field directions do not depend much on magnetospheric activity, in contrast to the empirical field models. Finally, as applications of the above conclusions, we show examples of electron pitch angle distributions observed by LANL GEO and also take the derived magnetic field directions as the real ones so as to test the performance of empirical field models along the GEO orbits, with results suggesting dependence on solar cycles as well as satellite locations. This study demonstrates the validity and value of the method that infers local magnetic field directions from particle spin-resolved distributions.

  13. The development of statistical models to determine the relationship between aromatic-ring class profile and repeat-dose and developmental toxicities of high-boiling petroleum substances.

    PubMed

    Nicolich, Mark J; Simpson, Barry J; Murray, F Jay; Roth, Randy N; Gray, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    The repeat-dose and developmental toxicities of certain petroleum refinery streams are related to their polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) content (Feuston et al., 1994). Building on this foundation, and working within the context of the US EPA High Production Volume (HPV) Chemical Challenge Program, we: (1) characterized relationships between PAC content and repeat-dose and developmental toxicities of high boiling petroleum substances (HBPS), and (2) developed statistical models that can be used to predict critical effects of similar untested substances. Data from 39 dermal toxicity studies of HBPS were used to develop statistical models to predict the dose-response relationships between the weight percent concentration of each of their 1-7 aromatic ring classes and 4 repeat-dose and 3 developmental endpoints (absolute thymus weight, hemoglobin count, platelet count, liver to body weight, live fetus count, fetal weight, and percent resorptions). The correlations between the observed and model-predicted values are >0.90. The predictive ability of the models was tested via a series of evaluation or corroboration methods. As is shown in the paper, using only compositional data of untested HBPS, the models can be used to predict the effect at a given dose or the dose that causes an effect of a stipulated magnitude.

  14. Issues for comparability of DRG statistics in Europe. Results from EURODRG.

    PubMed

    Casas, M

    1991-03-01

    DRG use has spread through most European countries thus offering an opportunity for improving hospital data bases at the European level. An EEC Concerted Action 'Use of DRGs to support Hospital Sector Management in the European Community' was approved by the Committee of Health Services Research of the EEC. A general overview of the project is presented as well as a detailed description of the results of the work on aspects related to DRG data production. These aspects (MBDS implementation and variables definition; coding systems and updating; mapping systems; data auditing; trimming methods; and DRG grouper versions) have been analyzed with the objective of increasing opportunities for valid international comparisons of DRG statistics between European countries. PMID:10170739

  15. DYNAMIC STABILITY OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM: STATISTICALLY INCONCLUSIVE RESULTS FROM ENSEMBLE INTEGRATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zeebe, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the chaotic nature of the solar system, the question of its long-term stability can only be answered in a statistical sense, for instance, based on numerical ensemble integrations of nearby orbits. Destabilization of the inner planets, leading to close encounters and/or collisions can be initiated through a large increase in Mercury's eccentricity, with a currently assumed likelihood of ∼1%. However, little is known at present about the robustness of this number. Here I report ensemble integrations of the full equations of motion of the eight planets and Pluto over 5 Gyr, including contributions from general relativity. The results show that different numerical algorithms lead to statistically different results for the evolution of Mercury's eccentricity (e{sub M}). For instance, starting at present initial conditions (e{sub M}≃0.21), Mercury's maximum eccentricity achieved over 5 Gyr is, on average, significantly higher in symplectic ensemble integrations using heliocentric rather than Jacobi coordinates and stricter error control. In contrast, starting at a possible future configuration (e{sub M}≃0.53), Mercury's maximum eccentricity achieved over the subsequent 500 Myr is, on average, significantly lower using heliocentric rather than Jacobi coordinates. For example, the probability for e{sub M} to increase beyond 0.53 over 500 Myr is >90% (Jacobi) versus only 40%-55% (heliocentric). This poses a dilemma because the physical evolution of the real system—and its probabilistic behavior—cannot depend on the coordinate system or the numerical algorithm chosen to describe it. Some tests of the numerical algorithms suggest that symplectic integrators using heliocentric coordinates underestimate the odds for destabilization of Mercury's orbit at high initial e{sub M}.

  16. Dose Escalation and Quality of Life in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy: Long-Term Results of the Dutch Randomized Dose-Escalation Trial (CKTO 96-10 Trial)

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Wielen, Gerard J. van der; Levendag, Peter C.; Incrocci, Luca

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of dose escalation of radiotherapy on quality of life (QoL) in prostate cancer patients. Patients and Methods: Three hundred prostate cancer patients participating in the Dutch randomized trial (CKTO 69-10) comparing 68 Gy with 78 Gy were the subject of this analysis. These patients filled out the SF-36 QoL questionnaire before radiotherapy (baseline) and 6, 12, 24, and 36 months thereafter. Changes in QoL over time of {>=}10 points were considered clinically relevant. Repeated-measures regression analyses were applied to estimate and test the QoL changes over time, the differences between the two arms, and for association with a number of covariates. Results: At 3-year follow-up, the summary score physical health was 73.2 for the 68-Gy arm vs. 71.6 for the 78-Gy arm (p = 0.81), and the summary score mental health was 76.7 for the 68-Gy arm vs. 76.1 for the 78-Gy arm (p = 0.97). Statistically significant (p < 0.01) deterioration in QoL scores over time was registered in both arms in six scales. The deterioration over time was more pronounced in the high-dose arm for most scales. However, clinically relevant deterioration (>10 points) was seen for only two scales. None of the tested covariates were significantly correlated with QoL scores. Conclusion: Dose escalation did not result in significant deterioration of QoL in prostate cancer patients. In both randomization arms, statistically significant decreases in QoL scores over time were seen in six scales. The deterioration of QoL was more pronounced in the physical than in the mental health domain and in some scales more in the high- than in the low-dose arm, but the differences between arms were not statistically significant.

  17. Evaluation of a statistics-based Ames mutagenicity QSAR model and interpretation of the results obtained.

    PubMed

    Barber, Chris; Cayley, Alex; Hanser, Thierry; Harding, Alex; Heghes, Crina; Vessey, Jonathan D; Werner, Stephane; Weiner, Sandy K; Wichard, Joerg; Giddings, Amanda; Glowienke, Susanne; Parenty, Alexis; Brigo, Alessandro; Spirkl, Hans-Peter; Amberg, Alexander; Kemper, Ray; Greene, Nigel

    2016-04-01

    The relative wealth of bacterial mutagenicity data available in the public literature means that in silico quantitative/qualitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) systems can readily be built for this endpoint. A good means of evaluating the performance of such systems is to use private unpublished data sets, which generally represent a more distinct chemical space than publicly available test sets and, as a result, provide a greater challenge to the model. However, raw performance metrics should not be the only factor considered when judging this type of software since expert interpretation of the results obtained may allow for further improvements in predictivity. Enough information should be provided by a QSAR to allow the user to make general, scientifically-based arguments in order to assess and overrule predictions when necessary. With all this in mind, we sought to validate the performance of the statistics-based in vitro bacterial mutagenicity prediction system Sarah Nexus (version 1.1) against private test data sets supplied by nine different pharmaceutical companies. The results of these evaluations were then analysed in order to identify findings presented by the model which would be useful for the user to take into consideration when interpreting the results and making their final decision about the mutagenic potential of a given compound. PMID:26708083

  18. Compendium of Current Total Ionizing Dose Results and Displacement Damage Results for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Donna J.; O'Bryan, Martha V.; Buchner, Stephen P.; Poivey, Christian; Ladbury, Ray L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    Sensitivity of a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to total ionizing dose and displacement damage is studied. Devices tested include optoelectronics, digital, analog, linear bipolar devices, and hybrid devices.

  19. Results of dose sensors measurements in the middle-Earth orbit for the period of 2009-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protopopov, Grigory; Shatov, Pavel; Tasenko, Sergey; Lyakhov, Igor; Makarova, Nina; Balashov, Sergey; Sitnikova, Ninel

    2016-07-01

    The measurements results of space radiation exposure on electronic components carried out by dose sensors are presented in the paper. Dose sensors operate on metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor dosimetry pricniple. The flight data have been receiving for more than 6 years. The measurements results are compared with others flight data on different orbits. The analysis of the received data from 2009 to 2015 allows us to find out the periods with sharp increase of dose rate and to define values of such increases. We had analyzed space radiation characteristics data from other monitoring systems (such as GOES, Electro-L) in dates of dose rate sharp increase. Results of the analysis of dose rate increase, which had been fixed by TID sensors in 2015, will be presented in full paper. We had calculated average dose rates for different space models in the middle-Earth orbit (AE8, AE9 and others) and determined the most relevant models to the experimental data (with account for relaxation effect of dose sensor outputs). The comparison results for different models will be presented in the full paper. We had used different approaches for simulating of dose sensors shielding geometry, such as semi-sphere, semi-infinite plate, sector analysis, with taking account of different shielding elements. The analysis results of shielding configuration influence on calculated values of dose rate will be presented in the full paper.

  20. Internal fiducial markers can assist dose escalation in treatment of prostate cancer: result of organ motion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Moiseenko, V.; Liu, M.; Craig, T.

    2006-01-01

    Use of internal fiducial markers and electronic portal imaging (EPI) to realign patients has been shown to significantly reduce positioning uncertainties in prostate radiation treatment. This creates the possibility of improving the treatment by decreasing the planning target volume (PTV) margin added to the clinical target volume (CTV), which in turn may allow dose escalation. Conformal treatment plans for three prostate cancer patients were evaluated by using different PTV margins with dose prescription of 70 Gy/35 fr initially. Two beam arrangements, 4-field-box (4FB) and 4-field-oblique (4FO), were used. Then, two dose escalation schemes, 74 Gy and 78 Gy, with tighter PTV margins, were chosen from the first simulation and were tested. A Monte Carlo model was developed to simulate the daily geometric uncertainty and calculate the dose to each organ. After the whole treatment, dose-volume histograms were produced and tumour control probability, prostate equivalent uniform dose and the effective dose to critical organs were calculated. By comparing these radiobiological metrics, optimized dose escalation schemes were found. The results show that using internal fiducial markers and EPI, the prescription dose can be escalated to 78 Gy/39 fr with a 4 mm PTV margin. Based on the available dose-response data for intermediate risk prostate patients, this is estimated to result in a 20% increase of local control and significantly reduced rectal complications.

  1. Exhaling a budesonide inhaler through the nose results in a significant reduction in dose requirement of budesonide nasal spray in patients having asthma with rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, W A

    1999-01-01

    Budesonide, an inhaled corticosteroid is used routinely in the treatment of bronchial asthma and rhinitis. Although inhaled corticosteroids in therapeutic doses are unlikely to result in systemic side effects, there is as yet skepticism about their routine and prolonged use. The aim of this study was to determine whether budesonide inhalation through a metered dose inhaler, when exhaled through the nose could result in a reduction in the dose requirement of budesonide metered nasal spray in patients having perennial allergic asthma with rhinitis. This study was an open, parallel, comparative, crossover trial in which 49 young patients having perennial allergic asthma with rhinitis were divided into two groups and administered either a combination of budesonide metered dose inhaler with a budesonide nasal spray or a budesonide inhaler alone, which was to be exhaled through the nose. Both groups were later crossed over and weekly symptom scores and peak nasal inspiratory flow rates were monitored during each phase of the study. Finally, patients who volunteered from both groups were instructed to note the reduction in dose requirement of budesonide nasal spray while using a budesonide inhaler and exhaling it through the nose. The results of this study reveal that when a budesonide inhaler is exhaled through the nose, it results in an improvement in symptom scores and peak nasal inspiratory flow rates, which were significantly less than those obtained in the group using both a budesonide nasal spray and a metered dose inhaler. In addition, exhaling budesonide through the nose results in a 40.1% reduction in the dose requirement of a budesonide nasal spray, which is statistically significant (p < 0.001).

  2. "What If" Analyses: Ways to Interpret Statistical Significance Test Results Using EXCEL or "R"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Elif

    2012-01-01

    The present paper aims to review two motivations to conduct "what if" analyses using Excel and "R" to understand the statistical significance tests through the sample size context. "What if" analyses can be used to teach students what statistical significance tests really do and in applied research either prospectively to estimate what sample size…

  3. Dose Measurement Results Obtained by Radiation Monitoring System of Russian Segment of International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. M.; Benghin, V. V.; Volkov, A. N.; Aleksandrin, A. P.; Lyagushin, V. I.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Tel'Tsov, M. V.; Kutuzov, Yu. V.

    Radiation monitoring system RMS being deployed on the International Space Station is a part of radiation safety system of the station The purpose of the RMS is to provide information for assessment of radiation doses absorbed by the crews during space flights Radiation monitoring system RMS has worked on board of the International Space Station ISS practically continuously beginning from August 2001 RMS consist of 7 units begin itemize item The R-16 dosimeter Two ionization chambers are the sensitive elements of the R-16 dosimeter item Four DB-8 dosimeters with semiconductor radiation detectors item Data collection unit and Utility unit destined for processing and analysis of measurement results end itemize RMS with other ISS systems integration permits to downlink telemetry information and to display radiation parameters to crew In June 2005 the software of data collection unit was updated It permits the RMS telemetry information upgrading to alert the crew when exposure rates exceed set threshold to supply an opportunity of interactive communication the crew and RMS The report contains information on performance of equipment and dose rate measured since August 2001 till December 2005 both in quiet time and during solar proton events Comparison with MIR station R-16 data registered since 1991 year is carried out

  4. Review of Statistical Analyses Resulting from Performance of HLDWD- DWPF-005

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, R.S.

    1997-09-29

    The Engineering Department at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has reviewed two reports from the Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) involving the statistical analysis of test results for analysis of small sample inserts (references 1{ampersand}2). The test results cover two proposed analytical methods, a room temperature hydrofluoric acid preparation (Cold Chem) and a sodium peroxide/sodium hydroxide fusion modified for insert samples (Modified Fusion). The reports support implementation of the proposed small sample containers and analytical methods at DWPF. Hydragard sampler valve performance was typical of previous results (reference 3). Using an element from each major feed stream. lithium from the frit and iron from the sludge, the sampler was determined to deliver a uniform mixture in either sample container.The lithium to iron ratios were equivalent for the standard 15 ml vial and the 3 ml insert.The proposed method provide equivalent analyses as compared to the current methods. The biases associated with the proposed methods on a vitrified basis are less than 5% for major elements. The sum of oxides for the proposed method compares favorably with the sum of oxides for the conventional methods. However, the average sum of oxides for the Cold Chem method was 94.3% which is below the minimum required recovery of 95%. Both proposed methods, cold Chem and Modified Fusion, will be required at first to provide an accurate analysis which will routinely meet the 95% and 105% average sum of oxides limit for Product Composition Control System (PCCS).Issued to be resolved during phased implementation are as follows: (1) Determine calcine/vitrification factor for radioactive feed; (2) Evaluate covariance matrix change against process operating ranges to determine optimum sample size; (3) Evaluate sources for low sum of oxides; and (4) Improve remote operability of production versions of equipment and instruments for installation in 221-S.The specifics of

  5. Application of universal kriging for estimation of earthquake ground motion: Statistical significance of results

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J.R.; Roberts, K.P.

    1989-02-01

    Universal kriging is compared with ordinary kriging for estimation of earthquake ground motion. Ordinary kriging is based on a stationary random function model; universal kriging is based on a nonstationary random function model representing first-order drift. Accuracy of universal kriging is compared with that for ordinary kriging; cross-validation is used as the basis for comparison. Hypothesis testing on these results shows that accuracy obtained using universal kriging is not significantly different from accuracy obtained using ordinary kriging. Test based on normal distribution assumptions are applied to errors measured in the cross-validation procedure; t and F tests reveal no evidence to suggest universal and ordinary kriging are different for estimation of earthquake ground motion. Nonparametric hypothesis tests applied to these errors and jackknife statistics yield the same conclusion: universal and ordinary kriging are not significantly different for this application as determined by a cross-validation procedure. These results are based on application to four independent data sets (four different seismic events).

  6. Average radiation dose in standard CT examinations of the head: results of the 1990 NEXT survey.

    PubMed

    Conway, B J; McCrohan, J L; Antonsen, R G; Rueter, F G; Slayton, R J; Suleiman, O H

    1992-07-01

    In 1990, as part of the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) program, 252 computed tomographic (CT) systems were evaluated to measure radiation doses associated with standard head CT in adults. The multiple-scan average dose (MSAD) was used as the dose descriptor. For most of the systems, the MSAD at the midpoint on the central axis of a standard dosimetry phantom was between 34 and 55 mGy. Doses were as high as 140 mGy, and dose sometimes varied by a factor of two or more for identical CT units. This range indicates that dose can potentially be reduced by careful selection of standard CT techniques. Users of CT systems should be aware of radiation dose delivered with CT, dose ranges associated with different systems, and doses delivered with their particular unit, which requires that dose performance of CT systems be assessed by means of a protocol that allows comparison of data collected for identical and/or different units.

  7. Pion and electromagnetic contribution to dose: Comparisons of HZETRN to Monte Carlo results and ISS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Reddell, Brandon; Bahadori, Amir; Norman, Ryan B.; Badavi, Francis F.

    2013-07-01

    Recent work has indicated that pion production and the associated electromagnetic (EM) cascade may be an important contribution to the total astronaut exposure in space. Recent extensions to the deterministic space radiation transport code, HZETRN, allow the production and transport of pions, muons, electrons, positrons, and photons. In this paper, the extended code is compared to the Monte Carlo codes, Geant4, PHITS, and FLUKA, in slab geometries exposed to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) boundary conditions. While improvements in the HZETRN transport formalism for the new particles are needed, it is shown that reasonable agreement on dose is found at larger shielding thicknesses commonly found on the International Space Station (ISS). Finally, the extended code is compared to ISS data on a minute-by-minute basis over a seven day period in 2001. The impact of pion/EM production on exposure estimates and validation results is clearly shown. The Badhwar-O'Neill (BO) 2004 and 2010 models are used to generate the GCR boundary condition at each time-step allowing the impact of environmental model improvements on validation results to be quantified as well. It is found that the updated BO2010 model noticeably reduces overall exposure estimates from the BO2004 model, and the additional production mechanisms in HZETRN provide some compensation. It is shown that the overestimates provided by the BO2004 GCR model in previous validation studies led to deflated uncertainty estimates for environmental, physics, and transport models, and allowed an important physical interaction (π/EM) to be overlooked in model development. Despite the additional π/EM production mechanisms in HZETRN, a systematic under-prediction of total dose is observed in comparison to Monte Carlo results and measured data.

  8. High-Dose Conformal Radiotherapy Reduces Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality: Results of a Meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda; Godoi Bernardes da Silva, Lucas; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To determine in a meta-analysis whether prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), biochemical or clinical failure (BCF), and overall mortality (OM) in men with localized prostate cancer treated with conformal high-dose radiotherapy (HDRT) are better than those in men treated with conventional-dose radiotherapy (CDRT). Methods and Materials: The MEDLINE, Embase, CANCERLIT, and Cochrane Library databases, as well as the proceedings of annual meetings, were systematically searched to identify randomized, controlled studies comparing conformal HDRT with CDRT for localized prostate cancer. Results: Five randomized, controlled trials (2508 patients) that met the study criteria were identified. Pooled results from these randomized, controlled trials showed a significant reduction in the incidence of PCSM and BCF rates at 5 years in patients treated with HDRT (p = 0.04 and p < 0.0001, respectively), with an absolute risk reduction (ARR) of PCSM and BCF at 5 years of 1.7% and 12.6%, respectively. Two trials evaluated PCSM with 10 years of follow up. The pooled results from these trials showed a statistical benefit for HDRT in terms of PCSM (p = 0.03). In the subgroup analysis, trials that used androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) showed an ARR for BCF of 12.9% (number needed to treat = 7.7, p < 0.00001), whereas trials without ADT had an ARR of 13.6% (number needed to treat = 7, p < 0.00001). There was no difference in the OM rate at 5 and 10 years (p = 0.99 and p = 0.11, respectively) between the groups receiving HDRT and CDRT. Conclusions: This meta-analysis is the first study to show that HDRT is superior to CDRT in preventing disease progression and prostate cancer-specific death in trials that used conformational technique to increase the total dose. Despite the limitations of our study in evaluating the role of ADT and HDRT, our data show no benefit for HDRT arms in terms of BCF in trials with or without ADT.

  9. 42 CFR 82.26 - How will NIOSH report dose reconstruction results?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Reporting and Review of... cancer diagnosis; (2) Separate dose estimates for acute and chronic exposures, different types...

  10. 42 CFR 82.26 - How will NIOSH report dose reconstruction results?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Reporting and Review of... cancer diagnosis; (2) Separate dose estimates for acute and chronic exposures, different types...

  11. 42 CFR 82.26 - How will NIOSH report dose reconstruction results?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Reporting and Review of... cancer diagnosis; (2) Separate dose estimates for acute and chronic exposures, different types...

  12. 42 CFR 82.26 - How will NIOSH report dose reconstruction results?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Reporting and Review of... cancer diagnosis; (2) Separate dose estimates for acute and chronic exposures, different types...

  13. 42 CFR 82.26 - How will NIOSH report dose reconstruction results?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Reporting and Review of... cancer diagnosis; (2) Separate dose estimates for acute and chronic exposures, different types...

  14. AN UPDATED CATALOG OF M33 CLUSTERS AND CANDIDATES: UBVRI PHOTOMETRY AND SOME STATISTICAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jun

    2012-08-15

    We present UBVRI photometry for 392 star clusters and candidates in the field of M33, which are selected from the most recent star cluster catalog. In this catalog, the authors listed star clusters' parameters such as cluster positions, magnitudes, colors in the UBVRIJHK{sub s} filters, and so on. However, a large fraction of objects in this catalog do not have previously published photometry. Photometry is performed using archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the major axis of M33. Detailed comparisons show that, in general, our photometry is consistent with previous measurements. Positions (right ascension and declination) for some clusters are corrected here. Combined with previous literature, ours constitute a large sample of M33 star clusters. Based on this cluster sample, we present some statistical results: none of the youngest M33 clusters ({approx}10{sup 7} yr) have masses approaching 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} ; roughly half the star clusters are consistent with the 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} mass models; the continuous distribution of star clusters along the model line indicates that M33 star clusters have been formed continuously from the epoch of the first star cluster formation until recent times; and there are {approx}50 star clusters which are overlapped with the Galactic globular clusters on the color-color diagram, and these clusters are old globular cluster candidates in M33.

  15. Statistical isotropy violation in WMAP CMB maps resulting from non-circular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Santanu; Mitra, Sanjit; Rotti, Aditya; Pant, Nidhi; Souradeep, Tarun

    2016-06-01

    Statistical isotropy (SI) of cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations is a key observational test to validate the cosmological principle underlying the standard model of cosmology. While a detection of SI violation would have immense cosmological ramification, it is important to recognise their possible origin in systematic effects of observations. The WMAP seven year (WMAP-7) release claimed significant deviation from SI in the bipolar spherical harmonic (BipoSH) coefficients and . Here we present the first explicit reproduction of the measurements reported in WMAP-7, confirming that beam systematics alone can completely account for the measured SI violation. The possibility of such a systematic origin was alluded to in WMAP-7 paper itself and other authors but not as explicitly so as to account for it accurately. We simulate CMB maps using the actual WMAP non-circular beams and scanning strategy. Our estimated BipoSH spectra from these maps match the WMAP-7 results very well. It is also evident that only a very careful and adequately detailed modelling, as carried out here, can conclusively establish that the entire signal arises from non-circular beam effect. This is important since cosmic SI violation signals are expected to be subtle and dismissing a large SI violation signal as observational artefact based on simplistic plausibility arguments run the serious risk of "throwing the baby out with the bathwater".

  16. WE-G-18A-04: 3D Dictionary Learning Based Statistical Iterative Reconstruction for Low-Dose Cone Beam CT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, T; Yan, H; Shi, F; Jia, X; Jiang, Steve B.; Lou, Y; Xu, Q; Mou, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a 3D dictionary learning based statistical reconstruction algorithm on graphic processing units (GPU), to improve the quality of low-dose cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging with high efficiency. Methods: A 3D dictionary containing 256 small volumes (atoms) of 3x3x3 voxels was trained from a high quality volume image. During reconstruction, we utilized a Cholesky decomposition based orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm to find a sparse representation on this dictionary basis of each patch in the reconstructed image, in order to regularize the image quality. To accelerate the time-consuming sparse coding in the 3D case, we implemented our algorithm in a parallel fashion by taking advantage of the tremendous computational power of GPU. Evaluations are performed based on a head-neck patient case. FDK reconstruction with full dataset of 364 projections is used as the reference. We compared the proposed 3D dictionary learning based method with a tight frame (TF) based one using a subset data of 121 projections. The image qualities under different resolutions in z-direction, with or without statistical weighting are also studied. Results: Compared to the TF-based CBCT reconstruction, our experiments indicated that 3D dictionary learning based CBCT reconstruction is able to recover finer structures, to remove more streaking artifacts, and is less susceptible to blocky artifacts. It is also observed that statistical reconstruction approach is sensitive to inconsistency between the forward and backward projection operations in parallel computing. Using high a spatial resolution along z direction helps improving the algorithm robustness. Conclusion: 3D dictionary learning based CBCT reconstruction algorithm is able to sense the structural information while suppressing noise, and hence to achieve high quality reconstruction. The GPU realization of the whole algorithm offers a significant efficiency enhancement, making this algorithm more feasible for potential

  17. Exploring discrepancies between quantitative validation results and the geomorphic plausibility of statistical landslide susceptibility maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steger, Stefan; Brenning, Alexander; Bell, Rainer; Petschko, Helene; Glade, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Empirical models are frequently applied to produce landslide susceptibility maps for large areas. Subsequent quantitative validation results are routinely used as the primary criteria to infer the validity and applicability of the final maps or to select one of several models. This study hypothesizes that such direct deductions can be misleading. The main objective was to explore discrepancies between the predictive performance of a landslide susceptibility model and the geomorphic plausibility of subsequent landslide susceptibility maps while a particular emphasis was placed on the influence of incomplete landslide inventories on modelling and validation results. The study was conducted within the Flysch Zone of Lower Austria (1,354 km2) which is known to be highly susceptible to landslides of the slide-type movement. Sixteen susceptibility models were generated by applying two statistical classifiers (logistic regression and generalized additive model) and two machine learning techniques (random forest and support vector machine) separately for two landslide inventories of differing completeness and two predictor sets. The results were validated quantitatively by estimating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) with single holdout and spatial cross-validation technique. The heuristic evaluation of the geomorphic plausibility of the final results was supported by findings of an exploratory data analysis, an estimation of odds ratios and an evaluation of the spatial structure of the final maps. The results showed that maps generated by different inventories, classifiers and predictors appeared differently while holdout validation revealed similar high predictive performances. Spatial cross-validation proved useful to expose spatially varying inconsistencies of the modelling results while additionally providing evidence for slightly overfitted machine learning-based models. However, the highest predictive performances were obtained for

  18. Low kilovoltage peak (kVp) with an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm in computed tomography urography: evaluation of image quality and radiation dose

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiguo; Chen, Haixi; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Shanghui; Xu, Jingbo; Wang, Xifu; Wang, Qingguo; Zhang, Guixiang; Zhang, Zhuoli; Zheng, Linfeng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the image quality and radiation dose in computed tomography urography (CTU) images acquired with a low kilovoltage peak (kVp) in combination with an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) algorithm. Methods: A total of 45 subjects (18 women, 27 men) who underwent CTU with kV assist software for automatic selection of the optimal kVp were included and divided into two groups (A and B) based on the kVp and image reconstruction algorithm: group A consisted of patients who underwent CTU with a 80 or 100 kVp and whose images were reconstructed with the 50% ASiR algorithm (n=32); group B consisted of patients who underwent CTU with a 120 kVp and whose images were reconstructed with the filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm (n=13). The images were separately reconstructed with volume rendering (VR) and maximum intensity projection (MIP). Finally, the image quality was evaluated using an image score, CT attenuation, image noise, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the renal pelvis-to-abdominal visceral fat and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the renal pelvis. The radiation dose was assessed using volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP) and effective dose (ED). Results: For groups A and B, the subjective image scores for the VR reconstruction images were 3.9±0.4 and 3.8±0.4, respectively, while those for the MIP reconstruction images were 3.8±0.4 and 3.6±0.6, respectively. No significant difference was found (p>0.05) between the two groups’ image scores for either the VR or MIP reconstruction images. Additionally, the inter-reviewer image scores did not significantly differ (p>0.05). The mean attenuation of the bilateral renal pelvis in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (271.4±57.6 vs. 221.8±35.3 HU, p<0.05), whereas the image noise in group A was significantly lower than that in group B (7.9±2.1 vs. 10.5±2.3 HU, p<0.05). The CNR and SNR in group A were

  19. RESULTS OF QA/QC TESTING OF EPA BENCHMARK DOSE SOFTWARE VERSION 1.2

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is developing benchmark dose software (BMDS) to support cancer and non-cancer dose-response assessments. Following the recent public review of BMDS version 1.1b, EPA developed a Hill model for evaluating continuous data, and improved the user interface and Multistage, Polyno...

  20. Radiation doses in adult computed tomography practice in Serbia: initial results.

    PubMed

    Arandjic, Danijela; Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Hadnadjev, Darka; Stojanovic, Sanja; Bozovic, Predrag; Ceklic, Sandra; Lazarevic, Djordje

    2014-11-01

    This work presents initial data on radiation doses in adult computed tomography (CT) in Serbia. Data were collected in terms of CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) values for head, chest and abdomen examination. The range of CTDIvol values was found to be 53-98, 11-34 and 8.5-227 mGy whereas for DLP was 803-1066, 350-845 and 1066-3078 mGy cm(-1) for head, chest and abdomen examination, respectively. Except for abdomen on one CT unit, all estimated values were in line with the reported data. This work also presents simple method on how to reduce radiation doses when scanning head. Using axial (step-and-shot) instead of helical mode and decreasing tube current-time product leads to significant dose reduction. CTDIvol was decreased by 20 % whereas DLP was reduced for a factor 2. PMID:25063787

  1. Thermospheric and geomagnetic responses to interplanetary coronal mass ejections observed by ACE and GRACE: Statistical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, S.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A.; Baur, O.; Lammer, H.

    2015-10-01

    For the period July 2003 to August 2010, the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) catalogue maintained by Richardson and Cane lists 106 Earth-directed events, which have been measured in situ by plasma and field instruments on board the ACE satellite. We present a statistical investigation of the Earth's thermospheric neutral density response by means of accelerometer measurements collected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, which are available for 104 ICMEs in the data set, and its relation to various geomagnetic indices and characteristic ICME parameters such as the impact speed (vmax), southward magnetic field strength (Bz). The majority of ICMEs causes a distinct density enhancement in the thermosphere, with up to a factor of 8 compared to the preevent level. We find high correlations between ICME Bz and thermospheric density enhancements (≈0.9), while the correlation with the ICME impact speed is somewhat smaller (≈0.7). The geomagnetic indices revealing the highest correlations are Dst and SYM-H(≈0.9); the lowest correlations are obtained for Kp and AE (≈0.7), which show a nonlinear relation with the thermospheric density enhancements. Separating the response for the shock-sheath region and the magnetic structure of the ICME, we find that the Dst and SYM-H reveal a tighter relation to the Bz minimum in the magnetic structure of the ICME, whereas the polar cap indices show higher correlations with the Bz minimum in the shock-sheath region. Since the strength of the Bz component—either in the sheath or in the magnetic structure of the ICME—is highly correlated (≈0.9) with the neutral density enhancement, we discuss the possibility of satellite orbital decay estimates based on magnetic field measurements at L1, i.e., before the ICME hits the Earth magnetosphere. These results are expected to further stimulate progress in space weather understanding and applications regarding satellite operations.

  2. ALE3D Statistical Hot Spot Model Results for LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A L III; Tarver, C M; McGuire, E M

    2003-07-11

    The Statistical Hot Spot shock initiation and detonation reactive flow model for solid explosives in the ALE3D hydrodynamic computer code provides physically realistic descriptions of: hot spot formation; ignition (or failure to ignite); growth of reaction (or failure to grow) into surrounding particles; coalescence of reacting hot spots; transition to detonation; and self-sustaining detonation. The model has already successfully modeled several processes in HMX-based explosives, such as shock desensitization, that can not predicted by other reactive flow models. In this paper, the Statistical Hot Spot model is applied to experimental embedded gauge data on the insensitive triaminotrintrobenzene (TATB) based explosive LX-17.

  3. Dosing free nitrous acid for sulfide control in sewers: results of field trials in Australia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangming; Keating, Anthony; Corrie, Shaun; O'halloran, Kelly; Nguyen, Lam; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2013-09-01

    Intermittent dosing of free nitrous acid (FNA), with or without the simultaneous dosing of hydrogen peroxide, is a new strategy developed recently for the control of sulfide production in sewers. Six-month field trials have been carried out in a rising main sewer in Australia (150 mm in diameter and 1080 m in length) to evaluate the performance of the strategy that was previously demonstrated in laboratory studies. In each trial, FNA was dosed at a pumping station for a period of 8 or 24 h, some with simultaneous hydrogen peroxide dosing. The sulfide control effectiveness was monitored by measuring, on-line, the dissolved sulfide concentration at a downstream location of the pipeline (828 m from the pumping station) and the gaseous H2S concentration at the discharge manhole. Effective sulfide control was achieved in all nine consecutive trials, with sulfide production reduced by more than 80% in 10 days following each dose. Later trials achieved better control efficiency than the first few trials possibly due to the disrupting effects of FNA on sewer biofilms. This suggests that an initial strong dose (more chemical consumption) followed by maintenance dosing (less chemical consumption) could be a very cost-effective way to achieve consistent control efficiency. It was also found that heavy rainfall slowed the recovery of sulfide production after dosing, likely due to the dilution effects and reduced retention time. Overall, intermittent dose of FNA or FNA in combination with H2O2 was successfully demonstrated to be a cost-effective method for sulfide control in rising main sewers.

  4. Patient radiation doses in the most common interventional cardiology procedures in Croatia: first results.

    PubMed

    Brnić, Z; Krpan, T; Faj, D; Kubelka, D; Ramac, J Popić; Posedel, D; Steiner, R; Vidjak, V; Brnić, V; Visković, K; Baraban, V

    2010-02-01

    Apart from its benefits, the interventional cardiology (IC) is known to generate high radiation doses to patients and medical staff involved. The European Union Medical Exposures Directive 97/43/Euroatom strongly recommend patient dosimetry in interventional radiology, including IC. IC patient radiation doses in four representative IC rooms in Croatia were investigated. Setting reference levels for these procedures have difficulties due to the large difference in procedure complexity. Nevertheless, it is important that some guideline values are available as a benchmark to guide the operators during these potentially high-dose procedures. Local and national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were proposed as a guidance. A total of 138 diagnostic (coronary angiography, CA) and 151 therapeutic (PTCA, stenting) procedures were included. Patient irradiation was measured in terms of kerma-area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT) and number of cine-frames (F). KAP was recorded using calibrated KAP-meters. DRLs of KAP, FT and F were calculated as third quartile values rounded up to the integer. Skin doses were assessed on a selected sample of high skin dose procedures, using radiochromic films, and peak skin doses (PSD) were presented. A relative large range of doses in IC was detected. National DRLs were proposed as follows: 32 Gy cm(2), 6.6 min and 610 frames for CA and 72 Gy cm(2), 19 min and 1270 frames for PTCA. PSD <1 Gy were measured in 72 % and PSD >2 Gy in 8 % of selected patients. Measuring the patient doses in radiological procedures is required by law, but rarely implemented in Croatia. The doses recorded in the study are acceptable when compared with the literature, but optimisation is possible. The preliminary DRL values proposed may be used as a guideline for local departments, and should be a basis for radiation reduction measures and quality assurance programmes in IC in Croatia. PMID:19880413

  5. Patient radiation doses in the most common interventional cardiology procedures in Croatia: first results.

    PubMed

    Brnić, Z; Krpan, T; Faj, D; Kubelka, D; Ramac, J Popić; Posedel, D; Steiner, R; Vidjak, V; Brnić, V; Visković, K; Baraban, V

    2010-02-01

    Apart from its benefits, the interventional cardiology (IC) is known to generate high radiation doses to patients and medical staff involved. The European Union Medical Exposures Directive 97/43/Euroatom strongly recommend patient dosimetry in interventional radiology, including IC. IC patient radiation doses in four representative IC rooms in Croatia were investigated. Setting reference levels for these procedures have difficulties due to the large difference in procedure complexity. Nevertheless, it is important that some guideline values are available as a benchmark to guide the operators during these potentially high-dose procedures. Local and national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were proposed as a guidance. A total of 138 diagnostic (coronary angiography, CA) and 151 therapeutic (PTCA, stenting) procedures were included. Patient irradiation was measured in terms of kerma-area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT) and number of cine-frames (F). KAP was recorded using calibrated KAP-meters. DRLs of KAP, FT and F were calculated as third quartile values rounded up to the integer. Skin doses were assessed on a selected sample of high skin dose procedures, using radiochromic films, and peak skin doses (PSD) were presented. A relative large range of doses in IC was detected. National DRLs were proposed as follows: 32 Gy cm(2), 6.6 min and 610 frames for CA and 72 Gy cm(2), 19 min and 1270 frames for PTCA. PSD <1 Gy were measured in 72 % and PSD >2 Gy in 8 % of selected patients. Measuring the patient doses in radiological procedures is required by law, but rarely implemented in Croatia. The doses recorded in the study are acceptable when compared with the literature, but optimisation is possible. The preliminary DRL values proposed may be used as a guideline for local departments, and should be a basis for radiation reduction measures and quality assurance programmes in IC in Croatia.

  6. Dosing free nitrous acid for sulfide control in sewers: results of field trials in Australia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangming; Keating, Anthony; Corrie, Shaun; O'halloran, Kelly; Nguyen, Lam; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2013-09-01

    Intermittent dosing of free nitrous acid (FNA), with or without the simultaneous dosing of hydrogen peroxide, is a new strategy developed recently for the control of sulfide production in sewers. Six-month field trials have been carried out in a rising main sewer in Australia (150 mm in diameter and 1080 m in length) to evaluate the performance of the strategy that was previously demonstrated in laboratory studies. In each trial, FNA was dosed at a pumping station for a period of 8 or 24 h, some with simultaneous hydrogen peroxide dosing. The sulfide control effectiveness was monitored by measuring, on-line, the dissolved sulfide concentration at a downstream location of the pipeline (828 m from the pumping station) and the gaseous H2S concentration at the discharge manhole. Effective sulfide control was achieved in all nine consecutive trials, with sulfide production reduced by more than 80% in 10 days following each dose. Later trials achieved better control efficiency than the first few trials possibly due to the disrupting effects of FNA on sewer biofilms. This suggests that an initial strong dose (more chemical consumption) followed by maintenance dosing (less chemical consumption) could be a very cost-effective way to achieve consistent control efficiency. It was also found that heavy rainfall slowed the recovery of sulfide production after dosing, likely due to the dilution effects and reduced retention time. Overall, intermittent dose of FNA or FNA in combination with H2O2 was successfully demonstrated to be a cost-effective method for sulfide control in rising main sewers. PMID:23764584

  7. Is the applicability of fractal statistics to sedimentary structures the result of scale-invariant stochastic processes or deterministic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Turcotte, D.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Fractal statistics are the only statistics that are scale invariant. Examples in tectonics include distributions of faults, displacements on faults, distributions and permeabilities of fractures, and distributions of folds. Many aspects of sedimentology are also fractal including distributions of sedimentary sequences, variations in permeability, and shapes of boundaries. Since the underlying processes are likely to be scale invariant, it is reasonable to conclude that the number-size statistics of oil fields will be fractal. Log-normal statistics are often applied; they are not scale invariant. Two explanations for fractal statistics can be given. They may be the result of scale-invariant stochastic processes. Random walk (Brownian noise) is one example. Topography generally resembles Brownian noise, a power-law spectrum with fractal dimension D = 1.5. Alternatively fractal statistics can be the result of deterministic chaos. Turbulent flows are examples of deterministic chaos, the governing equations are deterministic but the resulting flows are statistical. Tectonic displacements can be shown to be the result of deterministic chaos; it is likely that erosion is another example.

  8. Extremity and eye lens doses in interventional radiology and cardiology procedures: first results of the ORAMED project.

    PubMed

    Domienik, J; Brodecki, M; Carinou, E; Donadille, L; Jankowski, J; Koukorava, C; Krim, S; Nikodemova, D; Ruiz-Lopez, N; Sans-Mercé, M; Struelens, L; Vanhavere, F

    2011-03-01

    The main objective of WP1 of the ORAMED (Optimization of RAdiation protection for MEDical staff) project is to obtain a set of standardised data on extremity and eye lens doses for staff in interventional radiology (IR) and cardiology (IC) and to optimise staff protection. A coordinated measurement program in different hospitals in Europe will help towards this direction. This study aims at analysing the first results of the measurement campaign performed in IR and IC procedures in 34 European hospitals. The highest doses were found for pacemakers, renal angioplasties and embolisations. Left finger and wrist seem to receive the highest extremity doses, while the highest eye lens doses are measured during embolisations. Finally, it was concluded that it is difficult to find a general correlation between kerma area product and extremity or eye lens doses.

  9. Mainstreaming Remedial Mathematics Students in Introductory Statistics: Results Using a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logue, Alexandra W.; Watanabe-Rose, Mari

    2014-01-01

    This study used a randomized controlled trial to determine whether students, assessed by their community colleges as needing an elementary algebra (remedial) mathematics course, could instead succeed at least as well in a college-level, credit-bearing introductory statistics course with extra support (a weekly workshop). Researchers randomly…

  10. Flipped Statistics Class Results: Better Performance than Lecture over One Year Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winquist, Jennifer R.; Carlson, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we compare an introductory statistics course taught using a flipped classroom approach to the same course taught using a traditional lecture based approach. In the lecture course, students listened to lecture, took notes, and completed homework assignments. In the flipped course, students read relatively simple chapters and answered…

  11. Surgical Results of Symmetric and Asymmetric Surgeries and Dose-Response in Patients with Infantile Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    Yurdakul, Nazife Sefi; Bodur, Seda; Koç, Feray

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the results of symmetric and asymmetric surgery and responses to surgical amounts in patients with infantile esotropia. Materials and Methods: The records of patients with infantile esotropia who underwent bilateral medial rectus recession (symmetric surgery) and unilateral medial rectus recession with lateral rectus resection (asymmetric surgery) were analyzed. The results of the cases with symmetric (group 1) and asymmetric (group 2), successful (group 3) and failed (group 4) surgeries were compared, and responses to the amount of surgery were investigated. Results: There were no significant differences between group 1 (n=71) and group 2 (n=13) cases in terms of gender, refraction, preoperative distance deviation, anisometropia and postoperative deviation angles, binocular vision, surgical success or follow-up period (p>0.05). The rate of amblyopia, near deviation and amount of surgery were higher in group 2 cases (p<0.05). Between group 3 (n=64) and group 4 subjects (n=20), no significant differences were detected in terms of gender, surgical age, refraction, amblyopia, anisometropia, preoperative deviation angles, the number of symmetric and asymmetric surgeries, the amount of surgery, or postoperative binocular vision (p>0.05). The average postoperative follow-up period was 15.41±19.93 months (range, 6-98 months) in group 3 cases and 40.45±40.06 months (range, 6-143 months) in group 4 cases (p=0.000). No significant difference was detected in the amount of deviation corrected per 1 mm of surgical procedure between the successful cases in the symmetric and asymmetric groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: Symmetric or asymmetric surgery may be preferable in patients with infantile esotropia according to the clinical features. It is necessary for every clinic to review its own dose-response results. PMID:27800232

  12. Compendium of Single-Event Latchup and Total Ionizing Dose Test Results of Commercial Analog to Digital Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Agarwal, Shri G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports single-event latchup and total dose results for a variety of analog to digital converters targeted for possible use in NASA spacecraft's. The compendium covers devices tested over the last 15 years.

  13. Code System for Calculating Internal and External Doses Resulting from an Atmospheric Release of Radioactive Material.

    1982-06-15

    WRAITH calculates the atmospheric transport of radioactive material to each of a number of downwind receptor points and the external and internal doses to a reference man at each of the receptor points.

  14. Standard dosing of amikacin and gentamicin in critically ill patients results in variable and subtherapeutic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Roger, Claire; Nucci, Bastian; Molinari, Nicolas; Bastide, Sophie; Saissi, Gilbert; Pradel, Gael; Barbar, Saber; Aubert, Clément; Lloret, Sophie; Elotmani, Loubna; Polge, Anne; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Roberts, Jason A; Muller, Laurent

    2015-07-01

    Low peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) of amikacin and gentamicin are reported in intensive care unit (ICU) patients after administration of the first dose. The present study aimed to describe the proportion of ICU patients in whom an adequate Cmax was achieved throughout the course of therapy. Septic ICU patients with an indication for intravenous amikacin or gentamicin were eligible for inclusion in this single-centre observational study. The first and subsequent doses and the corresponding Cmax values were recorded. The target Cmax was ≥60mg/L for amikacin and ≥30mg/L for gentamicin. Amikacin and gentamicin plasma concentrations were available in 66 and 24 patients, respectively (59±17 years; 79±19kg; height 169±12cm; SAPS II score 46±19). Pulmonary, abdominal and urinary tract infections were diagnosed in 64 patients. Culture-positive infection was confirmed in 65 patients (72%). A target first Cmax was achieved in 17/90 patients (19%). For amikacin, the target Cmax was achieved in 16/66 patients (24%) after the initial dose. In the 50 remaining patients, a change in dosing was performed in 14 patients, leading adequate peak plasma level in 2 patients. For gentamicin, the targeted Cmax was achieved in only 1/24 patient (4%) after the initial dose and was never achieved after the third dose. In conclusion, standard dosing of amikacin or gentamicin led to adequate Cmax in only 19% of patients. Subtherapeutic Cmax were not significantly corrected after subsequent doses. PMID:25857948

  15. High dose intensity combination chemotherapy for advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetenham, J. W.; McKendrick, J. J.; Jones, D. H.; Whitehouse, J. M.; Williams, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Retrospective studies have recently demonstrated a significant correlation between dose intensity of chemotherapy and response rates and survival in various diseases including epithelial ovarian carcinoma. As part of a proposed randomised trial to assess the effect of dose intensity on outcome in ovarian carcinoma, a pilot study has been undertaken to determine the toxicity and efficacy of the high intensity therapy. Nineteen patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma received initial treatment with cisplatin 120 mg m-2 i.v. day 1, and cyclophosphamide 1,000 mg-2 i.v. day 1, given at 21-day intervals for six cycles. The average relative dose intensity of this therapy is 1.14 when compared with the CHAP regimen. Severe toxicity was experienced by most patients. The median received average relative dose intensity was 0.90, with only one patient receiving treatment to the proposed intensity. Randomised studies of the effect of dose intensity in ovarian carcinoma are essential, but an initial step must be to assess whether the proposed high dose treatment can be delivered. PMID:2155645

  16. Initial communication survey results for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.M.

    1991-03-01

    To support the public communication efforts of the Technical Steering Panel of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, a public survey was conducted. The survey was intended to provide information about the public's knowledge and interest in the project and the best ways to communicate project results. Questions about the project were included as part of an omnibus survey conducted by Washington State University. The survey was conducted by phone to Washington State residents in the spring of 1990. This report gives the HEDR-related questions and summary data of responses. Questions associated with the HEDR Project were grouped into four categories: knowledge of the HEDR Project; interest in the project; preferred ways of receiving information about the project (including public information meetings, a newsletter mailed to homes, presentations to civic groups in the respondent's community, a computer bulletin board respondent could access with a modem, information displays at public buildings and shopping malls, and an information video sent to respondent); and level of concern over past exposure from Hanford operations. Questions abut whom state residents are most likely to trust about radiation issues were also part of the omnibus survey, and responses are included in this report.

  17. US Geological Survey nutrient preservation experiment : experimental design, statistical analysis, and interpretation of analytical results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, Charles J.; Gilroy, Edward J.

    1999-01-01

    Data on which this report is based, including nutrient concentrations in synthetic reference samples determined concurrently with those in real samples, are extensive (greater than 20,000 determinations) and have been published separately. In addition to confirming the well-documented instability of nitrite in acidified samples, this study also demonstrates that when biota are removed from samples at collection sites by 0.45-micrometer membrane filtration, subsequent preservation with sulfuric acid or mercury (II) provides no statistically significant improvement in nutrient concentration stability during storage at 4 degrees Celsius for 30 days. Biocide preservation had no statistically significant effect on the 30-day stability of phosphorus concentrations in whole-water splits from any of the 15 stations, but did stabilize Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations in whole-water splits from three data-collection stations where ammonium accounted for at least half of the measured Kjeldahl nitrogen.

  18. Recent results of the German Thorotrast study--epidemiological results and dose effect relationships in Thorotrast patients.

    PubMed

    Van Kaick, G; Lieberman, D; Lorenz, D; Lorenz, W J; Lührs, H; Scheer, K E; Wesch, H; Muth, H; Kaul, A; Immich, H; Wagner, G; Wegener, K

    1983-01-01

    The German Thorotrast Study includes 5159 Thorotrast patients and 5160 control patients. 887 Thorotrast patients and 660 control patients could be clinically and biophysically examined and followed-up. The mean age at injection or hospitalization in the case of the control group was 28 yr. The mean injected volume of Thorotrast was calculated to be 24.7 ml and the X-ray films of 249 Thorotrast patients showed paravascular deposits. In the meantime 432 Thorotrast patients and 122 patients of the control group have died. Among the deceased patients we have registered (Thorotrast vs control): hepatic tumors 152/0; myeloproliferative diseases 10/0; Hodgkin's diseases 2/0; non-Hodgkin's lymphomas 5/1; bronchogenic carcinomas 13/6; pleural mesothelioma 1/0; bone sarcoma 1/1(?); sarcoma at injection site 1/0; hepatic cirrhosis 90/6; bone marrow failure 8/1; other neoplastic diseases 46/19; other non-neoplastic diseases 151/88. The cumulative incidence of liver tumors depends on the dose rate to liver tissue and is not influenced by the age at injection. A dose effect relationship for the myeloproliferative diseases is not yet apparent.

  19. Multileaf Collimator Tracking Improves Dose Delivery for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy: Results of the First Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Colvill, Emma; Booth, Jeremy T.; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Eade, Thomas N.; Kneebone, Andrew B.; Poulsen, Per R.; Keall, Paul J.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking improves the consistency between the planned and delivered dose compared with the dose without MLC tracking, in the setting of a prostate cancer volumetric modulated arc therapy trial. Methods and Materials: Multileaf collimator tracking was implemented for 15 patients in a prostate cancer radiation therapy trial; in total, 513 treatment fractions were delivered. During each treatment fraction, the prostate trajectory and treatment MLC positions were collected. These data were used as input for dose reconstruction (multiple isocenter shift method) to calculate the treated dose (with MLC tracking) and the dose that would have been delivered had MLC tracking not been applied (without MLC tracking). The percentage difference from planned for target and normal tissue dose-volume points were calculated. The hypothesis was tested for each dose-volume value via analysis of variance using the F test. Results: Of the 513 fractions delivered, 475 (93%) were suitable for analysis. The mean difference and standard deviation between the planned and treated MLC tracking doses and the planned and without-MLC tracking doses for all 475 fractions were, respectively, PTV D{sub 99%} −0.8% ± 1.1% versus −2.1% ± 2.7%; CTV D{sub 99%} −0.6% ± 0.8% versus −0.6% ± 1.1%; rectum V{sub 65%} 1.6% ± 7.9% versus −1.2% ± 18%; and bladder V{sub 65%} 0.5% ± 4.4% versus −0.0% ± 9.2% (P<.001 for all dose-volume results). Conclusion: This study shows that MLC tracking improves the consistency between the planned and delivered doses compared with the modeled doses without MLC tracking. The implications of this finding are potentially improved patient outcomes, as well as more reliable dose-volume data for radiobiological parameter determination.

  20. The Impact of Acquisition Dose on Quantitative Breast Density Estimation with Digital Mammography: Results from ACRIN PA 4006.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Ray, Shonket; Keller, Brad M; Pertuz, Said; McDonald, Elizabeth S; Conant, Emily F; Kontos, Despina

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To investigate the impact of radiation dose on breast density estimation in digital mammography. Materials and Methods With institutional review board approval and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliance under waiver of consent, a cohort of women from the American College of Radiology Imaging Network Pennsylvania 4006 trial was retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent breast screening with a combination of dose protocols, including standard full-field digital mammography, low-dose digital mammography, and digital breast tomosynthesis. A total of 5832 images from 486 women were analyzed with previously validated, fully automated software for quantitative estimation of density. Clinical Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) density assessment results were also available from the trial reports. The influence of image acquisition radiation dose on quantitative breast density estimation was investigated with analysis of variance and linear regression. Pairwise comparisons of density estimations at different dose levels were performed with Student t test. Agreement of estimation was evaluated with quartile-weighted Cohen kappa values and Bland-Altman limits of agreement. Results Radiation dose of image acquisition did not significantly affect quantitative density measurements (analysis of variance, P = .37 to P = .75), with percent density demonstrating a high overall correlation between protocols (r = 0.88-0.95; weighted κ = 0.83-0.90). However, differences in breast percent density (1.04% and 3.84%, P < .05) were observed within high BI-RADS density categories, although they were significantly correlated across the different acquisition dose levels (r = 0.76-0.92, P < .05). Conclusion Precision and reproducibility of automated breast density measurements with digital mammography are not substantially affected by variations in radiation dose; thus, the use of low-dose techniques for the purpose of density estimation

  1. The Impact of Acquisition Dose on Quantitative Breast Density Estimation with Digital Mammography: Results from ACRIN PA 4006.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Ray, Shonket; Keller, Brad M; Pertuz, Said; McDonald, Elizabeth S; Conant, Emily F; Kontos, Despina

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To investigate the impact of radiation dose on breast density estimation in digital mammography. Materials and Methods With institutional review board approval and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliance under waiver of consent, a cohort of women from the American College of Radiology Imaging Network Pennsylvania 4006 trial was retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent breast screening with a combination of dose protocols, including standard full-field digital mammography, low-dose digital mammography, and digital breast tomosynthesis. A total of 5832 images from 486 women were analyzed with previously validated, fully automated software for quantitative estimation of density. Clinical Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) density assessment results were also available from the trial reports. The influence of image acquisition radiation dose on quantitative breast density estimation was investigated with analysis of variance and linear regression. Pairwise comparisons of density estimations at different dose levels were performed with Student t test. Agreement of estimation was evaluated with quartile-weighted Cohen kappa values and Bland-Altman limits of agreement. Results Radiation dose of image acquisition did not significantly affect quantitative density measurements (analysis of variance, P = .37 to P = .75), with percent density demonstrating a high overall correlation between protocols (r = 0.88-0.95; weighted κ = 0.83-0.90). However, differences in breast percent density (1.04% and 3.84%, P < .05) were observed within high BI-RADS density categories, although they were significantly correlated across the different acquisition dose levels (r = 0.76-0.92, P < .05). Conclusion Precision and reproducibility of automated breast density measurements with digital mammography are not substantially affected by variations in radiation dose; thus, the use of low-dose techniques for the purpose of density estimation

  2. Relation Between Dose of Loop Diuretics and Outcomes in a Heart Failure Population: Results of the ESCAPE Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hasselblad, Vic; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Shah, Monica R.; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Califf, Robert M.; Adams, Kirkwood F.

    2007-01-01

    Background We examined the relation of maximal in-hospital diuretic dose to weight loss, changes in renal function, and mortality in hospitalised heart failure (HF) patients. Methods In ESCAPE, 395 patients received diuretics in-hospital. Weight was measured at baseline, discharge, and every other day before discharge. Weight loss was defined as the difference between baseline and last in-hospital weight. Mortality was assessed using a log-logistic model with non-zero background. Results Median weight loss: 2.8 kg (0.7, 6.1); mean: 3.7 kg (22% of values <0). Weight loss and maximum in-hospital dose were correlated (p = 0.0007). Baseline weight, length of stay, and baseline brain natriuretic peptide were significant predictors of weight loss. After adjusting for these, dose was not a significant predictor of weight loss. A strong relation between dose and mortality was seen (p = 0.003), especially at >300 mg/day. Dose remained a significant predictor of mortality after adjusting for baseline variables that significantly predicted mortality. Correlation between maximal dose and creatinine level change was not significant (r = 0.043; p = 0.412) Conclusions High diuretic doses during HF hospitalisation are associated with increased mortality and poor 6-month outcome. PMID:17719273

  3. Differences in Clinical Results After LINAC-Based Single-Dose Radiosurgery Versus Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Welzel, Thomas; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Juergen

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) vs. those treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: This study is based on an analysis of 200 patients with 202 VSs treated with FSRT (n = 172) or SRS (n = 30). Patients with tumor progression and/or progression of clinical symptoms were selected for treatment. In 165 out of 202 VSs (82%), RT was performed as the primary treatment for VS, and for 37 VSs (18%), RT was conducted for tumor progression after neurosurgical intervention. For patients receiving FSRT, a median total dose of 57.6 Gy was prescribed, with a median fractionation of 5 x 1.8 Gy per week. For patients who underwent SRS, a median single dose of 13 Gy was prescribed to the 80% isodose. Results: FSRT and SRS were well tolerated. Median follow-up time was 75 months. Local control was not statistically different for both groups. The probability of maintaining the pretreatment hearing level after SRS with doses of <=13 Gy was comparable to that of FSRT. The radiation dose for the SRS group (<=13 Gy vs. >13 Gy) significantly influenced hearing preservation rates (p = 0.03). In the group of patients treated with SRS doses of <=13 Gy, cranial nerve toxicity was comparable to that of the FSRT group. Conclusions: FSRT and SRS are both safe and effective alternatives for the treatment of VS. Local control rates are comparable in both groups. SRS with doses of <=13 Gy is a safe alternative to FSRT. While FSRT can be applied safely for the treatment of VSs of all sizes, SRS should be reserved for smaller lesions.

  4. The breaking load method - Results and statistical modification from the ASTM interlaboratory test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, E. L.; Emptage, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    The breaking load test provides quantitative stress corrosion cracking data by determining the residual strength of tension specimens that have been exposed to corrosive environments. Eight laboratories have participated in a cooperative test program under the auspices of ASTM Committee G-1 to evaluate the new test method. All eight laboratories were able to distinguish between three tempers of aluminum alloy 7075. The statistical analysis procedures that were used in the test program do not work well in all situations. An alternative procedure using Box-Cox transformations shows a great deal of promise. An ASTM standard method has been drafted which incorporates the Box-Cox procedure.

  5. Statistically significant performance results of a mine detector and fusion algorithm from an x-band high-resolution SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Arnold C.; Pachowicz, Peter W.

    2004-09-01

    Current mine detection research indicates that no single sensor or single look from a sensor will detect mines/minefields in a real-time manner at a performance level suitable for a forward maneuver unit. Hence, the integrated development of detectors and fusion algorithms are of primary importance. A problem in this development process has been the evaluation of these algorithms with relatively small data sets, leading to anecdotal and frequently over trained results. These anecdotal results are often unreliable and conflicting among various sensors and algorithms. Consequently, the physical phenomena that ought to be exploited and the performance benefits of this exploitation are often ambiguous. The Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision Laboratory and Electron Sensors Directorate has collected large amounts of multisensor data such that statistically significant evaluations of detection and fusion algorithms can be obtained. Even with these large data sets care must be taken in algorithm design and data processing to achieve statistically significant performance results for combined detectors and fusion algorithms. This paper discusses statistically significant detection and combined multilook fusion results for the Ellipse Detector (ED) and the Piecewise Level Fusion Algorithm (PLFA). These statistically significant performance results are characterized by ROC curves that have been obtained through processing this multilook data for the high resolution SAR data of the Veridian X-Band radar. We discuss the implications of these results on mine detection and the importance of statistical significance, sample size, ground truth, and algorithm design in performance evaluation.

  6. Results of the Phase I Dose-Escalating Study of Motexafin Gadolinium With Standard Radiotherapy in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Judith M. Seiferheld, Wendy; Alger, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Genevieve; Endicott, Thyra J.; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter; Phan, See-Chun

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is a putative radiation enhancer initially evaluated in patients with brain metastases. This Phase I trial studied the safety and tolerability of a 2-6-week course (10-22 doses) of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 glioblastoma multiforme patients received one of seven MGd regimens starting at 10 doses of 4 mg/kg/d MGd and escalating to 22 doses of 5.3 mg/kg/d MGd (5 or 10 daily doses then three times per week). The National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program toxicity and stopping rules were applied. Results: The maximal tolerated dose was 5.0 mg/kg/d MGd (5 d/wk for 2 weeks, then three times per week) for 22 doses. The dose-limiting toxicity was reversible transaminase elevation. Adverse reactions included rash/pruritus (45%), chills/fever (30%), and self-limiting vesiculobullous rash of the thumb and fingers (42%). The median survival of 17.6 months prompted a case-matched analysis. In the case-matched analysis, the MGd patients had a median survival of 16.1 months (n = 31) compared with the matched Radiation Therapy Oncology Group database patients with a median survival of 11.8 months (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.94). Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme in this study was 5 mg/kg/d for 22 doses (daily for 2 weeks, then three times weekly). The baseline survival calculations suggest progression to Phase II trials is appropriate, with the addition of MGd to radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide.

  7. Supercomputing enabling exhaustive statistical analysis of genome wide association study data: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Reumann, Matthias; Makalic, Enes; Goudey, Benjamin W; Inouye, Michael; Bickerstaffe, Adrian; Bui, Minh; Park, Daniel J; Kapuscinski, Miroslaw K; Schmidt, Daniel F; Zhou, Zeyu; Qian, Guoqi; Zobel, Justin; Wagner, John; Hopper, John L

    2012-01-01

    Most published GWAS do not examine SNP interactions due to the high computational complexity of computing p-values for the interaction terms. Our aim is to utilize supercomputing resources to apply complex statistical techniques to the world's accumulating GWAS, epidemiology, survival and pathology data to uncover more information about genetic and environmental risk, biology and aetiology. We performed the Bayesian Posterior Probability test on a pseudo data set with 500,000 single nucleotide polymorphism and 100 samples as proof of principle. We carried out strong scaling simulations on 2 to 4,096 processing cores with factor 2 increments in partition size. On two processing cores, the run time is 317h, i.e. almost two weeks, compared to less than 10 minutes on 4,096 processing cores. The speedup factor is 2,020 that is very close to the theoretical value of 2,048. This work demonstrates the feasibility of performing exhaustive higher order analysis of GWAS studies using independence testing for contingency tables. We are now in a position to employ supercomputers with hundreds of thousands of threads for higher order analysis of GWAS data using complex statistics. PMID:23366127

  8. Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2008 (MWDS-2008): assessment of internal dose from measurement results of plutonium activity in urine.

    PubMed

    Khokhryakov, Victor V; Khokhryakov, Valentin F; Suslova, Klara G; Vostrotin, Vadim V; Vvedensky, Vladimir E; Sokolova, Alexandra B; Krahenbuhl, Melinda P; Birchall, Alan; Miller, Scott C; Schadilov, Anatoly E; Ephimov, Alexander V

    2013-04-01

    A new modification of the prior human lung compartment plutonium model, Doses-2005, has been described. The modified model was named "Mayak Worker Dosimetry System-2008" (MWDS-2008). In contrast to earlier models developed for workers at the Mayak Production Association (Mayak PA), the new model more correctly describes plutonium biokinetics and metabolism in pulmonary lymph nodes. The MWDS-2008 also provides two sets of doses estimates: one based on bioassay data and the other based on autopsy data, where available. The algorithm of internal dose calculation from autopsy data will be described in a separate paper. Results of comparative analyses of Doses-2005 and MWDS-2008 are provided. Perspectives on the further development of plutonium dosimetry are discussed.

  9. Questionnaire- and measurement-based individual thyroid doses in Ukraine resulting from the Chornobyl nuclear reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Likhtarev, I; Bouville, A; Kovgan, L; Luckyanov, N; Voillequé, P; Chepurny, M

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI), in cooperation with the Ministries of Health of Belarus and of Ukraine, is involved in epidemiological studies of thyroid diseases presumably related to the Chornobyl accident, which occurred in Ukraine on 26 April 1986. Within the framework of these studies, individual thyroid absorbed doses, as well as uncertainties, have been estimated for all members of the cohorts (13,215 Ukrainians and 11,918 Belarusians), who were selected from the large group of children aged 0 to 18 whose thyroids were monitored for gamma radiation within a few weeks after the accident. Information on the residence history and dietary habits of each cohort member was obtained during personal interviews. The methodology used to estimate the thyroid absorbed doses resulting from intakes of (131)I by the Ukrainian cohort subjects is described. The model of thyroid dose estimation is run in two modes: deterministic and stochastic. In the stochastic mode, the model is run 1,000 times for each subject using a Monte Carlo procedure. The geometric means of the individual thyroid absorbed doses obtained in the stochastic mode range from 0.0006 to 42 Gy. The arithmetic and geometric means of these individual thyroid absorbed doses over the entire cohort are 0.68 and 0.23 Gy, respectively. On average, the individual thyroid dose estimates obtained in the deterministic mode are about the same as the geometric mean doses obtained in the stochastic mode, while the arithmetic mean thyroid absorbed doses obtained in the stochastic mode are about 20% higher than those obtained in the deterministic mode. The distributions of the 1000 values of the individual thyroid absorbed dose estimates are found to be approximately lognormal, with geometric standard deviations ranging from 1.6 to 5.0 for most cohort subjects. For the time being, only the thyroid doses resulting from intakes of (131)I have been estimated for all subjects. Future work will include the estimation

  10. Statistics is not enough: revisiting Ronald A. Fisher's critique (1936) of Mendel's experimental results (1866).

    PubMed

    Pilpel, Avital

    2007-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the role of rational belief change theory in the philosophical understanding of experimental error. Today, philosophers seek insight about error in the investigation of specific experiments, rather than in general theories. Nevertheless, rational belief change theory adds to our understanding of just such cases: R. A. Fisher's criticism of Mendel's experiments being a case in point. After an historical introduction, the main part of this paper investigates Fisher's paper from the point of view of rational belief change theory: what changes of belief about Mendel's experiment does Fisher go through and with what justification. It leads to surprising insights about what Fisher had done right and wrong, and, more generally, about the limits of statistical methods in detecting error.

  11. A nonparametric approach for statistical comparison of results from alternative forced choice experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noo, Frédéric; Wunderlich, Adam; Heuscher, Dominic; Schmitt, Katharina; Yu, Zhicong

    2013-03-01

    Task-based image quality assessment is a valuable methodology for development, optimization and evaluation of new image formation processes in x-ray computed tomography (CT), as well as in other imaging modalities. A simple way to perform such an assessment is through the use of two (or more) alternative forced choice (AFC) experiments. In this paper, we are interested in drawing statistical inference from outcomes of multiple AFC experiments that are obtained using multiple readers as well as multiple cases. We present a non-parametric covariance estimator for this problem. Then, we illustrate its usefulness with a practical example involving x-ray CT simulations. The task for this example is classification between presence or absence of one lesion with unknown location within a given object. This task is used for comparison of three standard image reconstruction algorithms in x-ray CT using four human observers.

  12. The Total Ozone Series of Arosa: History, Homogenization and new results using statistical extreme value theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staehelin, J.; Rieder, H. E.; Maeder, J. A.; Ribatet, M.; Davison, A. C.; Stübi, R.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric ozone protects the biota living at the Earth's surface from harmful solar UV-B and UV-C radiation. The global ozone shield is expected to gradually recover from the anthropogenic disturbance of ozone depleting substances (ODS) in the coming decades. The stratospheric ozone layer at extratropics might significantly increase above the thickness of the chemically undisturbed atmosphere which might enhance ozone concentrations at the tropopause altitude where ozone is an important greenhouse gas. At Arosa, a resort village in the Swiss Alps, total ozone measurements started in 1926 leading to the longest total ozone series of the world. One Fery spectrograph and seven Dobson spectrophotometers were operated at Arosa and the method used to homogenize the series will be presented. Due to its unique length the series allows studying total ozone in the chemically undisturbed as well as in the ODS loaded stratosphere. The series is particularly valuable to study natural variability in the period prior to 1970, when ODS started to affect stratospheric ozone. Concepts developed by extreme value statistics allow objective definitions of "ozone extreme high" and "ozone extreme low" values by fitting the (daily mean) time series using the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD). Extreme high ozone events can be attributed to effects of ElNino and/or NAO, whereas in the chemically disturbed stratosphere high frequencies of extreme low total ozone values simultaneously occur with periods of strong polar ozone depletion (identified by statistical modeling with Equivalent Stratospheric Chlorine times Volume of Stratospheric Polar Clouds) and volcanic eruptions (such as El Chichon and Pinatubo).

  13. The cross-cut statistic and its sensitivity to bias in observational studies with ordered doses of treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Paul R

    2016-03-01

    A common practice with ordered doses of treatment and ordered responses, perhaps recorded in a contingency table with ordered rows and columns, is to cut or remove a cross from the table, leaving the outer corners--that is, the high-versus-low dose, high-versus-low response corners--and from these corners to compute a risk or odds ratio. This little remarked but common practice seems to be motivated by the oldest and most familiar method of sensitivity analysis in observational studies, proposed by Cornfield et al. (1959), which says that to explain a population risk ratio purely as bias from an unobserved binary covariate, the prevalence ratio of the covariate must exceed the risk ratio. Quite often, the largest risk ratio, hence the one least sensitive to bias by this standard, is derived from the corners of the ordered table with the central cross removed. Obviously, the corners use only a portion of the data, so a focus on the corners has consequences for the standard error as well as for bias, but sampling variability was not a consideration in this early and familiar form of sensitivity analysis, where point estimates replaced population parameters. Here, this cross-cut analysis is examined with the aid of design sensitivity and the power of a sensitivity analysis.

  14. Blood phenylalanine concentrations in patients with PAH-deficient hyperphenylalaninaemia off diet without and with three different single oral doses of tetrahydrobiopterin: assessing responsiveness in a model of statistical process control.

    PubMed

    Lindner, M; Gramer, G; Garbade, S F; Burgard, P

    2009-08-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) cofactor loading is a standard procedure to differentiate defects of BH(4) metabolism from phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) deficiency. BH(4) responsiveness also exists in PAH-deficient patients with high residual PAH activity. Unexpectedly, single cases with presumed nil residual PAH activity have been reported to be BH(4) responsive, too. BH(4) responsiveness has been defined either by a >or=30% reduction of blood Phe concentration after a single BH(4) dose or by a decline greater than the individual circadian Phe level variation. Since both methods have methodological disadvantages, we present a model of statistical process control (SPC) to assess BH(4) responsiveness. Phe levels in 17 adult PKU patients of three phenotypic groups off diet were compared without and with three different single oral dosages of BH(4) applied in a double-blind randomized cross-over design. Results are compared for >or=30% reduction and SPC. The effect of BH(4) by >or=30% reduction was significant for groups (p < 0.01) but not for dose (p = 0.064), with no interaction of group with dose (p = 0.24). SPC revealed significant effects for group (p < 0.01) and the interaction for group with dose (p < 0.05) but not for dose alone (p = 0.87). After one or more loadings, seven patients would be judged to be BH(4) responsive either by the 30% criterion or by the SPC model, but only three by both. Results for patients with identical PAH genotype were not very consistent within (for different BH(4) doses) and between the two models. We conclude that a comparison of protein loadings without and with BH(4) combined with a standardized procedure for data analysis and decision would increase the reliability of diagnostic results. PMID:19513811

  15. Long-Term Results of Fixed High-Dose I-131 Treatment for Toxic Nodular Goiter: Higher Euthyroidism Rates in Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aktaş, Gül Ege; Turoğlu, Halil Turgut; Erdil, Tanju Yusuf; İnanır, Sabahat; Dede, Fuat

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Geriatric patient population has special importance due to particular challenges. In addition to the increase in incidence of toxic nodular goiter (TNG) with age, it has a high incidence in the regions of low-medium iodine intake such as in our country. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall outcome of high fixed dose radioiodine (RAI) therapy, and investigate the particular differences in the geriatric patient population. Methods: One hundred and three TNG patients treated with high dose I-131 (370-740 MBq) were retrospectively reviewed. The baseline characteristics; age, gender, scintigraphic patterns and thyroid function tests before and after treatment, as well as follow-up, duration of antithyroid drug (ATD) medication and achievement of euthyroid or hypothyroid state were evaluated. The patient population was divided into two groups as those=>65 years and those who were younger, in order to assess the effect of age. Results: Treatment success was 90% with single dose RAI therapy. Hyperthyroidism was treated in 7±7, 2 months after RAI administration. At the end of the first year, overall hypothyroidism rate was 30% and euthyroid state was achieved in 70% of patients. Age was found to be the only statistically significant variable effecting outcome. A higher ratio of euthyroidism was achieved in the geriatric patient population. Conclusion: High fixed dose I-131 treatment should be preferred in geriatric TNG patients in order to treat persistent hyperthyroidism rapidly. The result of this study suggests that high fixed dose RAI therapy is a successful modality in treating TNG, and high rates of euthyroidism can be achieved in geriatric patients. PMID:27529883

  16. Feasibility Study of Using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) and Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) for Reducing Radiation and Iodine Contrast Dose in Abdominal CT Patients with High BMI Values

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Zhao, Xin-ming; Zhao, Yan-feng; Wang, Xiao-yi; Zhou, Chun-wu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively investigate the effect of using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for reducing radiation and iodine contrast dose in abdominal CT patients with high BMI values. Materials and Methods 26 patients (weight > 65kg and BMI ≥ 22) underwent abdominal CT using GSI mode with 300mgI/kg contrast material as study group (group A). Another 21 patients (weight ≤ 65kg and BMI ≥ 22) were scanned with a conventional 120 kVp tube voltage for noise index (NI) of 11 with 450mgI/kg contrast material as control group (group B). GSI images were reconstructed at 60keV with 50%ASIR and the conventional 120kVp images were reconstructed with FBP reconstruction. The CT values, standard deviation (SD), signal-noise-ratio (SNR), contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) of 26 landmarks were quantitatively measured and image quality qualitatively assessed using statistical analysis. Results As for the quantitative analysis, the difference of CNR between groups A and B was all significant except for the mesenteric vein. The SNR in group A was higher than B except the mesenteric artery and splenic artery. As for the qualitative analysis, all images had diagnostic quality and the agreement for image quality assessment between the reviewers was substantial (kappa = 0.684). CT dose index (CTDI) values for non-enhanced, arterial phase and portal phase in group A were decreased by 49.04%, 40.51% and 40.54% compared with group B (P = 0.000), respectively. The total dose and the injection rate for the contrast material were reduced by 14.40% and 14.95% in A compared with B. Conclusion The use of GSI and ASIR provides similar enhancement in vessels and image quality with reduced radiation dose and contrast dose, compared with the use of conventional scan protocol. PMID:26079259

  17. Methods Used to Calculate Doses Resulting from Inhalation of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Guthrie; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Traub, Richard J.; Little, Thomas T.; Guilmette, Ray A.

    2009-02-26

    The methods used to calculate radiological and toxicological doses to hypothetical persons inside either a United States Army Abrams tank or Bradley Fighting Vehicle that has been perforated by depleted uranium munitions is described. Data from time- and particle-size-resolved measurements of depleted uranium aerosol as well as particle-size resolved measurements of aerosol solubility in lung fluids for aerosol produced in the breathing zones of the hypothetical occupants were used. The aerosol was approximated as a mixture of nine monodisperse (single particle size) components corresponding to particle size increments measured by the eight stages plus backup filter of the cascade impactors used. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo Bayesian analysis technique was employed, which straightforwardly calculates the uncertainties in doses. Extensive quality control checking of the various computer codes used is described.

  18. Statistically-constrained shallow text marking: techniques, evaluation paradigm and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Brian; Vogel, Carl

    2007-02-01

    We present three natural language marking strategies based on fast and reliable shallow parsing techniques, and on widely available lexical resources: lexical substitution, adjective conjunction swaps, and relativiser switching. We test these techniques on a random sample of the British National Corpus. Individual candidate marks are checked for goodness of structural and semantic fit, using both lexical resources, and the web as a corpus. A representative sample of marks is given to 25 human judges to evaluate for acceptability and preservation of meaning. This establishes a correlation between corpus based felicity measures and perceived quality, and makes qualified predictions. Grammatical acceptability correlates with our automatic measure strongly (Pearson's r = 0.795, p = 0.001), allowing us to account for about two thirds of variability in human judgements. A moderate but statistically insignificant (Pearson's r = 0.422, p = 0.356) correlation is found with judgements of meaning preservation, indicating that the contextual window of five content words used for our automatic measure may need to be extended.

  19. Some results on the statistics of hull perimeters in large planar triangulations and quadrangulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guitter, Emmanuel

    2016-11-01

    The hull perimeter at distance d in a planar map with two marked vertices at distance k from each other is the length of the closed curve separating these two vertices and lying at distance d from the first one (d\\lt k). We study the statistics of hull perimeters in large random planar triangulations and quadrangulations as a function of both k and d. Explicit expressions for the probability density of the hull perimeter at distance d, as well as for the joint probability density of hull perimeters at distances d 1 and d 2, are obtained in the limit of infinitely large k. We also consider the situation where the distance d at which the hull perimeter is measured corresponds to a finite fraction of k. The various laws that we obtain are identical for triangulations and for quadrangulations, up to a global rescaling. Our approach is based on recursion relations recently introduced by the author which determine the generating functions of so-called slices, i.e. pieces of maps with appropriate distance constraints. It is indeed shown that the map decompositions underlying these recursion relations are intimately linked to the notion of hull perimeters and provide a simple way to fully control them.

  20. Dumb-bell galaxies in southern clusters: Catalog and preliminary statistical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vettolani, G.; Gregorini, L.; Parma, P.; Deruiter, H. R.

    1990-01-01

    The dominant galaxy of a rich cluster is often an object whose formation and evolution is closely connected to the dynamics of the cluster itself. Hoessel (1980) and Schneider et al. (1983) estimate that 50 percent of the dominant galaxies are either of the dumb-bell type or have companions at projected distances less than 20 kpc, which is far in excess of the number expected from chance projection (see also Rood and Leir 1979). Presently there is no complete sample of these objects, with the exception of the listing of dumb-bell galaxies in BM type I and I-II clusters in the Abell statistical sample of Rood and Leir (1979). Recent dynamical studies of dumb-bell galaxies in clusters (Valentijn and Casertano, 1988) still suffer from inhomogeneity of the sample. The fact that it is a mixture of optically and radio selected objects may have introduced an unknown biases, for instance if the probability of radio emission is enhanced by the presence of close companions (Stocke, 1978, Heckman et al. 1985, Vettolani and Gregorini 1988) a bias could be present in their velocity distribution. However, this situation is bound to improve: a new sample of Abell clusters in the Southern Hemisphere has been constructed (Abell et al., 1988 hereafter ACO), which has several advantages over the original northern catalog. The plate material (IIIaJ plates) is of better quality and reaches fainter magnitudes. This makes it possible to classify the cluster types with a higher degree of accuracy, as well as to fainter magnitudes. The authors therefore decided to reconsider the whole problem constructing a new sample of dumb-bell galaxies homogeneously selected from the ACO survey. Details of the classification criteria are given.

  1. Long-term results of high-dose methylprednisolone in aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    López-Karpovitch, X; Gil-Rondero, C; Hurtado-Monroy, R

    1991-01-01

    Four males and two females, aged 13 to 57 years (median 22 years), with acquired severe aplastic anemia (AA) were treated with intravenous bolus of high doses of 6-methylprednisolone (MPL). Patients received MPL within a 30-day period at a dose of 20 mg/kg/day (3 days), 10 mg/kg/day (4 days), 5 mg/kg/day (4 days), 2 mg/kg/day (9 days), and 1 mg/kg/day (10 days). Within the first 3 months following MPL therapy, a response rate of 83%, assessed by means of increase in reticulocytes, neutrophils or platelets, was recorded in the group: two cases showed partial response and three improvement. The 3-month, and 1-, 2- and 3-year survival of the group was 67%, 50%, 33% and 33%, respectively. Neither the presence of reticulocytopenia or thrombocytopenia prior MPL therapy, nor age, gender, etiology of AA or time between diagnosis and initiation of MPL influenced survival. In contrast, neutrophil counts before MPL treatment had a strong prognostic value. Patients with less than 0.5 x 10(9)/L neutrophils had a median survival of 4.2 months (range 1.2 to 5.2 months) as compared to the 36.1 months median survival (range 12.1 to 36.8 months) of patients whose neutrophil counts were greater than 0.5 x 10(9)/L. Follow-up data suggest that the administration of androgens two months after MPL therapy did not modify survival. It is concluded that high-dose MPL is useful in the treatment of some patients with acquired severe AA, particularly in those with greater than 0.5 x 10(9)/L neutrophils who are not candidates for bone marrow transplantation.

  2. An application of combining results from multiple methods—statistical evaluation of uncertainty for NIST SRM 1508a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornikova, A.; Zhang, N. F.; Welch, M. J.; Tai, S.

    2006-06-01

    NIST standard reference materials (SRMs) are certified reference materials that are developed at NIST and provided to laboratories (industry, government and academia) for assessment and improvement of measurement quality. This paper details the statistical analysis related to the recertification of SRM 1508a, benzoylecgonine (cocaine metabolite) in freeze-dried urine, to incorporate new data. The recertification is based on combining measurement results from different measurement methods and time periods. Several different statistical models and corresponding estimators were considered for the certified value, its standard uncertainty and its expanded uncertainty.

  3. Universal spectral statistics in Wigner-Dyson, chiral, and Andreev star graphs. I. Construction and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnutzmann, Sven; Seif, Burkhard

    2004-05-01

    In a series of two papers we investigate the universal spectral statistics of chaotic quantum systems in the ten known symmetry classes of quantum mechanics. In this first paper we focus on the construction of appropriate ensembles of star graphs in the ten symmetry classes. A generalization of the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture is given that covers all these symmetry classes. The conjecture is supported by numerical results that demonstrate the fidelity of the spectral statistics of star graphs to the corresponding Gaussian random-matrix theories.

  4. Measurements of natural radioactivity and the resulting radiation doses from commercial granites.

    PubMed

    Aydarous, A Sh; Zeghib, Sadek; Al-Dughmah, Mohammed

    2010-12-01

    Saudi Arabia is becoming a relatively large market for local and foreign marble and granite use in dwellings. Due to increasing concern about environmental radiological protection, different types of locally widely used granite tiles were collected from different suppliers in the Jeddah province, Saudi Arabia. The analysis for these granite tiles for gamma radiation was conducted by means of a high-resolution HPGe gamma-spectroscopy system. The activity concentrations of (232)Th, (226)Ra and 40K in the selected granite samples ranged from 4.9 to 144, 9.7 to 133 and 168 to 1806 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The data were compared with other granite types and building materials used all over the world. The absorbed dose rates, effective dose rates, radium equivalent activities as well as the radiation hazard indices were estimated. The radium equivalent activities (Ra(eq)) are lower than the limit of 370 Bq kg(-1) set by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (Exposure to radiation from the natural radioactivity in building materials. Report by a Group of Experts of the OECD, Nuclear Energy Agency, OECD, Paris, 1979) except in three samples.

  5. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renis, M.; Borghesi, M.; Favetta, M.; Malfa, G.; Manti, L.; Romano, F.; Schettino, G.; Tomasello, B.; Cirrone, G. A. P.

    2013-07-01

    Studies regarding the radiobiological effects of low dose radiation, microbeam irradiation services have been developed in the world and today laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may be used in radiation therapy. The application of different facilities is essential for studying bystander effects and relating signalling phenomena in different cells or tissues. In particular the use of ion beams results advantageous in cancer radiotherapy compared to more commonly used X-rays, since the ability of ions in delivering lethal amount of doses into the target tumour avoiding or limiting damage to the contiguous healthy tissues. At the INFN-LNS in Catania, a multidisciplinary radiobiology group is strategically structured aimed to develop radiobiological research, finalised to therapeutic applications, compatible with the use of high dose laser-driven ion beams. The characteristic non-continuous dose rates with several orders of magnitude of laser-driven ion beams makes this facility very interesting in the cellular systems' response to ultra-high dose rates with non-conventional pulse time intervals cellular studies. Our group have projected to examine the effect of high dose laser-driven ion beams on two cellular types: foetal fibroblasts (normal control cells) and DU145 (prostate cancer cells), studying the modulation of some different bio-molecular parameters, in particular cell proliferation and viability, DNA damage, redox cellular status, morphological alterations of both the cytoskeleton components and some cell organelles and the possible presence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Our group performed preliminary experiments with high energy (60 MeV), dose rate of 10 Gy/min, doses of 1, 2, 3 Gy and LET 1 keV/μm on human foetal fibroblasts (control cells). We observed that cell viability was not influenced by the characteristics of the beam, the irradiation conditions or the analysis time. Conversely, DNA damage was present at time 0, immediately

  6. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Renis, M.; Malfa, G.; Tomasello, B.; Borghesi, M.; Schettino, G.; Favetta, M.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Manti, L.

    2013-07-26

    Studies regarding the radiobiological effects of low dose radiation, microbeam irradiation services have been developed in the world and today laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may be used in radiation therapy. The application of different facilities is essential for studying bystander effects and relating signalling phenomena in different cells or tissues. In particular the use of ion beams results advantageous in cancer radiotherapy compared to more commonly used X-rays, since the ability of ions in delivering lethal amount of doses into the target tumour avoiding or limiting damage to the contiguous healthy tissues. At the INFN-LNS in Catania, a multidisciplinary radiobiology group is strategically structured aimed to develop radiobiological research, finalised to therapeutic applications, compatible with the use of high dose laser-driven ion beams. The characteristic non-continuous dose rates with several orders of magnitude of laser-driven ion beams makes this facility very interesting in the cellular systems' response to ultra-high dose rates with non-conventional pulse time intervals cellular studies. Our group have projected to examine the effect of high dose laser-driven ion beams on two cellular types: foetal fibroblasts (normal control cells) and DU145 (prostate cancer cells), studying the modulation of some different bio-molecular parameters, in particular cell proliferation and viability, DNA damage, redox cellular status, morphological alterations of both the cytoskeleton components and some cell organelles and the possible presence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Our group performed preliminary experiments with high energy (60 MeV), dose rate of 10 Gy/min, doses of 1, 2, 3 Gy and LET 1 keV/μm on human foetal fibroblasts (control cells). We observed that cell viability was not influenced by the characteristics of the beam, the irradiation conditions or the analysis time. Conversely, DNA damage was present at time 0, immediately

  7. [The dose estimation to the population as a result of radioactive contamination of the Semipalatinsk Test area].

    PubMed

    Spiridonova, S I; Mukusheva, M K; Shubina, O A; Solomatin, V M; Epifanova, I E

    2008-01-01

    The results are presented from estimation of spatial distribution of 137Cs and 90Sr contamination densities in the areas of horses and sheep grazing within the Semipalatinsk Test Site. Dose burdens to various cohorts of the population living within the STS and consuming contaminated animal products are predicted. Doses of shepherds in the most contaminated pasture areas have been found to exceed the accepted limit (1 mSv/y). The conclusion is made about the need for further studies on the risk assessment of the STS population exposure above the accepted limits.

  8. Treatment results of high dose cabergoline as an adjuvant therapy in six patients with established severe ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saharkhiz, Nasrin; Akbari Sene, Azadeh; Salehpour, Saghar; Tamimi, Maryam; Vasheghani Farahani, Masoumeh; Sheibani, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The beneficial role of cabergoline as a prophylactic agent to prevent ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome (OHSS) among high-risk patients has been demonstrated in previous studies. But data for its role as a treatment for established severe OHSS is still limited. We represent the treatment results of high dose oral cabergoline in management of six patients after the syndrome is established. Case: High-dose oral cabergoline (1 mg daily for eight days) was prescribed as an adjuvant to symptomatic treatment for six hospitalized patients with established severe OHSS following infertility treatment cycles. In two cases OHSS resolved rapidly despite the occurrence of ongoing pregnancy. Conclusion: Considering the treatment outcomes of our patients, high dose cabergoline did not eliminate the need for traditional treatments, but it was a relatively effective and safe therapy in management of established severe OHSS, and prevented the increase in its severity following the occurrence of pregnancy. PMID:25469130

  9. SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Lloyd A.; Paresol, Bernard

    2014-09-01

    This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report “SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report”, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

  10. Active Learning in Large Classes: Can Small Interventions Produce Greater Results than Are Statistically Predictable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adrian, Lynne M.

    2010-01-01

    Six online postings and six one-minute papers were added to an introductory first-year class, forming 5 percent of the final grade, but represented significant intervention in class functioning and amount of active learning. Active learning produced results in student performance beyond the percentage of the final grade it constituted. (Contains 1…

  11. Low lead doses and atherogenic diet in rabbits: biochemical results in blood.

    PubMed

    Speich, M; Métayer, C; Arnaud, P; Nguyen, V G; Bousquet, B; Boiteau, H L

    1983-01-01

    Changes in concentrations of blood lead, cholesterol, triacylglycerols, GOT and GPT enzymes, phosphorus, proteins, plasma calcium and magnesium, and erythrocyte magnesium were studied for 25 weeks in 4 groups of 6 rabbits each receiving different diets: I (controls), II (water with 9.66 mumol/l of lead), III (atherogenic) and IV (atherogenic + 9.66 mumol/l of lead). Differences observed, with respect to the diets, for lead, cholesterol, enzymes, proteins and erythrocyte magnesium were evident from the 42nd day on. Low lead doses raised the levels of cholesterol and triacylglycerols in group II, whereas triacylglycerols were lower in the plasma of group IV in comparison with group III and were accumulated in the aorta. The elevation of enzymes in groups III and IV indicated heart and liver dysfunctions. There was a significant drop in erythrocyte magnesium in groups III and IV, which was especially marked in the latter group, with an interaction between the two diets.

  12. Importance of dose-rate and cell proliferation in the evaluation of biological experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. B.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclei of cells within the bodies of astronauts traveling on extended missions outside the geomagnetosphere will experience single traversals of particles with high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) (e.g., one iron ion per one hundred years, on average) superimposed on a background of tracks with low LET (approximately one proton every two to three days, and one helium ion per month). In addition, some cell populations within the body will be proliferating, thus possibly providing increasing numbers of cells with 'initiated' targets for subsequent radiation hits. These temporal characteristics are not generally reproduced in laboratory experimental protocols. Implications of the differences in the temporal patterns of radiation delivery between conventionally designed radiation biology experiments and the pattern to be experienced in space are examined and the importance of dose-rate and cell proliferation are pointed out in the context of radiation risk assessment on long mission in space.

  13. Importance of dose-rate and cell proliferation in the evaluation of biological experimental results.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S B

    1994-01-01

    The nuclei of cells within the bodies of astronauts traveling on extended missions outside the geomagnetosphere will experience single traversals of particles with high LET (e.g., one iron ion per one hundred years, on average) superimposed on a background of tracks with low LET (approximately one proton every two to three days, and one helium ion per month). In addition, some cell populations within the body will be proliferating, thus possibly providing increasing numbers of cells with "initiated" targets for subsequent radiation hits. These temporal characteristics are not generally reproduced in laboratory experimental protocols. Implications of the differences in the temporal patterns of radiation delivery between conventionally designed radiation biology experiments and the pattern to be experienced in space are examined and the importance of dose-rate and cell proliferation are pointed out in the context of radiation risk assessment on long missions in space. PMID:11538040

  14. The Solid Rocket Motor Slag Population: Results of a Radar-based Regressive Statistical Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Matthew F.; Xu, Yu-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Solid rocket motor (SRM) slag has been identified as a significant source of man-made orbital debris. The propensity of SRMs to generate particles of 100 m and larger has caused concern regarding their contribution to the debris environment. Radar observation, rather than in-situ gathered evidence, is currently the only measurable source for the NASA/ODPO model of the on-orbit slag population. This simulated model includes the time evolution of the resultant orbital populations using a historical database of SRM launches, propellant masses, and estimated locations and times of tail-off. However, due to the small amount of observational evidence, there can be no direct comparison to check the validity of this model. Rather than using the assumed population developed from purely historical and physical assumptions, a regressional approach was used which utilized the populations observed by the Haystack radar from 1996 to present. The estimated trajectories from the historical model of slag sources, and the corresponding plausible detections by the Haystack radar, were identified. Comparisons with observational data from the ensuing years were made, and the SRM model was altered with respect to size and mass production of slag particles to reflect the historical data obtained. The result is a model SRM population that fits within the bounds of the observed environment.

  15. Results of an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model comparison using a state accepted statistical protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Ciolek, J.T. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant, located approximately 26 km northwest of downtown Denver, Colorado, has developed an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model for complex terrain applications. Plant personnel would use the model, known as the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) (Hodgin 1985) to project plume impacts and provide off-site protective action recommendations to the State of Colorado should a hazardous material release occur from the facility. The Colorado Department of Health (CDH) entered into an interagency agreement with the Rocky Flats Plant prime contractor, EG&G Rocky Flats, and the US Department of Energy to evaluate TRAC as an acceptable emergency response tool. After exhaustive research of similar evaluation processes from other emergency response and regulatory organizations, the interagency committee devised a formal acceptance process. The process contains an evaluation protocol (Hodgin and Smith 1992), descriptions of responsibilities, an identified experimental data set to use in the evaluation, and judgment criteria for model acceptance. The evaluation protocol is general enough to allow for different implementations. This paper explains one implementation, shows protocol results for a test case, and presents results of a comparison between versions of TRAC with different wind Field codes: a two dimensional mass consistent code called WINDS (Fosberg et al. 1976) that has been extended to three dimensions, and a fully 3 dimensional mass conserving code called NUATMOS (Ross and Smith 1987, Ross et al. 1988).

  16. The nonmonotonic dose dependence of optically stimulated luminescence in Al2O3:C: Analytical and numerical simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Pagonis, V.; Lawless, J. L.

    2006-02-01

    Nonmonotonic dose dependence of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) has been reported in a number of materials including Al2O3:C which is one of the main dosimetric materials. In a recent work, the nonmonotonic effect has been shown to result, under certain circumstances, from the competition either during excitation or during readout between trapping states or recombination centers. In the present work, we report on a study of the effect in a more concrete framework of two trapping states and two kinds of recombination centers involved in the luminescence processes in Al2O3:C. Using sets of trapping parameters, based on available experimental data, previously utilized to explain the nonmonotonic dose dependence of thermoluminescence including nonzero initial occupancies of recombination centers (F+ centers), the OSL along with the occupancies of the relevant traps and centers are simulated numerically. The connection between these different resulting quantities is discussed, giving a better insight as to the ranges of the increase and decrease of the integral OSL as a function of dose, as well as the constant equilibrium value occurring at high doses.

  17. Unrealistic statistics: how average constitutive coefficients can produce non-physical results.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Daniel; Cook, Douglas

    2014-12-01

    The coefficients of constitutive models are frequently averaged in order to concisely summarize the complex, nonlinear, material properties of biomedical materials. However, when dealing with nonlinear systems, average inputs (e.g. average constitutive coefficients) often fail to generate average behavior. This raises an important issue because average nonlinear constitutive coefficients of biomedical materials are commonly reported in the literature. This paper provides examples which demonstrate that average constitutive coefficients applied to nonlinear constitutive laws in the field of biomedical material characterization can fail to produce average stress-strain responses and in some cases produce non-physical responses. Results are presented from a literature survey which indicates that approximately 90% of tissue measurement studies that employ a nonlinear constitutive model report average nonlinear constitutive coefficients. We suggest that reviewers and editors of future measurement studies discourage the reporting of average nonlinear constitutive coefficients. Reporting of individual coefficient sets for each test sample should be considered and discussed as designation for a "best practice" in the field of biomedical material characterization.

  18. Statistics of dark matter substructure - II. Comparison of model with simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bosch, Frank C.; Jiang, Fangzhou

    2016-05-01

    We compare subhalo mass and velocity functions obtained from different simulations with different subhalo finders among each other, and with predictions from the new semi-analytical model presented in Paper I. We find that subhalo mass functions (SHMFs) obtained using different subhalo finders agree with each other at the level of ˜20 per cent, but only at the low-mass end. At the massive end, subhalo finders that identify subhaloes based purely on density in configuration space dramatically underpredict the subhalo abundances by more than an order of magnitude. These problems are much less severe for subhalo velocity functions (SHVFs), indicating that they arise from issues related to assigning masses to the subhaloes, rather than from detecting them. Overall the predictions from the semi-analytical model are in excellent agreement with simulation results obtained using the more advanced subhalo finders that use information in six-dimensional phase-space. In particular, the model accurately reproduces the slope and host-mass-dependent normalization of both the subhalo mass and velocity functions. We find that the SHMFs and SHVFs have power-law slopes of 0.86 and 2.77, respectively, significantly shallower than what has been claimed in several studies in the literature.

  19. [Statistical studies and results of treatment of patients with perioral dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Wilsch, L; Hornstein, O P

    1976-01-01

    279 patients suffering from perioral rosaceiform dermatitis have been treated during the past 5 years. With the exception of two men and one five-year-old girl, all patients were female adults, mostly in their thirties. Skin eruptions had been present for 1--2 years in 73% of the cases. Two third of the patients had been treated locally with corticosteroids and one tenth of this group had previously undergone systemic therapy. In 22,2% of the patients, typical signs of local corticosteroid overtreatment were seen. There was a great number of patients holding rather high-ranking jobs and showing remarkable zeal to advance either in their habitual professional field or in a new career. 90% of the perioral dermatitis patients suffered from concomitant vegetative disturbances, especially nervousness, insomnia, headaches and fatigue. In 40% of the cases, symptoms of general neurovascular lability were stated and 60% complained of digestive troubles, particularly obstipation. Out of 220 patients, 206 (=93%) supervised since the end of our treatment showed no relapse of their dermatosis. Our therapeutic program since 1970 consists of mild, corti-costeroid-free local treatment and psychotherapy (see A. Thurn). In the majority of cases, the skin lesions disappeared during the first 3 months and in 90% after 6 months. In 33 cases, under conditions of stress and conflict, one or several relapses occured before final recovery was attained. The evaluation of therapy results showed a progredient reduction of recovery time corresponding to the increasing psychoanalytical experience of our interdisciplinary team. However, in perioral dermatitis patients showing no concomitant vegetative symptoms (10%), a conspiciously longer recovery time was noted, when compared with the remainder of our cases. Patients suffering from several concomitant vegetative symptoms may possibly stop, taking out' psychic problems on their skin when partially resolved by short-term therapy, tending instead

  20. Statistical results from the Virginia Tech propagation experiment using the Olympus 12, 20, and 30 GHz satellite beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, Warren L.; Safaai-Jazi, A.; Pratt, Timothy; Nelson, B.; Laster, J.; Ajaz, H.

    1993-01-01

    Virginia Tech has performed a comprehensive propagation experiment using the Olympus satellite beacons at 12.5, 19.77, and 29.66 GHz (which we refer to as 12, 20, and 30 GHz). Four receive terminals were designed and constructed, one terminal at each frequency plus a portable one with 20 and 30 GHz receivers for microscale and scintillation studies. Total power radiometers were included in each terminal in order to set the clear air reference level for each beacon and also to predict path attenuation. More details on the equipment and the experiment design are found elsewhere. Statistical results for one year of data collection were analyzed. In addition, the following studies were performed: a microdiversity experiment in which two closely spaced 20 GHz receivers were used; a comparison of total power and Dicke switched radiometer measurements, frequency scaling of scintillations, and adaptive power control algorithm development. Statistical results are reported.

  1. The Solid Rocket Motor Slag Population: Results of a Radar-Based Regressive Statistical Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Matthew F.; Xu, Yu-Lin

    2008-01-01

    estimated locations and times of tailoff to produce and propagate the SRM debris clouds. Comparisons with radar data from the ensuing years were made, and the SRM model was altered with respect to size and mass production of slag particles to reflect the populations estimated from the data. The result is a model SRM population that fits within the bounds of the observed environment and estimates of the production and contribution of SRM debris to the environment.

  2. Dose levels of the occupational radiation exposures in Poland based on results from the accredited dosimetry service at the IFJ PAN, Krakow.

    PubMed

    Budzanowski, Maciej; Kopeć, Renata; Obryk, Barbara; Olko, Paweł

    2011-03-01

    Individual dosimetry service based on thermoluminescence (TLD) detectors has started its activity at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ) in Krakow in 1965. In 2002, the new Laboratory of Individual and Environment Dosimetry (Polish acronym LADIS) was established and underwent the accreditation according to the EN-PN-ISO/IEC 17025 standard. Nowadays, the service is based on the worldwide known standard thermoluminescent detectors MTS-N (LiF:Mg,Ti) and MCP-N (LiF:Mg,Cu,P), developed at IFJ, processed in automatic thermoluminescent DOSACUS or RE2000 (Rados Oy, Finland) readers. Laboratory provides individual monitoring in terms of personal dose equivalent H(p)(10) and H(p)(0.07) in photon and neutron fields, over the range from 0.1 mSv to 1 Sv, and environmental dosimetry in terms of air kerma K(a) over the range from 30 μGy to 1 Gy and also ambient dose equivalent H*(10) over the range from 30 μSv to 1 Sv. Dosimetric service is currently performed for ca. 3200 institutions from Poland and abroad, monitored on quarterly and monthly basis. The goal of this paper is to identify the main activities leading to the highest radiation exposures in Poland. The paper presents the results of statistical evaluation of ∼ 100,000 quarterly H(p)(10) and K(a) measurements performed between 2002 and 2009. Sixty-five per cent up to 90 % of all individual doses in Poland are on the level of natural radiation background. The dose levels between 0.1 and 5 mSv per quarter are the most frequent in nuclear medicine, veterinary and industrial radiography sectors. PMID:21183549

  3. Latin American dose survey results in mammography studies under IAEA programme: radiological protection of patients in medical exposures (TSA3).

    PubMed

    Mora, Patricia; Blanco, Susana; Khoury, Helen; Leyton, Fernando; Cárdenas, Juan; Defaz, María Yolanda; Garay, Fernando; Telón, Flaviano; Aguilar, Juan Garcia; Roas, Norma; Gamarra, Mirtha; Blanco, Daniel; Quintero, Ana Rosa; Nader, Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela) working under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Cooperation Programme: TSA3 Radiological Protection of Patients in Medical Exposures have joined efforts in the optimisation of radiation protection in mammography practice. Through surveys of patient doses, the region has a unique database of diagnostic reference levels for analogue and digital equipment that will direct future optimisation activities towards the early detection of breast cancer among asymptomatic women. During RLA9/057 (2007-09) 24 institutions participated with analogue equipment in a dose survey. Regional training on methodology and measurement equipment was addressed in May 2007. The mean glandular dose (DG) was estimated using the incident kerma in air and relevant conversion coefficients for both projections craneo caudal and mediolateral oblique (CC and MLO). For Phase 2, RLA9/067 (2010-11), it was decided to include also digital systems in order to see their impact in future dose optimisation activities. Any new country that joined the project received training in the activities through IAEA expert missions. Twenty-nine new institutions participated (9 analogue and 20 digital equipment). A total of 2262 patient doses were collected during this study and from them D(G) (mGy) for both projections were estimated for each institution and country. Regional results (75 percentile in mGy) show for CC and MLO views, respectively: RLA9/057 (analogue) 2.63 and 3.17; RLA/067: 2.57 and 3.15 (analogue) and 2.69 and 2.90 (digital). Regarding only digital equipment for CC and MLO, respectively, computed radiography systems showed 2.59 and 2.78 and direct digital radiography (DDR) systems 2.78 and 3.04. Based on the IAEA Basic Safety Standard (BSS) reference dose (3 mGy), it can be observed that there is enough room to start

  4. Latin American dose survey results in mammography studies under IAEA programme: radiological protection of patients in medical exposures (TSA3).

    PubMed

    Mora, Patricia; Blanco, Susana; Khoury, Helen; Leyton, Fernando; Cárdenas, Juan; Defaz, María Yolanda; Garay, Fernando; Telón, Flaviano; Aguilar, Juan Garcia; Roas, Norma; Gamarra, Mirtha; Blanco, Daniel; Quintero, Ana Rosa; Nader, Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela) working under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Cooperation Programme: TSA3 Radiological Protection of Patients in Medical Exposures have joined efforts in the optimisation of radiation protection in mammography practice. Through surveys of patient doses, the region has a unique database of diagnostic reference levels for analogue and digital equipment that will direct future optimisation activities towards the early detection of breast cancer among asymptomatic women. During RLA9/057 (2007-09) 24 institutions participated with analogue equipment in a dose survey. Regional training on methodology and measurement equipment was addressed in May 2007. The mean glandular dose (DG) was estimated using the incident kerma in air and relevant conversion coefficients for both projections craneo caudal and mediolateral oblique (CC and MLO). For Phase 2, RLA9/067 (2010-11), it was decided to include also digital systems in order to see their impact in future dose optimisation activities. Any new country that joined the project received training in the activities through IAEA expert missions. Twenty-nine new institutions participated (9 analogue and 20 digital equipment). A total of 2262 patient doses were collected during this study and from them D(G) (mGy) for both projections were estimated for each institution and country. Regional results (75 percentile in mGy) show for CC and MLO views, respectively: RLA9/057 (analogue) 2.63 and 3.17; RLA/067: 2.57 and 3.15 (analogue) and 2.69 and 2.90 (digital). Regarding only digital equipment for CC and MLO, respectively, computed radiography systems showed 2.59 and 2.78 and direct digital radiography (DDR) systems 2.78 and 3.04. Based on the IAEA Basic Safety Standard (BSS) reference dose (3 mGy), it can be observed that there is enough room to start

  5. Measurements of radiocesium transfer to milk and calculation of resulting dose in Brescia, Italy, following the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Albini, E; Mascaro, L; Belletti, S

    1990-10-01

    Results are presented of several measurements on components of the cows' milk chain performed at our Medical Physics Service after the Chernobyl accident. Values were obtained for Cs isotope transfer coefficients, namely, for cows' diet-milk and diet-feces transfers. Other measured parameters were the effective half-life of Cs in milk and the 134Cs:137Cs ratio. In addition, an evaluation of Cs contribution to the absorbed dose to population from milk is performed.

  6. Very Low Dose Fetal Exposure to Chernobyl Contamination Resulted in Increases in Infant Leukemia in Europe and Raises Questions about Current Radiation Risk Models

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Christopher C.

    2009-01-01

    Following contamination from the Chernobyl accident in April 1986 excess infant leukemia (0–1 y) was reported from five different countries, Scotland, Greece, Germany, Belarus and Wales and Scotland combined. The cumulative absorbed doses to the fetus, as conventionally assessed, varied from 0.02 mSv in the UK through 0.06 mSv in Germany, 0.2 mSv in Greece and 2 mSv in Belarus, where it was highest. Nevertheless, the effect was real and given the specificity of the cohort raised questions about the safety of applying the current radiation risk model of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to these internal exposures, a matter which was discussed in 2000 by Busby and Cato [7,8] and also in the reports of the UK Committee examining Radiation Risk from Internal Emitters. Data on infant leukemia in the United Kingdom, chosen on the basis of the cohorts defined by the study of Greece were supplied by the UK Childhood Cancer Research Group. This has enabled a study of leukemia in the combined infant population of 15,466,845 born in the UK, Greece, and Germany between 1980 and 1990. Results show a statistically significant excess risk RR = 1.43 (95% CI 1.13 < RR < 1.80 (2-tailed); p = 0.0025) in those born during the defined peak exposure period of 01/07/86 to 31/12/87 compared with those born between 01/01/80 and 31/12/85 and 01/01/88 and 31/12/90. The excess risks in individual countries do not increase monotonically with the conventionally calculated doses, the relation being biphasic, increasing sharply at low doses and falling at high doses. This result is discussed in relation to fetal/cell death at higher doses and also to induction of DNA repair. Since the cohort is chosen specifically on the basis of exposure to internal radionuclides, the result can be expressed as evidence for a significant error in the conventional modeling for such internal fetal exposures. PMID:20049249

  7. A Consumer's Guide to Benchmark Dose Models: Results of U.S. EPA Testing of 14 Dichotomous, 8 Continuous, and 6 Developmental Models (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benchmark dose risk assessment software (BMDS) was designed by EPA to generate dose-response curves and facilitate the analysis, interpretation and synthesis of toxicological data. Partial results of QA/QC testing of the EPA benchmark dose software (BMDS) are presented. BMDS pr...

  8. Low dose cadmium poisoning results in sustained ERK phosphorylation and caspase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Patrick . E-mail: pmartin@unice.fr; Poggi, Marie Christine . E-mail: poggi@unice.fr; Chambard, Jean Claude . E-mail: chambard@unice.fr; Boulukos, Kim E. . E-mail: boulukos@unice.fr; Pognonec, Philippe . E-mail: pognonec@unice.fr

    2006-11-24

    Cadmium poisoning has been known to result in a wide variety of cellular responses, including oxidative stress and kinase activation. It has been reported that ERK is activated following acute cadmium exposure, and this response is commonly seen as a classical ERK survival mechanism. Here, we analyzed different cell types for their responses to low concentrations of cadmium poisoning. We found that there is an association between cell susceptibility to cadmium toxicity and ERK activation. This activation is atypical, since it consists of a sustained ERK phosphorylation, that lasts up to 6 days post stimulation. This activation is associated with the appearance of cleaved caspases 8 and 3, processed PARP, and irreversible damage. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK phosphorylation results in the ability of cells to resist cadmium poisoning. Our data indicate that low cadmium concentrations result in an unconventional ERK sustained phosphorylation, which in turn leads to death signaling.

  9. Chronic cadmium intake results in dose-related excretion of metallothionein in urine.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Z A; Harnett, K M; Perlin, S A; Huang, P C

    1989-02-15

    Urinary excretion of metallothionein was measured by radioimmunoassay in rats given drinking water containing 5 or 50 mg cadmium/l for up to 2 years. The metallothionein levels corresponded to the concentration of cadmium in the drinking water and increased linearly over the course of the study. These results demonstrate that urinary metallothionein is a sensitive biological indicator of oral cadmium exposure.

  10. Results of loading doses of aspartame by two phenylketonuric (PKU) children compared with two normal children.

    PubMed

    Koch, R; Schaeffler, G; Shaw, N F

    1976-11-01

    Separate tolerance tests with aspartame at 34 mg/kg-day and phenylalanine at 19 mg/kg-day were compared. The results reveal that slight serum elevation of phenylalanine and tyrosine occurred in the two PKU and the normal healthy adolescents. It would appear that the phenylalanine in the sweetener aspartame is small enough to be of little clinical significance.

  11. Preliminary On-Orbit Neutron Dose Equivalent and Energy Spectrum Results from the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector (FND)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semones, Edward; Leitgab, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ISS-RAD instrument was activated on ISS on February 1st, 2016. Integrated in ISS-RAD, the Fast Neutron Detector (FND) performs, for the first time on ISS, routine and precise direct neutron measurements between 0.5 and 8 MeV. Preliminary results for neutron dose equivalent and neutron flux energy distributions from online/on-board algorithms and offline ground analyses will be shown, along with comparisons to simulated data and previously measured neutron spectral data. On-orbit data quality and pre-launch analysis validation results will be discussed as well.

  12. The Thurgood Marshall School of Law Empirical Findings: A Report of the Statistical Analysis of the July 2010 TMSL Texas Bar Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadhi, Tau; Holley, D.

    2010-01-01

    The following report gives the statistical findings of the July 2010 TMSL Bar results. Procedures: Data is pre-existing and was given to the Evaluator by email from the Registrar and Dean. Statistical analyses were run using SPSS 17 to address the following research questions: 1. What are the statistical descriptors of the July 2010 overall TMSL…

  13. The Thurgood Marshall School of Law Empirical Findings: A Report of the Statistical Analysis of the February 2010 TMSL Texas Bar Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadhi, T.; Holley, D.; Rudley, D.; Garrison, P.; Green, T.

    2010-01-01

    The following report gives the statistical findings of the 2010 Thurgood Marshall School of Law (TMSL) Texas Bar results. This data was pre-existing and was given to the Evaluator by email from the Dean. Then, in-depth statistical analyses were run using the SPSS 17 to address the following questions: 1. What are the statistical descriptors of the…

  14. Estimates of inhalation doses resulting from the possible use of phospho-gypsum plaster-board in Australian homes.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, R S; Peggie, J R; Leith, I S

    1995-04-01

    Current materials used as internal lining in Australian buildings are based on natural gypsum of low radium content. A study was carried out to estimate the contribution to the annual effective dose due to airborne contamination from chemical by-product gypsum plaster-board of higher radium content if it were used as an internal lining. The 226Ra content and 222Rn exhalation rate were measured for several samples of the plaster-board, and the behavior of 222Rn and its progeny (218Po, 214Pb, 214Bi, and 214Po) in a typical building was modeled numerically, using the results of the exhalation rate measurements as input. For building ventilation rates greater than approximately 0.5 air changes per hour, the contribution to the total annual effective dose from inhalation of 222Rn and its progeny exhaled from the phospho-gypsum plaster-board is estimated to be below 1 mSv. This contribution is reduced if the surface of the plaster-board is coated with paint or cardboard, or if the very fine particles are removed from the phospho-gypsum during manufacture of the plaster-board. The effective doses arising from dust generation during the installation of the plaster-board are also estimated to be below 1 mSv. The recommended action level of 200 Bq m-3 for radon in air in Australia corresponds to an annual effective dose of approximately 6 mSv. The study indicates that the suggested acceptable level of 185 Bq kg-1 for the 226Ra concentration in the plaster-board may be too restrictive under Australian conditions.

  15. Randomized, Multicenter Trial on the Effect of Radiation Therapy on Plantar Fasciitis (Painful Heel Spur) Comparing a Standard Dose With a Very Low Dose: Mature Results After 12 Months' Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Niewald, Marcus; Micke, Oliver; Graeber, Stefan; Schaefer, Vera; Scheid, Christine; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Licht, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for painful heel spur, comparing a standard dose with a very low dose. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six patients were randomized to receive radiation therapy either with a total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy twice weekly (standard dose) or with a total dose of 0.6 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 0.1 Gy twice weekly (low dose). In all patients lateral opposing 4- to 6-MV photon beams were used. The results were measured using a visual analogue scale, the Calcaneodynia score, and the SF12 health survey. The fundamental phase of the study ended after 3 months, and the follow-up was continued up to 1 year. Patients with insufficient pain relief after 3 months were offered reirradiation with the standard dosage at any time afterward. Results: Of 66 patients, 4 were excluded because of withdrawal of consent or screening failures. After 3 months the results in the standard arm were highly significantly superior compared with those in the low-dose arm (visual analogue scale, P=.001; Calcaneodynia score, P=.027; SF12, P=.045). The accrual of patients was stopped at this point. Further evaluation after 12 months' follow-up showed the following results: (1) highly significant fewer patients were reirradiated in the standard arm compared with the low-dose arm (P<.001); (2) the results of patients in the low-dose arm who were reirradiated were identical to those in the standard arm not reirradiated (reirradiation as a salvage therapy if the lower dose was ineffective); (3) patients experiencing a favorable result after 3 months showed this even after 12 months, and some results even improved further between 3 and 12 months. Conclusions: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy with 6-Gy doses on painful heel spur even for a longer time period of at least 1 year.

  16. Cinacalcet HCl and Concurrent Low-dose Vitamin D Improves Treatment of Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Dialysis Patients Compared with Vitamin D Alone: The ACHIEVE Study Results

    PubMed Central

    Fishbane, Steven; Shapiro, Warren B.; Corry, Dalila B.; Vicks, Steven L.; Roppolo, Michael; Rappaport, Kenneth; Ling, Xiang; Goodman, William G.; Turner, Stewart; Charytan, Chaim

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) receiving dialysis often develop secondary hyperparathyroidism with disturbed calcium and phosphorus metabolism. The National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) was established to guide treatment practices for these disorders. The ACHIEVE study was designed to test two treatment strategies for achieving KDOQI goals. Design, setting, participants, measurements: Individuals on hemodialysis treated with vitamin D sterols were enrolled in this 33-week study. Subjects were randomly assigned to treatment with either cinacalcet and low-dose vitamin D (Cinacalcet-D) or flexible vitamin D alone (Flex-D) to achieve KDOQI-recommended bone mineral targets. ACHIEVE included a 6-week screening phase, including vitamin D washout, a 16-week dose-titration phase, and an 11-week assessment phase. Results: Of 173 subjects enrolled, 83% of Cinacalcet-D and 67% of Flex-D subjects completed the study. A greater proportion of Cinacalcet-D versus Flex-D subjects had a ≥30% reduction in parathyroid hormone (PTH) (68% versus 36%, P < 0.001) as well as PTH ≤300 pg/ml (44% versus 23%, P = 0.006). The proportion of subjects simultaneously achieving targets for intact PTH (150–300 pg/ml) and calcium-phosphorus product (Ca×P) (<55 mg2/dl2) was also greater (21% versus 14%), but this was not statistically significant. This was attributable to 19% of Cinacalcet-D subjects with a PTH value below the KDOQI target range. Conclusions: Achievement of KDOQI targets was difficult, especially with Flex-D. Maintaining calcium and phosphorus target values precluded the use of vitamin D doses necessary to lower PTH to within the narrow target range and highlighted limitations inherent to the KDOQI treatment algorithm. PMID:18945995

  17. Local Control Following Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy: Effect of High Biologically Effective Dose on Biopsy Results and Oncologic Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Unger, Pam

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To determine factors that influence local control and systemic relapse in patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB). Methods and Materials: A total of 584 patients receiving PPB alone or PPB with external beam radiation therapy (19.5%) agreed to undergo prostate biopsy (PB) at 2 years postimplantion and yearly if results were positive or if the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level increased. Short-term hormone therapy was used with 280 (47.9%) patients. Radiation doses were converted to biologically effective doses (BED) (using alpha/beta = 2). Comparisons were made by chi-square analysis and linear regression. Survival was determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median PSA concentration was 7.1 ng/ml, and the median follow-up period was 7.1 years. PB results were positive for 48/584 (8.2%) patients. Positive biopsy results by BED group were as follows: 22/121 (18.2%) patients received a BED of <=150 Gy; 15/244 (6.1%) patients received >150 to 200 Gy; and 6/193 (3.1%; p < 0.001) patients received >200 Gy. Significant associations of positive PB results by risk group were low-risk group BED (p = 0.019), intermediate-risk group hormone therapy (p = 0.011) and BED (p = 0.040), and high-risk group BED (p = 0.004). Biochemical freedom from failure rate at 7 years was 82.7%. Biochemical freedom from failure rate by PB result was 84.7% for negative results vs. 59.2% for positive results (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis revealed significant associations with BED (p = 0.038) and PB results (p = 0.002) in low-risk patients, with BED (p = 0.003) in intermediate-risk patients, and with Gleason score (p = 0.006), PSA level (p < 0.001), and PB result (p = 0.038) in high-risk patients. Fifty-three (9.1%) patients died, of which eight deaths were due to prostate cancer. Cause-specific survival was 99.2% for negative PB results vs. 87.6% for positive PB results (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Higher radiation doses are required to achieve local

  18. Dose-response relationships in chemical carcinogenesis: superposition of different mechanisms of action, resulting in linear-nonlinear curves, practical thresholds, J-shapes.

    PubMed

    Lutz, W K

    1998-09-20

    The shape of a carcinogen dose-cancer incidence curve is discussed as the result of a superposition of dose-response relationships for various effects of the carcinogen on the process of carcinogenesis. Effects include direct DNA damage, e.g., by covalent binding, indirect DNA damage, e.g., by increased formation of reactive oxygen species or interaction with DNA replication or chromosome integrity. The 'fixation' of a DNA adduct as a heritable mutation depends on its pro-mutagenic potency and on the rates of DNA repair and DNA replication. Endogenous and unavoidable DNA damage is responsible for a background rate of the process of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis and forms the basis of spontaneous cancer incidence. For DNA-reactive carcinogens, linearity of the dose response at the low-dose end is expected. With increasing dose, saturation of DNA repair can introduce a sublinearity (example: dimethylnitrosamine). Stimulation of cell division as a result of high-dose toxicity and regenerative proliferation also results in a sublinear deviation from low-dose linearity. If the DNA-damaging potency of the carcinogen is low in comparison with the high-dose effects, the linear part of the low dose-cancer incidence curve might be hidden within the background variability. Under such conditions, 'practical thresholds' could be discussed (formaldehyde). If a carcinogen increases the rate of cell division or the level of oxidative stress at high dose but has an antimitogenic or antioxidative effect at low dose, a J-shaped (or: U-shaped) curve with a decrease of the spontaneous tumor incidence at low dose could result (caffeic acid; TCDD). This phenomenon has been observed even under conditions of a genotoxic contribution (ionizing radiation; diesel exhaust particles). For a mechanism-based assessment of a low-dose cancer risk, information on the various modes of action and modulations should be available over the full dose range, and models should be refined to incorporate the

  19. Statistical analysis of results from the 1995 survey of CFC consumption on US Navy ships. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.C.; Smith, D.E.

    1995-08-01

    The production of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants will cease in the United States at the end of 1995. The Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) needs to monitor total fleet requirements of CFCs until they are phased out. Stockpile requirements for ozone-depleting substances were determined from the results of a survey covering the period from 1 May 1993 to 30 April 1994. A second survey was conducted for the period from 1 May 1994 to 30 April 1995 for two primary reasons: to provide additional nformation on reserve requirements and to measure the effects of policies designed to reduce fleet CFC consumption. This report provides a statistical analysis of the data from the new survey, which includes reported usage for CFC-ll, CFC-12, and CFC-114. The new results are compared to those from the earlier survey, showing a significant reduction in CFC usage. Summary information in the report can be used to refine estimates of reserve requirements.

  20. Does bisphenol A induce superfeminization in Marisa cornuarietis? Part II: toxicity test results and requirements for statistical power analyses.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Valery E; Aufderheide, John; Warbritton, Ryan; van der Hoeven, Nelly; Caspers, Norbert

    2007-03-01

    This study presents results of the effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on adult egg production, egg hatchability, egg development rates and juvenile growth rates in the freshwater gastropod, Marisa cornuarietis. We observed no adult mortality, substantial inter-snail variability in reproductive output, and no effects of BPA on reproduction during 12 weeks of exposure to 0, 0.1, 1.0, 16, 160 or 640 microg/L BPA. We observed no effects of BPA on egg hatchability or timing of egg hatching. Juveniles showed good growth in the control and all treatments, and there were no significant effects of BPA on this endpoint. Our results do not support previous claims of enhanced reproduction in Marisa cornuarietis in response to exposure to BPA. Statistical power analysis indicated high levels of inter-snail variability in the measured endpoints and highlighted the need for sufficient replication when testing treatment effects on reproduction in M. cornuarietis with adequate power.

  1. Mean Organ Doses Resulting From Non-Human Primate Whole Thorax Lung Irradiation Prescribed to Mid-Line Tissue.

    PubMed

    Prado, Charlotte; Kazi, Abdul; Bennett, Alexander; MacVittie, Thomas; Prado, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Multi-organ dose evaluations and the effects of heterogeneous tissue dose calculations have been retrospectively evaluated following irradiation to the whole thorax and lung in non-human primates (NHP). A clinical-based approach was established to evaluate actual doses received in the heart and lungs during whole thorax lung irradiation. Anatomical structure and organ densities have been introduced in the calculations to show the effects of dose distribution through heterogeneous tissue. Mean organ doses received by non-human primates undergoing whole thorax lung irradiations were calculated using a treatment planning system that is routinely used in clinical radiation oncology. The doses received by non-human primates irradiated following conventional dose calculations have been retrospectively reconstructed using computerized tomography-based, heterogeneity-corrected dose calculations. The use of dose volume descriptors for irradiation to organs at risk and tissue exposed to radiation is introduced. Mean and partial-volume doses to lung and heart are presented and contrasted. The importance of exact dose definitions is highlighted, and the relevance of precise dosimetry to establish organ-specific dose response relationships in NHP models of acute and delayed effects of acute radiation exposure is emphasized.

  2. Dolutegravir in antiretroviral-naive adults with HIV-1: 96-week results from a randomized dose-ranging study

    PubMed Central

    Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Reynes, Jacques; Lazzarin, Adriano; Voronin, Eugene; Pulido, Federico; Felizarta, Franco; Almond, Steve; Clair, Marty St; Flack, Nancy; Min, Sherene

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety/tolerability of dolutegravir (DTG, S/GSK1349572), a potent inhibitor of HIV integrase, through the full 96 weeks of the SPRING-1 study. Design: ING112276 (SPRING-1) was a 96-week, randomized, partially blinded, phase IIb dose-ranging study. Methods: Treatment-naive adults with HIV received DTG 10, 25, or 50 mg once daily or efavirenz (EFV) 600 mg once daily (control arm) combined with investigator-selected dual nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor backbone regimen (tenofovir/emtricitabine or abacavir/lamivudine). The primary endpoint of the study was the proportion of participants with plasma HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies/ml, based on time to loss of virologic response at 16 weeks (conducted for the purpose of phase III dose selection), with a planned analysis at 96 weeks. Safety and tolerability were also assessed. Results: Of 208 participants randomized to treatment, 205 received study drug. At week 96, the proportion of participants achieving plasma HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies/ml was 79, 78, and 88% for DTG 10, 25, and 50 mg, respectively, compared with 72% for EFV. The median increase from baseline in CD4+ cells was 338 cells/μl with DTG (all treatment groups combined) compared with 301 cells/μl with EFV (P = 0.155). No clinically significant dose-related trends in adverse events were observed, and fewer participants who received DTG withdrew because of adverse events (3%) compared with EFV (10%). Conclusion: Throughout the 96 weeks of the SPRING-1 study, DTG demonstrated sustained efficacy and favorable safety/tolerability in treatment-naive individuals with HIV-1. PMID:23807273

  3. Characterization of chlamydial genital infection resulting from sexual transmission from male to female guinea pigs and determination of infectious dose.

    PubMed

    Rank, Roger G; Bowlin, Anne K; Reed, Ronald L; Darville, Toni

    2003-11-01

    A major problem in the study of chlamydial genital infections in animal models has been the use of varied doses of chlamydiae for infection in different laboratories. It is clearly desirable to use a dose which approximates that of natural sexual infection, but that dose to date has not been determined because of the inability of researchers to quantify chlamydiae in semen. Fortunately, sexual transmission of chlamydiae has been described for the guinea pig model of infection with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). In this study, we undertook to determine the approximate infection dose in actual sexual transmission by comparing the kinetics of infection in female guinea pigs acquired via sexual contact to those of genital infections induced artificially with known quantities of chlamydiae. Groups of guinea pigs were infected intravaginally with 10(4), 10(3), 10(2), and 10(1) inclusion-forming units (IFU) of GPIC, and the kinetics of the infection were determined. Infection with 10(2) IFU produced infections with lower peak levels than those in animals receiving 10(4) or 10(3) IFU. Seventy percent of animals receiving 10(2) IFU became infected, while 100 and 79% of animals receiving 10(4) and 10(3) IFU, respectively, became infected. Animals receiving 10(2) IFU also had a longer incubation period. Of 19 animals that mated with infected males, 63.2% became infected, with an infection course which was not significantly different than that of the 10(2)-IFU-infected group. The data suggest that female guinea pigs received approximately 10(2) IFU by sexual transmission. Of interest was the observation that the guinea pigs infected by sexual transmission shed organisms for a significantly shorter time period than that of any group that was artificially infected. This result suggests that there may be factors associated with semen which passively transfer antimicrobial activity to the female or enhance the innate host response in the female

  4. Outcomes of High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pinn-Bingham, Melva; Puthawala, Ajmel A.; Syed, A.M. Nisar; Sharma, Anil; DiSaia, Philip; Berman, Michael; Tewari, Krishnansu S.; Randall-Whitis, Leslie; Mahmood, Usama; Ramsinghani, Nilam; Kuo, Jeffrey; Chen, Wen-Pin; McLaren, Christine E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and toxicity of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between March 1996 and May 2009, 116 patients with cervical cancer were treated. Of these, 106 (91%) patients had advanced disease (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIB-IVA). Ten patients had stage IB, 48 had stage II, 51 had stage III, and 7 had stage IVA disease. All patients were treated with a combination of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the pelvis (5040 cGy) and 2 applications of HDR-ISBT to a dose of 3600 cGy to the implanted volume. Sixty-one percent of patients also received interstitial hyperthermia, and 94 (81%) patients received chemotherapy. Results: Clinical LRC was achieved in 99 (85.3%) patients. Three-year DFS rates were 59%, 67%, 71%, and 57% for patients with stage IB, II, III, and IVA disease, respectively. The 5-year DFS and overall survival rates for the entire group were 60% and 44%, respectively. Acute and late toxicities were within acceptable limits. Conclusions: Locally advanced cervical cancer patients for whom intracavitary BT is unsuitable can achieve excellent LRC and OS with a combination of EBRT and HDR-ISBT.

  5. Sexual Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From a Dose-Escalation Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wielen, Gerard J. van der . E-mail: g.vanderwielen@erasmusmc.nl; Putten, Wim van; Incrocci, Luca

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to provide information about sexual function (SF) after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer while taking important factors into account that influence SF. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, a total of 268 patients from a randomized dose-escalation trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy agreed to participate in an additional part of the trial that evaluated SF. Results: At baseline 28% of patients had erectile dysfunction (ED). After 1 year, 27% of the pretreatment potent patients had developed ED. After 2 years this percentage had increased to 36%. After 3 years it almost stabilized at 38%. Satisfaction with sexual life was significantly correlated with ED. After 2 years one third of the pre-treatment potent patients still had considerable to very much sexual desire and found sex (very) important. No significant differences were found between the two dose-arms. Potency aids were used on a regular base by 14% of the patients. Conclusion: By taking adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT), HT during follow-up and potency aids into account, we found a lower percentage of ED after 3D-CRT than reported in previous prospective studies. A large group of patients still had sexual desire, considered sex important and 14% used potency aids after 3D-CRT.

  6. Dose of fluphenazine, familial expressed emotion, and outcome in schizophrenia. Results of a two-year controlled study.

    PubMed

    Hogarty, G E; McEvoy, J P; Munetz, M; DiBarry, A L; Bartone, P; Cather, R; Cooley, S J; Ulrich, R F; Carter, M; Madonia, M J

    1988-09-01

    Issues regarding the side effects of antipsychotic medication and the possible contribution of the environment to dose requirements led to a two-year controlled dosage study of maintenance antipsychotic medication and familial environment among recently discharged schizophrenic patients. Seventy stable patients, living in high- or low-expressed emotion (EE) households, were randomized, double blind, to receive a standard dose of fluphenazine decanoate (average, 25 mg every two weeks) or a minimal dose representing 20% of the dose prescribed (average, 3.8 mg every two weeks). No differences in relapse were observed among dose, EE, or dose and EE. Patients in the minimal dose/high-EE condition experienced more minor but aborted episodes in year 2. Side effects were fewer on the minimal dose after one year, and low-EE patients were better adjusted than high-EE patients. Over time, minimal-dose recipients were significantly more improved in their instrumental and interpersonal role performance than were standard-dose recipients.

  7. Fixed-dose capecitabine is feasible: results from a pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic study in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rudek, Michelle A; Connolly, Roisin M; Hoskins, Janelle M; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Jeter, Stacie C; Armstrong, Deborah K; Fetting, John H; Stearns, Vered; Wright, Laurie A; Zhao, Ming; Watkins, Stanley P; McLeod, Howard L; Davidson, Nancy E; Wolff, Antonio C

    2013-05-01

    The pro-drug capecitabine is approved for treatment of anthracycline- and paclitaxel-resistant metastatic breast cancer. However, toxicity and large interpatient pharmacokinetic variability occur despite body surface area (BSA)-dosing. We hypothesized that a fixed-dose schedule would simplify dosing and provide an effective and safe alternative to BSA-based dosing. We conducted an open label, single-arm, two-stage study of oral capecitabine with fixed starting dose (3,000 mg total daily dose in two divided doses × 14 days q21 days) in patients with metastatic breast cancer. We correlated pharmacodynamic endpoints [e.g., efficacy (response) per RECIST and toxicity], adherence and pharmacokinetics/pharmacogenetics. Sample size of 45 patients was required to detect a 25 % response rate from null response rate of 10 % using a Simon two-stage design. Twenty-six patients were enrolled in the first-stage and 21 were evaluable after a median of four cycles of capecitabine. Two thirds of patients received either the same dose or a dose 500 mg lower than what would have been administered with a commonly used 2,000 mg/m(2) BSA-dosing schedule. Eight patients had stable disease but progressed after a median of seven cycles. Despite a clinical benefit rate of 19 %, no RECIST responses were observed following the first stage and the study was closed. Dose-reductions were required for grade 2 hand-foot syndrome (28 %) and vomiting (5 %). Adherence was similar when using both patient-reported and Medication Event Monitoring System methods. High interpatient variability was observed for capecitabine and metabolite pharmacokinetics, but was not attributed to observed pharmacogenetic or BSA differences. Single agent activity of capecitabine was modest in our patients with estrogen receptor-positive or -negative metastatic breast cancer and comparable to recent studies. BSA was not the main source of pharmacokinetic variability. Fixed-dose capecitabine is feasible, and simplifies

  8. Exposure to low doses (20 cGy) of Hze results in spatial memory impairment in rats.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britten, Richard; Johnson, Angela; Davis, Leslie; Green-Mitchell, Shamina; Chabriol, Olivia; Sanford, Larry; Drake, Richard

    INTRODUCTION. Current models predict that the astronauts on a mission to a deep space destination, such as Mars, will be exposed to 25 cGy of Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). The long-term consequence of exposure to such doses is largely unknown, but given that 1.3 Gy of X-rays has been reported to lead to long-term cognitive deficits (Shore et al, 1976) and that CGR have an RBE of 2-5, it is likely that the predicted 25 cGy of GCR will lead to defects in the cognitive ability of the astronauts during and after the mission. Our studies are designed to help define the GCR dose that will lead to defects in complex working memory, and also to elucidate the mechanisms whereby hadronic radiation diminishes neurocognitive function. The identification of such processes would provide an opportunity for post-mission surveillance, and hopefully will lead to intervention strategies that will ameliorate or attenuate GCR-induced neurocognitive deficits. MATERIALS METHODS. Four-week old male Wistar rats were exposed to either X-rays or 1 GeV 56Fe. At three or six months post exposure the performance of the rats in the Barnes' Maze (Spatial memory) was established. The duration and frequency of REM sleep was also monitored to determine if the neurocognitive deficits arose due to reduced memory consolidation as a result of diminished REM sleep. We used a novel, but maturing technique, called MALDI-MS imaging (or MALDI-MSI), to identify specific regions of the brain where the neuroproteome differs in rats that have developed spatial memory impairments. RESULTS. 11.5 Gy of X-rays led to reduced performance in the Barnes's maze. In contrast, exposure to 20 cGy of Hze (1 GeV 56Fe) resulted in a significant impairment of spatial memory performance as measured in the Barnes' Maze, which was manifested by an increase in relative escape latency REL over a 5 day testing period. Such an increase in REL could arise from the rats becoming less able, or perhaps less willing, to locate the

  9. Functional impact of high clopidogrel maintenance dosing in patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary interventions. Results of a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Angiolillo, Dominick J; Bernardo, Esther; Palazuelos, Jorge; Desai, Bhaloo; Weisberg, Ian; Alfonso, Fernando; Guzman, Luis A; Hernández-Antolin, Rosana; Zenni, Martin Z; Macaya, Carlos; Fernandez-Ortiz, Antonio; Bass, Theodore A

    2008-01-01

    The currently recommended maintenance dose of clopidogrel is often associated with inadequate platelet inhibition, suggesting the need for a higher dose. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the functional impact of a high (150 mg/day) maintenance dose of clopidogrel in patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This is a prospective, randomized, platelet function study which was performed in elective PCI patients assigned to treatment with either a 75 mg (n = 20) or 150 mg (n = 20) daily maintenance dose of clopidogrel for 30 days; afterwards, all patients resumed standard dosing. Platelet aggregation was performed using light transmittance aggregometry following 20 microM and 5 microM adenosine diphosphate (ADP) stimuli 30 days after randomization and 30 days after resuming standard dosing. Patients treated with 150 mg/day clopidogrel had lower 20 microM ADP-induced platelet aggregation compared to patients on 75 mg/day (52.1 +/- 9% vs. 64.0 +/- 8%; p < 0.001; primary endpoint). The dose-dependent effect was confirmed by the absolute and relative increase in platelet aggregation after resuming standard dosing (p < 0.001). No changes were observed in patients randomized to standard dosing. Parallel findings were observed following 5 microM ADP stimuli for all assessments. A broad variability in clopidogrel-induced antiplatelet effects was observed irrespective of dosing. In conclusion, a 150 mg/day maintenance dose regimen of clopidogrel is associated with reduced platelet reactivity and enhanced platelet inhibition compared to that achieved with the currently recommended 75 mg/day in patients undergoing elective PCI.

  10. Extended Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Analyses at the Shuttle Landing Facility: Phase II Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred C.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the AMU's Short-Range Statistical Forecasting task for peak winds at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The peak wind speeds are an important forecast element for the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle programs. The 45th Weather Squadron and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group indicate that peak winds are challenging to forecast. The Applied Meteorology Unit was tasked to develop tools that aid in short-range forecasts of peak winds at tower sites of operational interest. A seven year record of wind tower data was used in the analysis. Hourly and directional climatologies by tower and month were developed to determine the seasonal behavior of the average and peak winds. Probability density functions (PDF) of peak wind speed were calculated to determine the distribution of peak speed with average speed. These provide forecasters with a means of determining the probability of meeting or exceeding a certain peak wind given an observed or forecast average speed. A PC-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) tool was created to display the data quickly.

  11. Impact of coronal mass ejections on the Earth's thermosphere and geoeffectiveness observed by ACE and GRACE: Statistical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Sandro; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid; Baur, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    For the period July 2003 to August 2010, the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) catalogue maintained by Richardson and Cane lists 106 Earth-directed events, which have been measured in situ by plasma and field instruments on board the ACE satellite. We present a statistical investigation of the Earth's thermospheric neutral density response by means of accelerometer measurements collected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, which are available for 104 ICMEs in the data set. We relate the thermospheric density increase to various geomagnetic indices (e.g. Dst, AE, Kp, a-indices, ...) and characteristic ICME parameters (impact speed, southward magnetic field strength Bz). We find high correlations between the ICME Bz and thermospheric density enhancements as well as with most of the geomagnetic indices. Separating the response for the shock-sheath region and the magnetic structure of the ICME, we find for instance that the Dst and SYM-H indices reveal a tighter relation to the Bz minimum in the magnetic structure of the ICME, whereas the polar cap indices show higher correlations with the Bz minimum in the shock-sheath region. These results are expected to further stimulate progress in space weather understanding and applications regarding satellite operations.

  12. High-Dose-Rate Rotte 'Y' Applicator Brachytherapy for Definitive Treatment of Medically Inoperable Endometrial Cancer: 10-Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, Devin; Beriwal, Sushil Heron, Dwight E.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Edwards, Robert P.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Zorn, Kristin K.; Krivak, Thomas C.

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the intermediate clinical outcomes of medically inoperable patients with endometrial cancer treated with definitive Rotte 'Y' applicator high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) over a 10-year period. Methods and Materials: Forty-nine inoperable patients were treated with HDRB from 1997 to 2007. Forty three (84%) were markedly obese (body mass index >35 kg/m{sup 2}). Thirty-one patients (63.3%) underwent two-dimensional treatment planning, whereas 18 patients (36.7%) underwent three-dimensional treatment planning. Thirty five of the patients (71.4%) were first treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). For patients receiving EBRT in addition to HDRB, the median Y-applicator dose was 20 Gy in 5 fractions; for patients receiving HDRB alone it was 35 Gy in 5 fractions. All patients received two Y-applicator treatments per day. Results: Median follow-up time for all patients was 33 months. Acute HDRB toxicities were limited to Grade 1 and 2 occurring in 5 patients. One patient had a myocardial infarction. Four patients had late Grade 2 or 3 toxicity. Three patients had local recurrence (median time to recurrence, 16 months). The 3- and 5-year actuarial cause-specific survival rates were 93% and 87%, respectively; the overall survival rate was 83% and 42%, respectively, at 3 and 5 years. Conclusions: Twice-daily HDRB using a Y-applicator is a well-tolerated and efficacious regimen for the definitive treatment of medically inoperable patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. The recent incorporation of three-dimensional treatment planning has the potential to further decrease treatment morbidities.

  13. Prevalence of Hyperthyroidism Following Exposure During Childhood or Adolescence to Radioiodines from the Chornobyl Nuclear Accident: Dose-Response Results from the Ukrainian-American Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, M.; Furukawa, K.; Brenner, A.; Olinjyk, V.; Ron, E.; Zablotska, L.; Terekhova, G.; McConnell, R.; Markov, V.; Shpak, V.; Ostroumova, E.; Bouville, A.; Tronko, M.

    2013-01-01

    Relatively few data are available on the prevalence of hyperthyroidism (TSH concentrations of < 0.3 mIU/L, with normal or elevated concentrations of free T4) in individuals exposed to radioiodines at low levels. The accident at the Chornobyl (Chernobyl) nuclear plant in Ukraine on April 26, 1986 exposed large numbers of residents to radioactive fallout, principally to iodine-131 (I-131) (mean and median doses = 0.6 Gray (Gy) and 0.2 Gy). We investigated the relationship of I-131 and prevalent hyperthyroidism among 11,853 individuals exposed as children or adolescents in Ukraine who underwent an in-depth, standardized thyroid gland screening examination 12–14 years later. Radioactivity measurements taken shortly after the accident were available for all subjects and were used to estimate individual thyroid doses. We identified 76 cases of hyperthyroidism (11 overt, 65 subclinical). Using logistic regression, we tested a variety of continuous risk models and conducted categorical analyses for all subjects combined and for females (53 cases, n=5,767) and males (23 cases, n=6,086) separately, but found no convincing evidence of a dose response relationship between I-131 and hyperthyroidism. There was some suggestion of elevated risk among females in an analysis based on a dichotomous dose model with a threshold of 0.5 Gy chosen empirically (OR=1.86, P=0.06), but the statistical significance level was reduced (P=0.13) in a formal analysis with an estimated threshold. In summary, after a thorough exploration of the data, we found no statistically significant dose response relationship between individual I-131 thyroid doses and prevalent hyperthyroidism. PMID:21128800

  14. Prevalence of hyperthyroidism after exposure during childhood or adolescence to radioiodines from the chornobyl nuclear accident: dose-response results from the Ukrainian-American Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hatch, M; Furukawa, K; Brenner, A; Olinjyk, V; Ron, E; Zablotska, L; Terekhova, G; McConnell, R; Markov, V; Shpak, V; Ostroumova, E; Bouville, A; Tronko, M

    2010-12-01

    Relatively few data are available on the prevalence of hyperthyroidism (TSH concentrations of <0.3 mIU/liter, with normal or elevated concentrations of free T4) in individuals exposed to radioiodines at low levels. The accident at the Chornobyl (Chernobyl) nuclear plant in Ukraine on April 26, 1986 exposed large numbers of residents to radioactive fallout, principally to iodine-131 ((131)I) (mean and median doses  =  0.6 Gy and 0.2 Gy). We investigated the relationship between (131)I and prevalent hyperthyroidism among 11,853 individuals exposed as children or adolescents in Ukraine who underwent an in-depth, standardized thyroid gland screening examination 12-14 years later. Radioactivity measurements taken shortly after the accident were available for all subjects and were used to estimate individual thyroid doses. We identified 76 cases of hyperthyroidism (11 overt, 65 subclinical). Using logistic regression, we tested a variety of continuous risk models and conducted categorical analyses for all subjects combined and for females (53 cases, n  =  5,767) and males (23 cases, n  =  6,086) separately but found no convincing evidence of a dose-response relationship between (131)I and hyperthyroidism. There was some suggestion of elevated risk among females in an analysis based on a dichotomous dose model with a threshold of 0.5 Gy chosen empirically (OR  =  1.86, P  =  0.06), but the statistical significance level was reduced (P  =  0.13) in a formal analysis with an estimated threshold. In summary, after a thorough exploration of the data, we found no statistically significant dose-response relationship between individual (131)I thyroid doses and prevalent hyperthyroidism. PMID:21128800

  15. Hodgkin's disease in children: Treatment with MOPP and low-dose, extended field irradiation without laparotomy. Late results and toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkin, D.; Doyle, J.; Berry, M.; Blanchette, V.; Chan, H.; Doherty, M.; Freedman, M.; Greenberg, M.; Panzarella, T.; Saunders, F. )

    1990-01-01

    The 10 year results of a trial of bimodal treatment of Hodgkin's disease in children with 6 cycles of MOPP and low-dose extended field irradiation, without staging laparotomy, were for 57 children in all stages as follows: survival 85%, relapse-free survival 80%, and survival-free of second relapse 86%. There were three fatal toxic events, two due to viral infection and one to a second malignant tumor (NHL). Three other patients developed a second malignant tumour, and one developed a thyroid adenoma. No patient developed acute leukemia. These results are compared with the results of treatment of surgically staged children by extended field irradiation alone, with bimodal treatment reserved for relapse or advanced disease at diagnosis. Initial bimodal treatment improved the overall 10 year survival free from a second relapse rate by 20% (86% vs. 66%). No major difference in treatment toxicity between these two groups has emerged during the first 10 years of follow-up. We conclude that, except for favourable CS-1 presentations, children with Hodgkin's disease confined to the lymphatic system should be given bimodal treatment, but that the least morbid effective combination remains to be determined.

  16. Estimating Optimal Dose of Twice-Weekly Gemcitabine for Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Mature Results of GEMRT-01 Phase I Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, Nicolas; Mornex, Francoise; Bossard, Nadine; Ychou, Marc; Chauffert, Bruno; Wautot, Virginie

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To accurately determine the maximal tolerated dose, feasibility, and antitumor activity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy including twice-weekly gemcitabine in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with histologically proven adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were included in this Phase I trial. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 50 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy with twice-weekly gemcitabine was administered during the 5 weeks of radiotherapy, from an initial dose of 30 mg/m{sup 2}. The gemcitabine doses were escalated in 10-mg/m{sup 2} increments in a three-plus-three design, until dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Results: A total of 35 patients were included in the trial. The feasibility of chemoradiotherapy was high, because all the patients received the planned total radiation dose, and 26 patients (74%) received {>=}70% of the planned chemotherapy dose. The mean total delivered dose of gemcitabine was 417 mg/m{sup 2} (i.e., 77% of the prescribed dose). The maximal tolerated dose of twice-weekly gemcitabine was 70 mg/m{sup 2}. Of the 35 patients, 13 had a partial response (37%) and 21 had stable disease (60%). Overall, the median survival and the 6-, 12-, and 18-month survival rates were 10.6 months and 82%, 31%, and 11%, respectively. Survival was significantly longer in patients with an initial performance status of 0 or 1 (p = .004). Conclusion: Our mature data have indicated that gemcitabine doses can be increased {<=}70 mg/m{sup 2}, when delivered twice-weekly with concurrent radiotherapy. This combination shows promises to achieve better recurrence-free and overall survival. These results will serve as a basis for further implementation of the multimodal treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  17. Randomized Noninferiority Trial of Reduced High-Dose Volume Versus Standard Volume Radiation Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of the BC2001 Trial (CRUK/01/004)

    SciTech Connect

    Huddart, Robert A.; Hall, Emma; Hussain, Syed A.; Jenkins, Peter; Rawlings, Christine; Tremlett, Jean; Crundwell, Malcolm; Adab, Fawzi A.; Sheehan, Denise; Syndikus, Isabel; Hendron, Carey; Lewis, Rebecca; Waters, Rachel; James, Nicholas D.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To test whether reducing radiation dose to uninvolved bladder while maintaining dose to the tumor would reduce side effects without impairing local control in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: In this phase III multicenter trial, 219 patients were randomized to standard whole-bladder radiation therapy (sRT) or reduced high-dose volume radiation therapy (RHDVRT) that aimed to deliver full radiation dose to the tumor and 80% of maximum dose to the uninvolved bladder. Participants were also randomly assigned to receive radiation therapy alone or radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in a partial 2 × 2 factorial design. The primary endpoints for the radiation therapy volume comparison were late toxicity and time to locoregional recurrence (with a noninferiority margin of 10% at 2 years). Results: Overall incidence of late toxicity was less than predicted, with a cumulative 2-year Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3/4 toxicity rate of 13% (95% confidence interval 8%, 20%) and no statistically significant differences between groups. The difference in 2-year locoregional recurrence free rate (RHDVRT − sRT) was 6.4% (95% confidence interval −7.3%, 16.8%) under an intention to treat analysis and 2.6% (−12.8%, 14.6%) in the “per-protocol” population. Conclusions: In this study RHDVRT did not result in a statistically significant reduction in late side effects compared with sRT, and noninferiority of locoregional control could not be concluded formally. However, overall low rates of clinically significant toxicity combined with low rates of invasive bladder cancer relapse confirm that (chemo)radiation therapy is a valid option for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and safety of single doses of drisapersen in non-ambulant subjects with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Results of a double-blind randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Flanigan, Kevin M.; Voit, Thomas; Rosales, Xiomara Q.; Servais, Laurent; Kraus, John E.; Wardell, Claire; Morgan, Allison; Dorricott, Susie; Nakielny, Joanna; Quarcoo, Naashika; Liefaard, Lia; Drury, Tom; Campion, Giles; Wright, Padraig

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive, lethal neuromuscular disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin protein due to mutations of the dystrophin gene. Drisapersen is a 2′-O-methyl-phosphorothioate oligonucleotide designed to skip exon 51 in dystrophin pre-mRNA to restore the reading frame of the mRNA. This study assessed safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of drisapersen after a single subcutaneous administration in non-ambulatory subjects. Eligible subjects were non-ambulant boys aged ≥9 years, in wheelchairs for ≥1 to ≤4 years, with a diagnosis of DMD resulting from a mutation correctable by drisapersen treatment. Four dose cohorts were planned (3, 6, 9 and 12 mg/kg), but study objectives were met with the 9 mg/kg dose. Less than proportional increase in exposure was demonstrated over the 3–9 mg/kg dose range, though post hoc analysis showed dose proportionality was more feasible over the 3–6 mg/kg range. Single doses of drisapersen at 3 and 6 mg/kg did not result in significant safety or tolerability concerns; however, at the 9 mg/kg dose, pyrexia and transient elevations in inflammatory parameters were seen. The maximum tolerated dose of 6 mg/kg drisapersen was identified for further characterization in multiple dose studies in the non-ambulant DMD population. PMID:24321374

  19. WRAITH - A Computer Code for Calculating Internal and External Doses Resulting From An Atmospheric Release of Radioactive Material

    SciTech Connect

    Scherpelz, R. I.; Borst, F. J.; Hoenes, G. R.

    1980-12-01

    WRAITH is a FORTRAN computer code which calculates the doses received by a standard man exposed to an accidental release of radioactive material. The movement of the released material through the atmosphere is calculated using a bivariate straight-line Gaussian distribution model, with Pasquill values for standard deviations. The quantity of material in the released cloud is modified during its transit time to account for radioactive decay and daughter production. External doses due to exposure to the cloud can be calculated using a semi-infinite cloud approximation. In situations where the semi-infinite cloud approximation is not a good one, the external dose can be calculated by a "finite plume" three-dimensional point-kernel numerical integration technique. Internal doses due to acute inhalation are cal.culated using the ICRP Task Group Lung Model and a four-segmented gastro-intestinal tract model. Translocation of the material between body compartments and retention in the body compartments are calculated using multiple exponential retention functions. Internal doses to each organ are calculated as sums of cross-organ doses, with each target organ irradiated by radioactive material in a number of source organs. All doses are calculated in rads, with separate values determined for high-LET and low-LET radiation.

  20. A Simple Low-dose X-ray CT Simulation from High-dose Scan

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Dong; Huang, Jing; Bian, Zhaoying; Niu, Shanzhou; Zhang, Hua; Feng, Qianjin; Liang, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose X-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation from high-dose scan is required in optimizing radiation dose to patients. In this study, we propose a simple low-dose CT simulation strategy in sinogram domain using the raw data from high-dose scan. Specially, a relationship between the incident fluxes of low- and high- dose scans is first determined according to the repeated projection measurements and analysis. Second, the incident flux level of the simulated low-dose scan is generated by properly scaling the incident flux level of high-dose scan via the determined relationship in the first step. Third, the low-dose CT transmission data by energy integrating detection is simulated by adding a statistically independent Poisson noise distribution plus a statistically independent Gaussian noise distribution. Finally, a filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm is implemented to reconstruct the resultant low-dose CT images. The present low-dose simulation strategy is verified on the simulations and real scans by comparing it with the existing low-dose CT simulation tool. Experimental results demonstrated that the present low-dose CT simulation strategy can generate accurate low-dose CT sinogram data from high-dose scan in terms of qualitative and quantitative measurements. PMID:26543245

  1. Simvastatin Results in a Dose-Dependent Toxic Effect on Spiral Ganglion Neurons in an In Vitro Organotypic Culture Assay

    PubMed Central

    Leitmeyer, Katharina; Glutz, Andrea; Setz, Cristian; Wieland, Leonie; Egloff, Sulamith; Bodmer, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Statins are inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, an enzyme necessary for the production of mevalonate. They are widely used as cholesterol-lowering drugs. However, conflicting data about the effect of statins on neuronal cells has been published. To explore the effect of simvastatin on spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), SG explants of 5-day-old rats were treated with increasing concentrations of simvastatin. In addition, SG explants were treated with mevalonate and with the combination of simvastatin and mevalonate. SGN number, length of the neurites, area of nonneuronal supporting cells, and neuronal survival were analyzed. Simvastatin treatment results in a significant dose-dependent decrease of SG neurite number, length of neurites, area of supporting cells, and SG neuronal survival compared to control. Interestingly, treatment with mevalonate in addition to simvastatin increased SG neuronal survival compared to simvastatin treatment only. However, treatment with mevalonate in addition to simvastatin did not influence SG neurite number, length of neurites, and area of supporting cells compared to simvastatin treatment only. Our results suggest a neurotoxic effect of simvastatin on SGNs in vitro. Neurotoxicity seems to be at least partially mediated by the mevalonate pathway. Therefore, caution is warranted to use simvastatin as a potential otoprotective drug. PMID:27051663

  2. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with transurethral resection before implantation in prostate cancer. Long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Prada, Pedro J.; Anchuelo, Javier; Blanco, Ana García; Payá, Gema; Cardenal, Juan; Acuña, Enrique; Ferri, María; Vázquez, Andrés; Pacheco, Maite; Sanchez, Jesica

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives We analyzed the long-term oncologic outcome for patients with prostate cancer and transurethral resection who were treated using low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials From January 2001 to December 2005, 57 consecutive patients were treated with clinically localized prostate cancer. No patients received external beam radiation. All of them underwent LDR prostate brachytherapy. Biochemical failure was defined according to the “Phoenix consensus”. Patients were stratified as low and intermediate risk based on The Memorial Sloan Kettering group definition. Results The median follow-up time for these 57 patients was 104 months. The overall survival according to Kaplan-Meier estimates was 88% (±6%) at 5 years and 77% (±6%) at 12 years. The 5 and 10 years for failure in tumour-free survival (TFS) was 96% and respectively (±2%), whereas for biochemical control was 94% and respectively (±3%) at 5 and 10 years, 98% (±1%) of patients being free of local recurrence. A patient reported incontinence after treatment (1.7%). The chronic genitourinary complains grade I were 7% and grade II, 10%. At six months 94% of patients reported no change in bowel function. Conclusions The excellent long-term results and low morbidity presented, as well as the many advantages of prostate brachytherapy over other treatments, demonstrates that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with transurethral resection and clinical organ-confined prostate cancer. PMID:27136466

  3. Dose response to vitamin D supplementation in African Americans: results of a 4-arm, randomized, placebo-controlled trial1234

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kimmie; Scott, Jamil B; Drake, Bettina F; Chan, Andrew T; Hollis, Bruce W; Chandler, Paulette D; Bennett, Gary G; Giovannucci, Edward L; Gonzalez-Suarez, Elizabeth; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Emmons, Karen M; Fuchs, Charles S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Association studies have suggested that lower circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in African Americans may partially underlie higher rates of cardiovascular disease and cancer in this population. Nonetheless, the relation between vitamin D supplementation and 25(OH)D concentrations in African Americans remains undefined. Objective: Our primary objective was to determine the dose-response relation between vitamin D and plasma 25(OH)D. Design: A total of 328 African Americans in Boston, MA, were enrolled over 3 winters from 2007 to 2010 and randomly assigned to receive a placebo or 1000, 2000, or 4000 IU vitamin D3/d for 3 mo. Subjects completed sociodemographic and dietary questionnaires, and plasma samples were drawn at baseline and 3 and 6 mo. Results: Median plasma 25(OH)D concentrations at baseline were 15.1, 16.2, 13.9, and 15.7 ng/mL for subjects randomly assigned to receive the placebo or 1000, 2000, or 4000 IU/d, respectively (P = 0.63). The median plasma 25(OH)D concentration at 3 mo differed significantly between supplementation arms at 13.7, 29.7, 34.8, and 45.9 ng/mL, respectively (P < 0.001). An estimated 1640 IU vitamin D3/d was needed to raise the plasma 25(OH)D concentration to ≥20 ng/mL in ≥97.5% of participants, whereas a dose of 4000 IU/d was needed to achieve concentrations ≥33 ng/mL in ≥80% of subjects. No significant hypercalcemia was seen in a subset of participants. Conclusions: Within African Americans, an estimated 1640 IU vitamin D3/d was required to achieve concentrations of plasma 25(OH)D recommended by the Institute of Medicine, whereas 4000 IU/d was needed to reach concentrations predicted to reduce cancer and cardiovascular disease risk in prospective observational studies. These results may be helpful for informing future trials of disease prevention. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00585637. PMID:24368437

  4. Recommendations to the Technical Steering Panel regarding approach for estimating individual radiation doses resulting from releases of radionuclides to the Columbia River. Volume 1, Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Brothers, A.J.

    1992-07-01

    At the direction of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle staff have reviewed and analyzed available data regarding possible historical radiation doses to individuals resulting from radionuclide releases to the Columbia River. The objective of this review was to recommend to the TSP the spatial and temporal scope and level of effort on Columbia River work to most effectively extend work performed in Phase I of the project (PNL 1991a, PNL 1991b) to meet the project objectives. A number of options were analyzed. Four stretches of the Columbia River and adjacent Pacific coastal waters were defined and investigated for four time periods. Radiation doses arising from ten potentially major exposure pathways were evaluated for each of the time/location combinations, and several alternative methods were defined for estimating the doses from each pathway. Preliminary cost estimates were also developed for implementing dose estimation activities for each of the possible combinations.

  5. Recommendations to the Technical Steering Panel regarding approach for estimating individual radiation doses resulting from releases of radionuclides to the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Brothers, A.J.

    1992-07-01

    At the direction of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle staff have reviewed and analyzed available data regarding possible historical radiation doses to individuals resulting from radionuclide releases to the Columbia River. The objective of this review was to recommend to the TSP the spatial and temporal scope and level of effort on Columbia River work to most effectively extend work performed in Phase I of the project (PNL 1991a, PNL 1991b) to meet the project objectives. A number of options were analyzed. Four stretches of the Columbia River and adjacent Pacific coastal waters were defined and investigated for four time periods. Radiation doses arising from ten potentially major exposure pathways were evaluated for each of the time/location combinations, and several alternative methods were defined for estimating the doses from each pathway. Preliminary cost estimates were also developed for implementing dose estimation activities for each of the possible combinations.

  6. A COMPARISON OF DOSE RESULTS FROM THE CLEAN AIR ACT ASSESSMENT PACKAGE-1988, PERSONAL COMPUTER (CAP88-PC), VERSION 3 TO PREVIOUS VERSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, Kathleen; Snyder, Sandra F.; Staven, Lissa H.

    2013-08-01

    EPA-approved computer software packages, including CAP88-PC, are used by Department of Energy sites to demonstrate compliance with the radionuclide air emission standard under the Clean Air Act. The most recent update, CAP88-PC version 3, was approved by EPA in February 2006 for use by Department of Energy facilities. Version 3 incorporates several major changes that have the potential to affect calculated doses relative to calculations using earlier versions. This analysis examined the types and magnitudes of changes to dose estimates for specific radionuclides calculated using the version 3 software compared with the previous versions. Total effective dose calculated with version 3 was compared to effective dose equivalent calculated with previous versions for parent radionuclides and for the total dose from radionuclide chains. Various comparisons were also performed to determine which of the updates in version 3 accounted for changes in overall dose estimates. CAP88-PC version 3 would produce substantially different results relative to previous versions of the code for a number of radionuclides, including some isotopes that may be present at Department of Energy facilities, as well as those used for industrial and medical applications. In general, doses for many radionuclides are lower using version 3 but doses for a few key radionuclides would be higher.

  7. A comparison of dose results from the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988, personal computer (CAP88-PC), version 3 to previous versions.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, Kathleen; Snyder, Sandra; Staven, Lissa

    2013-08-01

    Computer software packages approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), including CAP88-PC, are used by U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) sites to demonstrate compliance with the radionuclide air emission standard under the Clean Air Act. CAP88-PC version 3, was approved by the U.S. EPA in February 2006 for use by U.S. DOE facilities. Version 3 incorporates several major changes that have the potential to affect calculated doses relative to calculations using earlier versions. This analysis examined the types and magnitudes of changes to dose estimates for specific radionuclides calculated using the version 3 software compared with the previous versions. For parent radionuclides and for the total dose from radionuclide chains, total effective dose calculated with version 3 was compared to effective dose equivalent calculated with previous versions. Various comparisons were also performed to determine which of the updates in version 3 accounted for changes in overall dose estimates. CAP88-PC version 3 would produce substantially different results relative to previous versions of the code for a number of radionuclides, including some isotopes that may be present at U.S. DOE facilities, as well as those used for industrial and medical applications. In general, doses for many radionuclides were lower using version 3 but doses for a few key radionuclides increased relative to the previous versions.

  8. Dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated modes of action for liver carcinogenicity: Results of a workshop

    EPA Science Inventory

    A public workshop, organized by a Steering Committee of scientists from government, industry, universities, and research organizations, was held at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in September, 2010. The workshop explored the dose-response implicat...

  9. Localized Low-Dose Radiotherapy for Follicular Lymphoma: History, Clinical Results, Mechanisms of Action, and Future Outlooks

    SciTech Connect

    Ganem, Gerard; Cartron, Guillaume; Girinsky, Theodore; Haas, Rick L.M.; Cosset, Jean Marc; Solal-Celigny, Philippe

    2010-11-15

    The extreme radiosensitivity of indolent lymphomas was reported in the early years of radiotherapy (RT). The efficacy of low-dose total body irradiation (1.5-2 Gy) was particularly demonstrative. Higher doses were considered appropriate for localized disease. The optimal (or conventional) dose of curative RT derived from the early studies was determined to be 30-35 Gy. Nevertheless, in older series addressing the tumoricidal radiation dose in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, investigators noted that a significant number of 'nodular' lymphomas were controlled with a dose of <22 Gy for >3 years. The idea of reintroducing localized low-dose radiotherapy (LDRT) for indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphomas came from a clinical observation. The first study showing the high efficacy of LDRT (4 Gy in two fractions of 2 Gy within 3 days) in selected patients with chemoresistant, indolent, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas was published in 1994. Since this first report, at least eight series of patients treated with localized LDRT have been published, showing a 55% complete response rate in irradiated sites, with a median duration of 15-42 months. How LDRT induces lymphoma cell death remains partly unknown. However, some important advances have recently been reported. Localized LDRT induces an apoptosis of follicular lymphoma cells. This apoptotic cell death elicits an immune response mediated by macrophages and dendritic cells. Follicular lymphoma is probably an ideal model to explore these mechanisms. This review also discusses the future of LDRT for follicular lymphoma.

  10. SU-E-J-06: Additional Imaging Guidance Dose to Patient Organs Resulting From X-Ray Tubes Used in CyberKnife Image Guidance System

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, A; Ding, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The use of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has become increasingly common, but the additional radiation exposure resulting from repeated image guidance procedures raises concerns. Although there are many studies reporting imaging dose from different image guidance devices, imaging dose for the CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System is not available. This study provides estimated organ doses resulting from image guidance procedures on the CyberKnife system. Methods: Commercially available Monte Carlo software, PCXMC, was used to calculate average organ doses resulting from x-ray tubes used in the CyberKnife system. There are seven imaging protocols with kVp ranging from 60 – 120 kV and 15 mAs for treatment sites in the Cranium, Head and Neck, Thorax, and Abdomen. The output of each image protocol was measured at treatment isocenter. For each site and protocol, Adult body sizes ranging from anorexic to extremely obese were simulated since organ dose depends on patient size. Doses for all organs within the imaging field-of-view of each site were calculated for a single image acquisition from both of the orthogonal x-ray tubes. Results: Average organ doses were <1.0 mGy for every treatment site and imaging protocol. For a given organ, dose increases as kV increases or body size decreases. Higher doses are typically reported for skeletal components, such as the skull, ribs, or clavicles, than for softtissue organs. Typical organ doses due to a single exposure are estimated as 0.23 mGy to the brain, 0.29 mGy to the heart, 0.08 mGy to the kidneys, etc., depending on the imaging protocol and site. Conclusion: The organ doses vary with treatment site, imaging protocol and patient size. Although the organ dose from a single image acquisition resulting from two orthogonal beams is generally insignificant, the sum of repeated image acquisitions (>100) could reach 10–20 cGy for a typical treatment fraction.

  11. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modelling using spatial dose metrics and machine learning methods for severe acute oral mucositis resulting from head and neck radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jamie A; Wong, Kee H; Welsh, Liam C; Jones, Ann-Britt; Schick, Ulrike; Newbold, Kate L; Bhide, Shreerang A; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M; Gulliford, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Severe acute mucositis commonly results from head and neck (chemo)radiotherapy. A predictive model of mucositis could guide clinical decision-making and inform treatment planning. We aimed to generate such a model using spatial dose metrics and machine learning. Material and Methods Predictive models of severe acute mucositis were generated using radiotherapy dose (dose-volume and spatial dose metrics) and clinical data. Penalised logistic regression, support vector classification and random forest classification (RFC) models were generated and compared. Internal validation was performed (with 100-iteration cross-validation), using multiple metrics, including area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and calibration slope, to assess performance. Associations between covariates and severe mucositis were explored using the models. Results The dose-volume-based models (standard) performed equally to those incorporating spatial information. Discrimination was similar between models, but the RFCstandard had the best calibration. The mean AUC and calibration slope for this model were 0.71 (s.d.=0.09) and 3.9 (s.d.=2.2), respectively. The volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses were associated with severe mucositis. Conclusions The RFCstandard model performance is modest-to-good, but should be improved, and requires external validation. Reducing the volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses may reduce mucositis incidence. PMID:27240717

  12. High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Treatment Evolution and Mature Results

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboglou, Nikolaos; Tselis, Nikolaos; Baltas, Dimos; Buhleier, Thomas; Martin, Thomas; Milickovic, Natasa; Papaioannou, Sokratis; Ackermann, Hanns; Tunn, Ulf W.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial (IRT) brachytherapy (BRT) as sole treatment (monotherapy) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2009, 718 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided HDR monotherapy. Three treatment protocols were applied; 141 patients received 38.0 Gy using one implant in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy with computed tomography-based treatment planning; 351 patients received 38.0 Gy in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy, using 2 implants (2 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning; and 226 patients received 34.5 Gy, using 3 single-fraction implants of 11.5 Gy (3 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus, and toxicity was evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. The 36-, 60-, and 96-month biochemical control and metastasis-free survival rates for the entire cohort were 97%, 94%, and 90% and 99%, 98%, and 97%, respectively. Toxicity was scored per event, with 5.4% acute grade 3 genitourinary and 0.2% acute grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 3.5% and 1.6%, respectively. Two patients developed grade 4 incontinence. No other instance of grade 4 or greater acute or late toxicity was reported. Conclusion: Our results confirm IRT-HDR-BRT is safe and effective as monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

  13. Doses measured using AEC on direct digital radiographic (DDR) X-rays systems: updated results with an RP 162 perspective.

    PubMed

    Bowden, L; Faulkner, R; Gallagher, A; O'Connor, U; Walsh, C; Dowling, A; O'Reilly, G

    2013-02-01

    As digital technology in diagnostic radiology systems becomes more prevalent, there is a need to provide comparative dose information for these new systems. This is needed in particular for testing the automatic exposure control (AEC) devices on direct digital radiography (DDR) systems as there is no consensus on the receptor dose level in the current guidelines. The new European Commission RP 162 document sets the suspension level for the 'verification of kerma at receptor entrance in computed radiography and DDR systems under AEC' as ≥10 µGy. This document also notes that alternate methodologies are acceptable, and may require adjustment in the suspension level if used. This study provides a range of typical doses under AEC for DDR systems, for a variety measurement methodologies, including that described in RP 162.

  14. Reducing the rates of prescribing high-dose antipsychotics and polypharmacy on psychiatric inpatient and intensive care units: results of a 6-year quality improvement programme

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is no conclusive evidence that either high doses or combinations of antipsychotics are more effective than standard doses or monotherapy alone. Nonetheless, prescription of both remains prevalent in the UK. In 2006 the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLAM) participated in a national survey of prescription of antipsychotic medications, organized by the Prescribing Observatory for Mental Health. Over half of the patients on SLAM inpatient or psychiatric intensive care units were prescribed a high-dose antipsychotic or a combination of antipsychotics. Prescribing high-dose antipsychotics and polypharmacy in SLAM was found to be among the highest in the UK. Aim: To assess the impact of a 6-year quality improvement programme aimed at reducing the rates of prescribing high-dose antipsychotics and polypharmacy on SLAM inpatients and psychiatric intensive care units. Results: There was a significant reduction between baseline and final survey in the rates of prescription of both high-dose antipsychotics and polypharmacy on SLAM inpatients and intensive care units (58% versus 10% p < 0.0001 and 57% versus 16%, p < 0.0001 respectively). The proportion of patients at final survey prescribed a high-dose antipsychotic and a combination was substantially lower in SLAM than in the national sample (10% versus 28%, p < 0.0001 and 16% versus 38%, p < 0.0001 respectively). Clinical implications: A sustained change in the prescribing culture of an organization can be achieved through a targeted improvement programme. PMID:25653825

  15. Generalized results of individualized exposure doses reconstruction for the subjects of Ukrainian State Register of persons, affected due to Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Likhtarov, I A; Kovgan, L M; Masiuk, S V; Ivanova, O M; Chepurny, M I; Boyko, Z N; Gerasymenko, V B; Tereshchenko, S A; Kravchenko, I G; Kortushin, G I; Marcenjyk, O D; Gubina, I G

    2015-12-01

    Since 2007, the department of dosimetry of NRCRM has been working for to supply the Ukrainian State Register (SRU) of persons affected due to Chernobyl accident by exposure doses estimations. As of now, the individualization of doses has been performed for nine raions located in Kyiv, Zhytomyr, Rivne and Chernihiv oblasts. The structure of raion-specific models used for the reconstruction of individualized doses was described in detail in the previous 19-th issue of this journal (2014). The choice conditions for persons from the SRU using which for each raion there was formed a contingent of persons for whom the dose could be reconstructed. During the period of 2007-2015, the individualized dose was reconstructed for 244226 persons in 9 raions, representing ~ 58% of all registered in the SRU inhabitants of the raions. The calculation results were transferred to the SRU in formats adapted to the common database structure of the SRU. For each person who satisfied the conditions of selection there were estimated: (1) possible absorbed internal exposure dose of the thyroid by radioiodine in 1986 (assuming that the person in 1986 lived in the same village and was enlisted in the SRU); (2) annual doses of external, internal and total exposure of the whole body for a period of observation in the SRU; (3) total exposure dose of whole body accumulated during the period of observation in the SRU; (4) the total cumulative dose of feasible exposure during the period since 1986 till the decision to be registered in the SRU. There are presented the generalized results of the SRU subjects distribution for different raions in dependence on intervals of doses accumulated at different periods after the accident. The raion matrix tables show the dynamics of accumulation of doses by the SRU subjects both for their stay on the account and for the period of their possible residence registration in the settlement since 1986. The directions for further research to be implemented for

  16. 42 CFR 82.27 - How can claimants obtain reviews of their NIOSH dose reconstruction results by NIOSH?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION... reconstruction through the processes established by DOL under 20 CFR 30. DOL will request NIOSH to review...

  17. 42 CFR 82.27 - How can claimants obtain reviews of their NIOSH dose reconstruction results by NIOSH?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION... reconstruction through the processes established by DOL under 20 CFR 30. DOL will request NIOSH to review...

  18. 42 CFR 82.27 - How can claimants obtain reviews of their NIOSH dose reconstruction results by NIOSH?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION... reconstruction through the processes established by DOL under 20 CFR 30. DOL will request NIOSH to review...

  19. 42 CFR 82.27 - How can claimants obtain reviews of their NIOSH dose reconstruction results by NIOSH?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION... reconstruction through the processes established by DOL under 20 CFR 30. DOL will request NIOSH to review...

  20. 42 CFR 82.27 - How can claimants obtain reviews of their NIOSH dose reconstruction results by NIOSH?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES METHODS FOR CONDUCTING DOSE RECONSTRUCTION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION... reconstruction through the processes established by DOL under 20 CFR 30. DOL will request NIOSH to review...

  1. Impact of aspirin dose on adenosine diphosphate-mediated platelet activities. Results of an in vitro pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Thano, Estela; Rollini, Fabiana; Patel, Ronakkumar; Wilson, Ryan E; Muñiz-Lozano, Ana; Franchi, Francesco; Darlington, Andrew; Desai, Bhaloo; Guzman, Luis A; Bass, Theodore A; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2013-10-01

    Different aspirin dosing regimens have been suggested to impact outcomes when used in combination with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) P2Y12 receptor antagonists. Prior investigations have shown that not only aspirin, but also potent ADP P2Y12 receptor blockade can inhibit thromboxane A2-mediated platelet activation. The impact of aspirin dosing on ADP mediated platelet activities is unknown and represents the aim of this in vitro pilot pharmacodynamic (PD) investigation. Twenty-six patients with stable coronary artery disease on aspirin 81 mg/day and P2Y12 naïve were enrolled. PD assessments were performed at baseline, while patients were on 81 mg/day aspirin and after switching to 325 mg/day for 7 ± 2 days with and without escalating concentrations (vehicle, 1, 3, and 10 μM) of prasugrel's active metabolite (P-AM). PD assays included flow cytometric assessment of VASP to define the platelet reactivity index (PRI) and the Multiplate Analyzer (MEA) using multiple agonists [ADP, ADP + prostaglandin (PGE1), arachidonic acid (AA), and collagen]. Escalating P-AM concentrations showed incremental platelet P2Y12 inhibition measured by VASP-PRI (p<0.001). However, there were no differences according to aspirin dosing regimen at any P-AM concentration (vehicle: p=0.899; 1 μM: p=0.888; 3 μM: p=0.524; 10 μM: p=0.548). Similar findings were observed in purinergic markers assessed by MEA (ADP and ADP+PGE1). P-AM addition significantly reduced AA and collagen induced platelet aggregation (p<0.001 for all measures), irrespective of aspirin dose. In conclusion, aspirin dosing does not appear to affect PD measures of ADP-mediated platelet reactivity irrespective of the degree of P2Y12 receptor blockade. P2Y12 receptor blockade modulates platelet reactivity mediated by alternative activators. PMID:23884248

  2. Dose-dependent changes in cognitive function with exercise augmentation for major depression: results from the TREAD study.

    PubMed

    Greer, Tracy L; Grannemann, Bruce D; Chansard, Matthieu; Karim, Alyzae I; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2015-02-01

    Cognitive dysfunction has been repeatedly observed in major depressive disorder (MDD), particularly in areas of attention, verbal and nonverbal learning and memory, and executive functioning. Exercise has been shown to improve cognitive outcomes in other populations, including age-associated cognitive decline, but has not to our knowledge been investigated as an augmentation strategy in depression. This study evaluated the effectiveness of exercise augmentation on cognitive performance in persons with MDD and residual symptoms that included cognitive complaints following initial treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Participants enrolled in the Treatment with Exercise Augmentation for Depression (TREAD) study were randomized to receive either a low or high dose exercise regimen. TREAD participants who provided informed consent for the current study completed Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery measures assessing Attention, Visual Memory, Executive Function/Set-shifting and Working Memory, and Executive Function/Spatial Planning domains. Data were analyzed for 39 participants completing both baseline and Week 12 cognitive testing. Overall tests indicated a significant task × group × time interaction for the Executive Function/Set-shifting and Working Memory domain. Post-hoc tests indicated improvements in high dose exercisers' spatial working memory, but decreases in spatial working memory and set-shifting outcomes in low dose exercisers. Both groups improved on measures of psychomotor speed, attention, visual memory and spatial planning. This study suggests a dose-response effect of exercise in specific executive function and working memory tasks among depressed persons with a partial response to SSRI and cognitive complaints, with some cognitive functions improving regardless of exercise dose.

  3. Low-dose azathioprine is effective in maintaining remission in steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis: results from a territory-wide Chinese population-based IBD registry

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hai Yun; Chan, Francis K. L.; Leung, Wai Keung; Li, Michael K. K.; Leung, Chi Man; Sze, Shun Fung; Ching, Jessica Y. L.; Lo, Fu Hang; Tsang, Steven W. C.; Shan, Edwin H. S.; Mak, Lai Yee; Lam, Belsy C. Y.; Hui, Aric J.; Chow, Wai Hung; Wong, Marc T. L.; Hung, Ivan F. N.; Hui, Yee Tak; Chan, Yiu Kay; Chan, Kam Hon; Loo, Ching Kong; Ng, Carmen K. M.; Lao, Wai Cheung; Harbord, Marcus; Wu, Justin C. Y.; Sung, Joseph J. Y.; Ng, Siew C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Whether low-dose azathioprine (AZA) is effective in maintaining remission in patients with steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis (UC) remains unclear. We assessed the efficacy and safety of low-dose AZA in a Chinese population with UC. Methods: We identified steroid-dependent UC patients in clinical remission on AZA maintenance therapy from a territory-wide IBD Registry. Standard- and low-dose AZA were defined as at least 2 mg/kg/day and less than 2 mg/kg/day, respectively. Relapse rates were analyzed by Kaplan–Meier analysis and compared using log-rank test. Results: Among 1226 UC patients, 128 (53% male, median duration on AZA 44 months) were included. Median maintenance AZA dose was 1.3 mg/kg/day. 97.7% of the patients were on concomitant oral 5-aminosalicylic acid. Cumulative relapse-free rates in patients on standard-dose and low-dose AZA were 71.2%, 52.8% and 45.2%, and 71.8%, 55.3% and 46.2% at 12, 24 and 36 months, respectively (p = 0.871). Relapse rate within 12 months was higher in patients who withdrew compared with those who maintained on AZA (52.6% versus 29.4%; p = 0.045). Mean corpuscular volume increased after AZA therapy in both of the low-dose [median (interquartile range, IQR): 88.2 (81.4–92.2) versus 95.1 (90.1–100.9) fl, p < 0.001] and standard-dose subgroups [median (IQR) 86.8 (76.9–89.9) versus 94.7 (85.9–99.7) fl, p < 0.001]. Leukopenia occurred in 21.1% of the patients. Patients on standard dose had a higher risk for leukopenia than those on low-dose AZA [odds ratio (OR) 3.9, 95% CI 1.9–8.2, p < 0.001]. Conclusions: In the Chinese population, low-dose AZA is effective for maintaining remission in steroid-dependent UC patients. Standard-dose AZA was associated with more than threefold increased risk of leukopenia. PMID:27366213

  4. Special Analysis: Atmospheric Dose Resulting from the Release of C14 from Reactor Moderator Deionizers in a Disposal Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hiergesell, Robert A.; Swingle, Robert F.

    2005-08-18

    The proposed action of disposing of 52 moderator deionizer vessels within the ILV was evaluated in this SA. In particular, a detailed analysis of the release of {sup 14}C via the atmospheric pathway was conducted for these vessels since the major concern has been the nearly 20 Ci of {sup 14}C that is associated with each vessel. The more rigorous evaluation of the atmospheric pathway for {sup 14}C included incorporation of new information about the chemical availability of {sup 14}C when disposed in a grout/cement encapsulation environment, as will be the case in the ILV. This information was utilized to establish the source term for a 1-D numerical model to simulate the diffusion of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from the ILV Waste Zone to the land surface. The results indicate a peak surface emanation rate from the entire ILV of 1.42E-08 Ci/yr with an associated dose of only 3.83E-05 mrem/yr to the Maximally Exposed Individual (MEI) at 100m. The fact that the atmospheric pathway exposure for {sup 14}C is controlled by chemical solubility limits for {sup 14}C between the solid waste, pore water and pore vapor within the disposal environment rather than the absolute inventory suggests that the establishment of specific facility limits is inappropriate. With the relaxation of the atmospheric pathway restriction, the groundwater pathway becomes the more restrictive in terms of disposing {sup 14}C or {sup 14}C{sub KB} within the ILV. Since the resin-based {sup 14}C of the 52 moderator deionizer vessels is highly similar to the {sup 14}C{sub KB} waste form, the inventory from the 52 deionizer vessels is compared against the groundwater limits for that waste form. The small groundwater pathway fraction (1.14E-05) calculated for the proposed inventory of the 52 moderator deionizer vessels indicates that the proposed action will have an insignificant impact with respect to possible exposures via the groundwater pathway. This investigation recommends that there be no ILV Atmospheric

  5. Literature review of some selected types of results and statistical analyses of total-ozone data. [for the ozonosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    The depletion of ozone in the stratosphere is examined, and causes for the depletion are cited. Ground station and satellite measurements of ozone, which are taken on a worldwide basis, are discussed. Instruments used in ozone measurement are discussed, such as the Dobson spectrophotometer, which is credited with providing the longest and most extensive series of observations for ground based observation of stratospheric ozone. Other ground based instruments used to measure ozone are also discussed. The statistical differences of ground based measurements of ozone from these different instruments are compared to each other, and to satellite measurements. Mathematical methods (i.e., trend analysis or linear regression analysis) of analyzing the variability of ozone concentration with respect to time and lattitude are described. Various time series models which can be employed in accounting for ozone concentration variability are examined.

  6. Panasonic dosimetry system performance testing and results at nuclear accident dose levels 500 rad to 10,000 rad

    SciTech Connect

    Klueber, M.R.

    1998-04-06

    Panasonic thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are used as the photon dose assessment part of the personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) and may be used for the same purpose with the fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD). To demonstrate compliance with 10CFR835.1304 (and, its predecessor, DOE Order 5480.11), several sets of dosimeters were irradiated to photon doses above the upper limit of the DOELAP testing standard, DOE/EH-0026 and DOE/EH-0027. The upper range of the test was 10,000 rads, using both low energy (70 keV) and high energy (662 keV and 1,332 keV) sources. The testing indicated that the Panasonic TLD system is capable of meeting the requirements of 10CFR835.1304 and DOE Order 5480.11.

  7. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition symptoms of mania: which one(s) result(s) more often from right than left hemisphere lesions?

    PubMed

    Braun, Claude M J; Daigneault, Rafael; Gaudelet, Sandrine; Guimond, Anik

    2008-01-01

    Previously published single case reports of patients with a unilateral lesion were assembled. After the lesion, each of the 244 cases presented at least one of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) symptoms of a manic episode, namely, elated or irritable mood, grandiosity, talkativeness, flight of ideas, hyperhedonism, reduced need for sleep, agitation, or distractibility (all optional in DSM-IV). As expected, the subgroup of 59 manic patients had a right hemisphere lesion far more often than a left one. However, this was also true of various sets of the nonmanic cases. Furthermore, elation was not the symptom most strongly associated with lesion side. Elation without mania was not significantly predicted by lesion side. However, talkativeness was strongly predicted by right lesion side whether in manic or nonmanic patients or even when the symptom was the only symptom observed. Agitation was consistently and robustly associated with right lesion side, but not completely distinctly so (it fell short of significance when not accompanied by elation or other symptoms). It is proposed that prevalence of right hemisphere lesions causing mania is primarily related to mental and behavioral disinhibition rather than a shift of mood and that it consists of release of left hemisphere influence.

  8. Comparison of secondary neutron dose in proton therapy resulting from the use of a tungsten alloy MLC or a brass collimator system

    SciTech Connect

    Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Ainsley, Christopher G.; Kirk, Maura L.; McDonough, James E.; Maughan, Richard L.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To apply the dual ionization chamber method for mixed radiation fields to an accurate comparison of the secondary neutron dose arising from the use of a tungsten alloy multileaf collimator (MLC) as opposed to a brass collimator system for defining the shape of a therapeutic proton field. Methods: Hydrogenous and nonhydrogenous ionization chambers were constructed with large volumes to enable measurements of absorbed doses below 10{sup -4} Gy in mixed radiation fields using the dual ionization chamber method for mixed-field dosimetry. Neutron dose measurements were made with a nominal 230 MeV proton beam incident on a closed tungsten alloy MLC and a solid brass block. The chambers were cross-calibrated against a {sup 60}Co-calibrated Farmer chamber in water using a 6 MV x-ray beam and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to account for variations in ionization chamber response due to differences in secondary neutron energy spectra. Results: The neutron and combined proton plus {gamma}-ray absorbed doses are shown to be nearly equivalent downstream from either a closed tungsten alloy MLC or a solid brass block. At 10 cm downstream from the distal edge of the collimating material the neutron dose from the closed MLC was (5.3 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -5} Gy/Gy. The neutron dose with brass was (6.4 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup -5} Gy/Gy. Further from the secondary neutron source, at 50 cm, the neutron doses remain close for both the MLC and brass block at (6.9 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -6} Gy/Gy and (6.3 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup -6} Gy/Gy, respectively. Conclusions: The dual ionization chamber method is suitable for measuring secondary neutron doses resulting from proton irradiation. The results of measurements downstream from a closed tungsten alloy MLC and a brass block indicate that, even in an overly pessimistic worst-case scenario, secondary neutron production in a tungsten alloy MLC leads to absorbed doses that are nearly equivalent to those seen from brass collimators. Therefore

  9. Statistics Clinic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, Alan H.; Foy, Millennia; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Fiedler, James

    2014-01-01

    Do you have elevated p-values? Is the data analysis process getting you down? Do you experience anxiety when you need to respond to criticism of statistical methods in your manuscript? You may be suffering from Insufficient Statistical Support Syndrome (ISSS). For symptomatic relief of ISSS, come for a free consultation with JSC biostatisticians at our help desk during the poster sessions at the HRP Investigators Workshop. Get answers to common questions about sample size, missing data, multiple testing, when to trust the results of your analyses and more. Side effects may include sudden loss of statistics anxiety, improved interpretation of your data, and increased confidence in your results.

  10. SEER Statistics

    Cancer.gov

    The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute works to provide information on cancer statistics in an effort to reduce the burden of cancer among the U.S. population.

  11. Results of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation After Treatment With Different High-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Regimens in Five Dutch Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Loes van Kempen-Harteveld, M. Brand, Ronald; Kal, Henk B.; Verdonck, Leo F.; Hofman, Pieter; Schattenberg, Anton V.; Maazen, Richard W. van der; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Eijkenboom, Wil M.H.; Lelie, Johannes P. van der; Oldenburger, Foppe; Barge, Renee M.; Biezen, Anja van; Vossen, Jaak M.J.J.; Noordijk, Evert M.; Struikmans, Henk

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate results of high-dose total-body irradiation (TBI) regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,032 patients underwent TBI in one or two fractions before autologous or allogeneic hematologic stem cell transplantation for acute leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The TBI regimens were normalized by using the biological effective dose (BED) concept. The BED values were divided into three dose groups. Study end points were relapse incidence (RI), non-relapse mortality (NRM), relapse-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Multivariate analysis was performed, stratified by disease. Results: In the highest TBI dose group, RI was significantly lower and NRM was higher vs. the lower dose groups. However, a significant influence on RFS and OS was not found. Relapses in the eye region were found only after shielding to very low doses. Age was of significant influence on OS, RFS, and NRM in favor of younger patients. The NRM of patients older than 40 years significantly increased, and OS decreased. There was no influence of age on RI. Men had better OS and RFS and lower NRM. Type of transplantation significantly influenced RI and NRM for patients with acute leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There was no influence on RFS and OS. Conclusions: Both RI and NRM were significantly influenced by the size of the BED of single-dose or two-fraction TBI regimens; OS and RFS were not. Age was of highly significant influence on NRM, but there was no influence of age on RI. Hyperfractionated TBI with a high BED might be useful, assuming NRM can be reduced.

  12. Planck 2013 results. XXI. Power spectrum and high-order statistics of the Planck all-sky Compton parameter map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    We have constructed the first all-sky map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect by applying specifically tailored component separation algorithms to the 100 to 857 GHz frequency channel maps from the Planck survey. This map shows an obvious galaxy cluster tSZ signal that is well matched with blindly detected clusters in the Planck SZ catalogue. To characterize the signal in the tSZ map we have computed its angular power spectrum. At large angular scales (ℓ < 60), the major foreground contaminant is the diffuse thermal dust emission. At small angular scales (ℓ > 500) the clustered cosmic infrared background and residual point sources are the major contaminants. These foregrounds are carefully modelled and subtracted. We thus measure the tSZ power spectrum over angular scales 0.17° ≲ θ ≲ 3.0° that were previously unexplored. The measured tSZ power spectrum is consistent with that expected from the Planck catalogue of SZ sources, with clear evidence of additional signal from unresolved clusters and, potentially, diffuse warm baryons. Marginalized band-powers of the Planck tSZ power spectrum and the best-fit model are given. The non-Gaussianity of the Compton parameter map is further characterized by computing its 1D probability distribution function and its bispectrum. The measured tSZ power spectrum and high order statistics are used to place constraints on σ8.

  13. Encephalopathy is the dose-limiting toxicity of intravenous hepsulfam: results of a phase I trial in patients with advanced hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Larson, R A; Geller, R B; Janisch, L; Milton, J; Grochow, L B; Ratain, M J

    1995-01-01

    Hepsulfam is a bisulfamic ester which is similar in structure to busulfan and is believed to act as a bifunctional alkylator inducing both DNA-DNA and DNA-protein crosslinks. Prior studies in patients with refractory solid tumors have identified the dose-limiting toxicity of hepsulfam to be cumulative myelosuppression resulting in prolonged leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. This phase I trial was designed to determine the maximally tolerated dose of hepsulfam administered intravenously in patients with refractory leukemias and other advanced hematologic malignancies. Hepsulfam was administered as a 30-min or 2-h intravenous infusion to 21 patients with advanced leukemia or multiple myeloma. All patients had been extensively treated and had progressive disease. Cycles were repeated every 5 weeks. Cohorts of patients were treated at 360, 480, 640, and 800 mg/m2. The dose-limiting toxicity of intravenous hepsulfam was severe encephalopathy. The single patient treated at 800 mg/m2 became comatose within 48 h and required 3 weeks for his mental status to return to baseline. There were, however, no irreversible neurological sequelae. Several patients treated at 640 mg/m2 had clinical evidence of toxic deliriums and slowing of alpha rhythm waves on electroencephalograms indicative of a gray-matter encephalopathy. When hepsulfam was infused over 30 min, patients complained of uncomfortable parasthesias, but when the drug was administered over 2 h, these acute symptoms were less common. Myelosuppression was observed in most patients. Among those patients who had some suppression of their leukemia, peripheral blood counts recovered to pretreatment levels after 3-5 weeks. Apart from CNS toxicity, non-hematologic toxicity was minimal. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated rapid clearance of hepsulfam so that the drug was not reliably detected in the plasma after 24 h. The recommended phase II dose of hepsulfam as a single 2-h intravenous infusion is 480 mg/m2, but this dose

  14. Toward Complete Statistics of Massive Binary Stars: Penultimate Results from the Cygnus OB2 Radial Velocity Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Kiminki, Daniel C.; Lundquist, Michael J.; Burke, Jamison; Chapman, James; Keller, Erica; Lester, Kathryn; Rolen, Emily K.; Topel, Eric; Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Smullen, Rachel A.; Vargas Álvarez, Carlos A.; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Dale, Daniel A.; Brotherton, Michael M.

    2014-08-01

    We analyze orbital solutions for 48 massive multiple-star systems in the Cygnus OB2 association, 23 of which are newly presented here, to find that the observed distribution of orbital periods is approximately uniform in log P for P < 45 days, but it is not scale-free. Inflections in the cumulative distribution near 6 days, 14 days, and 45 days suggest key physical scales of sime0.2, sime0.4, and sime1 A.U. where yet-to-be-identified phenomena create distinct features. No single power law provides a statistically compelling prescription, but if features are ignored, a power law with exponent β ~= -0.22 provides a crude approximation over P = 1.4-2000 days, as does a piece-wise linear function with a break near 45 days. The cumulative period distribution flattens at P > 45 days, even after correction for completeness, indicating either a lower binary fraction or a shift toward low-mass companions. A high degree of similarity (91% likelihood) between the Cyg OB2 period distribution and that of other surveys suggests that the binary properties at P <~ 25 days are determined by local physics of disk/clump fragmentation and are relatively insensitive to environmental and evolutionary factors. Fully 30% of the unbiased parent sample is a binary with period P < 45 days. Completeness corrections imply a binary fraction near 55% for P < 5000 days. The observed distribution of mass ratios 0.2 < q < 1 is consistent with uniform, while the observed distribution of eccentricities 0.1 < e < 0.6 is consistent with uniform plus an excess of e ~= 0 systems. We identify six stars, all supergiants, that exhibit aperiodic velocity variations of ~30 km s-1 attributed to atmospheric fluctuations.

  15. Results of a phase I dose escalation study of eltrombopag in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma receiving doxorubicin and ifosfamide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this Phase I dose escalation study was to explore the safety and tolerability of eltrombopag, an oral, nonpeptide, thrombopoietin receptor agonist, in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and thrombocytopenia due to treatment with doxorubicin and ifosfamide (AI) combination chemotherapy. Methods Patients aged 18 or older with histologically confirmed, locally advanced or metastatic STS were treated with 1 cycle of AI followed by AI with eltrombopag starting at Cycle 2, using 2 different dosing schedules. The study design included an eltrombopag dose escalation phase starting at 75 mg daily to determine the optimal biological dose (OBD). Results Eighteen patients were enrolled and 15 received at least 1 dose of chemotherapy; 3 patients withdrew prior to receiving eltrombopag. Seven, 4, and 1 patients received 75 mg, 100 mg, and 150 mg eltrombopag daily, respectively. No dose-limiting toxicities were reported. Due to slow recruitment, the study was closed prior to identifying an OBD. The most common hematologic adverse events (AEs) were thrombocytopenia (80%), neutropenia (73%), and anemia (67%). The most common nonhematologic AEs were fatigue (53%), alanine aminotransferase increased, constipation, and nausea (47% each). Eleven of 12 patients who received eltrombopag completed at least 2 chemotherapy cycles; all had increased platelet counts on Day 1 of Cycle 2 (cycle with eltrombopag) compared to Day 1 of Cycle 1 (cycle without eltrombopag). Conclusions Although data are limited, safety data were consistent with the known toxicities of AI combination chemotherapy or the side effect profile of eltrombopag seen in other studies. Available data suggest a potential pre- and post-chemotherapy dosing scheme for eltrombopag when administered with AI chemotherapy, and support further investigation of eltrombopag treatment in patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. PMID:23497336

  16. Cosmic statistics of statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szapudi, István; Colombi, Stéphane; Bernardeau, Francis

    1999-12-01

    The errors on statistics measured in finite galaxy catalogues are exhaustively investigated. The theory of errors on factorial moments by Szapudi & Colombi is applied to cumulants via a series expansion method. All results are subsequently extended to the weakly non-linear regime. Together with previous investigations this yields an analytic theory of the errors for moments and connected moments of counts in cells from highly non-linear to weakly non-linear scales. For non-linear functions of unbiased estimators, such as the cumulants, the phenomenon of cosmic bias is identified and computed. Since it is subdued by the cosmic errors in the range of applicability of the theory, correction for it is inconsequential. In addition, the method of Colombi, Szapudi & Szalay concerning sampling effects is generalized, adapting the theory for inhomogeneous galaxy catalogues. While previous work focused on the variance only, the present article calculates the cross-correlations between moments and connected moments as well for a statistically complete description. The final analytic formulae representing the full theory are explicit but somewhat complicated. Therefore we have made available a fortran program capable of calculating the described quantities numerically (for further details e-mail SC at colombi@iap.fr). An important special case is the evaluation of the errors on the two-point correlation function, for which this should be more accurate than any method put forward previously. This tool will be immensely useful in the future for assessing the precision of measurements from existing catalogues, as well as aiding the design of new galaxy surveys. To illustrate the applicability of the results and to explore the numerical aspects of the theory qualitatively and quantitatively, the errors and cross-correlations are predicted under a wide range of assumptions for the future Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The principal results concerning the cumulants ξ, Q3 and Q4 is that

  17. Results on Dose Distributions in a Human Body from the Matroshka-R Experiment onboard the ISS Obtained with the Tissue-Equivalent Spherical Phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Nikolaev, Igor; Kartsev, Ivan; Tolochek, Raisa; Lyagushin, Vladimir

    The tissue-equivalent spherical phantom (32 kg mass, 35 cm diameter and 10 cm central spherical cave) made in Russia has been used on board the ISS in Matroshka-R experiment for more than 10 years. Both passive and active space radiation detectors can be located inside the phantom and on its surface. Due to the specially chosen phantom shape and size, the chord length distributions of the detector locations are attributed to self-shielding properties of the critical organs in a human body. Originally the spherical phantom was installed in the star board crew cabin of the ISS Service Module, then in the Piers-1, MIM-2, and MIM-1 modules of the ISS Russian segment, and finally in JAXA Kibo module. Total duration of the detector exposure is more than 2000 days in 9 sessions of the space experiment. In the first phase of the experiment with the spherical phantom the dose measurements were realized with only passive detectors (thermoluminescent and solid state track detectors). The detectors are placed inside the phantom along the axes of 20 containers and on the phantom outer surface in 32 pockets of the phantom jacket. After each session the passive detectors are returned to the ground. The results obtained show the dose difference on the phantom surface as much as a factor of 2, the highest dose being usually observed close to the outer wall of the compartment, and the lowest dose being in the opposite location along the phantom diameter. However, because of the ISS module shielding properties an inverse dose distribution in a human body can be observed when the dose rate maximum is closer to the geometrical center of the module. Maximum dose rate measured in the phantom is obviously due to the action of two radiation sources, namely, galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Earth’ radiation belts. Minimum dose rate is produced mainly by the strongly penetrating GCR particles and is mostly observed behind more than 5 g/cm2 tissue shielding. Critical organ doses, mean

  18. Description of statistical methods and a routine for determining the parameters of a model in processing experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usikov, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    A computer routine is suggested for selecting the optimum parameters of a theoretical model and determining the errors in them due to errors in physical measurements and for evaluating the conformity of theory with the experiment. The paper describes the specification sequence for the input data and the format of the calculation results. Sample printouts are appended.

  19. Results of a Survey of Illinois Academic Libraries Affiliated with ILLINET. Illinois Libraries Statistical Report No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhor, Herbert

    This publication reports the results of the first annual survey of those Illinois academic libraries affiliated with the Illinois Library and Information Network (ILLINET). It is noted that responses were received from 132 libraries, a 91 percent response rate. Information is presented on public use of academic library materials and services;…

  20. Teaching Science in Five Countries: Results From the TIMSS 1999 Video Study. Statistical Analysis Report. NCES 2006-011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Kathleen J.; Druker, Stephen L.; Garnier, Helen E.; Lemmens, Meike; Chen, Catherine; Kawanaka, Takako; Rasmussen, Dave; Trubacova, Svetlana; Warvi, Dagmar; Okamoto, Yukari; Stigler, James; Gallimore, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of eighth-grade science teaching, conducted as part of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 1999 Video Study. The Video Study is a supplement to the TIMSS 1999 student assessment, a successor to the TIMSS 1995 student assessment. The TIMSS 1999 Video Study had the broad purpose…

  1. Healthy birth weight results in higher vitamin A storage in neonate piglets administered high-dose supplements.

    PubMed

    Heying, Emily K; Hovel, Elizabeth; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2015-10-01

    A proposed intervention for newborn infants in countries with suspected vitamin A (VA) deficiency is to administer 50,000 IU retinyl palmitate at birth to reduce mortality risk. However, no studies have investigated birth weight effects. In this study, low birth weight (LBW; <1 kg, n = 18) and healthy birth weight (HBW) piglets (>1.5 kg, n = 18) from VA-depleted sows were dosed with 25,000 or 50,000 IU retinyl palmitate (26.2 or 52.4 µmol retinol equivalents) at birth to compare VA reserves. Blood was collected at varying times (n = 3-5/time/dose), and piglets were killed at 12 or 24 h for blood, liver, kidneys, spleen, lungs, adrenal gland, and intestinal contents. HBW piglets had significantly higher birth, death, and organ weights than LBW (P < 0.0001 for all). HBW and LBW piglets, which received VA, had higher liver and kidney VA concentrations (0.18 ± 0.09, 0.24 ± 0.10 µmol/g liver and 13.4 ± 4.1, 14.2 ± 4.5 nmol/g kidney, respectively) than controls (n = 10) (0.051 ± 0.01 µmol/g liver and 1.01 ± 0.43 nmol/g kidney) (P = 0.0061 and < 0.0001, respectively). Total liver (9.75 ± 5.16 µmol) and kidney retinol (204 ± 79.1 nmol) were higher in HBW than LBW piglets (P < 0.0001). Extrahepatic tissues, except lung, had higher VA concentration than controls (P < 0.0001). Serum retinol and ester concentrations were higher in treated than control piglets (P = 0.0028, P < 0.0001, respectively), and significantly changed during the times sampled (P = 0.022, P = 0.011, respectively). Peak serum retinyl ester concentrations, which occurred at 3 h, were higher in piglets that received 50,000 IU (4.2 ± 4.4 µmol/L) than 25,000 IU (2.7 ± 2.3 µmol/L) (P = 0.031). Regardless of dose amount, HBW piglets stored more supplemental VA than LBW piglets when administered at birth. PMID:25681469

  2. Healthy birth weight results in higher vitamin A storage in neonate piglets administered high-dose supplements

    PubMed Central

    Heying, Emily K; Hovel, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    A proposed intervention for newborn infants in countries with suspected vitamin A (VA) deficiency is to administer 50,000 IU retinyl palmitate at birth to reduce mortality risk. However, no studies have investigated birth weight effects. In this study, low birth weight (LBW; <1 kg, n = 18) and healthy birth weight (HBW) piglets (>1.5 kg, n = 18) from VA-depleted sows were dosed with 25,000 or 50,000 IU retinyl palmitate (26.2 or 52.4 µmol retinol equivalents) at birth to compare VA reserves. Blood was collected at varying times (n = 3–5/time/dose), and piglets were killed at 12 or 24 h for blood, liver, kidneys, spleen, lungs, adrenal gland, and intestinal contents. HBW piglets had significantly higher birth, death, and organ weights than LBW (P < 0.0001 for all). HBW and LBW piglets, which received VA, had higher liver and kidney VA concentrations (0.18 ± 0.09, 0.24 ± 0.10 µmol/g liver and 13.4 ± 4.1, 14.2 ± 4.5 nmol/g kidney, respectively) than controls (n = 10) (0.051 ± 0.01 µmol/g liver and 1.01 ± 0.43 nmol/g kidney) (P = 0.0061 and < 0.0001, respectively). Total liver (9.75 ± 5.16 µmol) and kidney retinol (204 ± 79.1 nmol) were higher in HBW than LBW piglets (P < 0.0001). Extrahepatic tissues, except lung, had higher VA concentration than controls (P < 0.0001). Serum retinol and ester concentrations were higher in treated than control piglets (P = 0.0028, P < 0.0001, respectively), and significantly changed during the times sampled (P = 0.022, P = 0.011, respectively). Peak serum retinyl ester concentrations, which occurred at 3 h, were higher in piglets that received 50,000 IU (4.2 ± 4.4 µmol/L) than 25,000 IU (2.7 ± 2.3 µmol/L) (P = 0.031). Regardless of dose amount, HBW piglets stored more supplemental VA than LBW piglets when administered at birth. PMID:25681469

  3. Cloud vertical structures detected by lidar and its statistical results at HeRO site in Hefei, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lu; Liu, Dong; Wang, Zhien; Wang, Zhenzhu; Wu, Decheng; Bo, Guangyu; Wang, Yingjian

    2014-11-01

    Extensive studies have illustrated the importance of obtaining exact vertical structures of clouds and aerosols for satellite and relevant climate simulations. However, challenging exists, for example, in distinguishing clouds from aerosols at times. Accurate cloud vertical profiles are mainly determined by cloud bases and heights. Based on the ground-based lidar observations in Hefei Radiation Observatory (HeRO), the vertical structures of clouds and aerosols in Hefei area(31.89°N 117.17°E) during May 2012-May 2014 have been investigated. The results show that the cloud fraction in the autumn and winter is less than that in the summer and spring, and is largest in the spring followed by the summer. The cloud fractions in the autumn and winter are comparable. The low cloud accounts for the most portion of the total. Compared with the cloud of the other heights, the high cloud is the least in the winter. Nearly 50% of the total vertical profiles can be detected by lidar as clouds and the proportion of the cloud of different heights seems to be stable annually. The fraction of low cloud is nearly 45%, medium cloud is nearly 35%, and high cloud is nearly 20%. In comparison with the results derived from CALIPSO, it is found that high cloud is usually missed for the ground-based lidar, while low cloud is usually omitted for the satellite observations. A combination of ground-based and space-borne lidar could lead to more reliable results. Further analysis will be performed in future studies.

  4. Statistical analyses of the results of 25 years of beach litter surveys on the south-eastern North Sea coast.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Marcus; Clemens, Thomas; Förster, Harald; Harder, Thorsten; Fleet, David; Gaus, Silvia; Grave, Christel; Flegel, Imme; Schrey, Eckart; Hartwig, Eike

    2015-08-01

    In the North Sea, the amount of litter present in the marine environment represents a severe environmental problem. In order to assess the magnitude of the problem and measure changes in abundance, the results of two beach litter monitoring programmes were compared and analysed for long-term trends applying multivariate techniques. Total beach litter pollution was persistently high. Spatial differences in litter abundance made it difficult to identify long-term trends: Partly more than 8000 litter items year(-1) were recorded on a 100 m long survey site on the island of Scharhörn, while the survey site on the beach on the island of Amrum revealed abundances lower by two orders of magnitude. Beach litter was dominated by plastic with mean proportions of 52%-91% of total beach litter. Non-parametric time series analyses detected many significant trends, which, however, did not show any systematic spatial patterns. Cluster analyses partly led to groupings of beaches according to their expositions to sources of litter, wind and currents. Surveys in short intervals of one to two weeks were found to give higher annual sums of beach litter than the quarterly surveys of the OSPAR method. Surveys at regular intervals of four weeks to five months would make monitoring results more reliable.

  5. Statistical analyses of the results of 25 years of beach litter surveys on the south-eastern North Sea coast.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Marcus; Clemens, Thomas; Förster, Harald; Harder, Thorsten; Fleet, David; Gaus, Silvia; Grave, Christel; Flegel, Imme; Schrey, Eckart; Hartwig, Eike

    2015-08-01

    In the North Sea, the amount of litter present in the marine environment represents a severe environmental problem. In order to assess the magnitude of the problem and measure changes in abundance, the results of two beach litter monitoring programmes were compared and analysed for long-term trends applying multivariate techniques. Total beach litter pollution was persistently high. Spatial differences in litter abundance made it difficult to identify long-term trends: Partly more than 8000 litter items year(-1) were recorded on a 100 m long survey site on the island of Scharhörn, while the survey site on the beach on the island of Amrum revealed abundances lower by two orders of magnitude. Beach litter was dominated by plastic with mean proportions of 52%-91% of total beach litter. Non-parametric time series analyses detected many significant trends, which, however, did not show any systematic spatial patterns. Cluster analyses partly led to groupings of beaches according to their expositions to sources of litter, wind and currents. Surveys in short intervals of one to two weeks were found to give higher annual sums of beach litter than the quarterly surveys of the OSPAR method. Surveys at regular intervals of four weeks to five months would make monitoring results more reliable. PMID:26026589

  6. Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation following high-dose immunosuppressive therapy for advanced multiple sclerosis: long-term results.

    PubMed

    Bowen, J D; Kraft, G H; Wundes, A; Guan, Q; Maravilla, K R; Gooley, T A; McSweeney, P A; Pavletic, S Z; Openshaw, H; Storb, R; Wener, M; McLaughlin, B A; Henstorf, G R; Nash, R A

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the long-term safety and effectiveness of high-dose immunosuppressive therapy (HDIT) followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) in advanced multiple sclerosis (MS). TBI, CY and antithymocyte globulin were followed by transplantation of autologous, CD34-selected PBSCs. Neurological examinations, brain magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for oligoclonal bands (OCB) were serially evaluated. Patients (n=26, mean Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS)=7.0, 17 secondary progressive, 8 primary progressive, 1 relapsing/remitting) were followed for a median of 48 months after HDIT followed by AHCT. The 72-month probability of worsening ≥1.0 EDSS point was 0.52 (95% confidence interval, 0.30-0.75). Five patients had an EDSS at baseline of ≤6.0; four of them had not failed treatment at last study visit. OCB in CSF persisted with minor changes in the banding pattern. Four new or enhancing lesions were seen on MRI, all within 13 months of treatment. In this population with high baseline EDSS, a significant proportion of patients with advanced MS remained stable for as long as 7 years after transplant. Non-inflammatory events may have contributed to neurological worsening after treatment. HDIT/AHCT may be more effective in patients with less advanced relapsing/remitting MS.

  7. Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation following high-dose immunosuppressive therapy for advanced multiple sclerosis: long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, James D.; Kraft, George H.; Wundes, Annette; Guan, QingYan; Maravilla, Kenneth R.; Gooley, Theodore A.; McSweeney, Peter A.; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Openshaw, Harry; Storb, Rainer; Wener, Mark; McLaughlin, Bernadette A.; Henstorf, Gretchen R.; Nash, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the long-term safety and effectiveness of high-dose immunosuppressive therapy (HDIT) followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) in advanced multiple sclerosis (MS). Total body irradiation, cyclophosphamide, and antithymocyte globulin were followed by transplantation of autologous, CD34-selected peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). Neurological examinations, brain MRIs and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for oligoclonal bands (OCB) were serially evaluated. Patients (n=26, mean EDSS=7.0, 17 secondary progressive, 8 primary progressive, 1 relapsing/remitting) were followed for a median of 48 months after HDIT followed by AHCT. The 72-month probability of worsening ≥ 1.0 EDSS point was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.30 to 0.75). Five patients had an EDSS at baseline of ≤ 6.0; four of these had not failed treatment at last study visit. OCB in CSF persisted with minor changes in the banding pattern. Four new or enhancing lesions were seen on MRI, all within 13 months of treatment. In this population with high baseline EDSS, a significant proportion of patients with advanced MS remained stable as long as 7 years after transplant. Non-inflammatory events may have contributed to neurological worsening after treatment. HDIT/AHCT may be more effective in patients with less advanced relapsing/remitting MS. PMID:22056644

  8. The Protective Effect of Low-Dose Aspirin against Colorectal Cancer Is Unlikely Explained by Selection Bias: Results from Three Different Study Designs in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Cea Soriano, Lucía; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse; García Rodríguez, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Background We conducted three differently designed nested case–control studies to evaluate whether the protective effect of low-dose aspirin against colorectal cancer (CRC) is explained by selection bias. Methods Using a large validated UK primary care database, we followed different cohorts of patients, who varied in their demographic and clinical characteristics, to identify first ever cases of CRC. In Studies 1 and 2, two cohorts were followed, i) new users of low-dose aspirin at start of follow-up (N = 170,336 in Study 1, N = 171,527 in Study 2) and either ii) non-users of low-dose aspirin (Study 1, N = 170,336) or new users of paracetamol (Study 2, N = 149,597) at start of follow-up. In Study 3 a single cohort of individuals näive to low-dose aspirin at the start of observation was followed. Controls were selected using incidence sampling and logistic regression used to obtain an unbiased estimate of the incidence rate ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Low-dose aspirin exposure was analyzed ‘as-treated’ before the index date (CRC date for cases, random date for controls). Results In the three studies, median (maximum) follow-up was 5.1 (12), 5.8 (12) and 7.5 (13) years, respectively. 3033 incident CRC cases were identified in Study 1, 3174 in Study 2, and 12,333 in Study 3. Current use of low-dose aspirin was associated with a significantly reduced risk of 34%, 29% and 31% in the three studies, respectively; corresponding RRs (95% CIs) were 0.66 (0.60–0.73), 0.71 (0.63–0.80) and 0.69 (0.64–0.74). In each study, significantly reduced risks of CRC were seen when low-dose aspirin was used for primary or secondary cardiovascular disease prevention, in both sexes, and across all age groups evaluated. Conclusion Low-dose aspirin is associated with a significantly reduced risk of CRC. The consistency of our findings across different studies makes selection bias an unlikely explanation. PMID:27428004

  9. Risk of gastrointestinal complications associated to NSAIDs, low-dose aspirin and their combinations: Results of a pharmacovigilance reporting system.

    PubMed

    Rafaniello, Concetta; Ferrajolo, Carmen; Sullo, Maria Giuseppa; Sessa, Maurizio; Sportiello, Liberata; Balzano, Antonio; Manguso, Francesco; Aiezza, Maria Luisa; Rossi, Francesco; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Capuano, Annalisa

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are one of the most limiting cause of use of NSAIDs. Beyond others well defined factors, history of peptic ulcer, older age, Helicobacter pylori infection and use of gastrotoxic drugs may affect their GI safety profile. In particular, the risk of GI complications associated to the use of antiplatelet drugs, especially low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (LDA) should deserve much attention. However, only few studies have focused on the effect of combination LDA/NSAIDs on the GI tract compared with the monotherapy and much less studies assessed this effect with multiple NSAIDs use. We aimed to characterize the GI safety profile of NSAIDs and LDA as monotherapy or their combinations in real-life conditions by analysing spontaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reporting system in a Southern Italy. We used the case/non-case method in the Italian Pharmacovigilance Network (RNF). Cases were reports of GI events in the RNF between January 2007 and December 2011. Non-cases were all other reports during the same period. The association between NSAID and suspected GI ADRs was calculated using the reporting odds ratio (ROR) with 95% confidence intervals as a measure of disproportionality while adjusting for age, and concomitant use of antineoplastic agents or drugs for cardiovascular diseases. Sub-analysis were performed within the NSAID class. Among the 2816 adverse drug reactions recorded, we identified 374 (13.3%) cases of GI complications. Upper GI complications were the most frequently reported type of events. The highest associations were found for the combined use of NSAIDs and/or LDA, whilst the lowest associations were for their respective monotherapy. Looking at individual NSAIDs the highest association with GI events was observed for ketorolac exposure followed by nimesulide, diclofenac, aspirin, ketoprofen, and ibuprofen. This study highlights the primary role of the national spontaneous reporting system to bring out potential signals

  10. Immunogenicity and safety of low-dose intradermal rabies vaccination given during an Expanded Programme on immunization session in Viet Nam: results of a comparative randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Lang, J; Hoa, D Q; Gioi, N V; Vien, N C; Nguyen, C V; Rouyrre, N; Forrat, R

    1999-01-01

    The World Health Organization recently recommended a rabies vaccine pre-exposure schedule using 3 intradermal (i.d.) injections of one-fifth the standard intramuscular (i.m.) dose of current cell culture vaccines as a cost-reducing alternative for developing countries. As a strategy to improve further the acceptability of childhood rabies immunization, we assessed, in a controlled, randomized trial performed in 240 Vietnamese infants, the possibility of associating i.d. administration of a one-fifth dose of purified Vero-cell rabies vaccine (PVRV) with routine Expanded Programme on Immunization vaccines given at 2, 3 and 4 months of age (diphtheria, tetanus, whole-cell pertussis and inactivated poliomyelitis combined vaccine, DTP-IPV). Safety and immunogenicity results were compared with a group of infants given 2 i.m. doses of PVRV (2, 4 months) in association with DTP-IPV (2, 3, 4 months). After i.d. injection, more infants experienced local reactions, particularly redness, but these reactions were generally mild and transient. The rate of systemic reactions was the same in both groups. Although the rabies antibody titres (rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test) were higher 1 month after the third vaccine dose in the i.m. group (30.6 IU/mL vs 12.0 IU/mL in the i.d. group), all infants in both groups had achieved WHO-acceptable protective antibody titres (> or = 0.5 IU/mL) at this time. There was no evidence for any interference between DTP-IPV and rabies vaccine, supporting the interest of a low-dose i.d. PVRV pre-exposure regimen in infants living in rabies-endemic developing countries. PMID:10450451

  11. Efficacy and safety of desmopressin orally disintegrating tablet in patients with central diabetes insipidus: results of a multicenter open-label dose-titration study.

    PubMed

    Arima, Hiroshi; Oiso, Yutaka; Juul, Kristian Vinter; Nørgaard, Jens Peter

    2013-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is associated with arginine vasopressin (AVP) deficiency with resultant polyuria and polydipsia. Intranasal desmopressin provides physiological replacement but oral formulations are preferred for their ease of administration. This study aimed to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of desmopressin orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) in the treatment of Japanese patients with CDI, and confirm that antidiuresis is maintained on switching from intranasal desmopressin to desmopressin ODT. A total of 20 patients aged 6-75 years with CDI were included in this 4-week multicenter, open-label study. Following observation, patients switched from intranasal desmopressin to desmopressin ODT with titration to optimal dose over ≤5 days at the study site. Following three consecutive doses with stable patient fluid balance, patients were discharged with visits at Weeks 2 and 4. Following titration from intranasal desmopressin to ODT, the mean 24-hour urine volume was unchanged, indicating similar antidiuresis with both formulations. The proportion of patients with endpoint measurements (urine osmolality, 24-hour urine volume, hourly diuresis rate and urine-specific gravity) within normal range at Days 1-2 (intranasal desmopressin) and Week 4 (desmopressin ODT) was similar. The mean daily dose ratio of intranasal desmopressin to desmopressin ODT (Week 4) was 1:24 but a wide range was observed across individuals to maintain adequate antidiuretic effect. Hyponatraemia was generally mild and managed by dose titration. Desmopressin ODT achieved sufficient antidiuretic control compared to intranasal therapy and was well tolerated over long-term treatment. The wide range of intranasal:ODT dose ratios underline the importance of individual titration. PMID:23811987

  12. Efficacy and safety of desmopressin orally disintegrating tablet in patients with central diabetes insipidus: results of a multicenter open-label dose-titration study.

    PubMed

    Arima, Hiroshi; Oiso, Yutaka; Juul, Kristian Vinter; Nørgaard, Jens Peter

    2013-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is associated with arginine vasopressin (AVP) deficiency with resultant polyuria and polydipsia. Intranasal desmopressin provides physiological replacement but oral formulations are preferred for their ease of administration. This study aimed to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of desmopressin orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) in the treatment of Japanese patients with CDI, and confirm that antidiuresis is maintained on switching from intranasal desmopressin to desmopressin ODT. A total of 20 patients aged 6-75 years with CDI were included in this 4-week multicenter, open-label study. Following observation, patients switched from intranasal desmopressin to desmopressin ODT with titration to optimal dose over ≤5 days at the study site. Following three consecutive doses with stable patient fluid balance, patients were discharged with visits at Weeks 2 and 4. Following titration from intranasal desmopressin to ODT, the mean 24-hour urine volume was unchanged, indicating similar antidiuresis with both formulations. The proportion of patients with endpoint measurements (urine osmolality, 24-hour urine volume, hourly diuresis rate and urine-specific gravity) within normal range at Days 1-2 (intranasal desmopressin) and Week 4 (desmopressin ODT) was similar. The mean daily dose ratio of intranasal desmopressin to desmopressin ODT (Week 4) was 1:24 but a wide range was observed across individuals to maintain adequate antidiuretic effect. Hyponatraemia was generally mild and managed by dose titration. Desmopressin ODT achieved sufficient antidiuretic control compared to intranasal therapy and was well tolerated over long-term treatment. The wide range of intranasal:ODT dose ratios underline the importance of individual titration.

  13. Estimating statistical uncertainty of Monte Carlo efficiency-gain in the context of a correlated sampling Monte Carlo code for brachytherapy treatment planning with non-normal dose distribution.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D; Sampson, Andrew J; Deniz, Daniel; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun; Williamson, Jeffrey; Malusek, Alexandr

    2012-01-01

    Correlated sampling Monte Carlo methods can shorten computing times in brachytherapy treatment planning. Monte Carlo efficiency is typically estimated via efficiency gain, defined as the reduction in computing time by correlated sampling relative to conventional Monte Carlo methods when equal statistical uncertainties have been achieved. The determination of the efficiency gain uncertainty arising from random effects, however, is not a straightforward task specially when the error distribution is non-normal. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the applicability of the F distribution and standardized uncertainty propagation methods (widely used in metrology to estimate uncertainty of physical measurements) for predicting confidence intervals about efficiency gain estimates derived from single Monte Carlo runs using fixed-collision correlated sampling in a simplified brachytherapy geometry. A bootstrap based algorithm was used to simulate the probability distribution of the efficiency gain estimates and the shortest 95% confidence interval was estimated from this distribution. It was found that the corresponding relative uncertainty was as large as 37% for this particular problem. The uncertainty propagation framework predicted confidence intervals reasonably well; however its main disadvantage was that uncertainties of input quantities had to be calculated in a separate run via a Monte Carlo method. The F distribution noticeably underestimated the confidence interval. These discrepancies were influenced by several photons with large statistical weights which made extremely large contributions to the scored absorbed dose difference. The mechanism of acquiring high statistical weights in the fixed-collision correlated sampling method was explained and a mitigation strategy was proposed.

  14. Split-course radiation therapy of carcinoma of the nasopharynx: results of a national collaborative clinical trial of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. [Comparative effectiveness of fractionated and split-dose radiotherapy and complications

    SciTech Connect

    Marcial, V.A.; Hanley, J.A.; Chang, C.; Davis, L.W.; Moscol, J.A.

    1980-04-01

    The initial results of a prospective randomized collaborative therapeutic trial of split-course radiotherapy in carcinoma of the nasopharynx are reported. The split-course therapy consisted of two irradiation courses, each delivering 3000 rad in 2 weeks, in 10 fractions of 300 rad. The courses were separated by a rest period of 3 weeks. Continuous radiation therapy consisted of 30 fractions of 220 rad each, for a total dose of 6600 rad. One hundred and nine patients were eligible for analysis with a minimal follow-up period of 1 year. No statistically significant differences were observed in the two therapeutic groups with regard to acute toxicity (normal tissue reactions, completion of therapy, and need of hospitalization during radiotherapy), late toxicity, incidence of distant metastases, patients who became free of clinically detectable tumor in the primary and neck sites at last follow-up or at death, and survival after therapy.

  15. Cognitive Results of CANTAB Tests and Their Change Due to the First Dose of Donepezil May Predict Treatment Efficacy in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmickienė, Jurgita; Kaubrys, Gintaras

    2015-01-01

    Background Ability to predict the efficacy of treatment in Alzheimer disease (AD) may be very useful in clinical practice. Cognitive predictors should be investigated alongside with the demographic, genetic, and other predictors of treatment efficacy. The aim of this study was to establish whether the baseline measures of CANTAB tests and their changes due to the first donepezil dose are able to predict the efficacy of treatment after 4 months of therapy. We also compared the predictive value of cognitive, clinical, and demographic predictors of treatment efficacy in AD. Material/Methods Seventy-two AD patients (62 treatment-naïve and 10 donepezil-treated) and 30 controls were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, rater-blinded, follow-up study. Treatment-naïve AD patients were randomized to 2 groups to take the first donepezil dose after the first or second CANTAB testing, separated by 4 hours. Follow-up Test 3 was performed 4 months after the initial assessment. Results The groups were similar in age, education, gender, Hachinski index, and depression. General Regression Models (GRM) have shown that cognitive changes after the first dose of donepezil in PAL (t-values for regression coefficients from 3.43 to 6.44), PRMd (t=4.33), SWM (t=5.85) test scores, and baseline results of PAL (t=2.57–2.86), PRM (t=3.08), and CRT (t=3.42) tests were significant predictors of long-term donepezil efficacy in AD (p<0.05). Conclusions The cognitive changes produced by the first donepezil dose in CANTAB PAL, PRM, and SWM test measures are able to predict the long-term efficacy of donepezil in AD. Baseline PAL, PRM, and CRT test results were significant predictors. PMID:26656642

  16. Cognitive Results of CANTAB Tests and Their Change Due to the First Dose of Donepezil May Predict Treatment Efficacy in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuzmickienė, Jurgita; Kaubrys, Gintaras

    2015-12-14

    BACKGROUND Ability to predict the efficacy of treatment in Alzheimer disease (AD) may be very useful in clinical practice. Cognitive predictors should be investigated alongside with the demographic, genetic, and other predictors of treatment efficacy. The aim of this study was to establish whether the baseline measures of CANTAB tests and their changes due to the first donepezil dose are able to predict the efficacy of treatment after 4 months of therapy. We also compared the predictive value of cognitive, clinical, and demographic predictors of treatment efficacy in AD. MATERIAL AND METHODS Seventy-two AD patients (62 treatment-naïve and 10 donepezil-treated) and 30 controls were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, rater-blinded, follow-up study. Treatment-naïve AD patients were randomized to 2 groups to take the first donepezil dose after the first or second CANTAB testing, separated by 4 hours. Follow-up Test 3 was performed 4 months after the initial assessment. RESULTS The groups were similar in age, education, gender, Hachinski index, and depression. General Regression Models (GRM) have shown that cognitive changes after the first dose of donepezil in PAL (t-values for regression coefficients from 3.43 to 6.44), PRMd (t=4.33), SWM (t=5.85) test scores, and baseline results of PAL (t=2.57-2.86), PRM (t=3.08), and CRT (t=3.42) tests were significant predictors of long-term donepezil efficacy in AD (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS The cognitive changes produced by the first donepezil dose in CANTAB PAL, PRM, and SWM test measures are able to predict the long-term efficacy of donepezil in AD. Baseline PAL, PRM, and CRT test results were significant predictors.

  17. Long-Term Results After High-Dose Radiotherapy and Adjuvant Hormones in Prostate Cancer: How Curable Is High-Risk Disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Zapatero, Almudena; Garcia-Vicente, Feliciano; Martin de Vidales, Carmen; Cruz Conde, Alfonso; Ibanez, Yamile; Fernandez, Inmaculada; Rabadan, Mariano

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze long-term outcome and prognostic factors for high-risk prostate cancer defined by National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria treated with high-dose radiotherapy and androgen deprivation in a single institution. Methods and Materials: A total of 306 patients treated between 1995 and 2007 in a radiation dose-escalation program fulfilled the National Comprehensive Cancer Network high-risk criteria. Median International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements radiation dose was 78 Gy (range, 66.0-84.1 Gy). Long-term androgen deprivation (LTAD) was administered in 231 patients, short-term androgen deprivation (STAD) in 59 patients, and no hormones in 16 patients. The Phoenix (nadir plus 2 ng/mL) consensus definition was used for biochemical control. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the independent prognostic impact of clinical and treatment factors. Median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 24-171 months). Results: The actuarial overall survival at 5 and 10 years was 95.7% and 89.8%, respectively, and the corresponding biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was 89.5% and 67.2%, respectively. Fourteen patients (4.6%) developed distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis showed that Gleason score >7 (p = 0.001), pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >20 ng/mL (p = 0.037), higher radiation dose (p = 0.005), and the use of adjuvant LTAD vs. STAD (p = 0.011) were independent prognostic factors affecting bDFS in high-risk disease. The 5-year bDFS for patients treated with LTAD plus radiotherapy dose >78 Gy was 97%. Conclusions: For high-risk patients the present series showed that the use of LTAD in conjunction with higher doses (>78 Gy) of radiotherapy was associated with improved biochemical tumor control. We observed that the presence of Gleason sum >7 and pretreatment PSA level >20 ng/mL in the same patient represents a 6.8 times higher risk of PSA failure. These men could be considered for clinical trials with

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Results of a Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Heron, Dwight E.; Ferris, Robert L.; Karamouzis, Michalis; Andrade, Regiane S.; Deeb, Erin L.; Burton, Steven; Gooding, William E.; Branstetter, Barton F.; Mountz, James M.; Johnson, Jonas T.; Argiris, Athanassios; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Lai, Stephen Y.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in previously irradiated patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods: In this Phase I dose-escalation clinical trial, 25 patients were treated in five dose tiers up to 44 Gy, administered in 5 fractions over a 2-week course. Response was assessed according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors and [{sup 18}F]-fluorodeoxyglucose standardized uptake value change on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). Results: No Grade 3/4 or dose-limiting toxicities occurred. Four patients had Grade 1/2 acute toxicities. Four objective responses were observed, for a response rate of 17% (95% confidence interval 2%-33%). The maximum duration of response was 4 months. Twelve patients had stable disease. Median time to disease progression was 4 months, and median overall survival was 6 months. Self-reported quality of life was not significantly affected by treatment. Fluorodeoxyglucose PET was a more sensitive early-measure response to treatment than CT volume changes. Conclusion: Reirradiation up to 44 Gy using SBRT is well tolerated in the acute setting and warrants further evaluation in combination with conventional and targeted therapies.

  19. Lack of radiological and clinical benefit over two years of low dose prednisolone for rheumatoid arthritis: results of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Capell, H; Madhok, R; Hunter, J; Porter, D; Morrison, E; Larkin, J; Thomson, E; Hampson, R; Poon, F

    2004-01-01

    Background: Evidence for disease modifying activity of low dose corticosteroid treatment in rheumatoid arthritis is contradictory. Studies showing radiological benefit suggest that continued treatment is required to sustain the effect. Objective: To evaluate the effect of low dose oral prednisolone in early rheumatoid arthritis on disease activity over two years. Design: Double blind placebo controlled trial. Methods: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis, duration <3 years (n = 167), were started on a disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD; sulphasalazine) and allocated by stratified randomisation to prednisolone 7 mg/day or placebo. Primary outcome measure was radiological damage, assessed by the modified Sharp method. Clinical benefit was a secondary outcome. A proactive approach to identifying and treating corticosteroid adverse events was adopted. Patients who discontinued sulphasalazine were offered an alternative DMARD. Results: 90 of 257 patients eligible for the study refused to participate (more women than men). Of those enrolled, 84% were seropositive for rheumatoid factor, median age 56 years, median disease duration 12 months, female to male ratio 1.8:1. Prednisolone was given to 84 patients; of these 73% continued prednisolone and 70% sulphasalazine at 2 years. Of the 83 patients on placebo, 80% continued placebo and 64% sulphasalazine at 2 years. There were no significant differences in radiological score or clinical and laboratory measures at 0 and 2 years. Conclusions: Low dose prednisolone conferred no radiological or clinical benefit on patients maintained on a DMARD over two years. Low dose corticosteroids have no role in the routine management of rheumatoid arthritis treated with conventional disease modifying drugs. PMID:15194574

  20. Increasing Dose of Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Transplantation Is Related to Stroke Outcome: Results from a Pooled Analysis of Two Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Moniche, Francisco; Rosado-de-Castro, Paulo Henrique; Escudero, Irene; Zapata, Elena; de la Torre Laviana, Francisco Javier; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Carmona, Magdalena; Piñero, Pilar; Bustamante, Alejandro; Lebrato, Lucía; Cabezas, Juan Antonio; Gonzalez, Alejandro; de Freitas, Grabriel R; Montaner, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. BM-MNC transplantation improves recovery in experimental models of ischemic stroke. Clinical trials are ongoing to test efficacy in stroke patients. However, whether cell dose is related to outcomes is not known. Methods. We performed a pooling data analysis of two pilot clinical trials with autologous BM-MNCs transplantation in ischemic stroke patients. Cell dose and route were analyzed to evaluate their relation to good outcome (m-Rankin scale [mRS] score 0-2) at 6 months. Results. Twenty-two patients were included. A median of 153 × 10(6) (±121 × 10(6)) BM-MNCs was injected. Intra-arterial route was used in 77.3% of cases. A higher number of cells injected were associated with better outcomes at 180 days (390 × 10(6) [320-422] BM-MNCs injected in those patients with mRS of 0-2 at 6 months versus 130 × 10(6) [89-210] in those patients with mRS 3-6, p = 0.015). In the intra-arterially treated patients, a strong correlation between dose of cells and disability was found (r = -0.63, p = 0.006). A cut point of 310 × 10(6) injected cells predicted good outcome with 80% sensitivity and 88.2% specificity. Conclusions. Similar to preclinical studies, a higher dose of autologous BM-MNC was related to better outcome in stroke patients, especially when more than 310 × 10(6) cells are injected. Further interventional studies are warranted to confirm these data. PMID:27525011

  1. Increasing Dose of Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Transplantation Is Related to Stroke Outcome: Results from a Pooled Analysis of Two Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Irene; Zapata, Elena; de la Torre Laviana, Francisco Javier; Carmona, Magdalena; Piñero, Pilar; Bustamante, Alejandro; Lebrato, Lucía; Cabezas, Juan Antonio; Gonzalez, Alejandro; de Freitas, Grabriel R.; Montaner, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. BM-MNC transplantation improves recovery in experimental models of ischemic stroke. Clinical trials are ongoing to test efficacy in stroke patients. However, whether cell dose is related to outcomes is not known. Methods. We performed a pooling data analysis of two pilot clinical trials with autologous BM-MNCs transplantation in ischemic stroke patients. Cell dose and route were analyzed to evaluate their relation to good outcome (m-Rankin scale [mRS] score 0–2) at 6 months. Results. Twenty-two patients were included. A median of 153 × 106 (±121 × 106) BM-MNCs was injected. Intra-arterial route was used in 77.3% of cases. A higher number of cells injected were associated with better outcomes at 180 days (390 × 106 [320–422] BM-MNCs injected in those patients with mRS of 0–2 at 6 months versus 130 × 106 [89–210] in those patients with mRS 3–6, p = 0.015). In the intra-arterially treated patients, a strong correlation between dose of cells and disability was found (r = −0.63, p = 0.006). A cut point of 310 × 106 injected cells predicted good outcome with 80% sensitivity and 88.2% specificity. Conclusions. Similar to preclinical studies, a higher dose of autologous BM-MNC was related to better outcome in stroke patients, especially when more than 310 × 106 cells are injected. Further interventional studies are warranted to confirm these data. PMID:27525011

  2. Hypofractionated High-Dose Proton Beam Therapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Preliminary Results of A Phase I/II Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Masaharu . E-mail: mhata@syd.odn.ne.jp; Tokuuye, Koichi; Kagei, Kenji; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To present treatment outcomes of hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with Stage I NSCLC (11 with Stage IA and 10 with Stage IB) underwent hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy. At the time of irradiation, patient age ranged from 51 to 85 years (median, 74 years). Nine patients were medically inoperable because of comorbidities, and 12 patients refused surgical resection. Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 6 patients, adenocarcinoma in 14, and large cell carcinoma in 1. Tumor size ranged from 10 to 42 mm (median, 25 mm) in maximum diameter. Three and 18 patients received proton beam irradiation with total doses of 50 Gy and 60 Gy in 10 fractions, respectively, to primary tumor sites. Results: Of 21 patients, 2 died of cancer and 2 died of pneumonia at a median follow-up period of 25 months. The 2-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 74% and 86%, respectively. All but one of the irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period. Five patients showed recurrences 6-29 months after treatment, including local progression and new lung lesions outside of the irradiated volume in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. The local progression-free and disease-free rates were 95% and 79% at 2 years, respectively. No therapy-related toxicity of Grade {>=}3 was observed. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy seems feasible and effective for Stage I NSCLC. Proton beams may contribute to enhanced efficacy and lower toxicity in the treatment of patients with Stage I NSCLC.

  3. Predictors for Rectal and Intestinal Acute Toxicities During Prostate Cancer High-Dose 3D-CRT: Results of a Prospective Multicenter Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vavassori, Vittorio; Fiorino, Claudio . E-mail: fiorino.claudio@hsr.it; Rancati, Tiziana; Magli, Alessandro; Fellin, Gianni; Baccolini, Michela; Bianchi, Carla; Cagna, Emanuela; Mauro, Flora A.; Monti, Angelo F.; Munoz, Fernando; Stasi, Michele; Franzone, Paola; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To find predictors for rectal and intestinal acute toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with {>=}70 Gy conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between July 2002 and March 2004, 1,132 patients were entered into a cooperative study (AIROPROS01-02). Toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scale and by considering the changes (before and after treatment) of the scores of a self-administered questionnaire on rectal/intestinal toxicity. The correlation with a number of parameters was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Concerning the questionnaire, only moderate/severe complications were considered. Results: Of 1,132 patients, 1,123 were evaluable. Of these patients, 375, 265, and 28 had Grade 1, 2, and 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity, respectively. The mean rectal dose was the most predictive parameter (p = 0.0004; odds ratio, 1.035) for Grade 2 or worse toxicity, and the use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants (p 0.02; odds ratio, 0.63) and hormonal therapy (p = 0.04, odds ratio, 0.65) were protective. The questionnaire-based scoring revealed that a greater mean rectal dose was associated with a greater risk of bleeding; larger irradiated volumes were associated with frequency, tenesmus, incontinence, and bleeding; hormonal therapy was protective against frequency and tenesmus; hemorrhoids were associated with a greater risk of tenesmus and bleeding; and diabetes associated highly with diarrhea. Conclusion: The mean rectal dose correlated with acute rectal/intestinal toxicity in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and hormonal therapy and the use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants were protective. According to the moderate/severe injury scores on the self-assessed questionnaire, several clinical and dose-volume parameters were independently predictive for

  4. High energy ions and electrons upstream from the Earth's bow shock and their dependence on geomagnetic conditions: Statistical results between years 1982-1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Kaliabetsos, G.; Argyropoulos, G.; Sarris, E. T.

    We present initial results from a statistical analysis of 2034 energetic (50-220 keV) ion events observed by the IMP-8 spacecraft upstream from the Earth’s bow shock during a 6 years period. The most important findings are the following: (1) the percentage Pe of high intensity energetic ion events accompanied by the presence of relativistic (≥ 220 keV) electrons is ˜80% (for all geomagnetic conditions), and increases significantly with increasing the index Kp of geomagnetic activity, (2) high intensity energetic ion events most often (˜93%) show spectra extending up to energies E>˜300 keV, (3) a percentage of ˜71.5% of events display non-inverse energy dispersion of ion intensities. The above results, as well as additional results discussed in the text, suggest that a percentage as high as ˜80% of high intensity 50-220 keV ion events in our statistical sample have an origin within the magnetosphere.

  5. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  6. SU-C-18C-06: Radiation Dose Reduction in Body Interventional Radiology: Clinical Results Utilizing a New Imaging Acquisition and Processing Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Kohlbrenner, R; Kolli, KP; Taylor, A; Kohi, M; Fidelman, N; LaBerge, J; Kerlan, R; Gould, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the patient radiation dose reduction achieved during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) procedures performed in a body interventional radiology suite equipped with the Philips Allura Clarity imaging acquisition and processing platform, compared to TACE procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform. Methods: Total fluoroscopy time, cumulative dose area product, and cumulative air kerma were recorded for the first 25 TACE procedures performed to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a Philips body interventional radiology suite equipped with Philips Allura Clarity. The same data were collected for the prior 85 TACE procedures performed to treat HCC in the same suite equipped with Philips Allura Xper. Mean values from these cohorts were compared using two-tailed t tests. Results: Following installation of the Philips Allura Clarity platform, a 42.8% reduction in mean cumulative dose area product (3033.2 versus 1733.6 mGycm∧2, p < 0.0001) and a 31.2% reduction in mean cumulative air kerma (1445.4 versus 994.2 mGy, p < 0.001) was achieved compared to similar procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform. Mean total fluoroscopy time was not significantly different between the two cohorts (1679.3 versus 1791.3 seconds, p = 0.41). Conclusion: This study demonstrates a significant patient radiation dose reduction during TACE procedures performed to treat HCC after a body interventional radiology suite was converted to the Philips Allura Clarity platform from the Philips Allura Xper platform. Future work will focus on evaluation of patient dose reduction in a larger cohort of patients across a broader range of procedures and in specific populations, including obese patients and pediatric patients, and comparison of image quality between the two platforms. Funding for this study was provided by Philips Healthcare, with 5% salary support provided to authors K. Pallav

  7. Odanacatib, a selective cathepsin K inhibitor to treat osteoporosis: safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics – results from single oral dose studies in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Stoch, S Aubrey; Zajic, Stefan; Stone, Julie A; Miller, Deborah L; Bortel, Lucas; Lasseter, Kenneth C; Pramanik, Barnali; Cilissen, Caroline; Liu, Qi; Liu, Lida; Scott, Boyd B; Panebianco, Deborah; Ding, Yu; Gottesdiener, Keith; Wagner, John A

    2013-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of odanacatib (ODN), a cathepsin K inhibitor, in humans. Methods Two double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, single oral dose studies were performed with ODN (2–600 mg) in 44 healthy volunteers (36 men and eight postmenopausal women). Results Adverse experiences (AEs) with single doses of ODN were transient and mild to moderate, with the exception of one severe AE of gastroenteritis. Headache was the most frequent AE. After absorption of ODN (initial peak concentrations 4–6 h postdose), plasma concentrations exhibited a monophasic decline, with an apparent terminal half-life of ∼40–80 h. The area under the curve0-24 hours (AUC0–24 h), concentration at 24 hours (C24 h) and maximum concentration (Cmax,overal) increased in a less than dose-proportional manner from 2 to 600 mg. Administration of ODN with a high-fat meal led to ∼100% increases in AUC0–24 h, Cmax,day1, Cmax,overall and C24 h relative to the fasted state, while administration with a low-fat meal led to a ∼30% increase in those parameters. Reduction of biomarkers of bone resorption, the C- and N-telopeptides of cross-links of type I collagen, (CTx and NTx, respectively), was noted at 24 h for doses ≥5 mg and at 168 h postdose for ≥10 mg. In postmenopausal women administered 50 mg ODN, reductions in serum CTx of −66% and urine NTx/creatinine (uNTx/Cr) of −51% relative to placebo were observed at 24 h. At 168 h, reductions in serum CTx (−70%) and uNTx/Cr (−78%) were observed relative to baseline. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling characterized the ODN concentration/uNTx/Cr relation, with a modeled EC50 value of 43.8 nM and ∼80% maximal reduction. Conclusions Odanacatib was well tolerated and has a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile suitable for once weekly dosing. PMID:23013236

  8. Radiation Doses to Members of the U.S. Population from Ubiquitous Radionuclides in the Body: Part 3, Results, Variability, and Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, David J.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2011-02-25

    This paper is part three of a three-part series investigating annual effective doses to residents of the United States from intakes of ubiquitous radionuclides, including radionuclides occurring naturally, radionuclides whose concentrations are technologically enhanced, and anthropogenic radionuclides. The radionuclides of interest are the 238U series (14 nuclides), the actinium series (headed by 235U; 11 nuclides), and the 232Th series (11 nuclides); primordial radionuclides 87Rb and 40K; cosmogenic and fallout radionuclides 14C and 3H; and purely anthropogenic radionuclides 137Cs-137mBa, 129I and 90Sr-90Y. This series of papers explicitly excludes intakes from inhaling 222Rn, 220Rn, and their short-lived decay products; it also excludes intakes of radionuclides in occupational and medical settings. Part one reviewed, summarized, characterized, and grouped all published and some unpublished data for U.S. residents on ubiquitous radionuclide concentrations in tissues and organs. Part two described the methods used to organize the data collected in part one and segregate it into the ages and genders defined by the study, imputed missing values from the existing data, apportioned activity in bone, and imputed activity in hollow organ contents and the remainder of the body. This paper estimates equivalent doses to target tissues from source regions and maps target tissues to lists of tissues with International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) tissue-weighting factors or to surrogate tissue regions when there is no direct match. Effective doses, using ICRP tissue-weighting factors recommended in 1977, 1990, and 2007, are then calculated, and an upper bound of variability of the effective dose is estimated by calculating the average coefficients of variation (CV), assuming all variance is due to variability. Most of the data were for adult males, whose average annual effective dose is estimated to be 337 μSv (CV = 0.65, geometric mean = 283 μSv, geometric

  9. Estimating thyroid dose in pediatric CT exams from surface dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Senan, Rani; Mueller, Deborah L.; Hatab, Mustapha R.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of estimating pediatric thyroid doses from CT using surface neck doses. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters were used to measure the neck surface dose of 25 children ranging in ages between one and three years old. The neck circumference for each child was measured. The relationship between obtained surface doses and thyroid dose was studied using acrylic phantoms of various sizes and with holes of different depths. The ratios of hole-to-surface doses were used to convert patients' surface dose to thyroid dose. ImPACT software was utilized to calculate thyroid dose after applying the appropriate age correction factors. A paired t-test was performed to compare thyroid doses from our approach and ImPACT. The ratio of thyroid to surface dose was found to be 1.1. Thyroid doses ranged from 20 to 80 mGy. Comparison showed no statistical significance (p = 0.18). In addition, the average of surface dose variation along the z-axis in helical scans was studied and found to range between 5% (in 10 cm diameter phantom/24 mm collimation/pitch 1.0) and 8% (in 16 cm diameter phantom/12 mm collimation/pitch 0.7). We conclude that surface dose is an acceptable predictor for pediatric thyroid dose from CT. The uncertainty due to surface dose variability may be reduced if narrower collimation is used with a pitch factor close to 1.0. Also, the results did not show any effect of thyroid depth on the measured dose.

  10. Five Years' Experience Treating Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer With Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy and High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Results From a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Kate; Gallop-Evans, Eve; Hanna, Louise Adams, Malcolm

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical outcomes after concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) followed by high-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix and perform a multivariate analysis of the prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: The outcomes were analyzed for all women treated between 1999 and 2004 with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy and RT followed by high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for overall survival (OS), local control (LC), and distant control (DC). The Cox proportional hazards model was used to perform multivariate analysis of the prognostic variables. Results: The standard regimen comprised whole pelvic external RT 45 Gy in 25 fractions with concurrent weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}, followed by four high-dose-rate brachytherapy insertions of 6 Gy. Patients with radiologically enlarged para-aortic lymph nodes underwent extended-field RT. Of 92 patients, the OS rate was 72% at 2 years and 55% at 5 years. The LC rate was 76% at 2 years and 67% at 5 years. The DC rate was 68% at 2 years and 48% at 5 years. The most important prognostic factor for OS, LC, and DC was the pretreatment hemoglobin. For OS, the tumor size and the presence of enlarged lymph nodes were also important. For LC, the number of brachytherapy insertions was important; and for DC, the number of chemotherapy treatments was important. Of the patients, 4% experienced late Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the regimen is effective, with acceptable long-term side effects. In this cohort, the most important prognostic factor was the pretreatment hemoglobin level, a disease-related factor. However, more effective systemic treatments are needed.

  11. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  12. A Statistical Description of the Types and Severities of Accidents Involving Tractor Semi-Trailers, Updated Results for 1992-1996

    SciTech Connect

    BLOWER,DANIEL F.; CLAUSS,DAVID B.

    1999-10-01

    This report provides a statistical description of the types and severities of tractor semi-trailer accidents involving at least one fatality. The data were developed for use in risk assessments of hazardous materials transportation. A previous study (SAND93-2580) reviewed the availability of accident data, identified the TIFA (Trucks Involved in Fatal Accidents) as the best source of accident data for accidents involving heavy trucks, and provided statistics on accident data collected between 1980 and 1990. The current study is an extension of the previous work and describes data collected for heavy truck accidents occurring between 1992 and 1996. The TIFA database created at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute was extensively utilized. Supplementary data on collision and fire severity, which was not available in the TIFA database, were obtained by reviewing police reports and interviewing responders and witnesses for selected TEA accidents. The results are described in terms of frequencies of different accident types and cumulative distribution functions for the peak contact velocity, rollover skid distance, effective fire temperature, fire size, fire separation, and fire duration.

  13. Long-term results of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the primary treatment of medically inoperable stage I-II endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Niazi, Tamim M.; Souhami, Luis . E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca; Portelance, Lorraine; Bahoric, Boris; Gilbert, Lucy; Stanimir, Gerald

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: Total-abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAHBSO) is the gold-standard therapy for patients with endometrial carcinoma. However, patients with high operative risks are usually treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone. The goal of this study was to update our experience of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB), with or without external-beam irradiation (EBRT), for such patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 2003, 38 patients with Stage I and Stage II adenocarcinoma of the endometrium considered high operative risk received RT as the primary treatment. The median age was 74.1 years. Before 1996, the local extent of the disease was assessed by an examination under anesthesia (EUA) and by EUA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) thereafter. Eight patients (21%) were treated with combined HDRB and EBRT, and 30 patients (79%) were treated with with HDRB alone. The median HDRB dose was 23.9 Gy, typically delivered in 3 fractions in a weekly schedule. The median EBRT dose was 42 Gy. Results: At a median follow-up of 57.5 months for patients at risk, 11 patients (29%) have failed: 6 patients (16%) locally, 4 patients (10.5%) distantly, and 1 patient (3%) locally and distantly. Local failure was established by biopsy, and 4 patients were salvaged by TAHBSO. Higher stage and higher grade were both associated with increased failure rate. The 15-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 78% for all stages, 90% for Stage I, and 42% for Stage II (p < 0.0001). The 15-year DSS was 91% for Grade I and 67% for Grade II and III combined (p = 0.0254). Patients with Stage I disease established by MRI (11 patients) and who received a total HDRB dose of 30 Gy had a DSS rate of 100% at 10 years. Four patients experienced late toxicities: 1 Grade II and 3 Grade III or IV. Conclusion: Medically inoperable Stage I endometrial carcinoma may be safely and effectively treated with HDRB as the primary therapy. In selected Stage I patients, our results are

  14. The dynamics of the H(+) + D(2) reaction: a comparison of quantum mechanical wavepacket, quasi-classical and statistical-quasi-classical results.

    PubMed

    Jambrina, P G; Aoiz, F J; Bulut, N; Smith, Sean C; Balint-Kurti, G G; Hankel, M

    2010-02-01

    A detailed study of the proton exchange reaction H(+) + D(2)(v = 0, j = 0) --> HD + D(+) on its ground 1(1)A' potential energy surface has been carried out using 'exact' close-coupled quantum mechanical wavepacket (WP-EQM), quasi-classical trajectory (QCT), and statistical quasi-classical trajectory (SQCT) calculations for a range of collision energies starting from the reaction threshold to 1.3 eV. The WP-EQM calculations include all total angular momenta up to J(max) = 50, and therefore the various dynamical observables are converged up to 0.6 eV. It has been found that it is necessary to include all Coriolis couplings to obtain reliable converged results. Reaction probabilities obtained using the different methods are thoroughly compared as a function of the total energy for a series of J values. Comparisons are also made of total reaction cross sections as function of the collision energy, and rate constants. In addition, opacity functions, integral cross sections (ICS) and differential cross sections (DCS) are presented at 102 meV, 201.3 meV and 524.6 meV collision energy. The agreement between the three sets of results is only qualitative. The QCT calculations fail to describe the overall reactivity and most of the dynamical observables correctly. At low collision energies, the QCT method is plagued by the lack of conservation of zero point energy, whilst at higher collision energies and/or total angular momenta, the appearance of an effective repulsive potential associated with the centrifugal motion "over" the well causes a substantial decrease of the reactivity. In turn, the statistical models overestimate the reactivity over the whole range of collision energies as compared with the WP-EQM method. Specifically, at sufficiently high collision energies the reaction cannot be deemed to be statistical and important dynamical effects seem to be present. In general the WP-EQM results lie in between those obtained using the QCT and SQCT methods. One of the main

  15. Initial Results of a Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Concurrent and Maintenance Erlotinib and Reirradiation for Recurrent and New Primary Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Raben, David; Kane, Madeleine; Song, John I.; Nicolaou, Nicos; Mehra, Ranee; Burtness, Barbara; Ridge, John; Swing, Robyn; Lango, Miriam; Cohen, Roger; Jimeno, Antonio; Chen Changhu

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To present the first report of a Phase I trial evaluating concurrent and maintenance erlotinib and reirradiation in patients with recurrent or secondary primary head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: Patients with recurrent or new primary HNC with an interval of at least 6 months since prior radiation were eligible. Patients were treated in 3 sequential cohorts: Cohort I, 100 mg of erlotinib daily with reirradiation at 61.6 Gy in 28 fractions; Cohort II, 150 mg of erlotinib with 61.6 Gy in 28 fractions; and Cohort III, 150 mg of erlotinib with 66 Gy in 30 fractions. Maintenance erlotinib started immediately after reirradiation at 150 mg daily and was continued for 2 years or until disease progression or dose-limiting toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicities were defined as any Grade 4 or 5 toxicity or a toxicity-related delay in radiation therapy of greater than 7 days. Results: Fourteen patients were accrued, 3 to Cohort I, 4 to Cohort II, and 7 to Cohort III. Thirteen patients were evaluable for toxicity. Median follow-up was 8.4 months overall and 15.1 months for surviving patients. One patient had a dose-limiting toxicity in Cohort III. This patient declined initial percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement, was hospitalized with Grade 3 dysphagia and aspiration, and required a delay in radiation therapy of greater than 7 days. No Grade 4 acute toxicity was observed. Acute Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 9 of 13 patients. No erlotinib-related toxicity of Grade 3 or greater was observed during maintenance therapy. One patient had Grade 5 carotid hemorrhage 6 months after reirradiation, and another patient had Grade 3 osteoradionecrosis. Conclusions: Reirradiation (66 Gy in 2.2 Gy fractions) with concurrent and maintenance erlotinib (150 mg daily) for recurrent or new primary HNC is feasible.

  16. Low-dose bacille Calmette–Guérin for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: Results of a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Hani H.; Gobashy, Smair E.; Kamal, Ahmad M.; Elbaz, Ahmad G.; Roshdy, Mamdouh A.; Kamel, Ahmad I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of low-dose (45 mg) intravesical bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) therapy in the treatment of patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), as intravesical BCG is the most acceptable adjuvant therapy for NMI transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. However, in the standard regimen, undesirable effects are the main cause of treatment discontinuation. Patients and methods The present study included 37 men with primary NIMBC. All patients underwent complete TURB and 2 weeks later, a 6-week course of 45 mg BCG diluted in 50 mL isotonic saline was instilled into the bladder and retained for 2 h. Patients were evaluated for BCG efficacy (recurrence with or without progression) and safety by documentation of minor and/or major side-effects. Results There were no major or severe side-effects and no treatment discontinuations. Local adverse effects occurred in 20 patients, while systemic effects, in the form of fever, occurred in six patients (16.2%). There was recurrence in 14 patients (37.8%) after 18–34 months, with disease progression (muscle invasion) in four (10.8%) after 6–18 months. The recurrence index was 0.39/100 patients/month and the mean (range) tumour-free period was 30.97 (7–36) months. Conclusion Low-dose BCG intravesical therapy is an effective adjuvant treatment in NMIBC. However, this needs to be validated in future studies and in comparison with other proposed doses and/or regimens. PMID:26609440

  17. Whole-brain radiotherapy and high-dose methylprednisolone for elderly patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma: Results of North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) 96-73-51

    SciTech Connect

    Laack, Nadia N.; Ballman, Karla V.; Brown, Paul B.; O'Neill, Brian Patrick . E-mail: boneill@mayo.edu

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, toxicity, and survival of whole-brain radiotherapy-treated (WBRT) and high-dose methylprednisolone (HDMP)-treated in elderly patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Methods and Materials: Patients with PCNSL who were 70 years and older received 1 g of methylprednisolone daily for 5 days, 30 days after WBRT. Patients then received 1 g of methylprednisolone every 28 days until progression. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) at 6 months. Results were compared with those in patients on the previous North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) trial who received pre-WBRT cytoxan, adriamycin, vincristine, prednisone (CHOP) and high-dose cytarabine (CHOP-WBRT). A planned interim analysis was performed. The current regimen would be considered inactive if survival was not improved from patients treated with CHOP-WBRT. Results: Nineteen patients were accrued between 1998 and 2003. Median age was 76 years. Interim analysis revealed a 6-month survival of 33%, resulting in closure of the trial. Toxicity, OS, and event-free survival (EFS) were similar to those in patients more than 70 years of age who received CHOP-WBRT. The subgroup of patients who received HDMP had longer OS (12.1 vs. 7.0 months, p = 0.76) and EFS (11.7 vs. 4.0 months, p = 0.04) compared with the CHOP-WBRT patients alive 60 days after the start of treatment. Conclusions: Patients on-study long enough to receive HDMP had prolongation of OS and EFS compared to patients receiving CHOP-WBRT. Although the numbers of patients are too small for statistical conclusions, the HDMP regimen deserves further study.

  18. Statistical Reference Datasets

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    Statistical Reference Datasets (Web, free access)   The Statistical Reference Datasets is also supported by the Standard Reference Data Program. The purpose of this project is to improve the accuracy of statistical software by providing reference datasets with certified computational results that enable the objective evaluation of statistical software.

  19. Radiation doses to members of the U.S. population from ubiquitous radionuclides in the body: Part 3, results, variability, and uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Watson, David J; Strom, Daniel J

    2011-04-01

    ), assuming all variance is due to variability. Most of the data were for adult males, whose average effective dose rate is estimated to be 337 μSv y(-1) (CV = 0.65, geometric mean = 283 μSv y(-1), geometric standard deviation s(G) = 1.81) using 2007 ICRP tissue-weighting factors. This result is between the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements' 1987 estimate of 390 μSv y(-1) (using 1977 w(T)s) and its 2009 estimate of 285 μSv y(-1) (using 2007 w(T)s) and is higher than the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation's 2000 estimate of 310 μSv y(-1) (using 1990 w(T)s). The methods and software developed for this project are sufficiently detailed and sufficiently general to be usable with autopsy data from any or all countries. PMID:21350346

  20. BPA exposure during in vitro oocyte maturation results in dose-dependent alterations to embryo development rates, apoptosis rate, sex ratio and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Jacqueline; Mahboubi, Kiana; MacLusky, Neil; King, W Allan; Favetta, Laura A

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the oocyte's environment can negatively affect embryo development. Oocyte quality, which can determine embryonic viability, is easily perturbed, thus factors affecting normal oocyte maturation are a concern. Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting chemical that elicits a variety of reproductive effects. BPA has previously been found to disrupt meiosis, however the embryonic effects in mammals are not well documented. Here, bovine oocytes were matured in vitro with and without BPA treatment. Resulting embryos exhibited decreased embryonic development rates, increased apoptosis, and a skewed sex ratio. Gene expression in blastocysts was not altered, whereas treatment with 15ng/mL BPA resulted in increased expression of several of the genes studies, however this increase was largely due to a vehicle effect. BPA exposure during oocyte maturation in vitro can therefore, in a dose-dependent way, decrease oocyte and embryo quality and developmental potential and affect gene expression of developmentally important transcripts.

  1. Long-term results of high-dose imatinib in children and adolescents with chronic myeloid leukaemia in chronic phase: the Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Giona, Fiorina; Putti, Maria C; Micalizzi, Concetta; Menna, Giuseppe; Moleti, Maria L; Santoro, Nicola; Iaria, Grazia; Ladogana, Saverio; Burnelli, Roberta; Consarino, Caterina; Varotto, Stefania; Tucci, Francesca; Messina, Chiara; Nanni, Mauro; Diverio, Daniela; Biondi, Andrea; Pession, Andrea; Locatelli, Franco; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Gottardi, Enrico; Saglio, Giuseppe; Foà, Robin

    2015-08-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM) is used for the management of childhood chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). The most effective dosage of IM and its long-term efficacy in children are not well defined. The purpose of this multicentre study is to report on the long-term results of high-dose IM (340 mg/m2 /d) in CML patients in chronic phase (CP-CML) aged <18 years at diagnosis. A total of 47 CP-CML patients with a median age at diagnosis of 11 years 9 months were enrolled in nine Italian centres. Complete cytogenetic response was achieved in 91.5% of the evaluable patients at a median time of 6 months. BCR-ABL1 International Scale ≤ 0.1% (major molecular response; MMR) and ≤0.01% (molecular response; MR) at 12 months were 66.6% and 33%, respectively. During follow-up, MMR and MR were achieved in 78.6% and 61% of children, respectively. IM was safely discontinued in 3 long-term treated children with a durable MR. Twelve patients (eight cytogenetic/molecular responders) underwent stem cell transplantation. The progression-free survival probabilities at 96 months for responding patients who continued IM and for those transplanted were 60% and 50%, respectively. After a median follow-up of 52 months (range 3-146), all patients are alive. High-dose IM is a long-term effective therapy in children and adolescents with CP-CML.

  2. High doses of lercanidipine are better tolerated than other dihydropyridines in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome: results from the TOLERANCE study

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, V; Escobar, C; de la Figuera, M; Honorato, J; Llisterri, J L; Segura, J; Calderón, A

    2008-01-01

    Aims/Introduction The TOlerabilidad de LERcanidipino 20 mg frente a Amlodipino y Nifedipino en CondicionEs normales de uso study was aimed to compare the tolerability of high doses of lercanidipine with amlodipine and nifedipine gastro-intestinal therapeutic system (GITS) in the treatment of hypertension in daily clinical practice. Patients/methods Essential hypertensives ≥ 18 years, treated during at least 1 month with lercanidipine 20 mg, amlodipine 10 mg or nifedipine GITS 60 mg, after a previous treatment course of at least 1 month with half the dose of the corresponding drugs were included. We present the data of the subgroup of patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Results Three hundred and thirty-seven of the 650 study population fulfilled criteria of MetS, 233 (69.1%) on lercanidipine and 104 (30.9%) on amlodipine/nifedipine GITS. Overall, a significantly lower proportion of lercanidipine-treated patients showed adverse reactions (ARs) when compared with patients receiving other-dihydropyridines (DHPs) (60.1% vs. 73.1%, p = 0.003). Similarly, the most common vasodilation-related ARs (oedema, swelling, flushing and headache) were significantly less frequent in lercanidipine group (all p < 0.01). Conclusion In conclusion, lercanidipine appears to exhibit a better tolerability profile and less vasodilation-related ARs compared with other DHPs in hypertensive patients with MetS. PMID:18355238

  3. Analytical results and effective dose estimation of the operational Environmental Monitoring Program for the radioactive waste repository in Abadia de Goiás from 1998 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Edison; Tauhata, Luiz; dos Santos, Eliane Eugenia; da Silveira Corrêa, Rosangela

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program for the Radioactive waste repository of Abadia de Goiás, which was originated from the accident of Goiania, conducted by the Regional Center of Nuclear Sciences (CRCN-CO) of the National Commission on Nuclear Energy (CNEN), from 1998 to 2008. The results are related to the determination of (137)Cs activity per unit of mass or volume of samples from surface water, ground water, depth sediments of the river, soil and vegetation, and also the air-kerma rate estimation for gamma exposure in the monitored site. In the phase of operational Environmental Monitoring Program, the values of the geometric mean and standard deviation obtained for (137)Cs activity per unit of mass or volume in the analyzed samples were (0.08 ± 1.16) Bq.L(-1) for surface and underground water, (0.22 ± 2.79) Bq.kg(-1) for soil, and (0.19 ± 2.72) Bq.kg(-1) for sediment, and (0.19 ± 2.30) Bq.kg(-1) for vegetation. These results were similar to the values of the pre-operational Environmental Monitoring Program. With these data, estimations for effective dose were evaluated for public individuals in the neighborhood of the waste repository, considering the main possible way of exposure of this population group. The annual effective dose obtained from the analysis of these results were lower than 0.3 mSv.y(-1), which is the limit established by CNEN for environmental impact in the public individuals indicating that the facility is operating safely, without any radiological impact to the surrounding environment.

  4. Single-Fraction High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Hypofractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer - Long Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Cury, Fabio L.; Duclos, Marie; Aprikian, Armen; Patrocinio, Horacio; Kassouf, Wassim; Shenouda, George; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc; Souhami, Luis

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We present the long-term results of a cohort of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PC) treated with single-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (HypoRT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated exclusively with HDRB and HypoRT. HDRB delivered a dose of 10 Gy to the prostate surface and HypoRT consisted of 50 Gy delivered in 20 daily fractions. The first 121 consecutive patients with a minimum of 2 years posttreatment follow-up were assessed for toxicity and disease control. Results: The median follow-up was 65.2 months. No acute Grade III or higher toxicity was seen. Late Grade II gastrointestinal toxicity was seen in 9 patients (7.4%) and Grade III in 2 (1.6%). Late Grade III genitourinary toxicity was seen in 2 patients (1.6%). After a 24-month follow-up, a rebiopsy was offered to the first 58 consecutively treated patients, and 44 patients agreed with the procedure. Negative biopsies were found in 40 patients (91%). The 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival rate was 90.7% (95% CI, 84.5-96.9%), with 13 patients presenting biochemical failure. Among them, 9 were diagnosed with distant metastasis. Prostate cancer-specific and overall survival rates at 5 years were 100% and 98.8% (95% CI, 96.4-100%), respectively. Conclusion: The combination of HDRB and HypoRT is well tolerated, with acceptable toxicity rates. Furthermore, results from rebiopsies revealed an encouraging rate of local control. These results confirm that the use of conformal RT techniques, adapted to specific biological tumor characteristics, have the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio in intermediate-risk PC patients.

  5. Dose dependent pharmacokinetics of naproxen in man.

    PubMed

    Niazi, S K; Alam, S M; Ahmad, S I

    1996-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics of one of the most widely used non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, naproxen, were studied in 28 healthy human volunteers at the two most commonly used dose levels, viz., 250 mg and 500 mg, in a cross-over design. The plasma levels of naproxen were analysed by a modified high-pressure liquid chromatography method. The plasma concentrations at higher doses were not proportional to dose, indicating a non-linearity in the pharmacokinetics at the dose levels studied; this finding is new since earlier studies had studied only higher doses and assumed that at lower doses the pharmacokinetics would be linear. There was, however, no significant difference in the elimination half-life (rate constant), time to reach peak concentration (Cmax), mean residence time (MRT), or area under first moment curve (AUMC). The clearance and distribution volume of naproxen were substantially increased at higher dose resulting in statistically lower proportional concentration and the total area under the curve (AUC). These observations are explained on the basis of a change in the plasma protein binding resulting in more free naproxen available for quicker clearance and wider penetration into tissues. These findings have several important clinical implications for the long-term use of naproxen as an antiarthritic drug. It is proposed that the clinical efficacy of naproxen can be increased and side-effects reduced by giving it in small divided doses instead of large doses.

  6. Statistical and Prediction modeling of the Ka Band Using Experimental Results from ACTS Propagation Terminals at 20.185 and 27.505 GHZ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogunwuyi, Oluwatosin O.

    2004-01-01

    With the increase in demand for wireless communication services, most of the operating frequency bands have become very congested. The increase of wireless costumers is only fractional contribution to this phenomenon. The demand for more services such as video streams and internet explorer which require a lot of band width has been a more significant contributor to the congestion in a communication system. One way to increase the amount of information or data per unit of time transmitted with in a wireless communication system is to use a higher radio frequency. However in spite the advantage available in the using higher frequency bands such as, the Ka-band, higher frequencies also implies short wavelengths. And shorter wavelengths are more susceptible to rain attenuation. Until the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) was launched, the Ka- band frequency was virtually unused - the majority of communication satellites operated in lower frequency bands called the C- and Ku- bands. Ka-band is desirable because its higher frequency allows wide bandwidth applications, smaller spacecraft and ground terminal components, and stronger signal strength. Since the Ka-band is a high frequency band, the millimeter wavelengths of the signals are easily degraded by rain. This problem known as rain fade or rain attenuation The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) propagation experiment has collected 5 years of Radio Frequency (RF) attenuation data from December 1993 to November 1997. The objective of my summer work is to help develop the statistics and prediction techniques that will help to better characterize the Ka Frequency band. The statistical analysis consists of seasonal and cumulative five-year attenuation statistics for the 20.2 and 27.5 GHz. The cumulative five-year results give the link outage that occurs for a given link margin. The experiment has seven ground station terminals that can be attributed to a unique rain zone climate. The

  7. Results of a statistical approach to rainfall estimation using Nimbus 5 6.7 micrometers and 11.5 micrometers THIR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    Nimbus 5 6.7 mm and 11.5 mm temperature humidity infrared radiometer (THIR) data were used in a simple multiple regression scheme to test the feasibility of using these data to estimate hourly rainfall. Throughout the test area (85 W to 105 W and 45 N to 30 N) subareas (8 deg x 6 deg) were chosen from which point to point and areal statistics were obtained. Four subsets of data were used. The first consisted of only those surface stations indicating precipitation whose latitude and longitude coincided with the THIR grid points. A second used surface stations 0.1 degree from the THIR grid points. The third was a combination of subsets one and two. A reciprocal distance weighting scheme was used to derive precipitation values in data sparse areas. A fourth subset was made using these data combined with the data from subsets one and two. Point estimates resulted in negative correlations between estimated and grid derived "surface" precipitation. One degree areal estimates showed a slight improvement with a correlation coefficient of approximately 0.11. Single regression areal estimates resulted in correlations of approximately 0.11 and 0.20 for the 6.7 mm and 11.5 mm data respectively. These poor results were attributed to problems which are inherent in the satellite data (location errors, short temporal span of data, wavelength of sensors, etc.) and the lack of sufficient surface data to better verify the satellite estimate.

  8. SU-E-J-08: Comparison of Unintended Radiation Doses to Organs at Risk Resulting From the Out-Of-Field Therapeutic Beams and From Image-Guidance X-Ray Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, G; Wang, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The unintended radiation dose to organs at risk (OAR) can be contributed from imaging guidance procedures as well as from leakage and scatter of therapeutic beams. This study compares the imaging dose with the unintended out-of-field therapeutic dose to patient sensitive organs. Methods: The Monte Carlo EGSnrc user codes, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc, were used to simulate kV X-ray sources from imaging devices as well as the therapeutic IMRT/VMAT beams and to calculate doses to target and OARs on patient treatment planning CT images. The accuracy of the Monte Carlo simulations was benchmarked against measurements in phantoms. The dose-volume histogram was utilized in analyzing the patient organ doses. Results: The dose resulting from Standard Head kV-CBCT scans to bone and soft tissues ranges from 0.7 to 1.1 cGy and from 0.03 to 0.3 cGy, respectively. The dose resulting from Thorax scans on the chest to bone and soft tissues ranges from 1.1 to 1.8 cGy and from 0.3 to 0.6 cGy, respectively. The dose resulting from Pelvis scans on the abdomen to bone and soft tissues range from 3.2 to 4.2 cGy and from 1.2 to 2.2 cGy, respectively. The out-of-field doses to OAR are sensitive to the distance between the treated target and the OAR. For a typical Head-and-Neck IMRT/VMAT treatment the out-of-field doses to eyes are 1–3% of the target dose, or 2–6 cGy per fraction. Conclusion: The imaging doses to OAR are predictable based on the imaging protocols used when OARs are within the imaged volume and can be estimated and accounted for by using tabulated values. The unintended out-of-field doses are proportional to the target dose, strongly depend on the distance between the treated target and OAR, and are generally higher comparing to the imaging dose. This work was partially supported by Varian research grant VUMC40590.

  9. Ethylglucuronide and Ethyl Sulfate Assays in Clinical Trials, Interpretation and Limitations: Results of a Dose Ranging Alcohol Challenge Study and Two Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Jatlow, Peter I.; Agro, Ann; Wu, Ran; Nadim, Haleh; Toll, Benjamin A.; Ralevski, Elizabeth; Nogueira, Christine; Shi, Julia; Dziura, James D.; Petrakis, Ismene L.; O'Malley, Stephanie S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The ethanol metabolites, ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and ethyl sulfate (EtS) are biomarkers of recent alcohol consumption that provide objective measures of abstinence. Our goals are to better understand the impact of cutoff concentration on test interpretation, the need for measuring both metabolites, and how best to integrate test results with self-reports in clinical trials. Methods Subjects (n=18) were administered, one week apart, 3 alcohol doses calibrated to achieve blood concentrations of 20, 80 and 120 mg/dL respectively. Urinary EtG/EtS were measured at timed intervals during a 24 hour hospitalization and twice daily thereafter. In addition, participants from 2 clinical trials provided samples for EtG/EtS and drinking histories. Cutoffs for EtG/EtS of 100/50, 200/100 and 500/250 ng/mL were evaluated. Results Twelve hours following each challenge, EtG was always positive at the 100 and 200 cutoffs, but at 24 hours sensitivity was poor at all cutoffs following the low dose, and poor after 48 hours regardless of dose or cutoff. Similarly, in the clinical trials EtG sensitivity was good for detecting any drinking during the last 24 hours at the two lowest cutoffs, but under 40% during the last 24-48 hours. Sensitivity was reduced at the 500 ng/mL cutoff. Discrepancies between EtG and EtS were few. Comparison of self- reports of abstinence and EtG confirmed abstinence indicated under-reporting of drinking. Conclusions Any drinking the night before should be detectable the following morning with EtG cutoffs of 100 or 200 ng/mL. Twenty-four hours after drinking, sensitivity is poor for light drinking, but good for heavier consumption. At 48 hours, sensitivity is low following 6 drinks or less. Increasing the cutoff to 500 ng/mL leads to substantially reduced sensitivity. Monitoring both EtG and EtS should usually be unnecessary. We recommend EtG confirmed self-reports of abstinence for evaluation of outcomes in clinical trials. PMID:24773137

  10. Nightly sildenafil use after radical prostatectomy has adverse effects on urinary convalescence: Results from a randomized trial of nightly vs on-demand dosing regimens

    PubMed Central

    Hyndman, Matthew Eric; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Feng, Zhaoyong; Mettee, Lynda Z.; Su, Li-Ming; Trock, Bruce J.; Pavlovich, Christian P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This is a report on urinary function results from a randomized trial of nightly versus on-demand sildenafil after nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (RP), a secondary objective. We analyzed the effects of these sildenafil administration schemes on urinary health-related quality of life after RP. Methods: In total, 100 potent men were equally randomized to nightly and on-demand sildenafil 50 mg after minimally-invasive RP for 1 year. Health-related quality of life questionnaires were administered at various postoperative intervals. Urinary function was assessed using appropriate expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC) subscales. Analyses of covariance and linear mixed-effects modeling were used to compare the effects of treatment over time on urinary recovery, controlling for age, nerve-sparing score, and time from surgery. Results: The nightly (n = 50) and on-demand (n = 50) sildenafil groups were well-matched at baseline. Nightly sildenafil patients had worse EPIC urinary bother and urinary irritative/obstructive subscale scores at 3 and 6 months after RP, even after controlling for multiple variables. On mixed-model analyses, the differences between groups for these EPIC subscales (4.9 and 2.5, respectively) were greater than documented thresholds for clinical significance. Increasing nerve-sparing score was associated with improvements in EPIC urinary summary, bother, incontinence, and function scores; time from surgery was associated with improvements in all EPIC urinary health-related quality of life subscales. Conclusions: In this specific population and drug dose, we found that on-demand short-acting phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor (PDE5i) dosing may be more effective after RP to maximize early urinary health-related quality of life. In preoperatively potent men, nightly sildenafil 50 mg impaired urinary health-related quality of life more than on-demand use in the early months after nerve-sparing RP, independent of effects on urinary

  11. A Prospective Cohort Study to Compare Treatment Results Between 2 Fractionation Schedules of High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in Patients With Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Eng-Yen; Sun, Li-Min; Lin, Hao; Lan, Jen-Hong; Chanchien, Chan-Chao; Huang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Chang-Yu; Wang, Chong-Jong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the treatment results of 2 fractionation schedules for high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2001 through January 2008, 267 patients with stage IB-IVA cervical cancer were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent 4-field pelvic irradiation and HDR-ICBT. The median central and parametrial doses were 39.6 Gy and 45 Gy, respectively. Patient underwent either 6 Gy Multiplication-Sign 4 (HDR-4) (n=144) or 4.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 6 (HDR-6) (n=123) to point A of ICBT using {sup 192}Ir isotope twice weekly. The rates of overall survival, locoregional failure, distant metastasis, proctitis, cystitis, and enterocolitis were compared between HDR-4 and HDR-6. Results: There were no significant differences in the demographic data between HDR-4 and HDR-6 except for total treatment time. The 5-year proctitis rates were 23.0% and 21.5% in HDR-4 and HDR-6 (P=.399), respectively. The corresponding rates of grade 2-4 proctitis were 18.7% and 9.6% (P=.060). The corresponding rates of grades 3-4 proctitis were 5.2% and 1.3% (P=.231). Subgroup analysis revealed that HDR-4 significantly increased grade 2-4 proctitis in patients aged {>=}62 years old (P=.012) but not in patients aged <62 years (P=.976). The rates of overall survival, locoregional failure, distant metastasis, cystitis, and enterocolitis were not significantly different between HDR-4 and HDR-6 schedules. Conclusion: The small fraction size of HDR-ICBT is associated with grade 2 proctitis without compromise of prognosis in elderly patients. This schedule is suggested for patients who tolerate an additional 2 applications of HDR-ICBT.

  12. An intercomparison of a large ensemble of statistical downscaling methods for Europe: Overall results from the VALUE perfect predictor cross-validation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Jose Manuel; Maraun, Douglas; Widmann, Martin; Huth, Radan; Hertig, Elke; Benestad, Rasmus; Roessler, Ole; Wibig, Joanna; Wilcke, Renate; Kotlarski, Sven

    2016-04-01

    VALUE is an open European network to validate and compare downscaling methods for climate change research (http://www.value-cost.eu). A key deliverable of VALUE is the development of a systematic validation framework to enable the assessment and comparison of both dynamical and statistical downscaling methods. This framework is based on a user-focused validation tree, guiding the selection of relevant validation indices and performance measures for different aspects of the validation (marginal, temporal, spatial, multi-variable). Moreover, several experiments have been designed to isolate specific points in the downscaling procedure where problems may occur (assessment of intrinsic performance, effect of errors inherited from the global models, effect of non-stationarity, etc.). The list of downscaling experiments includes 1) cross-validation with perfect predictors, 2) GCM predictors -aligned with EURO-CORDEX experiment- and 3) pseudo reality predictors (see Maraun et al. 2015, Earth's Future, 3, doi:10.1002/2014EF000259, for more details). The results of these experiments are gathered, validated and publicly distributed through the VALUE validation portal, allowing for a comprehensive community-open downscaling intercomparison study. In this contribution we describe the overall results from Experiment 1), consisting of a European wide 5-fold cross-validation (with consecutive 6-year periods from 1979 to 2008) using predictors from ERA-Interim to downscale precipitation and temperatures (minimum and maximum) over a set of 86 ECA&D stations representative of the main geographical and climatic regions in Europe. As a result of the open call for contribution to this experiment (closed in Dec. 2015), over 40 methods representative of the main approaches (MOS and Perfect Prognosis, PP) and techniques (linear scaling, quantile mapping, analogs, weather typing, linear and generalized regression, weather generators, etc.) were submitted, including information both data

  13. Risk of Late Toxicity in Men Receiving Dose-Escalated Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Prostate Radiation Therapy: Results From a Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Karen E. Voong, K. Ranh; Pugh, Thomas J.; Skinner, Heath; Levy, Lawrence B.; Takiar, Vinita; Choi, Seungtaek; Du, Weiliang; Frank, Steven J.; Johnson, Jennifer; Kanke, James; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Lee, Andrew K.; Mahmood, Usama; McGuire, Sean E.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2014-04-01

    Objective: To report late toxicity outcomes from a randomized trial comparing conventional and hypofractionated prostate radiation therapy and to identify dosimetric and clinical parameters associated with late toxicity after hypofractionated treatment. Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer were enrolled in a trial that randomized men to either conventionally fractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (CIMRT, 75.6 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) or to dose-escalated hypofractionated IMRT (HIMRT, 72 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions). Late (≥90 days after completion of radiation therapy) genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were prospectively evaluated and scored according to modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: 101 men received CIMRT and 102 men received HIMRT. The median age was 68, and the median follow-up time was 6.0 years. Twenty-eight percent had low-risk, 71% had intermediate-risk, and 1% had high-risk disease. There was no difference in late GU toxicity in men treated with CIMRT and HIMRT. The actuarial 5-year grade ≥2 GU toxicity was 16.5% after CIMRT and 15.8% after HIMRT (P=.97). There was a nonsignificant numeric increase in late GI toxicity in men treated with HIMRT compared with men treated with CIMRT. The actuarial 5-year grade ≥2 GI toxicity was 5.1% after CIMRT and 10.0% after HIMRT (P=.11). In men receiving HIMRT, the proportion of rectum receiving 36.9 Gy, 46.2 Gy, 64.6 Gy, and 73.9 Gy was associated with the development of late GI toxicity (P<.05). The 5-year actuarial grade ≥2 GI toxicity was 27.3% in men with R64.6Gy ≥ 20% but only 6.0% in men with R64.6Gy < 20% (P=.016). Conclusions: Dose-escalated IMRT using a moderate hypofractionation regimen (72 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions) can be delivered safely with limited grade 2 or 3 late toxicity. Minimizing the proportion of rectum that receives moderate and high dose decreases the risk of late rectal toxicity after this

  14. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts on Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station: Phase I Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred C.; Merceret, Francis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the results of the ANU's (Applied Meteorology Unit) Short-Range Statistical Forecasting task for peak winds. The peak wind speeds are an important forecast element for the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle programs. The Keith Weather Squadron and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group indicate that peak winds are challenging to forecast. The Applied Meteorology Unit was tasked to develop tools that aid in short-range forecasts of peak winds at tower sites of operational interest. A 7 year record of wind tower data was used in the analysis. Hourly and directional climatologies by tower and month were developed to determine the seasonal behavior of the average and peak winds. In all climatologies, the average and peak wind speeds were highly variable in time. This indicated that the development of a peak wind forecasting tool would be difficult. Probability density functions (PDF) of peak wind speed were calculated to determine the distribution of peak speed with average speed. These provide forecasters with a means of determining the probability of meeting or exceeding a certain peak wind given an observed or forecast average speed. The climatologies and PDFs provide tools with which to make peak wind forecasts that are critical to safe operations.

  15. Statistical methods applied to the study of opinion formation models: a brief overview and results of a numerical study of a model based on the social impact theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordogna, Clelia María; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold. On the one hand we present a brief overview on the application of statistical physics methods to the modelling of social phenomena focusing our attention on models for opinion formation. On the other hand, we discuss and present original results of a model for opinion formation based on the social impact theory developed by Latané. The presented model accounts for the interaction among the members of a social group under the competitive influence of a strong leader and the mass media, both supporting two different states of opinion. Extensive simulations of the model are presented, showing that they led to the observation of a rich scenery of complex behaviour including, among others, critical behaviour and phase transitions between a state of opinion dominated by the leader and another dominated by the mass media. The occurrence of interesting finite-size effects reveals that, in small communities, the opinion of the leader may prevail over that of the mass media. This observation is relevant for the understanding of social phenomena involving a finite number of individuals, in contrast to actual physical phase transitions that take place in the thermodynamic limit. Finally, we give a brief outlook of open questions and lines for future work.

  16. Statistical Characterization of Kilometer-Scale Topography of Volcanic Units In Daedalia Planum, Mars: New Results From MGS MOLA Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreslavsky, M. A.; Head, J. W.

    2001-12-01

    Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) onboard MGS spacecraft produced a large set of 300-m-spaced precise measurements of Mars surface elevation. We use this data set to study statistical characteristics of topography. We present new results on kilometer-scale topographic patterns of Daedalia Planum. For all MOLA profiles in the area 35S - 10S, 135W - 105W we calculated a characteristic of profile curvature at a set of baselines from 0.6 km to 10 km. For each cell of a grid covering the area under study we calculated the curvature-frequency distribution at each baseline. The width of the frequency distributions can be considered as a characteristic of roughness at a scale defined by the baseline length. The median curvature characterizes prevalence of convex or concave segments of the profiles. These parameters plotted within the grid form maps of kilometer-scale topographic patterns. Daedalia Planum is volcanic plain formed mainly by lava flows from Arsia Mons. Different generations of the lava flows display distinctively different kilometer-scale topographic patterns. Middle Amazonian flows (unit At5 according to USGS 1:15M geological map by D.H.Scott and K.L.Tanaka) are characterized by the steep increase of roughness at short baselines and by prevalence of convex profiles, while Late Hesperian flows (AHt3, Ht2, Ht1) are relatively rougher at longer baselines and often display prevalence of a concave relief. The roughness maps allow to accurately and reliably outline the units. High-resolution MOC images show high diversity of tens-meter-scale surface patterns within all units, as well as a systematic difference correlating with kilometer-scale topography pattern characteristics. MOC images show various buried and exhumed small-scale features in the areas and evidences for presence and erosion of surficial deposits of various thickness. The difference in kilometer-scale statistics of topography is probably controlled by the presence and characteristics of these

  17. 70 Gy Versus 80 Gy in Localized Prostate Cancer: 5-Year Results of GETUG 06 Randomized Trial;Prostate cancer; Dose escalation; Conformal radiotherapy; Randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Beckendorf, Veronique; Guerif, Stephane; Le Prise, Elisabeth; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Bougnoux, Agnes; Chauvet, Bruno; Salem, Naji; Chapet, Olivier; Bourdain, Sylvain; Bachaud, Jean-Marc; Maingon, Philippe; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Malissard, Luc; Simon, Jean-Marc; Pommier, Pascal; Hay, Men; Dubray, Bernard; Lagrange, Jean-Leon; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Bey, Pierre

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To perform a randomized trial comparing 70 and 80 Gy radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 306 patients with localized prostate cancer were randomized. No androgen deprivation was allowed. The primary endpoint was biochemical relapse according to the modified 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and Phoenix definitions. Toxicity was graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 1991 criteria and the late effects on normal tissues-subjective, objective, management, analytic scales (LENT-SOMA) scales. The patients' quality of life was scored using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30-item cancer-specific and 25-item prostate-specific modules. Results: The median follow-up was 61 months. According to the 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 39% and 28% in the 70- and 80-Gy arms, respectively (p = .036). Using the Phoenix definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 32% and 23.5%, respectively (p = .09). The subgroup analysis showed a better biochemical outcome for the higher dose group with an initial prostate-specific antigen level >15 ng/mL. At the last follow-up date, 26 patients had died, 10 of their disease and none of toxicity, with no differences between the two arms. According to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, the Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity rate was 14% and 19.5% for the 70- and 80-Gy arms (p = .22), respectively. The Grade 2 or greater urinary toxicity was 10% at 70 Gy and 17.5% at 80 Gy (p = .046). Similar results were observed using the LENT-SOMA scale. Bladder toxicity was more frequent at 80 Gy than at 70 Gy (p = .039). The quality-of-life questionnaire results before and 5 years after treatment were available for 103 patients with no differences found between the 70- and 80-Gy arms. Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy provided a

  18. Clinical experience and results of treatment with suprofen in pediatrics. 3rd communication: Antipyretic effect and tolerability of repeat doses of suprofen and paracetamol syrup in hospitalized children/A single-blind study.

    PubMed

    Weippl, G; Michos, N; Sundal, E J; Stocker, H

    1985-01-01

    Antipyretic effect and tolerability of alpha-methyl-4-(2-thienylcarbonyl)-phenyl acetic acid (suprofen, Suprol), syrup and paracetamol (acetaminophen) were compared within the scope of the present randomized single-blind study; the test population included a total of 115 children ranging in age from 6 months to 12 years. All patients were admitted to the hospital with an average temperature of 39.3 degrees C, their disease being caused by bacterial or viral infections. The dose levels for treatment with syrup depended upon the children's age and body weight. Treatment was in most cases given for two days; a three-times-a-day schedule was used. The (rectal) temperature as well as pulse and respiratory rates were measured prior to treatment and 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 h after first administration of the test preparations. The results showed that the antipyretic effect of suprofen was in both age groups at all rating times statistically significantly superior to that of paracetamol. Pulse and respiratory rates dropped in both age groups after treatment; the means were within the normal range at all rating times. Adverse drug reactions were seen in 5 patients on suprofen and in 3 cases on paracetamol. It is, however, questionable whether such reactions are drug-dependent. PMID:3911963

  19. A STATISTICAL REVIEW OF THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION MEASUREMENTS AND PCT RESULTS FOR THE GLASSES FABRICATED AS PART OF THE US TEST MATRIX

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K

    2007-06-12

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is part of a consortium that is looking to improve the retention of aluminum, chromium, and sulfate in high level radioactive waste (HLW) glass. Such glass has been produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina since it began operating in 1996 and is planned to be produced by the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington. The consortium conducting this study, which is designated as Task No.6 by the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program sponsoring this effort, is made up of personnel from SRNL, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI). Coordinated glass experimental work will be performed by each member of the consortium. The glasses that are being studied were selected to further the understanding of composition-property relationships within the glass regions of interest to both DWPF and WTP. Forty-five (45) glasses, making up the US test matrix, were batched and fabricated to support the study. The chemical compositions of these glasses were measured by SRNL's Process Science Analytical Laboratory (PSAL) under the auspices of an analytical plan. In addition, two heat treatments (quenched and centerline canister cooled, ccc) of each glass were subjected to the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT) to assess their durabilities. More specifically, the Method A of the PCT (ASTM C-1285-2002) was used for these tests. Measurements of the resulting leachate solutions were conducted by PSAL under the auspices of three analytical plans. A statistical review of the PSAL measurements of the chemical compositions and of the PCT results for the glasses making up the US test matrix is provided in this memorandum. Target, measured, and measured bias-corrected compositional views were determined for these glasses. The durability results for the US

  20. Fear based Education or Curiosity based Education as an Example of Earthquake and Natural Disaster Education: Results of Statistical Study in Primary Schools in Istanbul-Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcep, T.; Ozcep, F.

    2012-04-01

    Natural disaster reduction focuses on the urgent need for prevention activities to reduce loss of life, damage to property, infrastructure and environment, and the social and economic disruption caused by natural hazards. One of the most important factors in reduction of the potential damage of earthquakes is trained manpower. To understanding the causes of earthquakes and other natural phenomena (landslides, avalanches, floods, volcanoes, etc.) is one of the pre-conditions to show a conscious behavior. The aim of the study is to analysis and to investigate, how earthquakes and other natural phenomena are perceived by the students and the possible consequences of this perception, and their effects of reducing earthquake damage. One of the crucial questions is that is our education system fear or curiosity based education system? Effects of the damages due to earthquakes have led to look like a fear subject. In fact, due to the results of the effects, the earthquakes are perceived scary phenomena. In the first stage of the project, the learning (or perception) levels of earthquakes and other natural disasters for the students of primary school are investigated with a survey. Aim of this survey study of earthquakes and other natural phenomena is that have the students fear based or curiosity based approaching to the earthquakes and other natural events. In the second stage of the project, the path obtained by the survey are evaluated with the statistical point of approach. A questionnaire associated with earthquakes and natural disasters are applied to primary school students (that total number of them is approximately 700 pupils) to measure the curiosity and/or fear levels. The questionnaire consists of 17 questions related to natural disasters. The questions are: "What is the Earthquake ?", "What is power behind earthquake?", "What is the mental response during the earthquake ?", "Did we take lesson from earthquake's results ?", "Are you afraid of earthquake

  1. Multicriteria optimization of the spatial dose distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaefer, Alexander; Viulet, Tiberiu; Muacevic, Alexander; Fürweger, Christoph

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning for radiation therapy involves trade-offs with respect to different clinical goals. Typically, the dose distribution is evaluated based on few statistics and dose–volume histograms. Particularly for stereotactic treatments, the spatial dose distribution represents further criteria, e.g., when considering the gradient between subregions of volumes of interest. The authors have studied how to consider the spatial dose distribution using a multicriteria optimization approach.Methods: The authors have extended a stepwise multicriteria optimization approach to include criteria with respect to the local dose distribution. Based on a three-dimensional visualization of the dose the authors use a software tool allowing interaction with the dose distribution to map objectives with respect to its shape to a constrained optimization problem. Similarly, conflicting criteria are highlighted and the planner decides if and where to relax the shape of the dose distribution.Results: To demonstrate the potential of spatial multicriteria optimization, the tool was applied to a prostate and meningioma case. For the prostate case, local sparing of the rectal wall and shaping of a boost volume are achieved through local relaxations and while maintaining the remaining dose distribution. For the meningioma, target coverage is improved by compromising low dose conformality toward noncritical structures. A comparison of dose–volume histograms illustrates the importance of spatial information for achieving the trade-offs.Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to consider the location of conflicting criteria during treatment planning. Particularly, it is possible to conserve already achieved goals with respect to the dose distribution, to visualize potential trade-offs, and to relax constraints locally. Hence, the proposed approach facilitates a systematic exploration of the optimal shape of the dose distribution.

  2. Intensified High-Dose Chemoradiotherapy With Induction Chemotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer-Safety and Toxicity Results Within a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Poettgen, Christoph; Eberhardt, Wilfried E.; Gauler, Thomas; Krbek, Thomas; Berkovic, Katharina; Abu Jawad, Jehad; Korfee, Soenke; Teschler, Helmut; Stamatis, Georgios; Stuschke, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To analyze the toxicity profile of an intensified definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) schedule in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (Stage IIIA N2/selected IIIB) treated within a prospective multicenter trial. Patients and Methods: After mediastinoscopy and routine staging procedures, three cycles of induction chemotherapy (cisplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 1 and 8; paclitaxel 175 mg/m{sup 2} Day 1, every 21 days) were planned, followed by concurrent CRT (accelerated-hyperfractionated regimen, 45 Gy, 2 x 1.5 Gy/d, cisplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 64 and 71, vinorelbine 20 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 64 and 71). At 45 Gy, a multidisciplinary panel decision was made regarding operability. Inoperable patients received definitive radiotherapy (total dose 65 or 71 Gy, depending on the mean lung dose) with additional concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}, Day 85; vinorelbine 15 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 85 and 92). Results: A total of 28 patients (23 men and 5 women; median age, 58 years; range 41-73; Stage IIIA in 3 and Stage IIIB in 25) were judged ineligible for surgery by the multidisciplinary panel and underwent definitive CRT (75% of the patients received 71 Gy). The maximum toxicity (Grade 3 or greater) during induction chemotherapy included leukopenia (11%) and anemia (4%). During concurrent CRT, leukopenia (Grade 3 or greater) was observed in 39% of the patients. The maximal nonhematologic toxicity during concurrent CRT included esophagitis (Grade 3 or greater) in 18% and pneumonitis (Grade 3 or greater) in 4% of the patients. At 3 years, the locoregional control rate was 52% (95% confidence interval, 29-75%) and the overall survival rate was 31% (95% confidence interval, 12-50%). Conclusion: This intensified treatment protocol with induction chemotherapy and concurrent CRT, including hyperfractionated-accelerated RT, showed only moderate toxicity and proved feasible. This treatment represents the definitive CRT arm of our ongoing

  3. Hypofractionated High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Multi-Institutional Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Fonteyne, Valerie; Soete, Guy; Arcangeli, Stefano; De Neve, Wilfried; Rappe, Bernard; Storme, Guy; Strigari, Lidia; Arcangeli, Giorgio; De Meerleer, Gert

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To report late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity, biochemical and clinical outcomes, and overall survival after hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Three institutions included 113 patients with T1 to T3N0M0 PC in a phase II study. Patients were treated with 56 Gy in 16 fractions over 4 weeks. Late toxicity was scored using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria extended with additional symptoms. Biochemical outcome was reported according to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure. Results: The incidence of late GI and GU toxicity was low. The 3-year actuarial risk of developing late GU and GI toxicity of grade {>=}2 was 13% and 8% respectively. Five-year biochemical non-evidence of disease (bNED) was 94%. Risk group, T stage, and deviation from planned hormone treatment were significant predictive factors for bNED. Deviation from hormone treatment remained significant in multivariate analysis. Five-year clinical non evidence of disease and overall survival was 95% and 91% respectively. No patient died from PC. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose radiation therapy is a valuable treatment option for patients with PC, with excellent biochemical and clinical outcome and low toxicity.

  4. Clinical results of high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in children with advanced stage rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Kyun; Kim, Hyo Sun; Suh, Chang-Ok; Kim, Hyun Ok; Lyu, Chuhl Joo

    2012-09-01

    Regardless of improvement in cure of Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the results in treatment of advanced stage of RMS in children are still dismal. Recently, high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (HDC/APBSCT) has been tried to manage the advanced high-risk RMS patients. We investigated the effectiveness of HDC/APBSCT by reviewing the clinical records of high-risk pediatric RMS patients in single institute database. Over twenty years, 37 patients were diagnosed as RMS with high-risk at the time of first diagnosis. These patients were classified as two groups according to treatment method. The first group was HDC/APBSCT and the other was conventional multi-agent chemotherapy group. Differences of clinical results between the two groups were analyzed. The median age of patients was 5 yr, ranging from 6 months to 15 yr. The 5-yr event free survival rate (EFS) of all patients was 24.8% ± 4.8%. HDC/APBSCT group and conventional multi-agent chemotherapy group were 41.3% ± 17.8% and 16.7% ± 7.6% for 5-yr EFS, respectively (P = 0.023). There was a significant difference in the result of HDC/APBSCT between complete remission or very good partial response group and poor response group (50% ± 20.4% vs 37.5% ± 28.6%, P = 0.018). HDC/APBSCT can be a promising treatment modality in high-risk RMS patients. PMID:22969254

  5. Morbidity statistics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alwyn

    1969-01-01

    This paper is based on an analysis of questionnaires sent to the health ministries of Member States of WHO asking for information about the extent, nature, and scope of morbidity statistical information. It is clear that most countries collect some statistics of morbidity and many countries collect extensive data. However, few countries relate their collection to the needs of health administrators for information, and many countries collect statistics principally for publication in annual volumes which may appear anything up to 3 years after the year to which they refer. The desiderata of morbidity statistics may be summarized as reliability, representativeness, and relevance to current health problems. PMID:5306722

  6. Explorations in statistics: statistical facets of reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2016-06-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This eleventh installment of Explorations in Statistics explores statistical facets of reproducibility. If we obtain an experimental result that is scientifically meaningful and statistically unusual, we would like to know that our result reflects a general biological phenomenon that another researcher could reproduce if (s)he repeated our experiment. But more often than not, we may learn this researcher cannot replicate our result. The National Institutes of Health and the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology have created training modules and outlined strategies to help improve the reproducibility of research. These particular approaches are necessary, but they are not sufficient. The principles of hypothesis testing and estimation are inherent to the notion of reproducibility in science. If we want to improve the reproducibility of our research, then we need to rethink how we apply fundamental concepts of statistics to our science.

  7. Photospheric Magnetic Field Properties of Flaring vs. Flare-Quiet Active Regions II: A Magnetic Charge Topology Model and Statistical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.; Longcope, D. W.

    2003-05-01

    The complexity of the coronal magnetic field extrapolated from a Magnetic Charge Topology (MCT) model, is examined for pre-event signatures unique to solar energetic phenomena. Although extensive use has been made of quantities measured at the photosphere, it is important to consider the magnetic field in the corona, where (for example) the hard X-ray signatures of energy release in solar flares are observed. By quantifying the inferred coronal magnetic topology we are no longer limited to considering solely the magnetic state of the photosphere. MCT is applied to temporally sampled photospheric magnetic data from the U. Hawai`i Imaging Vector Magnetograph, for 24 flare-event and flare-quiet epochs from seven active regions. We outline the methodology employed for automating the application of MCT to large data sets of complex active regions: partitioning the observed Bz at the photosphere, assigning a charge to each partition, and using this charge distribution to extrapolate the field in the corona. From the resulting field we compute the connectivity matrix ψ ij, the location of null points and the intersection of separatrix surfaces, i.e. separator field lines. Parameters are constructed to describe, for example, the magnetic connectivities, the magnetic flux in those connections, and the number of separators. Examining particular events results in no obvious trends in the magnitude and temporal evolution of the parameters just prior to flare events. Thus, we employ the same quantitative statistical approach outlined in Leka and Barnes [this session], i.e. applying discriminant analysis and Hotelling's T2-test, and ranking all four-variable discriminant functions as a proxy for a single all-variable discriminant function. We present those parameters which consistently appear in the best combinations, indicating that they may play an important role in defining a pre-event coronal state. This work was performed under Air Force Office of Scientific Research

  8. The impact of x-ray tube stabilization on localized radiation dose in axial CT scans: initial results in CTDI phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Cody, Dianna D.

    2016-10-01

    Rise, fall, and stabilization of the x-ray tube output occur immediately before and after data acquisition on some computed tomography (CT) scanners and are believed to contribute additional dose to anatomy facing the x-ray tube when it powers on or off. In this study, we characterized the dose penalty caused by additional radiation exposure during the rise, stabilization, and/or fall time (referred to as overscanning). A 32 cm CT dose-index (CTDI) phantom was scanned on three CT scanners: GE Healthcare LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare Discovery CT750 HD, and Siemens Somatom Definition Flash. Radiation exposure was detected for various x-ray tube start acquisition angles using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed in the peripheral chamber hole at the phantom’s 12 o’clock position. Scan rotation time, ionization chamber location, phantom diameter, and phantom centering were varied to quantify their effects on the dose penalty caused by overscanning. For 1 s single, axial rotations, CTDI at the 12 o’clock chamber position (CTDI100, 12:00) was 6.1%, 4.0%, and 4.4% higher when the start angle of the x-ray tube was aligned at the top of the gantry (12 o’clock) versus when the start angle was aligned at 9 o’clock for the Siemens Flash, GE CT750 HD, and GE VCT scanner, respectively. For the scanners’ fastest rotation times (0.285 s for the Siemens and 0.4 s for both GE scanners), the dose penalties increased to 22.3%, 10.7%, and 10.5%, respectively, suggesting a trade-off between rotation speed and the dose penalty from overscanning. In general, overscanning was shown to have a greater radiation dose impact for larger diameter phantoms, shorter rotation times, and to peripheral phantom locations. Future research is necessary to determine an appropriate method for incorporating the localized dose penalty from overscanning into standard dose metrics, as well as to assess the impact on organ dose.

  9. Statistical Diversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petocz, Peter; Sowey, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The term "data snooping" refers to the practice of choosing which statistical analyses to apply to a set of data after having first looked at those data. Data snooping contradicts a fundamental precept of applied statistics, that the scheme of analysis is to be planned in advance. In this column, the authors shall elucidate the statistical…

  10. Potent response of QS-21 as a vaccine adjuvant in the skin when delivered with the Nanopatch, resulted in adjuvant dose sparing

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Hwee-Ing; Fernando, Germain J. P.; Depelsenaire, Alexandra C. I.; Kendall, Mark A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants play a key role in boosting immunogenicity of vaccines, particularly for subunit protein vaccines. In this study we investigated the induction of antibody response against trivalent influenza subunit protein antigen and a saponin adjuvant, QS-21. Clinical trials of QS-21 have demonstrated the safety but, also a need of high dose for optimal immunity, which could possibly reduce patient acceptability. Here, we proposed the use of a skin delivery technology – the Nanopatch – to reduce both adjuvant and antigen dose but also retain its immune stimulating effects when compared to the conventional needle and syringe intramuscular (IM) delivery. We have demonstrated that Nanopatch delivery to skin requires only 1/100th of the IM antigen dose to induce equivalent humoral response. QS-21 enhanced humoral response in both skin and muscle route. Additionally, Nanopatch has demonstrated 30-fold adjuvant QS-21 dose sparing while retaining immune stimulating effects compared to IM. QS-21 induced localised, controlled cell death in the skin, suggesting that the danger signals released from dead cells contributed to the enhanced immunogenicity. Taken together, these findings demonstrated the suitability of reduced dose of QS-21 and the antigen using the Nanopatch to enhance humoral responses, and the potential to increase patient acceptability of QS-21 adjuvant. PMID:27404789

  11. Absorbed Dose and Dose Equivalent Calculations for Modeling Effective Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Andrew; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    While in orbit, Astronauts are exposed to a much higher dose of ionizing radiation than when on the ground. It is important to model how shielding designs on spacecraft reduce radiation effective dose pre-flight, and determine whether or not a danger to humans is presented. However, in order to calculate effective dose, dose equivalent calculations are needed. Dose equivalent takes into account an absorbed dose of radiation and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This is important in preventing long-term, stochastic radiation effects in humans spending time in space. Monte carlo simulations run with the particle transport code FLUKA, give absorbed and equivalent dose data for relevant shielding. The shielding geometry used in the dose calculations is a layered slab design, consisting of aluminum, polyethylene, and water. Water is used to simulate the soft tissues that compose the human body. The results obtained will provide information on how the shielding performs with many thicknesses of each material in the slab. This allows them to be directly applicable to modern spacecraft shielding geometries.

  12. Radiotherapy Breast Boost With Reduced Whole-Breast Dose Is Associated With Improved Cosmesis: The Results of a Comprehensive Assessment From the St. George and Wollongong Randomized Breast Boost Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, Eric; Browne, Lois H.; Khanna, Sam; Cail, Stacy; Cert, Grad; Chin, Yaw; Clark, Catherine; Inder, Stephanie; Szwajcer, Alison; Graham, Peter H.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate comprehensively the effect of a radiotherapy boost on breast cosmetic outcomes after 5 years in patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. Methods: The St. George and Wollongong trial (NCT00138814) randomized 688 patients with histologically proven Tis-2, N 0-1, M0 carcinoma to the control arm of 50 Gy in 25 fractions (342 patients) and the boost arm of 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the whole breast followed by a 16 Gy in 8 fraction electron boost (346 patients). Five-year cosmetic outcomes were assessed by a panel subjectively in 385 patients and objectively using pBRA (relative breast retraction assessment). A subset of patients also had absolute BRA measurements. Clinician assessment and patient self-assessment of overall cosmetic and specific items as well as computer BCCT.core analysis were also performed. Results: The boost arm had improved cosmetic overall outcomes as scored by the panel and BCCT.core software with 79% (p = 0.016) and 81% (p = 0.004) excellent/good cosmesis respectively compared with 68% in no-boost arm. The boost arm also had lower pBRA and BRA values with a mean difference of 0.60 and 1.82 mm, respectively, but was not statistically significant. There was a very high proportion of overall excellent/good cosmetic outcome in 95% and 93% in the boost and no-boost arms using patient self-assessment. However, no difference in overall and specific items scored by clinician assessment and patient self-assessment was found. Conclusion: The results show the negative cosmetic effect of a 16-Gy boost is offset by a lower whole-breast dose of 45 Gy.

  13. Betrixaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation: results of a phase 2, randomized, dose-ranging study (Explore-Xa)

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Stuart J.; Eikelboom, John; Dorian, Paul; Hohnloser, Stefan H.; Gretler, Daniel D.; Sinha, Uma; Ezekowitz, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are at increased risk of stroke. Betrixaban is a novel oral factor Xa inhibitor administered once daily, mostly excreted unchanged in the bile and with low (17%) renal excretion. Methods and results Patients with AF and more than one risk factor for stroke were randomized to one of three blinded doses of betrixaban (40, 60, or 80 mg once daily) or unblinded warfarin, adjusted to an international normalized ratio of 2.0–3.0. The primary outcome was major or clinically relevant non-major bleeding. The mean follow-up was 147 days. Among 508 patients randomized, the mean CHADS2 score was 2.2; 87% of patients had previously received vitamin K antagonist therapy. The time in therapeutic range on warfarin was 63.4%. There were one, five, five, and seven patients with a primary outcome on betrixaban 40, 60, 80 mg daily, or warfarin, respectively. The rate of the primary outcome was lowest on betrixaban 40 mg (hazard ratio compared with warfarin = 0.14, exact stratified log-rank P-value 0.04, unadjusted for multiple testing). Rates of the primary outcome with betrixaban 60 or 80 mg were more similar to those of wafarin. Two ischaemic strokes occurred, one each on betrixaban 60 and 80 mg daily. There were two vascular deaths, one each on betrixaban 40 mg and warfarin. Betrixaban was associated with higher rates of diarrhoea than warfarin. Conclusion Betrixaban was well tolerated and had similar or lower rates of bleeding compared with well-controlled warfarin in patients with AF at risk for stroke. PMID:23487517

  14. Effectiveness and safety of fixed dose combination of acarbose/metformin in Indian Type 2 diabetes patients: Results from observational GLOBE Study

    PubMed Central

    Saboo, Banshi; Reddy, Gundam Chandrasekhara; Juneja, Subhashchander; Kedia, Ashok Kumar; Manjrekar, Pravin; Rathod, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Primary objective - evaluate effectiveness and safety of acarbose/metformin fixed dose FDC on glycemic control in Indian T2DM patients in real life clinical setting. Secondary objective - evaluate safety and satisfaction of treatment. Materials and Methods: Open-label, prospective, multicentre, single-arm, non-interventional study. Patients included were aged ≥18 years with T2DM on Acarbose (25/50 mg) and Metformin (500 mg) FDC. Glycemic parameters were recorded during observation. Results: Total 9364 patients were enrolled in the study (mean age, 50.7 years and 60.1% were male). Mean (SD) FBG and PPG was significantly reduced by 42.4 (32.6) mg/dl (P < 0.0001) and 80.2 (49.7) mg/dl (P < 0.0001) respectively at the end of observation. Mean (SD) HbA1c reduced by -1.0% (0.8) to 7.3% (0.7) at the last follow-up visit (P <0.0001). Majority of patients (97.5%) and physicians (98.42%) were satisfied with acarbose/metformin FDC treatment. Also, significant reduction in body weight by -1.7 (2.2) kg was observed (P < 0.0001). Patients with known T2DM and newly diagnosed showed a similar glycemic control (P < 0.0001). Drug-related adverse events were reported by only 1.4% patients mostly gastrointestinal. Conclusions: Acarbose/metformin FDC was efficacious, safe well accepted in routine clinical practice. It was well-tolerated without significant risk of hypoglycemia and can be used in early T2DM management PMID:25593840

  15. Adjuvant high-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic stem cell support for high-risk primary breast cancer: results from the Italian national registry.

    PubMed

    Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Martinelli, Giovanni; Gianni, Alessandro Massimo; Da Prada, Gian Antonio; Ballestrero, Alberto; Rosti, Giovanni; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca; Aieta, Michele; Secondino, Simona; Cinieri, Saverio; Fedele, Roberta; Bengala, Carmelo; Bregni, Marco; Grasso, Donatella; De Giorgi, Ugo; Lanza, Francesco; Castagna, Luca; Bruno, Barbara; Martino, Massimo

    2014-04-01

    The efficacy of high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous hemopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (AHPCT) for breast cancer (BC) patients has been an area of intense controversy among the medical oncology community. The aim of this study was to assess toxicity and efficacy of this procedure in a large cohort of high-risk primary BC patients who underwent AHPCT in Italy. A total of 1183 patients receiving HDC for high-risk BC (HRBC) (>3 positive nodes) were identified in the Italian registry. The median age was 46 years, 62% of patients were premenopausal at treatment, 60.1% had endocrine-responsive tumors, and 20.7% had a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive tumor. The median number of positive lymph nodes (LN) at surgery was 15, with 71.5% of patients having ≥ 10 positive nodes. Seventy-three percent received an alkylating agent-based HDC as a single procedure, whereas 27% received epirubicin or mitoxantrone-containing HDC, usually within a multitransplantation program. The source of stem cells was peripheral blood in the vast majority of patients. Transplantation-related mortality was .8%, whereas late cardiac and secondary tumor-related mortality were around 1%, overall. With a median follow-up of 79 months, median disease-free and overall survival (OS) in the entire population were 101 and 134 months, respectively. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that OS was significantly better in patients with endocrine-responsive tumors and in patients receiving multiple transplantation procedures. HER2 status did not affect survival probability. The size of the primary tumor and number of involved LN negatively affected OS. Adjuvant HDC with AHPCT has a low mortality rate and provides impressive long-term survival rates in patients with high-risk primary BC. Our results suggest that this treatment modality should be proposed in selected HRBC patients and further investigated in clinical trials.

  16. Planck intermediate results. VII. Statistical properties of infrared and radio extragalactic sources from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue at frequencies between 100 and 857 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Argüeso, F.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bethermin, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurinsky, N.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschènes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sajina, A.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Sudiwala, R.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2013-02-01

    We make use of the Planck all-sky survey to derive number counts and spectral indices of extragalactic sources - infrared and radio sources - from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) at 100 to 857 GHz (3 mm to 350 μm). Three zones (deep, medium and shallow) of approximately homogeneous coverage are used to permit a clean and controlled correction for incompleteness, which was explicitly not done for the ERCSC, as it was aimed at providing lists of sources to be followed up. Our sample, prior to the 80% completeness cut, contains between 217 sources at 100 GHz and 1058 sources at 857 GHz over about 12 800 to 16 550 deg2 (31 to 40% of the sky). After the 80% completeness cut, between 122 and 452 and sources remain, with flux densities above 0.3 and 1.9 Jy at 100 and 857 GHz. The sample so defined can be used for statistical analysis. Using the multi-frequency coverage of the Planck High Frequency Instrument, all the sources have been classified as either dust-dominated (infrared galaxies) or synchrotron-dominated (radio galaxies) on the basis of their spectral energy distributions (SED). Our sample is thus complete, flux-limited and color-selected to differentiate between the two populations. We find an approximately equal number of synchrotron and dusty sources between 217 and 353 GHz; at 353 GHz or higher (or 217 GHz and lower) frequencies, the number is dominated by dusty (synchrotron) sources, as expected. For most of the sources, the spectral indices are also derived. We provide for the first time counts of bright sources from 353 to 857 GHz and the contributions from dusty and synchrotron sources at all HFI frequencies in the key spectral range where these spectra are crossing. The observed counts are in the Euclidean regime. The number counts are compared to previously published data (from earlier Planck results, Herschel, BLAST, SCUBA, LABOCA, SPT, and ACT) and models taking into account both radio or infrared galaxies, and covering a

  17. Dose-mass inverse optimization for minimally moving thoracic lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaylov, I. B.; Moros, E. G.

    2015-05-01

    In the past decade, several different radiotherapy treatment plan evaluation and optimization schemes have been proposed as viable approaches, aiming for dose escalation or an increase of healthy tissue sparing. In particular, it has been argued that dose-mass plan evaluation and treatment plan optimization might be viable alternatives to the standard of care, which is realized through dose-volume evaluation and optimization. The purpose of this investigation is to apply dose-mass optimization to a cohort of lung cancer patients and compare the achievable healthy tissue sparing to that one achievable through dose-volume optimization. Fourteen non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient plans were studied retrospectively. The range of tumor motion was less than 0.5 cm and motion management in the treatment planning process was not considered. For each case, dose-volume (DV)-based and dose-mass (DM)-based optimization was performed. Nine-field step-and-shoot IMRT was used, with all of the optimization parameters kept the same between DV and DM optimizations. Commonly used dosimetric indices (DIs) such as dose to 1% the spinal cord volume, dose to 50% of the esophageal volume, and doses to 20 and 30% of healthy lung volumes were used for cross-comparison. Similarly, mass-based indices (MIs), such as doses to 20 and 30% of healthy lung masses, 1% of spinal cord mass, and 33% of heart mass, were also tallied. Statistical equivalence tests were performed to quantify the findings for the entire patient cohort. Both DV and DM plans for each case were normalized such that 95% of the planning target volume received the prescribed dose. DM optimization resulted in more organs at risk (OAR) sparing than DV optimization. The average sparing of cord, heart, and esophagus was 23, 4, and 6%, respectively. For the majority of the DIs, DM optimization resulted in lower lung doses. On average, the doses to 20 and 30% of healthy lung were lower by approximately 3 and 4%, whereas lung

  18. Allowing for random errors in radiation dose estimates for the atomic bomb survivor data.

    PubMed

    Pierce, D A; Stram, D O; Vaeth, M

    1990-09-01

    The presence of random errors in the individual radiation dose estimates for the A-bomb survivors causes underestimation of radiation effects in dose-response analyses, and also distorts the shape of dose-response curves. Statistical methods are presented which will adjust for these biases, provided that a valid statistical model for the dose estimation errors is used. Emphasis is on clarifying some rather subtle statistical issues. For most of this development the distinction between radiation dose and exposure is not critical. The proposed methods involve downward adjustment of dose estimates, but this does not imply that the dosimetry system is faulty. Rather, this is a part of the dose-response analysis required to remove biases in the risk estimates. The primary focus of this report is on linear dose-response models, but methods for linear-quadratic models are also considered briefly. Some plausible models for the dose estimation errors are considered, which have typical errors in a range of 30-40% of the true values, and sensitivity analysis of the resulting bias corrections is provided. It is found that for these error models the resulting estimates of excess cancer risk based on linear models are about 6-17% greater than estimates that make no allowance for dose estimation errors. This increase in risk estimates is reduced to about 4-11% if, as has often been done recently, survivors with dose estimates above 4 Gy are eliminated from the analysis.

  19. Radiation dose in coronary angiography and intervention: initial results from the establishment of a multi-centre diagnostic reference level in Queensland public hospitals

    SciTech Connect

    Crowhurst, James A; Whitby, Mark; Thiele, David; Halligan, Toni; Westerink, Adam; Crown, Suzanne; Milne, Jillian

    2014-09-15

    Radiation dose to patients undergoing invasive coronary angiography (ICA) is relatively high. Guidelines suggest that a local benchmark or diagnostic reference level (DRL) be established for these procedures. This study sought to create a DRL for ICA procedures in Queensland public hospitals. Data were collected for all Cardiac Catheter Laboratories in Queensland public hospitals. Data were collected for diagnostic coronary angiography (CA) and single-vessel percutaneous intervention (PCI) procedures. Dose area product (P{sub KA}), skin surface entrance dose (K{sub AR}), fluoroscopy time (FT), and patient height and weight were collected for 3 months. The DRL was set from the 75th percentile of the P{sub KA.} 2590 patients were included in the CA group where the median FT was 3.5 min (inter-quartile range = 2.3–6.1). Median K{sub AR} = 581 mGy (374–876). Median P{sub KA} = 3908 uGym{sup 2} (2489–5865) DRL = 5865 uGym{sup 2}. 947 patients were included in the PCI group where median FT was 11.2 min (7.7–17.4). Median K{sub AR} = 1501 mGy (928–2224). Median P{sub KA} = 8736 uGym{sup 2} (5449–12,900) DRL = 12,900 uGym{sup 2}. This study established a benchmark for radiation dose for diagnostic and interventional coronary angiography in Queensland public facilities.

  20. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-P-Dioxin (Tcdd) Dose-Response Studies: Preliminary Literature Search Results and Request for Additional Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA invited the public to comment on the preliminary list of in vivo mammalian dose-response citations for 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). This list was compiled as a first step in the development of EPA’s response to the National Academy of Sciences comments (NAS, 2...

  1. Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer statistics across the world. U.S. Cancer Mortality Trends The best indicator of progress against cancer is ... the number of cancer survivors has increased. These trends show that progress is being made against the ...

  2. Results from the PharmaSat Nanosatellite Mission: Dose Dependence of Growth and Metabolic Parameters for S. cerevisiae Grown in Microgravity and Challenged by Voriconazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricco, Antonio; Parra, Macarena; Niesel, David; Ly, Diana; Kudlicki, Andrzej; McGinnis, Michael; Hines, John

    We report cellular growth and metabolic activity results for Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown aboard PharmaSat, a 5.0-kg autonomous, self-contained biological nanosatellite launched as a secondary payload in May of 2009 and presently in Earth orbit at 450 km. The response of S. cerevisiae to three dose levels bracketing the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the antifungal voriconazole was monitored in microgravity using 3-color absorbance to measure metabolic activity and turbidity (cell number), which were characterized chiefly by two param-eters: (1) the doubling time and (2) the time delay before the onset of rapid growth. Growth was conducted in forty-eight 100-L microwells containing the yeast—one fluidically separate bank of 12 wells for each voriconazole concentration, plus a control bank. Yeast were main-tained in stasis until the satellite had been deployed, the orbit stabilized, the communications links established, and the growth temperature of 27 ° C stabilized. To re-initiate yeast growth, RPMI growth medium was added. The S. cerevisiae were grown for approximately 12 hr, at which time they were challenged with varying concentrations (0, 0.25xMIC, MIC, 4xMIC) of voriconazole; the optical density and the color change of the redox-based viability indicator alamar blue were recorded as growth proceeded for an additional 84 hr. Results telemetered to the ground reveal a 33 percent longer lag time in microgravity and 60 percent longer dou-bling time than identical ground control experiments. Lag and doubling times are essentially unaffected by voriconazole at 0.125 g/mL in either environment; they lengthen similarly at 0.5 g/mL, voriconazole's MIC. At four times MIC, ground controls show no significant growth nor metabolic activity as tracked by alamar blue; in space, while there was also no measurable cellu-lar growth, remarkably, metabolic activity was clearly present (n = 12 wells). Explanations for the differences in metabolic activity and

  3. Statistical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Claudine

    Statistical Physics bridges the properties of a macroscopic system and the microscopic behavior of its constituting particles, otherwise impossible due to the giant magnitude of Avogadro's number. Numerous systems of today's key technologies - such as semiconductors or lasers - are macroscopic quantum objects; only statistical physics allows for understanding their fundamentals. Therefore, this graduate text also focuses on particular applications such as the properties of electrons in solids with applications, and radiation thermodynamics and the greenhouse effect.

  4. Impact of Safety-Related Dose Reductions or Discontinuations on Sustained Virologic Response in HCV-Infected Patients: Results from the GUARD-C Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Graham R.; Coppola, Carmine; Derbala, Moutaz; Ferenci, Peter; Orlandini, Alessandra; Reddy, K. Rajender; Tallarico, Ludovico; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Ahlers, Silke; Bakalos, Georgios; Hassanein, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, peginterferon alfa/ribavirin remains relevant in many resource-constrained settings. The non-randomized GUARD-C cohort investigated baseline predictors of safety-related dose reductions or discontinuations (sr-RD) and their impact on sustained virologic response (SVR) in patients receiving peginterferon alfa/ribavirin in routine practice. Methods A total of 3181 HCV-mono-infected treatment-naive patients were assigned to 24 or 48 weeks of peginterferon alfa/ribavirin by their physician. Patients were categorized by time-to-first sr-RD (Week 4/12). Detailed analyses of the impact of sr-RD on SVR24 (HCV RNA <50 IU/mL) were conducted in 951 Caucasian, noncirrhotic genotype (G)1 patients assigned to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin for 48 weeks. The probability of SVR24 was identified by a baseline scoring system (range: 0–9 points) on which scores of 5 to 9 and <5 represent high and low probability of SVR24, respectively. Results SVR24 rates were 46.1% (754/1634), 77.1% (279/362), 68.0% (514/756), and 51.3% (203/396), respectively, in G1, 2, 3, and 4 patients. Overall, 16.9% and 21.8% patients experienced ≥1 sr-RD for peginterferon alfa and ribavirin, respectively. Among Caucasian noncirrhotic G1 patients: female sex, lower body mass index, pre-existing cardiovascular/pulmonary disease, and low hematological indices were prognostic factors of sr-RD; SVR24 was lower in patients with ≥1 vs. no sr-RD by Week 4 (37.9% vs. 54.4%; P = 0.0046) and Week 12 (41.7% vs. 55.3%; P = 0.0016); sr-RD by Week 4/12 significantly reduced SVR24 in patients with scores <5 but not ≥5. Conclusions In conclusion, sr-RD to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin significantly impacts on SVR24 rates in treatment-naive G1 noncirrhotic Caucasian patients. Baseline characteristics can help select patients with a high probability of SVR24 and a low probability of sr-RD with

  5. Long-Term Efficacy of Modified-Release Recombinant Human Thyrotropin Augmented Radioiodine Therapy for Benign Multinodular Goiter: Results from a Multicenter, International, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Dose-Selection Study

    PubMed Central

    Hegedüs, Laszlo; Pacini, Furio; Pinchera, Aldo; Leung, Angela M.; Vaisman, Mario; Reiners, Christoph; Wemeau, Jean-Louis; Huysmans, Dyde A.; Harper, William; Rachinsky, Irina; de Souza, Hevelyn Noemberg; Castagna, Maria G.; Antonangeli, Lucia; Braverman, Lewis E.; Corbo, Rossana; Düren, Christian; Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Marriott, Christopher; Driedger, Albert; Grupe, Peter; Watt, Torquil; Magner, James; Purvis, Annie; Graf, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Background: Enhanced reduction of multinodular goiter (MNG) can be achieved by stimulation with recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) before radioiodine (131I) therapy. The objective was to compare the long-term efficacy and safety of two low doses of modified release rhTSH (MRrhTSH) in combination with 131I therapy. Methods: In this phase II, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study, 95 patients (57.2±9.6 years old, 85% women, 83% Caucasians) with MNG (median size 96.0 mL; range 31.9–242.2 mL) were randomized to receive placebo (n=32), 0.01 mg MRrhTSH (n=30), or 0.03 mg MRrhTSH (n=33) 24 hours before a calculated 131I activity. Thyroid volume (TV) and smallest cross-sectional area of trachea (SCAT) were measured (by computed tomography scan) at baseline, six months, and 36 months. Thyroid function and quality of life (QoL) was evaluated at three-month and yearly intervals respectively. Results: At six months, TV reduction was enhanced in the 0.03 mg MRrhTSH group (32.9% vs. 23.1% in the placebo group; p=0.03) but not in the 0.01 mg MRrhTSH group. At 36 months, the mean percent TV reduction from baseline was 44±12.7% (SD) in the placebo group, 41±21.0% in the 0.01 mg MRrhTSH group, and 53±18.6% in the 0.03 mg MRrhTSH group, with no statistically significant differences among the groups, p=0.105. In the 0.03 mg MRrhTSH group, the subset of patients with basal 131I uptake <20% had a 24% greater TV reduction at 36 months than the corresponding subset of patients in the placebo group (p=0.01). At 36 months, the largest relative increase in SCAT was observed in the 0.03 mg MRrhTSH group (13.4±23.2%), but this was not statistically different from the increases observed in the placebo or the 0.01 mg MRrhTSH group (p=0.15). Goiter-related symptoms were reduced and QoL improved, without any enhanced benefit from using MRrhTSH. At three years, the prevalence of permanent hypothyroidism was 13%, 33%, and 45% in the placebo, 0.01 mg, and 0.03

  6. Breast cancer risk from low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation: results of parallel analysis of three exposed populations of women

    SciTech Connect

    Land, C.E.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Shore, R.E.; Norman, J.E.; Tokunaga, M.

    1980-08-01

    Breast cancer incidence data were analyzed from three populations of women exposed to ionizing radiation: survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs, patients in Massachusetts tuberculosis sanitoria who were exposed to multiple chest fluoroscopies, and patients treated by X-rays for acute postpartum mastitis in Rochester, New York. Parallel analyses by radiation dose, age at exposure, and time after exposure suggested that risk of radiation-induced cancer increased approximately linearly with increasing dose and was heavily dependent on age at exposure; however, the risk was otherwise remarkably similar among the three populations, at least for ages 10 to 40 years at exposure, and followed the same temporal pattern of occurrence as did breast cancer incidence in nonexposed women of similar ages.

  7. A Phase I/II Radiation Dose Escalation Study With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Inoperable Stages I to III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Phase I Results of RTOG 0117

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Moughan, Jennifer; Graham, Mary V.; Byhardt, Roger; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Fowler, Jack; Purdy, James A.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gore, Elizabeth; Choy, Hak

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: In preparation for a Phase III comparison of high-dose versus standard-dose radiation therapy, this Phase I/II study was initiated to establish the maximum tolerated dose of radiation therapy in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy, using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included patients with histologically proven, unresectable Stages I to III non-small-cell lung cancer. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of paclitaxel, 50 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin, AUC of 2, given weekly. The radiation dose was to be sequentially intensified by increasing the daily fraction size, starting from 75.25 Gy/35 fractions. Results: The Phase I portion of this study accrued 17 patients from 10 institutions and was closed in January 2004. After the initial 8 patients were accrued to cohort 1, the trial closed temporarily on September 26, 2002, due to reported toxicity. Two acute treatment-related dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were reported at the time: a case of grade 5 and grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. The protocol, therefore, was revised to de-escalate the radiation therapy dose (74 Gy/37 fractions). Patients in cohort 1 continued to develop toxicity, with 6/8 (75%) patients eventually developing grade >=3 events. Cohort 2 accrued 9 patients. There was one DLT, a grade 3 esophagitis, in cohort 2 in the first 5 patients (1/5 patients) and no DLTs for the next 2 patients (0/2 patients). Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 74 Gy/37 fractions (2.0 Gy per fraction) using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent paclitaxel and carboplatin therapy. This dose level in the Phase II portion has been well tolerated, with low rates of acute and late lung toxicities.

  8. Low-dose benznidazole treatment results in parasite clearance and attenuates heart inflammatory reaction in an experimental model of infection with a highly virulent Trypanosoma cruzi strain

    PubMed Central

    Cevey, Ágata Carolina; Mirkin, Gerardo Ariel; Penas, Federico Nicolás; Goren, Nora Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is the main cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Americas. Antiparasitic treatment mostly relies on benznidazole (Bzl) due to Nifurtimox shortage or unavailability. Both induce adverse drug effects (ADE) of varied severity in many patients, leading to treatment discontinuation or abandonment. Since dosage may influence ADE, we aimed to assess Bzl efficacy in terms of parasiticidal and anti-inflammatory activity, using doses lower than those previously reported. BALB/c mice infected with the T. cruzi RA strain were treated with different doses of Bzl. Parasitaemia, mortality and weight change were assessed. Parasite load, tissue infiltrates and inflammatory mediators were studied in the heart. Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity was determined as a marker of heart damage. The infection-independent anti-inflammatory properties of Bzl were studied in an in vitro model of LPS-treated cardiomyocyte culture. Treatment with 25 mg/kg/day Bzl turned negative the parasitological parameters, induced a significant decrease in IL-1β, IL-6 and NOS2 in the heart and CK activity in serum, to normal levels. No mortality was observed in infected treated mice. Primary cultured cardiomyocytes treated with Bzl showed that inflammatory mediators were reduced via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. A Bzl dose lower than that previously reported for treatment of experimental Chagas disease exerts adequate antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory effects leading to parasite clearance and tissue healing. This may be relevant to reassess the dose currently used for the treatment of human Chagas disease, aiming to minimize ADE. PMID:26862474

  9. Low-dose benznidazole treatment results in parasite clearance and attenuates heart inflammatory reaction in an experimental model of infection with a highly virulent Trypanosoma cruzi strain.

    PubMed

    Cevey, Ágata Carolina; Mirkin, Gerardo Ariel; Penas, Federico Nicolás; Goren, Nora Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is the main cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Americas. Antiparasitic treatment mostly relies on benznidazole (Bzl) due to Nifurtimox shortage or unavailability. Both induce adverse drug effects (ADE) of varied severity in many patients, leading to treatment discontinuation or abandonment. Since dosage may influence ADE, we aimed to assess Bzl efficacy in terms of parasiticidal and anti-inflammatory activity, using doses lower than those previously reported. BALB/c mice infected with the T. cruzi RA strain were treated with different doses of Bzl. Parasitaemia, mortality and weight change were assessed. Parasite load, tissue infiltrates and inflammatory mediators were studied in the heart. Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity was determined as a marker of heart damage. The infection-independent anti-inflammatory properties of Bzl were studied in an in vitro model of LPS-treated cardiomyocyte culture. Treatment with 25 mg/kg/day Bzl turned negative the parasitological parameters, induced a significant decrease in IL-1β, IL-6 and NOS2 in the heart and CK activity in serum, to normal levels. No mortality was observed in infected treated mice. Primary cultured cardiomyocytes treated with Bzl showed that inflammatory mediators were reduced via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. A Bzl dose lower than that previously reported for treatment of experimental Chagas disease exerts adequate antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory effects leading to parasite clearance and tissue healing. This may be relevant to reassess the dose currently used for the treatment of human Chagas disease, aiming to minimize ADE. PMID:26862474

  10. Measurement verification of dose distributions in pulsed-dose rate brachytherapy in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mantaj, Patrycja; Zwierzchowski, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to verify the dose distribution optimisation method in pulsed brachytherapy. Background The pulsed-dose rate brachytherapy is a very important method of breast tumour treatment using a standard brachytheraphy equipment. The appropriate dose distribution round an implant is an important issue in treatment planning. Advanced computer systems of treatment planning are equipped with algorithms optimising dose distribution. Materials and methods The wax-paraffin phantom was constructed and seven applicators were placed within it. Two treatment plans (non-optimised, optimised) were prepared. The reference points were located at a distance of 5 mm from the applicators’ axis. Thermoluminescent detectors were placed in the phantom at suitable 35 chosen reference points. Results The dosimetry verification was carried out in 35 reference points for the plans before and after optimisation. Percentage difference for the plan without optimisation ranged from −8.5% to 1.4% and after optimisation from −8.3% to 0.01%. In 16 reference points, the calculated percentage difference was negative (from −8.5% to 1.3% for the plan without optimisation and from −8.3% to 0.8% for the optimised plan). In the remaining 19 points percentage difference was from 9.1% to 1.4% for the plan without optimisation and from 7.5% to 0.01% for the optimised plan. No statistically significant differences were found between calculated doses and doses measured at reference points in both dose distribution non-optimised treatment plans and optimised treatment plans. Conclusions No statistically significant differences were found in dose values at reference points between doses calculated by the treatment planning system and those measured by TLDs. This proves the consistency between the measurements and the calculations. PMID:24416545

  11. Myeloablative Anti-CD20 Radioimmunotherapy +/- High-Dose Chemotherapy Followed by Autologous Stem Cell Support for Relapsed/Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma Results in Excellent Long-Term Survival

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Susanne; Schmidt, Burkhard; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Peschel, Christian; von Schilling, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Background Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been used to treat relapsed/refractory CD20+ Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Myeloablative anti-CD20 RIT followed by autologous stem cell infusion (ASCT) enables high radiation doses to lymphoma sites. We performed a phase I/II trial to assess feasibility and survival. Methods Twenty-three patients with relapsed/refractory NHL without complete remission (CR) to salvage chemotherapy were enrolled to evaluate RIT with Iodine-131 labelled rituximab (131I-rituximab) in a myeloablative setting. Biodistribution and dosimetric studies were performed to determine 131I activity required to induce a total body dose of 21-27Gy to critical organs. In 6/23 patients RIT was combined with high-dose chemotherapy. 8/23 patients received a sequential high-dose chemotherapy with a second ASCT. The median follow-up is 9.5 years. Results 6.956-19.425GBq of 131I was delivered to achieve the limiting organ dose to lungs or kidneys. No grade III/IV non-hematologic toxicity was seen with RIT alone. Significant grade III/IV toxicity (mucositis, fever, infection, one therapy related death) was observed in patients treated with RIT combined with high-dose chemotherapy. The overall response rate was 87% (64% CR). The median progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) is 47.5 and 101.5 months. An international prognostic index score >1 was predictive for OS. Conclusion Myeloablative RIT with 131I-rituximab followed by ASCT is feasible, well-tolerated and effective in high risk CD20+ NHL. Combination of RIT and high-dose chemotherapy increased toxicity significantly. Long-term results for PFS and OS are encouraging. PMID:23765188

  12. Low-dose radiation exposure and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-07-01

    Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation by the genetic material in the cell leads to damage to DNA, which in turn leads to cell death, chromosome aberrations and gene mutations. While early or deterministic effects result from organ and tissue damage caused by cell killing, latter two are considered to be involved in the initial events that lead to the development of cancer. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the dose-response relationships for cancer induction and quantitative evaluations of cancer risk following exposure to moderate to high doses of low-linear energy transfer radiation. A linear, no-threshold model has been applied to assessment of the risks resulting from exposure to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation; however, a statistically significant increase has hardly been described for radiation doses below 100 mSv. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the physical and biological features of low-dose radiation and discusses the possibilities of induction of cancer by low-dose radiation. PMID:22641644

  13. Seasonal precipitation forecasts for selected regions in West Africa using circulation type classifications in combination with further statistical approaches - Conceptual framework and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliefernicht, Jan; Laux, Patrik; Waongo, Moussa; Kunstmann, Harald

    2015-04-01

    Providing valuable forecasts of the seasonal precipitation amount for the upcoming rainy season is one of the big challenges for the national weather services in West Africa. Every year a harmonized forecast of the seasonal precipitation amount for the West African region is issued by the national weather services within the PRESAO framework. The PREASO forecast is based on various statistical approaches ranging from a simple subjective analog method based on the experiences of a meteorological expert to objective regression-based approaches by using various sources of input information such as predicted monsoon winds or observed sea surface temperature anomalies close to the West African coastline. The objective of this study is to perform an evaluation of these techniques for selected West African regions and to introduce classification techniques in the current operational practices and to combine these approaches with further techniques for an additional refinement of the forecasting procedure. We use a fuzzy-rule based technique for a classification of (sub-) monthly large-scale atmospheric and oceanic patterns which are combined to further statistical approaches such as an analog method and a data depth approach for the prediction of the (sub-) seasonal precipitation amounts and additional precipitation indices. The study regions are located from the Edges of the Sahel region in the North of Burkina Faso to the coastline of Ghana. A novel precipitation archive based on daily observations provided by the meteorological services of Burkina Faso and Ghana is the basis for the predictands and is used as reference for model evaluation. The performance of the approach is evaluated over a long period (e.g. 50 years) using cross-validation techniques and sophisticated verification measures for an evaluation of a probability forecast. The precipitation forecast of the classification techniques are also compared to the techniques of the PREASAO community, the

  14. Results of the first statistical study of pioneer Venus orbiter plasma observations in the distant Venus tail: Evidence for a hemispheric asymmetry in the pickup of ionospheric ions

    SciTech Connect

    Intriligator, D.S. )

    1989-02-01

    Pioneer Venus Orbiter plasma and magnetometer observations from the first nine tail seasons of crossings of the Venus wake are used to study ion pickup in the far wake of an unmagnetized object embedded in the solar wind. This first statistical study treats all of the plasma spectra containing pickup ions in the vicinity of the Venus tail. The author finds a hemispheric asymmetry in the pickup of ionospheric ions, with approximately four times more O{sup +} events observed in the northern magnetic hemisphere (where Z{double prime} > O), i.e., the induced electric field points outward, (away from the ionopause boundary) than in the southern (Z{double prime} < O) magnetic hemisphere. Out of a total of 167 large O{sup +} events, 125, or 75%, occurred in the northern hemisphere when position is calculated in terms of Venus radii and 129 or 77% occurred in the northern hemisphere when position is expressed in gyroradii. This hemisphere asymmetry in ion pickup is consistent with the prediction of the Cloutier et al. (1974) mass loading model for Venusian ions above the ionopause boundary.

  15. Tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma: results of SMC NB-2004 study.

    PubMed

    Sung, K W; Son, M H; Lee, S H; Yoo, K H; Koo, H H; Kim, J Y; Cho, E J; Lee, S K; Choi, Y S; Lim, D H; Kim, J-S; Kim, D W

    2013-01-01

    From January 2004 to December 2008, 50 consecutive patients with high-risk neuroblastoma were assigned to receive tandem HDCT (high-dose chemotherapy)/auto-SCT after nine cycles of induction chemotherapy. CEC (carboplatin + etoposide + cyclophosphamide) regimen and TM (thiotepa + melphalan)-TBI regimen (or TM regimen for stage 3 patients) were the first and second HDCT regimens. Local radiotherapy, differentiation therapy with 13-cis-retinoid acid and immunotherapy with interleukin-2 were given after tandem HDCT/auto-SCT. Of the 50 patients, 49 underwent a first HDCT/auto-SCT and 47 underwent a second HDCT/auto-SCT. The tumor relapsed or progressed in 14 patients, secondary malignancy developed in one patient and one patient died from chronic lung disease. Therefore, 34 patients remained event free with a median follow-up of 54.5 months (range, 14-94 months) from diagnosis. The probabilities of 5-year OS and EFS for all 50 patients were 77.0% (95% confidence interval (CI), 63.7-90.3) and 71.4% (95% CI, 58.7-84.1), respectively. However, all patients who remained event free for >3 years after tandem HDCT/auto-SCT experienced late adverse effects. Chemotherapeutic dose-escalation strategy using tandem HDCT/auto-SCT was very encouraging for survival. However, further studies incorporating newer treatment modalities are needed to reduce late adverse effects without jeopardizing the survival rate.

  16. RESRAD-BUILD: A computer model for analyzing the radiological doses resulting from the remediation and occupancy of buildings contaminated with radioactive material

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; LePoire, D.J.; Jones, L.G.

    1994-11-01

    The RESRAD-BUILD computer code is a pathway analysis model designed to evaluate the potential radiological dose incurred by an individual who works or lives in a building contaminated with radioactive material. The transport of radioactive material inside the building from one compartment to another is calculated with an indoor air quality model. The air quality model considers the transport of radioactive dust particulates and radon progeny due to air exchange, deposition and resuspension, and radioactive decay and ingrowth. A single run of the RESRAD-BUILD code can model a building with up to: three compartments, 10 distinct source geometries, and 10 receptor locations. A shielding material can be specified between each source-receptor pair for external gamma dose calculations. Six exposure pathways are considered in the RESRAD-BUILD code: (1) external exposure directly from the source; (2) external exposure to materials deposited on the floor; (3) external exposure due to air submersion; (4) inhalation of airborne radioactive particulates; (5) inhalation of aerosol indoor radon progeny; and (6) inadvertent ingestion of radioactive material, either directly from the sources or from materials deposited on the surfaces of the building compartments. 4 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Monte Carlo Bayesian Inference on a Statistical Model of Sub-gridcolumn Moisture Variability Using High-resolution Cloud Observations . Part II; Sensitivity Tests and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    da Silva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Part I presented a Monte Carlo Bayesian method for constraining a complex statistical model of GCM sub-gridcolumn moisture variability using high-resolution MODIS cloud data, thereby permitting large-scale model parameter estimation and cloud data assimilation. This part performs some basic testing of this new approach, verifying that it does indeed significantly reduce mean and standard deviation biases with respect to the assimilated MODIS cloud optical depth, brightness temperature and cloud top pressure, and that it also improves the simulated rotational-Ramman scattering cloud optical centroid pressure (OCP) against independent (non-assimilated) retrievals from the OMI instrument. Of particular interest, the Monte Carlo method does show skill in the especially difficult case where the background state is clear but cloudy observations exist. In traditional linearized data assimilation methods, a subsaturated background cannot produce clouds via any infinitesimal equilibrium perturbation, but the Monte Carlo approach allows finite jumps into regions of non-zero cloud probability. In the example provided, the method is able to restore marine stratocumulus near the Californian coast where the background state has a clear swath. This paper also examines a number of algorithmic and physical sensitivities of the new method and provides guidance for its cost-effective implementation. One obvious difficulty for the method, and other cloud data assimilation methods as well, is the lack of information content in the cloud observables on cloud vertical structure, beyond cloud top pressure and optical thickness, thus necessitating strong dependence on the background vertical moisture structure. It is found that a simple flow-dependent correlation modification due to Riishojgaard (1998) provides some help in this respect, by better honoring inversion structures in the background state.

  18. Understanding Undergraduate Statistical Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKim, Courtney

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand undergraduate students' views of statistics. Results reveal that students with less anxiety have a higher interest in statistics and also believe in their ability to perform well in the course. Also students who have a more positive attitude about the class tend to have a higher belief in their…

  19. Statistical Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Joseph W.

    2000-07-01

    The Wiley Classics Library consists of selected books that have become recognized classics in their respective fields. With these new unabridged and inexpensive editions, Wiley hopes to extend the life of these important works by making them available to future generations of mathematicians and scientists. Currently available in the Series: T. W. Anderson The Statistical Analysis of Time Series T. S. Arthanari & Yadolah Dodge Mathematical Programming in Statistics Emil Artin Geometric Algebra Norman T. J. Bailey The Elements of Stochastic Processes with Applications to the Natural Sciences Robert G. Bartle The Elements of Integration and Lebesgue Measure George E. P. Box & Norman R. Draper Evolutionary Operation: A Statistical Method for Process Improvement George E. P. Box & George C. Tiao Bayesian Inference in Statistical Analysis R. W. Carter Finite Groups of Lie Type: Conjugacy Classes and Complex Characters R. W. Carter Simple Groups of Lie Type William G. Cochran & Gertrude M. Cox Experimental Designs, Second Edition Richard Courant Differential and Integral Calculus, Volume I RIchard Courant Differential and Integral Calculus, Volume II Richard Courant & D. Hilbert Methods of Mathematical Physics, Volume I Richard Courant & D. Hilbert Methods of Mathematical Physics, Volume II D. R. Cox Planning of Experiments Harold S. M. Coxeter Introduction to Geometry, Second Edition Charles W. Curtis & Irving Reiner Representation Theory of Finite Groups and Associative Algebras Charles W. Curtis & Irving Reiner Methods of Representation Theory with Applications to Finite Groups and Orders, Volume I Charles W. Curtis & Irving Reiner Methods of Representation Theory with Applications to Finite Groups and Orders, Volume II Cuthbert Daniel Fitting Equations to Data: Computer Analysis of Multifactor Data, Second Edition Bruno de Finetti Theory of Probability, Volume I Bruno de Finetti Theory of Probability, Volume 2 W. Edwards Deming Sample Design in Business Research

  20. Effects of Proton Radiation Dose, Dose Rate and Dose Fractionation on Hematopoietic Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ware, J. H.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X. S.; Rusek, A.; Kennedy, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05–0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons. PMID:20726731

  1. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  2. [Results of measuring neutrons doses and energy spectra inside Russian segment of the International Space Station in experiment "Matryoshka-R" using bubble detectors during the ISS-24-34 missions].

    PubMed

    Khulapko, S V; Liagushin, V I; Arkhangel'skiĭ, V V; Shurshakov, V A; Smith, M; Ing, H; Machrafi, R; Nikolaev, I V

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the results of calculating the equivalent dose from and energy spectrum of neutrons in the right-hand crewquarters in module Zvezda of the ISS Russian segment. Dose measurements were made in the period between July, 2010 and November, 2012 (ISS Missions 24-34) by research equipment including the bubble dosimeter as part of experiment "Matryoshka-R". Neutron energy spectra in the crewquarters are in good agreement with what has been calculated for the ISS USOS and, earlier, for the MIR orbital station. The neutron dose rate has been found to amount to 196 +/- 23 microSv/d on Zvezda panel-443 (crewquarters) and 179 +/- 16 microSv/d on the "Shielding shutter" surface in the crewquarters.

  3. Postoperative irradiation of carcinoma of the head of the pancreas area: Short-time tolerance and results to precision high-dose technique in 18 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.D.; Bugat, R.; Combes, P.F.

    1982-07-01

    During the period from January 1977-August 1979, 18 patients with biopsy-proven pancreas duct or ampullary adenocarcinoma with no distant or liver metastases underwent external beam radiation therapy following laparotomy. With the use of a 25 MEV photon beam and a four field ''box'' technique, the dose delivered to the target volume identified with radio-opaque clips at laparotomy was 6000 rad in six weeks, while largely sparing the spinal cord, kidney, liver and gut. All patients subjected to low fat, gluten free diet completed treatment as planned without any acute reaction. Three patients developed delayed pancreatic insufficiency. According to actuarial survival analysis and low morbidity such an approach may lead to increased survival in patients with pancreatic cancer.

  4. Survey of clinical doses from computed tomography examinations in the Canadian province of Manitoba.

    PubMed

    A Elbakri, Idris; D C Kirkpatrick, Iain

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to document CT doses for common CT examinations performed throughout the province of Manitoba. Survey forms were sent out to all provincial CT sites. Thirteen out of sixteen (81 %) sites participated. The authors assessed scans of the brain, routine abdomen-pelvis, routine chest, sinuses, lumbar spine, low-dose lung nodule studies, CT pulmonary angiograms, CT KUBs, CT colonographies and combination chest-abdomen-pelvis exams. Sites recorded scanner model, protocol techniques and patient and dose data for 100 consecutive patients who were scanned with any of the aforementioned examinations. Mean effective doses and standard deviations for the province and for individual scanners were computed. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the variability of effective doses amongst scanners. The t test was used to compare doses and their provincial ranges between newer and older scanners and scanners that used dose saving tools and those that did not. Abdomen-pelvis, chest and brain scans accounted for over 70 % of scans. Their mean effective doses were 18.0 ± 6.7, 13.2 ± 6.4 and 3.0 ± 1.0 mSv, respectively. Variations in doses amongst scanners were statistically significant. Most examinations were performed at 120 kVp, and no lower kVp was used. Dose variations due to scanner age and use of dose saving tools were not statistically significant. Clinical CT doses in Manitoba are broadly similar to but higher than those reported in other Canadian provinces. Results suggest that further dose reduction can be achieved by modifying scanning techniques, such as using lower kVp. Wide variation in doses amongst different scanners suggests that standardisation of scanning protocols can reduce patient dose. New technological advances, such as dose-reduction software algorithms, can be adopted to reduce patient dose.

  5. Inhibition of ovulation by administration of estetrol in combination with drospirenone or levonorgestrel: Results of a phase II dose-finding pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Duijkers, Ingrid J.M.; Klipping, Christine; Zimmerman, Yvette; Appels, Nicole; Jost, Maud; Maillard, Catherine; Mawet, Marie; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Coelingh Bennink, Herjan J. T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of different dosages of estetrol (E4) combined with one of two progestins in suppressing the pituitary–ovarian axis and ovulation in healthy premenopausal women. Methods This was an open, parallel, phase II, dose-finding, pilot study performed in healthy women aged 18 to 35 years with a documented ovulatory cycle before treatment. For three consecutive cycles in a 24/4-day regimen, participants received 5 mg or 10 mg E4/3 mg drospirenone (DRSP); 5 mg, 10 mg or 20 mg E4/150 μg levonorgestrel; or 20 μg ethinylestradiol (EE)/3 mg DRSP as comparator. Pituitary–ovarian axis activity and the occurrence of ovulation were evaluated by monitoring follicular size, serum levels of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinising hormone, estradiol and progesterone during treatment cycles 1 and 3. Endometrial thickness was evaluated throughout the trial, and the return of ovulation was evaluated after the last intake of medication. Results A total of 109 women were included in the trial. No ovulation occurred in any treatment group. Ovarian activity inhibition seemed proportional to the E4 dosage: the highest suppression was observed in the 20 mg E4 group and was very similar to that observed with EE/DRSP. Endometrial thickness was suppressed to the same extent in all groups. Post-treatment ovulation occurred in all participants between 17 and 21 days after the last active treatment. The study combinations were well tolerated and safe. Conclusions Combined with a progestin, E4 adequately suppresses ovarian activity, particularly when given at a dosage above 10 mg/day. Chinese Abstract 摘要 目的 这项研究的目的是评估不同剂量的雌四醇联合两种孕激素中的其中一种对垂体-卵巢轴以及健康的绝经前妇女的排卵方面的抑制疗效。 方法 这是一个在18到35岁的健康女性中进行的开放的、平行的,关于II期药物剂量探索的初步研究,这些女

  6. TEAMS: Toxicity- and Efficacy-based Dose Insertion Design with Adaptive Model Selection for Phase I/II Dose-Escalation Trials in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wentian; Ni, Yang; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Summary In many oncology clinical trials it is necessary to insert new candidate doses when the prespecified doses are poorly elicited. Formal statistical designs with dose insertion are lacking. We propose a dose insertion design for phase I/II clinical trials in oncology based on both efficacy and toxicity outcomes. We also implement Bayesian model selection during the course of the trial so that better models can be adaptively chosen to achieve more accurate inference. The new design, TEAMS, achieves great operating characteristics in extensive simulation studies due to its ability to adaptively insert new doses as well as perform model selection. As a result, appropriate doses are inserted when necessary and desirable doses are selected with higher probabilities at the end of the trial. PMID:26528377

  7. [Statistical materials].

    PubMed

    1986-01-01

    Official population data for the USSR are presented for 1985 and 1986. Part 1 (pp. 65-72) contains data on capitals of union republics and cities with over one million inhabitants, including population estimates for 1986 and vital statistics for 1985. Part 2 (p. 72) presents population estimates by sex and union republic, 1986. Part 3 (pp. 73-6) presents data on population growth, including birth, death, and natural increase rates, 1984-1985; seasonal distribution of births and deaths; birth order; age-specific birth rates in urban and rural areas and by union republic; marriages; age at marriage; and divorces. PMID:12178831

  8. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in India-how and by whom: results from a speciality clinic-use of low-dose methotrexate (MTX) was inexplicably suboptimal.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, Anand N; Gogia, S B

    2016-09-01

    This study was conducted in order to study (a) seropositive RA patients for their prior caregivers, diagnosis makers, drugs and doses taken and (b) the disease status at the first visit and the last visit, from the standpoint of whether they received optimum or suboptimum DMARD treatment. Prospectively entered data were extracted from a rheumatology-specific electronic health record for demography, diagnostic delay, prior caregivers, diagnosis makers, intake of DMARDs and glucocorticoids and disease activity state at first presentation and at the last visit using structured query language. Among 316 patients, prior caregivers were orthopaedicians (73.4 %), alternative systems of medicine practitioners (62 %), internists (38 %), rheumatologists (35.8 %), general practitioners (17 %) and others (12 %). The diagnosis of RA was made by rheumatologists (55.6 %), orthopaedicians (21 %), internists (12.6 %), physiotherapists (3.5 %), homeopaths (2.8 %), general practitioner (2.1 %), neurologists (1.4 %) and Ayurvedic physicians (0.7 %). The mean and the median diagnostic delay among 142 patients where information was available were 18 and 8.5 months, respectively (SD +23.2). Thirty-two percent of the patients had early disease, 48 % established disease and 20 % late disease at presentation. Sixty-six percent of the patients had taken DMARDs-methotrexate (56 %), hydroxychloroquine (46.2 %), leflunomide (18.7 %) and sulfasalazine (20.6 %)-and often in combinations. Different preparations, doses and schedules of glucocorticoids were taken orally or parentally by 51 %. Only one (0.3 %) patient had taken biological DMARDs prior to visiting this clinic. High or moderate disease activity was present in 84 % at the first clinic visit that fell to 14 % at the last clinic visit. The majority of patients with RA were treated by orthopaedicians and practitioners of alternative systems of medicine with only a third by rheumatologists. In 80 % of patients, the

  9. Nutrient intake and nutrient patterns and risk of lung cancer among heavy smokers: results from the COSMOS screening study with annual low-dose CT.

    PubMed

    Gnagnarella, Patrizia; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Bellomi, Massimo; Rampinelli, Cristiano; Bertolotti, Raffaella; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Palli, Domenico; Veronesi, Giulia

    2013-06-01

    The role of nutrients in lung cancer aetiology remains controversial and has never been evaluated in the context of screening. Our aim was to investigate the role of single nutrients and nutrient patterns in the aetiology of lung cancer in heavy smokers. Asymptomatic heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years) were invited to undergo annual low-dose computed tomography. We assessed diet using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire and collected information on multivitamin supplement use. We performed principal component analysis identifying four nutrient patterns and used Cox proportional Hazards regression to assess the association between nutrients and nutrients patterns and lung cancer risk. During a mean follow-up of 5.7 years, 178 of 4,336 participants were diagnosed with lung cancer by screening. We found a significant risk reduction of lung cancer with increasing vegetable fat consumption (HR for highest vs. lowest quartile = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.31-0.80; P-trend = 0.02). Participants classified in the high "vitamins and fiber" pattern score had a significant risk reduction of lung cancer (HR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.36-0.90, P-trend = 0.01). Among heavy smokers enrolled in a screening trial, high vegetable fat intake and adherence to the "vitamin and fiber" nutrient pattern were associated with reduced lung cancer incidence.

  10. Derived Reference Doses (RfDs) for the environmental degradates of the herbicides alachlor and acetochlor: results of an independent expert panel deliberation.

    PubMed

    Gadagbui, Bernard; Maier, Andrew; Dourson, Michael; Parker, Ann; Willis, Alison; Christopher, John P; Hicks, Lebelle; Ramasamy, Santhini; Roberts, Stephen M

    2010-01-01

    An independent peer expert panel was convened under the auspices of the Alliance for Risk Assessment (ARA) to review toxicology data and derive oral Reference Doses (RfDs) for four environmental degradates of the acetanilide herbicides, alachlor and acetochlor. The degradates included in this evaluation were (1) alachlor tertiary-ethanesulfonic acid (ESA), (2) alachlor tertiary-oxanilic acid (OXA), (3) acetochlor ESA, and (4) acetochlor OXA. Each degradate was judged to have sufficient data for developing low to medium confidence RfD, with use of an additional uncertainty factor (UF) to cover data gaps. Body weight decreases were identified as the most sensitive treatment-related adverse effect for RfD development. A composite UF of 1000 (10 for human variability in sensitivity, 10 for interspecies differences in sensitivity, and 10 for subchronic to chronic and database deficiency combined; i.e., 10(A)x10(H)x10(S&D)) for each degradate was considered reasonable, while noting that an argument could be made for an UF of 3000 (10(A)x10(H)x30(S&D)). Based on the available data, an oral RfD of 0.2 mg/kg-day is recommended for both acetochlor ESA and acetochlor OXA and an oral RfD of 0.8 mg/kg-day is recommended for both alachlor ESA and alachlor OXA. PMID:20206657

  11. Results of high-dose therapy for 1000 patients with multiple myeloma: durable complete remissions and superior survival in the absence of chromosome 13 abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Desikan, R; Barlogie, B; Sawyer, J; Ayers, D; Tricot, G; Badros, A; Zangari, M; Munshi, N C; Anaissie, E; Spoon, D; Siegel, D; Jagannath, S; Vesole, D; Epstein, J; Shaughnessy, J; Fassas, A; Lim, S; Roberson, P; Crowley, J

    2000-06-15

    High-dose therapy (HDT) has increased complete remission (CR) rates and survival in multiple myeloma (MM). We now report on continuous CR (CCR) and associated prognostic factors in 1000 consecutive patients receiving melphalan-based tandem HDT. Five-year CCR was 52% among 112 CR patients without chromosome 13 (triangle up13) abnormalities and with beta-2-microglobulin

  12. Induction Therapy with Bortezomib Followed by Bortezomib-High Dose Melphalan and Stem Cell Transplantation for Light Chain Amyloidosis: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Sanchorawala, Vaishali; Brauneis, Dina; Shelton, Anthony C; Lo, Stephen; Sun, Fangui; Sloan, J Mark; Quillen, Karen; Seldin, David C

    2015-08-01

    The depth of hematologic response has been shown to correlate with survival and organ responses for patients with light chain (AL) amyloidosis. We conducted a prospective trial of 2 cycles of induction with bortezomib and dexamethasone on a twice a week schedule followed by conditioning with bortezomib and high-dose melphalan (HDM) and autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT). The objectives were hematologic responses, tolerability, and survival. Thirty-five patients were enrolled from 2010 to 2013. Of these, 30 proceeded with SCT, whereas 5 did not because of clinical deterioration during induction (n = 3) or complications after stem cell collection (n = 2). Two patients developed features of an autologous graft-versus-host disease-like syndrome post-SCT, which responded to steroids; no other unusual complications were seen. Treatment-related mortality occurred in 8.5% (3/35). Hematologic responses were achieved by 100% of the 27 assessable patients (63% complete response, 37% very good partial response [VGPR]) who completed the planned treatment. By intention-to-treat, hematologic responses occurred in 77% of patients (49% complete response, 29% VGPR). With a median follow-up of 36 months, the median overall survival and progression-free survival were not reached. In conclusion, incorporating bortezomib into induction and conditioning yielded a high rate of hematologic responses after HDM/SCT in patients with AL amyloidosis.

  13. Overview of results from the WaterTox intercalibration and environmental testing phase II program: Part 1, statistical analysis of blind sample testing.

    PubMed

    Ronco, A; Gagnon, P; Diaz-Baez, M C; Arkhipchuk, V; Castillo, G; Castillo, L E; Dutka, B J; Pica-Granados, Y; Ridal, J; Srivastava, R C; Sánchez, A

    2002-01-01

    There is an urgent need to evaluate the presence of toxicants in waters used for human consumption and to develop strategies to reduce and prevent their contamination. The International Development Research Centre undertook an intercalibration project to develop and validate a battery of bioassays for toxicity testing of water samples. The project was carried out in two phases by research institutions from eight countries that formed the WaterTox network. Results for the first phase were reported in the special September 2000 issue of Environmental Toxicology. Phase II involved toxicity screening tests of environmental and blind samples (chemical solutions of unknown composition to participating laboratories) using the following battery: Daphnia magna, Hydra attenuata, seed root inhibition with Lactuca sativa, and Selenastrum capricornutum. This battery was also used to assess potential toxicity in concentrated (10x) water samples. Results are presented for a set of six blind samples sent to the participating laboratories over a 1-year period. Analyses were performed for each bioassay to evaluate variations among laboratories of responses to negative controls, violations of test quality control criteria, false positive responses induced by sample concentration, and variability within and between labs of responses to toxic samples. Analyses of the data from all bioassays and labs provided comparisons of false positive rates (based on blind negative samples), test sensitivities to a metal or organic toxicant, and interlaboratory test variability. Results indicate that the battery was reliable in detecting toxicity when present. However, some false positives were identified with a concentrated soft-water sample and with the Lactuca and Hydra (sublethal end-point) tests. Probabilities of detecting false positives for individual and combined toxic responses of the four bioassays are presented. Overall, interlaboratory comparisons indicate a good reliability of the

  14. Statistics 101 for Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Anvari, Arash; Halpern, Elkan F; Samir, Anthony E

    2015-10-01

    Diagnostic tests have wide clinical applications, including screening, diagnosis, measuring treatment effect, and determining prognosis. Interpreting diagnostic test results requires an understanding of key statistical concepts used to evaluate test efficacy. This review explains descriptive statistics and discusses probability, including mutually exclusive and independent events and conditional probability. In the inferential statistics section, a statistical perspective on study design is provided, together with an explanation of how to select appropriate statistical tests. Key concepts in recruiting study samples are discussed, including representativeness and random sampling. Variable types are defined, including predictor, outcome, and covariate variables, and the relationship of these variables to one another. In the hypothesis testing section, we explain how to determine if observed differences between groups are likely to be due to chance. We explain type I and II errors, statistical significance, and study power, followed by an explanation of effect sizes and how confidence intervals can be used to generalize observed effect sizes to the larger population. Statistical tests are explained in four categories: t tests and analysis of variance, proportion analysis tests, nonparametric tests, and regression techniques. We discuss sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, receiver operating characteristic analysis, and likelihood ratios. Measures of reliability and agreement, including κ statistics, intraclass correlation coefficients, and Bland-Altman graphs and analysis, are introduced. PMID:26466186

  15. Statistics 101 for Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Anvari, Arash; Halpern, Elkan F; Samir, Anthony E

    2015-10-01

    Diagnostic tests have wide clinical applications, including screening, diagnosis, measuring treatment effect, and determining prognosis. Interpreting diagnostic test results requires an understanding of key statistical concepts used to evaluate test efficacy. This review explains descriptive statistics and discusses probability, including mutually exclusive and independent events and conditional probability. In the inferential statistics section, a statistical perspective on study design is provided, together with an explanation of how to select appropriate statistical tests. Key concepts in recruiting study samples are discussed, including representativeness and random sampling. Variable types are defined, including predictor, outcome, and covariate variables, and the relationship of these variables to one another. In the hypothesis testing section, we explain how to determine if observed differences between groups are likely to be due to chance. We explain type I and II errors, statistical significance, and study power, followed by an explanation of effect sizes and how confidence intervals can be used to generalize observed effect sizes to the larger population. Statistical tests are explained in four categories: t tests and analysis of variance, proportion analysis tests, nonparametric tests, and regression techniques. We discuss sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, receiver operating characteristic analysis, and likelihood ratios. Measures of reliability and agreement, including κ statistics, intraclass correlation coefficients, and Bland-Altman graphs and analysis, are introduced.

  16. High-Dose Hypofractionated Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Is Safe and Effective for Central and Peripheral Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of a 12-Year Experience at Loma Linda University Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, David A.; Cheek, Gregory; Zaheer, Salman; Wallen, Jason; Mirshahidi, Hamid; Katerelos, Ari; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We update our previous reports on the use of hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy for early-stage lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had biopsy-proven non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and were medically inoperable or refused surgery. Clinical workup required staging of T1 or T2, N0, M0. Subjects received hypofractionated proton beam therapy to the primary tumor only. The dose delivered was sequentially escalated from 51 to 60 Gy, then to 70 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Endpoints included toxicity, pulmonary function, overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC). Results: One hundred eleven subjects were analyzed for treatment outcomes. The patient population had the following average characteristics; age 73.2 years, tumor size 3.6 cm, and 1.33 L forced expiratory volume in 1 second. The entire group showed improved OS with increasing dose level (51, 60, and 70 Gy) with a 4-year OS of 18%, 32%, and 51%, respectively (P=.006). Peripheral T1 tumors exhibited LC of 96%, DSS of 88%, and OS of 60% at 4 years. Patients with T2 tumors showed a trend toward improved LC and survival with the 70-Gy dose level. On multivariate analysis, larger tumor size was strongly associated with increased local recurrence and decreased survival. Central versus peripheral location did not correlate with any outcome measures. Clinical radiation pneumonitis was not found to be a significant complication, and no patient required steroid therapy after treatment for radiation pneumonitis. Pulmonary function was well maintained 1 year after treatment. Conclusions: High-dose hypofractionated proton therapy achieves excellent outcomes for lung carcinomas that are peripherally or centrally located. The 70-Gy regimen has been adopted as standard therapy for T1 tumors at our institution. Larger T2 tumors show a trend toward improved outcomes with higher doses, suggesting that better results could be seen with

  17. Informal Statistics Help Desk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, M.; Koslovsky, M.; Schaefer, Caroline M.; Feiveson, A. H.

    2017-01-01

    Back by popular demand, the JSC Biostatistics Laboratory and LSAH statisticians are offering an opportunity to discuss your statistical challenges and needs. Take the opportunity to meet the individuals offering expert statistical support to the JSC community. Join us for an informal conversation about any questions you may have encountered with issues of experimental design, analysis, or data visualization. Get answers to common questions about sample size, repeated measures, statistical assumptions, missing data, multiple testing, time-to-event data, and when to trust the results of your analyses.

  18. Relevance of biotic pathways to the long-term regulation of nuclear waste disposal. Estimation of radiation dose to man resulting from biotic transport: the BIOPORT/MAXI1 software package. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, D.H.; Cadwell, L.L.; Gano, K.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Prohammer, L.A.; Simmons, M.A.

    1985-10-01

    BIOPORT/MAXI1 is a collection of five computer codes designed to estimate the potential magnitude of the radiation dose to man resulting from biotic transport processes. Dose to man is calculated for ingestion of agricultural crops grown in contaminated soil, inhalation of resuspended radionuclides, and direct exposure to penetrating radiation resulting from the radionuclide concentrations established in the available soil surface by the biotic transport model. This document is designed as both an instructional and reference document for the BIOPORT/MAXI1 computer software package and has been written for two major audiences. The first audience includes persons concerned with the mathematical models of biological transport of commercial low-level radioactive wastes and the computer algorithms used to implement those models. The second audience includes persons concerned with exercising the computer program and exposure scenarios to obtain results for specific applications. The report contains sections describing the mathematical models, user operation of the computer programs, and program structure. Input and output for five sample problems are included. In addition, listings of the computer programs, data libraries, and dose conversion factors are provided in appendices.

  19. Estimation of the Dose and Dose Rate Effectiveness Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2013-01-01

    Current models to estimate radiation risk use the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort that received high doses and high dose rates of radiation. Transferring risks from these high dose rates to the low doses and dose rates received by astronauts in space is a source of uncertainty in our risk calculations. The solid cancer models recommended by BEIR VII [1], UNSCEAR [2], and Preston et al [3] is fitted adequately by a linear dose response model, which implies that low doses and dose rates would be estimated the same as high doses and dose rates. However animal and cell experiments imply there should be curvature in the dose response curve for tumor induction. Furthermore animal experiments that directly compare acute to chronic exposures show lower increases in tumor induction than acute exposures. A dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) has been estimated and applied to transfer risks from the high doses and dose rates of the LSS cohort to low doses and dose rates such as from missions in space. The BEIR VII committee [1] combined DDREF estimates using the LSS cohort and animal experiments using Bayesian methods for their recommendation for a DDREF value of 1.5 with uncertainty. We reexamined the animal data considered by BEIR VII and included more animal data and human chromosome aberration data to improve the estimate for DDREF. Several experiments chosen by BEIR VII were deemed inappropriate for application to human risk models of solid cancer risk. Animal tumor experiments performed by Ullrich et al [4], Alpen et al [5], and Grahn et al [6] were analyzed to estimate the DDREF. Human chromosome aberration experiments performed on a sample of astronauts within NASA were also available to estimate the DDREF. The LSS cohort results reported by BEIR VII were combined with the new radiobiology results using Bayesian methods.

  20. ``Models'' CAVEAT EMPTOR!!!: ``Toy Models Too-Often Yield Toy-Results''!!!: Statistics, Polls, Politics, Economics, Elections!!!: GRAPH/Network-Physics: ``Equal-Distribution for All'' TRUMP-ED BEC ``Winner-Take-All'' ``Doctor Livingston I Presume?''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preibus-Norquist, R. N. C.-Grover; Bush-Romney, G. W.-Willard-Mitt; Dimon, J. P.; Adelson-Koch, Sheldon-Charles-David-Sheldon; Krugman-Axelrod, Paul-David; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig; D. N. C./O. F. P./''47''%/50% Collaboration; R. N. C./G. O. P./''53''%/49% Collaboration; Nyt/Wp/Cnn/Msnbc/Pbs/Npr/Ft Collaboration; Ftn/Fnc/Fox/Wsj/Fbn Collaboration; Lb/Jpmc/Bs/Boa/Ml/Wamu/S&P/Fitch/Moodys/Nmis Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    ``Models''? CAVEAT EMPTOR!!!: ``Toy Models Too-Often Yield Toy-Results''!!!: Goldenfeld[``The Role of Models in Physics'', in Lects.on Phase-Transitions & R.-G.(92)-p.32-33!!!]: statistics(Silver{[NYTimes; Bensinger, ``Math-Geerks Clearly-Defeated Pundits'', LATimes, (11/9/12)])}, polls, politics, economics, elections!!!: GRAPH/network/net/...-PHYSICS Barabasi-Albert[RMP (02)] (r,t)-space VERSUS(???) [Where's the Inverse/ Dual/Integral-Transform???] (Benjamin)Franklin(1795)-Fourier(1795; 1897;1822)-Laplace(1850)-Mellin (1902) Brillouin(1922)-...(k,)-space, {Hubbard [The World According to Wavelets,Peters (96)-p.14!!!/p.246: refs.-F2!!!]},and then (2) Albert-Barabasi[]Bose-Einstein quantum-statistics(BEQS) Bose-Einstein CONDENSATION (BEC) versus Bianconi[pvt.-comm.; arXiv:cond-mat/0204506; ...] -Barabasi [???] Fermi-Dirac

  1. Understanding Solar Flare Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    A review is presented of work aimed at understanding solar flare statistics, with emphasis on the well known flare power-law size distribution. Although avalanche models are perhaps the favoured model to describe flare statistics, their physical basis is unclear, and they are divorced from developing ideas in large-scale reconnection theory. An alternative model, aimed at reconciling large-scale reconnection models with solar flare statistics, is revisited. The solar flare waiting-time distribution has also attracted recent attention. Observed waiting-time distributions are described, together with what they might tell us about the flare phenomenon. Finally, a practical application of flare statistics to flare prediction is described in detail, including the results of a year of automated (web-based) predictions from the method.

  2. Effect of Embolization Material in the Calculation of Dose Deposition in Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    De la Cruz, O. O. Galvan; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Celis-Lopez, M. A.

    2010-12-07

    In this work it is studied the impact of the incorporation of high Z materials (embolization material) in the dose calculation for stereotactic radiosurgery treatment for arteriovenous malformations. A statistical analysis is done to establish the variables that may impact in the dose calculation. To perform the comparison pencil beam (PB) and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation algorithms were used. The comparison between both dose calculations shows that PB overestimates the dose deposited. The statistical analysis, for the quantity of patients of the study (20), shows that the variable that may impact in the dose calculation is the volume of the high Z material in the arteriovenous malformation. Further studies have to be done to establish the clinical impact with the radiosurgery result.

  3. Effect of Embolization Material in the Calculation of Dose Deposition in Arteriovenous Malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Cruz, O. O. Galván; Lárraga-Gutiérrez, J. M.; Moreno-Jiménez, S.; Célis-López, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    In this work it is studied the impact of the incorporation of high Z materials (embolization material) in the dose calculation for stereotactic radiosurgery treatment for arteriovenous malformations. A statistical analysis is done to establish the variables that may impact in the dose calculation. To perform the comparison pencil beam (PB) and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation algorithms were used. The comparison between both dose calculations shows that PB overestimates the dose deposited. The statistical analysis, for the quantity of patients of the study (20), shows that the variable that may impact in the dose calculation is the volume of the high Z material in the arteriovenous malformation. Further studies have to be done to establish the clinical impact with the radiosurgery result.

  4. Statistical iterative reconstruction using adaptive fractional order regularization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Weihua; Lin, Feng; Pu, Yifei; Zhou, Jiliu

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce the radiation dose of the X-ray computed tomography (CT), low-dose CT has drawn much attention in both clinical and industrial fields. A fractional order model based on statistical iterative reconstruction framework was proposed in this study. To further enhance the performance of the proposed model, an adaptive order selection strategy, determining the fractional order pixel-by-pixel, was given. Experiments, including numerical and clinical cases, illustrated better results than several existing methods, especially, in structure and texture preservation. PMID:27231604

  5. TESS-based dose-response using pediatric clonidine exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Blaine E. . E-mail: jebenson@salud.unm.edu; Spyker, Daniel A.; Troutman, William G.; Watson, William A. . E-mail: http://www.aapcc.org/

    2006-06-01

    Objective: The toxic and lethal doses of clonidine in children are unclear. This study was designed to determine whether data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS) could be utilized to determine a dose-response relationship for pediatric clonidine exposure. Methods: 3458 single-substance clonidine exposures in children <6 years of age reported to TESS from January 2000 through December 2003 were examined. Dose ingested, age, and medical outcome were available for 1550 cases. Respiratory arrest cases (n = 8) were classified as the most severe of the medical outcome categories (Arrest, Major, Moderate, Mild, and No effect). Exposures reported as a 'taste or lick' (n = 51) were included as a dose of 1/10 of the dosage form involved. Dose ranged from 0.4 to 1980 (median 13) {mu}g/kg. Weight was imputed based on a quadratic estimate of weight for age. Dose certainty was coded as exact (26% of cases) or not exact (74%). Medical outcome (response) was examined via logistic regression using SAS JMP (release 5.1). Results: The logistic model describing medical outcome (P < 0.0001) included Log dose/kg (P 0.0000) and Certainty (P = 0.045). Conclusion: TESS data can provide the basis for a statistically sound description of dose-response for pediatric clonidine poisoning exposures.

  6. Dose Estimation from Daily and Weekly Dosimetry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrouchov, G.

    2001-11-16

    Statistical analyses of data from epidemiologic studies of workers exposed to radiation have been based on recorded annual radiation doses (yearly dose of record). It is usually assumed that the dose values are known exactly, although it is generally recognized that the data contain uncertainty due to measurement error and bias. In our previous work with weekly data, a probability distribution was used to describe an individual's dose during a specific period of time and statistical methods were developed for estimating it from weekly film dosimetry data. This study showed that the yearly dose of record systematically underestimates doses for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) workers. This could result in biased estimates of dose-response coefficients and their standard errors. The results of this evaluation raise serious questions about the suitability of the yearly dose of record for direct use in low-dose studies of nuclear industry workers. Here, we extend our previous work to use full information in Pocket meter data and develop the Data Synthesis for Individual Dose Estimation (DSIDE) methodology. Although the DSIDE methodology in this study is developed in the context of daily and weekly data to produce a cumulative yearly dose estimate, in principle it is completely general and can be extended to other time period and measurement combinations. The new methodology takes into account the ''measurement error'' that is produced by the film and pocket-meter dosimetry systems, the biases introduced by policies that lead to recording left-censored doses as zeros, and other measurement and recording practices. The DSIDE method is applied to a sample of dose histories obtained from hard copy dosimetry records at ORNL for the years 1945 to 1955. First, the rigorous addition of daily pocket-meter information shows that the negative bias is generally more severe than was reported in our work based on weekly film data only, however, the amount of bias also varies

  7. Oral Debio1143 (AT406), an antagonist of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, in combination with daunorubicin and cytarabine in patients with poor-risk acute myeloid leukemia - results of a phase I dose escalation study

    PubMed Central

    Erba, Harry P.; Larson, Richard A.; Luger, Selina M.; Tallman, Martin S.; Brill, Jeffrey M.; Vuagniaux, Gregoire; Rouits, Elisabeth; Sorensen, J. Mel; Zanna, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains difficult due to the development of treatment resistance which might be overcome through antagonists of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). Patients and methods This multi-center, open-label, dose escalation study aimed to evaluate tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and efficacy of Debio1143 (formerly AT-406), a new IAP antagonist, when given along with a standard "7 plus 3 regimen" of daunorubicin and cytarabine to poor-risk patients with AML during the induction cycle. Consecutive patient cohorts received once daily 100, 200, 300, or 400 mg of oral Debio1143 on treatment days 1–5. Blood samples were collected regularly until hematological recovery or response; bone marrow samples on day 0, 14, and 29; and PK and PD samples on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 1, 2, 8, respectively. Results Of 29 enrolled patients, 23 completed the study. Most common adverse events of any grade deemed related to treatment were nausea (31% of patients), diarrhea (14%), and febrile neutropenia (14%). Exposure exceeded dose-proportionality, without accumulation over 5 days. Inhibition of cIAP-1 was detectable in CD34/CD117+ cells and blasts. A total of 11 (38%) patients achieved complete remission, the majority in the 100 mg dose cohort. Of these, 6 (56%) relapsed still within the study period. Responders more frequently showed plasma increases of TNFα and IL-8 post-first dose of Debio1143. Conclusion Debio1143 up to 400 mg/day showed good tolerability in combination with daunorubicin and cytarabine; further studies in subsets of patients with AML are warranted. PMID:25842225

  8. What can be learned from epidemiologic studies of persons exposed to low doses of radiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1993-04-01

    The main objective of radiation risk assessment is to determine the risk of various adverse health effects associated with exposure to low doses and low dose rates. Extrapolation of risks from studies of persons exposed at high doses (generally exceeding 1 Sv) and dose rates has been the primary approach used to achieve this objective. The study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has played an especially important role in risk assessment efforts. A direct assessment of the dose-response function based on studies of persons exposed at low doses and dose rates is obviously desirable. This paper focuses on the potential of both current and future nuclear workers studies for investigating the dose-response functions at low doses, and also discusses analyses making use of the low dose portion of the atomic bomb survivor data. Difficulties in using these data are the statistical imprecision of estimated dose-response parameters, and potential bias resulting from confounding factors and from uncertainties in dose estimates.

  9. A method for estimating occupational radiation dose to individuals, using weekly dosimetry data

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.J.; Ostrouchov, G.; Frome, E.L.; Kerr, G.D.

    1993-12-01

    Statistical analyses of data from epidemiologic studies of workers exposed to radiation have been based on recorded annual radiation doses. It is usually assumed that the annual dose values are known exactly, although it is generally recognized that the data contain uncertainty due to measurement error and bias. We propose the use of a probability distribution to describe an individual`s dose during a specific period of time. Statistical methods for estimating this dose distribution are developed. The methods take into account the ``measurement error`` that is produced by the dosimetry system, and the bias that was introduced by policies that lead to right censoring of small doses as zero. The method is applied to a sample of dose histories obtained from hard copy dosimetry records at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The result of this evaluation raises serious questions about the validity of the historical personnel dosimetry data that is currently being used in low-dose studies of nuclear industry workers. In particular, it appears that there was a systematic underestimation of doses for ORNL workers. This could result in biased estimates of dose-response coefficients and their standard errors.

  10. Low-dose radiation epidemiology studies: status and issues.

    PubMed

    Shore, Roy E

    2009-11-01

    Although the Japanese atomic bomb study and radiotherapy studies have clearly documented cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposures, radiation risk assessment groups have long recognized that protracted or low exposures to low-linear energy transfer radiations are key radiation protection concerns because these are far more common than high-exposure scenarios. Epidemiologic studies of human populations with low-dose or low dose-rate exposures are one approach to addressing those concerns. A number of large studies of radiation workers (Chernobyl clean-up workers, U.S. and Chinese radiological technologists, and the 15-country worker study) or of persons exposed to environmental radiation at moderate to low levels (residents near Techa River, Semipalatinsk, Chernobyl, or nuclear facilities) have been conducted. A variety of studies of medical radiation exposures (multiple-fluoroscopy, diagnostic (131)I, scatter radiation doses from radiotherapy, etc.) also are of interest. Key results from these studies are summarized and compared with risk estimates from the Japanese atomic bomb study. Ideally, one would like the low-dose and low dose-rate studies to guide radiation risk estimation regarding the shape of the dose-response curve, DDREF (dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor), and risk at low doses. However, the degree to which low-dose studies can do so is subject to various limitations, especially those pertaining to dosimetric uncertainties and limited statistical power. The identification of individuals who are particularly susceptible to radiation cancer induction also is of high interest in terms of occupational and medical radiation protection. Several examples of studies of radiation-related cancer susceptibility are discussed, but none thus far have clearly identified radiation-susceptible genotypes.

  11. Fast dose calculation in magnetic fields with GPUMCD.

    PubMed

    Hissoiny, S; Raaijmakers, A J E; Ozell, B; Després, P; Raaymakers, B W

    2011-08-21

    A new hybrid imaging-treatment modality, the MRI-Linac, involves the irradiation of the patient in the presence of a strong magnetic field. This field acts on the charged particles, responsible for depositing dose, through the Lorentz force. These conditions require a dose calculation engine capable of taking into consideration the effect of the magnetic field on the dose distribution during the planning stage. Also in the case of a change in anatomy at the time of treatment, a fast online replanning tool is desirable. It is improbable that analytical solutions such as pencil beam calculations can be efficiently adapted for dose calculations within a magnetic field. Monte Carlo simulations have therefore been used for the computations but the calculation speed is generally too slow to allow online replanning. In this work, GPUMCD, a fast graphics processing unit (GPU)-based Monte Carlo dose calculation platform, was benchmarked with a new feature that allows dose calculations within a magnetic field. As a proof of concept, this new feature is validated against experimental measurements. GPUMCD was found to accurately reproduce experimental dose distributions according to a 2%-2 mm gamma analysis in two cases with large magnetic field-induced dose effects: a depth-dose phantom with an air cavity and a lateral-dose phantom surrounded by air. Furthermore, execution times of less than 15 s were achieved for one beam in a prostate case phantom for a 2% statistical uncertainty while less than 20 s were required for a seven-beam plan. These results indicate that GPUMCD is an interesting candidate, being fast and accurate, for dose calculations for the hybrid MRI-Linac modality.

  12. Low-dose radiation epidemiology studies: status and issues.

    PubMed

    Shore, Roy E

    2009-11-01

    Although the Japanese atomic bomb study and radiotherapy studies have clearly documented cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposures, radiation risk assessment groups have long recognized that protracted or low exposures to low-linear energy transfer radiations are key radiation protection concerns because these are far more common than high-exposure scenarios. Epidemiologic studies of human populations with low-dose or low dose-rate exposures are one approach to addressing those concerns. A number of large studies of radiation workers (Chernobyl clean-up workers, U.S. and Chinese radiological technologists, and the 15-country worker study) or of persons exposed to environmental radiation at moderate to low levels (residents near Techa River, Semipalatinsk, Chernobyl, or nuclear facilities) have been conducted. A variety of studies of medical radiation exposures (multiple-fluoroscopy, diagnostic (131)I, scatter radiation doses from radiotherapy, etc.) also are of interest. Key results from these studies are summarized and compared with risk estimates from the Japanese atomic bomb study. Ideally, one would like the low-dose and low dose-rate studies to guide radiation risk estimation regarding the shape of the dose-response curve, DDREF (dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor), and risk at low doses. However, the degree to which low-dose studies can do so is subject to various limitations, especially those pertaining to dosimetric uncertainties and limited statistical power. The identification of individuals who are particularly susceptible to radiation cancer induction also is of high interest in terms of occupational and medical radiation protection. Several examples of studies of radiation-related cancer susceptibility are discussed, but none thus far have clearly identified radiation-susceptible genotypes. PMID:19820457

  13. Measurement of 226Ra, 232Th, 137Cs and 40K activities of Wheat and Corn Products in Ilam Province – Iran and Resultant Annual Ingestion Radiation Dose

    PubMed Central

    CHANGIZI, Vahid; SHAFIEI, Elham; ZAREH, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Background: Natural background radiation is the main source of human exposure to radioactive material. Soils naturally have radioactive mineral contents. The aim of this study is to determine natural (238 U, 232 Th, 40 K) and artificial (137 Cs) radioactivity levels in wheat and corn fields of Eilam province. Methods: HPGe detector was used to measure the concentration activity of 238 U and 232 Th series, 40 K and 137 Cs in wheat and corn samples taken from different regions of Eilam province, in Iran. Results: In wheat and corn samples, the average activity concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and 137 Cs were found to be 1, 67, 0.5, 91.73, 0.01 and 0.81, 0.85, 101.52, 0.07 Bq/kg (dry weight), respectively. H ex and H in in the present work are lower than 1. The average value of H ex was found to be 0.02 and 0.025 and average value of H in to be found 0.025 and 0.027 in wheat fields samples and corn samples in Eilam provinces, respectively. The obtained values of AGDE are 30.49 mSv/yr for wheat filed samples and 37.89 mSv/yr for corn samples; the AEDE rate values are 5.28 mSv/yr in wheat filed samples and this average value was found to be 6.13 mSv/yr in corn samples in Eilam. Transfer factors (TFs) of long lived radionuclide such as 137 Cs, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K from soils to corn and wheat plants have been studied by radiotracer experiments. Conclusion: The natural radioactivity levels in Eilam province are not at the range of high risk of morbidity and are under international standards. PMID:26056646

  14. Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    2014 Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics Cosmetic Procedure Trends 2014 Plastic Surgery Statistics Report Please credit the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF PLASTIC SURGEONS when citing statistical data or using ...

  15. Statistical Physics of Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Alava, Mikko; Nukala, Phani K; Zapperi, Stefano

    2006-05-01

    Disorder and long-range interactions are two of the key components that make material failure an interesting playfield for the application of statistical mechanics. The cornerstone in this respect has been lattice models of the fracture in which a network of elastic beams, bonds, or electrical fuses with random failure thresholds are subject to an increasing external load. These models describe on a qualitative level the failure processes of real, brittle, or quasi-brittle materials. This has been particularly important in solving the classical engineering problems of material strength: the size dependence of maximum stress and its sample-to-sample statistical fluctuations. At the same time, lattice models pose many new fundamental questions in statistical physics, such as the relation between fracture and phase transitions. Experimental results point out to the existence of an intriguing crackling noise in the acoustic emission and of self-affine fractals in the crack surface morphology. Recent advances in computer power have enabled considerable progress in the understanding of such models. Among these partly still controversial issues, are the scaling and size-effects in material strength and accumulated damage, the statistics of avalanches or bursts of microfailures, and the morphology of the crack surface. Here we present an overview of the results obtained with lattice models for fracture, highlighting the relations with statistical physics theories and more conventional fracture mechanics approaches.

  16. Efficacy and safety of betahistine treatment in patients with Meniere’s disease: primary results of a long term, multicentre, double blind, randomised, placebo controlled, dose defining trial (BEMED trial)

    PubMed Central

    Adrion, Christine; Fischer, Carolin Simone; Wagner, Judith; Gürkov, Robert; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Study question What is the long term efficacy of betahistine dihydrochloride on the incidence of vertigo attacks in patients with Meniere’s disease, compared with placebo? Methods The BEMED trial is a multicentre, double blind, randomised, placebo controlled, three arm, parallel group, phase III, dose defining superiority trial conducted in 14 German tertiary referral centres (for neurology or ear, nose, and throat). Adults aged 21-80 years (mean age 56 years) with definite unilateral or bilateral Meniere’s disease were recruited from March 2008 to November 2012. Participants received placebo (n=74), low dose betahistine (2×24 mg daily, (n=73)), or high dose betahistine (3×48 mg daily, (n=74)) over nine months. The primary outcome was the number of attacks per 30 days, based on patients’ diaries during a three month assessment period at months seven to nine. An internet based randomisation schedule performed a concealed 1:1:1 allocation, stratified by study site. Secondary outcomes included the duration and severity of attacks, change in quality of life scores, and several observer-reported parameters to assess changes in audiological and vestibular function. Study answer and limitations Incidence of attacks related to Meniere’s disease did not differ between the three treatment groups (P=0.759). Compared with placebo, attack rate ratios were 1.036 (95% confidence interval 0.942 to 1.140) and 1.012 (0.919 to 1.114) for low dose and high dose betahistine, respectively. The overall monthly attack rate fell significantly by the factor 0.758 (0.705 to 0.816; P<0.001). The population based, mean monthly incidence averaged over the assessment period was 2.722 (1.304 to 6.309), 3.204 (1.345 to 7.929), and 3.258 (1.685 to 7.266) for the placebo, low dose betahistine, and high dose betahistine groups, respectively. Results were consistent for all secondary outcomes. Treatment was well tolerated with no unexpected safety findings. Without a control group of

  17. Long term dose monitoring onboard the European Columbus module of the international space station (ISS) in the frame of DOSIS and DOSIS 3D project - results from the active instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmeister, Soenke; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Guenther; Boehme, Matthias; Haumann, Lutz; Labrenz, Johannes

    Besides the effects of the microgravity environment, and the psychological and psychosocial problems encountered in confined spaces, radiation is the main health detriment for long duration human space missions. The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones encountered on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station ISS is therefore needed. For the investigation of the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiation field inside the European COLUMBUS module the experiment DOSIS (Dose Distribution Inside the ISS) under the lead of DLR has been launched on July 15 (th) 2009 with STS-127 to the ISS. The experimental package was transferred from the Space Shuttle into COLUMBUS on July 18 (th) . It consists of a combination of passive detector packages (PDP) distributed at 11 locations inside the European Columbus Laboratory and two active radiation detectors (Dosimetry Telescopes = DOSTELs) with a DDPU (DOSTEL Data and Power Unit) in a Nomex pouch (DOSIS MAIN BOX) mounted at a fixed location beneath the European Physiology Module rack (EPM) inside COLUMBUS. The active components of the DOSIS experiment were operational from July 18 (th) 2009 to June 16 (th) 2011. After refurbishment the hardware has been reactivated on May 15 (th) 2012 as active part of the DOSIS 3D experiment and provides continuous data since this activation. The presentation will focus on the latest results from the two DOSTEL instruments as absorbed dose, dose equivalent and the related LET spectra gathered within the DOSIS (2009 - 2011) and DOSIS 3D (2012 - 2014) experiment. The CAU contributions to DOSIS and DOSIS 3D are

  18. Efficacy of a Radiation Absorbing Shield in Reducing Dose to the Interventionalist During Peripheral Endovascular Procedures: A Single Centre Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Power, S.; Mirza, M.; Thakorlal, A.; Ganai, B.; Gavagan, L. D.; Given, M. F.; Lee, M. J.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThis prospective pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of using a radiation absorbing shield to reduce operator dose from scatter during lower limb endovascular procedures.Materials and MethodsA commercially available bismuth shield system (RADPAD) was used. Sixty consecutive patients undergoing lower limb angioplasty were included. Thirty procedures were performed without the RADPAD (control group) and thirty with the RADPAD (study group). Two separate methods were used to measure dose to a single operator. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badges were used to measure hand, eye, and unshielded body dose. A direct dosimeter with digital readout was also used to measure eye and unshielded body dose. To allow for variation between control and study groups, dose per unit time was calculated.ResultsTLD results demonstrated a significant reduction in median body dose per unit time for the study group compared with controls (p = 0.001), corresponding to a mean dose reduction rate of 65 %. Median eye and hand dose per unit time were also reduced in the study group compared with control group, however, this was not statistically significant (p = 0.081 for eye, p = 0.628 for hand). Direct dosimeter readings also showed statistically significant reduction in median unshielded body dose rate for the study group compared with controls (p = 0.037). Eye dose rate was reduced for the study group but this was not statistically significant (p = 0.142).ConclusionInitial results are encouraging. Use of the shield resulted in a statistically significant reduction in unshielded dose to the operator’s body. Measured dose to the eye and hand of operator were also reduced but did not reach statistical significance in this pilot study.

  19. Dose Calculation Spreadsheet

    1997-06-10

    VENTSAR XL is an EXCEL Spreadsheet that can be used to calculate downwind doses as a result of a hypothetical atmospheric release. Both building effects and plume rise may be considered. VENTSAR XL will run using any version of Microsoft EXCEL version 4.0 or later. Macros (the programming language of EXCEL) was used to automate the calculations. The user enters a minimal amount of input and the code calculates the resulting concentrations and doses atmore » various downwind distances as specified by the user.« less

  20. Analogies for Understanding Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hocquette, Jean-Francois

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a simple way to explain the limitations of statistics to scientists and students to avoid the publication of misleading conclusions. Biologists examine their results extremely critically and carefully choose the appropriate analytic methods depending on their scientific objectives. However, no such close attention is usually…

  1. Neonatal ethanol exposure results in dose-dependent impairments in the acquisition and timing of the conditioned eyeblink response and altered cerebellar interpositus nucleus and hippocampal CA1 unit activity in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Derick H; Sokoloff, Greta; Milner, Eric; Steinmetz, Joseph E

    2013-09-01

    Exposure to ethanol in neonatal rats results in reduced neuronal numbers in the cerebellar cortex and deep nuclei of juvenile and adult animals. This reduction in cell numbers is correlated with impaired delay eyeblink conditioning (EBC), a simple motor learning task in which a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS; tone) is repeatedly paired with a co-terminating unconditioned stimulus (US; periorbital shock). Across training, cell populations in the interpositus (IP) nucleus model the temporal form of the eyeblink-conditioned response (CR). The hippocampus, though not required for delay EBC, also shows learning-dependent increases in CA1 and CA3 unit activity. In the present study, rat pups were exposed to 0, 3, 4, or 5 mg/kg/day of ethanol during postnatal days (PD) 4-9. As adults, CR acquisition and timing were assessed during 6 training sessions of delay EBC with a short (280 ms) interstimulus interval (ISI; time from CS onset to US onset) followed by another 6 sessions with a long (880 ms) ISI. Neuronal activity was recorded in the IP and area CA1 during all 12 sessions. The high-dose rats learned the most slowly and, with the moderate-dose rats, produced the longest CR peak latencies over training to the short ISI. The low dose of alcohol impaired CR performance to the long ISI only. The 3E (3 mg/kg/day of ethanol) and 5E (5 mg/kg/day of ethanol) rats also showed slower-than-normal increases in learning-dependent excitatory unit activity in the IP and CA1. The 4E (4 mg/kg/day of ethanol) rats showed a higher rate of CR production to the long ISI and enhanced IP and CA1 activation when compared to the 3E and 5E rats. The results indicate that binge-like ethanol exposure in neonatal rats induces long-lasting, dose-dependent deficits in CR acquisition and timing and diminishes conditioning-related neuronal excitation in both the cerebellum and hippocampus.

  2. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon and Washington, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on human (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits and; Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  3. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

  4. Exposure time independent summary statistics for assessment of drug dependent cell line growth inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vitro generated dose-response curves of human cancer cell lines are widely used to develop new therapeutics. The curves are summarised by simplified statistics that ignore the conventionally used dose-response curves’ dependency on drug exposure time and growth kinetics. This may lead to suboptimal exploitation of data and biased conclusions on the potential of the drug in question. Therefore we set out to improve the dose-response assessments by eliminating the impact of time dependency. Results First, a mathematical model for drug induced cell growth inhibition was formulated and used to derive novel dose-response curves and improved summary statistics that are independent of time under the proposed model. Next, a statistical analysis workflow for estimating the improved statistics was suggested consisting of 1) nonlinear regression models for estimation of cell counts and doubling times, 2) isotonic regression for modelling the suggested dose-response curves, and 3) resampling based method for assessing variation of the novel summary statistics. We document that conventionally used summary statistics for dose-response experiments depend on time so that fast growing cell lines compared to slowly growing ones are considered overly sensitive. The adequacy of the mathematical model is tested for doxorubicin and found to fit real data to an acceptable degree. Dose-response data from the NCI60 drug screen were used to illustrate the time dependency and demonstrate an adjustment correcting for it. The applicability of the workflow was illustrated by simulation and application on a doxorubicin growth inhibition screen. The simulations show that under the proposed mathematical model the suggested statistical workflow results in unbiased estimates of the time independent summary statistics. Variance estimates of the novel summary statistics are used to conclude that the doxorubicin screen covers a significant diverse range of responses ensuring it is

  5. Suite versus composite statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balsillie, J.H.; Tanner, W.F.

    1999-01-01

    Suite and composite methodologies, two statistically valid approaches for producing statistical descriptive measures, are investigated for sample groups representing a probability distribution where, in addition, each sample is probability distribution. Suite and composite means (first moment measures) are always equivalent. Composite standard deviations (second moment measures) are always larger than suite standard deviations. Suite and composite values for higher moment measures have more complex relationships. Very seldom, however, are they equivalent, and they normally yield statistically significant but different results. Multiple samples are preferable to single samples (including composites) because they permit the investigator to examine sample-to-sample variability. These and other relationships for suite and composite probability distribution analyses are investigated and reported using granulometric data.

  6. Dose-limiting inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by ladostigil results from the rapid formation and fast hydrolysis of the drug-enzyme complex formed by its major metabolite, R-MCPAI.

    PubMed

    Moradov, Dorit; Finkin-Groner, Efrat; Bejar, Corina; Sunita, Priyashree; Schorer-Apelbaum, Donna; Barasch, Dinorah; Nemirovski, Alina; Cohen, Marganit; Weinstock, Marta

    2015-03-15

    Ladostigil is a pseudo reversible inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) that differs from other carbamates in that the maximal enzyme inhibition obtainable does not exceed 50-55%. This could explain the low incidence of cholinergic adverse effects induced by ladostigil in rats and human subjects. The major metabolite, R-MCPAI is believed to be responsible for AChE inhibition by ladostigil in vivo. Therefore we determined whether the ceiling in AChE inhibition resulted from a limit in the metabolism of ladostigil to R-MCPAI by liver microsomal enzymes, or from the kinetics of enzyme inhibition by R-MCPAI. Ladostigil reduces TNF-α in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia. In vivo, it may also reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines by inhibiting AChE and increasing the action of ACh on macrophages and splenic lymphocytes. We also assessed the contribution of AChE inhibition in the spleen of LPS-injected mice to the anti-inflammatory effect of ladostigil. As in other species, AChE inhibition by ladostigil in spleen, brain and plasma did not exceed 50-55%. Since levels of R-MCPAI increased with increasing doses of ladostigil we concluded that there was no dose or rate limitation of metabolism. The kinetics of enzyme inhibition by R-MCPAI are characterized by a rapid formation of the drug-enzyme complex and fast hydrolysis which limits the attainable degree of AChE inhibition. Ladostigil and its metabolites (1-100 nM) decreased TNF-α in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages. Ladostigil (5 and 10mg/kg) also reduced TNF-α in the spleen after injection of lipopolysaccharide in mice. However, AChE inhibition contributed to the anti-inflammatory effect only at a dose of 10mg/kg.

  7. On determining dose rate constants spectroscopically

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate several aspects of the Chen and Nath spectroscopic method of determining the dose rate constants of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds [Z. Chen and R. Nath, Phys. Med. Biol. 55, 6089-6104 (2010)] including the accuracy of using a line or dual-point source approximation as done in their method, and the accuracy of ignoring the effects of the scattered photons in the spectra. Additionally, the authors investigate the accuracy of the literature's many different spectra for bare, i.e., unencapsulated {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources. Methods: Spectra generated by 14 {sup 125}I and 6 {sup 103}Pd seeds were calculated in vacuo at 10 cm from the source in a 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 0.05 cm{sup 3} voxel using the EGSnrc BrachyDose Monte Carlo code. Calculated spectra used the initial photon spectra recommended by AAPM's TG-43U1 and NCRP (National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements) Report 58 for the {sup 125}I seeds, or TG-43U1 and NNDC(2000) (National Nuclear Data Center, 2000) for {sup 103}Pd seeds. The emitted spectra were treated as coming from a line or dual-point source in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the dose rate constant. The TG-43U1 definition of the dose rate constant was used. These calculations were performed using the full spectrum including scattered photons or using only the main peaks in the spectrum as done experimentally. Statistical uncertainties on the air kerma/history and the dose rate/history were Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 0.2%. The dose rate constants were also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of the full seed model. Results: The ratio of the intensity of the 31 keV line relative to that of the main peak in {sup 125}I spectra is, on average, 6.8% higher when calculated with the NCRP Report 58 initial spectrum vs that calculated with TG-43U1 initial spectrum. The {sup 103}Pd spectra exhibit an average 6.2% decrease in the 22.9 keV line relative to the main peak when

  8. Exercise frequency and bone mineral density development in exercising postmenopausal osteopenic women. Is there a critical dose of exercise for affecting bone? Results of the Erlangen Fitness and Osteoporosis Prevention Study.

    PubMed

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; von Stengel, Simon; Kohl, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Due to older people's low sports participation rates, exercise frequency may be the most critical component for designing exercise protocols that address bone. The aims of the present article were to determine the independent effect of exercise frequency (ExFreq) and its corresponding changes on bone mineral density (BMD) and to identify the minimum effective dose that just relevantly affects bone. Based on the 16-year follow-up of the intense, consistently supervised Erlangen Fitness and Osteoporosis Prevention-Study, ExFreq was retrospectively determined in the exercise-group of 55 initially early-postmenopausal females with osteopenia. Linear mixed-effect regression analysis was conducted to determine the independent effect of ExFreq on BMD changes at lumbar spine and total hip. Minimum effective dose of ExFreq based on BMD changes less than the 90% quantile of the sedentary control-group (n=43). Cut-offs were determined after 4, 8, 12 and 16years using bootstrap with 5000 replications. After 16years, average ExFreq ranged between 1.02 and 2.96sessions/week (2.28±0.40sessions/week). ExFreq has an independent effect on LS-BMD (p<.001) and hip-BMD (p=.005) changes. Bootstrap analysis detected a minimum effective dose at about 2sessions/week/16years (cut-off LS-BMD: 2.11, 95% CI: 2.06-2.12; total hip-BMD: 2.22, 95% CI: 2.00-2.78sessions/week/16years). In summary, the minimum effective dose of exercise frequency that relevantly addresses BMD is quite high, at least compared with the low sport participation rate of older adults. This result might not be generalizable across all exercise types, protocols and cohorts, but it does indicate at least that even when applying high impact/high intensity programs, exercise frequency and its maintenance play a key role in bone adaptation.

  9. Exercise frequency and bone mineral density development in exercising postmenopausal osteopenic women. Is there a critical dose of exercise for affecting bone? Results of the Erlangen Fitness and Osteoporosis Prevention Study.

    PubMed

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; von Stengel, Simon; Kohl, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Due to older people's low sports participation rates, exercise frequency may be the most critical component for designing exercise protocols that address bone. The aims of the present article were to determine the independent effect of exercise frequency (ExFreq) and its corresponding changes on bone mineral density (BMD) and to identify the minimum effective dose that just relevantly affects bone. Based on the 16-year follow-up of the intense, consistently supervised Erlangen Fitness and Osteoporosis Prevention-Study, ExFreq was retrospectively determined in the exercise-group of 55 initially early-postmenopausal females with osteopenia. Linear mixed-effect regression analysis was conducted to determine the independent effect of ExFreq on BMD changes at lumbar spine and total hip. Minimum effective dose of ExFreq based on BMD changes less than the 90% quantile of the sedentary control-group (n=43). Cut-offs were determined after 4, 8, 12 and 16years using bootstrap with 5000 replications. After 16years, average ExFreq ranged between 1.02 and 2.96sessions/week (2.28±0.40sessions/week). ExFreq has an independent effect on LS-BMD (p<.001) and hip-BMD (p=.005) changes. Bootstrap analysis detected a minimum effective dose at about 2sessions/week/16years (cut-off LS-BMD: 2.11, 95% CI: 2.06-2.12; total hip-BMD: 2.22, 95% CI: 2.00-2.78sessions/week/16years). In summary, the minimum effective dose of exercise frequency that relevantly addresses BMD is quite high, at least compared with the low sport participation rate of older adults. This result might not be generalizable across all exercise types, protocols and cohorts, but it does indicate at least that even when applying high impact/high intensity programs, exercise frequency and its maintenance play a key role in bone adaptation. PMID:27108341

  10. Assessment and Minimization of Contralateral Breast Dose for Conventional and Intensity Modulated Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Burmeister, Jay Alvarado, Nicole; Way, Sarah; McDermott, Patrick; Bossenberger, Todd; Jaenisch, Harriett; Patel, Rajiv; Washington, Tara

    2008-04-01

    Breast radiotherapy is associated with an increased risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC) in women under age 45 at the time of treatment. This risk increases with increasing absorbed dose to the contralateral breast. The use of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is expected to substantially reduce the dose to the contralateral breast by eliminating scattered radiation from physical beam modifiers. The absorbed dose to the contralateral breast was measured for 5 common radiotherapy techniques, including paired 15 deg. wedges, lateral 30 deg. wedge only, custom-designed physical compensators, aperture based (field-within-field) IMRT with segments chosen by the planner, and inverse planned IMRT with segments chosen by a leaf sequencing algorithm after dose volume histogram (DVH)-based fluence map optimization. Further reduction in contralateral breast dose through the use of lead shielding was also investigated. While shielding was observed to have the most profound impact on surface dose, the radiotherapy technique proved to be most important in determining internal dose. Paired wedges or compensators result in the highest contralateral breast doses (nearly 10% of the prescription dose on the medial surface), while use of IMRT or removal of the medial wedge results in significantly lower doses. Aperture-based IMRT results in the lowest internal doses, primarily due to the decrease in the number of monitor units required and the associated reduction in leakage dose. The use of aperture-based IMRT reduced the average dose to the contralateral breast by greater than 50% in comparison to wedges or compensators. Combined use of IMRT and 1/8-inch-thick lead shielding reduced the dose to the interior and surface of the contralateral breast by roughly 60% and 85%, respectively. This reduction may warrant the use of IMRT for younger patients who have a statistically significant risk of contralateral breast cancer associated with breast radiotherapy.

  11. Basic statistics in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Vaux, David L

    2014-01-01

    The physicist Ernest Rutherford said, "If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment." Although this aphorism remains true for much of today's research in cell biology, a basic understanding of statistics can be useful to cell biologists to help in monitoring the conduct of their experiments, in interpreting the results, in presenting them in publications, and when critically evaluating research by others. However, training in statistics is often focused on the sophisticated needs of clinical researchers, psychologists, and epidemiologists, whose conclusions depend wholly on statistics, rather than the practical needs of cell biologists, whose experiments often provide evidence that is not statistical in nature. This review describes some of the basic statistical principles that may be of use to experimental biologists, but it does not cover the sophisticated statistics needed for papers that contain evidence of no other kind.

  12. Ideal statistically quasi Cauchy sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savas, Ekrem; Cakalli, Huseyin

    2016-08-01

    An ideal I is a family of subsets of N, the set of positive integers which is closed under taking finite unions and subsets of its elements. A sequence (xk) of real numbers is said to be S(I)-statistically convergent to a real number L, if for each ɛ > 0 and for each δ > 0 the set { n ∈N :1/n | { k ≤n :| xk-L | ≥ɛ } | ≥δ } belongs to I. We introduce S(I)-statistically ward compactness of a subset of R, the set of real numbers, and S(I)-statistically ward continuity of a real function in the senses that a subset E of R is S(I)-statistically ward compact if any sequence of points in E has an S(I)-statistically quasi-Cauchy subsequence, and a real function is S(I)-statistically ward continuous if it preserves S(I)-statistically quasi-Cauchy sequences where a sequence (xk) is called to be S(I)-statistically quasi-Cauchy when (Δxk) is S(I)-statistically convergent to 0. We obtain results related to S(I)-statistically ward continuity, S(I)-statistically ward compactness, Nθ-ward continuity, and slowly oscillating continuity.

  13. {alpha}/{beta} ratio: A dose range dependence study

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Lourdes M. . E-mail: logarcia@ottawahospital.on.ca; Wilkins, David E.; Raaphorst, Gijsbert P.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dependence of the {alpha}/{beta} ratio determined from in vitro survival curves on the dose ranges. Methods: Detailed clonogenic cell survival experiments were used to determine the least squares estimators for the linear quadratic model for different dose ranges. The cell lines used were CHO AA8, a Chinese hamster fibroblast cell line; U-373 MG, a human glioblastoma cell line; and CP3 and DU-145, two human prostate carcinoma cell lines. The {alpha}, {beta}, and {alpha}/{beta} ratio behaviors, combined with a goodness-of-fit analysis and Monte Carlo simulation of the experiments, were assessed within different dose regions. Results: Including data from the low-dose region has a significant influence on the determination of the {alpha}, {beta}, and {alpha}/{beta} ratio from in vitro survival curve data. In this region, the values are poorly determined and have significant variability. The mid-dose region is characterized by more precise and stable values and is in agreement with the linear quadratic model. The high-dose region shows relatively small statistical error in the fitted parameters but the goodness-of-fit and Monte Carlo analyses showed poor quality fits. Conclusion: The dependence of the fitted {alpha} and {beta} on the dose range has an impact on the {alpha}/{beta} ratio determined from the survival data. The low-dose region had a significant influence that could be a result of a strong linear, rather than quadratic, component, hypersensitivity, and adaptive responses. This dose dependence should be interpreted as a caution against using inadequate in vitro cell survival data for {alpha}/{beta} ratio determination.

  14. LADTAPXL Aqueous Dose Spreadsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, David M.; Simpkins, Ali A.; Jannik, G. T.

    1999-08-10

    LADTAPXL is an EXCEL spreadsheet model of the NRC computer code LADTAP. LADTAPXL calculates maximally exposed individual and population doses from chronic liquid releases. Environmental pathways include external exposure resulting from recreational activities on the Savannah River and ingestion of water, fish, and invertebrates of Savannah River origin.

  15. Predict! Teaching Statistics Using Informational Statistical Inference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makar, Katie

    2013-01-01

    Statistics is one of the most widely used topics for everyday life in the school mathematics curriculum. Unfortunately, the statistics taught in schools focuses on calculations and procedures before students have a chance to see it as a useful and powerful tool. Researchers have found that a dominant view of statistics is as an assortment of tools…

  16. SOCR: Statistics Online Computational Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinov, Ivo D.

    2006-01-01

    The need for hands-on computer laboratory experience in undergraduate and graduate statistics education has been firmly established in the past decade. As a result a number of attempts have been undertaken to develop novel approaches for problem-driven statistical thinking, data analysis and result interpretation. In this paper we describe an…

  17. 42 CFR 402.109 - Statistical sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Statistical sampling. 402.109 Section 402.109... Statistical sampling. (a) Purpose. CMS or OIG may introduce the results of a statistical sampling study to... or caused to be presented. (b) Prima facie evidence. The results of the statistical sampling...

  18. 42 CFR 402.109 - Statistical sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Statistical sampling. 402.109 Section 402.109... Statistical sampling. (a) Purpose. CMS or OIG may introduce the results of a statistical sampling study to... or caused to be presented. (b) Prima facie evidence. The results of the statistical sampling...

  19. 42 CFR 402.109 - Statistical sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Statistical sampling. 402.109 Section 402.109... Statistical sampling. (a) Purpose. CMS or OIG may introduce the results of a statistical sampling study to... or caused to be presented. (b) Prima facie evidence. The results of the statistical sampling...

  20. 42 CFR 402.109 - Statistical sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Statistical sampling. 402.109 Section 402.109... Statistical sampling. (a) Purpose. CMS or OIG may introduce the results of a statistical sampling study to... or caused to be presented. (b) Prima facie evidence. The results of the statistical sampling...

  1. 42 CFR 402.109 - Statistical sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Statistical sampling. 402.109 Section 402.109... Statistical sampling. (a) Purpose. CMS or OIG may introduce the results of a statistical sampling study to... or caused to be presented. (b) Prima facie evidence. The results of the statistical sampling...

  2. Critical analysis of adsorption data statistically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, Achla; Singh, S. K.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental data can be presented, computed, and critically analysed in a different way using statistics. A variety of statistical tests are used to make decisions about the significance and validity of the experimental data. In the present study, adsorption was carried out to remove zinc ions from contaminated aqueous solution using mango leaf powder. The experimental data was analysed statistically by hypothesis testing applying t test, paired t test and Chi-square test to (a) test the optimum value of the process pH, (b) verify the success of experiment and (c) study the effect of adsorbent dose in zinc ion removal from aqueous solutions. Comparison of calculated and tabulated values of t and χ 2 showed the results in favour of the data collected from the experiment and this has been shown on probability charts. K value for Langmuir isotherm was 0.8582 and m value for Freundlich adsorption isotherm obtained was 0.725, both are <1, indicating favourable isotherms. Karl Pearson's correlation coefficient values for Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were obtained as 0.99 and 0.95 respectively, which show higher degree of correlation between the variables. This validates the data obtained for adsorption of zinc ions from the contaminated aqueous solution with the help of mango leaf powder.

  3. TU-A-12A-12: Improved Airway Measurement Accuracy for Low Dose Quantitative CT (qCT) Using Statistical (ASIR), at Reduced DFOV, and High Resolution Kernels in a Phantom and Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yadava, G; Imai, Y; Hsieh, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative accuracy of Iodine Hounsfield Unit (HU) in conventional single-kVp scanning is susceptible to beam-hardening effect. Dual-energy CT has unique capabilities of quantification using monochromatic CT images, but this scanning mode requires the availability of the state-of-the-art CT scanner and, therefore, is limited in routine clinical practice. Purpose of this work was to develop a beam-hardening-correction (BHC) for single-kVp CT that can linearize Iodine projections at any nominal energy, apply this approach to study Iodine response with respect to keV, and compare with dual-energy based monochromatic images obtained from material-decomposition using 80kVp and 140kVp. Methods: Tissue characterization phantoms (Gammex Inc.), containing solid-Iodine inserts of different concentrations, were scanned using GE multi-slice CT scanner at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp. A model-based BHC algorithm was developed where Iodine was estimated using re-projection of image volume and corrected through an iterative process. In the correction, the re-projected Iodine was linearized using a polynomial mapping between monochromatic path-lengths at various nominal energies (40 to 140 keV) and physically modeled polychromatic path-lengths. The beam-hardening-corrected 80kVp and 140kVp images (linearized approximately at effective energy of the beam) were used for dual-energy material-decomposition in Water-Iodine basis-pair followed by generation of monochromatic images. Characterization of Iodine HU and noise in the images obtained from singlekVp with BHC at various nominal keV, and corresponding dual-energy monochromatic images, was carried out. Results: Iodine HU vs. keV response from single-kVp with BHC and dual-energy monochromatic images were found to be very similar, indicating that single-kVp data may be used to create material specific monochromatic equivalent using modelbased projection linearization. Conclusion: This approach may enable quantification of

  4. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  5. Single-dose fosaprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting associated with moderately emetogenic chemotherapy: results of a randomized, double-blind phase III trial†

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, C.; Jordan, K.; Green, S. A.; Camacho, E.; Khanani, S.; Beckford-Brathwaite, E.; Vallejos, W.; Liang, L. W.; Noga, S. J.; Rapoport, B. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background To establish the role of antiemetic therapy with neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor antagonists (RAs) in nonanthracycline and cyclophosphamide (AC)-based moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) regimens, this study evaluated single-dose intravenous (i.v.) fosaprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) associated with non-AC MEC. Patients and methods In this international, phase III, double-blind trial, adult cancer subjects scheduled to receive ≥1 non-AC MEC on day 1 were randomized to a regimen comprising single-dose i.v. fosaprepitant 150 mg or placebo along with ondansetron and dexamethasone on day 1; control regimen recipients received ondansetron on days 2 and 3. Primary end points were the proportion of subjects achieving a complete response (CR; no vomiting and no use of rescue medication) in the delayed phase (25–120 h after MEC initiation) and safety. Secondary end points included CR in the overall and acute phases (0–120 and 0–24 h after MEC initiation, respectively) and no vomiting in the overall phase. Nausea and the Functional Living Index-Emesis were assessed as exploratory end points. Results The fosaprepitant regimen improved CR significantly in the delayed (78.9% versus 68.5%; P < 0.001) and overall (77.1% versus 66.9%; P < 0.001) phases, but not in the acute phase (93.2% versus 91.0%; P = 0.184), versus control. In the overall phase, the proportion of subjects with no vomiting (82.7% versus 72.9%; P < 0.001) and no significant nausea (83.2% versus 77.9%; P = 0.030) was also significantly improved with the fosaprepitant regimen. The fosaprepitant regimen was generally well tolerated. Conclusion Single-dose fosaprepitant added to a 5-HT3 RA and dexamethasone was well tolerated and demonstrated superior control of CINV (primary end point achieved) associated with non-AC MEC. This is the first study to evaluate NK1 RA therapy as an i.v. formulation in a well-defined non-AC MEC population. Clinical

  6. Effects of Low-Dose Estrogen Replacement During Childhood on Pubertal Development and Gonadotropin Concentrations in Patients With Turner Syndrome: Results of a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiaohai; Garg, Sipi; Kowal, Karen; Cutler, Gordon B.; Ross, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The optimal approach to estrogen replacement in girls with Turner syndrome has not been determined. Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the effects of an individualized regimen of low-dose ethinyl estradiol (EE2) during childhood from as early as age 5, followed by a pubertal induction regimen starting after age 12 and escalating to full replacement over 4 years. Design: This study was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Setting: The study was conducted at two US pediatric endocrine centers. Subjects: Girls with Turner syndrome (n = 149), aged 5.0–12.5 years, were enrolled; data from 123 girls were analyzable for pubertal onset. Intervention(s): Interventions comprised placebo or recombinant GH injections three times a week, with daily oral placebo or oral EE2 during childhood (25 ng/kg/d, ages 5–8 y; 50 ng/kg/d, ages >8–12 y); after age 12, all patients received escalating EE2 starting at a nominal dosage of 100 ng/kg/d. Placebo/EE2 dosages were reduced by 50% for breast development before age 12 years, vaginal bleeding before age 14 years, or undue advance in bone age. Main Outcome Measures: The main outcome measures for this report were median ages at Tanner breast stage ≥2, median age at menarche, and tempo of puberty (Tanner 2 to menarche). Patterns of gonadotropin secretion and impact of childhood EE2 on gonadotropins also were assessed. Results: Compared with recipients of oral placebo (n = 62), girls who received childhood low-dose EE2 (n = 61) had significantly earlier thelarche (median, 11.6 vs 12.6 y, P < 0.001) and slower tempo of puberty (median, 3.3 vs 2.2 y, P = 0.003); both groups had delayed menarche (median, 15.0 y). Among childhood placebo recipients, girls who had spontaneous breast development before estrogen exposure had significantly lower median FSH values than girls who did not. Conclusions: In addition to previously reported effects on cognitive measures and GH

  7. Dose and dose rate effectiveness of space radiation.

    PubMed

    Schimmerling, W; Cucinotta, F A

    2006-01-01

    Dose and dose rate effectiveness factors (DDREF), in conjunction with other weighting factors, are commonly used to scale atomic bomb survivor data in order to establish limits for occupational radiation exposure, including radiation exposure in space. We use some well-known facts about the microscopic pattern of energy deposition of high-energy heavy ions, and about the dose rate dependence of chemical reactions initiated by radiation, to show that DDREF are likely to vary significantly as a function of particle type and energy, cell, tissue, and organ type, and biological end point. As a consequence, we argue that validation of DDREF by conventional methods, e.g. irradiating animal colonies and compiling statistics of cancer mortality, is not appropriate. However, the use of approaches derived from information theory and thermodynamics is a very wide field, and the present work can only be understood as a contribution to an ongoing discussion. PMID:17169950

  8. Single-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy using real-time transrectal ultrasound based planning in combination with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer: dosimetrics and early clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Lauche, Olivier; Delouya, Guila; Taussky, Daniel; Menard, Cynthia; Béliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Hervieux, Yannick; Larouche, Renée

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To validate the feasibility of a single-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) boost for prostate cancer using real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) based planning. Material and methods From August 2012 to September 2015, 126 patients underwent a single-fraction HDRBT boost of 15 Gy using real-time TRUS based planning. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (37.5 Gy/15 fractions, 44 Gy/22 fractions, or 45 Gy/25 fractions) was performed before (31%) or after (69%) HDRBT boost. Genito-urinary (GU) and gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicity were assessed 4 and 12 months after the end of combined treatment using the international prostate symptom score scale (IPSS) and the common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) v3.0. Results All dose-planning objectives were achieved in 90% of patients. Prostate D90 ≥ 105% and ≤ 115% was achieved in 99% of patients, prostate V150 ≤ 40% in 99%, prostate V200 < 11% in 96%, urethra D10 < 120% for 99%, urethra V125 = 0% in 100%, and rectal V75 < 1 cc in 93% of patients. Median IPSS score was 4 at baseline and did not change at 4 and 12 months after combined treatment. No patients developed ≥ grade 2 GI toxicity. With a median follow-up of 10 months, only two patients experienced biochemical failure. Among patients who didn't receive ADT, cumulative percentage of patients with PSA ≤ 1 ng/ml at 4 and 18 months was respectively 23% and 66%. Conclusions Single-fraction HDRBT boost of 15 Gy using real-time TRUS based planning achieves consistently high dosimetry quality. In combination with EBRT, toxicity outcomes appear promising. A longer follow-up is needed to assess long-term outcome and toxicities. PMID:27257413

  9. The Statistical Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, C.

    2008. 4. A practical example is then given of how the SEH works numerically. Each of the ten random variables is uniformly distributed around its own mean value as given by Dole (1964) and a standard deviation of 10% is assumed. The conclusion is that the average number of habitable planets in the Galaxy should be around 100 million ±200 million, and the average distance in between any two nearby habitable planets should be about 88 light years ±40 light years. 5. The SEH results are matched against the results of the Statistical Drake Equation from reference 4. As expected, the number of currently communicating ET civilizations in the Galaxy turns out to be much smaller than the number of habitable planets (about 10,000 against 100 million, i.e. one ET civilization out of 10,000 habitable planets). The average distance between any two nearby habitable planets is much smaller that the average distance between any two neighbouring ET civilizations: 88 light years vs. 2000 light years, respectively. This means an ET average distance about 20 times higher than the average distance between any pair of adjacent habitable planets. 6. Finally, a statistical model of the Fermi Paradox is derived by applying the above results to the coral expansion model of Galactic colonization. The symbolic manipulator "Macsyma" is used to solve these difficult equations. A new random variable Tcol, representing the time needed to colonize a new planet is introduced, which follows the lognormal distribution, Then the new quotient random variable Tcol/D is studied and its probability density function is derived by Macsyma. Finally a linear transformation of random variables yields the overall time TGalaxy needed to colonize the whole Galaxy. We believe that our mathematical work in deriving this STATISTICAL Fermi Paradox is highly innovative and fruitful for the future.

  10. The Statistical Drake Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We provide the statistical generalization of the Drake equation. From a simple product of seven positive numbers, the Drake equation is now turned into the product of seven positive random variables. We call this "the Statistical Drake Equation". The mathematical consequences of this transformation are then derived. The proof of our results is based on the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) of Statistics. In loose terms, the CLT states that the sum of any number of independent random variables, each of which may be ARBITRARILY distributed, approaches a Gaussian (i.e. normal) random variable. This is called the Lyapunov Form of the CLT, or the Lindeberg Form of the CLT, depending on the mathematical constraints assumed on the third moments of the various probability distributions. In conclusion, we show that: The new random variable N, yielding the number of communicating civilizations in the Galaxy, follows the LOGNORMAL distribution. Then, as a consequence, the mean value of this lognormal distribution is the ordinary N in the Drake equation. The standard deviation, mode, and all the moments of this lognormal N are also found. The seven factors in the ordinary Drake equation now become seven positive random variables. The probability distribution of each random variable may be ARBITRARY. The CLT in the so-called Lyapunov or Lindeberg forms (that both do not assume the factors to be identically distributed) allows for that. In other words, the CLT "translates" into our statistical Drake equation by allowing an arbitrary probability distribution for each factor. This is both physically realistic and practically very useful, of course. An application of our statistical Drake equation then follows. The (average) DISTANCE between any two neighboring and communicating civilizations in the Galaxy may be shown to be inversely proportional to the cubic root of N. Then, in our approach, this distance becomes a new random variable. We derive the relevant probability density

  11. SOCR: Statistics Online Computational Resource

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.

    2011-01-01

    The need for hands-on computer laboratory experience in undergraduate and graduate statistics education has been firmly established in the past decade. As a result a number of attempts have been undertaken to develop novel approaches for problem-driven statistical thinking, data analysis and result interpretation. In this paper we describe an integrated educational web-based framework for: interactive distribution modeling, virtual online probability experimentation, statistical data analysis, visualization and integration. Following years of experience in statistical teaching at all college levels using established licensed statistical software packages, like STATA, S-PLUS, R, SPSS, SAS, Systat, etc., we have attempted to engineer a new statistics education environment, the Statistics Online Computational Resource (SOCR). This resource performs many of the standard types of statistical analysis, much like other classical tools. In addition, it is designed in a plug-in object-oriented architecture and is completely platform independent, web-based, interactive, extensible and secure. Over the past 4 years we have tested, fine-tuned and reanalyzed the SOCR framework in many of our undergraduate and graduate probability and statistics courses and have evidence that SOCR resources build student’s intuition and enhance their learning. PMID:21451741

  12. Cytogenetic dose-response in vitro for biological dosimetry after exposure to high doses of gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr A; Maznyk, Nataliya A

    2013-04-01

    The dose response for dicentrics plus centric rings and total unstable chromosome-type aberrations was studied in the first mitoses of cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro to doses of ∼2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 16 and 20 Gy of acute (60)Со gamma-rays. A dose-dependent increase of aberration yield was accompanied by a tendency to the underdispersion of dicentrics and centric rings among cells distributions compared with Poisson statistics at doses ≥6 Gy. The formal fitting of the data to a linear-quadratic model resulted in an equation with the linear and quadratic coefficients ranged 0.098-0.129×cell(-1)×Gy(-1) and 0.039-0.034×cell(-1)×Gy(-2), respectively, depending on the fitting method. The actual radiation-induced aberration yield was markedly lower than expected from a calibration curve, generated earlier within a lower dose range. Interlaboratory variations in reported dicentric yields induced by medium-to-high radiation doses in vitro are discussed.

  13. A method to estimate the effect of deformable image registration uncertainties on daily dose mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Martin J.; Salguero, Francisco J.; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Staub, David; Vaman, Constantin

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To develop a statistical sampling procedure for spatially-correlated uncertainties in deformable image registration and then use it to demonstrate their effect on daily dose mapping. Methods: Sequential daily CT studies are acquired to map anatomical variations prior to fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The CTs are deformably registered to the planning CT to obtain displacement vector fields (DVFs). The DVFs are used to accumulate the dose delivered each day onto the planning CT. Each DVF has spatially-correlated uncertainties associated with it. Principal components analysis (PCA) is applied to measured DVF error maps to produce decorrelated principal component modes of the errors. The modes are sampled independently and reconstructed to produce synthetic registration error maps. The synthetic error maps are convolved with dose mapped via deformable registration to model the resulting uncertainty in the dose mapping. The results are compared to the dose mapping uncertainty that would result from uncorrelated DVF errors that vary randomly from voxel to voxel. Results: The error sampling method is shown to produce synthetic DVF error maps that are statistically indistinguishable from the observed error maps. Spatially-correlated DVF uncertainties modeled by our procedure produce patterns of dose mapping error that are different from that due to randomly distributed uncertainties. Conclusions: Deformable image registration uncertainties have complex spatial distributions. The authors have developed and tested a method to decorrelate the spatial uncertainties and make statistical samples of highly correlated error maps. The sample error maps can be used to investigate the effect of DVF uncertainties on daily dose mapping via deformable image registration. An initial demonstration of this methodology shows that dose mapping uncertainties can be sensitive to spatial patterns in the DVF uncertainties.

  14. Effect of Low-Dose MDCT and Iterative Reconstruction on Trabecular Bone Microstructure Assessment.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Felix K; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Baum, Thomas; Nasirudin, Radin A; Mei, Kai; Garcia, Eduardo G; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J; Kirschke, Jan S; Noël, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of low-dose multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) in combination with statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms on trabecular bone microstructure parameters. Twelve donated vertebrae were scanned with the routine radiation exposure used in our department (standard-dose) and a low-dose protocol. Reconstructions were performed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and maximum-likelihood based statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR). Trabecular bone microstructure parameters were assessed and statistically compared for each reconstruction. Moreover, fracture loads of the vertebrae were biomechanically determined and correlated to the assessed microstructure parameters. Trabecular bone microstructure parameters based on low-dose MDCT and SIR significantly correlated with vertebral bone strength. There was no significant difference between microstructure parameters calculated on low-dose SIR and standard-dose FBP images. However, the results revealed a strong dependency on the regularization strength applied during SIR. It was observed that stronger regularization might corrupt the microstructure analysis, because the trabecular structure is a very small detail that might get lost during the regularization process. As a consequence, the introduction of SIR for trabecular bone microstructure analysis requires a specific optimization of the regularization parameters. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches, superior noise-resolution trade-offs can be found with the proposed methods.

  15. Effect of Low-Dose MDCT and Iterative Reconstruction on Trabecular Bone Microstructure Assessment.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Felix K; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Baum, Thomas; Nasirudin, Radin A; Mei, Kai; Garcia, Eduardo G; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J; Kirschke, Jan S; Noël, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of low-dose multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) in combination with statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms on trabecular bone microstructure parameters. Twelve donated vertebrae were scanned with the routine radiation exposure used in our department (standard-dose) and a low-dose protocol. Reconstructions were performed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and maximum-likelihood based statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR). Trabecular bone microstructure parameters were assessed and statistically compared for each reconstruction. Moreover, fracture loads of the vertebrae were biomechanically determined and correlated to the assessed microstructure parameters. Trabecular bone microstructure parameters based on low-dose MDCT and SIR significantly correlated with vertebral bone strength. There was no significant difference between microstructure parameters calculated on low-dose SIR and standard-dose FBP images. However, the results revealed a strong dependency on the regularization strength applied during SIR. It was observed that stronger regularization might corrupt the microstructure analysis, because the trabecular structure is a very small detail that might get lost during the regularization process. As a consequence, the introduction of SIR for trabecular bone microstructure analysis requires a specific optimization of the regularization parameters. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches, superior noise-resolution trade-offs can be found with the proposed methods. PMID:27447827

  16. Effect of Low-Dose MDCT and Iterative Reconstruction on Trabecular Bone Microstructure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Thomas; Nasirudin, Radin A.; Mei, Kai; Garcia, Eduardo G.; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Kirschke, Jan S.; Noël, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of low-dose multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) in combination with statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms on trabecular bone microstructure parameters. Twelve donated vertebrae were scanned with the routine radiation exposure used in our department (standard-dose) and a low-dose protocol. Reconstructions were performed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and maximum-likelihood based statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR). Trabecular bone microstructure parameters were assessed and statistically compared for each reconstruction. Moreover, fracture loads of the vertebrae were biomechanically determined and correlated to the assessed microstructure parameters. Trabecular bone microstructure parameters based on low-dose MDCT and SIR significantly correlated with vertebral bone strength. There was no significant difference between microstructure parameters calculated on low-dose SIR and standard-dose FBP images. However, the results revealed a strong dependency on the regularization strength applied during SIR. It was observed that stronger regularization might corrupt the microstructure analysis, because the trabecular structure is a very small detail that might get lost during the regularization process. As a consequence, the introduction of SIR for trabecular bone microstructure analysis requires a specific optimization of the regularization parameters. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches, superior noise-resolution trade-offs can be found with the proposed methods. PMID:27447827

  17. Dose reconstruction for real-time patient-specific dose estimation in CT

    SciTech Connect

    De Man, Bruno Yin, Zhye; Wu, Mingye; FitzGerald, Paul; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Many recent computed tomography (CT) dose reduction approaches belong to one of three categories: statistical reconstruction algorithms, efficient x-ray detectors, and optimized CT acquisition schemes with precise control over the x-ray distribution. The latter category could greatly benefit from fast and accurate methods for dose estimation, which would enable real-time patient-specific protocol optimization. Methods: The authors present a new method for volumetrically reconstructing absorbed dose on a per-voxel basis, directly from the actual CT images. The authors’ specific implementation combines a distance-driven pencil-beam approach to model the first-order x-ray interactions with a set of Gaussian convolution kernels to model the higher-order x-ray interactions. The authors performed a number of 3D simulation experiments comparing the proposed method to a Monte Carlo based ground truth. Results: The authors’ results indicate that the proposed approach offers a good trade-off between accuracy and computational efficiency. The images show a good qualitative correspondence to Monte Carlo estimates. Preliminary quantitative results show errors below 10%, except in bone regions, where the authors see a bigger model mismatch. The computational complexity is similar to that of a low-resolution filtered-backprojection algorithm. Conclusions: The authors present a method for analytic dose reconstruction in CT, similar to the techniques used in radiation therapy planning with megavoltage energies. Future work will include refinements of the proposed method to improve the accuracy as well as a more extensive validation study. The proposed method is not intended to replace methods that track individual x-ray photons, but the authors expect that it may prove useful in applications where real-time patient-specific dose estimation is required.

  18. A dose error evaluation study for 4D dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milz, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.; Ullrich, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that respiration induced motion is not negligible for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. The intrafractional breathing induced motion influences the delivered dose distribution on the underlying patient geometry such as the lung or the abdomen. If a static geometry is used, a planning process for these indications does not represent the entire dynamic process. The quality of a full 4D dose calculation approach depends on the dose coordinate transformation process between deformable geometries. This article provides an evaluation study that introduces an advanced method to verify the quality of numerical dose transformation generated by four different algorithms. The used transformation metric value is based on the deviation of the dose mass histogram (DMH) and the mean dose throughout dose transformation. The study compares the results of four algorithms. In general, two elementary approaches are used: dose mapping and energy transformation. Dose interpolation (DIM) and an advanced concept, so called divergent dose mapping model (dDMM), are used for dose mapping. The algorithms are compared to the basic energy transformation model (bETM) and the energy mass congruent mapping (EMCM). For evaluation 900 small sample regions of interest (ROI) are generated inside an exemplary lung geometry (4DCT). A homogeneous fluence distribution is assumed for dose calculation inside the ROIs. The dose transformations are performed with the four different algorithms. The study investigates the DMH-metric and the mean dose metric for different scenarios (voxel sizes: 8 mm, 4 mm, 2 mm, 1 mm 9 different breathing phases). dDMM achieves the best transformation accuracy in all measured test cases with 3-5% lower errors than the other models. The results of dDMM are reasonable and most efficient in this study, although the model is simple and easy to implement. The EMCM model also achieved suitable results, but the approach requires a more complex

  19. Dose fractionation theorem in 3-D reconstruction (tomography)

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    It is commonly assumed that the large number of projections for single-axis tomography precludes its application to most beam-labile specimens. However, Hegerl and Hoppe have pointed out that the total dose required to achieve statistical significance for each voxel of a computed 3-D reconstruction is the same as that required to obtain a single 2-D image of that isolated voxel, at the same level of statistical significance. Thus a statistically significant 3-D image can be computed from statistically insignificant projections, as along as the total dosage that is distributed among these projections is high enough that it would have resulted in a statistically significant projection, if applied to only one image. We have tested this critical theorem by simulating the tomographic reconstruction of a realistic 3-D model created from an electron micrograph. The simulations verify the basic conclusions of high absorption, signal-dependent noise, varying specimen contrast and missing angular range. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that individual projections in the series of fractionated-dose images can be aligned by cross-correlation because they contain significant information derived from the summation of features from different depths in the structure. This latter information is generally not useful for structural interpretation prior to 3-D reconstruction, owing to the complexity of most specimens investigated by single-axis tomography. These results, in combination with dose estimates for imaging single voxels and measurements of radiation damage in the electron microscope, demonstrate that it is feasible to use single-axis tomography with soft X-ray microscopy of frozen-hydrated specimens.

  20. The prevalence and clinical characteristics associated with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Version-5-defined anxious distress specifier in adults with major depressive disorder: results from the International Mood Disorders Collaborative Project

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Roger S.; Woldeyohannes, Hanna O.; Soczynska, Joanna K.; Vinberg, Maj; Cha, Danielle S.; Lee, Yena; Gallaugher, Laura A.; Dale, Roman S.; Alsuwaidan, Mohammad T.; Mansur, Rodrigo B.; Muzina, David J.; Carvalho, Andre; Kennedy, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of and illness characteristics in adults with major depressive disorder (MDD) with anxious distress specifier (ADS) enrolled in the International Mood Disorders Collaborative Project, which is a collaborative research platform at the Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University of Toronto, Canada and the Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. Methods: Data from participants who met criteria for a current major depressive episode as part of MDD (n = 830) were included in this post hoc analysis. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Version-5-defined ADS was operationalized as the presence of at least two out of three proxy items instead of two out of five specifiers. Results: A total of 464 individuals (i.e. 56%) met criteria for ADS. There were no between-group differences in sociodemographic variables (e.g. gender, employment, marital status). Greater severity of illness was observed in adults with ADS as evidenced by a higher number of hospitalizations, higher rates of suicidal ideation, greater depressive symptom severity, greater workplace impairment, decreased quality of life, and greater self-reported cognitive impairment. Conclusions: Our findings underscore the importance of evaluating ADS in adults with MDD as its presence identifies a subpopulation with greater illness-associated burden and hazards. PMID:27347362

  1. Application of fluid-rock reaction studies to in situ recovery from oil sand deposits, Alberta, Canada - I. Aqueous phase results for an experimental-statistical study of water-bitumen-shale reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, J. A.; Hitchon, Brian

    1983-02-01

    In situ recovery operations in oil sand deposits effectively represent man-imposed low to intermediate temperature metamorphism of the sediments in the deposit. In order to evaluate some of the reactions which occur, a factorial experiment was earned out in which a shale from the Lower Cretaceous McMurray Formation in the Athabasca oil sand deposit of Alberta, in the presence or absence of bitumen, was subjected to hydrothermal treatment with aqueous fluids of varying pH and salinity, at two different temperatures, for periods up to 92 hours. The aqueous fluid was analyzed and the analytical data subjected to statistical factor analysis and analysis of variance, which enabled identification of the main processes, namely, cation exchange, the production of two types of colloidal material, and the dissolution of quartz There is also saturation of the aqueous phase by. as yet unidentified, "total organic carbon" and complete conversion and removal of all nitrogen in the shale to the aqueous phase. These reactions have implications with regards to the economics of the in situ recovery process, specifically with respect to the reuse and/or disposal of the produced water and the plugging of the pore space and hence of reduction of permeability between the injection and production wells. As a result of these experiments it is suggested that monitoring of the composition of the produced water from in situ recovery operations in oil sand deposits would be advisable.

  2. Dose-Volume Constraints to Reduce Rectal Side Effects From Prostate Radiotherapy: Evidence From MRC RT01 Trial ISRCTN 47772397

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Foo, Kerwyn; Morgan, Rachel C.; Aird, Edwin G.; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Critchley, Helen; Evans, Philip M. D.Phil.; Gianolini, Stefano; Mayles, W. Philip; Moore, A. Rollo; Sanchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Partridge, Mike; Sydes, Matthew R. C.Stat; Webb, Steve; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer is effective but dose limited because of the proximity of normal tissues. Comprehensive dose-volume analysis of the incidence of clinically relevant late rectal toxicities could indicate how the dose to the rectum should be constrained. Previous emphasis has been on constraining the mid-to-high dose range (>=50 Gy). Evidence is emerging that lower doses could also be important. Methods and Materials: Data from a large multicenter randomized trial were used to investigate the correlation between seven clinically relevant rectal toxicity endpoints (including patient- and clinician-reported outcomes) and an absolute 5% increase in the volume of rectum receiving the specified doses. The results were quantified using odds ratios. Rectal dose-volume constraints were applied retrospectively to investigate the association of constraints with the incidence of late rectal toxicity. Results: A statistically significant dose-volume response was observed for six of the seven endpoints for at least one of the dose levels tested in the range of 30-70 Gy. Statistically significant reductions in the incidence of these late rectal toxicities were observed for the group of patients whose treatment plans met specific proposed dose-volume constraints. The incidence of moderate/severe toxicity (any endpoint) decreased incre