Science.gov

Sample records for dose-response relationships exemplified

  1. The Dose Response Relationship for Radiation Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Eric

    2008-03-01

    Recent surveys show that the collective population radiation dose from medical procedures in the U.S. has increased by 750% in the past two decades. It would be impossible to imagine the practice of medicine today without diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, but nevertheless the widespread and rapidly increasing use of a modality which is a known human carcinogen is a cause for concern. To assess the magnitude of the problem it is necessary to establish the shape of the dose response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis. Information on radiation carcinogenesis comes from the A-bomb survivors, from occupationally exposed individuals and from radiotherapy patients. The A-bomb survivor data indicates a linear relationship between dose and the risk of solid cancers up to a dose of about 2.5 Sv. The lowest dose at which there is a significant excess cancer risk is debatable, but it would appear to be between 40 and 100 mSv. Data from the occupation exposure of nuclear workers shows an excess cancer risk at an average dose of 19.4 mSv. At the other end of the dose scale, data on second cancers in radiotherapy patients indicates that cancer risk does not continue to rise as a linear function of dose, but tends towards a plateau of 40 to 60 Gy, delivered in a fractionated regime. These data can be used to estimate the impact of diagnostic radiology at the low dose end of the dose response relationship, and the impact of new radiotherapy modalities at the high end of the dose response relationship. In the case of diagnostic radiology about 90% of the collective population dose comes from procedures (principally CT scans) which involve doses at which there is credible evidence of an excess cancer incidence. While the risk to the individual is small and justified in a symptomatic patient, the same is not true of some screening procedures is asymptomatic individuals, and in any case the huge number of procedures must add up to a potential public health problem. In the

  2. Dose-response relationships for carcinogens: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Zeise, L; Wilson, R; Crouch, E A

    1987-01-01

    We review the experimental evidence for various shapes of dose-response relationships for carcinogens and summarize those experiments that give the most information on relatively low doses. A brief review of some models is given to illustrate the shapes of dose-response curve expected from them. Our major interest is in the use of dose-response relationships to estimate risks to humans at low doses, and so we pay special attention to experimentally observed and theoretically expected nonlinearities. There are few experimental examples of nonlinear dose-response relations in humans, but this may simply be due to the limitations in the data. The several examples in rodents, even though for high dose data, suggest that nonlinearity is common. In some cases such nonlinearities may be rationalized on the basis of the pharmacokinetics of the test compound or its metabolites. PMID:3311725

  3. Dose-response relationships for carcinogens: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Zeise, L.; Wilson, R.; Crouch, E.A.C.

    1987-08-01

    The authors review the experimental evidence for various shapes of dose-response relationships for carcinogens and summarize those experiments that give the most information on relatively low doses. A brief review of some models is given to illustrate the shapes of dose-response curve expected from them. Their major interest is in the use of dose-response relationships to estimate risks to humans at low doses, and so they pay special attention to experimentally observed and theoretically expected nonlinearities. There are few experimental examples of nonlinear dose-response relations in humans, but this may simply be due to the limitations in the data. The several examples in rodents, even though for high dose data, suggest that nonlinearity is common. In some cases such nonlinearities may be rationalized on the basis of the pharmacokinetics of the test compound or its metabolites.

  4. Curious cases: Altered dose-response relationships in addiction genetics.

    PubMed

    Uhl, George R; Drgonova, Jana; Hall, F Scott

    2014-03-01

    Dose-response relationships for most addictive substances are "inverted U"-shaped. Addictive substances produce both positive features that include reward, euphoria, anxiolysis, withdrawal-relief, and negative features that include aversion, dysphoria, anxiety and withdrawal symptoms. A simple model differentially associates ascending and descending limbs of dose-response curves with rewarding and aversive influences, respectively. However, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) diagnoses of substance dependence fail to incorporate dose-response criteria and don't directly consider balances between euphoric and dysphoric drug effects. Classical genetic studies document substantial heritable influences on DSM substance dependence. Linkage and genome-wide association studies identify modest-sized effects at any locus. Nevertheless, clusters of SNPs within selected genes display 10(-2)>p>10(-8) associations with dependence in many independent samples. For several of these genes, evidence for cis-regulatory, level-of-expression differences supports the validity of mouse models in which levels of expression are also altered. This review documents surprising, recently defined cases in which convergent evidence from humans and mouse models supports central influences of altered dose-response relationships in mediating the impact of relevant genomic variation on addiction phenotypes. For variation at loci for the α5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, cadherin 13, receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase Δ and neuronal cell adhesion molecule genes, changed dose-response relationships conferred by gene knockouts in mice are accompanied by supporting human data. These observations emphasize desirability of carefully elucidating dose-response relationships for both rewarding and aversive features of abused substances wherever possible. They motivate consideration of individual differences in dose-response relationships in addiction nosology and therapeutics. © 2013.

  5. Radiation Dose-Response Relationships and Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-07-05

    The notion of a dose-response relationship was probably invented shortly after the discovery of poisons, the invention of alcoholic beverages, and the bringing of fire into a confined space in the forgotten depths of ancient prehistory. The amount of poison or medicine ingested can easily be observed to affect the behavior, health, or sickness outcome. Threshold effects, such as death, could be easily understood for intoxicants, medicine, and poisons. As Paracelsus (1493-1541), the 'father' of modern toxicology said, 'It is the dose that makes the poison.' Perhaps less obvious is the fact that implicit in such dose-response relationships is also the notion of dose rate. Usually, the dose is administered fairly acutely, in a single injection, pill, or swallow; a few puffs on a pipe; or a meal of eating or drinking. The same amount of intoxicants, medicine, or poisons administered over a week or month might have little or no observable effect. Thus, before the discovery of ionizing radiation in the late 19th century, toxicology ('the science of poisons') and pharmacology had deeply ingrained notions of dose-response relationships. This chapter demonstrates that the notion of a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation is hopelessly simplistic from a scientific standpoint. While useful from a policy or regulatory standpoint, dose-response relationships cannot possibly convey enough information to describe the problem from a quantitative view of radiation biology, nor can they address societal values. Three sections of this chapter address the concepts, observations, and theories that contribute to the scientific input to the practice of managing risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. The presentation begins with irradiation regimes, followed by responses to high and low doses of ionizing radiation, and a discussion of how all of this can inform radiation risk management. The knowledge that is really needed for prediction of individual risk is presented

  6. In vivo quantification of human lung dose response relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Walter; Wang, Peng; Liu, Haisong; Fuller, David; Schell, Michael C.; Okunieff, Paul

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To implement a new non-invasive in-vivo assay to compute the dose-response relationship following radiation-induced injury to normal lung tissue, using computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest. Methods and Materials: Follow-up volumetric CT scans were acquired in patients with metastatic tumors to the lung treated using stereotactic radiation therapy. The images reveal a focal region of fibrosis corresponding to the high-dose region and no observable long-term damage in distant sites. For each pixel in the follow-up image the treatment dose and the change in apparent tissue density was compiled. For each of 12 pre-selected dose levels the average pixel tissue density change was computed and fit to a two-parameter dose-response model. The sensitivity of the resulting fits to registration error was also quantified. Results: Complete in vivo dose-response relationships in human normal lung tissue were computed. Increasing radiation sensitivity was found with larger treatment volume. Radiation sensitivity increased also over time up to 12 months, but decreased at later time points. The time-course of dose response correlated with the time-course of levels of circulating IL-1α, TGFβ and MCP-1. The method was found to be robust to registration errors up to 3 mm. Conclusions: This approach for the first time enables the quantification of the full range dose response relationship in human subjects. The method may be used to assess quantitatively the efficacy of various agents thought to illicit radiation protection to the lung.

  7. Using machine learning to model dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Linden, Ariel; Yarnold, Paul R; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K

    2016-12-01

    Establishing the relationship between various doses of an exposure and a response variable is integral to many studies in health care. Linear parametric models, widely used for estimating dose-response relationships, have several limitations. This paper employs the optimal discriminant analysis (ODA) machine-learning algorithm to determine the degree to which exposure dose can be distinguished based on the distribution of the response variable. By framing the dose-response relationship as a classification problem, machine learning can provide the same functionality as conventional models, but can additionally make individual-level predictions, which may be helpful in practical applications like establishing responsiveness to prescribed drug regimens. Using data from a study measuring the responses of blood flow in the forearm to the intra-arterial administration of isoproterenol (separately for 9 black and 13 white men, and pooled), we compare the results estimated from a generalized estimating equations (GEE) model with those estimated using ODA. Generalized estimating equations and ODA both identified many statistically significant dose-response relationships, separately by race and for pooled data. Post hoc comparisons between doses indicated ODA (based on exact P values) was consistently more conservative than GEE (based on estimated P values). Compared with ODA, GEE produced twice as many instances of paradoxical confounding (findings from analysis of pooled data that are inconsistent with findings from analyses stratified by race). Given its unique advantages and greater analytic flexibility, maximum-accuracy machine-learning methods like ODA should be considered as the primary analytic approach in dose-response applications. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. [Dose-response relationship: relevance for medical practice].

    PubMed

    Klinkhardt, U; Harder, S

    2000-05-01

    Dose-finding studies are performed routinely in patients and--if appropriate surrogate models exist--also in healthy volunteers. Such studies aim at establishing the optimal dose range for further clinical studies on the efficacy and the risk-benefit ratio of a new drug. The dose-response relationship of a drug is most often described by a sigmoidal curve. Its parameters include the mean effective dose, the maximal effect and the steepness. Interpretation of such curves should be done in the context of the intended clinical indications of the drug. The risk-benefit ratio of a drug can be assessed by overlapping the dose-response curve of wanted and unwanted clinical effects, again, any overlapping (which can be described e.g. by the therapeutic index) should be seen in the context of the indication and available therapeutic alternatives.

  9. Confidence bounds for nonlinear dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Baayen, C; Hougaard, P

    2015-11-30

    An important aim of drug trials is to characterize the dose-response relationship of a new compound. Such a relationship can often be described by a parametric (nonlinear) function that is monotone in dose. If such a model is fitted, it is useful to know the uncertainty of the fitted curve. It is well known that Wald confidence intervals are based on linear approximations and are often unsatisfactory in nonlinear models. Apart from incorrect coverage rates, they can be unreasonable in the sense that the lower confidence limit of the difference to placebo can be negative, even when an overall test shows a significant positive effect. Bootstrap confidence intervals solve many of the problems of the Wald confidence intervals but are computationally intensive and prone to undercoverage for small sample sizes. In this work, we propose a profile likelihood approach to compute confidence intervals for the dose-response curve. These confidence bounds have better coverage than Wald intervals and are more precise and generally faster than bootstrap methods. Moreover, if monotonicity is assumed, the profile likelihood approach takes this automatically into account. The approach is illustrated using a public dataset and simulations based on the Emax and sigmoid Emax models.

  10. Dose response relationship in anti-stress gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E

    2007-03-02

    To maintain a stable intracellular environment, cells utilize complex and specialized defense systems against a variety of external perturbations, such as electrophilic stress, heat shock, and hypoxia, etc. Irrespective of the type of stress, many adaptive mechanisms contributing to cellular homeostasis appear to operate through gene regulatory networks that are organized into negative feedback loops. In general, the degree of deviation of the controlled variables, such as electrophiles, misfolded proteins, and O2, is first detected by specialized sensor molecules, then the signal is transduced to specific transcription factors. Transcription factors can regulate the expression of a suite of anti-stress genes, many of which encode enzymes functioning to counteract the perturbed variables. The objective of this study was to explore, using control theory and computational approaches, the theoretical basis that underlies the steady-state dose response relationship between cellular stressors and intracellular biochemical species (controlled variables, transcription factors, and gene products) in these gene regulatory networks. Our work indicated that the shape of dose response curves (linear, superlinear, or sublinear) depends on changes in the specific values of local response coefficients (gains) distributed in the feedback loop. Multimerization of anti-stress enzymes and transcription factors into homodimers, homotrimers, or even higher-order multimers, play a significant role in maintaining robust homeostasis. Moreover, our simulation noted that dose response curves for the controlled variables can transition sequentially through four distinct phases as stressor level increases: initial superlinear with lesser control, superlinear more highly controlled, linear uncontrolled, and sublinear catastrophic. Each phase relies on specific gain-changing events that come into play as stressor level increases. The low-dose region is intrinsically nonlinear, and depending on

  11. Lisinopril dose-response relationship in essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, H. J.; Cirillo, V. J.; Sromovsky, J. A.; Otterbein, E. S.; Shaw, W. C.; Rush, J. E.; Chrysant, S. G.; Gradman, A. H.; Leon, A. S.; MacCarthy, E. P.; Nelson, E. B.; Pool, J.; Vedin, A.

    1989-01-01

    1 This was a multicentre, double-blind, parallel study in 216 patients with mild to moderate (supine diastolic blood pressure = 95-115 mm Hg) essential hypertension. 2 After a 4-week placebo washout, patients were randomized to placebo or lisinopril 1.25, 5, 20 or 80 mg once daily for 6 consecutive weeks. Supine and erect blood pressure was measured 24 h postdose at the end of weeks -2, 0, 2, 4, and 6. 3 There was a linear dose-response relationship for both supine and erect blood pressure. Diastolic blood pressure reductions in the lisinopril 20 and 80 mg day-1 groups were significantly greater than in the placebo or lisinopril 1.25 and 5 mg day-1 groups. 4 Lisinopril, at doses up to 80 mg day-1, was well tolerated. PMID:2556172

  12. Prediction of the mortality dose-response relationship in man

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.D.; Jones, T.D.

    1987-01-01

    Based upon an extensive data base including 100 separate animal studies, an estimate of the mortality dose-response relationship due to continuous photon radiation is predicted for 70 kg man. The model used in this prediction exercise includes fixed terms accounting for effects of body weight and dose rate, and random terms accounting for inter- and intra-species variation and experimental error. Point predictions and 95% prediction intervals are given for the LD/sub 05/, LD/sub 10/, LD/sub 25/, LD/sub 50/, LD/sub 75/, LD/sub 90/, and LD/sub 95/, for dose rates ranging from 1 to 50 R/min. 6 refs., 5 tabs.

  13. Dose-response relationship between light exposure and cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Knaier, R; Meister, S; Aeschbacher, T; Gemperle, D; Rossmeissl, A; Cajochen, C; Schmidt-Trucksäss, A

    2016-07-01

    Light has a stimulating effect on physical performance if scheduled according to the chronotype, but dose-dependent effects on performance have not yet been examined. Three groups of healthy men (25.1 ± 3.1 years) were exposed to light for different durations in a parallel group design before a 40-min time-trial. In each group, subjects were exposed to either bright light (BL, 4420 lx) or moderate light (ML, 230 lx) in a randomized order in a crossover design. The durations of light exposure were 120 min prior to and during exercise (2HEX; n = 16), 60 min prior to and during exercise (1HEX; n = 10), or only for 60 min prior to exercise (1H; n = 15). Total work performed during the time-trial in kJ in the 2HEX group was significantly higher in the BL setting (527 kJ) than in ML (512 kJ) (P = 0.002), but not in 1HEX (BL: 485 kJ; ML: 498 kJ) or 1H (BL: 519 kJ; ML: 514 kJ) (P = 0.770; P = 0.485). There was a significant (P = 0.006) positive dose-response relationship between the duration of light exposure and the work performed over the three doses of light exposure. A long duration light exposure is an effective tool to increase total work in a medium length time-trial in subjects normalized for their individual chronotype.

  14. Chronic periodontitis and smoking Prevalence and dose-response relationship

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahrukh; Khalid, Taimur; Awan, Kamran H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence and dose-response relationship of chronic periodontitis among smokers in Pakistan. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study among participants seeking dental care in Karachi Medical and Dental College, Karachi, Pakistan. A total of 443 participants with a mean age of 44.3 (±6.5) participated in the study from April 2011 to December 2011. Males comprised 64.7%, and females comprised 35.2%. Participants were interviewed on social demographics and oral habits. Participants with shallow pockets (3.5-5.5 mm) and deep pockets (>5.5 mm) were considered suffering from chronic periodontitis. The characteristics of participants were assessed using frequency distribution for categorical variables and mean (standard deviation) for continuous variables. Results: Among 443 participants, smokers were distributed as 55.1% and non-smokers as 44.9%. Smoking was found to be significantly related to young adults (p<0.007), male gender (p<0.001), and lower education level (p<0.01). Overall prevalence of chronic periodontitis among smokers was estimated at 81.6%. Heavy smoking was found to have significantly high prevalence (p<0.001) and severity (p<0.001) of periodontitis as compared with moderate and light smokers. The multivariate unadjusted model depicted 3.5 times higher risk of chronic periodontitis among smokers (p<0.001). Conclusion: Chronic periodontitis had a high prevalence among smokers. Heavy smoking was found to have a higher risk for having periodontitis. PMID:27464867

  15. Beetroot juice and exercise: pharmacodynamic and dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Lee J; Kelly, James; Bailey, Stephen J; Blackwell, Jamie R; Skiba, Philip F; Winyard, Paul G; Jeukendrup, Asker E; Vanhatalo, Anni; Jones, Andrew M

    2013-08-01

    Dietary supplementation with beetroot juice (BR), containing approximately 5-8 mmol inorganic nitrate (NO3(-)), increases plasma nitrite concentration ([NO2(-)]), reduces blood pressure, and may positively influence the physiological responses to exercise. However, the dose-response relationship between the volume of BR ingested and the physiological effects invoked has not been investigated. In a balanced crossover design, 10 healthy men ingested 70, 140, or 280 ml concentrated BR (containing 4.2, 8.4, and 16.8 mmol NO3(-), respectively) or no supplement to establish the effects of BR on resting plasma [NO3(-)] and [NO2(-)] over 24 h. Subsequently, on six separate occasions, 10 subjects completed moderate-intensity and severe-intensity cycle exercise tests, 2.5 h postingestion of 70, 140, and 280 ml BR or NO3(-)-depleted BR as placebo (PL). Following acute BR ingestion, plasma [NO2(-)] increased in a dose-dependent manner, with the peak changes occurring at approximately 2-3 h. Compared with PL, 70 ml BR did not alter the physiological responses to exercise. However, 140 and 280 ml BR reduced the steady-state oxygen (O2) uptake during moderate-intensity exercise by 1.7% (P = 0.06) and 3.0% (P < 0.05), whereas time-to-task failure was extended by 14% and 12% (both P < 0.05), respectively, compared with PL. The results indicate that whereas plasma [NO2(-)] and the O2 cost of moderate-intensity exercise are altered dose dependently with NO3(-)-rich BR, there is no additional improvement in exercise tolerance after ingesting BR containing 16.8 compared with 8.4 mmol NO3(-). These findings have important implications for the use of BR to enhance cardiovascular health and exercise performance in young adults.

  16. Computer Simulation of Quantal Dose-Response Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGilliard, Kip L.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a program which simulates animal pharmacology experiments involving "all-or-none" responses. Use of the Applesoft BASIC program in the pharmacology teaching laboratory provides students with a rapid and economical way to gain experience in the design and statistical analysis of quantal dose-response experiments. Information on…

  17. Computer Simulation of Quantal Dose-Response Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGilliard, Kip L.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a program which simulates animal pharmacology experiments involving "all-or-none" responses. Use of the Applesoft BASIC program in the pharmacology teaching laboratory provides students with a rapid and economical way to gain experience in the design and statistical analysis of quantal dose-response experiments. Information on…

  18. Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationships in Biology, Toxicology and Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The purpose of the conference was to attract researchers from diverse backgrounds who are working in the common area of non-linear dose - response relationships...This unique interdisciplinary conference represents an important step in furthering the understanding of the occurrence, origin, mechanisms, significance and practical applications of non-linear dose - response relationships.

  19. BY HOW MUCH DO SHAPES OF TOXICOLOGICAL DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS VARY? (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A re-analysis of a large number of historical dose-response data for continuous endpoints showed that the shapes of the dose-response relationships were surprisingly homogenous. The datasets were selected on the sole criterion that they were expected to provide relatively good in...

  20. Continuous Toxicological Dose-Response Relationships Are Pretty Homogeneous (Society for Risk Analysis Annual Meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-response relationships for a wide range of in vivo and in vitro continuous datasets are well-described by a four-parameter exponential or Hill model, based on a recent analysis of multiple historical dose-response datasets, mostly with more than five dose groups (Slob and Se...

  1. BY HOW MUCH DO SHAPES OF TOXICOLOGICAL DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS VARY? (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A re-analysis of a large number of historical dose-response data for continuous endpoints showed that the shapes of the dose-response relationships were surprisingly homogenous. The datasets were selected on the sole criterion that they were expected to provide relatively good in...

  2. Continuous Toxicological Dose-Response Relationships Are Pretty Homogeneous (Society for Risk Analysis Annual Meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-response relationships for a wide range of in vivo and in vitro continuous datasets are well-described by a four-parameter exponential or Hill model, based on a recent analysis of multiple historical dose-response datasets, mostly with more than five dose groups (Slob and Se...

  3. Dose-response relationships and extrapolation in toxicology - Mechanistic and statistical considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Controversy on toxicological dose-response relationships and low-dose extrapolation of respective risks is often the consequence of misleading data presentation, lack of differentiation between types of response variables, and diverging mechanistic interpretation. In this chapter...

  4. Dose-response relationships and extrapolation in toxicology - Mechanistic and statistical considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Controversy on toxicological dose-response relationships and low-dose extrapolation of respective risks is often the consequence of misleading data presentation, lack of differentiation between types of response variables, and diverging mechanistic interpretation. In this chapter...

  5. [Dose-response relationship of xipamide in healthy subjects].

    PubMed

    Knauf, H; Haase, W; Mutschler, E

    1980-01-01

    To establish a dose-effect relationship for the xipamide diuretic in double-blind trials 0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg of xipamide were administered to 5 groups of 6 to 14 healthy test persons in each group. Before, during and after the 15-d period of application all the blood electrolytes as well as the metabolism parameters of glucose, uric acid, cholesterol, neutral fats as well as creatinine and urea were determined. Similarly during the entire period of investigation the 24-h urine samples were collected daily and from these the electrolyte excretion as well as the endogenic creatinine clearance were determined. It was found that diuresis and natriuresis significantly enhanced in comparison with placebo were already achieved with 5 mg xipamide per day, they could no further be increased by higher doses. Much rather at 40 mg xipamide per day a significant hypokalaemia as well as a light hypercalcaemia developed. Independently of the dose, during the period of investigation a light, fully compensated hypochloraemic alkalosis developed. Regarding the metabolic processes a slight increase in the uric acid and cholesterol blood levels was observed, while the blood-sugar level, the triglycerides as well as the endogenic creatinine clearance remained unaffected. It can be concluded from the investigations that maximum natriuresis and diuresis can already be achieved with a daily xipamide dose of 5 mg, while side effects can be kept at a minimum.

  6. Concord grape juice polyphenols and cardiovascular risk factors: dose-response relationships

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pure fruit juices provide nutritional value with evidence suggesting some of their benefits on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk may be derived from their constituent polyphenols, particularly flavonoids. However, few data from clinical trials are available on the dose-response relationship ...

  7. The Dose-Response Relationship of Adolescent Religious Activity and Substance Use: Variation across Demographic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinman, Kenneth J.; Ferketich, Amy K.; Sahr, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses two inconsistent findings in the literature on adolescent religious activity (RA) and substance use: whether a dose-response relationship characterizes the association of these variables, and whether the association varies by grade, gender, ethnicity, family structure, school type, and type of substance. Multinomial logistic…

  8. Development of the dose-response relationship for human toxoplasma gondii infection associated with meat consumption

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite that is responsible for approximately 24% of deaths attributed to foodborne pathogens in the United States.A substantial portion of human T. gondii infections may be acquired through the consumption of meats. The dose-response relationship for human exposure...

  9. The Dose-Response Relationship of Adolescent Religious Activity and Substance Use: Variation across Demographic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinman, Kenneth J.; Ferketich, Amy K.; Sahr, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses two inconsistent findings in the literature on adolescent religious activity (RA) and substance use: whether a dose-response relationship characterizes the association of these variables, and whether the association varies by grade, gender, ethnicity, family structure, school type, and type of substance. Multinomial logistic…

  10. Concord Grape Juice Polyphenols and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Dose-Response Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, Jeffrey B.; Vita, Joseph A.; Chen, C. -Y. Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Pure fruit juices provide nutritional value with evidence suggesting some of their benefits on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk may be derived from their constituent polyphenols, particularly flavonoids. However, few data from clinical trials are available on the dose-response relationship of fruit juice flavonoids to these outcomes. Utilizing the results of clinical trials testing single doses, we have analyzed data from studies of 100% Concord grape juice by placing its flavonoid content in the context of results from randomized clinical trials of other polyphenol-rich foods and beverages describing the same outcomes but covering a broader range of intake. We selected established biomarkers determined by similar methods for measuring flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), blood pressure, platelet aggregation, and the resistance of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) to oxidation. Despite differences among the clinical trials in the treatment, subjects, and duration, correlations were observed between the dose and FMD. Inverse dose-response relationships, albeit with lower correlation coefficients, were also noted for the other outcomes. These results suggest a clear relationship between consumption of even modest serving sizes of Concord grape juice, flavonoid intake, and effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This approach to dose-response relationships may prove useful for testing other individual foods and beverages. PMID:26633488

  11. Concord Grape Juice Polyphenols and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Dose-Response Relationships.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Vita, Joseph A; Chen, C-Y Oliver

    2015-12-02

    Pure fruit juices provide nutritional value with evidence suggesting some of their benefits on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk may be derived from their constituent polyphenols, particularly flavonoids. However, few data from clinical trials are available on the dose-response relationship of fruit juice flavonoids to these outcomes. Utilizing the results of clinical trials testing single doses, we have analyzed data from studies of 100% Concord grape juice by placing its flavonoid content in the context of results from randomized clinical trials of other polyphenol-rich foods and beverages describing the same outcomes but covering a broader range of intake. We selected established biomarkers determined by similar methods for measuring flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), blood pressure, platelet aggregation, and the resistance of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) to oxidation. Despite differences among the clinical trials in the treatment, subjects, and duration, correlations were observed between the dose and FMD. Inverse dose-response relationships, albeit with lower correlation coefficients, were also noted for the other outcomes. These results suggest a clear relationship between consumption of even modest serving sizes of Concord grape juice, flavonoid intake, and effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This approach to dose-response relationships may prove useful for testing other individual foods and beverages.

  12. A review of uncertainties in radiotherapy dose reconstruction and their impacts on dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Vũ Bezin, Jérémi; Allodji, Rodrigue S; Mège, Jean-Pierre; Beldjoudi, Guillaume; Saunier, Fleur; Chavaudra, Jean; Deutsch, Eric; de Vathaire, Florent; Bernier, Valérie; Carrie, Christian; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2017-03-20

    Proper understanding of the risk of radiation-induced late effects for patients receiving external photon beam radiotherapy requires the determination of reliable dose-response relationships. Although significant efforts have been devoted to improving dose estimates for the study of late effects, the most often questioned explanatory variable is still the dose. In this work, based on a literature review, we provide an in-depth description of the radiotherapy dose reconstruction process for the study of late effects. In particular, we focus on the identification of the main sources of dose uncertainty involved in this process and summarise their impacts on the dose-response relationship for radiotherapy late effects. We provide a number of recommendations for making progress in estimating the uncertainties in current studies of radiotherapy late effects and reducing these uncertainties in future studies.

  13. Exploring the dose-response relationship between resistance exercise intensity and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Etnier, Jennifer L

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the dose-response relationship between resistance exercise intensity and cognitive performance. Sixty-eight participants were randomly assigned into control, 40%, 70%, or 100% of 10-repetition maximal resistance exercise groups. Participants were tested on Day 1 (baseline) and on Day 2 (measures were taken relative to performance of the treatment). Heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion, self-reported arousal, and affect were assessed on both days. Cognitive performance was assessed on Day 1 and before and following treatment on Day 2. Results from regression analyses indicated that there is a significant linear effect of exercise intensity on information processing speed, and a significant quadratic trend for exercise intensity on executive function. Thus, there is a dose-response relationship between the intensity of resistance exercise and cognitive performance such that high-intensity exercise benefits speed of processing, but moderate intensity exercise is most beneficial for executive function.

  14. Perception and annoyance due to wind turbine noise--a dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Eja; Waye, Kerstin Persson

    2004-12-01

    Installed global wind power increased by 26% during 2003, with U.S and Europe accounting for 90% of the cumulative capacity. Little is known about wind turbines' impact on people living in their vicinity. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of annoyance due to wind turbine noise and to study dose-response relationships. Interrelationships between noise annoyance and sound characteristics, as well as the influence of subjective variables such as attitude and noise sensitivity, were also assessed. A cross-sectional study was performed in Sweden in 2000. Responses were obtained through questionnaires (n = 351; response rate 68.4%), and doses were calculated as A-weighted sound pressure levels for each respondent. A statistically significant dose-response relationship was found, showing higher proportion of people reporting perception and annoyance than expected from the present dose-response relationships for transportation noise. The unexpected high proportion of annoyance could be due to visual interference, influencing noise annoyance, as well as the presence of intrusive sound characteristics. The respondents' attitude to the visual impact of wind turbines on the landscape scenery was found to influence noise annoyance.

  15. Maximizing strength development in athletes: a meta-analysis to determine the dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Mark D; Rhea, Matthew R; Alvar, Brent A

    2004-05-01

    The efficiency, safety, and effectiveness of strength training programs are paramount for sport conditioning. Therefore, identifying optimal doses of the training variables allows for maximal gains in muscular strength to be elicited per unit of time and also for the reduction in risk of overtraining and/or overuse injuries. A quantified dose-response relationship for the continuum of training intensities, frequencies, and volumes has been identified for recreationally trained populations but has yet to be identified for competitive athletes. The purpose of this analysis was to identify this relationship in collegiate, professional, and elite athletes. A meta-analysis of 37 studies with a total of 370 effect sizes was performed to identify the dose-response relationship among competitive athletes. Criteria for study inclusion were (a) participants must have been competitive athletes at the collegiate or professional level, (b) the study must have employed a strength training intervention, and (c) the study must have included necessary data to calculate effect sizes. Effect size data demonstrate that maximal strength gains are elicited among athletes who train at a mean training intensity of 85% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM), 2 days per week, and with a mean training volume of 8 sets per muscle group. The current data exhibit different dose-response trends than previous meta-analytical investigations with trained and untrained nonathletes. These results demonstrate explicit dose-response trends for maximal strength gains in athletes and may be directly used in strength and conditioning venues to optimize training efficiency and effectiveness.

  16. Changes in the Dose-Response Relationship of One Toxicant Under Simultaneous Exposure to Another Toxicant.

    PubMed

    Katsnelson, B A; Panov, V G; Varaksin, A N; Minigalieva, I A; Privalova, L I; Sutunkova, M P

    2016-01-01

    We considered, in general form for a 2(2) full factorial experiment, linear approximations of the organism's dose-response relationship for some factors operating alone and modification of this relationship by another factor operating in the background. A typological classification of such modifications is suggested. An analysis of the outcomes obtained in a number of subchronic animal experiments on rats in which this response was assessed by changes in a large number of biomedical indices revealed that all theoretically possible variants (types) of the modification under consideration are actually observed depending on a specific index and specific harmful exposure. Statistical significance estimation procedures are formulated for each of them.

  17. Dose-response Relationships between Mouse Allergen Exposure and Asthma Morbidity Among Urban Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Torjusen, Erika N.; Diette, Gregory B.; Breysse, Patrick N.; Curtin-Brosnan, Jean; Aloe, Charles; Matsui, Elizabeth C.

    2012-01-01

    Home mouse allergen exposure is associated with asthma morbidity, but little is known about the shape of the dose-response relationship or the relevance of location of exposure within the home. Asthma outcome and allergen exposure data were collected every three months for 1 year in 150 urban children with asthma. Participants were stratified by mouse sensitization and relationships between continuous measures of mouse allergen exposure and outcomes of interest were analyzed. Every ten-fold increase in the bed mouse allergen level was associated with an 87% increase in the odds of any asthma-related health care use among mouse sensitized (OR (95% CI): 1.87 (1.21–2.88)), but not non-mouse sensitized participants. Similar relationships were observed for emergency department visit and unscheduled doctor visit among mouse sensitized participants. Kitchen floor and bedroom air mouse allergen concentrations were also associated with greater odds of asthma-related healthcare utilization; however, the magnitude of the association was less than that observed for bed mouse allergen concentrations. In this population of urban children with asthma, there is a linear dose-response relationship between mouse allergen concentrations and asthma morbidity among mouse-sensitized asthmatics. Bed and bedroom air mouse allergen exposure compartments may have a greater impact on asthma morbidity than other compartments. PMID:23067271

  18. Dose-response relationship between physical activity and dyslipidemia in youth.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Allana G; Janssen, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The minimal and optimal amount of physical activity associated with cardiovascular health benefits in young people is unknown. To determine the dose-response relationship between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with high-risk low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride values in youth. The study sample consisted of 1235 adolescents (12 to 19 years of age) from the 20032004 and 20052006 cycles of the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Objective measures of MVPA were obtained over seven days with accelerometers. LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and triglycerides were measured from a fasting blood sample. High-risk values for these lipidslipoproteins were determined using age- and sex-specific thresholds. Logistic regression models were used to determine the dose-response relationships between MVPA and high-risk lipid levels. ORs for high-risk HDL cholesterol and triglyceride values decreased in a curvilinear manner with increasing minutes of MVPA. Compared with no MVPA (0 min), the ORs for high-risk HDL cholesterol values at 15 min, 30 min and 60 min per day of MVPA were 0.29 (95% CI 0.13 to 0.67), 0.24 (95% CI 0.10 to 0.64) and 0.21 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.61), respectively. The corresponding ORs for high-risk triglyceride values were 0.40 (95% CI 0.18 to 0.76), 0.22 (95% CI 0.06 to 0.66) and 0.10 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.51). There was no discernible dose-response relationship between MVPA and LDL cholesterol. Small amounts of MVPA were associated with a large reduction in the likelihood of having high-risk HDL cholesterol and triglyceride values in this representative sample of adolescents.

  19. Dose-response relationship of temozolomide, determined by the Pig-a, comet, and micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Guérard, M; Johnson, G; Dertinger, S; Duran-Pacheco, G; Funk, J; Zeller, A

    2017-02-15

    Temozolomide (TMZ), a monofunctional alkylating agent, was selected as a model compound to determine its quantitative genotoxic dose-response relationship in different tissues (blood, liver, and jejunum) and endpoints [Pig-a-, comet-, and micronucleus assay (MNT)] in male rats. TMZ was administered p.o. over 5 consecutive days (day 1-5), followed by a treatment-free period of 50 days (day 6-56) and a final administration prior to necropsy (day 57-59). TMZ showed a dose-dependent increase in DNA damage in all interrogated endpoints. A statistically significant increase in Pig-a mutant phenotypes was observed on day 44 starting at 7.5 mg/kg/day for mutant reticulocytes (for RET(CD59-)) and at 3.75 mg/kg/day for mutant red blood cells (RBC(CD59-)), respectively. In addition, a statistically significant increase in cytogenetic damage, as measured by micronucleated reticulocytes, was observed starting at 3.75 mg/kg/day on day 3 and 1.5 mg/kg/day on day 59. DNA strand breaks, as detected by the comet assay, showed a dose-dependent and statistically significant increase in liver, blood, and jejunum starting at doses of 3.75, 3.75, and 7.5 mg/kg/day, respectively. The dose-response relationships of the Pig-a, MNT, and comet data were analyzed for possible points of departure (PoD) using the benchmark-dose (BMD) software PROAST with different critical effect sizes (CES) (BMD0.1, BMD0.5, BMD1, and BMD1SD). Overall, PoD values show a high concordance between different tissues and endpoints, underlining the suitability of this experimental design to explore quantitative dose-response relationships in a variety of different tissues and endpoints, while minimizing animal use.

  20. An analysis of the dose-response relationship at voltage-clamped frog neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, V E; Steinbach, J H; Stevens, C F

    1978-01-01

    1. Frog neuromuscular junctions were viewed with Nomarski optics and voltage clamped. Agonist was applied ionophoretically and agonist concentrations were measured using a micro-electrode sensitive to quaternary amines. 2. The dose-response relationship was studied using the agonists carbamylcholine, suberyldicholine and hydroxyphenyl-propyltrimethylammonium. 3. With all of these agonists, it appeared that the ACh receptor could be active when either one or two agonist binding sites were occupied. The receptor was much more likely to be active when both sites were occupied. Agonist dissociation constants and receptor activation probabilities were estimated by non-linear regression techniques for several possible receptor activation schemes. PMID:309004

  1. Symptom overreporting obscures the dose-response relationship between trauma severity and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Merckelbach, Harald; Langeland, Willie; de Vries, Gerard; Draijer, Nel

    2014-07-30

    We investigated whether symptom overreporting affects the dose-response relationship between self-reported abuse severity and psychiatric symptoms in two samples. The first sample (N=599) consisted of adults who had previously reported to a public commission that they had been witnesses to or victims of childhood sexual abuse by Roman Catholic Church representatives. The second sample (N=1756) consisted of general population respondents who indicated that they had been victims of non-familial childhood sexual abuse. Using a web-based data collection procedure, both samples completed the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-18), items addressing abuse severity, and items flagging symptom overreporting. Adjusting for overreporting reduced the proportion of participants with clinically raised BSI-18 scores from 60% to 47% in sample 1 and from 26% to 22% in sample 2. Also, in both samples, normal range reporting participants exhibited the typical dose-response relationship between trauma severity and BSI-18 scores, whereas this pattern was largely non-significant in overreporting participants. Our findings show that symptom overreporting has a psychometric impact that may obscure relationships between clinically relevant variables and should therefore preferably be monitored in surveys. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dose-Response relationship of luteinizing hormone to luteinizing hormone—releasing hormone in man

    PubMed Central

    Kastin, Abba J.; Schally, Andrew V.; Gual, Carlos; Midgley, A. Rees; Miller, M. Clinton; Cabeza, Angela

    1971-01-01

    In previous clinical studies with highly purified porcine luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH), administration of the somewhat arbitrarily chosen doses of 700-1500 μg resulted in increased serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). The present study determined the minimum effective dose as well as the relationship of the response of serum LH and FSH to the dose of LH-RH administered. Three normal men received i.v. injections of 1.1-810 μg of LH-RH. A dose of 10 μg of LH-RH caused a statistically significant elevation in serum LH. 30 μg of LH-RH significantly increased serum FSH levels. A highly significant linear trend was observed in the log dose-response curve. The results indicate that both LH and FSH release occurs in man with doses of LH-RH much lower than previously used and that a linear log dose-response relationship can be obtained. PMID:4932985

  3. Meta-analysis on occupational exposure to pesticides--neurobehavioral impact and dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Baron, Monika; Knapp, Guido; Schäper, Michael; van Thriel, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    While the health impact of high exposures to pesticides is acknowledged, the impact of chronic exposures in the absence of acute poisonings is controversial. A systematic analysis of dose-response relationships is still missing. Its absence may provoke alternative explanations for altered performances. Consequently, opportunities for health prevention in the occupational and environmental field may be missed. Objectives were (1) quantification of the neurotoxic impact of pesticides by an analysis of functional alterations in workers measured by neuropsychological performance tests, (2) estimates of dose-response relationships on the basis of exposure duration, and (3) exploration of susceptible subgroups. The meta-analysis employed a random effects model to obtain overall effects for individual performance tests. Twenty-two studies with a total of 1758 exposed and 1260 reference individuals met the inclusion criteria. At least three independent outcomes were available for twenty-six performance variables. Significant performance effects were shown in adults and referred to both cognitive and motor performances. Effect sizes ranging from dRE=-0.14 to dRE=-0.67 showed consistent outcomes for memory and attention. Relationships between effect sizes and exposure duration were indicated for individual performance variables and the total of measured performances. Studies on adolescents had to be analyzed separately due to numerous outliers. The large variation among outcomes hampered the analysis of the susceptibility in this group, while data on female workers was too scant for the analysis. Relationships exist between the impact of pesticides on performances and exposure duration. A change in test paradigms would help to decipher the impact more specifically. The use of biomarkers appropriate for lower exposures would allow a better prevention of neurotoxic effects due to occupational and environmental exposure. Intervention studies in adolescents seem warranted to

  4. Intervention Engagement Moderates the Dose-Response Relationships in a Dietary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Lippke, Sonia; Corbet, Jana M; Lange, Daniela; Parschau, Linda; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral interventions could lead to changes in behavior through changes in a mediator. This dose-response relationship might only hold true for those participants who are actively engaged in interventions. This Internet study investigated the role of engagement in a planning intervention to promote fruit and vegetable consumption in addition to testing the intervention effect on planning and behavior. A sample of 701 adults (mean = 38.71 years, 81% women) were randomly assigned either to a planning intervention (experimental group) or to one of 2 control conditions (untreated waiting list control group or placebo active control group). Moderated mediation analyses were carried out. Significant changes over time and time × group effects revealed the effectiveness of the intervention. The effect of the intervention (time 1) on changes in behavior (time 3; 1 month after the personal deadline study participants set for themselves to start implementing their plans) was mediated by changes in planning (time 2; 1 week the personal deadline). Effects of planning on behavior were documented only at a moderate level of intervention engagement. This indicates an inverse U-shaped dose-response effect. Thus, examining participants' intervention engagement allows for a more careful evaluation of why some interventions work and others do not.

  5. The Dose Response Relationship between In Ear Occupational Noise Exposure and Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, Peter M.; Galusha, Deron; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Clougherty, Jane E.; Neitzel, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Current understanding of the dose-response relationship between occupational noise and hearing loss is based on cross-sectional studies prior to the widespread use hearing protection and with limited data regarding noise exposures below 85dBA. We report on the hearing loss experience of a unique cohort of industrial workers with daily monitoring of noise inside of hearing protection devices. Methods At an industrial facility, workers exhibiting accelerated hearing loss were enrolled in a mandatory program to monitor daily noise exposures inside of hearing protection. We compared these noise measurements (as time-weighted LAVG) to interval rates of high frequency hearing loss over a six year period using a mixed effects model, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Workers’ high frequency hearing levels at study inception averaged more than 40 dB hearing threshold level (HTL). Most noise exposures were less than 85dBA (mean LAVG 76 dBA, interquartile range 74 to 80 dBA). We found no statistical relationship between LAvg and high frequency hearing loss (p = 0.53). Using a metric for monthly maximum noise exposure did not improve model fit. Conclusion At-ear noise exposures below 85dBA did not show an association with risk of high frequency hearing loss among workers with substantial past noise exposure and hearing loss at baseline. Therefore, effective noise control to below 85dBA may lead to significant reduction in occupational hearing loss risk in such individuals. Further research is needed on the dose response relationship of noise and hearing loss in individuals with normal hearing and little prior noise exposure. PMID:23825197

  6. The dose-response relationship between in-ear occupational noise exposure and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, Peter M; Galusha, Deron; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Clougherty, Jane E; Neitzel, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Current understanding of the dose-response relationship between occupational noise and hearing loss is based on cross-sectional studies prior to the widespread use of hearing protection, and with limited data regarding noise exposures below 85 dBA. We report on the hearing loss experience of a unique cohort of industrial workers, with daily monitoring of noise inside of hearing protection devices. At an industrial facility, workers exhibiting accelerated hearing loss were enrolled in a mandatory programme to monitor daily noise exposures inside of hearing protection. We compared these noise measurements (as time-weighted LAVG) to interval rates of high-frequency hearing loss over a 6-year period using a mixed-effects model, adjusting for potential confounders. Workers' high-frequency hearing levels at study inception averaged more than 40 dB Hearing threshold level (HTL). Most noise exposures were less than 85 dBA (mean LAVG 76 dBA, IQR 74-80 dBA). We found no statistical relationship between LAvg and high-frequency hearing loss (p=0.53). Using a metric for monthly maximum noise exposure did not improve model fit. At-ear noise exposures below 85 dBA did not show an association with risk of high-frequency hearing loss among workers with substantial past noise exposure and hearing loss at baseline. Therefore, effective noise control to below 85 dBA may lead to significant reduction in occupational hearing loss risk in such individuals. Further research is needed on the dose-response relationship of noise and hearing loss in individuals with normal hearing and little prior noise exposure.

  7. Mass shootings: a meta-analysis of the dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Laura C

    2014-12-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to examine the dose-response theory as it relates to posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSSs) following mass shootings. It was hypothesized that greater exposure to a mass shooting would be associated with greater PTSSs. Trauma exposure in the current study was broadly defined as the extent to which a person experienced or learned about a mass shooting. The meta-analysis identified 11 qualifying studies that included 13 independent effect sizes from a total of 8,047 participants. The overall weighted mean effect size, based on a random effects model, was r = .19, p < .001, 95% CI [.13, .25]. Maximum likelihood meta-regressions revealed no significant linear effects of participant gender, participant age, or time elapsed since the shooting on the relationship between exposure and PTSSs. Because so few studies satisfied the inclusion criteria, the present study also documents that this area of the literature is underresearched.

  8. New flux based dose-response relationships for ozone for European forest tree species.

    PubMed

    Büker, P; Feng, Z; Uddling, J; Briolat, A; Alonso, R; Braun, S; Elvira, S; Gerosa, G; Karlsson, P E; Le Thiec, D; Marzuoli, R; Mills, G; Oksanen, E; Wieser, G; Wilkinson, M; Emberson, L D

    2015-11-01

    To derive O3 dose-response relationships (DRR) for five European forest trees species and broadleaf deciduous and needleleaf tree plant functional types (PFTs), phytotoxic O3 doses (PODy) were related to biomass reductions. PODy was calculated using a stomatal flux model with a range of cut-off thresholds (y) indicative of varying detoxification capacities. Linear regression analysis showed that DRR for PFT and individual tree species differed in their robustness. A simplified parameterisation of the flux model was tested and showed that for most non-Mediterranean tree species, this simplified model led to similarly robust DRR as compared to a species- and climate region-specific parameterisation. Experimentally induced soil water stress was not found to substantially reduce PODy, mainly due to the short duration of soil water stress periods. This study validates the stomatal O3 flux concept and represents a step forward in predicting O3 damage to forests in a spatially and temporally varying climate.

  9. Dose-response relationships between pollination and fruiting refine pollinator comparisons for cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon [Ericaceae]).

    PubMed

    Cane, James H; Schiffhauer, Daniel

    2003-10-01

    Comparisons of pollinator efficacy using pollen received on stigmas can be refined by incorporating experimental dose-response relationships for pollen deposition and fruiting responses. A range of discrete pollen doses applied to cranberry stigmas resulted in decelerating curvilinear responses for fruiting, berry size, and seed set. Minimum thresholds and maximum asymptotes bounded reproductive responses to incremental stigmatic pollen loads. Four bee species were compared for their pollination efficacies on commercial cranberries, using counts of pollen received by stigmas during single bee visits to previously virgin flowers. Differences between these bee species were found to be exaggerated when raw pollen counts were used for comparison because foragers of some species often delivered pollen in excess of that needed to maximize fruit and seed production. Sixfold differences between species in mean pollen deposition translated into 1.5-2-fold differences in predicted cranberry fruit set and size. Implications for pollen tube competition and agricultural production are discussed.

  10. Dose-response relationship for breast cancer induction at radiotherapy dose.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uwe; Sumila, Marcin; Robotka, Judith; Gruber, Günther; Mack, Andreas; Besserer, Jürgen

    2011-06-08

    Cancer induction after radiation therapy is known as a severe side effect. It is therefore of interest to predict the probability of second cancer appearance for the patient to be treated including breast cancer. In this work a dose-response relationship for breast cancer is derived based on(i) the analysis of breast cancer induction after Hodgkin's disease,(ii) a cancer risk model developed for high doses including fractionation based on the linear quadratic model, and(iii) the reconstruction of treatment plans for Hodgkin's patients treated with radiotherapy,(iv) the breast cancer induction of the A-bomb survivor data. The fitted model parameters for an α/β = 3 Gy were α = 0.067Gy-1 and R = 0.62. The risk for breast cancer is according to this model for small doses consistent with the finding of the A-bomb survivors, has a maximum at doses of around 20 Gy and drops off only slightly at larger doses. The predicted EAR for breast cancer after radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease is 11.7/10000PY which can be compared to the findings of several epidemiological studies where EAR for breast cancer varies between 10.5 and 29.4/10000PY. The model was used to predict the impact of the reduction of radiation volume on breast cancer risk. It was estimated that mantle field irradiation is associated with a 3.2-fold increased risk compared with mediastinal irradiation alone, which is in agreement with a published value of 2.7. It was also shown that the modelled age dependency of breast cancer risk is in satisfying agreement with published data. The dose-response relationship obtained in this report can be used for the prediction of radiation induced secondary breast cancer of radiotherapy patients.

  11. Shape and Steepness of Toxicological Dose-Response Relationships of Continuous Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    A re-analysis of a large number of historical dose-response data for continuous endpoints indicates that an exponential or a Hill model with four parameters both adequately describe toxicological dose-responses. The four parameters relate to the background response, the potency o...

  12. Shape and Steepness of Toxicological Dose-Response Relationships of Continuous Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    A re-analysis of a large number of historical dose-response data for continuous endpoints indicates that an exponential or a Hill model with four parameters both adequately describe toxicological dose-responses. The four parameters relate to the background response, the potency o...

  13. Western red cedar dust exposure and lung function: a dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Noertjojo, H K; Dimich-Ward, H; Peelen, S; Dittrick, M; Kennedy, S M; Chan-Yeung, M

    1996-10-01

    The relationship between levels of cumulative red cedar dust exposure and decline in lung function was explored in an 11-yr follow-up study of 243 sawmill workers who participated in at least two occasions. We also studied 140 office workers in a similar manner as control subjects. Workers with asthma were excluded from the analysis. During the period of the study, 916 personal and 216 area samples of dust were collected from the sawmill. Cumulative wood dust exposure was calculated for each sawmill worker according to the duration and exposure in each job, based on the geometric mean of all dust measurements for that job. Average daily dust exposure was calculated by dividing the total cumulative exposure by the number of days of work. Workers were divided into low-, medium-, and high-exposure groups with mean daily level of exposure of < 0.2, 0.2 to 0.4, and > 0.4 mg/m3, respectively. Sawmill workers had significantly greater declines in FEV1 and FVC compared with office workers adjusted for age, smoking, and initial lung function. A dose-response relationship was observed between the level of exposure and the annual decline in FVC. We conclude that exposure to Western red cedar dust is associated with a greater decline in lung function which may lead to development of chronic airflow limitation.

  14. Tests of the linear, no-threshold dose-response relationship for high-LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.L.

    1987-05-01

    It is pointed out that induction of lung cancer by exposure to Rn daughters, applied at high doses to miners and at low doses to exposures in homes, provides a very stringent and sensitive test of the linear, no-threshold dose-response relationship for high-LET radiation, because this relationship predicts that a substantial fraction of lung cancer among non-smokers is due to average Rn levels. Therefore, it predicts an easily observable elevation of lung cancer rates in areas where Rn levels are many times greater than the average, especially at times before cigarette smoking began to have important effects on lung cancer statistics. While more data are needed (and will be forthcoming), some of the early indications of these studies are reviewed here. Several cases are now known where average Rn levels are very high, and in all of these cases lung cancer rates are well below average. Methods for analyzing these data are discussed, and it is concluded that, based on current evidence, they indicate at least a factor of 4 disagreement with linear, no-threshold predictions.

  15. Generation of dose-response relationships to assess the effects of acidity in precipitation on growth and productivity of vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were performed with several plant species in natural environments as well in a greenhouse and/or tissue culture facilities to establish dose-response functions of plant responses to simulated acidic rain in order to determine environmental risk assessments to ambient levels of acidic rain. Response functions of foliar injury, biomass of leaves and seed of soybean and pinto beans, root yields of radishes and garden beets, and reproduction of bracken fern are considered. The dose-response function of soybean seed yields with the hydrogen ion concentration of simulated acidic rainfalls was expressed by the equation y = 21.06-1.01 log x where y = seed yield in grams per plant and x = the hydrogen concentration if ..mu..eq l/sup -1/. The correlation coefficient of this relationship was -0.90. A similar dose-response function was generated for percent fertilization of ferns in a forest understory. When percent fertilization is plotted on logarithmic scale with hydrogen ion concentration of the simulated rain solution, the Y intercept is 51.18, slope -0.041 with a correlation coefficient of -0.98. Other dose-response functions were generated that assist in a general knowledge as to which plant species and which physiological processes are most impacted by acidic precipitation. Some responses did not produce convenient dose-response relationships. In such cases the responses may be altered by other environmental factors or there may be no differences among treatment means.

  16. Dose-response relationships using brain–computer interface technology impact stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Young, Brittany M.; Nigogosyan, Zack; Walton, Léo M.; Remsik, Alexander; Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A.; Tyler, Mitchell E.; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Caldera, Kristin; Sattin, Justin A.; Williams, Justin C.; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) are an emerging novel technology for stroke rehabilitation. Little is known about how dose-response relationships for BCI therapies affect brain and behavior changes. We report preliminary results on stroke patients (n = 16, 11 M) with persistent upper extremity motor impairment who received therapy using a BCI system with functional electrical stimulation of the hand and tongue stimulation. We collected MRI scans and behavioral data using the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), 9-Hole Peg Test (9-HPT), and Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) before, during, and after the therapy period. Using anatomical and functional MRI, we computed Laterality Index (LI) for brain activity in the motor network during impaired hand finger tapping. Changes from baseline LI and behavioral scores were assessed for relationships with dose, intensity, and frequency of BCI therapy. We found that gains in SIS Strength were directly responsive to BCI therapy: therapy dose and intensity correlated positively with increased SIS Strength (p ≤ 0.05), although no direct relationships were identified with ARAT or 9-HPT scores. We found behavioral measures that were not directly sensitive to differences in BCI therapy administration but were associated with concurrent brain changes correlated with BCI therapy administration parameters: therapy dose and intensity showed significant (p ≤ 0.05) or trending (0.05 < p < 0.1) negative correlations with LI changes, while therapy frequency did not affect LI. Reductions in LI were then correlated (p ≤ 0.05) with increased SIS Activities of Daily Living scores and improved 9-HPT performance. Therefore, some behavioral changes may be reflected by brain changes sensitive to differences in BCI therapy administration, while others such as SIS Strength may be directly responsive to BCI therapy administration. Data preliminarily suggest that when using BCI in stroke rehabilitation, therapy frequency may be less important than dose

  17. Examining the exercise-affect dose-response relationship: does duration influence frontal EEG asymmetry?

    PubMed

    Woo, Minjung; Kim, Sungwoon; Kim, Jingu; Petruzzello, Steven J; Hatfield, Bradley D

    2009-05-01

    The "feel better" effect of exercise has been well established, but the specific influence of exercise duration on affect has not been systematically studied from a multi-level measurement approach. Such an approach offers the opportunity to assess psychophysiological responses that relate to psychological state. One relevant response is the change in frontal brain processes indexed by anterior EEG asymmetry, which is related to approach-withdrawal orientation and affective state [Davidson, R.J., 1993. Cerebral asymmetry and emotion: conceptual and methodological conundrums. Cogn. Emot. 7, 138; Davidson, R.J., 1998. Anterior electrophysiological asymmetries, emotion, and depression: Conceptual and methodological conundrums. Psychophysiology 35(5), 607-614.]. To examine the relationship between exercise duration and affective response, as well as the role of frontal brain processes in this relationship, female undergraduate students (N=16, VO(2) max=35.93 ml kg(-1) min(-1), aged 19-23 yrs) were assessed for frontal EEG and self-reported affective responses, as measured by the Profile of Mood States (POMS), following rest and three different durations of exercise (15, 30 and 45 min) performed at a standardized intensity (i.e., just below the ventilatory threshold (VT)). Psychological vigor and frontal EEG asymmetry following exercise of 30 min were elevated compared to that observed following rest and other exercise durations (i.e., 15, 45 min). The results support a dose-response relationship between exercise duration and affect characterized by an inverted-U. Furthermore, the covariance analysis, conducted to assess the role of cortical activation at the homologous sites in the post-exercise affective response, suggests that the enhanced vigor observed after 30 min of exercise results from the reduction of withdrawal-oriented processes rather than the facilitation of approach-oriented processes.

  18. Dose-response relationships using brain-computer interface technology impact stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Young, Brittany M; Nigogosyan, Zack; Walton, Léo M; Remsik, Alexander; Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A; Tyler, Mitchell E; Edwards, Dorothy F; Caldera, Kristin; Sattin, Justin A; Williams, Justin C; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are an emerging novel technology for stroke rehabilitation. Little is known about how dose-response relationships for BCI therapies affect brain and behavior changes. We report preliminary results on stroke patients (n = 16, 11 M) with persistent upper extremity motor impairment who received therapy using a BCI system with functional electrical stimulation of the hand and tongue stimulation. We collected MRI scans and behavioral data using the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), 9-Hole Peg Test (9-HPT), and Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) before, during, and after the therapy period. Using anatomical and functional MRI, we computed Laterality Index (LI) for brain activity in the motor network during impaired hand finger tapping. Changes from baseline LI and behavioral scores were assessed for relationships with dose, intensity, and frequency of BCI therapy. We found that gains in SIS Strength were directly responsive to BCI therapy: therapy dose and intensity correlated positively with increased SIS Strength (p ≤ 0.05), although no direct relationships were identified with ARAT or 9-HPT scores. We found behavioral measures that were not directly sensitive to differences in BCI therapy administration but were associated with concurrent brain changes correlated with BCI therapy administration parameters: therapy dose and intensity showed significant (p ≤ 0.05) or trending (0.05 < p < 0.1) negative correlations with LI changes, while therapy frequency did not affect LI. Reductions in LI were then correlated (p ≤ 0.05) with increased SIS Activities of Daily Living scores and improved 9-HPT performance. Therefore, some behavioral changes may be reflected by brain changes sensitive to differences in BCI therapy administration, while others such as SIS Strength may be directly responsive to BCI therapy administration. Data preliminarily suggest that when using BCI in stroke rehabilitation, therapy frequency may be less important than dose and

  19. Dose-response relationships for female radium dial workers: A new look

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, R.E.

    1994-05-01

    The values of initial systemic intake and of skeletal dose for all of the U.S. radium cases have recently been revised. This revision was required following the demonstrations by Rundo and by Keane that humans who were exposed to radium as adults lost radium at a rate that depended on the quantity of radium originally deposited within their bodies. These new values have been used to define new dose-response relationships for both the bone sarcomas and the carcinomas arising in the paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells induced by internally deposited radium. The population examined was employed in the U.S. dial painting industry prior to 1950 and consisted of 1530 female dial workers for whom radium body burden measurements were available. By the end of 1990, 46 cases of bone sarcomas and 19 cases of head carcinomas had been diagnosed in this cohort. The head carcinoma incidence can be adequately fitted by a simple linear function, as was found in previous analyses. The bone sarcoma cases were previously fitted by a dose-squared-exponential function. With the revised values of systemic intake, the sarcoma results could not be satisfactorily fitted with this expression. When the exponent on D was increased to larger values, excellent fits were obtained.

  20. A rat model for dose-response relationships of Salmonella Enteritidis infection.

    PubMed

    Havelaar, A H; Garssen, J; Takumi, K; Koedam, M A; Dufrenne, J B; van Leusden, F M; de La Fonteyne, L; Bousema, J T; Vos, J G

    2001-09-01

    To develop an animal model to study dose-response relationships of enteropathogenic bacteria. Adult, male Wistar Unilever rats were exposed orally to different doses of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis after overnight starvation and neutralization of gastric acid by sodium bicarbonate. The spleen was the most sensitive and reproducible organ for detection of dose-dependent systemic infection. Illness was only observed in animals exposed to doses of 10(8) cfu or more. At lower doses, histopathological changes in the gastro-intestinal tract were observed, but these were not accompanied by illness. Marked changes in numbers and types of white blood cells, as well as delayed-type hyperresponsiveness, indicated a strong, dose-dependent cellular immune response to Salm. Enteritidis. The rat model is a sensitive and reproducible tool for studying the effects of oral exposure to Salm. Enteritidis over a wide dose range. The rat model allows controlled quantification of different factors related to the host, pathogen and food matrix on initial stages of infection by food-borne bacterial pathogens.

  1. Standard error of inverse prediction for dose-response relationship: approximate and exact statistical inference.

    PubMed

    Demidenko, Eugene; Williams, Benjamin B; Flood, Ann Barry; Swartz, Harold M

    2013-05-30

    This paper develops a new metric, the standard error of inverse prediction (SEIP), for a dose-response relationship (calibration curve) when dose is estimated from response via inverse regression. SEIP can be viewed as a generalization of the coefficient of variation to regression problem when x is predicted using y-value. We employ nonstandard statistical methods to treat the inverse prediction, which has an infinite mean and variance due to the presence of a normally distributed variable in the denominator. We develop confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for SEIP on the basis of the normal approximation and using the exact statistical inference based on the noncentral t-distribution. We derive the power functions for both approaches and test them via statistical simulations. The theoretical SEIP, as the ratio of the regression standard error to the slope, is viewed as reciprocal of the signal-to-noise ratio, a popular measure of signal processing. The SEIP, as a figure of merit for inverse prediction, can be used for comparison of calibration curves with different dependent variables and slopes. We illustrate our theory with electron paramagnetic resonance tooth dosimetry for a rapid estimation of the radiation dose received in the event of nuclear terrorism.

  2. Influence of image slice thickness on rectal dose-response relationships following radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, C.; Thor, M.; Liu, M.; Moissenko, V.; Petersen, S. E.; Høyer, M.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2014-07-01

    When pooling retrospective data from different cohorts, slice thicknesses of acquired computed tomography (CT) images used for treatment planning may vary between cohorts. It is, however, not known if varying slice thickness influences derived dose-response relationships. We investigated this for rectal bleeding using dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum and rectal wall for dose distributions superimposed on images with varying CT slice thicknesses. We used dose and endpoint data from two prostate cancer cohorts treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to either 74 Gy (N = 159) or 78 Gy (N = 159) at 2 Gy per fraction. The rectum was defined as the whole organ with content, and the morbidity cut-off was Grade ≥2 late rectal bleeding. Rectal walls were defined as 3 mm inner margins added to the rectum. DVHs for simulated slice thicknesses from 3 to 13 mm were compared to DVHs for the originally acquired slice thicknesses at 3 and 5 mm. Volumes, mean, and maximum doses were assessed from the DVHs, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. For each organ and each of the simulated slice thicknesses, we performed predictive modeling of late rectal bleeding using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. For the most coarse slice thickness, rectal volumes increased (≤18%), whereas maximum and mean doses decreased (≤0.8 and ≤4.2 Gy, respectively). For all a values, the gEUD for the simulated DVHs were ≤1.9 Gy different than the gEUD for the original DVHs. The best-fitting LKB model parameter values with 95% CIs were consistent between all DVHs. In conclusion, we found that the investigated slice thickness variations had minimal impact on rectal dose-response estimations. From the perspective of predictive modeling, our results suggest that variations within 10 mm in slice thickness between cohorts are unlikely to be a limiting factor when pooling multi-institutional rectal dose data that include slice thickness

  3. Dose-response relationship between sports activity and musculoskeletal pain in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Masamitsu; Abe, Takafumi; Kitayuguchi, Jun; Imamura, Fumiaki; Lee, I-Min; Kadowaki, Masaru; Sawada, Susumu S; Miyachi, Motohiko; Matsui, Yuzuru; Uchio, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    Physical activity has multiple health benefits but may also increase the risk of developing musculoskeletal pain (MSP). However, the relationship between physical activity and MSP has not been well characterized. This study examined the dose-response relationship between sports activity and MSP among adolescents. Two school-based serial surveys were conducted 1 year apart in adolescents aged 12 to 18 years in Unnan, Japan. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by 2403 students. Associations between time spent in organized sports activity and MSP were analyzed cross-sectionally (n = 2403) and longitudinally (n = 374, students free of pain and in seventh or 10th grade at baseline) with repeated-measures Poisson regression and restricted cubic splines, with adjustment for potential confounders. The prevalence of overall pain, defined as having pain recently at least several times a week in at least one part of the body, was 27.4%. In the cross-sectional analysis, sports activity was significantly associated with pain prevalence. Each additional 1 h/wk of sports activity was associated with a 3% higher probability of having pain (prevalence ratio = 1.03, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.04). Similar trends were found across causes (traumatic and nontraumatic pain) and anatomic locations (upper limbs, lower back, and lower limbs). In longitudinal analysis, the risk ratio for developing pain at 1-year follow-up per 1 h/wk increase in baseline sports activity was 1.03 (95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.05). Spline models indicated a linear association (P < 0.001) but not a nonlinear association (P ≥ 0.45). The more the adolescents played sports, the more likely they were to have and develop pain.

  4. Lead-induced anemia: Dose-response relationships and evidence for a threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.; Landrigan, P.J.; Baker, E.L. Jr.; Orenstein, W.A.; von Lindern, I.H. )

    1990-02-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional epidemiologic study to assess the association between blood lead level and hematocrit in 579 one to five year-old children living near a primary lead smelter in 1974. Blood lead levels ranged from 0.53 to 7.91 mumol/L (11 to 164 micrograms/dl). To predict hematocrit as a function of blood lead level and age, we derived non-linear regression models and fit percentile curves. We used logistic regression to predict the probability of hematocrit values less than 35 per cent. We found a strong non-linear, dose-response relationship between blood lead level and hematocrit. This relationship was influenced by age, but (in this age group) not by sex; the effect was strongest in youngest children. In one year-olds, the age group most severely affected, the risk of an hematocrit value below 35 percent was 2 percent above background at blood lead levels between 0.97 and 1.88 mumol/L (20 and 39 micrograms/dl), 18 percent above background at lead levels of 1.93 to 2.85 mumol/L (40 to 59 micrograms/dl), and 40 percent above background at lead levels of 2.9 mumol/L (60 micrograms/dl) and greater; background was defined as a blood lead level below 1.88 mumol/L (20 micrograms/dl). This effect appeared independent of iron deficiency. These findings suggest that blood lead levels close to the currently recommended limit value of 1.21 mumol/L (25 micrograms/dl) are associated with dose-related depression of hematocrit in young children.

  5. Exercise volume and intensity: a dose-response relationship with health benefits.

    PubMed

    Foulds, Heather J A; Bredin, Shannon S D; Charlesworth, Sarah A; Ivey, Adam C; Warburton, Darren E R

    2014-08-01

    The health benefits of exercise are well established. However, the relationship between exercise volume and intensity and health benefits remains unclear, particularly the benefits of low-volume and intensity exercise. The primary purpose of this investigation was, therefore, to examine the dose-response relationship between exercise volume and intensity with derived health benefits including volumes and intensity of activity well below international recommendations. Generally healthy, active participants (n = 72; age = 44 ± 13 years) were assigned randomly to control (n = 10) or one of five 13-week exercise programs: (1) 10-min brisk walking 1×/week (n = 10), (2) 10-min brisk walking 3×/week (n = 10), (3) 30-min brisk walking 3×/week (n = 18), (4) 60-min brisk walking 3×/week (n = 10), and (5) 30-min running 3×/week (n = 14), in addition to their regular physical activity. Health measures evaluated pre- and post-training including blood pressure, body composition, fasting lipids and glucose, and maximal aerobic power (VO2max). Health improvements were observed among programs at least 30 min in duration, including body composition and VO2max: 30-min walking 28.8-34.5 mL kg(-1) min(-1), 60-min walking 25.1-28.9 mL kg(-1) min(-1), and 30-min running 32.4-36.4 mL kg(-1) min(-1). The greater intensity running program also demonstrated improvements in triglycerides. In healthy active individuals, a physical activity program of at least 30 min in duration for three sessions/per week is associated with consistent improvements in health status.

  6. Teenage and adult tonsillectomy: dose-response relationship between diathermy energy used and morbidity.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, A A J; Hallikeri, C; Lawrence, H; Sankar, V; Hargreaves, S

    2007-10-01

    To determine whether an increase in the use of bipolar diathermy energy to perform a tonsillectomy is associated with an increase in postoperative pain and haemorrhage. Prospective study. District General Hospital. In all, 101 patients above the age of 13 years who underwent a tonsillectomy that involved the use of bipolar diathermy during the study period were included. The cumulative amount of diathermy energy used to perform each tonsillectomy was calculated with the help of a digital stop clock timing device connected to the diathermy foot-pedal. Postoperative pain scores and the incidence of secondary haemorrhage were recorded for each patient at four points in time following surgery, up to the tenth postoperative day. The haemorrhage rates were categorised into three groups (no bleeding, minor bleeding and major bleeding) according to severity. Associations between the diathermy energy used to perform each tonsillectomy and the corresponding postoperative pain scores and secondary bleeding rates were investigated. There was a statistically significant positive relationship between the total amount of bipolar diathermy energy used per tonsillectomy and the pain scores at all the four recorded points in time (r(s) = 0.44-0.72, P < 0.001). When the median energy consumption in the three groups (no bleeding, minor bleeding and major bleeding) were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test, we found that there was limited evidence of a difference between the groups, but this was not statistically significant at the 5% level [H (2) = 5.374, P = 0.065, 99% CI 0.058-0.071]. Increased use of bipolar diathermy during the performance of a tonsillectomy is associated with a statistically significant increased amount of postoperative pain. The dose-response relationship between diathermy energy and postoperative bleeding is less clear. This suggests that there could be other important factors such as surgical instrument characteristics and degree of tonsillar adherence that

  7. A resource conservative procedure for comparison of dose-response relationships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Hill, E.F.; Hines, J.E.; Henry, P.F.P.

    1996-01-01

    The evaluation of effects of toxicants on a wildlife community can be complicated by varying responses among the community's constituent populations. Even within populations, considerable variability in dose-response relations may result from different avenues of exposure to the toxicant. Full scale investigations of the dose-response relations among a variety of species and avenues of exposure can therefore be prohibitively expensive, whether this expense is measured by the number of experimental animals needed, by the human resources committed to the study, or by laboratory expenses. We propose an abbreviated protocol for investigations of multiple dose-response relations that is designed to limit these expenses. The protocol begins with the judicious choice of a baseline dose-response relation to be estimated by a full scale study involving a minimum of 5 doses levels, with 10 subjects per dose level. This relation is then used as the basis for rapid screening of subsequent dose-response relations, which are compared to the baseline relation by testing for differences in the median effective dosages. These secondary studies can consist of as few as 14 animals exposed to the estimated LC50 from the baseline study. We describe MS-DOS compatible software available from the authors which can be used to analyze these data.

  8. Dose-response relationship of autonomic nervous system responses to individualized training impulse in marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Vincenzo; Castagna, Carlo; Padua, Elvira; Lombardo, Mauro; D'Ottavio, Stefano; Massaro, Michele; Volterrani, Maurizio; Iellamo, Ferdinando

    2009-06-01

    In athletes, exercise training induces autonomic nervous system (ANS) adaptations that could be used to monitor training status. However, the relationship between training and ANS in athletes has been investigated without regard for individual training loads. We tested the hypothesis that in long-distance athletes, changes in ANS parameters are dose-response related to individual volume/intensity training load and could predict athletic performance. A spectral analysis of heart rate (HR), systolic arterial pressure variability, and baroreflex sensitivity by the sequences technique was investigated in eight recreational athletes during a 6-mo training period culminating with a marathon. Individualized training load responses were monitored by a modified training impulse (TRIMP(i)) method, which was determined in each athlete using the individual HR and lactate profiling determined during a treadmill test. Monthly TRIMP(i) steadily increased during the training period. All the ANS parameters were significantly and very highly correlated to the dose of exercise with a second-order regression model (r(2) ranged from 0.90 to 0.99; P < 0.001). Variance, high-frequency oscillations of HR variability (HRV), and baroreflex sensitivity resembled a bell-shaped curve with a minimum at the highest TRIMP(i), whereas low-frequency oscillations of HR and systolic arterial pressure variability and the low frequency (LF)-to-high frequency ratio resembled an U-shaped curve with a maximum at the highest TRIMP(i). The LF component of HRV assessed at the last recording session was significantly and inversely correlated to the time needed to complete the nearing marathon. These results suggest that in recreational athletes, ANS adaptations to exercise training are dose related on an individual basis, showing a progressive shift toward a sympathetic predominance, and that LF oscillations in HRV at peak training load could predict athletic achievement in this athlete population.

  9. Dose-response relationship for α-tocopherol prevention of ultraviolet radiation induced cataract in rat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Löfgren, Stefan; Dong, Xiuqin; Galichanin, Konstantin; Söderberg, Per G

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish the dose response relationship for α-tocopherol protection of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induced cataract in the rat. Four groups of 20 six-week-old albino Sprague Dawley rats received 5, 25, 50, and 100 IU/day α-tocopherol, whilst another group of 20 rats without any α-tocopherol feeding was the control group. After 4 weeks of feeding, each rat was unilaterally exposed to 8 kJ/m(2) UVR-300 nm for 15 min. At 1 week after exposure, the rats were sacrificed and lens light scattering was measured quantitatively. Lens total reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione; glutathione reductase (GR) and peroxidase (GPx) were determined spectrophotometrically. The UVR-exposed lenses in the α-tocopherol fed groups developed superficial cataract, whereas lenses in the control group developed cortical and equatorial opacities. Light scattering in lenses from the α-tocopherol-supplemented rats was lower than in lenses from the control group. The difference of light scattering between the exposed and contralateral non-exposed lens decreased with increasing doses of α-tocopherol to an asymptote level. UVR-exposure caused a significant depletion of lens GSH in rats without or at low α-tocopherol supplementation. The depletion of GSH became less with higher α-tocopherol supplementation. There was no detectable difference in lens GSSG, GR or GPx at any level of α-tocopherol supplementation. Orally administered α-tocopherol dose dependently protects against UVR-induced cataract. The protection is associated with an α-tocopherol dose-dependent GSH depletion secondary to UVR exposure. UVR-induced light scattering only occurs if the GSH depletion exceeds a threshold.

  10. Leisure time physical activity and mortality: a detailed pooled analysis of the dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Arem, Hannah; Moore, Steven C; Patel, Alpa; Hartge, Patricia; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Visvanathan, Kala; Campbell, Peter T; Freedman, Michal; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Adami, Hans Olov; Linet, Martha S; Lee, I-Min; Matthews, Charles E

    2015-06-01

    , 0.69 [95% CI, 0.59-0.78]). A similar dose-response relationship was observed for mortality due to cardiovascular disease and to cancer. Meeting the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans minimum by either moderate- or vigorous-intensity activities was associated with nearly the maximum longevity benefit. We observed a benefit threshold at approximately 3 to 5 times the recommended leisure time physical activity minimum and no excess risk at 10 or more times the minimum. In regard to mortality, health care professionals should encourage inactive adults to perform leisure time physical activity and do not need to discourage adults who already participate in high-activity levels.

  11. Development of Dose-Response Models to Predict the Relationship for Human Toxoplasma gondii Infection Associated with Meat Consumption.

    PubMed

    Guo, Miao; Mishra, Abhinav; Buchanan, Robert L; Dubey, Jitender P; Hill, Dolores E; Gamble, H Ray; Jones, Jeffrey L; Du, Xianzhi; Pradhan, Abani K

    2016-05-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite that is responsible for approximately 24% of deaths attributed to foodborne pathogens in the United States. It is thought that a substantial portion of human T. gondii infections is acquired through the consumption of meats. The dose-response relationship for human exposures to T. gondii-infected meat is unknown because no human data are available. The goal of this study was to develop and validate dose-response models based on animal studies, and to compute scaling factors so that animal-derived models can predict T. gondii infection in humans. Relevant studies in literature were collected and appropriate studies were selected based on animal species, stage, genotype of T. gondii, and route of infection. Data were pooled and fitted to four sigmoidal-shaped mathematical models, and model parameters were estimated using maximum likelihood estimation. Data from a mouse study were selected to develop the dose-response relationship. Exponential and beta-Poisson models, which predicted similar responses, were selected as reasonable dose-response models based on their simplicity, biological plausibility, and goodness fit. A confidence interval of the parameter was determined by constructing 10,000 bootstrap samples. Scaling factors were computed by matching the predicted infection cases with the epidemiological data. Mouse-derived models were validated against data for the dose-infection relationship in rats. A human dose-response model was developed as P (d) = 1-exp (-0.0015 × 0.005 × d) or P (d) = 1-(1 + d × 0.003 / 582.414)(-1.479) . Both models predict the human response after consuming T. gondii-infected meats, and provide an enhanced risk characterization in a quantitative microbial risk assessment model for this pathogen.

  12. Dose-response relationship between hand-transmitted vibration and hand-arm vibration syndrome in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Su, Anselm Ting; Maeda, Setsuo; Fukumoto, Jin; Darus, Azlan; Hoe, Victor C W; Miyai, Nobuyuki; Isahak, Marzuki; Takemura, Shigeki; Bulgiba, Awang; Yoshimasu, Kouichi; Miyashita, Kazuhisa

    2013-07-01

    The dose-response relationship for hand-transmitted vibration has been investigated extensively in temperate environments. Since the clinical features of hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) differ between the temperate and tropical environment, we conducted this study to investigate the dose-response relationship of HAVS in a tropical environment. A total of 173 male construction, forestry and automobile manufacturing plant workers in Malaysia were recruited into this study between August 2011 and 2012. The participants were interviewed for history of vibration exposure and HAVS symptoms, followed by hand functions evaluation and vibration measurement. Three types of vibration doses-lifetime vibration dose (LVD), total operating time (TOT) and cumulative exposure index (CEI)-were calculated and its log values were regressed against the symptoms of HAVS. The correlation between each vibration exposure dose and the hand function evaluation results was obtained. The adjusted prevalence ratio for finger tingling and numbness was 3.34 (95% CI 1.27 to 8.98) for subjects with lnLVD≥20 ln m(2) s(-4) against those <16 ln m(2) s(-4). Similar dose-response pattern was found for CEI but not for TOT. No subject reported white finger. The prevalence of finger coldness did not increase with any of the vibration doses. Vibrotactile perception thresholds correlated moderately with lnLVD and lnCEI. The dose-response relationship of HAVS in a tropical environment is valid for finger tingling and numbness. The LVD and CEI are more useful than TOT when evaluating the dose-response pattern of a heterogeneous group of vibratory tools workers.

  13. DOSE -RESPONSE RELATIONSHIP OF CRUDE COBRA VENOM (NAJA JANA) IN THE DOG

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The study was conducted to determine the dose - response effects of crude cobra venom (Naja naja) in the anesthetized dog. It was concluded that the LD50 is about 0.105 mg/kg, and the LD99 is 0.148 mg/kg.

  14. Radiation Dose-Response Relationship for Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Survivors of Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    van Nimwegen, Frederika A; Schaapveld, Michael; Cutter, David J; Janus, Cècile P M; Krol, Augustinus D G; Hauptmann, Michael; Kooijman, Karen; Roesink, Judith; van der Maazen, Richard; Darby, Sarah C; Aleman, Berthe M P; van Leeuwen, Flora E

    2016-01-20

    Cardiovascular diseases are increasingly recognized as late effects of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treatment. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) and to quantify the effects of radiation dose to the heart, chemotherapy, and other cardiovascular risk factors. We conducted a nested case-control study in a cohort of 2,617 5-year HL survivors, treated between 1965 and 1995. Cases were patients diagnosed with CHD as their first cardiovascular event after HL. Detailed treatment information was collected from medical records of 325 cases and 1,204 matched controls. Radiation charts and simulation radiographs were used to estimate in-field heart volume and mean heart dose (MHD). A risk factor questionnaire was sent to patients still alive. The median interval between HL and CHD was 19.0 years. Risk of CHD increased linearly with increasing MHD (excess relative risk [ERR]) per Gray, 7.4%; 95% CI, 3.3% to 14.8%). This results in a 2.5-fold increased risk of CHD for patients receiving a MHD of 20 Gy from mediastinal radiotherapy, compared with patients not treated with mediastinal radiotherapy. ERRs seemed to decrease with each tertile of age at treatment (ERR/Gy(<27.5years), 20.0%; ERR/Gy(27.5-36.4years), 8.8%; ERR/Gy(36.5-50.9years), 4.2%; P(interaction) = .149). Having ≥ 1 classic CHD risk factor (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, or hypercholesterolemia) independently increased CHD risk (rate ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.1). A high level of physical activity was associated with decreased CHD risk (rate ratio, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.8). The linear radiation dose-response relationship identified can be used to predict CHD risk for future HL patients and survivors. Appropriate early management of CHD risk factors and stimulation of physical activity may reduce CHD risk in HL survivors. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man - I. Gustatory tissues response during photon and neutron radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1982-08-01

    Quantitative radiation dose-response curves for normal gustatory tissue in man were studied. Taste function, expressed as taste loss, was evaluated in 84 patients who were given either photon or neutron radiotherapy for tumors in the head and neck region. Patients were treated to average tumor doses of 6600 cGy (photon) or 2200 cGy intervals for photon patients and 320-cGy intervals for neutron patients during radiotherapy. The dose-response curves for photons and neutrons were analyzed by fitting a four-parameter logistic equation to the data. Photon and neutron curves differed principally in their relative position along the dose axis. Comparison of the dose-response curves were made by determination of RBE. At 320 cGy, the lowest neutron dose at which taste measurements were made, RBE = 5.7. If this RBE is correct, then the therapeutic gain factor may be equal to or less than 1, indicating no biological advantage in using neutrons over photons for this normal tissue. These studies suggest measurements of taste function and evaluation of dose-response relationships may also be useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficacy of chemical modifiers of radiation response such as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and radioprotectors.

  16. Modeling dose-response relationships of the effects of fesoterodine in patients with overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Linda; Khullar, Vik; El-Tahtawy, Ahmed; Guan, Zhonghong; Malhotra, Bimal; Staskin, David

    2010-08-19

    Fesoterodine is an antimuscarinic for the treatment of overactive bladder, a syndrome of urgency, with or without urgency urinary incontinence (UUI), usually with increased daytime frequency and nocturia. Our objective was to develop predictive models to describe the dose response of fesoterodine. Data from subjects enrolled in double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II and III trials were used for developing longitudinal dose-response models. The models predicted that clinically significant and near-maximum treatment effects would be seen within 3 to 4 weeks after treatment initiation. For a typical patient with 11 micturitions per 24 hours at baseline, predicted change was -1.2, -1.7, and -2.2 micturitions for placebo and fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg, respectively. For a typical patient with 2 UUI episodes per 24 hours at baseline, predicted change was -1.05, -1.26, and -1.43 UUI episodes for placebo and fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg, respectively. Increase in mean voided volume was estimated at 9.7 mL for placebo, with an additional 14.2 mL and 28.4 mL for fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg, respectively. A consistent dose response for fesoterodine was demonstrated for bladder diary endpoints in subjects with overactive bladder, a result that supports the greater efficacy seen with fesoterodine 8 mg in post hoc analyses of clinical trial data. The dose-response models can be used to predict outcomes for doses not studied or for patient subgroups underrepresented in clinical trials. The phase III trials used in this analysis have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00220363 and NCT00138723).

  17. Modeling dose-response relationships of the effects of fesoterodine in patients with overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fesoterodine is an antimuscarinic for the treatment of overactive bladder, a syndrome of urgency, with or without urgency urinary incontinence (UUI), usually with increased daytime frequency and nocturia. Our objective was to develop predictive models to describe the dose response of fesoterodine. Methods Data from subjects enrolled in double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II and III trials were used for developing longitudinal dose-response models. Results The models predicted that clinically significant and near-maximum treatment effects would be seen within 3 to 4 weeks after treatment initiation. For a typical patient with 11 micturitions per 24 hours at baseline, predicted change was -1.2, -1.7, and -2.2 micturitions for placebo and fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg, respectively. For a typical patient with 2 UUI episodes per 24 hours at baseline, predicted change was -1.05, -1.26, and -1.43 UUI episodes for placebo and fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg, respectively. Increase in mean voided volume was estimated at 9.7 mL for placebo, with an additional 14.2 mL and 28.4 mL for fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg, respectively. Conclusions A consistent dose response for fesoterodine was demonstrated for bladder diary endpoints in subjects with overactive bladder, a result that supports the greater efficacy seen with fesoterodine 8 mg in post hoc analyses of clinical trial data. The dose-response models can be used to predict outcomes for doses not studied or for patient subgroups underrepresented in clinical trials. Trial Registration The phase III trials used in this analysis have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00220363 and NCT00138723). PMID:20723260

  18. Dose-response relationship for light intensity and ocular and electroencephalographic correlates of human alertness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Zeitzer, J. M.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Light can elicit both circadian and acute physiological responses in humans. In a dose response protocol men and women were exposed to illuminances ranging from 3 to 9100 lux for 6.5 h during the early biological night after they had been exposed to <3 lux for several hours. Light exerted an acute alerting response as assessed by a reduction in the incidence of slow-eye movements, a reduction of EEG activity in the theta-alpha frequencies (power density in the 5-9 Hz range) as well as a reduction in self-reported sleepiness. This alerting response was positively correlated with the degree of melatonin suppression by light. In accordance with the dose response function for circadian resetting and melatonin suppression, the responses of all three indices of alertness to variations in illuminance were consistent with a logistic dose response curve. Half of the maximum alerting response to bright light of 9100 lux was obtained with room light of approximately 100 lux. This sensitivity to light indicates that variations in illuminance within the range of typical, ambient, room light (90-180 lux) can have a significant impact on subjective alertness and its electrophysiologic concomitants in humans during the early biological night.

  19. Dose-response relationship for light intensity and ocular and electroencephalographic correlates of human alertness.

    PubMed

    Cajochen, C; Zeitzer, J M; Czeisler, C A; Dijk, D J

    2000-10-01

    Light can elicit both circadian and acute physiological responses in humans. In a dose response protocol men and women were exposed to illuminances ranging from 3 to 9100 lux for 6.5 h during the early biological night after they had been exposed to <3 lux for several hours. Light exerted an acute alerting response as assessed by a reduction in the incidence of slow-eye movements, a reduction of EEG activity in the theta-alpha frequencies (power density in the 5-9 Hz range) as well as a reduction in self-reported sleepiness. This alerting response was positively correlated with the degree of melatonin suppression by light. In accordance with the dose response function for circadian resetting and melatonin suppression, the responses of all three indices of alertness to variations in illuminance were consistent with a logistic dose response curve. Half of the maximum alerting response to bright light of 9100 lux was obtained with room light of approximately 100 lux. This sensitivity to light indicates that variations in illuminance within the range of typical, ambient, room light (90-180 lux) can have a significant impact on subjective alertness and its electrophysiologic concomitants in humans during the early biological night.

  20. Dose-response relationship for light intensity and ocular and electroencephalographic correlates of human alertness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Zeitzer, J. M.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Light can elicit both circadian and acute physiological responses in humans. In a dose response protocol men and women were exposed to illuminances ranging from 3 to 9100 lux for 6.5 h during the early biological night after they had been exposed to <3 lux for several hours. Light exerted an acute alerting response as assessed by a reduction in the incidence of slow-eye movements, a reduction of EEG activity in the theta-alpha frequencies (power density in the 5-9 Hz range) as well as a reduction in self-reported sleepiness. This alerting response was positively correlated with the degree of melatonin suppression by light. In accordance with the dose response function for circadian resetting and melatonin suppression, the responses of all three indices of alertness to variations in illuminance were consistent with a logistic dose response curve. Half of the maximum alerting response to bright light of 9100 lux was obtained with room light of approximately 100 lux. This sensitivity to light indicates that variations in illuminance within the range of typical, ambient, room light (90-180 lux) can have a significant impact on subjective alertness and its electrophysiologic concomitants in humans during the early biological night.

  1. Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat M.F. Hughes1, D.G. Ross1, J.M. Starr1, E.J. Scollon1,2, M.J. Wolansky1,3, K.M. Crofton1, M.J. DeVito1,4 1U.S. EPA, ORD, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2U.S. EPA,...

  2. The dose-response relationship between cumulative lifting load and lumbar disk degeneration based on magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Ju; Shih, Tiffany T-F; Chen, Bang-Bin; Hwang, Yaw-Huei; Ma, Li-Ping; Huang, Wen-Chuan; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Ho, Ing-Kang; Guo, Yue L

    2014-11-01

    Lumbar disk degeneration (LDD) has been related to heavy physical loading. However, the quantification of the exposure has been controversial, and the dose-response relationship with the LDD has not been established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-response relationship between lifetime cumulative lifting load and LDD. This was a cross-sectional study. Every participant received assessments with a questionnaire, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine, and estimation of lumbar disk compression load. The MRI assessments included assessment of disk dehydration, annulus tear, disk height narrowing, bulging, protrusion, extrusion, sequestration, degenerative and spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, foramina narrowing, and nerve root compression on each lumbar disk level. The compression load was predicted using a biomechanical software system. A total of 553 participants were recruited in this study and categorized into tertiles by cumulative lifting load (ie, <4.0 × 10(5), 4.0 × 10(5) to 8.9 × 10(6), and ≥8.9 × 10(6) Nh). The risk of LDD increased with cumulative lifting load. The best dose-response relationships were found at the L5-S1 disk level, in which high cumulative lifting load was associated with elevated odds ratios of 2.5 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]=1.5, 4.1) for dehydration and 4.1 (95% CI=1.9, 10.1) for disk height narrowing compared with low lifting load. Participants exposed to intermediate lifting load had an increased odds ratio of 2.1 (95% CI=1.3, 3.3) for bulging compared with low lifting load. The tests for trend were significant. There is no "gold standard" assessment tool for measuring the lumbar compression load. The results suggest a dose-response relationship between cumulative lifting load and LDD. © 2014 American Physical Therapy Association.

  3. Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat M.F. Hughes1, D.G. Ross1, J.M. Starr1, E.J. Scollon1,2, M.J. Wolansky1,3, K.M. Crofton1, M.J. DeVito1,4 1U.S. EPA, ORD, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2U.S. EPA,...

  4. Linear and non-linear dose-response functions reveal a hormetic relationship between stress and learning.

    PubMed

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Diamond, David M

    2008-10-16

    Over a century of behavioral research has shown that stress can enhance or impair learning and memory. In the present review, we have explored the complex effects of stress on cognition and propose that they are characterized by linear and non-linear dose-response functions, which together reveal a hormetic relationship between stress and learning. We suggest that stress initially enhances hippocampal function, resulting from amygdala-induced excitation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity, as well as the excitatory effects of several neuromodulators, including corticosteroids, norepinephrine, corticotropin-releasing hormone, acetylcholine and dopamine. We propose that this rapid activation of the amygdala-hippocampus brain memory system results in a linear dose-response relation between emotional strength and memory formation. More prolonged stress, however, leads to an inhibition of hippocampal function, which can be attributed to compensatory cellular responses that protect hippocampal neurons from excitotoxicity. This inhibition of hippocampal functioning in response to prolonged stress is potentially relevant to the well-described curvilinear dose-response relationship between arousal and memory. Our emphasis on the temporal features of stress-brain interactions addresses how stress can activate, as well as impair, hippocampal functioning to produce a hormetic relationship between stress and learning.

  5. Dose-response relationship for rat liver DNA damage caused by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Kitchin, K T; Brown, J L

    1996-12-02

    An experimental approach was taken to the question of dose-response curves for chemical carcinogenesis, using DNA damage as a biomarker. Female rats were give 13 different doses of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (from 1.4 to 135,000 micrograms/kg) and the subsequent hepatic DNA damage was determined by the alkaline elution technique. DMH doses below 450 micrograms/kg did not significantly damage DNA; all DMH doses of 1000 micrograms/kg or higher damaged rat hepatic DNA (P < 0.05). In this study the x values (dose) ranged over five orders of magnitude and the y values (DNA damage) ranged 30-fold. Ten different regression models (linear, quadratic, cubic, power, and six nonlinear transition models) were compared in their ability to fit the experimental data. With respect to log transformed dose, the six nonlinear transition equations fit the data considerably better than the four power type of equations. A sigmoid model fit to the log transformed dose of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine had an r2 of 0.9979, a degree of freedom adjusted r2 of 0.9969, a F-statistic of 1,457, and a fit standard error of 0.50. With respect to untransformed dose, only three equations (sigmoid, cascade and gaussian cumulative) could creditably fit the DMH data. The experimental results are interpreted with respect to hormesis, use of log transformed dose, sigmoid dose-response models, thresholds of biological response and cancer risk assessment.

  6. Dose-Response Relationship between Alanine Aminotransferase Levels within the Reference Interval and Metabolic Syndrome in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peipei; Chen, Qicai; Chen, Lili; Zhang, Pengpeng; Xiao, Juan; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Meng

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Elevation in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels is a biomarker for metabolic syndrome (MS); however, the relationship has not been fully investigated within the reference interval of ALT levels. Our objective was to explore the relationship between serum ALT levels within the reference interval and MS in Chinese adults. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study included 16028 adults, who attended routine health check-ups at Shengli Oilfield Central Hospital from January 2006 to March 2012. The reference interval of serum ALT level was defined as less than 40 U/L. Logistic regression models and restricted cubic spline were used to evaluate the association of ALT with MS. Results The prevalence of MS in the total population was 13.7% (6.4% for females and 18.4% for males). Multiple logistic regression showed that ALT levels were positively associated with MS after adjustment for potential confounding factors. The odds ratio of MS in the top quartile was 4.830 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.980–7.829] in females and 3.168 (95% CI: 2.649–3.790) in males, compared with the ALT levels in the bottom quartile. The restricted cubic spline models revealed a positive non-linear dose-response relationship between ALT levels and the risk of MS in women (p for nonlinearity was 0.0327), but a positive linear dose-response relationship in men (p for nonlinearity was 0.0659). Conclusion Serum ALT levels within the reference interval are positively associated with MS in a dose-response manner. Elevated ALT levels, even within the reference interval, may reflect early dysmetabolic changes. PMID:27873509

  7. [Occlusion treatment for amblyopia. Age dependence and dose-response relationship].

    PubMed

    Fronius, M

    2016-04-01

    Based on clinical experience and studies on animal models the age of 6-7 years was regarded as the limit for treatment of amblyopia, although functional improvement was also occasionally reported in older patients. New technical developments as well as insights from clinical studies and the neurosciences have attracted considerable attention to this topic. Various aspects of the age dependence of amblyopia treatment are discussed in this article, e. g. prescription, electronic monitoring of occlusion dosage, calculation of indicators for age-dependent plasticity of the visual system, and novel, alternative treatment approaches. Besides a discussion of the recent literature, results of studies by our "Child Vision Research Unit" in Frankfurt are presented: results of a questionnaire about prescription habits concerning age limits of patching, electronic recording of occlusion in patients beyond the conventional treatment age, calculation of dose-response function and efficiency of patching and their age dependence. The results of the questionnaire illustrate the uncertainty about age limits of prescription with significant deviations from the guideline of the German Ophthalmological Society (DOG). Electronic recording of occlusion allowed the quantification of declining dose-response function and treatment efficiency between 5 and 16 years of age. Reports about successful treatment with conventional and novel methods in adults are at variance with the notion of a rigid adult visual system lacking plasticity. Electronic recording of patching allowed new insights into the age-dependent susceptibility of the visual system and contributes to a more evidence-based treatment of amblyopia. Alternative approaches for adults challenge established notions about age limits of amblyopia therapy. Further studies comparing different treatment options are urgently needed.

  8. Recent odour regulation developments in Flanders: ambient odour quality standards based on dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Van Broeck, G; Van Langenhove, H; Nieuwejaers, B

    2001-01-01

    Until now there has been little uniformity in the approach of odour nuisance problems in Flanders. A switch to a standardised and scientifically underpinned approach is essential and is currently in full development. This paper mainly discusses the results of five year research on odour concentration standard developments in Flanders, executed in the period 1996-2000. The research was focused on five pilot sectors: pig farms, slaughterhouses, paint spray installations, sewage treatment plants and textile plants. The general approach of the method to determine the dose-response relation was found to be sufficient. The methodology used is fully described in the paper presented by Van Broeck and Van Langenhove at the CIWEM and IAWO Joint International Conference on Control and Prevention of Odours in the Water Industry in September 1999. For each location (16 locations in total) an unambiguous dose-response relation could be derived (rising nuisance for rising concentrations). In most cases, a "no effect" level could be determined. The background percentage nuisance fluctuated between 0 and 15%. For the sectors of the slaughterhouses, paint spray installations and sewage treatment plants a no effect level was 0.5, 2.0 and 0.5 sniffing units m(-3) as 98th percentile (sniffing units are odour concentrations measured by means of sniffing measurements on the field) was determined. For the sectors of the textile plants and pig farms, no unambiguous no effect level was found. Currently research is undertaken to translate the no effect levels to odour standards. Other initiatives, taken to underpin the Flemish odour regulations, such as the development of an odour source inventory and a complaint handling system, are also briefly discussed.

  9. Augmentation index (AI) in a dose-response relationship with smoking habits in males: The Tanushimaru study.

    PubMed

    Tsuru, Tomoko; Adachi, Hisashi; Enomoto, Mika; Fukami, Ako; Kumagai, Eita; Nakamura, Sachiko; Nohara, Yume; Kono, Shoko; Nakao, Erika; Sakaue, Akiko; Morikawa, Nagisa; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the relationship between augmentation index (AI) and smoking habits in community-dwelling Japanese.This cross-sectional study enrolled 1926 subjects (769 males and 1157 females) aged 40 to 95 years who underwent a health check-up in a Japanese cohort of the Seven Countries Study, in Tanushimaru, a typical farming town in Kyushu Island in 2009. The subjects' medical history, alcohol intake, smoking habit, and current medications for hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes were ascertained by questionnaire. Radial arterial pressure wave analysis was used to obtain AI. We analyzed the data stratified by gender.Age-adjusted means of AI in males showed a clear dose-response relationship in 4 categories of smoking habits (P = 0.010). There was no significant relationship between AI and smoking habits in females (P = 0.127). The significant dose-response relationship (P = 0.036) in males between AI and 4 categories of smoking habits still remained even after adjustment for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration rate, glucose, hypertensive medication, and alcohol intake.The present study demonstrated that AI values were significantly associated with smoking habits in a dose-dependent manner in Japanese males.

  10. Modeling the dose-response relationship for cytotoxicity of human cells exposed to chemical carcinogens. [N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Heflich, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    Compounds like N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene (N-AcO-AAF) result from the in vivo reduction of nitrate derivatives of benzo(..cap alpha..)pyrene. The dose-response relationship for survival of cloning ability in human fibroblasts exposed to N-AcO-AAF is being investigated to obtain a better understanding of the carcinogenic potential of coal-related air pollutants. A model is presented which correlates the survival of normal human fibroblasts after exposure to N-AcO-AAF with the rate of excision of carcinogen residues bound to DNA. The model predicts that the survival of normal cells, S/sub N/, is related to the survival of repair deficient cells, S/sub XPA/, by the equation 1n(S/sub N/) = 1n(S/sub XPA/) (1-f) where f is the fraction of potentially lethal damage repaired in the normal cell at a given dose of carcinogen. The rate of excision of AAF residues from the DNA of confluent human fibroblasts was measured over the same dose range as the survival studies. This information together with the dose-response relationship for survival of normal and repair deficient cells permits a determination of the mean number of adducts required to produce a potentially lethal lesion and the effective time available for repair. The model can be used to predict the mean lifetime of carcinogen residues on the DNA of partially repair deficient cells and the effect of recovery on the survival of normal cells. Extensions of the model to account for shoulders on the dose-response relationship curves are also discussed.

  11. Leisure Time Physical Activity and Mortality: A Detailed Pooled Analysis of the Dose-Response Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Arem, Hannah; Moore, Steven C.; Patel, Alpa; Hartge, Patricia; de Gonzalez, Amy Berrington; Visvanathan, Kala; Campbell, Peter T.; Freedman, Michal; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Adami, Hans Olov; Linet, Martha S.; Lee, I-Min; Matthews, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Importance The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommended a minimum of 75 vigorous-intensity or 150 moderate-intensity minutes per week (7.5 metabolic equivalent hours per week (MET h/wk)) of aerobic activity for “substantial” health benefit, and suggested “additional” benefits by doing more than double this amount. However, the upper limit of longevity benefit or possible harm with more physical activity is unclear. Objective To quantify the dose-response association between leisure-time physical activity and mortality, and to define the upper limit of benefit or harm associated with more physical activity. Design We pooled data from six studies in the NCI Cohort Consortium (baseline 1992–2003). We used Cox proportional hazards regression with cohort stratification to generate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Median follow-up time was 14.2 years. Setting Population-based prospective cohorts in the U.S. and Europe with self-reported physical activity. Participants 661,137 men and women (116,686 deaths); median age 62 (range 21–98) years. Exposure Leisure-time moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity Main Outcome Mortality Results Compared to those reporting no leisure-time physical activity, we observed a 20% lower mortality risk among those performing less than the recommended 7.5 MET h/wk minimum (HR=0.80, 95% CI 0.78–0.82), a 31% lower risk at 1–2 times the recommended minimum (0.69, 0.67–0.70), and a 37% lower risk at 2–3 times the minimum (0.63, 0.62–0.65). An upper threshold for mortality benefit occurred at 3–5 times the physical activity recommendation (0.61, 0.59–0.62), but compared to the recommended minimum, the additional benefit was modest (31% vs. 39%). There was no evidence of harm at 10+ times the recommended minimum (0.68, 0.59–0.78). A similar dose-response was observed for mortality due to cardiovascular disease and to cancer. Conclusions and

  12. Is There a Dose-Response Relationship of Cement Volume With Cement Leakage and Pain Relief After Vertebroplasty?

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhiyi; Hu, Xiaopeng; Wu, Yujie; Zhou, Zihui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if there were dose-response relationships of cement volume with cement leakage and pain relief after percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) for osteoporosis vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs). We collected the patient and procedural characteristics on 108 patients with OVCFs in our hospital who received PVP. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to explore the relationships between these potential influential variables and cement leakage and pain relief at 1 month postoperatively. Multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted with the pain score reduction and the bone cement leakage as dependent variables and the potential risk factors as independent variables, respectively. The results showed that the independent risk factors for the pain relief were the cement volume injected and fracture age, and for bone cement leakage were the cement volume injected and low-viscosity cement. In conclusion, the present study indicated that there were positive dose-response correlation relationships of cement volume with the incidence of cement leakage and the degree of pain relief after PVP, respectively. Thus, the cement should be injected into the vertebrae as much as possible during the PVP procedure.

  13. Cardiorespiratory dose-response relationship of isoflurane in Cinereous vulture (Aegypius monachus) during spontaneous ventilation

    PubMed Central

    SEOK, Seong-Hoon; JEONG, Dong-Hyuk; HONG, Il-Hwa; LEE, Hee-Chun; YEON, Seong-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Anesthesia is an inevitably important component of diagnosis and treatments examining the health condition of wild animals. Not only does anesthesia become an essential tool in minimizing stress of the patients and providing an opportunity to deliver accurate and safe procedures, but it also ensures the safety of the medical crew members. This study was conducted to investigate the dose-response cardiorespiratory effects of isoflurane during spontaneous ventilation in ten cinereous vultures. Each bird was administered isoflurane at initial concentration of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 and then an end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (ETiso) of 1.0% for an equilibration period of 15 min in the given order. At the end of the equilibration period, the direct blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR) and end tidal CO2 partial pressure (PETCO2) were recorded, and blood gas analysis was performed. Increasing isoflurane concentrations during spontaneous ventilation led to dose-dependent increases in HR and PETCO2, with minimal changes in RR, decreased arterial BP and respiratory acidosis. Overall, isoflurane for anesthesia of spontaneously breathing cinereous vultures is a suitable choice for diagnostic or surgical procedures. PMID:27725351

  14. Results of animal studies suggest a nonlinear dose-response relationship for benzene effects

    SciTech Connect

    Parodi, S.; Taningher, M. ); Lutz, W.K. ); Colacci, A.; Mazzullo, M.; Grilli, S. )

    1989-07-01

    Considering the very large industrial usage of benzene, studies in risk assessment aimed at the evaluation of carcinogenic risk at low levels of exposure are important. Animal data can offer indications about what could happen in humans and provide more diverse information than epidemiological data with respect to dose-response consideration. The authors have considered experiments investigating metabolism, short-term genotoxicity tests, DNA adduct formation, and carcinogenicity long-term tests. According to the different experiments, a saturation of benzene metabolism and benzene effects in terms of genotoxicity seems evident above 30 to 100 ppm. Below 30 to 60 ppm the initiating effect of benzene seems to be linear for a large interval of dosages, at least judging from DNA adduct formation. Potential lack of a promoting effect of benzene (below 10 ppm) could generate a sublinear response at nontoxic levels of exposure. This possibility was suggested by epidemiological data in humans and is not confirmed or excluded by their observations with animals.

  15. Occupational Exposure to Diesel Motor Exhaust and Lung Cancer: A Dose-Response Relationship Hidden by Asbestos Exposure Adjustment? The ICARE Study

    PubMed Central

    Matrat, Mireille; Guida, Florence; Cénée, Sylvie; Févotte, Joelle; Carton, Matthieu; Cyr, Diane; Menvielle, Gwenn; Paget-Bailly, Sophie; Radoï, Loredana; Schmaus, Annie; Bara, Simona; Velten, Michel; Luce, Danièle; Stücker, Isabelle; The Icare Study Group

    2015-01-01

    Background. In a French large population-based case-control study we investigated the dose-response relationship between lung cancer and occupational exposure to diesel motor exhaust (DME), taking into account asbestos exposure. Methods. Exposure to DME was assessed by questionnaire. Asbestos was taken into account through a global indicator of exposure to occupational carcinogens or by a specific JEM. Results. We found a crude dose response relationship with most of the indicators of DME exposure, including with the cumulative exposure index. All results were affected by adjustment for asbestos exposure. The dose response relationships between DME and lung cancer were observed among subjects never exposed to asbestos. Conclusions. Exposure to DME and to asbestos is frequently found among the same subjects, which may explain why dose-response relationships in previous studies that adjusted for asbestos exposure were inconsistent. PMID:26425123

  16. New insights: dose-response relationship between psychotropic drugs and falls: a study in nursing home residents with dementia.

    PubMed

    Sterke, Carolyn S; van Beeck, Ed F; van der Velde, Nathalie; Ziere, Gijsbertus; Petrovic, Mirko; Looman, Caspar W N; van der Cammen, Tischa J M

    2012-06-01

    The contribution of specific psychotropic drugs to fall risk in patients with dementia has not been quantified precisely until now. The authors evaluated the dose-response relationship between psychotropic drugs and falls in nursing home residents with dementia. Daily drug use and daily falls were recorded in 248 nursing home residents with dementia from January 1, 2006, to January 1, 2008. For each day of the study period, data on drug use were abstracted from the prescription database, and falls were retrieved from a standardized incident report system, resulting in a data set of 85 074 person-days. The authors found significant dose-response relationships for the use of antipsychotics (hazard ratio [HR], 2.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49-5.17), anxiolytics (1.60; 1.20-2.14), hypnotics and sedatives (2.58; 1.42-4.68), and antidepressants (2.84; 1.93-4.16). Fall risk increased significantly with 28% at 0.25 of the defined daily dose (DDD) of an antipsychotic or antidepressant, with 8% at 0.2 of the DDD of an anxiolytic, and with 56% at 0.5 of the DDD of a hypnotic or sedative; it increased further with dose increments and with combinations of psychotropics. Even at low dosages, psychotropic drugs are associated with increased fall risk in nursing home residents with dementia.

  17. Indications of a dose-response relationship between cannabis use and age at onset in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Lagerberg, Trine Vik; Kvitland, Levi Røstad; Aminoff, Sofie R; Aas, Monica; Ringen, Petter Andreas; Andreassen, Ole Andreas; Melle, Ingrid

    2014-01-30

    Cannabis use seems to play a causal role in the development of psychotic disorders. Recent evidence suggests that it may also precipitate onset in bipolar disorder. We here investigate if there is a dose-response relationship between cannabis use and age at onset in bipolar disorder, and whether there are interactions between cannabis use and illness characteristics (presenting polarity and presence of psychosis). Consecutively recruited patients with a DSM-IV, SCID verified diagnosis of bipolar I, II or NOS disorder (n=324) participated. Two-way ANCOVAS were used to investigate the effect of levels of cannabis use (<10 times during one month lifetime, >10 times during one month lifetime or a cannabis use disorder) on age at onset, including interaction effects with illness characteristics, while controlling for possible confounders. There was a significant association indicating a dose-response relationship between cannabis use and age at onset, which remained statistically significant after controlling for possible confounders (gender, bipolar subtype, family history of severe mental illness and alcohol or other substance use disorders). There were no interaction effects between cannabis use and presenting polarity or presence of psychosis. Doses of cannabis used may affect the age at onset of bipolar disorder.

  18. Dose-response relationship between sleep duration and human psychomotor vigilance and subjective alertness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, M. E.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Dinges, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    Although it has been well documented that sleep is required for human performance and alertness to recover from low levels after prolonged periods of wakefulness, it remains unclear whether they increase in a linear or asymptotic manner during sleep. It has been postulated that there is a relation between the rate of improvement in neurobehavioral functioning and rate of decline of slow-wave sleep and/or slow-wave activity (SWS/SWA) during sleep, but this has not been verified. Thus, a cross-study comparison was conducted in which dose-response curves (DRCs) were constructed for Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS) and Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) tests taken at 1000 hours by subjects who had been allowed to sleep 0 hours, 2 hours, 5 hours or 8 hours the previous night. We found that the DRCs to each PVT metric improved in a saturating exponential manner, with recovery rates that were similar [time constant (T) approximately 2.14 hours] for all the metrics. This recovery rate was slightly faster than, though not statistically significantly different from, the reported rate of SWS/SWA decline (T approximately 2.7 hours). The DRC to the SSS improved much more slowly than psychomotor vigilance, so that it could be fit equally well by a linear function (slope = -0.26) or a saturating exponential function (T = 9.09 hours). We conclude that although SWS/SWA, subjective alertness, and a wide variety of psychomotor vigilance metrics may all change asymptotically during sleep, it remains to be determined whether the underlying physiologic processes governing their expression are different.

  19. Dose-response relationship between sleep duration and human psychomotor vigilance and subjective alertness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, M. E.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Dinges, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    Although it has been well documented that sleep is required for human performance and alertness to recover from low levels after prolonged periods of wakefulness, it remains unclear whether they increase in a linear or asymptotic manner during sleep. It has been postulated that there is a relation between the rate of improvement in neurobehavioral functioning and rate of decline of slow-wave sleep and/or slow-wave activity (SWS/SWA) during sleep, but this has not been verified. Thus, a cross-study comparison was conducted in which dose-response curves (DRCs) were constructed for Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS) and Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) tests taken at 1000 hours by subjects who had been allowed to sleep 0 hours, 2 hours, 5 hours or 8 hours the previous night. We found that the DRCs to each PVT metric improved in a saturating exponential manner, with recovery rates that were similar [time constant (T) approximately 2.14 hours] for all the metrics. This recovery rate was slightly faster than, though not statistically significantly different from, the reported rate of SWS/SWA decline (T approximately 2.7 hours). The DRC to the SSS improved much more slowly than psychomotor vigilance, so that it could be fit equally well by a linear function (slope = -0.26) or a saturating exponential function (T = 9.09 hours). We conclude that although SWS/SWA, subjective alertness, and a wide variety of psychomotor vigilance metrics may all change asymptotically during sleep, it remains to be determined whether the underlying physiologic processes governing their expression are different.

  20. Chemotherapy dose--response relationships in non-small cell lung cancer and implied resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Stewart, David J; Chiritescu, Gabriela; Dahrouge, Simone; Banerjee, Srabani; Tomiak, Eva M

    2007-04-01

    We hypothesized excess resistance factor ("active resistance") gives a dose--response curve (DRC) shoulder, deficiency of a factor required for drug sensitivity ("saturable passive resistance") gives a DRC terminal plateau, and alteration of a factor gives decreased DRC slope. We used response rates from published non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) clinical studies to estimate mean percent tumor cell kill in each study (assuming cell kill is proportional to tumor volume change) and performed regression and meta-regression analyses of percent cell survival and patient survival vs planned dose-intensity. As single agents, cell kill approached that of combinations only at highest doses. While DRC shape varied between single agents, DRCs for all combinations tested flattened at higher doses. Patient median survival times also failed to vary significantly with dose for any combination. DRC flattening at higher doses suggests therapy efficacy is limited by deficiency/saturation of factors required for cell killing. Based on this and other clinical observations, we hypothesize: (1) active resistance may modulate cell killing at lower doses, but ability to overcome this by increasing doses is limited by saturable passive resistance (e.g. by non-cycling cells). (2) Cells surviving initial chemotherapy may upregulate active resistance mechanisms (permitting growth despite therapy). (3) If active resistance mechanisms are insufficient for growth/survival, cells may survive until therapy cessation by downregulating metabolism/cycling, becoming temporarily quiescent. This could help explain broad cross-resistance between agents and would imply that improved targeting of non-cycling cells will be required for major improvement in therapy efficacy.

  1. Ondansetron: A newer aspect of dose response relationship on ileal smooth muscles of rabbit.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Ayesha; Khan, Bushra Tayyaba; Bakhtiar, Salman

    2016-01-01

    There are several life threatening deadly diseases in our world but ‘Cancer’ out powers them all in recent years. Chemotherapy may be used on its own or an adjunct to other forms of therapy. Despite the advancement in cytotoxic drug therapy and supportive treatment almost 70% of patient suffer from chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). Ondansetron, a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist has now become a gold standard in the treatment of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. The central actions of ondansetron are well established but its peripheral actions are not well recognized. The aim of our study was to explore the peripheral actions of ondansetron. Experiments were performed in five groups (n=6) and ileal smooth muscles activity was recorded on power lab (USA). The effects of increasing concentrations of acetylcholine, serotonin & ondansetron alone was observed in first three groups. In the next two groups effects of acetylcholine and serotonin pretreated with fixed concentration (1ml) of ondansetron (10¯ϖ M)were studied. The maximum response obtained by acetylcholine served as a control for our study. Maximum response with acetylcholine was taken as 100% and with serotonin was 177 percent of control. Cumulative dose response curve with ondansetron was triphasic. At 10¯ψM it was 28.8%, whereas with 10¯ξM the amplitude decreased to 16.87%, it reached to plateau at 10¯ϖ M. Response of acetylcholine & serotonin was decreased to 57% and 78% respectively in the presence of fixed concentration of ondansetron (10¯ϖ M). Ondansetron reduces the acetylcholine and serotonin induced gastrointestinal motility. Our study has indicated that ondansetron apart from having central action also has marked peripheral actions that play an important role in CINV and may act as a partial agonist.

  2. Is There a Dose-Response Relationship for Heart Disease With Low-Dose Radiation Therapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Corbett, James R.; Moran, Jean M.; Griffith, Kent A.; Marsh, Robin B.; Feng, Mary; Jagsi, Reshma; Kessler, Marc L.; Ficaro, Edward C.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify cardiac radiation therapy (RT) exposure using sensitive measures of cardiac dysfunction; and to correlate dysfunction with heart doses, in the setting of adjuvant RT for left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: On a randomized trial, 32 women with node-positive left-sided breast cancer underwent pre-RT stress single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT-CT) myocardial perfusion scans. Patients received RT to the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes to doses of 50 to 52.2 Gy. Repeat SPECT-CT scans were performed 1 year after RT. Perfusion defects (PD), summed stress defects scores (SSS), and ejection fractions (EF) were evaluated. Doses to the heart and coronary arteries were quantified. Results: The mean difference in pre- and post-RT PD was −0.38% ± 3.20% (P=.68), with no clinically significant defects. To assess for subclinical effects, PD were also examined using a 1.5-SD below the normal mean threshold, with a mean difference of 2.53% ± 12.57% (P=.38). The mean differences in SSS and EF before and after RT were 0.78% ± 2.50% (P=.08) and 1.75% ± 7.29% (P=.39), respectively. The average heart Dmean and D95 were 2.82 Gy (range, 1.11-6.06 Gy) and 0.90 Gy (range, 0.13-2.17 Gy), respectively. The average Dmean and D95 to the left anterior descending artery were 7.22 Gy (range, 2.58-18.05 Gy) and 3.22 Gy (range, 1.23-6.86 Gy), respectively. No correlations were found between cardiac doses and changes in PD, SSS, and EF. Conclusions: Using sensitive measures of cardiac function, no clinically significant defects were found after RT, with the average heart Dmean <5 Gy. Although a dose response may exist for measures of cardiac dysfunction at higher doses, no correlation was found in the present study for low doses delivered to cardiac structures and perfusion, SSS, or EF.

  3. Evaluation of the Comet Assay for Assessing the Dose-Response Relationship of DNA Damage Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Xu, Chang; Du, Li Qing; Cao, Jia; Liu, Jian Xiang; Su, Xu; Zhao, Hui; Fan, Fei-Yue; Wang, Bing; Katsube, Takanori; Fan, Sai Jun; Liu, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Dose- and time-response curves were combined to assess the potential of the comet assay in radiation biodosimetry. The neutral comet assay was used to detect DNA double-strand breaks in lymphocytes caused by γ-ray irradiation. A clear dose-response relationship with DNA double-strand breaks using the comet assay was found at different times after irradiation (p < 0.001). A time-response relationship was also found within 72 h after irradiation (p < 0.001). The curves for DNA double-strand breaks and DNA repair in vitro of human lymphocytes presented a nice model, and a smooth, three-dimensional plane model was obtained when the two curves were combined. PMID:24240807

  4. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF DOSE-EFFECT AND DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT In 2003, the International Union of Pure and Applied chemistry (IUPAC) issued a glossary of terms that included the defi nition of dose-effect and doseresponse relationships (Nordberg et al., 2004). Dose effect relationship is defined as an association between dose and...

  5. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF DOSE-EFFECT AND DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT In 2003, the International Union of Pure and Applied chemistry (IUPAC) issued a glossary of terms that included the defi nition of dose-effect and doseresponse relationships (Nordberg et al., 2004). Dose effect relationship is defined as an association between dose and...

  6. Determining the behavioural dose-response relationship of marine mammals to air gun noise and source proximity.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Rebecca A; Noad, Michael J; McCauley, Robert D; Scott-Hayward, Lindsay; Kniest, Eric; Slade, Robert; Paton, David; Cato, Douglas H

    2017-08-15

    The effect of various anthropogenic sources of noise (e.g. sonar, seismic surveys) on the behaviour of marine mammals is sometimes quantified as a dose-response relationship, where the probability of an animal behaviourally 'responding' (e.g. avoiding the source) increases with 'dose' (or received level of noise). To do this, however, requires a definition of a 'significant' response (avoidance), which can be difficult to quantify. There is also the potential that the animal 'avoids' not only the source of noise but also the vessel operating the source, complicating the relationship. The proximity of the source is an important variable to consider in the response, yet difficult to account for given that received level and proximity are highly correlated. This study used the behavioural response of humpback whales to noise from two different air gun arrays (20 and 140 cubic inch air gun array) to determine whether a dose-response relationship existed. To do this, a measure of avoidance of the source was developed, and the magnitude (rather than probability) of this response was tested against dose. The proximity to the source, and the vessel itself, was included within the one-analysis model. Humpback whales were more likely to avoid the air gun arrays (but not the controls) within 3 km of the source at levels over 140 re. 1 µPa(2) s(-1), meaning that both the proximity and the received level were important factors and the relationship between dose (received level) and response is not a simple one. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Dose-Response Relationships of Resistance Training in Healthy Old Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Borde, Ron; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Granacher, Urs

    2015-12-01

    Resistance training (RT) is an intervention frequently used to improve muscle strength and morphology in old age. However, evidence-based, dose-response relationships regarding specific RT variables (e.g., training period, frequency, intensity, volume) are unclear in healthy old adults. The aims of this systematic review and meta-analysis were to determine the general effects of RT on measures of muscle strength and morphology and to provide dose-response relationships of RT variables through an analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that could improve muscle strength and morphology in healthy old adults. A computerized, systematic literature search was performed in the electronic databases PubMed, Web of Science, and The Cochrane Library from January 1984 up to June 2015 to identify all RCTs related to RT in healthy old adults. The initial search identified 506 studies, with a final yield of 25 studies. Only RCTs that examined the effects of RT in adults with a mean age of 65 and older were included. The 25 studies quantified at least one measure of muscle strength or morphology and sufficiently described training variables (e.g., training period, frequency, volume, intensity). We quantified the overall effects of RT on measures of muscle strength and morphology by computing weighted between-subject standardized mean differences (SMDbs) between intervention and control groups. We analyzed the data for the main outcomes of one-repetition maximum (1RM), maximum voluntary contraction under isometric conditions (MVC), and muscle morphology (i.e., cross-sectional area or volume or thickness of muscles) and assessed the methodological study quality by Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. Heterogeneity between studies was assessed using I2 and χ2 statistics. A random effects meta-regression was calculated to explain the influence of key training variables on the effectiveness of RT in terms of muscle strength and morphology. For meta

  8. The dose-response relationship between tobacco smoking and the risk of lymphomas: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Taborelli, Martina; Montella, Maurizio; Libra, Massimo; Tedeschi, Rosamaria; Crispo, Anna; Grimaldi, Maria; Dal Maso, Luigino; Serraino, Diego; Polesel, Jerry

    2017-06-16

    Previous studies have provided limited support to the association between tobacco smoking and lymphomas with weak evidence of a dose-response relationship. We investigated the relationship between tobacco smoking and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphomas (HL) through logistic regression spline models. Data were derived from an Italian hospital-based case-control study (1999-2014), which enrolled 571 NHLs, 188 HLs, and 1004 cancer-free controls. Smoking habits and other lifestyle factors were assessed through a validated questionnaire. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Compared to never smokers, people smoking ≥15 cigarettes/day showed increased risks of both NHL (OR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.97) and HL (OR = 2.47, 95% CI: 1.25, 4.87); the risk was particularly elevated for follicular NHL (OR = 2.43; 95% CI:1.31-4.51) and mixed cellularity HL (OR = 5.60, 95% CI: 1.31, 23.97). No excess risk emerged for former smokers or people smoking <15 cigarettes/day. Spline analyses showed a positive dose-response relationship with significant increases in NHL and HL risks starting from 15 and 21 cigarettes/day, respectively, with the most evident effects for follicular NHL and mixed cellularity HL. Smoking duration was significantly associated with the HL risk only (OR = 2.15, 95% CI: 1.16, 3.99). These findings support a role of tobacco smoking in the etiology of both NHL and HL, providing evidence of a direct association of risk with smoking intensity.

  9. Establishing a dose-response relationship between acute resistance-exercise and the immune system: Protocol for a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Szlezak, Adam Michael; Szlezak, Siri Lauluten; Keane, James; Tajouri, Lotti; Minahan, Clare

    2016-12-01

    Exercise immunology research has traditionally focussed on aerobic-exercise, however it has become apparent in more recent years that resistance-exercise can also considerably affect host immunobiology. To date however, no systematic process has been used to establish a dose-response relationship between resistance-exercise and the immune system. The present systematic review was thus conducted to determine the dose-response effects of a bout of resistance-exercise on acute leukocyte counts. In accordance with the PRISMA guidelines, a systematic literature search was conducted in the electronic databases, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar, over the date range of 1989-2016. Following the PICO elements, eligibility criteria included: i) participants: healthy humans aged 18-40; ii) intervention: a single bout of resistance-exercise; iii) comparator: at least one comparator group; iv) outcome: acute measures of circulating leukocyte counts. Specific exclusion criteria were also applied. Risk of bias and quality of evidence was assessed using the PEDro scale. Due to the individual designs of the admitted studies, a qualitative analysis (systematic narrative synthesis) was employed in the present review. The results of the present review demonstrate that a single bout of resistance-exercise induces an acute monocytosis, neutrophilia, and lymphocytosis. It became apparent that the reviewed literature either does not consistently specify, or does not describe with sufficient detail, the time-course between the onset of exercise and the collection of blood. We recommend that researchers consider addressing this in future studies, and also collect blood measures during exercise to aid with comparison of temporal effects. Regarding the determination of a dose-response relationship, an acute neutrophilia, monocytosis and lymphocytosis appears to occur more rapidly and to a greater magnitude following a single bout of high-dose vs low-dose resistance

  10. The dose-response relationship for tumourigenesis by UV radiation in the region 311-312 nm.

    PubMed

    Sterenborg, H J; van Weelden, H; van der Leun, J C

    1988-09-01

    Groups of hairless mice were irradiated daily with Philips TL01 UVB sources. This type of lamp has become available recently and was developed for UVB phototherapy of psoriasis. The TL01 emits radiation in a narrow band around 311-312 nm. Tumours developed on all animals. The dose-response relationship had practically the same shape as that found in a similar experiment with Westinghouse FS40 sunlamps; the tumour induction time appeared to be proportional to the daily dose to a power of -0.58. An additional experiment was performed with a TL01 from which the shorter wavelengths were filtered away. This reduced the carcinogenic effectiveness by a factor of 2.3. The potential of the filtered lamp for phototherapy of psoriasis is discussed.

  11. Radiation alone in the treatment of cancer of the uterine cervix: Analysis of pelvic failure and dose response relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, R.Y.; Trotti, A.; Wu, C.J.; Soong, S.J.; Salter, M.M. )

    1989-11-01

    This retrospective analysis involves 569 patients with invasive cancer of the uterine cervix treated with irradiation alone between 1969 and 1980. Treatment consisted of external and intracavitary irradiation and treatment policy remained consistent throughout the study interval. In early stage disease (FIGO IA, IB, and IIA), pelvic failure was 4.6%, 11.2%, and 8.2%, respectively. In late stage disease (FIGO IIB, III, and IVA), pelvic failure was 30.1%, 52.3%, and 69.2%, respectively. Further analysis revealed that total dose at point A is well correlated with pelvic control. An aggressive treatment is crucial in late stage disease in determining the probability of pelvic tumor control and survival. Methods of dose prescription, dose-response relationships, treatment philosophy and its therapeutic implications are discussed.

  12. Functional MRI determination of a dose-response relationship to lower extremity neuromuscular electrical stimulation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gerald V; Alon, Gad; Roys, Steven R; Gullapalli, Rao P

    2003-05-01

    Although empirical evidence supports the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) to treat physical impairments associated with stroke, the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of this modality are poorly understood. Recent studies have employed functional imaging to investigations of brain responses to median nerve stimulation. These studies suggest a dose-response relationship may exist between selected stimulation parameters and hemodynamic responses in sensorimotor regions. However, substantial gaps exist in this literature. The present study was designed to address these deficiencies. Ten healthy subjects participated. In phase one, four stimulus intensity levels were established: (1). sensory threshold [Th], (2). (MM-Th)x0.333+Th [low-intermediate level, LI], (3). (MM-Th)x0.666+Th [high-intermediate level, HI], and (4). maximal motor (MM). In phase two, subjects were scanned using a spiral-echoplanar imaging technique at each stimulus level. Image sets were analyzed to determine hemodynamic responses at the highest Pearson correlation level ( r) ascertained for each of five areas of interest (AOI): (1). primary sensory, (2). primary motor, (3). cingulate gyrus, (4). thalamus, and (5). cerebellum. ANOVA demonstrated significant main effects for BOLD signal amplitude ( p<0.05) changes in all AOI. Similarly, ANOVA showed significant differences in the volume of activation ( p<0.05) with increasing stimulus intensity in four AOI. Secondary analyses of pooled data showed increasing probabilities of activation at higher stimulus intensities within each AOI. Collectively, these data indicate a dose-response relationship exists between lower extremity NMES and brain activation in specific neural regions. The current results, while limited in their generalizability, are foundational for future studies of interventions using NMES.

  13. Dose-response relationships of three amphotericin B formulations in a non-neutropenic murine model of invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Mouton, J W; te Dorsthorst, D T A; Meis, J F G M; Verweij, P E

    2009-12-01

    New lipid-associated formulations of amphotericin B (AmB) have been developed in order to reduce toxicity and enhance the efficacy of AmB by allowing administration of higher doses of the drug. We determined the in vivo dose-response relationships of 1 day and 7 day treatment of AmB, Ambisome (AmBi) and Abelcet (ABLC) in a non-neutropenic murine model of invasive aspergillosis by using survival as an endpoint. Female CD-1 mice were infected intravenously 48 h prior to start therapy with Aspergillus fumigatus (1 x 10(7) conidia/mouse). Groups of 10 mice were treated iv for 1 day or 7 days with increasing 2-fold doses of AmB, ABLC and AmBi up to a maximum of 20 mg/kg/day. Mortality was determined twice daily until day 15. Results were analyzed using product-moment survival analysis and by determining the dose response relationships on day 15. Survival at day 15 of mice with 7 day AmBi or ABLC treatment was significantly better than that of controls or AmB. The ED50s of AmBi and ABLC were 0.06 (95% CI: 0.03-0.127) mg/kg and 0.21 (0.06-0.66) mg/kg respectively. In addition, the maximum effect was higher for AmBi than ABLC, 90% survival versus 68%, respectively. Most of the effects of treatment with AmBi were reached after 1 day of treatment, indicating that the first dose given is most important in predicting survival. This study shows that AmBi and ABLC were significantly more efficacious than AmB in a non-neutropenic murine model of invasive aspergillosis, and that the effect observed was primarily dependent on the first dose administered.

  14. Biologically Effective Dose-Response Relationship for Breast Cancer Treated by Conservative Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To find a biologically effective dose (BED) response for adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) for initial-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Results of randomized trials of RT vs. non-RT were reviewed and the tumor control probability (TCP) after RT was calculated for each of them. Using the linear-quadratic formula and Poisson statistics of cell-kill, the average initial number of clonogens per tumor before RT and the average tumor cell radiosensitivity (alpha-value) were calculated. An {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 4 Gy was assumed for these calculations. Results: A linear regression equation linking BED to TCP was derived: -ln[-ln(TCP)] = -ln(No) + {alpha}{sup *} BED = -4.08 + 0.07 * BED, suggesting a rather low radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells (alpha = 0.07 Gy{sup -1}), which probably reflects population heterogeneity. From the linear relationship a sigmoid BED-response curve was constructed. Conclusion: For BED values higher than about 90 Gy{sub 4} the radiation-induced TCP is essentially maximizing at 90-100%. The relationship presented here could be an approximate guide in the design and reporting of clinical trials of adjuvant breast RT.

  15. Cryptosporidium parvum: determination of ID₅₀ and the dose-response relationship in experimentally challenged dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Zambriski, J A; Nydam, D V; Wilcox, Z J; Bowman, D D; Mohammed, H O; Liotta, J L

    2013-10-18

    The objectives were to determine the median infective dose (ID₅₀) of Cryptosporidium parvum and to describe the dose-response relationship including associated clinical illness in experimentally challenged dairy calves. Within the first 24h of life, 27 test calves were experimentally challenged with C. parvum oocysts and 3 control calves were sham dosed. Test calves received 1 of 8 possible doses (25, 50, 100, 500, 1 × 10(3), 1 × 10(4), 1 × 10(5), and 1 × 10(6) oocysts). All 27 test calves developed diarrhea. Fecal oocyst shedding occurred in 25 (92.6%) test calves and in 0 control calves. The 2 non-shedding test calves both received 25 oocysts. There was an inverse relationship between dose and time to onset of fecal oocyst shedding (P=0.005). There was no relationship found between dose and duration (P=0.2) or cessation (P=0.3) of fecal oocyst shedding. In addition, there was not a significant relationship between log-dose and the log-peak oocysts (P=0.2) or log-total oocysts (P=0.5) counted/g of feces across the dose groups. There was a positive dose-response relationship between log-dose and diarrhea (P=0.01). However, when controlling for other factors, such as onset and cessation of fecal oocyst shedding, dose was not a significant predictor of diarrhea (P=0.5). Onset and cessation of fecal oocyst shedding were found to be the best predictors of diarrhea (P=0.0006 and P=0.04, respectively). The ID₅₀ for fecal oocyst shedding was 5.8 oocysts, for diarrhea was 9.7 oocysts, and for fecal oocyst shedding with diarrhea was 16.6 oocysts. Given that the ID₅₀ of C. parvum is far less than would be excreted into the environment by a naturally infected calf, prevention and control of cryptosporidiosis is a formidable challenge.

  16. Dose-response relationships for resetting of human circadian clock by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boivin, D. B.; Duffy, J. F.; Kronauer, R. E.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    Since the first report in unicells, studies across diverse species have demonstrated that light is a powerful synchronizer which resets, in an intensity-dependent manner, endogenous circadian pacemakers. Although it is recognized that bright light (approximately 7,000 to 13,000 lux) is an effective circadian synchronizer in humans, it is widely believed that the human circadian pacemaker is insensitive to ordinary indoor illumination (approximately 50-300 lux). It has been proposed that the relationship between the resetting effect of light and its intensity follows a compressive nonlinear function, such that exposure to lower illuminances still exerts a robust effect. We therefore undertook a series of experiments which support this hypothesis and report here that light of even relatively low intensity (approximately 180 lux) significantly phase-shifts the human circadian pacemaker. Our results clearly demonstrate that humans are much more sensitive to light than initially suspected and support the conclusion that they are not qualitatively different from other mammals in their mechanism of circadian entrainment.

  17. Dose-response relationships for resetting of human circadian clock by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boivin, D. B.; Duffy, J. F.; Kronauer, R. E.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    Since the first report in unicells, studies across diverse species have demonstrated that light is a powerful synchronizer which resets, in an intensity-dependent manner, endogenous circadian pacemakers. Although it is recognized that bright light (approximately 7,000 to 13,000 lux) is an effective circadian synchronizer in humans, it is widely believed that the human circadian pacemaker is insensitive to ordinary indoor illumination (approximately 50-300 lux). It has been proposed that the relationship between the resetting effect of light and its intensity follows a compressive nonlinear function, such that exposure to lower illuminances still exerts a robust effect. We therefore undertook a series of experiments which support this hypothesis and report here that light of even relatively low intensity (approximately 180 lux) significantly phase-shifts the human circadian pacemaker. Our results clearly demonstrate that humans are much more sensitive to light than initially suspected and support the conclusion that they are not qualitatively different from other mammals in their mechanism of circadian entrainment.

  18. Effects and dose-response relationships of skin cancer and blackfoot disease with arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Wen-Ping

    1977-01-01

    In a limited area on the southwest coast of Taiwan, where artesian well water with a high concentration of arsenic has been used for more than 60 years, a high prevalence of chronic arsenicism has been observed in recent years. The total population of this “endemic” area is approximately 100,000. A general survey of 40,421 inhabitants and follow-up of 1,108 patients with blackfoot disease were made. Blackfoot disease, so-termed locally, is a peripheral vascular disorder resulting in gangrene of the extremities, especially the feet. The overall prevalence rates for skin cancer was 10.6 per 1000, and for blackfoot disease 8.9 per 1000. Generally speaking, the prevalence increased steadily with age in both diseases. The prevalence rates for skin cancer and blackfoot disease increased with the arsenic content of well water, i.e., the higher the arsenic content, the more patients with skin cancer and blackfoot disease. A dose–response relationship between blackfoot disease and the duration of water intake was also noted. Furthermore, the degree of permanent impairment of function in the patient was directly related to duration of intake of arsenical water and to duration of such intake at the time of onset. The most common cause of death in the patients with skin cancer and blackfoot disease was carcinoma of various sites. The 5-year survival rate after the onset of blackfoot disease was 76.3%; the 10-year survival rate was 63.3% and 15-year survival rate, 52.2%. The 50% survival point was 16 years after onset of the disease. ImagesFIGURE 1.FIGURE 2. PMID:908285

  19. The H-ARS Dose Response Relationship (DRR): Validation and Variables

    PubMed Central

    Plett, P. Artur; Sampson, Carol H.; Chua, Hui Lin; Jackson, William; Vemula, Sasidhar; Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Fisher, Alexa; Feng, Hailin; Wu, Tong; MacVittie, Thomas J.; Orschell, Christie M.

    2015-01-01

    Manipulations of lethally-irradiated animals, such as for administration of pharmaceuticals, blood sampling, or other laboratory procedures, have the potential to induce stress effects that may negatively affect morbidity and mortality. To investigate this in a murine model of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome, 20 individual survival efficacy studies were grouped based on the severity of the administration (Admn) schedules of their medical countermeasure (MCM) into Admn 1 (no injections), Admn 2 (one to three injections), or Admn 3 (29 injections or six to nine oral gavages). Radiation doses ranged from LD30/30 to LD95/30. Thirty-day survival of vehicle controls in each group was used to construct radiation dose lethality response relationship (DRR) probit plots, which were compared statistically to the original DRR from which all LDXX/30 for the studies were obtained. The slope of the Admn 3 probit was found to be significantly steeper (5.190) than that of the original DRR (2.842) or Admn 2 (2.009), which were not significantly different. The LD50/30 for Admn 3 (8.43 Gy) was less than that of the original DRR (8.53 Gy, p<0.050), whereas the LD50/30 of other groups were similar. Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed significantly worse survival of Admn 3 mice compared to the three other groups (p=0.007). Taken together, these results show that stressful administration schedules of MCM can negatively impact survival, and that dosing regimens should be considered when constructing DRR to use in survival studies. PMID:26425900

  20. The Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome in Rhesus Macaques: A Systematic Review of the Lethal Dose Response Relationship.

    PubMed

    MacVittie, Thomas J; Farese, Ann M; Jackson, William

    2015-11-01

    Well characterized animal models that mimic the human response to potentially lethal doses of radiation are required to assess the efficacy of medical countermeasures under the criteria of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration "animal rule." Development of a model requires the determination of the radiation dose response relationship and time course of mortality and morbidity across the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. The nonhuman primate, rhesus macaque, is a relevant animal model that may be used to determine the efficacy of medical countermeasures to mitigate major signs of morbidity and mortality at selected lethal doses of total body irradiation. A systematic review of relevant studies that determined the dose response relationship for the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome in the rhesus macaque relative to radiation quality, dose rate, and exposure uniformity has never been performed. The selection of data cohorts was made from the following sources: Ovid Medline (1957-present), PubMed (1954-present), AGRICOLA (1976-present), Web of Science (1954-present), and U.S. HHS REPORT (2002 to present). The following terms were used: Rhesus, total body-irradiation, total body x irradiation, TBI, irradiation, gamma radiation, hematopoiesis, LD50/60, Macaca mulatta, whole-body irradiation, nonhuman primate, NHP, monkey, primates, hematopoietic radiation syndrome, mortality, and nuclear radiation. The reference lists of all studies, published and unpublished, were reviewed for additional studies. The total number of hits across all search sites was 3,001. There were a number of referenced, unpublished, non-peer reviewed government reports that were unavailable for review. Fifteen studies, 11 primary (n = 863) and four secondary (n = 153) studies [n = 1,016 total nonhuman primates (NHP), rhesus Macaca mulatta] were evaluated to provide an informative and consistent review. The dose response relationships (DRRs) were determined for uniform or non-uniform total

  1. Dose-response relationship between dietary magnesium intake and cardiovascular mortality: A systematic review and dose-based meta-regression analysis of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Liang, Chun; Li, Mei; Montgomery, Scott; Fall, Katja; Aaseth, Jan; Cao, Yang

    2016-12-01

    Although epidemiology studies have reported the relationship, including a dose-response relationship, between dietary magnesium intake and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the risk for CVD mortality is inconclusive and the evidence for a dose-response relationship has not been summarized. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies to summarize the evidence regarding the association of dietary magnesium intake with risk of CVD mortality and describe their dose-response relationship. We identified relevant studies by searching major scientific literature databases and grey literature resources from their inception to August 2015, and reviewed references lists of retrieved articles. We included population-based studies that reported mortality risks, i.e. relative risks (RRs), odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios (HRs) of CVD mortality or cause-specific CVD death. Linear dose-response relationships were assessed using random-effects meta-regression. Potential nonlinear associations were evaluated using restricted cubic splines. Out of 3002 articles, 9 articles from 8 independent studies met the eligibility criteria. These studies comprised 449,748 individuals and 10,313 CVD deaths. Compared with the lowest dietary magnesium consumption group in the population, the risk of CVD mortality was reduced by 16% in women and 8% in men. No significant linear dose-response relationship was found between increment in dietary magnesium intake and CVD mortality across all the studies. After adjusting for age and BMI, the risk of CVD mortality was reduced by 24-25% per 100mg/d increment in dietary magnesium intake in women of all the participants and in all the US participants. Although the combined data confirm the role of dietary magnesium intake in reducing CVD mortality, the dose-response relationship was only found among women and in US population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanistic Basis for Nonlinear Dose-Response Relationships for Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Stochastic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Bobby R.; Walker, Dale M.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Schöllnberger, Helmut; Walker, Vernon

    2003-01-01

    The linear nonthreshold (LNT) model plays a central role in low-dose radiation risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation exposure is assumed to increase one’s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Here, we introduce a mechanism-based model for low-dose, radiation-induced, stochastic effects (genomic instability, apoptosis, mutations, neoplastic transformation) that leads to a LNT relationship between the risk for neoplastic transformation and dose only in special cases. It is shown that nonlinear dose-response relationships for risk of stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected based on known biological mechanisms. Further, for low-dose, low-dose rate, low-LET radiation, large thresholds may exist for cancer induction. We summarize previously published data demonstrating large thresholds for cancer induction. We also provide evidence for low-dose-radiation-induced, protection (assumed via apoptosis) from neoplastic transformation. We speculate based on work of others (Chung 2002) that such protection may also be induced to operate on existing cancer cells and may be amplified by apoptosis-inducing agents such as dietary isothiocyanates. PMID:19330114

  3. Phototherapy in Gunn rats. A study to assess the photobiologically most effective radiant energy and dose/response relationships.

    PubMed

    Ballowitz, L; Geutler, G; Krochmann, J; Pannitschka, R; Roemer, G; Roemer, I

    1977-01-01

    In order to get a more realistic spectral efficiency curve and to evaluate dose/response relationships in phototherapy, homozygous weanling Gunn rats -- nondepilated, with fur -- were illuminated under standardized conditions with 8 different fluorescent tubes. Some of the tubes were operated with different electric power. Clear spectal differences in the extent and the rapidity of the bilirubin decay could be ascertained. Furthermore, the sharpness of the bilirubin decrease depended on the baseline concentration. For the calculations the animals were therefore divided into 3 groups with starting levels of larger than or equal to 8 mg%, 6.5--7.9 mg% and less than 6.5 mg%. Correlating the spectral power distribution of the lamps with the bilirubin decomposition found in the experiment, the spectral response function s(lambda)bili, rel was calculated by an integral method. A comparison of our results with data from the literature shows that so far near UV radiation was evaluated too high. A new radiometer for digital measuring the effective irradiance Ebili was developed. On a logarithmic scale a comparatively sharp dose/response relationship could be demonstrated in dependence on the measured effective radiant exposure. Serum bilirubin decrease is directly proportional to log Ebili. A dose of about 2.5 mW - h/cm2 is necessary to achieve a constant serum bilirubin decrease at all. Good results were obtained at doses of about 35 mW - h/cm2 with the most efficient being at 160 mW - h/cm2. Highly effective doses can be applied with different types of lamps. However, there are great differences in the time of illumination required. 24 h are necessary with daylight tubes (Osram L 20 W/19) to apply 20 mW - h/cm2, whereas the same dose is already attained after 4 h with BAM blue tubes (Philips). The accuracy of the radiometer was finally controlled by screening Westinghouse special blue and Osram standard blue tubes with black tapes, so that the effective irradiance (Ebili

  4. [The dose-response relationship study between the quantitative morphological stereology on thyroid and different iodine doses in mice].

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiuju; Zhang, Shiyong; Xu, Chongliang; Liu, Ying; Wang, Pei; Zhang, Shuchun

    2002-01-01

    To study the dose-response relationship between the quantitative morphological stereology on thyroid and different iodine doses in mice. Weaning Kunming mice were randomly divided into seven groups. The mice were fed for 100 days with distilled water containing different KIO3 concentrations, i.e. 50, 250, 500, 1 000, 1 500, 2 000, and 3 000 microgram/L respectively. The 50 microgram/L (proper iodine concentration) group was control group, and the groups of 250 approximately 3 000 microgram/L were high iodine groups. The stereology parameters of thyroid follicle and follicular cavities were measured with HPIAS-1000 (High Resolution Pathological Image & word Analysis System). The stereology parameters included mean surface, volume on area, volume on circumference, specific surface, numerical density on area, spherical factor, the percentage of mean surface and mean volume of the follicular epithelial cell in thyroid follicle was further calculated. Positive correlations was observed between the thyroid absolute and relative weight, goiter rate and different iodine doses. And the thyroid absolute and relative weight of mice in the 250 microgram/L group was significantly different from that in 50 microgram/L group. The goiter rate of mice in different high iodine groups was in conformity with that of epidemiological investigation. The goiter rate of mice in 500 microgram/L group was different from that in 50 microgram/L group. Positive correlations were observed between mean surface, volume on area, volume on circumference, spherical factor and iodine doses, but the negative correlations were observed between numerical density on area, specific surface, the percentage of mean surface and mean volume of the follicular epithelial cell in thyroid follicle and iodine doses. When Iodine doses are between 250 approximately 3 000 microgram/L, the dose-response relationship was observed between the morphological stereology parameters of thyroid follicle and follicular cavities

  5. Dose-Response Relationship between Dietary Magnesium Intake and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Han, Hedong; Li, Mei; Liang, Chun; Fan, Zhongjie; Aaseth, Jan; He, Jia; Montgomery, Scott; Cao, Yang

    2016-11-19

    The epidemiological evidence for a dose-response relationship between magnesium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is sparse. The aim of the study was to summarize the evidence for the association of dietary magnesium intake with risk of T2D and evaluate the dose-response relationship. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies that reported dietary magnesium intake and risk of incident T2D. We identified relevant studies by searching major scientific literature databases and grey literature resources from their inception to February 2016. We included cohort studies that provided risk ratios, i.e., relative risks (RRs), odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios (HRs), for T2D. Linear dose-response relationships were assessed using random-effects meta-regression. Potential nonlinear associations were evaluated using restricted cubic splines. A total of 25 studies met the eligibility criteria. These studies comprised 637,922 individuals including 26,828 with a T2D diagnosis. Compared with the lowest magnesium consumption group in the population, the risk of T2D was reduced by 17% across all the studies; 19% in women and 16% in men. A statistically significant linear dose-response relationship was found between incremental magnesium intake and T2D risk. After adjusting for age and body mass index, the risk of T2D incidence was reduced by 8%-13% for per 100 mg/day increment in dietary magnesium intake. There was no evidence to support a nonlinear dose-response relationship between dietary magnesium intake and T2D risk. The combined data supports a role for magnesium in reducing risk of T2D, with a statistically significant linear dose-response pattern within the reference dose range of dietary intake among Asian and US populations. The evidence from Europe and black people is limited and more prospective studies are needed for the two subgroups.

  6. Dose-Response Relationship between Dietary Magnesium Intake and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xin; Han, Hedong; Li, Mei; Liang, Chun; Fan, Zhongjie; Aaseth, Jan; He, Jia; Montgomery, Scott; Cao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological evidence for a dose-response relationship between magnesium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is sparse. The aim of the study was to summarize the evidence for the association of dietary magnesium intake with risk of T2D and evaluate the dose-response relationship. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies that reported dietary magnesium intake and risk of incident T2D. We identified relevant studies by searching major scientific literature databases and grey literature resources from their inception to February 2016. We included cohort studies that provided risk ratios, i.e., relative risks (RRs), odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios (HRs), for T2D. Linear dose-response relationships were assessed using random-effects meta-regression. Potential nonlinear associations were evaluated using restricted cubic splines. A total of 25 studies met the eligibility criteria. These studies comprised 637,922 individuals including 26,828 with a T2D diagnosis. Compared with the lowest magnesium consumption group in the population, the risk of T2D was reduced by 17% across all the studies; 19% in women and 16% in men. A statistically significant linear dose-response relationship was found between incremental magnesium intake and T2D risk. After adjusting for age and body mass index, the risk of T2D incidence was reduced by 8%–13% for per 100 mg/day increment in dietary magnesium intake. There was no evidence to support a nonlinear dose-response relationship between dietary magnesium intake and T2D risk. The combined data supports a role for magnesium in reducing risk of T2D, with a statistically significant linear dose-response pattern within the reference dose range of dietary intake among Asian and US populations. The evidence from Europe and black people is limited and more prospective studies are needed for the two subgroups. PMID:27869762

  7. A U-shaped dose-response relationship between x radiation and sex-linked recessive lethal mutation in male germ cells of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Koana, Takao; Tsujimura, Hidenobu

    2010-07-01

    We reported previously that low-dose X irradiation of DNA repair-proficient immature sperm of wild-type Drosophila melanogaster at a low dose rate (50 mGy/min) resulted in a mutation frequency that was lower than that in the sham-irradiated group. Therefore, a U-shaped dose-response relationship was suggested. Here we show that the dose-response curve is actually U-shaped by carrying out a large-scale sex-linked recessive lethal assay using Drosophila. No reduction of the mutation frequency was observed in a strain mutant for the nucleotide excision repair gene mei-9a (Drosophila homologue of human XPF). Introduction of a chromosome fragment containing mei-9+ into the mei-9a mutant strain restored the reduction of the mutation frequency in the low-dose-irradiated group. These results showed that DNA repair was responsible for the U-shaped dose-response relationship in Drosophila.

  8. Dose-effect and dose-response relationships of blood lead to erythrocytic protoporphyrin in young children

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, P.B.; Bornschein, R.L.; Succop, P.

    1985-10-01

    Dose-effect and dose-response relationships were analyzed for blood lead concentration (PbB) vs blood protoporphyrin concentration using multiple data points from 165 children, ages 3-36 months. Protoporphyrin concentrations were measured using a front-face flurometer designed to measure zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) and an extraction method designed to measure total protoporphyrin as the free base (FEP). Estimations were made of the thresholds for PbB effects on FEP and ZPP, as well as the slopes of the PbB-FEP and PbB-ZPP interactions. There was essentially no difference in thresholds estimated using ZPP vs FEP as the effect parameter. There was no apparent effect of age on threshold. However, the slope for PbB vs ZPP was less steep than the slope for PbB vs FEP. Moreover, the average ratio FEP:ZPP was markedly elevated at 3 months (1.84:1) and decreased slowly, attaining unity at 33 months. The possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed, as well as the implications for interpretation of lead screening program data.

  9. ESTIMATING A DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LENGTH OF STAY AND FUTURE RECIDIVISM IN SERIOUS JUVENILE OFFENDERS.

    PubMed

    Loughran, Thomas A; Mulvey, Edward P; Schubert, Carol A; Fagan, Jeffrey; Piquero, Alex R; Losoya, Sandra H

    2009-01-01

    The effect of sanctions on subsequent criminal activity is of central theoretical importance in criminology. A key question for juvenile justice policy is the degree to which serious juvenile offenders respond to sanctions and/or treatment administered by the juvenile court. The policy question germane to this debate is finding the level of confinement within the juvenile justice system that maximizes the public safety and therapeutic benefits of institutional confinement. Unfortunately, research on this issue has been limited with regard to serious juvenile offenders. We use longitudinal data from a large sample of serious juvenile offenders from two large cities to 1) estimate a causal treatment effect of institutional placement, as opposed to probation, on future rate of rearrest and 2) investigate the existence of a marginal effect (i.e., benefit) for longer length of stay once the institutional placement decision had been made. We accomplish the latter by determining a dose-response relationship between the length of stay and future rates of rearrest and self-reported offending. The results suggest that an overall null effect of placement exists on future rates of rearrest or self-reported offending for serious juvenile offenders. We also find that, for the group placed out of the community, it is apparent that little or no marginal benefit exists for longer lengths of stay. Theoretical, empirical, and policy issues are outlined.

  10. An appraisal of critical effect sizes for the benchmark dose approach to assess dose-response relationships in genetic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Andreas; Duran-Pacheco, Gonzalo; Guérard, Melanie

    2017-08-10

    The benchmark dose (BMD) concept is increasingly utilized to analyze quantitative dose-response relationships in genetic toxicology. This methodology requires the user (i.e. the toxicologist) to a priori define a small increase over controls that is "acceptable" to be induced by a genotoxic test substance. The increase is called benchmark response (BMR) or critical effect size (CES), depending on the software used. To render the metrics calculated from the data of animals treated with the test substance applicable for risk assessment, the BMR or CES must represent biologically relevant changes of parameters measured in in vivo genotoxicity assays such as the Micronucleus, Comet, Transgenic rodent or Pig-a assay. Current recommendations for CES in genotoxicology are arbitrary (10% increase over mean vehicle controls) or based on limited, usually 5-6, data points (i.e. the standard deviation of the concurrent vehicle control group). We have, therefore, analyzed historical vehicle control data of standard in vivo genotoxicity test systems with statistical methods. Based on this evaluation, we illustrate limitations of the currently recommended CES values and propose a pragmatic approach that may contribute to better defining endpoint-specific CES values for BMD software like PROAST.

  11. ESTIMATING A DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LENGTH OF STAY AND FUTURE RECIDIVISM IN SERIOUS JUVENILE OFFENDERS*

    PubMed Central

    Loughran, Thomas A.; Mulvey, Edward P.; Schubert, Carol A.; Fagan, Jeffrey; Piquero, Alex R.; Losoya, Sandra H.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of sanctions on subsequent criminal activity is of central theoretical importance in criminology. A key question for juvenile justice policy is the degree to which serious juvenile offenders respond to sanctions and/or treatment administered by the juvenile court. The policy question germane to this debate is finding the level of confinement within the juvenile justice system that maximizes the public safety and therapeutic benefits of institutional confinement. Unfortunately, research on this issue has been limited with regard to serious juvenile offenders. We use longitudinal data from a large sample of serious juvenile offenders from two large cities to 1) estimate a causal treatment effect of institutional placement, as opposed to probation, on future rate of rearrest and 2) investigate the existence of a marginal effect (i.e., benefit) for longer length of stay once the institutional placement decision had been made. We accomplish the latter by determining a dose-response relationship between the length of stay and future rates of rearrest and self-reported offending. The results suggest that an overall null effect of placement exists on future rates of rearrest or self-reported offending for serious juvenile offenders. We also find that, for the group placed out of the community, it is apparent that little or no marginal benefit exists for longer lengths of stay. Theoretical, empirical, and policy issues are outlined. PMID:20052309

  12. Dose-response relationship of radiation-induced harderian gland tumors and myeloid leukemia of the CBA/Cne mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Majo, V.; Coppola, M.; Rebessi, S.; Bassani, B.; Alati, T.; Saran, A.; Bangrazi, C.; Covelli, V.

    1986-05-01

    Transplantation of harderian gland cells from CBA/-Cne mice into the fat pad of isogenic recipients was used for a quantitative in vivo study of cell survival and risk of transformation after x-ray irradiation (1-7 Gy). A survival curve for gland cells was generated in vivo with a D0 of 1.83 Gy and an extrapolation number of 7.23. Subsequently, the dose-response curve for lesions observed in nodules after cell transplantation was compared with that for lesions observed in glands irradiated in situ. A high incidence of epithelial hyperplasias with severe dysplasia was observed in transplantation nodules after x-irradiation. Gland tumors were significantly induced in whole-body irradiated animals; the tumors reached a maximum incidence after doses of 3 Gy. The risk of transformation per surviving cell was estimated both for dysplastic lesions and for tumors. These results approximated a dose-squared relationship in both cases, suggesting a common induction mechanism at the cellular level. Myeloid leukemia was observed at all doses in whole-body irradiated mice, and the maximum tumor incidence was reached at doses around 3 Gy.

  13. Dose-Response Relationship between Inorganic Arsenic Exposure and Lung Cancer among Arseniasis Residents with Low Methylation Capacity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Hsu, Ling-I; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2016-12-22

    Background Exposure to inorganic arsenic (InAs) has been documented as a risk factor for lung cancer. This study examined the association between InAs exposure, its metabolism, and lung cancer occurrence. Methods We followed 1300 residents from an arseniasis area in Taiwan, determined urinary InAs metabolites, and identified 39 lung cancer cases. Cox proportional hazard model was performed. Results The results demonstrated that participants with either the primary methylation index (monomethylarsonic acid [MMA]/InAs) or the secondary methylation index (dimethylarsinic acid[DMA]/MMA) lower than their respective median values were at a higher risk of lung cancer (hazard ratios from 3.41 to 4.66) than those with high methylation capacity. The incidence density of lung cancer increased from 79.9/100000 (year-1) to 467.4/100000 (year-1) for residents with low methylation capacity and from 0 to 158.5/100000 (year-1) for residents with high methylation capacity when the arsenic exposure dose increased from 2-10 ppb to ≥200 ppb, respectively. The analyses revealed a dose-response relationship between lung cancer occurrence and increasing arsenic concentrations in drinking water as well as cumulative arsenic exposure (monotonic trend test; P < .05 and P < .05, respectively) among the residents with low methylation capacity. The relationship between arsenic exposure and lung cancer among high methylaters was not statistically significant. Conclusions Hypomethylation responses to InAs exposure may dose-dependently increase lung cancer occurrence. Impact The high-risk characteristics observed among those exposed should be considered in future preventive medicine and research on arsenic carcinogenesis.

  14. Home dampness, childhood asthma, hay fever, and airway symptoms in Shanghai, China: associations, dose-response relationships, and lifestyle's influences.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Liu, W; Huang, C; Zou, Z J; Zhao, Z H; Shen, L; Sundell, J

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies of associations between dampness and respiratory diseases have been conducted, but their implications remain inconclusive. In this study of 13,335 parent-reported questionnaires (response rate: 85.3%), we analyzed associations between home dampness and asthma and related symptoms in 4- to 6-year-old children in a cross-sectional study of Shanghai. Indicators of home dampness were strongly and significantly associated with dry cough, wheeze, and rhinitis symptoms. In the current residence, children with visible mold spots (VMS) exposure had 32% higher risk of asthma (adjusted OR, 95% CI: 1.32, 1.07-1.64); damp clothing and/or bedding (frequently) was strongly associated with dry cough (1.78, 1.37-2.30); condensation on windows was strongly associated with hay fever (1.60, 1.27-2.01). In the early-life residence, VMS or damp stains (frequently) were strongly associated with dry cough (2.20, 1.55-3.11) and rhinitis ever (1.57, 1.11-2.21). Associations between dampness and diseases among children with or without family history of atopy were similar. The total number of dampness indicators had strong dose-response relationships with investigated health outcomes. Actions, including opening windows of the child's room at night and cleaning the child's room frequently, could potentially mitigate 25% of home VMS, thereby preventing more than 1.5% of attributable risk of the studied symptoms. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Curvilinear dose-response relationship of carbohydrate (0-120 g·h(-1)) and performance.

    PubMed

    Smith, Johneric W; Pascoe, David D; Passe, Dennis H; Ruby, Brent C; Stewart, Laura K; Baker, Lindsay B; Zachwieja, Jeffrey J

    2013-02-01

    There is a lack of consensus regarding the optimal range of carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion rates recommended for endurance athletes. This study investigated the relationship between CHO dose and cycling time trial performance to identify an optimal range of CHO ingestion rates for endurance performance. Fifty-one cyclists and triathletes (28 ± 7 yr, mean ± SD) across four research sites completed four trials. Each trial consisted of a 2-h constant load ride at 95% of the workload that elicited a 4-mmol·L(-1) blood lactate concentration immediately followed by a computer-simulated 20-km time trial, which subjects were asked to complete as quickly as possible. Twelve CHO electrolyte (18 mmol·L(-1) Na, 3 mmol·L(-1) K, and 11 mmol·L(-1) Cl) beverages (three at each site) were tested in a double-blind manner, providing subjects 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, and 120 g CHO (1:1:1 glucose-fructose-maltodextrin) per hour during the 2-h constant load ride at a fluid intake rate of 1 L·h(-1). All subjects also consumed a noncaloric placebo on one counterbalanced test occasion. Data were natural log transformed, subjected to a mixed-model analysis, and are reported as adjusted treatment means. We estimate incremental performance improvements of 1.0%, 2.0%, 3.0%, 4.0%, and 4.7% at 9, 19, 31, 48, and 78 g·h, respectively, with diminishing performance enhancement seen at CHO levels >78 g·h(-1). CHO beverage ingestion and endurance (∼160 min) performance appear to be related in a curvilinear dose-response manner, with the best performance occurring with a CHO (1:1:1 glucose-fructose-maltodextrin) ingestion rate of 78 g·h(-1).

  16. Dose-response relationships of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure and oxidative damage to DNA and lipid in coke oven workers.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Dan; Zhang, Wangzhen; Deng, Qifei; Zhang, Xiao; Huang, Kun; Guan, Lei; Hu, Die; Wu, Tangchun; Guo, Huan

    2013-07-02

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known to induce reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, but the dose-response relationships between exposure to PAHs and oxidative stress levels have not been established. In this study, we recruited 1333 male coke oven workers, monitored the levels of environmental PAHs, and measured internal PAH exposure biomarkers including 12 urinary PAH metabolites and plasma benzo[a]pyrene-r-7,t-8,t-9,c-10-tetrahydotetrol-albumin (BPDE-Alb) adducts, as well as the two oxidative biomarkers urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-iso-prostaglandin-F2α (8-iso-PGF2α). We found that the total concentration of urinary PAH metabolites and plasma BPDE-Alb adducts were both significantly associated with increased 8-OHdG and 8-iso-PGF2α in both smokers and nonsmokers (all p < 0.05). This exposure-response effect was also observed for most PAH metabolites (all p(trend) < 0.01), except for 4-hydroxyphenanthrene and 8-OHdG (p(trend) = 0.108). Furthermore, it was shown that only urinary 1-hydroxypyrene has a significant positive association with both 8-OHdG and 8-iso-PGF2α after a Bonferroni correction (p < 0.005). Our results indicated that urinary ΣOH-PAHs and plasma BPDE-Alb adducts can result in significant dose-related increases in oxidative damage to DNA and lipids. Furthermore, when a multianalyte method is unavailable, our findings demonstrate that urinary 1-hydroxypyrene is a useful biomarker for evaluating total PAHs exposure and assessing oxidative damage in coke oven workers.

  17. Positive linear dose-response relationships, but no J-shaped relationship, between drinking habits and estimated glomerular filtration rate in middle-aged Japanese men.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Yoshiro; Kuriki, Kiyonori; Endoh, Kaori; Miyauchi, Rie; Kasezawa, Nobuhiko; Tohyama, Kazushige; Goda, Toshinao

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between drinking frequency and amount of alcohol consumption (i.e., drinking habits) and the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains unclear. We aimed to clarify either a linear or J-shaped dose-response relationship between drinking habits and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) as a biomarker for identifying individuals at high risk of CKD. In a large-scale cross-sectional study, 403 men and 121 women with an eGFR of 30-60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) were defined as cases, and 1209 men and 363 women with ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) were randomly extracted as controls (one case subject was matched with three control subjects, matched according to age and season of data collection). We calculated multivariate-adjusted CKD risk and the corresponding mean eGFR according to drinking habits. In men, negative and positive linear relationships with drinking habits were found for CKD risk and mean eGFR (p < 0.001 for all linear terms), respectively, but there were no corresponding J-shaped relationships (not significant for all quadratic terms). In regard to the mean eGFR, however, positive linear relationships were only shown in men in the highest eGFR quartile (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01 for drinking frequency and amount of alcohol consumption, respectively). In women, no association was found. Regarding each drinking habit, we found a positive linear dose-response relationship to eGFR in middle-aged men with an eGFR ≥30 mL/min/1.73 m(2).

  18. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man. II. Response of the salivary glands during radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1983-08-01

    A quantitative dose-response curve for salivary gland function in patients during radiotherapy is presented. Salivary-function data used in this study were obtained from four previously published reports. All patients were treated with /sup 60/Co teletherapy to the head and neck using conventional treatment techniques. Salivary dysfunction was determined at specific dose levels by comparing salivary flow rates before therapy with flow rates at specific dose intervals during radiotherapy up to a total dose of 6000 cGy. Fifty percent salivary dysfunction occurred after 1000 cGy and eighty percent dysfunction was observed by the end of the therapy course (6000 cGy). The salivary-function curve was also compared to the previously published dose-response curve for taste function. Comparisons of the two curves indicate that salivary dysfunction precedes taste loss and that the shapes of the dose-response curves are different. A new term, tissue tolerance ratio, defined as the ratio of responses of two tissues given the same radiation dose, was used to make the comparisons between gustatory and salivary gland tissue effects. Measurements of salivary gland function and analysis of dose-response curves may be useful in evaluating chemical modifiers of radiation response.

  19. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man. II. Response of the salivary glands during radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1983-08-01

    A quantitative dose-response curve for salivary gland function in patients during radiotherapy is presented. Salivary-function data used in this study were obtained from four previously published reports. All patients were treated wih /sup 60/Co teletherapy to the head and neck using conventional treatment techniques. Salivary dysfunction was determined at specific dose levels by comparing salivary flow rates before therapy with flow rates at specific dose intervals during radiotherapy up to a total dose of 6000 cGy. Fifty percent salivary dysfunction occurred after 1000 cGy and eighty percent dysfunction was observed by the end of the therapy course (6000 cGy). The salivary-function curve was also compared to the previously published dose-response curve for taste function. Comparisons of the two curves indicate that salivary dysfunction precedes taste loss and that the shapes of the dose-response curves are different. A new term, tissue tolerance ratio, defined as the ratio of responses of two tissues given the same radiation dose, was used to make the comparisons between gustatory and salivary gland tissue effects. Measurements of salivary gland function and analysis of dose-response curves may be useful in evaluating chemical modifiers of radiation response.

  20. Establishment of in vitro 192Ir γ-ray dose-response relationship for dose assessment by the lymphocyte dicentric assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska, Maria; Meronka, Katarzyna; Szewczak, Kamil

    2012-03-01

    In vitro dose-response relationships are used to describe the relation between dicentric chromosomes and radiation dose for human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The dicentric yield depends on both the dose and the radiation quality. Thus, for reliable dose estimation in vitro dose responses must be determined for different radiation qualities. This paper reports the work for setting up the relationship for the dicentric production in the lymphocytes exposed in vitro to 192Ir g-rays at Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection (CLOR). In a case of a radiation accident in industrial radiography using 192Ir sealed sources, this will be the basis for the indirect evaluation of the g-ray dose to which an accidental victim was exposed.

  1. Predicting Dose-Response Relationships of Acute Cadmium Hepatoxicity and Metallothionein Regulation in the Rat Via In Vitro to In Vivo Extrapolation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    sensitivity to cadmium- induced hepatotoxicity in Fischer 344 and Sprague-Dawley rats . Toxicol. Sci. 67:329-40. Hoffman, E.O., Cook, J.A., DiLuzio, N.R...Vitro - In Vivo Extrapolation: Predicting Dose- Response Relationship of Acute Hepatotoxicity in the Rat (Rattus norvegicus) .............. 38 Appendix...absence of MT I and MT II has been shown to increase inorganic Cd- induced lethality and 3 hepatotoxicity , whereas gene over-expression causing

  2. The Role of Target and Bystander Cells in Dose-Response Relationship of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in Two Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Sazgarnia, Ameneh; Mohebbi, Shokoufe

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Radiation effect induced in nonirradiated cells which are adjacent or far from irradiated cells is termed radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE). Published data on dose-response relationship of RIBE is controversial. In the present study the role of targeted and bystander cells in RIBE dose-response relationship of two cell lines have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Two cell lines (QU-DB and MRC5) which had previously exhibited different dose-response relationship were selected. In the previous study the two cell lines received medium from autologous irradiated cells and the results showed that the magnitude of damages induced in QU-DB cells was dependent on dose unlike MRC5 cells. In the present study, the same cells irradiated with 0.5, 2 and 4 Gy gamma rays and their conditioned media were transferred to nonautologous bystander cells; such that the bystander effects due to cross-interaction between them were studied. Micronucleus assay was performed to measure the magnitude of damages induced in bystander cells (RIBE level). Results: QU-DB cells exhibited a dose-dependent response. RIBE level in MRC5 cells which received medium from 0.5 and 2 Gy QU-DB irradiated cells was not statistically different, but surprisingly when they received medium from 4Gy irradiated QU-DB cells, RIBE was abrogated. Conclusion: Results pertaining to QU-DB and MRC5 cells indicated that both target and bystander cells determined the outcome. Triggering the bystander effect depended on the radiation dose and the target cell-type, but when RIBE was triggered, dose-response relationship was predominantly determined by the bystander cell type. PMID:24298387

  3. Systematic review using meta-analyses to estimate dose-response relationships between iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status in different population groups.

    PubMed

    Ristić-Medić, Danijela; Dullemeijer, Carla; Tepsić, Jasna; Petrović-Oggiano, Gordana; Popović, Tamara; Arsić, Aleksandra; Glibetić, Marija; Souverein, Olga W; Collings, Rachel; Cavelaars, Adriënne; de Groot, Lisette; van't Veer, Pieter; Gurinović, Mirjana

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies investigating iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status, to assess the data of the selected studies, and to estimate dose-response relationships using meta-analysis. All randomized controlled trials, prospective cohort studies, nested case-control studies, and cross-sectional studies that supplied or measured dietary iodine and measured iodine biomarkers were included. The overall pooled regression coefficient (β) and the standard error of β were calculated by random-effects meta-analysis on a double-log scale, using the calculated intake-status regression coefficient (β) for each individual study. The results of pooled randomized controlled trials indicated that the doubling of dietary iodine intake increased urinary iodine concentrations by 14% in children and adolescents, by 57% in adults and the elderly, and by 81% in pregnant women. The dose-response relationship between iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status indicated a 12% decrease in thyroid-stimulating hormone and a 31% decrease in thyroglobulin in pregnant women. The model of dose-response quantification used to describe the relationship between iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status may be useful for providing complementary evidence to support recommendations for iodine intake in different population groups.

  4. The influence of tube voltage and phantom size in computed tomography on the dose-response relationship of dicentrics in human blood samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, G.; Lengsfeld, P.; Voth, M.; Schmid, E.; Pietsch, H.

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dose response relationship of dicentrics in human lymphocytes after CT scans at tube voltages of 80 and 140 kV. Blood samples from a healthy donor placed in tissue equivalent abdomen phantoms of standard, pediatric and adipose sizes were exposed at dose levels up to 0.1 Gy using a 64-slice CT scanner. It was found that both the tube voltage and the phantom size significantly influenced the CT scan-induced linear dose-response relationship of dicentrics in human lymphocytes. Using the same phantom (standard abdomen), 80 kV CT x-rays were biologically more effective than 140 kV CT x-rays. However, it could also be determined that the applied phantom size had much more influence on the biological effectiveness. Obviously, the increasing slopes of the CT scan-induced dose response relationships of dicentrics in human lymphocytes obtained in a pediatric, a standard and an adipose abdomen have been induced by scattering effects of photons, which strongly increase with increasing phantom size.

  5. Radiation dose-response relationships for thyroid nodules and autoimmune thyroid diseases in Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors 55-58 years after radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Misa; Usa, Toshiro; Tominaga, Tan; Neriishi, Kazuo; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Nakashima, Eiji; Ashizawa, Kiyoto; Hida, Ayumi; Soda, Midori; Fujiwara, Saeko; Yamada, Michiko; Ejima, Eri; Yokoyama, Naokata; Okubo, Masamichi; Sugino, Keizo; Suzuki, Gen; Maeda, Renju; Nagataki, Shigenobu; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2006-03-01

    Effects of irradiation on thyroid diseases such as thyroid nodules and autoimmune thyroid diseases have not been evaluated among people exposed to radiation more than 50 years in the past. To evaluate the prevalence of thyroid diseases and their radiation-dose responses in atomic bomb survivors. Survey study comprising 4091 cohort members (mean age, 70 [SD, 9] years; 1352 men and 2739 women) who participated in the thyroid study at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Thyroid examinations were conducted between March 2000 and February 2003. Prevalence of thyroid diseases, including thyroid nodules (malignant and benign) and autoimmune thyroid diseases, and the dose-response relationship of atomic bomb radiation in each thyroid disease. Thyroid diseases were identified in 1833 (44.8%) of the total participants (436 men [32.2% of men] and 1397 women [51.0% of women]) (P<.001). In 3185 participants, excluding persons exposed in utero, not in the city at the time of the atomic bombings, or with unknown radiation dose, the prevalence of all solid nodules, malignant tumors, benign nodules, and cysts was 14.6%, 2.2%, 4.9%, and 7.7%, respectively. The prevalence of positive thyroid antibodies, antithyroid antibody-positive hypothyroidism, and Graves disease was 28.2%, 3.2%, and 1.2%, respectively. A significant linear dose-response relationship was observed for the prevalence of all solid nodules, malignant tumors, benign nodules, and cysts (P<.001). We estimate that about 28% of all solid nodules, 37% of malignant tumors, 31% of benign nodules, and 25% of cysts are associated with radiation exposure at a mean and median thyroid radiation dose of 0.449 Sv and 0.087 Sv, respectively. No significant dose-response relationship was observed for positive antithyroid antibodies (P = .20), antithyroid antibody-positive hypothyroidism (P = .92), or Graves disease (P = .10). A significant linear radiation dose response for thyroid nodules, including malignant tumors and

  6. Dose-response relationship of physical activity to premature and total all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in walkers.

    PubMed

    Williams, Paul T

    2013-01-01

    To assess the dose-response relationships between cause-specific mortality and exercise energy expenditure in a prospective epidemiological cohort of walkers. The sample consisted of the 8,436 male and 33,586 female participants of the National Walkers' Health Study. Walking energy expenditure was calculated in metabolic equivalents (METs, 1 MET = 3.5 ml O2/kg/min), which were used to divide the cohort into four exercise categories: category 1 (≤ 1.07 MET-hours/d), category 2 (1.07 to 1.8 MET-hours/d), category 3 (1.8 to 3.6 MET-hours/d), and category 4 (≥ 3.6 MET-hours/d). Competing risk regression analyses were use to calculate the risk of mortality for categories 2, 3 and 4 relative to category 1. 22.9% of the subjects were in category 1, 16.1% in category 2, 33.3% in category 3, and 27.7% in category 4. There were 2,448 deaths during the 9.6 average years of follow-up. Total mortality was 11.2% lower in category 2 (P = 0.04), 32.4% lower in category 3 (P<10(-12)) and 32.9% lower in category 4 (P = 10(-11)) than in category 1. For underlying causes of death, the respective risk reductions for categories 2, 3 and 4 were 23.6% (P = 0.008), 35.2% (P<10(-5)), and 34.9% (P = 0.0001) for cardiovascular disease mortality; 27.8% (P = 0.18), 20.6% (P = 0.07), and 31.4% (P = 0.009) for ischemic heart disease mortality; and 39.4% (P = 0.18), 63.8% (P = 0.005), and 90.6% (P = 0.002) for diabetes mortality when compared to category 1. For all related mortality (i.e., underlying and contributing causes of death combined), the respective risk reductions for categories 2, 3 and 4 were 18.7% (P = 0.22), 42.5% (P = 0.001), and 57.5% (P = 0.0001) for heart failure; 9.4% (P = 0.56), 44.3% (P = 0.0004), and 33.5% (P = 0.02) for hypertensive diseases; 11.5% (P = 0.38), 41.0% (P<10(-4)), and 35.5% (P = 0.001) for dysrhythmias: and 23.2% (P = 0.13), 45.8% (P = 0.0002), and 41.1% (P = 0.005) for

  7. An update on modeling dose-response relationships: Accounting for correlated data structure and heterogeneous error variance in linear and nonlinear mixed models.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, M A D; Bello, N M; Dritz, S S; Tokach, M D; DeRouchey, J M; Woodworth, J C; Goodband, R D

    2016-05-01

    Advanced methods for dose-response assessments are used to estimate the minimum concentrations of a nutrient that maximizes a given outcome of interest, thereby determining nutritional requirements for optimal performance. Contrary to standard modeling assumptions, experimental data often present a design structure that includes correlations between observations (i.e., blocking, nesting, etc.) as well as heterogeneity of error variances; either can mislead inference if disregarded. Our objective is to demonstrate practical implementation of linear and nonlinear mixed models for dose-response relationships accounting for correlated data structure and heterogeneous error variances. To illustrate, we modeled data from a randomized complete block design study to evaluate the standardized ileal digestible (SID) Trp:Lys ratio dose-response on G:F of nursery pigs. A base linear mixed model was fitted to explore the functional form of G:F relative to Trp:Lys ratios and assess model assumptions. Next, we fitted 3 competing dose-response mixed models to G:F, namely a quadratic polynomial (QP) model, a broken-line linear (BLL) ascending model, and a broken-line quadratic (BLQ) ascending model, all of which included heteroskedastic specifications, as dictated by the base model. The GLIMMIX procedure of SAS (version 9.4) was used to fit the base and QP models and the NLMIXED procedure was used to fit the BLL and BLQ models. We further illustrated the use of a grid search of initial parameter values to facilitate convergence and parameter estimation in nonlinear mixed models. Fit between competing dose-response models was compared using a maximum likelihood-based Bayesian information criterion (BIC). The QP, BLL, and BLQ models fitted on G:F of nursery pigs yielded BIC values of 353.7, 343.4, and 345.2, respectively, thus indicating a better fit of the BLL model. The BLL breakpoint estimate of the SID Trp:Lys ratio was 16.5% (95% confidence interval [16.1, 17.0]). Problems with

  8. Second Solid Cancers After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Studies of the Radiation Dose-Response Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P.

    2013-06-01

    Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ≥60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

  9. Dose-Response Relationship Between Serum 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin and Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Michael; Narayan, K. M. Venkat; Flanders, Dana; Chang, Ellen T.; Adami, Hans-Olov; Boffetta, Paolo; Mandel, Jack S.

    2015-01-01

    We systematically evaluated studies published through May 2014 in which investigators assessed the dose-response relationship between serum levels of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and the occurrence of diabetes mellitus (DM), and we investigated the extent and sources of interstudy heterogeneity. The dose-response relationship between serum TCDD and DM across studies was examined using 2 dependent variables: an exposure level–specific proportion of persons with DM and a corresponding natural log-transformed ratio measure of the association between TCDD and DM. Regression slopes for each dependent variable were obtained for each study and included in a random-effects meta-analysis. Sensitivity analyses were used to assess the influence of inclusion and exclusion decisions, and sources of heterogeneity were explored using meta-regression models and a series of subanalyses. None of the summary estimates in the main models or in the sensitivity analyses indicated a statistically significant association. We found a pronounced dichotomy: a positive dose-response in cross-sectional studies of populations with low-level TCDD exposures (serum concentrations <10 pg/g lipid) and heterogeneous, but on balance null, results for prospective studies of persons with high prediagnosis TCDD body burdens. Considering the discrepancy of results for low current versus high past TCDD levels, the available data do not indicate that increasing TCDD exposure is associated with an increased risk of DM. PMID:25731889

  10. Ecological versus case-control studies for testing a linear-no threshold dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B L

    1990-09-01

    The two basic problems with ecological studies are (A) individuals studied are not necessarily the individuals who are at risk, and (B) they are very vulnerable to confounding factors. It is shown that where the study is designed to test a linear-no threshold dose-response theory, (A) does not apply. Where the ecological study deals with the average dose and response in a large number of US counties, the available data and computer capability for reducing effects of confounders are so powerful that (B) may be no more important for the ecological than for a case-control study. The migration problem is treated and found to be relatively unimportant.

  11. Dose-response relationships for the onset of avoidance of sonar by free-ranging killer whales.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patrick J O; Antunes, Ricardo N; Wensveen, Paul J; Samarra, Filipa I P; Alves, Ana Catarina; Tyack, Peter L; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Kleivane, Lars; Lam, Frans-Peter A; Ainslie, Michael A; Thomas, Len

    2014-02-01

    Eight experimentally controlled exposures to 1-2 kHz or 6-7 kHz sonar signals were conducted with four killer whale groups. The source level and proximity of the source were increased during each exposure in order to reveal response thresholds. Detailed inspection of movements during each exposure session revealed sustained changes in speed and travel direction judged to be avoidance responses during six of eight sessions. Following methods developed for Phase-I clinical trials in human medicine, response thresholds ranging from 94 to 164 dB re 1 μPa received sound pressure level (SPL) were fitted to Bayesian dose-response functions. Thresholds did not consistently differ by sonar frequency or whether a group had previously been exposed, with a mean SPL response threshold of 142 ± 15 dB (mean ± s.d.). High levels of between- and within-individual variability were identified, indicating that thresholds depended upon other undefined contextual variables. The dose-response functions indicate that some killer whales started to avoid sonar at received SPL below thresholds assumed by the U.S. Navy. The predicted extent of habitat over which avoidance reactions occur depends upon whether whales responded to proximity or received SPL of the sonar or both, but was large enough to raise concerns about biological consequences to the whales.

  12. A meta-analysis including dose-response relationship between night shift work and the risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Ji, Alin; Zhu, Yi; Liang, Zhen; Wu, Jian; Li, Shiqi; Meng, Shuai; Zheng, Xiangyi; Xie, Liping

    2015-09-22

    A meta-analysis was conducted to quantitatively evaluate the correlation between night shift work and the risk of colorectal cancer. We searched for publications up to March 2015 using PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, EMBASE and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases, and the references of the retrieved articles and relevant reviews were also checked. OR and 95% CI were used to assess the degree of the correlation between night shift work and risk of colorectal cancer via fixed- or random-effect models. A dose-response meta-analysis was performed as well. The pooled OR estimates of the included studies illustrated that night shift work was correlated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (OR = 1.318, 95% CI 1.121-1.551). No evidence of publication bias was detected. In the dose-response analysis, the rate of colorectal cancer increased by 11% for every 5 years increased in night shift work (OR = 1.11, 95% CI 1.03-1.20). In conclusion, this meta-analysis indicated that night shift work was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Further researches should be conducted to confirm our findings and clarify the potential biological mechanisms.

  13. Site-specific dose-response relationships for cancer induction from the combined Japanese A-bomb and Hodgkin cohorts for doses relevant to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uwe; Sumila, Marcin; Robotka, Judith

    2011-07-26

    Most information on the dose-response of radiation-induced cancer is derived from data on the A-bomb survivors. Since, for radiation protection purposes, the dose span of main interest is between zero and one Gy, the analysis of the A-bomb survivors is usually focused on this range. However, estimates of cancer risk for doses larger than one Gy are becoming more important for radiotherapy patients. Therefore in this work, emphasis is placed on doses relevant for radiotherapy with respect to radiation induced solid cancer. For various organs and tissues the analysis of cancer induction was extended by an attempted combination of the linear-no-threshold model from the A-bomb survivors in the low dose range and the cancer risk data of patients receiving radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease in the high dose range. The data were fitted using organ equivalent dose (OED) calculated for a group of different dose-response models including a linear model, a model including fractionation, a bell-shaped model and a plateau-dose-response relationship. The quality of the applied fits shows that the linear model fits best colon, cervix and skin. All other organs are best fitted by the model including fractionation indicating that the repopulation/repair ability of tissue is neither 0 nor 100% but somewhere in between. Bone and soft tissue sarcoma were fitted well by all the models. In the low dose range beyond 1 Gy sarcoma risk is negligible. For increasing dose, sarcoma risk increases rapidly and reaches a plateau at around 30 Gy. In this work OED for various organs was calculated for a linear, a bell-shaped, a plateau and a mixture between a bell-shaped and plateau dose-response relationship for typical treatment plans of Hodgkin's disease patients. The model parameters (α and R) were obtained by a fit of the dose-response relationships to these OED data and to the A-bomb survivors. For any three-dimensional inhomogenous dose distribution, cancer risk can be compared by

  14. Site-specific dose-response relationships for cancer induction from the combined Japanese A-bomb and Hodgkin cohorts for doses relevant to radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Most information on the dose-response of radiation-induced cancer is derived from data on the A-bomb survivors. Since, for radiation protection purposes, the dose span of main interest is between zero and one Gy, the analysis of the A-bomb survivors is usually focused on this range. However, estimates of cancer risk for doses larger than one Gy are becoming more important for radiotherapy patients. Therefore in this work, emphasis is placed on doses relevant for radiotherapy with respect to radiation induced solid cancer. Materials and methods For various organs and tissues the analysis of cancer induction was extended by an attempted combination of the linear-no-threshold model from the A-bomb survivors in the low dose range and the cancer risk data of patients receiving radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease in the high dose range. The data were fitted using organ equivalent dose (OED) calculated for a group of different dose-response models including a linear model, a model including fractionation, a bell-shaped model and a plateau-dose-response relationship. Results The quality of the applied fits shows that the linear model fits best colon, cervix and skin. All other organs are best fitted by the model including fractionation indicating that the repopulation/repair ability of tissue is neither 0 nor 100% but somewhere in between. Bone and soft tissue sarcoma were fitted well by all the models. In the low dose range beyond 1 Gy sarcoma risk is negligible. For increasing dose, sarcoma risk increases rapidly and reaches a plateau at around 30 Gy. Conclusions In this work OED for various organs was calculated for a linear, a bell-shaped, a plateau and a mixture between a bell-shaped and plateau dose-response relationship for typical treatment plans of Hodgkin's disease patients. The model parameters (α and R) were obtained by a fit of the dose-response relationships to these OED data and to the A-bomb survivors. For any three

  15. [DNA double-strand breaks in human lymphocytes after single irradiation by low doses of pulsed X-rays: non-linear dose-response relationship].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, S A; Stepanova, E Iu; Kutenkov, O P; Belenko, A A; Zharkova, L P; Bol'shakov, M A; Lebedev, I N; Rostov, V V

    2012-01-01

    Effects of ionizing radiation registered in cells after low dose irradiation are still poorly understood. A pulsed mode of irradiation is even more problematic in terms of predicting the radiation-induced response in cells. Thus, the aim of this paper was to study and analyze the effects of dose and frequency of pulsed X-rays on the frequency of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks and their repair kinetics in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. Analysis of radiation-induced gammaH2AX and 53BP1 repair foci was used to assess the DNA damage in these cells. The dose-response curve of radiation-induced foci of both proteins has shown deviations from linearity to a higher effect in the 12-32 mGy dose range and a lower effect at 72 mGy. The dose-response curve was linear at doses higher than 100 mGy. The number of radiation-induced gammaH2AX and 53BP1 foci depended on the frequency of X-ray pulses: the highest effect was registered at 13 pulses per second. Moreover, slower repair kinetics was observed for those foci induced by very low doses with a nonlinear dose-response relationship.

  16. Dose-response relationship of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes obtained for the fission neutron therapy facility MEDAPP at the research reactor FRM II.

    PubMed

    Schmid, E; Wagner, F M; Romm, H; Walsh, L; Roos, H

    2009-02-01

    The biological effectiveness of neutrons from the neutron therapy facility MEDAPP (mean neutron energy 1.9 MeV) at the new research reactor FRM II at Garching, Germany, has been analyzed, at different depths in a polyethylene phantom. Whole blood samples were exposed to the MEDAPP beam in special irradiation chambers to total doses of 0.14-3.52 Gy at 2-cm depth, and 0.18-3.04 Gy at 6-cm depth of the phantom. The neutron and gamma-ray absorbed dose rates were measured to be 0.55 Gy min(-1) and 0.27 Gy min(-1) at 2-cm depth, while they were 0.28 and 0.25 Gy min(-1) at 6-cm depth. Although the irradiation conditions at the MEDAPP beam and the RENT beam of the former FRM I research reactor were not identical, neutrons from both facilities gave a similar linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for dicentric chromosomes at a depth of 2 cm. Different dose-response curves for dicentrics were obtained for the MEDAPP beam at 2 and 6 cm depth, suggesting a significantly lower biological effectiveness of the radiation with increasing depth. No obvious differences in the dose-response curves for dicentric chromosomes estimated under interactive or additive prediction between neutrons or gamma-rays and the experimentally obtained dose-response curves could be determined. Relative to (60)Co gamma-rays, the values for the relative biological effectiveness at the MEDAPP beam decrease from 5.9 at 0.14 Gy to 1.6 at 3.52 Gy at 2-cm depth, and from 4.1 at 0.18 Gy to 1.5 at 3.04 Gy at 6-cm depth. Using the best possible conditions of consistency, i.e., using blood samples from the same donor and the same measurement techniques for about two decades, avoiding the inter-individual variations in sensitivity or the differences in methodology usually associated with inter-laboratory comparisons, a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for the mixed neutron and gamma-ray MEDAPP field as well as for its fission neutron part was obtained. Therefore, the debate on whether the fission

  17. Dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and the serum enzymes for liver function tests in the individuals exposed to arsenic: a cross sectional study in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Islam, Khairul; Haque, Abedul; Karim, Rezaul; Fajol, Abul; Hossain, Ekhtear; Salam, Kazi Abdus; Ali, Nurshad; Saud, Zahangir Alam; Rahman, Matiar; Rahman, Mashiur; Karim, Rezaul; Sultana, Papia; Hossain, Mostaque; Akhand, Anwarul Azim; Mandal, Abul; Miyataka, Hideki; Himeno, Seiichiro; Hossain, Khaled

    2011-07-08

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been shown to cause liver damage. However, serum hepatic enzyme activity as recognized on liver function tests (LFTs) showing a dose-response relationship with arsenic exposure has not yet been clearly documented. The aim of our study was to investigate the dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and major serum enzyme marker activity associated with LFTs in the population living in arsenic-endemic areas in Bangladesh. A total of 200 residents living in arsenic-endemic areas in Bangladesh were selected as study subjects. Arsenic concentrations in the drinking water, hair and nails were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The study subjects were stratified into quartile groups as follows, based on concentrations of arsenic in the drinking water, as well as in subjects' hair and nails: lowest, low, medium and high. The serum hepatic enzyme activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were then assayed. Arsenic concentrations in the subjects' hair and nails were positively correlated with arsenic levels in the drinking water. As regards the exposure-response relationship with arsenic in the drinking water, the respective activities of ALP, AST and ALT were found to be significantly increased in the high-exposure groups compared to the lowest-exposure groups before and after adjustments were made for different covariates. With internal exposure markers (arsenic in hair and nails), the ALP, AST and ALT activity profiles assumed a similar shape of dose-response relationship, with very few differences seen in the higher groups compared to the lowest group, most likely due to the temporalities of exposure metrics. The present study demonstrated that arsenic concentrations in the drinking water were strongly correlated with arsenic concentrations in the subjects' hair and nails. Further, this study revealed a novel exposure- and dose- response

  18. Dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and the serum enzymes for liver function tests in the individuals exposed to arsenic: a cross sectional study in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic arsenic exposure has been shown to cause liver damage. However, serum hepatic enzyme activity as recognized on liver function tests (LFTs) showing a dose-response relationship with arsenic exposure has not yet been clearly documented. The aim of our study was to investigate the dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and major serum enzyme marker activity associated with LFTs in the population living in arsenic-endemic areas in Bangladesh. Methods A total of 200 residents living in arsenic-endemic areas in Bangladesh were selected as study subjects. Arsenic concentrations in the drinking water, hair and nails were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The study subjects were stratified into quartile groups as follows, based on concentrations of arsenic in the drinking water, as well as in subjects' hair and nails: lowest, low, medium and high. The serum hepatic enzyme activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were then assayed. Results Arsenic concentrations in the subjects' hair and nails were positively correlated with arsenic levels in the drinking water. As regards the exposure-response relationship with arsenic in the drinking water, the respective activities of ALP, AST and ALT were found to be significantly increased in the high-exposure groups compared to the lowest-exposure groups before and after adjustments were made for different covariates. With internal exposure markers (arsenic in hair and nails), the ALP, AST and ALT activity profiles assumed a similar shape of dose-response relationship, with very few differences seen in the higher groups compared to the lowest group, most likely due to the temporalities of exposure metrics. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that arsenic concentrations in the drinking water were strongly correlated with arsenic concentrations in the subjects' hair and nails. Further, this study revealed a

  19. Comparison of Ecotoxicological Dose-Response Relationships between Amphibians (Lithobates sylvaticus and Ambystoma maculatum) and Fish (Salmo salar and Salvelinus fontinalis) in the Freshwater Acidification Literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, A.; Gooding Lassiter, M.; Greaver, T.

    2016-12-01

    Ecosystem acidification due to increased deposition of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and sulfur (SOX) has been an issue since the 1970s. Elevated levels of NOX and SOX deposition due to human activity can cause chemical changes in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems, which may adversely affect biota. Reduced pH is a chemical change that may be caused by elevated deposition; survival is an example of a biological response to chemical changes. Although amphibians have historically been considered relatively tolerant to acidification, most studies have focused on phytoplankton, invertebrates and fish. The goal of this study is to compare ecotoxicological dose-response relationships for amphibians and fish in the freshwater acidification literature from the 1970s to the present. Our data sources were references from the U.S. EPA's 2008 Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur - Ecological Criteria, references from the Baker et al. 1990 report "Biological effects of changes in surface water acid-base chemistry", and keyword searches in Web of Science limited to 1990 to 2016 to include more recent studies. Fish comprised nearly 50% of the 54 identified species or groupings for which acidification effects are available, and amphibians comprised about 12% of them. Initial data suggest the most common dose-response relationship among commonly studied fish and amphibians was pH versus survival. Amphibians (Lithobates sylvaticus and Ambystoma maculatum) appear more tolerant to acidification than fish (Salmo salar and Salvelinus fontinalis). Although this observation is solely based on the pH versus survival dose-response relationships, other factors may also contribute to differences in tolerance to acidification between amphibians and fish. The views expressed in this abstract are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of the U.S. EPA.

  20. Does Incidental Irradiation With Doses Below 50 Gy Effectively Reduce Isolated Nodal Failures in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Dose-Response Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Kepka, Lucyna; Maciejewski, B. Withers, Rodney H.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose-response relationship for a wide range of doses lower than 50 Gy delivered to the hilar and mediastinal lymph node stations from incidental irradiation in 220 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The endpoint was isolated nodal recurrence (INR) in stations that were initially negative. Methods and Materials: The individual responses of 2596 nodal stations were analyzed. Different fractionation schedules were used in different patients. Total prescribed tumor doses ranged from 52 Gy to 74 Gy given over 16-56 days. There were 1198 nodal stations (46%) within and 1398 stations beyond the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) volumes. The INR incidence was estimated for six dose levels ranging from 5 {+-} 5 Gy to {>=}56 Gy. Results: There were a total of 25 INRs in 17 patients (8%). The incidence of INR within the electively treated volumes was 0.58%, compared with 1.28% in nodal stations beyond the ENI. Almost 80% of the INRs occurred during 10 months of follow-up. A strong dose-response relationship was seen for the lower 'incidental' doses, most of which were less than 50 Gy. As the dose increased from 5 {+-} 5 Gy to 40 {+-} 5 Gy, the rate of freedom from INR increased from 12% to 76% (p = 0.005). Conclusions: There is evidence of a dose-response relationship between a reduction in the rate of INR and doses lower than 50 Gy. This suggests that incidental irradiation can eradicate at least some subclinical metastases in regional lymph nodes.

  1. Effects and dose-response relationships of resistance training on physical performance in youth athletes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lesinski, Melanie; Prieske, Olaf; Granacher, Urs

    2016-07-01

    To quantify age, sex, sport and training type-specific effects of resistance training on physical performance, and to characterise dose-response relationships of resistance training parameters that could maximise gains in physical performance in youth athletes. Systematic review and meta-analysis of intervention studies. Studies were identified by systematic literature search in the databases PubMed and Web of Science (1985-2015). Weighted mean standardised mean differences (SMDwm) were calculated using random-effects models. Only studies with an active control group were included if these investigated the effects of resistance training in youth athletes (6-18 years) and tested at least one physical performance measure. 43 studies met the inclusion criteria. Our analyses revealed moderate effects of resistance training on muscle strength and vertical jump performance (SMDwm 0.8-1.09), and small effects on linear sprint, agility and sport-specific performance (SMDwm 0.58-0.75). Effects were moderated by sex and resistance training type. Independently computed dose-response relationships for resistance training parameters revealed that a training period of >23 weeks, 5 sets/exercise, 6-8 repetitions/set, a training intensity of 80-89% of 1 repetition maximum (RM), and 3-4 min rest between sets were most effective to improve muscle strength (SMDwm 2.09-3.40). Resistance training is an effective method to enhance muscle strength and jump performance in youth athletes, moderated by sex and resistance training type. Dose-response relationships for key training parameters indicate that youth coaches should primarily implement resistance training programmes with fewer repetitions and higher intensities to improve physical performance measures of youth athletes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Dicentric chromosomes and gamma-H2AX foci formation in lymphocytes of human blood samples exposed to a CT scanner: a direct comparison of dose response relationships.

    PubMed

    Golfier, Sven; Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus; Lengsfeld, Philipp; Eckardt-Schupp, Friederike; Schmid, Ernst; Voth, Matthias

    2009-02-01

    Experiments using the induction of dicentric chromosomes (dicentrics) as well as the gamma-H2AX foci formation in lymphocytes of blood samples from a healthy donor were performed to directly evaluate the radiation sensitivity of both biological endpoints. For computed tomography scans at dose levels from 0.025 to 1 Gy, a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for dicentrics and a linear dose-response relationship for gamma-H2AX foci were obtained. The coefficients of the dose-response relationship for dicentrics are alpha = (3.76 +/- 0.29) x 10(-2) Gy(-1) and beta = (5.54 +/- 0.45) x 10(-2) Gy(-2), the linear coefficient for gamma-H2AX foci is (7.38 +/- 0.11) Gy(-1). The findings indicate that scoring of dicentrics as well as microscopic analysis of gamma-H2AX foci are sensitive methods to quantify a radiation-induced biological damage at low doses. However, since gamma-H2AX foci can be partially repaired within a few hours, biological damages present for days or even months, which constitute the clinically relevant endpoints, can only be quantified reliably by scoring of chromosome aberrations. Thus currently the quantification of dicentrics or reciprocal translocations remains the recommended method for estimating the effect of exposures to low dose levels of radiation ('biological dosimetry'). However, owing to the high radiation sensitivity of the gamma-H2AX foci assay observed in the present study, further investigations on the effectiveness of low-linear energy transfer radiation qualities in producing gamma-H2AX foci in lymphocytes from healthy donors should be performed.

  3. The Relationship between Zinc Intake and Serum/Plasma Zinc Concentration in Children: A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Victoria Hall; Stammers, Anna-Louise; Medina, Marisol Warthon; Patel, Sujata; Dykes, Fiona; Souverein, Olga W.; Dullemeijer, Carla; Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Nissensohn, Mariela; Lowe, Nicola M.

    2012-01-01

    Recommendations for zinc intake during childhood vary widely across Europe. The EURRECA project attempts to consolidate the basis for the definition of micronutrient requirements, taking into account relationships among intake, status and health outcomes, in order to harmonise these recommendations. Data on zinc intake and biomarkers of zinc status reported in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) can provide estimates of dose-response relationships which may be used for underpinning zinc reference values. This systematic review included all RCTs of apparently healthy children aged 1–17 years published by February 2010 which provided data on zinc intake and biomarkers of zinc status. An intake-status regression coefficient () was calculated for each individual study and calculated the overall pooled and SE () using random effects meta-analysis on a double log scale. The pooled dose-response relationship between zinc intake and zinc status indicated that a doubling of the zinc intake increased the serum/plasma zinc status by 9%. This evidence can be utilised, together with currently used balance studies and repletion/depletion studies, when setting zinc recommendations as a basis for nutrition policies. PMID:23016120

  4. Dose response explorer: an integrated open-source tool for exploring and modelling radiotherapy dose volume outcome relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, I.; Suneja, G.; Lindsay, P. E.; Hope, A. J.; Alaly, J. R.; Vicic, M.; Bradley, J. D.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2006-11-01

    Radiotherapy treatment outcome models are a complicated function of treatment, clinical and biological factors. Our objective is to provide clinicians and scientists with an accurate, flexible and user-friendly software tool to explore radiotherapy outcomes data and build statistical tumour control or normal tissue complications models. The software tool, called the dose response explorer system (DREES), is based on Matlab, and uses a named-field structure array data type. DREES/Matlab in combination with another open-source tool (CERR) provides an environment for analysing treatment outcomes. DREES provides many radiotherapy outcome modelling features, including (1) fitting of analytical normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and tumour control probability (TCP) models, (2) combined modelling of multiple dose-volume variables (e.g., mean dose, max dose, etc) and clinical factors (age, gender, stage, etc) using multi-term regression modelling, (3) manual or automated selection of logistic or actuarial model variables using bootstrap statistical resampling, (4) estimation of uncertainty in model parameters, (5) performance assessment of univariate and multivariate analyses using Spearman's rank correlation and chi-square statistics, boxplots, nomograms, Kaplan-Meier survival plots, and receiver operating characteristics curves, and (6) graphical capabilities to visualize NTCP or TCP prediction versus selected variable models using various plots. DREES provides clinical researchers with a tool customized for radiotherapy outcome modelling. DREES is freely distributed. We expect to continue developing DREES based on user feedback.

  5. Toxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles on soil nitrification at environmentally relevant concentrations: Lack of classical dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Marie; Martins, Jean M F; Le Roux, Xavier; Uzu, Gaëlle; Calas, Aude; Richaume, Agnès

    2017-03-01

    Titanium-dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) are increasingly released in agricultural soils through, e.g. biosolids, irrigation or nanoagrochemicals. Soils are submitted to a wide range of concentrations of TiO2-NPs depending on the type of exposure. However, most studies have assessed the effects of unrealistically high concentrations, and the dose-response relationships are not well characterized for soil microbial communities. Here, using soil microcosms, we assessed the impact of TiO2-NPs at concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 500 mg kg(-1 )dry-soil, on the activity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB), and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (Nitrobacter and Nitrospira). In addition, aggregation and oxidative potential of TiO2-NPs were measured in the spiking suspensions, as they can be important drivers of TiO2-NPs toxicity. After 90 days of exposure, non-classical dose-response relationships were observed for nitrifier abundance or activity, making threshold concentrations impossible to compute. Indeed, AOA abundance was reduced by 40% by TiO2-NPs whatever the concentration, while Nitrospira was never affected. Moreover, AOB and Nitrobacter abundances were decreased mainly at intermediate concentrations nitrification was reduced by 25% at the lowest (0.05 mg kg(-1)) and the highest (100 and 500 mg kg(-1)) TiO2-NPs concentrations. Path analyses indicated that TiO2-NPs affected nitrification through an effect on the specific activity of nitrifiers, in addition to indirect effects on nitrifier abundances. Altogether these results point out the need to include very low concentrations of NPs in soil toxicological studies, and the lack of relevance of classical dose-response tests and ecotoxicological dose metrics (EC50, IC50…) for TiO2-NPs impact on soil microorganisms.

  6. Dose-response relationships of inhaled insulin delivered via the Aerodose insulin inhaler and subcutaneously injected insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dennis; Mudaliar, Sunder; Chinnapongse, Sithipol; Chu, Neelima; Boies, Sarah M; Davis, Trent; Perera, Ayesh D; Fishman, Robert S; Shapiro, David A; Henry, Robert

    2003-10-01

    To compare the dose-response relationship following inhalation of regular insulin delivered via the Aerodose insulin inhaler with that following subcutaneously injected regular insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-four patients with type 2 diabetes (21 nonsmoking men, aged 36-80 years) each received two of three doses of 80, 160, or 240 units inhaled regular insulin, delivered via a clinical Aerodose insulin inhaler, and two of three corresponding doses of 8, 16, or 24 units by subcutaneous injection under isoglycemic clamp conditions on 4 separate study days in an incomplete block design study. Glucose infusion rates (GIRs) and serum insulin concentrations were monitored over the following 8 h. Inhaled insulin exhibited significantly shorter time-to-peak insulin levels (T(max) 77 +/- 66 vs. 193 +/- 104 min, P < 0.001) and time-to-peak metabolic effects (T(GIRmax) 240 +/- 94 vs. 353 +/- 60 min, P < 0.001) compared with subcutaneously injected insulin. Comparison of total insulin absorption (insulin area under the curve [AUC]) versus total metabolic effect (GIR-AUC) from 0 to 8 h (group means) revealed overlapping dose-response relationships for both inhaled and subcutaneous injection treatments. Comparison of slopes revealed no significant differences between the inhaled and subcutaneous injection treatment groups (P = 0.6). No significant differences in either relative bioavailability or relative biopotency were found among doses, indicating a consistent subcutaneous injection-to-inhaled dosing conversion ratio among doses. No serious adverse events or clinically relevant changes in lung function were observed. The overlapping dose-response curves of inhaled and subcutaneous treatments together with a consistent relative bioavailability and relative biopotency for inhaled insulin across doses suggest that the Aerodose insulin inhaler will deliver a pharmacologically predictable insulin dose to patients with diabetes similar to that observed following

  7. Adaptive response to hydrogen peroxide in yeast: induction, time course, and relationship to dose-response models.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, George R; Moczula, Andrew V; Laterza, Amanda M; Macneil, Lindsey K; Tartaglione, Jason P

    2013-07-01

    The assay for trp5 gene conversion and ilv1-92 reversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain D7 was used to characterize the induction of an adaptive response by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Effects of a small priming dose on the genotoxic effects of a larger challenge dose were measured in exponential cultures and in early stationary phase. An adaptive response, indicated by smaller convertant and revertant frequencies after the priming dose, occurred at lower priming and challenge doses in young, well-aerated cultures. Closely spaced priming doses from 0.000975 to 2 mM, followed by a 1 mM challenge, showed that the induction of the adaptive response is biphasic. In exponential cultures it was maximal with a priming dose of 0.125-0.25 mM. Very small priming doses were insufficient to induce the adaptive response, whereas higher doses contributed to damage. A significant adaptive response was detected when the challenge dose was administered 10-20 min after the priming exposure. It was fully expressed within 45 min, and the yeast began to return to the nonadapted state after 4-6 hr. Because of the similarity of the biphasic induction to hormetic curves and the proposal that adaptive responses are a manifestation of hormesis, we evaluated whether the low doses of H(2)O(2) that induce the adaptive response show a clear hormetic response without a subsequent challenge dose. Hormesis was not evident, but there was an apparent threshold for genotoxicity at or slightly below 0.125 mM. The results are discussed with respect to linear, threshold, and hormesis dose-response models.

  8. Dose-response relationship of robot-assisted stroke motor rehabilitation: the impact of initial motor status.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-wei; Wu, Ching-yi; Lin, Keh-chung; Yao, Grace; Wu, Kuen-yuh; Chang, Ya-ju

    2012-10-01

    The increasing availability of robot-assisted therapy (RT), which provides quantifiable, reproducible, interactive, and intensive practice, holds promise for stroke rehabilitation, but data on its dose-response relation are scanty. This study used 2 different intensities of RT to examine the treatment effects of RT and the effect on outcomes of the severity of initial motor deficits. Fifty-four patients with stroke were randomized to a 4-week intervention of higher-intensity RT, lower-intensity RT, or control treatment. The primary outcome, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, was administered at baseline, midterm, and posttreatment. Secondary outcomes included the Medical Research Council scale, the Motor Activity Log, and the physical domains of the Stroke Impact Scale. The higher-intensity RT group showed significantly greater improvements on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment than the lower-intensity RT and control treatment groups at midterm (P=0.003 and P=0.02) and at posttreatment (P=0.04 and P=0.02). Within-group gains on the secondary outcomes were significant, but the differences among the 3 groups did not reach significance. Recovery rates of the higher-intensity RT group were higher than those of the lower-intensity RT group, particularly on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment. Scatterplots with curve fitting showed that patients with moderate motor deficits gained more improvements than those with severe or mild deficits after the higher-intensity RT. This study demonstrated the higher treatment intensity provided by RT was associated with better motor outcome for patients with stroke, which may shape further stroke rehabilitation. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00917605.

  9. Dose-response relationship of total and leisure time physical activity to risk of heart failure: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kasper; Mariosa, Daniela; Adami, Hans-Olov; Held, Claes; Ingelsson, Erik; Lagerros, Ylva Trolle; Nyrén, Olof; Ye, Weimin; Bellocco, Rino; Sundström, Johan

    2014-09-01

    The nature of the association between levels of physical activity and risk of heart failure is little known. We investigated nonlinear associations of total and leisure time physical activity with risk of heart failure. In 1997, 39 805 persons without heart failure completed a questionnaire of lifestyle factors and medical history. We used Cox regression models to investigate total (adjusting for education and previous myocardial infarction) and direct (multivariable-adjusted) effects of self-reported total and leisure time physical activity on risk of heart failure of any cause and heart failure of nonischemic origin. Heart failure diagnoses were obtained until December 31, 2010. Higher leisure time physical activity was associated with lower risk of heart failure of any cause; hazard ratio of the total effect of leisure time physical activity was for fifth versus first quintile 0.54; 95% confidence interval was 0.44 to 0.66. The direct effect was similar. High total daily physical activity level was associated with lower risk of heart failure, although the effect was less pronounced than for leisure time physical activity (total effect hazard ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.95; fifth versus first quintile). A similar direct effect observed. Leisure time physical activity was inversely related to risk of developing heart failure in a dose-response fashion. This was reflected in a similar but less pronounced association of total physical activity with risk of heart failure. Only part of the effects appeared to be mediated by traditional risk factors. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Glyphosate-resistant and -susceptible soybean (Glycine max) and canola (Brassica napus) dose response and metabolism relationships with glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Nandula, Vijay K; Reddy, Krishna N; Rimando, Agnes M; Duke, Stephen O; Poston, Daniel H

    2007-05-02

    Experiments were conducted to determine (1) dose response of glyphosate-resistant (GR) and -susceptible (non-GR) soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and canola (Brassica napus L.) to glyphosate, (2) if differential metabolism of glyphosate to aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA) is the underlying mechanism for differential resistance to glyphosate among GR soybean varieties, and (3) the extent of metabolism of glyphosate to AMPA in GR canola and to correlate metabolism to injury from AMPA. GR50 (glyphosate dose required to cause a 50% reduction in plant dry weight) values for GR (Asgrow 4603RR) and non-GR (HBKC 5025) soybean were 22.8 kg ae ha-1 and 0.47 kg ha-1, respectively, with GR soybean exhibiting a 49-fold level of resistance to glyphosate as compared to non-GR soybean. Differential reduction in chlorophyll by glyphosate was observed between GR soybean varieties, but there were no differences in shoot fresh weight reduction. No significant differences were found between GR varieties in metabolism of glyphosate to AMPA, and in shikimate levels. These results indicate that GR soybean varieties were able to outgrow the initial injury from glyphosate, which was previously caused at least in part by AMPA. GR50 values for GR (Hyola 514RR) and non-GR (Hyola 440) canola were 14.1 and 0.30 kg ha-1, respectively, with GR canola exhibiting a 47-fold level of resistance to glyphosate when compared to non-GR canola. Glyphosate did not cause reduction in chlorophyll content and shoot fresh weight in GR canola, unlike GR soybean. Less glyphosate (per unit leaf weight) was recovered in glyphosate-treated GR canola as compared to glyphosate-treated GR soybean. External application of AMPA caused similar injury in both GR and non-GR canola. The presence of a bacterial glyphosate oxidoreductase gene in GR canola contributes to breakdown of glyphosate to AMPA. However, the AMPA from glyphosate breakdown could have been metabolized to nonphytotoxic metabolites before causing injury

  11. The psychological impact of terrorist attacks: examining a dose-response relationship between exposure to 9/11 and Axis I mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Christine A; Bolton, James M; Sareen, Jitender

    2010-11-01

    Previous research has suggested a dose-response relationship between exposure to the 9/11 terrorist attacks and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. However, this relationship has not been examined with other Axis I mental disorders. This study examined whether the incidence of Axis I mental disorders was associated with level of exposure to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Data came from the Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC-2; N=34,653, ages 20+) collected between 2004 and 2005. This survey utilized a fully structured face-to-face interview to assess the presence of DSM-IV Axis I disorders since Wave 1 of the NESARC, collected between 2001 and 2002. Multiple logistic regression analyses were employed to examine the relationship between the level of exposure to 9/11 and the prevalence of Axis I disorders since Wave 1. In adjusted models, higher levels of exposure increased the odds of having new onset PTSD, any anxiety disorder, and any mental disorder. Compared to participants who were not exposed to 9/11, those who directly experienced 9/11 had six times the odds of having PTSD, 2.5 times the odds of having any anxiety disorder, and nearly twice the odds of having any mental disorder. Results suggest that there is a dose-response relationship between level of exposure to the 9/11 attacks and PTSD. Furthermore, higher levels of exposure increase the odds of having any anxiety disorder and any Axis I mental disorder.

  12. Multiple comparison procedure and modeling: a versatile tool for evaluating dose-response relationships in veterinary pharmacology - a case study with furosemide.

    PubMed

    Bieth, B; Bornkamp, B; Toutain, C; Garcia, R; Mochel, J P

    2016-12-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a leading cause of mortality with an increasing prevalence in human and canine populations. While furosemide is a loop diuretic prescribed for the majority of CHF patients to reduce fluid retention, it also activates the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) which further contributes to the accelerated progression of heart failure. Our objective was to quantify the effect of furosemide on diuresis, renin activity (RA), and aldosterone (AL) in dogs, using a combined multiple comparisons and model-based approach (MCP-Mod). Twenty-four healthy beagle dogs were allocated to four treatment groups (saline vs. furosemide 1, 2, and 4 mg/kg i.m., q12 h for 5 days). Data from RA and AL values at furosemide trough concentrations, as well as 24-h Diuresis, were analyzed using the MCP-Mod procedure. A combination of Emax models adequately described the dose-response relationships of furosemide for the various endpoints. The dose-response curves of RA and AL were found to be well in agreement, with an apparent shallower slope compared with 24-h Diuresis. The research presented herein constitutes the first application of MCP-Mod in Veterinary Medicine. Our data show that furosemide produces a submaximal effect on diuresis at doses lower than those identified to activate the circulating RAAS.

  13. Nonlinear dose-response relationship between radon exposure and the risk of lung cancer: evidence from a meta-analysis of published observational studies.

    PubMed

    Duan, Peng; Quan, Chao; Hu, Chunhui; Zhang, Jicai; Xie, Fei; Hu, Xiuxue; Yu, Zongtao; Gao, Bo; Liu, Zhixiang; Zheng, Hong; Liu, Changjiang; Wang, Chengmin; Yu, Tingting; Qi, Suqin; Fu, Wenjuan; Kourouma, Ansoumane; Yang, Kedi

    2015-07-01

    Although radon exposure (RE) has been confirmed to increase the risk of lung cancer (LC), questions remain about the shape of the dose-response relationship between RE and the risk of LC. We carried out a dose-response meta-analysis to investigate and quantify the potential dose-response association between residential and occupational exposure to radon and the risk of LC. All cohort and case-control studies published in English and Chinese on Embase, PubMed, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) digital databases through November 2013 were identified systematically. We extracted effect measures (relative risk, odds ratio, standardized mortality ratio, standardized incidence ratio, or standardized rate ratio) from individual studies to generate pooled results using meta-analysis approaches. We derived meta-analytic estimates using random-effects models taking into account the correlation between estimates. Restricted cubic splines and generalized least-squares regression methods were used to model a potential curvilinear relationship and to carry out a dose-response meta-analysis. Stratified analysis, sensitivity analysis, and assessment of bias were performed in our meta-analysis. Sixty publications fulfilling the inclusion criteria for this meta-analysis were finally included. Occupational RE was associated with LC [risk ratio 1.86, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.67-2.09; I²=92.2%; 27 prospective studies], for pooled risk estimate of the: standardized mortality ratio [2.00 (95% CI=1.82-2.32)]; standardized incidence ratio [1.45 (95% CI=1.20-1.74)]; relative risk [2.10 (95% CI=1.64-2.69)]. In a subgroup analysis of uranium miners and residents exposed to occupational uranium, the summary risk was 2.23 (95% CI=1.86-2.68) and 1.23 (95% CI=1.05-1.44). The overall meta-analysis showed evidence of a nonlinear association between RE and the risk of LC (P(nonlinearity)<0.014); in addition, the point value of residential radon also improved the results

  14. A dose-response relationship research on botulinum toxin type A local intramuscular injections of lower extremity spasticity in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajie; Gao, Baoqin

    2008-05-01

    To observe the dose-response relationship of intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) in the spastic cerebral palsy. One hundred fifty cases (age between 2 and 12 years) were randomly divided into three groups. The patients were injected with different dose of BTX-A. The movement function was evaluated with modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and physician's rating scale (PRS) at entry and 1 month after injection. The analyses were conducted with one-way analysis of variance and chi (2) test. The evaluation of MAS and PRS revealed a significant increase of movement function. No statistically significant differences of the side effects among three groups could be demonstrated. The study suggested that the movement function was more significantly improved with relatively higher dose of BTX-A, which was safe and effective.

  15. Dose-Response Relationship between Cumulative Occupational Lead Exposure and the Associated Health Damages: A 20-Year Cohort Study of a Smelter in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yue; Gu, Jun-Ming; Huang, Yun; Duan, Yan-Ying; Huang, Rui-Xue; Hu, Jian-An

    2016-01-01

    Long-term airborne lead exposure, even below official occupational limits, has been found to cause lead poisoning at higher frequencies than expected, which suggests that China’s existing occupational exposure limits should be reexamined. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 1832 smelting workers from 1988 to 2008 in China. These were individuals who entered the plant and came into continuous contact with lead at work for longer than 3 months. The dose-response relationship between occupational cumulative lead exposure and lead poisoning, abnormal blood lead, urinary lead and erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) were analyzed and the benchmark dose lower bound confidence limits (BMDLs) were calculated. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between cumulative lead dust and lead fumes exposures and workplace seniority, blood lead, urinary lead and ZPP values. A dose-response relationship was observed between cumulative lead dust or lead fumes exposure and lead poisoning (p < 0.01). The BMDLs of the cumulative occupational lead dust and fumes doses were 0.68 mg-year/m3 and 0.30 mg-year/m3 for lead poisoning, respectively. The BMDLs of workplace airborne lead concentrations associated with lead poisoning were 0.02 mg/m3 and 0.01 mg/m3 for occupational exposure lead dust and lead fume, respectively. In conclusion, BMDLs for airborne lead were lower than occupational exposure limits, suggesting that the occupational lead exposure limits need re-examination and adjustment. Occupational cumulative exposure limits (OCELs) should be established to better prevent occupational lead poisoning. PMID:26999177

  16. Dose-Response Relationship between Cumulative Occupational Lead Exposure and the Associated Health Damages: A 20-Year Cohort Study of a Smelter in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Gu, Jun-Ming; Huang, Yun; Duan, Yan-Ying; Huang, Rui-Xue; Hu, Jian-An

    2016-03-16

    Long-term airborne lead exposure, even below official occupational limits, has been found to cause lead poisoning at higher frequencies than expected, which suggests that China's existing occupational exposure limits should be reexamined. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 1832 smelting workers from 1988 to 2008 in China. These were individuals who entered the plant and came into continuous contact with lead at work for longer than 3 months. The dose-response relationship between occupational cumulative lead exposure and lead poisoning, abnormal blood lead, urinary lead and erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) were analyzed and the benchmark dose lower bound confidence limits (BMDLs) were calculated. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between cumulative lead dust and lead fumes exposures and workplace seniority, blood lead, urinary lead and ZPP values. A dose-response relationship was observed between cumulative lead dust or lead fumes exposure and lead poisoning (p < 0.01). The BMDLs of the cumulative occupational lead dust and fumes doses were 0.68 mg-year/m³ and 0.30 mg-year/m³ for lead poisoning, respectively. The BMDLs of workplace airborne lead concentrations associated with lead poisoning were 0.02 mg/m³ and 0.01 mg/m³ for occupational exposure lead dust and lead fume, respectively. In conclusion, BMDLs for airborne lead were lower than occupational exposure limits, suggesting that the occupational lead exposure limits need re-examination and adjustment. Occupational cumulative exposure limits (OCELs) should be established to better prevent occupational lead poisoning.

  17. A dose-response relationship for marketable yield reduction of two lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cultivars exposed to tropospheric ozone in Southern Europe.

    PubMed

    Marzuoli, Riccardo; Finco, Angelo; Chiesa, Maria; Gerosa, Giacomo

    2016-12-27

    The present study investigated the response to ozone (O3) of two cultivars (cv.'Romana' and cv. 'Canasta') of irrigated lettuce grown in an open-top chamber (OTC) experiment in Mediterranean conditions. Two different levels of O3 were applied, ambient O3 in non-filtered OTCs (NF-OTCs) and -40% of ambient O3 in charcoal-filtered OTCs (CF-OTCs), during four consecutive growing cycles. At the end of each growing cycle, the marketable yield (fresh biomass) was assessed while during the growing periods, measurements of the stomatal conductance at leaf level were performed and used to define a stomatal conductance model for calculation of the phytotoxic ozone dose (POD) absorbed by the plants.Results showed that O3 caused statistically significant yield reductions in the first and in the last growing cycle. In general, the marketable yield of the NF-OTC plants was always lower than the CF-OTC plants for both cultivars, with mean reductions of -18.5 and -14.5% for 'Romana' and 'Canasta', respectively. On the contrary, there was no statistically significant difference in marketable yield due to the cultivar factor or to the interaction between O3 and cultivar in any of the growing cycle performed.Dose-response relationships for the marketable relative yield based on the POD values were calculated according to different flux threshold values (Y). The best regression fit was obtained using an instantaneous flux threshold of 6 nmol O3 m(-2) s(-1) (POD6); the same value was obtained also for other crops. According to the generic lettuce dose-response relationship, an O3 critical level of 1 mmol O3 m(-2) of POD6 for a 15% of marketable yield loss was found.

  18. Rethinking the Dose-Response Relationship Between Usage and Outcome in an Online Intervention for Depression: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hickie, Ian B; Christensen, Helen; Naismith, Sharon L; Neal, Bruce; Cockayne, Nicole L; Glozier, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Background There is now substantial evidence that Web-based interventions can be effective at changing behavior and successfully treating psychological disorders. However, interest in the impact of usage on intervention outcomes has only been developed recently. To date, persistence with or completion of the intervention has been the most commonly reported metric of use, but this does not adequately describe user behavior online. Analysis of alternative measures of usage and their relationship to outcome may help to understand how much of the intervention users may need to obtain a clinically significant benefit from the program. Objective The objective of this study was to determine which usage metrics, if any, are associated with outcome in an online depression treatment trial. Methods Cardiovascular Risk E-couch Depression Outcome (CREDO) is a randomized controlled trial evaluating an unguided Web-based program (E-couch) based on cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal therapy for people with depression and cardiovascular disease. In all, 280 participants in the active arm of the trial commenced the program, delivered in 12 modules containing pages of text and activities. Usage data (eg, number of log-ins, modules completed, time spent online, and activities completed) were captured automatically by the program interface. We estimated the association of these and composite metrics with the outcome of a clinically significant improvement in depression score on the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) of ≥5 points. Results In all, 214/280 (76.4%) participants provided outcome data at the end of the 12-week period and were included in the analysis. Of these, 94 (43.9%) participants obtained clinically significant improvement. Participants logged into the program an average of 18.7 times (SD 8.3) with most (62.1%, 133/214) completing all 12 modules. Average time spent online per log-in was 17.3 minutes (SD 10.5). Participants completed an average of 9 of 18

  19. Chromosome damage in human cells by γ rays, α particles and heavy ions: track interactions in basic dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Loucas, Bradford D; Durante, Marco; Bailey, Susan M; Cornforth, Michael N

    2013-01-01

    We irradiated normal human lymphocytes and fibroblasts with (137)Cs γ rays, 3.5 MeV α particles and 1 GeV/amu (56)Fe ions and measured the subsequent formation of chromosome-type aberrations by mFISH at the first mitosis following irradiation. This was done for the purposes of characterizing the shape of dose-response relationships and determining the frequency distribution of various aberration types with respect to the parameters of dose, radiation quality and cell type. Salient results and conclusions include the following. For low-LET γ rays, lymphocytes showed a more robust dose response for overall damage and a higher degree of upward curvature compared to fibroblasts. For both sources of high-LET radiation, and for both cell types, the response for simple and complex exchanges was linear with dose. Independent of all three parameters considered, the most likely damage outcome was the formation of a simple exchange event involving two breaks. However, in terms of the breakpoints making up exchange events, the majority of damage registered following HZE particle irradiation was due to complex aberrations involving multiple chromosomes. This adds a decidedly nonlinear component to the overall breakpoint response, giving it a significant degree of positive curvature, which we interpret as being due to interaction between ionizations of the primary HZE particle track and long-range δ rays produced by other nearby tracks. While such track interaction had been previously theorized, to the best of our knowledge, it has never been demonstrated experimentally.

  20. Chromosome Damage in Human Cells by γ Rays, α Particles and Heavy Ions: Track Interactions in Basic Dose-Response Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Loucas, Bradford D.; Durante, Marco; Bailey, Susan M.; Cornforth, Michael N.

    2013-01-01

    We irradiated normal human lymphocytes and fibroblasts with 137Cs γ rays, 3.5 MeV α particles and 1 GeV/amu 56Fe ions and measured the subsequent formation of chromosome-type aberrations by mFISH at the first mitosis following irradiation. This was done for the purposes of characterizing the shape of dose-response relationships and determining the frequency distribution of various aberration types with respect to the parameters of dose, radiation quality and cell type. Salient results and conclusions include the following. For low-LET γ rays, lymphocytes showed a more robust dose response for overall damage and a higher degree of upward curvature compared to fibroblasts. For both sources of high-LET radiation, and for both cell types, the response for simple and complex exchanges was linear with dose. Independent of all three parameters considered, the most likely damage outcome was the formation of a simple exchange event involving two breaks. However, in terms of the breakpoints making up exchange events, the majority of damage registered following HZE particle irradiation was due to complex aberrations involving multiple chromosomes. This adds a decidedly nonlinear component to the overall breakpoint response, giving it a significant degree of positive curvature, which we interpret as being due to interaction between ionizations of the primary HZE particle track and long-range δ rays produced by other nearby tracks. While such track interaction had been previously theorized, to the best of our knowledge, it has never been demonstrated experimentally. PMID:23198992

  1. Nonlinearity and thresholds in dose-response relationships for carcinogenicity due to sampling variation, logarithmic dose scaling, or small differences in individual susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, W.K. . E-mail: lutz@toxi.uni-wuerzburg.de; Gaylor, D.W.; Conolly, R.B.; Lutz, R.W.

    2005-09-01

    Nonlinear and threshold-like shapes of dose-response curves are often observed in tests for carcinogenicity. Here, we present three examples where an apparent threshold is spurious and can be misleading for low dose extrapolation and human cancer risk assessment. Case 1: For experiments that are not replicated, such as rodent bioassays for carcinogenicity, random variation can lead to misinterpretation of the result. This situation was simulated by 20 random binomial samplings of 50 animals per group, assuming a true linear dose response from 5% to 25% tumor incidence at arbitrary dose levels 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 4. Linearity was suggested only by 8 of the 20 simulations. Four simulations did not reveal the carcinogenicity at all. Three exhibited thresholds, two showed a nonmonotonic behavior with a decrease at low dose, followed by a significant increase at high dose ('hormesis'). Case 2: Logarithmic representation of the dose axis transforms a straight line into a sublinear (up-bent) curve, which can be misinterpreted to indicate a threshold. This is most pronounced if the dose scale includes a wide low dose range. Linear regression of net tumor incidences and intersection with the dose axis results in an apparent threshold, even with an underlying true linear dose-incidence relationship. Case 3: Nonlinear shapes of dose-cancer incidence curves are rarely seen with epidemiological data in humans. The discrepancy to data in rodents may in part be explained by a wider span of individual susceptibilities for tumor induction in humans due to more diverse genetic background and modulation by co-carcinogenic lifestyle factors. Linear extrapolation of a human cancer risk could therefore be appropriate even if animal bioassays show nonlinearity.

  2. Probabilistic hazard assessment for skin sensitization potency by dose-response modeling using feature elimination instead of quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Luechtefeld, Thomas; Maertens, Alexandra; McKim, James M; Hartung, Thomas; Kleensang, Andre; Sá-Rocha, Vanessa

    2015-11-01

    Supervised learning methods promise to improve integrated testing strategies (ITS), but must be adjusted to handle high dimensionality and dose-response data. ITS approaches are currently fueled by the increasing mechanistic understanding of adverse outcome pathways (AOP) and the development of tests reflecting these mechanisms. Simple approaches to combine skin sensitization data sets, such as weight of evidence, fail due to problems in information redundancy and high dimensionality. The problem is further amplified when potency information (dose/response) of hazards would be estimated. Skin sensitization currently serves as the foster child for AOP and ITS development, as legislative pressures combined with a very good mechanistic understanding of contact dermatitis have led to test development and relatively large high-quality data sets. We curated such a data set and combined a recursive variable selection algorithm to evaluate the information available through in silico, in chemico and in vitro assays. Chemical similarity alone could not cluster chemicals' potency, and in vitro models consistently ranked high in recursive feature elimination. This allows reducing the number of tests included in an ITS. Next, we analyzed with a hidden Markov model that takes advantage of an intrinsic inter-relationship among the local lymph node assay classes, i.e. the monotonous connection between local lymph node assay and dose. The dose-informed random forest/hidden Markov model was superior to the dose-naive random forest model on all data sets. Although balanced accuracy improvement may seem small, this obscures the actual improvement in misclassifications as the dose-informed hidden Markov model strongly reduced " false-negatives" (i.e. extreme sensitizers as non-sensitizer) on all data sets.

  3. Dose-response relationship in music therapy for people with serious mental disorders: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gold, Christian; Solli, Hans Petter; Krüger, Viggo; Lie, Stein Atle

    2009-04-01

    Serious mental disorders have considerable individual and societal impact, and traditional treatments may show limited effects. Music therapy may be beneficial in psychosis and depression, including treatment-resistant cases. The aim of this review was to examine the benefits of music therapy for people with serious mental disorders. All existing prospective studies were combined using mixed-effects meta-analysis models, allowing to examine the influence of study design (RCT vs. CCT vs. pre-post study), type of disorder (psychotic vs. non-psychotic), and number of sessions. Results showed that music therapy, when added to standard care, has strong and significant effects on global state, general symptoms, negative symptoms, depression, anxiety, functioning, and musical engagement. Significant dose-effect relationships were identified for general, negative, and depressive symptoms, as well as functioning, with explained variance ranging from 73% to 78%. Small effect sizes for these outcomes are achieved after 3 to 10, large effects after 16 to 51 sessions. The findings suggest that music therapy is an effective treatment which helps people with psychotic and non-psychotic severe mental disorders to improve global state, symptoms, and functioning. Slight improvements can be seen with a few therapy sessions, but longer courses or more frequent sessions are needed to achieve more substantial benefits.

  4. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: Dose-Response Relationship of Selective-Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Varigonda, Anjali L.; Freemantle, Nicholas; Taylor, Matthew J.; Bloch, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies suggested that the treatment response to Selective-Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) follows a flat response curve within the therapeutic dose range. Our study was designed to clarify the relationship between dosage and treatment response in MDD. Methods We searched PubMed for randomized placebo-controlled trials examining the efficacy of SSRIs for treating adults with MDD. Trials were also required to assess improvement in depression severity at multiple time points. Additional data was collected on treatment response and all cause and side effect-related discontinuation. All medication doses were transformed into imipramine equivalent doses. The longitudinal data was analyzed with a mixed regression model. Endpoint and tolerability analyses were analyzed using meta-regression and stratified subgroup analysis by predefined SSRI dose categories in order to assess the effect of SSRI dosing on the efficacy and tolerability of SSRIs for MDD. Results We included 40 studies involving 10,039 participants.. Longitudinal modeling [dose × time interaction=0.0007(95%CI:0.0001–0.0013;p=0.0196)] and endpoint analysis (meta-regression β=0.00053,95%CI:0.00018–0.00088,z=2.98,p=0.0029) demonstrated a small, but statistically significant positive association between SSRI dose and efficacy. Higher doses of SSRIs were associated with an increased likelihood of dropouts due to side-effects (meta-regression β=0.00207,95%CI:0.00071–0.00342,z=2.98,p=0.003) and decreased likelihood of all-cause dropout (meta-regression β=−0.00093,95% CI−0.00165–(−0.00021),z=−2.54,p=0.01). Conclusions Higher doses of SSRIs appear slightly more effective in MDD. This benefit appears to plateau around 250mg of imipramine equivalents (50mg of fluoxetine). The slightly increased benefits of SSRIs at higher doses are somewhat offset by decreased tolerability at high doses. PMID:26552940

  5. Dose-Response Relationship in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Patients Undergoing Radioiodine Treatment Assessed by Means of 124I PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Wierts, Roel; Brans, Boudewijn; Havekes, Bas; Kemerink, Gerrit J; Halders, Servais G; Schaper, Nicolaas N; Backes, Walter H; Mottaghy, Felix M; Jentzen, Walter

    2016-07-01

    The dose-response relationship in a fixed-activity approach generally applied in the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer was assessed using (124)I PET/CT. Pretherapeutic (124)I PET/CT images of 47 patients scheduled for radioiodine therapy were retrospectively analyzed. (124)I PET/CT images were acquired 24 and 96 h after oral administration of approximately 28 MBq of (124)I-sodium iodide. Lesions were identified as thyroid remnants or metastases (lymph node, lung, bone). After a neoteric segmentation technique allowing accurate volume estimation down to the (124)I PET spatial resolution of 0.15 mL was applied, lesions were divided into a known-volume group and a small-volume group. For the known-volume group, average lesion-absorbed dose (AD) values were calculated, whereas for the small-volume group a minimum lesion AD was estimated. Lesion response was determined on the basis of (124)I PET/CT and (131)I SPECT/CT follow-up images. A lesion not detectable on any of the follow-up images was considered a completely responding lesion. Differences in lesion AD estimations between completely and incompletely responding lesions were evaluated by Mann-Whitney U test. Moreover, receiver-operating-characteristic curves were used to test the performance of pretherapeutic (124)I PET/CT lesion AD for prediction of complete lesion response. In the approach of fixed radioiodine activity (3.0 ± 1.0 GBq), 89% of thyroid remnants and 69% of metastases responded completely. Except for the small-volume groups, the lesion AD of completely responding lesions was significantly higher than that of incompletely responding lesions. Using receiver-operating-characteristic curve analysis, it was shown that for the known-volume group, pretherapeutic (124)I PET/CT lesion dosimetry can be used as a prognostic tool to predict lesion-based (131)I therapy response with an area under the curve of 0.76 for remnants and 0.97 for metastases. The corresponding lesion AD threshold value

  6. Dose-Response Analysis Using R.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Christian; Baty, Florent; Streibig, Jens C; Gerhard, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Dose-response analysis can be carried out using multi-purpose commercial statistical software, but except for a few special cases the analysis easily becomes cumbersome as relevant, non-standard output requires manual programming. The extension package drc for the statistical environment R provides a flexible and versatile infrastructure for dose-response analyses in general. The present version of the package, reflecting extensions and modifications over the last decade, provides a user-friendly interface to specify the model assumptions about the dose-response relationship and comes with a number of extractors for summarizing fitted models and carrying out inference on derived parameters. The aim of the present paper is to provide an overview of state-of-the-art dose-response analysis, both in terms of general concepts that have evolved and matured over the years and by means of concrete examples.

  7. Dose response signal detection under model uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Dette, Holger; Titoff, Stefanie; Volgushev, Stanislav; Bretz, Frank

    2015-12-01

    We investigate likelihood ratio contrast tests for dose response signal detection under model uncertainty, when several competing regression models are available to describe the dose response relationship. The proposed approach uses the complete structure of the regression models, but does not require knowledge of the parameters of the competing models. Standard likelihood ratio test theory is applicable in linear models as well as in nonlinear regression models with identifiable parameters. However, for many commonly used nonlinear dose response models the regression parameters are not identifiable under the null hypothesis of no dose response and standard arguments cannot be used to obtain critical values. We thus derive the asymptotic distribution of likelihood ratio contrast tests in regression models with a lack of identifiability and use this result to simulate the quantiles based on Gaussian processes. The new method is illustrated with a real data example and compared to existing procedures using theoretical investigations as well as simulations.

  8. DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN METHADONE DOSE AND ADHERENCE TO ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY AMONG HIV-POSITIVE PERSONS WHO USE ILLICIT OPIOIDS

    PubMed Central

    Lappalainen, Leslie; Nolan, Seonaid; Dobrer, Sabina; Puscas, Cathy; Montaner, Julio; Ahamad, Keith; Dong, Huiru; Kerr, Thomas; Wood, Evan; Milloy, M-J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims For HIV-positive individuals who use illicit opioids, engagement in methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) can contribute to improved HIV treatment outcomes. However, to our knowledge, the role of methadone dosing in adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has not yet been investigated. We sought to examine the relationship between methadone dose and ART adherence among a cohort of persons who use illicit opioids. Design and Setting We used data from the ACCESS study, an ongoing prospective observational cohort of HIV-positive persons who use illicit drugs in Vancouver, Canada, confidentially linked to comprehensive HIV treatment data in a setting of universal no-cost medical care including medications. We evaluated the longitudinal relationship between methadone dose and the likelihood of ≥ 95% adherence to ART among ART-exposed participants during periods of engagement in MMT. Participants 297 ART-exposed individuals on MMT were recruited between December 2005 and May 2013 and followed for a median of 42.1 months. Measurements We measured methadone dose at ≥ 100 vs < 100 mg/day and the likelihood of ≥ 95% adherence to ART. Findings In adjusted generalized estimating equation (GEE) analyses, MMT dose ≥ 100 mg/day was independently associated with optimal adherence to ART (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08 – 1.77, p = 0.010). In a sub-analysis, we observed a dose-response relationship between increasing MMT dose and ART adherence (AOR = 1.06 per 20 mg/day increase, 95% CI: 1.00 – 1.12, p = 0.041). Conclusion Among HIV-positive individuals in methadone maintenance therapy, those receiving higher doses of methadone (≥ 100 mg/day) are more likely to achieve ≥ 95% adherence to antiretroviral therapy than those receiving lower doses. PMID:25940906

  9. Comparison of Community Response to Road Traffic Noise in Japan and SWEDEN—PART i: Outline of Surveys and DOSE-RESPONSE Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SATO, T.; YANO, T.; BJÖRKMAN, M.; RYLANDER, R.

    2002-02-01

    To investigate cross-cultural differences in the community response to road traffic noise, social surveys were conducted in Gothenburg, Sweden, and Kumamoto and Sapporo, Japan, using the same questionnaire and noise measurement method. Typical residential areas with detached houses and apartments were selected as the target areas in each city. The questionnaire comprised 40 questions relating to environmental, housing and personal factors. The key questions concerned annoyance caused by road traffic noise. The total numbers of respondents were 1142 in Gothenburg, 837 in Kumamoto and 780 in Sapporo. The response rates were 68·8, 69·3 and 57·5% respectively. After the questionnaires were completed, noise measurements were made in each area. Community responses were compared on the basis of the dose-response relationships. There were no systematic differences between community responses in Sapporo and Kumamoto, which have the same culture. People living in detached houses in Gothenburg were more annoyed by the same road traffic noise than the people living in Japanese cities. There were no systematic differences among the three cities with regard to activity disturbances indoors, but significant disturbance of activities and resting in gardens or on balconies was noted in Gothenburg. The difference in activity disturbance was due to the differences between lifestyles in the two countries. People living in detached houses were more annoyed by the house vibration caused by road traffic than those living in apartments and people were annoyed by the exhaust from road traffic to the same extent as noise.

  10. Quantifying the dose-response relationship between circulating folate concentrations and colorectal cancer in cohort studies: a meta-analysis based on a flexible meta-regression model.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Shu-Chun; Rota, Matteo; Gunter, Marc J; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Eussen, Simone J P M; Vollset, Stein Emil; Ueland, Per Magne; Norat, Teresa; Ziegler, Regina G; Vineis, Paolo

    2013-10-01

    Most epidemiologic studies on folate intake suggest that folate may be protective against colorectal cancer, but the results on circulating (plasma or serum) folate are mostly inconclusive. We conducted a meta-analysis of case-control studies nested within prospective studies on circulating folate and colorectal cancer risk by using flexible meta-regression models to test the linear and nonlinear dose-response relationships. A total of 8 publications (10 cohorts, representing 3,477 cases and 7,039 controls) were included in the meta-analysis. The linear and nonlinear models corresponded to relative risks of 0.96 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.91, 1.02) and 0.99 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.02), respectively, per 10 nmol/L of circulating folate in contrast to the reference value. The pooled relative risks when comparing the highest with the lowest category were 0.80 (95% CI: 0.61, 0.99) for radioimmunoassay and 1.03 (95% CI: 0.83, 1.22) for microbiological assay. Overall, our analyses suggest a null association between circulating folate and colorectal cancer risk. The stronger association for the radioimmunoassay-based studies could reflect differences in cohorts and study designs rather than assay performance. Further investigations need to integrate more accurate measurements and flexible modeling to explore the effects of folate in the presence of genetic, lifestyle, dietary, and hormone-related factors.

  11. For whom the bell (curve) tolls: cortisol rapidly affects memory retrieval by an inverted U-shaped dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Thomas M; Kölsch, Monika; Larra, Mauro F; Zech, Carina M; Blumenthal, Terry D; Frings, Christian; Schächinger, Hartmut

    2013-09-01

    Stress and cortisol are generally considered to impair declarative memory retrieval, although opposite results have also been reported. Dose-dependent effects and differences between genomic and non-genomic cortisol effects are possible reasons for these discrepancies. The aim of the current experiment was to assess the non-genomic effects of escalating doses of intravenous cortisol on cued recall of socially relevant information in humans. 40 participants (age range 20-30 years; 20 females) learned associations between male faces with a neutral facial expression and descriptions of either positive or negative social behaviors and were tested one week later in a cued recall paradigm. Escalating doses of cortisol (0, 3, 6, 12, 24 mg) were administered 8 min before testing according to a between-subjects design. An inverted U-shaped dose-response relationship between salivary cortisol levels and recall performance was observed, with moderate elevation of salivary cortisol resulting in the best recall performance. This is the first study in humans demonstrating that cortisol rapidly modulates declarative memory retrieval via a dose-dependent, non-genomic mechanism that follows an inverted U-shaped curve. Our result further emphasizes the importance of fast cortisol effects for human cognition.

  12. Antioxidants reveal an inverted U-shaped dose-response relationship between reactive oxygen species levels and the rate of aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, David; Cacho-Valadez, Briseida; Liu, Ju-Ling; Wang, Ying; Yee, Callista; Bernard, Kristine; Khaki, Arman; Breton, Lionel; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2017-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are potentially toxic, but they are also signaling molecules that modulate aging. Recent observations that ROS can promote longevity have to be reconciled with the numerous claims about the benefits of antioxidants on lifespan. Here, three antioxidants [N-acetylcysteine (NAC), vitamin C, and resveratrol (RSV)] were tested on Caenorhabditis elegans mutants that alter drug uptake, mitochondrial function, and ROS metabolism. We observed that like pro-oxidants, antioxidants can both lengthen and shorten lifespan, dependent on concentration, genotypes, and conditions. The effects of antioxidants thus reveal an inverted U-shaped dose-response relationship between ROS levels and lifespan. In addition, we observed that RSV can act additively to both NAC and paraquat, to dramatically increase lifespan. This suggests that the effect of compounds that modulate ROS levels can be additive when their loci of action or mechanisms of action are sufficiently distinct. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Dose-response relationship between weekly resistance training volume and increases in muscle mass: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Ogborn, Dan; Krieger, James W

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to systematically review the current literature and elucidate the effects of total weekly resistance training (RT) volume on changes in measures of muscle mass via meta-regression. The final analysis comprised 34 treatment groups from 15 studies. Outcomes for weekly sets as a continuous variable showed a significant effect of volume on changes in muscle size (P = 0.002). Each additional set was associated with an increase in effect size (ES) of 0.023 corresponding to an increase in the percentage gain by 0.37%. Outcomes for weekly sets categorised as lower or higher within each study showed a significant effect of volume on changes in muscle size (P = 0.03); the ES difference between higher and lower volumes was 0.241, which equated to a percentage gain difference of 3.9%. Outcomes for weekly sets as a three-level categorical variable (<5, 5-9 and 10+ per muscle) showed a trend for an effect of weekly sets (P = 0.074). The findings indicate a graded dose-response relationship whereby increases in RT volume produce greater gains in muscle hypertrophy.

  14. Meta-analysis for deriving age- and gender-specific dose-response relationships between urinary cadmium concentration and {beta} {sub 2}-microglobulinuria under environmental exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gamo, Masashi . E-mail: masashi-gamo@aist.go.jp; Ono, Kyoko; Nakanishi, Junko

    2006-05-15

    A meta-analysis was conducted to derive age- and gender-specific dose-response relationships between urinary cadmium (Cd) concentration and {beta} {sub 2}-microglobulinuria ({beta}2MG-uria) under environmental exposure. {beta}2MG-uria was defined by a cutoff point of 1000 {mu}g {beta} {sub 2}-microglobulin/g creatinine. We proposed a model for describing the relationships among the interindividual variabilities in urinary Cd concentration, the ratio of Cd concentrations in the target organ and in urine, and the threshold Cd concentration in the target organ. The parameters in the model were determined so that good agreement might be achieved between the prevalence rates of {beta}2MG-uria reported in the literature and those estimated by the model. In this analysis, only the data from the literature on populations environmentally exposed to Cd were used. Using the model and estimated parameters, the prevalence rate of {beta}2MG-uria can be estimated for an age- and gender-specific subpopulation for which the distribution of urinary Cd concentrations is known. The maximum permissible level of urinary Cd concentration was defined as the maximum geometric mean of the urinary Cd concentration in an age- and gender-specific subpopulation that would not result in a statistically significant increase in the prevalence rate of {beta}2MG-uria. This was estimated to be approximately 3 {mu}g/g creatinine for a population in a small geographical area and approximately 2 {mu}g/g creatinine for a nationwide population.

  15. The Relationship between Dietary Protein Consumption and Risk of Fracture: a subgroup and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ai-Min; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Lv, Qing-Bo; Zhou, Yong; Xia, Dong-Dong; Xu, Hua-Zi; Huang, Qi-Shan; Chi, Yong-Long

    2015-01-01

    It is still debate of the relationship between the dietary protein consumption and risk of fracture. We searched Medline and Embase to assess the effects of dietary protein consumption on risk of fracture. Twelve prospective cohort studies with 407,104 participants were included, higher total protein consumption may be decrease 11% risk of hip fractures, with adj. RR of 0.89 (0.82, 0.97), no significant difference was found for total protein and risk of all fractures and limb fracture; for animal protein consumption and risk of all fractures and hip fracture, with adj.RR of 0.79 (032, 1.96) and 1.04 (0.70, 1.54); for vegetable protein consumption and risk of all fractures, hip fracture and limb fractures with adj.RR of 0.77 (0.52, 1.12), 1.00 (0.53, 1.91), and 0.94 (0.40, 2.22), the subgroup of vegetable protein consumption and risk of all fractures of postmenopausal women with adj.RR of 0.78(0.52,1.16). Dose-response meta-analysis the relationship of total/animal/vegetable protein and hip fracture was consistent to the results of forest plot, the line of total protein and hip fracture was below the Y = 1.0 line. This meta-analysis showed that total dietary protein consumption may be decrease the risk of hip fracture, but not for animal or vegetable protein. PMID:25779888

  16. The relationship between dietary protein consumption and risk of fracture: a subgroup and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ai-Min; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Lv, Qing-Bo; Zhou, Yong; Xia, Dong-Dong; Xu, Hua-Zi; Huang, Qi-Shan; Chi, Yong-Long

    2015-03-16

    It is still debate of the relationship between the dietary protein consumption and risk of fracture. We searched Medline and Embase to assess the effects of dietary protein consumption on risk of fracture. Twelve prospective cohort studies with 407,104 participants were included, higher total protein consumption may be decrease 11% risk of hip fractures, with adj. RR of 0.89 (0.82, 0.97), no significant difference was found for total protein and risk of all fractures and limb fracture; for animal protein consumption and risk of all fractures and hip fracture, with adj.RR of 0.79 (032, 1.96) and 1.04 (0.70, 1.54); for vegetable protein consumption and risk of all fractures, hip fracture and limb fractures with adj.RR of 0.77 (0.52, 1.12), 1.00 (0.53, 1.91), and 0.94 (0.40, 2.22), the subgroup of vegetable protein consumption and risk of all fractures of postmenopausal women with adj.RR of 0.78(0.52,1.16). Dose-response meta-analysis the relationship of total/animal/vegetable protein and hip fracture was consistent to the results of forest plot, the line of total protein and hip fracture was below the Y = 1.0 line. This meta-analysis showed that total dietary protein consumption may be decrease the risk of hip fracture, but not for animal or vegetable protein.

  17. Dose-Response Relationship between Radiation Dose and Loco-regional Control in Patients with Stage II-III Esophageal Cancer Treated with Definitive Chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Suh, Yang-Gun; Lee, Yong Chan; Lee, Sang Kil; Shin, Sung Kwan; Cho, Byung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol

    2017-07-01

    The correlation between radiation dose and loco-regional control (LRC) was evaluated in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Medical records of 236 stage II-III esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive CRT at Yonsei Cancer Center between 1994 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Among these, 120 received a radiation dose of < 60 Gy (standard-dose group), while 116 received ≥ 60 Gy (high-dose group). The median doses of radiation in the standard- and high-dose groups were 50.4 and 63 Gy, respectively. Concurrent 5-fluorouracil/cisplatin chemotherapy was administered to most patients. There were no differences in patient characteristics between the two groups except for high Karnofsky performance status and lower-thoracic lesions being more prevalent in the standard-dose group. The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) times were 13.2 months and 26.2 months, respectively. Patients in the high-dose group had significantly better 2-year LRC (69.1% vs. 50.3%, p=0.002), median PFS (16.7 months vs. 11.7 months, p=0.029), and median OS (35.1 months vs. 22.3 months, p=0.043). Additionally, LRC exhibited a dose-response relationship and the complete response rate was significantly higher in the high-dose group (p=0.006). There were no significant differences in treatment-related toxicities between the groups. A higher radiation dose (> 60 Gy) is associated with increased LRC, PFS, and OS in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive CRT.

  18. Dose-response relationship of baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability to individually-tailored exercise training in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Iellamo, Ferdinando; Manzi, Vincenzo; Caminiti, Giuseppe; Sposato, Barbara; Massaro, Michele; Cerrito, Anna; Rosano, Giuseppe; Volterrani, Maurizio

    2013-06-20

    Heart Rate Variability (HRV) and Baroreflex Sensitivity (BRS) are impaired in patients with Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) and carry negative prognosis. Exercise training improves these parameters. However, the relationship between exercise training with HRV and BRS has been investigated without regard for individual training loads. We tested the hypothesis that in CHF patients changes in HRV and BRS are dose-response related to individual volume/intensity training load (TL). Twenty patients with stable postinfarction CHF under optimal medical treatment were randomized to either aerobic continuous training (ACT) or aerobic interval training (AIT) for 12weeks. Individualized TL was monitored by the Training Impulses (TRIMPi) method, which was determined using the individual HR and lactate profiling determined during a treadmill test at baseline. HRV (standard deviation of mean R-R interval) and BRS were assessed at rest and 3weeks apart, throughout the study. HRV, BRS and R-R interval increased significantly with training, being very highly correlated to the dose of exercise with a second-order regression model (r(2) ranged from 0.75 to 0.96; P<0.001), resembling a bell-shaped in the ACT, and an asymptotic-shaped curve in the AIT groups, respectively. These changes were accompanied by a significant increase in functional capacity. No significant differences were detected between ACT and AIT in any variable. These results suggest that improvements in HRV and BRS by exercise training in CHF patients are dose related to TL in a non-linear fashion on an individual basis, with optimal results at moderate doses of exercise. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. DOSE-RESPONSE Relationships Between Whole-Body Vibration and Lumbar Disk DISEASE—A Field Study on 388 Drivers of Different Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, S.; Notbohm, G.; Dupuis, H.; Hartung, E.

    1998-08-01

    In a longitudinal study, the dose-response relationships between long term occupational exposure to whole-body vibration and degenerative processes in the lumbar spine caused by the lumbar disks were examined. From 1990 to 1992, 388 vibration-exposed workers from different driving jobs were examined medically and by lumbar X-ray. For each individual, a history of all exposure conditions was recorded, and a cumulative vibration dose was calculated allowing comparisons between groups of low, middle, and high intensity of exposure. 310 subjects were selected for a follow-up four years later, of whom 90·6% (n=281) agreed to participate. In comparing the exposure groups, the results indicate that the limit value ofazw(8h)=0·8 m/s2should be reviewed. The best fit between the lifelong vibration dose and the occurrence of a lumbar syndrome was obtained by applying a daily reference ofazw(8h)=0·6 ms2as a limit value. The results became more distinct still when only those subjects were included in the statistical analysis who had had no lumbar symptoms up to the end of the first year of exposure. The prevalence of lumbar syndrome is 1·55 times higher in the highly exposed group when compared to the reference group with low exposure (CI95%=1·24/1·95). Calculating the cumulative incidence of new cases of lumbar syndrome in the follow-up period yields a relative risk ofRRMH=1·37 (CI95%=0·86/2·17) for the highly exposed group. It is concluded that the limit value for the calculation of an individual lifelong vibration dose should be based on a daily reference exposure ofazw(8h)=0·6 m/s2. With increasing dose it is more and more probable that cases of lumbar syndrome are caused by exposure to vibration.

  20. The dose-response relationship between the amount of straw provided on the floor and gastric ulceration of pars oesophagea in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Karin H; Jørgensen, Lisbeth; Haugegaard, Svend; Herskin, Mette S; Jensen, Margit B; Pedersen, Lene J; Canibe, Nuria

    2017-01-12

    The aim of the present study was (1) to determine the dose-response relationship between the amount of straw provided on the floor and oesophageal ulceration in pigs kept under typical Danish production conditions (18 pigs/pen, 0.7m(2)/pig, partly slatted floor, ad libitum access to feed), (2) to reveal whether straw ingestion explains the effect of straw provision on the stomach health and (3) to elucidate the effect of straw ingestion on the stomach conditions. Data were collected at slaughter (approximately 100kg body weight) on pigs provided with straw amounts in the range 10g to 500g wheat straw/pig/day from 30kg body weight and fed a wheat-based pelleted feed added 15% non-heated and non-pelleted rolled barley. Aims (1) and (2) included 712 pigs kept in 42 pens, whereas (3) was studied on a subset of 37 pigs with either none or obvious amounts of straw in the stomach. The amount of straw provided affected stomach health in a curvilinear manner. Provision of up to approximately 300gstraw/pig/day progressively decreased the risk of oesophageal ulceration and scarring. At larger amounts of straw the ulceroprotective effect of straw was reduced which requires further investigation. Straw ingestion appeared to be an essential intermediary factor for the improvement of stomach health. The number of pigs without straw in the stomach decreased linearly with the logarithm of the amount of straw provided, which explained the effect of straw provision on stomach health. The structure of the stomach contents increased as revealed by the increased weight and dry matter content and decreased sedimentation of the digesta. Provision of approximately 300gstraw/pig/day on the floor may be a potential strategy to reduce, but not inevitably eliminate, oesophageal ulceration in pigs in commercial pig production.

  1. Efficacy, safety and dose-response relationship of teneligliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, T; Kondo, K

    2013-09-01

    To assess the efficacy, safety and dose-response relationship of once-daily teneligliptin, a novel dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) inadequately controlled with diet and exercise. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study, patients (n = 324) were randomized to receive teneligliptin 10, 20 or 40 mg, or placebo, once daily before breakfast for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was the change in haemoglobin (Hb)A1c from baseline to week 12. All teneligliptin-treated groups showed significantly greater reductions in HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) than did the placebo group. The differences between the teneligliptin 10, 20 or 40 mg groups and the placebo group for the change in HbA1c were -0.9 [least-squares (LS) mean; 95% confidence interval: -1.0, -0.7], -0.9 (-1.1, -0.7) and -1.0 (-1.2, -0.9)%, respectively (all, p < 0.001). The respective LS means for FPG were -17.8 (-23.4, -12.1), -16.9 (-22.6, -11.2) and -20.0 (-25.7, -14.3) mg/dl (all, p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in HbA1c among the three doses of teneligliptin. The incidence of adverse events and adverse drug reactions was similar in each group. The incidence of hypoglycaemia was not significantly different among the four groups. Treatment with teneligliptin for 12 weeks provided significant and clinically meaningful reductions in HbA1c and FPG across the dose range studied and was generally well tolerated in Japanese patients with T2DM. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Assessment of The Dose-Response Relationship of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Two Cell Lines Exposed to High Doses of Ionizing Radiation (6 and 8 Gy)

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Khademi, Sara; Azimian, Hosein; Mohebbi, Shokoufeh; Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman

    2017-01-01

    Objective The dose-response relationship of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is controversial at high dose levels. The aim of the present study is to assess RIBE at high dose levels by examination of different endpoints. Materials and Methods This experimental study used the medium transfer technique to induce RIBE. The cells were divided into two main groups: QU-DB cells which received medium from autologous irradiated cells and MRC5 cells which received medium from irradiated QU-DB cells. Colony, MTT, and micronucleus assays were performed to quantify bystander responses. The medium was diluted and transferred to bystander cells to investigate whether medium dilution could revive the RIBE response that disappeared at a high dose. Results The RIBE level in QU-DB bystander cells increased in the dose range of 0.5 to 4 Gy, but decreased at 6 and 8 Gy. The Micronucleated cells per 1000 binucleated cells (MNBN) frequency of QU-DB bystander cells which received the most diluted medium from 6 and 8 Gy QU-DB irradiated cells reached the maximum level compared to the MNBN frequency of the cells that received complete medium (P<0.0001). MNBN frequency of MRC5 cells which received the most diluted medium from 4 Gy QU-DB irradiated cells reached the maximum level compared to MNBN frequency of cells that received complete medium (P<0.0001). Conclusion Our results showed that RIBE levels decreased at doses above 4 Gy; however, RIBE increased when diluted conditioned medium was transferred to bystander cells. This finding confirmed that a negative feedback mechanism was responsible for the decrease in RIBE response at high doses. Decrease of RIBE at high doses might be used to predict that in radiosurgery, brachytherapy and grid therapy, in which high dose per fraction is applied, normal tissue damage owing to RIBE may decrease. PMID:28836405

  3. Assessment of The Dose-Response Relationship of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Two Cell Lines Exposed to High Doses of Ionizing Radiation (6 and 8 Gy).

    PubMed

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Khademi, Sara; Azimian, Hosein; Mohebbi, Shokoufeh; Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman

    2017-10-01

    The dose-response relationship of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is controversial at high dose levels. The aim of the present study is to assess RIBE at high dose levels by examination of different endpoints. This experimental study used the medium transfer technique to induce RIBE. The cells were divided into two main groups: QU-DB cells which received medium from autologous irradiated cells and MRC5 cells which received medium from irradiated QU-DB cells. Colony, MTT, and micronucleus assays were performed to quantify bystander responses. The medium was diluted and transferred to bystander cells to investigate whether medium dilution could revive the RIBE response that disappeared at a high dose. The RIBE level in QU-DB bystander cells increased in the dose range of 0.5 to 4 Gy, but decreased at 6 and 8 Gy. The Micronucleated cells per 1000 binucleated cells (MNBN) frequency of QU-DB bystander cells which received the most diluted medium from 6 and 8 Gy QU-DB irradiated cells reached the maximum level compared to the MNBN frequency of the cells that received complete medium (P<0.0001). MNBN frequency of MRC5 cells which received the most diluted medium from 4 Gy QU-DB irradiated cells reached the maximum level compared to MNBN frequency of cells that received complete medium (P<0.0001). Our results showed that RIBE levels decreased at doses above 4 Gy; however, RIBE increased when diluted conditioned medium was transferred to bystander cells. This finding confirmed that a negative feedback mechanism was responsible for the decrease in RIBE response at high doses. Decrease of RIBE at high doses might be used to predict that in radiosurgery, brachytherapy and grid therapy, in which high dose per fraction is applied, normal tissue damage owing to RIBE may decrease.

  4. Age-related differences in the dose-response relationship of muscle protein synthesis to resistance exercise in young and old men.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Selby, Anna; Rankin, Debbie; Patel, Rekha; Atherton, Philip; Hildebrandt, Wulf; Williams, John; Smith, Kenneth; Seynnes, Olivier; Hiscock, Natalie; Rennie, Michael J

    2009-01-15

    We investigated how myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle anabolic signalling were affected by resistance exercise at 20-90% of 1 repetition maximum (1 RM) in two groups (25 each) of post-absorptive, healthy, young (24 +/- 6 years) and old (70 +/- 5 years) men with identical body mass indices (24 +/- 2 kg m(-2)). We hypothesized that, in response to exercise, anabolic signalling molecule phosphorylation and MPS would be modified in a dose-dependant fashion, but to a lesser extent in older men. Vastus lateralis muscle was sampled before, immediately after, and 1, 2 and 4 h post-exercise. MPS was measured by incorporation of [1,2-(13)C] leucine (gas chromatography-combustion-mass spectrometry using plasma [1,2-(13)C]alpha-ketoisocaparoate as surrogate precursor); the phosphorylation of p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70s6K) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4EBP1) was measured using Western analysis with anti-phosphoantibodies. In each group, there was a sigmoidal dose-response relationship between MPS at 1-2 h post-exercise and exercise intensity, which was blunted (P < 0.05) in the older men. At all intensities, MPS fell in both groups to near-basal values by 2-4 h post-exercise. The phosphorylation of p70s6K and 4EBP1 at 60-90% 1 RM was blunted in older men. At 1 h post-exercise at 60-90% 1 RM, p70s6K phosphorylation predicted the rate of MPS at 1-2 h post-exercise in the young but not in the old. The results suggest that in the post-absorptive state: (i) MPS is dose dependant on intensity rising to a plateau at 60-90% 1 RM; (ii) older men show anabolic resistance of signalling and MPS to resistance exercise.

  5. Evidence of a Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationship between Training Load and Stress Markers in Elite Female Futsal Players

    PubMed Central

    Milanez, Vinicius F.; Ramos, Solange P.; Okuno, Nilo M.; Boullosa, Daniel A.; Nakamura, Fabio Y.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was: to describe typical training load (TL) carried out by a professional female futsal team for a period of 5 weeks; and to verify the relationship between TL, stress symptoms, salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) levels, and symptoms of upper respiratory infections (URI). Over 45 sessions, the TL of the athletes was monitored daily by means of session-RPE method during the in-season period prior to the main national competition. Stress symptoms were measured weekly by means of the “Daily Analysis of Life Demands in Athletes Questionnaire” (DALDA), SIgA levels, and by symptoms of URI by the “Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21” (WURSS). There was a significant increase in TL, monotony, and training strain in week 3, with a concomitant and significant reduction in percentage variation (Δ%) of SIgA concentration and secretion rate (p < 0.05). Additionally, a second order regression model showed a high goodness of fit (R2 = 0.64 - 0.89) between TL and strain with SIgA concentration, secretion rate, and “worse than normal” responses of stress symptoms from the questionnaire. In conclusion, a link between TL and SIgA levels, and stress symptoms in female futsal players was evident in a non linear fashion. There appears to be an optimal range of values of daily TL between ~343 and ~419 AU and strain between ~2639 and 3060 AU, because at levels below and above these values there was an increase in stress symptoms and above ~435 and ~3160 AU to TL and strain there were a decrease in SIgA levels. In contrast, symptoms of URI failed to demonstrate relationship with the variables studied. Key Points There is a dose-response relationship between SIgA levels and stress symptoms with TL. For the athletes of the present study, values of ~436 AU and ~3161 AU to TL and strain training would be desirable because higher values would decrease responses of SIgA levels. An optimal range of values of TL between ~336 and ~412 AU to TL

  6. Bioavailability and toxicity of zinc from contaminated freshwater sediments: linking exposure-dose-response relationships of the freshwater bivalve Hyridella australis to zinc-spiked sediments.

    PubMed

    Marasinghe Wadige, Chamani P M; Taylor, Anne M; Maher, William A; Krikowa, Frank

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the use of the freshwater bivalve Hyridella australis as a potential biomonitor for zinc contamination in freshwater sediments, the bioavailability and toxicity of zinc contaminated sediments (low 44 ± 5, medium 526 ± 41, high 961 ± 38 μg/g dry mass) were investigated in laboratory microcosms for 28 days by examining H. australis exposure-dose-response relationships. Zinc concentrations in sediments and surface waters were measured as zinc exposure. Zinc in whole organism soft body tissues and five individual tissues were measured as organism zinc dose. Sub-cellular localisation of zinc in hepatopancreas tissues was investigated to further understand the zinc handling strategies and tolerance of H. australis. Total antioxidant capacity, lipid peroxidation and lysosomal membrane stability were measured in hepatopancreas tissues as zinc induced biomarker responses. Accumulated zinc concentrations in whole body tissues of H. australis reflected the zinc exposure and exhibited exposure dependent zinc accumulation at day 28. Gills accumulated significantly higher zinc concentrations than other tissues, however, no significant differences in zinc accumulation between treatments were detected for any of the individual tissues analysed. Analysis of individual tissue zinc concentrations, therefore, may not offer any advantages for monitoring bioavailable zinc in freshwater environments with this organism. Relationships between tissue zinc and calcium concentration suggest accumulation of zinc by H. australis may have occurred as an analogue of calcium which is a major constituent in shell and granules of unionid bivalves. A high percentage of accumulated zinc in the hepatopancreas tissues was detoxified and stored in metallothionein like proteins and metal rich granules. Of the zinc accumulated in the biologically active metal pool, 59-70% was stored in the lysosome+microsome fraction. At the concentrations tested, increasing zinc exposure resulted in

  7. Pharmacodynamics and Dose-Response Relationships of Liposomal Amphotericin B against Different Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus Isolates in a Murine Model of Disseminated Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Melchers, Willem J. G.; Mouton, Johan W.

    2013-01-01

    The management of invasive aspergillosis (IA) has become more complicated due to the emergence of acquired azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus, which is associated with treatment failure and a mortality rate of 88%. Treatment with liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) may be a useful alternative to improve therapeutic outcome in azole-resistant IA. Four clinical A. fumigatus isolates obtained from patients with proven IA were studied in a nonneutropenic murine model of infection: a wild-type isolate without mutations in the cyp51A gene and three azole-resistant isolates harboring a single mutation at codon 220 (M220I) and tandem repeat mutations (a 34-bp tandem repeat mutation in the promoter region of the cyp51A gene in combination with substitutions at codon L98 [TR34/L98H] and a 46-bp tandem repeat mutation in the promoter region of the cyp51A gene in combination with mutation at codons Y121 and T289 [TR46/Y121F/T289A]), respectively. Female CD-1 mice were infected intravenously 24 h prior to the start of therapy. Groups of 11 mice were treated at days 1, 2, and 5 postchallenge with increasing 4-fold doses of L-AmB ranging from 0.004 to 16 mg/kg/day and observed for 14 days. Survival for all 4 isolates at day 14 was significantly better than that of controls. A dose-response relationship was observed independent of the azole resistance mechanism. The Hill-type model with a variable slope fitted the relationship between the dose and 14-day survival well for all isolates, with R2 values of 0.95 (wild-type), 0.97 (M220I), 0.85 (TR34/L98H), and 0.94 (TR46/Y121F/T289A), respectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis confirmed that there was no significant difference between groups. The results of these experiments indicate that L-AmB was able to prolong survival in vivo in disseminated IA independent of the presence of an azole resistance mechanism in a dose-dependent manner, and therefore, they support a role for L-AmB in the treatment of azole-resistant IA

  8. Association of Longitudinal Cognitive Decline With Amyloid Burden in Middle-aged and Older Adults: Evidence for a Dose-Response Relationship.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Michelle E; Kennedy, Kristen M; Rodrigue, Karen M; Wig, Gagan; Bischof, Gérard N; Rieck, Jennifer R; Chen, Xi; Festini, Sara B; Devous, Michael D; Park, Denise C

    2017-07-01

    Presently, the clinical standard for reporting the results of an amyloid positron emission tomography scan is to assign a dichotomous rating of positive or negative for the presence of amyloid. In a 4-year longitudinal study, we investigated whether using a continuous measure of the magnitude of baseline amyloid burden would provide valuable information about the rate of future cognitive decline over the subsequent 4 years compared with a dichotomous measure in middle-aged and older adults. To examine whether a continuous, dose-response relationship between amyloid burden and cognitive decline was present among middle-aged and older adults. This cohort study included 174 participants from the Dallas Lifespan Brain Study who were 40 to 89 years old at the beginning of the study, were cognitively normal at baseline (a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 26 or higher) with no history of neurological or psychiatric disorders, and had completed amyloid imaging ([18F]-florbetapir) at baseline and cognitive assessments at baseline and a 4-year follow-up. Continuous amyloid burden was measured as the mean cortical standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) at baseline. Linear mixed models assessed the effect of increasing baseline amyloid over time (SUVR × time interaction) on episodic memory, reasoning, processing speed, vocabulary, and Mini-Mental State Examination performance. Age, sex, education, apolipoprotein ε4, and the random effect of intercepts were included as covariates. The mean (SD) age for all participants (n = 174) was 66.44 (11.74) years, and 65 participants (37%) were men. The primary analyses yielded significant SUVR × time interactions in episodic memory, processing speed, vocabulary, and Mini-Mental State Examination performance, but not in reasoning performance. Higher baseline SUVR projected greater cognitive decline over 4 years. When controlling for variance related to a dichotomized positive/negative classification, most effects on

  9. The importance of body weight for the dose response relationship of oral vitamin D supplementation and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ekwaru, John Paul; Zwicker, Jennifer D; Holick, Michael F; Giovannucci, Edward; Veugelers, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Unlike vitamin D recommendations by the Institute of Medicine, the Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Endocrine Society acknowledge body weight differentials and recommend obese subjects be given two to three times more vitamin D to satisfy their body's vitamin D requirement. However, the Endocrine Society also acknowledges that there are no good studies that clearly justify this. In this study we examined the combined effect of vitamin D supplementation and body weight on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin (25(OH)D) and serum calcium in healthy volunteers. We analyzed 22,214 recordings of vitamin D supplement use and serum 25(OH)D from 17,614 healthy adult volunteers participating in a preventive health program. This program encourages the use of vitamin D supplementation and monitors its use and serum 25(OH)D and serum calcium levels. Participants reported vitamin D supplementation ranging from 0 to 55,000 IU per day and had serum 25(OH)D levels ranging from 10.1 to 394 nmol/L. The dose response relationship between vitamin D supplementation and serum 25(OH)D followed an exponential curve. On average, serum 25(OH)D increased by 12.0 nmol/L per 1,000 IU in the supplementation interval of 0 to 1,000 IU per day and by 1.1 nmol/L per 1,000 IU in the supplementation interval of 15,000 to 20,000 IU per day. BMI, relative to absolute body weight, was found to be the better determinant of 25(OH)D. Relative to normal weight subjects, obese and overweight participants had serum 25(OH)D that were on average 19.8 nmol/L and 8.0 nmol/L lower, respectively (P<0.001). We did not observe any increase in the risk for hypercalcemia with increasing vitamin D supplementation. We recommend vitamin D supplementation be 2 to 3 times higher for obese subjects and 1.5 times higher for overweight subjects relative to normal weight subjects. This observational study provides body weight specific recommendations to achieve 25(OH)D targets.

  10. mFISH analysis of chromosome aberrations induced in vitro by α-particle radiation: examination of dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Curwen, Gillian B; Tawn, E Janet; Cadwell, Kevin K; Guyatt, Laura; Thompson, James; Hill, Mark A

    2012-11-01

    A multicolored FISH (mFISH) technique was used to characterize the cytogenetic damage associated with exposure to α-particle radiation with particular emphasis on the quality and quantity that is likely to be transmitted through cell division to descendant cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with (238)Pu α particles with a range of mean doses up to 936 mGy and were cultured for 47 h. The dose responses for total aberrant cells, stable and unstable cells, and cells with one simple chromosome aberration and multiple chromosome aberrations were predominantly linear for doses that resulted in cell nuclei receiving a single α-particle traversal. However, there was a decrease per unit dose in aberrant cells of all types at higher doses because of cells increasingly receiving multiple traversals. The proportion of radiation-induced aberrant cells containing multiple aberrations ranged from 48 to 74% with little evidence of dose dependency. Ninety-one percent of all cells with multiple aberrations were classified as unstable. Resolving the chromosome rearrangements into simple categories resulted in a linear dose response for dicentrics of 24.9 ± 3.3 × 10(-2) per Gy. The predominant aberration in stable transmissible cells was a single translocation with a dose response for predominantly single hit cell nuclei of 4.1 ± 1.3 × 10(-2) per Gy. Thus, translocations are the most likely aberration to be observed in peripheral blood lymphocytes from individuals with incorporated α-emitting radionuclides resulting in long-term chronic exposure.

  11. Dose Response Data for Hormonally Active Chemicals ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the late 1940s. The debate originally focused on linear no threshold (LNT) vs threshold responses in the low dose range for cancer and noncancer related effects. For noncancer effects the default assumption is that noncancer effects generally display threshold rather than LNT responses. More recently, claims have arisen that the chemicals, like endocrine disrupters (EDS), which act via high affinity, low capacity nuclear receptors, may display LNT or nonmonotonic low dose responses: responses that could be missed in multigenerational guideline toxicity testing. This presentation will discuss LNT, threshold and nonmonotonic dose response relationships from case studies of chemicals that disrupt reproductive development and function via the ER, AR and AhR pathways and will include in vitro and in vivo multigenerational data. The in vivo studies in this discussion include only robust, well designed, comprehensive studies that administered the chemical via a relevant route(s) of exposure over a broad dose response range, including low dose(s) in the microgram/kg/d range. The chemicals include ethinyl estradiol, estradiol, genistein, bisphenol a, trenbolone, finasteride, flutamide, phthalate esters and 2,3,7,8 TCDD. The objective is to critically evaluate the data from well done studies in this field to address concerns that current multigenerational reproductive test gui

  12. The suppression of pineal melatonin content and N-acetyltransferase activity by different light irradiances in the Syrian hamster: a dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Brainard, G C; Richardson, B A; King, T S; Matthews, S A; Reiter, R J

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the influence of various irradiances of cool white fluorescent light on the suppression of pineal N-acetyltransferase activity (NAT) and melatonin content in hamsters. Groups of animals were exposed to light irradiances ranging from 0.00-1.86 microwatts (microW)/cm2 for 20 min during the night. Both pineal NAT and melatonin were similarly depressed by the light irradiances in a dose-related manner. The shape of the resultant dose-response curves and the calculated ED50 for NAT (0.066 microW/cm2) and melatonin (0.058 microW/cm2) were remarkably similar. These findings may be relevant to the physiological control of the pineal by natural illumination.

  13. Dose-response relationship between alcohol consumption before and during pregnancy and the risks of low birth weight, preterm birth and small-size-for-gestational age (SGA) – A systematic review and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Jayadeep; Bakker, Rachel; Irving, Hyacinth; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Malini, Shobha; Rehm, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Background The effects of moderate alcohol consumption during pregnancy on adverse pregnancy outcomes have been inconsistent. Objective To review systematically and perform meta-analyses on the effect of maternal alcohol exposure on the risk of low birth weight, preterm birth and small-size-for-gestational age (SGA). Search Strategy Using Medical Subject Headings, a literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CABS, WHOlist, SIGLE, ETOH, and Web of Science between 1 January 1980 and 1 August 2009 was performed followed by manual searches. Selection Criteria Case control or cohort studies were assessed for quality (STROBE), 36 available studies were included. Data collection and Analysis Two reviewers independently extracted the information on low birth weight, preterm birth and SGA using a standardized protocol. Meta-analyses on dose-response relationship were performed using linear as well as first-order and second-order fractional polynomial regressions to estimate best fitting curves to the data. Main Results Compared to abstainers, the overall dose-response relationships for low birth weight and SGA had no effect up to 10 g/day (an average of about 1 drink/day) and preterm birth had no effect up to 18 g/day (an average of 1.5 drinks/day) of pure alcohol consumption; thereafter, the relationship had monotonically increasing risk for increasing maternal alcohol consumption. Moderate consumption during pre-pregnancy was associated with reduced risks for both outcomes. Conclusions Dose-response relationship indicates that heavy alcohol consumption during pregnancy increases the risks of all three outcomes while light to moderate alcohol consumption shows no effect. Preventive measures during antenatal consults should be initiated. PMID:21729235

  14. Dose-response-a challenge for allelopathy?

    PubMed

    Belz, Regina G; Hurle, Karl; Duke, Stephen O

    2005-04-01

    The response of an organism to a chemical depends, among other things, on the dose. Nonlinear dose-response relationships occur across a broad range of research fields, and are a well established tool to describe the basic mechanisms of phytotoxicity. The responses of plants to allelochemicals as biosynthesized phytotoxins, relate as well to nonlinearity and, thus, allelopathic effects can be adequately quantified by nonlinear mathematical modeling. The current paper applies the concept of nonlinearity to assorted aspects of allelopathy within several bioassays and reveals their analysis by nonlinear regression models. Procedures for a valid comparison of effective doses between different allelopathic interactions are presented for both, inhibitory and stimulatory effects. The dose-response applications measure and compare the responses produced by pure allelochemicals [scopoletin (7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one); DIBOA (2,4-dihydroxy-2H-1,4-benzoxaxin-3(4H)-one); BOA (benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one); MBOA (6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one)], involved in allelopathy of grain crops, to demonstrate how some general principles of dose responses also relate to allelopathy. Hereupon, dose-response applications with living donor plants demonstrate the validity of these principles for density-dependent phytotoxicity of allelochemicals produced and released by living plants (Avena sativa L., Secale cereale L., Triticum L. spp.), and reveal the use of such experiments for initial considerations about basic principles of allelopathy. Results confirm that nonlinearity applies to allelopathy, and the study of allelopathic effects in dose-response experiments allows for new and challenging insights into allelopathic interactions.

  15. Spatial distribution and dose-response relationship for different operation modes in a reaction-diffusion model of the MAPK cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Yi, Ming; Liu, Yan

    2011-10-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade plays a critical role in the control of cell growth. Deregulation of this pathway contributes to the development of many cancers. To better understand its signal transduction, we constructed a reaction-diffusion model for the MAPK pathway. We modeled the three layers of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation reactions and diffusion processes from the cell membrane to the nucleus. Based on different types of feedback in the MAPK cascade, four operation modes are introduced. For each of the four modes, spatial distributions and dose-response curves of active kinases (i.e. ppMAPK) are explored by numerical simulation. The effects of propagation length, diffusion coefficient and feedback strength on the pathway dynamics are investigated. We found that intrinsic bistability in the MAPK cascade can generate a traveling wave of ppMAPK with constant amplitude when the propagation length is short. ppMAPK in this mode of intrinsic bistability decays more slowly than it does in all other modes as the propagation length increases. Moreover, we examined the global and local responses to Ras-GTP of these four modes, and demonstrated how the shapes of these dose-response curves change as the propagation length increases. Also, we found that larger diffusion constant gives a higher response level on the zero-order regime and makes the ppMAPK profiles flatter under strong Ras-GTP stimulus. Furthermore, we observed that spatial responses of ppMAPK are more sensitive to negative feedback than to positive feedback in the broader signal range. Finally, we showed how oscillatory signals pass through the kinase cascade, and found that high frequency signals are damped faster than low frequency ones.

  16. A dose-response relationship between exposure to a large-scale HIV preventive intervention and consistent condom use with different sexual partners of female sex workers in southern India

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Avahan Initiative, a large-scale HIV preventive intervention targeted to high-risk populations including female sex workers (FSWs), was initiated in 2003 in six high-prevalence states in India, including Karnataka. This study assessed if intervention exposure was associated with condom use with FSWs’ sexual partners, including a dose-response relationship. Methods Data were from a cross-sectional study (2006-07) of 775 FSWs in three districts in Karnataka. Survey methods accounted for the complex cluster sampling design. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression was used to separately model the relationships between each of five intervention exposure variables and five outcomes for consistent condom use (CCU= always versus frequently/sometimes/never) with different sex partners, including with: all clients; occasional clients; most recent repeat client; most recent non-paying partner; and the husband or cohabiting partner. Linear tests for trends were conducted for three continuous intervention exposure variables. Results FSWs reported highest CCU with all clients (81.7%); CCU was lowest with FSWs’ husband or cohabiting partner (9.6%). In multivariable analysis, the odds of CCU with all clients and with occasional clients were 6.3-fold [95% confidence intervals, CIs: 2.8-14.5] and 2.3-fold [95% CIs: 1.4-4.1] higher among FSWs contacted by intervention staff and 4.9-fold [95% CIs: 2.6-9.3] and 2.3-fold [95% CIs: 1.3-4.1] higher among those who ever observed a condom demonstration by staff, respectively, compared to those who had not. A significant dose-response relationship existed between each of these CCU outcomes and increased duration since first contacted by staff (P=0.001; P=0.006) and numbers of condom demonstrations witnessed (P=0.004; P=0.026); a dose-response relationship was also observed between condom use with all clients and number of times contacted by staff (P=0.047). Intervention exposure was not associated with higher odds

  17. A dose-response relationship between exposure to a large-scale HIV preventive intervention and consistent condom use with different sexual partners of female sex workers in southern India.

    PubMed

    Deering, Kathleen N; Boily, Marie-Claude; Lowndes, Catherine M; Shoveller, Jean; Tyndall, Mark W; Vickerman, Peter; Bradley, Jan; Gurav, Kaveri; Pickles, Michael; Moses, Stephen; Ramesh, Banadakoppa M; Washington, Reynold; Rajaram, S; Alary, Michel

    2011-12-29

    The Avahan Initiative, a large-scale HIV preventive intervention targeted to high-risk populations including female sex workers (FSWs), was initiated in 2003 in six high-prevalence states in India, including Karnataka. This study assessed if intervention exposure was associated with condom use with FSWs' sexual partners, including a dose-response relationship. Data were from a cross-sectional study (2006-07) of 775 FSWs in three districts in Karnataka. Survey methods accounted for the complex cluster sampling design. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression was used to separately model the relationships between each of five intervention exposure variables and five outcomes for consistent condom use (CCU= always versus frequently/sometimes/never) with different sex partners, including with: all clients; occasional clients; most recent repeat client; most recent non-paying partner; and the husband or cohabiting partner. Linear tests for trends were conducted for three continuous intervention exposure variables. FSWs reported highest CCU with all clients (81.7%); CCU was lowest with FSWs' husband or cohabiting partner (9.6%). In multivariable analysis, the odds of CCU with all clients and with occasional clients were 6.3-fold [95% confidence intervals, CIs: 2.8-14.5] and 2.3-fold [95% CIs: 1.4-4.1] higher among FSWs contacted by intervention staff and 4.9-fold [95% CIs: 2.6-9.3] and 2.3-fold [95% CIs: 1.3-4.1] higher among those who ever observed a condom demonstration by staff, respectively, compared to those who had not. A significant dose-response relationship existed between each of these CCU outcomes and increased duration since first contacted by staff (P=0.001; P=0.006) and numbers of condom demonstrations witnessed (P=0.004; P=0.026); a dose-response relationship was also observed between condom use with all clients and number of times contacted by staff (P=0.047). Intervention exposure was not associated with higher odds of CCU with the most recent

  18. Simplified Warfarin Dose-response Pharmacodynamic Models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongho; Gaweda, Adam E.; Wu, Dongfeng; Li, Lang; Rai, Shesh N.; Brier, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin is a frequently used oral anticoagulant for long-term prevention and treatment of thromboembolic events. Due to its narrow therapeutic range and large inter-individual dose-response variability, it is highly desirable to personalize warfarin dosing. However, the complexity of the conventional kinetic-pharmacodynamic (K-PD) models hampers the development of the personalized dose management. To avert this challenge, we propose simplified PD models for warfarin dose-response relationship, which is motivated by ideas from control theory. The simplified models were further applied to longitudinal data of 37 patients undergoing anticoagulation treatment using the standard two-stage approach and then compared with the conventional K-PD models. Data analysis shows that all models have a similar predictive ability, but the simplified models are most parsimonious. PMID:25750489

  19. Dose-response relationships of FMISO between trace dose and various macro-doses in rat by ultra-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry and radioactivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Du, Jinglei; Zhu, Lin; Zhou, Xue; Yin, Wei; Deng, Aifang; Qiao, Jinping

    2012-11-01

    Screening the pharmacokinetics of candidates using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) may be efficacious and safe for the research and development of new PET imaging agents. However, the PET imaging agent is administered as trace dose and the sensitivity of LC-MS/MS is often insufficient. If the dose was increased to be quantifiable, it should be necessary to prove whether the pharmacokinetics between trace and macro-doses is consistent or not. In this paper, fluoromisonidazole (FMISO), a tumor PET imaging agent, was chosen to evaluate the dose-response pharmacokinetics by administering various single intravenous doses (0.1, 0.4, 1.6 and 6.4 mg/kg) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The plasma concentration of FMISO was determined by an ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (UPLC-MS/MS) method, and the blood radioactivity of [(18)F]FMISO was detected by a gamma counter. By calculating and comparing the pharmacokinetic parameters, the total area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC(0-∞)) and peak plasma concentration (C(max)) values increased with the selected FMISO doses, and showing linear dose-dependent. On the other hand, some parameters related to time, such as the elimination half-lives (t(1/2)) and elimination rate constant (K(e)) were dose-independent, and there is no significant deference between trace dose and various macro-doses. The data should be useful to evaluate the novel 2-nitroimidazole derivatives as potential PET tumor imaging agents.

  20. Steep Dose-Response Relationship for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using Hypofractionated High-Dose Irradiation by Real-Time Tumor-Tracking Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Onimaru, Rikiya Fujino, Masaharu; Yamazaki, Koichi; Onodera, Yuya; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Katoh, Norio; Hommura, Fumihiro; Oizumi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical outcomes of patients with pathologically proven, peripherally located, Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer who had undergone stereotactic body radiotherapy using real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy during the developmental period. Methods and Materials: A total of 41 patients (25 with Stage T1 and 16 with Stage T2) were admitted to the study between February 2000 and June 2005. A 5-mm planning target volume margin was added to the clinical target volume determined with computed tomography at the end of the expiratory phase. The gating window ranged from {+-}2 to 3 mm. The dose fractionation schedule was 40 or 48 Gy in four fractions within 1 week. The dose was prescribed at the center of the planning target volume, giving more than an 80% dose at the planning target volume periphery. Results: For 28 patients treated with 48 Gy in four fractions, the overall actuarial survival rate at 3 years was 82% for those with Stage IA and 32% for those with Stage IB. For patients treated with 40 Gy in four fractions within 1 week, the overall actuarial survival rate at 3 years was 50% for those with Stage IA and 0% for those with Stage IB. A significant difference was found in local control between those with Stage IB who received 40 Gy vs. 48 Gy (p = 0.0015) but not in those with Stage IA (p = 0.5811). No serious radiation morbidity was observed with either dose schedule. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that 48 Gy in four fractions within 1 week is a safe and effective treatment for peripherally located, Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer. A steep dose-response curve between 40 and 48 Gy using a daily dose of 12 Gy delivered within 1 week was identified for Stage IB non-small-cell lung cancer in stereotactic body radiotherapy using real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy.

  1. Characterization of the dose response relationship for lung injury following acute radiation exposure in three well-established murine strains: developing an interspecies bridge to link animal models with human lung.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Isabel L; Xu, Pu-Ting; Nguyen, Giao; Down, Julian D; Johnson, Cynthia S; Katz, Barry P; Hadley, Caroline C; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Approval of radiation countermeasures through the FDA Animal Rule requires pivotal efficacy screening in one or more species that are expected to react with a response similar to humans (21 C.F.R. § 314.610, drugs; § 601.91, biologics). Animal models used in screening studies should reflect the dose response relationship (DRR), clinical presentation, and pathogenesis of lung injury in humans. Over the past 5 y, the authors have characterized systematically the temporal onset, dose-response relationship (DRR), and pathologic outcomes associated with acute, high dose radiation exposure in three diverse mouse strains. In these studies, C57L/J, CBA/J, and C57BL/6J mice received wide field irradiation to the whole thorax with shielding of the head, abdomen, and forelimbs. Doses were delivered at a rate of 69 cGy min using an x-ray source operated at 320 kVp with half-value layer (HVL) of 1 mm Cu. For all strains, radiation dose was associated significantly with 180 d mortality (p < 0.0001). The lethal dose for 50% of animals within the first 180 d (LD50/180) was 11.35 Gy (95% CI 11.1-11.6 Gy) for C57L/J mice, 14.17 Gy (95% CI 13.9-14.5 Gy) for CBA/J mice, and 14.10 Gy (95% CI 12.2-16.4 Gy) for C57BL/6J mice. The LD50/180 in the C57L/J strain was most closely analogous to the DRR for clinical incidence of pneumonitis in non-human primates (10.28 Gy; 95% CI 9.9-10.7 Gy) and humans (10.60 Gy; 95% CI 9.9-12.1 Gy). Furthermore, in the C57L/J strain, there was no gender-specific difference in DRR (p = 0.5578). The reliability of the murine models is demonstrated by the reproducibility of the dose-response and consistency of disease presentation across studies.Health Phys. 106(1):000-000; 2014.

  2. Dose-response relationship between urinary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons metabolites and urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in a Chinese general population.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huizhen; Hou, Jian; Zhou, Yun; Yang, Yuqing; Cheng, Juan; Xu, Tian; Xiao, Lili; Chen, Weihong; Yuan, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Association of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with increased urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation has been reported in occupational population and children. However, studies on the association between them in general population are limited. A total of 1864 eligible subjects from the baseline Wuhan participants of the Wuhan-Zhuhai Cohort Study (n = 3053) were included in this study, after excluding individuals with certain disease and missing data on urinary monohydroxy PAHs (OH-PAHs) and 8-OHdG levels. Urinary monohydroxy PAHs and 8-OHdG levels were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection, respectively. Association of urinary OH-PAHs with urinary 8-OHdG was analyzed by multiple linear regression analysis. We found a dose-dependent relationship between urinary PAHs metabolites and urinary 8-OHdG (p < 0.05 for all). Furthermore, more evidence for the association of total concentrations of urinary OH-PAHs with 8-OHdG levels were observed in individuals with normal body mass index or central obesity (p < 0.01 for all). There was a dose-dependent relationship between urinary OH-PAHs levels and urinary 8-OHdG levels among a general Chinese population. Exposure to background PAHs may have a greater influence on urinary 8-OHdG levels in individuals with central obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Seamless integration of dose-response screening and flow chemistry: efficient generation of structure-activity relationship data of β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Werner, Michael; Kuratli, Christoph; Martin, Rainer E; Hochstrasser, Remo; Wechsler, David; Enderle, Thilo; Alanine, Alexander I; Vogel, Horst

    2014-02-03

    Drug discovery is a multifaceted endeavor encompassing as its core element the generation of structure-activity relationship (SAR) data by repeated chemical synthesis and biological testing of tailored molecules. Herein, we report on the development of a flow-based biochemical assay and its seamless integration into a fully automated system comprising flow chemical synthesis, purification and in-line quantification of compound concentration. This novel synthesis-screening platform enables to obtain SAR data on b-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors at an unprecedented cycle time of only 1 h instead of several days. Full integration and automation of industrial processes have always led to productivity gains and cost reductions, and this work demonstrates how applying these concepts to SAR generation may lead to a more efficient drug discovery process. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Short-term dose-response relationships for the relative systemic effects of oral prednisolone and inhaled fluticasone in asthmatic adults

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A M; Lipworth, B J

    1999-01-01

    Aims To determine the systemic dose–response relationships with oral prednisolone and inhaled fluticasone propionate administered in a putative 11:1 mg equivalent basis, in terms of effects on adrenal, bone and haematological markers. Methods Twelve asthmatic patients mean (s.e.) age, 28.8 [3.3] years, FEV1 94.7 [3.6]% predicted, FEF25–75 65.5 [6.1]% predicted were studied in a double-blind, double dummy randomised crossover design comparing placebo, inhaled fluticasone propionate via volumatic spacer given twice a day (ex actuator dose 0.44 mg day−1, 0.88 mg day−1, 1.76 mg day−1) and oral prednisolone given once daily (5 mg day−1, 10 mg day−1, 20 mg day−1). All treatments were for 4 days at each dose level with a 7-day washout at crossover. Measurements were made at 08.00 h after the last dose of each dose level for plasma cortisol, serum osteocalcin and blood eosinophil count. Results There were significant dose-related effects for suppression of all three endpoints with both prednisolone and fluticasone propionate. Parallel slope analysis revealed a calculated dose ratio for relative potency of 8.5:1 mg (95% CI 5.7–11.2) comparing Pred with FP for morning cortisol. The magnitude of suppression with FP was less for osteocalcin and eosinophils than for cortisol. Conclusions Systemic tissues exhibit different dose–response relationships for the effects of inhaled and oral corticosteroids with suppression of cortisol being greater than osteocalcin or eosinophils. For cortisol suppression we observed an 8.5:1 mg relative potency ratio comparing prednisolone with fluticasone propionate. Patients taking high dose inhaled fluticasone propionate should therefore be screened for evidence of impaired adrenal reserve. PMID:10583029

  5. Linear Versus Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationship Between Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Meconium Concentration of Nine Different Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J.Y.; Kwak, H.S.; Choi, J.S.; Ahn, H.K.; Oh, Y.J.; Velázquez-Armenta, E.Y.; Nava-Ocampo, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Presence of individual fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in meconium is considered to be a reliable biomarker of prenatal alcohol exposure, and their concentration has been found to be linearly associated with poor postnatal development, supporting the widely extended idea that ethanol is a non-threshold teratogen. However, a growing number of epidemiological studies have consistently found a lack of adverse short- and long-term fetal outcomes at low exposure levels. We therefore aimed to investigate the relationship between the concentration of individual FAEEs and prenatal alcohol exposure in meconium samples collected within the first 6 to 12?h after birth from 182 babies born to abstainer mothers and from 54 babies born to women who self-reported either light or moderate alcohol ingestion in the second or third trimester of pregnancy. In most cases, the individual FAEE concentrations were negligible and not significantly different (P >0.05) between exposed and control babies. The concentrations appeared to increase linearly with the dose only in the few babies born to mothers who reported >3 drinks/week. These results provide evidence that the correlation between prenatal alcohol exposure and individual FAEE concentrations in meconium is non-linear shape, with a threshold probably at 3 drinks/week. PMID:26691866

  6. Single toxin dose-response models revisited

    PubMed Central

    Glaholt, SP; Kyker-Snowman, E; Shaw, JR; Chen, CY

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to offer a rigorous analysis of the sigmoid shape single toxin dose-response relationship. The toxin efficacy function is introduced and four special points, including maximum toxin efficacy and inflection points, on the dose-response curve are defined. The special points define three phases of the toxin effect on mortality: (1) toxin concentrations smaller than the first inflection point or (2) larger then the second inflection point imply low mortality rate, and (3) concentrations between the first and the second inflection points imply high mortality rate. Probabilistic interpretation and mathematical analysis for each of four models, Hill, logit, probit, and Weibull is provided. Two general model extensions are introduced: (1) the multi-target hit model that accounts for the existence of several vital receptors affected by the toxin, and (2) model with a nonzero mortality at zero concentration to account for natural mortality. Special attention is given to statistical estimation in the framework of the generalized linear model with the binomial dependent variable as the mortality count in each experiment, contrary to the widespread nonlinear regression treating the mortality rate as continuous variable. The models are illustrated using standard EPA Daphnia acute (48 hours) toxicity tests with mortality as a function of NiCl or CuSO4 toxin. PMID:27847315

  7. Formaldehyde dose-response in healthy nonsmokers

    SciTech Connect

    Kulle, T.J.; Sauder, L.R.; Hebel, J.R.; Green, D.J.; Chatham, M.D.

    1987-08-01

    Industrial, commercial, and domestic levels of formaldehydes exposure range from <0.1 to >5.0 ppm. Irritation of the eyes and upper respiratory tract predominate, and bronchoconstriction is described in case reports. However, pulmonary function and irritant symptoms together have not been assessed over a range of HCHO concentrations in a controlled environment. The authors investigated dose response in both symptoms and pulmonary function associated with 3-h exposures to 0.0-3.0 ppm HCHO in a controlled environmental chamber. Ten subjects were randomly exposed to 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 ppm HCHO at rest plus 2.0 ppm HCHO with exercise and nine additional subjects were randomly exposed to 0.0, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 ppm HCHO at rest plus 2.0 ppm HCHO with exercise. Significant dose-response relationships in odor and eye irritation were observed (p < 0.05). Nasal flow resistance was increased at 3.0 ppm (p < 0.01), but not at 2.0 ppm HCHO. There were no significant decrements in pulmonary function (FVC, FEV/sub 1/, FEF/sub 25-75%/, SGaw) or increases in bronchial reactivity to methacholine (log PD/sub 35SGaw/) with exposure to 0.5-3.0 ppm HCHO at rest or to 2.0 ppm HCHO with exercise.

  8. Dose-Response Calculator for ArcGIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanser, Steven E.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Leu, Matthias; Nielsen, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    The Dose-Response Calculator for ArcGIS is a tool that extends the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS 10 Desktop application to aid with the visualization of relationships between two raster GIS datasets. A dose-response curve is a line graph commonly used in medical research to examine the effects of different dosage rates of a drug or chemical (for example, carcinogen) on an outcome of interest (for example, cell mutations) (Russell and others, 1982). Dose-response curves have recently been used in ecological studies to examine the influence of an explanatory dose variable (for example, percentage of habitat cover, distance to disturbance) on a predicted response (for example, survival, probability of occurrence, abundance) (Aldridge and others, 2008). These dose curves have been created by calculating the predicted response value from a statistical model at different levels of the explanatory dose variable while holding values of other explanatory variables constant. Curves (plots) developed using the Dose-Response Calculator overcome the need to hold variables constant by using values extracted from the predicted response surface of a spatially explicit statistical model fit in a GIS, which include the variation of all explanatory variables, to visualize the univariate response to the dose variable. Application of the Dose-Response Calculator can be extended beyond the assessment of statistical model predictions and may be used to visualize the relationship between any two raster GIS datasets (see example in tool instructions). This tool generates tabular data for use in further exploration of dose-response relationships and a graph of the dose-response curve.

  9. Chemical Principles Exemplified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumb, Robert C.

    1970-01-01

    This is the first of a new series of brief ancedotes about materials and phenomena which exemplify chemical principles. Examples include (1) the sea-lab experiment illustrating principles of the kinetic theory of gases, (2) snow-making machines illustrating principles of thermodynamics in gas expansions and phase changes, and (3) sunglasses that…

  10. Chemical Principles Exemplified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumb, Robert C.

    1970-01-01

    This is the first of a new series of brief ancedotes about materials and phenomena which exemplify chemical principles. Examples include (1) the sea-lab experiment illustrating principles of the kinetic theory of gases, (2) snow-making machines illustrating principles of thermodynamics in gas expansions and phase changes, and (3) sunglasses that…

  11. Deviation from additivity in mixture toxicity: relevance of nonlinear dose-response relationships and cell line differences in genotoxicity assays with combinations of chemical mutagens and gamma-radiation.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Werner K; Vamvakas, Spyros; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Schlatter, Josef; Stopper, Helga

    2002-12-01

    Sublinear dose-response relationships are often seen in toxicity testing, particularly with bioassays for carcinogenicity. This is the result of a superimposition of various effects that modulate and contribute to the process of cancer formation. Examples are saturation of detoxification pathways or DNA repair with increasing dose, or regenerative hyperplasia and indirect DNA damage as a consequence of high-dose cytotoxicity and cell death. The response to a combination treatment can appear to be supra-additive, although it is in fact dose-additive along a sublinear dose-response curve for the single agents. Because environmental exposure of humans is usually in a low-dose range and deviation from linearity is less likely at the low-dose end, combination effects should be tested at the lowest observable effect levels (LOEL) of the components. This principle has been applied to combinations of genotoxic agents in various cellular models. For statistical analysis, all experiments were analyzed for deviation from additivity with an n-factor analysis of variance with an interaction term, n being the number of components tested in combination. Benzo[a]pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, and dibenz[a,c]anthracene were tested at the LOEL, separately and in combination, for the induction of revertants in the Ames test, using Salmonella typhimurium TA100 and rat liver S9 fraction. Combined treatment produced no deviation from additivity. The induction of micronuclei in vitro was investigated with ionizing radiation from a 137Cs source and ethyl methanesulfonate. Mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells revealed a significant 40% supra-additive combination effect in an experiment based on three independent replicates for controls and single and combination treatments. On the other hand, two human lymphoblastoid cell lines (TK6 and WTK1) as well as a pilot study with human primary fibroblasts from fetal lung did not show deviation from additivity. Data derived from one cell line should therefore

  12. Bayesian Isotonic Regression Dose-response (BIRD) Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Fu, Haoda

    2016-12-21

    Understanding dose-response relationship is a crucial step in drug development. There are a few parametric methods to estimate dose-response curves, such as the Emax model and the logistic model. These parametric models are easy to interpret and, hence, widely used. However, these models often require the inclusion of patients on high-dose levels; otherwise, the model parameters cannot be reliably estimated. To have robust estimation, nonparametric models are used. However, these models are not able to estimate certain important clinical parameters, such as ED50 and Emax. Furthermore, in many therapeutic areas, dose-response curves can be assumed as non-decreasing functions. This creates an additional challenge for nonparametric methods. In this paper, we propose a new Bayesian isotonic regression dose-response model which features advantages from both parametric and nonparametric models. The ED50 and Emax can be derived from this model. Simulations are provided to evaluate the Bayesian isotonic regression dose-response model performance against two parametric models. We apply this model to a data set from a diabetes dose-finding study.

  13. Exploring the dose response of radiochromic dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skyt, P. S.; Wahlstedt, I.; Yates, E. S.; Muren, L. P.; Petersen, J. B. B.; Balling, P.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the dose response of a newly developed radio-chromic hydrogel dosimeter based on leuco malachite green dye in a gelatine matrix. The original dosimeter composition was first investigated in terms of dose response and dose-rate dependence. In addition, the initiating compounds producing chlorine radicals were substituted with compounds producing fluorine radicals, oxygen-centered radicals, carbon-centered radicals and bromine radicals. Also the surfactant was substituted by other compounds of different molecular size and charge. The original composition gave a dose response of 3.5·10-3 Gy-1cm-1 at 6 Gy/min with a dose rate dependence giving a 27 % increase when decreasing the dose rate to 1 Gy/min. None of the substituted initiating components contributed to an increase in dose response while only one surfactant increased the dose response slightly.

  14. Emesis in Ferrets Following Exposure to Different Types of Radiation: A Dose-Response Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    SR92-34 Emesis in Ferrets Following Exposure to Different Types of Radiation: N A Dose -Response Study L51 BERNARD M. RABIN, Ph.D., WALTER A. HUNT...fission neutrons (1500-2000 following exposure to different types o" radiation: a dose -response cGy), Young (13) reported that increasing the propor...order to establish the dose -response relationships monkey, but did not produce an increase in the total for emesis following exposure to different types

  15. Kalman Filter Models for Extrapolations in Dose-Response Experiments and Accelerated Life-Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-09

    Kalman-Filter models with Gaussian innovations provide a useful and easy to implement tool for inference from dose - response experiments and...proposed dose - response relationship. This is in contrast to the currently used approaches wherein there is an implicit commitment to the validity of

  16. A Bayesian Semiparametric Model for Radiation Dose-Response Estimation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Misumi, Munechika; Cologne, John B; Cullings, Harry M

    2016-06-01

    In evaluating the risk of exposure to health hazards, characterizing the dose-response relationship and estimating acceptable exposure levels are the primary goals. In analyses of health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, while there is a clear agreement that moderate to high radiation doses cause harmful effects in humans, little has been known about the possible biological effects at low doses, for example, below 0.1 Gy, which is the dose range relevant to most radiation exposures of concern today. A conventional approach to radiation dose-response estimation based on simple parametric forms, such as the linear nonthreshold model, can be misleading in evaluating the risk and, in particular, its uncertainty at low doses. As an alternative approach, we consider a Bayesian semiparametric model that has a connected piece-wise-linear dose-response function with prior distributions having an autoregressive structure among the random slope coefficients defined over closely spaced dose categories. With a simulation study and application to analysis of cancer incidence data among Japanese atomic bomb survivors, we show that this approach can produce smooth and flexible dose-response estimation while reasonably handling the risk uncertainty at low doses and elsewhere. With relatively few assumptions and modeling options to be made by the analyst, the method can be particularly useful in assessing risks associated with low-dose radiation exposures.

  17. Statistical strategies for averaging EC50 from multiple dose-response experiments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoqi; Kopp-Schneider, Annette

    2015-11-01

    In most dose-response studies, repeated experiments are conducted to determine the EC50 value for a chemical, requiring averaging EC50 estimates from a series of experiments. Two statistical strategies, the mixed-effect modeling and the meta-analysis approach, can be applied to estimate average behavior of EC50 values over all experiments by considering the variabilities within and among experiments. We investigated these two strategies in two common cases of multiple dose-response experiments in (a) complete and explicit dose-response relationships are observed in all experiments and in (b) only in a subset of experiments. In case (a), the meta-analysis strategy is a simple and robust method to average EC50 estimates. In case (b), all experimental data sets can be first screened using the dose-response screening plot, which allows visualization and comparison of multiple dose-response experimental results. As long as more than three experiments provide information about complete dose-response relationships, the experiments that cover incomplete relationships can be excluded from the meta-analysis strategy of averaging EC50 estimates. If there are only two experiments containing complete dose-response information, the mixed-effects model approach is suggested. We subsequently provided a web application for non-statisticians to implement the proposed meta-analysis strategy of averaging EC50 estimates from multiple dose-response experiments.

  18. The use of mode of action information in risk assessment: quantitative key events/dose-response framework for modeling the dose-response for key events.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ted W; Simons, S Stoney; Preston, R Julian; Boobis, Alan R; Cohen, Samuel M; Doerrer, Nancy G; Fenner-Crisp, Penelope A; McMullin, Tami S; McQueen, Charlene A; Rowlands, J Craig

    2014-08-01

    The HESI RISK21 project formed the Dose-Response/Mode-of-Action Subteam to develop strategies for using all available data (in vitro, in vivo, and in silico) to advance the next-generation of chemical risk assessments. A goal of the Subteam is to enhance the existing Mode of Action/Human Relevance Framework and Key Events/Dose Response Framework (KEDRF) to make the best use of quantitative dose-response and timing information for Key Events (KEs). The resulting Quantitative Key Events/Dose-Response Framework (Q-KEDRF) provides a structured quantitative approach for systematic examination of the dose-response and timing of KEs resulting from a dose of a bioactive agent that causes a potential adverse outcome. Two concepts are described as aids to increasing the understanding of mode of action-Associative Events and Modulating Factors. These concepts are illustrated in two case studies; 1) cholinesterase inhibition by the pesticide chlorpyrifos, which illustrates the necessity of considering quantitative dose-response information when assessing the effect of a Modulating Factor, that is, enzyme polymorphisms in humans, and 2) estrogen-induced uterotrophic responses in rodents, which demonstrate how quantitative dose-response modeling for KE, the understanding of temporal relationships between KEs and a counterfactual examination of hypothesized KEs can determine whether they are Associative Events or true KEs.

  19. [Dose-response relation: relevance for clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Klinkhardt, U; Harder, S

    1998-12-15

    Dose-finding studies are performed routinely in patients and--if appropriate surrogate models exist--also in healthy volunteers. Such studies aim at establishing the optimal dose range for further clinical studies on the efficacy and the risk-benefit ratio of a new drug. The dose-response relationship of a drug is most often described by a sigmoidal curve. Its parameters include the mean effective dose, the maximal effect and the steepness. Interpretation of such curves should be done in the context of the intended clinical indications of the drug. The risk-benefit ratio of a drug can be assessed by overlapping the dose-response curve of wanted and unwanted clinical effects, again, any overlapping (which can be described e.g. by the therapeutic index) should be seen in the context of the indication and available therapeutic alternatives.

  20. A strategy to model nonmonotonic dose-response curve and estimate IC50.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Holden-Wiltse, Jeanne; Wang, Jiong; Liang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC[Formula: see text] is an important pharmacodynamic index of drug effectiveness. To estimate this value, the dose response relationship needs to be established, which is generally achieved by fitting monotonic sigmoidal models. However, recent studies on Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) mutants developing resistance to antiviral drugs show that the dose response curve may not be monotonic. Traditional models can fail for nonmonotonic data and ignore observations that may be of biologic significance. Therefore, we propose a nonparametric model to describe the dose response relationship and fit the curve using local polynomial regression. The nonparametric approach is shown to be promising especially for estimating the IC[Formula: see text] of some HIV inhibitory drugs, in which there is a dose-dependent stimulation of response for mutant strains. This model strategy may be applicable to general pharmacologic, toxicologic, or other biomedical data that exhibits a nonmonotonic dose response relationship for which traditional parametric models fail.

  1. Analytical modelling of regional radiotherapy dose response of lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangkyu; Stroian, Gabriela; Kopek, Neil; AlBahhar, Mahmood; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of the dose-response of radiation-induced lung disease (RILD) is necessary for optimization of radiotherapy (RT) treatment plans involving thoracic cavity irradiation. This study models the time-dependent relationship between local radiation dose and post-treatment lung tissue damage measured by computed tomography (CT) imaging. Fifty-eight follow-up diagnostic CT scans from 21 non-small-cell lung cancer patients were examined. The extent of RILD was segmented on the follow-up CT images based on the increase of physical density relative to the pre-treatment CT image. The segmented RILD was locally correlated with dose distribution calculated by analytical anisotropic algorithm and the Monte Carlo method to generate the corresponding dose-response curves. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model was fit to the dose-response curves at six post-RT time periods, and temporal change in the LKB parameters was recorded. In this study, we observed significant correlation between the probability of lung tissue damage and the local dose for 96% of the follow-up studies. Dose-injury correlation at the first three months after RT was significantly different from later follow-up periods in terms of steepness and threshold dose as estimated from the LKB model. Dependence of dose response on superior-inferior tumour position was also observed. The time-dependent analytical modelling of RILD might provide better understanding of the long-term behaviour of the disease and could potentially be applied to improve inverse treatment planning optimization.

  2. Dose-response effects of oral yohimbine in unrestrained primates.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, L A; Coplan, J D; Friedman, S; Bassoff, T

    1991-04-01

    Six unrestrained bonnet macaques were each observed after oral administration of four dosages of yohimbine hydrochloride (0.10, 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 mg/kg) and a placebo. Yohimbine significantly increased episodes of motoric activation and affective response interspersed with intervals of behavioral enervation. Yohimbine scores correlated closely with baseline levels; there was no dose-response relationship. Response to oral yohimbine differed in several ways from subcutaneous and intravenous sodium lactate infusions, including prominent enervative symptoms and the appearance of sexual arousal. In light of the appearance of cyclic enervative episodes, this study suggests limitations to primate models of panic disorder utilizing oral yohimbine.

  3. Development of a dose-response model for SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toru; Bartrand, Timothy A; Weir, Mark H; Omura, Tatsuo; Haas, Charles N

    2010-07-01

    In order to develop a dose-response model for SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), the pooled data sets for infection of transgenic mice susceptible to SARS-CoV and infection of mice with murine hepatitis virus strain 1, which may be a clinically relevant model of SARS, were fit to beta-Poisson and exponential models with the maximum likelihood method. The exponential model (k= 4.1 x l0(2)) could describe the dose-response relationship of the pooled data sets. The beta-Poisson model did not provide a statistically significant improvement in fit. With the exponential model, the infectivity of SARS-CoV was calculated and compared with those of other coronaviruses. The does of SARS-CoV corresponding to 10% and 50% responses (illness) were estimated at 43 and 280 PFU, respectively. Its estimated infectivity was comparable to that of HCoV-229E, known as an agent of human common cold, and also similar to those of some animal coronaviruses belonging to the same genetic group. Moreover, the exponential model was applied to the analysis of the epidemiological data of SARS outbreak that occurred at an apartment complex in Hong Kong in 2003. The estimated dose of SARS-CoV for apartment residents during the outbreak, which was back-calculated from the reported number of cases, ranged from 16 to 160 PFU/person, depending on the floor. The exponential model developed here is the sole dose-response model for SARS-CoV at the present and would enable us to understand the possibility for reemergence of SARS.

  4. Exact analysis of dose response for multiple correlated binary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Han, Karen E; Catalano, Paul J; Senchaudhuri, Pralay; Mehta, Cyrus

    2004-03-01

    The neurotoxicity of a substance is often tested using animal bioassays. In the functional observational battery, animals are exposed to a test agent and multiple outcomes are recorded to assess toxicity, using approximately 40 animals measured on up to 30 different items. This design gives rise to a challenging statistical problem: a large number of outcomes for a small sample of subjects. We propose an exact test for multiple binary outcomes, under the assumption that the correlation among these items is equal. This test is based upon an exponential model described by Molenberghs and Ryan (1999, Environmetrics 10, 279-300) and extends the methods developed by Corcoran et al. (2001, Biometrics 57, 941-948) who developed an exact test for exchangeably correlated binary data for groups (clusters) of correlated observations. We present a method that computes an exact p-value testing for a joint dose-response relationship. An estimate of the parameter for dose response is also determined along with its 95% confidence bound. The method is illustrated using data from a neurotoxicity bioassay for the chemical perchlorethylene.

  5. TESS-based dose-response using pediatric clonidine exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Blaine E. . E-mail: jebenson@salud.unm.edu; Spyker, Daniel A.; Troutman, William G.; Watson, William A. . E-mail: http://www.aapcc.org/

    2006-06-01

    Objective: The toxic and lethal doses of clonidine in children are unclear. This study was designed to determine whether data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS) could be utilized to determine a dose-response relationship for pediatric clonidine exposure. Methods: 3458 single-substance clonidine exposures in children <6 years of age reported to TESS from January 2000 through December 2003 were examined. Dose ingested, age, and medical outcome were available for 1550 cases. Respiratory arrest cases (n = 8) were classified as the most severe of the medical outcome categories (Arrest, Major, Moderate, Mild, and No effect). Exposures reported as a 'taste or lick' (n = 51) were included as a dose of 1/10 of the dosage form involved. Dose ranged from 0.4 to 1980 (median 13) {mu}g/kg. Weight was imputed based on a quadratic estimate of weight for age. Dose certainty was coded as exact (26% of cases) or not exact (74%). Medical outcome (response) was examined via logistic regression using SAS JMP (release 5.1). Results: The logistic model describing medical outcome (P < 0.0001) included Log dose/kg (P 0.0000) and Certainty (P = 0.045). Conclusion: TESS data can provide the basis for a statistically sound description of dose-response for pediatric clonidine poisoning exposures.

  6. Multiple confidence intervals for selected parameters adjusted for the false coverage rate in monotone dose-response microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jianan; Liu, Wei; Bretz, Frank; Shkedy, Ziv

    2017-07-01

    Benjamini and Yekutieli () introduced the concept of the false coverage-statement rate (FCR) to account for selection when the confidence intervals (CIs) are constructed only for the selected parameters. Dose-response analysis in dose-response microarray experiments is conducted only for genes having monotone dose-response relationship, which is a selection problem. In this paper, we consider multiple CIs for the mean gene expression difference between the highest dose and control in monotone dose-response microarray experiments for selected parameters adjusted for the FCR. A simulation study is conducted to study the performance of the method proposed. The method is applied to a real dose-response microarray experiment with 16, 998 genes for illustration. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Influences of mechanical exposure biographies on physical capabilities of workers from automotive industry - a study on possible dose-response relationships and consequences for short and long term job rotation.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, Holger; Bruder, Ralph; Sinn-Behrendt, Andrea; Landau, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a field study in production areas of a vehicle manufacturing plant, where 106 male workers (aged from 20 to 63 years) were examined and interviewed by the authors. Aim of study was to identify relationships between specific physical worker capabilities and doses of mechanical exposures using self-developed standardized questionnaires as well as a battery of work-specific tests. The dependent variables are different "physical capabilities", classified using a five-point rating scale with regard to the grade of limitation of the respective capability. Independent variables are "age" and specific "mechanical exposures". Several exposures were combined and multiplied with their respective durations in order to determine doses on three different body regions - back, shoulder-neck and upper limbs. There are significant positive correlations between "age" and "dose of mechanical exposure on back/shoulder-neck/upper limbs region". The analysis of the relationship between dose of exposure and different capabilities to lift or reposition loads (with variable weight) shows weak significant correlations for all three body regions. Data analysis shows no significant correlations between any dose of mechanical exposure and capabilities to work in awkward body postures.These results should be considered in age management programs when scheduling future employee assignments to workplaces, especially for production systems where manual handling tasks are dominant.

  8. Bayesian Dose-Response Modeling in Sparse Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Steven B.

    This book discusses Bayesian dose-response modeling in small samples applied to two different settings. The first setting is early phase clinical trials, and the second setting is toxicology studies in cancer risk assessment. In early phase clinical trials, experimental units are humans who are actual patients. Prior to a clinical trial, opinions from multiple subject area experts are generally more informative than the opinion of a single expert, but we may face a dilemma when they have disagreeing prior opinions. In this regard, we consider compromising the disagreement and compare two different approaches for making a decision. In addition to combining multiple opinions, we also address balancing two levels of ethics in early phase clinical trials. The first level is individual-level ethics which reflects the perspective of trial participants. The second level is population-level ethics which reflects the perspective of future patients. We extensively compare two existing statistical methods which focus on each perspective and propose a new method which balances the two conflicting perspectives. In toxicology studies, experimental units are living animals. Here we focus on a potential non-monotonic dose-response relationship which is known as hormesis. Briefly, hormesis is a phenomenon which can be characterized by a beneficial effect at low doses and a harmful effect at high doses. In cancer risk assessments, the estimation of a parameter, which is known as a benchmark dose, can be highly sensitive to a class of assumptions, monotonicity or hormesis. In this regard, we propose a robust approach which considers both monotonicity and hormesis as a possibility. In addition, We discuss statistical hypothesis testing for hormesis and consider various experimental designs for detecting hormesis based on Bayesian decision theory. Past experiments have not been optimally designed for testing for hormesis, and some Bayesian optimal designs may not be optimal under a

  9. Testing the dose-response specification in epidemiology: public health and policy consequences for lead.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Stephen J; Rothenberg, Jesse C

    2005-09-01

    Statistical evaluation of the dose-response function in lead epidemiology is rarely attempted. Economic evaluation of health benefits of lead reduction usually assumes a linear dose-response function, regardless of the outcome measure used. We reanalyzed a previously published study, an international pooled data set combining data from seven prospective lead studies examining contemporaneous blood lead effect on IQ (intelligence quotient) of 7-year-old children (n = 1,333). We constructed alternative linear multiple regression models with linear blood lead terms (linear-linear dose response) and natural-log-transformed blood lead terms (log-linear dose response). We tested the two lead specifications for nonlinearity in the models, compared the two lead specifications for significantly better fit to the data, and examined the effects of possible residual confounding on the functional form of the dose-response relationship. We found that a log-linear lead-IQ relationship was a significantly better fit than was a linear-linear relationship for IQ (p = 0.009), with little evidence of residual confounding of included model variables. We substituted the log-linear lead-IQ effect in a previously published health benefits model and found that the economic savings due to U.S. population lead decrease between 1976 and 1999 (from 17.1 microg/dL to 2.0 microg/dL) was 2.2 times (319 billion dollars) that calculated using a linear-linear dose-response function (149 billion dollars). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention action limit of 10 microg/dL for children fails to protect against most damage and economic cost attributable to lead exposure.

  10. A Meta-Analysis To Determine the Dose Response for Strength Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, Matthew R.; Alvar, Brent A.; Burkett, Lee N.; Ball, Stephen D.

    2003-01-01

    Examined the quantitative dose-response relationship for strength development by calculating the magnitude of gains elicited by various levels of training intensity, frequency, and volume; thus clarifying the effort to benefit ratio. A meta-analysis of 140 studies with 1,433 effect sizes (ES) was conducted. ES demonstrated different responses…

  11. Duration of Exposure and the Dose-Response Model of PTSD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaysen, Debra; Rosen, Gerald; Bowman, Marilyn; Resick, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    A dose-response model underlies posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and posits a relationship between event magnitude and clinical outcome. The present study examines whether one index of event magnitude--duration of exposure--contributes to risk of PTSD among female victims of sexual assault. Findings support a small but significant contribution…

  12. A Meta-Analysis To Determine the Dose Response for Strength Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, Matthew R.; Alvar, Brent A.; Burkett, Lee N.; Ball, Stephen D.

    2003-01-01

    Examined the quantitative dose-response relationship for strength development by calculating the magnitude of gains elicited by various levels of training intensity, frequency, and volume; thus clarifying the effort to benefit ratio. A meta-analysis of 140 studies with 1,433 effect sizes (ES) was conducted. ES demonstrated different responses…

  13. Duration of Exposure and the Dose-Response Model of PTSD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaysen, Debra; Rosen, Gerald; Bowman, Marilyn; Resick, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    A dose-response model underlies posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and posits a relationship between event magnitude and clinical outcome. The present study examines whether one index of event magnitude--duration of exposure--contributes to risk of PTSD among female victims of sexual assault. Findings support a small but significant contribution…

  14. Dose-Response Issues Concerning the Relations between Regular Physical Activity and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankinen, Tuomo; Bouchard, Claude

    2002-01-01

    This paper categorizes the many benefits of physical activity, offering information concerning the type of dose necessary to get that benefit. In 2000, Health Canada and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, along with other agencies, sponsored a symposium to determine whether there was a dose-response relationship between…

  15. Analysis of Transcriptomic Dose Response Data in the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Slide presentation at the HESI-HEALTH Canada-McGill Workshop on Transcriptomic Dose Response Data in the Context of Chemical Risk Assessment Slide presentation at the HESI-HEALTH Canada-McGill Workshop on Transcriptomic Dose Response Data in the Context of Chemical Risk Assessment

  16. An adaptive two-stage dose-response design method for establishing Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Franchetti, Yoko; Anderson, Stewart J.; Sampson, Allan R.

    2013-01-01

    We propose an adaptive two-stage dose-response design where a pre-specified adaptation rule is used to add and/or drop treatment arms between the stages. We extend the multiple comparison procedures-modeling (MCP-Mod) approach into a two-stage design. In each stage, we use the same set of candidate dose-response models and test for a dose-response relationship or proof of concept (PoC) via model-associated statistics. The stage-wise test results are then combined to establish ‘global’ PoC using a conditional error function. Our simulation studies showed good and more robust power in our design method compared to conventional and fixed designs. PMID:23957520

  17. Adaptive dose finding based on t-statistic for dose-response trials.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Bolognese, James A; Perevozskaya, Inna

    2008-05-10

    The goals of phase II dose-response studies are to prove that the treatment is effective and to choose the dose for further development. Randomized designs with equal allocation to either a high dose and placebo or to each of several doses and placebo are typically used. However, in trials where response is observed relatively quickly, adaptive designs might offer an advantage over equal allocation. We propose an adaptive design for dose-response trials that concentrates the allocation of subjects in one or more areas of interest, for example, near a minimum clinically important effect level, or near some maximal effect level, and also allows for the possibility to stop the trial early if needed. The proposed adaptive design yields higher power to detect a dose-response relationship, higher power in comparison with placebo, and selects the correct dose more frequently compared with a corresponding randomized design with equal allocation to doses.

  18. Analysis of pramipexole dose-response relationships in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Sun, Sheng-Gang; Zhu, Sui-Qiang; Liu, Chun-Feng; Liu, Yi-Ming; Di, Qing; Shang, Hui-Fang; Ren, Yan; Xiang, Wei; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2017-01-01

    Pramipexole (PPX), a non-ergot dopamine receptor agonist, is a first-line treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). A critical dose level above which a better benefit-to-harm ratio exists has not been examined. Chinese PD patients (n=464) were retrospectively analyzed by PPX maintenance dose, PD stage, combined levodopa dose, and baseline tremor contribution. The sum score of Baseline Activities of Daily Living (part II) and Motor Examination (III) of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS II+III) was used as a covariate for final score adjustment. Sustained-release (SR) and immediate-release (IR) PPX showed similar efficacy based on score changes at 18 weeks, with comparable tolerability. Approximately two-third of patients received PPX at ≥1.5 mg/d, and one fourth of patients had ≥20% tremor contribution to UPDRS II+III. After treatment, patients receiving PPX ≥1.5 mg/d showed better improvement in UPDRS II+III scores (P=0.0025), with similar trends with the IR and SR formulations. Patients with ≥20% tremor contribution showed better improvement in UPDRS II+III scores (P=0.0017). No differences were seen based on PD stage or combined levodopa dose. The overall proportions of adverse events (AEs) were similar. More patients discontinued because of intolerable side effects, and more investigator-defined drug-related AEs were recorded in the <1.5 mg/d subgroup. UPDRS II+III improvement was better with PPX ≥1.5 than with <1.5 mg/d in Chinese PD patients after 18 weeks of treatment, with similar trends seen with IR and SR formulations. The frequency of AEs in PPX ≥1.5 and <1.5 mg/d subgroups was similar.

  19. The Dose Response Relationship in Psychotherapy: Implications for Social Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnett, Paul; O'Donovan, Analise; Lambert, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The principle aim of this study was to estimate the number of sessions of psychotherapy needed for clients suffering from psychiatric illness to return to a normal state of functioning or reliably improve. This would be helpful for treatment planning and policy decisions regarding how much therapy is enough. The progress of 125 clients entering…

  20. Efficacy, dose-response relationship and safety of once-daily extended-release metformin (Glucophage XR) in type 2 diabetic patients with inadequate glycaemic control despite prior treatment with diet and exercise: results from two double-blind, placebo-controlled studies.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, K; Brazg, R L; Raz, I; Bruce, S; Joyal, S; Swanink, R; Pans, M

    2005-01-01

    The efficacy, dose-response relationships and safety of an extended-release formulation of metformin (Glucophage) XR) were evaluated in two double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies of 24 and 16 weeks' duration, in patients with inadequate glycaemic control despite diet and exercise. Protocol 1 provided an evaluation of metformin XR at a commonly used dosage. Protocol 2 evaluated different dosages of metformin XR. In Protocol 1, 240 patients were randomized to receive metformin XR 1000 mg once daily. or placebo in a 2:1 ratio for 12 weeks (patients could receive metformin XR 1500 mg during weeks 12-24 if required). In Protocol 2, 742 patients were randomized to receive metformin XR 500 mg once daily, 1000 mg once daily, 1500 mg once daily, 2000 mg once daily, 1000 mg twice daily or placebo for 16 weeks. The primary endpoint in each study was the change from baseline in HbA(1C) at 12 weeks (Protocol 1) or 16 weeks (Protocol 2). Metformin XR reduced HbA(1C) in Protocol 1, with mean treatment differences for 1000 mg once daily vs. placebo of -0.7% at 12 weeks and -0.8% at 24 weeks (p < 0.001 for each). In Protocol 2, a clear dose-response relationship was evident at doses up to 1500 mg, with treatment differences vs. placebo of -0.6% (500 mg once daily), -0.7% (1000 mg once daily), -1.0% (1500 mg once daily) and -1.0% (2000 mg once daily). The efficacy of metformin XR 2000 mg once daily and 1000 mg twice daily were similar (mean treatment differences vs. placebo in HbA(1C) were -1.0% and -1.2%, respectively). More patients achieved HbA(1C) < 7.0% with metformin XR vs. placebo in Protocol 1 (29% vs. 14% at 12 weeks) and with once-daily metformin XR in Protocol 2 (up to 36% vs. 10% at 16 weeks). No significant changes in fasting insulin or body weight occurred. Total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol improved (p < 0.05-p < 0.001) in metformin XR groups in Protocol 2. Metformin XR was well tolerated; gastrointestinal side effects were more common

  1. The Key Events Dose-Response Framework: A Cross-Disciplinary Mode-of-Action Based Approach to Examining Dose-Response and Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    JULIEN, ELIZABETH; BOOBIS, ALAN R.; OLIN, STEPHEN S.

    2009-01-01

    The ILSI Research Foundation convened a cross-disciplinary working group to examine current approaches for assessing dose-response and identifying safe levels of intake or exposure for four categories of bioactive agents—food allergens, nutrients, pathogenic microorganisms, and environmental chemicals. This effort generated a common analytical framework—the Key Events Dose-Response Framework (KEDRF)—for systematically examining key events that occur between the initial dose of a bioactive agent and the effect of concern. Individual key events are considered with regard to factors that influence the dose-response relationship and factors that underlie variability in that relationship. This approach illuminates the connection between the processes occurring at the level of fundamental biology and the outcomes observed at the individual and population levels. Thus, it promotes an evidence-based approach for using mechanistic data to reduce reliance on default assumptions, to quantify variability, and to better characterize biological thresholds. This paper provides an overview of the KEDRF and introduces a series of four companion papers that illustrate initial application of the approach to a range of bioactive agents. PMID:19690994

  2. Dose response of caffeine on 2000-m rowing performance.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Tina L; Jenkins, David G; Coombes, Jeff S; Taaffe, Dennis R; Leveritt, Michael D

    2010-03-01

    To determine whether a dose-response relationship exists between caffeine and 2000-m rowing performance. In this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study, 10 competitive male rowers (mean +/- SD: age = 20.6 +/- 1.4 yr, body mass = 87.7 +/- 10.5 kg, height = 186.8 +/- 6.8 cm, (.)VO2peak = 5.1 +/- 0.6 L x min(-1)) consumed 2, 4, or 6 mg x kg(-1) caffeine or a placebo 60 min before completing a 2000-m time trial on a rowing ergometer. The trials were preceded by a 24-h standardized diet (including a light preexercise meal of 2 g x kg(-1) CHO), and subjects were tested preexercise for hydration, caffeine abstinence, and blood glucose concentrations. Time trial performance was not significantly different across the three caffeine doses or placebo (P = 0.249). After the three caffeine trials, postexercise plasma glucose and lactate concentrations were higher compared with the placebo trial (P < 0.05). Plasma caffeine concentrations after 60 min of ingestion were lower than the values reported previously by others following the same dose, and there was considerable interindividual variation in plasma caffeine concentrations in response to the various caffeine doses. The large interindividual response to the caffeine doses suggests that individual characteristics need to be considered when administering caffeine for performance enhancement. In addition, preexercise feeding may significantly affect plasma caffeine concentrations and the potential for caffeine to improve performance.

  3. Fesoterodine dose response in subjects with overactive bladder syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khullar, Vik; Rovner, Eric S; Dmochowski, Roger; Nitti, Victor; Wang, Joseph; Guan, Zhonghong

    2008-05-01

    To compare the efficacy of fesoterodine 4 mg versus 8 mg in treating subjects with overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome. This is a pooled analysis of data from 2 randomized placebo (PBO)-controlled phase III trials. Eligible subjects with frequency and urgency or urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) were randomized to PBO or fesoterodine 4 or 8 mg for 12 weeks. Subjects assessed efficacy using 3-day bladder diaries recording the time of each void, urgency, and incontinence episode. Endpoints included treatment response (based on a 4-point Treatment Benefit scale) and change from baseline in micturitions, UUI episodes, mean volume voided, urgency episodes, and continent days. We assessed tolerability and safety by evaluating adverse events, residual urine volume, laboratory parameters, and treatment withdrawals. At the end of treatment, both doses of fesoterodine showed statistically significant improvements in all efficacy endpoints versus PBO (P <0.01). These effects were seen 2 weeks after initiation of treatment (the earliest evaluation point) and were sustained throughout the treatment period. Fesoterodine 8 mg performed significantly better than fesoterodine 4 mg in improving all diary variables (P <0.05) except micturition frequency, demonstrating a dose-response relationship. Adverse events reported more frequently with fesoterodine than with PBO included dry mouth, constipation, and urinary tract infection. Both fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg are effective in improving OAB symptoms. The higher 8-mg dose provides additional benefit compared with the lower dose in improving most bladder diary variables, thus offering the possibility of dose flexibility and titration.

  4. Characterization of a developmental toxicity dose-response model

    SciTech Connect

    Faustman, E.M.; Wellington, D.G.; Smith, W.P.; Kimmel, C.A.

    1989-02-01

    The Rai and Van Ryzin dose-response model proposed for teratology experiments has been characterized for its appropriateness and applicability in modeling the dichotomous response data from developmental toxicity studies. Modifications were made in the initial probability statements to reflect more accurately biological events underlying developmental toxicity. Data sets used for the evaluation were obtained from the National Toxicology Program and U.S. EPA laboratories. The studies included developmental evaluations of ethylene glycol, diethylhexyl phthalate, di- and triethylene glycol dimethyl ethers, and nitrofen in rats, mice, or rabbits. Graphic examination and statistical evaluation demonstrate that this model is sensitive to the data when compared to directly measured experimental outcomes. The model was used to interpolate to low-risk dose levels, and comparisons were made between the values obtained and the no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) divided by an uncertainty factor. Our investigation suggests that the Rai and Van Ryzin model is sensitive to the developmental toxicity end points, prenatal deaths, and malformations, and appears to model closely their relationship to dose.

  5. Patients who do not respond to the "usual" dose: why Terry fell off the dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Preskorn, Sheldon H

    2009-11-01

    Clinical trials are aimed at determining what happens in the "usual" patient; however, clinicians are interested in what happens in their patients even if they are not usual. The usual dose-response relationship is determined as part of the drug development process required for approval of a new drug. However, clinicians are likely to encounter patients who "fall off" the usual dose-response curve because they are either sensitive or resistant to the beneficial (efficacy) or adverse effects of a drug. This column is the first in a series that will examine why specific patients fall off the usual dose-response curve and how clinicians can manage such patients when they encounter them. This column discusses what a dose-response curve is, how it is determined, and why it is clinically important.

  6. Dose-response relation between physical activity and blood pressure in youth.

    PubMed

    Mark, Amy E; Janssen, Ian

    2008-06-01

    The dose-response relationship between physical activity (PA) and cardiovascular health in children and adolescents is unclear. Blood pressure (BP) is a practical and useful measure of cardiovascular health in youth. This study aims to examine the dose-response relationship between objectively measured PA and BP in children and adolescents. The sample included 1170 youth aged 8-17 yr from the 2003/04 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. PA was measured using Actigraph accelerometers (Ft. Walton Beach, FL, USA) over 7 d. Thresholds of 2000 and 3000 counts per minute were used to denote those minutes where the participants were engaged in total PA and moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA, respectively. BP was measured using standard procedures. Systolic and diastolic BP values were adjusted for age, height, and sex. Participants with adjusted BP values > or = 90th percentile were considered to have hypertension. Thirty-six fractional polynomial regression models were used to obtain the dose-response curve that best fit the relation between PA with systolic BP, diastolic BP, and hypertension. Inverse dose-response relations were observed between total and moderate-to-vigorous PA with systolic and diastolic BP. The slopes of the curves were modest indicating a minimal influence of PA on mean BP values. The likelihood of having hypertension decreased in a curvilinear manner with increasing minutes of PA. At 30 and 60 min.d of moderate-to-vigorous PA, the odd ratios (95% confidence intervals) for hypertension were 0.50 (0.28-0.64) and 0.38 (0.17-0.52), respectively, in comparison to no PA. A modest dose-response relation was observed between PA and mean systolic and diastolic BP values. PA did, however, have a strong gradient effect on BP when predicting hypertensive values. These results support the public health recommendation that children and youth accumulate at least 60 min of moderate-to-vigorous PA daily.

  7. A comparison of the dose-response behavior of AQUAJOINT®-based polymer gel and PAGAT gel dosimeters measured using Optical CT and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takanashi, Takaoki; Kawamura, Hiraku; Fukasaku, Kazuaki; Sahade, Daniel Antonio; Hamada, Toshimasa

    2017-05-01

    Absorbed dose-response characteristics of AQUAJOINT®-based polymer gel and PAGAT gel dosimeters were compared using Optical CT and MRI. AQUAJOINT® gel exhibited a relatively good linear dose-response relationship in the radiation dose range of 0-5 Gy.

  8. Coffee and tea consumption and risk of lung cancer: a dose-response analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaopeng; Yu, Xuyi; Wu, Yili; Zhang, Dongfeng

    2012-11-01

    Results from the recent meta-analysis suggested a favorable effect of green tea consumption and risk of lung cancer, while no significant association was found between black tea consumption and risk of lung cancer. Besides, a significantly positive association was found between coffee consumption and risk of lung cancer. However, the relationship of green tea and coffee consumption is unclear. Thus the dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline model and multivariate random-effect meta-regression. Results suggested that a linear dose-response relationship exists between coffee consumption and risk of lung cancer, while the dose-response relationship is nonlinear between green tea consumption and risk of lung cancer.

  9. Evaluating quantitative formulas for dose-response assessment of chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hertzberg, Richard C; Teuschler, Linda K

    2002-12-01

    Risk assessment formulas are often distinguished from dose-response models by being rough but necessary. The evaluation of these rough formulas is described here, using the example of mixture risk assessment. Two conditions make the dose-response part of mixture risk assessment difficult, lack of data on mixture dose-response relationships, and the need to address risk from combinations of chemicals because of public demands and statutory requirements. Consequently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed methods for carrying out quantitative dose-response assessment for chemical mixtures that require information only on the toxicity of single chemicals and of chemical pair interactions. These formulas are based on plausible ideas and default parameters but minimal supporting data on whole mixtures. Because of this lack of mixture data, the usual evaluation of accuracy (predicted vs. observed) cannot be performed. Two approaches to the evaluation of such formulas are to consider fundamental biological concepts that support the quantitative formulas (e.g., toxicologic similarity) and to determine how well the proposed method performs under simplifying constraints (e.g., as the toxicologic interactions disappear). These ideas are illustrated using dose addition and two weight-of-evidence formulas for incorporating toxicologic interactions.

  10. The effect of measurement error on the dose-response curve

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, I. )

    1990-07-01

    In epidemiological studies for an environmental risk assessment, doses are often observed with errors. However, they have received little attention in data analysis. This paper studies the effect of measurement errors on the observed dose-response curve. Under the assumptions of the monotone likelihood ratio on errors and a monotone increasing dose-response curve, it is verified that the slope of the observed dose-response curve is likely to be gentler than the true one. The observed variance of responses are not so homogeneous as to be expected under models without errors. The estimation of parameters in a hockey-stick type dose-response curve with a threshold is considered on line of the maximum likelihood method for a functional relationship model. Numerical examples adaptable to the data in a 1986 study of the effect of air pollution that was conducted in Japan are also presented. The proposed model is proved to be suitable to the data in the example cited in this paper.

  11. Physical activity and cancer risk: dose-response and cancer, all sites and site-specific.

    PubMed

    Thune, I; Furberg, A S

    2001-06-01

    The association between physical activity and overall and site-specific cancer risk is elaborated in relation to whether any observed dose-response association between physical activity and cancer can be interpreted in terms of how much physical activity (type, intensity, duration, frequency) is needed to influence site- and gender-specific cancer risk. Observational studies were reviewed that have examined the independent effect of the volume of occupational physical activity (OPA) and/or leisure time physical activity (LPA) on overall and site-specific cancer risk. The evidence of cohort and case-control studies suggests that both leisure time and occupational physical activity protect against overall cancer risk, with a graded dose-response association suggested in both sexes. Confounding effects such as diet, body weight, and parity are often included as a covariate in the analyses, with little influence on the observed associations. A crude graded inverse dose-response association was observed between physical activity and colon cancer in 48 studies including 40,674 colon/colorectal cancer cases for both sexes. A dose-response effect of physical activity on colon cancer risk was especially observed, when participation in activities of at least moderate activity (>4.5 MET) and demonstrated by activities expressed as MET-hours per week. An observed inverse association with a dose-response relationship between physical activity and breast cancer was also identified in the majority of the 41 studies including 108,031 breast cancer cases. The dose-response relationship was in particular observed in case-control studies and supported by observations in cohort studies when participation in activities of at least moderate activity (>4.5 MET) and demonstrated by activities expressed by MET-hours per week. This association between physical activity and breast cancer risk is possibly dependent on age at exposure, age at diagnosis, menopausal status and other effect

  12. Dose-Response Relation Between Work Hours and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Findings From the Panel Study of Income Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Conway, Sadie H; Pompeii, Lisa A; Roberts, Robert E; Follis, Jack L; Gimeno, David

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the presence of a dose-response relationship between work hours and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a representative sample of U.S. workers. A retrospective cohort study of 1926 individuals from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (1986 to 2011) employed for at least 10 years. Restricted cubic spline regression was used to estimate the dose-response relationship of work hours with CVD. A dose-response relationship was observed in which an average workweek of 46 hours or more for at least 10 years was associated with an increased risk of CVD. Compared with working 45 hours per week, working an additional 10 hours per week or more for at least 10 years increased CVD risk by at least 16%. Working more than 45 work hours per week for at least 10 years may be an independent risk factor for CVD.

  13. Dose-Response Relation between Work Hours and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Findings from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Sadie H.; Pompeii, Lisa A.; Roberts, Robert E.; Follis, Jack L.; Gimeno, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the presence of a dose-response relationship between work hours and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a representative sample of U.S. workers. Methods Retrospective cohort study of 1,926 individuals from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (1986–2011) employed for at least 10 years. Restricted cubic spline regression was used to estimate the dose-response relationship of work hours with CVD. Results A dose-response relationship was observed in which an average workweek of 46 hours or more for at least 10 years was associated with increased risk of CVD. Compared to working 45 hours per week, working an additional 10 hours per week or more for at least 10 years increased CVD risk by at least 16%. Conclusions Working more than 45 work hours per week for at least 10 years may be an independent risk factor for CVD. PMID:26949870

  14. Steepness of the radiation dose-response curve for dose-per-fraction escalation keeping the number of fractions fixed.

    PubMed

    Bentzen, Søren M

    2005-01-01

    Clinically, there is growing interest in strategies for intensifying radiation therapy by escalating the dose per fraction. This paper considers the steepness of the dose-response curve in this case. The steepness of a radiation dose-response curve is most conveniently quantified by the normalized dose-response gradient, gamma. Under the assumption of a linear-quadratic dose-effect model, a simple analytical relationship is derived between the gamma-value for a dose-response curve generated by varying the total dose while keeping the number of fractions constant, i.e. escalating the dose per fraction, and the gamma-value for a dose-response curve generated by varying the total dose while keeping the dose per fraction constant. This formulation is compared with clinical dose-response data from the literature and shown to be in good agreement with the observations. Some implications of this formulation for non-uniform dose distributions delivered using 3D conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are briefly discussed.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa dose response and bathing water infection.

    PubMed

    Roser, D J; van den Akker, B; Boase, S; Haas, C N; Ashbolt, N J; Rice, S A

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the opportunistic pathogen mostly implicated in folliculitis and acute otitis externa in pools and hot tubs. Nevertheless, infection risks remain poorly quantified. This paper reviews disease aetiologies and bacterial skin colonization science to advance dose-response theory development. Three model forms are identified for predicting disease likelihood from pathogen density. Two are based on Furumoto & Mickey's exponential 'single-hit' model and predict infection likelihood and severity (lesions/m2), respectively. 'Third-generation', mechanistic, dose-response algorithm development is additionally scoped. The proposed formulation integrates dispersion, epidermal interaction, and follicle invasion. The review also details uncertainties needing consideration which pertain to water quality, outbreaks, exposure time, infection sites, biofilms, cerumen, environmental factors (e.g. skin saturation, hydrodynamics), and whether P. aeruginosa is endogenous or exogenous. The review's findings are used to propose a conceptual infection model and identify research priorities including pool dose-response modelling, epidermis ecology and infection likelihood-based hygiene management.

  16. A Generalized QMRA Beta-Poisson Dose-Response Model.

    PubMed

    Xie, Gang; Roiko, Anne; Stratton, Helen; Lemckert, Charles; Dunn, Peter K; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) is widely accepted for characterizing the microbial risks associated with food, water, and wastewater. Single-hit dose-response models are the most commonly used dose-response models in QMRA. Denoting PI(d) as the probability of infection at a given mean dose d, a three-parameter generalized QMRA beta-Poisson dose-response model, PI(d|α,β,r*), is proposed in which the minimum number of organisms required for causing infection, Kmin , is not fixed, but a random variable following a geometric distribution with parameter 0dose-response mechanism. Since a maximum likelihood solution is not easily available, a likelihood-free approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) algorithm is employed for parameter estimation. By fitting the generalized model to four experimental data sets from the literature, this study reveals that the posterior median r* estimates produced fall short of meeting the required condition of r* = 1 for single-hit assumption. However, three out of four data sets fitted by the generalized models could not achieve an improvement in goodness of fit. These combined results imply that, at least in some cases, a single-hit assumption for characterizing the dose-response process may not be appropriate, but that the more complex models may be difficult to support especially if the sample size is small. The three-parameter generalized model provides a possibility to investigate the mechanism of a dose-response process in greater detail than is possible under a single-hit model.

  17. Qualities that Exemplify Student Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Effective leadership begins with the individual. Until a person is self-actualized, external relationships and communications are often unpredictable and potentially flawed. The paradox is that young people need exposure to situations that require them to lead, in order to develop individual skills that will enable them to be successful group and…

  18. The Key Events Dose-Response Framework: Its Potential for Application to Foodborne Pathogenic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    BUCHANAN, ROBERT L.; HAVELAAR, ARIE H.; SMITH, MARY ALICE; WHITING, RICHARD C.; JULIEN, ELIZABETH

    2009-01-01

    The Key Events Dose-Response Framework (KEDRF) is an analytical approach that facilitates the use of currently available data to gain insight regarding dose-response relationships. The use of the KEDRF also helps identify critical knowledge gaps that once filled, will reduce reliance on assumptions. The present study considers how the KEDRF might be applied to pathogenic microorganisms, using fetal listeriosis resulting from maternal ingestion of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes as an initial example. Major biological events along the pathway between food ingestion and the endpoint of concern are systematically considered with regard to dose (i.e., number of organisms), pathogen factors (e.g., virulence), and protective host mechanisms (e.g., immune response or other homeostatic mechanisms). It is concluded that the KEDRF provides a useful structure for systematically evaluating the complex array of host and pathogen factors that influence the dose-response relationship. In particular, the KEDRF supports efforts to specify and quantify the sources of variability, a prerequisite to strengthening the scientific basis for food safety decision making. PMID:19690997

  19. A Theoretical Model for the Hormetic Dose-response Curve for Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Tatsuya; Ohashi, Takuya; Oura, Shoji; Kokawa, Yozo; Kawago, Mitsumasa; Hirai, Yoshimitsu; Miyasaka, Miwako; Nishiguchi, Haruka; Kawashima, Sayoko; Yata, Yumi; Honda, Mariko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Yoshitaka

    2015-11-01

    In the present article, we quantitatively evaluated the dose-response relationship of hormetic reactions of anticancer agents in vitro. Serial dilutions of gemcitabine, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, vinorelbine, and paclitaxel were administered to the A549 non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. The bi-phasic sigmoidal curve with hormetic and cytotoxic effects is given by the formula y=(a-b/(1+exp(c(*)log(x)-d)))/(1+exp(e(*)log(x)-f)), that was used to perform a non-linear least square regression. The dose-responses of the five anticancer agents were fitted to this equation. Gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil, which had the lowest ED50 for their hormetic reaction, had the most pronounced promotive effects out of the five anticancer agents tested. The hormetic reaction progressed exponentially with culturing time. Our theoretical model will be useful in predicting how hormetic reactions affect patients with malignant tumors.

  20. Biological stress response terminology: Integrating the concepts of adaptive response and preconditioning stress within a hormetic dose-response framework

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Edward J. . E-mail: edwardc@schoolph.umass.edu; Bachmann, Kenneth A.; Bailer, A. John; Bolger, P. Michael; Borak, Jonathan; Cai, Lu; Cedergreen, Nina; Cherian, M. George; Chiueh, Chuang C.; Clarkson, Thomas W.; Cook, Ralph R.; Diamond, David M.; Doolittle, David J.; Dorato, Michael A.; Duke, Stephen O.; Feinendegen, Ludwig; Gardner, Donald E.; Hart, Ronald W.; Hastings, Kenneth L.; Hayes, A. Wallace; Hoffmann, George R.; Ives, John A.; Jaworowski, Zbigniew; Johnson, Thomas E.; Jonas, Wayne B.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2007-07-01

    Many biological subdisciplines that regularly assess dose-response relationships have identified an evolutionarily conserved process in which a low dose of a stressful stimulus activates an adaptive response that increases the resistance of the cell or organism to a moderate to severe level of stress. Due to a lack of frequent interaction among scientists in these many areas, there has emerged a broad range of terms that describe such dose-response relationships. This situation has become problematic because the different terms describe a family of similar biological responses (e.g., adaptive response, preconditioning, hormesis), adversely affecting interdisciplinary communication, and possibly even obscuring generalizable features and central biological concepts. With support from scientists in a broad range of disciplines, this article offers a set of recommendations we believe can achieve greater conceptual harmony in dose-response terminology, as well as better understanding and communication across the broad spectrum of biological disciplines.

  1. Biological stress response terminology: Integrating the concepts of adaptive response and preconditioning stress within a hormetic dose-response framework.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J; Bachmann, Kenneth A; Bailer, A John; Bolger, P Michael; Borak, Jonathan; Cai, Lu; Cedergreen, Nina; Cherian, M George; Chiueh, Chuang C; Clarkson, Thomas W; Cook, Ralph R; Diamond, David M; Doolittle, David J; Dorato, Michael A; Duke, Stephen O; Feinendegen, Ludwig; Gardner, Donald E; Hart, Ronald W; Hastings, Kenneth L; Hayes, A Wallace; Hoffmann, George R; Ives, John A; Jaworowski, Zbigniew; Johnson, Thomas E; Jonas, Wayne B; Kaminski, Norbert E; Keller, John G; Klaunig, James E; Knudsen, Thomas B; Kozumbo, Walter J; Lettieri, Teresa; Liu, Shu-Zheng; Maisseu, Andre; Maynard, Kenneth I; Masoro, Edward J; McClellan, Roger O; Mehendale, Harihara M; Mothersill, Carmel; Newlin, David B; Nigg, Herbert N; Oehme, Frederick W; Phalen, Robert F; Philbert, Martin A; Rattan, Suresh I S; Riviere, Jim E; Rodricks, Joseph; Sapolsky, Robert M; Scott, Bobby R; Seymour, Colin; Sinclair, David A; Smith-Sonneborn, Joan; Snow, Elizabeth T; Spear, Linda; Stevenson, Donald E; Thomas, Yolene; Tubiana, Maurice; Williams, Gary M; Mattson, Mark P

    2007-07-01

    Many biological subdisciplines that regularly assess dose-response relationships have identified an evolutionarily conserved process in which a low dose of a stressful stimulus activates an adaptive response that increases the resistance of the cell or organism to a moderate to severe level of stress. Due to a lack of frequent interaction among scientists in these many areas, there has emerged a broad range of terms that describe such dose-response relationships. This situation has become problematic because the different terms describe a family of similar biological responses (e.g., adaptive response, preconditioning, hormesis), adversely affecting interdisciplinary communication, and possibly even obscuring generalizable features and central biological concepts. With support from scientists in a broad range of disciplines, this article offers a set of recommendations we believe can achieve greater conceptual harmony in dose-response terminology, as well as better understanding and communication across the broad spectrum of biological disciplines.

  2. Dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A public workshop, organized by a Steering Committee of scientists from government, industry, universities, and research organizations, was held at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in September, 2010. The workshop explored the dose-response implications of toxicant modes of action (MOA) mediated by nuclear receptors. The dominant paradigm in human health risk assessment has been linear extrapolation without a threshold for cancer, and estimation of sub-threshold doses for non-cancer and (in appropriate cases) cancer endpoints. However, recent publications question the application of dose-response modeling approaches with a threshold. The growing body of molecular toxicology information and computational toxicology tools has allowed for exploration of the presence or absence of subthreshold doses for a number of receptor-mediated MOPs. The workshop explored the development of dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated liver cancer, within a MOA Human Relevance framework (HRF). Case studies addressed activation of the AHR; the CAR/PXR, and the PPARa. This paper describes the workshop process, key issues discussed, and conclusions. The value of an interactive workshop approach to apply current MOA/HRF frameworks was demonstrated. The results may help direct research on the MOA and dose-response of receptor-based toxicity, since there are commonalities for many receptors in the basic pathways involved for late steps in the

  3. A Framework for "Fit for Purpose" Dose Response Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NRC report Science and Decisions: Advancing Risk Assessment made several recommendations to improve chemical risk assessment, with a focus on in-depth chronic dose-response assessments conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The recommendations addressed two ...

  4. A Framework for "Fit for Purpose" Dose Response Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NRC report Science and Decisions: Advancing Risk Assessment made several recommendations to improve chemical risk assessment, with a focus on in-depth chronic dose-response assessments conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The recommendations addressed two ...

  5. Dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A public workshop, organized by a Steering Committee of scientists from government, industry, universities, and research organizations, was held at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in September, 2010. The workshop explored the dose-response implications of toxicant modes of action (MOA) mediated by nuclear receptors. The dominant paradigm in human health risk assessment has been linear extrapolation without a threshold for cancer, and estimation of sub-threshold doses for non-cancer and (in appropriate cases) cancer endpoints. However, recent publications question the application of dose-response modeling approaches with a threshold. The growing body of molecular toxicology information and computational toxicology tools has allowed for exploration of the presence or absence of subthreshold doses for a number of receptor-mediated MOPs. The workshop explored the development of dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated liver cancer, within a MOA Human Relevance framework (HRF). Case studies addressed activation of the AHR; the CAR/PXR, and the PPARa. This paper describes the workshop process, key issues discussed, and conclusions. The value of an interactive workshop approach to apply current MOA/HRF frameworks was demonstrated. The results may help direct research on the MOA and dose-response of receptor-based toxicity, since there are commonalities for many receptors in the basic pathways involved for late steps in the

  6. Different behavioral effect dose-response profiles in mice exposed to two-carbon chlorinated hydrocarbons: influence of structural and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Umezu, Toyoshi; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to clarify whether dose-response profiles of acute behavioral effects of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE), trichloroethylene (TRIC), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) differ. A test battery involving 6 behavioral endpoints was applied to evaluate the effects of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC in male ICR strain mice under the same experimental conditions. The behavioral effect dose-response profiles of these compounds differed. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the dose-response profiles and structural and physical properties of the compounds. Dose-response profile differences correlated significantly with differences in specific structural and physical properties. These results suggest that differences in specific structural and physical properties of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC are responsible for differences in behavioral effects that lead to a variety of dose-response profiles.

  7. QMRA for Drinking Water: 2. The Effect of Pathogen Clustering in Single-Hit Dose-Response Models.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Vegard; Wyller, John

    2016-01-01

    Spatial and/or temporal clustering of pathogens will invalidate the commonly used assumption of Poisson-distributed pathogen counts (doses) in quantitative microbial risk assessment. In this work, the theoretically predicted effect of spatial clustering in conventional "single-hit" dose-response models is investigated by employing the stuttering Poisson distribution, a very general family of count distributions that naturally models pathogen clustering and contains the Poisson and negative binomial distributions as special cases. The analysis is facilitated by formulating the dose-response models in terms of probability generating functions. It is shown formally that the theoretical single-hit risk obtained with a stuttering Poisson distribution is lower than that obtained with a Poisson distribution, assuming identical mean doses. A similar result holds for mixed Poisson distributions. Numerical examples indicate that the theoretical single-hit risk is fairly insensitive to moderate clustering, though the effect tends to be more pronounced for low mean doses. Furthermore, using Jensen's inequality, an upper bound on risk is derived that tends to better approximate the exact theoretical single-hit risk for highly overdispersed dose distributions. The bound holds with any dose distribution (characterized by its mean and zero inflation index) and any conditional dose-response model that is concave in the dose variable. Its application is exemplified with published data from Norovirus feeding trials, for which some of the administered doses were prepared from an inoculum of aggregated viruses. The potential implications of clustering for dose-response assessment as well as practical risk characterization are discussed. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  8. Dose-response model of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) for human.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Sushil B; Haas, Charles N

    2011-10-01

    Rickettsia rickettsii is the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) and is the prototype bacterium in the spotted fever group of rickettsiae, which is found in North, Central, and South America. The bacterium is gram negative and an obligate intracellular pathogen. The disease is transmitted to humans and vertebrate host through tick bites; however, some cases of aerosol transmission also have been reported. The disease can be difficult to diagnose in the early stages, and without prompt and appropriate treatment, it can be fatal. This article develops dose-response models of different routes of exposure for RMSF in primates and humans. The beta-Poisson model provided the best fit to the dose-response data of aerosol-exposed rhesus monkeys, and intradermally inoculated humans (morbidity as end point of response). The average 50% infectious dose among (ID₅₀) exposed human population, N₅₀, is 23 organisms with 95% confidence limits of 1 to 89 organisms. Similarly, ID₁₀ and ID₂₀ are 2.2 and 5.0, respectively. Moreover, the data of aerosol-exposed rhesus monkeys and intradermally inoculated humans could be pooled. This indicates that the dose-response models fitted to different data sets are not significantly different and can be described by the same relationship.

  9. Interpreting 'dose-response' curves using homeodynamic data: with an improved explanation for hormesis.

    PubMed

    Stebbing, A R D

    2009-04-15

    A re-interpretation of the 'dose-response' curve is given that accommodates homeostasis. The outcome, or overall effect, of toxicity is the consequence of toxicity that is moderated by homeodynamic responses. Equilibrium is achieved by a balance of opposing forces of toxic inhibition countered by a stimulatory response. A graphical model is given consisting of two linked curves (response vs concentration and effect vs concentration), which provide the basis for a re-interpretation of the 'dose-response' curve. The model indicates that such relationships are non-linear with a threshold, which is due to homeodynamic responses. Subthreshold concentrations in 'dose-response' curves provide the sum of toxic inhibition minus the homeodynamic response; the response itself is unseen in serving its purpose of neutralizing perturbation. This interpretation suggests why the alpha- and beta-curves are non-linear. The beta-curve indicates adaptive overcorrection to toxicity that confers greater resistance to subsequent toxic exposure, with hormesis as an epiphenomenon.

  10. A dose-response perspective on college drinking and related problems.

    PubMed

    Gruenewald, Paul J; Johnson, Fred W; Ponicki, William R; Lascala, Elizabeth A

    2010-02-01

    In order to examine the degree to which heavy drinking contributes to risks for problems among college drinkers this paper develops and tests a dose-response model of alcohol use that relates frequencies of drinking specific quantities of alcohol to the incidence of drinking problems. A mathematical model was developed that enabled estimation of dose-response relationships between drinking quantities and drinking problems using self-report data from 8698 college drinkers across 14 campuses in California, USA. The model assumes that drinking risks are a direct monotone function of the amount consumed per day and additive across drinking days. Drinking problems accumulate across drinking occasions and are the basis for cumulative reports of drinking problems reported by college drinkers. Statistical analyses using the model showed that drinking problems were related to every drinking level, but increased fivefold at three drinks and more gradually thereafter. Problems were associated most strongly with occasions on which three drinks were consumed, and more than half of all reported problems were related to occasions on which four or fewer drinks were consumed. There were some important differences in dose-responsiveness between men and women and between different groups of 'light', 'moderate' and 'heavier' drinkers. Many problems among college students are associated with drinking relatively small amounts of alcohol (two to four drinks). Programs to reduce college drinking problems should emphasize risks associated with low drinking levels.

  11. Dose-response trend tests for tumorigenesis, adjusted for body weight.

    PubMed

    Gaylor, D W; Kodell, R L

    1999-06-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a relationship between rodent body weight and tumor incidence for some tissue/organ sites. It is not uncommon for a chemical tested for carcinogenicity to also affect body weight. In such cases, comparisons of tumor incidence may be biased by body-weight differences across dose groups. A simple procedure was investigated for reducing this bias. This procedure divides the animals into a few groups based on body weight. Body weight at 12 months was used, before the appearance of a tumor was likely to affect body weight. Statistics for dose-response trend tests are calculated within body weight strata and pooled to obtain an overall dose-response trend test. This procedure is analogous to that currently used, of stratifying animals, based on their age at the time of removal from a study. Age stratification is used to account for differences in animal age across dose groups, which can affect comparisons of tumor incidence. Several examples were investigated where the high-dose group had reduced body weights and associated reductions in tumor incidence. When the data were analyzed by body-weight strata, some positive dose-response trends for tumor incidence were demonstrated. In one case, the weight-adjusted analysis indicated that a negative dose-response trend in tumor incidence was a real effect, in addition to a body weight reduction. These examples indicate that it is important to consider the effects of body weight changes as low as 10%, and perhaps below, that were caused by chemicals in 2-year bioassays for carcinogenesis. The simple procedure of analyzing tumor incidence within body-weight strata can reduce the bias introduced by weight differences across dose groups.

  12. Acute Effects of Classroom Exercise Breaks on Executive Function and Math Performance: A Dose-Response Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, Erin K.; Schatz, Jeffrey; Pate, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the acute dose-response relationship of classroom exercise breaks with executive function and math performance in 9- to 12-year-old children by comparing 5-min, 10-min, or 20-min classroom exercise breaks to 10 min of sedentary classroom activity. Method: This study used a within-subjects…

  13. Acute Effects of Classroom Exercise Breaks on Executive Function and Math Performance: A Dose-Response Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, Erin K.; Schatz, Jeffrey; Pate, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the acute dose-response relationship of classroom exercise breaks with executive function and math performance in 9- to 12-year-old children by comparing 5-min, 10-min, or 20-min classroom exercise breaks to 10 min of sedentary classroom activity. Method: This study used a within-subjects…

  14. Bayesian multimodel inference for dose-response studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Albers, P.H.

    2007-01-01

    Statistical inference in dose?response studies is model-based: The analyst posits a mathematical model of the relation between exposure and response, estimates parameters of the model, and reports conclusions conditional on the model. Such analyses rarely include any accounting for the uncertainties associated with model selection. The Bayesian inferential system provides a convenient framework for model selection and multimodel inference. In this paper we briefly describe the Bayesian paradigm and Bayesian multimodel inference. We then present a family of models for multinomial dose?response data and apply Bayesian multimodel inferential methods to the analysis of data on the reproductive success of American kestrels (Falco sparveriuss) exposed to various sublethal dietary concentrations of methylmercury.

  15. Bayesian development of a dose-response model for Aspergillus fumigatus and invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Leleu, Christopher; Menotti, Jean; Meneceur, Pascale; Choukri, Firas; Sulahian, Annie; Garin, Yves Jean-François; Denis, Jean-Baptiste; Derouin, Francis

    2013-08-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a major cause of mortality in immunocompromized hosts, most often consecutive to the inhalation of spores of Aspergillus. However, the relationship between Aspergillus concentration in the air and probability of IA is not quantitatively known. In this study, this relationship was examined in a murine model of IA. Immunosuppressed Balb/c mice were exposed for 60 minutes at day 0 to an aerosol of A. fumigatus spores (Af293 strain). At day 10, IA was assessed in mice by quantitative culture of the lungs and galactomannan dosage. Fifteen separate nebulizations with varying spore concentrations were performed. Rates of IA ranged from 0% to 100% according to spore concentrations. The dose-response relationship between probability of infection and spore exposure was approximated using the exponential model and the more flexible beta-Poisson model. Prior distributions of the parameters of the models were proposed then updated with data in a Bayesian framework. Both models yielded close median dose-responses of the posterior distributions for the main parameter of the model, but with different dispersions, either when the exposure dose was the concentration in the nebulized suspension or was the estimated quantity of spores inhaled by a mouse during the experiment. The median quantity of inhaled spores that infected 50% of mice was estimated at 1.8 × 10(4) and 3.2 × 10(4) viable spores in the exponential and beta-Poisson models, respectively. This study provides dose-response parameters for quantitative assessment of the relationship between airborne exposure to the reference A. fumigatus strain and probability of IA in immunocompromized hosts.

  16. Dose-Response of Aerobic Exercise on Cognition: A Community-Based, Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Vidoni, Eric D; Johnson, David K; Morris, Jill K; Van Sciver, Angela; Greer, Colby S; Billinger, Sandra A; Donnelly, Joseph E; Burns, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest a dose-response relationship exists between physical activity and cognitive outcomes. However, no direct data from randomized trials exists to support these indirect observations. The purpose of this study was to explore the possible relationship of aerobic exercise dose on cognition. Underactive or sedentary participants without cognitive impairment were randomized to one of four groups: no-change control, 75, 150, and 225 minutes per week of moderate-intensity semi-supervised aerobic exercise for 26-weeks in a community setting. Cognitive outcomes were latent residual scores derived from a battery of 16 cognitive tests: Verbal Memory, Visuospatial Processing, Simple Attention, Set Maintenance and Shifting, and Reasoning. Other outcome measures were cardiorespiratory fitness (peak oxygen consumption) and measures of function functional health. In intent-to-treat (ITT) analyses (n = 101), cardiorespiratory fitness increased and perceived disability decreased in a dose-dependent manner across the 4 groups. No other exercise-related effects were observed in ITT analyses. Analyses restricted to individuals who exercised per-protocol (n = 77) demonstrated that Simple Attention improved equivalently across all exercise groups compared to controls and a dose-response relationship was present for Visuospatial Processing. A clear dose-response relationship exists between exercise and cardiorespiratory fitness. Cognitive benefits were apparent at low doses with possible increased benefits in visuospatial function at higher doses but only in those who adhered to the exercise protocol. An individual’s cardiorespiratory fitness response was a better predictor of cognitive gains than exercise dose (i.e., duration) and thus maximizing an individual’s cardiorespiratory fitness may be an important therapeutic target for achieving cognitive benefits. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01129115.

  17. Dose-Response of Aerobic Exercise on Cognition: A Community-Based, Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jill K.; Van Sciver, Angela; Greer, Colby S.; Billinger, Sandra A.; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Burns, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest a dose-response relationship exists between physical activity and cognitive outcomes. However, no direct data from randomized trials exists to support these indirect observations. The purpose of this study was to explore the possible relationship of aerobic exercise dose on cognition. Underactive or sedentary participants without cognitive impairment were randomized to one of four groups: no-change control, 75, 150, and 225 minutes per week of moderate-intensity semi-supervised aerobic exercise for 26-weeks in a community setting. Cognitive outcomes were latent residual scores derived from a battery of 16 cognitive tests: Verbal Memory, Visuospatial Processing, Simple Attention, Set Maintenance and Shifting, and Reasoning. Other outcome measures were cardiorespiratory fitness (peak oxygen consumption) and measures of function functional health. In intent-to-treat (ITT) analyses (n = 101), cardiorespiratory fitness increased and perceived disability decreased in a dose-dependent manner across the 4 groups. No other exercise-related effects were observed in ITT analyses. Analyses restricted to individuals who exercised per-protocol (n = 77) demonstrated that Simple Attention improved equivalently across all exercise groups compared to controls and a dose-response relationship was present for Visuospatial Processing. A clear dose-response relationship exists between exercise and cardiorespiratory fitness. Cognitive benefits were apparent at low doses with possible increased benefits in visuospatial function at higher doses but only in those who adhered to the exercise protocol. An individual’s cardiorespiratory fitness response was a better predictor of cognitive gains than exercise dose (i.e., duration) and thus maximizing an individual’s cardiorespiratory fitness may be an important therapeutic target for achieving cognitive benefits. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01129115 PMID:26158265

  18. Drug development and hormesis: changing conceptual understanding of the dose response creates new challenges and opportunities for more effective drugs.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J; Staudenmayer, John W; Stanek, Edward J

    2006-01-01

    This review proposes that the emerging acceptance of the hormetic dose-response model in toxicology and pharmacology has the potential to significantly change important aspects of drug development. Two situations where the hormesis concept may affect drug development are considered: one in which low-dose stimulation may represent an adverse/unwanted effect (eg, stimulation of tumor cell proliferation by antitumor drugs), the other in which low-dose stimulation defines the therapeutic zone (ie, a beneficial or intended effect; eg, cognition enhancement in Alzheimer's disease treatment). Examples are used to demonstrate that the hormetic dose-response model has implications for the definition of an ideal candidate for a therapeutic agent, as well as implications for study designs needed to assess the quantitative features of the dose-response relationship.

  19. Interpretation of the margin of exposure for genotoxic carcinogens - elicitation of expert knowledge about the form of the dose response curve at human relevant exposures.

    PubMed

    Boobis, Alan; Flari, Villie; Gosling, John Paul; Hart, Andy; Craig, Peter; Rushton, Lesley; Idahosa-Taylor, Ehi

    2013-07-01

    The general approach to risk assessment of genotoxic carcinogens has been to advise reduction of exposure to "as low as reasonably achievable/practicable" (ALARA/P). However, whilst this remains the preferred risk management option, it does not provide guidance on the urgency or extent of risk management actions necessary. To address this, the "Margin of Exposure" (MOE) approach has been proposed. The MOE is the ratio between the point of departure for carcinogenesis and estimated human exposure. However, interpretation of the MOE requires implicit or explicit consideration of the shape of the dose-response curve at human relevant exposures. In a structured elicitation exercise, we captured expert opinion on available scientific evidence for low dose-response relationships for genotoxic carcinogens. This allowed assessment of: available evidence for the nature of dose-response relationships at human relevant exposures; the generality of judgments about such dose-response relationships; uncertainties affecting judgments on the nature of such dose-response relationships; and whether this last should differ for different classes of genotoxic carcinogens. Elicitation results reflected the variability in experts' views on the form of the dose-response curve for low dose exposure and major sources of uncertainty affecting the assumption of a linear relationship.

  20. Biphasic dose response in low level light therapy - an update.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K; Carroll, James; Hamblin, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been known since 1967 but still remains controversial due to incomplete understanding of the basic mechanisms and the selection of inappropriate dosimetric parameters that led to negative studies. The biphasic dose-response or Arndt-Schulz curve in LLLT has been shown both in vitro studies and in animal experiments. This review will provide an update to our previous (Huang et al. 2009) coverage of this topic. In vitro mediators of LLLT such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial membrane potential show biphasic patterns, while others such as mitochondrial reactive oxygen species show a triphasic dose-response with two distinct peaks. The Janus nature of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may act as a beneficial signaling molecule at low concentrations and a harmful cytotoxic agent at high concentrations, may partly explain the observed responses in vivo. Transcranial LLLT for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice shows a distinct biphasic pattern with peaks in beneficial neurological effects observed when the number of treatments is varied, and when the energy density of an individual treatment is varied. Further understanding of the extent to which biphasic dose responses apply in LLLT will be necessary to optimize clinical treatments.

  1. Biphasic dose response in low level light therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Chen, Aaron C-H; Carroll, James D; Hamblin, Michael R

    2009-09-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing cell death and tissue damage has been known for over forty years since the invention of lasers. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial in mainstream medicine. The biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and the complexity of rationally choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters such as wavelength, fluence, power density, pulse structure and treatment timing has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. A biphasic dose response has been frequently observed where low levels of light have a much better effect on stimulating and repairing tissues than higher levels of light. The so-called Arndt-Schulz curve is frequently used to describe this biphasic dose response. This review will cover the molecular and cellular mechanisms in LLLT, and describe some of our recent results in vitro and in vivo that provide scientific explanations for this biphasic dose response.

  2. Biphasic Dose Response in Low Level Light Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Carroll, James D.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing cell death and tissue damage has been known for over forty years since the invention of lasers. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial in mainstream medicine. The biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and the complexity of rationally choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters such as wavelength, fluence, power density, pulse structure and treatment timing has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. A biphasic dose response has been frequently observed where low levels of light have a much better effect on stimulating and repairing tissues than higher levels of light. The so-called Arndt-Schulz curve is frequently used to describe this biphasic dose response. This review will cover the molecular and cellular mechanisms in LLLT, and describe some of our recent results in vitro and in vivo that provide scientific explanations for this biphasic dose response. PMID:20011653

  3. Evaluation of biomarkers for ecotoxicity assessment by dose-response dynamic models: Effects of nitrofurazone on antioxidant enzymes in the model ciliated protozoan Euplotes vannus.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yazhen; Tan, Yalin; Meng, Yang; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Yu; Warren, Alan; Li, Jiqiu; Lin, Xiaofeng

    2017-10-01

    Understanding dose-responses is crucial for determining the utility of biomarkers in ecotoxicity assessment. Nitrofurazone is a broad-spectrum antibiotic that is widely used in the aquaculture industry in China despite its detrimental effects on ecosystems. Potential dose-response models were examined for the effect of nitrofurazone on two antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), in the ciliated protozoan Euplotes vannus. This was achieved by measuring enzyme activity and gene expression profiling of SOD and GPx in ciliate cells exposed to nitrofurazone at doses ranging from 0 to 180mgl(-1) for 6h, 12h, 18h and 24h. Dose-response dynamics were characterized by mathematical models. Results showed that: 1) dose-response patterns differed significantly among the tested endpoints, nitrofurazone concentrations and durations of exposure; 2) GPx activity was the best candidate biomarker because of its linear dose-response relationship; 3) SOD activity and mRNA relative expression levels of GPx and SOD are also candidate biomarkers but their dose-responses were non-linear and therefore more difficult to interpret; 4) partitioning the dose-response dynamic model by piecewise function can help to clarify the relationships between biological endpoints. This study demonstrates the utility of dynamic model analysis and the potential of antioxidant enzymes, in particular GPx activity, as a candidate biomarkers for environmental monitoring and risk assessment of nitrofurazone in the aquaculture industry. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Transmission and dose-response experiments for social animals: a reappraisal of the colonization biology of Campylobacter jejuni in chickens.

    PubMed

    Conlan, Andrew J K; Line, John E; Hiett, Kelli; Coward, Chris; Van Diemen, Pauline M; Stevens, Mark P; Jones, Michael A; Gog, Julia R; Maskell, Duncan J

    2011-12-07

    Dose-response experiments characterize the relationship between infectious agents and their hosts. These experiments are routinely used to estimate the minimum effective infectious dose for an infectious agent, which is most commonly characterized by the dose at which 50 per cent of challenged hosts become infected-the ID(50). In turn, the ID(50) is often used to compare between different agents and quantify the effect of treatment regimes. The statistical analysis of dose-response data typically makes the assumption that hosts within a given dose group are independent. For social animals, in particular avian species, hosts are routinely housed together in groups during experimental studies. For experiments with non-infectious agents, this poses no practical or theoretical problems. However, transmission of infectious agents between co-housed animals will modify the observed dose-response relationship with implications for the estimation of the ID(50) and the comparison between different agents and treatments. We derive a simple correction to the likelihood for standard dose-response models that allows us to estimate dose-response and transmission parameters simultaneously. We use this model to show that: transmission between co-housed animals reduces the apparent value of the ID(50) and increases the variability between replicates leading to a distinctive all-or-nothing response; in terms of the total number of animals used, individual housing is always the most efficient experimental design for ascertaining dose-response relationships; estimates of transmission from previously published experimental data for Campylobacter spp. in chickens suggest that considerable transmission occurred, greatly increasing the uncertainty in the estimates of dose-response parameters reported in the literature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that accounting for transmission in the analysis of dose-response data for Campylobacter spp. challenges our current understanding of the

  5. Coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer: a dose-response analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Tian, Changwei; Wang, Wenming; Hong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xingliang

    2013-06-01

    Coffee consumption has been linked to risk of colorectal cancer theoretically, but the findings were conflicting from observational studies. Results from the recent meta-analysis suggested a moderate favorable effect of coffee consumption on colorectal cancer risk, especially for colon cancer. However, the relationship, if exists, between coffee consumption and colorectal cancer risk is unclear. Thus, the dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline model and multivariate random-effect meta-regression. The results suggested that a significant association was found between coffee consumption and decreased risk of colorectal and colon cancer among subjects consuming ≥4 cups of coffee per day. A potential nonlinear relationship should be assessed before assuming a linear relationship.

  6. Modeling and regression analysis of semiochemical dose-response curves of insect antennal reception and behavior.

    PubMed

    Byers, John A

    2013-08-01

    Dose-response curves of the effects of semiochemicals on neurophysiology and behavior are reported in many articles in insect chemical ecology. Most curves are shown in figures representing points connected by straight lines, in which the x-axis has order of magnitude increases in dosage vs. responses on the y-axis. The lack of regression curves indicates that the nature of the dose-response relationship is not well understood. Thus, a computer model was developed to simulate a flux of various numbers of pheromone molecules (10(3) to 5 × 10(6)) passing by 10(4) receptors distributed among 10(6) positions along an insect antenna. Each receptor was depolarized by at least one strike by a molecule, and subsequent strikes had no additional effect. The simulations showed that with an increase in pheromone release rate, the antennal response would increase in a convex fashion and not in a logarithmic relation as suggested previously. Non-linear regression showed that a family of kinetic formation functions fit the simulated data nearly perfectly (R(2) >0.999). This is reasonable because olfactory receptors have proteins that bind to the pheromone molecule and are expected to exhibit enzyme kinetics. Over 90 dose-response relationships reported in the literature of electroantennographic and behavioral bioassays in the laboratory and field were analyzed by the logarithmic and kinetic formation functions. This analysis showed that in 95% of the cases, the kinetic functions explained the relationships better than the logarithmic (mean of about 20% better). The kinetic curves become sigmoid when graphed on a log scale on the x-axis. Dose-catch relationships in the field are similar to dose-EAR (effective attraction radius, in which a spherical radius indicates the trapping effect of a lure) and the circular EARc in two dimensions used in mass trapping models. The use of kinetic formation functions for dose-response curves of attractants, and kinetic decay curves for

  7. Dose-response association of physical activity with HbA1c: Intensity and bout length.

    PubMed

    Gay, Jennifer L; Buchner, David M; Schmidt, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize the dose-response relationship between moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA), and light-intensity activity with HbA1c in adults at low, moderate, and high risks of type 2 diabetes, and to compare the relationship of short (1 to 9min) versus long (10+min) bouts of MVPA with HbA1c. Data from 2707 participants from the 2003-2006 National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed in 2014-2015. Type 2 diabetes risk was classified into three groups based upon age (<40years; ≥40years) and BMI (<30; ≥30). The relationship between HbA1c and accelerometer-based physical activity variables was assessed using multiple regression models. There was a curvilinear dose-response relationship between HbA1c with total activity and MVPA in adults at moderate or high risk for type 2 diabetes: higher amounts of physical activity were associated with lower HbA1c. The association of physical activity on HbA1c was stronger at lower levels of physical activity. There was no dose-response relationship in adults at low risk for type 2 diabetes. The relationship between short bouts with HbA1c was stronger than for bouts≥10min. In adults at risk for type 2 diabetes, there is a dose-response relationship between physical activity and HbA1c levels such that the relationship: (1) is curvilinear; (2) is stronger when a higher percent of total activity comes from MVPA; and (3) is more potent with short bouts of MVPA. Fractionalized physical activity of at least moderate-intensity may contribute to long-term glucose control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Radiation Dose-Response of the Human Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To characterize the radiation dose-response of the human spinal cord. Methods and Materials: Because no single institution has sufficient data to establish a dose-response function for the human spinal cord, published reports were combined. Requisite data were dose and fractionation, number of patients at risk, number of myelopathy cases, and survival experience of the population. Eight data points for cervical myelopathy were obtained from five reports. Using maximum likelihood estimation correcting for the survival experience of the population, estimates were obtained for the median tolerance dose, slope parameter, and {alpha}/{beta} ratio in a logistic dose-response function. An adequate fit to thoracic data was not possible. Hyperbaric oxygen treatments involving the cervical cord were also analyzed. Results: The estimate of the median tolerance dose (cervical cord) was 69.4 Gy (95% confidence interval, 66.4-72.6). The {alpha}/{beta} = 0.87 Gy. At 45 Gy, the (extrapolated) probability of myelopathy is 0.03%; and at 50 Gy, 0.2%. The dose for a 5% myelopathy rate is 59.3 Gy. Graphical analysis indicates that the sensitivity of the thoracic cord is less than that of the cervical cord. There appears to be a sensitizing effect from hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Conclusions: The estimate of {alpha}/{beta} is smaller than usually quoted, but values this small were found in some studies. Using {alpha}/{beta} = 0.87 Gy, one would expect a considerable advantage by decreasing the dose/fraction to less than 2 Gy. These results were obtained from only single fractions/day and should not be applied uncritically to hyperfractionation.

  9. Modeling Effective Dosages in Hormetic Dose-Response Studies

    PubMed Central

    Belz, Regina G.; Piepho, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Two hormetic modifications of a monotonically decreasing log-logistic dose-response function are most often used to model stimulatory effects of low dosages of a toxicant in plant biology. As just one of these empirical models is yet properly parameterized to allow inference about quantities of interest, this study contributes the parameterized functions for the second hormetic model and compares the estimates of effective dosages between both models based on 23 hormetic data sets. Based on this, the impact on effective dosage estimations was evaluated, especially in case of a substantially inferior fit by one of the two models. Methodology/Principal Findings The data sets evaluated described the hormetic responses of four different test plant species exposed to 15 different chemical stressors in two different experimental dose-response test designs. Out of the 23 data sets, one could not be described by any of the two models, 14 could be better described by one of the two models, and eight could be equally described by both models. In cases of misspecification by any of the two models, the differences between effective dosages estimates (0–1768%) greatly exceeded the differences observed when both models provided a satisfactory fit (0–26%). This suggests that the conclusions drawn depending on the model used may diverge considerably when using an improper hormetic model especially regarding effective dosages quantifying hormesis. Conclusions/Significance The study showed that hormetic dose responses can take on many shapes and that this diversity can not be captured by a single model without risking considerable misinterpretation. However, the two empirical models considered in this paper together provide a powerful means to model, prove, and now also to quantify a wide range of hormetic responses by reparameterization. Despite this, they should not be applied uncritically, but after statistical and graphical assessment of their adequacy. PMID

  10. Clinical dose-response for a broad set of biological products: A model-based meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Joseph; Banerjee, Anindita; Jin, Bo; Menon, Sandeep M; Martin, Steven W; Heatherington, Anne C

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing clinical dose-response is a critical step in drug development. Uncertainty in the dose-response model when planning a dose-ranging study can often undermine efficiency in both the design and analysis of the trial. Results of a previous meta-analysis on a portfolio of small molecule compounds from a large pharmaceutical company demonstrated a consistent dose-response relationship that was well described by the maximal effect model. Biologics are different from small molecules due to their large molecular sizes and their potential to induce immunogenicity. A model-based meta-analysis was conducted on the clinical efficacy of 71 distinct biologics evaluated in 91 placebo-controlled dose-response studies published between 1995 and 2014. The maximal effect model, arising from receptor occupancy theory, described the clinical dose-response data for the majority of the biologics (81.7%, n = 58). Five biologics (7%) with data showing non-monotonic trend assuming the maximal effect model were identified and discussed. A Bayesian model-based hierarchical approach using different joint specifications of prior densities for the maximal effect model parameters was used to meta-analyze the whole set of biologics excluding these five biologics ( n = 66). Posterior predictive distributions of the maximal effect model parameters were reported and they could be used to aid the design of future dose-ranging studies. Compared to the meta-analysis of small molecules, the combination of fewer doses, narrower dosing ranges, and small sample sizes further limited the information available to estimate clinical dose-response among biologics.

  11. New data, strategies, and insights for Listeria monocytogenes dose-response models: summary of an interagency workshop, 2011.

    PubMed

    Hoelzer, K; Chen, Y; Dennis, S; Evans, P; Pouillot, R; Silk, B J; Walls, I

    2013-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a leading cause of hospitalization, fetal loss, and death due to foodborne illnesses in the United States. A quantitative assessment of the relative risk of listeriosis associated with the consumption of 23 selected categories of ready-to-eat foods, published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 2003, has been instrumental in identifying the food products and practices that pose the greatest listeriosis risk and has guided the evaluation of potential intervention strategies. Dose-response models, which quantify the relationship between an exposure dose and the probability of adverse health outcomes, were essential components of the risk assessment. However, because of data gaps and limitations in the available data and modeling approaches, considerable uncertainty existed. Since publication of the risk assessment, new data have become available for modeling L. monocytogenes dose-response. At the same time, recent advances in the understanding of L. monocytogenes pathophysiology and strain diversity have warranted a critical reevaluation of the published dose-response models. To discuss strategies for modeling L. monocytogenes dose-response, the Interagency Risk Assessment Consortium (IRAC) and the Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (JIFSAN) held a scientific workshop in 2011 (details available at http://foodrisk.org/irac/events/). The main findings of the workshop and the most current and relevant data identified during the workshop are summarized and presented in the context of L. monocytogenes dose-response. This article also discusses new insights on dose-response modeling for L. monocytogenes and research opportunities to meet future needs.

  12. Dose-response of physical activity and low back pain, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Vuori, I M

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the evidence for causal relationships between physical activity (PA) and low back pain (LBP), osteoarthritis (OA), and osteoporosis (OP), and for dose-response relations involved. Computer database searches and personal retrieval systems were used to locate relevant literature. PA can be effective in preventing LBP (Category A) but prolonged, heavy loading can lead to LBP (Category C). Specific exercises have not been found effective in treatment of acute LBP (Category A), but PA can be effective in chronic LBP (Category B), especially for diminishing the effects of deconditioning. No evidence indicates that PA directly prevents OA. Large amounts of intensive PA involving high impacts or torsional loadings or causing injuries increases risk of OA (Category C). Light or moderate PA does not increase the risk of OA (Category C). PA can be effective in the treatment and rehabilitation of OA (Category B). High-intensity loading is osteogenic and possibly useful in prevention of OP (Category A) at the loaded site, but low to moderate loading is not osteogenic (Category D). Static efforts and slow movements are ineffective or less effective than fast application of force (Category B). The types of PA to attain the effects mentioned above are known except in the case of prevention of LBP, but dose-response relationships are poorly known; at best, semiquantitatively on the basis of just a few studies. Given the shown primary and/or secondary preventative effectiveness of PA regarding LBP, OA, and OP, research to elucidate the inadequately known dose-response relations should be given high priority.

  13. Fractional poisson--a simple dose-response model for human norovirus.

    PubMed

    Messner, Michael J; Berger, Philip; Nappier, Sharon P

    2014-10-01

    This study utilizes old and new Norovirus (NoV) human challenge data to model the dose-response relationship for human NoV infection. The combined data set is used to update estimates from a previously published beta-Poisson dose-response model that includes parameters for virus aggregation and for a beta-distribution that describes variable susceptibility among hosts. The quality of the beta-Poisson model is examined and a simpler model is proposed. The new model (fractional Poisson) characterizes hosts as either perfectly susceptible or perfectly immune, requiring a single parameter (the fraction of perfectly susceptible hosts) in place of the two-parameter beta-distribution. A second parameter is included to account for virus aggregation in the same fashion as it is added to the beta-Poisson model. Infection probability is simply the product of the probability of nonzero exposure (at least one virus or aggregate is ingested) and the fraction of susceptible hosts. The model is computationally simple and appears to be well suited to the data from the NoV human challenge studies. The model's deviance is similar to that of the beta-Poisson, but with one parameter, rather than two. As a result, the Akaike information criterion favors the fractional Poisson over the beta-Poisson model. At low, environmentally relevant exposure levels (<100), estimation error is small for the fractional Poisson model; however, caution is advised because no subjects were challenged at such a low dose. New low-dose data would be of great value to further clarify the NoV dose-response relationship and to support improved risk assessment for environmentally relevant exposures.

  14. Low-Active Male Adolescents: A Dose Response to High-Intensity Interval Training.

    PubMed

    Logan, Greig Robert Melrose; Harris, Nigel; Duncan, Scott; Plank, Lindsay D; Merien, Fabrice; Schofield, Grant

    2016-03-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a potential alternative to traditionally recommended steady state exercise for providing health benefits in adolescents, yet its dose-response relationship in this cohort remains unclear, as does its translatability to real-world, nonclinical settings. The present study adopts a novel dose-response design to investigate the effects of undertaking 8 wk of HIIT on the cardiometabolic health of low-active male adolescents. Twenty-six male adolescents (age 16 ± 1 yr), identified as low active by nonparticipation in structured sport and physical education classes, were randomly assigned to one of five treatment groups. Corresponding with their group numbers (1-5), participants completed a number of HIIT "sets," which consisted of 4 repeated bouts of 20-s near-maximal exertion interspersed with 10-s passive recovery. Participants performed two HIIT sessions and one resistance training session each week for 8 wk. Baseline and follow-up health measures consisted of peak oxygen uptake (V˙O2peak) with an incremental ramp test to volitional exhaustion; body composition (including visceral fat mass, body fat, and lean tissue mass) with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; and lipid profile, glucose, insulin, and interleukin-6 from blood analysis. All health outcomes were analyzed as percentage changes, and data were modeled using a quadratic function to explore dose-response relationships. Significant improvements were observed for V˙O2peak (∼6%), body fat percentage (∼4%), visceral fat mass (∼10%), and waist circumference-to-height ratio (∼3%), but there was no clear effect of dose across groups. Low-active adolescent males performing a single HIIT set twice weekly, in addition to one resistance training session, gained meaningful improvements in fitness and body composition. Performing additional HIIT sets provided no additional improvements to those of the lowest dose in this study.

  15. Dose-response meta-analysis of poultry intake and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Yu, Pei-Wu; Zeng, Dong-Zhu

    2015-03-01

    Poultry intake has been inconsistently associated with incidence or mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC) in epidemiologic studies. The purpose of this study was to assess their relationships by performing a dose-response meta-analysis. We conducted a search of PubMed database between January 1966 and July 2013 for prospective studies that reported relative risks (RRs) with 95 % confidence interval (CIs) of CRC for at least three categories of poultry intake. Dose-response relationships were examined with the generalized least-squares trend estimation. Study-specific results were pooled with a random-effects model. Subgroup, sensitivity, and meta-regression analyses were also conducted to explore heterogeneity. Sixteen studies on poultry intake and CRC incidence, and four studies regarding poultry intake and CRC mortality were identified. These studies involved a total of 13,949 incident CRC cases and 983 CRC deaths. The RRs of CRC for higher compared with lower intake of poultry were reported in these studies, and the reported levels of poultry intake varied substantially. Results of the dose-response meta-analysis conferred a RR of 0.89 (95 % CI 0.81-0.97) for an increase in poultry intake of 50 g/day. The results were not sensitive to any individual studies and were similar for colon and rectal cancer. Poultry intake was not associated with CRC mortality (RR for 50 g/day = 0.97, 95 % CI 0.79-1.20). This meta-analysis indicates that poultry intake may be moderately associated with reduced incidence of CRC.

  16. Alcohol intake and Helicobacter pylori infection: a dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi-Yu; Han, Xin-Chen; Sun, Jan; Chen, Guang-Xia; Zhou, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Guo-Xin

    2016-04-01

    Background Alcohol intake has been suggested to have an impact on the development of many chronic diseases. How alcohol intake may modulate risk of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, however, remains a subject open for investigation. A dose-response meta-analysis was performed of epidemiological studies to better quantify this relationship. Materials and methods Twelve observational articles were identified. The summary odds ratio (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for alcohol drinkers vs non-drinkers. The summary OR estimates were obtained using the random-effects model and dose-response meta-analysis. Sub-group and sensitivity analysis were also conducted. Results The summary OR was 0.78 (95% CI = 0.69-0.89). The dose-response analysis demonstrated that for drinkers of 10, 15, 30, 60 and 96 g/day alcohol intake, the estimated ORs were 0.80 (95% CI = 0.76-0.85), 0.79 (95% CI = 0.75-0.84), 0.83 (95% CI = 0.78-0.87), 0.85 (95% CI = 0.78-0.93) and 0.87 (95% CI = 0.70-1.06), respectively, compared to non-drinkers. The inverse relationship between alcohol intake and H. pylori infection was consistent, regardless of sex, age, geographic areas, detection methods or beverage types. Evidence from these observational studies suggests that moderate alcohol intake is associated with a reduction in H. pylori infection of ∼ 22% and may facilitate elimination of H. pylori.

  17. Dose-response model for teratological experiments involving quantal responses

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, K.; Van Ryzin, J.

    1985-03-01

    This paper introduces a dose-response model for teratological quantal response data where the probability of response for an offspring from a female at a given dose varies with the litter size. The maximum likelihood estimators for the parameters of the model are given as the solution of a nonlinear iterative algorithm. Two methods of low-dose extrapolation are presented, one based on the litter size distribution and the other a conservative method. The resulting procedures are then applied to a teratological data set from the literature.

  18. Characterization of Statin Dose-response within Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei-Qi; Feng, Qiping; Jiang, Lan; Waitara, Magarya S.; Iwuchukwu, Otito F.; Roden, Dan M.; Jiang, Min; Xu, Hua; Krauss, Ronald M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Davis, Robert L.; Berg, Richard L.; Peissig, Peggy L.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Wilke, Russell A.; Denny, Joshua C.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to define the genetic architecture underlying variable statin response have met with limited success possibly because previous studies were limited to effect based on one-single-dose. We leveraged electronic medical records (EMRs) to extract potency (ED50) and efficacy (Emax) of statin dose-response curves and tested them for association with 144 pre-selected variants. Two large biobanks were used to construct dose-response curves for 2,026 (simvastatin) and 2,252 subjects (atorvastatin). Atorvastatin was more efficacious, more potent, and demonstrated less inter-individual variability than simvastatin. A pharmacodynamic variant emerging from randomized trials (PRDM16) was associated with Emax for both. For atorvastatin, Emax was 51.7 mg/dl in homozygous for the minor allele versus 75.0 mg/dl for those homozygous for the major allele. We also identified several loci associated with ED50. The extraction of rigorously defined traits from EMRs for pharmacogenetic studies represents a promising approach to further understand of genetic factors contributing to drug response. PMID:24096969

  19. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, E.L; DuFrain, R.J.

    1983-10-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between the yield of dicentric chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The dicentric yields follow the Poisson distribution, and the expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose for low LET radiation. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been obtained by Kellerer and Rossi using the theory of dual radiation action. The yield of elementary lesions is kappa(..gamma..d + g(t, tau)d/sup 2/), where t is the time and d is dose. The coefficient of the d/sup 2/ term is determined by the recovery function and the temporal mode of irradiation. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described and illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure.

  20. Transcriptomic Dose-Response Analysis for Mode of Action ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Microarray and RNA-seq technologies can play an important role in assessing the health risks associated with environmental exposures. The utility of gene expression data to predict hazard has been well documented. Early toxicogenomics studies used relatively high, single doses with minimal replication. Thus, they were not useful in understanding health risks at environmentally-relevant doses. Until the past decade, application of toxicogenomics in dose response assessment and determination of chemical mode of action has been limited. New transcriptomic biomarkers have evolved to detect chemical hazards in multiple tissues together with pathway methods to study biological effects across the full dose response range and critical time course. Comprehensive low dose datasets are now available and with the use of transcriptomic benchmark dose estimation techniques within a mode of action framework, the ability to incorporate informative genomic data into human health risk assessment has substantially improved. The key advantage to applying transcriptomic technology to risk assessment is both the sensitivity and comprehensive examination of direct and indirect molecular changes that lead to adverse outcomes. Book Chapter with topic on future application of toxicogenomics technologies for MoA and risk assessment

  1. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, E.L.; DuFrain, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes are exposed to low-LET radiation, and the resulting dicentric chromosome aberrations follow the Poisson distribution. The expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been presented by Kellerer and Rossi (1972, Current Topics on Radiation Research Quarterly 8, 85-158; 1978, Radiation Research 75, 471-488) using the theory of dual radiation action. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting dose-time-response models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general-purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described, and estimation for the nonlinear models is illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure.

  2. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function.

    PubMed

    Rabin, B M; Joseph, J A; Shukitt-Hale, B

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity.

  3. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity.

  4. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose- response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B.; Joseph, J.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation- induced disruption of dopaminergic function disrupts a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, spatial learning and memory (Morris water maze), and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current presentation will review the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are in fact common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity. Supported by N.A.S.A. Grant NAG9-1190.

  5. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bayesian penalized log-likelihood ratio approach for dose response clinical trial studies.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuanyuan; Cai, Chunyan; Sun, Liangrui; He, Jianghua

    2017-02-13

    In literature, there are a few unified approaches to test proof of concept and estimate a target dose, including the multiple comparison procedure using modeling approach, and the permutation approach proposed by Klingenberg. We discuss and compare the operating characteristics of these unified approaches and further develop an alternative approach in a Bayesian framework based on the posterior distribution of a penalized log-likelihood ratio test statistic. Our Bayesian approach is much more flexible to handle linear or nonlinear dose-response relationships and is more efficient than the permutation approach. The operating characteristics of our Bayesian approach are comparable to and sometimes better than both approaches in a wide range of dose-response relationships. It yields credible intervals as well as predictive distribution for the response rate at a specific dose level for the target dose estimation. Our Bayesian approach can be easily extended to continuous, categorical, and time-to-event responses. We illustrate the performance of our proposed method with extensive simulations and Phase II clinical trial data examples.

  8. PHYSIOLOCIGALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODELING AND MODE OF ACTION IN DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODELING AND MODE OF ACTION IN DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT. Barton HA. Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA
    Dose-response analysis requires quantitatively linking infor...

  9. Low blood lead level effects on intelligence: can a dose-response curve be determined from the epidemiological data?

    PubMed

    Banner, W; Kahn, C M

    2014-02-01

    CONTEXT. Recent publications have graphically demonstrated a curvilinear relationship between measures of intelligence and blood lead levels at low concentrations (< 10 mcg/dl). This led to speculation that a greater biologic effect occurs at lower concentrations. Critics of this conclusion hypothesized that this graphical relationship may be a function of the underlying distributions of these variables. OBJECTIVE. To study the impact of the distribution of data on the shape of apparent dose-response curves. METHODS. Random data based on varied distributions were constructed to simulate a previous study using a single, randomly generated covariate income (Inc) to demonstrate the impact of normally versus exponentially distributed data on the shape of the graph of intelligence quotient (IQ) versus blood lead. We also used an existing database of US blood lead levels and constructed a similar model of income and IQ using both assumptions of distribution for the intermediate variable income. RESULTS. When both lead and income are exponentially distributed, the graph of lead and IQ will be a curve. CONCLUSION. The apparent shape of a dose-response relationship from simulated epidemiological data is nonlinear when one variable and a covariate are exponentially distributed. A non-linear biological relationship should not be assumed and in fact may be the least likely explanation. The use of observational epidemiological data to discern a dose-response relationship between two variables may be misleading.

  10. Appropriate statistical methods to compare dose responses of methionine sources.

    PubMed

    Kratzer, D D; Littell, R C

    2006-05-01

    Two sources of methionine (Met) activity are frequently used in commercial feed formulation: DL-2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio) butanoic acid (HMTBA), most commonly available as an 88% solution with 12% water; and DL-methionine (DLM, 99% powder). Despite the fact that both compounds have been in commercial use for over 50 yr, controversy and confusion remain with respect to their relative bioefficacy (RBE). This paper presents a review of the use of a nonlinear common plateau asymptotic regression technique (NLCPAR) that has been used to compare the 2 Met sources with particular emphasis on the validity of the basic assumptions of that model. The thesis of this paper is that the controversy is due, at least in part, to the misapplication of this regression technique to estimate the RBE of HMTBA and DLM. The NLCPAR model is a bioassay with the key dependent assumptions that HMTBA is a dilution of DLM, and that each follows dose-response curves of the same form and approach a common plateau. Because both provide Met activity, it may be considered reasonable to accept these assumptions; however, specifically testing them demonstrated that the assumption of a common dose-response is not supported by data. The common plateau assumption was tested with an alternative approach of fitting nonlinear separate plateaus asymptotic regression (NLSPAR) to a set of 13 published broiler studies in which the NLCPAR model had been used to estimate RBE of HMTBA and DLM. The hypothesis of a common plateau was rejected (P < 0.01), meaning that the conclusion that HMTBA had lower bioefficacy than DLM based on the NLCPAR methodology was not valid. An example using published data demonstrated that the NLSPAR model was a significantly better fit than the NLCPAR model, and showed that HMTBA and DLM followed different dose responses. Consequently, there was no single value for RBE for the entire dose range; rather, the RBE of the 2 compounds varied with use level. The evidence presented here

  11. Stress biology and hormesis: the Yerkes-Dodson law in psychology--a special case of the hormesis dose response.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2008-01-01

    This article traces the historical foundations of the Yerkes-Dodson Law from its experimental foundations in the first decade of the 20th century, to its recognition as a generalizable phenomenon in multiple species including humans and to more current attempts to understand its molecular basis within the framework of stress-related biological processes. Within this context, the biological and dose-response characteristics of the Yerkes-Dodson Law are evaluated and compared to the hormesis dose-response model. Based on this evaluation, which includes study design analysis, statistical models of multiple factor/chemical interaction, and a comparative assessment of the quantitative features of these respective dose-response relationships and their molecular foundations, the Yerkes-Dodson Law is shown to represent a special case of the general concept of hormesis illustrating the interaction of two independent study variables, which has typically been observed to be an additive response, although not theoretically restricted to one. The conceptual integration of the Yerkes-Dodson Law within the hormetic dose response framework adds further support for the generalization of the hormesis concept.

  12. Household physical activity and cancer risk: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yun; Li, Tingting; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Lingling; Qin, Qin; Yin, Jieyun; Wei, Sheng; Liu, Li; Nie, Shaofa

    2015-10-07

    Controversial results of the association between household physical activity and cancer risk were reported among previous epidemiological studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the relationship of household physical activity and cancer risk quantitatively, especially in dose-response manner. PubMed, Embase, Web of science and the Cochrane Library were searched for cohort or case-control studies that examined the association between household physical activity and cancer risks. Random-effect models were conducted to estimate the summary relative risks (RRs), nonlinear or linear dose-response meta-analyses were performed to estimate the trend from the correlated log RR estimates across levels of household physical activity quantitatively. Totally, 30 studies including 41 comparisons met the inclusion criteria. Total cancer risks were reduced 16% among the people with highest household physical activity compared to those with lowest household physical activity (RR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.76-0.93). The dose-response analyses indicated an inverse linear association between household physical activity and cancer risk. The relative risk was 0.98 (95% CI = 0.97-1.00) for per additional 10 MET-hours/week and it was 0.99 (95% CI = 0.98-0.99) for per 1 hour/week increase. These findings provide quantitative data supporting household physical activity is associated with decreased cancer risk in dose-response effect.

  13. Dose-response curve estimation: a semiparametric mixture approach.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Yin, Guosheng

    2011-12-01

    In the estimation of a dose-response curve, parametric models are straightforward and efficient but subject to model misspecifications; nonparametric methods are robust but less efficient. As a compromise, we propose a semiparametric approach that combines the advantages of parametric and nonparametric curve estimates. In a mixture form, our estimator takes a weighted average of the parametric and nonparametric curve estimates, in which a higher weight is assigned to the estimate with a better model fit. When the parametric model assumption holds, the semiparametric curve estimate converges to the parametric estimate and thus achieves high efficiency; when the parametric model is misspecified, the semiparametric estimate converges to the nonparametric estimate and remains consistent. We also consider an adaptive weighting scheme to allow the weight to vary according to the local fit of the models. We conduct extensive simulation studies to investigate the performance of the proposed methods and illustrate them with two real examples.

  14. A broadly applicable function for describing luminescence dose response

    SciTech Connect

    Burbidge, C. I.

    2015-07-28

    The basic form of luminescence dose response is investigated, with the aim of developing a single function to account for the appearance of linear, superlinear, sublinear, and supralinear behaviors and variations in saturation signal level and rate. A function is assembled based on the assumption of first order behavior in different major factors contributing to measured luminescence-dosimetric signals. Different versions of the function are developed for standardized and non-dose-normalized responses. Data generated using a two trap two recombination center model and experimental data for natural quartz are analyzed to compare results obtained using different signals, measurement protocols, pretreatment conditions, and radiation qualities. The function well describes a range of dose dependent behavior, including sublinear, superlinear, supralinear, and non-monotonic responses and relative response to α and β radiation, based on change in relative recombination and trapping probability affecting signals sourced from a single electron trap.

  15. Caffeine and sprinting performance: dose responses and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Glaister, Mark; Patterson, Stephen D; Foley, Paul; Pedlar, Charles R; Pattison, John R; McInnes, Gillian

    2012-04-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of caffeine supplementation on sprint cycling performance and to determine if there was a dose-response effect. Using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 17 well-trained men (age: 24 ± 6 years, height: 1.82 ± 0.06 m, and body mass(bm): 82.2 ± 6.9 kg) completed 7 maximal 10-second sprint trials on an electromagnetically braked cycle ergometer. Apart from trial 1 (familiarization), all the trials involved subjects ingesting a gelatine capsule containing either caffeine or placebo (maltodextrin) 1 hour before each sprint. To examine dose-response effects, caffeine doses of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mg·kg bm(-1) were used. There were no significant (p ≥ 0.05) differences in baseline measures of plasma caffeine concentration before each trial (grand mean: 0.14 ± 0.28 μg·ml(-1)). There was, however, a significant supplement × time interaction (p < 0.001), with larger caffeine doses producing higher postsupplementation plasma caffeine levels. In comparison with placebo, caffeine had no significant effect on peak power (p = 0.11), mean power (p = 0.55), or time to peak power (p = 0.17). There was also no significant effect of supplementation on pretrial blood lactate (p = 0.58), but there was a significant time effect (p = 0.001), with blood lactate reducing over the 50 minute postsupplementation rest period from 1.29 ± 0.36 to 1.06 ± 0.33 mmol·L(-1). The results of this study show that caffeine supplementation has no effect on short-duration sprint cycling performance, irrespective of the dosage used.

  16. Application of the Key Events Dose-response Framework to Folate Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Wang, Bing; Sahyoun, Nadine R

    2016-06-10

    Folate is a vitamin that plays a role as a cofactor and coenzyme in many essential reactions. These reactions are interrelated and any change in folate homeostasis could affect other reactions. With food fortified with folic acid, and use of multivitamin, unmetabolized folic acid (UMFA) has been detected in blood circulation, particularly among older adults. This has raised concern about the potential harmful effect of high folic acid intake and UMFA on health conditions such as cognitive dysfunction and cancer. To examine what is known about folate metabolism and the release of circulating UMFA, the Key Events Dose-Response Framework (KEDRF) was used to review each of the major key events, dose-response characteristics and homeostatic mechanisms of folate metabolism. The intestine, liver and kidneys each play essential roles in regulating body folate homeostasis. But the determining event in folate metabolism leading to the release of UMFA in circulation appears to be the saturation of dihydrofolate reductase in the liver. However, at each of the key events in folate metabolism, limited information is available on threshold, homeostatic regulation and intracellular effects of folic acid. More studies are needed to fill in the knowledge gaps for quantitatively characterizing the dose-effect relationship especially in light of the call for extending folate fortification to other foods.

  17. Hierarchical Bayesian inference for ion channel screening dose-response data

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dose-response (or ‘concentration-effect’) relationships commonly occur in biological and pharmacological systems and are well characterised by Hill curves. These curves are described by an equation with two parameters: the inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50); and the Hill coefficient. Typically just the ‘best fit’ parameter values are reported in the literature. Here we introduce a Python-based software tool, PyHillFit, and describe the underlying Bayesian inference methods that it uses, to infer probability distributions for these parameters as well as the level of experimental observation noise. The tool also allows for hierarchical fitting, characterising the effect of inter-experiment variability. We demonstrate the use of the tool on a recently published dataset on multiple ion channel inhibition by multiple drug compounds. We compare the maximum likelihood, Bayesian and hierarchical Bayesian approaches. We then show how uncertainty in dose-response inputs can be characterised and propagated into a cardiac action potential simulation to give a probability distribution on model outputs. PMID:27918599

  18. Hierarchical Bayesian inference for ion channel screening dose-response data.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Ross H; Bardenet, Rémi; Gavaghan, David J; Mirams, Gary R

    2016-01-01

    Dose-response (or 'concentration-effect') relationships commonly occur in biological and pharmacological systems and are well characterised by Hill curves. These curves are described by an equation with two parameters: the inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50); and the Hill coefficient. Typically just the 'best fit' parameter values are reported in the literature. Here we introduce a Python-based software tool, PyHillFit , and describe the underlying Bayesian inference methods that it uses, to infer probability distributions for these parameters as well as the level of experimental observation noise. The tool also allows for hierarchical fitting, characterising the effect of inter-experiment variability. We demonstrate the use of the tool on a recently published dataset on multiple ion channel inhibition by multiple drug compounds. We compare the maximum likelihood, Bayesian and hierarchical Bayesian approaches. We then show how uncertainty in dose-response inputs can be characterised and propagated into a cardiac action potential simulation to give a probability distribution on model outputs.

  19. Dose responsive effects of cisplatin in L02 cells using NMR-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Xueyi; Gu, Runhuan; Ding, Zongli

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various cancers, such as bladder cancer, epithelial ovarian cancer, cervical cancer, and so on. However, cisplatin can cause various side effects. In this study, the dose-responsive effects of cisplatin were investigated in an in vitro model of human liver cells (L02) using NMR-based metabolomics. The inverted U-shaped curve of cell proliferation confirmed the hormetic effects of cisplatin (from 1 nM to 1 mM) in L02 cells. However, the metabolite changes revealed both U-shaped (ethanol, lactate, aspartate, choline, etc.) and inverted U-shaped (glutamate, glutamine, 4-aminobutyrate, myo-inositol, etc.) curves induced by three typical concentrations of cisplatin which covered the inverted U-shaped curve as indicated by the cell proliferation assay. These findings suggested that a macroscopic hormesis phenomenon on the cell proliferation could be reflected by both stimulated and inhibited metabolites and corresponding metabolic pathways to cisplatin treatments. Therefore, a global analysis using metabolomics may give a broader view into the dose-response relationship than using a single endpoint at molecular levels.

  20. High-resolution dose-response screening using droplet-based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Miller, Oliver J; El Harrak, Abdeslam; Mangeat, Thomas; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Frenz, Lucas; El Debs, Bachir; Mayot, Estelle; Samuels, Michael L; Rooney, Eamonn K; Dieu, Pierre; Galvan, Martin; Link, Darren R; Griffiths, Andrew D

    2012-01-10

    A critical early step in drug discovery is the screening of a chemical library. Typically, promising compounds are identified in a primary screen and then more fully characterized in a dose-response analysis with 7-10 data points per compound. Here, we describe a robust microfluidic approach that increases the number of data points to approximately 10,000 per compound. The system exploits Taylor-Aris dispersion to create concentration gradients, which are then segmented into picoliter microreactors by droplet-based microfluidics. The large number of data points results in IC(50) values that are highly precise (± 2.40% at 95% confidence) and highly reproducible (CV = 2.45%, n = 16). In addition, the high resolution of the data reveals complex dose-response relationships unambiguously. We used this system to screen a chemical library of 704 compounds against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, a diabetes, obesity, and cancer target. We identified a number of novel inhibitors, the most potent being sodium cefsulodine, which has an IC(50) of 27 ± 0.83 μM.

  1. The phylogenetic utility of acetyltransferase (ARD1) and glutaminyl tRNA synthetase (QtRNA) for reconstructing Cenozoic relationships as exemplified by the large Australian cicada Pauropsalta generic complex.

    PubMed

    Owen, Christopher L; Marshall, David C; Hill, Kathy B R; Simon, Chris

    2015-02-01

    The Pauropsalta generic complex is a large group of cicadas (72 described spp.; >82 undescribed spp.) endemic to Australia. No previous molecular work on deep level relationships within this complex has been conducted, but a recent morphological revision and phylogenetic analysis proposed relationships among the 11 genera. We present here the first comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the complex using five loci (1 mtDNA, 4 nDNA), two of which are from nuclear genes new to cicada systematics. We compare the molecular phylogeny to the morphological phylogeny. We evaluate the phylogenetic informativeness of the new loci to traditional cicada systematics loci to generate a baseline of performance and behavior to aid in gene choice decisions in future systematic and phylogenomic studies. Our maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenies strongly support the monophyly of most of the newly described genera; however, relationships among genera differ from the morphological phylogeny. A comparison of phylogenetic informativeness among all loci revealed that COI 3rd positions dominate the informativeness profiles relative to all other loci but exhibit some among taxon nucleotide bias. After removing COI 3rd positions, COI 1st positions dominate near the terminals, while the period intron has the most phylogenetic informativeness near the root. Among the nuclear loci, ARD1 and QtRNA have lower phylogenetic informativeness than period intron and elongation factor 1 alpha intron, but the informativeness increases at you move from the tips to the root. The increase in phylogenetic informativeness deeper in the tree suggests these loci may be useful for resolving older relationships.

  2. Resting heart rate and risk of metabolic syndrome in adults: a dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejiao; Luo, Xinping; Liu, Yu; Sun, Xizhuo; Han, Chengyi; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Bingyuan; Ren, Yongcheng; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Dongdong; Hu, Dongsheng; Zhang, Ming

    2017-03-01

    The magnitude of the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) with increased resting heart rate (RHR) has been inconsistently reported in some observational studies, and whether a dose-response relationship exists between RHR and MetS is unclear. We performed a meta-analysis including dose-response analysis to quantitatively evaluate this association in adults. We searched PubMed, Web of Knowledge, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and WanFang databases for articles published up to April 2, 2016. A random-effects model was used to pool relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs); restricted cubic spline function was used to assess the dose-response relationship. Seven prospective cohort studies and 10 cross-sectional studies with a total of 169,786 participants were included. The pooled RR was 2.10 (95% CI 1.80-2.46, I (2) = 79.8%, n = 13) for the highest versus reference RHR category and 1.28 (95% CI 1.23-1.34, I (2) = 87.7%, n = 15) for each 10 beats per minute (bpm) increment in RHR. We found no evidence of a nonlinear dose-response association between RHR and MetS (P nonlinearity = 0.201). The relationship was consistent in most subgroup analyses and robust on sensitivity analysis. No significant publication bias was observed. This meta-analysis suggests that risk of MetS may be increased with elevated RHR.

  3. Dose response for TCDD promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis in rats initiated with DEN: histologic, biochemical, and cell proliferation endpoints.

    PubMed Central

    Maronpot, R R; Foley, J F; Takahashi, K; Goldsworthy, T; Clark, G; Tritscher, A; Portier, C; Lucier, G

    1993-01-01

    The present study examines the dose-response relationship for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) promotion of histologic and biochemical parameters by using a two-stage model for hepatocarcinogenesis in female Sprague-Dawley rats initiated with a single intraperitoneal dose of 175 mg of diethylnitrosamine (DEN)/kg body weight at 70 days of age. Starting 2 weeks after initiation, treatment groups of 8-10 rats were given TCDD by gavage in corn oil once every 2 weeks for 30 weeks. Doses were 3.5, 10.7, 35.7, and 125 ng TCDD/kg body weight/day. A significant body weight reduction was present in the noninitiated group that received 125 ng TCDD. Relative liver weight was statistically increased in initiated rats treated with > or = 10.7 ng TCDD and in noninitiated rats treated with > or = 35.7 ng TCDD. Histopathologic evidence of cytotoxicity was dose-related in all TCDD-treated groups. There was a statistically significant dose response in the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) S-phase labeling index (LI) in the DEN-initiated rats (p < 0.01) and a marginally significant trend in the saline-treated rats (p = 0.10), but proliferating cell nuclear antigen S-phase LI and growth fraction within altered hepatic foci showed no increase. Among the DEN-initiated groups there was a significant increase in glutathione S-transferase altered hepatic foci stereological parameters in the 125 ng TCDD group. This study demonstrates that dose-response relationships for TCDD's effects on cell proliferation growth of altered hepatic foci are different from previously reported effects on P450 gene expression, indicating that different biological or biochemical responses may exhibit different dose-response relationships.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:8143597

  4. Dose response for TCDD promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis in rats initiated with DEN: histologic, biochemical, and cell proliferation endpoints.

    PubMed

    Maronpot, R R; Foley, J F; Takahashi, K; Goldsworthy, T; Clark, G; Tritscher, A; Portier, C; Lucier, G

    1993-12-01

    The present study examines the dose-response relationship for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) promotion of histologic and biochemical parameters by using a two-stage model for hepatocarcinogenesis in female Sprague-Dawley rats initiated with a single intraperitoneal dose of 175 mg of diethylnitrosamine (DEN)/kg body weight at 70 days of age. Starting 2 weeks after initiation, treatment groups of 8-10 rats were given TCDD by gavage in corn oil once every 2 weeks for 30 weeks. Doses were 3.5, 10.7, 35.7, and 125 ng TCDD/kg body weight/day. A significant body weight reduction was present in the noninitiated group that received 125 ng TCDD. Relative liver weight was statistically increased in initiated rats treated with > or = 10.7 ng TCDD and in noninitiated rats treated with > or = 35.7 ng TCDD. Histopathologic evidence of cytotoxicity was dose-related in all TCDD-treated groups. There was a statistically significant dose response in the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) S-phase labeling index (LI) in the DEN-initiated rats (p < 0.01) and a marginally significant trend in the saline-treated rats (p = 0.10), but proliferating cell nuclear antigen S-phase LI and growth fraction within altered hepatic foci showed no increase. Among the DEN-initiated groups there was a significant increase in glutathione S-transferase altered hepatic foci stereological parameters in the 125 ng TCDD group. This study demonstrates that dose-response relationships for TCDD's effects on cell proliferation growth of altered hepatic foci are different from previously reported effects on P450 gene expression, indicating that different biological or biochemical responses may exhibit different dose-response relationships.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. On the dose response of some CVD diamond thermoluminescent detectors.

    PubMed

    Marczewska, B; Bilski, P; Olko, P; Nesladek, M; Rebisz, M; Guerrero, M J

    2006-01-01

    The linearity of dose response of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamonds grown at the Institute for Materials Research at Limburg University, Belgium, was investigated over a dose range relevant for radiotherapy. The following CVD diamonds were investigated: (1) a batch of square 3 x 3 mm2 detectors cut from a CVD wafer and (2) an as-grown CVD wafer of 6 cm diameter. A total of 20 CVD square detectors were irradiated with 137Cs gamma rays over the dose range from 200 mGy to 25 Gy. The CVD wafer, used as a large-area thermoluminescent (TL) detector, was exposed to a 226Ra needle. Very few square detectors showed linearity over a limited dose range, followed by saturation of the TL signal. The dose range of linearity was found to be strongly affected by the thermal annealing procedure of the detector. Owing to its high sensitivity and homogeneity of response, the large CVD diamond wafer was found to be very suitable as a large-area detector for 2-D dose mapping of the 226Ra brachytherapy source, possibly for Quality Assurance purposes.

  6. A normal tissue dose response model of dynamic repair processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Markus; Belka, Claus

    2006-01-01

    A model is presented for serial, critical element complication mechanisms for irradiated volumes from length scales of a few millimetres up to the entire organ. The central element of the model is the description of radiation complication as the failure of a dynamic repair process. The nature of the repair process is seen as reestablishing the structural organization of the tissue, rather than mere replenishment of lost cells. The interactions between the cells, such as migration, involved in the repair process are assumed to have finite ranges, which limits the repair capacity and is the defining property of a finite-sized reconstruction unit. Since the details of the repair processes are largely unknown, the development aims to make the most general assumptions about them. The model employs analogies and methods from thermodynamics and statistical physics. An explicit analytical form of the dose response of the reconstruction unit for total, partial and inhomogeneous irradiation is derived. The use of the model is demonstrated with data from animal spinal cord experiments and clinical data about heart, lung and rectum. The three-parameter model lends a new perspective to the equivalent uniform dose formalism and the established serial and parallel complication models. Its implications for dose optimization are discussed.

  7. Peer Review for EPA's Biologically Based Dose-Response ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is developing a regulation for perchlorate in drinking water. As part the regulatory process EPA must develop a Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG). FDA and EPA scientists developed a biologically based dose-response (BBDR) model to assist in deriving the MCLG. This model is designed to determine under what conditions of iodine nutrition and exposure to perchlorate across sensitive lifestages would result in low serum free and total thyroxine (hypothyroxinemia). EPA is undertaking a peer review to provide a focused, objective independent peer evaluation of the draft model and its model results report. EPA is undertaking a peer review to provide a focused, objective independent peer evaluation of the draft model and its model results report. Peer review is an important component of the scientific process. The criticism, suggestions, and new ideas provided by the peer reviewers stimulate creative thought, strengthen the interpretation of the reviewed material, and confer credibility on the product. The peer review objective is to provide advice to EPA on steps that will yield a highly credible scientific product that is supported by the scientific community and a defensible perchlorate MCLG.

  8. CALUX measurements: statistical inferences for the dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Elskens, M; Baston, D S; Stumpf, C; Haedrich, J; Keupers, I; Croes, K; Denison, M S; Baeyens, W; Goeyens, L

    2011-09-30

    Chemical Activated LUciferase gene eXpression [CALUX] is a reporter gene mammalian cell bioassay used for detection and semi-quantitative analyses of dioxin-like compounds. CALUX dose-response curves for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin [TCDD] are typically smooth and sigmoidal when the dose is portrayed on a logarithmic scale. Non-linear regression models are used to calibrate the CALUX response versus TCDD standards and to convert the sample response into Bioanalytical EQuivalents (BEQs). Several complications may arise in terms of statistical inference, specifically and most important is the uncertainty assessment of the predicted BEQ. This paper presents the use of linear calibration functions based on Box-Cox transformations to overcome the issue of uncertainty assessment. Main issues being addressed are (i) confidence and prediction intervals for the CALUX response, (ii) confidence and prediction intervals for the predicted BEQ-value, and (iii) detection/estimation capabilities for the sigmoid and linearized models. Statistical comparisons between different calculation methods involving inverse prediction, effective concentration ratios (ECR(20-50-80)) and slope ratio were achieved with example datasets in order to provide guidance for optimizing BEQ determinations and expand assay performance with the recombinant mouse hepatoma CALUX cell line H1L6.1c3.

  9. Visceral adiposity and colorectal adenomas: dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Keum, N; Lee, D H; Kim, R; Greenwood, D C; Giovannucci, E L

    2015-06-01

    Obesity-related hormonal and metabolic perturbations implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis are mainly driven by visceral adipose tissue (VAT) rather than subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). Yet, most epidemiologic studies have examined the relationship between excess adiposity and colorectal neoplasia using body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). Due to the inability of BMI and WC to distinguish VAT from SAT, they are likely to have underestimated the true association. We conducted a dose-response meta-analysis to summarize the relationships between VAT and colorectal adenomas and to examine the value of VAT as an independent risk factor beyond BMI, WC, and SAT. PubMed and Embase were searched through September 2014 to identify relevant observational studies. The summary odds ratio (OR) 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using a random-effects model. In linear dose-response meta-analysis, the summary OR for each 25 cm(2) increase in VAT area was 1.13 (95% CI 1.05-1.21; I(2) = 62%; 6 studies; 2776 cases; range of VAT area = 30-228 cm(2)). The dose-response curve suggested no evidence of nonlinearity (Pnon-linearity = 0.37). In meta-analysis comparing the highest versus lowest category of VAT based on 12 studies, a positive association between VAT and adenomas remained statistically significant even after adjustment for BMI, WC, and SAT. In contrast, adjustment for VAT substantially attenuated associations of BMI, WC, and SAT with adenomas. Across the studies, VAT was more strongly associated with advanced adenomas than nonadvanced adenomas. VAT may be the underlying mediator of the observed associations of BMI and WC with adenomas, increasing adenoma risk continuously over a wide range of VAT area. Considering that the joint use of BMI and WC better captures VAT than the use of either one, clinicians are recommended to use both BMI and WC to identify those at high risk for colorectal neoplasia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University

  10. Dose-response effect of the lercanidipine/enalapril combination: a pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Rizzoni, Damiano

    2016-10-01

    The dose-effect relationship of fixed-dose combinations of anti-hypertensive drugs has been only poorly explored. This pooled analysis investigates the dose-response relationship of fixed-dose lercanidipine + enalapril in patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension. This was an individual patient data analysis of four randomized studies (n = 2340). The primary efficacy variable was the change from baseline in sitting diastolic blood pressure (SDBP). Secondary variables were change from baseline in sitting systolic BP (SSBP), proportion of responder patients, and safety. All fixed-dose combinations were superior to placebo in the reduction of SDBP. The greatest effect was observed with the market-available combination lercanidipine 20 mg/enalapril 20 mg (-15.3 mmHg vs. baseline; p < 0.05). The reduction in SDBP associated with the other two marketed fixed combinations of lercanidipine/enalapril were -10.7 mmHg for the 10 mg/20 mg combination and -9.8 mmHg for the 10 mg/10 mg combination (p < .05 for both comparisons). Similar findings were reported for SSBP reduction: the greatest effect was observed with lercanidipine 20 mg/enalapril 20 mg (-19.2 mmHg). The reduction in SSBP was -12.5 mmHg for the 10 mg/20 mg combination and -11.1 mmHg for the 10 mg/10 mg combination (p < .05 for all comparisons). The highest responder rate was reported with lercanidipine 20 mg/enalapril 20 mg (75.0%); this figure was 56.1% with the 10 mg/20 mg and 53.0% with the 10/10 mg combination. No safety concerns were reported. This pooled analysis of four randomized studies shows evidence of a dose-response effect in BP reduction with different fixed combinations of lercanidipine + enalapril. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis investigating the dose-response effect of a specific fixed-dose combination of anti-hypertensive agents. Further studies on this intriguing topic are however necessary.

  11. Dose-response fallacy in human reproductive studies of toxic exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Selevan, S.G.; Lemasters, G.K.

    1987-05-01

    The manner in which exposure is defined can affect the findings of reproductive studies of toxic exposures. The individual end points potentially examined, such as fetal loss, subfertility, and congenital malformations observed at birth, are on a continuum by severity of effect: The most extreme effect of the three being infertility because no pregnancy is possible, and the least extreme, congenital malformations recognized at birth. End points observed at birth are survivors of a long and complex process. The process yielding one of these adverse end points may result from a number of factors, including level of exposure. For example, a very high exposure could result in early fetal loss, whereas a lower one might result in a congenital malformation observed at birth. If the probability of a less severe end point falls due to increasing probability of more severe end points with increasing exposure, then a nontraditional dose-response relationship may be observed in the study of one type of outcome.

  12. Dose-response fallacy in human reproductive studies of toxic exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Selevan, S.G.; Lemasters, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    The manner in which exposure is defined can affect the findings of reproductive studies of toxic exposures. The individual end points potentially examined, such as fetal loss, subfertility, and congenital malformations observed at birth, are on a continuum by severity of effect: the most extreme effects of the three being infertility because no pregnancy is possible, and the least extreme, congenital malformations recognized at birth. End points observed at birth are survivors of a long and complex process. The process yielding one of these adverse end points may result from a number of factors, including level of exposure could result in early fetal loss, whereas a lower one might result in a congenital malformation observed at birth. If the probability of a less-severe end point falls due to increasing probability of more-severe end points with increasing exposure, then a nontraditional dose-response relationship may be observed in the study of one type of outcome.

  13. Estimating dose-response effects in psychological treatment trials: the role of instrumental variables.

    PubMed

    Maracy, Mohammad; Dunn, Graham

    2011-06-01

    We present a relatively non-technical and practically orientated review of statistical methods that can be used to estimate dose-response relationships in randomised controlled psychotherapy trials in which participants fail to attend all of the planned sessions of therapy. Here we are investigating the effects on treatment outcome of the number of sessions attended when the latter is possibly subject to hidden selection effects (hidden confounding). The aim is to estimate the parameters of a structural mean model (SMM) using randomisation, and possibly randomisation by covariate interactions, as instrumental variables. We describe, compare and illustrate the equivalence of the use of a simple G-estimation algorithm and two two-stage least squares procedures that are traditionally used in economics.

  14. Dose-response functions for the soiling of heritage materials due to air pollution exposure.

    PubMed

    Watt, John; Jarrett, David; Hamilton, Ron

    2008-08-01

    A set of materials (Portland limestone, white painted steel, white plastic and polycarbonate filter material) was exposed at locations in London, Athens and Krakow. Regular measurements of reflectance were taken over a period of twelve months. Co-located measurements of PM(10) concentrations were available. Based on these results, the relationship between soiling (measured as loss of reflectance) and ambient PM(10) concentrations was quantified leading to the development of dose-response functions for the soiling of materials. The results for limestone revealed too much scatter for a prediction to be made. Implications for air quality management and for the conservation of cultural heritage buildings are considered, including public acceptability and economic factors.

  15. Folate intake, serum folate levels and esophageal cancer risk: an overall and dose-response meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Guo, Chenyang; Hu, Hongtao; Zheng, Lin; Ma, Junli; Jiang, Li; Zhao, Erjiang; Li, Hailiang

    2017-02-07

    Previously reported findings on the association between folate intake or serum folate levels and esophageal cancer risk have been inconsistent. This study aims to summarize the evidence regarding these relationships using a dose-response meta-analysis approach. We performed electronic searches of the Pubmed, Medline and Cochrane Library electronic databases to identify studies examining the effect of folate on the risk of esophageal cancer. Ultimately, 19 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Summary odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using a random effects model. A linear regression analysis of the natural logarithm of the OR was carried out to assess the possible dose-response relationship between folate intake and esophageal cancer risk. The pooled ORs for esophageal cancer in the highest vs. lowest levels of dietary folate intake and serum folate were 0.63 (95% CI: 0.56-0.71) and 0.71 (95% CI: 0.55-0.92), respectively. The dose-response meta-analysis indicated that a 100 μg/day increment in dietary folate intake reduced the estimate risk of esophageal cancer by 12%. These findings suggest that dietary and serum folate exert a protective effect against esophageal carcinogenesis.

  16. Body mass index and risk of renal cell cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of published cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Furan; Xu, Yinghua

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is accepted as one of the major risk factors for renal cell cancer (RCC). However, conflicting results persist for the pooled risks based on the results from case-control and cohort studies combined, and the exact shape of the dose-response relationship has not been clearly defined yet. To help elucidate the role of obesity, PubMed and Embase databases were searched for published cohort studies on associations between body mass index (BMI) and risk of RCC. Random-effects models and dose-response meta-analyses were used to pool study results. Subgroup analyses were conducted by the available characteristics of studies and participants. Cohort studies (21) with 15,144 cases and 9,080,052 participants were identified. Compared to normal weight, the pooled relative risks and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals of RCC were 1.28(1.24-1.33) for preobesity and 1.77(1.68-1.87) for obesity, respectively. A nonlinear dose-response relationship was also found for RCC risk with BMI (p = 0.000), and the risk increased by 4% for each 1 kg/m(2) increment in BMI. There was no significant between-study heterogeneity among studies (I(2) = 35.6% for preobesity and I(2) = 44.2% for obesity, respectively). Subgroup analysis showed a basically consistent result with the overall analysis. These results suggest that increased BMI are associated with increased risk of RCC both for men and women. © 2014 UICC.

  17. Dose-response effects of diphenylhydantoin on pregnant dams and embryo-fetal development in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hwan; Lee, In-Chul; Baek, Hyung-Seon; Lim, Jeong-Hyeon; Moon, Changjong; Shin, Dong-Ho; Kim, Sung-Ho; Park, Seung-Chun; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2012-10-01

    Despite the widespread use of diphenylhydantoin (DPH), there is a lack of reliable information on the teratogenic effects, correlation with maternal and developmental toxicity, and dose-response relationship of DPH. This study investigated the dose-response effects of DPH on pregnant dams and embryo-fetal development as well as the relationship between maternal and developmental toxicity. DPH was orally administered to pregnant rats from gestational days 6 through 15 at 0, 50, 150, and 300 mg/kg/day. At 300 mg/kg, maternal toxicity including increased clinical signs, suppressed body weight, decreased food intake, and increased weights of adrenal glands, liver, kidneys, and brain were observed in dams. Developmental toxicity, including a decrease in fetal and placental weights, increased incidence of morphological alterations, and a delay in fetal ossification delay also occurred. At 150 mg/kg, maternal toxicity manifested as an increased incidence of clinical signs, reduced body weight gain and food intake, and increased weights of adrenal glands and brain. Only minimal developmental toxicity, including decreased placental weight and an increased incidence of visceral and skeletal variations, was observed. No treatment-related maternal or developmental effects were observed at 50 mg/kg. These results show that DPH is minimally embryotoxic at a minimal maternotoxic dose (150 mg/kg/day) but is embryotoxic and teratogenic at an overt maternotoxic dose (300 mg/kg/day). Under these experimental conditions, the no-observed-adverse-effect level of DPH for pregnant dams and embryo-fetal development is considered to be 50 mg/kg/day. These data indicate that DPH is not a selective developmental toxicant in the rat.

  18. Cerebral radioprotection by pentobarbital: Dose-response characteristics and association with GABA agonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Orr, K.; Delaney, T.; Oldfield, E.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Pentobarbital reduces cerebral radiation toxicity; however, the mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. As an anesthetic and depressant of cerebral metabolism, pentobarbital induces its effects on the central nervous system by stimulating the binding of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to its receptor and by inhibiting postsynaptic excitatory amino acid activity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of these actions as well as other aspects of the radioprotective activity of pentobarbital. Fischer 344 rats were separated into multiple groups and underwent two dose-response evaluations. In one set of experiments to examine the relationship of radioprotection to pentobarbital dose, a range of pentobarbital doses (0 to 75 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally prior to a constant-level radiation dose (70 Gy). In a second series of experiments to determine the dose-response relationship of radiation protection to radiation dose, a range of radiation doses (10 to 90 Gy) were given with a single pentobarbital dose. Further groups of animals were used to evaluate the importance of the timing of pentobarbital administration, the function of the (+) and (-) isomers of pentobarbital, and the role of an alternative GABA agonist (diazepam). In addition, the potential protective effects of alternative methods of anesthesia (ketamine) and induction of cerebral hypometabolism (hypothermia) were examined. Enhancement of survival time from acute radiation injury due to high-dose single-fraction whole-brain irradiation was maximal with 60 mg/kg of pentobarbital, and occurred over the range of all doses examined between 30 to 90 Gy. Protection was seen only in animals that received the pentobarbital before irradiation. Administration of other compounds that enhance GABA binding (Saffan and diazepam) also significantly enhanced survival time.

  19. GLP-1-induced alterations in the glucose-stimulated insulin secretory dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Brandt, A; Katschinski, M; Arnold, R; Polonsky, K S; Göke, B; Byrne, M M

    2001-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to establish in normal volunteers the alterations in beta-cell responsiveness to glucose associated with a constant infusion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or a pretreatment infusion for 60 min. A high-dose graded glucose infusion protocol was used to explore the dose-response relationship between glucose and insulin secretion. Studies were performed in 10 normal volunteers, and insulin secretion rates (ISR) were calculated by deconvolution of peripheral C-peptide levels by use of a two-compartmental model that utilized mean kinetic parameters. During the saline study, from 5 to 15 mM glucose, the relationship between glucose and ISR was linear. Constant GLP-1 infusion (0.4 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1)) shifted the dose-response curve to the left, with an increase in the slope of this curve from 5 to 9 mM glucose from 71.0 +/- 12.4 pmol x min(-1) x mM(-1) during the saline study to 241.7 +/- 36.6 pmol x min(-1) x mM(-1) during the constant GLP-1 infusion (P < 0.0001). GLP-1 consistently stimulated a >200% increase in ISR at each 1 mM glucose interval, maintaining plasma glucose at <10 mM (P < 0.0007). Pretreatment with GLP-1 for 60 min resulted in no significant priming of the beta-cell response to glucose (P = 0.2). Insulin clearance rates were similar in all three studies at corresponding insulin levels. These studies demonstrate that physiological levels of GLP-1 stimulate glucose-induced insulin secretion in a linear manner, with a consistent increase in ISR at each 1 mM glucose interval, and that they have no independent effect on insulin clearance and no priming effect on subsequent insulin secretory response to glucose.

  20. Light exposure at night, sleep duration, melatonin, and breast cancer: a dose-response analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan-Shui; Deng, Qin; Fan, Wen-Yan; Wang, Wei-Ye; Wang, Xin

    2014-07-01

    Evidence from observational studies on light at night (LAN) exposure, sleep duration, endogenous melatonin levels, and risk for breast cancer in women is conflicting. This led us to conduct a dose-response analysis of published observational data. Pertinent studies were identified by searching Medline, Web of Science, and EMBASE through April 2013. The dose-response relationship between sleep duration, urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin levels, and breast cancer was assessed using the restricted cubic spline model and by multivariate random-effects metaregression. A separate meta-analysis was also carried out to calculate the relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer for the comparable categories or highest levels of exposure versus the lowest levels. Twelve case-control and four cohort studies were included in the analysis. High artificial LAN exposure is associated with an increased risk for breast cancer (RR=1.17, 95% CI: 1.11-1.23), but not ambient LAN exposure (RR=0.91, 95% CI: 0.78-1.07). The summary RR for breast cancer is 1.00 (95% CI: 0.995-1.01) for an increment of 1 h of sleep per night. No significant dose-response relationship between sleep duration and breast cancer was found either for the linearity test (Ptrend=0.725) or for the nonlinearity (Ptrend=0.091) test. An increasein of 15 ng/mg creatinine in urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin is associated with a 14% reduced risk for breast cancer (RR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.78-0.95), with a linear dose-response trend (Ptrend=0.003). There was no evidence of substantial heterogeneity or publication bias in the analysis. Our study adds to the evidence of LAN breast cancer theory. Further research in this area is warranted.

  1. Dose Response Effects of Hypertonic Saline and Dextran on Cardiovascular Responses in Sheep

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-02-01

    137-144, 1995 DOSE RESPONSE EFFECTS OF HYPERTONIC SALINE AND DEXTRAN ON CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSES AND PLASMA VOLUME EXPANSION IN SHEEP Michael A...addressed the dose - response effects of HS or D-70 solutions or their possible synergistic combinations to evaluate optimal concentrations of the HS and D...205-217, 1989. 13. Halvorsen L, Günther RA, Dubick MA, Holcroft JW: Dose response characteristics of hypertonic saline dextran solution. J Trauma

  2. Photobacterial Response to Cadmium Chloride, Mercuric Chloride, and Selenium Dioxide: Dose-Response and Interaction Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    activity) and producing a dose - response curve by adding different concentrations of the second compound. The EC50 values from such paired compounds...fixing the dose of the first metal at its ECIo concentra- tion and varying the concentration of the second to produce a dose - response curve . The EC5 0...concentration of one metal at approximately its EC10 and varying the concentration of the second metal to produce a dose - response curve . The six possible

  3. Shared Dosimetry Error in Epidemiological Dose-Response Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed. PMID:25799311

  4. Cryptosporidium Infection Risk: Results of New Dose-Response Modeling.

    PubMed

    Messner, Michael J; Berger, Philip

    2016-10-01

    Cryptosporidium human dose-response data from seven species/isolates are used to investigate six models of varying complexity that estimate infection probability as a function of dose. Previous models attempt to explicitly account for virulence differences among C. parvum isolates, using three or six species/isolates. Four (two new) models assume species/isolate differences are insignificant and three of these (all but exponential) allow for variable human susceptibility. These three human-focused models (fractional Poisson, exponential with immunity and beta-Poisson) are relatively simple yet fit the data significantly better than the more complex isolate-focused models. Among these three, the one-parameter fractional Poisson model is the simplest but assumes that all Cryptosporidium oocysts used in the studies were capable of initiating infection. The exponential with immunity model does not require such an assumption and includes the fractional Poisson as a special case. The fractional Poisson model is an upper bound of the exponential with immunity model and applies when all oocysts are capable of initiating infection. The beta Poisson model does not allow an immune human subpopulation; thus infection probability approaches 100% as dose becomes huge. All three of these models predict significantly (>10x) greater risk at the low doses that consumers might receive if exposed through drinking water or other environmental exposure (e.g., 72% vs. 4% infection probability for a one oocyst dose) than previously predicted. This new insight into Cryptosporidium risk suggests additional inactivation and removal via treatment may be needed to meet any specified risk target, such as a suggested 10(-4) annual risk of Cryptosporidium infection.

  5. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses

    DOE PAGES

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; ...

    2015-03-23

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takesmore » up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.« less

  6. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre; Zeeb, Hajo

    2015-03-23

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.

  7. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses.

    PubMed

    Stram, Daniel O; Preston, Dale L; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.

  8. Shared Dosimetry Error in Epidemiological Dose-Response Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre; Zeeb, Hajo

    2015-03-23

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. Use of these methods for several studies, including the Mayak Worker Cohort and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.

  9. The main features of the interaction of mantle magmas with granulite complexes of the lower crust and their relationship with granitic melts (exemplified by the Early Caledonides of the West Baikal Region, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, Alexandr; Khromykh, Sergei; Mekhonoshin, Alexei; Volkova, Nina; Travin, Alexei; Mikheev, Evgeny; Vladimirova, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Granulite complexes occurring in the Early Caledonian southern folded framing of the Siberian Craton are deeply eroded fragments of the Vendian-Early Paleozoic accretionary prism, which is an indicator of the early stages of the Paleo-Asian Ocean (Gladkochub et al., 2010). The main feature of the granulite complexes is a wide development of gabbro-pyroxenites composing tectonic plates, synmetamorphic intrusive bodies, and numerous disintegrated fragments (boudins and enclaves), immersed in a metamorphic matrix. The volume of basites reaches 5-10 %, which allows us to consider mantle magmatism as a heat source for the granulite metamorphism. The most studied polygon is Chernorud granulite zone, which is a part of the Olkhon metamorphic terrane, West Baikal Region. Just this polygon was used for considering the problems of interaction of mantle magmas with lower crust granulite complexes and their relationship with granitic melts. The Chernorud Zone is a typical example of the accretionary prism with a predominance of metabasalts (70-80 %), subordinate amounts of marbles, quartzites and metapelites that have been subjected to granulite facies metamorphism and viscoelastic flow of rock masses. Study of two-pyroxene granulites (metabasalts) and garnet-sillimanite gneisses (metapelites) allows us to estimate P-T metamorphic conditions (P = 7.7-8.6 kbar, T = 770-820°C) and their U-Pb metamorphic age (530-500 Ma). Metabasalts correspond in their geochemistry to the island-arc tholeiitic series (Volkova et al., 2010; Gladkochub et al., 2010). Sin-metamorphic gabbro-pyroxenites formed in two stages: 1) Chernorud complex - tectonic slices and body's exhumed from deep earth crust levels (10-12 kb) and composed of arc tholeiitic series rocks (age T ≥ 500 Ma); 2) Ulan-Khargana complex - supply magmatic canals and fragmented tabular intrusions. This rocks composition corresponds to subalkaline petrochemical series (OIB) and U/Pb age is equal to 485±10 Ma (Travin et al., 2009

  10. Conceptualizing and Exemplifying Science Teachers' Assessment Expertise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geaney Lyon, Edward

    2013-05-01

    Although research in science education has led to new assessment forms and functions, the reality is that little work has been done to unpack and capture what it means for a teacher to develop expertise at assessing science. The purpose of this paper is two-fold. First, I suggest a conceptualization of assessment expertise that is organized around three dimensions: (a) designing aligned and theoretically cohesive assessment (Design), (b) using assessment to support students' science learning (Use), and (c) equitably assessing language minorities (Equity). The second purpose is to suggest and exemplify various levels of teaching expertise across the three conceptual dimensions using written assessment plans gathered from a study on secondary science pre-service teachers' assessment growth. The contribution of this paper lies in its further conceptual development of assessment expertise, instantiated in a rubric, which can spark discussion about how to capture the range of assessment practices that might be found in science classrooms as well as move toward a potential learning progression of assessment expertise.

  11. Bayesian dose-response analysis for epidemiological studies with complex uncertainty in dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Deukwoo; Hoffman, F Owen; Moroz, Brian E; Simon, Steven L

    2016-02-10

    Most conventional risk analysis methods rely on a single best estimate of exposure per person, which does not allow for adjustment for exposure-related uncertainty. Here, we propose a Bayesian model averaging method to properly quantify the relationship between radiation dose and disease outcomes by accounting for shared and unshared uncertainty in estimated dose. Our Bayesian risk analysis method utilizes multiple realizations of sets (vectors) of doses generated by a two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation method that properly separates shared and unshared errors in dose estimation. The exposure model used in this work is taken from a study of the risk of thyroid nodules among a cohort of 2376 subjects who were exposed to fallout from nuclear testing in Kazakhstan. We assessed the performance of our method through an extensive series of simulations and comparisons against conventional regression risk analysis methods. When the estimated doses contain relatively small amounts of uncertainty, the Bayesian method using multiple a priori plausible draws of dose vectors gave similar results to the conventional regression-based methods of dose-response analysis. However, when large and complex mixtures of shared and unshared uncertainties are present, the Bayesian method using multiple dose vectors had significantly lower relative bias than conventional regression-based risk analysis methods and better coverage, that is, a markedly increased capability to include the true risk coefficient within the 95% credible interval of the Bayesian-based risk estimate. An evaluation of the dose-response using our method is presented for an epidemiological study of thyroid disease following radiation exposure.

  12. Hormones and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Low-Dose Effects and Nonmonotonic Dose Responses

    PubMed Central

    Colborn, Theo; Hayes, Tyrone B.; Heindel, Jerrold J.; Jacobs, David R.; Lee, Duk-Hee; Shioda, Toshi; Soto, Ana M.; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Welshons, Wade V.; Zoeller, R. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    For decades, studies of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have challenged traditional concepts in toxicology, in particular the dogma of “the dose makes the poison,” because EDCs can have effects at low doses that are not predicted by effects at higher doses. Here, we review two major concepts in EDC studies: low dose and nonmonotonicity. Low-dose effects were defined by the National Toxicology Program as those that occur in the range of human exposures or effects observed at doses below those used for traditional toxicological studies. We review the mechanistic data for low-dose effects and use a weight-of-evidence approach to analyze five examples from the EDC literature. Additionally, we explore nonmonotonic dose-response curves, defined as a nonlinear relationship between dose and effect where the slope of the curve changes sign somewhere within the range of doses examined. We provide a detailed discussion of the mechanisms responsible for generating these phenomena, plus hundreds of examples from the cell culture, animal, and epidemiology literature. We illustrate that nonmonotonic responses and low-dose effects are remarkably common in studies of natural hormones and EDCs. Whether low doses of EDCs influence certain human disorders is no longer conjecture, because epidemiological studies show that environmental exposures to EDCs are associated with human diseases and disabilities. We conclude that when nonmonotonic dose-response curves occur, the effects of low doses cannot be predicted by the effects observed at high doses. Thus, fundamental changes in chemical testing and safety determination are needed to protect human health. PMID:22419778

  13. Origin of the linearity no threshold (LNT) dose-response concept.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2013-09-01

    This paper identifies the origin of the linearity at low-dose concept [i.e., linear no threshold (LNT)] for ionizing radiation-induced mutation. After the discovery of X-ray-induced mutations, Olson and Lewis (Nature 121(3052):673-674, 1928) proposed that cosmic/terrestrial radiation-induced mutations provide the principal mechanism for the induction of heritable traits, providing the driving force for evolution. For this concept to be general, a LNT dose relationship was assumed, with genetic damage proportional to the energy absorbed. Subsequent studies suggested a linear dose response for ionizing radiation-induced mutations (Hanson and Heys in Am Nat 63(686):201-213, 1929; Oliver in Science 71:44-46, 1930), supporting the evolutionary hypothesis. Based on an evaluation of spontaneous and ionizing radiation-induced mutation with Drosophila, Muller argued that background radiation had a negligible impact on spontaneous mutation, discrediting the ionizing radiation-based evolutionary hypothesis. Nonetheless, an expanded set of mutation dose-response observations provided a basis for collaboration between theoretical physicists (Max Delbruck and Gunter Zimmer) and the radiation geneticist Nicolai Timoféeff-Ressovsky. They developed interrelated physical science-based genetics perspectives including a biophysical model of the gene, a radiation-induced gene mutation target theory and the single-hit hypothesis of radiation-induced mutation, which, when integrated, provided the theoretical mechanism and mathematical basis for the LNT model. The LNT concept became accepted by radiation geneticists and recommended by national/international advisory committees for risk assessment of ionizing radiation-induced mutational damage/cancer from the mid-1950s to the present. The LNT concept was later generalized to chemical carcinogen risk assessment and used by public health and regulatory agencies worldwide.

  14. In situ protocol for the determination of dose-response effect of low-fluoride dentifrices on enamel remineralization.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Rebeca Lima; Pessan, Juliano Pelim; Igreja, Bruna Babler; Cantagallo, Camila Fernandes; Danelon, Marcelle; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo

    2013-01-01

    No in situ protocol has assessed the dose-response effects of fluoride dentifrices involving low-fluoride formulations. To assess the ability of an in situ remineralization model in determining dose-response effects of dentifrices containing low fluoride concentrations ([F]) on bovine enamel. Volunteers wore palatal appliances containing demineralized enamel blocks and brushed their teeth and devices with the dentifrices supplied (double-blind, crossover protocol) separately for 3 and 7 days. Surface hardness (SH), integrated subsurface hardness (ΔKHN) and [F] in enamel were determined. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey's test and Pearson's correlation (p<0.05). Dose-response relationships were verified between [F] in dentifrices and SH, ΔKHN and enamel [F]. Higher correlation coefficients between enamel [F] and SH and ΔKHN were obtained for the 3-day period. Significant differences in SH and ΔKHN were observed among all groups for the 3-day period, but not between 0-275, 275-550, and 550-1,100 µg F/g dentifrices for the 7-day period, nor between 3- and 7-day periods for the 1,100 µg F/g groups. Considering that the peak remineralization capacity of the conventional dentifrice (1,100 µg F/g) was achieved in 3 days, this experimental period could be used in future studies assessing new dentifrice formulations, especially at low-fluoride concentrations.

  15. In situ protocol for the determination of dose-response effect of low-fluoride dentifrices on enamel remineralization

    PubMed Central

    AFONSO, Rebeca Lima; PESSAN, Juliano Pelim; IGREJA, Bruna Babler; CANTAGALLO, Camila Fernandes; DANELON, Marcelle; DELBEM, Alberto Carlos Botazzo

    2013-01-01

    No in situ protocol has assessed the dose-response effects of fluoride dentifrices involving low-fluoride formulations. Objective To assess the ability of an in situ remineralization model in determining dose-response effects of dentifrices containing low fluoride concentrations ([F]) on bovine enamel. Material and Methods Volunteers wore palatal appliances containing demineralized enamel blocks and brushed their teeth and devices with the dentifrices supplied (double-blind, crossover protocol) separately for 3 and 7 days. Surface hardness (SH), integrated subsurface hardness (ΔKHN) and [F] in enamel were determined. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey's test and Pearson's correlation (p<0.05). Results Dose-response relationships were verified between [F] in dentifrices and SH, ΔKHN and enamel [F]. Higher correlation coefficients between enamel [F] and SH and ΔKHN were obtained for the 3-day period. Significant differences in SH and ΔKHN were observed among all groups for the 3-day period, but not between 0-275, 275-550, and 550-1,100 µg F/g dentifrices for the 7-day period, nor between 3- and 7-day periods for the 1,100 µg F/g groups. Conclusions Considering that the peak remineralization capacity of the conventional dentifrice (1,100 µg F/g) was achieved in 3 days, this experimental period could be used in future studies assessing new dentifrice formulations, especially at low-fluoride concentrations. PMID:24473718

  16. Dose-response curve and time-course of effect of vecuronium in male and female patients.

    PubMed

    Xue, F S; Liao, X; Liu, J H; Tong, S Y; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, R J; An, G; Luo, L K

    1998-06-01

    To determine the differences between men and women in the dose-response curve and the time-course of effect of vecuronium, we studied 60 adult patients (30 male and 30 female), ASA I, age 18-51 yr, undergoing elective plastic surgery. Anaesthesia was maintained with nitrous oxide 60% in oxygen; thiopentone and incremental doses of fentanyl were given as required. Neuromuscular function was assessed mechanomyographically using the train-of-four (TOF) stimulation at the wrist every 12 s. The percentage depression of T1 was used as the study variable. The dose-response relationship of vecuronium was determined by a cumulative dose-response technique. The dose-response curve in men was shifted in a parallel fashion to the right, indicating a decrease in the sensitivity to vecuronium-induced neuromuscular block, compared with women. The ED50, ED90 and ED95 of vecuronium were 23.9 (4.7), 45.4 (11.2) and 55.7 (14.3) micrograms kg-1 in men and 18.4 (3.7), 33.5 (7.8) and 39.8 (9.6) micrograms kg-1 in women respectively. There were statistically significant differences in these values between the two groups (P < 0.01 in each instance). After a total dose of vecuronium 80 micrograms kg-1, neuromuscular block was significantly longer in women than in men. The duration of peak effect, clinical duration, and the total duration were 18.7 (7.1), 26.6 (8.8) and 50.6 (16.0) min respectively in men and 26.0 (7.2), 37.1 (11.2) and 65.9 (20.7) min in women. They differed significantly between men and women (P < 0.005 in each case).

  17. A dose-response meta-analysis reveals an association between vitamin B12 and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sun, Nai-Hui; Huang, Xuan-Zhang; Wang, Shuai-Bo; Li, Yuan; Wang, Long-Yi; Wang, Hong-Chi; Zhang, Chang-Wang; Zhang, Cong; Liu, Hong-Peng; Wang, Zhen-Ning

    2016-06-01

    The current meta-analysis evaluated the association between vitamin B12 intake and blood vitamin B12 level and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. The PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched. A dose-response analysis was performed with generalized least squares regression, with the relative risk (RR) and 95 % CI as effect values. The meta-analysis included seventeen studies. A total of 10 601 patients. The non-linear dose-response relationship between total vitamin B12 intake and CRC risk was insignificant (P=0·690), but the relationship between dietary vitamin B12 intake and CRC risk was significant (P<0·001). Every 4·5 μg/d increment in total and dietary vitamin B12 intake was inversely associated with CRC risk (total intake: RR=0·963; 95 % CI 0·928, 0·999; dietary intake: RR=0·914; 95 % CI 0·856, 0·977). The inverse association between vitamin B12 intake and CRC risk was also significant when vitamin B12 intake was over a dosage threshold, enhancing the non-linear relationship. The non-linear dose-response relationship between blood vitamin B12 level and CRC risk was insignificant (P=0·219). There was an insignificant association between every 150 pmol/l increment in blood vitamin B12 level and CRC risk (RR=1·023; 95 % CI 0·881, 1·187). Our meta-analysis indicates that evidence supports the use of vitamin B12 for cancer prevention, especially among populations with high-dose vitamin B12 intake, and that the association between CRC risk and total vitamin B12 intake is stronger than between CRC risk and dietary vitamin B12 intake only.

  18. Recognizing the importance of exposure-dose-response dynamics for ecotoxicity assessment: nitrofurazone-induced antioxidase activity and mRNA expression in model protozoan Euplotes vannus.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yazhen; Liu, Shuxing; Lin, Xiaofeng; Li, Jiqiu; Yi, Zhenzhen; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S

    2015-06-01

    The equivocality of dose-response relationships has, in practice, hampered the application of biomarkers as a means to evaluate environmental risk, yet this important issue has not yet been fully recognized or explored. This paper evaluates the potential of antioxidant enzymes in the ciliated protozoan Euplotes vannus for use as biomarkers. Dose-response dynamics, together with both the enzyme activity and the gene expression of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, were investigated when E. vannus were exposed to graded doses of nitrofurazone for several discrete durations. Mathematical models were explored to characterize the dose-response profiles and, specifically, to identify any equivocality in terms of endpoint. Significant differences were found in both enzyme activity and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in the E. vannus treated with nitrofurazone, and the interactions between exposure dosage and duration were significant. Correlations between enzyme activity, mRNA expression, and nitrofurazone dose varied with exposure duration. Particularly, the dose-responses showed different dynamics depending on either endpoint or exposure duration. Our findings suggest that both the enzyme activity and the gene expression of the tested antioxidant enzymes can be used as biomarkers for ecotoxicological assessment on the premise of ascertaining appropriate dosage scope, exposure duration, endpoint, etc., which can be achieved by using dose-response dynamics.

  19. Characterizing dose-responses of catalase to nitrofurazone exposure in model ciliated protozoan Euplotes vannus for ecotoxicity assessment: enzyme activity and mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiqiu; Zhou, Liang; Lin, Xiaofeng; Yi, Zhenzhen; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S

    2014-02-01

    In environmental studies, some biological responses, known as biomarkers, have been used as a powerful bioassay tool for more than four decades. Disparity between enzyme activity and mRNA abundance leads to correlation equivocality, which makes the application of biomarkers for environmental risk assessment more complicated. This study investigates this disparity in the case of catalase when used as a biomarker for detecting ecotoxicity induced by antibiotics in aquatic ecosystems. In particular, dose-responses for catalase activity and mRNA expression abundance were investigated in Euplotes vannus which were exposed to graded doses of nitrofurazone for several discrete durations, and dose-response models were developed to characterize the dose-response dynamics. Significant differences were found in both catalase activity and mRNA expression abundance among the E. vannus treated with nitrofurazone. Catalase activity showed a hormetic-like effect in terms of dose-response, characterized by a biphasic relationship which was more clearly evident after a longer exposure period, while mRNA expression abundance increased linearly with the exposure duration. Additionally, the correlation between catalase activity and mRNA expression abundance reversed along with the duration of exposure to nitrofurazone. Taken together, our results demonstrate that catalase mRNA expression offers a more straightforward dose-response model than enzyme activity. Our findings suggest that both catalase enzyme activity and mRNA expression abundance can be used jointly as bioassay tools for detecting ecotoxicity induced by nitrofurazone in aquatic ecosystems.

  20. NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS: DATA GAPS THAT CHALLENGE DOSE-RESPONSE ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxic effects of environmental agents: Data gaps that challenge dose-response estimation
    S Gutter*, P Mendola+, SG Selevan**, D Rice** (*UNC Chapel Hill; +US EPA, NHEERL; **US EPA, NCEA)

    Dose-response estimation is a critical feature of risk assessment. It can be...

  1. EVALUATING QUANTITATIVE FORMULAS FOR DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessment formulas are often distinguished from dose-response models by being rough but necessary. The evaluation of these rough formulas is described here, using the example of mixture risk assessment. Two conditions make the dose-response part of mixture risk assessment d...

  2. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. EVALUATING QUANTITATIVE FORMULAS FOR DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessment formulas are often distinguished from dose-response models by being rough but necessary. The evaluation of these rough formulas is described here, using the example of mixture risk assessment. Two conditions make the dose-response part of mixture risk assessment d...

  4. Estimation of dose-response models for discrete and continuous data in weed science

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dose-response analysis is widely used in biological sciences and has application to a variety of risk assessment, bioassay, and calibration problems. In weed science, dose-response methodologies have typically relied on least squares estimation under an assumption of normality. Advances in computati...

  5. Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal?**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal? The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the 1940s, originally focusing on linear no threshold (LNT) versus threshold responses for cancer and noncanc...

  6. Testing the Capacity of the National Biological Dose Response Plan (NBDRP) EX40801

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    Testing the capacity of the National Biological Dose Response Plan (NBDRP) EX40801 Ruth Wilkins, James McNamee, Hillary...2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Testing the capacity of the National Biological Dose Response Plan (NBDRP) EX40801 5a...Report July 2009 Page 2 of 11 Testing the capacity of the NBDRP

  7. USE OF MECHANISTIC DATA TO HELP DEFINE DOSE-RESPONSE CURVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of Mechanistic Data to Help Define Dose-Response Curves

    The cancer risk assessment process described by the U.S. EPA necessitates a description of the dose-response curve for tumors in humans at low (environmental) exposures. This description can either be a default l...

  8. ENDOCRINE ACTIVE SUBSTANCES AND DOSE-RESPONSE FOR INDIVIDUALS AND POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine Active Substances and Dose-Response for Individuals and Populations
    Hugh A. Barton

    Abstract for IUPAC-SCOPE article

    Dose-response characteristics for endocrine disruption have been major focuses in efforts to understand potential impacts on human and ec...

  9. NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS: DATA GAPS THAT CHALLENGE DOSE-RESPONSE ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxic effects of environmental agents: Data gaps that challenge dose-response estimation
    S Gutter*, P Mendola+, SG Selevan**, D Rice** (*UNC Chapel Hill; +US EPA, NHEERL; **US EPA, NCEA)

    Dose-response estimation is a critical feature of risk assessment. It can be...

  10. Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal?**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal? The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the 1940s, originally focusing on linear no threshold (LNT) versus threshold responses for cancer and noncanc...

  11. Breastfeeding and thyroid cancer risk in women: A dose-response meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xingyang; Zhu, Jingjing; Zhu, Xiao; Liu, Guang Jian; Wu, Lang

    2016-10-01

    The association between breastfeeding and thyroid cancer risk is not consistent from epidemiological studies. To better clarify the association including assessing a potential dose-response relationship, we conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis. We searched PubMed (MEDLINE) up to November 2015 for prospective studies or case-control studies that evaluated the association between breastfeeding and risk of thyroid cancer. Effect estimates were pooled using a fixed-effects model. Nine reports (2 prospective studies, 6 case-control studies and 1 pooled analysis of 14 case-control studies) involving 2423 cases and 350,081 non-cases were identified. After pooling relevant studies, there was a significant inverse association between ever breastfeeding and risk of thyroid cancer (RR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.83-0.99), with minor heterogeneity (I(2) = 10.1%). The dose-response analysis revealed a significant linear relationship between the duration of breastfeeding and risk of thyroid cancer. The summary RR for an increment of 1 month of breastfeeding with risk of thyroid cancer was 0.983 (95% CI 0.98-0.99). When focusing on cohort studies, a more prominent linear dose-response relationship was detected, with the combined RR for every increment of 1 month of breastfeeding to be 0.965 (95% CI 0.96-0.97). This meta-analysis suggests that breastfeeding is potentially inversely associated with thyroid cancer risk. Also longer duration of breastfeeding may further decreases thyroid cancer risk. If validated in large-scale prospective studies, our findings may have implications for impacting women's decision in breastfeeding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  12. A Dose-Response Study of Arsenic Exposure and Markers of Oxidative Damage in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Kristin N.; Liu, Xinhua; Hall, Megan N.; Ilievski, Vesna; Oka, Julie; Calancie, Larissa; Slavkovich, Vesna; Levy, Diane; Siddique, Abu; Alam, Shafiul; Mey, Jacob L.; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H.; Gamble, Mary V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and markers of oxidative damage in Bangladeshi adults. Methods We recruited 378 participants drinking from wells assigned to five water arsenic exposure categories; the distribution of subjects was as follows: 1) <10 μg/L (n=76); 2) 10–100 μg/L (n=104); 3) 101–200 μg/L (n=86); 4) 201–300 μg/L (n=67); and 5) > 300 μg/L (n=45). Arsenic concentrations were measured in well water, as well as in urine and blood. Urinary 8-oxo-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) and plasma protein carbonyls were measured to assess oxidative damage. Results None of our measures of arsenic exposure were significantly associated with protein carbonyl or 8-oxo-dG levels. Conclusions We found no evidence to support a significant relationship between chronic exposure to arsenic-contaminated drinking water and biomarkers of oxidative damage among Bangladeshi adults. PMID:24854259

  13. An automated fitting procedure and software for dose-response curves with multiphasic features

    PubMed Central

    Veroli, Giovanni Y. Di; Fornari, Chiara; Goldlust, Ian; Mills, Graham; Koh, Siang Boon; Bramhall, Jo L; Richards, Frances M.; Jodrell, Duncan I.

    2015-01-01

    In cancer pharmacology (and many other areas), most dose-response curves are satisfactorily described by a classical Hill equation (i.e. 4 parameters logistical). Nevertheless, there are instances where the marked presence of more than one point of inflection, or the presence of combined agonist and antagonist effects, prevents straight-forward modelling of the data via a standard Hill equation. Here we propose a modified model and automated fitting procedure to describe dose-response curves with multiphasic features. The resulting general model enables interpreting each phase of the dose-response as an independent dose-dependent process. We developed an algorithm which automatically generates and ranks dose-response models with varying degrees of multiphasic features. The algorithm was implemented in new freely available Dr Fit software (sourceforge.net/projects/drfit/). We show how our approach is successful in describing dose-response curves with multiphasic features. Additionally, we analysed a large cancer cell viability screen involving 11650 dose-response curves. Based on our algorithm, we found that 28% of cases were better described by a multiphasic model than by the Hill model. We thus provide a robust approach to fit dose-response curves with various degrees of complexity, which, together with the provided software implementation, should enable a wide audience to easily process their own data. PMID:26424192

  14. The Maturing of Hormesis as a Credible Dose-Response Model

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Edward J.

    2003-01-01

    Hormesis is a dose-response phenomenon that has received little recognition, credibility and acceptance as evidenced by its absence from major toxicological/risk assessment texts, governmental regulatory dose-response modeling for risk assessment, and non-visibility in major professional toxicological society national meetings. This paper traces the historical evolution of the hormetic dose-response hypothesis, why this model is not only credible but also more common than the widely accepted threshold model in direct comparative evaluation, and how the toxicological community made a critical error in rejecting hormesis, a rejection sustained over 70 years. PMID:19330138

  15. Association between tea consumption and risk of cognitive disorders: A dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueying; Du, Xiaoyuan; Han, Guanying; Gao, Wenyuan

    2017-01-01

    Background The epidemiological evidence for a dose-response relationship between tea consumption and risk of cognitive disorders is sparse. The aim of the study was to summarize the evidence for the association of tea consumption with risk of cognitive disorders and assess the dose-response relationship. Methods We searched electronic databases of Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane Library (from 1965 to Jan 19, 2017) for eligible studies that published in the international journals. A random-effects model was used to pool the most adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Seventeen studies involving 48,435 participants were included in our study. The meta-analysis showed that a higher tea consumption was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of cognitive disorders (OR=0.73, 95% CI: 0.65-0.82). When considering the specific types of tea consumption, the significantly inverse association is only found in green tea consumption (OR=0.64, 95% CI: 0.53-0.77) but not in black/oolong tea consumption (OR=0.75, 95% CI: 0.55-1.01). Dose-response meta-analysis indicated that tea consumption is linearly associated with a reduced risk of cognitive disorders. An increment of 100 ml/day, 300 ml/day, and 500 ml/day of tea consumption was associated with a 6% (OR=0.94, 95% CI: 0.92-0.96), 19% (OR=0.81, 95% CI: 0.74-0.88), and 29% (OR=0.71, 95% CI: 0.62-0.82) lower risk of cognitive disorders. Conclusions Tea consumption is inversely and linearly related to the risk of cognitive disorders. More studies are needed to further confirm our findings. PMID:28496007

  16. Obesity and Risk of Bladder Cancer: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of 15 Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiang-Wei; Zhao, Long-Gang; Yang, Yang; Ma, Xiao; Wang, Ying-Ying; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent association between obesity and risk of bladder cancer, and the dose-response relationship between them has not been clearly defined. Methods We carried out a meta-analysis to summarize available evidence from epidemiological studies on this point. Relevant articles were identified by searching the PubMed and Web of Science databases through September 30, 2014. We pooled the relative risks from individual studies using random-effect model, and the dose—response relationship was estimated by using restricted cubic spline model. Results Fifteen cohort studies with 38,072 bladder cancer cases among 14,201,500 participants were included. Compared to normal weight, the pooled relative risks and corresponding 95% confidence intervals of bladder cancer were 1.07(1.01-1.14) and 1.10(1.06-1.14) for preobese and obesity, with moderate (I2 = 37.6%, P = 0.029) and low (I2 = 15.5%, P = 0.241) heterogeneities between studies, respectively. In a dose-response meta-analysis, body mass index (BMI) was associated with bladder cancer risk in a linear fashion (Pnon-linearity = 0.467) and the risk increased by 4.2% for each 5 kg/m2 increase. No significant publication bias was found (P = 0.912 for Begg’s test, P = 0.712 for Egger’s test). Conclusions Findings from this dose-response meta-analysis suggest obesity is associated with linear-increased risk of bladder cancer. PMID:25803438

  17. Methods for meta-analysis of pharmacodynamic dose-response data with application to multi-arm studies of alogliptin.

    PubMed

    Langford, Oliver; Aronson, Jeffrey K; van Valkenhoef, Gert; Stevens, Richard J

    2016-03-17

    Standard methods for meta-analysis of dose-response data in epidemiology assume a model with a single scalar parameter, such as log-linear relationships between exposure and outcome; such models are implicitly unbounded. In contrast, in pharmacology, multi-parameter models, such as the widely used Emax model, are used to describe relationships that are bounded above and below. We propose methods for estimating the parameters of a dose-response model by meta-analysis of summary data from the results of randomized controlled trials of a drug, in which each trial uses multiple doses of the drug of interest (possibly including dose 0 or placebo). We assume that, for each randomized arm of each trial, the mean and standard error of a continuous response measure and the corresponding allocated dose are available. We consider weighted least squares fitting of the model to the mean and dose pairs from all arms of all studies, and a two-stage procedure in which scalar inverse-variance meta-analysis is performed at each dose, and the dose-response model is fitted to the results by weighted least squares. We then compare these with two further methods inspired by network meta-analysis that fit the model to the contrasts between doses. We illustrate the methods by estimating the parameters of the Emax model to a collection of multi-arm, multiple-dose, randomized controlled trials of alogliptin, a drug for the management of diabetes mellitus, and further examine the properties of the four methods with sensitivity analyses and a simulation study. We find that all four methods produce broadly comparable point estimates for the parameters of most interest, but a single-stage method based on contrasts between doses produces the most appropriate confidence intervals. Although simpler methods may have pragmatic advantages, such as the use of standard software for scalar meta-analysis, more sophisticated methods are nevertheless preferable for their advantages in estimation.

  18. The Use of Mode of Action Information in Risk Assessment: Quantitative Key Events/Dose-Response Framework for Modeling the Dose-Response for Key Events

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HESI RISK21 project formed the Dose-Response/Mode-of-Action Subteam to develop strategies for using all available data (in vitro, in vivo, and in silico) to advance the next-generation of chemical risk assessments. A goal of the Subteam is to enhance the existing Mode of Act...

  19. The Use of Mode of Action Information in Risk Assessment: Quantitative Key Events/Dose-Response Framework for Modeling the Dose-Response for Key Events

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HESI RISK21 project formed the Dose-Response/Mode-of-Action Subteam to develop strategies for using all available data (in vitro, in vivo, and in silico) to advance the next-generation of chemical risk assessments. A goal of the Subteam is to enhance the existing Mode of Act...

  20. Manganese Exposure and Cognition Across the Lifespan: Contemporary Review and Argument for Biphasic Dose-Response Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Vollet, Kaitlin; Haynes, Erin N; Dietrich, Kim N

    2016-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) is both an essential micronutrient and potential neurotoxicant. This dual role underlies a growing body of literature demonstrating that Mn exhibits a biphasic dose-response relationship with neurocognitive outcomes. We reviewed recent epidemiologic studies from 2007 to 2016 that investigated the relationship between Mn exposure and cognitive outcomes across the lifespan: early life, school-aged children, and adulthood. In total, 27 research articles were included in this review: 12 pediatric and 15 adult studies (10 occupational and five environmental exposures). The majority of these studies provided evidence of the negative effects of Mn exposure on cognition. The pediatric literature provides evidence that both high and low levels of Mn are negatively associated with intellectual development. Future Mn research should include examination of non-linear relationships and multiple neurotoxicants across the lifespan and particularly during critical developmental windows.

  1. Quantifying the dose-response of walking in reducing coronary heart disease risk: meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Henry; Orsini, Nicola; Amin, Janaki; Wolk, Alicja; Nguyen, Van Thi Thuy; Ehrlich, Fred

    2009-01-01

    The evidence for the efficacy of walking in reducing the risk of and preventing coronary heart disease (CHD) is not completely understood. This meta-analysis aimed to quantify the dose-response relationship between walking and CHD risk reduction for both men and women in the general population. Studies on walking and CHD primary prevention between 1954 and 2007 were identified through Medline, SportDiscus and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Random-effect meta-regression models were used to pool the relative risks from individual studies. A total of 11 prospective cohort studies and one randomized control trial study met the inclusion criteria, with 295,177 participants free of CHD at baseline and 7,094 cases at follow-up. The meta-analysis indicated that an increment of approximately 30 min of normal walking a day for 5 days a week was associated with 19% CHD risk reduction (95% CI = 14-23%; P-heterogeneity = 0.56; I (2) = 0%). We found no evidence of heterogeneity between subgroups of studies defined by gender (P = 0.67); age of the study population (P = 0.52); or follow-up duration (P = 0.77). The meta-analysis showed that the risk for developing CHD decreases as walking dose increases. Walking should be prescribed as an evidence-based effective exercise modality for CHD prevention in the general population.

  2. Dose-response curve slope helps predict therapeutic potency and breadth of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Webb, Nicholas E; Montefiori, David C; Lee, Benhur

    2015-09-29

    A new generation of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) with remarkable potency, breadth and epitope diversity has rejuvenated interest in immunotherapeutic strategies. Potencies defined by in vitro IC50 and IC80 values (50 and 80% inhibitory concentrations) figure prominently into the selection of clinical candidates; however, much higher therapeutic levels will be required to reduce multiple logs of virus and impede escape. Here we predict bnAb potency at therapeutic levels by analysing dose-response curve slopes, and show that slope is independent of IC50/IC80 and specifically relates to bnAb epitope class. With few exceptions, CD4-binding site and V3-glycan bnAbs exhibit slopes >1, indicative of higher expected therapeutic effectiveness, whereas V2-glycan, gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and gp120-gp41 bnAbs exhibit less favourable slopes <1. Our results indicate that slope is one major predictor of both potency and breadth for bnAbs at clinically relevant concentrations, and may better coordinate the relationship between bnAb epitope structure and therapeutic expectations.

  3. Estimation and uncertainty analysis of dose response in an inter-laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toman, Blaza; Rösslein, Matthias; Elliott, John T.; Petersen, Elijah J.

    2016-02-01

    An inter-laboratory experiment for the evaluation of toxic effects of NH2-polystyrene nanoparticles on living human cancer cells was performed with five participating laboratories. Previously published results from nanocytoxicity assays are often contradictory, mostly due to challenges related to producing a reliable cytotoxicity assay protocol for use with nanomaterials. Specific challenges include reproducibility preparing nanoparticle dispersions, biological variability from testing living cell lines, and the potential for nano-related interference effects. In this experiment, such challenges were addressed by developing a detailed experimental protocol and using a specially designed 96-well plate layout which incorporated a range of control measurements to assess multiple factors such as nanomaterial interference, pipetting accuracy, cell seeding density, and instrument performance. Detailed data analysis of these control measurements showed that good control of the experiments was attained by all participants in most cases. The main measurement objective of the study was the estimation of a dose response relationship between concentration of the nanoparticles and metabolic activity of the living cells, under several experimental conditions. The dose curve estimation was achieved by imbedding a three parameter logistic curve in a three level Bayesian hierarchical model, accounting for uncertainty due to all known experimental conditions as well as between laboratory variability in a top-down manner. Computation was performed using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The fit of the model was evaluated using Bayesian posterior predictive probabilities and found to be satisfactory.

  4. The notion of hormesis and the dose-response theory: a unified approach.

    PubMed

    Murado, M A; Vázquez, J A

    2007-02-07

    According to an opinion which is vigorous and insistently defended for approximately one decade, hormesis (the response of a biological entity to an effector, with stimulatory results at low doses and inhibitory results at high doses) radically puts into question the classic theory of dose-response (DR) relationships and demands a profound revision of environmental protection policies. Herein we show that DR theory, with the modifications which we propose, allows the modelling of various kinds of biphasic responses which are phenomenologically similar to hormetic ones and of well-defined origin, as well as responses which have been treated as genuinely hormetic. Our descriptive approach may also represent a useful resource for experimental design, directed towards identifying some of the potentially heterogeneous mechanisms which underlie the hormetic phenomenon. Finally, it also allows to discuss some factors which prevent the use of the notion of hormesis-perhaps useful in a clinical context, under strictly controlled conditions-to make decisions on environmental protection measures.

  5. Optical and NMR dose response of N-isopropylacrylamide normoxic polymer gel for radiation therapy dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Mesbahi, Asghar; Jafarzadeh, Vahid; Gharehaghaji, Nahideh

    2012-01-01

    Background Application of less toxic normoxic polymer gel of N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAM) for radiation therapy has been studied in recent years. Aim In the current study the optical and NMR properties of NIPAM were studied for radiation therapy dosimetry application. Materials and methods NIPAM normoxic polymer gel was prepared and irradiated by 9 MV photon beam of a medical linac. The optical absorbance was measured using a conventional laboratory spectrophotometer in different wavelengths ranging from 390 to 860 nm. R2 measurements of NIPAM gels were performed using a 1.5 T scanner and R2–dose curve was obtained. Results Our results showed R2 dose sensitivity of 0.193 ± 0.01 s−1 Gy−1 for NIPAM gel. Both R2 and optical absorbance showed a linear relationship with dose from 1.5 to 11 Gy for NIPAM gel dosimeter. Moreover, absorbance–dose response varied considerably with light wavelength and highest sensitivity was seen for the blue part of the spectrum. Conclusion Our results showed that both optical and NMR approaches have acceptable sensitivity and accuracy for dose determination with NIPAM gel. However, for optical reading of the gel, utilization of an optimum optical wavelength is recommended. PMID:24377016

  6. Parity and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: a Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Lv, Haichen; Wu, Hongyi; Yin, Jiasheng; Qian, Juying; Ge, Junbo

    2015-08-24

    Parity has been shown to inversely associate with cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, but the evidence of epidemiological studies is still controversial. Therefore, we quantitatively assessed the relationship between parity and CVD mortality by summarizing the evidence from prospective studies. We searched MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE and ISI Web of Science databases for relevant prospective studies of parity and CVD mortality through the end of March 2015. Fixed- or random-effects models were used to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity among studies was assessed using the I(2) statistics. All statistical tests were two-sided. Ten prospective studies were included with a total of 994,810 participants and 16,601 CVD events. A borderline significant inverse association was observed while comparing parity with nulliparous, with summarized RR = 0.79 (95% CI: 0.60-1.06; I(2) = 90.9%, P < 0.001). In dose-response analysis, we observed a significant nonlinear association between parity number and CVD mortality. The greatest risk reduction appeared when the parity number reached four. The findings of this meta-analysis suggests that ever parity is inversely related to CVD mortality. Furthermore, there is a statistically significant nonlinear inverse association between parity number and CVD mortality.

  7. Association between vitamin C intake and lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jie; Shen, Li; Zheng, Di

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies evaluating the association between the intake of vitamin C and lung cancer risk have produced inconsistent results. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the association between them. Pertinent studies were identified by a search of PubMed, Web of Knowledge and Wan Fang Med Online through December of 2013. Random-effect model was used to combine the data for analysis. Publication bias was estimated using Begg's funnel plot and Egger's regression asymmetry test. Eighteen articles reporting 21 studies involving 8938 lung cancer cases were included in this meta-analysis. Pooled results suggested that highest vitamin C intake level versus lowest level was significantly associated with the risk of lung cancer [summary relative risk (RR) = 0.829, 95%CI = 0.734–0.937, I2 = 57.8%], especially in the United States and in prospective studies. A linear dose-response relationship was found, with the risk of lung cancer decreasing by 7% for every 100 mg/day increase in the intake of vitamin C [summary RR = 0.93, 95%CI = 0.88–0.98]. No publication bias was found. Our analysis suggested that the higher intake of vitamin C might have a protective effect against lung cancer, especially in the United States, although this conclusion needs to be confirmed. PMID:25145261

  8. RASS SOT Webinar - Nonmonotonic Dose Response Curves (NMDRCs) Common after Estrogen or Androgen Signaling Pathway Disruption

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides the listening and viewing audience with Dr Gray's scientific information on the relevance of nonmonotonic dose response curves to the risk assessment of estrogenic and androgenic chemicals

  9. Cancer Dose-Response Assessment for Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) and Application to Environmental Mixtures

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report updates the cancer dose-response assessment for PCBs and shows how information on toxicity, disposition, and environmental processes can be considered together to evaluate health risks from PCB mixtures in the environment.

  10. RASS SOT Webinar - Nonmonotonic Dose Response Curves (NMDRCs) Common after Estrogen or Androgen Signaling Pathway Disruption

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides the listening and viewing audience with Dr Gray's scientific information on the relevance of nonmonotonic dose response curves to the risk assessment of estrogenic and androgenic chemicals

  11. Cigarette smoking and risk of rheumatoid arthritis: a dose-response meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although previous studies found that cigarette smoking is associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the dose-response relationship remains unclear. This meta-analysis quantitatively summarizes accumulated evidence regarding the association of lifelong exposure to cigarette smoking assessed as pack-years with the risk of RA. Methods Relevant studies were identified by a search of MEDLINE and EMBASE from 1966 to October 2013, with no restrictions. Reference lists from retrieved articles were also reviewed. Studies that reported relative risks (RR) or odds ratio (OR) estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between pack-years of cigarette smoking and rheumatoid arthritis were included in a dose-response random-effects meta-regression analysis. Results We included 3 prospective cohorts and 7 case-control studies in the meta-analysis. They included a total of 4,552 RA cases. There was no indication of heterogeneity (Pheterogeneity = 0.32) and publication bias did not affect the results. Compared to never smokers, the risk of developing RA increased by 26% (RR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.39) among those who smoked 1 to 10 pack-years and doubled among those with more than 20 pack-years (RR for 21 to 30 pack years = 1.94, 95% CI 1.65 to 2.27). The risk of RA was not increasing further for higher exposure levels (RR for >40 pack-years = 2.07, 95% CI 1.15 to 3.73). The risk of RA was statistically significantly higher among rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive RA cases (RR = 2.47, 95% CI 2.02 to 3.02) compared to RF-negative (RR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.18) when comparing the highest versus lowest category of pack-years for the individual studies. Conclusions Lifelong cigarette smoking was positively associated with the risk of RA even among smokers with a low lifelong exposure. The risk of RA did not further increase with an exposure higher than 20 pack-years. PMID:24594022

  12. Cigarette smoking and risk of rheumatoid arthritis: a dose-response meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Di Giuseppe, Daniela; Discacciati, Andrea; Orsini, Nicola; Wolk, Alicja

    2014-03-05

    Although previous studies found that cigarette smoking is associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the dose-response relationship remains unclear. This meta-analysis quantitatively summarizes accumulated evidence regarding the association of lifelong exposure to cigarette smoking assessed as pack-years with the risk of RA. Relevant studies were identified by a search of MEDLINE and EMBASE from 1966 to October 2013, with no restrictions. Reference lists from retrieved articles were also reviewed. Studies that reported relative risks (RR) or odds ratio (OR) estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between pack-years of cigarette smoking and rheumatoid arthritis were included in a dose-response random-effects meta-regression analysis. We included 3 prospective cohorts and 7 case-control studies in the meta-analysis. They included a total of 4,552 RA cases. There was no indication of heterogeneity (Pheterogeneity = 0.32) and publication bias did not affect the results. Compared to never smokers, the risk of developing RA increased by 26% (RR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.39) among those who smoked 1 to 10 pack-years and doubled among those with more than 20 pack-years (RR for 21 to 30 pack years = 1.94, 95% CI 1.65 to 2.27). The risk of RA was not increasing further for higher exposure levels (RR for >40 pack-years = 2.07, 95% CI 1.15 to 3.73). The risk of RA was statistically significantly higher among rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive RA cases (RR = 2.47, 95% CI 2.02 to 3.02) compared to RF-negative (RR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.18) when comparing the highest versus lowest category of pack-years for the individual studies. Lifelong cigarette smoking was positively associated with the risk of RA even among smokers with a low lifelong exposure. The risk of RA did not further increase with an exposure higher than 20 pack-years.

  13. Neurobehavioral Dynamics Following Chronic Sleep Restriction: Dose-Response Effects of One Night for Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Siobhan; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Maislin, Greg; Dinges, David F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Establish the dose-response relationship between increasing sleep durations in a single night and recovery of neurobehavioral functions following chronic sleep restriction. Design: Intent-to-treat design in which subjects were randomized to 1 of 6 recovery sleep doses (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 h TIB) for 1 night following 5 nights of sleep restriction to 4 h TIB. Setting: Twelve consecutive days in a controlled laboratory environment. Participants: N = 159 healthy adults (aged 22-45 y), median = 29 y). Interventions: Following a week of home monitoring with actigraphy and 2 baseline nights of 10 h TIB, subjects were randomized to either sleep restriction to 4 h TIB per night for 5 nights followed by randomization to 1 of 6 nocturnal acute recovery sleep conditions (N = 142), or to a control condition involving 10 h TIB on all nights (N = 17). Measurements and Results: Primary neurobehavioral outcomes included lapses on the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT), subjective sleepiness from the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), and physiological sleepiness from a modified Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT). Secondary outcomes included psychomotor and cognitive speed as measured by PVT fastest RTs and number correct on the Digit Symbol Substitution Task (DSST), respectively, and subjective fatigue from the Profile of Mood States (POMS). The dynamics of neurobehavioral outcomes following acute recovery sleep were statistically modeled across the 0 h-10 h recovery sleep doses. While TST, stage 2, REM sleep and NREM slow wave energy (SWE) increased linearly across recovery sleep doses, best-fitting neurobehavioral recovery functions were exponential across recovery sleep doses for PVT and KSS outcomes, and linear for the MWT. Analyses based on return to baseline and on estimated intersection with control condition means revealed recovery was incomplete at the 10 h TIB (8.96 h TST) for PVT performance, KSS sleepiness, and POMS fatigue. Both TST and SWE were elevated

  14. Length of surgery and pressure ulcers risk in cardiovascular surgical patients: a dose-response meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Shen, Wang-Qin; Liu, Peng; Liu, Kun

    2017-03-02

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between length of surgery (LOS) and pressure ulcer (PU) risk in cardiovascular surgery patients. PubMed and Web of Science were systematically searched. We compared LOS difference between PU (+) group and PU (-) group. We also examined the dose-response effect of this relationship. The mean LOS in the PU(+) groups ranged from 252·5 to 335·7 minutes, compared with 233·0 to 298·3 minutes in PU(-) groups. The LOS was higher in PU(+) groups compared with PU(-) groups [weighted mean difference (WMD) = 36·081 minutes; 95% CI: 21·640-50·522 minutes; Z = 4·90, P = 0·000]. The funnel plot showed no publication bias. A significant dose-response association was also found between the LOS and the risk of surgery-related pressure ulcers (SRPU, model χ(2)  = 9·29, P = 0·000). In the linear model, the PU OR was 1·296 (95% CI 1·097-1·531) for a 60-minute increase in the LOS intervals and 13·344 (95% CI 2·521-70·636) for a 600-minute increase. In a spline model, the OR of PU increased almost linearly along with the LOS. Our meta-analysis indicated that LOS was an important risk factor for pressure ulcers in cardiovascular surgical patients.

  15. A sex-specific dose-response curve for testosterone: could excessive testosterone limit sexual interaction in women?

    PubMed

    Krapf, Jill M; Simon, James A

    2017-04-01

    Testosterone treatment increases sexual desire and well-being in women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder; however, many studies have shown only modest benefits limited to moderate doses. Unlike men, available data indicate women show a bell-shaped dose-response curve for testosterone, wherein a threshold dosage of testosterone leads to desirable sexual function effects, but exceeding this threshold results in a lack of further positive sexual effects or may have a negative impact. Emotional and physical side-effects of excess testosterone, including aggression and virilization, may counteract the modest benefits on sexual interaction, providing a possible explanation for a threshold dose of testosterone in women. In this commentary, we will review and critically analyze data supporting a curvilinear dose-response relationship between testosterone treatment and sexual activity in women with low libido, and also explore possible explanations for this observed relationship. Understanding optimal dosing of testosterone unique to women may bring us one step closer to overcoming regulatory barriers in treating female sexual dysfunction.

  16. Dietary Magnesium Intake and Metabolic Syndrome in the Adult Population: Dose-Response Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sang-Yhun; Choi, Whan-Seok; Ock, Sun-Myeong; Kim, Chul-Min; Kim, Do-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested an association between dietary magnesium intake and metabolic syndrome. However, previous research examining dietary magnesium intake and metabolic syndrome has produced mixed results. Our objective was to determine the relationship between dietary magnesium intake and metabolic syndrome in the adult population using a dose-response meta-analysis. We searched the PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library databases from August, 1965, to May, 2014. Observational studies reporting risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for metabolic syndrome in ≥3 categories of dietary magnesium intake levels were selected. The data extraction was performed independently by two authors, and the quality of the studies was evaluated using the Risk of Bias Assessment Tool for Nonrandomized Studies (RoBANS). Based on eight cross-sectional studies and two prospective cohort studies, the pooled relative risks of metabolic syndrome per 150 mg/day increment in magnesium intake was 0.88 (95% CI, 0.84–0.93; I2 = 36.3%). The meta-regression model showed a generally linear, inverse relationship between magnesium intake (mg/day) and metabolic syndrome. This dose-response meta-analysis indicates that dietary magnesium intake is significantly and inversely associated with the risk of metabolic syndrome. However, randomized clinical trials will be necessary to address the issue of causality and to determine whether magnesium supplementation is effective for the prevention of metabolic syndrome. PMID:25533010

  17. A Grid Algorithm for High Throughput Fitting of Dose-Response Curve Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhong; Jadhav, Ajit; Southal, Noel; Huang, Ruili; Nguyen, Dac-Trung

    2010-01-01

    We describe a novel algorithm, Grid algorithm, and the corresponding computer program for high throughput fitting of dose-response curves that are described by the four-parameter symmetric logistic dose-response model. The Grid algorithm searches through all points in a grid of four dimensions (parameters) and finds the optimum one that corresponds to the best fit. Using simulated dose-response curves, we examined the Grid program’s performance in reproducing the actual values that were used to generate the simulated data and compared it with the DRC package for the language and environment R and the XLfit add-in for Microsoft Excel. The Grid program was robust and consistently recovered the actual values for both complete and partial curves with or without noise. Both DRC and XLfit performed well on data without noise, but they were sensitive to and their performance degraded rapidly with increasing noise. The Grid program is automated and scalable to millions of dose-response curves, and it is able to process 100,000 dose-response curves from high throughput screening experiment per CPU hour. The Grid program has the potential of greatly increasing the productivity of large-scale dose-response data analysis and early drug discovery processes, and it is also applicable to many other curve fitting problems in chemical, biological, and medical sciences. PMID:21331310

  18. A grid algorithm for high throughput fitting of dose-response curve data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhong; Jadhav, Ajit; Southal, Noel; Huang, Ruili; Nguyen, Dac-Trung

    2010-10-21

    We describe a novel algorithm, Grid algorithm, and the corresponding computer program for high throughput fitting of dose-response curves that are described by the four-parameter symmetric logistic dose-response model. The Grid algorithm searches through all points in a grid of four dimensions (parameters) and finds the optimum one that corresponds to the best fit. Using simulated dose-response curves, we examined the Grid program's performance in reproducing the actual values that were used to generate the simulated data and compared it with the DRC package for the language and environment R and the XLfit add-in for Microsoft Excel. The Grid program was robust and consistently recovered the actual values for both complete and partial curves with or without noise. Both DRC and XLfit performed well on data without noise, but they were sensitive to and their performance degraded rapidly with increasing noise. The Grid program is automated and scalable to millions of dose-response curves, and it is able to process 100,000 dose-response curves from high throughput screening experiment per CPU hour. The Grid program has the potential of greatly increasing the productivity of large-scale dose-response data analysis and early drug discovery processes, and it is also applicable to many other curve fitting problems in chemical, biological, and medical sciences.

  19. Dose-response assessment of naphthalene-induced genotoxicity and glutathione detoxication in human TK6 lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Recio, Leslie; Shepard, Kim G; Hernández, Lya G; Kedderis, Gregory L

    2012-04-01

    The dose-response relationship for the induction of micronuclei (MN) and the impact of glutathione (GSH) detoxication on naphthalene-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were investigated in human TK6 cells. TK6 cells were exposed to 10 concentrations ranging from 0.0625 to 30μM naphthalene in the presence of β-naphthoflavone- and phenobarbital (βNP/PB)-induced rat liver S9 with a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-generating system. Three approaches were used to identify a no-observed-effect level (NOEL) for naphthalene-induced genotoxicity: (1) laboratory criteria of ≥ twofold increase over the concurrent solvent controls (NOEL = 10μM), (2) ANOVA with Bonferroni correction (NOEL = 2.5μM), and (3) the benchmark dose approach (BMCL(10) = 3.35μM). The NOEL and point of departure micronucleus frequency for naphthalene-induced MN are between the tested naphthalene concentrations of 2.5-10.0μM in this experimental system. Supplementation of the exposure system with physiological relevant concentrations of 5mM GSH eliminated naphthalene-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity; no increased cytotoxicity or genotoxicity was observed at concentrations of up to 500μM naphthalene in the presence of GSH compared with 2.5-10.0μM in the absence of GSH. Naphthalene bioactivation by βNP/PB-induced rat liver S9 exhibits a nonlinear dose-response for the induction of MN in TK6 cells with a NOEL of 2.5-10μM that in the presence of GSH is shifted upward greater than 50- to 200-fold. These data demonstrate a nonlinear dose-response for naphthalene-induced genotoxicity that is eliminated by GSH, and both observations should be considered when assessing human risk from naphthalene exposures.

  20. Dose response characteristics of special opti-chromic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humprerys, K. C.; Kantz, A. D.

    In 1981 Kronenberg, McLaughlin, and Siebentritt proposed measurement of radiation dosage using optical waveguides with leuco dye solutions. Based on this work, an opti-chromic system was proposed at the Fourth International Meeting on Radiation Processing. This opti-chromic system has been evaluated by McLaughlin and Radak. The opti-chromic waveguide system may be even more valuable for other applications which involve measurements with special requirements and configurations. The linearity of the radiation response can be enhanced by proper selection of leuco dye concentration, waveguide materials, organic activator solvents, and trace chemical additives. This paper presents experimental data resulting from an examination of the organic solvents TEP, DMSO, and n-propyl alcohol in relationship to stability, temperature characteristics, and radiation chemistry. The experimental data indicates that by varying the types and combinations of organic solvents, special opti-chromic waveguides can be fabricated to measure various radiation ranges under a variety of temperature ranges which have stability over time.

  1. Dose-response meta-analysis on coffee, tea and caffeine consumption with risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hui; Li, Shixue

    2014-04-01

    A dose-response meta-analysis was carried out between Parkinson's disease (PD) risk, and coffee, tea and caffeine consumption. A comprehensive search was carried out to identify eligible studies. The fixed or random effect model was used based on heterogeneity test. The dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline. A total of 13 articles involving 901 764 participants for coffee, eight articles involving 344 895 participants for tea and seven articles involving 492 724 participants for caffeine were included. A non-linear relationship was found between coffee consumption and PD risk overall, and the strength of protection reached the maximum at approximately 3 cups/day (smoking-adjusted relative risk: 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.65-0.81). A linear relationship was found between tea and caffeine consumption, and PD risk overall, and the smoking-adjusted risk of PD decreased by 26% and 17% for every two cups/day and 200 mg/day increments, respectively. The association of coffee and tea consumption with PD risk was stronger for men than that for women, and the association of caffeine consumption with PD risk was stronger for ever users of hormones than that for never users of hormones among postmenopausal women. The aforementioned associations were weaker for USA relative to Europe or Asia. A linear dose-relationship for decreased PD risk with tea and caffeine consumption was found, whereas the strength of protection reached a maximum at approximately 3 cups/day for coffee consumption overall. Further studies are required to confirm the findings. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. Association between dietary vitamin C intake and risk of esophageal cancer: A dose-response meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bo, Yacong; Lu, Yan; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Erjiang; Yuan, Ling; Lu, Weiquan; Cui, Lingling; Lu, Quanjun

    2016-04-15

    While several epidemiological studies have investigated the association between vitamin C and risk of esophageal cancer, the results remain inconsistent. In the present study, a meta-analysis was conducted to assess the impact of dietary vitamin C intake on esophageal cancer risk. Online databases were searched up to March 29, 2015, for studies on the association between dietary vitamin C intake and esophageal cancer risk. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) or odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model. Dose-response analyses were performed using the method of restricted cubic splines with four knots at percentiles of 5, 35, 65 and 95% of the distribution. Publication bias was estimated using Egger's tests and funnel plots. In all, 15 articles were included in this meta-analysis, including 20 studies, containing 7063 controls and 3955 cases of esophageal cancer. By comparing the highest vs. the lowest categories of vitamin C intake, we found that vitamin C was inversely associated with the risk of esophageal cancer [overall OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.49-0.68, I(2) = 56%]. A linear dose-response relationship was found. With an increase in dietary vitamin C intake of 50 mg/day, the risk of esophageal cancer statistically decreased by 13% (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.80-0.93, p(linearity) = 0.0002). In conclusion, our analysis suggested that the higher intake of dietary vitamin C might have a protective effect against esophageal cancer.

  3. Untargeted Metabolomics Reveals Dose-Response Characteristics for Effect of Rhubarb in a Rat Model of Cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cong-En; Niu, Ming; Li, Rui-Yu; Feng, Wu-Wen; Ma, Xiao; Dong, Qin; Ma, Zhi-Jie; Li, Guang-Quan; Meng, Ya-Kun; Wang, Ya; Yin, Ping; He, Lan-Zhi; Li, Yu-Meng; Tan, Peng; Zhao, Yan-Ling; Wang, Jia-Bo; Dong, Xiao-Ping; Xiao, Xiao-He

    2016-01-01

    Cholestasis is a serious manifestation of liver diseases with limited therapies. Rhubarb, a widely used herbal medicine, has been frequently used at a relatively large dose for treating cholestasis. However, whether large doses are optimal and the therapeutic mechanism remain unclear. To explore these questions, the anti-cholestatic effect of five doses of rhubarb (0.21, 0.66, 2.10, 6.60, and 21.0 g/kg) in an alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced rat model of cholestasis was examined by histopathology and serum biochemistry. A dose-dependent anti-cholestatic effect of rhubarb (0.21-6.6 g/kg) was observed, and an overdose of 21.0 g/kg showed a poor effect. LC-MS-based untargeted metabolomics together with pathway analysis were further applied to characterize the metabolic alterations induced by the different rhubarb doses. Altogether, 13 biomarkers were identified. The dose-response curve based on nine important biomarkers indicated that doses in the 0.42-6.61 g/kg range (EC20-EC80 range, corresponding to 4.00-62.95 g in the clinic) were effective for cholestasis treatment. The pathway analysis showed that bile acid metabolism and excretion, inflammation and amino acid metabolism were altered by rhubarb in a dose-dependent manner and might be involved in the dose-response relationship and therapeutic mechanism of rhubarb for cholestasis treatment.

  4. Coffee consumption and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Alessio; Discacciati, Andrea; Larsson, Susanna C; Wolk, Alicja; Orsini, Nicola

    2014-10-15

    Several studies have analyzed the relationship between coffee consumption and mortality, but the shape of the association remains unclear. We conducted a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies to examine the dose-response associations between coffee consumption and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and all cancers. Pertinent studies, published between 1966 and 2013, were identified by searching PubMed and by reviewing the reference lists of the selected articles. Prospective studies in which investigators reported relative risks of mortality from all causes, CVD, and all cancers for 3 or more categories of coffee consumption were eligible. Results from individual studies were pooled using a random-effects model. Twenty-one prospective studies, with 121,915 deaths and 997,464 participants, met the inclusion criteria. There was strong evidence of nonlinear associations between coffee consumption and mortality for all causes and CVD (P for nonlinearity < 0.001). The largest risk reductions were observed for 4 cups/day for all-cause mortality (16%, 95% confidence interval: 13, 18) and 3 cups/day for CVD mortality (21%, 95% confidence interval: 16, 26). Coffee consumption was not associated with cancer mortality. Findings from this meta-analysis indicate that coffee consumption is inversely associated with all-cause and CVD mortality.

  5. Statins intake and risk of liver cancer: A dose-response meta analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Yi, Changhong; Song, Zhenggui; Wan, Maolin; Chen, Ya; Cheng, Xiang

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have indicated that statins intake was associated with liver cancer risk, but presented controversial results.Studies in PubMed and EMBASE were searched update to February 2017 to identify and quantify the potential dose-response association between statins intake and liver cancer.Six eligible studies involving a total of 11,8961 participants with 9530 incident cases were included in this meta-analysis. Statistically significant association was observed between increasing statins intake and liver cancer risk reduction (OR = 0.46, 95%CI: 0.24-0.68, P <.001). Furthermore, the summary relative risk of liver cancer for an increase of 50 cumulative defined daily dose per year was 0.86 (95%CI: 0.81-0.90, P <.001). Evidence of a nonlinear dose-response relationship between statins intake and liver cancer risk was found (P for nonlinearity <.01). Subgroups analysis indicated that statins intake was associated with a significantly risk of liver cancer risk reduction in Asia (OR = 0.44, 95%CI: 0.11-0.77, P <.001) and Caucasian (OR = 0.49, 95%CI: 0.36-0.61, P <.001). Subgroup meta-analyses in study design, study quality, number of participants, and number of cases showed consistency with the primary findings.Additional statins intake is associated with liver cancer risk reduction.

  6. Radiation dose response simulation for biomechanical-based deformable image registration of head and neck cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mayah, Adil; Moseley, Joanne; Hunter, Shannon; Brock, Kristy

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical-based deformable image registration is conducted on the head and neck region. Patient specific 3D finite element models consisting of parotid glands (PG), submandibular glands (SG), tumor, vertebrae (VB), mandible, and external body are used to register pre-treatment MRI to post-treatment MR images to model the dose response using image data of five patients. The images are registered using combinations of vertebrae and mandible alignments, and surface projection of the external body as boundary conditions. In addition, the dose response is simulated by applying a new loading technique in the form of a dose-induced shrinkage using the dose-volume relationship. The dose-induced load is applied as dose-induced shrinkage of the tumor and four salivary glands. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) is calculated for the four salivary glands, and tumor to calculate the volume overlap of the structures after deformable registration. A substantial improvement in the registration is found by including the dose-induced shrinkage. The greatest registration improvement is found in the four glands where the average DSC increases from 0.53, 0.55, 0.32, and 0.37 to 0.68, 0.68, 0.51, and 0.49 in the left PG, right PG, left SG, and right SG, respectively by using bony alignment of vertebrae and mandible (M), body (B) surface projection and dose (D) (VB+M+B+D).

  7. Cancer chemoprevention: Evidence of a nonlinear dose response for the protective effects of resveratrol in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hong; Scott, Edwina; Kholghi, Abeer; Andreadi, Catherine; Rufini, Alessandro; Karmokar, Ankur; Britton, Robert G; Horner-Glister, Emma; Greaves, Peter; Jawad, Dhafer; James, Mark; Howells, Lynne; Ognibene, Ted; Malfatti, Michael; Goldring, Christopher; Kitteringham, Neil; Walsh, Joanne; Viskaduraki, Maria; West, Kevin; Miller, Andrew; Hemingway, David; Steward, William P; Gescher, Andreas J; Brown, Karen

    2015-07-29

    Resveratrol is widely promoted as a potential cancer chemopreventive agent, but a lack of information on the optimal dose prohibits rationally designed trials to assess efficacy. To challenge the assumption that "more is better," we compared the pharmacokinetics and activity of a dietary dose with an intake 200 times higher. The dose-response relationship for concentrations generated and the metabolite profile of [(14)C]-resveratrol in colorectal tissue of cancer patients helped us to define clinically achievable levels. In Apc(Min) mice (a model of colorectal carcinogenesis) that received a high-fat diet, the low resveratrol dose suppressed intestinal adenoma development more potently than did the higher dose. Efficacy correlated with activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and increased expression of the senescence marker p21. Nonlinear dose responses were observed for AMPK and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in mouse adenoma cells, culminating in autophagy and senescence. In human colorectal tissues exposed to low dietary concentrations of resveratrol ex vivo, we measured enhanced AMPK phosphorylation and autophagy. The expression of the cytoprotective NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, quinone 1 (NQO1) enzyme was also increased in tissues from cancer patients participating in our [(14)C]-resveratrol trial. These findings warrant a revision of developmental strategies for diet-derived agents designed to achieve cancer chemoprevention.

  8. Parameterizing dose-response models to estimate relative potency functions directly.

    PubMed

    Dinse, Gregg E; Umbach, David M

    2012-10-01

    Many comparative analyses of toxicity assume that the potency of a test chemical relative to a reference chemical is constant, but employing such a restrictive assumption uncritically may generate misleading conclusions. Recent efforts to characterize non-constant relative potency rely on relative potency functions and estimate them secondarily after fitting dose-response models for the test and reference chemicals. We study an alternative approach of specifying a relative potency model a priori and estimating it directly using the dose-response data from both chemicals. We consider a power function in dose as a relative potency model and find that it keeps the two chemicals' dose-response functions within the same family of models for families typically used in toxicology. When differences in the response limits for the test and reference chemicals are attributable to the chemicals themselves, the older two-stage approach is the more convenient. When differences in response limits are attributable to other features of the experimental protocol or when response limits do not differ, the direct approach is straightforward to apply with nonlinear regression methods and simplifies calculation of simultaneous confidence bands. We illustrate the proposed approach using Hill models with dose-response data from U.S. National Toxicology Program bioassays. Though not universally applicable, this method of estimating relative potency functions directly can be profitably applied to a broad family of dose-response models commonly used in toxicology.

  9. Modeling Dose-response at Low Dose: A Systems Biology Approach for Ionization Radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuchao; Ricci, Paolo F

    2010-03-18

    For ionization radiation (IR) induced cancer, a linear non-threshold (LNT) model at very low doses is the default used by a number of national and international organizations and in regulatory law. This default denies any positive benefit from any level of exposure. However, experimental observations and theoretical biology have found that both linear and J-shaped IR dose-response curves can exist at those very low doses. We develop low dose J-shaped dose-response, based on systems biology, and thus justify its use regarding exposure to IR. This approach incorporates detailed, molecular and cellular descriptions of biological/toxicological mechanisms to develop a dose-response model through a set of nonlinear, differential equations describing the signaling pathways and biochemical mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, and tumor incidence due to IR. This approach yields a J-shaped dose response curve while showing where LNT behaviors are likely to occur. The results confirm the hypothesis of the J-shaped dose response curve: the main reason is that, at low-doses of IR, cells stimulate protective systems through a longer cell arrest time per unit of IR dose. We suggest that the policy implications of this approach are an increasingly correct way to deal with precautionary measures in public health.

  10. Tea Consumption and Risk of Bladder Cancer: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Weng, Hong; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Li, Sheng; Kwong, Joey S W; Liu, Tong-Zu; Wang, Xing-Huan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Controversial results of the association between tea (black tea, green tea, mate, and oolong tea) consumption and risk of bladder cancer were reported among epidemiological studies. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis of observational studies to investigate the association. Methods: We searched the PubMed and Embase for studies of tea consumption and bladder cancer that were published in any language up to March, 2016. Cohort or case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. All statistical analyses were performed in Stata 12.0 software. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess the relationship between tea consumption and risk of bladder cancer. Results: Totally, 25 case-control studies (15 643 cases and 30 795 controls) and seven prospective cohort studies (1807 cases and 443 076 participants) were included. The meta-analysis showed that tea consumption was not significantly associated with bladder cancer risk (OR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.86-1.06) (in a comparison of highest vs. lowest category). No non-linearity association was observed between tea consumption and bladder cancer risk (P = 0.51 for non-linearity). Specific analysis for black tea, green tea, and mate yielded similar results. The dose-response analysis showed the summary OR for an increment of 1 cup/day of tea consumption was 1.01 (95% CI 0.97-1.05). Conclusion: Results based on current meta-analysis indicated that no significant association was observed between tea consumption and risk of bladder cancer.

  11. ANTIOXIDANT VITAMINS AND THE RISK OF ENDOMETRIAL CANCER: A DOSE-RESPONSE META-ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Bandera, Elisa V.; Gifkins, Dina M.; Moore, Dirk F.; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Kushi, Lawrence H.

    2008-01-01

    Antioxidant vitamins may reduce cancer risk by limiting oxidative DNA damage. To summarize and quantify the current epidemiologic evidence of an association between antioxidant vitamin intake and endometrial cancer we conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis. One cohort and 12 case-control studies presenting relevant risk estimates were identified by conducting bibliographical searches through June 2008. Dose-response meta-analyses were conducted for beta-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E from food sources. Intake from supplements was not considered in the meta-analyses due to the few studies that reported relevant information. Based on case-control data, the random-effects summary odds ratios (OR) were, for beta-carotene: 0.88 (95% CI: 0.79–0.98) per 1,000 mcg/1,000 kcal (I2: 77.7%; p <0.01); for vitamin C: 0.85 (95% CI: 0.73–0.98) per 50 mg / 1,000 kcal (I2: 66.1%; p <0.01); and, for vitamin E: 0.91 (95% CI: 0.84–0.99) per 5 mg / 1,000 kcal (I2: 0.0%; p:0.45). In contrast, the only prospective study identified provided little indication of an association. Although the current case-control data suggest an inverse relationship of endometrial cancer risk with dietary intakes of beta-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E from food sources, additional studies are needed, particularly cohort studies, to confirm an association. PMID:19083131

  12. Influence of Exercise Intensity for Improving Depressed Mood in Depression: A Dose-Response Study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jacob D; Koltyn, Kelli F; Stegner, Aaron J; Kim, Jee-Seon; Cook, Dane B

    2016-07-01

    Exercise effectively improves mood in major depressive disorder (MDD), but the optimal exercise stimulus to improve depressed mood is unknown. To determine the dose-response relationship of acute exercise intensity with depressed mood responses to exercise in MDD. We hypothesized that the acute response to exercise would differ between light, moderate, and hard intensity exercise with higher intensities yielding more beneficial responses. Once weekly, 24 women (age: 38.6±14.0) diagnosed with MDD underwent a 30-minute session at one of three steady-state exercise intensities (light, moderate, hard; rating of perceived exertion 11, 13 or 15) or quiet rest on a stationary bicycle. Depressed mood was evaluated with the Profile of Mood States before, 10 and 30 minutes post-exercise. Exercise reduced depressed mood 10 and 30 minutes following exercise, but this effect was not influenced by exercise intensity. Participants not currently taking antidepressants (n=10) had higher baseline depression scores, but did not demonstrate a different antidepressant response to exercise compared to those taking antidepressants. To acutely improve depressed mood, exercise of any intensity significantly improved feelings of depression with no differential effect following light, moderate, or hard exercise. Pharmacological antidepressant usage did not limit the mood-enhancing effect of acute exercise. Acute exercise should be used as a symptom management tool to improve mood in depression, with even light exercise an effective recommendation. These results need to be replicated and extended to other components of exercise prescription (e.g., duration, frequency, mode) to optimize exercise guidelines for improving depression. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Tea Consumption and Risk of Bladder Cancer: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Hong; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Li, Sheng; Kwong, Joey S. W.; Liu, Tong-Zu; Wang, Xing-Huan

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Controversial results of the association between tea (black tea, green tea, mate, and oolong tea) consumption and risk of bladder cancer were reported among epidemiological studies. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis of observational studies to investigate the association. Methods: We searched the PubMed and Embase for studies of tea consumption and bladder cancer that were published in any language up to March, 2016. Cohort or case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. All statistical analyses were performed in Stata 12.0 software. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess the relationship between tea consumption and risk of bladder cancer. Results: Totally, 25 case-control studies (15 643 cases and 30 795 controls) and seven prospective cohort studies (1807 cases and 443 076 participants) were included. The meta-analysis showed that tea consumption was not significantly associated with bladder cancer risk (OR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.86–1.06) (in a comparison of highest vs. lowest category). No non-linearity association was observed between tea consumption and bladder cancer risk (P = 0.51 for non-linearity). Specific analysis for black tea, green tea, and mate yielded similar results. The dose-response analysis showed the summary OR for an increment of 1 cup/day of tea consumption was 1.01 (95% CI 0.97–1.05). Conclusion: Results based on current meta-analysis indicated that no significant association was observed between tea consumption and risk of bladder cancer. PMID:28167914

  14. Dose-response effect of ergocalciferol therapy on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration during critical illness.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Roland N; Berry, Scott C; Ziebarth, Jamie D; Swanson, Joseph M; Maish, George O; Minard, Gayle; Brown, Rex O

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dose-response relationship between ergocalciferol therapy and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in enterally fed, critically ill patients with traumatic injuries. A retrospective cohort of critically ill patients with traumatic injuries and vitamin D deficiency (25-OH vitamin D <50 nmol/L) were given either 50 000 IU of liquid ergocalciferol weekly, twice weekly, or three times weekly while in the intensive care unit (ICU). Serum 25-OH vitamin D and ionized calcium concentrations were monitored weekly. Ergocalciferol therapy was stopped when the serum 25-OH vitamin D was >75 nmol/L, if the patient experienced hypercalcemia (ionized calcium >1.34 mmol/L), when the patient was discharged from the ICU, or if enteral nutrition was discontinued. Sixty-five patients (16, 18, and 31 per dosage group) were examined. One (6%), two (11%), and eight (26%) patients achieved normal 25-OH vitamin D concentrations after 2 to 4 wk of ergocalciferol therapy for each dosage group, respectively (P < 0.001). Serum 25-OH vitamin D concentrations improved from 36 ± 6, 40 ± 7, and 37 ± 6 nmol/L to 50 ± 15, 54 ± 21, and 62 ± 17 nmol/L, respectively, after 2 wk of ergocalciferol therapy (P < 0.001) Two (13%), one (6%), and seven (23%) patients developed hypercalcemia for each dosage group, respectively (P = NS). Ergocalciferol therapy improved baseline serum 25-OH vitamin D concentrations but was inadequate for consistently achieving normal serum concentrations of 25-OH vitamin D during critical illness. The trend in increasing appearance of mild hypercalcemia for the highest dosage group is concerning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dose response of retinol and isotretinoin in the prevention of nonmelanoma skin cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Clouser, Mary C; Roe, Denise J; Foote, Janet A; Harris, Robin B; Alberts, David S

    2010-01-01

    Using data from a randomized, double blind, study of the efficacy of retinol or isotretinoin vs. placebo on recurrence of nonmelanoma skin cancer in high-risk subjects, a reanalysis of the original intent to treat analysis was performed in a dose-response format. Cox proportional hazards models describe the relationship between dose quartiles of isotretinoin and retinol use and time to first occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in crude and adjusted models. Neither the isotretinoin nor retinol models showed any significance at any quartile for reduction in first BCC or SCC occurrence. Crude and adjusted retinol models show a statistically significant increase in risk of developing an SCC in the first quartile, whereas only the crude model shows a statistically significant increase in risk in the first quartile of the isotretinoin model. For retinol and SCC, hazard ratios (HRs) for the first quartile were as follows: HR = 2.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.67-5.10 crude; HR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.00-3.80 adjusted. For isotretinoin and SCC, HRs for the first quartile were as follows: HR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.35-4.19 crude; HR = 1.69, 95% CI = 0.87-3.31 adjusted. Test for trend was not significant in any of the models. These analyses confirm the results of the original intent to treat analyses and raise an interesting question related to the potential for increased risk for patients in the first quartile of retinol dose.

  16. [Dose response curve of paclitaxel measured by histoculture drug response assay].

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Tatsuya; Oura, Shoji; Hirai, Issei; Kokawa, Yozo; Okamura, Yoshitaka; Furukawa, Tomoko

    2005-04-01

    Dose response curves of paclitaxel were measured by histoculture drug response assay (HDRA) in 11 lung cancer patients. Inhibition rates of paclitaxel at several concentrations were measured and fitted to the sigmoid dose response curve, using non-linear least square analysis, with fitting equation y=A (1-1/(1+exp (b (x-log (ED50)). Parameters A, b, and ED50 were 88.3+/-6.0 (80.0-100.0) %, 9.57+/-4.32 (2.25-15.0), and 26.8+/-8.1 (15.0-41.0) microg/ml, respectively. The parameter b was lower in well-differentiated tumors compared with moderately and poorly-differentiated tumors. Dose response curves of paclitaxel could be measured by HDRA in lung cancer. This method provides us more information for drug sensitivity than the usual HDRA method. This may lead to the improved accuracy of HDRA.

  17. Dose-response curve for anaesthetics based on the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model.

    PubMed

    Iwai, T; Kihara, H; Imaiand, K; Uchida, M

    1996-10-01

    We have analysed the dose-response curve for halothane and isoflurane according to the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) model. This model describes the nature of the physiological data reported by Wakamori, Ikemoto and Akaike for inhibitory Cl currents induced by GABA or glycine in dissociated rat brain neurones and by Herrington and colleagues for Ca2+ currents in clonal pituitary cells. With some assumptions on the difference in response to anaesthetics between patients, the model is applicable in vivo, and it also describes well the human dose-response curve for isoflurane reported by Mather, Raftery and Prys-Roberts. However, the steeply sigmoidal dose-response curve in humans for halothane presented by deJong and Eger is difficult to understand with the same model, because it gives rise to unrealistic MWC variables.

  18. The hypnotic and analgesic effects of oral clonidine during sevoflurane anesthesia in children: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Inomata, Shinichi; Kihara, Shin-Ichi; Miyabe, Masayuki; Sumiya, Kenji; Baba, Yasuyuki; Kohda, Yukinao; Toyooka, Hidenori

    2002-06-01

    Although clonidine has both hypnotic and analgesic actions, the dose relationship for each actions is still unknown in a clinical setting when clonidine is used as a premedication in children. We studied 80 ASA physical status I children (age range, 3-8 yr). Subjects were randomly divided into two groups (minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration [MAC]-Awake group, n = 40; MAC-Tetanus group, n = 40). Each patient received one dose of clonidine from 1 to 5 microg/kg orally, 100 min before arrival at the operating room. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane in oxygen and air. Before tracheal intubation, end-tidal sevoflurane was decreased stepwise by 0.2% at the start of 1.2%, a verbal command was given to the patients, and MAC-awake was determined in each patient. We also investigated MAC-tetanus, determined with transcutaneous electric tetanic stimulations, after tracheal intubation in each patient by observing the motor response to a transcutaneous electric tetanic stimulus to the ulnar nerve at a sevoflurane concentration decreased stepwise by 0.25% at the start of 2.75%. The initial reduction in MAC-tetanus was not as steep as that in MAC-awake. Clonidine reduced MAC-tetanus by 40% at the maximal dose of 5 microg/kg, whereas MAC-awake was already reduced by 50% at 2 microg/kg. We conclude that separate dose-response relationships for oral clonidine are present regarding the hypnotic and analgesic effects in children undergoing sevoflurane anesthesia. Separate dose-response relationships for oral clonidine were found regarding the hypnotic and analgesic effects in children undergoing sevoflurane anesthesia.

  19. Dose-response modeling of occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with biomarkers of exposure and effect.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Beate; Kappler, Martin; Straif, Kurt; Marczynski, Boleslaw; Preuss, Ralf; Rossbach, Bernd; Rihs, Hans-Peter; Weiss, Tobias; Rabstein, Sylvia; Pierl, Christiane; Scherenberg, Michael; Adams, Ansgar; Käfferlein, Heiko Udo; Angerer, Jürgen; Wilhelm, Michael; Seidel, Albrecht; Brüning, Thomas

    2007-09-01

    In regulatory toxicology, the dose-response relationship between occupational exposure and biomarkers is of importance in setting threshold values. We analyzed the relationships between occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and various biomarkers of internal exposure and DNA damage with data from 284 highly exposed male workers. Personal exposure to phenanthrene and other PAHs was measured during shift and correlated with the sum of 1-, 2+9-, 3-, and 4-hydroxyphenanthrenes in post-shift urine. PAHs and hydroxyphenanthrenes were associated with DNA damage assessed in WBC as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine/10(6) dGuo and strand breaks by Comet assay as Olive tail moment. Hydroxyphenanthrenes correlated with phenanthrene (Spearman r(s) = 0.70; P < 0.0001). No correlations could be found between strand breaks and exposure (r(s) = 0.01, P < 0.0001 for PAHs; r(s) = -0.03, P = 0.68 for hydroxyphenanthrenes). Correlations with 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine/10(6) dGuo were weakly negative (r(s) = -0.22, P = 0.004 for PAHs) or flat (r(s) = -0.08, P = 0.31 for hydroxyphenanthrenes). Linear splines were applied to assess the relationships between the log-transformed variables. All regression models were adjusted for smoking and type of industry. For hydroxyphenanthrenes, 51.7% of the variance could be explained by phenanthrene and other predictors. Up to 0.77 microg/m(3) phenanthrene, no association could be found with hydroxyphenanthrenes. Above that point, hydroxyphenanthrenes increased by a factor of 1.47 under a doubling of phenanthrene exposure (slope, 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.64). Hydroxyphenanthrenes may be recommended as biomarker of occupational PAH exposure, whereas biomarkers of DNA damage in blood did not show a dose-response relation to PAH exposure.

  20. Time-dependent dose-response relation for absence of vaginal elasticity after gynecological radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Alevronta, Eleftheria; Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Al-Abany, Massoud; Nyberg, Tommy; Lind, Helena; Waldenström, Ann-Charlotte; Olsson, Caroline; Dunberger, Gail; Bergmark, Karin; Steineck, Gunnar; Lind, Bengt K

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the dose-response relation between the dose to the vagina and the patient-reported symptom 'absence of vaginal elasticity' and how time to follow-up influences this relation. The study included 78 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated between 1991 and 2003 with external beam radiation therapy. Of those, 24 experienced absence of vaginal elasticity. A normal tissue complication model is introduced that takes into account the influence of time to follow-up on the dose-response relation and the patient's age. The best estimates of the dose-response parameters were calculated using Probit, Probit-Relative Seriality (RS) and Probit-time models. Log likelihood (LL) values and the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) were used to evaluate the model fit. The dose-response parameters for 'absence of vaginal elasticity' according to the Probit and Probit-time models with the 68% Confidence Intervals (CI) were: LL=-39.8, D50=49.7 (47.2-52.4) Gy, γ50=1.40 (1.12-1.70) and LL=-37.4, D50=46.9 (43.5-50.9) Gy, γ50=1.81 (1.17-2.51) respectively. The proposed model, which describes the influence of time to follow-up on the dose-response relation, fits our data best. Our data indicate that the steepness of the dose-response curve of the dose to the vagina and the symptom 'absence of vaginal elasticity' increases with time to follow-up, while D50 decreases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Emergence of the Dose-Response Concept in Biology and Medicine.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2016-12-05

    A historical assessment of the origin of the dose-response in modern toxicology and its integration as a central concept in biology and medicine is presented. This article provides an overview of how the threshold, linear and biphasic (i.e., hormetic) dose-response models emerged in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and competed for acceptance and dominance. Particular attention is directed to the hormetic model for which a general description and evaluation is provided, including its historical basis, and how it was marginalized by the medical and pharmacology communities in the early decades of the 20th century.

  2. Comparison of Risk Predicted by Multiple Norovirus Dose-Response Models and Implications for Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Van Abel, Nicole; Schoen, Mary E; Kissel, John C; Meschke, J Scott

    2016-06-10

    The application of quantitative microbial risk assessments (QMRAs) to understand and mitigate risks associated with norovirus is increasingly common as there is a high frequency of outbreaks worldwide. A key component of QMRA is the dose-response analysis, which is the mathematical characterization of the association between dose and outcome. For Norovirus, multiple dose-response models are available that assume either a disaggregated or an aggregated intake dose. This work reviewed the dose-response models currently used in QMRA, and compared predicted risks from waterborne exposures (recreational and drinking) using all available dose-response models. The results found that the majority of published QMRAs of norovirus use the 1 F1 hypergeometric dose-response model with α = 0.04, β = 0.055. This dose-response model predicted relatively high risk estimates compared to other dose-response models for doses in the range of 1-1,000 genomic equivalent copies. The difference in predicted risk among dose-response models was largest for small doses, which has implications for drinking water QMRAs where the concentration of norovirus is low. Based on the review, a set of best practices was proposed to encourage the careful consideration and reporting of important assumptions in the selection and use of dose-response models in QMRA of norovirus. Finally, in the absence of one best norovirus dose-response model, multiple models should be used to provide a range of predicted outcomes for probability of infection.

  3. Functions of Japanese Exemplifying Particles in Spoken and Written Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Yuki Io

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines how the Japanese particles "nado", "toka", and "tari" which all may be translated as "such as", "etc.", or "like" behave differently in written and spoken discourse. According to traditional analyses (e.g. Martin, 1987), these particles are assumed to be Exemplifying Particles (EP) used to provide concrete examples to…

  4. Functions of Japanese Exemplifying Particles in Spoken and Written Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Yuki Io

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines how the Japanese particles "nado", "toka", and "tari" which all may be translated as "such as", "etc.", or "like" behave differently in written and spoken discourse. According to traditional analyses (e.g. Martin, 1987), these particles are assumed to be Exemplifying Particles (EP) used to provide concrete examples to…

  5. Dose-response relationship for exercise on severity of experimental osteoarthritis in rats: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Galois, Laurent; Etienne, Stéphanie; Grossin, Laurent; Watrin-Pinzano, Astrid; Cournil-Henrionnet, Christel; Loeuille, Damien; Netter, Patrick; Mainard, Didier; Gillet, Pierre

    2004-10-01

    To investigate the influence of a calibrated exercise on the progression of structural lesions in an experimental model of osteoarthritis (OA) in the rat, and to explore the effect of exercise on the level of chondrocyte caspase-dependent apoptosis and of Hsp70. The OA model was induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT). Rats were placed in 4 experimental groups: operated (ACLT) free moving rats, and 3 exercise groups (slight, moderate and intense) subjected to running training. Rats were killed 14 and 28 days after surgery. On D14 histological assessment demonstrated a beneficial influence of a slight and a moderate exercise vs control ACLT group. Hsp70 increased significantly in the moderate group vs controls. On D28, histological lesions strongly decreased in the slight and moderate exercise groups vs ACLT group, while an intense effort abolished this beneficial trend. Interestingly, the concomitant course of apoptotic events (caspase 3-positive cells) and the co-expression of Hsp70 in the various groups varied, when significant, in an inverse manner. In the intense group this overexpression was not noted, as a "burn out" appeared, thus leading to a loss of this protective effect. This study shows that a calibrated slight or moderate exercise exerts a beneficial influence on the severity of chondral lesions in ACLT rats. Conversely, a strong effort abolishes this chondroprotective effect. This effect could be related to a reduced level of chondrocyte apoptosis through anti-apoptotic capacities of stress-induced Hsp70 overexpression.

  6. Dose-Response Relationships in Gene Expression Profiles in Rainbow Trout, Onorhyncus mykiss Exposed to Ethynylestradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Sharon E.; Skillman, Ann D.; Small, Jack A.; Schultz, Irv R.

    2006-07-10

    Determining how gene expression profiles change with toxicant dose will improve the utility of arrays in identifying biomarkers and modes of toxic action. We exposed isogenic rainbow trout, Onorhyncus mykiss, to 10, 50 or 100 ng/L ethynylestradiol (a xeno-estrogen) for 7 days. Following exposure, fish were euthanized, livers harvested and RNA extracted. Fluorescently labeled cDNA were generated and hybridized against a commercially available Atlantic Salmon/Trout array (GRASP project, University of Victoria) spotted with 16,000 cDNA's. The slides were scanned to measure abundance of a given transcript in each sample relative to controls. Data were analyzed via Genespring (Silicon Genetics) to identify genes with altered expression, as well as to determine gene clustering patterns that can be used as ''expression signatures''. Array results were confirmed via qRT PCR. Our analysis indicates that gene expression profiles varied somewhat with dose. Established biomarkers of exposure to estrogenic chemicals, such as vitellogenin, vitelline envelope proteins, and the estrogen receptor alpha, were induced at every dose. Other genes were dose specific, suggesting that different doses induce distinct physiological responses. These findings demonstrate that cDNA microarrays could be used to identify both toxicant class and relative dose.

  7. Pharmacodynamics of tolfenamic acid in dogs. Evaluation of dose response relationships.

    PubMed

    McKellar, Q A; Lees, P; Gettinby, G

    1994-03-03

    Tolfenamic acid was administered to beagle dogs at 2, 4 and 8 mg/kg bodyweight i.m. and the concentration of drug in plasma and in inflamed (administered carrageenan) and non-inflamed subcutaneous tissue cage fluid was measured. The concentration of thromboxane B2 in serum from blood allowed to clot under standardized conditions was determined and the concentrations of prostaglandin E2, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) and leucocyte numbers were measured in fluid from the carrageenan administered tissue cages. Skin temperature was also measured over each tissue cage following administration of drug. Tolfenamic acid displayed linear pharmacokinetics since the area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC) values were 13.74 +/- 1.88, 29.82 +/- 6.53 and 50.52 +/- 5.73 micrograms/ml.h following administration of 2, 4 and 8 mg/kg, respectively. Tolfenamic acid proved to be a potent inhibitor of ex vivo thromboxane B2 generation in clotting blood. Maximal inhibition was greater than 80% at all dose rates and 97% at the 8 mg/kg dose rate 1 h after drug administration. It also proved to be a potent inhibitor of prostaglandin E2 production in inflammatory exudate, and significantly (P < 0.05) decreased prostaglandin E2 production at all dose levels. Tolfenamic acid did not significantly alter 12-HETE generation or white blood cell accumulation in inflammatory exudate. Tolfenamic acid significantly reduced the elevated skin temperature over carrageenan administered cages at all dose levels.

  8. Use of the Restricted Academic Task in ADHD Dose-Response Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Mariellen; Newby, Robert F.

    1998-01-01

    A study examined the efficacy of the Restricted Academic Task in evaluating the effects of stimulant medication in 149 children (ages 5-17) with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The measure consists of standardized observation of a child performing an academic-like task, and was found to be both reliable and valid. (Author/CR)

  9. Breast-feeding and infant illness: a dose-response relationship?

    PubMed

    Raisler, J; Alexander, C; O'Campo, P

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether breast-feeding has a dose-related protective effect against illness and whether it confers special health benefits to poor infants. The association between breast-feeding dose and illnesses in the first 6 months of life was analyzed with generalized estimating equations regression for 7092 infants from the National Maternal and Infant Health Survey. Breast-feeding dose (ratio of breast-feedings to other feedings) was categorized as full, most, equal, less, or no breast-feeding. Compared with no breast-feeding, full breast-feeding infants had lower odds ratios of diarrhea, cough or wheeze, and vomiting and lower mean ratios of illness months and sick baby medical visits. Most breast-feeding infants had lower odds ratios of diarrhea and cough or wheeze, and equal breast-feeding infants had lower odds ratios of cough or wheeze. Full, most, and equal breast-feeding infants without siblings had lower odds ratios of ear infections and certain other illnesses, but those with siblings did not. Less breast-feeding infants had no reduced odds ratios of illness. Findings did not vary by income. Full breast-feeding was associated with the lowest illness rates. Minimal (less) breast-feeding was not protective. Breast-feeding conferred similar health benefits in all economic groups.

  10. Dose-response relationships in gene expression profiles in rainbow trout, Oncorhyncus mykiss, exposed to ethynylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Hook, Sharon E; Skillman, Ann D; Small, Jack A; Schultz, Irvin R

    2006-07-01

    Determining how gene expression profiles change with toxicant dose will improve the utility of arrays in identifying biomarkers and modes of toxic action. Isogenic rainbow trout, Oncorhyncus mykiss,were exposed to 10, 50 or 100 ng/L ethynylestradiol (a xeno-estrogen) for 7 days. Following exposure hepatic RNA was extracted. Fluorescently labeled cDNA were generated and hybridized against a commercially available Atlantic Salmon/Trout array (GRASP project, University of Victoria) spotted with 16,000 cDNAs. Transcript expression in treated vs control fish was analyzed via Genespring (Silicon Genetics) to identify genes with altered expression, as well as to determine gene clustering patterns that can be used as "expression signatures". Array results were confirmed via qRT PCR. Our analysis indicates that gene expression profiles varied somewhat with dose. Established biomarkers of exposure to estrogenic chemicals, such as vitellogenin, vitelline envelope proteins, and the estrogen receptor alpha, were induced at every dose. Other genes were dose specific, suggesting that different doses induce distinct physiological responses. These findings demonstrate that cDNA microarrays could be used to identify both toxicant class and relative dose.

  11. Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationships in Biology, Toxicology and Medicine - An International Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Edward J.; Kostecki, Paul T.

    2002-05-28

    Conference abstract book contains seven sections: Plenary-4 abstracts; Chemical-9 abstracts; Radiation-7 abstracts; Ultra Low Doses and Medicine-6 abstracts; Biomedical-11 abstracts; Risk Assessment-5 abstracts and Poster Sessions-25 abstracts. Each abstract was provided by the author/presenter participating in the conference.

  12. Ozone dose-response relationships for spring oilseed rape and broccoli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bock, Maarten; Op de Beeck, Maarten; De Temmerman, Ludwig; Guisez, Yves; Ceulemans, Reinhart; Vandermeiren, Karine

    2011-03-01

    Tropospheric ozone is an important air pollutant with known detrimental effects for several crops. Ozone effects on seed yield, oil percentage, oil yield and 1000 seed weight were examined for spring oilseed rape ( Brassica napus cv. Ability). For broccoli ( Brassica oleracea L. cv. Italica cv. Monaco) the effects on fresh marketable weight and total dry weight were studied. Current ozone levels were compared with an increase of 20 and 40 ppb during 8 h per day, over the entire growing season. Oilseed rape seed yield was negatively correlated with ozone dose indices calculated from emergence until harvest. This resulted in an R2 of 0.24 and 0.26 ( p < 0.001) for the accumulated hourly O 3 exposure over a threshold of 40 ppb (AOT40) and the phytotoxic ozone dose above a threshold of 6 nmol m -2 s -1 (POD 6) respectively. Estimated critical levels, above which 5% yield reduction is expected, were 3.7 ppm h and 4.4 mmol m -2 respectively. Our results also confirm that a threshold value of 6 nmol s -1 m -2 projected leaf area, as recommended for agricultural crops (UNECE, Mills, 2004), can indeed be applied for spring oilseed rape. The reduction of oilseed rape yield showed the highest correlation with the ozone uptake during the vegetative growth stage: when only the first 47 days after emergence were used to calculate POD 6, R2 values increased up to 0.476 or even 0.545 when the first 23 days were excluded. The highest ozone treatments, corresponding to the future ambient level by 2100 (IPCC, Meehl et al., 2007), led to a reduction of approximately 30% in oilseed rape seed yield in comparison to the current ozone concentrations. Oil percentage was also significantly reduced in response to ozone ( p < 0.001). As a consequence oil yield was even more severely affected by elevated ozone exposure compared to seed yield: critical levels for oil yield dropped to 3.2 ppm h and 3.9 mmol m -2. For broccoli the applied ozone doses had no effect on yield.

  13. Dose-response relationships of clothianidin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam to Blissus occiduus (Hemiptera: Blissidae).

    PubMed

    Stamm, M D; Baxendale, F P; Heng-Moss, T M; Siegfried, B D; Blankenship, E E; Gaussoin, R E

    2011-02-01

    The western chinch bug, Blissus occiduus Barber (Hemiptera: Blissidae), has emerged as a serious pest of buffalograss, Buchlod dactyloides (Nuttall) Engelmann. In general, neonicotinoid insecticides effectively control a variety of turfgrass insects, particularly phloem-feeding pests. However, because of well documented inconsistencies in control, these compounds are generally not recommended for chinch bugs. This study was designed to document the contact and systemic toxicity of three neonicotinoid insecticides (clothianidin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam) to B. occiduus. In contact bioassays, thiamethoxam was approximately 20-fold less toxic than clothianidin or imidacloprid to B. occiduus nymphs and three-fold more toxic to adults. In adult systemic bioassays, thiamethoxam was up to five-fold more toxic than clothianidin or imidacloprid. Interestingly, thiamethoxam was significantly more toxic to adults than to nymphs in both contact and systemic bioassays. This was not observed with clothianidin or imidacloprid. Bifenthrin, used for comparative purposes, exhibited 1844-fold and 122-fold increase in toxicity to nymphs and adults, respectively. These results provide the first documentation of the relative toxicity of these neonicotinoid insecticides to B. occiduus.

  14. Breast-feeding and infant illness: a dose-response relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Raisler, J; Alexander, C; O'Campo, P

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine whether breast-feeding has a dose-related protective effect against illness and whether it confers special health benefits to poor infants. METHODS: The association between breast-feeding dose and illnesses in the first 6 months of life was analyzed with generalized estimating equations regression for 7092 infants from the National Maternal and Infant Health Survey. Breast-feeding dose (ratio of breast-feedings to other feedings) was categorized as full, most, equal, less, or no breast-feeding. RESULTS: Compared with no breast-feeding, full breast-feeding infants had lower odds ratios of diarrhea, cough or wheeze, and vomiting and lower mean ratios of illness months and sick baby medical visits. Most breast-feeding infants had lower odds ratios of diarrhea and cough or wheeze, and equal breast-feeding infants had lower odds ratios of cough or wheeze. Full, most, and equal breast-feeding infants without siblings had lower odds ratios of ear infections and certain other illnesses, but those with siblings did not. Less breast-feeding infants had no reduced odds ratios of illness. Findings did not vary by income. CONCLUSIONS: Full breast-feeding was associated with the lowest illness rates. Minimal (less) breast-feeding was not protective. Breast-feeding conferred similar health benefits in all economic groups. PMID:9987460

  15. Ribosomal protein insufficiency and the minute syndrome in Drosophila: a dose-response relationship.

    PubMed Central

    Saebøe-Larssen, S; Lyamouri, M; Merriam, J; Oksvold, M P; Lambertsson, A

    1998-01-01

    Minutes comprise > 50 phenotypically similar mutations scattered throughout the genome of Drosophila, many of which are identified as mutations in ribosomal protein (rp) genes. Common traits of the Minute phenotype are short and thin bristles, slow development, and recessive lethality. By mobilizing a P element inserted in the 5' UTR of M(3)95A, the gene encoding ribosomal protein S3 (RPS3), we have generated two homozygous viable heteroalleles that are partial revertants with respect to the Minute phenotype. Molecular characterization revealed both alleles to be imprecise excisions, leaving 40 and 110 bp, respectively, at the P-element insertion site. The weaker allele (40 bp insert) is associated with a approximately 15% decrease in RPS3 mRNA abundance and displays a moderate Minute phenotype. In the stronger allele (110 bp insert) RPS3 mRNA levels are reduced by approximately 60%, resulting in an extreme Minute phenotype that includes many morphological abnormalities as well as sterility in both males and females due to disruption of early gametogenesis. The results show that there is a correlation between reduced RPS3 mRNA levels and the severity of the Minute phenotype, in which faulty differentiation of somatic tissues and arrest of gametogenesis represent the extreme case. That heteroalleles in M(3)95A can mimic the phenotypic variations that exist between different Minute/rp-gene mutations strongly suggests that all phenotypes primarily are caused by reductions in maximum protein synthesis rates, but that the sensitivity for reduced levels of the individual rp-gene products is different. PMID:9539436

  16. Dose-response relationship of ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in unanesthetized guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, M.; Suzuki, S.; Ikeda, H.; Fukuda, T.; Suzuki, J.; Okubo, T. )

    1990-06-01

    The effect of ozone dose (the product of ozone concentration and exposure time) on airway responsiveness was examined in unanesthetized, spontaneously breathing guinea pigs. Airway responsiveness was assessed by measuring specific airway resistance (sRaw) as a function of increasing concentration of inhaled methacholine (Mch) aerosol (the concentration of Mch required in order to double the baseline sRaw: PC200Mch). The airway responsiveness was measured before and at 5 min, 5 h, and 24 h after exposure. A 30-min exposure to 1 ppm ozone (dose 30 ppm.min) did not change PC200Mch at any time after exposure. Both a 90-min exposure to 1 ppm ozone and a 30-min exposure to 3 ppm ozone, which are identical in terms of ozone dose (90 ppm.min), decreased PC200Mch to a similar degree. A 120-min exposure to 3 ppm ozone (360 ppm.min) produced a much greater decrease of PC200Mch at 5 min and 5 h after exposure, compared with low-dose exposure. There was a significant correlation between ozone dose and the change in airway responsiveness. In all groups, the baseline sRaw was increased by approximately 50% at 5 min after exposure, but there was no correlation between the changes in PC200Mch and the baseline sRaw. This study suggests that ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs is closely related to ozone dose.

  17. Ozone acting on human blood yields a hormetic dose-response relationship

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze why ozone can be medically useful when it dissolves in blood or in other biological fluids. In reviewing a number of clinical studies performed in Peripheral Arterial Diseases (PAD) during the last decades, it has been possible to confirm the long-held view that the inverted U-shaped curve, typical of the hormesis concept, is suitable to represent the therapeutic activity exerted by the so-called ozonated autohemotherapy. The quantitative and qualitative aspects of human blood ozonation have been also critically reviewed in regard to the biological, therapeutic and safety of ozone. It is hoped that this gas, although toxic for the pulmonary system during prolonged inhalation, will be soon recognized as a useful agent in oxidative-stress related diseases, joining other medical gases recently thought to be of therapeutic im