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Sample records for dosimetry study evaluating

  1. Nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies.

    PubMed

    Sims, C S

    1989-09-01

    Twenty-two nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies utilizing the fast-pulse Health Physics Research Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducted since 1965. These studies have provided a total of 62 different organizations a forum for discussion of criticality accident dosimetry, an opportunity to test their neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry systems under a variety of simulated criticality accident conditions, and the experience of comparing results with reference dose values as well as with the measured results obtained by others making measurements under identical conditions. Sixty-nine nuclear accidents (27 with unmoderated neutron energy spectra and 42 with eight different shielded spectra) have been simulated in the studies. Neutron doses were in the 0.2-8.5 Gy range and gamma doses in the 0.1-2.0 Gy range. A total of 2,289 dose measurements (1,311 neutron, 978 gamma) were made during the intercomparisons. The primary methods of neutron dosimetry were activation foils, thermoluminescent dosimeters, and blood sodium activation. The main methods of gamma dose measurement were thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiophotoluminescent glass, and film. About 68% of the neutron measurements met the accuracy guidelines (+/- 25%) and about 52% of the gamma measurements met the accuracy criterion (+/- 20%) for accident dosimetry.

  2. [Computational radiofrequency electromagnetic field dosimetry in evaluation of biological effects].

    PubMed

    Perov, S Iu; Kudryashov, Iu B; Rubtsova, N B

    2012-01-01

    Given growing computational resources, radiofrequency electromagnetic field dosimetry is becoming more vital in the study of biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation. The study analyzes numerical methods which are used in theoretical dosimetry to assess the exposure level and specific absorption rate distribution. The advances of theoretical dosimetry are shown. Advantages and disadvantages of different methods are analyzed in respect to electromagnetic field biological effects. The finite-difference time-domain method was implemented in detail; also evaluated were possible uncertainties of complex biological structure simulation for bioelectromagnetic investigations.

  3. Studies in Ultrasonic Dosimetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouni, Abderrachid

    The widespread use of ultrasonic devices in both industry and medicine confirms the great importance of ultrasound as a source of nonionizing radiation. The biological effects of this type of radiation are not completely known up to today, and the need for proper dosimetry is evident. Previous work in the field has been limited to the determination of ultrasonic energy deposition by attenuation measurements of traveling sound waves in homogenized specimens. Alternatively, observed effects were correlated to the output of the source. The objective of this work was to correlate the absorption properties of sound absorbing media to their elastic properties and deduce a correlation between the sonic absorption coefficient and the corresponding Young's modulus. Energy deposition measurements were performed in isotropic rubber samples and in anisotropic meat specimens by the use of the thermocouple probe method which measures the absorbed energy directly. Elasticity measurements were performed for the different types of materials used. The Young's modulus for each type was deduced from defletion measurements on rectangular strips when subjected to successive forces of varying magnitude. The final experimental results showed the existence of a linear relationship between the absorption coefficient of a given elastic material and the inverse square root of its Young's modulus.

  4. Dosimetry studies in Zaborie village.

    PubMed

    Takada, J; Hoshi, M; Endo, S; Stepanenko, V F; Kondrashov, A E; Petin, D; Skvortsov, V; Ivannikov, A; Tikounov, D; Gavrilin, Y; Snykov, V P

    2000-05-01

    Dosimetry studies in Zaborie, a territory in Russia highly contaminated by the Chernobyl accident, were carried out in July, 1997. Studies on dosimetry for people are important not only for epidemiology but also for recovery of local social activity. The local contamination of the soil was measured to be 1.5-6.3 MBq/m2 of Cs-137 with 0.7-4 microSv/h of dose rate. A case study for a villager presently 40 years old indicates estimations of 72 and 269 mSv as the expected internal and external doses during 50 years starting in 1997 based on data of a whole-body measurement of Cs-137 and environmental dose rates. Mean values of accumulated external and internal doses for the period from the year 1986 till 1996 are also estimated to be 130 mSv and 16 mSv for Zaborie. The estimation of the 1986-1996 accumulated dose on the basis of large scale ESR teeth enamel dosimetry provides for this village, the value of 180 mSv. For a short term visitor from Japan to this area, external and internal dose are estimated to be 0.13 mSv/9d (during visit in 1997) and 0.024 mSv/50y (during 50 years starting from 1997), respectively.

  5. Seventh Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.

    1981-12-01

    The Seventh Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted March 31-April 10, 1981, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dosimeters from 34 participating agencies were mounted on anthropomorphic phantoms and exposed to a range of low-level dose equivalents (1.5-15.0mSv neutron and 0.1-2.8 mSv gamma) which could be encountered during routine personnel monitoring in mixed radiation fields. The Health Physics Research Reactor, operating in the steady-state mode, served as the source of radiation for two equivalent sets of six separate exposures. Lucite and concrete shields along with the unshielded reactor provided three different neutron and gamma spectra for five of the exposures in each set. Results reported by the participating agencies showed that no single type of neutron dosimeter exhibited acceptable performance characteristics for all mixed-field environments encountered in this study. Film, TLD, and TLD-albed dosimeters were found to be inadequate for neutron dose equivalent measurements when large numbers of slow neutrons are present unless significant corrections are made to measured results. Track dosimeters indicated the least sensitivity to spectral characteristics, but did not always yield to the most accurate results. Gamma dose measurements showed that TLD-700 dosimeters produced significantly more accurate results than film dosimeters which tend to overestimate gamma doses in mixed radiation fields.

  6. Proton minibeam radiation therapy: Experimental dosimetry evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Peucelle, C.; Martínez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y.; Nauraye, C.; Patriarca, A.; Hierso, E.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Proton minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT) is a new radiotherapy (RT) approach that allies the inherent physical advantages of protons with the normal tissue preservation observed when irradiated with submillimetric spatially fractionated beams. This dosimetry work aims at demonstrating the feasibility of the technical implementation of pMBRT. This has been performed at the Institut Curie - Proton Therapy Center in Orsay. Methods: Proton minibeams (400 and 700 μm-width) were generated by means of a brass multislit collimator. Center-to-center distances between consecutive beams of 3200 and 3500 μm, respectively, were employed. The (passive scattered) beam energy was 100 MeV corresponding to a range of 7.7 cm water equivalent. Absolute dosimetry was performed with a thimble ionization chamber (IBA CC13) in a water tank. Relative dosimetry was carried out irradiating radiochromic films interspersed in a IBA RW3 slab phantom. Depth dose curves and lateral profiles at different depths were evaluated. Peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR), beam widths, and output factors were also assessed as a function of depth. Results: A pattern of peaks and valleys was maintained in the transverse direction with PVDR values decreasing as a function of depth until 6.7 cm. From that depth, the transverse dose profiles became homogeneous due to multiple Coulomb scattering. Peak-to-valley dose ratio values extended from 8.2 ± 0.5 at the phantom surface to 1.08 ± 0.06 at the Bragg peak. This was the first time that dosimetry in such small proton field sizes was performed. Despite the challenge, a complete set of dosimetric data needed to guide the first biological experiments was achieved. Conclusions: pMBRT is a novel strategy in order to reduce the side effects of RT. This works provides the experimental proof of concept of this new RT method: clinical proton beams might allow depositing a (high) uniform dose in a brain tumor located in the center of the brain (7.5 cm depth

  7. Neutron generator (HIRRAC) and dosimetry study.

    PubMed

    Endo, S; Hoshi, M; Takada, J; Tauchi, H; Matsuura, S; Takeoka, S; Kitagawa, K; Suga, S; Komatsu, K

    1999-12-01

    Dosimetry studies have been made for neutrons from a neutron generator at Hiroshima University (HIRRAC) which is designed for radiobiological research. Neutrons in an energy range from 0.07 to 2.7 MeV are available for biological irradiations. The produced neutron energies were measured and evaluated by a 3He-gas proportional counter. Energy spread was made certain to be small enough for radiobiological studies. Dose evaluations were performed by two different methods, namely use of tissue equivalent paired ionization chambers and activation of method with indium foils. Moreover, energy deposition spectra in small targets of tissue equivalent materials, so-called lineal energy spectrum, were also measured and are discussed. Specifications for biological irradiation are presented in terms of monoenergetic beam conditions, dose rates and deposited energy spectra.

  8. Software for evaluation of EPR-dosimetry performance.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, E A; Timofeev, Yu S; Ivanov, D V

    2014-06-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with tooth enamel is a method extensively used for retrospective external dosimetry. Different research groups apply different equipment, sample preparation procedures and spectrum processing algorithms for EPR dosimetry. A uniform algorithm for description and comparison of performances was designed and implemented in a new computer code. The aim of the paper is to introduce the new software 'EPR-dosimetry performance'. The computer code is a user-friendly tool for providing a full description of method-specific capabilities of EPR tooth dosimetry, from metrological characteristics to practical limitations in applications. The software designed for scientists and engineers has several applications, including support of method calibration by evaluation of calibration parameters, evaluation of critical value and detection limit for registration of radiation-induced signal amplitude, estimation of critical value and detection limit for dose evaluation, estimation of minimal detectable value for anthropogenic dose assessment and description of method uncertainty.

  9. Mayak worker dosimetry study: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilenko, E. K.; Khokhryakov, V. F.; Miller, S C.; Fix, Jack J.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Choe, Dong Ok; Gorelov, Mikhail; Khokhryakov, Victor V.; Knyazev, V.; Krahenbuhl, Melinda P.; Scherpelz, Robert I.; Smetanin, Mikhail; Suslova, K. G.; Vostrotin, V.

    2007-09-01

    The Mayak Production Association (MPA) was the first plutonium production plant in the former Soviet Union. Workers at the MPA were exposed to relatively large internal radiation intakes and external radiation exposures, particularly in the early years of plant operations. This paper describes the updated dosimetry database, Doses-2005. Doses-2005 represents a significant improvement in the determination of absorbed organ dose from external radiation and plutonium intake for the original cohort of 18,831 Mayak workers. The methods of dose reconstruction of absorbed organ doses from external radiation uses: 1) archive records of measured dose and worker exposure history, 2) measured energy and directional response characteristics of historical Mayak film dosimeters, and 3) calculated dose conversion factors for Mayak Study-defined exposure scenarios using Monte Carlo techniques. The methods of dose reconstruction for plutonium intake uses two revised models developed from empirical data derived from bioassay and autopsy cases and/or updates from prevailing or emerging International Commission on Radiological Protection models. Other sources of potential significant exposure to workers such as medical diagnostic x-rays, ambient onsite external radiation, neutron radiation, intake of airborne effluent, and intake of nuclides other than plutonium were evaluated to determine their impact on the dose estimates.

  10. Tenth ORNL Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Chou, T.L.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.

    1985-03-01

    The Tenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during April 9-11, 1984. Dosemeter badges from 31 participating organizations were mounted on 40cm Lucite phantoms and exposed to a range of dose equivalents which could be encountered during routine personnel monitoring in mixed radiation fields. The Health Physics Research Reactor served as the only source of radiation for eight of the ten irradiations which included a low (approx. 0.50 mSv) and high (approx. 10.00 mSv) neutron dose equivalent run for each of four shield conditions. Two irradiations were also conducted for which concrete- and Lucite-shield reactor irradiations were gamma-enhanced using a /sup 137/Cs source. Results indicated that some participants had difficulty obtaining measurable indication of neutron and gamma exposures at dose equivalents less than about 0.50 mSv and 0.20 mSv, respectively. Albedo dosemeters provided the best overall accuracy and precision for the neutron measurements. Direct interaction TLD systems showed significant variation in accuracy with incident spectrum, and threshold neutron dosemeters (film and recoil track) underestimated reference values by more than 50%. Gamma dose equivalents estimated in the mixed fields were higher than reference values with TL gamma dosemeters generally yielding more accurate results than film. Under the conditions of this study in which participants had information concerning exposure conditions and radiation field characteristics prior to dosemeter evaluation, only slightly more than half of all reported results met regulatory standards for neutron and gamma accuracy. 19 refs., 2 figs., 29 tabs.

  11. A new technique for dosimetry reaction cross-section evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Badikov, S.A.

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: An objective of this paper is a unification of the procedure for dosimetry reaction cross-section evaluation. A set of requirements for the unified evaluation procedure is presented. A new code (ORTHO) was developed in order to meet these requirements. A statistical model, an algorithm, and the basic formulae employed in the code are described. The code was used for Ti48(n,p) reaction cross-section evaluation. The results of the evaluation are compared to International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF)-2002 data. The evaluated cross-sections and their correlations from this work are in good agreement with the IRDF-2002 evaluated data, whereas the uncertainties of the evaluated cross-sections are inconsistent. (authors)

  12. Evaluation of a glassless photographic film scanner for high-gradient radiochromic film dosimetry.

    PubMed

    De Puysseleyr, A; Srivastava, R P; Paelinck, L; De Neve, W; De Wagter, C

    2012-01-07

    This study evaluates the performance of the Nikon Coolscan 9000 ED film scanner for high-gradient radiochromic film dosimetry. As a reference for comparison, analogue experiments were performed on the Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner. Based on these results, a dosimetric protocol was established for the Nikon scanner and its overall performance for high-gradient dosimetry was evaluated. The Nikon scanner demonstrated a high sensitivity for radiochromic film dosimetry, resulting in more contrast in the digitized image. The scanner's optics also demonstrated excellent stability and did not necessitate warm-up scans prior to data acquisition. Moreover, negative effects of temperature changes of the film inside the scanner were shown to be limited. None of the digitized images showed significant disturbances by moiré-patterns, by virtue of the absence of a glass plate for film positioning. However, scanner response was found to vary considerably across the reading area, requiring an optical density-dependent correction procedure to be incorporated into the scanning protocol. The main limitation of the Nikon Coolscan 9000 ED transmission scanner remains its film size restriction to 6.2 × 20 cm2. Nevertheless, its excellent characteristics render it the preferential tool for high-gradient radiochromic film dosimetry in applications limited to small film sizes, such as dosimetry in the build-up region.

  13. [Methods of dosimetry in evaluation of electromagnetic fields' biological action].

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, N B; Perov, S Iu

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental dosimetry can be used for adequate evaluation of the effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. In view of the tough electromagnetic environment in aircraft, pilots' safety is of particular topicality. The dosimetric evaluation is made from the quantitative characteristics of the EMF interaction with bio-objects depending on EM energy absorption in a unit of tissue volume or mass calculated as a specific absorbed rate (SAR) and measured in W/kg. Theoretical dosimetry employs a number of computational methods to determine EM energy, as well as the augmented method of boundary conditions, iterative augmented method of boundary conditions, moments method, generalized multipolar method, finite-element method, time domain finite-difference method, and hybrid methods combining several decision plans modeling the design philosophy of navigation, radiolocation and human systems. Because of difficulties with the experimental SAR estimate, theoretical dosimetry is regarded as the first step in analysis of the in-aircraft conditions of exposure and possible bio-effects.

  14. The US Department of Energy Personnel Dosimetry Evaluation and Upgrade Program

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, L.G.; Stroud, C.M.; Swinth, K.L.; Vallario, E.J.

    1987-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Personnel Dosimetry Evaluation and Upgrade Program is designed to identify and evaluate dosimetry deficiencies and to conduct innovative research and development programs that will improve overall capabilities, thus ensuring that DOE can comply with applicable standards and regulations for dose measurement. To achieve these goals, two programs were initiated to evaluate and upgrade beta measurement and neutron dosimetry. 3 refs.

  15. Evaluation of two-dimensional bolus effect of immobilization/support devices on skin doses: A radiochromic EBT film dosimetry study in phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Chan, Maria F.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In this study, the authors have quantified the two-dimensional (2D) perspective of skin dose increase using EBT film dosimetry in phantom in the presence of patient immobilization devices during conventional and IMRT treatments. Methods: For 6 MV conventional photon field, the authors evaluated and quantified the 2D bolus effect on skin doses for six different common patient immobilization/support devices, including carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, Orfit carbon fiber base plate, balsa wood board, Styrofoam, perforated AquaPlast sheet, and alpha-cradle. For 6 and 15 MV IMRT fields, a stack of two film layers positioned above a solid phantom was exposed at the air interface or in the presence of a patient alpha-cradle. All the films were scanned and the pixel values were converted to doses based on an established calibration curve. The authors determined the 2D skin dose distributions, isodose curves, and cross-sectional profiles at the surface layers with or without the immobilization/support device. The authors also generated and compared the dose area histograms (DAHs) and dose area products from the 2D skin dose distributions. Results: In contrast with 20% relative dose [(RD) dose relative to d{sub max} on central axis] at 0.0153 cm in the film layer for 6 MV 10x10 cm{sup 2} open field, the average RDs at the same depth in the film layer were 71%, 69%, 55%, and 57% for Orfit, balsa wood, Styrofoam, and alpha-cradle, respectively. At the same depth, the RDs were 54% under a strut and 26% between neighboring struts of a carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, and between 34% and 56% for stretched perforated AquaPlast sheet. In the presence of the alpha-cradle for the 6 MV (15 MV) IMRT fields, the hot spot doses at the effective measurement depths of 0.0153 and 0.0459 cm were 140% and 150% (83% and 89%), respectively, of the isocenter dose. The enhancement factor was defined as the ratio of a given DAH parameter (minimum dose received in a given area) with

  16. Preparation, Biological Evaluation and Dosimetry Studies of 175Yb-Bis-Phosphonates for Palliative Treatment of Bone Pain

    PubMed Central

    Fakhari, Ashraf; Jalilian, Amir R.; Yousefnia, Hassan; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed; Samani, Ali Bahrami; Daha, Fariba Johari; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee; Khalaj, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Optimized production and quality control of ytterbium-175 (Yb-175) labeled pamidronate and alendronate complexes as efficient agents for bone pain palliation has been presented. Methods: Yb-175 labeled pamidronate and alendronate (175Yb-PMD and 175Yb-ALN) complexes were prepared successfully at optimized conditions with acceptable radiochemical purity, stability and significant hydroxyapatite absorption. The biodistribution of complexes were evaluated up to 48 h, which demonstrated significant bone uptake ratios for 175Yb-PAM at all-time intervals. It was also detected that 175Yb-PAM mostly washed out and excreted through the kidneys. Results: The performance of 175Yb-PAM in an animal model was better or comparable to other 175Yb-bone seeking complexes previously reported. Conclusion: Based on calculations, the total body dose for 175Yb-ALN is 40% higher as compared to 175Yb-PAM (especially kidneys) indicating that 175Yb-PAM is probably a safer agent than 175Yb-ALN. PMID:27529886

  17. Evaluation of correlation between chemical dosimetry and subharmonic spectrum analysis to examine the acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh, Hadi; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe; Bathaie, S Zahra; Hassan, Zuhair M

    2010-06-01

    Currently several therapeutic applications of ultrasound in cancer treatment are under progress which uses cavitation phenomena to deliver their effects. There are several methods to evaluate cavitation activity such as chemical dosimetry and measurement of subharmonic signals. In this study, the cavitation activity induced by the ultrasound irradiation on exposure parameters has been measured by terephthalic acid chemical dosimetry and subharmonic analysis. Experiments were performed in the near 1 MHz fields in the progressive wave mode and effect of duty cycles changes with 2 W/cm(2) intensity (I(SATA)) and acoustic intensity changes in continuous mode on both fluorescence intensity and subharmonic intensity were measured. The dependence between fluorescence intensity of terephthalic acid chemical dosimetry and subharmonic intensity analysis were analyzed by Pearson correlation (p-value <0.05). It has been shown that the subharmonic intensity and the fluorescence intensity for continuous mode is higher than for pulsing mode (p-value <0.05). Also results show that there is a significant difference between the subharmonic intensity and the fluorescence intensity with sonication intensity (p-value <0.05). A significant correlation between the fluorescence intensity and subharmonic intensity at different duty cycles (R=0.997, p-value <0.05) and different intensities (R=0.985, p-value <0.05) were shown. The subharmonic intensity (microW/cm(2)) significantly correlated with the fluorescence intensity (count) (R=0.901; p<0.05) and the fluorescence intensity due to chemical dosimetry could be estimated with subharmonic intensity due to subharmonic spectrum analysis. It is concluded that there is dependence between terephthalic acid chemical dosimetry and subharmonic spectrum analysis to examine the acoustic cavitation activity. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A transferability study of the EPR-tooth-dosimetry technique.

    PubMed

    Sholom, S; Chumak, V; Desrosiers, M; Bouville, A

    2006-01-01

    The transferability of a measurement protocol from one laboratory to another is an important feature of any mature, standardised protocol. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-tooth dosimetry technique that was developed in Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine, AMS, Ukraine (SCRM) for routine dosimetry of Chernobyl liquidators has demonstrated consistent results in several inter-laboratory measurement comparisons. Transferability to the EPR dosimetry laboratory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) was examined. Several approaches were used to test the technique, including dose reconstruction of SCRM-NIST inter-comparison samples. The study has demonstrated full transferability of the technique and the possibility to reproduce results in a different laboratory environment.

  19. Seventeenth nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison study: August 11-15, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Greene, R.T.

    1981-04-01

    The Seventeenth Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted August 11-15, 1980, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Nuclear criticality accidents with three different neutron and gamma ray energy spectra were simulated by operating the Health Physics Research Reactor in the pulse mode. Participants from 13 organizations exposed dosimeters set up as area monitors and mounted on phantoms for personnel monitoring. Analysis of experimental results reported by participants showed that less than 60% of the neutron dose measurements using foil activation, thermoluminescent, or sodium activation methods and less than 20% of the gamma dose measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters met nuclear criticality accident dosimetry guidelines which suggest accuracies of +-25% for neutron dose and +-20% for gamma dose. This indicates that continued development and evaluation of criticality accident dosimetry systems for area and personnel monitoring are required to improve measurement accuracy so that existing standards can be met.

  20. Evaluation of a novel 4D in vivo dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Cherpak, A.; Ding, W.; Hallil, A.; Cygler, J. E.

    2009-05-15

    A prototype of a new 4D in vivo dosimetry system capable of simultaneous real-time position monitoring and dose measurement has been developed. The radiation positioning system (RADPOS) is controlled by a computer and combines two technologies: MOSFET radiation detector coupled with an electromagnetic positioning device. Special software has been developed that allows sampling position and dose either manually or automatically in user-defined time intervals. Preliminary tests of the new device include a dosimetric evaluation of the detector in {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, and 18 MV beams and measurements of spatial position stability and accuracy. In addition, the effect of metals and other materials on the performance of the positioning system has been investigated. Results show that the RADPOS system can measure in-air dose profiles that agree, on average, within 3%-5% of diode measurements for the energies tested. The response of the detector is isotropic within 1.6% (1 SD) with a maximum deviation of {+-}4.0% over 360 deg. The maximum variation in the calibration coefficient over field sizes from 6x6 to 25x25 cm{sup 2} was 2.3% for RADPOS probe with the high sensitivity MOSFET and 4.6% for the probe with the standard sensitivity MOSFET. Of the materials tested, only aluminum, lead, and brass caused shifts in the RADPOS read position. The magnitude of the shift varied between materials and size of the material sample. Nonmagnetic stainless steel (Grade 304) caused a distortion of less than 2 mm when placed within 10 mm of the detector; therefore, it can provide a reasonable alternative to other metals if required. The results of the preliminary tests indicate that the device can be used for in vivo dosimetry in {sup 60}Co and high-energy beams from linear accelerators.

  1. Dosimetry studies on prototype 241Am sources for brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Nath, R; Gray, L

    1987-06-01

    Sealed sources of 241Am emit primarily 60 keV photons which, because of multiple Compton scattering, produce dose distributions in water that are comparable to those from 226Ra or 137Cs. However, americium gamma rays can be shielded by thin layers of high atomic number materials since the half value layer thickness is only 1/8th of a mm of lead for americium gamma rays as compared to a value of 12 mm for 226Ra gamma rays. This may allow effective in vivo shielding of critical organs, for example; the bladder can be partially shielded by hypaque solution, and the rectum and sigmoid colon by barium sulfate. In addition, the exposure to medical personnel involved in intracavitary application and patient care may be reduced substantially by the use of relatively thin lead aprons and light weight, portable shields. To investigate the feasibility of 241Am sources for intracavitary irradiation, dosimetry studies on prototype 241Am sources have been performed and a computer model for the determination of dose distributions around encapsulated cylindrical sources of 241Am has been developed and tested. Results of dosimetry measurements using ionization chambers, lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters, a scanning scintillation probe, and film dosimetry, confirm theoretical predictions that these sources can deliver dose rates adequate for intracavitary irradiation. Further dosimetry measurements in simulated clinical situations using lead foils and test tubes filled with hypaque or barium sulfate, confirm the predicted effectiveness of in vivo shielding which can be readily achieved with 241Am sources.

  2. Feasibility study on dosimetry verification of volumetric-modulated arc therapy-based total marrow irradiation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yun; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Pawlicki, Todd; Mundt, Arno J; Mell, Loren K

    2013-03-04

    The purpose of this study was to develop dosimetry verification procedures for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-based total marrow irradiation (TMI). The VMAT based TMI plans were generated for three patients: one child and two adults. The planning target volume (PTV) was defined as bony skeleton, from head to mid-femur, with a 3 mm margin. The plan strategy similar to published studies was adopted. The PTV was divided into head and neck, chest, and pelvic regions, with separate plans each of which is composed of 2-3 arcs/fields. Multiple isocenters were evenly distributed along the patient's axial direction. The focus of this study is to establish a dosimetry quality assurance procedure involving both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric verifications, which is desirable for a large PTV treated with multiple isocenters. The 2D dose verification was performed with film for gamma evaluation and absolute point dose was measured with ion chamber, with attention to the junction between neighboring plans regarding hot/cold spots. The 3D volumetric dose verification used commercial dose reconstruction software to reconstruct dose from electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) images. The gamma evaluation criteria in both 2D and 3D verification were 5% absolute point dose difference and 3 mm of distance to agreement. With film dosimetry, the overall average gamma passing rate was 98.2% and absolute dose difference was 3.9% in junction areas among the test patients; with volumetric portal dosimetry, the corresponding numbers were 90.7% and 2.4%. A dosimetry verification procedure involving both 2D and 3D was developed for VMAT-based TMI. The initial results are encouraging and warrant further investigation in clinical trials.

  3. Eighteenth nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison study: August 10-14, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.

    1982-11-01

    The Eighteenth Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted August 10-14, 1981, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Nuclear criticality accidents with three different neutron and gamma ray energy spectra were simulated by operating the Health Physics Research Reactor in the pulse mode. Participants from 13 organizations exposed dosimeters set up as area monitors and mounted on phantoms for personnel monitoring. Analysis of experimental results showed that about 56% of the reported neutron doses measured using foil activation, thermoluminescent, or sodium activation methods and about 53% of the gamma doses measured using thermoluminescent methods met nuclear accident dosimetry guidelines which suggest accuracies of +- 25% for neutron dose and +- 20% for gamma dose. The greatest difficulties in measuring accident doses occurred in radiation fields with large fractions of low energy neutrons and a high gamma component (> 40%). Results of this study indicate that continued accident dosimetry intercomparisons are necessary to test dosimetry systems and training programs are needed to improve the technical competence of evaluating personnel.

  4. Neutron personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: a summary (1981-1986).

    PubMed

    Swaja, R E; Sims, C S

    1988-09-01

    To provide an opportunity for dosimetrists to test and calibrate their neutron personnel monitoring systems, the staff of the Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies (PDIS) periodically since 1974. During these studies, personnel dosimeters are mailed to ORNL, exposed to low-level (less than 15 mSv) neutron dose equivalents in a variety of mixed-radiation fields, and then returned to the participants for evaluation. These intercomparisons have provided more data on neutron dosimeter performance than any other periodic test program conducted to date. This report presents a summary and analysis of about 3450 neutron dose equivalent measurements reported for PDIS 7 through 12 (1981-1986) with emphasis on low dose equivalent sensitivity, accuracy and precision, and performance relative to accreditation standards for the basic types of personnel dosimetry systems. Relationships of the PDIS results to occupational neutron monitoring, accreditation testing, and methods to improve personnel neutron dosimetry performance are also discussed.

  5. Consistency of external dosimetry in epidemiologic studies of nuclear workers

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J.J.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1991-10-01

    To make the best use of available epidemiologic data in assessing risks from exposure to low-level radiation, it is important that biases and uncertainties in estimated doses be understood and documented. With this understanding, analyses of mortality data can be strengthened by including the use of correction factors where judged appropriate, excluding portions of the data where uncertainty in dose estimates is judged to be very large, and conducting sensitivity analyses to examine the effect of alternative assumptions about dosimetry errors and biases on results. It is hoped that the pooling of data from several epidemiologic studies and improved understanding of dosimetry will lead to better estimates of radiation risks. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Systematic evaluation of photodetector performance for plastic scintillation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Boivin, Jonathan Beaulieu, Luc; Beddar, Sam; Guillemette, Maxime

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The authors’ objective was to systematically assess the performance of seven photodetectors used in plastic scintillation dosimetry. The authors also propose some guidelines for selecting an appropriate detector for a specific application. Methods: The plastic scintillation detector (PSD) consisted of a 1-mm diameter, 10-mm long plastic scintillation fiber (BCF-60), which was optically coupled to a clear 10-m long optical fiber of the same diameter. A light-tight plastic sheath covered both fibers and the scintillator end was sealed. The clear fiber end was connected to one of the following photodetectors: two polychromatic cameras (one with an optical lens and one with a fiber optic taper replacing the lens), a monochromatic camera with an optical lens, a PIN photodiode, an avalanche photodiode (APD), or a photomultiplier tube (PMT). A commercially available W1 PSD was also included in the study, but it relied on its own fiber and scintillator. Each PSD was exposed to both low-energy beams (120, 180, and 220 kVp) from an orthovoltage unit and high-energy beams (6 and 23 MV) from a linear accelerator. Various dose rates were tested to identify the operating range and accuracy of each photodetector. Results: For all photodetectors, the relative uncertainty was less than 5% for dose rates higher than 3 mGy/s. The cameras allowed multiple probes to be used simultaneously, but they are less sensitive to low-light signals. The PIN, APD, and PMT had higher sensitivity, making them more suitable for low dose rate and out-of-field dose monitoring. The relative uncertainty of the PMT was less than 1% at the lowest dose rate achieved (0.10 mGy/s), suggesting that it was optimal for use in live dosimetry. Conclusions: For dose rates higher than 3 mGy/s, the PIN diode is the most effective photodetector in terms of performance/cost ratio. For lower dose rates, such as those seen in interventional radiology or high-gradient radiotherapy, PMTs are the optimal choice.

  7. Monte Carlo verification of polymer gel dosimetry applied to radionuclide therapy: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Gear, J I; Charles-Edwards, E; Partridge, M; Flux, G D

    2011-11-21

    This study evaluates the dosimetric performance of the polymer gel dosimeter 'Methacrylic and Ascorbic acid in Gelatin, initiated by Copper' and its suitability for quality assurance and analysis of I-131-targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry. Four batches of gel were manufactured in-house and sets of calibration vials and phantoms were created containing different concentrations of I-131-doped gel. Multiple dose measurements were made up to 700 h post preparation and compared to equivalent Monte Carlo simulations. In addition to uniformly filled phantoms the cross-dose distribution from a hot insert to a surrounding phantom was measured. In this example comparisons were made with both Monte Carlo and a clinical scintigraphic dosimetry method. Dose-response curves generated from the calibration data followed a sigmoid function. The gels appeared to be stable over many weeks of internal irradiation with a delay in gel response observed at 29 h post preparation. This was attributed to chemical inhibitors and slow reaction rates of long-chain radical species. For this reason, phantom measurements were only made after 190 h of irradiation. For uniformly filled phantoms of I-131 the accuracy of dose measurements agreed to within 10% when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. A radial cross-dose distribution measured using the gel dosimeter compared well to that calculated with Monte Carlo. Small inhomogeneities were observed in the dosimeter attributed to non-uniform mixing of monomer during preparation. However, they were not detrimental to this study where the quantitative accuracy and spatial resolution of polymer gel dosimetry were far superior to that calculated using scintigraphy. The difference between Monte Carlo and gel measurements was of the order of a few cGy, whilst with the scintigraphic method differences of up to 8 Gy were observed. A manipulation technique is also presented which allows 3D scintigraphic dosimetry measurements to be compared to polymer

  8. Monte Carlo verification of polymer gel dosimetry applied to radionuclide therapy: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gear, J. I.; Charles-Edwards, E.; Partridge, M.; Flux, G. D.

    2011-11-01

    This study evaluates the dosimetric performance of the polymer gel dosimeter 'Methacrylic and Ascorbic acid in Gelatin, initiated by Copper' and its suitability for quality assurance and analysis of I-131-targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry. Four batches of gel were manufactured in-house and sets of calibration vials and phantoms were created containing different concentrations of I-131-doped gel. Multiple dose measurements were made up to 700 h post preparation and compared to equivalent Monte Carlo simulations. In addition to uniformly filled phantoms the cross-dose distribution from a hot insert to a surrounding phantom was measured. In this example comparisons were made with both Monte Carlo and a clinical scintigraphic dosimetry method. Dose-response curves generated from the calibration data followed a sigmoid function. The gels appeared to be stable over many weeks of internal irradiation with a delay in gel response observed at 29 h post preparation. This was attributed to chemical inhibitors and slow reaction rates of long-chain radical species. For this reason, phantom measurements were only made after 190 h of irradiation. For uniformly filled phantoms of I-131 the accuracy of dose measurements agreed to within 10% when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. A radial cross-dose distribution measured using the gel dosimeter compared well to that calculated with Monte Carlo. Small inhomogeneities were observed in the dosimeter attributed to non-uniform mixing of monomer during preparation. However, they were not detrimental to this study where the quantitative accuracy and spatial resolution of polymer gel dosimetry were far superior to that calculated using scintigraphy. The difference between Monte Carlo and gel measurements was of the order of a few cGy, whilst with the scintigraphic method differences of up to 8 Gy were observed. A manipulation technique is also presented which allows 3D scintigraphic dosimetry measurements to be compared to polymer

  9. GEANT4 for breast dosimetry: parameters optimization study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedon, C.; Longo, F.; Mettivier, G.; Longo, R.

    2015-08-01

    Mean glandular dose (MGD) is the main dosimetric quantity in mammography. MGD evaluation is obtained by multiplying the entrance skin air kerma (ESAK) by normalized glandular dose (DgN) coefficients. While ESAK is an empirical quantity, DgN coefficients can only be estimated with Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Thus, a MC parameters benchmark is needed for effectively evaluating DgN coefficients. GEANT4 is a MC toolkit suitable for medical purposes that offers to the users several computational choices. In this work we investigate the GEANT4 performances testing the main PhysicsLists for medical applications. Four electromagnetic PhysicsLists were implemented: the linear attenuation coefficients were calculated for breast glandularity 0%, 50%, 100% in the energetic range 8-50 keV and DgN coefficients were evaluated. The results were compared with published data. Fit equations for the estimation of the G-factor parameter, introduced by the literature for converting the dose delivered in the heterogeneous medium to that in the glandular tissue, are proposed and the application of this parameter interaction-by-interaction or retrospectively is discussed. G4EmLivermorePhysicsList shows the best agreement for the linear attenuation coefficients both with theoretical values and published data. Moreover, excellent correlation factor ({{r}2}>0.99 ) is found for the DgN coefficients with the literature. The final goal of this study is to identify, for the first time, a benchmark of parameters that could be useful for future breast dosimetry studies with GEANT4.

  10. A comprehensive evaluation of the PRESAGE/optical-CT 3D dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Sakhalkar, H. S.; Adamovics, J.; Ibbott, G.; Oldham, M.

    2009-01-15

    This work presents extensive investigations to evaluate the robustness (intradosimeter consistency and temporal stability of response), reproducibility, precision, and accuracy of a relatively new 3D dosimetry system comprising a leuco-dye doped plastic 3D dosimeter (PRESAGE) and a commercial optical-CT scanner (OCTOPUS 5x scanner from MGS Research, Inc). Four identical PRESAGE 3D dosimeters were created such that they were compatible with the Radiologic Physics Center (RPC) head-and-neck (H and N) IMRT credentialing phantom. Each dosimeter was irradiated with a rotationally symmetric arrangement of nine identical small fields (1x3 cm{sup 2}) impinging on the flat circular face of the dosimeter. A repetitious sequence of three dose levels (4, 2.88, and 1.28 Gy) was delivered. The rotationally symmetric treatment resulted in a dose distribution with high spatial variation in axial planes but only gradual variation with depth along the long axis of the dosimeter. The significance of this treatment was that it facilitated accurate film dosimetry in the axial plane, for independent verification. Also, it enabled rigorous evaluation of robustness, reproducibility and accuracy of response, at the three dose levels. The OCTOPUS 5x commercial scanner was used for dose readout from the dosimeters at daily time intervals. The use of improved optics and acquisition technique yielded substantially improved noise characteristics (reduced to {approx}2%) than has been achieved previously. Intradosimeter uniformity of radiochromic response was evaluated by calculating a 3D gamma comparison between each dosimeter and axially rotated copies of the same dosimeter. This convenient technique exploits the rotational symmetry of the distribution. All points in the gamma comparison passed a 2% difference, 1 mm distance-to-agreement criteria indicating excellent intradosimeter uniformity even at low dose levels. Postirradiation, the dosimeters were all found to exhibit a slight increase in

  11. A comprehensive evaluation of the PRESAGE/optical-CT 3D dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Sakhalkar, H S; Adamovics, J; Ibbott, G; Oldham, M

    2009-01-01

    This work presents extensive investigations to evaluate the robustness (intradosimeter consistency and temporal stability of response), reproducibility, precision, and accuracy of a relatively new 3D dosimetry system comprising a leuco-dye doped plastic 3D dosimeter (PRESAGE) and a commercial optical-CT scanner (OCTOPUS 5x scanner from MGS Research, Inc). Four identical PRESAGE 3D dosimeters were created such that they were compatible with the Radiologic Physics Center (RPC) head-and-neck (H&N) IMRT credentialing phantom. Each dosimeter was irradiated with a rotationally symmetric arrangement of nine identical small fields (1 x 3 cm2) impinging on the flat circular face of the dosimeter. A repetitious sequence of three dose levels (4, 2.88, and 1.28 Gy) was delivered. The rotationally symmetric treatment resulted in a dose distribution with high spatial variation in axial planes but only gradual variation with depth along the long axis of the dosimeter. The significance of this treatment was that it facilitated accurate film dosimetry in the axial plane, for independent verification. Also, it enabled rigorous evaluation of robustness, reproducibility and accuracy of response, at the three dose levels. The OCTOPUS 5x commercial scanner was used for dose readout from the dosimeters at daily time intervals. The use of improved optics and acquisition technique yielded substantially improved noise characteristics (reduced to approximately 2%) than has been achieved previously. Intradosimeter uniformity of radiochromic response was evaluated by calculating a 3D gamma comparison between each dosimeter and axially rotated copies of the same dosimeter. This convenient technique exploits the rotational symmetry of the distribution. All points in the gamma comparison passed a 2% difference, 1 mm distance-to-agreement criteria indicating excellent intradosimeter uniformity even at low dose levels. Postirradiation, the dosimeters were all found to exhibit a slight increase in

  12. Studies on the Ozyorsk population: dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhryakov, Victor V.; Drozhko, Evgeniy G.; Glagolenko, Y V.; Rovny, Sergey I.; Vasilenko, E K.; Suslov, A; Anspaugh, L R.; Napier, Bruce A. ); Bouville, A; Khokhryakov, V F.; Suslova, K G.; Romanov, S A.

    2001-12-01

    The Mayak Production Association (MPA) is located in the northern part of Chelyabinsk Oblast. Operating areas are about 10 km from the town of Ozyorsk, the largest populated area nearby, but other nearby populated areas include Novogorny Village, New Metlino Village, and Kyshtym Town. The long-term objective of this (unfunded) project is reconstruction of the time-dependent individual radiation doses to residents of Ozyorsk and the surrounding area from atmospheric releases of radionuclides from the facilities of the Mayak Production Association (MPA). The time period is from 1948 to the present. This information could be used in several epidemiologic studies of the regional population. Two pilotscale studies of thyroid disease among residents of Ozyorsk have found an increase in thyroid nodules among exposed persons compared to unexposed persons and an increase in thyroid carcinoma in Ozyorsk. The success of follow-on studies would depend upon the availability of thyroid doses proposed to be provided. The availability of credible thyroid doses would allow the quantification of risk of thyroid disease and the evaluation of factors such as host susceptibility, age and time effects, and gender differences. Perhaps more importantly, studies of the Ozyorsk residents would not be encumbered with the complications associated with previous early detection screening, as in the Chernobyl studies, or previous medical conditions, as in the I-131 medical studies. The releases to the atmosphere from MPA stacks are a source of exposure to other populations that are the subject of epidemiologic investigation; these populations include the Extended Techa River Cohort (JCCRER Direction 1), the MPA workers (JCCRER Direction 2), and proposed studies of the East Urals Radioactive Trace (EURT) cohort. The doses received by these cohorts from atmospheric releases at the MPA represent a confounding variable that cannot be considered without the information proposed to be provided.

  13. Evaluation of accuracy and precision in polymer gel dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Evan; Hilts, Michelle; Heath, Emily; Jirasek, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    To assess the overall reproducibility and accuracy of an X-ray computed tomography (CT) polymer gel dosimetry (PGD) system and investigate what effects the use of generic, interbatch, and intrabatch gel calibration have on dosimetric and spatial accuracy. A N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM)-based gel formulation optimized for X-ray CT gel dosimetry was used, and the results over four different batches of gels were analyzed. All gels were irradiated with three 6 MV beams in a calibration pattern at both the bottom and top of the dosimeter. Postirradiation CT images of the gels were processed using background subtraction, image averaging, adaptive mean filtering, and remnant artifact removal. The gel dose distributions were calibrated using a Monte Carlo (Vancouver Island Monte Carlo system) calculated dose distribution of the calibration pattern. Using the calibration results from all gels, an average or "generic" calibration curve was calculated and this generic calibration curve was used to calibrate each of the gels within the sample. For each of the gels, the irradiation pattern at the bottom of the dosimeter was also calibrated using the irradiation pattern at the top of the dosimeter to evaluate intragel calibration. Comparison of gel measurements with Monte Carlo dose calculations found excellent dosimetric accuracy when using an average (or generic) calibration with a mean dose discrepancy of 1.8% in the low-dose gradient region which compared to a "best-case scenario" self-calibration method with a mean dose discrepancy of 1.6%. The intragel calibration method investigated produced large dose discrepancies due to differences in dose response at the top and bottom of the dosimeter, but the use of a dose-dependent correction reduced these dose errors. Spatial accuracy was found to be excellent for the average calibration method with a mean distance-to-agreement (DTA) of 0.63 mm and 99.6% of points with a DTA < 2 mm in high-dose gradient regions. This

  14. Evaluation of deltamethrin kinetics and dosimetry in the maturing rat using a PBPK model

    SciTech Connect

    Tornero-Velez, Rogelio; Mirfazaelian, Ahmad; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Anand, Sathanandam S.; Kim, Hyo J.; Haines, Wendy T.; Bruckner, James V.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2010-04-15

    Immature rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute neurotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides like deltamethrin (DLM). A companion kinetics study (Kim et al., in press) revealed that blood and brain levels of the neuroactive parent compound were inversely related to age in rats 10, 21, 40 and 90 days old. The objective of the current study was to modify a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of DLM disposition in the adult male Sprague-Dawley rat (Mirfazaelian et al., 2006), so blood and target organ dosimetry could be accurately predicted during maturation. Age-specific organ weights and age-dependent changes in the oxidative and hydrolytic clearance of DLM were modeled with a generalized Michaelis-Menten model for growth and the summary equations incorporated into the PBPK model. The model's simulations compared favorably with empirical DLM time-courses in plasma, blood, brain and fat for the four age-groups evaluated (10, 21, 40 and 90 days old). PND 10 pups' area under the 24-h brain concentration time curve (AUC{sub 0-24h}) was 3.8-fold higher than that of the PND 90 adults. Our maturing rat PBPK model allows for updating with age- and chemical-dependent parameters, so pyrethroid dosimetry can be forecast in young and aged individuals. Hence, this model provides a methodology for risk assessors to consider age-specific adjustments to oral Reference Doses on the basis of PK differences.

  15. Evaluation of a 3D diamond detector for medical radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanxheri, K.; Servoli, L.; Oh, A.; Munoz Sanchez, F.; Forcolin, G. T.; Murphy, S. A.; Aitkenhead, A.; Moore, C. J.; Morozzi, A.; Passeri, D.; Bellini, M.; Corsi, C.; Lagomarsino, S.; Sciortino, S.

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic diamond has several properties that are particularly suited to applications in medical radiation dosimetry. It is tissue equivalent, not toxic and shows a high resistance to radiation damage, low leakage current and stability of response. It is an electrical insulator, robust and realizable in small size; due to these features there are several examples of diamond devices, mainly planar single-crystalline chemical vapor depositation (sCVD) diamond, used for relative dose measurement in photon beams. Thanks to a new emerging technology, diamond devices with 3-dimensional structures are produced by using laser pulses to create graphitic paths in the diamond bulk. The necessary bias voltage to operate such detector decreases considerably while the signal response and radiation resistance increase. In order to evaluate the suitability of this new technology for measuring the dose delivered by radiotherapy beams in oncology a 3D polycrystalline (pCVD) diamond detector designed for single charged particle detection has been tested and the photon beam profile has been studied. The good linearity and high sensitivity to the dose observed in the 3D diamond, opens the way to the possibility of realizing a finely segmented device with the potential for dose distribution measurement in a single exposure for small field dosimetry that nowadays is still extremely challenging.

  16. Twenty-first nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison study, August 6-10, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Ragan, G.E.; Sims, C.S.

    1985-05-01

    The twenty-first in a series of nuclear accident dosimetry (NAD) intercomparison (NAD) studies was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Dosimetry Applications Research Facility during August 6-10, 1984. The Health Physics Research Reactor operated in the pulse mode was used to simulate three criticality accidents with different radiation fields. Participants from five organizations measured neutron doses between 0.53 and 4.36 Gy and gamma doses between 0.19 and 1.01 Gy at area monitoring stations and on phantoms. About 75% of all neutron dose estimates based on foil activation, hair activation, simulated blood sodium activation, and thermoluminescent methods were within +-25% of reference values. Approximately 86% of all gamma results measured using thermoluminescent (TLD-700 or CaSO/sub 4/) systems were within +-20% of reference doses which represents a significant improvement over previous studies. Improvements observed in the ability of intercomparison participants to estimate neutron and gamma doses under criticality accident conditions can be partly attributed to experience in previous NAD studies which have provided practical tests of dosimetry systems, enabled participants to improve evaluation methods, and standardized dose reporting conventions. 16 refs., 15 tabs.

  17. Dosimetry Evaluation of In-Core and Above-Core Zirconium Alloy Samples in a PWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Benjamin W.; Foster, John P.; Greenwood, Larry R.

    2016-02-01

    A description of the neutron fluence analysis of activated zirconium alloys samples at a Westinghouse 3-loop reactor is presented. These samples were irradiated in the core and in the fuel plenum region, where dosimetry measurements are relatively rare compared with regions radially outward of the core. Dosimetry measurements performed by Batelle/PNNL are compared to the calculational models. Good agreement is shown with the in-core measurements when using analysis conditions expected to best represent this region, such as an assembly-specific axial power distribution. However, the use of these conditions to evaluate dosimetry in the fuel plenum region can lead to significant underestimation of the fluence. The use of a flat axial power distribution, however, does not underestimate the fluence in the fuel plenum region.

  18. Evaluation of detectors for the small field measurements used for clinical radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Miljenko

    Advanced radiation therapy treatments with very small field sizes are complex. Increasingly higher doses delivered in single or few fractions are being commonly used for the treatments of the small target volume. Absolute or relative small field dosimetry is difficult due to radiation transport. Therefore it is very important to understand characteristics of the small field, detector selection as well as correction factors that have to be taken into account for the accurate measurements. Reducing uncertainty in relative dose measurement and modeling dose on treatment planning systems are factors contributing to the accuracy of the small field radiation treatments. Several challenges in small field dosimetry arise because of the lack of lateral charge particle equilibrium as well as the occlusion of the direct photon beam source and collimator settings. Presence of low-density media in irradiation geometry does complicate dosimetry even more. All those conditions are representing the challenge when it comes to dosimetric measurements. Size and construction are crucial when it comes to choice of the detector. Depending on beam energy, resolving the beam profile and penumbra for the small field sizes are a challenge and practically impossible with detectors commonly used in clinics. With decreasing field size and due to changes in particle spectrum, variations in radiological parameters have to be taken into account. To measure percent depth dose, tissue maximum ratios, tissue phantom ratios as well as output factors for the small field size experimental studies and Monte Carlo simulations have been conducted to determine appropriate detectors for the measurements. The primary goal of Specific Aim 1 was experimental quantification of the performance parameters for single detectors used for dosimetric verification of the small fields in radiotherapy. The proposed method and qualitative value for appropriate detectors selection defined by field size has been set. The

  19. Applying an analytical method to study neutron behavior for dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, S. A. Mousavi

    2016-12-01

    In this investigation, a new dosimetry process is studied by applying an analytical method. This novel process is associated with a human liver tissue. The human liver tissue has compositions including water, glycogen and etc. In this study, organic compound materials of liver are decomposed into their constituent elements based upon mass percentage and density of every element. The absorbed doses are computed by analytical method in all constituent elements of liver tissue. This analytical method is introduced applying mathematical equations based on neutron behavior and neutron collision rules. The results show that the absorbed doses are converged for neutron energy below 15MeV. This method can be applied to study the interaction of neutrons in other tissues and estimating the absorbed dose for a wide range of neutron energy.

  20. Mid-infrared laser orbital septal tightening: ex vivo dosimetry study and pilot clinical study.

    PubMed

    Chu, Eugene A; Li, Michael; Lazarow, Frances B; Wong, Brian J F

    2014-01-01

    Blepharoplasty is one of the most commonly performed facial aesthetic surgeries. While myriad techniques exist to improve the appearance of the lower eyelids, there is no clear consensus on the optimal management of the orbital septum. To evaluate the safety and feasibility of the use of the holmium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Ho:YAG) laser for orbital septal tightening, and to determine whether modest use of this laser would provide some degree of clinical efficacy. Direct laser irradiation of ex vivo bovine tissue was used to determine appropriate laser dosimetry using infrared thermal imaging and optical coherence tomography before conducting a pilot clinical study in 5 patients. Laser irradiation of the lower eyelid orbital septum was performed through a transconjunctival approach. Standardized preoperative and postoperative photographs were taken for each patient and evaluated by 6 unbiased aesthetic surgeons. Use of the Ho:YAG laser for orbital septal tightening. To determine appropriate laser dosimetry, infrared thermal imaging and optical coherence tomography were used to monitor temperature and tissue shape changes of ex vivo bovine tissue that was subjected to direct laser irradiation. For the clinical study, preoperative and postoperative photographs were evaluated by 6 surgeons on a 10-point Likert scale. Optical coherence tomography demonstrated that laser irradiation of bovine tissue to a temperature range of 60°C to 80°C resulted in an increase in thickness of up to 2-fold. There were no complications or adverse cosmetic outcomes in the patient study. Patient satisfaction with the results of surgery averaged 7 on a 10-point Likert scale. For 3 patients, 3 (50%) of the evaluators believed there was a mild improvement in appearance of the lower eyelids after surgery. The remaining patients were thought to have no significant changes. Transconjunctival Ho:YAG laser blepharoplasty is a safe procedure that may ameliorate mild pseudoherniation of lower

  1. Absorbed dose to water based dosimetry versus air kerma based dosimetry for high-energy photon beams: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Palmans, Hugo; Nafaa, Laila; De, Jans Jo; Gillis, Sofie; Hoornaert, Marie-Thérèse; Martens, Chantal; Piessens, Marleen; Thierens, Hubert; Van der Plaetsen, Ann; Vynckier, Stefaan

    2002-02-07

    In recent years, a change has been proposed from air kerma based reference dosimetry to absorbed dose based reference dosimetry for all radiotherapy beams of ionizing radiation. In this paper, a dosimetry study is presented in which absorbed dose based dosimetry using recently developed formalisms was compared with air kerma based dosimetry using older formalisms. Three ionization chambers of each of three different types were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water and air kerma and sent to five hospitals. There, reference dosimetry with all the chambers was performed in a total of eight high-energy clinical photon beams. The selected chamber types were the NE2571, the PTW-30004 and the Wellhöfer-FC65G (previously Wellhöfer-IC70). Having a graphite wall, they exhibit a stable volume and the presence of an aluminium electrode ensures the robustness of these chambers. The data were analysed with the most important recommendations for clinical dosimetry: IAEA TRS-398, AAPM TG-51, IAEA TRS-277, NCS report-2 (presently recommended in Belgium) and AAPM TG-21. The necessary conversion factors were taken from those protocols, or calculated using the data in the different protocols if data for a chamber type are lacking. Polarity corrections were within 0.1% for all chambers in all beams. Recombination corrections were consistent with theoretical predictions, did not vary within a chamber type and only slightly between different chamber types. The maximum chamber-to-chamber variations of the dose obtained with the different formalisms within the same chamber type were between 0.2% and 0.6% for the NE2571, between 0.2% and 0.6% for the PTW-30004 and 0.1% and 0.3% for the Wellhöfer-FC65G for the different beams. The absorbed dose results for the NE2571 and Wellhöfer-FC65G chambers were in good agreement for all beams and all formalisms. The PTW-30004 chambers gave a small but systematically higher result compared to the result for the NE2571 chambers (on the

  2. Evaluation of dosimetry and image of very low-dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric positron emission tomography/computed tomography: phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, Y. K.; Park, H. H.; Lee, C. H.; Kim, H. S.; Lyu, K. Y.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, phantom was used to evaluate attenuation correction computed tomography (CT) dose and image in case of pediatric positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan. Three PET/CT scanners were used along with acryl phantom in the size for infant and ion-chamber dosimeter. The CT image acquisition conditions were changed from 10 to 20, 40, 80, 100 and 160 mA and from 80 to 100, 120 and 140 kVp, which aimed at evaluating penetrate dose and computed tomography dose indexvolume (CTDIvol) value. And NEMA PET Phantom™ was used to obtain PET image under the same CT conditions in order to evaluate each attenuation-corrected PET image based on standard uptake value (SUV) value and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In general, the penetrate dose was reduced by around 92% under the minimum CT conditions (80 kVp and 10 mA) with the decrease in CTDIvol value by around 88%, compared with the pediatric abdomen CT conditions (100 kVp and 100 mA). The PET image with its attenuation corrected according to each CT condition showed no change in SUV value and no influence on the SNR. In conclusion, if the minimum dose CT that is properly applied to body of pediatric patient is corrected for attenuation to ensure that the effective dose is reduced by around 90% or more compared with that for adult patient, this will be useful to reduce radiation exposure level.

  3. Egyptian limestone for gamma dosimetry: an electron paramagnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, E.

    2014-04-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) properties of limestone from a certain Egyptian site were investigated in order to propose an efficient and low-cost gamma dosimeter. Radiation-induced free radicals were of one type which was produced in the limestone samples at g=2.0066 after exposure to gamma radiation (60Co). EPR spectrum was recorded and analyzed. The microwave power saturation curve and the effect of changing modulation amplitude on peak-to- peak signal height were investigated. The response of limestone to different radiation doses (0.5-20 kGy) was studied. Except for the decrease in signal intensities during the first five hours following irradiation, over the period of two months fair stabilities of signal intensities were noticed. From the current results, it is possible to conclude that natural limestone may be a suitable material for radiation dosimetry in the range of irradiation processing.

  4. SurgiLight bent-tip optical fiber: preliminary dosimetry and canine studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Douglas E.; Cromeens, Douglas M.; Stoddard, Cindy M.; Klaasen, Garry L.; Price, Roger E.

    1994-05-01

    We report preliminary potato dosimetry and canine studies evaluating a new 1,000-(mu) optical fiber whose distal tip has been bent to 45 degree(s), allowing for endoscopic delivery of neodymium:YAG laser energy at an angle of 60 degree(s). Our results suggest that this fiber is comparable with other more complex angled delivery systems; has several advantages: it can deliver greater power over longer time intervals, producing larger volumes of coagulative necrosis, and it may be operated in a contact mode within a fluid medium without fiber `burnout.' This fiber should prove useful for transurethral laser ablation of the prostate.

  5. Evaluation of a commercial flatbed document scanner and radiographic film scanner for radiochromic EBT film dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Matney, Jason E; Parker, Brent C; Neck, Daniel W; Henkelmann, Greg; Rosen, Isaac I

    2010-04-19

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the performance and assess the utility of two different types of scanners for radiochromic EBT film dosimetry: a commercial flatbed document scanner and a widely used radiographic film scanner. We evaluated the Epson Perfection V700 Photo flatbed scanner and the Vidar VXR Dosimetry Pro Advantage scanner as measurement devices for radiochromic EBT film. Measurements were made of scan orientation effects, response uniformity, and scanner noise. Scanners were tested using films irradiated with eight separate 3x3cm2 fields to doses ranging from 0.115-5.119 Gy. ImageJ and RIT software was used for analyzing the Epson and Vidar scans, respectively. For repeated scans of a single film, the measurements in each dose region were reproducible to within +/- 0.3% standard deviation (SD) with both scanners. Film-to-film variations for corresponding doses were measured to be within +/- 0.4% SD for both Epson scanner and Vidar scanners. Overall, the Epson scanner showed a 10% smaller range of pixel value compared to the Vidar scanner. Scanner noise was small: +/- 0.3% SD for the Epson and +/- 0.2% for the Vidar. Overall measurement uniformity for blank film in both systems was better than +/- 2%, provided that the leading and trailing 2 cm film edges were neglected in the Vidar system. In this region artifacts are attributed to the film rollers. Neither system demonstrated a clear measurement advantage. The Epson scanner is a relatively inexpensive method for analyzing radiochromic film, but there is a lack of commercially available software. For a clinic already using a Vidar scanner, applying it to radiochromic film is attractive because commercial software is available. However, care must be taken to avoid using the leading and trailing film edges.

  6. Recent uses of biological data for the evaluation of A-bomb radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Stram, D O; Sposto, R

    1991-03-01

    Random errors in the DS86 radiation dose estimates used in the analysis of A-bomb survivor data are recognized to have an important impact upon estimates of the risk of late effects such as cancer. Little however is known for certain concerning the distribution of such random errors. This paper gives an overview of recent work at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) using multivariate analysis of biological data, including acute effects of radiation exposure, late effects (eg leukemia mortality) and stable chromosome aberrations, for the purpose of evaluating the extent of random error in the estimation of individual doses using DS86. The emphasis here is on analyses of apparent association between biological endpoints, in light of a dosimetry error model framework proposed recently by Pierce et al. Analyses performed to date appear to be consistent with the view that lognormal random dosimetry errors with a standard deviation of 40% or greater of true dose may exist in DS86. Association between radiogenic outcomes in A-bomb survivors, after adjustment for DS86 estimated dose level, has been detected for such widely varying pairs of outcomes as mutant T-cell frequencies and chromosome aberrations, epilation and leukemia mortality, and epilation and chromosome aberrations. The motivation for examining association between pairs of biological endpoints has usually been to determine the extent to which radiation sensitivity varies between individual survivors. Recognizing, however, that random error in dose estimates results in apparent association between biological outcomes is crucial to interpreting studies, such as these, which use data on multiple biological endpoints. To go one step further, in situations where there is a prior knowledge about the biological plausibility of such associations in outcome data the amount of association between radiogenic outcomes (remaining after adjustment for estimated dose), to the extent that they are greater than

  7. The Evaluation and Study of Modern Radiation Dosimetry Methods as Applied to Advanced Radiation Therapy Treatments Using Intensity Modulated Megavoltage Photon Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra K. K.

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate quasi-3D arrays for use with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and to determine their clinical relevance. This is achieved using a Delta4 from Scandidos and ArcCheck from Sun Nuclear and the associated software. While certain aspects of these devices and software have been previously evaluated, the main goal of this work is to evaluate the new aspects, such as reconstructing dose on a patient CT set, and extending the capabilities. This includes the capability to reconstruct the dose based on a helical delivery as well as studying the dose to a moving target using measurement-guided motion simulations. It was found that Sun Nuclear's ArcCheck/3DVH system exhibited excellent agreement for dose reconstruction for IMRT/VMAT using a traditional C-arm linear accelerator and stringent 2%/2mm comparison constraints. It also is a powerful tool for measurement-guided dose estimates for moving targets, allowing for many simulations to be performed based on one measurement and the target motion data. For dose reconstruction for a helical delivery, the agreement was not as good for the stringent comparison but was reasonable for the clinically acceptable 3%/3mm comparison. Scandidos' Delta4 shows good agreement with stringent 2%/2mm constraints for its dose reconstruction on the phantom. However, the dose reconstruction on the patient CT set was poor and needs more work. Overall, it was found that quasi-3D arrays are powerful tools for dose reconstruction and treatment plan comparisons. The ability to reconstruct the dose allows for a dose resolution comparable to the treatment plan, which negates the previous issues with inadequate sampling and resolution issues found when just comparing the diodes. The ability to quickly and accurately compare many plans and target motions with minimum setup makes the quasi-3D array an attractive tool for both commissioning and patient specific

  8. Evaluation of GAFCHROMIC registered EBT film for CyberKnife registered dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Ellen E.; Daskalov, George M.

    2007-06-15

    External beam therapy (EBT) GAFCHROMIC registered film is evaluated for dosimetry and characterization of the CyberKnife registered radiation beams. Percentage depth doses, lateral beam profiles, and output factors are measured in solid water using EBT GAFCHROMIC registered film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ) for the 6 MV radiation beams of diameter 5 to 60 mm produced by the CyberKnife registered (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). The data are compared to those measured with the PTW 60008 diode and the Wellhofer CC01 ion chamber in water. For the small radiation field sizes used in stereotactic radiosurgery, lateral electronic disequilibrium and steep dose gradients exist in a large portion of these fields, requiring the use of high-resolution measurement techniques. For small beams, the detector size approaches the dimensions of the beam and adversely affects measurement accuracy in regions where the gradient varies across the detector. When film is the detector, the scanning system is usually the resolution-limiting component. Radiographic films based upon silver halide (AgH) emulsions are widely used for relative dosimetry of external radiation treatment beams in the megavoltage energy range, because of their good spatial resolution and capability to provide integrated dosimetry over two dimensions. Film dosimetry, however, has drawbacks due to its steep energy dependence at low photon energies as well as film processor and densitometer artifacts. EBT radiochromic film, introduced in 2004 specifically for IMRT dosimetry, may be a detector of choice for the characterization of small radiosurgical beams, because of its near-tissue equivalence, radiation beam energy independence, high spatial resolution, and self developing properties. For radiation beam sizes greater than 10 mm, the film measurements were identical to those of the diode and ion chamber. For the smaller beam diameters of 7.5 and 5 mm, however, there were differences in the data measured with

  9. Quantitative evaluation of 3D dosimetry for stereotactic volumetric-modulated arc delivery using COMPASS.

    PubMed

    Vikraman, Subramani; Manigandan, Durai; Karrthick, Karukkupalayam Palaniappan; Sambasivaselli, Raju; Senniandavar, Vellaingiri; Ramu, Mahendran; Rajesh, Thiyagarajan; Lutz, Muller; Muthukumaran, Manavalan; Karthikeyan, Nithyanantham; Tejinder, Kataria

    2014-01-07

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the patient-specific 3D dosimetry tool COMPASS with 2D array MatriXX detector for stereotactic volumetric-modulated arc delivery. Twenty-five patients CT images and RT structures from different sites (brain, head & neck, thorax, abdomen, and spine) were taken from CyberKnife Multiplan planning system for this study. All these patients underwent radical stereotactic treatment in CyberKnife. For each patient, linac based volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) stereotactic plans were generated in Monaco TPS v3.1 using Elekta Beam Modulator MLC. Dose prescription was in the range of 5-20 Gy per fraction. Target prescription and critical organ constraints were tried to match the delivered treatment plans. Each plan quality was analyzed using conformity index (CI), conformity number (CN), gradient Index (GI), target coverage (TC), and dose to 95% of volume (D95). Monaco Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated treatment plan delivery accuracy was quantitatively evaluated with COMPASS-calculated (CCA) dose and COMPASS indirectly measured (CME) dose based on dose-volume histogram metrics. In order to ascertain the potential of COMPASS 3D dosimetry for stereotactic plan delivery, 2D fluence verification was performed with MatriXX using MultiCube phantom. Routine quality assurance of absolute point dose verification was performed to check the overall delivery accuracy. Quantitative analyses of dose delivery verification were compared with pass and fail criteria of 3 mm and 3% distance to agreement and dose differences. Gamma passing rate was compared with 2D fluence verification from MatriXX with MultiCube. Comparison of COMPASS reconstructed dose from measured fluence and COMPASS computed dose has shown a very good agreement with TPS calculated dose. Each plan was evaluated based on dose volume parameters for target volumes such as dose at 95% of volume (D95) and average dose. For critical organs dose at 20% of volume (D20

  10. Investigation of practical approaches to evaluating cumulative dose for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) from standard CT dosimetry measurements: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Abuhaimed, Abdullah; Martin, Colin J; Sankaralingam, Marimuthu; Gentle, David J

    2015-07-21

    a CBCT scan over the 100 mm length. Like the Gx(L) function, the Gx(W)100 function showed only a weak dependency on tube potential at most positions for the phantoms studied. The results were fitted to polynomial equations from which f (0) within the longer PMMA, PE, or water phantoms can be evaluated from measurements of f 100(150)x. Comparisons with other studies, suggest that these functions may be suitable for application to any CT or CBCT scan acquired with stationary table mode.

  11. Investigation of practical approaches to evaluating cumulative dose for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) from standard CT dosimetry measurements: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuhaimed, Abdullah; Martin, Colin J.; Sankaralingam, Marimuthu; Gentle, David J.

    2015-07-01

    a CBCT scan over the 100 mm length. Like the Gx(L) function, the Gx(W)100 function showed only a weak dependency on tube potential at most positions for the phantoms studied. The results were fitted to polynomial equations from which f (0) within the longer PMMA, PE, or water phantoms can be evaluated from measurements of f 100(150)x. Comparisons with other studies, suggest that these functions may be suitable for application to any CT or CBCT scan acquired with stationary table mode.

  12. Evaluation of Effective Sources in Uncertainty Measurements of Personal Dosimetry by a Harshaw TLD System.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Pooya, Sm; Orouji, T

    2014-06-01

    The accurate results of the individual doses in personal dosimety which are reported by the service providers in personal dosimetry are very important. There are national / international criteria for acceptable dosimetry system performance. Objective : In this research, the sources of uncertainties are identified, measured and calculated in a personal dosimetry system by TLD. These sources are included; inhomogeneity of TLDs sensitivity, variability of TLD readings due to limited sensitivity and background, energy dependence, directional dependence, non-linearity of the response, fading, dependent on ambient temperature / humidity and calibration errors, which may affect on the dose responses. Some parameters which influence on the above sources of uncertainty are studied for Harshaw TLD-100 cards dosimeters as well as the hot gas Harshaw 6600 TLD reader system. The individual uncertainties of each sources was measured less than 6.7% in 68% confidence level. The total uncertainty was calculated 17.5% with 95% confidence level. The TLD-100 personal dosimeters as well as the Harshaw TLD-100 reader 6600 system show the total uncertainty value which is less than that of admissible value of 42% for personal dosimetry services.

  13. Evaluation of Effective Sources in Uncertainty Measurements of Personal Dosimetry by a Harshaw TLD System

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini Pooya, SM; Orouji, T

    2014-01-01

    Background: The accurate results of the individual doses in personal dosimety which are reported by the service providers in personal dosimetry are very important. There are national / international criteria for acceptable dosimetry system performance. Objective: In this research, the sources of uncertainties are identified, measured and calculated in a personal dosimetry system by TLD. Method: These sources are included; inhomogeneity of TLDs sensitivity, variability of TLD readings due to limited sensitivity and background, energy dependence, directional dependence, non-linearity of the response, fading, dependent on ambient temperature / humidity and calibration errors, which may affect on the dose responses. Some parameters which influence on the above sources of uncertainty are studied for Harshaw TLD-100 cards dosimeters as well as the hot gas Harshaw 6600 TLD reader system. Results: The individual uncertainties of each sources was measured less than 6.7% in 68% confidence level. The total uncertainty was calculated 17.5% with 95% confidence level. Conclusion: The TLD-100 personal dosimeters as well as the Harshaw TLD-100 reader 6600 system show the total uncertainty value which is less than that of admissible value of 42% for personal dosimetry services. PMID:25505769

  14. Effects of random dosimetry errors and the use of data on acute symptoms for dosimetry evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1983-09-01

    Two approaches are used to address questions regarding dose measurement errors. The first is to describe and compare the effects of random error for several dose treatments including the use of grouped and ungrouped data, and analyses with and without truncation at 600 rad. It is found that the ways in which measurement error is most likely to mislead are through downward bias in the estimated regression coefficients and through distortion of the shape of the dose response curve. The second approach makes use of data on acute symptons to identify survivors in particular shielding situations or locations whose dose estimates may be especially biased or subject to unusual amounts of random error. It is found that the dose-response curves for acute symptoms differ considerably by many of the factors studied, but it is not possible to separate differences resulting from varying degrees of random error from systematic bias. The analyses also suggest that doses of Hiroshima survivors are in general better estimated than doses of Nagasaki survivors, a situation which could easily bias city comparisons. 17 references.

  15. Dosimetric characterization of two radium sources for retrospective dosimetry studies

    SciTech Connect

    Candela-Juan, C.; Karlsson, M.; Lundell, M.; Ballester, F.; Tedgren, Å. Carlsson

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: During the first part of the 20th century, {sup 226}Ra was the most used radionuclide for brachytherapy. Retrospective accurate dosimetry, coupled with patient follow up, is important for advancing knowledge on long-term radiation effects. The purpose of this work was to dosimetrically characterize two {sup 226}Ra sources, commonly used in Sweden during the first half of the 20th century, for retrospective dose–effect studies. Methods: An 8 mg {sup 226}Ra tube and a 10 mg {sup 226}Ra needle, used at Radiumhemmet (Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden), from 1925 to the 1960s, were modeled in two independent Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes: GEANT4 and MCNP5. Absorbed dose and collision kerma around the two sources were obtained, from which the TG-43 parameters were derived for the secular equilibrium state. Furthermore, results from this dosimetric formalism were compared with results from a MC simulation with a superficial mould constituted by five needles inside a glass casing, placed over a water phantom, trying to mimic a typical clinical setup. Calculated absorbed doses using the TG-43 formalism were also compared with previously reported measurements and calculations based on the Sievert integral. Finally, the dose rate at large distances from a {sup 226}Ra point-like-source placed in the center of 1 m radius water sphere was calculated with GEANT4. Results: TG-43 parameters [including g{sub L}(r), F(r, θ), Λ, and s{sub K}] have been uploaded in spreadsheets as additional material, and the fitting parameters of a mathematical curve that provides the dose rate between 10 and 60 cm from the source have been provided. Results from TG-43 formalism are consistent within the treatment volume with those of a MC simulation of a typical clinical scenario. Comparisons with reported measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters show differences up to 13% along the transverse axis of the radium needle. It has been estimated that

  16. Dosimetric characterization of two radium sources for retrospective dosimetry studies.

    PubMed

    Candela-Juan, C; Karlsson, M; Lundell, M; Ballester, F; Tedgren, Å Carlsson

    2015-05-01

    During the first part of the 20th century, (226)Ra was the most used radionuclide for brachytherapy. Retrospective accurate dosimetry, coupled with patient follow up, is important for advancing knowledge on long-term radiation effects. The purpose of this work was to dosimetrically characterize two (226)Ra sources, commonly used in Sweden during the first half of the 20th century, for retrospective dose-effect studies. An 8 mg (226)Ra tube and a 10 mg (226)Ra needle, used at Radiumhemmet (Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden), from 1925 to the 1960s, were modeled in two independent Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes: geant4 and mcnp5. Absorbed dose and collision kerma around the two sources were obtained, from which the TG-43 parameters were derived for the secular equilibrium state. Furthermore, results from this dosimetric formalism were compared with results from a MC simulation with a superficial mould constituted by five needles inside a glass casing, placed over a water phantom, trying to mimic a typical clinical setup. Calculated absorbed doses using the TG-43 formalism were also compared with previously reported measurements and calculations based on the Sievert integral. Finally, the dose rate at large distances from a (226)Ra point-like-source placed in the center of 1 m radius water sphere was calculated with geant4. TG-43 parameters [including gL(r), F(r, θ), Λ, and sK] have been uploaded in spreadsheets as additional material, and the fitting parameters of a mathematical curve that provides the dose rate between 10 and 60 cm from the source have been provided. Results from TG-43 formalism are consistent within the treatment volume with those of a MC simulation of a typical clinical scenario. Comparisons with reported measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters show differences up to 13% along the transverse axis of the radium needle. It has been estimated that the uncertainty associated to the absorbed dose within the

  17. Eye lens dosimetry in anesthesiology: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Vaes, Bart; Van Keer, Karel; Struelens, Lara; Schoonjans, Werner; Nijs, Ivo; Vandevenne, Jan; Van Poucke, Sven

    2017-04-01

    The eye lens is one of the most sensitive organs for radiation injury and exposure might lead to radiation induced cataract. Eye lens dosimetry in anesthesiology has been published in few clinical trials and an active debate about the causality of radiation induced cataract is still ongoing. Recently, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommended a reduction in the annual dose limit for occupational exposure for the lens of the eye from 150 to 20 mSv, averaged over a period of 5 years, with the dose in a single year not exceeding 50 mSv. This prospective study investigated eye lens dosimetry in anesthesiology practice during a routine year of professional activity. The radiation exposure measured represented the exposure in a normal working schedule of a random anesthesiologist during 1 month and this cumulative eye lens dose was extrapolated to 1 year. Next, eye lens doses were measured in anesthesiology during neuro-embolisation procedures, radiofrequency ablations or vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty procedures. The eye lens doses are measured in terms of the dose equivalent H p(3) with the Eye-D dosimeter (Radcard, Poland) close to the right eye (on the temple). In 16 anesthesiologists, the estimated annual eye lens doses range from a minimum of 0.4 mSv to a maximum of 3.5 mSv with an average dose of 1.33 mSv. Next, eye lens doses were measured for nine neuro-embolisation procedures, ten radiofrequency ablations and six vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty procedures. Average eye lens doses of 77 ± 76 µSv for neuro-embolisations, 38 ± 34 µSv for cardiac ablations and 40 ± 44 µSv for vertebro-/kyphoplasty procedures were recorded. The maximum doses were respectively 264, 97 and 122 µSv. This study demonstrated that the estimated annual eye lens dose is well below the revised ICRP's limit of 20 mSv/year. However, we demonstrated high maximum and average doses during neuro-embolisation, cardiac ablation and vertebro

  18. 1982 US-CEC neutron personnel dosimetry intercomparison study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.; Schraube, H.; Burger, G.

    1983-11-01

    A neutron personnel dosimetry intercomparison study was conducted during April 19-23, 1982, as a joint effort between the United States and the Commission of European Communities. Dosimeters from 48 participating agencies were mounted on cylindrical phantoms and exposed to a range of low-level dose equivalents (0.48-13.91 mSv neutron and 0.02-1.32 mSv gamma) in nine different radiation fields. Exposure conditions considered in this study included four mixed-field spectra produced using the Health Physics Research Reactor, four monoenergetic neutron fields generated by accelerators, and one 15-cm D/sub 2/O-moderated californium source spectrum. In general, neutron results reported by the participating agencies were consistent with expected dosimeter performance based on energy response characteristics of the detection systems. Albedo dosimeters, which were the most popular neutron monitoring systems used in this study, provided the best overall accuracy for all exposure conditions. Film, Cr-39 recoil track, and Th-232 fission track systems generally underestimated dose equivalents relative to reference values. Associated gamma measurements showed that TLD monitors produced more accurate results than film dosimeters although both systems overestimated gamma dose equivalents in mixed radiation fields. 24 references, 10 figures, 19 tables.

  19. Dosimetry cross-section evaluation by cubic B-spline fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, S.

    1994-12-31

    Five threshold dosimetry cross-sections have been re-evaluated on the basis of experimental data for update of JENDL DOSIMETRY FILE: {sup 23}Na(n,2n){sup 22}Na, {sup 54}Mn(n,2n){sup 54}Mn, {sup 59}Co(n,2n){sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Ni(n,p){sup 60}Co, and {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92m}Nb. The experimental data selection from the data base was made with the aide of a pattern clustering method. The selected data were fitted by a set of cubic B-spline functions using the least-squares method. The covariance data were simultaneously produced.

  20. Inhomogeneity in optical properties of rat brain: a study for LLLT dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Marcelo V. P.; Prates, Renato; Kato, Ilka T.; Sabino, Caetano P.; Yoshimura, Tania M.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Magalhães, Ana C.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2013-03-01

    Over the last few years, low-level light therapy (LLLT) has shown an incredible suitability for a wide range of applications for central nervous system (CNS) related diseases. In this therapeutic modality light dosimetry is extremely critical so the study of light propagation through the CNS organs is of great importance. To better understand how light intensity is delivered to the most relevant neural sites we evaluated optical transmission through slices of rat brain point by point. We experimented red (λ = 660 nm) and near infrared (λ = 808 nm) diode laser light analyzing the light penetration and distribution in the whole brain. A fresh Wistar rat (Rattus novergicus) brain was cut in sagittal slices and illuminated with a broad light beam. A high-resolution digital camera was employed to acquire data of transmitted light. Spatial profiles of the light transmitted through the sample were obtained from the images. Peaks and valleys in the profiles show sites where light was less or more attenuated. The peak intensities provide information about total attenuation and the peak widths are correlated to the scattering coefficient at that individual portion of the sample. The outcomes of this study provide remarkable information for LLLT dose-dependent studies involving CNS and highlight the importance of LLLT dosimetry in CNS organs for large range of applications in animal and human diseases.

  1. Evaluation of the US Army DT-236 battlefield personnel dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Oyan, R.; Sims, C.S.; Dooley, M.A.

    1986-06-01

    Performance characteristics of the US Army DT-236 battlefield personnel dosimetry system were evaluated using the Health Physics Research Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The DT-236 dosimeter is designed to measure total (neutron plus gamma) radiation dose using a radiophotoluminescent (RPL) detector for gamma rays and a silicon diode for fast neutrons. Areas considered in this evaluation included preirradiation dose indication; accuracy and precision of total, gamma, and neutron dose measurements; fading; angular response; temperature dependence; and relative dosimeter response in air and on various body locations. Experimental results for a variety of radiation fields and dose levels indicate that the existing system overestimates total, neutron, and gamma radiation doses in air by about 20 to 60% relative to reference values. Associated measurement precisions were about +-5% of the means for doses above approximately 0.5 Gy. Fading characteristics, angular dependence, and temperature dependence of the RPL and diode systems were consistent with results expected based on detector characteristics and previous performance studies. Recommendations to improve existing reader performance and measurement accuracy are also presented.

  2. OSL studies of alkali fluoroperovskite single crystals for radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, D. Joseph; Raja, A.; Madhusoodanan, U.; Annalakshmi, O.; Ramasamy, P.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a preliminary investigation of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of alkali fluoroperovskite single crystals for radiation dosimetry. The perovskite-like KMgF3, NaMgF3 and LiBaF3 polycrystalline compounds doped with rare earths (Eu2+ and Ce3+) were synthesized by standard solid state reaction technique. Phase purity of the synthesized compounds was analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction technique. Single crystals of these compounds have been grown from melt by using vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger method. The Linearly Modulated OSL and Continuous Wave OSL measurements were performed in these alkali fluorides using blue light stimulation. Thermal bleaching experiments have shown that OSL signals originate from traps which are unstable near 200 °C, thus proving the suitability of the signals for dosimetric purposes. Optical bleaching measurements were also performed for these fluoride samples. OSL dose response was studied as a function of dose which was found to increase with beta dose.

  3. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Sega, G.A.

    1990-11-06

    The traveler participated in an International Symposium on Trends in Biological Dosimetry and presented an invited paper entitled, Adducts in sperm protamine and DNA vs mutation frequency.'' The purpose of the Symposium was to examine the applicability of new methods to study quantitatively the effects of xenobiotic agents (radiation and chemicals) on molecular, cellular and organ systems, with special emphasis on human biological dosimetry. The general areas covered at the meeting included studies on parent compounds and metabolites; protein adducts; DNA adducts; gene mutations; cytogenetic end-points and reproductive methods.

  4. External audit of photon beams by mailed film dosimetry: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, J.; Gomola, I.; Izewska, J.; Huyskens, D.; Dutreix, A.

    1997-07-01

    A feasibility study for mailed film dosimetry has been performed. The global reproducibility of the method is better than 2%. It is shown that the normalized sensitometric curve does not depend on photon beam quality in the range from Co-60 -rays to 18 MV x-rays, although the dose per optical density decreases when the energy increases. The fading of the latent image before film processing is only 3% per month and the normalized sensitometric curve is not modified after a period of 51 days between irradiation and processing. Sets of films were mailed to three different institutes for irradiation and returned for processing and evaluation after more than two months in order to verify that mailing of irradiated and unprocessed films does not produce unwanted artefacts. Finally the feasibility of external audits with mailed film dosimetry is illustrated by comparison of beam profiles measured with films and ionization chambers in a polystyrene phantom.

  5. The Impact of Iterative Reconstruction on Computed Tomography Radiation Dosimetry: Evaluation in a Routine Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Moorin, Rachael E.; Gibson, David A. J.; Forsyth, Rene K.; Fox, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of introduction of iterative reconstruction as a mandated software upgrade on radiation dosimetry in routine clinical practice over a range of computed tomography examinations. Methods Random samples of scanning data were extracted from a centralised Picture Archiving Communication System pertaining to 10 commonly performed computed tomography examination types undertaken at two hospitals in Western Australia, before and after the introduction of iterative reconstruction. Changes in the mean dose length product and effective dose were evaluated along with estimations of associated changes to annual cancer incidence. Results We observed statistically significant reductions in the effective radiation dose for head computed tomography (22–27%) consistent with those reported in the literature. In contrast the reductions observed for non-contrast chest (37–47%); chest pulmonary embolism study (28%), chest/abdominal/pelvic study (16%) and thoracic spine (39%) computed tomography. Statistically significant reductions in radiation dose were not identified in angiographic computed tomography. Dose reductions translated to substantial lowering of the lifetime attributable risk, especially for younger females, and estimated numbers of incident cancers. Conclusion Reduction of CT dose is a priority Iterative reconstruction algorithms have the potential to significantly assist with dose reduction across a range of protocols. However, this reduction in dose is achieved via reductions in image noise. Fully realising the potential dose reduction of iterative reconstruction requires the adjustment of image factors and forgoing the noise reduction potential of the iterative algorithm. Our study has demonstrated a reduction in radiation dose for some scanning protocols, but not to the extent experimental studies had previously shown or in all protocols expected, raising questions about the extent to which iterative reconstruction achieves dose

  6. Workshop Report on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry--Residual Radiation Exposure: Recent Research and Suggestions for Future Studies

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-06

    There is a need for accurate dosimetry for studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors because of the important role that these studies play in worldwide radiation protection standards. International experts have developed dosimetry systems, such as the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), which assess the initial radiation exposure to gamma rays and neutrons but only briefly consider the possibility of some minimal contribution to the total body dose by residual radiation exposure. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of the topic of residual radiation exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, recently reported studies were reviewed at a technical session at the 57th Annual Meeting of the Health Physics Society in Sacramento, California, 22-26 July 2012. A one-day workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of these newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposures to the atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Suggestions for possible future studies are also included in this workshop report.

  7. Workshop report on atomic bomb dosimetry-residual radiation exposure: recent research and suggestions for future studies.

    PubMed

    Kerr, George D; Egbert, Stephen D; Al-Nabulsi, Isaf; Beck, Harold L; Cullings, Harry M; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Imanaka, Tetsuji; Kaul, Dean C; Maruyama, Satoshi; Reeves, Glen I; Ruehm, Werner; Sakaguchi, Aya; Simon, Steven L; Spriggs, Gregory D; Stram, Daniel O; Tonda, Tetsuji; Weiss, Joseph F; Weitz, Ronald L; Young, Robert W

    2013-08-01

    There is a need for accurate dosimetry for studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors because of the important role that these studies play in worldwide radiation protection standards. International experts have developed dosimetry systems, such as the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), which assess the initial radiation exposure to gamma rays and neutrons but only briefly consider the possibility of some minimal contribution to the total body dose by residual radiation exposure. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of the topic of residual radiation exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, recently reported studies were reviewed at a technical session at the 57th Annual Meeting of the Health Physics Society in Sacramento, California, 22-26 July 2012. A one-day workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of these newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposures to the atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Suggestions for possible future studies are also included in this workshop report.

  8. Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia for Bladder Cancer: A Preclinical Dosimetry Study

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea D.; Etienne, Wiguins; Ashcraft, Kathleen A.; McNerny, Katie L.; Mashal, Alireza; Nouls, John; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Beyer, Wayne F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes a preclinical investigation of the feasibility of thermotherapy treatment of bladder cancer with Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH), performed by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Materials and Methods The bladders of twenty-five female rats were instilled with magnetite-based nanoparticles, and hyperthermia was induced using a novel small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder, CO). We aimed to increase the bladder lumen temperature to 42°C in <10 min and maintain that temperature for 60 min. Temperatures were measured within the bladder lumen and throughout the rat with seven fiberoptic probes (OpSens Technologies, Quebec, Canada). An MRI analysis was used to confirm the effectiveness of the catheterization method to deliver and maintain various nanoparticle volumes within the bladder. Thermal dosimetry measurements recorded the temperature rise of rat tissues for a variety of nanoparticle exposure conditions. Results Thermal dosimetry data demonstrated our ability to raise and control the temperature of rat bladder lumen ≥1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C with minimal heating of surrounding normal tissues. MRI scans confirmed the homogenous nanoparticle distribution throughout the bladder. Conclusion These data demonstrate that our MFH system with magnetite-based nanoparticles provide well-localized heating of rat bladder lumen with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues. PMID:24050253

  9. Applicability study on existing dosimetry systems to high-power Bremsstrahlung irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Kishor; Kojima, Takuji; Sunaga, Hiromi

    2003-12-01

    Applicability of the existing dosimetry systems to high-power Bremsstrahlung irradiation was investigated through a dose intercomparison study, where several dosimeters were irradiated in the dose range 4-12 kGy in identical polyethylene phantoms in a Bremsstrahlung beam obtained from a 5-MeV electron accelerator. Included in the study were alanine dosimeters molded by three different binders, three types of liquid dosimeters—ceric-cerous, dichromate and ethanol-chlorobenzen (ECB), and glutamine powder. The dosimeter responses for Bremsstrahlung radiation were analyzed at the issuing laboratories, and the dose values determined using calibration based on cobalt-60 gamma-ray irradiation. Dose values for all the three dose levels for all dosimetry systems were in good agreement—better than 3%. The results of the study demonstrate that these existing dosimetry systems have a potential for application to high-power Bremsstrahlung irradiation.

  10. Evaluating noncancer effects of trichloroethylene: dosimetry, mode of action, and risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Barton, H A; Clewell, H J

    2000-01-01

    Alternatives for developing chronic exposure limits for noncancer effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) were evaluated. These alternatives were organized within a framework for dose-response assessment--exposure:dosimetry (pharmacokinetics):mode of action (pharmacodynamics): response. This framework provides a consistent structure within which to make scientific judgments about available information, its interpretation, and use. These judgments occur in the selection of critical studies, internal dose metrics, pharmacokinetic models, approaches for interspecies extrapolation of pharmacodynamics, and uncertainty factors. Potentially limiting end points included developmental eye malformations, liver effects, immunotoxicity, and kidney toxicity from oral exposure and neurological, liver, and kidney effects by inhalation. Each end point was evaluated quantitatively using several methods. Default analyses used the traditional no-observed adverse effect level divided by uncertainty factors and the benchmark dose divided by uncertainty factors methods. Subsequently, mode-of-action and pharmacokinetic information were incorporated. Internal dose metrics were estimated using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for TCE and its major metabolites. This approach was notably useful with neurological and kidney toxicities. The human PBPK model provided estimates of human exposure doses for the internal dose metrics. Pharmacodynamic data or default assumptions were used for interspecies extrapolation. For liver and neurological effects, humans appear no more sensitive than rodents when internal dose metrics were considered. Therefore, the interspecies uncertainty factor was reduced, illustrating that uncertainty factors are a semiquantitative approach fitting into the organizational framework. Incorporation of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics can result in values that differ significantly from those obtained with the default methods. PMID:10807562

  11. Thorium metabolism and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.R.; Hill, R.L.; Birchall, A.; Jarvis, N.S.

    1994-07-01

    Thorium occurs widely in nature, and has been used in medicine, industry, and advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Despite many studies, there still remains uncertainty in the dosimetry of Th, particularly that associated with the Th-232 decay chain. This presentation reviews past and current uses of thorium, and describes the residual difficulties involved with monitoring methods and calculations used in both environmental and occupational exposure evaluations.

  12. Performance testing of personnel dosimetry services. Final report of a two-year pilot study, October 1977-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Plato, P.; Hudson, G.

    1980-01-01

    A two-year pilot study was conducted of the Health Physics Society Standards Committee (HPSSC) Standard titled, Criteria for Testing Personnel Dosimetry Performance. The objectives of the pilot study were: to give processors an opportunity to correct any problems that are uncovered; to develop operational and administrative prodedures to be used later by a permanent testing laboratory; and to determine whether the proposed HPSSC Standard provides an adequate and practical test of dosimetry performance. Fifty-nine dosimetry processors volunteered to submit dosimeters for test irradiations according to the requirements of the HPSSC Standard. The feasibility of using the HPSSC Standard for a future mandatory testing program for personnel dosimetry processors is discussed. This report shows the results of the pilot study and contains recommendations for revisions in the Standard that will make a mandatory testing program useful to regulatory agencies, dosimetry processors, and radiation workers that use personnel dosimeters.

  13. Comparison of Rapid Arc and Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Plans Using Unified Dosimetry Index and the Impact of Conformity Index on Unified Dosimetry Index Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Jayapalan; Shetty, Jayarama; Rao, Suresh; Hegde, Sanath; Shambhavi, C

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of conformity index in the unified dosimetry index (UDI) score for two different planning techniques namely intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and Rapid Arc. Rapid Arc and IMRT plans of 57 patients were evaluated and compared using UDI score which incorporates four indices. To determine the impact of conformity index on the IMRT and Rapid Arc plans, UDI at conformity index one of all plan (UDIunit_CI) score was calculated by assuming conformity index is equal to one. Mean and standard deviations of all indices were calculated. Rapid Arc technique plans of different treatment sites of all patients scored lesser UDI than IMRT plans, and the conformity index of Rapid Arc plan was significantly better than IMRT plan. The average dose gradient, homogeneity, coverage, and conformity index of all sites with Rapid Arc plans were 0.212 ± 0.05, 1.123 ± 0.03, 0.959 ± 0.03, and 1.056 ± 0.09; with IMRT plans were 0.190 ± 0.05, 1.113 ± 0.04, 0.950 ± 0.04, and 1.172 ± 0.16, respectively. UDI score value with actual conformity index of Rapid Arc and IMRT plans differed significantly (P < 0.001). However, UDIunit_CI score values with assumed conformity index equal to one did not differ significantly (P = 0.528). In the comparison of IMRT and Rapid Arc plans using the UDI score, the impact of conformity index was significant.

  14. Comparison of Rapid Arc and Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Plans Using Unified Dosimetry Index and the Impact of Conformity Index on Unified Dosimetry Index Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jayapalan; Shetty, Jayarama; Rao, Suresh; Hegde, Sanath; Shambhavi, C

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of conformity index in the unified dosimetry index (UDI) score for two different planning techniques namely intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and Rapid Arc. Rapid Arc and IMRT plans of 57 patients were evaluated and compared using UDI score which incorporates four indices. To determine the impact of conformity index on the IMRT and Rapid Arc plans, UDI at conformity index one of all plan (UDIunit_CI) score was calculated by assuming conformity index is equal to one. Mean and standard deviations of all indices were calculated. Rapid Arc technique plans of different treatment sites of all patients scored lesser UDI than IMRT plans, and the conformity index of Rapid Arc plan was significantly better than IMRT plan. The average dose gradient, homogeneity, coverage, and conformity index of all sites with Rapid Arc plans were 0.212 ± 0.05, 1.123 ± 0.03, 0.959 ± 0.03, and 1.056 ± 0.09; with IMRT plans were 0.190 ± 0.05, 1.113 ± 0.04, 0.950 ± 0.04, and 1.172 ± 0.16, respectively. UDI score value with actual conformity index of Rapid Arc and IMRT plans differed significantly (P < 0.001). However, UDIunit_CI score values with assumed conformity index equal to one did not differ significantly (P = 0.528). In the comparison of IMRT and Rapid Arc plans using the UDI score, the impact of conformity index was significant. PMID:28405103

  15. SU-E-T-624: Quantitative Evaluation of 2D Versus 3D Dosimetry for Stereotactic Volumetric Modulated Arc Delivery Using COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Vikraman, S; Karrthick, K; Rajesh, T; Sambasivaselli, R; Senniandanvar, V; Kataria, T; Manigandan, D; Karthikeyan, N; Muthukumaran, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitatively 2D versus 3D dosimetry for stereotactic volumetric modulated arc delivery using COMPASS with 2D array. Methods: Twenty-five patients CT images and RT structures of different sites like brain, head and neck, thorax, abdomen and spine were taken from Multiplan planning system for this study. All these patients underwent radical stereotactic treatment in Cyberknife. For each patient, linac based VMAT stereotactic plans were generated in Monaco TPS v 3.1 using Elekta Beam Modulator MLC. Dose prescription was in the range of 5-20Gy/fraction.TPS calculated VMAT plan delivery accuracy was quantitatively evaluated with COMPASS measured dose and calculated dose based on DVH metrics. In order to ascertain the potential of COMPASS 3D dosimetry for stereotactic plan delivery, 2D fluence verification was performed with MatriXX using Multicube. Results: For each site, D{sub 9} {sub 5} was achieved with 100% of prescription dose with maximum 0.05SD. Conformity index (CI) was observed closer to 1.15 in all cases. Maximum deviation of 2.62 % was observed for D{sub 9} {sub 5} when compared TPS versus COMPASS measured. Considerable deviations were observed in head and neck cases compare to other sites. The maximum mean and standard deviation for D{sub 9} {sub 5}, average target dose and average gamma were -0.78±1.72, -1.10±1.373 and 0.39±0.086 respectively. Numbers of pixels passing 2D fluence verification were observed as a mean of 99.36% ±0.455 SD with 3% dose difference and 3mm DTA. For critical organs in head and neck cases, significant dose differences were observed in 3D dosimetry while the target doses were matched well within limit in both 2D and 3D dosimetry. Conclusion: The quantitative evaluations of 2D versus 3D dosimetry for stereotactic volumetric modulated plans showed the potential of highlighting the delivery errors. This study reveals that COMPASS 3D dosimetry is an effective tool for patient

  16. Evaluation of radiograph-based interstitial implant dosimetry on computed tomography images using dose volume indices for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Ritu Raj; Dayananda, S.; Bhalawat, R. L.; Bedre, Girish N.; Deshpande, D. D.

    2007-01-01

    Conventional radiograph-based implant dosimetry fails to correlate the spatial dose distribution on patient anatomy with lack in dosimetry quality. Though these limitations are overcome in computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry, it requires an algorithm which can reconstruct catheters on the multi-planner CT images. In the absence of such algorithm, we proposed a technique in which the implanted geometry and dose distribution generated from orthogonal radiograph were mapped onto the CT data using coordinate transformation method. Radiograph-based implant dosimetry was generated for five head and neck cancer patients on Plato Sunrise treatment planning system. Dosimetry was geometrically optimized on volume, and dose was prescribed according to the natural prescription dose. The final dose distribution was retrospectively mapped onto the CT data set of the same patients using coordinate transformation method, which was verified in a phantom prior to patient study. Dosimetric outcomes were evaluated qualitatively by visualizing isodose distribution on CT images and quantitatively using the dose volume indices, which includes coverage index (CI), external volume index (EI), relative dose homogeneity index (HI), overdose volume index (OI) and conformal index (COIN). The accuracy of coordinate transformation was within ±1 mm in phantom and ±2 mm in patients. Qualitative evaluation of dosimetry on the CT images shows reasonably good coverage of target at the expense of excessive normal tissue irradiation. The mean (SD) values of CI, EI and HI were estimated to be 0.81 (0.039), 0.55 (0.174) and 0.65 (0.074) respectively. The maximum OI estimated was 0.06 (mean 0.04, SD = 0.015). Finally, the COIN computed for each patient ranged from 0.4 to 0.61 (mean 0.52, SD = 0.078). The proposed technique is feasible and accurate to implement even for the most complicated implant geometry. It allows the physicist and physician to evaluate the plan both qualitatively and

  17. Re-evaluation of the dosimetry for reactor pressure-vessel surveillance capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, R.L.; Kellogg, L.S.; Lippincott, E.P.; McElroy, W.N.; Oberg, D.L.

    1982-03-01

    Revised fluences and displacements per atom (dpa) and their uncertainties were determined after re-evaluating the neutron dosimeters from forty-one pressurized water reactor (PWR) surveillance capsules. The goals of this HEDL Reactor Dosimetry Center work are (1) to apply and test new ASTM recommended physics-dosimetry analysis methods and data being developed for LWR power plant surveillance and (2) to provide improved neutron exposure values for reactor pressure vessel steel metallurgical data bases; particularly for the changes in nil ductility transition temperature (..delta..NDTT) and upper shelf energy. Uncertainties in the FERRET-SAND adjustment Code derived neutron exposure values range from 10 to 34%. The ratio of the new to the old exposure values for fluence greater than 1 MeV varied from a low of 0.79 to a high of 2.11, with an average value of 1.30. The fission reactions for /sup 238/U and /sup 237/Np were found to be instrumental in producing low uncertainties in the exposure values (10 to 15%) whereas with their absence the uncertainty increased to 25 to 34%. Corrections for fissile impurity atoms in the /sup 238/U dosimeters were found to be as high as 29% in some cases. Other sources of corrections such as surveillance capsule perturbations and photo fission reactions have been considered.

  18. A method for evaluating treatment quality using in vivo EPID dosimetry and statistical process control in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Greer, Peter B; Simpson, John; Zwan, Benjamin J; Middleton, Richard H

    2017-03-13

    Purpose Due to increasing complexity, modern radiotherapy techniques require comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programmes, that to date generally focus on the pre-treatment stage. The purpose of this paper is to provide a method for an individual patient treatment QA evaluation and identification of a "quality gap" for continuous quality improvement. Design/methodology/approach A statistical process control (SPC) was applied to evaluate treatment delivery using in vivo electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry. A moving range control chart was constructed to monitor the individual patient treatment performance based on a control limit generated from initial data of 90 intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and ten volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) patient deliveries. A process capability index was used to evaluate the continuing treatment quality based on three quality classes: treatment type-specific, treatment linac-specific, and body site-specific. Findings The determined control limits were 62.5 and 70.0 per cent of the χ pass-rate for IMRT and VMAT deliveries, respectively. In total, 14 patients were selected for a pilot study the results of which showed that about 1 per cent of all treatments contained errors relating to unexpected anatomical changes between treatment fractions. Both rectum and pelvis cancer treatments demonstrated process capability indices were less than 1, indicating the potential for quality improvement and hence may benefit from further assessment. Research limitations/implications The study relied on the application of in vivo EPID dosimetry for patients treated at the specific centre. Sampling patients for generating the control limits were limited to 100 patients. Whilst the quantitative results are specific to the clinical techniques and equipment used, the described method is generally applicable to IMRT and VMAT treatment QA. Whilst more work is required to determine the level of clinical significance, the

  19. Lung dosimetry and risk assessment of nanoparticles: Evaluating and extending current models in rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Kuempel, E.D.; Tran, C.L.; Castranova, V.; Bailer, A.J.

    2006-09-15

    Risk assessment of occupational exposure to nanomaterials is needed. Human data are limited, but quantitative data are available from rodent studies. To use these data in risk assessment, a scientifically reasonable approach for extrapolating the rodent data to humans is required. One approach is allometric adjustment for species differences in the relationship between airborne exposure and internal dose. Another approach is lung dosimetry modeling, which provides a biologically-based, mechanistic method to extrapolate doses from animals to humans. However, current mass-based lung dosimetry models may not fully account for differences in the clearance and translocation of nanoparticles. In this article, key steps in quantitative risk assessment are illustrated, using dose-response data in rats chronically exposed to either fine or ultrafine titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), carbon black (CB), or diesel exhaust particulate (DEP). The rat-based estimates of the working lifetime airborne concentrations associated with 0.1% excess risk of lung cancer are approximately 0.07 to 0.3 mg/m{sup 3} for ultrafine TiO{sub 2}, CB, or DEP, and 0.7 to 1.3 mg/m{sup 3} for fine TiO{sub 2}. Comparison of observed versus model-predicted lung burdens in rats shows that the dosimetry models predict reasonably well the retained mass lung burdens of fine or ultrafine poorly soluble particles in rats exposed by chronic inhalation. Additional model validation is needed for nanoparticles of varying characteristics, as well as extension of these models to include particle translocation to organs beyond the lungs. Such analyses would provide improved prediction of nanoparticle dose for risk assessment.

  20. WE-F-201-03: Evaluate Clinical Cases Using Commercially Available Systems and Compare to TG-43 Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, L.

    2015-06-15

    With the recent introduction of heterogeneity correction algorithms for brachytherapy, the AAPM community is still unclear on how to commission and implement these into clinical practice. The recently-published AAPM TG-186 report discusses important issues for clinical implementation of these algorithms. A charge of the AAPM-ESTRO-ABG Working Group on MBDCA in Brachytherapy (WGMBDCA) is the development of a set of well-defined test case plans, available as references in the software commissioning process to be performed by clinical end-users. In this practical medical physics course, specific examples on how to perform the commissioning process are presented, as well as descriptions of the clinical impact from recent literature reporting comparisons of TG-43 and heterogeneity-based dosimetry. Learning Objectives: Identify key clinical applications needing advanced dose calculation in brachytherapy. Review TG-186 and WGMBDCA guidelines, commission process, and dosimetry benchmarks. Evaluate clinical cases using commercially available systems and compare to TG-43 dosimetry.

  1. RESPIRATORY DOSE TO SUSCEPTIBLE POPULATIONS ASSESSED BY EXPOSURE AND DOSIMETRY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Respiratory Dose to Susceptible Populations Assessed by Exposure and Dosimetry Studies

    Chong Kim1 and Ronald Williams2, 1USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory and 2USEPA National Exposure Research Laboratory, RTP, NC.

    Rationale: Parti...

  2. RESPIRATORY DOSE TO SUSCEPTIBLE POPULATIONS ASSESSED BY EXPOSURE AND DOSIMETRY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Respiratory Dose to Susceptible Populations Assessed by Exposure and Dosimetry Studies

    Chong Kim1 and Ronald Williams2, 1USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory and 2USEPA National Exposure Research Laboratory, RTP, NC.

    Rationale: Parti...

  3. Dosimetry for Radiopharmaceutical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Hobbs, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) involves the use of radionuclides that are either conjugated to tumor-targeting agents (eg, nanoscale constructs, antibodies, peptides, and small molecules) or concentrated in tissue through natural physiological mechanisms that occur predominantly in neoplastic or otherwise targeted cells (eg, Graves disease). The ability to collect pharmacokinetic data by imaging and use this to perform dosimetry calculations for treatment planning distinguishes RPT from other systemic treatment modalities. Treatment planning has not been widely adopted, in part, because early attempts to relate dosimetry to outcome were not successful. This was partially because a dosimetry methodology appropriate to risk evaluation rather than efficacy and toxicity was being applied to RPT. The weakest links in both diagnostic and therapeutic dosimetry are the accuracy of the input and the reliability of the radiobiological models used to convert dosimetric data to the relevant biologic end points. Dosimetry for RPT places a greater demand on both of these weak links. To date, most dosimetric studies have been retrospective, with a focus on tumor dose-response correlations rather than prospective treatment planning. In this regard, transarterial radioembolization also known as intra-arterial radiation therapy, which uses radiolabeled (90Y) microspheres of glass or resin to treat lesions in the liver holds much promise for more widespread dosimetric treatment planning. The recent interest in RPT with alpha-particle emitters has highlighted the need to adopt a dosimetry methodology that specifically accounts for the unique aspects of alpha particles. The short range of alpha-particle emitters means that in cases in which the distribution of activity is localized to specific functional components or cell types of an organ, the absorbed dose will be equally localized and dosimetric calculations on the scale of organs or even voxels (~5 mm) are no longer sufficient

  4. Evaluation of superficial dosimetry between treatment planning system and measurement for several breast cancer treatment techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi; Das, Indra J.; Bartlett, Gregory K.; Zhang Hualin; Thompson, Elizabeth; Zook, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Dosimetric accuracy in radiation treatment of breast cancer is critical for the evaluation of cosmetic outcomes and survival. It is often considered that treatment planning systems (TPS) may not be able to provide accurate dosimetry in the buildup region. This was investigated in various treatment techniques such as tangential wedges, field-in-field (FF), electronic compensator (eComp), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: Under Institutional Review Board (IRB) exemption, radiotherapy treatment plans of 111 cases were retrospectively analyzed. The distance between skin surface and 95% isodose line was measured. For measurements, Gafchromic EBT2 films were used on a humanoid unsliced phantom. Multiple layers of variable thickness of superflab bolus were placed on the breast phantom and CT scanned for planning. Treatment plans were generated using four techniques with two different grid sizes (1 Multiplication-Sign 1 and 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 2.5 mm{sup 2}) to provide optimum dose distribution. Films were placed at different depths and exposed with the selected techniques. A calibration curve for dose versus pixel values was also generated on the same day as the phantom measurement was conducted. The DICOM RT image, dose, and plan data were imported to the in-house software. On axial plane of CT slices, curves were drawn at the position where EBT2 films were placed, and the dose profiles on the lines were acquired. The calculated and measured dose profiles were separated by check points which were marked on the films before irradiation. The segments of calculated profiles were stretched to match their resolutions to that of film dosimetry. Results: On review of treatment plans, the distance between skin and 95% prescribed dose was up to 8 mm for plans of 27 patients. The film measurement revealed that the medial region of phantom surface received a mere 45%-50% of prescribed dose. For wedges, FF, and eComp techniques, region around the

  5. SU-E-T-119: Evaluation of New VMAT and IMRT Planning QA Devices: Portal Dosimetry Vs Compass.

    PubMed

    Kum, O; Shin, H; Han, Y

    2012-06-01

    Wide spread clinical use of advanced radiation treatment delivery techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and IMRT needs an easy-to-use, well-defined, and effective quality assurance (QA) system to ensure the accuracy of dose delivery. The comprehensive evaluation of two delivery QA systems (DQA) (Portal Dosimetry and Compass) for the advanced radiation delivery techniques is necessary for the clinical setting. Portal Dosimetry QA system with Varian PortalVision (PV) provides a quantitative comparison of measured electronic dose profile to a predicted dose profile with Varian's Eclipse™ treatment planning system (TPS) for the VMAT and IMRT plans. Quantitative comparisons of the two images, including dose difference, gamma analysis, points dose measurements, and line profiles are easily acquired in two dimensions. Meanwhile, Compass system with MatriXX can provide an accurate three-dimensional quantitative analysis of dose delivery. We applied the two planning QA systems to our RapidArc patient- specific QAs. Validation of the Compass and Portal Dosimetry systems were performed with ionization chamber measurements for absolute dosimetry and film measurements for gamma index calculations for phantom and patient treatment plans. Compass system was very sensitive to the MLC leaf gap variations in three dimensional gamma analyses. However, Compass system was not enough to fix the errors in dosimetric leaf gap by itself. DQA process with Portal Dosimetry took approximately 6 minutes for the two Arcs VMAT plan. Compass took about 40 minutes for the same plan in our first clinical trial. For the three typical IMRT and VMAT plans, the two systems showed the same passing rates in 95% pixels passing gamma criteria 3%/3mm. Portal Dosimetry DQA system has the advantages of effectiveness and practicality in the clinical setting. On the other hand, Compass was the next supportive system because of its accuracy and reality with patient's anatomy. © 2012

  6. The Utah leukemia case-control study: Dosimetry methodology and results

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, S.L.; Kerber, R.L.; Stevens, W.

    1995-04-01

    This paper discusses the dosimetry methodology used to estimate bone marrow dose and the results of dosimetry calculations for 6,507 subjects in an epidemiologic case. control study of leukemia among Utah residents. The estimated doses were used to determine if a higher incidence of leukemia among residents of Utah could have been attributed to exposure to radioactive fallout from above-ground nuclear weapons tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site. The objective of the dosimetry methodology was to estimate absorbed dose to active marrow specific to each case and each control subject. Data on the residence of each subject were available from records of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Deposition of fallout was determined from databases developed using historical measurements and exposure for each subject from each test was estimated using those data. Exposure was converted to dose by applying an age-dependent dose conversion factor and a factor for shielding. The median dose for all case and control subjects was 3.2 mGy. The maximum estimated mean dose for any case or control was 29 {plus_minus} 5.6 mGy (a resident of Washington County, UT). Uncertainties were estimated for each estimated dose. The results of the dosimetry calculations were applied in an epidemiological analysis.

  7. The Utah Leukemia Case-Control Study: dosimetry methodology and results.

    PubMed

    Simon, S L; Till, J E; Lloyd, R D; Kerber, R L; Thomas, D C; Preston-Martin, S; Lyon, J L; Stevens, W

    1995-04-01

    This paper discusses the dosimetry methodology used to estimate bone marrow dose and the results of dosimetry calculations for 6,507 subjects in an epidemiologic case-control study of leukemia among Utah residents. The estimated doses were used to determine if a higher incidence of leukemia among residents of Utah could have been attributed to exposure to radioactive fallout from above-ground nuclear weapons tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site. The objective of the dosimetry methodology was to estimate absorbed dose to active marrow specific to each case and each control subject. Data on the residence of each subject were available from records of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Deposition of fallout was determined from databases developed using historical measurements and exposure for each subject from each test was estimated using those data. Exposure was converted to dose by applying an age-dependent dose conversion factor and a factor for shielding. The median dose for all case and control subjects was 3.2 mGy. The maximum estimated mean dose for any case or control was 29 +/- 5.6 mGy (a resident of Washington County, UT). Uncertainties were estimated for each estimated dose. The results of the dosimetry calculations were applied in an epidemiological analysis.

  8. SU-E-T-609: Evaluation of Transit Dosimetry Software Using Heterogeneous Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Matulewicz, L; Prazmowska, J; Stapor-Fudzinska, M; Slosarek, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate limits and capabilities in the transit dosimetry software for use with the TomoTherapy system by irradiating a heterogeneous phantom. Methods: Helical TomoTherapy plan was created using CIRS phantom (model 062M) with nine various tissue equivalent inserts (lung inhale 0.2 g/cm{sup 3}, lung exhale 0.5 g/cm{sup 3}, adipose 0.96 g/cm{sup 3}, breast 0.99 g/cm{sup 3}, water 1.01 g/cm{sup 3}, muscle 1.06 g/cm{sup 3}, liver 1.07 g/cm{sup 3}, trabecular bone 1.16 g/cm{sup 3}, and dense bone 1.53 g/cm{sup 3}). Targets were contoured within every insert. The phantom was scanned with a 50 cm field of view and 3 mm slice width. Images were imported into the TomoTherapy TPS. A plan was generated to deliver 20 Gy to every insert (2 Gy per fraction) with a jaw width of 2.5 cm, a pitch of 0.430 and an actual modulation factor of 2.621. After the radiation delivery the planning CT, the RT structure, the RT plan, and the RT dose (DICOM format) as well as the exit detector sinogram were imported into the Dosimetry Check software (Math Resolutions, LLC). The 3D delivered doses were reconstructed from the exit detector data by correcting for phantom and couch attenuation. The resulting dose distribution were compared with the TPS planned dose using gamma index. Results: Using the clinical gamma criteria, 3% and 3 mm, all tissue equivalent inserts had a passing percentage of 100% except for 0.2 g/cm{sup 3} and 0.5 g/cm{sup 3} density inserts (gamma value of 81.67% and 99.18% respectively). Conclusion: The evaluated transit dosimetry software provides an independent verification of helical TomoTherapy plans giving additional confidence in the treatment delivery, however, an overestimation of the reconstructed dose in low density materials has been revealed. Implementation of Monte Carlo algorithm for exit dose reconstruction should improve dosimetric accuracy in heterogeneous patient tissues. Agreement with Math Resolutions.

  9. SU-E-T-376: Evaluation of a New Stereotactic Diode for Small Field Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kralik, J; Kosterin, P; Mooij, R; Solberg, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a new stereotactic diode for dosimetry of small photon fields. Methods: A new stereotactic diode, consisting of an unshielded p-type silicon chip, and with improved radiation hardness energy dependence was recently developed (IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruch, Germany). The diode has an active volume of 0.6 mm dia. x 0.02 mm thick. Two new diodes were evaluated, one which was pre-irradiated to 100kGy with 10 MeV electrons and another which received no prior irradiation. Sensitivity, stability, reproducibility, and linearity as a function of dose were assessed. Beam profiles and small field output factors were measured on a CyberKnife (CK) and compared with measurements using two commercially available diodes. Results: The new diodes exhibit linear behavior (within 0.6%) over a dose range 0.02 – 50 Gy; a commercially available device exhibits excursions of up to 4% over the same range. The sensitivity is 4.1 and 3.8 nC/Gy for the un-irradiated and pre-irradiated diodes, respectively. When irradiated with 150 Gy in dose increments of 5, 20 and 35 Gy, both new diodes provide a stable response within 0.5%. Output factors measured with the two new diodes are identical and compare favorably with other commercially available diodes and published data. Similarly, no differences in measured field size or penumbra were observed among the devices tested. Conclusion: The new diodes show excellent stability and sensitivity. The beam characterization in terms of output factors and beam profiles is consistent with that obtained with commercially available diodes.

  10. Evaluation of an a-Si EPID in direct detection configuration as a water-equivalent dosimeter for transit dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sabet, Mahsheed; Menk, Frederick W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: A major problem associated with amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for transit dosimetry is the presence of a phosphor layer, which can introduce large deviations from water-equivalent behavior due to energy-dependent response and visible light scattering. In this study, an amorphous silicon EPID was modified to a direct detection configuration by removing the phosphor layer, and the accuracy of using it for transit dosimetry measurements was investigated for 6 and 18 MV treatment beams by comparison to ion-chamber in water measurements. Methods: Solid water and copper were both evaluated as buildup materials. Using the optimum buildup thickness in each case, effects of changes in radiation field size, source to detector distance, and patient/phantom thickness were investigated by comparison to reference measurements made by an ionization chamber on the central axis. The off-axis response of the imager was also investigated by comparison of EPID image profiles to dose profiles obtained by a scanning ionization chamber in a water tank with various thicknesses of slab phantoms, and an anthropomorphic phantom in the beam using Gamma evaluation (3%, 3 mm criteria). The imaging characteristics of the direct EPID were investigated by comparison to a commercial EPID using QC3V phantom, and by taking images of an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom containing fiducial gold markers. Results: Either 30 mm of solid water or 3.3 mm of copper were found to be the most suitable buildup thicknesses with solid water providing more accurate results. Using solid water buildup, the EPID response compared to the reference dosimeter within 2% for all conditions except phantom thicknesses larger than 25 cm in 6 MV beams, which was up to 6.5%. Gamma evaluation results comparing EPID profiles and reference ionization chamber profiles showed that for 6 and 18 MV beams, at least 91.8% and 90.9% of points had a Gamma<1 for all phantoms, respectively. But

  11. Re-Evaluation of Dosimetry in the New Surveillance Programme for the Loviisa 1 VVER-440 Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serén, Tom

    2009-08-01

    An extensive new surveillance programme for the Loviisa I VVER-440 reactor was implemented in 1996 - 2005, following annealing heat treatment of the pressure vessel. This programme comprised 12 surveillance chains with several different irradiation-annealing sequences. The changing orientation of the irradiation capsules between annealings presented some problems from the viewpoint of dosimetry. The fluence determinations for the specimens were based on Fe/Ni plates irradiated together with the specimens and on the application of the kernel-based PREVIEW code. During the course of the programme several new fuel types were introduced, which the old version of PREVIEW and its kernel library could not properly handle. Thus an updated and more flexible version was developed[1], with provision for more fuel types and location-specific dosimetry cross sections based on the IRDF-2002 library[2]. The dosimetry results obtained using the old PREVIEW version have been re-evaluated with the updated version. The results of this re-evaluation is presented and discussed as well as some experiences with the application of the IRDF-2002 library. A comparison with the results of a simultaneously undertaken ex-vessel irradiation[3] is also presented. This irradiation occurred during the third cycle of the programme in the same azimuthal direction as one of the chains taken out after three cycles. The dosimetry results from all twelve irradiation channels are compared in order to investigate any possible differences due to geometrical deviations in the channel locations.

  12. An evaluation of ionization chambers for the relative dosimetry of kilovoltage x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Robin; Mo Zhao; Haque, Mamoon; Baldock, Clive

    2009-09-15

    In this work, the authors have evaluated ten different ionization chambers for the relative dosimetry of kilovoltage x-ray beams in the energy range of 50-280 kVp. Percentage depth doses in water and relative detector response (in Solid Water and in air) were measured for each of the x-ray beams studied using a number of chambers. Measured depth dose data were compared with Monte Carlo calculated depth doses using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo package and the BEAMnrc user code. The accuracy of the phase space files generated by BEAMnrc was verified by calculating the half-value layer and comparing with the measured half-value layer of each x-ray beam. The results indicate that the Advanced Markus, Markus, NACP, and Roos parallel plate ionization chambers were suitable for the measurement of depth dose data in this beam quality range with an uncertainty of less than 3%, including in the regions close to the water surface. While the relative detector response of the Farmer and scanning thimble chambers exhibited a better energy response, they were not suitable for depth dose measurements in the first 5 mm below the water surface with differences of up to 12% in the surface dose measurement for the 50 kVp x-ray beam. These differences were due to dose artifacts generated by the chamber size and the dose gradient. However, at depths greater than 5 mm, the Farmer and thimble scanning chambers gave uncertainties of less than 3% for the depth dose measurements for all beam energies. The PTW PinPoint 31006 chamber was found to give varying dose differences of up to 8% depending on the x-ray beam energy; this was attributed to the steel central electrode. The authors recommend that one of the parallel plate ionization chambers investigated be used to determine depth dose data for kilovoltage x-ray beams in the energy range studied and give correct dose information close to the surface and at depth in the water phantom.

  13. Development and evaluation of gallium nitride-based thin films for x-ray dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Markus; Howgate, John; Sharp, Ian D; Stutzmann, Martin; Thalhammer, Stefan

    2011-06-07

    X-ray radiation plays an important role in medical procedures ranging from diagnostics to therapeutics. Due to the harm such ionizing radiation can cause, it has become common practice to closely monitor the dosages received by patients. To this end, precise online dosimeters have been developed with the dual objectives of monitoring radiation in the region of interest and improving therapeutic methods. In this work, we evaluate GaN thin film high electron mobility heterostructures with sub-mm(2) detection areas as x-ray radiation detectors. Devices were tested using 40-300 kV Bremsstrahlung x-ray sources. We find that the photoconductive device response exhibits a large gain, is almost independent of the angle of irradiation, and is constant to within 2% of the signal throughout this medical diagnostic x-ray range, indicating that these sensors do not require recalibration for geometry or energy. Furthermore, the devices show a high sensitivity to x-ray intensity and can measure in the air kerma rate (free-in-air) range of 1 µGy s(-1) to 10 mGy s(-1) with a signal stability of ±1% and a linear total dose response over time. Medical conditions were simulated by measurements of device responses to irradiation through human torso phantoms. Direct x-ray imaging is demonstrated using the index finger and wrist sections of a human phantom. The results presented here indicate that GaN-based thin film devices exhibit a wide range of properties, which make them promising candidates for dosimetry applications. In addition, with potential detection volumes smaller than 10(-6) cm(3), they are well suited for high-resolution x-ray imaging. Moreover, with additional engineering steps, these devices can be adapted to potentially provide both in vivo biosensing and x-ray dosimetry.

  14. Internal photon and electron dosimetry of the newborn patient—a hybrid computational phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayson, Michael; Lee, Choonsik; Sgouros, George; Treves, S. Ted; Frey, Eric; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2012-03-01

    Estimates of radiation absorbed dose to organs of the nuclear medicine patient are a requirement for administered activity optimization and for stochastic risk assessment. Pediatric patients, and in particular the newborn child, represent that portion of the patient population where such optimization studies are most crucial owing to the enhanced tissue radiosensitivities and longer life expectancies of this patient subpopulation. In cases where whole-body CT imaging is not available, phantom-based calculations of radionuclide S values—absorbed dose to a target tissue per nuclear transformation in a source tissue—are required for dose and risk evaluation. In this study, a comprehensive model of electron and photon dosimetry of the reference newborn child is presented based on a high-resolution hybrid-voxel phantom from the University of Florida (UF) patient model series. Values of photon specific absorbed fraction (SAF) were assembled for both the reference male and female newborn using the radiation transport code MCNPX v2.6. Values of electron SAF were assembled in a unique and time-efficient manner whereby the collisional and radiative components of organ dose--for both self- and cross-dose terms—were computed separately. Dose to the newborn skeletal tissues were assessed via fluence-to-dose response functions reported for the first time in this study. Values of photon and electron SAFs were used to assemble a complete set of S values for some 16 radionuclides commonly associated with molecular imaging of the newborn. These values were then compared to those available in the OLINDA/EXM software. S value ratios for organ self-dose ranged from 0.46 to 1.42, while similar ratios for organ cross-dose varied from a low of 0.04 to a high of 3.49. These large discrepancies are due in large part to the simplistic organ modeling in the stylized newborn model used in the OLINDA/EXM software. A comprehensive model of internal dosimetry is presented in this study for

  15. Internal photon and electron dosimetry of the newborn patient--a hybrid computational phantom study.

    PubMed

    Wayson, Michael; Lee, Choonsik; Sgouros, George; Treves, S Ted; Frey, Eric; Bolch, Wesley E

    2012-03-07

    Estimates of radiation absorbed dose to organs of the nuclear medicine patient are a requirement for administered activity optimization and for stochastic risk assessment. Pediatric patients, and in particular the newborn child, represent that portion of the patient population where such optimization studies are most crucial owing to the enhanced tissue radiosensitivities and longer life expectancies of this patient subpopulation. In cases where whole-body CT imaging is not available, phantom-based calculations of radionuclide S values--absorbed dose to a target tissue per nuclear transformation in a source tissue--are required for dose and risk evaluation. In this study, a comprehensive model of electron and photon dosimetry of the reference newborn child is presented based on a high-resolution hybrid-voxel phantom from the University of Florida (UF) patient model series. Values of photon specific absorbed fraction (SAF) were assembled for both the reference male and female newborn using the radiation transport code MCNPX v2.6. Values of electron SAF were assembled in a unique and time-efficient manner whereby the collisional and radiative components of organ dose--for both self- and cross-dose terms--were computed separately. Dose to the newborn skeletal tissues were assessed via fluence-to-dose response functions reported for the first time in this study. Values of photon and electron SAFs were used to assemble a complete set of S values for some 16 radionuclides commonly associated with molecular imaging of the newborn. These values were then compared to those available in the OLINDA/EXM software. S value ratios for organ self-dose ranged from 0.46 to 1.42, while similar ratios for organ cross-dose varied from a low of 0.04 to a high of 3.49. These large discrepancies are due in large part to the simplistic organ modeling in the stylized newborn model used in the OLINDA/EXM software. A comprehensive model of internal dosimetry is presented in this study for the

  16. SU-E-J-70: Evaluation of Multiple Isocentric Intensity Modulated and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Techniques Using Portal Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidhar, K Raja; Pangam, S; Kolla, J; Ponaganti, S; Ali, M; Vuba, S; Mariyappan, P; Babaiah, M; Komanduri, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for verification of dose distribution in a patient during treatment using multiple isocentric Intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc therapy techniques with portal dosimetry. Methods: Varian True Beam accelerator, equipped with an aS1000 megavoltage electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has an integrated image mode for portal dosimetry (PD). The source-to-imager distance was taken at 150 cm to avoid collision to the table. Fourteen fractions were analyzed for this study. During shift in a single plan from one isocenter to another isocenter, EPID also shifted longitudinally for each field by taking the extent of divergence of beam into the consideration for EPID distance of 150cm. Patients were given treatment everyday with EPID placed in proper position for each field. Several parameters were obtained by comparing the dose distribution between fractions to fraction. The impact of the intra-fraction and inter-fraction of the patient in combination with isocenter shift of the beams were observed. Results: During treatment, measurements were performed by EPID and were evaluated by the gamma method. Analysis was done between fractions for multiple isocenter treatments. The pass rates of the gamma analysis with a criterion of 3% and 3 mm for the 14 fractions were over 97.8% with good consistency. Whereas maximum gamma exceeded the criteria in few fractions (in<1 cc vol). Average gamma was observed in the criteria of 0.5%. Maximum dose difference and average dose differences were less than 0.22 CU and 0.01 CU for maximum tolerance of 1.0 CU and 0.2 CU respectively. Conclusion: EPID with extended distance is ideal method to verify the multiple isocentric dose distribution in patient during treatment, especially cold and hot spots in junction dose. Verification of shifts as well as the dose differences between each fraction due to inter-fraction and intra-fraction of the patient can be derived.

  17. TU-E-201-02: Eye Lens Dosimetry From CT Perfusion Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.

    2015-06-15

    Madan M. Rehani, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Methods for Eye Lens Dosimetry and Studies On Lens Opacities with Interventionalists Radiation induced cataract is a major threat among staff working in interventional suites. Nearly 16 million interventional procedures are performed annually in USA. Recent studies by the principal investigator’s group, primarily among interventional cardiologists, on behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency, show posterior subcapsular (PSC) changes in the eye lens in 38–53% of main operators and 21–45% of support staff. These changes have potential to lead to cataract in future years, as per information from A-Bomb survivors. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has reduced dose limit for staff by a factor of 7.5 (from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y). With increasing emphasis on radiation induced cataracts and reduction in threshold dose for eye lens, there is a need to implement strategies for estimating eye lens dose. Unfortunately eye lens dosimetry is at infancy when it comes to routine application. Various approaches are being tried namely direct measurement using active or passive dosimeters kept close to eyes, retrospective estimations and lastly correlating patient dose in interventional procedures with staff eye dose. The talk will review all approaches available and ongoing active research in this area, as well as data from surveys done in Europe on status of eye dose monitoring in interventional radiology and nuclear medicine. The talk will provide update on how good is Hp(10) against Hp(3), estimations from CTDI values, Monte Carlo based simulations and current status of eye lens dosimetry in USA and Europe. The cataract risk among patients is in CT examinations of the head. Since radiation induced cataract predominantly occurs in posterior sub-capsular (PSC) region and is thus distinguishable from age or drug related cataracts and is also preventable, actions on

  18. Evaluation of the uncertainty in an EBT3 film dosimetry system utilizing net optical density.

    PubMed

    Marroquin, Elsa Y León; Herrera González, José A; Camacho López, Miguel A; Barajas, José E Villarreal; García-Garduño, Olivia A

    2016-09-01

    Radiochromic film has become an important tool to verify dose distributions for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and quality assurance (QA) procedures. A new radiochromic film model, EBT3, has recently become available, whose composition and thickness of the sensitive layer are the same as those of previous EBT2 films. However, a matte polyester layer was added to EBT3 to prevent the formation of Newton's rings. Furthermore, the symmetrical design of EBT3 allows the user to eliminate side-orientation dependence. This film and the flatbed scanner, Epson Perfection V750, form a dosimetry system whose intrinsic characteristics were studied in this work. In addition, uncertainties associated with these intrinsic characteristics and the total uncertainty of the dosimetry system were determined. The analysis of the response of the radiochromic film (net optical density) and the fitting of the experimental data to a potential function yielded an uncertainty of 2.6%, 4.3%, and 4.1% for the red, green, and blue channels, respectively. In this work, the dosimetry system presents an uncertainty in resolving the dose of 1.8% for doses greater than 0.8 Gy and less than 6 Gy for red channel. The films irradiated between 0 and 120 Gy show differences in the response when scanned in portrait or landscape mode; less uncertainty was found when using the portrait mode. The response of the film depended on the position on the bed of the scanner, contributing an uncertainty of 2% for the red, 3% for the green, and 4.5% for the blue when placing the film around the center of the bed of scanner. Furthermore, the uniformity and reproducibility radiochromic film and reproducibility of the response of the scanner contribute less than 1% to the overall uncertainty in dose. Finally, the total dose uncertainty was 3.2%, 4.9%, and 5.2% for red, green, and blue channels, respectively. The above uncertainty values were obtained by minimizing the contribution to the total dose uncertainty

  19. Evaluation of the uncertainty in an EBT3 film dosimetry system utilizing net optical density.

    PubMed

    León Marroquin, Elsa Y; Herrera González, José A; Camacho López, Miguel A; Villarreal Barajas, José E; García-Garduño, Olivia A

    2016-09-08

    Radiochromic film has become an important tool to verify dose distributions for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and quality assurance (QA) procedures. A new radiochromic film model, EBT3, has recently become available, whose composition and thickness of the sensitive layer are the same as those of previous EBT2 films. However, a matte polyester layer was added to EBT3 to prevent the formation of Newton's rings. Furthermore, the symmetrical design of EBT3 allows the user to eliminate side-orientation dependence. This film and the flatbed scanner, Epson Perfection V750, form a dosimetry system whose intrinsic characteristics were studied in this work. In addition, uncertainties associated with these intrinsic characteristics and the total uncertainty of the dosimetry system were determined. The analysis of the response of the radiochromic film (net optical density) and the fitting of the experimental data to a potential function yielded an uncertainty of 2.6%, 4.3%, and 4.1% for the red, green, and blue channels, respectively. In this work, the dosimetry system presents an uncertainty in resolving the dose of 1.8% for doses greater than 0.8 Gy and less than 6 Gy for red channel. The films irradiated between 0 and 120 Gy show differences in the response when scanned in portrait or landscape mode; less uncertainty was found when using the portrait mode. The response of the film depended on the position on the bed of the scanner, contributing an uncertainty of 2% for the red, 3% for the green, and 4.5% for the blue when placing the film around the center of the bed of scanner. Furthermore, the uniformity and reproducibility radiochromic film and reproducibility of the response of the scanner contribute less than 1% to the overall uncertainty in dose. Finally, the total dose uncertainty was 3.2%, 4.9%, and 5.2% for red, green, and blue channels, respectively. The above uncertainty values were obtained by mini-mizing the contribution to the total dose uncertainty

  20. Dosimetry study for a new in vivo X-ray fluorescence (XRF) bone lead measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Huiling; Chettle, David; Luo, Liqiang; O'Meara, Joanne

    2007-10-01

    A new 109Cd γ-ray induced bone lead measurement system has been developed to reduce the minimum detectable limit (MDL) of the system. The system consists of four 16 mm diameter detectors. It requires a stronger source compared to the "conventional" system. A dosimetry study has been performed to estimate the dose delivered by this system. The study was carried out by using human-equivalent phantoms. Three sets of phantoms were made to estimate the dose delivered to three age groups: 5-year old, 10-year old and adults. Three approaches have been applied to evaluate the dose: calculations, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, and experiments. Experimental results and analytical calculations were used to validate MC simulation. The experiments were performed by placing Panasonic UD-803AS TLDs at different places in phantoms that representing different organs. Due to the difficulty of obtaining the organ dose and the whole body dose solely by experiments and traditional calculations, the equivalent dose and effective dose were calculated by MC simulations. The result showed that the doses delivered to the organs other than the targeted lower leg are negligibly small. The total effective doses to the three age groups are 8.45/9.37 μSv (female/male), 4.20 μSv, and 0.26 μSv for 5-year old, 10-year old and adult, respectively. An approval to conduct human measurements on this system has been received from the Research Ethics Board based on this research.

  1. Australasian brachytherapy audit: results of the 'end-to-end' dosimetry pilot study.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Annette; Wilfert, Lisa; Butler, Duncan; Ebert, Martin A; Todd, Stephen; Bucci, Joseph; Duchesne, Gillian M; Joseph, David; Kron, Tomas

    2013-08-01

    We present the results of a pilot study to test the feasibility of a brachytherapy dosimetry audit. The feasibility study was conducted at seven sites from four Australian states in both public and private centres. A purpose-built cylindrical water phantom was imaged using the local imaging protocol and a treatment plan was generated to deliver 1 Gy to the central (1 of 3) thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) from six dwell positions. All centres completed the audit, consisting of three consecutive irradiations, within a 2-h time period, with the exception of one centre that uses a pulsed dose rate brachytherapy unit. All TLD results were within 4.5% of the predicted value, with the exception of one subset where the dwell position step size was incorrectly applied. While the limited data collected in the study demonstrated considerable heterogeneity in clinical practice, the study proved a brachytherapy dosimetry audit to be feasible. Future studies should include verification of source strength using a Standard Dosimetry Laboratory calibrated chamber, a phantom that more closely mimics the clinical situation, a more comprehensive review of safety and quality assurance (QA) procedures including source dwell time and position accuracy, and a review of patient treatment QA procedures such as applicator position verification. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  2. Construction of mouse phantoms from segmented CT scan data for radiation dosimetry studies

    PubMed Central

    Welch, D; Harken, A D; Randers-Pehrson, G; Brenner, D J

    2015-01-01

    We present the complete construction methodology for an anatomically accurate mouse phantom made using materials which mimic the characteristics of tissue, lung, and bone for radiation dosimetry studies. Phantoms were constructed using 2 mm thick slices of tissue equivalent material which was precision machined to clear regions for insertion of lung and bone equivalent material where appropriate. Images obtained using a 3D computed tomography (CT) scan clearly indicate regions of tissue, lung, and bone that match their position within the original mouse CT scan. Additionally, radiographic films are used with the phantom to demonstrate dose mapping capabilities. The construction methodology presented here can be quickly and easily adapted to create a phantom of any specific small animal given a segmented CT scan of the animal. These physical phantoms are a useful tool to examine individual organ dose and dosimetry within mouse systems that are complicated by density inhomogeneity due to bone and lung regions. PMID:25860401

  3. Study of homogeneity and inhomogeneity phantom in CUDA EGS for small field dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yani, Sitti; Rhani, Mohamad Fahdillah; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam

    2017-02-01

    CUDA EGS was CUDA implementation to simulate transport photon in a material based on Monte Carlo algorithm for X-ray imaging. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of inhomogeneities in inhomogeneity phantom for small field dosimetry (1×1, 2×2, 3×3, 4×4 and 5×5 cm2). Two phantoms, homogeneity and inhomogeneity phantom were used. The interaction in homogeneity and inhomogeneity phantom was dominated by Compton interaction and multiple scattering. The CUDA EGS can represent the inhomogeneity effect in small field dosimetry by combining the grayscale curve between homogeneity and inhomogeneity phantom. The grayscale curve in inhomogeneity phantom is not asymmetric because of the existence of different material in phantom.

  4. Construction of mouse phantoms from segmented CT scan data for radiation dosimetry studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, D.; Harken, A. D.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Brenner, D. J.

    2015-05-01

    We present the complete construction methodology for an anatomically accurate mouse phantom made using materials which mimic the characteristics of tissue, lung, and bone for radiation dosimetry studies. Phantoms were constructed using 2 mm thick slices of tissue equivalent material which was precision machined to clear regions for insertion of lung and bone equivalent material where appropriate. Images obtained using a 3D computed tomography (CT) scan clearly indicate regions of tissue, lung, and bone that match their position within the original mouse CT scan. Additionally, radiographic films are used with the phantom to demonstrate dose mapping capabilities. The construction methodology presented here can be quickly and easily adapted to create a phantom of any specific small animal given a segmented CT scan of the animal. These physical phantoms are a useful tool to examine individual organ dose and dosimetry within mouse systems that are complicated by density inhomogeneity due to bone and lung regions.

  5. Construction of mouse phantoms from segmented CT scan data for radiation dosimetry studies.

    PubMed

    Welch, D; Harken, A D; Randers-Pehrson, G; Brenner, D J

    2015-05-07

    We present the complete construction methodology for an anatomically accurate mouse phantom made using materials which mimic the characteristics of tissue, lung, and bone for radiation dosimetry studies. Phantoms were constructed using 2 mm thick slices of tissue equivalent material which was precision machined to clear regions for insertion of lung and bone equivalent material where appropriate. Images obtained using a 3D computed tomography (CT) scan clearly indicate regions of tissue, lung, and bone that match their position within the original mouse CT scan. Additionally, radiographic films are used with the phantom to demonstrate dose mapping capabilities. The construction methodology presented here can be quickly and easily adapted to create a phantom of any specific small animal given a segmented CT scan of the animal. These physical phantoms are a useful tool to examine individual organ dose and dosimetry within mouse systems that are complicated by density inhomogeneity due to bone and lung regions.

  6. Computed tomography dosimetry with high-resolution detectors commonly used in radiotherapy - an energy dependence study.

    PubMed

    Liebmann, Mario; Poppe, Bjoern; von Boetticher, Heiner

    2015-09-08

    New methods of dosimetry in computed tomography (CT) X-ray fields require the use of high-resolution detectors instead of pencil-type ionization chambers typically used for CT dose index (CTDI) measurements. This paper presents a study on the suitability of a wide range of ionization chambers, diodes, and a two-dimensional detector array, used primarily in radiation therapy, for CT and cone-beam CT dosimetry. Specifically, the energy dependence of these detectors from 50 kVp up to 125 kVp is reported. All measurements were performed in reference to a calibrated diode for use in this energy region. The radiation quality correction factors provided by the manufacturer were used, depending on the measured half-value layer (HVL) for the particular X-ray beam. Our study demonstrated the general usability of thimble ionization chambers. These thimble ionization chambers showed a maximum variation in energy response of 5%. Ionization chambers with even smaller sensitive volume, and which exhibit similar variation in energy dependence, can be used if higher spatial resolution is required. Furthermore, the investigated detectors are better suited for dosimetry at CT and CBCT units than conventional large volume or flat detectors, due to their rotational symmetry. Nevertheless, a flat detector can be used for certain measurement tasks, such as the acquisition of percent depth-dose curves or beam profiles for nonrotating beams, which are important for beam characterization.

  7. A Feasibility Study of Fricke Dosimetry as an Absorbed Dose to Water Standard for 192Ir HDR Sources

    PubMed Central

    deAlmeida, Carlos Eduardo; Ochoa, Ricardo; de Lima, Marilene Coelho; David, Mariano Gazineu; Pires, Evandro Jesus; Peixoto, José Guilherme; Salata, Camila; Bernal, Mario Antônio

    2014-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) using 192Ir sources is well accepted as an important treatment option and thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of the absolute dose to water for this particular source type is currently not available. An improved standard for the absorbed dose to water based on Fricke dosimetry of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources is presented in this study. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the Fricke dosimetry technique for the standardization of the quantity absorbed dose to water for 192Ir sources. A molded, double-walled, spherical vessel for water containing the Fricke solution was constructed based on the Fricke system. The authors measured the absorbed dose to water and compared it with the doses calculated using the AAPM TG-43 report. The overall combined uncertainty associated with the measurements using Fricke dosimetry was 1.4% for k = 1, which is better than the uncertainties reported in previous studies. These results are promising; hence, the use of Fricke dosimetry to measure the absorbed dose to water as a standard for HDR 192Ir may be possible in the future. PMID:25521914

  8. a Study of the Dosimetry of IODINE-125 Seed Interstitial Implants Using Monte Carlo Simulation Methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Gregory Scott

    Monte Carlo simulation methods were used to investigate the absorbed dose distribution around several preliminary source configurations and the 3M Company models 6701, 6702, and 6711 I-125 seeds in water. Simulations for the preliminary sources, all of which were structurally simpler than the seeds, were conducted to demonstrate correct behavior of the computer software. The relative dose distributions of the three seed models were found to be anisotropic, and distinct. Observed differences in the relative dose distributions of the three models are attributable to differences in seed design and photon emission spectrum. Variations in end weld thicknesses and radioactivity distributions within the seeds were found to have substantial influence on the relative dose distributions. Dosimetry estimates along the longitudinal axis of the seeds are particularly uncertain due to such variations. Finally, perturbations of the single seed dose distribution created by neighboring seeds within the implant were determined. Such perturbations are strongly dependent on the seed model used and on the separation between seeds. Simple superposition of single seed dose distributions in multiple seed implants causes overestimation of dose within seed planes. Errors may be quite large for single plane implants with small seed separations. The results of this study provide a means to reduce errors in iodine seed implant dosimetry through the use of seed design-specific two-dimensional dosimetry data, and through improved understanding of the causes of uncertainties in iodine seed relative dose distributions.

  9. Preclinical Evaluation of 86Y-Labeled Inhibitors of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen for Dosimetry Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Foss, Catherine A.; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Wang, Yuchuan; Srinivasan, Senthamizhchelvan; Hobbs, Robert F.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Mease, Ronnie C.; Sgouros, George; Pomper, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    86Y (half-life = 14.74 h, 33% β+) is within an emerging class of positron-emitting isotopes with relatively long physical half-lives that enables extended imaging of biologic processes. We report the synthesis and evaluation of 3 low-molecular-weight compounds labeled with 86Y for imaging the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) using PET. Impetus for the study derives from the need to perform dosimetry estimates for the corresponding 90Y-labeled radiotherapeutics. Methods Multistep syntheses were used in preparing 86Y-4–6. PSMA inhibition constants were evaluated by competitive binding assay. In vivo characterization using tumor-bearing male mice was performed by PET/CT for 86Y-4–6 and by biodistribution studies of 86Y-4 and 86Y-6 out to 24 h after injection. Quantitative whole-body PET scans were recorded to measure the kinetics for 14 organs in a male baboon using 86Y-6. Results Compounds 86Y-4–6 were obtained in high radiochemical yield and purity, with specific radioactivities of more than 83.92 GBq/µmol. PET imaging and biodistribution studies using PSMA-positive PC-3 PIP and PSMA-negative PC-3 flu tumor-bearing mice revealed that 86Y-4–6 had high site-specific uptake in PSMA-positive PC-3 PIP tumor starting at 20 min after injection and remained high at 24 h. Compound 86Y-6 demonstrated the highest tumor uptake and retention, with 32.17 ± 7.99 and 15.79 ± 6.44 percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) at 5 and 24 h, respectively. Low activity concentrations were associated with blood and normal organs, except for the kidneys, a PSMA-expressing tissue. PET imaging in baboons reveals that all organs have a 2-phase (rapid and slow) clearance, with the highest uptake (8 %ID/g) in the kidneys at 25 min. The individual absolute uptake kinetics were used to calculate radiation doses using the OLINDA/EXM software. The highest mean absorbed dose was received by the renal cortex, with 1.9 mGy per MBq of 86Y-6. Conclusion Compound 86Y-6 is a promising

  10. In Vivo Dosimetry Of Patients Submitted To Brain Spect Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Cortés, D.; Azorín, J.; Saucedo, V. M.

    2004-09-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a diagnosis technique which allows to visualize a three dimensional distribution of a radioactive material in the brain. This technique is used for evaluating the blood flux and the metabolic function of the diverse brain regions and is very useful to diagnostic several pathologies such as Alzheimer disease, tumors, epilepsy brain hemorrhages, etc. The radioactive tracer used is 99mTc-labeled hexamethylpropyleneamineoxime (99mTc-HMPAO). We present the results obtained from measurements performed in the chest, back and skull of patients submitted to brain SPECT studies during two hours using home-made LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE thermoluminescent dosimeters. Results obtained showed that the dose received by the patients during two hours are lower than 0.3 mGy.

  11. Voice Use Among Music Theory Teachers: A Voice Dosimetry and Self-Assessment Study.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Isabel S; Morsomme, Dominique; Remacle, Angélique

    2017-07-25

    This study aimed (1) to investigate music theory teachers' professional and extra-professional vocal loading and background noise exposure, (2) to determine the correlation between vocal loading and background noise, and (3) to determine the correlation between vocal loading and self-evaluation data. Using voice dosimetry, 13 music theory teachers were monitored for one workweek. The parameters analyzed were voice sound pressure level (SPL), fundamental frequency (F0), phonation time, vocal loading index (VLI), and noise SPL. Spearman correlation was used to correlate vocal loading parameters (voice SPL, F0, and phonation time) and noise SPL. Each day, the subjects self-assessed their voice using visual analog scales. VLI and self-evaluation data were correlated using Spearman correlation. Vocal loading parameters and noise SPL were significantly higher in the professional than in the extra-professional environment. Voice SPL, phonation time, and female subjects' F0 correlated positively with noise SPL. VLI correlated with self-assessed voice quality, vocal fatigue, and amount of singing and speaking voice produced. Teaching music theory is a profession with high vocal demands. More background noise is associated with increased vocal loading and may indirectly increase the risk for voice disorders. Correlations between VLI and self-assessments suggest that these teachers are well aware of their vocal demands and feel their effect on voice quality and vocal fatigue. Visual analog scales seem to represent a useful tool for subjective vocal loading assessment and associated symptoms in these professional voice users. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Practical neutron dosimetry at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    McCaslin, J.B.; Thomas, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    Dosimetry at high energy particle accelerators is discussed with emphasis on physical measurements which define the radiation environment and provide an immutable basis for the derivation of any quantities subsequently required for risk evaluation. Results of inter-laboratory dosimetric comparisons are reviewed and it is concluded that a well-supported systematic program is needed which would make possible detailed evaluations and inter-comparisons of instruments and techniques in well characterized high energy radiation fields. High-energy dosimetry is so coupled with radiation transport that it is clear their study should proceed concurrently.

  13. Evaluation of the Gafchromic{sup Registered-Sign} EBT2 film for the dosimetry of radiosurgical beams

    SciTech Connect

    Larraga-Gutierrez, Jose M.; Garcia-Hernandez, Diana; Garcia-Garduno, Olivia A.; Galvan de la Cruz, Olga O.; Ballesteros-Zebadua, Paola; Esparza-Moreno, Karina P.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Radiosurgery uses small fields and high-radiation doses to treat intra- and extracranial lesions in a single session. The lack of a lateral electronic equilibrium and the presence of high-dose gradients in these fields are challenges for adequate measurements. The availability of radiation detectors with the high spatial resolution required is restricted to only a few. Stereotactic diodes and EBT radiochromic films have been demonstrated to be good detectors for small-beam dosimetry. Because the stereotactic diode is the standard measurement for the dosimetry of radiosurgical beams, the goal of this work was to perform measurements with the radiochromic film Gafchromic{sup Registered-Sign} EBT2 and compare its results with a stereotactic diode. Methods: Total scatter factors, tissue maximum, and off-axis ratios from a 6 MV small photon beams were measured using EBT2 radiochromic film in a water phantom. The film-measured data were evaluated by comparing it with the data measured with a stereotactic field diode (IBA-Dosimetry). Results: The film and diode measurements had excellent agreement. The differences between the detectors were less than or equal to 2.0% for the tissue maximum and the off-axis ratios. However, for the total scatter factors, there were significant differences, up to 4.9% (relative to the reference field), for field sizes less than 1.0 cm. Conclusions: This work found that the Gafchromic{sup Registered-Sign} EBT2 film is adequate for small photon beam measurements, particularly for tissue maximum and off-axis ratios. However, careful attention must be taken when measuring output factors of small beams below 1.0 cm due to the film's energy dependence. The measurement differences may be attributable to the film's active layer composition because EBT2 incorporates higher Z elements (i.e., bromide and potassium), hence revealing a potential energy dependence for the dosimetry of small photon beams.

  14. An evaluation of the contouring abilities of medical dosimetry students for the anatomy of a prostate cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Kevin S.

    2012-10-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common diseases treated in a radiation oncology department. One of the major predictors of the treatment outcome and patient side effects is the accuracy of the anatomical contours for the treatment plan. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine which anatomical structures are most often contoured correctly and incorrectly by medical dosimetry students. The author also wanted to discover whether a review of the contouring rules would increase contouring accuracy. To achieve this, a male computed tomography dataset consisting of 72 transverse slices was sent to students for contouring. The students were instructed to import this dataset into their treatment planning system and contour the following structures: skin, bladder, rectum, prostate, penile bulb, seminal vesicles, left femoral head, and right femoral head. Upon completion of the contours, the contour file was evaluated against a 'gold standard' contour set using StructSure software (Standard Imaging, Inc). A review of the initial contour results was conducted and then students were instructed to contour the dataset a second time. The results of this study showed significant differences between contouring sessions. These results and the standardization of contouring rules should benefit all individuals who participate in the treatment planning of cancer patients.

  15. Phase 1 Evaluation of [(64)Cu]DOTA-Patritumab to Assess Dosimetry, Apparent Receptor Occupancy, and Safety in Subjects with Advanced Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, A Craig; Liu, Yongjian; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Laforest, Richard; Picus, Joel; Frye, Jennifer; Trull, Lauren; Belanger, Stefanie; Desai, Madhuri; Mahmood, Syed; Mendell, Jeanne; Welch, Michael J; Siegel, Barry A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety, dosimetry, and apparent receptor occupancy (RO) of [(64)Cu]DOTA-patritumab, a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody directed against HER3/ERBB3 in subjects with advanced solid tumors. Dosimetry subjects (n = 5) received [(64)Cu]DOTA-patritumab and underwent positron emission tomography (PET)/X-ray computed tomography (CT) at 3, 24, and 48 h. Evaluable RO subjects (n = 3 out of 6) received [(64)Cu]DOTA-patritumab at day 1 and day 8 (after 9.0 mg/kg patritumab) followed by PET/CT at 24 h post-injection. Endpoints included safety, tumor uptake, and efficacy. The tumor SUVmax (± SD) was 5.6 ± 4.5, 3.3 ± 1.7, and 3.0 ± 1.1 at 3, 24, and 48 h in dosimetry subjects. The effective dose and critical organ dose (liver) averaged 0.044 ± 0.008 mSv/MBq and 0.46 ± 0.086 mGy/MBq, respectively. In RO subjects, tumor-to-blood ratio decreased from 1.00 ± 0.32 at baseline to 0.57 ± 0.17 after stable patritumab, corresponding to a RO of 42.1 ± 3. [(64)Cu]DOTA-patritumab was safe. These limited results suggest that this PET-based method can be used to determine tumor-apparent RO.

  16. Computational dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Thomas, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a definition of the term ``Computational Dosimetry`` that is interpreted as the sub-discipline of computational physics which is devoted to radiation metrology. It is shown that computational dosimetry is more than a mere collection of computational methods. Computational simulations directed at basic understanding and modelling are important tools provided by computational dosimetry, while another very important application is the support that it can give to the design, optimization and analysis of experiments. However, the primary task of computational dosimetry is to reduce the variance in the determination of absorbed dose (and its related quantities), for example in the disciplines of radiological protection and radiation therapy. In this paper emphasis is given to the discussion of potential pitfalls in the applications of computational dosimetry and recommendations are given for their avoidance. The need for comparison of calculated and experimental data whenever possible is strongly stressed.

  17. Personnel-dosimetry intercomparison studies at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    Since 1974, seven annual personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the Health Physics Reactor. These studies have produced more than 2000 measurements by 72 participating organizations of neutron and gamma dose equivalents between 0.1 to 15.0 mSv in six mixed radiation fields. The relative performance of three basic types of personnel neutron dosimeters (nuclear emulsion film, thermoluminescent, and track-etch) and two basic types of gamma dosimeters (film and thermoluminescent) was assessed based on experimental results obtained during the seven intercomparisons.

  18. 4-Step renal dosimetry dependent on cortex geometry applied to 90Y peptide receptor radiotherapy: evaluation using a fillable kidney phantom imaged by 90Y PET.

    PubMed

    Walrand, Stephan; Jamar, François; van Elmbt, Larry; Lhommel, Renaud; Bekonde, Edgar Bidja'a; Pauwels, Stanislas

    2010-12-01

    Accurate dosimetry in (90)Y peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) helps to optimize the injected activity, to prevent kidney or red marrow toxicity, while giving the highest absorbed dose to tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether direct (90)Y bismuth germanate or lutetium yttrium orthosilicate time-of-flight PET was accurate enough to provide dosimetry estimates suitable to (90)Y PRRT. To overcome the statistical uncertainty arising from the low (90)Y positron counting rate, the computation of the cortex mean-absorbed dose was divided into 4 steps: delineation of the cortex volume of interest (VOI) on the CT scan, determination of the recovery coefficient from the cortex VOI using the point-spread function of the whole imaging process, determination of the mean cortex-absorbed dose per unit cumulated activity in the cortex (S(cortex←cortex) value) from the cortex VOI using a (90)Y voxel S value kernel, and determination of the number of decays in the cortex VOI from the PET reconstruction. Our 4-step method was evaluated using an anthropomorphic abdominal phantom containing a fillable kidney phantom based on the MIRD kidney model. Vertebrae with an attenuation similar to that of bone were also modeled. Two tumors were modeled by 7-mL hollow acrylic spheres and the spleen by a plastic bag. Activities corresponded to typical tissue uptake in a first (90)Y-DOTATOC cycle of 4.4 GBq, considered as free of significant renal toxicity. Eight successive 45-min scans were acquired on both systems. Both PET systems were successful in determining absorbed dose to modeled tumors but failed to provide accurate red marrow dosimetry. Renal cortex dosimetry was reproducible for both PET systems, with an accuracy of 3% for the bismuth germanate system but only 18% for the lutetium yttrium orthosilicate time-of-flight system, which was hindered by the natural radioactivity of the crystal, especially in the most attenuated area of the kidney. This study

  19. Feasibility study on pinhole camera system for online dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Hales, Brian; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Igashira, Masayuki; Khan, Zareen; Kobayashi, Tooru; Matsuhashi, Taihei; Miyazaki, Koichi; Ogawa, Koichi; Terada, Kazushi

    2014-06-01

    The feasibility of a pinhole camera system for online dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was studied. A prototype system was designed and built. Prompt γ-rays from the (10)B(n,α)(7)Li reaction from a phantom irradiated with neutrons were detected with the prototype system. An image was reconstructed from the experimental data. The reconstructed image showed a good separation of the two borated regions in the phantom. The counting rates and signal-to-noise ratio when using the system in actual BNCT applications are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Workshop Report on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry--Review of Dose Related Factors for the Evaluation of Exposures to Residual Radiation at Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Kerr, George D; Egbert, Stephen D; Al-Nabulsi, Isaf; Bailiff, Ian K; Beck, Harold L; Belukha, Irina G; Cockayne, John E; Cullings, Harry M; Eckerman, Keith F; Granovskaya, Evgeniya; Grant, Eric J; Hoshi, Masaharu; Kaul, Dean C; Kryuchkov, Victor; Mannis, Daniel; Ohtaki, Megu; Otani, Keiko; Shinkarev, Sergey; Simon, Steven L; Spriggs, Gregory D; Stepanenko, Valeriy F; Stricklin, Daniela; Weiss, Joseph F; Weitz, Ronald L; Woda, Clemens; Worthington, Patricia R; Yamamoto, Keiko; Young, Robert W

    2015-12-01

    Groups of Japanese and American scientists, supported by international collaborators, have worked for many years to ensure the accuracy of the radiation dosimetry used in studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Reliable dosimetric models and systems are especially critical to epidemiologic studies of this population because of their importance in the development of worldwide radiation protection standards. While dosimetry systems, such as Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) and Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), have improved, the research groups that developed them were unable to propose or confirm an additional contribution by residual radiation to the survivor's total body dose. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of residual radiation exposures in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a half-day technical session was held for reports on newer studies at the 59 th Annual HPS Meeting in 2014 in Baltimore, MD. A day-and-a-half workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of the newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposure to atomic bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The process also involved a re-examination of very early surveys of radioisotope emissions from ground surfaces at Hiroshima and Nagasaki and early reports of health effects. New insights were reported on the potential contribution to residual radiation from neutron-activated radionuclides in the airburst's dust stem and pedestal and in unlofted soil, as well as from fission products and weapon debris from the nuclear cloud. However, disparate views remain concerning the actual residual radiation doses received by the atomic bomb survivors at different distances from the hypocenter. The workshop discussion indicated that measurements made using thermal luminescence and optically stimulated luminescence, like earlier measurements, especially in very thin layers of the samples, could be expanded to detect possible

  1. Evaluation of an Epson flatbed scanner to read Gafchromic EBT films for radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, B C; Lopes, M C; Capela, M

    2009-02-21

    Gafchromic EBT (EBT) films are becoming increasingly popular due to their advantageous properties. When flatbed colour scanners are used for film dosimetry, a good quality control of the scanning device is a crucial step for accurate results. The proposal of this work was to fully assess the performance of the scanner Epson Expression 10000XL in order to quantify all parameters and needed corrections to minimize dose uncertainties. A standard step tablet, with 32 steps and optical densities from 0.06 to 3.8, was used to check the scanner linearity. The scanner warming-up effect and reproducibility were evaluated by performing 30 consecutive scans plus 20 scans in 15 min intervals. The scanning colour modes: 24 and 48 bits and scanning resolutions from 50 to 300 dpi were tested. A Wiener filter with different pixels regions was applied with the purpose of reducing the film noise. All scans were made in transmission mode with a constant film orientation. The red colour channel was posteriorly extracted from the images to maximize readout sensitivity. Two EBT films were irradiated, perpendicularly and parallel to beam incidence, with a 6 MV photon beam with doses that ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. A polynomial expression was used to convert optical density into dose. Dose uncertainty was quantified applying error propagation analysis. A correction for the non-uniform response of the scanner was determined using five films irradiated with a uniform dose. The scanner response was linear until an optical density of approximately 1 which corresponds to doses higher than those of clinical interest for EBT films. The scanner signal stabilized after seven readings. Scanner reproducibility around 0.2% was obtained either with the scanner warm or cold. However, reproducibility was significantly reduced when comparing images digitized with the scanner at different temperatures. Neither the colour depth mode, the scanning resolution, the multiscan option nor the Wiener filter had a

  2. Dosimetry for radiobiological studies of the human hematopoietic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, W. L.; Stokes, T. R.; Lushbaugh, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    A system for estimating individual bone marrow doses in therapeutic radiation exposures of leukemia patients was studied. These measurements are used to make dose response correlations and to study the effect of dose protraction on peripheral blood cell levels. Three irradiators designed to produce a uniform field of high energy gamma radiation for total body exposures of large animals and man are also used for radiobiological studies.

  3. Safety, pharmacokinetic and dosimetry evaluation of the proposed thrombus imaging agent 99mTc-DI-DD-3B6/22-80B3 Fab'.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, David J; Smart, Richard C; Tsui, Wendy W; Gerometta, Michael; Eisenberg, Paul R; Scott, Andrew M

    2006-06-01

    (99m)Tc-DI-DD-3B6/22-80B3 (Thromboview, hereafter abbreviated to (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab') is a humanised, radiolabelled monoclonal antibody Fab' fragment with high affinity and specificity for the D-dimer domain of cross-linked fibrin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of four increasing doses of (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab' in healthy volunteers. Thirty-two healthy volunteers (18-70 years; 16 male, 16 female) received a single intravenous injection of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 or 4.0 mg of (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab'. Safety outcomes (vital signs, electrocardiography, haematology, biochemistry, adverse events and development of human anti-human antibodies) were assessed up to 30 days post injection. Blood and urine samples were collected up to 48 h post injection. Gamma camera images were acquired at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 24 h post injection. Dosimetry was performed using standard MIRD methodology. No adverse events considered to be drug related were observed. Human anti-human antibody was not detectable in any subject during the follow-up period. (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab' had a rapid initial plasma clearance (t (1/2)alpha=1 h). The pharmacokinetic profile of the Fab' fragment was generally linear across the four dose cohorts. By 24 h, 30-35% of the administered radioactivity appeared in the urine. There was marked renal accumulation with time, but no specific uptake was identified within other normal tissues. The effective dose was 9 mSv/750 MBq. (99m)Tc-DI-80B3 Fab' is well tolerated, is rapidly cleared and exhibits clinically acceptable dosimetry-characteristics well suited to a potential thrombus imaging agent.

  4. TH-C-19A-10: Systematic Evaluation of Photodetectors Performances for Plastic Scintillation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Boivin, J; Beaulieu, L; Beddar, S; Guillemette, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess and compare the performance of different photodetectors likely to be used in a plastic scintillation detector (PSD). Methods: The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter, 10 mm long plastic scintillation fiber (BCF-60) which is optically coupled to a clear 10 m long optical fiber of the same diameter. A light-tight plastic sheath covers both fibers and the scintillator end is sealed. The clear fiber end is connected to one of the following six studied photodetectors: two polychromatic cameras (one with an optical lens and one with a fiber optic taper replacing the lens); a monochromatic camera with the same optical lens; a PIN photodiode; an avalanche photodiode (APD); and a photomultiplier tube (PMT). Each PSD is exposed to both low energy beams (120, 180, and 220 kVp) from an orthovoltage unit, and high energy beams (6 MV and 23 MV) from a linear accelerator. Various dose rates are explored to identify the photodetectors operating ranges and accuracy. Results: For all photodetectors, the relative uncertainty remains under 5 % for dose rates over 3 mGy/s. The taper camera collects four times more signal than the optical lens camera, although its standard deviation is higher since it could not be cooled. The PIN, APD and PMT have higher sensitivity, suitable for low dose rate and out-of-field dose monitoring. PMT's relative uncertainty remains under 1 % at the lowest dose rate achievable (50 μGy/s), suggesting optimal use for live dosimetry. Conclusion: A set of 6 photodetectors have been studied over a broad dose rate range at various energies. For dose rate above 3 mGy/s, the PIN diode is the most effective photodetector in term of performance/cost ratio. For lower dose rate, such as those seen in interventional radiology, PMTs are the optimal choice. FQRNT Doctoral Research Scholarship.

  5. Infants and young children modeling method for numerical dosimetry studies: application to plane wave exposure.

    PubMed

    Dahdouh, S; Varsier, N; Nunez Ochoa, M A; Wiart, J; Peyman, A; Bloch, I

    2016-02-21

    Numerical dosimetry studies require the development of accurate numerical 3D models of the human body. This paper proposes a novel method for building 3D heterogeneous young children models combining results obtained from a semi-automatic multi-organ segmentation algorithm and an anatomy deformation method. The data consist of 3D magnetic resonance images, which are first segmented to obtain a set of initial tissues. A deformation procedure guided by the segmentation results is then developed in order to obtain five young children models ranging from the age of 5 to 37 months. By constraining the deformation of an older child model toward a younger one using segmentation results, we assure the anatomical realism of the models. Using the proposed framework, five models, containing thirteen tissues, are built. Three of these models are used in a prospective dosimetry study to analyze young child exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. The results lean to show the existence of a relationship between age and whole body exposure. The results also highlight the necessity to specifically study and develop measurements of child tissues dielectric properties.

  6. Infants and young children modeling method for numerical dosimetry studies: application to plane wave exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahdouh, S.; Varsier, N.; Nunez Ochoa, M. A.; Wiart, J.; Peyman, A.; Bloch, I.

    2016-02-01

    Numerical dosimetry studies require the development of accurate numerical 3D models of the human body. This paper proposes a novel method for building 3D heterogeneous young children models combining results obtained from a semi-automatic multi-organ segmentation algorithm and an anatomy deformation method. The data consist of 3D magnetic resonance images, which are first segmented to obtain a set of initial tissues. A deformation procedure guided by the segmentation results is then developed in order to obtain five young children models ranging from the age of 5 to 37 months. By constraining the deformation of an older child model toward a younger one using segmentation results, we assure the anatomical realism of the models. Using the proposed framework, five models, containing thirteen tissues, are built. Three of these models are used in a prospective dosimetry study to analyze young child exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. The results lean to show the existence of a relationship between age and whole body exposure. The results also highlight the necessity to specifically study and develop measurements of child tissues dielectric properties.

  7. Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of BPA in rats at different life stages using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaoxia Doerge, Daniel R.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has received considerable attention throughout the last decade due to its widespread use in consumer products. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in neonatal and adult rats to quantitatively evaluate age-dependent pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II metabolites. The PBPK model was calibrated in adult rats using studies on BPA metabolism and excretion in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, and pharmacokinetic data with BPA in adult rats. For immature rats the hepatic and gastrointestinal metabolism of BPA was inferred from studies on the maturation of phase II enzymes coupled with serum time course data in pups. The calibrated model predicted the measured serum concentrations of BPA and BPA conjugates after administration of 100 μg/kg of d6-BPA in adult rats (oral gavage and intravenous administration) and postnatal days 3, 10, and 21 pups (oral gavage). The observed age-dependent BPA serum concentrations were partially attributed to the immature metabolic capacity of pups. A comparison of the dosimetry of BPA across immature rats and monkeys suggests that dose adjustments would be necessary to extrapolate toxicity studies from neonatal rats to infant humans. - Highlights: • A PBPK model predicts the kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in young and adult rats. • BPA metabolism within enterocytes is required for fitting of oral BPA kinetic data. • BPA dosimetry in young rats is different than adult rats and young monkeys.

  8. Dosimetry and Risk Assessment: Fundamental Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Darrell R.

    2005-12-29

    Radiation dosimetry is important for characterizing radiation exposures and for risk assessment. In a medical setting, dosimetry is important for evaluating the safety of administered radiopharmaceuticals and for planning the safe administration of therapeutic radionuclides. Environmental dosimetry helps establish the safety of radionuclide releases from electric power production and other human activities. Internal and external dosimetry help us understand the consequences of radiation exposure. The absorbed dose is the fundamental quantity in radiation dosimetry from which all other operational values in radiation protection are obtained. Equivalent dose to tissue and effective dose to the whole body are derivatives of absorbed dose and constructs of risk. Mathematical systems supported by computer software facilitate dose calculations and make it possible to estimate internal dose based on bioassay or other biokinetic data. Risk coefficients for radiation-induced cancer rely primarily on data from animal studies and long-term observations of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bomb survivors. Low-dose research shows that mechanisms of radiation interactions with tissue are dose-dependent, but the resulting biological effects are not necessarily linear with absorbed dose. Thus, the analysis of radiation effects and associated risks must account for the influences of microscopic energy distributions at the cellular level, dose-rate, cellular repair of sub-lethal radiation damage, and modifying factors such as bystander effects, adaptive response, and genomic instability.

  9. Detailed urethral dosimetry in the evaluation of prostate brachytherapy-related urinary morbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Zachariah A.; Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@wheelinghospital.com; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Kurko, Brian; Anderson, Richard L.; Murray, Brian C.; Galbreath, Robert W.

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between urinary morbidity after prostate brachytherapy and urethral doses calculated at the base, midprostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm. Methods and Materials: From February 1998 through July 2002, 186 consecutive patients without a prior history of a transurethral resection underwent monotherapeutic brachytherapy (no supplemental external beam radiation therapy or androgen deprivation therapy) with urethral-sparing techniques (average urethral dose 100%-140% minimum peripheral dose) for clinical T1c-T2b (2002 AJCC) prostate cancer. The median follow-up was 45.5 months. Urinary morbidity was defined by time to International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) resolution, maximum increase in IPSS, catheter dependency, and the need for postimplant surgical intervention. An alpha blocker was initiated approximately 2 weeks before implantation and continued at least until the IPSS returned to baseline. Evaluated parameters included overall urethral dose (average and maximum), doses to the base, midprostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm, patient age, clinical T stage, preimplant IPSS, ultrasound volume, isotope, and D90 and V100/150/200. Results: Of the 186 patients, 176 (94.6%) had the urinary catheter permanently removed on the day of implantation with only 1 patient requiring a urinary catheter >5 days. No patient had a urethral stricture and only 2 patients (1.1%) required a postbrachytherapy transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). For the entire cohort, IPSS on average peaked 2 weeks after implantation with a mean and median time to IPSS resolution of 14 and 3 weeks, respectively. For the entire cohort, only isotope predicted for IPSS resolution, while neither overall average prostatic urethra nor segmental urethral dose predicted for IPSS resolution. The maximum postimplant IPSS increase was best predicted by preimplant IPSS and the maximum apical urethral dose. Conclusions: With the routine use of prophylactic alpha

  10. Cell irradiation setup and dosimetry for radiobiological studies at ELBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeil, K.; Beyreuther, E.; Lessmann, E.; Wagner, W.; Pawelke, J.

    2009-07-01

    The radiation source ELBE delivers different types of secondary radiation, which is used for cell irradiation studies in radiobiological research. Thereby an important issue is the determination of the biological effectiveness of photon radiation as a function of photon energy by using low-energetic, monochromatic channeling radiation (10-100 keV) and high-energetic bremsstrahlung (up to 40 MV). Radiobiological studies at the research facility ELBE demand special technical and dosimetric prerequisites. Therefore, a cell irradiation system (CIS) has been designed, constructed and installed at the beam line. The CIS allows automatic irradiation of a larger cell sample number and the compensation of spatial inhomogeneity of the dose distribution within the beam spot. The recently introduced GafChromic ® EBT radiochromic film model has been used to verify the cell irradiation dose deposition achieving a dose uncertainty of <5%. Both, the installed cell irradiation system and the developed dosimetric procedure based on the use of the EBT film have been experimentally tested at ELBE. The biological effectiveness of 34 MV bremsstrahlung with respect to 200 kV X-rays from a conventional X-ray tube has been determined. An RBE value of 0.75 has been measured in good agreement with literature.

  11. SU-C-BRD-06: Results From a 5 Patient in Vivo Rectal Wall Dosimetry Study Using Plastic Scintillation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, L; Kudchadker, R; Lee, A; Beddar, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance characteristics of plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) in an in vivo environment for external beam radiation, and to establish the usefulness and ease of implementation of a PSD based in vivo dosimetry system for routine clinical use. Methods: A five patient IRB approved in vivo dosimetry study was performed. Five patients with prostate cancer were enrolled and PSDs were used to monitor rectal wall dose and verify the delivered dose for approximately two fractions each week over the course of their treatment (approximately fourteen fractions), resulting in a total of 142 in vivo measurements. A set of two PSDs was fabricated for each patient. At each monitored fraction the PSDs were attached to the anterior surface of an endorectal balloon used to immobilize the patient's prostate during treatment. A CT scan was acquired with a CTon- rails linear accelerator to localize the detectors and to calculate the dose expected to be delivered to the detectors. Each PSD acquired data in 10 second intervals for the duration of the treatment. The deviation between expected and measured cumulative dose was calculated for each detector for each fraction, and averaged over each patient and the patient population as a whole. Results: The average difference between expected dose and measured dose ranged from -3.3% to 3.3% for individual patients, with standard deviations between 5.6% and 7.1% for four of the patients. The average difference for the entire population was -0.4% with a standard deviation of 2.8%. The detectors were well tolerated by the patients and the system did not interrupt the clinical workflow. Conclusion: PSDs perform well as in vivo dosimeters, exhibiting good accuracy and precision. This, combined with the practicability of using such a system, positions the PSD as a strong candidate for clinical in vivo dosimetry in the future. This work supported in part by the National Cancer Institute through an R01 grant (CA120198

  12. Study of The Non-linear Uv Dosimetry In Simulated Extraterrestrial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berces, A.; Kerekgyarto, T.; Ronto, G.; Lammer, H.; Kargl, G.; Komle, N. I.

    In UV biological dosimetry the UV dose scale is additive starting at a value of zero ac- cording to the definition of CIE (Technical Report TC-6-18). The biological dose can be defined by a measured end-effect. In our dosimeters (phage T7 and uracil dosime- ter) exposed to natural (terrestrial) UV radiation the proportion of pyrimidin photo- products among the total photoproducts is smaller than 10 and the linear correlation between the biological and physical dose is higher than 0.9. According to the experi- mental data this linear relationship is often not valid. We observed that UV radiation did not only induce dimerisation but shorter wavelengths caused monomerisation of pyrimidin dimers. Performing the irradiation in oxygen free environment and using a Deuterium lamp as UV source, we could increase monomerisation against dimerisa- tion thus the DNA-based dosimetrySs additivity rule is not fulfilled in these conditions. In this study we will demonstrate those non-linear experiments which constitute the basis of our biological experiments on the International Space Station.

  13. Design, characterization and use of replicate human upper airways for radon dosimetry studies

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.; Cheng, Y.S.; Su, Y.F.; Yeh, H.C.

    1992-12-31

    The size distribution of inhaled radon progeny aerosols is a significant factor in dosimetry. The role of the airways above the trachea is an important determinant of the respiratory distribution of both attached and unattached progeny aerosols. In order to provide information on the effect of particle size and breathing conditions on the overall and local deposition, we have developed a method to produce a replicate airway model from an in vivo magnetic resonance imaging coronal scan. The model consists of a sandwich of methacrylate elements, each element having the thickness of the scan interval. The transition between successive scan outlines traced on the front and back surfaces of each element is handsculpted in the plastic. The hollow model of the nasal passages thus produced has been characterized both morphologically and fluid-mechanically and has a flow resistance typical of a normal adult. The model has several distinct advantages for studies of radon progeny aerosol deposition. After exposure to a radioaerosol (or to an aerosol of an otherwise measurable substance) the individual elements can be separated to determine local deposition. The dimensions of specific upper-airway regions can be changed by replacing a small number of elements. The model has been incorporated in an exposure system for determining overall nandregional deposition of aerosols whose median diameter is approximately 1.7 nm. Measurements at several flow rates are presented to demonstrate use of the model in radon dosimetry. The model should also be useful for determining the airway deposition of other environmental aerosols.

  14. Epid Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Peter B.; Vial, Philip

    2011-05-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were introduced originally for patient position verification. The idea of using EPIDs for dosimetry was realised in the 1980s. Little was published on the topic until the mid 1990's, when the interest in EPIDs for dosimetry increased rapidly and continues to grow. The increasing research on EPID dosimetry coincided with the introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). EPIDs are well suited to IMRT dosimetry because they are high resolution, two-dimensional (2D) digital detectors. They are also pre-existing on almost all modern linear accelerators. They generally show a linear response to increasing dose. Different types of EPIDs have been clinically implemented, and these have been described in several review papers. The current generation of commercially available EPIDs are indirect detection active matrix flat panel imagers, also known as amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPIDs. Disadvantages of a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry include non-water equivalent construction materials, and the energy sensitivity and optical scatter of the phosphor scintillators used to create optical signal from the megavoltage beam. This report discusses current knowledge regarding a-Si EPIDs for dosimetry.

  15. Personal dosimetry of exposure to mobile telephone base stations? An epidemiologic feasibility study comparing the Maschek dosimeter prototype and the Antennessa SP-090 system.

    PubMed

    Radon, Katja; Spegel, Hedwig; Meyer, Nicole; Klein, Jerome; Brix, Jutta; Wiedenhofer, Arno; Eder, Heinrich; Praml, Georg; Schulze, Anja; Ehrenstein, Vera; von Kries, Rüdiger; Nowak, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    The aim of our study was to test the feasibility and reliability of personal dosimetry. Twenty-four hour exposure assessment was carried out in 42 children, 57 adolescents, and 64 adults using the Maschek dosimeter prototype. Self-reported exposure to mobile phone frequencies were compared with the dosimetry results. In addition, dosimetry readings of the Maschek device and those of the Antennessa DSP-090 were compared in 40 subjects. Self-reported exposures were not associated with dosimetry readings. The measurement results of the two dosimeters were in moderate agreement (r(Spearman) = 0.35; P = .03). Personal dosimetry for exposure to mobile phone base station might be feasible in epidemiologic studies. However, the consistency seems to be moderate.

  16. Evaluation of plastic materials for range shifting, range compensation, and solid-phantom dosimetry in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Koba, Yusuke; Ogata, Risa

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Beam range control is the essence of radiotherapy with heavy charged particles. In conventional broad-beam delivery, fine range adjustment is achieved by insertion of range shifting and compensating materials. In dosimetry, solid phantoms are often used for convenience. These materials should ideally be equivalent to water. In this study, the authors evaluated dosimetric water equivalence of four common plastics, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polyoxymethylene (POM). Methods: Using the Bethe formula for energy loss, the Gottschalk formula for multiple scattering, and the Sihver formula for nuclear interactions, the authors calculated the effective densities of the plastics for these interactions. The authors experimentally measured variation of the Bragg peak of carbon-ion beams by insertion of HDPE, PMMA, and POM, which were compared with analytical model calculations. Results: The theoretical calculation resulted in slightly reduced multiple scattering and severely increased nuclear interactions for HDPE, compared to water and the other plastics. The increase in attenuation of carbon ions for 20-cm range shift was experimentally measured to be 8.9% for HDPE, 2.5% for PMMA, and 0.0% for POM while PET was theoretically estimated to be in between PMMA and POM. The agreement between the measurements and the calculations was about 1% or better. Conclusions: For carbon-ion beams, POM was dosimetrically indistinguishable from water and the best of the plastics examined in this study. The poorest was HDPE, which would reduce the Bragg peak by 0.45% per cm range shift, although with marginal superiority for reduced multiple scattering. Between the two clear plastics, PET would be superior to PMMA in dosimetric water equivalence.

  17. Evaluation of linear array MOSFET detectors for in vivo dosimetry to measure rectal dose in HDR brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Haughey, Aisling; Coalter, George; Mugabe, Koki

    2011-09-01

    The study aimed to assess the suitability of linear array metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors (MOSFETs) as in vivo dosimeters to measure rectal dose in high dose rate brachytherapy treatments. The MOSFET arrays were calibrated with an Ir192 source and phantom measurements were performed to check agreement with the treatment planning system. The angular dependence, linearity and constancy of the detectors were evaluated. For in vivo measurements two sites were investigated, transperineal needle implants for prostate cancer and Fletcher suites for cervical cancer. The MOSFETs were inserted into the patients' rectum in theatre inside a modified flatus tube. The patients were then CT scanned for treatment planning. Measured rectal doses during treatment were compared with point dose measurements predicted by the TPS. The MOSFETs were found to require individual calibration factors. The calibration was found to drift by approximately 1% ±0.8 per 500 mV accumulated and varies with distance from source due to energy dependence. In vivo results for prostate patients found only 33% of measured doses agreed with the TPS within ±10%. For cervix cases 42% of measured doses agreed with the TPS within ±10%, however of those not agreeing variations of up to 70% were observed. One of the most limiting factors in this study was found to be the inability to prevent the MOSFET moving internally between the time of CT and treatment. Due to the many uncertainties associated with MOSFETs including calibration drift, angular dependence and the inability to know their exact position at the time of treatment, we consider them to be unsuitable for in vivo dosimetry in rectum for HDR brachytherapy.

  18. Evaluation of plastic materials for range shifting, range compensation, and solid-phantom dosimetry in carbon-ion radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Koba, Yusuke; Ogata, Risa

    2013-04-01

    Beam range control is the essence of radiotherapy with heavy charged particles. In conventional broad-beam delivery, fine range adjustment is achieved by insertion of range shifting and compensating materials. In dosimetry, solid phantoms are often used for convenience. These materials should ideally be equivalent to water. In this study, the authors evaluated dosimetric water equivalence of four common plastics, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polyoxymethylene (POM). Using the Bethe formula for energy loss, the Gottschalk formula for multiple scattering, and the Sihver formula for nuclear interactions, the authors calculated the effective densities of the plastics for these interactions. The authors experimentally measured variation of the Bragg peak of carbon-ion beams by insertion of HDPE, PMMA, and POM, which were compared with analytical model calculations. The theoretical calculation resulted in slightly reduced multiple scattering and severely increased nuclear interactions for HDPE, compared to water and the other plastics. The increase in attenuation of carbon ions for 20-cm range shift was experimentally measured to be 8.9% for HDPE, 2.5% for PMMA, and 0.0% for POM while PET was theoretically estimated to be in between PMMA and POM. The agreement between the measurements and the calculations was about 1% or better. For carbon-ion beams, POM was dosimetrically indistinguishable from water and the best of the plastics examined in this study. The poorest was HDPE, which would reduce the Bragg peak by 0.45% per cm range shift, although with marginal superiority for reduced multiple scattering. Between the two clear plastics, PET would be superior to PMMA in dosimetric water equivalence.

  19. Adherence to ICRU-83 reporting recommendations is inadequate in prostate dosimetry studies.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Aishling; Forde, Elizabeth

    2017-08-31

    This study aimed to investigate if the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) 83 recommendations for reporting dosimetric endpoints are followed in published prostate studies using modulated techniques. Prostate dosimetry studies using inverse planning techniques were identified through a search of PubMed and EMBASE databases. These studies were analyzed to determine if the endpoints reported followed the recommendations outlined in ICRU-83. A data collection form was completed and any alternative methods of reporting were recorded. Results were analyzed using frequencies, percentages, and Fisher exact tests. The ICRU-83 recommendations were not followed in the majority of studies. For the planning target volume, the dose received by 2% of the volume, the dose received by 98% of the volume, and the dose received by 50% of the volume were reported in 22.9%, 18.8%, and 8.3% of studies, respectively. The adherence to reporting for the clinical target volume was below 5% for all specifications. The mean dose, the dose received by a specified volume, and dose received by 2% of the volume for organs at risk were reported in 47.1%, 83.3%, and 16.7%, respectively. The homogeneity index was used in 14.6% of studies. Conformity was discussed in 45.8% of studies. Confidence intervals were included in 37.5% of studies. The reporting recommendations of ICRU-83 were not adhered to in the majority of the dosimetry studies reviewed, highlighting the need for greater diligence for authors and reviewers when publishing planning outcomes for modulated techniques. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cone-beam CT dosimetry for the positional variation in isocenter: A Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Chow, James C L

    2009-08-01

    This study investigated variations in kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) dosimetry for a change in the isocenter positions in the head-and-neck, lung-breast, and pelvis Rando phantoms using Monte Carlo simulations. Phase space kV-CBCT beams with energy of 120kVp for the XVI system equipped to the Elekta Synergy medical linear accelerator were used to calculate dose distributions for the head-and-neck, lung-breast, and pelvis phantoms, with isocenters in the original positions near to the center of each phantom using the EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code. Dose calculations were repeated with kV-CBCT isocenters shifted from the original positions along the x, y, and z axes. The relative dose ratio profiles, corresponding to different isocenter positions normalized to the original ones, were compared to evaluate the variations in the dose distribution due to isocentric shifts. Moreover, the relative dose at the isocenter, maximum dose, and mean dose for each isocenteric shift in the three phantoms were calculated. In this study, the original isocenter/center of the phantom was used as the reference for dose normalization. When the isocenter was chosen off from the center of the head-and-neck phantom, the maximum and mean imaging doses were found, varying by 14% and 15% in the anterior-posterior directions and 9% and 7% in the left-right directions. These dosimetric variations were slightly larger (17% and 17% in the anterior-posterior directions and 19% and 16% in the left-right directions) for the lung-breast phantom. For the pelvis phantom, the maximum and mean imaging doses varied by 10% and 22% in the anterior-posterior directions and 9% and 14% in the left-right directions with changes in the isocenter positions. Since the typical imaging dose is in the range of 2-8cGy for the soft tissue per kV-CBCT acquisition, the variation in the imaging dose due to the patient setup error (∼2cm) is insignificant compared to the original designed imaging dose

  1. Cone-beam CT dosimetry for the positional variation in isocenter: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Chow, James C L

    2009-08-01

    This study investigated variations in kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) dosimetry for a change in the isocenter positions in the head-and-neck, lung-breast, and pelvis Rando phantoms using Monte Carlo simulations. Phase space kV-CBCT beams with energy of 120 kVp for the XVI system equipped to the Elekta Synergy medical linear accelerator were used to calculate dose distributions for the head-and-neck, lung-breast, and pelvis phantoms, with isocenters in the original positions near to the center of each phantom using the EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code. Dose calculations were repeated with kV-CBCT isocenters shifted from the original positions along the x, y, and z axes. The relative dose ratio profiles, corresponding to different isocenter positions normalized to the original ones, were compared to evaluate the variations in the dose distribution due to isocentric shifts. Moreover, the relative dose at the isocenter, maximum dose, and mean dose for each isocenteric shift in the three phantoms were calculated. In this study, the original isocenter/center of the phantom was used as the reference for dose normalization. When the isocenter was chosen off from the center of the head-and-neck phantom, the maximum and mean imaging doses were found, varying by 14% and 15% in the anterior-posterior directions and 9% and 7% in the left-right directions. These dosimetric variations were slightly larger (17% and 17% in the anterior-posterior directions and 19% and 16% in the left-right directions) for the lung-breast phantom. For the pelvis phantom, the maximum and mean imaging doses varied by 10% and 22% in the anterior-posterior directions and 9% and 14% in the left-right directions with changes in the isocenter positions. Since the typical imaging dose is in the range of 2-8 cGy for the soft tissue per kV-CBCT acquisition, the variation in the imaging dose due to the patient setup error (approximately 2 cm) is insignificant compared to the original designed

  2. Using exposure prediction tools to link exposure and dosimetry for risk based decisions: a case study with phthalates

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Population Life-course Exposure to Health Effects Modeling (PLETHEM) platform being developed provides a tool that links results from emerging toxicity testing tools to exposure estimates for humans as defined by the USEPA. A reverse dosimetry case study using phthalates was ...

  3. Evaluation of a semiautomated lung mass calculation technique for internal dosimetry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Busse, Nathan; Erwin, William; Pan, Tinsu

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The authors sought to evaluate a simple, semiautomated lung mass estimation method using computed tomography (CT) scans obtained using a variety of acquisition techniques and reconstruction parameters for mass correction of medical internal radiation dose-based internal radionuclide radiation absorbed dose estimates.Methods: CT scans of 27 patients with lung cancer undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment planning with PET/CT were analyzed retrospectively. For each patient, free-breathing (FB) and respiratory-gated 4DCT scans were acquired. The 4DCT scans were sorted into ten respiratory phases, representing one complete respiratory cycle. An average CT reconstruction was derived from the ten-phase reconstructions. Mid expiration breath-hold CT scans were acquired in the same session for many patients. Deep inspiration breath-hold diagnostic CT scans of many of the patients were obtained from different scanning sessions at similar time points to evaluate the effect of contrast administration and maximum inspiration breath-hold. Lung mass estimates were obtained using all CT scan types, and intercomparisons made to assess lung mass variation according to scan type. Lung mass estimates using the FB CT scans from PET/CT examinations of another group of ten male and ten female patients who were 21–30 years old and did not have lung disease were calculated and compared with reference lung mass values. To evaluate the effect of varying CT acquisition and reconstruction parameters on lung mass estimation, an anthropomorphic chest phantom was scanned and reconstructed with different CT parameters. CT images of the lungs were segmented using the OsiriX MD software program with a seed point of about −850 HU and an interval of 1000. Lung volume, and mean lung, tissue, and air HUs were recorded for each scan. Lung mass was calculated by assuming each voxel was a linear combination of only air and tissue. The specific gravity of lung volume was

  4. Reactor Dosimetry State of the Art 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorbraak, Wim; Debarberis, Luigi; D'Hondt, Pierre; Wagemans, Jan

    2009-08-01

    data, damage correlations. Two-dimensional mapping of the calculated fission power for the full-size fuel plate experiment irradiated in the advanced test reactor / G. S. Chang and M. A. Lillo. The radiation safety information computational center: a resource for reactor dosimetry software and nuclear data / B. L. Kirk. Irradiated xenon isotopic ratio measurement for failed fuel detection and location in fast reactor / C. Ito, T. Iguchi and H. Harano. Characterization of dosimetry of the BMRR horizontal thimble tubes and broad beam facility / J.-P. Hu, R. N. Reciniello and N. E. Holden. 2007 nuclear data review / N. E. Holden. Further dosimetry studies at the Rhode Island nuclear science / R. N. Reciniello ... [et al.]. Characterization of neutron fields in the experimental fast reactor Joyo MK-III core / S. Maeda ... [et al.]. Measuring [symbol]Li(n, t) and [symbol]B(n, [symbol]) cross sections using the NIST alpha-gamma apparatus / M. S. Dewey ... [et al.]. Improvement of neutron/gamma field evaluation for restart of JMTR / Y. Nagao ... [et al.]. Monitoring of the irradiated neutron fluence in the neutron transmutation doping process of HANARO / M.-S. Kim and S.-J. Park.Training reactor VR-l neutron spectrum determination / M. Vins, A. Kolros and K. Katovsky. Differential cross sections for gamma-ray production by 14 MeV neutrons on iron and bismuth / V. M. Bondar ... [et al.]. The measurements of the differential elastic neutron cross-sections of carbon for energies from 2 to 133 ke V / O. Gritzay ... [et al.]. Determination of neutron spectrum by the dosimetry foil method up to 35 Me V / S. P. Simakov ... [et al.]. Extension of the BGL broad group cross section library / D. Kirilova, S. Belousov and Kr. Ilieva. Measurements of neutron capture cross-section for tantalum at the neutron filtered beams / O. Gritzayand V. Libman. Measurements of microscopic data at GELINA in support of dosimetry / S. Kopecky ... [et al.]. Nuclide guide and international chart of

  5. Evaluation of a fast method of EPID-based dosimetry for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Rasmussen, Karl H.; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) could potentially be useful for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) QA. The data density, high resolution, large active area, and efficiency of the MV EPID make it an attractive option. However, EPIDs were designed to be effective imaging devices, but not dosimeters, and as a result they do not measure dose in tissue-equivalent materials. EPIDose (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL) is a tool designed for the use of EPIDs in IMRT QA that uses raw MV EPID images (no additional build-up and independent of gantry angle, but with dark and flood field corrections applied) to estimate absolute dose planes normal to the beam axis in a homogeneous media, i.e. similar to conventional IMRT QA methods. However, because of the inherent challenges of the EPID-based dosimetry, validating and commissioning such a system must be done very carefully, exploring the range of use cases and using well-proven “standards” for comparison. In this work, a multi-institutional study was performed to verify accurate EPID image to dose plane conversion over a variety of conditions. Converted EPID images were compared to 2D diode array absolute dose measurements for one hundred and eighty eight (188) fields from twenty eight (28) clinical IMRT treatment plans generated using a number of commercially available treatment planning systems (TPS) covering various treatment sites including prostate, head and neck, brain, and lung. The data included three beam energies (6, 10, and 15 MV) and both step-and-shoot and dynamic MLC fields. Out of 26,207 points of comparison over 188 fields analyzed the average overall field pass rate was 99.7% when 3mm/3% DTA criteria were used (range 94.0-100 per field). The pass rates for more stringent criteria were 97.8% for 2mm/2% DTA (range 82.0-100 per field), and 84.6% for 1mm/1% DTA (range 54.7-100 per field). Individual patient specific sites as well as different beam energies followed similar trends to the overall

  6. Radiation Dosimetry Study in Dental Enamel of Human Tooth Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Tania; Romanyukha, Alex; Pass, Barry; Misra, Prabhakar

    2009-07-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of tooth enamel is used for individual dose reconstruction following radiation accidents. The purpose of this study is to develop a rapid, minimally invasive technique of obtaining a sample of dental enamel small enough to not disturb the structure and functionality of a tooth and to improve the sensitivity of the spectral signals using X-band (9.4 GHz) and Q-band (34 GHz) EPR technique. In this study EPR measurements in X-band were performed on 100 mg isotropic powdered enamel samples and Q-band was performed on 4 mg, 1×1×3 mm enamel biopsy samples. All samples were obtained from discarded teeth collected during normal dental treatment. To study the variation of the Radiation-Induced Signal (RIS) at different orientations in the applied magnetic field, samples were placed in the resonance cavity for Q-band EPR. X-band EPR measurements were performed on 100 mg isotropic powdered enamel samples. In X-band spectra, the RIS is distinct from the "native" radiation-independent signal only for doses >0.5 Gy. Q-band, however, resolves the RIS and "native" signals and improves sensitivity by a factor of 20, enabling measurements in 2-4 mg tooth enamel samples, as compared to 100 mg for X-band. The estimated lower limit of Q-band dose measurement is 0.5 Gy. Q-band EPR enamel dosimetry results in greater sensitivity and smaller sample size through enhanced spectral resolution. Thus, this can be a valuable technique for population triage in the event of detonation of a radiation dispersal device ("dirty" bomb) or other radiation event with massive casualties. Further, the small 4 mg samples can be obtained by a minimally-invasive biopsy technique.

  7. Eleventh ORNL personnel dosimetry intercomparison study, May 22-23, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Oyan, R.; Sims, C.S.

    1986-07-01

    The Eleventh Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during May 22-23, 1985. Dosimeter badges from 44 participating organizations were mounted on Lucite block phantoms and exposed to four mixed-radiation fields with neutron dose equivalents around 5 mSv and gamma dose equivalents between 0.1 and 0.7 mSv. Results of this study indicated that no participants had difficulty obtaining measurable indication of neutron exposure at the provided dose equivalent levels, and very few had difficulty obtaining indication of gamma exposure at dose equivalents as low as 0.10 mSv. Average neutron results for all dosimeter types were within 20% of reference values with no obvious spectrum dependence. Different dosimeter types (albedo, direct interaction TLD, film, recoil track, and combination albedo-track) with 10 or more reported measurements provided average results within 35% of reference values for all spectra. With regard to precision, about 80% of the reported neutron results had single standard deviations within 10% at the means which indicates that precision is not a problem relative to accuracy for most participants. Average gamma results were greater than reference values by factors of 1.07 to 1.52 for the four exposures with TLD systems being more accurate than film. About 80% of all neutron results and 67% of all gamma results met regulatory standards for measurement accuracy and approximately 70% of all neutron data satisfied national dosimetry accreditation criteria for accuracy plus precision. In general, neutron dosimeter performance observed in this intercomparison was much improved compared to that observed in the prior studies while gamma dosimeter performance was about the same.

  8. Summary and analsysis of the 1986 ORNL personnel dosimetry intercomparison study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Weng, P.S.; Sims, C.S.; Yeh, S.H.

    1987-04-01

    The Twelfth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during April 14 to 17, 1986. Objectives of this study were to determine neutron dosimeter performance characteristics at neutron dose equivalent levels near the minimum specified for accreditation testing programs and to provide several radiation fields different from those that have been considered in prior ORNL intercomparisons. Dosimeter badges from 49 participating organizations were mounted on Lucite block phantoms and exposed to six mixed-radiation fields (five using the Health Physics Research Reactor and one using a PuBe source) with neutron dose equivalents of about 1.5 mSv and gamma dose equivalents between 0.04 and 5.37 mSv. Results of this study indicated that participants had no difficulty obtaining measurable indication of neutron exposure at dose equivalent levels of about 1.5 mSv. Average neutron results for all dosimeter types were within approximately 60% of reference values with hard spectra being more accurately measured than soft spectra. Considering all irradiations, albedo and direct interaction TLD systems provided about the same performance characteristics. With regard to precision, about 58% of the reported neutron results had single standard deviations within 10% at the means which indicates that precision was not a problem relative to accuracy for over half of the participants. Average gamma results varied from 0.98 to 2.22 times reference values for all exposures with TLD systems being more accurate than film. Some participants, especially those using film, had difficulty obtaining measurable indication of gamma exposures at dose equivalent levels lower than 0.09 mSv. About 69% of all neutron results and 77% of all gamma results met regulatory standards for measurement accuracy and approximately 65% of all neutron data satisfied national dosimetry accreditation criteria for accuracy plus precision. 18 refs., 1 fig., 30 tabs.

  9. Utero-fetal unit and pregnant woman modeling using a computer graphics approach for dosimetry studies.

    PubMed

    Anquez, Jérémie; Boubekeur, Tamy; Bibin, Lazar; Angelini, Elsa; Bloch, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    Potential sanitary effects related to electromagnetic fields exposure raise public concerns, especially for fetuses during pregnancy. Human fetus exposure can only be assessed through simulated dosimetry studies, performed on anthropomorphic models of pregnant women. In this paper, we propose a new methodology to generate a set of detailed utero-fetal unit (UFU) 3D models during the first and third trimesters of pregnancy, based on segmented 3D ultrasound and MRI data. UFU models are built using recent geometry processing methods derived from mesh-based computer graphics techniques and embedded in a synthetic woman body. Nine pregnant woman models have been generated using this approach and validated by obstetricians, for anatomical accuracy and representativeness.

  10. Dosimetry in radiobiological studies with the heavy ion beam of the Warsaw cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaźmierczak, U.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Czub, J.; Jaskóła, M.; Korman, A.; Kruszewski, M.; Lankoff, A.; Lisowska, H.; Malinowska, A.; Stępkowski, T.; Szefliński, Z.; Wojewódzka, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify various dosimetry methods in the irradiation of biological materials with a 12C ion beam at the Heavy Ion Laboratory of the University of Warsaw. To this end the number of ions hitting the cell nucleus, calculated on the basis of the Si-detector system used in the set-up, was compared with the number of ion tracks counted in irradiated Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors and with the number of ion tracks detected in irradiated Chinese Hamster Ovary cells processed for the γ-H2AX assay. Tests results were self-consistent and confirmed that the system serves its dosimetric purpose.

  11. ISDD: A Computational Model of Particle Sedimentation, Diffusion and Target Cell Dosimetry for In Vitro Toxicity Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hinderliter, Paul M.; Minard, Kevin R.; Orr, Galya; Chrisler, William B.; Thrall, Brian D.; Pounds, Joel G.; Teeguarden, Justin G.

    2010-11-30

    . As a consequence, in vitro hazard assessments utilizing mass-based exposure metrics have inherently high errors where particle number or surface areas target cells doses are believed to drive response. The gold standard for particle dosimetry for in vitro nanotoxicology studies should be direct experimental measurement of the cellular content of the studied particle. However, where such measurements are impractical, unfeasible, and before such measurements become common, particle dosimetry models such as ISDD provide a valuable, immediately useful alternative, and eventually an adjunct to such measurements.

  12. ISDD: A computational model of particle sedimentation, diffusion and target cell dosimetry for in vitro toxicity studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    doses on a particle surface area or number basis can be as high as three to six orders of magnitude. As a consequence, in vitro hazard assessments utilizing mass-based exposure metrics have inherently high errors where particle number or surface areas target cells doses are believed to drive response. The gold standard for particle dosimetry for in vitro nanotoxicology studies should be direct experimental measurement of the cellular content of the studied particle. However, where such measurements are impractical, unfeasible, and before such measurements become common, particle dosimetry models such as ISDD provide a valuable, immediately useful alternative, and eventually, an adjunct to such measurements. PMID:21118529

  13. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1989-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

  14. Comparing Hp(3) evaluated from the conversion coefficients from air kerma to personal dose equivalent for eye lens dosimetry calibrated on a new cylindrical PMMA phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esor, J.; Sudchai, W.; Monthonwattana, S.; Pungkun, V.; Intang, A.

    2017-06-01

    Based on a new occupational dose limit recommended by ICRP (2011), the annual dose limit for the lens of the eye for workers should be reduced from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y averaged over 5 consecutive years in which no single year exceeding 50 mSv. This new dose limit directly affects radiologists and cardiologists whose work involves high radiation exposure over 20 mSv/y. Eye lens dosimetry (Hp(3)) has become increasingly important and should be evaluated directly based on dosimeters that are worn closely to the eye. Normally, Hp(3) dose algorithm was carried out by the combination of Hp(0.07) and Hp(10) values while dosimeters were calibrated on slab PMMA phantom. Recently, there were three reports from European Union that have shown the conversion coefficients from air kerma to Hp(3). These conversion coefficients carried out by ORAMED, PTB and CEA Saclay projects were performed by using a new cylindrical head phantom. In this study, various delivered doses were calculated using those three conversion coefficients while nanoDot, small OSL dosimeters, were used for Hp(3) measurement. These calibrations were performed with a standard X-ray generator at Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). Delivered doses (Hp(3)) using those three conversion coefficients were compared with Hp(3) from nanoDot measurements. The results showed that percentage differences between delivered doses evaluated from the conversion coefficient of each project and Hp(3) doses evaluated from the nanoDots were found to be not exceeding -11.48 %, -8.85 % and -8.85 % for ORAMED, PTB and CEA Saclay project, respectively.

  15. Prenatal exposure estimation of BPA and DEHP using integrated external and internal dosimetry: A case study.

    PubMed

    Martínez, M A; Rovira, J; Sharma, R Prasad; Nadal, M; Schuhmacher, M; Kumar, V

    2017-10-01

    Prenatal exposure to Endocrine disruptors (EDs), such as Bisphenol A (BPA) and di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), has been associated with obesity and diabetes diseases in childhood, as well as reproductive, behavioral and neurodevelopment problems. The aim of this study was to estimate the prenatal exposure to BPA and DEHP through food consumption for pregnant women living in Tarragona County (Spain). Probabilistic calculations of prenatal exposure were estimated by integrated external and internal dosimetry modelling, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Physical characteristic data from the cohort, along with food intake information from the questionnaires (concentrations of BPA and DEHP in different food categories and the range of the different food ratios), were used to estimate the value of the total dietary intake for the Tarragona pregnancy cohort. The major contributors to the total dietary intake of BPA were canned fruits and vegetables, followed by canned meat and meat products. In turn, milk and dairy products, followed by ready to eat food (including canned dinners), were the most important contributors to the total dietary intake of DEHP. Despite the dietary variations among the participants, the intakes of both chemicals were considerably lower than their respective current tolerable daily intake (TDI) values established by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Internal dosimetry estimates suggest that the plasma concentrations of free BPA and the most important DEHP metabolite, mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), in pregnant women were characterized by transient peaks (associated with meals) and short half-lives (< 2h). In contrast, fetal exposure was characterized by a low and sustained basal BPA and MEHP concentration due to a lack of metabolic activity in the fetus. Therefore, EDs may have a greater effect on developing organs in young children or in the unborn child. Copyright © 2017

  16. Quasi 3D dosimetry (EPID, conventional 2D/3D detector matrices)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäck, A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient specific pretreatment measurement for IMRT and VMAT QA should preferably give information with a high resolution in 3D. The ability to distinguish complex treatment plans, i.e. treatment plans with a difference between measured and calculated dose distributions that exceeds a specified tolerance, puts high demands on the dosimetry system used for the pretreatment measurements and the results of the measurement evaluation needs a clinical interpretation. There are a number of commercial dosimetry systems designed for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. 2D arrays such as MapCHECK® (Sun Nuclear), MatriXXEvolution (IBA Dosimetry) and OCTAVIOUS® 1500 (PTW), 3D phantoms such as OCTAVIUS® 4D (PTW), ArcCHECK® (Sun Nuclear) and Delta4 (ScandiDos) and software for EPID dosimetry and 3D reconstruction of the dose in the patient geometry such as EPIDoseTM (Sun Nuclear) and Dosimetry CheckTM (Math Resolutions) are available. None of those dosimetry systems can measure the 3D dose distribution with a high resolution (full 3D dose distribution). Those systems can be called quasi 3D dosimetry systems. To be able to estimate the delivered dose in full 3D the user is dependent on a calculation algorithm in the software of the dosimetry system. All the vendors of the dosimetry systems mentioned above provide calculation algorithms to reconstruct a full 3D dose in the patient geometry. This enables analyzes of the difference between measured and calculated dose distributions in DVHs of the structures of clinical interest which facilitates the clinical interpretation and is a promising tool to be used for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. However, independent validation studies on the accuracy of those algorithms are scarce. Pretreatment IMRT QA using the quasi 3D dosimetry systems mentioned above rely on both measurement uncertainty and accuracy of calculation algorithms. In this article, these quasi 3D dosimetry systems and their use in patient specific pretreatment IMRT

  17. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  18. Patient dosimetry activities in the United States: the nationwide evaluation of X-ray trends (NEXT) and tissue dose handbooks.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, O H; Stern, S H; Spelic, D C

    1999-01-01

    In the United States the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in collaboration with the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) and state and local government agencies surveys clinical facilities about X-ray system air kerma and ancillary data related to patient dosimetry for a variety of diagnostic X-ray examinations. The survey program is known as the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT). The survey utilizes reference patient-equivalent phantoms in the collection of comprehensive technical information. With knowledge of the skin-entrance air kerma, specific tissue doses can be calculated. An overview of NEXT and previously published FDA tissue dose handbooks for diagnostic X-ray examinations is presented.

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Polymer gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldock, C.; De Deene, Y.; Doran, S.; Ibbott, G.; Jirasek, A.; Lepage, M.; McAuley, K. B.; Oldham, M.; Schreiner, L. J.

    2010-03-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented.

  20. Topical Review: Polymer gel dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, C; De Deene, Y; Doran, S; Ibbott, G; Jirasek, A; Lepage, M; McAuley, K B; Oldham, M; Schreiner, L J

    2010-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented. PMID:20150687

  1. Specific issues in small animal dosimetry and irradiator calibration

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizumi, Terry; Brady, Samuel L.; Robbins, Mike E.; Bourland, J. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In response to the increased risk of radiological terrorist attack, a network of Centers for Medical Countermeasures against Radiation (CMCR) has been established in the United States, focusing on evaluating animal model responses to uniform, relatively homogenous whole- or partial-body radiation exposures at relatively high dose rates. The success of such studies is dependent not only on robust animal models but on accurate and reproducible dosimetry within and across CMCR. To address this issue, the Education and Training Core of the Duke University School of Medicine CMCR organised a one-day workshop on small animal dosimetry. Topics included accuracy in animal dosimetry accuracy, characteristics and differences of cesium-137 and X-ray irradiators, methods for dose measurement, and design of experimental irradiation geometries for uniform dose distributions. This paper summarises the information presented and discussed. Conclusions Without ensuring accurate and reproducible dosimetry the development and assessment of the efficacy of putative countermeasures will not prove successful. Radiation physics support is needed, but is often the weakest link in the small animal dosimetry chain. We recommend: (i) A user training program for new irradiator users, (ii) subsequent training updates, and (iii) the establishment of a national small animal dosimetry center for all CMCR members. PMID:21961967

  2. ESR dosimetry for atomic bomb survivors and radiologic technologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi-Miyajima, Junko

    1987-06-01

    An individual absorbed dose for atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors and radiologic technologists has been estimated using a new personal dosimetry. This dosimetry is based on the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy of the CO 33- radicals, which are produced in their teeth by radiation. Measurements were carried out to study the characteristics of the dosimetry; the ESR signals of the CO 33- radicals were stable and increased linearly with the radiation dose. In the evaluation of the absorbed dose, the ESR signals were considered to be a function of photon energy. The absorbed doses in ten cases of A-bomb victims and eight cases of radiologic technologists were determined. For A-bomb survivors, the adsorbed doses, which were estimated using the ESR dosimetry, were consistent with the ones obtained using the calculations of the tissue dose in air of A-bomb, and also with the ones obtained using the chromosome measurements. For radiologic technologists, the absorbed doses, which were estimated using the ESR dosimetry, agreed with the ones calculated using the information on the occupational history and conditions. The advantages of this method are that the absorbed dose can be directly estimated by measuring the ESR signals obtained from the teeth of persons, who are exposed to radiation. Therefore, the ESR dosimetry is useful to estimate the accidental exposure and the long term cumulative dose.

  3. TU-E-201-01: Methods for Eye Lens Dosimetry and Studies On Lens Opacities with Interventionists

    SciTech Connect

    Rehani, M.

    2015-06-15

    Madan M. Rehani, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Methods for Eye Lens Dosimetry and Studies On Lens Opacities with Interventionalists Radiation induced cataract is a major threat among staff working in interventional suites. Nearly 16 million interventional procedures are performed annually in USA. Recent studies by the principal investigator’s group, primarily among interventional cardiologists, on behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency, show posterior subcapsular (PSC) changes in the eye lens in 38–53% of main operators and 21–45% of support staff. These changes have potential to lead to cataract in future years, as per information from A-Bomb survivors. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has reduced dose limit for staff by a factor of 7.5 (from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y). With increasing emphasis on radiation induced cataracts and reduction in threshold dose for eye lens, there is a need to implement strategies for estimating eye lens dose. Unfortunately eye lens dosimetry is at infancy when it comes to routine application. Various approaches are being tried namely direct measurement using active or passive dosimeters kept close to eyes, retrospective estimations and lastly correlating patient dose in interventional procedures with staff eye dose. The talk will review all approaches available and ongoing active research in this area, as well as data from surveys done in Europe on status of eye dose monitoring in interventional radiology and nuclear medicine. The talk will provide update on how good is Hp(10) against Hp(3), estimations from CTDI values, Monte Carlo based simulations and current status of eye lens dosimetry in USA and Europe. The cataract risk among patients is in CT examinations of the head. Since radiation induced cataract predominantly occurs in posterior sub-capsular (PSC) region and is thus distinguishable from age or drug related cataracts and is also preventable, actions on

  4. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.V.

    1981-06-16

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments. (ACR)

  5. Evaluation of The Combined Effects of Hyperthermia, Cobalt-60 Gamma Rays and IUdR on Cultured Glioblastoma Spheroid Cells and Dosimetry Using TLD-100.

    PubMed

    Neshasteh-Riz, Ali; Rahdani, Rozhin; Mostaar, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    In radiation treatment, the irradiation which is effective enough to control the tumors far exceeds normal-tissues tolerance. Thus to avoid such unfavourable outcomes, some methods sensitizing the tumor cells to radiation are used. Iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) is a halogenated thymidine analogue that known to be effective as a radiosensitizer in human cancer therapy. Improving the potential efficacy of radiation therapy after combining to hyperthermia depends on the magnitude of the differential sensitization of the hyperthermic effects or on the differential cytotoxicity of the radiation effects on the tumor cells. In this study, we evaluated the combined effects of IUdR, hyperthermia and gamma rays of (60)Co on human glioblastoma spheroids culture. In this experimental study,the cultured spheroids with 100µm diameter were treated by 1 µM IUdR, 43°C hyperthermia for an hour and 2 Gy gamma rays, respectively. The DNA damages induced in cells were compared using alkaline comet assay method, and dosimetry was then performed by TLD-100. Comet scores were calculated as mean ± standard error of mean (SEM) using one-way ANOVA. Comparison of DNA damages induced by IUdR and hyperthermia + gamma treatment showed 2.67- and 1.92-fold enhancement, respectively, as compared to the damages induced by radiation alone or radiation combined IUdR. Dosimetry results showed the accurate dose delivered to cells. Analysis of the comet tail moments of spheroids showed that the radiation treatments combined with hyperthermia and IUdR caused significant radiosensitization when compared to related results of irradiation alone or of irradiation with IUdR. These results suggest a potential clinical advantage of combining radiation with hyperthermia and indicate effectiveness of hyperthermia treatment in inducing cytotoxicity of tumor cells.

  6. A comprehensive tool for image-based generation of fetus and pregnant women mesh models for numerical dosimetry studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahdouh, S.; Varsier, N.; Serrurier, A.; De la Plata, J.-P.; Anquez, J.; Angelini, E. D.; Wiart, J.; Bloch, I.

    2014-08-01

    Fetal dosimetry studies require the development of accurate numerical 3D models of the pregnant woman and the fetus. This paper proposes a 3D articulated fetal growth model covering the main phases of pregnancy and a pregnant woman model combining the utero-fetal structures and a deformable non-pregnant woman body envelope. The structures of interest were automatically or semi-automatically (depending on the stage of pregnancy) segmented from a database of images and surface meshes were generated. By interpolating linearly between fetal structures, each one can be generated at any age and in any position. A method is also described to insert the utero-fetal structures in the maternal body. A validation of the fetal models is proposed, comparing a set of biometric measurements to medical reference charts. The usability of the pregnant woman model in dosimetry studies is also investigated, with respect to the influence of the abdominal fat layer.

  7. A study of detailed dosimetry records for a selected group of workers included in the Hanford mortality study

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1990-09-01

    Detailed dosimetry data from microfiche and microfilm in source records for the years 1944--1978 for 139 Hanford workers were examined. Information on these records was compared with computerized dose equivalent estimates used in mortality analyses. Because of difficulties in reading some early source records, and because of variation in the format of records and in algorithms for calculating whole body dose, this validation was difficult. However, apparent discrepancies in cumulative dose were less than 0.1 rem for 88% of the workers in this study, never exceeded 1.5 rem, and would be unlikely to distort conclusions of dose-response analyses. Most discrepancies occurred in early years of Hanford operations, especially 1944--46, with very few problems with dose estimates from the 1960's and 1970's. The study also provided data dosimetry practices, by calendar year, on frequency of monitoring, the number and proportion of dosimeters yielding positive results, and the magnitude of doses recorded for individual dosimeters. 7 refs., 5 figs., 13 tabs.

  8. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-20

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs.

  9. An evaluation of the external radiation exposure dosimetry and calculation of maximum permissible concentration values for airborne materials containing 18F, 15O, 13N, 11C and 133Xe.

    PubMed

    Piltingsrud, H V; Gels, G L

    1985-11-01

    To better understand the dose equivalent (D.E.) rates produced by airborne releases of gaseous positron-emitting radionuclides under various conditions of cloud size, a study of the external radiation exposure dosimetry of these radionuclides, as well as negatron, gamma and x-ray emitting 133Xe, was undertaken. This included a calculation of the contributions to D.E. as a function of cloud radii, at tissue depths of 0.07 mm (skin), 3 mm (lens of eye) and 10 mm (whole body) from both the particulate and photon radiations emitted by these radionuclides. Estimates of maximum permissible concentration (MPC) values were also calculated based on the calculated D.E. rates and current regulations for personnel radiation protection (CFR84). Three continuous air monitors, designed for use with 133Xe, were evaluated for applications in monitoring air concentrations of the selected positron emitters. The results indicate that for a given radionuclide and for a cloud greater than a certain radius, personnel radiation dosimeters must respond acceptably to only the photon radiations emitted by the radionuclide to provide acceptable personnel dosimetry. For clouds under that radius, personnel radiation dosimeters must also respond acceptably to the positron or negatron radiations to provide acceptable personnel dosimetry. It was found that two out of the three air concentration monitors may be useful for monitoring air concentrations of the selected positron emitters.

  10. Prospective Study of (68)Ga-NOTA-NFB: Radiation Dosimetry in Healthy Volunteers and First Application in Glioma Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Mingru; Wang, Liang; Wang, Shengjun; Kang, Fei; Li, Guoquan; Jacobson, Orit; Niu, Gang; Yang, Weidong; Wang, Jing; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is overexpressed in various types of human cancers. As a specific imaging agent of CXCR4, (68)Ga-NOTA-NFB was investigated in this study to assess its safety, biodistribution and dosimetry properties in healthy volunteers, and to preliminarily evaluate its application in glioma patients. Six healthy volunteers underwent whole-body PET scans at 0, 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 h after (68)Ga-NOTA-NFB injection (mean dose, 182.4 ± 3.7 MBq (4.93 ± 0.10 mCi)). For time-activity curve calculations, 1 mL blood samples were obtained at 1, 3, 5, 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min after the injection. The estimated radiation doses were calculated by OLINDA/EXM software. Eight patients with glioma were enrolled and underwent both (68)Ga-NOTA-NFB and (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans before surgery. The expression of CXCR4 on the resected brain tumor tissues was determined by immunohistochemical staining. (68)Ga-NOTA-NFB was safe and well tolerated by all subjects. A rapid activity clearance from the blood circulation was observed. The organs with the highest absorbed doses were spleen (193.8 ± 32.5 μSv/MBq) and liver (119.3 ± 25.0 μSv/MBq). The mean effective dose was 25.4 ± 6.1 μSv/MBq. The maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and the maximum target to non-target ratios (T/NTmax) of (68)Ga-NOTA-NFB PET/CT in glioma tissues were 4.11 ± 2.90 (range, 0.45-8.21) and 9.21 ± 8.75 (range, 3.66-24.88), respectively, while those of (18)F-FDG PET/CT were 7.34 ± 2.90 (range, 3.50-12.27) and 0.86 ± 0.41 (range, 0.35-1.59). The histopathological staining confirmed that CXCR4 was overexpressed on resected tumor tissues with prominent (68)Ga-NOTA-NFB uptake. With a favorable radiation dosimetry profile, (68)Ga-NOTA-NFB is safe for clinical imaging. Compared to (18)F-FDG PET/CT, (68)Ga-NOTA-NFB PET/CT is more sensitive in detecting glioma and could have potential in diagnosing and treatment planning for CXCR4 positive patients.

  11. Measurement of the neutron energy spectrum on the Godiva IV fast burst assembly for application to neutron dosimetry studies

    SciTech Connect

    Casson, W.H.; Hsu, H.H.; Paternoster, R.R.; Butterfield, K.B.

    1996-06-01

    In June, 1995, Los Alamos National Laboratory hosted the 23rd U.S. Department of Energy sponsored Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Study at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The participants tested their facilities accident dosimeters under a variety of neutrons fields produced by the Solution High Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) and the Godiva IV fast burst assembly. To provide useful information for the evaluation of the results, the neutron energy Spectrum was determined and the delivered absorbed dose to tissue. The measurement of the neutron energy spectrum on Godiva provides a unique problem in that the burst, which is nearly Gaussian in time, has a full width at half maximum of around 50 microseconds. The neutron spectrum was first determined at low-power while running at delayed critical using a standard set of Bonner spheres. At the same time, the response of a set of TLD dosimeters were measured. After that, measurements were conducted during a burst with another set of TLDs and with sulfur pellets.

  12. Radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists. PMID:2040250

  13. Time-Resolved Versus Integrated Transit Planar Dosimetry for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: Patient-Specific Dose Differences During Treatment, a Proof of Principle.

    PubMed

    Persoon, L C G G; Podesta, M; Nijsten, S M J J G; Troost, E G C; Verhaegen, F

    2016-12-01

    It is desirable that dosimetric deviations during radiation treatments are detected. Integrated transit planar dosimetry is commonly used to evaluate external beam treatments such as volumetric-modulated arc therapy. This work focuses on patient geometry changes which result in differences between the planned and the delivered radiation dose. Integrated transit planar dosimetry will average out some deviations. Novel time-resolved transit planar dosimetry compares the delivered dose of volumetric-modulated arc therapy to the planned dose at various time points. Four patient cases are shown where time-resolved transit planar dosimetry detects patient geometry changes during treatment. A control point to control point comparison between the planned dose and the treatment dose of volumetric-modulated arc therapy beams is calculated using the planning computed tomography and the kV cone-beam computed tomography of the day and evaluated with a time-resolved γ function. Results were computed for 4 patients treated with volumetric-modulated arc therapy, each showing an anatomical change: pleural effusion, rectal gas pockets, and tumor regression. In all cases, the geometrical change was detected by time-resolved transit planar dosimetry, whereas integrated transit planar dosimetry showed minor or no indication of the dose discrepancy. Both tumor regression cases were detected earlier in the treatment with time-resolved planar dosimetry in comparison to integrated transit planar dosimetry. The pleural effusion and the gas pocket were detected exclusively with time-resolved transit planar dosimetry. Clinical cases were presented in this proof-of-principle study in which integrated transit planar dosimetry did not detect dosimetrically relevant deviations to the same extent time-resolved transit planar dosimetry was able to. Time-resolved transit planar dosimetry also provides results that can be presented as a function of arc delivery angle allowing easier interpretation

  14. Improved dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy using high resolution contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Morancy, Tye; Kaplan, Irving; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Rofksy, Neil M.; Holupka, Edward; Oismueller, Renee; Hawliczek, Robert; Helbich, Thomas H.; Bloch, B. Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess detailed dosimetry data for prostate and clinical relevant intra- and peri-prostatic structures including neurovascular bundles (NVB), urethra, and penile bulb (PB) from postbrachytherapy computed tomography (CT) versus high resolution contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (HR-CEMRI). Material and methods Eleven postbrachytherapy prostate cancer patients underwent HR-CEMRI and CT imaging. Computed tomography and HR-CEMRI images were randomized and 2 independent expert readers created contours of prostate, intra- and peri-prostatic structures on each CT and HR-CEMRI scan for all 11 patients. Dosimetry data including V100, D90, and D100 was calculated from these contours. Results Mean V100 values from CT and HR-CEMRI contours were as follows: prostate (98.5% and 96.2%, p = 0.003), urethra (81.0% and 88.7%, p = 0.027), anterior rectal wall (ARW) (8.9% and 2.8%, p < 0.001), left NVB (77.9% and 51.5%, p = 0.002), right NVB (69.2% and 43.1%, p = 0.001), and PB (0.09% and 11.4%, p = 0.005). Mean D90 (Gy) derived from CT and HR-CEMRI contours were: prostate (167.6 and 150.3, p = 0.012), urethra (81.6 and 109.4, p = 0.041), ARW (2.5 and 0.11, p = 0.003), left NVB (98.2 and 58.6, p = 0.001), right NVB (87.5 and 55.5, p = 0.001), and PB (11.2 and 12.4, p = 0.554). Conclusions Findings of this study suggest that HR-CEMRI facilitates accurate and meaningful dosimetric assessment of prostate and clinically relevant structures, which is not possible with CT. Significant differences were seen between CT and HR-CEMRI, with volume overestimation of CT derived contours compared to HR-CEMRI. PMID:25834576

  15. Radiation effects in interventional radiology using biological and physical dosimetry methods: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Miguel; Montoro, Alegria; Almonacid, Miguel; Ferrer, Silvia; Barquinero, Joan Francesc; Tortosa, Ricardo; Verdú, Gumersindo; Rodríguez, Pilar; Barrios, Lleonard; Villaescusa, Juan Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    Interventional radiologists and staff members are frequently exposed to protracted and fractionated low doses of ionizing radiation, which extend during all their professional activities. These exposures can derive, due to the irradiation of skin tissues and peripheral blood, in deterministic effects (radiodermitis, aged skin, hands depilation) or stochastic ones (skin and non-solid cancers incidence). Epidemiological studies of population exposed to ionizing radiation provide information of radio-induced effects. The radiation risk or radiological detriment has been estimated from a group of six exposed interventionist radiologists of the Hospital La Fe (Valencia, Spain). Dosimetry has been periodically registered from TLDs and wrist dosimeters (physical methods) and estimated through translocations in lymphocytes of peripheral blood (biological methods), by extrapolating the yield of translocations to their respective dose-effect curves. The probability of non-melanoma skin cancer and leukaemia (acute myelogenous, acute lymphocytic and chronic myelogenous leukaemia) incidence has been estimated through the software RADRISK. This software is based on a transport model from epidemiological studies of population exposed to external low-LET ionizing radiation [1]. Other non-solid carcinomas have not been considered due to their low statistical power, such as myeloid and non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The discrepancies observed between the physically recorded doses and biological estimated doses could indicate that exposed workers did not always wear their dosimeters or these dosimeters were not always exposed to the radiation field.

  16. Dosimetry study of PHOTOFRIN-mediated photodynamic therapy in a mouse tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Haixia; Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-03-01

    It is well known in photodynamic therapy (PDT) that there is a large variability between PDT light dose and therapeutic outcomes. An explicit dosimetry model using apparent reacted 1O2 concentration [1O2]rx has been developed as a PDT dosimetric quantity to improve the accuracy of the predicted ability of therapeutic efficacy. In this study, this explicit macroscopic singlet oxygen model was adopted to establish the correlation between calculated reacted [1O2]rx and the tumor growth using Photofrin-mediated PDT in a mouse tumor model. Mice with radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors were injected with Photofrin at a dose of 5 mg/kg. PDT was performed 24h later with different fluence rates (50, 75 and 150 mW/cm2) and different fluences (50 and 135 J/cm2) using a collimated light applicator coupled to a 630nm laser. The tumor volume was monitored daily after PDT and correlated with the total light fluence and [1O2]rx. Photophysical parameters as well as the singlet oxygen threshold dose for this sensitizer and the RIF tumor model were determined previously. The result showed that tumor growth rate varied greatly with light fluence for different fluence rates while [1O2]rx had a good correlation with the PDT-induced tumor growth rate. This preliminary study indicated that [1O2]rx could serve as a better dosimetric predictor for predicting PDT outcome than PDT light dose.

  17. Hanford External Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J.J.

    1990-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford External Dosimetry Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include administrating the Hanford personnel dosimeter processing program and ensuring that the related dosimeter data accurately reflect occupational dose received by Hanford personnel or visitors. Specific chapters of this report deal with the following subjects: personnel dosimetry organizations at Hanford and the associated DOE and contractor exposure guidelines; types, characteristics, and procurement of personnel dosimeters used at Hanford; personnel dosimeter identification, acceptance testing, accountability, and exchange; dosimeter processing and data recording practices; standard sources, calibration factors, and calibration processes (including algorithms) used for calibrating Hanford personnel dosimeters; system operating parameters required for assurance of dosimeter processing quality control; special dose evaluation methods applied for individuals under abnormal circumstances (i.e., lost results, etc.); and methods for evaluating personnel doses from nuclear accidents. 1 ref., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. [Theoretical and experimental dosimetry in evaluation of biological effects of electromagnetic field for portable radio transmitters. Report 1. Flat phantoms].

    PubMed

    Perov, S Iu; Bogacheva, E V

    2014-01-01

    Results of the theoretical (numerical) and experimental dosimetry approach for portable radio transmitters are considered. The simulation and measurement results are shown. A generic type of a portable radio transmitter operating in a very high frequency range was tested as an electromagnetic field source. The analysis of specific absorption rate distribution in the flat homogeneous phantom was carried out on the basis of a portable radio transmitter. The results have shown the admissible divergence between measurements and simulation. According to these results, the authors have come to the conclusion about using the complex dosimetry approach including experimental and numerical dosimetry.

  19. The effect of patient inhomogeneities in oesophageal 192Ir HDR brachytherapy: a Monte Carlo and analytical dosimetry study.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, G; Baltas, D; Pantelis, E; Papagiannis, P; Sakelliou, L

    2004-06-21

    The effect of patient inhomogeneities surrounding the oesophagus on the dosimetry planning of an upper thoracic oesophageal 192Ir HDR brachytherapy treatment is studied. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code is used for dosimetry in a patient-equivalent phantom geometry and results are compared in terms of isodose contours as well as dose volume histograms with corresponding calculations by a contemporary treatment planning system software featuring a full TG-43 dose calculation algorithm (PLATO BPS version 14.2.4). It is found that the presence of patient inhomogeneities does not alter the delivery of the planned dose distribution to the planning treatment volume. Regarding the organs at risk, the common practice of current treatment planning systems (TPSs) to consider the patient geometry as a homogeneous water medium leads to a dose overestimation of up to 13% to the spinal cord and an underestimation of up to 15% to the sternum bone. These findings which correspond to the dose region of about 5-10% of the prescribed dose could only be of significance when brachytherapy is used as a boost to external beam therapy. Additionally, an analytical dosimetry model, which is efficient in calculating dose in mathematical phantoms containing inhomogeneity shells of materials of radiobiological interest, is utilized for dosimetry in the patient-equivalent inhomogeneous phantom geometry. Analytical calculations in this work are in good agreement with corresponding Monte Carlo results within the bone inhomogeneities of spinal cord and sternum bone but, like treatment planning system calculations, the model fails to predict the dose distribution in the proximal lung surface as well as within the lungs just as the TPS does, due to its inherent limitation in treating lateral scatter and backscatter radiation.

  20. Evaluation of neutron dosimetry on pancreatic cancer phantom model for application of intraoperative boron neutron-capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Yanagie, Hironobu; Sakurai, Yosiyuki; Ogura, Koichi; Kobayashi, Tooru; Furuya, Yoshitaka; Sugiyama, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Hisao; Ono, Koji; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Nakazawa, Masaharu; Eriguchi, Masazumi

    2007-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most difficult neoplasms to cure and there is a need for new combinated therapy. If sufficient boron compound can be targeted accurate to the tumour, Boron Neutron-Capture Therapy (BNCT) can be applied to pancreatic cancer. We administrated BNCT to a cancer with pancreatic cancer patient using intraoperative irradiation. In this study, we performed preliminary dosimetry of a phantom model of the abdominal cavity. The flux of 8>x10(7)n/cm(2)/s (0.1 ratio) was 4.5 cm in depth from the surface in the case of simple irradiation, and the field of thermal neutrons was spread as 13 cm and 11.5 cm were usage of Void and Void with LiF collimation, respectively in thermal (OO-0011) mode. In the case of epithermal (CO-0000) mode, epithermal and fast components are four times higher at the surface level. In the case of mixed beam (OO-0000) mode, thermal neutron flux was the same as thermal neutron mode at a depth of 10 cm, but the gamma-ray component was two times higher than that of thermal neutron mode. With the use of Void and LiF collimation, thermal neutrons were selectively applied to the tumour combined with the CT-imaging of the cancer patient. This means that we could irradiate the tumour selectively and safely as possible, reducing the effects on neighboring healthy tissues. High resolution whole body dosimetry will be necessary to extend the application of BNCT to pancreatic cancer.

  1. Study of runaway electrons using dosimetry of hard x-ray radiations in Damavand tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rasouli, C.; Pourshahab, B.; Rasouli, H.; Hosseini Pooya, S. M.; Orouji, T.

    2014-05-15

    In this work several studies have been conducted on hard x-ray emissions of Damavand tokamak based on radiation dosimetry using the Thermoluminescence method. The goal was to understand interactions of runaway electrons with plasma particles, vessel wall, and plasma facing components. Total of 354 GR-200 (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) crystals have been placed on 118 points – three TLDs per point – to map hard x-ray radiation doses on the exterior of the vacuum vessel. Results show two distinctive levels of x-ray radiations doses on the exterior of the vessel. The low-dose area on which measured dose is about 0.5 mSv/shot. In the low-dose area there is no particular component inside the vessel. On the contrary, on high-dose area of the vessel, x-ray radiations dose exceeds 30 mSv/shot. The high-dose area coincides with the position of limiters, magnetic probe ducts, and vacuum vessel intersections. Among the high-dose areas, the highest level of dose is measured in the position of the limiter, which could be due to its direct contact with the plasma column and with runaway electrons. Direct collisions of runaway electrons with the vessel wall and plasma facing components make a major contribution for production of hard x-ray photons in Damavand tokamak.

  2. Thermoluminescence of kunzite: A study of kinetic processes and dosimetry characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogundare, F. O.; Alatishe, M. A.; Chithambo, M. L.; Costin, G.

    2016-04-01

    Since the use of natural minerals for dating and dose reconstruction using luminescence techniques is well-established and always of interest, we present thermoluminescence characteristics of kunzite, a gem variety of spodumene. The chemical composition of the sample was determined using an Electron Probe MicroAnalyzer to be (Li0.996Na0.009Mn0.006)∑ = 1.016(Al0.981Cr0.003Fe2+0.001)∑ = 0.995[(Si1.993Al0.008)∑ = 2.000O6]. Thermoluminescence glow curves measured at 0.5 K/s after laboratory irradiation consist of three prominent peaks at 338 K (labelled as peak I), 454 K (peak II) and 681 K (peak III). The dose response of these three peaks is linear in the range 20-308 Gy studied. The position of each of the peaks is independent of dose, an archetypical feature of first order behaviour. However, detailed kinetic analyses showed that in fact, the peaks are not subject to first order kinetics. Each of the three peaks is affected by thermal quenching with an associated activation energy of thermal quenching estimated to be 0.70, 1.35 and 0.54 eV for peaks I, II and III respectively. In terms of dosimetry use, only peak III was found to be reliable for possible use in luminescence dating and dose reconstruction.

  3. ESR dosimetry study of population in the vicinity of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site

    PubMed Central

    Zhumadilov, Kassym; Ivannikov, Alexander; Stepanenko, Valeriy; Zharlyganova, Dinara; Toyoda, Shin; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    A tooth enamel electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry study was carried out with the purpose of obtaining the individual absorbed radiation doses of population from settlements in the Semipalatinsk region of Kazakhstan, which was exposed to radioactive fallout traces from nuclear explosions in the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site and Lop Nor test base, China. Most of the settlements are located near the central axis of radioactive fallout trace from the most contaminating surface nuclear test, which was conducted on 29 August 1949, with the maximum detected excess dose being 430 ± 93 mGy. A maximum dose of 268 ± 79 mGy was determined from the settlements located close to radioactive fallout trace resulting from surface nuclear tests on 24 August 1956 (Ust-Kamenogorsk, Znamenka, Shemonaikha, Glubokoe, Tavriya and Gagarino). An accidental dose of 56 ± 42 mGy was found in Kurchatov city residents located close to fallout trace after the nuclear test on 7 August 1962. This method was applied to human tooth enamel to obtain individual absorbed doses of residents of the Makanchi, Urdzhar and Taskesken settlements located near the Kazakhstan–Chinese border due to the influence of nuclear tests (1964–1981) at Lop Nor. The highest dose was 123 ± 32 mGy. PMID:23404205

  4. Study of runaway electrons using dosimetry of hard x-ray radiations in Damavand tokamak.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, C; Pourshahab, B; Hosseini Pooya, S M; Orouji, T; Rasouli, H

    2014-05-01

    In this work several studies have been conducted on hard x-ray emissions of Damavand tokamak based on radiation dosimetry using the Thermoluminescence method. The goal was to understand interactions of runaway electrons with plasma particles, vessel wall, and plasma facing components. Total of 354 GR-200 (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) crystals have been placed on 118 points--three TLDs per point--to map hard x-ray radiation doses on the exterior of the vacuum vessel. Results show two distinctive levels of x-ray radiations doses on the exterior of the vessel. The low-dose area on which measured dose is about 0.5 mSv/shot. In the low-dose area there is no particular component inside the vessel. On the contrary, on high-dose area of the vessel, x-ray radiations dose exceeds 30 mSv/shot. The high-dose area coincides with the position of limiters, magnetic probe ducts, and vacuum vessel intersections. Among the high-dose areas, the highest level of dose is measured in the position of the limiter, which could be due to its direct contact with the plasma column and with runaway electrons. Direct collisions of runaway electrons with the vessel wall and plasma facing components make a major contribution for production of hard x-ray photons in Damavand tokamak.

  5. A phantom study of an in vivo dosimetry system using plastic scintillation detectors for real-time verification of 192Ir HDR brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Therriault-Proulx, Francois; Briere, Tina M.; Mourtada, Firas; Aubin, Sylviane; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of the present work was to evaluate the accuracy of a plastic scintillation detector (PSD) system to perform in-phantom dosimetry during 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatments. Methods: A PSD system capable of stem effect removal was built. A red–green–blue photodiode connected to a dual-channel electrometer was used to detect the scintillation light emitted from a green scintillation component and transmitted along a plastic optical fiber. A clinically relevant prostate treatment plan was built using the HDR brachytherapy treatment planning system. An in-house fabricated template was used for accurate positioning of the catheters, and treatment delivery was performed in a water phantom. Eleven catheters were inserted and used for dose delivery from 192Ir radioactive source, while two others were used to mimic dosimetry at the rectum wall and in the urethra using a PSD. The measured dose and dose rate data were compared to the expected values from the planning system. The importance of removing stem effects from in vivo dosimetry using a PSD during 192Ir HDR brachytherapy treatments was assessed. Applications for dwell position error detection and temporal verification of the treatment delivery were also investigated. Results: In-phantom dosimetry measurements of the treatment plan led to a ratio to the expected dose of 1.003 ± 0.004 with the PSD at different positions in the urethra and 1.043 ± 0.003 with the PSD inserted in the rectum. Verification for the urethra of dose delivered within each catheter and at specific dwell positions led to average measured to expected ratios of 1.015 ± 0.019 and 1.014 ± 0.020, respectively. These values at the rectum wall were 1.059 ± 0.045 within each catheter and 1.025 ± 0.028 for specific dwell positions. The ability to detect positioning errors of the source depended of the tolerance on the difference to the expected value. A 5-mm displacement of the source was

  6. Radioembolization Dosimetry: The Road Ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, Maarten L. J. Elschot, Mattijs; Sze, Daniel Y.; Kao, Yung H.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Iagaru, Andre H.; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.

    2015-04-15

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the optimization of the results of RE. The heterogeneous and often clustered intrahepatic biodistribution of millions of point-source radioactive particles poses a challenge for dosimetry. Several studies found a relationship between absorbed doses and treatment outcome, with regard to both toxicity and efficacy. This should ultimately lead to improved patient selection and individualized treatment planning. New calculation methods and imaging techniques and a new generation of microspheres for image-guided RE will all contribute to these improvements. The aim of this review is to give insight into the latest and most important developments in RE dosimetry and to suggest future directions on patient selection, individualized treatment planning, and study designs.

  7. Radioembolization dosimetry: the road ahead.

    PubMed

    Smits, Maarten L J; Elschot, Mattijs; Sze, Daniel Y; Kao, Yung H; Nijsen, Johannes F W; Iagaru, Andre H; de Jong, Hugo W A M; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Lam, Marnix G E H

    2015-04-01

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the optimization of the results of RE. The heterogeneous and often clustered intrahepatic biodistribution of millions of point-source radioactive particles poses a challenge for dosimetry. Several studies found a relationship between absorbed doses and treatment outcome, with regard to both toxicity and efficacy. This should ultimately lead to improved patient selection and individualized treatment planning. New calculation methods and imaging techniques and a new generation of microspheres for image-guided RE will all contribute to these improvements. The aim of this review is to give insight into the latest and most important developments in RE dosimetry and to suggest future directions on patient selection, individualized treatment planning, and study designs.

  8. FERRET-SAND II physics-dosimetry analysis for N Reactor Pressure Tubes 2954, 3053 and 1165 using a WIMS calculated input spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, W.N.; Kellogg, L.S.; Matsumoto, W.Y.; Morgan, W.C.; Suski, A.E.

    1988-05-01

    This report is in response to a request from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) that the PNL National Dosimetry Center (NDC) perform physics-dosimetry analyses (E > MeV) for N Reactor Pressure Tubes 2954 and 3053. As a result of these analyses, and recommendations for additional studies, two physics-dosimetry re-evaluations for Pressure Tube 1165 were also accomplished. The primary objective of Pacific Northwest Laboratories' (PNL) National Dosimetry Center (NDC) physics-dosimetry work for N Reactor was to provide FERRET-SAND II physics-dosimetry results to assist in the assessment of neutron radiation-induced changes in the physical and mechanical properties of N Reactor pressure tubes. 15 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Operation Upshot-Knothole. Project 29. 1. Comparison and evaluation of dosimetry methods applicable to gamma radiation, Nevada Proving Ground. Report for March-June 1953

    SciTech Connect

    Taplin, G.V.; Sigoloff, S.C.; Douglas, C.H.; Paglia, D.E.; Heller, C.J.

    1984-10-31

    The three major objectives and parts of this project were to compare and evaluate the accuracy and practicality of chemical vs film and other methods of gamma dosimetry for radiations encountered under bomb conditions at sites receiving (1) either prompt- or residual-gamma exposures or mixtures of both, (2) only residualgamma radiations, either neutron induced or from fission-product fallout, and (3) mixed neutron-gamma irradiation plus correlation with biological effects.

  10. Worldwide bioassay data resources for plutonium/americium internal dosimetry studies.

    PubMed

    Miller, G; Riddell, A E; Filipy, R; Bertelli, L; Little, T; Guilmette, R

    2007-01-01

    Biokinetic models are the scientific underpinning of internal dosimetry and depend, ultimately, for their scientific validation on comparisons with human bioassay data. Three significant plutonium/americium bioassay databases, known to the authors, are described: (1) Sellafield, (2) Los Alamos and (3) the United States Transuranium Registry. A case is made for a uniform standard for database format, and the XML standard is discussed.

  11. High resolution MR based polymer dosimetry versus film densitometry: a systematic study based on the modulation transfer function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, A.; Pernkopf, M.; Waldhäusl, C.; Schmidt, W.; Moser, E.

    2004-09-01

    Precise methods of modern radiation therapy such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), brachytherapy (BT) and high LET irradiation allow for high dose localization in volumes of a few mm3. However, most dosimetry methods—ionization chambers, TLD arrangements or silicon detectors, for example—are not capable of detecting sub-mm dose variations or do not allow for simple dose imaging. Magnetic resonance based polymer dosimetry (MRPD) appears to be well suited to three-dimensional high resolution relative dosimetry but the spatial resolution based on a systematic modulation transfer function (MTF) approach has not yet been investigated. We offer a theoretical construct for addressing the spatial resolution in different dose imaging systems, i.e. the dose modulation transfer function (DMTF) approach, an experimental realization of this concept with a phantom and quantitative comparisons between two dosimetric systems: polymer gel and film dosimetry. Polymer gel samples were irradiated by Co-60 photons through an absorber grid which is characterized by periodic structures of different spatial period (a), the smallest one at width of a/2 = 280 µm. The modulation in dose under the grid is visualized via calibrated, high resolution, parameter-selective (T2) and dose images based on multi-echo MR imaging. The DMTF is obtained from the modulation depth of the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) after calibration. Voxel sizes below 0.04 mm3 could be achieved, which are significantly smaller than those reported in MR based dose imaging on polymer gels elsewhere, using a powerful gradient system and a highly sensitive small birdcage resonator on a whole-body 3T MR scanner. Dose modulations at 22% of maximum dose amplitude could be observed at about 2 line pairs per mm. The polymer DMTF results are compared to those of a typical clinical film-scanner system. This study demonstrates that MR based gel dosimetry at 200 µm pixel resolution might even be superior, with

  12. High resolution MR based polymer dosimetry versus film densitometry: a systematic study based on the modulation transfer function approach.

    PubMed

    Berg, A; Pernkopf, M; Waldhäusl, C; Schmidt, W; Moser, E

    2004-09-07

    Precise methods of modem radiation therapy such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), brachytherapy (BT) and high LET irradiation allow for high dose localization in volumes of a few mm3. However, most dosimetry methods-ionization chambers, TLD arrangements or silicon detectors, for example-are not capable of detecting sub-mm dose variations or do not allow for simple dose imaging. Magnetic resonance based polymer dosimetry (MRPD) appears to be well suited to three-dimensional high resolution relative dosimetry but the spatial resolution based on a systematic modulation transfer function (MTF) approach has not yet been investigated. We offer a theoretical construct for addressing the spatial resolution in different dose imaging systems, i.e. the dose modulation transfer function (DMTF) approach, an experimental realization of this concept with a phantom and quantitative comparisons between two dosimetric systems: polymer gel and film dosimetry. Polymer gel samples were irradiated by Co-60 photons through an absorber grid which is characterized by periodic structures of different spatial period (a), the smallest one at width of a/2 = 280 microm. The modulation in dose under the grid is visualized via calibrated, high resolution, parameter-selective (T2) and dose images based on multi-echo MR imaging. The DMTF is obtained from the modulation depth of the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) after calibration. Voxel sizes below 0.04 mm3 could be achieved, which are significantly smaller than those reported in MR based dose imaging on polymer gels elsewhere, using a powerful gradient system and a highly sensitive small birdcage resonator on a whole-body 3T MR scanner. Dose modulations at 22% of maximum dose amplitude could be observed at about 2 line pairs per mm. The polymer DMTF results are compared to those of a typical clinical film-scanner system. This study demonstrates that MR based gel dosimetry at 200 microm pixel resolution might even be superior, with

  13. Potential of Hybrid Computational Phantoms for Retrospective Heart Dosimetry After Breast Radiation Therapy: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Moignier, Alexandra; Derreumaux, Sylvie; Broggio, David; Beurrier, Julien; Chea, Michel; Boisserie, Gilbert; Franck, Didier; Aubert, Bernard; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Current retrospective cardiovascular dosimetry studies are based on a representative patient or simple mathematic phantoms. Here, a process of patient modeling was developed to personalize the anatomy of the thorax and to include a heart model with coronary arteries. Methods and Materials: The patient models were hybrid computational phantoms (HCPs) with an inserted detailed heart model. A computed tomography (CT) acquisition (pseudo-CT) was derived from HCP and imported into a treatment planning system where treatment conditions were reproduced. Six current patients were selected: 3 were modeled from their CT images (A patients) and the others were modelled from 2 orthogonal radiographs (B patients). The method performance and limitation were investigated by quantitative comparison between the initial CT and the pseudo-CT, namely, the morphology and the dose calculation were compared. For the B patients, a comparison with 2 kinds of representative patients was also conducted. Finally, dose assessment was focused on the whole coronary artery tree and the left anterior descending coronary. Results: When 3-dimensional anatomic information was available, the dose calculations performed on the initial CT and the pseudo-CT were in good agreement. For the B patients, comparison of doses derived from HCP and representative patients showed that the HCP doses were either better or equivalent. In the left breast radiation therapy context and for the studied cases, coronary mean doses were at least 5-fold higher than heart mean doses. Conclusions: For retrospective dose studies, it is suggested that HCP offers a better surrogate, in terms of dose accuracy, than representative patients. The use of a detailed heart model eliminates the problem of identifying the coronaries on the patient's CT.

  14. SU-E-T-407: Evaluation of Four Commercial Dosimetry Systems for Routine Patient-Specific Tomotherapy Delivery Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, A; Arumugam, S; Deshpande, S; George, A; Holloway, L; Vial, P; Goozee, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate the performance of four commercially available dosimetry systems for Tomotherapy delivery quality assurance (DQA). Methods: Eight clinical patient plans were chosen to represent a range of treatment sites and typical clinical plans. Four DQA plans for each patient plan were created using the TomoTherapy DQA Station (Hi-Art version 4.2.1) on CT images of the ScandiDose Delta4, IBA MatriXX Evolution, PTW Octavius 4D and Sun Nuclear ArcCHECK phantoms. Each detector was calibrated following the manufacture-provided procedure. No angular response correction was applied. All DQA plans for each detector were delivered on the Tomotherapy Hi-Art unit in a single measurement session but on different days. The measured results were loaded into the vendor supplied software for each QA system for comparison with the TPS-calculated dose. The Gamma index was calculated using 3%/3mm, 2%/2mm with 10% dose threshold of maximum TPS calculated dose. Results: Four detector systems showed comparable gamma pass rates for 3%/3m, which is recommended by AAPM TG119 and commonly used within the radiotherapy community. The averaged pass rates ± standard deviation for all DQA plans were (98.35±1.97)% for ArcCHECK, (99.9%±0.87)% for Matrix, (98.5%±5.09)% for Octavius 4D, (98.7%±1.27)% for Delata4. The rank of the gamma pass rate for individual plans was consistent between detectors. Using 2%/2mm Gamma criteria for analysis, the Gamma pass rate decreased on average by 9%, 8%, 6.6% and 5% respectively. Profile and Gamma failure map analysis using the software tools from each dosimetry system indicated that decreased passing rate is mainly due to the threading effect of Tomo plan. Conclusion: Despite the variation in detector type and resolution, phantom geometry and software implementation, the four systems demonstrated similar dosimetric performance, with the rank of the gamma pass rate consistent for the plans considered.

  15. SU-D-BRC-04: Development of Proton Tissue Equivalent Materials for Calibration and Dosimetry Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Olguin, E; Flampouri, S; Lipnharski, I; Bolch, W

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop new proton tissue equivalent materials (PTEM), urethane and fiberglass based, for proton therapy calibration and dosimetry studies. Existing tissue equivalent plastics are applicable only for x-rays because they focus on matching mass attenuation coefficients. This study aims to create new plastics that match mass stopping powers for proton therapy applications instead. Methods: New PTEMs were constructed using urethane and fiberglass resin materials for soft, fat, bone, and lung tissue. The stoichiometric analysis method was first used to determine the elemental composition of each unknown constituent. New initial formulae were then developed for each of the 4 PTEMs using the new elemental compositions and various additives. Samples of each plastic were then created and exposed to a well defined proton beam at the UF Health Proton Therapy Institute (UFHPTI) to validate its mass stopping power. Results: The stoichiometric analysis method revealed the elemental composition of the 3 components used in creating the PTEMs. These urethane and fiberglass based resins were combined with additives such as calcium carbonate, aluminum hydroxide, and phenolic micro spheres to achieve the desired mass stopping powers and densities. Validation at the UFHPTI revealed adjustments had to be made to the formulae, but the plastics eventually had the desired properties after a few iterations. The mass stopping power, density, and Hounsfield Unit of each of the 4 PTEMs were within acceptable tolerances. Conclusion: Four proton tissue equivalent plastics were developed: soft, fat, bone, and lung tissue. These plastics match each of the corresponding tissue’s mass stopping power, density, and Hounsfield Unit, meaning they are truly tissue equivalent for proton therapy applications. They can now be used to calibrate proton therapy treatment planning systems, improve range uncertainties, validate proton therapy Monte Carlo simulations, and assess in-field and out

  16. A Monte Carlo study of macroscopic and microscopic dose descriptors for kilovoltage cellular dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, P. A. K.; Thomson, Rowan M.

    2017-02-01

    This work investigates how doses to cellular targets depend on cell morphology, as well as relations between cellular doses and doses to bulk tissues and water. Multicellular models of five healthy and cancerous soft tissues are developed based on typical values of cell compartment sizes, elemental compositions and number densities found in the literature. Cells are modelled as two concentric spheres with nucleus and cytoplasm compartments. Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the absorbed dose to the nucleus and cytoplasm for incident photon energies of 20-370 keV, relevant for brachytherapy, diagnostic radiology, and out-of-field radiation in higher-energy external beam radiotherapy. Simulations involving cell clusters, single cells and single nuclear cavities are carried out for cell radii between 5 and 10~μ m, and nuclear radii between 2 and 9~μ m. Seven nucleus and cytoplasm elemental compositions representative of animal cells are considered. The presence of a cytoplasm, extracellular matrix and surrounding cells can affect the nuclear dose by up to 13 % . Differences in cell and nucleus size can affect dose to the nucleus (cytoplasm) of the central cell in a cluster of 13 cells by up to 13 % (8 % ). Furthermore, the results of this study demonstrate that neither water nor bulk tissue are reliable substitutes for subcellular targets for incident photon energies  <50 keV: nuclear (cytoplasm) doses differ from dose-to-medium by up to 32 % (18 % ), and from dose-to-water by up to 21 % (8 % ). The largest differences between dose descriptors are seen for the lowest incident photon energies; differences are less than 3 % for energies ≥slant 90 keV. The sensitivity of results with regard to the parameters of the microscopic tissue structure model and cell model geometry, and the importance of the nucleus and cytoplasm as targets for radiation-induced cell death emphasize the importance of accurate models for cellular dosimetry studies.

  17. Neutron Dosimetry on the Full-Core First Generation VVER-440 Aimed at Reactor Support Structure Load Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkin, P.; Borodkin, G.; Khrennikov, N.; Konheiser, J.; Noack, K.

    2009-08-01

    Reactor support structures (RSS), especially the ferritic steel wall of the water tank, of first-generation VVER-440 are non-restorable reactor equipment, and their lifetime may restrict plant-life. All operated Russian first generation VVER-440 have a reduced core with dummy assemblies except Unit 4 of Novovoronezh nuclear power plant (NPP). In comparison with other reactors, the full-core loading scheme of this reactor provides the highest neutron fluence on the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RSS accumulated over design service-life and its prolongation. The radiation load parameters on the RPV and RSS that have resulted from this core loading scheme should be evaluated by means of precise calculations and validated by ex-vessel neutron dosimetry to provide the reliable assessment of embrittlement parameters of these reactor components. The results of different types of calculations and their comparison with measured data have been analyzed in this paper. The calculational analysis of RSS fluence rate variation in dependence on the core loading scheme, including the standard and low leakage core as well as the introduction of dummy assemblies, is presented in this paper.

  18. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro, C.R.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR.

  19. Evaluation of the Monte Carlo method (KTMAN-2) in fluoroscopic dosimetry and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minho; Lee, Hyounggun; Kim, Hyosim; Park, Hongmin; Lee, Wonho; Park, Sungho

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the Monte Carlo method for determining the dose calculation in fluoroscopy by using a realistic human phantom. The dose was calculated by using Monte Carlo N-particle extended (MCNPX) in simulations and was measured by using Korean Typical Man-2 (KTMAN-2) phantom in the experiments. MCNPX is a widely-used simulation tool based on the Monte-Carlo method and uses random sampling. KTMAN-2 is a virtual phantom written in MCNPX language and is based on the typical Korean man. This study was divided into two parts: simulations and experiments. In the former, the spectrum generation program (SRS-78) was used to obtain the output energy spectrum for fluoroscopy; then, each dose to the target organ was calculated using KTMAN-2 with MCNPX. In the latter part, the output of the fluoroscope was calibrated first and TLDs (Thermoluminescent dosimeter) were inserted in the ART (Alderson Radiation Therapy) phantom at the same places as in the simulation. Thus, the phantom was exposed to radiation, and the simulated and the experimental doses were compared. In order to change the simulation unit to the dose unit, we set the normalization factor (NF) for unit conversion. Comparing the simulated with the experimental results, we found most of the values to be similar, which proved the effectiveness of the Monte Carlo method in fluoroscopic dose evaluation. The equipment used in this study included a TLD, a TLD reader, an ART phantom, an ionization chamber and a fluoroscope.

  20. Biokinetics and dosimetry of commonly used radiopharmaceuticals in diagnostic nuclear medicine - a review.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Uta; Bröer, Jörn Hendrik; Vandevoorde, Charlot; Santos, Paula; Bardiès, Manuel; Bacher, Klaus; Nosske, Dietmar; Lassmann, Michael

    2011-12-01

    The impact on patients' health of radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine diagnostics has not until now been evaluated systematically in a European context. Therefore, as part of the EU-funded Project PEDDOSE.NET ( www.peddose.net ), we review and summarize the current knowledge on biokinetics and dosimetry of commonly used diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals. A detailed literature search on published biokinetic and dosimetric data was performed mostly via PubMed ( www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed ). In principle the criteria for inclusion of data followed the EANM Dosimetry Committee guidance document on good clinical reporting. Data on dosimetry and biokinetics can be difficult to find, are scattered in various journals and, especially in paediatric nuclear medicine, are very scarce. The data collection and calculation methods vary with respect to the time-points, bladder voiding, dose assessment after the last data point and the way the effective dose was calculated. In many studies the number of subjects included for obtaining biokinetic and dosimetry data was fewer than ten, and some of the biokinetic data were acquired more than 20 years ago. It would be of interest to generate new data on biokinetics and dosimetry in diagnostic nuclear medicine using state-of-the-art equipment and more uniform dosimetry protocols. For easier public access to dosimetry data for diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals, a database containing these data should be created and maintained.

  1. Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of BPA in rats at different life stages using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Doerge, Daniel R; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has received considerable attention throughout the last decade due to its widespread use in consumer products. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in neonatal and adult rats to quantitatively evaluate age-dependent pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II metabolites. The PBPK model was calibrated in adult rats using studies on BPA metabolism and excretion in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, and pharmacokinetic data with BPA in adult rats. For immature rats the hepatic and gastrointestinal metabolism of BPA was inferred from studies on the maturation of phase II enzymes coupled with serum time course data in pups. The calibrated model predicted the measured serum concentrations of BPA and BPA conjugates after administration of 100μg/kg of d6-BPA in adult rats (oral gavage and intravenous administration) and postnatal days 3, 10, and 21 pups (oral gavage). The observed age-dependent BPA serum concentrations were partially attributed to the immature metabolic capacity of pups. A comparison of the dosimetry of BPA across immature rats and monkeys suggests that dose adjustments would be necessary to extrapolate toxicity studies from neonatal rats to infant humans.

  2. Cosmic Ray Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si Belkhir, F.; Attallah, R.

    2010-10-01

    Radiation levels at aircraft cruising altitudes are twenty times higher than at sea level. Thus, on average, a typical airline pilot receives a larger annual radiation dose than some one working in nuclear industry. The main source of this radiation is from galactic cosmic radiation, high energy particles generated by exploding stars within our own galaxy. In this work we study cosmic rays dosimetry at various aviation altitudes using the PARMA model.

  3. Report from the dosimetry working group to CEDR project management

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J J

    1994-08-01

    On August 2, 1989, Admiral Watkins, Secretary of the US Department of Energy (DOE), presented a four-point program designed to enhance the DOE epidemiology program. One part of this program was the establishment of a Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) to facilitate independent research to validate and supplement DOE research on human health effects. A Dosimetry Working Group was formed during May 1991 to evaluate radiation dose variables and associated documentation that would be most useful to researchers for retrospective and prospective studies. The Working Group consisted of thirteen individuals with expertise and experience in health physics, epidemiology, dosimetry, computing, and industrial hygiene. A final report was delivered to CEDR Project Management during February 1992. The report contains a number of major recommendations concerning collection, interpretation, and documentation of dosimetry data to maximize their usefulness to researchers using CEDR for examining possible health effects of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation.

  4. Application of optical instrumentations to reactor dosimetry for material irradiation study

    SciTech Connect

    Shikama, T.; Nagata, S.; Tsuchiya, B.; Zhao, M.; Katsui, H.; Narui, M.

    2011-07-01

    Optical dosimetry, utilizing the radioluminescence, the Cerenkov radiation, and the radiation induced optical absorption, has attractive features. However, it has a serious setback, namely, the optical signal changes in the course of irradiation and complicated calibration would be needed. Also, the intensity of radioluminescence would depend complicatedly on energy and kind of incident ions and quanta. Here, optical dosimetry, which could measure the electronic excitation dose rate, the atomic displacement, and the thermal neutron flux, separately and in-situ, is proposed, by analyzing behaviors of radioluminescence peaks in the fused silica (SiO{sub 2}), the chromium doped alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and the Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}). (authors)

  5. Dosimetry in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Asha, M L; Chatterjee, Ingita; Patil, Preeti; Naveen, S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review various dosimeters used in dentistry and the cumulative results of various studies done with various dosimeters. Several relevant PubMed indexed articles from 1999 to 2013 were electronically searched by typing "dosimeters", "dosimeters in dentistry", "properties of dosimeters", "thermoluminescent and optically stimulated dosimeters", "recent advancements in dosimetry in dentistry." The searches were limited to articles in English to prepare a concise review on dental dosimetry. Titles and abstracts were screened, and articles that fulfilled the criteria of use of dosimeters in dental applications were selected for a full-text reading. Article was divided into four groups: (1) Biological effects of radiation, (2) properties of dosimeters, (3) types of dosimeters and (4) results of various studies using different dosimeters. The present review on dosimetry based on various studies done with dosimeters revealed that, with the advent of radiographic technique the effective dose delivered is low. Therefore, selection of radiological technique plays an important role in dental dose delivery.

  6. Preclinical acute toxicity, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry and microPET imaging studies of [(18)F]fluorocholine in mice.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Marina B; Ferreira, Soraya M Z M D; Nascimento, Leonardo T C; Costa, Flávia M; Mendes, Bruno M; Ferreira, Andrea V; Malamut, Carlos; Silva, Juliana B; Mamede, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    [(18)F]Fluorocholine ([(18)F]FCH) has been proven to be effective in prostate cancer. Since [(18)F]FCH is classified as a new radiopharmaceutical in Brazil, preclinical safety and efficacy data are required to support clinical trials and to obtain its approval. The aim of this work was to perform acute toxicity, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry and microPET imaging studies of [(18)F]FCH. The results could support its use in nuclear medicine as an important piece of work for regulatory in Brazil.

  7. Evaluation of a synthetic single-crystal diamond detector for relative dosimetry on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery system

    SciTech Connect

    Mancosu, Pietro; Reggiori, Giacomo Stravato, Antonella; Gaudino, Anna; Lobefalo, Francesca; Palumbo, Valentina; Tomatis, Stefano; Navarria, Piera; Ascolese, Anna; Scorsetti, Marta; Picozzi, Piero; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, Gianluca

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the new commercial PTW-60019 synthetic single-crystal microDiamond detector (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for relative dosimetry measurements on a clinical Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery system. Methods: Detector output ratios (DORs) for 4 and 8 mm beams were measured using a microDiamond (PTW-60019), a stereotactic unshielded diode [IBA stereotactic field detector (SFD)], a shielded diode (IBA photon field detector), and GafChromic EBT3 films. Both parallel and transversal acquisition directions were considered for PTW-60019 measurements. Measured DORs were compared to the new output factor reference values for Gamma Knife Perfexion (0.814 and 0.900 for 4 and 8 mm, respectively). Profiles in the three directions were also measured for the 4 mm beam to evaluate full width at half maximum (FWHM) and penumbra and to compare them with the corresponding Leksell GammaPlan profiles. Results: FWHM and penumbra for PTW-60019 differed from the calculated values by less than 0.2 and 0.3 mm, for the parallel and transversal acquisitions, respectively. GafChromic films showed FWHM and penumbra within 0.1 mm. The output ratio obtained with the PTW-60019 for the 4 mm field was 1.6% greater in transverse direction compared to the nominal value. Comparable differences up to 0.8% and 1.0% for, respectively, GafChromic films and SFD were found. Conclusions: The microDiamond PTW-60019 is a suitable detector for commissioning and routine use of Gamma Knife with good agreement of both DORs and profiles in the three directions.

  8. Evaluation of a synthetic single-crystal diamond detector for relative dosimetry on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Mancosu, Pietro; Reggiori, Giacomo; Stravato, Antonella; Gaudino, Anna; Lobefalo, Francesca; Palumbo, Valentina; Navarria, Piera; Ascolese, Anna; Picozzi, Piero; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, Gianluca; Tomatis, Stefano; Scorsetti, Marta

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the new commercial PTW-60019 synthetic single-crystal microDiamond detector (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for relative dosimetry measurements on a clinical Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery system. Detector output ratios (DORs) for 4 and 8 mm beams were measured using a microDiamond (PTW-60019), a stereotactic unshielded diode [IBA stereotactic field detector (SFD)], a shielded diode (IBA photon field detector), and GafChromic EBT3 films. Both parallel and transversal acquisition directions were considered for PTW-60019 measurements. Measured DORs were compared to the new output factor reference values for Gamma Knife Perfexion (0.814 and 0.900 for 4 and 8 mm, respectively). Profiles in the three directions were also measured for the 4 mm beam to evaluate full width at half maximum (FWHM) and penumbra and to compare them with the corresponding Leksell GammaPlan profiles. FWHM and penumbra for PTW-60019 differed from the calculated values by less than 0.2 and 0.3 mm, for the parallel and transversal acquisitions, respectively. GafChromic films showed FWHM and penumbra within 0.1 mm. The output ratio obtained with the PTW-60019 for the 4 mm field was 1.6% greater in transverse direction compared to the nominal value. Comparable differences up to 0.8% and 1.0% for, respectively, GafChromic films and SFD were found. The microDiamond PTW-60019 is a suitable detector for commissioning and routine use of Gamma Knife with good agreement of both DORs and profiles in the three directions.

  9. SU-E-J-17: A Study of Accelerator-Induced Cerenkov Radiation as a Beam Diagnostic and Dosimetry Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, F; Tosh, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate accelerator-induced Cerenkov radiation imaging as a possible beam diagnostic and medical dosimetry tool. Methods: Cerenkov emission produced by clinical accelerator beams in a water phantom was imaged using a camera system comprised of a high-sensitivity thermoelectrically-cooled CCD camera coupled to a large aperture (f/0.75) objective lens with 16:1 magnification. This large format lens allows a significant amount of the available Cerenkov light to be collected and focused onto the CCD camera to form the image. Preliminary images, obtained with 6 MV photon beams, used an unshielded camera mounted horizontally with the beam normal to the water surface, and confirmed the detection of Cerenkov radiation. Several improvements were subsequently made including the addition of radiation shielding around the camera, and altering of the beam and camera angles to give a more favorable geometry for Cerenkov light collection. A detailed study was then undertaken over a range of electron and photon beam energies and dose rates to investigate the possibility of using this technique for beam diagnostics and dosimetry. Results: A series of images were obtained at a fixed dose rate over a range of electron energies from 6 to 20 MeV. The location of maximum intensity was found to vary linearly with the energy of the beam. A linear relationship was also found between the light observed from a fixed point on the central axis and the dose rate for both photon and electron beams. Conclusion: We have found that the analysis of images of beam-induced Cerenkov light in a water phantom has potential for use as a beam diagnostic and medical dosimetry tool. Our future goals include the calibration of the light output in terms of radiation dose and development of a tomographic system for 3D Cerenkov imaging in water phantoms and other media.

  10. Modeling the impact of prostate edema on LDR brachytherapy: a Monte Carlo dosimetry study based on a 3D biphasic finite element biomechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountris, K. A.; Bert, J.; Noailly, J.; Rodriguez Aguilera, A.; Valeri, A.; Pradier, O.; Schick, U.; Promayon, E.; Gonzalez Ballester, M. A.; Troccaz, J.; Visvikis, D.

    2017-03-01

    Prostate volume changes due to edema occurrence during transperineal permanent brachytherapy should be taken under consideration to ensure optimal dose delivery. Available edema models, based on prostate volume observations, face several limitations. Therefore, patient-specific models need to be developed to accurately account for the impact of edema. In this study we present a biomechanical model developed to reproduce edema resolution patterns documented in the literature. Using the biphasic mixture theory and finite element analysis, the proposed model takes into consideration the mechanical properties of the pubic area tissues in the evolution of prostate edema. The model’s computed deformations are incorporated in a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate their effect on post-operative dosimetry. The comparison of Day1 and Day30 dosimetry results demonstrates the capability of the proposed model for patient-specific dosimetry improvements, considering the edema dynamics. The proposed model shows excellent ability to reproduce previously described edema resolution patterns and was validated based on previous findings. According to our results, for a prostate volume increase of 10-20% the Day30 urethra D10 dose metric is higher by 4.2%-10.5% compared to the Day1 value. The introduction of the edema dynamics in Day30 dosimetry shows a significant global dose overestimation identified on the conventional static Day30 dosimetry. In conclusion, the proposed edema biomechanical model can improve the treatment planning of transperineal permanent brachytherapy accounting for post-implant dose alterations during the planning procedure.

  11. A novel geometry-dosimetry label fusion method in multi-atlas segmentation for radiotherapy: a proof-of-concept study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jina; Tian, Zhen; Lu, Weiguo; Gu, Xuejun; Chen, Mingli; Jiang, Steve B.

    2017-05-01

    Multi-atlas segmentation (MAS) has been widely used to automate the delineation of organs at risk (OARs) for radiotherapy. Label fusion is a crucial step in MAS to cope with the segmentation variabilities among multiple atlases. However, most existing label fusion methods do not consider the potential dosimetric impact of the segmentation result. In this proof-of-concept study, we propose a novel geometry-dosimetry label fusion method for MAS-based OAR auto-contouring, which evaluates the segmentation performance in terms of both geometric accuracy and the dosimetric impact of the segmentation accuracy on the resulting treatment plan. Differently from the original selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE), we evaluated and rejected the atlases based on both Dice similarity coefficient and the predicted error of the dosimetric endpoints. The dosimetric error was predicted using our previously developed geometry-dosimetry model. We tested our method in MAS-based rectum auto-contouring on 20 prostate cancer patients. The accuracy in the rectum sub-volume close to the planning tumor volume (PTV), which was found to be a dosimetric sensitive region of the rectum, was greatly improved. The mean absolute distance between the obtained contour and the physician-drawn contour in the rectum sub-volume 2 mm away from PTV was reduced from 3.96 mm to 3.36 mm on average for the 20 patients, with the maximum decrease found to be from 9.22 mm to 3.75 mm. We also compared the dosimetric endpoints predicted for the obtained contours with those predicted for the physician-drawn contours. Our method led to smaller dosimetric endpoint errors than the SIMPLE method in 15 patients, comparable errors in 2 patients, and slightly larger errors in 3 patients. These results indicated the efficacy of our method in terms of considering both geometric accuracy and dosimetric impact during label fusion. Our algorithm can be applied to different tumor sites

  12. Personnel neutron dosimetry at Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Endres, G.W.R.; Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.

    1980-08-01

    This study assesses the state of personnel neutron dosimetry at DOE facilities. A survey of the personnel dosimetry systems in use at major DOE facilities was conducted, a literature search was made to determine recent advances in neutron dosimetry, and several dosimetry experts were interviewed. It was concluded that personnel neutron dosimeters do not meet current needs and that serious problems exist now and will increase in the future if neutron quality factors are increased and/or dose limits are lowered.

  13. A Monte Carlo study of macroscopic and microscopic dose descriptors for kilovoltage cellular dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Oliver, P A K; Thomson, Rowan M

    2017-02-21

    of the nucleus and cytoplasm as targets for radiation-induced cell death emphasize the importance of accurate models for cellular dosimetry studies.

  14. Calibration and conformational studies in radiation dosimetry using polymer gel dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Richard L.

    2001-11-01

    The polymer gel dosimeter made its debut in the early 90's and dosimetrists and medical physicists alike were excited about the prospect of using the gel dosimeter as an effective and useful three-dimensional modeling tool. Research in the early to mid-90's brought on better polymer mixtures with greater sensitivity and shelf life. Nearly a decade later, these gels are not being used in a clinical setting. The question is, why are they not being routinely used in the clinical setting for modeling and quality assurance of radiation instrumentation and computer generated treatment plans? There are three main reasons and we address these reasons directly in this investigation. First, every promising experiment performed on these gels were done in ideal conditions. The problem ideal experimentation is that the conditions in a clinical setting are unpredictable hence these idealized protocols could not be easily used in practice. Second, attempts to use the gels in clinical settings had mixed results. There was no real consistency with the results based on calibration curves generated by the gel manufacturer and even based on additional calibration studies performed by the medical physicists. Third, there were no consistent and effective calculation programs that were flexible, rigorous, and consistent to use. Due to these main problems, medical physicists have begun to dismiss the gel dosimeter and reverted to traditional 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional verification methods. What we developed in this study is a means to put the polymer gel dosimeter back into the forefront of dosimetry. First, we performed experiments under a clinical setting. Then, we investigated three different calibration methods, including our very own normalized calibration protocol to identify calibration problems and offer up a solution to this problem. Finally, we also generated a good data processing program that is flexible, rigorous, and consistent to use in any setting. In addition to

  15. SU-E-T-120: Dosimetric Characteristics Study of NanoDotâ,,¢ for In-Vivo Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, A; Wasaye, A; Gohar, R; Rehman, L; Hussein, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to analyze the dosimetric characteristics (energy dependence, reproducibility and dose linearity) of nanoDot™ optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) and validate their potential use during in-vivo dosimetry, specifically TBI. The manufacturer stated accuracy is ±10% for standard nanoDot™. Methods: At AKUH, the InLight microStar OSL dosimetry system for patient in-vivo dosimetry is in use since 2012. Twenty-five standard nanoDot™ were used in the analysis. Sensitivity and reproducibility was tested in the first part with 6MV and 18 MV Varian x-ray beams. Each OSLD was irradiated to 100cGy dose at nominal SSD (100 cm). All the OSLDs were read 3 times for average reading. Dose linearity and calibration were also performed with same beams in common clinical dose range of 0 - 500 cGy. In addition, verification of TBI absolute dose at extended SSD (500cm) was also performed. Results: The reproducibility observed with the OSLD was better than the manufacturer stated limits. Measured doses vary less than ±2% in 19(76%) OSLDs, whereas less than ±3% in 6(24%) OSLDs. Their sensitivity was approximately 525 counts per cGy. Better agreement was observed between measurements, with a standard deviation of 1.8%. A linear dose response was observed with OSLDs for both 6 and 18MV beams in 0 - 500 cGy dose range. TBI measured doses at 500 cm SSD were also confirmed to be within ±0.5% and ±1.3% of the ion chamber measured doses for 6 and 18MV beams respectively. Conclusion: The dosimetric results demonstrate that nanoDot™ can be potentially used for in-vivo dosimetry verification in various clinical situations, with a high degree of accuracy and precision. In addition OSLDs exhibit better dose reproducibility with standard deviation of 1.8%. There was no significant difference in their response to 6 and 18MV beams. The dose response was also linear.

  16. A review of dosimetry studies on external-beam radiation treatment with respect to second cancer induction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, X George; Bednarz, Bryan; Paganetti, Harald

    2014-01-01

    It has been long known that patients treated with ionizing radiation carry a risk of developing a second cancer in their lifetimes. Factors contributing to the recently renewed concern about the second cancer include improved cancer survival rate, younger patient population as well as emerging treatment modalities such as intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) and proton therapy that can potentially elevate secondary exposures to healthy tissues distant from the target volume. In the past 30 years, external-beam treatment technologies have evolved significantly, and a large amount of data exist but appear to be difficult to comprehend and compare. This review article aims to provide readers with an understanding of the principles and methods related to scattered doses in radiation therapy by summarizing a large collection of dosimetry and clinical studies. Basic concepts and terminology are introduced at the beginning. That is followed by a comprehensive review of dosimetry studies for external-beam treatment modalities including classical radiation therapy, 3D-conformal x-ray therapy, intensity-modulated x-ray therapy (IMRT and tomotherapy) and proton therapy. Selected clinical data on second cancer induction among radiotherapy patients are also covered. Problems in past studies and controversial issues are discussed. The needs for future studies are presented at the end. PMID:18540047

  17. An analysis of intraoperative versus post-operative dosimetry with CT, CT-MRI fusion and XMR for the evaluation of permanent prostate brachytherapy implants.

    PubMed

    Acher, Peter; Puttagunta, Srikanth; Rhode, Kawal; Morris, Stephen; Kinsella, Janette; Gaya, Andrew; Dasgupta, Prokar; Deehan, Charles; Beaney, Ronald; Popert, Rick; Keevil, Stephen

    2010-08-01

    To assess the agreement between intraoperative and post-operative dosimetry and to identify factors that influence dose calculations of prostate brachytherapy implants. Patients treated with prostate brachytherapy implants underwent post-operative CT and XMR (combined X-ray and MR) imaging. Dose-volume histograms were calculated from CT, XMR and CT-MR fusion data and compared with intraoperative values for two observers. Multiple linear regression models assessed the influences of intraoperative D90, gland oedema, gland volume, source loss and migration, and implanted activity/volume prostate on post-operative D90. Forty-nine patients were studied. The mean D90 differences (95% confidence limits) between intraoperative and post-operative CT, XMR and CT-MR fusion assessments were: 11 Gy (-22, 45), 18 Gy (-13, 49) and 20 Gy (-17, 58) for Observer 1; and 15 Gy (-34, 63), 13 Gy (-29, 55) and 14 Gy (-27, 54) for Observer 2. Multiple linear regression modelling showed that the observed oedema and intraoperative D90 were significant independent variables for the prediction of post-operative D90 values for both observers using all modalities. This is the first study to report Bland-Altman agreement analysis between intraoperative and post-operative dosimetry. Agreement is poor. Post-operative dosimetry is dependent on the intraoperative D90 and the subjectively outlined gland volume. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An innovative in vitro device providing continuous low doses of gamma-rays and altered gravity mimicking spatial exposure: dosimetry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, Laetitia; Courtade-Saidi, Monique; Pereda Loth, Veronica; Franceries, Xavier; Afonso, Anne Sophie; Ayala, Alicia; Bardies, Manuel

    Astronauts are exposed to microgravity and chronic irradiation. Experimental conditions combining these two factors are difficult to reproduce on earth. The aim of our study was to create an experimental device able to combine chronic irradiation and altered gravity that may be used for cell cultures or plant models. Irradiation was provided with Thorium nitrate powder, conditioned in several bags in order to obtain a sealed source. This source was placed in an incubator. Lead leafs covered the internal walls of the incubator in order to protect people outside from radiations. Cell plates or plants seeds could be placed on direct contact with the source or at different distances above the source. Moreover, a random positioning machine (RPM) was placed inside the incubator and positioned on the source. The dosimetry was performed for different experimental conditions. The activity of the source was established considering all the decay chain of thorium. The spectrum of the source calculated according to the natural decrease of radioactivity was compared with gamma spectrometry (InterceptorTM) and showed a very good adequacy. The fluence evaluated with a gamma detector was closed to the theoretical fluence evaluated with our model, attesting that the source was uniformly distributed. Dosimetry was performed with radiophotoluminescent dosimeters (RPL) placed for one month exposition in different locations (x and y axis) inside cell culture dishes. When the dishes were placed directly on the source, we obtained a dose rate from 660 to 983 mSv/year, while it was between 80 to 127 mSv/year at a distance of 14.5 cm above the source. Using the RPM placed on the source we reached median dose rate levels of 140 mSv/year. In conclusion, we have elaborated a new device allowing the combination of chronic radiation exposure and altered gravity. This device can be used by researchers interested in the field of space biology.

  19. An evaluation of cine-mode 3D portal image dosimetry for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansbacher, W.; Swift, C.-L.; Greer, P. B.

    2010-11-01

    We investigated cine-mode portal imaging on a Varian Trilogy accelerator and found that the linearity and other dosimetric properties are sufficient for 3D dose reconstruction as used in patient-specific quality assurance for VMAT (RapidArc) treatments. We also evaluated the gantry angle label in the portal image file header as a surrogate for the true imaged angle. The precision is only just adequate for the 3D evaluation method chosen, as discrepancies of 2° were observed.

  20. A feasibility study using radiochromic films for fast neutron 2D passive dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Samuel L; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Howell, Calvin R; Crowell, Alexander S; Fallin, Brent; Tonchev, Anton P; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is threefold: (1) to establish sensitivity of XRQA and EBT radiochromic films to fast neutron exposure; (2) to develop a film response to radiation dose calibration curve and (3) to investigate a two-dimensional (2D) film dosimetry technique for use in establishing an experimental setup for a radiobiological irradiation of mice and to assess the dose to the mice in this setup. The films were exposed to a 10 MeV neutron beam via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction. The XRQA film response was a factor of 1.39 greater than EBT film response to the 10 MeV neutron beam when exposed to a neutron dose of 165 cGy. A film response-to-soft tissue dose calibration function was established over a range of 0–10 Gy and had a goodness of fit of 0.9926 with the calibration data. The 2D film dosimetry technique estimated the neutron dose to the mice by measuring the dose using a mouse phantom and by placing a piece of film on the exterior of the experimental mouse setup. The film results were benchmarked using Monte Carlo and aluminum (Al) foil activation measurements. The radiochromic film, Monte Carlo and Al foil dose measurements were strongly correlated, and the film within the mouse phantom agreed to better than 7% of the externally mounted films. These results demonstrated the potential application of radiochromic films for passive 2D neutron dosimetry. PMID:20693612

  1. Joint USNRC/EC consequence uncertainty study: The ingestion pathway, dosimetry and health effects expert judgment elicitations and results

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, F.; Goossens, L.; Abbott, M.

    1996-08-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and the European Commission (EC) have conducted a formal expert judgment elicitation jointly to systematically collect the quantitative information needed to perform consequence uncertainty analyses on a broad set of commercial nuclear power plants. Information from three sets of joint US/European expert panels was collected and processed. Information from the three sets of panels was collected in the following areas: in the phenomenological areas of atmospheric dispersion and deposition, in the areas of ingestion pathways and external dosimetry, and in the areas of health effects and internal dosimetry. This exercise has demonstrated that the uncertainty for particular issues as measured by the ratio of the 95th percentile to the 5th percentile can be extremely large (orders of magnitude), or rather small (factor of two). This information has already been used by many of the experts that were involved in this process in areas other than the consequence uncertainty field. The benefit to the field of radiological consequences is just beginning as the results of this study are published and made available to the consequence community.

  2. Application of the gamma evaluation method in Gamma Knife film dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong-Hoon; Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Chae-Yong; Oh, Chang Wan; Lee, Do-Heui; Suh, Tae-Suk; Gyu Kim, Dong; Chung, Hyun-Tai

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery is a minimally invasive surgical technique for the treatment of intracranial lesions. To minimize neurological deficits, submillimeter accuracy is required during treatment delivery. In this paper, the delivery accuracy of GK radiosurgery was assessed with the gamma evaluation method using planning dose distribution and film measurement data. Methods: Single 4, 8, and 16 mm and composite shot plans were developed for evaluation using the GK Perfexion (PFX) treatment planning system (TPS). The planning dose distributions were exported as digital image communications in medicine - radiation therapy (DICOM RT) files using a new function of GK TPS. A maximum dose of 8 Gy was prescribed for four test plans. Irradiation was performed onto a spherical solid water phantom using Gafchromic EBT2 films in the axial and coronal planes. The exposed films were converted to absolute dose based on a 4th-order polynomial calibration curve determined using ten calibration films. The film measurement results and planning dose distributions were registered for further analysis in the same Leksell coordinate using in-house software. The gamma evaluation method was applied to two dose distributions with varying spatial tolerance (0.3-2.0 mm) and dosimetric tolerance (0.3-2.0%), to verify the accuracy of GK radiosurgery. The result of gamma evaluation was assessed using pass rate, dose gamma index histogram (DGH), and dose pass rate histogram (DPH). Results: The 20, 50, and 80% isodose lines found in film measurements were in close agreement with the planning isodose lines, for all dose levels. The comparison of diagonal line profiles across the axial plane yielded similar results. The gamma evaluation method resulted in high pass rates of >95% within the 50% isodose line for 0.5 mm/0.5% tolerance criteria, in both the axial and coronal planes. They satisfied 1.0 mm/1.0% criteria within the 20% isodose line. Our DGH and DPH also showed that low

  3. [Theoretical and Experimental Dosimetry in Evaluation of Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Field for Portable Radio Transmitters. Report 2. Homogeneous Human Head Phantom].

    PubMed

    Perov, S Yu; Bogacheva, E V

    2015-01-01

    Results of theoretical (numerical) and experimental electromagnetic field dosimetry for homogeneous human head phantoms are considered. The simulation and measurement results are shown. This paper presents the results of Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) evaluation in the "special anthropomorphic model" of human head, when a source of electromagnetic radio frequency field is placed in front of the face. The minimal difference is shown between measurements and simulation results in Head Simulating Liquid, which makes it possible to conduct further brain tissue simulations. The investigations show that the type of electromagnetic field source and phantom form play an important part for SAR distribution.

  4. Singlet oxygen luminescence dosimetry (SOLD) for photodynamic therapy: current status, challenges and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Jarvi, Mark T; Niedre, Mark J; Patterson, Michael S; Wilson, Brian C

    2006-01-01

    As photodynamic therapy (PDT) continues to develop and find new clinical indications, robust individualized dosimetry is warranted to achieve effective treatments. We posit that the most direct PDT dosimetry is achieved by monitoring singlet oxygen (1O2), the major cytotoxic species generated photochemically during PDT. Its detection and quantification during PDT have been long-term goals for PDT dosimetry and the development of techniques for this, based on detection of its near-infrared luminescence emission (1270 nm), is at a noteworthy stage of development. We begin by discussing the theory behind singlet-oxygen luminescence dosimetry (SOLD) and the seminal contributions that have brought SOLD to its current status. Subsequently, technology developments that could potentially improve SOLD are discussed, together with future areas of research, as well as the potential limitations of this method. We conclude by examining the major thrusts for future SOLD applications: as a tool for quantitative photobiological studies, a point of reference to evaluate other PDT dosimetry techniques, the optimal means to evaluate new photosensitizers and delivery methods and, potentially, a direct and robust clinical dosimetry system.

  5. Dosimetry and evaluating the effect of treatment parameters on the leakage of multi leaf collimators in ONCOR linear accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Akbari, Muhaddeseh; Tavakoli, Mohamad Bagher; Amouheidari, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the standard equipment in medical linear accelerators is multi-leaf collimators (MLCs); which is used as a replacement for lead shielding. MLC's advantages are a reduction of the treatment time, the simplicity of treatment, and better dose distribution. The main disadvantage of MLC is the radiation leakages from the edges and between the leaves. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of various treatment parameters in the magnitude of MLC leakage in linear accelerators. Materials and Methods: This project was performed with ONCOR Siemens linear accelerators. The amount of radiation leakage was determined by film dosimetry method. The films were Kodak-extended dose range-2, and the beams were 6 MV and 18 MV photons. In another part of the experiment, the fluctuation of the leakage was measured at various depths and fields. Results: The amount of leakage was generally up to 1.5 ± 0.2% for both energies. The results showed that the level of the leakage and the amount of dose fluctuation depends on the field size and depth of measurement. The amount of the leakage fluctuations in all energies was decreased with increasing of field size. The variation of the leakage versus field size was similar to the inverse of scattering collimator factor. Conclusions: The amount of leakage was more for 18 MV compare to 6 MV The percentage of the leakage for both energies is less than the 5% value which is recommended by protocols. The fluctuation of the MLC leakage reduced by increasing the field size and depth. PMID:28217631

  6. Study of the secondary neutral radiation in proton therapy: Toward an indirect in vivo dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Carnicer, A.; Letellier, V.; Rucka, G.; Angellier, G.; Sauerwein, W.; Herault, J.

    2012-12-15

    between calculations and measurements were 2.3 and 0.5 for neutrons and photons, respectively, and remained constant for all the range of SOBPs studied, which provided validation for the Monte Carlo calculations. H*(10)/D values were found to correlate to the proton dose rate D/MU with a power fit, both for neutrons and photons. This result was exploited to implement a system to obtain D/MU values from the measurement of the integrated photon ambient dose equivalent H*(10) during treatment, which provides a method to control the dosimetric parameters D/MU and D. Conclusions: The treatment room at CAL is moderately polluted by secondary particles. The constant ratio between measurements and calculations for all SOBPs showed that simulations correctly predict the dosimetric parameters and the dependence of the production of secondary particles on the modulation. The correlation between H*(10)/D and D/MU is a useful tool for quality control and is currently used at CAL. This system works as an indirect in vivo dosimetry method, which is so far not feasible in proton therapy. This tool requires very simple instrumentation and can be implemented from the measurement of either photons or neutrons.

  7. SU-E-T-512: Intrinsic Characteristics of the Nine Detectors and Evaluation of Their Performance in Non-Equilibrium Radiation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Markovic, M; Stathakis, S; Jurkovic, I; Papanikolaou, N; Mavroidis, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose The aim for the study was to compare intrinsic characteristics of the nine detectors and evaluate their performance in non-equilibrium radiation dosimetry. Methods The intrinsic characteristics of the nine detectors that were evaluated are based on the composition and size of the active volume, operating voltage, initial recombination of the collected charge, temperature, the effective cross section of the detectors. The shortterm stability and collection efficiency has been investigated. The minimum radiation detection sensitivity and detectors leakage current has been measured. The sensitivity to changes in energy spectrum as well as change in incident beam angles were measured an analyzed. Results The short-term stability of the measurements within every detector showed consistency in the measured values with the highest value of the standard deviation of the mean not exceeding 0.5%. Air ion chamber detectors showed minimum sensitivity to change in incident beam angles while diode detectors underestimated measurements up to 16%. Comparing the slope of the tangents for detector’s sensitivity curve, diode detectors illustrate more sensitivity to change in photon spectrum than ion chamber detectors. The change in radiation detection sensitivity with increase in dose delivered has been observed for semiconductor detectors with maximum deviation 0.01% for doses between 1 Gy and 10 Gy. Leakage current has been mainly influenced by bias voltage (ion chamber detectors) and room light intensity (diode detectors). With dose per pulse varying from 1.47E−4 to 5.1E−4 Gy/pulse the maximum change in collection efficiency was 1.4% for the air ion chambers up to 8% for liquid filled ion chamber. Conclusion Broad range of measurements performed showed all the detectors susceptible to some limitations and while they are suitable for use in broad scope of applications, careful selection has to be made for particular range of measurements.

  8. Instrumental carbon monoxide dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Stetter, J R; Rutt, D R

    1980-10-01

    Modern technology for the ambient monitoring of carbon monoxide has been developed to produce a portable electrochemical instrument capable of the personal exposure to carbon monoxide. The performance characteristics of this device have been studied so that the unambiguous interpretation of field data could be performed. A study of the carbon monoxide exposure in a light manufacturing facility illustrate that effective dosimetry can be performed with expectations of accuracy typically better than +/- 15%, and that voluntary carbon monoxide exposures such as smoking were a significant contribution to the individual's exposure. Significant definition of the carbon monoxide exposure profile can be achieved with an instrument approach to the collection of the dosimetric data.

  9. Evaluation of Toxicity Ranking for Metal Oxide Nanoparticles via an in Vitro Dosimetry Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Liu, Haoyang Haven; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Xia, Tian; Nel, Andre E; Cohen, Yoram

    2015-09-22

    It has been argued that in vitro toxicity testing of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) should consider delivered dose (i.e., NP mass settled per suspension volume) rather than relying exclusively on administered dose (initial NP mass concentration). Delivered dose calculations require quantification of NP sedimentation in tissue cell culture media, taking into consideration fundamental suspension properties. In this article, we calculate delivered dose using a first-principles "particles in a box" sedimentation model, which accounts for the particle size distribution, fractal dimension, and permeability of agglomerated NPs. The sedimentation model was evaluated against external and our own experimental sedimentation data for metal oxide NPs. We then utilized the model to construct delivered dose-response analysis for a library of metal oxide NPs (previously used for hazard ranking and prediction making) in different cell culture media. Hierarchical hazard ranking of the seven (out of 24) toxic metal oxide NPs in our library, using EC50 calculated on the basis of delivered dose, did not measurably differ from our ranking based on administered dose. In contrast, simplified sedimentation calculations based on the assumption of impermeable NP agglomerates of a single average size significantly underestimated the settled NPs' mass, resulting in misinterpretation of toxicity ranking. It is acknowledged that in vitro dose-response outcomes are likely to be shaped by complex toxicodynamics, which include NP/cellular association, triggering of dynamic cell response pathways involved in NP uptake, and multiple physicochemical parameters that influence NP sedimentation and internalization.

  10. [New dosimetry system based on the thermoluminescence method for evaluation of ionizing radiation doses to workers of the health centers].

    PubMed

    Urban, Paweł; Skubacz, Krystian

    2015-01-01

    In different areas of industry, science and in the greater extend medicine, plenty of devices intended for production of ionizing radiation or containing sources of such radiation found application. Such situation causes the necessity to control such kind of hazards. Currently, the most popular technique for detection of ionizing radiation is the method based on the thermoluminescence phenomena. Within the frame of this work, a new Panasonic's dosimetry system based on thermoluminescence dosimeters, intended for assessment of doses in mixed radiation fields of various energies is presented. In addition, the measured dosimetry quantities and problems connected with monitoring of radiation hazard in mixed fields (commonly present in medical sector) are characterized. In orderto verify measurement capabilities of the new system the irradiations of dosimeters with ionizing radiation of different energies have been done.

  11. Evaluation of Deltamethrin Kinetics and Dosimetry in the Maturing Rat using a PBPK Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immature rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute neurotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides like deltamethrin (DLM). A companion kinetics study revealed that blood and brain levels of the neuroactive parent compound were inversely related to age in rats 10, 21, 40 and 90...

  12. Evaluation of a Gafchromic EBT2 film dosimetry system for radiotherapy quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Aland, T; Kairn, T; Kenny, J

    2011-06-01

    This study examines the dosimetric accuracy of Gafchromic EBT2 model radiochromic film for use in radiotherapy quality assurance. In this study, film was scanned using an Epson Perfection V700 flatbed scanner in transmission mode at 75 DPI with the subsequent analysis performed using the red and blue colour channels and ImageJ software. Results of this study suggest that the conversion of film optical density to measured dose should, at present, utilise red channel data only, without application of a blue channel correction to the data. For the batch of film examined here, film uniformity and reproducibility appear to have improved compared with published results using older batches. The orientation of the film on the scanner and the side of the film facing the light source were found to have substantial effects on results. Based on the results of this study, it is possible to recommend the use of EBT2 film in routine quality assurance testing for radiotherapy, in situations where a dose uncertainty of up to 2.8% is acceptable.

  13. Evaluation of Deltamethrin Kinetics and Dosimetry in the Maturing Rat using a PBPK Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immature rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute neurotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides like deltamethrin (DLM). A companion kinetics study revealed that blood and brain levels of the neuroactive parent compound were inversely related to age in rats 10, 21, 40 and 90...

  14. Test study of boron nitride as a new detector material for dosimetry in high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Poppinga, D; Halbur, J; Lemmer, S; Delfs, B; Harder, D; Looe, H K; Poppe, B

    2017-09-05

    The aim of this test study is to check whether boron nitride (BN) might be applied as a detector material in high-energy photon-beam dosimetry. Boron nitride exists in various crystalline forms. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) possesses high mobility of the electrons and holes as well as a high volume resistivity, so that ionizing radiation in the clinical range of the dose rate can be expected to produce a measurable electrical current at low background current. Due to the low atomic numbers of its constituents, its density (2.0 g cm(-3)) similar to silicon and its commercial availability, h-BN appears as possibly suitable for the dosimetry of ionizing radiation. Five h-BN plates were contacted to triaxial cables, and the detector current was measured in a solid-state ionization chamber circuit at an applied voltage of 50 V. Basic dosimetric properties such as formation by pre-irradiation, sensitivity, reproducibility, linearity and temporal resolution were measured with 6 MV photon irradiation. Depth dose curves at quadratic field sizes of 10 cm and 40 cm were measured and compared to ionization chamber measurements. After a pre-irradiation with 6 Gy, the devices show a stable current signal at a given dose rate. The current-voltage characteristic up to 400 V shows an increase in the collection efficiency with the voltage. The time-resolved detector current behavior during beam interrupts is comparable to diamond material, and the background current is negligible. The measured percentage depth dose curves at 10 cm  ×  10 cm field size agreed with the results of ionization chamber measurements within  ±2%. This is a first study of boron nitride as a detector material for high-energy photon radiation. By current measurements on solid ionization chambers made from boron nitride chips we could demonstrate that boron nitride is in principle suitable as a detector material for high-energy photon-beam dosimetry.

  15. Test study of boron nitride as a new detector material for dosimetry in high-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppinga, D.; Halbur, J.; Lemmer, S.; Delfs, B.; Harder, D.; Looe, H. K.; Poppe, B.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this test study is to check whether boron nitride (BN) might be applied as a detector material in high-energy photon-beam dosimetry. Boron nitride exists in various crystalline forms. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) possesses high mobility of the electrons and holes as well as a high volume resistivity, so that ionizing radiation in the clinical range of the dose rate can be expected to produce a measurable electrical current at low background current. Due to the low atomic numbers of its constituents, its density (2.0 g cm‑3) similar to silicon and its commercial availability, h-BN appears as possibly suitable for the dosimetry of ionizing radiation. Five h-BN plates were contacted to triaxial cables, and the detector current was measured in a solid-state ionization chamber circuit at an applied voltage of 50 V. Basic dosimetric properties such as formation by pre-irradiation, sensitivity, reproducibility, linearity and temporal resolution were measured with 6 MV photon irradiation. Depth dose curves at quadratic field sizes of 10 cm and 40 cm were measured and compared to ionization chamber measurements. After a pre-irradiation with 6 Gy, the devices show a stable current signal at a given dose rate. The current–voltage characteristic up to 400 V shows an increase in the collection efficiency with the voltage. The time-resolved detector current behavior during beam interrupts is comparable to diamond material, and the background current is negligible. The measured percentage depth dose curves at 10 cm  ×  10 cm field size agreed with the results of ionization chamber measurements within  ±2%. This is a first study of boron nitride as a detector material for high-energy photon radiation. By current measurements on solid ionization chambers made from boron nitride chips we could demonstrate that boron nitride is in principle suitable as a detector material for high-energy photon-beam dosimetry.

  16. Portal dosimetry in wedged beams.

    PubMed

    Spreeuw, Hanno; Rozendaal, Roel; Camargo, Priscilla; Mans, Anton; Wendling, Markus; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Van Herk, Marcel; Mijnheer, Ben

    2015-05-08

    Portal dosimetry using electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is often applied to verify high-energy photon beam treatments. Due to the change in photon energy spectrum, the resulting dose values are, however, not very accurate in the case of wedged beams if the pixel-to-dose conversion for the situation without wedge is used. A possible solution would be to consider a wedged beam as another photon beam quality requiring separate beam modeling of the dose calculation algorithm. The aim of this study was to investigate a more practical solution: to make aSi EPID-based dosimetry models also applicable for wedged beams without an extra commissioning effort of the parameters of the model. For this purpose two energy-dependent wedge multiplication factors have been introduced to be applied for portal images taken with and without a patient/phantom in the beam. These wedge multiplication factors were derived from EPID and ionization chamber measurements at the EPID level for wedged and nonwedged beams, both with and without a polystyrene slab phantom in the beam. This method was verified for an EPID dosimetry model used for wedged beams at three photon beam energies (6, 10, and 18 MV) by comparing dose values reconstructed in a phantom with data provided by a treatment planning system (TPS), as a function of field size, depth, and off-axis distance. Generally good agreement, within 2%, was observed for depths between dose maximum and 15 cm. Applying the new model to EPID dose measurements performed during ten breast cancer patient treatments with wedged 6 MV photon beams showed that the average isocenter underdosage of 5.3% was reduced to 0.4%. Gamma-evaluation (global 3%/3 mm) of these in vivo data showed an increase in percentage of points with γ ≤ 1 from 60.2% to 87.4%, while γmean reduced from 1.01 to 0.55. It can be concluded that, for wedged beams, the multiplication of EPID pixel values with an energy-dependent correction factor provides good agreement

  17. Photostimulable Storage Phosphor Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frye, Douglas Mahaffey Danks

    The feasibility of employing alkaline earth sulfide based photostimulable storage phosphors for relative dosimetry in radiation oncology has been investigated. The dosimetric characteristics, radiologic characteristics, and spacial sensitivity of calcium sulfide and strontium sulfide based phosphors were determined. Dosimetric characteristics were explored by cavity theory calculation, Monte Carlo simulation, and physical measurement. Dosimetric characteristics obtained with cavity theory and Monte Carlo simulations agree well. The dose perturbation of the phosphor base materials were comparable to those produced by clinical dosimeter materials over the energy region employed in radiation oncology. Dose perturbation in regions downstream of the phosphor were measured with a variety of clinical dosimeters and compared with simulation results. The results of the measurements and simulations agreed within the uncertainty levels of the simulations and the measurements. Radiological characteristics of sensitivity, fading, dose response, dose rate response, and energy dependence of response were studied with an experimental phosphor output reader. Relative sensitivity was found to be dependent upon the mass thickness of phosphor layer. Fading was quantified for the calcium sulfide phosphor, with a half time of 2300 minutes. The strontium sulfide sample exhibited some fading, however, the regression lines yielded low correlation coefficients. A linear dose response over the range of doses employed in radiation oncology was obtained for both phosphors. No significant dose rate dependence of response was measured for the phosphors. The phosphor's energy dependence of response paralleled the dose perturbation relative to water predicted by cavity theory and simulations. Spatial sensitivity was demonstrated with an experimental phosphor scanner. The phosphors exhibited spatial sensitivity, however, infrared scattering/piping in the transparent substrate appeared to cause

  18. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation: Evaluation of the dose with cytogenetic methodologies by the construction of calibration curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafiropoulos, Demetre; Facco, E.; Sarchiapone, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    In case of a radiation accident, it is well known that in the absence of physical dosimetry biological dosimetry based on cytogenetic methods is a unique tool to estimate individual absorbed dose. Moreover, even when physical dosimetry indicates an overexposure, scoring chromosome aberrations (dicentrics and rings) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) at metaphase is presently the most widely used method to confirm dose assessment. The analysis of dicentrics and rings in PBLs after Giemsa staining of metaphase cells is considered the most valid assay for radiation injury. This work shows that applying the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, using telomeric/centromeric peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes in metaphase chromosomes for radiation dosimetry, could become a fast scoring, reliable and precise method for biological dosimetry after accidental radiation exposures. In both in vitro methods described above, lymphocyte stimulation is needed, and this limits the application in radiation emergency medicine where speed is considered to be a high priority. Using premature chromosome condensation (PCC), irradiated human PBLs (non-stimulated) were fused with mitotic CHO cells, and the yield of excess PCC fragments in Giemsa stained cells was scored. To score dicentrics and rings under PCC conditions, the necessary centromere and telomere detection of the chromosomes was obtained using FISH and specific PNA probes. Of course, a prerequisite for dose assessment in all cases is a dose-effect calibration curve. This work illustrates the various methods used; dose response calibration curves, with 95% confidence limits used to estimate dose uncertainties, have been constructed for conventional metaphase analysis and FISH. We also compare the dose-response curve constructed after scoring of dicentrics and rings using PCC combined with FISH and PNA probes. Also reported are dose response curves showing scored dicentrics and rings per cell, combining

  19. Assessment of national dosimetry quality audits results for teletherapy machines from 1989 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Wazir; Ullah, Asad; Mahmood, Khalid; Matiullah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ensure accuracy in radiation dose delivery, external dosimetry quality audit has an equal importance with routine dosimetry performed at clinics. To do so, dosimetry quality audit was organized by the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) of Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH) at the national level to investigate and minimize uncertainties involved in the measurement of absorbed dose, and to improve the accuracy of dose measurement at different radiotherapy hospitals. A total of 181 dosimetry quality audits (i.e., 102 of Co-60 and 79 of linear accelerators) for teletherapy units installed at 22 different sites were performed from 1989 to 2015. The percent deviation between users’ calculated/stated dose and evaluated dose (in the result of on-site dosimetry visits) were calculated and the results were analyzed with respect to the limits of ± 2.5% (ICRU "optimal model") ± 3.0% (IAEA on-site dosimetry visits limit) and ± 5.0% (ICRU minimal or "lowest acceptable" model). The results showed that out of 181 total on-site dosimetry visits, 20.44%, 16.02%, and 4.42% were out of acceptable limits of ± 2.5% ± 3.0%, and ± 5.0%, respectively. The importance of a proper ongoing quality assurance program, recommendations of the followed protocols, and properly calibrated thermometers, pressure gauges, and humidity meters at radiotherapy hospitals are essential in maintaining consistency and uniformity of absorbed dose measurements for precision in dose delivery.

  20. Comparison study of MOSFET detectors and diodes for entrance in vivo dosimetry in 18 MV x-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Jornet, N; Carrasco, P; Jurado, D; Ruiz, A; Eudaldo, T; Ribas, M

    2004-09-01

    The feasibility of dual bias dual metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) for entrance in vivo dose measurements in high energy x-rays beams (18 MV) was investigated. A comparison with commercially available diodes for in vivo dosimetry for the same energy range was performed. As MOSFETs are sold without an integrated build-up cap, different caps were tested: 3 cm bolus, 2 cm bolus, 2 cm hemispherical cap of a water equivalent material (Plastic Water) and a metallic hemispherical cap. This metallic build-up cap is the same as the one that is mounted on the in vivo diode used in this study. Intrinsic precision and response linearity with dose were determined for MOSFETs and diodes. They were then calibrated for entrance in vivo dosimetry in an 18 MV x-ray beam. Calibration included determination of the calibration factor in standard reference conditions and of the correction factors (CF) when irradiation conditions differed from those of reference. Correction factors for field size, source surface distance, wedge, and temperature were determined. Sensitivity variation with accumulated dose and the lifetime of both types of detectors were also studied. Finally, the uncertainties of entrance in vivo measurements using MOSFET and diodes were discussed. Intrinsic precision for MOSFETs for the high sensitivity mode was 0.7% (1 s.d.) as compared to the 0.05% (1 s.d.) for the studied diodes. The linearity of the response with dose was excellent (R2 = 1.000) for both in vivo dosimetry systems. The absolute values of the studied correction factors for the MOSFETs when covered by the different build-up caps were of the same order of those determined for the diodes. However, the uncertainties of the correction factors for MOSFETs were significantly higher than for diodes. Although the intrinsic precision and the uncertainty on the CF was higher for MOSFET detectors than for the studied diodes, the total uncertainty in entrance dose determination, once they

  1. Nanoparticle-aided Radiation Therapy: Micro-dosimetry and Evaluation of the Mediators Producing Biological Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Nava Raj

    Radiation therapy has been established as a standard technique for cancer treatment. Advances in nanotechnology have enabled the application of many new approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Achievement of selective enhancement in radiation dose deposition within a targeted tumor, while sparing surrounding normal structures, remains a challenge and one of the major objectives of cancer-related research. This objective can be realized by the insertion of high atomic number (Z) materials in the tumor site. Due to their high atomic number (Z=79) and favorable biological compatibility, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been found very promising in this respect. Another candidate material, platinum (Z=78), offering very similar radiation interaction properties to gold and exhibiting additional cytotoxic effects, has been exploited in chemotherapeutic agents for a long time. We explore the radiation effects near the interface of gold and platinum with tissue under a wide range of energies with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Our studies show that AuNPs and PtNPs (platinum nanoparticles) can offer a useful dose enhancement effect even in high energy radiotherapy beams, which can be important when critical structures are located close to the tumor. Our MC calculated dose enhancement increase of about 50% due to the removal of the flattening filter from the path of the photon beam of Varian TrueBeam accelerator suggests that flattening-filter-free beams are better suited for nanoparticle-aided radiation therapy. Also, the increase in dose enhancement with the tumor depth suggests that nanopartcle-aided radiation therapy can yield a better outcome while treating deep-seated tumors. Experimental microdosimetry is a non-trivial task, demanding detectors with small sensitive volumes to achieve a high spatial resolution. We have developed a microdosimetry technique utilizing an inexpensive in-house-built photodetector for the measurement of dose in a narrow high dose

  2. 3D dosimetry estimation for selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using SPECT/CT images: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debebe, Senait A.; Franquiz, Juan; McGoron, Anthony J.

    2015-03-01

    Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is a common way to treat liver cancer that cannot be treated surgically. SIRT involves administration of Yttrium - 90 (90Y) microspheres via the hepatic artery after a diagnostic procedure using 99mTechnetium (Tc)-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) to detect extrahepatic shunting to the lung or the gastrointestinal tract. Accurate quantification of radionuclide administered to patients and radiation dose absorbed by different organs is of importance in SIRT. Accurate dosimetry for SIRT allows optimization of dose delivery to the target tumor and may allow for the ability to assess the efficacy of the treatment. In this study, we proposed a method that can efficiently estimate radiation absorbed dose from 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT images of liver and the surrounding organs. Bremsstrahlung radiation from 90Y was simulated using the Compton window of 99mTc (78keV at 57%). 99mTc images acquired at the photopeak energy window were used as a standard to examine the accuracy of dosimetry prediction by the simulated bremsstrahlung images. A Liqui-Phil abdominal phantom with liver, stomach and two tumor inserts was imaged using a Philips SPECT/CT scanner. The Dose Point Kernel convolution method was used to find the radiation absorbed dose at a voxel level for a three dimensional dose distribution. This method will allow for a complete estimate of the distribution of radiation absorbed dose by tumors, liver, stomach and other surrounding organs at the voxel level. The method provides a quantitative predictive method for SIRT treatment outcome and administered dose response for patients who undergo the treatment.

  3. Thin film tritium dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Paul R.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for tritium dosimetry. A dosimeter comprising a thin film of a material having relatively sensitive RITAC-RITAP dosimetry properties is exposed to radiation from tritium, and after the dosimeter has been removed from the source of the radiation, the low energy electron dose deposited in the thin film is determined by radiation-induced, thermally-activated polarization dosimetry techniques.

  4. A study of four radiochromic films currently used for (2D) radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Tiantian; Luthjens, Leonard H.; Gasparini, Alessia; Warman, John M.

    2017-04-01

    We have measured the dose, D, and dose rate, D', dependences of the radiation-induced change in optical absorption of four radiochromic films currently used for (2D) dosimetry: GafChromic® types EBT3, MD-V3, HD-V2 and HD-810. We have irradiated the films using two 60Co γ-ray sources with dose rates of 2 and 30 Gy/min and a 200 kVp X-ray source with dose rates from 0.2 to 1.0 Gy/min. The 48-bit RGB image files of the films, obtained using an Epson V700 flatbed scanner, were color-channel separated and the red, green and blue pixel levels, P(D), were determined using ImageJ software. The relationship P(D)/P(0)=[1+hD/m]/[1+D/m] is found to provide a good description of the dose dependence for all four films at all dose rates. The parameter h is the "plateau level" of P(D)/P(0) approached at high doses, i.e. P(∞)/P(0). The parameter m is the "median-dose" for which P(D)/P(0)(1+h)/2 which is the half point in the dynamic range of the particular film. The best-fit values of m over the dose rate range from 0.2 to 25 Gy/min using the red pixels were 1.42±0.03, 11.1±0.4, 63.6±0.9 and 60.6±1.6 Gy for EBT3, MD-V3, HD-V2 and HD-810 respectively. Using the green pixels the median dose is 1.8 times larger for the first 3 films and 2.5 times larger for HD-810. The blue pixels are considered unsuitable for dosimetry because of the large value of h (>0.4) and the resulting small dynamic range.

  5. EPR dosimetry of teeth in past and future accidents: a prospective look at a retrospective method

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, E.H.; Kenner, G.H.; Hayes, R.B.; Chumak, V.; Shalom, S.

    1996-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) of tooth enamel is a relatively new technique for retrospective dosimetry that in the past two years has seen increasing effort towards its development and evaluation. Efforts have centered on determining the accuracy which may be achieved with current measurement techniques as well as the minimum doses detectable. The study was focused on evaluating some factors which influence the accuracy of EPR dosimetry of enamel. Reported are studies on sample intercomparisions, instrumental considerations, and effects of dental x-rays, environmental sunlight and ultraviolet radiation.

  6. Computer simulations for internal dosimetry using voxel models.

    PubMed

    Kinase, Sakae; Mohammadi, Akram; Takahashi, Masa; Saito, Kimiaki; Zankl, Maria; Kramer, Richard

    2011-07-01

    In the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, several studies have been conducted on the use of voxel models for internal dosimetry. Absorbed fractions (AFs) and S values have been evaluated for preclinical assessments of radiopharmaceuticals using human voxel models and a mouse voxel model. Computational calibration of in vivo measurement system has been also made using Japanese and Caucasian voxel models. In addition, for radiation protection of the environment, AFs have been evaluated using a frog voxel model. Each study was performed by using Monte Carlo simulations. Consequently, it was concluded that these data of Monte Carlo simulations and voxel models could adequately reproduce measurement results. Voxel models were found to be a significant tool for internal dosimetry since the models are anatomically realistic. This fact indicates that several studies on correction of the in vivo measurement efficiency for the variability of human subjects and interspecies scaling of organ doses will succeed.

  7. Plutonium worker dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Birchall, Alan; Puncher, M; Harrison, J; Riddell, A; Bailey, M R; Khokryakov, V; Romanov, S

    2010-05-01

    Epidemiological studies of the relationship between risk and internal exposure to plutonium are clearly reliant on the dose estimates used. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is currently reviewing the latest scientific information available on biokinetic models and dosimetry, and it is likely that a number of changes to the existing models will be recommended. The effect of certain changes, particularly to the ICRP model of the respiratory tract, has been investigated for inhaled forms of (239)Pu and uncertainties have also been assessed. Notable effects of possible changes to respiratory tract model assumptions are (1) a reduction in the absorbed dose to target cells in the airways, if changes under consideration are made to the slow clearing fraction and (2) a doubling of absorbed dose to the alveolar region for insoluble forms, if evidence of longer retention times is taken into account. An important factor influencing doses for moderately soluble forms of (239)Pu is the extent of binding of dissolved plutonium to lung tissues and assumptions regarding the extent of binding in the airways. Uncertainty analyses have been performed with prior distributions chosen for application in epidemiological studies. The resulting distributions for dose per unit intake were lognormal with geometric standard deviations of 2.3 and 2.6 for nitrates and oxides, respectively. The wide ranges were due largely to consideration of results for a range of experimental data for the solubility of different forms of nitrate and oxides. The medians of these distributions were a factor of three times higher than calculated using current default ICRP parameter values. For nitrates, this was due to the assumption of a bound fraction, and for oxides due mainly to the assumption of slower alveolar clearance. This study highlights areas where more research is needed to reduce biokinetic uncertainties, including more accurate determination of particle transport rates

  8. Heavy construction equipment noise study using dosimetry and time-motion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Ellsworth R.; Yantek, David S.

    2005-09-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss continues to afflict workers in many occupational settings despite longstanding recognition of the problems and well-known methods of prevention and regulations. Sound levels associated with heavy construction equipment range from 80 to 120 dB(A) and power tools commonly used in construction produce sound levels up to 115 dB(A). The focus of the research was to determine the noise exposures of heavy construction equipment operators while documenting the workers' tasks, (i.e., hauling, moving, and/or pushing construction material). Time-motion studies were performed at the construction sites and were used to correlate the noise dosage with the work performed by equipment operators. The cumulative dose for the operator was then plotted with references to work tasks, to identify the tasks that caused the greatest noise exposure. Three construction sites were examined and located in the western Pennsylvania and eastern Ohio areas. The types of construction equipment studied included asphalt pavers, backhoes, bulldozers, compaction equipment, excavators, haul trucks, telehandlers, and wheeled loaders. The results showed that bulldozer operators consistently had the highest noise exposures, ranging from a NIOSH REL (Recommended Exposure Limit) dose of 844% to 25836% and an OSHA PEL (Permissible Exposure Limit) dose of 139% to 1397%.

  9. REVIEW OF DOSIMETRY FIELD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    three, oxalic acid , polyisobutylene, and Mylar film, seem sufficiently promising to warrant further development. Their current states of development...ceric sulfate dosimeters be included in the dosimetry handbook, but that additional work should be done on oxalic acid , polyisobutylene, and Mylar as dosimetry materials. (Author)

  10. Objective Measurement of Vocal Fatigue in Classically Trained Singers: A Pilot Study of Vocal Dosimetry Data

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Thomas; Nix, John; Hunter, Eric; Titze, Ingo; Abaza, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate vocal fatigue by using objective and subjective measurements of dose recorded by the National Center for Voice and Speech (NCVS) Dosimeter™ (Dosimeter). Study Design and Setting Seven subjects completed a two-week study period. The Dosimeter recorded vocal load, soft phonation tasks and subjective soft voice ratings. Three vocal doses (time, distance, and cycle) were measured in classical singers' larynges during an intensive practice period. Results Spikes in vocal load are reflected as harsher subjective ratings on the same day as well as 24–72 hours later. When at least 48 hours of vocal rest occurred before a vocal load, improved subjective evaluations were seen after the load. Conclusions The NCVS Dosimeter appears to be an effective tool for data collection on prolonged use of the voice. Significance This is the first multi-day study comparing objective and subjective data on vocal fatigue in a group of professional singers. PMID:17011424

  11. Comparative dosimetry study of three UK centres implementing total skin electron treatment through external audit.

    PubMed

    Misson-Yates, S; Gonzalez, R; McGovern, M; Greener, A

    2015-05-01

    This article describes the external audit measurements conducted in two UK centres implementing total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) and the results obtained. Measurements of output, energy, beam flatness and symmetry at a standard distance (95 or 100 cm SSD) were performed using a parallel plate chamber in solid water. Similarly, output and energy measurements were also performed at the treatment plane for single and dual fields. Clinical simulations were carried out using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) and Gafchromic® film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ) on an anthropomorphic phantom. Extended distance measurements confirmed that local values for the beam dosimetry at Centres A and B were within 2% for outputs and 1-mm agreement of the expected depth at which the dose is 50% of the maximum for the depth-dose curve in water (R50,D) value. Clinical simulation using TLDs) showed an agreement of -1.6% and -6.7% compared with the expected mean trunk dose for each centre, respectively, and a variation within 10% (±1 standard deviation) across the trunk. The film results confirmed that the delivery of the treatment technique at each audited centre complies with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer recommendations. This audit methodology has proven to be a successful way to confirm the agreement of dosimetric parameters for TSEBT treatments at both audited centres and could serve as the basis for an audit template to be used by other audit groups. TSEBT audits are not established in the UK owing to a limited number of centres carrying out the treatment technique. This article describes the audits performed at two UK centres prior to their clinical implementation.

  12. Evaluation of a lithium formate EPR dosimetry system for dose measurements around {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Antonovic, Laura; Gustafsson, Haakan; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun; Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2009-06-15

    A dosimetry system using lithium formate monohydrate (HCO{sub 2}Li{center_dot}H{sub 2}O) as detector material and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for readout has been used to measure absorbed dose distributions around clinical {sup 192}Ir sources. Cylindrical tablets with diameter of 4.5 mm, height of 4.8 mm, and density of 1.26 g/cm{sup 3} were manufactured. Homogeneity test and calibration of the dosimeters were performed in a 6 MV photon beam. {sup 192}Ir irradiations were performed in a PMMA phantom using two different source models, the GammaMed Plus HDR and the microSelectron PDR-v1 model. Measured absorbed doses to water in the PMMA phantom were converted to the corresponding absorbed doses to water in water phantoms of dimensions used by the treatment planning systems (TPSs) using correction factors explicitly derived for this experiment. Experimentally determined absorbed doses agreed with the absorbed doses to water calculated by the TPS to within {+-}2.9%. Relative standard uncertainties in the experimentally determined absorbed doses were estimated to be within the range of 1.7%-1.3% depending on the radial distance from the source, the type of source (HDR or PDR), and the particular absorbed doses used. This work shows that a lithium formate dosimetry system is well suited for measurements of absorbed dose to water around clinical HDR and PDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Being less energy dependent than the commonly used thermoluminescent lithium fluoride (LiF) dosimeters, lithium formate monohydrate dosimeters are well suited to measure absorbed doses in situations where the energy dependence cannot easily be accounted for such as in multiple-source irradiations to verify treatment plans. Their wide dynamic range and linear dose response over the dose interval of 0.2-1000 Gy make them suitable for measurements on sources of the strengths used in clinical applications. The dosimeter size needs, however, to be reduced for application to

  13. SU-E-T-507: Internal Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Using GATE and XCAT Phantom: A Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fallahpoor, M; Abbasi, M; Sen, A; Parach, A; Kalantari, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Monte Carlo simulations are routinely used for internal dosimetry studies. These studies are conducted with humanoid phantoms such as the XCAT phantom. In this abstract we present the absorbed doses for various pairs of source and target organs using three common radiotracers in nuclear medicine. Methods The GATE software package is used for the Monte Carlo simulations. A typical female XCAT phantom is used as the input. Three radiotracers 153Sm, 131I and 99mTc are studied. The Specific Absorbed Fraction (SAF) for gamma rays (99mTc, 153Sm and 131I) and Specific Fraction (SF) for beta particles (153Sm and 131I) are calculated for all 100 pairs of source target organs including brain, liver, lung, pancreas, kidney, adrenal, spleen, rib bone, bladder and ovaries. Results The source organs themselves gain the highest absorbed dose as compared to other organs. The dose is found to be inversely proportional to distance from the source organ. In SAF results of 153Sm, when the source organ is lung, the rib bone, gain 0.0730 (Kg-1) that is more than lung itself. Conclusion The absorbed dose for various organs was studied in terms of SAF and SF. Such studies hold importance for future therapeutic procedures and optimization of induced radiotracer.

  14. Evaluation of 3D printing materials for fabrication of a novel multi-functional 3D thyroid phantom for medical dosimetry and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alssabbagh, Moayyad; Tajuddin, Abd Aziz; Abdulmanap, Mahayuddin; Zainon, Rafidah

    2017-06-01

    Recently, the three-dimensional printer has started to be utilized strongly in medical industries. In the human body, many parts or organs can be printed from 3D images to meet accurate organ geometries. In this study, five common 3D printing materials were evaluated in terms of their elementary composition and the mass attenuation coefficients. The online version of XCOM photon cross-section database was used to obtain the attenuation values of each material. The results were compared with the attenuation values of the thyroid listed in the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements - ICRU 44. Two original thyroid models (hollow-inside and solid-inside) were designed from scratch to be used in nuclear medicine, diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy for dosimetry and image quality purposes. Both designs have three holes for installation of radiation dosimeters. The hollow-inside model has more two holes in the top for injection the radioactive materials. The attenuation properties of the Polylactic Acid (PLA) material showed a very good match with the thyroid tissue, which it was selected to 3D print the phantom using open source RepRap, Prusa i3 3D printer. The scintigraphy images show that the phantom simulates a real healthy thyroid gland and thus it can be used for image quality purposes. The measured CT numbers of the PA material after the 3D printing show a close match with the human thyroid CT numbers. Furthermore, the phantom shows a good accommodation of the TLD dosimeters inside the holes. The 3D fabricated thyroid phantom simulates the real shape of the human thyroid gland with a changeable geometrical shape-size feature to fit different age groups. By using 3D printing technology, the time required to fabricate the 3D phantom was considerably shortened compared to the longer conventional methods, where it took only 30 min to print out the model. The 3D printing material used in this study is commercially available and cost

  15. Testing the methodology for dosimetry audit of heterogeneity corrections and small MLC-shaped fields: Results of IAEA multi-center studies

    PubMed Central

    Izewska, Joanna; Wesolowska, Paulina; Azangwe, Godfrey; Followill, David S.; Thwaites, David I.; Arib, Mehenna; Stefanic, Amalia; Viegas, Claudio; Suming, Luo; Ekendahl, Daniela; Bulski, Wojciech; Georg, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a long tradition of supporting development of methodologies for national networks providing quality audits in radiotherapy. A series of co-ordinated research projects (CRPs) has been conducted by the IAEA since 1995 assisting national external audit groups developing national audit programs. The CRP ‘Development of Quality Audits for Radiotherapy Dosimetry for Complex Treatment Techniques’ was conducted in 2009–2012 as an extension of previously developed audit programs. Material and methods. The CRP work described in this paper focused on developing and testing two steps of dosimetry audit: verification of heterogeneity corrections, and treatment planning system (TPS) modeling of small MLC fields, which are important for the initial stages of complex radiation treatments, such as IMRT. The project involved development of a new solid slab phantom with heterogeneities containing special measurement inserts for thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and radiochromic films. The phantom and the audit methodology has been developed at the IAEA and tested in multi-center studies involving the CRP participants. Results. The results of multi-center testing of methodology for two steps of dosimetry audit show that the design of audit procedures is adequate and the methodology is feasible for meeting the audit objectives. A total of 97% TLD results in heterogeneity situations obtained in the study were within 3% and all results within 5% agreement with the TPS predicted doses. In contrast, only 64% small beam profiles were within 3 mm agreement between the TPS calculated and film measured doses. Film dosimetry results have highlighted some limitations in TPS modeling of small beam profiles in the direction of MLC leave movements. Discussion. Through multi-center testing, any challenges or difficulties in the proposed audit methodology were identified, and the methodology improved. Using the experience of these

  16. Testing the methodology for dosimetry audit of heterogeneity corrections and small MLC-shaped fields: Results of IAEA multi-center studies.

    PubMed

    Izewska, Joanna; Wesolowska, Paulina; Azangwe, Godfrey; Followill, David S; Thwaites, David I; Arib, Mehenna; Stefanic, Amalia; Viegas, Claudio; Suming, Luo; Ekendahl, Daniela; Bulski, Wojciech; Georg, Dietmar

    2016-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a long tradition of supporting development of methodologies for national networks providing quality audits in radiotherapy. A series of co-ordinated research projects (CRPs) has been conducted by the IAEA since 1995 assisting national external audit groups developing national audit programs. The CRP 'Development of Quality Audits for Radiotherapy Dosimetry for Complex Treatment Techniques' was conducted in 2009-2012 as an extension of previously developed audit programs. The CRP work described in this paper focused on developing and testing two steps of dosimetry audit: verification of heterogeneity corrections, and treatment planning system (TPS) modeling of small MLC fields, which are important for the initial stages of complex radiation treatments, such as IMRT. The project involved development of a new solid slab phantom with heterogeneities containing special measurement inserts for thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and radiochromic films. The phantom and the audit methodology has been developed at the IAEA and tested in multi-center studies involving the CRP participants. The results of multi-center testing of methodology for two steps of dosimetry audit show that the design of audit procedures is adequate and the methodology is feasible for meeting the audit objectives. A total of 97% TLD results in heterogeneity situations obtained in the study were within 3% and all results within 5% agreement with the TPS predicted doses. In contrast, only 64% small beam profiles were within 3 mm agreement between the TPS calculated and film measured doses. Film dosimetry results have highlighted some limitations in TPS modeling of small beam profiles in the direction of MLC leave movements. Through multi-center testing, any challenges or difficulties in the proposed audit methodology were identified, and the methodology improved. Using the experience of these studies, the participants could incorporate the auditing

  17. In vivo dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer--a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Anton, Mathias; Wagner, Daniela; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Hackel, Thomas; Hermann, Robert Michael; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Vorwerk, Hilke

    2009-05-07

    A phantom study for dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer is presented. The measurement method of the secondary standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt had to be slightly modified in order to be able to measure inside a Foley catheter. The absorbed dose to water response of the alanine dosimetry system to (192)Ir was determined with a reproducibility of 1.8% relative to (60)Co. The resulting uncertainty for measurements inside the urethra was estimated to be 3.6%, excluding the uncertainty of the dose rate constant Lambda. The applied dose calculated by a treatment planning system is compared to the measured dose for a small series of (192)Ir HDR irradiations in a gel phantom. The differences between the measured and applied dose are well within the limits of uncertainty. Therefore, the method is considered to be suitable for measurements in vivo.

  18. In vivo dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during 192Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer—a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, Mathias; Wagner, Daniela; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Hackel, Thomas; Hermann, Robert Michael; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Vorwerk, Hilke

    2009-05-01

    A phantom study for dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during 192Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer is presented. The measurement method of the secondary standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt had to be slightly modified in order to be able to measure inside a Foley catheter. The absorbed dose to water response of the alanine dosimetry system to 192Ir was determined with a reproducibility of 1.8% relative to 60Co. The resulting uncertainty for measurements inside the urethra was estimated to be 3.6%, excluding the uncertainty of the dose rate constant Λ. The applied dose calculated by a treatment planning system is compared to the measured dose for a small series of 192Ir HDR irradiations in a gel phantom. The differences between the measured and applied dose are well within the limits of uncertainty. Therefore, the method is considered to be suitable for measurements in vivo.

  19. Breast dosimetry in clinical mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, Luis Alberto Do Rego

    The objective of this study was show that a clinical dosimetry protocol that utilizes a dosimetric breast phantom series based on population anthropometric measurements can reliably predict the average glandular dose (AGD) imparted to the patient during a routine screening mammogram. In the study, AGD was calculated using entrance skin exposure and dose conversion factors based on fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness, mammography unit parameters and modifying parameters for homogeneous phantom (phantom factor), compressed breast lateral dimensions (volume factor) and anatomical features (anatomical factor). The protocol proposes the use of a fiber-optic coupled (FOCD) or Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter to measure the entrance skin exposure at the time of the mammogram without interfering with diagnostic information of the mammogram. The study showed that FOCD had sensitivity with less than 7% energy dependence, linear in all tube current-time product stations, and was reproducible within 2%. FOCD was superior to MOSFET dosimeter in sensitivity, reusability, and reproducibility. The patient fibroglandular content was evaluated using a calibrated modified breast tissue equivalent homogeneous phantom series (BRTES-MOD) designed from anthropomorphic measurements of a screening mammography population and whose elemental composition was referenced to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 44 tissues. The patient fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness along with unit parameters and spectrum half-value layer were used to derive the currently used dose conversion factor (DgN). The study showed that the use of a homogeneous phantom, patient compressed breast lateral dimensions and patient anatomical features can affect AGD by as much as 12%, 3% and 1%, respectively. The protocol was found to be superior to existing methodologies. In addition, the study population anthropometric

  20. Considerations on the miniaturization of detectors for in vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Micaela; Testa, Etienne; Beuve, Michael; Balosso, Jacques; Chaikh, Abdulhamid

    2017-05-01

    The evolution of technology in radiotherapy nowadays allows us to deliver much higher doses to the target volumes, thanks to better absorbed dose distribution accuracy and conformation, while better sparing healthy tissues. In photon radiotherapy, higher precision usually entails employing small and moving beams. This emphasizes the role of in vivo dosimetry, which assesses internal absorbed dose rather than entrance dose. This, along with advances in materials science, results in a tendency towards the miniaturization of dosimeters. However, the stochastic nature of the radiation-matter interaction takes on greater importance at smaller scales, resulting in fluctuations in energy deposition whose effect may not be negligible. Miniaturization needs to take this into account. We estimated such fluctuations by Monte Carlo simulations considering energy deposition in cylindrical volumes of different sizes and for several absorbed dose values. We not only present and discuss the probability distributions of absorbed doses for a large range of target sizes (0.1-10 μm) and clinically relevant doses (0.1-10 Gy), but also derive an estimation of the risk of measuring an absorbed dose with a value outside a given interval of tolerance (3, 5 and 10%) around the expected dose. The distributions presented features consistent with the theory of microdosimetry. Those for dosimeter sizes smaller than 0.3 μm showed a very high dispersion in specific energy, while those for 10 μm dosimeters tended to become Gaussian and narrower with increasing absorbed dose. The probability of measuring an absorbed dose outside the defined interval of tolerance is close to 100% for the smallest size, regardless of the dose and the interval width considered. It decreases with increasing dose, dosimeter size and width of the interval of tolerance. The best results were obtained with 10 μm dosimeters, for which the probability of doses outside the tolerance range is always zero for absorbed doses

  1. Student Perceptions of an Online Medical Dosimetry Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenards, Nishele D.

    2007-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin--La Crosse offers the first web-based medical dosimetry program in the nation. There is no data to research a program of this type. This research consisted of the evaluation of other distance education programs including health profession programs in addition to face-to-face medical dosimetry programs. There was need to…

  2. Medical dosimetry in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turák, O.; Osvay, M.; Ballay, L.

    2012-09-01

    Radiation exposure of medical staff during cardiological and radiological procedures was investigated. The exposure of medical staff is directly connected to patient exposure. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of doses on uncovered part of body of medical staff using LiF thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters in seven locations. Individual Kodak film dosimeters (as authorized dosimetry system) were used for the assessment of medical staff's effective dose. Results achieved on dose distribution measurements confirm that wearing only one film badge under the lead apron does not provide enough information on the personal dose. The value of estimated annual doses on eye lens and extremities (fingers) were in good correlation with international publications.

  3. Dosimetry of nasal uptake of water-soluble and reactive gases: a first study of interhuman variability.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guilherme J M; Schroeter, Jeffry D; Segal, Rebecca A; Stanek, John; Foureman, Gary L; Kimbell, Julia S

    2009-06-01

    Certain inhaled chemicals, such as reactive, water-soluble gases, are readily absorbed by the nasal mucosa upon inhalation and may cause damage to the nasal epithelium. Comparisons of the spatial distribution of nasal lesions in laboratory animals exposed to formaldehyde with gas uptake rates predicted by computational models reveal that lesions usually occur in regions of the susceptible epithelium where gas absorption is highest. Since the uptake patterns are influenced by air currents in the nose, interindividual variability in nasal anatomy and ventilation rates due to age, body size, and gender will affect the patterns of gas absorption in humans, potentially putting some age groups at higher risk when exposed to toxic gases. In this study, interhuman variability in the nasal dosimetry of reactive, water-soluble gases was investigated by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models in 5 adults and 2 children, aged 7 and 8 years old. Airflow patterns were investigated for allometrically scaled inhalation rates corresponding to resting breathing. The spatial distribution of uptake at the airway walls was predicted to be nonuniform, with most of the gas being absorbed in the anterior portion of the nasal passages. Under the conditions of these simulations, interhuman variability in dose to the whole nose (mass per time per nasal surface area) due to differences in anatomy and ventilation was predicted to be 1.6-fold among the 7 individuals studied. Children and adults displayed very similar patterns of nasal gas uptake; no significant differences were noted between the two age groups.

  4. An evaluation of the TSE MR sequence for time efficient data acquisition in polymer gel dosimetry of applications involving high doses and steep dose gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Baras, P.; Seimenis, I.; Sandilos, P.; Vlahos, L.; Bieganski, T.; Georgiou, E.; Pantelis, E.; Papagiannis, P.; Sakelliou, L.

    2005-11-15

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging as a readout method for polymer gel dosimetry commonly involves long imaging sessions, particularly when high spatial resolution is required in all three dimensions, for the investigation of dose distributions with steep dose gradients and stringent dose delivery specifications. In this work, a volume selective turbo spin echo (TSE) pulse sequence is compared to the established Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) multiecho acquisition with regard to providing accurate dosimetric results in significantly reduced imaging times. Polyethylene glycol diacrylate based (PABIG) gels were irradiated and subsequently scanned to obtain R2 relaxation rate measurements, using a CPMG multiecho sequence and a dual echo TSE utilizing an acceleration (turbo) factor of 64. R2 values, plotted against corresponding Monte Carlo dose calculations, provided calibration data of PABIG gels dose response over a wide dose range. A linear R2 versus dose relationship was demonstrated for both sequences with TSE results presenting reduced dose sensitivity. Although TSE data were found to deviate from linearity at lower doses compared to CPMG data, a relatively wide dynamic dose range of response extending up to approximately 100 Gy was observed for both sequences. The TSE and CPMG sequences were evaluated with a brachytherapy irradiation using a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir source and a gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery irradiation with a single 4 mm collimator helmet shot. Dosimetric results obtained with the TSE and CPMG are shown to compare equally well with the expected dose distributions for these irradiations. The 60-fold scan time reduction achieved with TSE implies that this sequence could prove to be a useful tool for the introduction of polymer gel dosimetry in clinical radiation therapy applications involving high doses and steep dose gradients.

  5. Evaluation of a real-time BeO ceramic fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry system for dose verification of high dose rate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Alexandre M Caraça; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Afshar V, Shahraam

    2015-11-01

    The authors evaluate the capability of a beryllium oxide (BeO) ceramic fiber-coupled luminescence dosimeter, named radioluminescence/optically stimulated luminescence (RL/OSL) BeO FOD, for dosimetric verification of high dose rate (HDR) treatments. The RL/OSL BeO FOD is capable of RL and OSL measurements. The RL/OSL BeO FOD is able to be inserted in 6F proguide needles, used in interstitial HDR treatments. Using a custom built Perspex phantom, 6F proguide needles could be submerged in a water tank at 1 cm separations from each other. A second background fiber was required to correct for the stem effect. The stem effect, dose linearity, reproducibility, depth-dose curves, and angular and temperature dependency of the RL/OSL BeO FOD were characterised using an Ir-192 source. The RL/OSL BeO FOD was also applied to the commissioning of a 10 mm horizontal Leipzig applicator. Both the RL and OSL were found to be reproducible and their percentage depth-dose curves to be in good agreement with those predicted via TG-43. A combined uncertainty of 7.9% and 10.1% (k=1) was estimated for the RL and OSL, respectively. For the 10 mm horizontal Leipzig applicator, measured percentage depth doses were within 5% agreement of the published reference calculations. The output at the 3 mm prescription depth for a 1 Gy delivery was verified to be 0.99±0.08 Gy and 1.01±0.10 Gy by the RL and OSL, respectively. The use of the second background fiber under the current setup means that the two fibers cannot fit into a single 6F needle. Hence, use of the RL is currently not adequate for the purpose of in vivo brachytherapy dosimetry. While not real-time, the OSL is shown to be adequate for in vivo brachytherapy dosimetry.

  6. Dosimetry and Image Quality in Control Studies in Computerised Tomography Realized to Paediatric Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, M. R.; Dies, P.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Rickards, J.; Ruiz, C.

    2008-08-01

    Computerised tomography (CT) is a favourite method of medical diagnosis. Its use has thus increased rapidly throughout the world, particularly in studies relating to children. However to avoid administering unnecessarily high doses of radiation to paediatric patients it is important to have correct dose reference levels to minimize risk. The research is being developed within the public health sector at the Hospital Infantil de México "Dr. Federico Gómez." We measured the entrance surface air kerma (KP) in paediatric patients, during the radiological studies of control in CT (studies of head, thorax and abdomen). Phantom was used to evaluate image quality as the tomograph requires a high resolution image in order to operate at its optimum level.

  7. Dosimetry and Image Quality in Control Studies in Computerised Tomography Realized to Paediatric Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, M. R.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Dies, P.; Rickards, J.; Ruiz, C.

    2008-08-11

    Computerised tomography (CT) is a favourite method of medical diagnosis. Its use has thus increased rapidly throughout the world, particularly in studies relating to children. However to avoid administering unnecessarily high doses of radiation to paediatric patients it is important to have correct dose reference levels to minimize risk. The research is being developed within the public health sector at the Hospital Infantil de Mexico 'Dr. Federico Gomez.' We measured the entrance surface air kerma (K{sub P}) in paediatric patients, during the radiological studies of control in CT (studies of head, thorax and abdomen). Phantom was used to evaluate image quality as the tomograph requires a high resolution image in order to operate at its optimum level.

  8. Education and training activities on personal dosimetry service in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tugrul Zeyrek, C; Akbiyik, Hayri

    2013-10-01

    A personal dosimetry service that evaluates the occupational doses for external and internal radiation of the radiation workers is one of the main components of radiation protection programme. The education and training (E&T) activities in this field are basic aspects of the optimisation of all exposures to radiation. The E&T activities in the field of occupational radiation protection at the national and international level are of main interest and implemented by the Ankara Nuclear Research and Training Center. This study describes the Turkish experience in E&T of the staff of dosimetry services, postgraduate students and medical physics experts. In Turkey, the first individual monitoring training course was conducted in 2012. The aim of this study is to provide a structured description of postgraduate courses that are addressed to qualified experts and medical physics experts, and the modules are mainly dedicated to individual monitoring.

  9. Mixed radiation field dosimetry utilizing Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Hintenlang, D.

    1991-01-01

    This project has proposed to develop a novel dosimetry system that is capable of directly evaluating the chemical/biological damage caused by neutrons, photons, or both in a single measurement. The dosimeter itself will consist of a small volume of biological equivalent material that is probed for radiation damage with Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques. NQR has previously been utilized as a sensitive probe of structural and chemical changes at the molecular level for a variety of organic compounds. The biological equivalent materials used in this study will not only have a density similar to tissue (tissue equivalent) but will have the same atomic components as tissue. This is a significant requirement if the important neutron interactions that occur in tissue are to occur in the dosimeter as well. The overall objective of this study is to investigate a methodology to perform accurate mixed-field (neutron and photon) dosimetry for biological systems.

  10. Exposure Setup and Dosimetry for a Study on Effects of Mobile Communication Signals on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohland, Martina; Baaske, Kai; Gläser, Katharina; Hintzsche, Henning; Stopper, Helga; Kleine-Ostmann, Thomas; Schrader, Thorsten

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we describe the design of an exposure setup used to study possible non-thermal effects due to the exposure of human hematopoietic stem cells to GSM, UMTS and LTE mobile communication signals. The experiments are performed under fully blinded conditions in a TEM waveguide located inside an incubator to achieve defined environmental conditions as required for the living cells. Chamber slides containing the cells in culture medium are placed on the septum of the waveguide. The environmental and exposure parameters such as signal power, temperatures, relative humidity and CO2 content of the surrounding atmosphere are monitored permanently during the exposure experiment. The power of the exposure signals required to achieve specific absorption rates of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 W kg-1 are determined by numerical calculation of the field distribution inside the cell culture medium at 900 MHz (GSM), 1950 MHz (UMTS) and 2535 MHz (LTE). The dosimetry is verified both with scattering parameter measurements on the waveguide with and without containers filled with cell culture medium and with temperature measurements with non-metallic probes in separate heating experiments.

  11. In aqua vivo EPID dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wendling, Markus; McDermott, Leah N.; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Pecharroman-Gallego, Raul; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Stroom, Joep; Herk, Marcel J.; Mijnheer, Ben van

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: At the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in vivo dosimetry using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been implemented for almost all high-energy photon treatments of cancer with curative intent. Lung cancer treatments were initially excluded, because the original back-projection dose-reconstruction algorithm uses water-based scatter-correction kernels and therefore does not account for tissue inhomogeneities accurately. The aim of this study was to test a new method, in aqua vivo EPID dosimetry, for fast dose verification of lung cancer irradiations during actual patient treatment. Methods: The key feature of our method is the dose reconstruction in the patient from EPID images, obtained during the actual treatment, whereby the images have been converted to a situation as if the patient consisted entirely of water; hence, the method is termed in aqua vivo. This is done by multiplying the measured in vivo EPID image with the ratio of two digitally reconstructed transmission images for the unit-density and inhomogeneous tissue situation. For dose verification, a comparison is made with the calculated dose distribution with the inhomogeneity correction switched off. IMRT treatment verification is performed for each beam in 2D using a 2D {gamma} evaluation, while for the verification of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments in 3D a 3D {gamma} evaluation is applied using the same parameters (3%, 3 mm). The method was tested using two inhomogeneous phantoms simulating a tumor in lung and measuring its sensitivity for patient positioning errors. Subsequently five IMRT and five VMAT clinical lung cancer treatments were investigated, using both the conventional back-projection algorithm and the in aqua vivo method. The verification results of the in aqua vivo method were statistically analyzed for 751 lung cancer patients treated with IMRT and 50 lung cancer patients treated with VMAT. Results: The improvements by

  12. Internal dosimetry - a review.

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Charles Augustus

    2004-06-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  13. Internal dosimetry: a review.

    PubMed

    Potter, Charles A

    2005-06-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  14. Unexplained overexposures on physical dosimetry reported by biological dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Montoro, A; Almonacid, M; Villaescusa, J I; Verdu, G

    2009-01-01

    The Medical Service of the Radiation Protection Service from the University Hospital La Fe (Valencia, Spain), carries out medical examinations of the workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. The Biological Dosimetry Laboratory is developing its activity since 2001. Up to now, the activities have been focused in performing biological dosimetry studies of Interventionists workers from La Fe Hospital. Recently, the Laboratory has been authorized by the Health Authority in the Valencian Community. Unexplained overexposures of workers and patients are also studied. Workers suspected of being overexposed to ionising radiation were referred for investigation by cytogenetic analysis. Two of these were from Hospitals of the Valencian Community and one belonged to an uranium mine from Portugal. Hospital workers had a physical dose by thermoluminiscence dosimeters (TLD) that exceeded the established limit. The worker of the uranium mine received a dose from a lost source of Cesium 137 with an activity of 170 mCi. All three cases showed normal values after the hematological analysis. Finally, the aim of this study consist to determine whether the dose showed by the dosimeter is reliable or not. In the case of workers that wore dosimeter, it is concluded that the doses measured by dosimeter are not corresponding to real doses. Hospital worker with a physical dose of 2.6 Sv and 0.269 Sv had an estimated absorbed dose by biological dosimetry of 0.076 Gy (0-0.165 Gy) and 0 Gy (0-0.089 Gy), respectively. In case of the mine worker an estimated absorbed dose of 0.073 Gy (0-0.159 Gy) was obtained by biological dosimetry. In all cases we used the odds ratio to present the results due to a very low frequency of observed aberrations [1].

  15. An improved MCNP version of the NORMAN voxel phantom for dosimetry studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, P.; Gualdrini, G.

    2005-09-01

    In recent years voxel phantoms have been developed on the basis of tomographic data of real individuals allowing new sets of conversion coefficients to be calculated for effective dose. Progress in radiation studies brought ICRP to revise its recommendations and a new report, already circulated in draft form, is expected to change the actual effective dose evaluation method. In the present paper the voxel phantom NORMAN developed at HPA, formerly NRPB, was employed with MCNP Monte Carlo code. A modified version of the phantom, NORMAN-05, was developed to take into account the new set of tissues and weighting factors proposed in the cited ICRP draft. Air kerma to organ equivalent dose and effective dose conversion coefficients for antero-posterior and postero-anterior parallel photon beam irradiations, from 20 keV to 10 MeV, have been calculated and compared with data obtained in other laboratories using different numerical phantoms. Obtained results are in good agreement with published data with some differences for the effective dose calculated employing the proposed new tissue weighting factors set in comparison with previous evaluations based on the ICRP 60 report.

  16. Latest developments in silica-based thermoluminescence spectrometry and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Bradley, D A; Jafari, S M; Siti Shafiqah, A S; Tamcheck, N; Shutt, A; Siti Rozaila, Z; Abdul Sani, S F; Sabtu, Siti Norbaini; Alanazi, Abdulaziz; Amouzad Mahdiraji, G; Abdul Rashid, H A; Maah, M J

    2016-11-01

    Using irradiated doped-silica preforms from which fibres for thermoluminescence dosimetry applications can be fabricated we have carried out a range of luminescence studies, the TL yield of the fibre systems offering many advantages over conventional passive dosimetry types. In this paper we investigate such media, showing emission spectra for irradiated preforms and the TL response of glass beads following irradiation to an (241)Am-Be neutron source located in a tank of water, the glass fibres and beads offering the advantage of being able to be placed directly into liquid. The outcomes from these and other lines of research are intended to inform development of doped silica radiation dosimeters of versatile utility, extending from environmental evaluations through to clinical and industrial applications.

  17. Applicability of Topaz Composites to Electron Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomfim, K. S.; Souza, D. N.

    2010-11-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetric topaz properties have been investigated and the results have shown that this mineral presents characteristics of a good dosimeter mainly in doses evaluation in radiotherapy with photons beams in radiotherapy. Typical applications of thermoluminescent dosimeters in radiotherapy are: in vivo dosimetry on patients (either as a routine quality assurance procedure or for dose monitoring in special cases); verification of treatment techniques; dosimetry audits; and comparisons among hospitals. The mean aim of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of topaz-Teflon pellets as thermoluminescent dosimeters in high-energy electron beams used to radiotherapy. Topaz-Teflon pellets were used as TLD.

  18. Radiotherapy dosimetry using a commercial OSL system

    SciTech Connect

    Viamonte, A.; Rosa, L. A. R. da; Buckley, L. A.; Cherpak, A.; Cygler, J. E.

    2008-04-15

    A commercial optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) system developed for radiation protection dosimetry by Landauer, Inc., the InLight microStar reader, was tested for dosimetry procedures in radiotherapy. The system uses carbon-doped aluminum oxide, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C, as a radiation detector material. Using this OSL system, a percent depth dose curve for {sup 60}Co gamma radiation was measured in solid water. Field size and SSD dependences of the detector response were also evaluated. The dose response relationship was investigated between 25 and 400 cGy. The decay of the response with time following irradiation and the energy dependence of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSL detectors were also measured. The results obtained using OSL dosimeters show good agreement with ionization chamber and diode measurements carried out under the same conditions. Reproducibility studies show that the response of the OSL system to repeated exposures is 2.5% (1sd), indicating a real possibility of applying the Landauer OSL commercial system for radiotherapy dosimetric procedures.

  19. In vivo dosimetry with semiconductors in medium dose rate (MDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Allahverdi, Mahmoud; Jaberi, Ramin; Aghili, Mehdi; Ghahremani, Fatemeh; Geraily, Ghazale

    2013-03-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the role of in vivo dosimetry with semiconductor detectors in gynaecological medium dose rate brachytherapy, and to compare the actual doses delivered to organs at risk (as measured using in vivo dosimetry) with those calculated during treatment planning. Doses to the rectum and bladder were measured in a group of patients with cervical carcinoma using semiconductor detectors and compared to the doses calculated using a treatment planning system. 36 applications of brachytherapy at dose rates of 1.8-2.3 Gy/h were performed in the patients. The mean differences between the measured and calculated doses were 3 % for the rectum and 11 % for the bladder. The main reason for the differences between the measured and calculated doses was patient movement. To reduce the risk of large errors in the dose delivered, in vivo dosimetry should be performed in addition to treatment planning system computations.

  20. Low energy cyclotron production and separation of yttrium-86 for evaluation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Shoner, S.; Link, J.; Krohn, K.; Schlyer, D.

    1999-06-01

    Although an excellent radionuclide for application to systemic isotopic therapy when complexed to various monoclonal antibodies, the lack of photon emission from yttrium-90 makes the determination of the pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the resultant radiopharmaceutical difficult. The introduction of the positron-emitting radionuclide yttrium-86 (T{sub 1/2}=14.7&hthinsp;h,&hthinsp;{beta}{sup +}=33{percent}) provides the non-invasive quantitation for the biodistribution of the chelated complex. The yttrium-86 radionuclide is produced at Memorial Sloan-Kettering using the CS-15 cyclotron via the (p,n) nuclear reaction on an enriched strontium-86 target. The separation is effectively achieved through a combination of solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography. Once investigational new drug approval has been received, the mixed nuclides, Y-90 and Y-86, are to be used to formulate the HuM195 labeled monoclonal antibody, a radiopharmaceutical under active investigation against hematopoietic progenitor cells. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Accuracy of dose planning for prostate radiotherapy in the presence of metallic implants evaluated by electron spin resonance dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Alves, G.G.; Kinoshita, A.; de Oliveira, H.F.; Guimarães, F.S.; Amaral, L.L.; Baffa, O.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main approaches to cure prostate cancer, and its success depends on the accuracy of dose planning. A complicating factor is the presence of a metallic prosthesis in the femur and pelvis, which is becoming more common in elderly populations. The goal of this work was to perform dose measurements to check the accuracy of radiotherapy treatment planning under these complicated conditions. To accomplish this, a scale phantom of an adult pelvic region was used with alanine dosimeters inserted in the prostate region. This phantom was irradiated according to the planned treatment under the following three conditions: with two metallic prostheses in the region of the femur head, with only one prosthesis, and without any prostheses. The combined relative standard uncertainty of dose measurement by electron spin resonance (ESR)/alanine was 5.05%, whereas the combined relative standard uncertainty of the applied dose was 3.35%, resulting in a combined relative standard uncertainty of the whole process of 6.06%. The ESR dosimetry indicated that there was no difference (P>0.05, ANOVA) in dosage between the planned dose and treatments. The results are in the range of the planned dose, within the combined relative uncertainty, demonstrating that the treatment-planning system compensates for the effects caused by the presence of femur and hip metal prostheses. PMID:26017344

  2. Dosimetry of nasal uptake of soluble and reactive gases: A first study of inter-human variability (Journal Article)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anatomically accurate human child and adult nasal tract models will be used in concert with computationally simulated air flow information to investigate the influence of age-related differences in anatomy on inhalation dosimetry in the upper and lower airways. The findings of t...

  3. Dosimetry of nasal uptake of soluble and reactive gases: A first study of inter-human variability (Journal Article)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anatomically accurate human child and adult nasal tract models will be used in concert with computationally simulated air flow information to investigate the influence of age-related differences in anatomy on inhalation dosimetry in the upper and lower airways. The findings of t...

  4. Monte Carlo study of LDR seed dosimetry with an application in a clinical brachytherapy breast implant

    SciTech Connect

    Furstoss, C.; Reniers, B.; Bertrand, M. J.; Poon, E.; Carrier, J.-F.; Keller, B. M.; Pignol, J. P.; Beaulieu, L.; Verhaegen, F.

    2009-05-15

    A Monte Carlo (MC) study was carried out to evaluate the effects of the interseed attenuation and the tissue composition for two models of {sup 125}I low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seeds (Medi-Physics 6711, IBt InterSource) in a permanent breast implant. The effect of the tissue composition was investigated because the breast localization presents heterogeneities such as glandular and adipose tissue surrounded by air, lungs, and ribs. The absolute MC dose calculations were benchmarked by comparison to the absolute dose obtained from experimental results. Before modeling a clinical case of an implant in heterogeneous breast, the effects of the tissue composition and the interseed attenuation were studied in homogeneous phantoms. To investigate the tissue composition effect, the dose along the transverse axis of the two seed models were calculated and compared in different materials. For each seed model, three seeds sharing the same transverse axis were simulated to evaluate the interseed effect in water as a function of the distance from the seed. A clinical study of a permanent breast {sup 125}I implant for a single patient was carried out using four dose calculation techniques: (1) A TG-43 based calculation, (2) a full MC simulation with realistic tissues and seed models, (3) a MC simulation in water and modeled seeds, and (4) a MC simulation without modeling the seed geometry but with realistic tissues. In the latter, a phase space file corresponding to the particles emitted from the external surface of the seed is used at each seed location. The results were compared by calculating the relevant clinical metrics V{sub 85}, V{sub 100}, and V{sub 200} for this kind of treatment in the target. D{sub 90} and D{sub 50} were also determined to evaluate the differences in dose and compare the results to the studies published for permanent prostate seed implants in literature. The experimental results are in agreement with the MC absolute doses (within 5% for EBT

  5. Mode of Action and Pharmacokinetic Studies of 2-Butoxyethanol in the Mouse with an Emphasis on Forestomach Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Poet, Torka S.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Mast, Terryl J.; Miller, Rodney A.; Thrall, Brian D.; Corley, Rick A.

    2003-02-01

    Chronic inhalation studies with 2-butoxyethanol conducted by National Toxicology Program identified the forestomach and liver of B6C3F1 mice as target organs for tumorigenicity. Previous studies have sown that liver tumors likely results from chronic hemolysis-induced oxidative stress. For forestomach lesions see in mice, chronic contact irritation (cytotoxicity) and regenerative hyperplasia are hypothesized to result in forestomach tumor development. To test this, experiments were conducted to address the sensitivity of mouse forestomach to BE administered by various routes. Oral administration of undiluted BE was shown to cause irritation and a compensatory proliferative response in mouse forestomach confirming that direct contact between forestomach and BE can cause irritation. However, only small amounts of BE were detected on fur of mice at the end of 6-h, whole-body or nose-only inhalation exposures to highest concentration used in the NTP chromic inhalation studies. Furthermore, no significant differences were detected in end-exposure blood concentrations of BE and butoxyacetic acid between these types of exposures. In addition, parenteral administration of BE also resulted in forestomach lesions, indicating there may be sources other than grooming for BE- or BAA-induced forestomach irritation. In pharmacokinetic study, BE and to a lesser extend BAA were eliminated more slowly from the forestomach tissue of mice than from blood or other tissues, following either oral gavage or ip injection. The forestomach was the only tissue with detectable levels of BE at 24 h. BE and BAA were both excreted in the saliva and were present in stomach contents for a prolong period of time following these routes of exposure which may further contribute to forestomach tissue dosimetry. Thus, there appear to be multiple mechanisms behind the increased levels of BE and BAA in the forestomach tissue of mice, which together can contribute to a prolong contact irritation

  6. Implementation of IMRT and VMAT using Delta4 phantom and portal dosimetry as dosimetry verification tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daci, Lulzime; Malkaj, Partizan

    2016-03-01

    In this study we analyzed and compared the dose distribution of different IMRT and VMAT plans with the intent to provide pre-treatment quality assurance using two different tools. Materials/Methods: We have used the electronic portal imaging device EPID after calibration to dose and correction for the background offset signal and also the Delta4 phantom after en evaluation of angular sensitivity. The Delta4 phantom has a two-dimensional array with ionization chambers. We analyzed three plans for each anatomical site calculated by Eclipse treatment planning system. The measurements were analyzed using γ-evaluation method with passing criteria 3% absolute dose and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). For all the plans the range of score has been from 97% to 99% for gantry fixed at 0° while for rotational planes there was a slightly decreased pass rates and above 95%. Point measurement with a ionization chamber were done in additional to see the accuracy of portal dosimetry and to evaluate the Delta4 device to various dose rates. Conclusions: Both Delt4 and Portal dosimetry shows good results between the measured and calculated doses. While Delta4 is more accurate in measurements EPID is more time efficient. We have decided to use both methods in the first steps of IMRT and VMAT implementation and later on to decide which of the tools to use depending on the complexity of plans, how much accurate we want to be and the time we have on the machine.

  7. Implementation of IMRT and VMAT using Delta4 phantom and portal dosimetry as dosimetry verification tools

    SciTech Connect

    Daci, Lulzime; Malkaj, Partizan

    2016-03-25

    In this study we analyzed and compared the dose distribution of different IMRT and VMAT plans with the intent to provide pre-treatment quality assurance using two different tools. Materials/Methods: We have used the electronic portal imaging device EPID after calibration to dose and correction for the background offset signal and also the Delta4 phantom after en evaluation of angular sensitivity. The Delta4 phantom has a two-dimensional array with ionization chambers. We analyzed three plans for each anatomical site calculated by Eclipse treatment planning system. The measurements were analyzed using γ-evaluation method with passing criteria 3% absolute dose and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). For all the plans the range of score has been from 97% to 99% for gantry fixed at 0° while for rotational planes there was a slightly decreased pass rates and above 95%. Point measurement with a ionization chamber were done in additional to see the accuracy of portal dosimetry and to evaluate the Delta4 device to various dose rates. Conclusions: Both Delt4 and Portal dosimetry shows good results between the measured and calculated doses. While Delta4 is more accurate in measurements EPID is more time efficient. We have decided to use both methods in the first steps of IMRT and VMAT implementation and later on to decide which of the tools to use depending on the complexity of plans, how much accurate we want to be and the time we have on the machine.

  8. Optimization of near-infrared laser tissue welding of porcine cornea: a Monte Carlo-aided dosimetry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Neil S.; Savage, Howard E.; Rosen, Richard B.; Halder, Rabindra K.; Kartazayeu, Uladzimir; McCormick, Steven A.; Katz, Alvin; Perry, Henry D.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2005-04-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to delineate the role of local fluence rates and absorption in histologic success and tensile strength analysis of laser welding of ocular corneal tissue using an erbium fiber laser system operating at 1455nm wavelength. Porcine cornea was used for in vitro welding, while varying power, scan time, and irradiance. Immediate histologic analysis was performed, as well as tensile strength studies. Simulations were performed using MCML code, with a total of 109 photons started. CONV code was used to convolve the output from MCML for a flat photon beam of 80-800 μ focal spot size and power specified by the experiment. The absorption coefficient, μa, was assumed to reflect that of water, 28.6 cm-1. The scattering coefficient, μs, and anisotropy factor, g, were both neglected due to the poor scattering capabilities of water in the wavelength of the laser beam. Fluence rates were determined and were within 0.3%-4% of surface dose calculations for a beam diameter of 80 μ. Interactive Data Language (IDL) was used to sum the dose for one convolved beam to an experiment with multiple scans across the porcine cornea. Achieving optimal usage of the laser system requires maximal use of the variables (power, scan patterns, scan time, irradiance) available to use, and the correlation between Monte Carlo-aided dosimetry and the histopathological and tensile strength studies was performed. Optimal parameters for use in this 1455 nm laser system can be studied, and will allow users the ability to predict histology scores of welding success and tissue injury based on absorption values. These results can refine our experience with laser tissue welding of porcine cornea and aid in determining optimal delivered dose for successful tissue apposition and minimal adverse thermal heating.

  9. Study of Optical Absorption in Gamma Irradiated Glass for Radiation Dosimetry Purpose

    SciTech Connect

    Farah, K.; Mejri, A.; Ben Ouada, H.

    2007-09-19

    Optical absorption investigation in a silicate glass before and after gamma irradiation was performed in the range 350-800 nm to study the induced colour centres to evaluate this potential as radiation-sensitive material for dose measurements. The radiation induced bands are observed around 410 and 600 nm leading. The intensities of the overall absorption spectra are observed to increase progressively with increasing doses between 1 and 1200 kGy. The influence of isothermal annealing on the formation and the decay of the induced colour centres has been investigated. The activation energy characteristic of the annealing process was calculated from Arrhenius equation. The obtained values are equal to 0.251 and 0.310 eV for the 410 nm band and 0.261 and 0.353 eV for the 600 nm one. The similarity of these values for both bands suggests that the related optical transitions correspond to the same type of Non-Bridging-Oxygen Hole Centres (NBOHCs): ({identical_to}Si-O deg.) in different configurations.

  10. STUDY OF THE SUITABILITY OF ISRAELI HOUSEHOLD SALT FOR RETROSPECTIVE DOSIMETRY.

    PubMed

    Datz, Hanan; Druzhyna, Sofia; Oster, Leonid; Orion, Itzhak; Horowitz, Yigal

    2016-09-01

    The first results of an in-depth evaluation of the practical potential of common household Israeli salt as a retrospective dosemeter in the event of a nuclear accident or terror attack are presented. Ten brands of salt were investigated with emphasis on four of the bestselling brands that constitute 76 % of the total consumer market. Eight of the ten brands show similar glow curves with two main glow peaks at maximum temperatures of ∼176°C and ∼225°C measured at a heating rate of 1°C s(-1) Chemical analysis of three major brands indicates substantial impurity levels of 200-500 ppm of Ca, K, Mg and S and significant differences of additional ppm trace impurities, which lead to an ∼50 % difference in the TL response of the three major brands. Fading in the dark is in significant but under room light is of the order of 35 % per day. The dose response is linear/supralinear with the threshold of supralinearity at ∼0.01 Gy reaching maximum value of ∼4 at 0.5-1 Gy for two of the major brands. The precision of repeated measurements is ∼10 % (1 SD), but the accuracy of dose assessment under field conditions requires further study.

  11. Modeling the dosimetry of organ-at-risk in head and neck IMRT planning: An intertechnique and interinstitutional study

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Jun Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Chang, Sha; Yuan, Lulin Yoo, David P.; Yin, FangFang; Wu, Q. Jackie; Ge, Yaorong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To build a statistical model to quantitatively correlate the anatomic features of structures and the corresponding dose-volume histogram (DVH) of head and neck (HN) Tomotherapy (Tomo) plans. To study if the model built upon one intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique (such as conventional Linac) can be used to predict anticipated organs-at-risk (OAR) DVH of patients treated with a different IMRT technique (such as Tomo). To study if the model built upon the clinical experience of one institution can be used to aid IMRT planning for another institution. Methods: Forty-four Tomotherapy intensity modulate radiotherapy plans of HN cases (Tomo-IMRT) from Institution A were included in the study. A different patient group of 53 HN fixed gantry IMRT (FG-IMRT) plans was selected from Institution B. The analyzed OARs included the parotid, larynx, spinal cord, brainstem, and submandibular gland. Two major groups of anatomical features were considered: the volumetric information and the spatial information. The volume information includes the volume of target, OAR, and overlapped volume between target and OAR. The spatial information of OARs relative to PTVs was represented by the distance-to-target histogram (DTH). Important anatomical and dosimetric features were extracted from DTH and DVH by principal component analysis. Two regression models, one for Tomotherapy plan and one for IMRT plan, were built independently. The accuracy of intratreatment-modality model prediction was validated by a leave one out cross-validation method. The intertechnique and interinstitution validations were performed by using the FG-IMRT model to predict the OAR dosimetry of Tomo-IMRT plans. The dosimetry of OARs, under the same and different institutional preferences, was analyzed to examine the correlation between the model prediction and planning protocol. Results: Significant patient anatomical factors contributing to OAR dose sparing in HN Tomotherapy plans have been

  12. Modeling the dosimetry of organ-at-risk in head and neck IMRT planning: An intertechnique and interinstitutional study

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Jun Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Chang, Sha; Yuan, Lulin Yoo, David P.; Yin, FangFang; Wu, Q. Jackie; Ge, Yaorong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To build a statistical model to quantitatively correlate the anatomic features of structures and the corresponding dose-volume histogram (DVH) of head and neck (HN) Tomotherapy (Tomo) plans. To study if the model built upon one intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique (such as conventional Linac) can be used to predict anticipated organs-at-risk (OAR) DVH of patients treated with a different IMRT technique (such as Tomo). To study if the model built upon the clinical experience of one institution can be used to aid IMRT planning for another institution. Methods: Forty-four Tomotherapy intensity modulate radiotherapy plans of HN cases (Tomo-IMRT) from Institution A were included in the study. A different patient group of 53 HN fixed gantry IMRT (FG-IMRT) plans was selected from Institution B. The analyzed OARs included the parotid, larynx, spinal cord, brainstem, and submandibular gland. Two major groups of anatomical features were considered: the volumetric information and the spatial information. The volume information includes the volume of target, OAR, and overlapped volume between target and OAR. The spatial information of OARs relative to PTVs was represented by the distance-to-target histogram (DTH). Important anatomical and dosimetric features were extracted from DTH and DVH by principal component analysis. Two regression models, one for Tomotherapy plan and one for IMRT plan, were built independently. The accuracy of intratreatment-modality model prediction was validated by a leave one out cross-validation method. The intertechnique and interinstitution validations were performed by using the FG-IMRT model to predict the OAR dosimetry of Tomo-IMRT plans. The dosimetry of OARs, under the same and different institutional preferences, was analyzed to examine the correlation between the model prediction and planning protocol. Results: Significant patient anatomical factors contributing to OAR dose sparing in HN Tomotherapy plans have been

  13. I-124 Imaging and Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Kuker, Russ; Sztejnberg, Manuel; Gulec, Seza

    2017-01-01

    Although radioactive iodine imaging and therapy are one of the earliest applications of theranostics, there still remain a number of unresolved clinical questions as to the optimization of diagnostic techniques and dosimetry protocols. I-124 as a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer has the potential to improve the current clinical practice in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The higher sensitivity and spatial resolution of PET/computed tomography (CT) compared to standard gamma scintigraphy can aid in the detection of recurrent or metastatic disease and provide more accurate measurements of metabolic tumor volumes. However the complex decay schema of I-124 poses challenges to quantitative PET imaging. More prospective studies are needed to define optimal dosimetry protocols and to improve patient-specific treatment planning strategies, taking into account not only the absorbed dose to tumors but also methods to avoid toxicity to normal organs. A historical perspective of I-124 imaging and dosimetry as well as future concepts are discussed. PMID:28117290

  14. I-124 Imaging and Dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kuker, Russ; Sztejnberg, Manuel; Gulec, Seza

    2016-01-05

    Although radioactive iodine imaging and therapy are one of the earliest applications of theranostics, there still remain a number of unresolved clinical questions as to the optimization of diagnostic techniques and dosimetry protocols. I-124 as a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer has the potential to improve the current clinical practice in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The higher sensitivity and spatial resolution of PET/computed tomography (CT) compared to standard gamma scintigraphy can aid in the detection of recurrent or metastatic disease and provide more accurate measurements of metabolic tumor volumes. However the complex decay schema of I-124 poses challenges to quantitative PET imaging. More prospective studies are needed to define optimal dosimetry protocols and to improve patient-specific treatment planning strategies, taking into account not only the absorbed dose to tumors but also methods to avoid toxicity to normal organs. A historical perspective of I-124 imaging and dosimetry as well as future concepts are discussed.

  15. Evaluation and optimization of the new EBT2 radiochromic film dosimetry system for patient dose verification in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richley, L.; John, A. C.; Coomber, H.; Fletcher, S.

    2010-05-01

    A new radiochromic film, the yellow Gafchromic EBT2, has been marketed as a drop-in replacement for the discontinued blue EBT film. In order to verify the manufacturer's claims prior to clinical use, EBT2 was characterized in transmission, and the less commonly used, reflection modes with an Epson Expression 10000XL A3 flatbed scanner. The red channel was confirmed to provide the greatest sensitivity and was used for all measurements. The post-irradiation darkening of the film was investigated, and the relative response was found to be dose dependent with higher doses stabilizing earlier than lower doses. After 13 h all dose levels had stabilized to within 1% of their value at 24 h. Uniformity of irradiated EBT2 films was within 0.8% and 1.2% (2SD of signal), in reflection and transmission modes, respectively. The light scattering effect, arising from the structure and thickness of EBT2, was found to give rise to an apparent scanner non-uniformity of up to 5.5% in signal. In reflection mode, differences of up to 1.2% were found between the signal obtained from a small film fragment (5 × 5 cm2) and the signal obtained from the same fragment bordered by extra film. Further work is needed to determine the origin of this effect, as there will be implications for reflection dosimetry of intensity modulated fields; reflection mode cannot yet be regarded as a viable alternative to transmission mode. Our results suggest that EBT2 film is a valid alternative, rather than a direct replacement for EBT film.

  16. Evaluation and optimization of the new EBT2 radiochromic film dosimetry system for patient dose verification in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Richley, L; John, A C; Coomber, H; Fletcher, S

    2010-05-07

    A new radiochromic film, the yellow Gafchromic EBT2, has been marketed as a drop-in replacement for the discontinued blue EBT film. In order to verify the manufacturer's claims prior to clinical use, EBT2 was characterized in transmission, and the less commonly used, reflection modes with an Epson Expression 10000XL A3 flatbed scanner. The red channel was confirmed to provide the greatest sensitivity and was used for all measurements. The post-irradiation darkening of the film was investigated, and the relative response was found to be dose dependent with higher doses stabilizing earlier than lower doses. After 13 h all dose levels had stabilized to within 1% of their value at 24 h. Uniformity of irradiated EBT2 films was within 0.8% and 1.2% (2SD of signal), in reflection and transmission modes, respectively. The light scattering effect, arising from the structure and thickness of EBT2, was found to give rise to an apparent scanner non-uniformity of up to 5.5% in signal. In reflection mode, differences of up to 1.2% were found between the signal obtained from a small film fragment (5 x 5 cm(2)) and the signal obtained from the same fragment bordered by extra film. Further work is needed to determine the origin of this effect, as there will be implications for reflection dosimetry of intensity modulated fields; reflection mode cannot yet be regarded as a viable alternative to transmission mode. Our results suggest that EBT2 film is a valid alternative, rather than a direct replacement for EBT film.

  17. Biodistribution, dosimetry, and clinical evaluation of technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer in normal subjects and in patients with chronic cerebral infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Hellman, R.S.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Mena, I.G.; Leveille, J.; Gherardi, P.G.; Moretti, J.L.; Bischof-Delaloye, A.; Hill, T.C.; Rigo, P.M.

    1989-06-01

    Technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) has high initial cerebral uptake with slow clearance in nonhuman primates suggesting ideal characteristics for single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) imaging. We evaluated the biodistribution, dosimetry and scintigraphic pattern of (/sup 99m/Tc)ECD in normal subjects and the accuracy of SPECT imaging in patients with chronic cerebral infarction. Sixteen normal subjects were injected with approximately 10 mCi of (/sup 99m/Tc)ECD. Anterior and posterior single-pass whole-body images were obtained at multiple times after injection. Blood clearance of the radiotracer was rapid, falling to 10.0 +/- 6.6% and 4.9 +/- 1.1% of the injected dose at 2 and 60 min, respectively. Brain uptake was 6.4 +/- 2.1% of the injected dose 5 min after injection. The critical organ was the urinary bladder. Technetium-99m ECD SPECT was performed with a rotating gamma camera in ten of the 16 normal subjects and 34 patients with clinical and CT evidence of chronic stroke. Thirty-three of the thirty-four patients had focal (/sup 99m/Tc)ECD abnormalities on SPECT (97.1%) based on visual inspection of the SPECT images. In summary, we obtained high quality SPECT images as a result of the optimal physical and biologic characteristics of the tracer. Technetium-99m ECD SPECT shows promise for the evaluation of patients with stroke.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (Rev 4)

    SciTech Connect

    Goke, Sarah Hayes; Elliott, Nathan Ryan

    2014-09-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories’ Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual is intended to provide extended technical discussion and justification of the internal dosimetry program at SNL. It serves to record the approach to evaluating internal doses from radiobioassay data, and where appropriate, from workplace monitoring data per the Department of Energy Internal Dosimetry Program Guide DOE G 441.1C. The discussion contained herein is directed primarily to current and future SNL internal dosimetrists. In an effort to conserve space in the TBM and avoid duplication, it contains numerous references providing an entry point into the internal dosimetry literature relevant to this program. The TBM is not intended to act as a policy or procedure statement, but will supplement the information normally found in procedures or policy documents. The internal dosimetry program outlined in this manual is intended to meet the requirements of Federal Rule 10CFR835 for monitoring the workplace and for assessing internal radiation doses to workers.

  19. A pilot study investigating two dose reduction techniques for AP lumbar spine radiography using direct dosimetry and Projection VR.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, M C

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare radiation dose measurements generated using a virtual radiography simulation with experimental dosimeter measurements for two radiation dose reduction techniques in digital radiography. Entrance Surface Dose (ESD) measurements were generated for an antero-posterior lumbar spine radiograph experimentally using NanoDOT™, single point dosimeters, for two radiographic systems (systems 1 and 2) and using Projection VR™, a virtual radiography simulation (system 3). Two dose reduction methods were tested, application of the 15% kVp rule, or simplified 10 kVp rule, and the exposure maintenance formula. The 15% or 10 kVp rules use a specified increase in kVp and halving of the mAs to reduce patient ESD. The exposure maintenance formula uses the increase in source-to-object distance to reduce ESD. Increasing kVp from 75 to 96 kVp, with the concomitant decrease in mAs, resulted in percent ESD reduction of 59.5% (4.02-1.63 mGy), 60.8% (3.55-1.39 mGy), and 60.3% (6.65-2.64 mGy), for experimental systems 1 and 2, and virtual simulation (system 3), respectively. Increasing the SID (with the appropriate increase in mAs) from 100 to 140 cm reduced ESD by 22.3% 18.8%, and 23.5%, for experimental systems 1 and 2, and virtual simulation (system 3), respectively. Percent dose reduction measurements were similar between the experimental and virtual measurement systems investigated. For the dose reduction practices tested, Projection VR™ provides a realistic alternate of percent dose reduction to direct dosimetry. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 3-D Imaging Based, Radiobiological Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric; Wahl, Richard; He, Bin; Prideaux, Andrew; Hobbs, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy holds promise as a new treatment against cancer. Advances in imaging are making it possible to evaluate the spatial distribution of radioactivity in tumors and normal organs over time. Matched anatomical imaging such as combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT have also made it possible to obtain tissue density information in conjunction with the radioactivity distribution. Coupled with sophisticated iterative reconstruction algorithims, these advances have made it possible to perform highly patient-specific dosimetry that also incorporates radiobiological modeling. Such sophisticated dosimetry techniques are still in the research investigation phase. Given the attendant logistical and financial costs, a demonstrated improvement in patient care will be a prerequisite for the adoption of such highly-patient specific internal dosimetry methods. PMID:18662554

  1. SNL RML recommended dosimetry cross section compendium

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F.; VanDenburg, J.

    1993-11-01

    A compendium of dosimetry cross sections is presented for use in the characterization of fission reactor spectrum and fluence. The contents of this cross section library are based upon the ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90 cross section libraries and are recommended as a replacement for the DOSCROS84 multigroup library that is widely used by the dosimetry community. Documentation is provided on the rationale for the choice of the cross sections selected for inclusion in this library and on the uncertainty and variation in cross sections presented by state-of-the-art evaluations.

  2. Evaluation of a real-time BeO ceramic fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry system for dose verification of high dose rate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Alexandre M. Caraça; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Shahraam, Afshar V.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the capability of a beryllium oxide (BeO) ceramic fiber-coupled luminescence dosimeter, named radioluminescence/optically stimulated luminescence (RL/OSL) BeO FOD, for dosimetric verification of high dose rate (HDR) treatments. The RL/OSL BeO FOD is capable of RL and OSL measurements. Methods: The RL/OSL BeO FOD is able to be inserted in 6F proguide needles, used in interstitial HDR treatments. Using a custom built Perspex phantom, 6F proguide needles could be submerged in a water tank at 1 cm separations from each other. A second background fiber was required to correct for the stem effect. The stem effect, dose linearity, reproducibility, depth-dose curves, and angular and temperature dependency of the RL/OSL BeO FOD were characterised using an Ir-192 source. The RL/OSL BeO FOD was also applied to the commissioning of a 10 mm horizontal Leipzig applicator. Results: Both the RL and OSL were found to be reproducible and their percentage depth-dose curves to be in good agreement with those predicted via TG-43. A combined uncertainty of 7.9% and 10.1% (k = 1) was estimated for the RL and OSL, respectively. For the 10 mm horizontal Leipzig applicator, measured percentage depth doses were within 5% agreement of the published reference calculations. The output at the 3 mm prescription depth for a 1 Gy delivery was verified to be 0.99 ± 0.08 Gy and 1.01 ± 0.10 Gy by the RL and OSL, respectively. Conclusions: The use of the second background fiber under the current setup means that the two fibers cannot fit into a single 6F needle. Hence, use of the RL is currently not adequate for the purpose of in vivo brachytherapy dosimetry. While not real-time, the OSL is shown to be adequate for in vivo brachytherapy dosimetry.

  3. Personnel radiation dosimetry symposium: program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    The purpose was to provide applied and research dosimetrists with sufficient information to evaluate the status and direction of their programs relative to the latest guidelines and techniques. A technical program was presented concerning experience, requirements, and advances in gamma, beta, and neutron personnel dosimetry.

  4. Radioactive Waste Management: Study of Spent Fuel Dissolution Rates in Geological Storage Using Dosimetry Modeling and Experimental Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Brady; Miller, William

    2011-10-28

    This research will provide improved predictions into the mechanisms and effects of radiolysis on spent nuclear fuel dissolution in a geological respository through accurate dosimetry modeling of the dose to water, mechanistic chemistry modeling of the resulting radiolytic reactions and confirmatory experimental measurements. This work will combine effort by the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute (NSEI) and the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) at the University of Missouri-Columbia, and the expertise and facilities at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

  5. Influence of 320-detector-row volume scanning and AAPM report 111 CT dosimetry metrics on size-specific dose estimate: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Kinomura, Yutaka; Ida, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Masanao

    2016-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) task group 204 has recommended the use of size-dependent conversion factors to calculate size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) values from volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) values. However, these conversion factors do not consider the effects of 320-detector-row volume computed tomography (CT) examinations or the new CT dosimetry metrics proposed by AAPM task group 111. This study aims to investigate the influence of these examinations and metrics on the conversion factors reported by AAPM task group 204, using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations were performed modelling a Toshiba Aquilion ONE CT scanner, in order to compute dose values in water for cylindrical phantoms with 8-40-cm diameters at 2-cm intervals for each scanning parameter (tube voltage, bow-tie filter, longitudinal beam width). Then, the conversion factors were obtained by applying exponential regression analysis between the dose values for a given phantom diameter and the phantom diameter combined with various scanning parameters. The conversion factors for each scanning method (helical, axial, or volume scanning) and CT dosimetry method (i.e., the CTDI100 method or the AAPM task group 111 method) were in agreement with those reported by AAPM task group 204, within a percentage error of 14.2 % for phantom diameters ≥11.2 cm. The results obtained in this study indicate that the conversion factors previously presented by AAPM task group 204 can be used to provide appropriate SSDE values for 320-detector-row volume CT examinations and the CT dosimetry metrics proposed by the AAPM task group 111.

  6. SU-E-T-87: A TG-100 Approach for Quality Improvement of Associated Dosimetry Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Manger, R; Pawlicki, T; Kim, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dosimetry protocols devote so much time to the discussion of ionization chamber choice, use and performance that is easy to forget about the importance of the associated dosimetry equipment (ADE) in radiation dosimetry - barometer, thermometer, electrometer, phantoms, triaxial cables, etc. Improper use and inaccuracy of these devices may significantly affect the accuracy of radiation dosimetry. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the risk factors in the monthly output dosimetry procedure and recommend corrective actions using a TG-100 approach. Methods: A failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) of the monthly linac output check procedure was performed to determine which steps and failure modes carried the greatest risk. In addition, a fault tree analysis (FTA) was performed to expand the initial list of failure modes making sure that none were overlooked. After determining the failure modes with the highest risk priority numbers (RPNs), 11 physicists were asked to score corrective actions based on their ease of implementation and potential impact. The results were aggregated into an impact map to determine the implementable corrective actions. Results: Three of the top five failure modes were related to the thermometer and barometer. The two highest RPN-ranked failure modes were related to barometric pressure inaccuracy due to their high lack-of-detectability scores. Six corrective actions were proposed to address barometric pressure inaccuracy, and the survey results found the following two corrective actions to be implementable: 1) send the barometer for recalibration at a calibration laboratory and 2) check the barometer accuracy against the local airport and correct for elevation. Conclusion: An FMEA on monthly output measurements displayed the importance of ADE for accurate radiation dosimetry. When brainstorming for corrective actions, an impact map is helpful for visualizing the overall impact versus the ease of implementation.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies for copper-64 PET dosimetry and radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Jeffrey N; Jia, Fang; Mohsin, Huma; Sivaguru, Geethapriya; Anderson, Carolyn J; Miller, William H; Henry, Carolyn J; Lewis, Michael R

    2011-06-15

    We previously described a two-antibody model of (64)Cu radioimmunotherapy to evaluate low-dose, solid-tumor response. This model was designed to test the hypothesis that cellular internalization is critical in causing tumor cell death by mechanisms in addition to radiation damage. The purpose of the present study was to estimate radiation dosimetry for both antibodies (mAbs) using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, and evaluate the effect of internalization on tumor growth. Dosimetry was similar between therapy groups. Median time to tumor progression to 1 g ranged from 7 to 12 days for control groups and was 32 days for both treatment groups (p < 0.0001). No statistically significant difference existed between any control group or between the treatment groups. In female nude mice bearing LS174T colon carcinoma xenografts, tumor dosimetry was calculated using serial PET images of three mice in each group of either internalizing (64)Cu-labeled DOTA-cBR96 (DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) or non-internalizing (64)Cu-labeled DOTA-cT84.66 from 3 to 48 h. For the therapy study, controls (n = 10) received saline, DOTA-cBR96, or DOTA-cT84.66. Treatment animals (n = 9) received 0.890 mCi of (64)Cu-labeled DOTA-cBR96 or 0.710 mCi of (64)Cu-labeled DOTA-cT84.66. Tumors were measured daily. PET imaging allows the use of (64)Cu for pre-therapy calculation of tumor dosimetry. In spite of highly similar tumor dosimetry, an internalizing antibody did not improve the outcome of (64)Cu radioimmunotherapy. Radioresistance of this tumor cell line and copper efflux may have confounded the study. Further investigations of the 2 therapeutic efficacy of (64)Cu-labeled mAbs will focus on interaction between (64)Cu and tumor suppressor genes and copper chaperones.

  8. Direct tumor in vivo dosimetry in highly-conformal radiotherapy: A feasibility study of implantable MOSFETs for hypofractionated extracranial treatments using the Cyberknife system

    SciTech Connect

    Scalchi, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cavedon, Carlo; Francescon, Paolo; Colombo, Federico

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: In highly-conformal radiotherapy, due to the complexity of both beam configurations and dose distributions, traditional in vivo dosimetry is unpractical or even impossible. The ideal dosimeter would be implanted inside the planning treatment volume so that it can directly measure the total delivered dose during each fraction with no additional uncertainty due to calculation models. The aim of this work is to verify if implantable metal oxide semiconductors field effect transistors (MOSFETs) can achieve a sufficient degree of dosimetric accuracy when used inside extracranial targets undergoing radiotherapy treatments using the Cyberknife system. Methods: Based on the preliminary findings of this study, new prototypes for high dose fractionations were developed to reduce the time dependence for long treatment delivery times. These dosimeters were recently cleared and are marketed as DVS-HFT. Multiple measurements were performed using both Virtual Water and water phantoms to characterize implantable MOSFETs under the Cyberknife beams, and included the reference-dosimetry consistency, the dependence of the response on the collimator size, on the daily delivered dose, and the time irradiation modality. Finally a Cyberknife prostate treatment simulation using a body phantom was conducted, and both MOSFET and ionization readings were compared to Monte Carlo calculations. The feasibility analysis was conducted based on the ratios of the absorbed dose divided by the dose reading, named as ''further calibration factor'' (FCF). Results: The average FCFs resulted to be 0.98 for the collimator dependence test, and about 1.00 for the reference-dosimetry test, the dose-dependence test, and the time-dependence test. The average FCF of the prostate treatment simulation test was 0.99. Conclusions: The obtained results are well within DVS specifications, that is, the factory calibration is still valid for such kind of treatments using the Cyberknife system, with no need of

  9. The importance of BMI in dosimetry of (153)Sm-EDTMP bone pain palliation therapy: A Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Fallahpoor, Maryam; Abbasi, Mehrshad; Asghar Parach, Ali; Kalantari, Faraz

    2017-02-28

    Using digital phantoms as an atlas compared to acquiring CT data for internal radionuclide dosimetry decreases patient overall radiation dose and reduces the required analysis effort and time for organ segmentation. The drawback is that the phantom may not match exactly with the patient. We assessed the effect of varying BMIs on dosimetry results for a bone pain palliation agent, (153)Sm-EDTMP. The simulation was done using the GATE Monte Carlo code. Female XCAT phantoms with the following different BMIs were employed: 18.6, 20.8, 22.1, 26.8, 30.3 and 34.7kg/m(2). S-factors (mGy/MBq.s) and SAFs (kg(-1)) were calculated for the dosimetry of the radiation from major source organs including spine, ribs, kidney and bladder into different target organs as well as whole body dosimetry from spine. The differences in dose estimates from different phantoms compared to those from the phantom with BMI of 26.8kg/m(2) as the reference, were calculated for both gamma and beta radiations. The relative differences (RD) of the S-factors or SAFs from the values of reference phantom were calculated. RDs greater than 10% and 100% were frequent in radiations to organs for photon and beta particles, respectively. The relative differences in whole body SAFs from the reference phantom were 15.4%, 7%, 4.2%, -9.8% and -1.4% for BMIs of 18.6, 20.8, 22.1, 30.3 and 34.7kg/m(2), respectively. The differences in whole body S-factors for the phantoms with BMIs of 18.6, 20.8, 22.1, 30.3 and 34.7kg/m(2) were 39.5%, 19.4%, 8.8%, -7.9% and -4.3%, respectively. The dosimetry of the gamma photons and beta particles changes substantially with the use of phantoms with different BMIs. The change in S-factors is important for dose calculation and can change the prescribed therapeutic dose of (153)Sm-EDTMP. Thus a phantom with BMI better matched to the patient is suggested for therapeutic purposes where dose estimates closer to those in the actual patient are required.

  10. Gafchromic EBT2 film dosimetry in reflection mode with a novel plan-based calibration method

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, I.; Hartman, V.; Hudej, R.; Strojnik, A.; Casar, B.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose:A dosimetric system formed by Gafchromic EBT2 radiochromic film and Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner was commissioned for dosimetry. In this paper, several open questions concerning the commissioning of radiochromic films for dosimetry were addressed: (a) is it possible to employ this dosimetric system in reflection mode; (b) if so, can the methods used in transmission mode also be used in reflection mode; (c) is it possible to obtain accurate absolute dose measurements with Gafchromic EBT2 films; (d) which calibration method should be followed; (e) which calibration models should be used; and (f) does three-color channel dosimetry offer a significant improvement over single channel dosimetry. The purpose of this paper is to help clarify these questions. Methods: In this study, films were scanned in reflection mode, the effect of surrounding film was evaluated and the feasibility of EBT2 film dosimetry in reflection mode was studied. EBT2's response homogeneity has been reported to lead to excessive dose uncertainties. To overcome this problem, a new plan-based calibration method was implemented. Plan-based calibration can use every pixel and each of the three color channels of the scanned film to obtain the parameters of the calibration model. A model selection analysis was conducted to select lateral correction and sensitometric curve models. The commonly used calibration with fragments was compared with red-channel plan-based calibration and with three-channel plan-based calibration. Results: No effect of surrounding film was found in this study. The film response inhomogeneity in EBT2 films was found to be important not only due to differences in the fog but also due to differences in sensitivity. The best results for lateral corrections were obtained using absolute corrections independent of the dose. With respect to the sensitometric curves, an empirical polynomial fit of order 4 was found to obtain results equivalent to a gamma

  11. Gafchromic EBT2 film dosimetry in reflection mode with a novel plan-based calibration method.

    PubMed

    Mendez, I; Hartman, V; Hudej, R; Strojnik, A; Casar, B

    2013-01-01

    A dosimetric system formed by Gafchromic EBT2 radiochromic film and Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner was commissioned for dosimetry. In this paper, several open questions concerning the commissioning of radiochromic films for dosimetry were addressed: (a) is it possible to employ this dosimetric system in reflection mode; (b) if so, can the methods used in transmission mode also be used in reflection mode; (c) is it possible to obtain accurate absolute dose measurements with Gafchromic EBT2 films; (d) which calibration method should be followed; (e) which calibration models should be used; and (f) does three-color channel dosimetry offer a significant improvement over single channel dosimetry. The purpose of this paper is to help clarify these questions. In this study, films were scanned in reflection mode, the effect of surrounding film was evaluated and the feasibility of EBT2 film dosimetry in reflection mode was studied. EBT2's response homogeneity has been reported to lead to excessive dose uncertainties. To overcome this problem, a new plan-based calibration method was implemented. Plan-based calibration can use every pixel and each of the three color channels of the scanned film to obtain the parameters of the calibration model. A model selection analysis was conducted to select lateral correction and sensitometric curve models. The commonly used calibration with fragments was compared with red-channel plan-based calibration and with three-channel plan-based calibration. No effect of surrounding film was found in this study. The film response inhomogeneity in EBT2 films was found to be important not only due to differences in the fog but also due to differences in sensitivity. The best results for lateral corrections were obtained using absolute corrections independent of the dose. With respect to the sensitometric curves, an empirical polynomial fit of order 4 was found to obtain results equivalent to a gamma-distributed single hit model based on

  12. DOSIMETRY AND REPRODUCTIVE/DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY DESIGN AND INTERPRETATION FOR RISK OR SAFETY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasingly reproductive and developmental toxicity studies are utilized in assessing the potential for adverse affects in pregnant women, nursing infants, and children. These studies largely have been utilized based upon the dose to the mother due to the complexity of describin...

  13. DOSIMETRY AND REPRODUCTIVE/DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY DESIGN AND INTERPRETATION FOR RISK OR SAFETY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasingly reproductive and developmental toxicity studies are utilized in assessing the potential for adverse affects in pregnant women, nursing infants, and children. These studies largely have been utilized based upon the dose to the mother due to the complexity of describin...

  14. Evaluation of Multiple-Sampling Function used with a Microtek flatbed scanner for Radiation Dosimetry Calibration of EBT2 Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Liyun; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Ding, Hueisch-Jy; Hwang, Ing-Ming; Chen, Pang-Yu; Lee, Tsair-Fwu

    2016-10-01

    The radiochromic EBT2 film is a widely used quality assurance device for radiation therapy. This study evaluated the film calibration performance of the multiple-sampling function, a function of the ScanWizard Pro scanning software provided by the manufacturer, when used with Microtek 9800XL plus (9800XL+) flatbed scanner. By using the PDD method, each one of the eight EBT2 films, four delivered by 290 monitor unit (MU) and four by 88 MU via 6-MV photon beams, was tightly sandwiched in a 303-cm3 water equivalent polystyrene phantom prior to irradiation. Before and after irradiation, all films were scanned using the Microtek 9800XL+ scanner with five different modes of the multiple-sampling function, which could generate the image with the averaged result of multiple-sampling. The net optical densities (netOD) on the beam central axis of film were assigned to corresponding depth doses for calibration. For each sampling mode with either delivered MU, the depth-dose uncertainty of a single film from repeated scans and that of a single scan of the four films were analyzed. Finally, the calibration error and the combined calibration uncertainty between film determined depth-doses and delivered depth-doses were calculated and evaluated for each sampling mode. All standard deviations and the calibration error were demonstrated to be unrelated to the number of sampling lines. The calibration error of the 2-line and 16-line mode was within 3 cGy and better than that of the other modes. The combined uncertainty of the 2-line mode was the lowest, which was generally less than 6 cGy except for the delivered dose around 100 cGy. The evaluation described herein revealed that the EBT2 film calibrated with the 2-line mode has relatively lower error, scanning time and combined uncertianty. Therefore, it is recommended for routine EBT2 film calibration and verification of treatment plans.

  15. Dosimetry with diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervino, G.; Marino, C.; Silvestri, F.; Lavagno, A.; Truc, F.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we present the dosimetry analysis in terms of stability and repeatability of the signal and dose rate dependence of a synthetic single crystal diamond grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) technique. The measurements carried out by 5 MeV X-ray photons beam show very promising results, even if the dose rate detector response points out that the charge trapping centers distribution is not uniform inside the crystal volume. This handicap that affects the detectors performances, must be ascribed to the growing process. Synthetic single crystal diamonds could be a valuable alternative to air ionization chambers for quality beam control and for intensity modulated radiation therapy beams dosimetry.

  16. Radiation doses for pregnant women in the late pregnancy undergoing fetal-computed tomography: a comparison of dosimetry and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Yuta; Kawaguchi, Ai; Kobayashi, Masanao; Suzuki, Shigetaka; Suzuki, Shoichi; Chida, Koichi

    2016-09-19

    The purposes of this study were (1) to compare the radiation doses for 320- and 80-row fetal-computed tomography (CT), estimated using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and the ImPACT Calculator (hereinafter referred to as the "CT dosimetry software"), for a woman in her late pregnancy and her fetus and (2) to estimate the overlapped fetal radiation dose from a 320-row CT examination using two different estimation methods of the CT dosimetry software. The direct TLD data in the present study were obtained from a previous study. The exposure parameters used for TLD measurements were entered into the CT dosimetry software, and the appropriate radiation dose for the pregnant woman and her fetus was estimated. When the whole organs (e.g., the colon, small intestine, and ovaries) and the fetus were included in the scan range, the difference in the estimated doses between the TLD measurement and the CT dosimetry software measurement was <1 mGy (<23 %) in both CT units. In addition, when the whole organs were within the scan range, the CT dosimetry software was used for evaluating the fetal radiation dose and organ-specific doses for the woman in the late pregnancy. The conventional method using the CT dosimetry software cannot take into account the overlap between volumetric sections. Therefore, the conventional method using a 320-row CT unit in a wide-volume mode might result in the underestimation of radiation doses for the fetus and the colon, small intestine, and ovaries.

  17. Gamma ray dosimetry and mating capacity studies in the laboratory on Aedes albopictus males.

    PubMed

    Balestrino, F; Medici, A; Candini, G; Carrieri, M; Maccagnani, B; Calvitti, M; Maini, S; Bellini, R

    2010-07-01

    In Italy, Aedes albopictus Skuse is currently recognized as the most dangerous mosquito, and as currently applied conventional control methods gave unsatisfactory results, we are developing alternative strategies such as the sterile insect technique. To find the optimal sterilizing dose, male pupae were exposed to different doses of gamma rays in the range 20-80 Gy, generated by a Cesium-137 source. The effects of male pupal age at irradiation and gamma ray dose on adult male emergence, sterility level, longevity, and mating capacity were evaluated, and dose-response curves of residual fertility were calculated. Radiation tests were also performed on female pupae to observe their reproductive capacity in case of accidental release. Results confirmed that the age at which the male pupa is irradiated is an important factor that affects the longevity of the adult, whereas the effect of age on the induced sterility level is less pronounced. When male pupae older than 30 h were irradiated, the longevity of the adults was not affected by doses up to 40 Gy. The 40-Gy dose appeared sufficient to induce high level of sterility (>99%) at any male pupal age for all the strains tested. The duration of coupling and the number of mated females per male appeared to be affected by the radiation received by male pupae only at doses higher than 40 Gy. The female pupae were more sensitive to radiation than male pupae, with strong reduction in fecundity and fertility at 20 Gy and complete suppression of oviposition at higher doses.

  18. Dose Estimation from Daily and Weekly Dosimetry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrouchov, G.

    2001-11-16

    Statistical analyses of data from epidemiologic studies of workers exposed to radiation have been based on recorded annual radiation doses (yearly dose of record). It is usually assumed that the dose values are known exactly, although it is generally recognized that the data contain uncertainty due to measurement error and bias. In our previous work with weekly data, a probability distribution was used to describe an individual's dose during a specific period of time and statistical methods were developed for estimating it from weekly film dosimetry data. This study showed that the yearly dose of record systematically underestimates doses for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) workers. This could result in biased estimates of dose-response coefficients and their standard errors. The results of this evaluation raise serious questions about the suitability of the yearly dose of record for direct use in low-dose studies of nuclear industry workers. Here, we extend our previous work to use full information in Pocket meter data and develop the Data Synthesis for Individual Dose Estimation (DSIDE) methodology. Although the DSIDE methodology in this study is developed in the context of daily and weekly data to produce a cumulative yearly dose estimate, in principle it is completely general and can be extended to other time period and measurement combinations. The new methodology takes into account the ''measurement error'' that is produced by the film and pocket-meter dosimetry systems, the biases introduced by policies that lead to recording left-censored doses as zeros, and other measurement and recording practices. The DSIDE method is applied to a sample of dose histories obtained from hard copy dosimetry records at ORNL for the years 1945 to 1955. First, the rigorous addition of daily pocket-meter information shows that the negative bias is generally more severe than was reported in our work based on weekly film data only, however, the amount of bias also varies

  19. Concerted Uranium Research in Europe (CURE): toward a collaborative project integrating dosimetry, epidemiology and radiobiology to study the effects of occupational uranium exposure.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Olivier; Gomolka, Maria; Haylock, Richard; Blanchardon, Eric; Giussani, Augusto; Atkinson, Will; Baatout, Sarah; Bingham, Derek; Cardis, Elisabeth; Hall, Janet; Tomasek, Ladislav; Ancelet, Sophie; Badie, Christophe; Bethel, Gary; Bertho, Jean-Marc; Bouet, Ségolène; Bull, Richard; Challeton-de Vathaire, Cécile; Cockerill, Rupert; Davesne, Estelle; Ebrahimian, Teni; Engels, Hilde; Gillies, Michael; Grellier, James; Grison, Stephane; Gueguen, Yann; Hornhardt, Sabine; Ibanez, Chrystelle; Kabacik, Sylwia; Kotik, Lukas; Kreuzer, Michaela; Lebacq, Anne Laure; Marsh, James; Nosske, Dietmar; O'Hagan, Jackie; Pernot, Eileen; Puncher, Matthew; Rage, Estelle; Riddell, Tony; Roy, Laurence; Samson, Eric; Souidi, Maamar; Turner, Michelle C; Zhivin, Sergey; Laurier, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    The potential health impacts of chronic exposures to uranium, as they occur in occupational settings, are not well characterized. Most epidemiological studies have been limited by small sample sizes, and a lack of harmonization of methods used to quantify radiation doses resulting from uranium exposure. Experimental studies have shown that uranium has biological effects, but their implications for human health are not clear. New studies that would combine the strengths of large, well-designed epidemiological datasets with those of state-of-the-art biological methods would help improve the characterization of the biological and health effects of occupational uranium exposure. The aim of the European Commission concerted action CURE (Concerted Uranium Research in Europe) was to develop protocols for such a future collaborative research project, in which dosimetry, epidemiology and biology would be integrated to better characterize the effects of occupational uranium exposure. These protocols were developed from existing European cohorts of workers exposed to uranium together with expertise in epidemiology, biology and dosimetry of CURE partner institutions. The preparatory work of CURE should allow a large scale collaborative project to be launched, in order to better characterize the effects of uranium exposure and more generally of alpha particles and low doses of ionizing radiation.

  20. Cell specific radiation dosimetry in skeleton from life-span carcinogenesis studies

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, S.S.J.

    1993-04-05

    The osteogenic sarcoma is the dominant life-threatening pathology in lifespan studies of beagles exposed to alpha-emitting bone-seeking radionuclides. It was deduced from these studies that certain skeletal sites are more prone to develop tumors. This project sought to determine the bone cells at risk and their cell-specific radiation dose. The cell-specific radiation dose values are related to loss and high Ra-226 and Pu-239 induced osteogenic sarcoma sites, to test different dose response hypothesis and predict the extent of effects in humans.

  1. Cell specific radiation dosimetry in skeleton from life-span carcinogenesis studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, S.S.J.

    1993-04-05

    The osteogenic sarcoma is the dominant life-threatening pathology in lifespan studies of beagles exposed to alpha-emitting bone-seeking radionuclides. It was deduced from these studies that certain skeletal sites are more prone to develop tumors. This project sought to determine the bone cells at risk and their cell-specific radiation dose. The cell-specific radiation dose values are related to loss and high Ra-226 and Pu-239 induced osteogenic sarcoma sites, to test different dose response hypothesis and predict the extent of effects in humans.

  2. SU-E-J-156: Preclinical Inverstigation of Dynamic Tumor Tracking Using Vero SBRT Linear Accelerator: Motion Phantom Dosimetry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mamalui-Hunter, M; Wu, J; Li, Z; Su, Z

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Following the ‘end-to-end testing’ paradigm of Dynamic Target Tracking option in our Image-Guided dedicated SBRT VeroTM linac, we verify the capability of the system to deliver planned dose to moving targets in the heterogeneous thorax phantom (CIRSTM). The system includes gimbaled C-band linac head, robotic 6 degree of freedom couch and a tumor tracking method based on predictive modeling of target position using fluoroscopically tracked implanted markers and optically tracked infrared reflecting external markers. Methods: 4DCT scan of the motion phantom with the VisicoilTM implanted marker in the close vicinity of the target was acquired, the ‘exhale’=most prevalent phase was used for planning (iPlan by BrainLabTM). Typical 3D conformal SBRT treatment plans aimed to deliver 6-8Gy/fx to two types of targets: a)solid water-equivalent target 3cm in diameter; b)single VisicoilTM marker inserted within lung equivalent material. The planning GTV/CTV-to-PTV margins were 2mm, the block margins were 3 mm. The dose calculated by MonteCarlo algorithm with 1% variance using option Dose-to-water was compared to the ion chamber (CC01 by IBA Dosimetry) measurements in case (a) and GafchromicTM EBT3 film measurements in case (b). During delivery, the target 6 motion patterns available as a standard on CIRSTM motion phantom were investigated: in case (a), the target was moving along the designated sine or cosine4 3D trajectory; in case (b), the inserted marker was moving sinusoidally in 1D. Results: The ion chamber measurements have shown the agreement with the planned dose within 1% under all the studied motion conditions. The film measurements show 98.1% agreement with the planar calculated dose (gamma criteria: 3%/3mm). Conclusion: We successfully verified the capability of the SBRT VeroTM linac to perform real-time tumor tracking and accurate dose delivery to the target, based on predictive modeling of the correlation between implanted marker motion and

  3. Prostatic edema in {sup 125}I permanent prostate implants: Dynamical dosimetry taking volume changes into account

    SciTech Connect

    Leclerc, Ghyslain; Lavallee, Marie-Claude; Roy, Rene; Vigneault, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc

    2006-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of edema on the dose delivered to the target volume. An evaluation of the edema characteristics was first made, and then a dynamical dosimetry algorithm was developed and used to compare its results to a standard clinical (static) dosimetry. Source positions and prostate contours extracted from 66 clinical cases on images taken at different points in time (planning, implant day, post-implant evaluation) were used, via the mean interseed distance, to characterize edema [initial increase ({delta}r{sub 0}), half-life ({tau})]. An algorithm was developed to take into account the edema by summing a time series of dose-volume histograms (DVHs) with a weight based on the fraction of the dose delivered during the time interval considered. The algorithm was then used to evaluate the impact of edema on the dosimetry of permanent implants by comparing its results to those of a standard clinical dosimetry. The volumetric study yielded results as follows: the initial prostate volume increase was found to be 1.58 (ranging from 1.15 to 2.48) and the edema half-life, approximately 30 days (range: 3 to 170 days). The dosimetric differences in D{sub 90} observed between the dynamic dosimetry and the clinical one for a single case were up to 15 Gy and depended on the edema half-life and the initial volume increase. The average edema half-life, 30 days, is about 3 times longer than the previously reported 9 days. Dosimetric differences up to 10% of the prescription dose are observed, which can lead to differences in the quality assertion of an implant. The study of individual patient edema resorption with time might be necessary to extract meaningful clinical correlation or biological parameters in permanent implants.

  4. Dosimetry of the Atomic Bomb Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, W.K.; Failla, P.

    1981-12-01

    A brief account of the presentations and discussions at the Late Effects Workshop on Dosimetry of the Atomic Bomb Survivors held in conjunction with the 29th Annual Meeting of the Radiation Reserch Society in Minneapolis, MN, on May 32, 1981 is presented. The following five papers are briefly reviewed: 1)Radiobiological significance of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki data by V.P. Bond; 2)Revised Dose Estimates at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, by W.E. Loewe; 3)Review of dosimetry for the Japanese atomic bomb survivors by G.D. Kerr; 4)Ichiban: numberoriginal studies, by J. Auxier; and 5)NCRP's involvement in the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Dosimetry, by H.O. Wyckoff. (JMT)

  5. Czech results at criticality dosimetry intercomparison 2002.

    PubMed

    Frantisek, Spurný; Jaroslav, Trousil

    2004-01-01

    Two criticality dosimetry systems were tested by Czech participants during the intercomparison held in Valduc, France, June 2002. The first consisted of the thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) (Al-P glasses) and Si-diodes as passive neutron dosemeters. Second, it was studied to what extent the individual dosemeters used in the Czech routine personal dosimetry service can give a reliable estimation of criticality accident exposure. It was found that the first system furnishes quite reliable estimation of accidental doses. For routine individual dosimetry system, no important problems were encountered in the case of photon dosemeters (TLDs, film badge). For etched track detectors in contact with the 232Th or 235U-Al alloy, the track density saturation for the spark counting method limits the upper dose at approximately 1 Gy for neutrons with the energy >1 MeV.

  6. Medical staff extremity dosimetry in CT fluoroscopy: an anthropomorphic hand voxel phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, C.; Becker, F.; Blunck, C.; DiMaria, S.; Baptista, M.; Esteves, B.; Paulo, G.; Santos, J.; Teles, P.; Vaz, P.

    2013-08-01

    This work aims to contribute to the study of the radiation dose distribution delivered to the hands of medical staff members during a general computed tomographic (CT) fluoroscopic guided procedure. In this study, both Monte Carlo simulations and measurements were performed. For free-in-air and computed tomography dose index (CTDI) body phantom measurements, a standard pencil ionization chamber (IC) 100 mm long was used. The CT scanner model was implemented using MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) and was successfully validated by comparing the simulated results with measurements. Subsequently, CT images of a hand, together with an anthropomorphic phantom, were voxelized and used with the MCNPX code for dose calculations. The hand dose distribution study was performed both by using thermo-luminescent detector measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The validated simulation tool provides a new perspective for detailed investigations of CT-irradiation scenarios. Simulations show that there is a strong dose gradient, namely the even zones of the hand that are in precise vicinity to the x-ray beam only receive about 4% of the maximum dose delivered to adjacent areas which are directly exposed to the primary x-ray beam. Finally, the scatter contribution of the patient was also studied through MC simulations. The results show that for directly exposed parts of the hand surface, the dose is reduced by the body of the patient (due to the shielding), whereas the dose is increased by scattered radiation from the patient for parts of the skin that receive scattered radiation only.

  7. Evaluation of dosimetry and excess seeds in permanent brachytherapy using a modified hybrid method: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kana; Okihara, Koji; Iwata, Tsuyoshi; Aibe, Norihiro; Kodani, Naohiro; Tsubokura, Takuji; Kamoi, Kazumi; Miki, Tsuneharu; Yamazaki, Hideya

    2013-05-01

    Permanent prostate brachytherapy is frequently performed worldwide, and many studies have demonstrated its favorable outcomes. Implant seeds used in this procedure contain a precise amount of radionuclide and are completely sealed. Because these seeds are not manufactured in Japan, they are expensive (6300 yen per seed) and therefore need careful management as a radioisotope. The proper implantation technique requires considerable procedure time, good dosimetric outcomes and simple radioactive isotope management. To evaluate the modified hybrid interactive technique based on these considerations, we assessed 313 patients who underwent hybrid interactive brachytherapy without additional external beam radiotherapy. We evaluated the duration of the procedure, dosimetric factors and the total number of excess seeds. The dosimetric results from computed tomography on Day 30 of follow-up were: 172 Gy (range 130-194 Gy) for pD90, 97.8% (83.5-100%) for pV100, 54.6% (27.5-82.4%) for pV150, 164 Gy (120-220 Gy) for uD90, 194 Gy (126-245 Gy) for uD30, 210 Gy (156-290 Gy) for uD5, 0.02 ml (0-1.2 ml) for rV100 and 0 ml (0-0.2 ml) for rV150. The number of excess seeds was determined by subtracting the number of implanted seeds from the expected number of seeds calculated from previously proposed nomograms. As per our method, nine excess seeds were used for two patients, whereas using the nomograms, the number of excess seeds was approximately eight per patient. Our modified hybrid interactive technique reduced the number of excess seeds while maintaining treatment quality.

  8. Image guidance during breast radiotherapy: a phantom dosimetry and radiation-induced second cancer risk study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, A.; Holloway, L.; Metcalfe, P.

    2013-06-01

    Imaging procedures utilised for patient position verification during breast radiotherapy can add a considerable dose to organs surrounding the target volume on top of therapeutic scatter dose. This study investigated the dose from a breast kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT), a breast megavoltage fan-beam CT (MV-FBCT), and a TomoDirectTM breast treatment. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed within a female anthropomorphic phantom were utilised to measure the dose to various organs and tissues. The contralateral breast, lungs and heart received 0.40 cGy, 0.45 cGy and 0.40 cGy from the kV-CBCT and 1.74 cGy, 1.39 cGy and 1.73 cGy from the MV-FBCT. In comparison to treatment alone, daily imaging would increase the contralateral breast, contralateral lung and heart dose by a relative 12%, 24% and 13% for the kV-CBCT, and 52%, 101% and 58% for the MV-FBCT. The impact of the imaging dose relative to the treatment dose was assessed with linear and linear-quadratic radiation-induced secondary cancer risk models for the contralateral breast. The additional imaging dose and risk estimates presented in this study should be taken into account when considering an image modality and frequency for patient position verification protocols in breast radiotherapy.

  9. Dosimetry for a study of low-dose radiation cataracts among Chernobyl clean-up workers.

    PubMed

    Chumak, V V; Worgul, B V; Kundiyev, Y I; Sergiyenko, N M; Vitte, P M; Medvedovsky, C; Bakhanova, E V; Junk, A K; Kyrychenko, O Y; Musijachenko, N V; Sholom, S V; Shylo, S A; Vitte, O P; Xu, S; Xue, X; Shore, R E

    2007-05-01

    A cohort of 8,607 Ukrainian Chernobyl clean-up workers during 1986-1987 was formed to study cataract formation after ionizing radiation exposure. Study eligibility required the availability of sufficient exposure information to permit the reconstruction of doses to the lens of the eye. Eligible groups included civilian workers, such as those who built the "sarcophagus" over the reactor, Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Workers, and military reservists who were conscripted for clean-up work. Many of the official doses for workers were estimates, because only a minority wore radiation badges. For 106 military workers, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of extracted teeth were compared with the recorded doses as the basis to adjust the recorded gamma-ray doses and provide estimates of uncertainties. Beta-particle doses to the lens were estimated with an algorithm devised to take into account the nature and location of Chernobyl work, time since the accident, and protective measures taken. A Monte Carlo routine generated 500 random estimates for each individual from the uncertainty distributions of the gamma-ray dose and of the ratio of beta-particle to gamma-ray doses. The geometric mean of the 500 combined beta-particle and gamma-ray dose estimates for each individual was used in the data analyses. The median estimated lens dose for the cohort was 123 mGy, while 4.4% received >500 mGy.

  10. Anthropometric approaches and their uncertainties to assigning computational phantoms to individual patients in pediatric dosimetry studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Scott; Lee, Choonsik; Williams, Jonathan L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2008-01-01

    Current efforts to reconstruct organ doses in children undergoing diagnostic imaging or therapeutic interventions using ionizing radiation typically rely upon the use of reference anthropomorphic computational phantoms coupled to Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. These phantoms are generally matched to individual patients based upon nearest age or sometimes total body mass. In this study, we explore alternative methods of phantom-to-patient matching with the goal of identifying those methods which yield the lowest residual errors in internal organ volumes. Various thoracic and abdominal organs were segmented and organ volumes obtained from chest-abdominal-pelvic (CAP) computed tomography (CT) image sets from 38 pediatric patients ranging in age from 2 months to 15 years. The organs segmented included the skeleton, heart, kidneys, liver, lungs and spleen. For each organ, least-squared regression lines, 95th percentile confidence intervals and 95th percentile prediction intervals were established as a function of patient age, trunk volume, estimated trunk mass, trunk height, and three estimates of the ventral body cavity volume based on trunk height alone, or in combination with circumferential, width and/or breadth measurements in the mid-chest of the patient. When matching phantom to patient based upon age, residual uncertainties in organ volumes ranged from 53% (lungs) to 33% (kidneys), and when trunk mass was used (surrogate for total body mass as we did not have images of patient head, arms or legs), these uncertainties ranged from 56% (spleen) to 32% (liver). When trunk height is used as the matching parameter, residual uncertainties in organ volumes were reduced to between 21 and 29% for all organs except the spleen (40%). In the case of the lungs and skeleton, the two-fold reduction in organ volume uncertainties was seen in moving from patient age to trunk height—a parameter easily measured in the clinic. When ventral body cavity volumes were used

  11. Study of the Melting Latent Heat of Semicrystalline PVDF applied to High Gamma Dose Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Gual, Maritza R.; Faria, Luiz O.; Lima, Claubia P.B.

    2015-07-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) homopolymers [PVDF] homopolymers were irradiated with gamma doses ranging from 0.5 to 2.75 MGy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and FTIR spectrometry were used in order to study the effects of gamma radiation in the amorphous and crystalline polymer structures. The FTIR data revealed absorption bands at 1730 and 1853 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the stretch of C=O bonds, at 1715 and 1754 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the C=C stretching and at 3518, 3585 and 3673 cm{sup -1} which were associated with NH stretch of NH{sub 2} and OH. The melting latent heat (LM) measured by DSC was used to construct an unambiguous relationship with the delivered dose. Regression analyses revealed that the best mathematical function that fits the experimental calibration curve is a 4-degree polynomial function, with an adjusted Rsquare of 0.99817. (authors)

  12. A Study of Occupational Radiation Dosimetry During Fluoroscopically Guided Simulated Urological Surgery in the Lithotomy Position.

    PubMed

    Horsburgh, Ben A; Higgins, Mike

    2016-12-01

    To quantify through environmental audit the radiation dose that urologists receive during surgery in the lithotomy position, and to quantify the dose reduction achieved by altering exposure techniques and personal protective equipment use. Simulated surgery in the lithotomy position using an anthropomorphic phantom as a patient and a SimMan(®) mannequin as the surgeon. Pulsed fluoroscopy, focus-to-skin distance (FSD), collimation, and addition of a lead shield at the table end were individually and collectively introduced after a control study. Scattered X-ray dose rates to the simulated surgeon's eye, thyroid, trunk, external genitalia, and leg were measured with each of the technique adjustments. The absorbed dose in air at the phantom skin was measured throughout. Results were compared to discover surgeon dose rates with technique alteration. Increasing FSD leads to a rise in surgeon eye dose, and table end lead protection increases the patient skin dose. Use of all the dose-reduction techniques together reduces the dose to the patient, and a surgeon's trunk dose is decreased by 95%, external genitalia dose by 99%, and leg dose by 97%. Sitting to perform fluoroscopically guided surgery in the lithotomy position increases surgeon dose by a median value of 17%, with the external genitalia dose increased by 78% compared with the standing position. This study describes effective methods of dose reduction that are easy to instigate. The resulting reduction in radiation dose during urology procedures meets the requirements of international guidelines and legislation. This change in practice improves patient care and reduces risk to urologists from occupational exposure to radiation. By combining all of the dose-reduction techniques, urologists should never reach the threshold for deterministic radiation effects to their eyes during their career, and they will have a significantly lower chance of stochastic risks such as cancer.

  13. In-vivo outcome study of HPPH mediated PDT using singlet oxygen explicit dosimetry (SOED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penjweini, Rozhin; Kim, Michele M.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2015-03-01

    Type II photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the use of photochemical reactions mediated through an interaction between a tumor-selective photosensitizer, photoexcitation with a specific wavelength of light, and production of reactive singlet oxygen. However, the medical application of this technique has been limited due to inaccurate PDT dosimetric methods. The goal of this study is to examine the relationship between outcome (in terms of tumor growth rate) and calculated reacted singlet oxygen concentration [1O2]rx after HPPH-mediated PDT to compare with other PDT dose metrics, such as PDT dose or total light fluence. Mice with radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors were treated with different light fluence and fluence rate conditions. Explicit measurements of photosensitizer drug concentration and tissue optical properties via fluorescence and absorption measurement with a contact probe before and after PDT were taken to then quantify total light fluence, PDT dose, and [1O2]rx based on a macroscopic model of singlet oxygen. In addition, photobleaching of photosenitizer were measured during PDT as a second check of the model. Changes in tumor volume were tracked following treatment and compared to the three calculated dose metrics. The correlations between total light fluence, PDT dose, reacted [1O2]rx and tumor growth demonstrate that [1O2]rx serves as a better dosimetric quantity for predicting treatment outcome and a clinically relevant tumor growth endpoint.

  14. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Jeffrey W. Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2011-11-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 {mu}g d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Voelkel et al., 2002). Voelkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Voelkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  15. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  16. Dosimetry in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Dance, David R; McLean, Donald; Kramer, Hans-Michael

    2010-10-01

    Dosimetry is an area of increasing importance in diagnostic radiology. There is a realisation amongst health professionals that the radiation dose received by patients from modern X-ray examinations and procedures can be at a level of significance for the induction of cancer across a population, and in some unfortunate instances, in the acute damage to particular body organs such as skin and eyes. The formulation and measurement procedures for diagnostic radiology dosimetry have recently been standardised through an international code of practice which describes the methodologies necessary to address the diverging imaging modalities used in diagnostic radiology. Common to all dosimetry methodologies is the measurement of the air kerma from the X-ray device under defined conditions. To ensure the accuracy of the dosimetric determination, such measurements need to be made with appropriate instrumentation that has a calibration that is traceable to a standards laboratory. Dosimetric methods are used in radiology departments for a variety of purposes including the determination of patient dose levels to allow examinations to be optimized and to assist in decisions on the justification of examination choices. Patient dosimetry is important for special cases such as for X-ray examinations of children and pregnant patients. It is also a key component of the quality control of X-ray equipment and procedures. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Ion storage dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, V. K.

    2001-09-01

    The availability of a reliable, accurate and cost-effective real-time personnel dosimetry system is fascinating to radiation workers. Electronic dosimeters are contemplated to meet this demand of active dosimetry. The development of direct ion storage (DIS) dosimeters, a member of the electronic dosimeter family, for personnel dosimetry is also an attempt in this direction. DIS dosimeter is a hybrid of the well-established technology of ion chambers and the latest advances in data storage using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) analog memory device. This dosimeter is capable of monitoring legal occupational radiation doses of gamma, X-rays, beta and neutron radiation. Similar to an ion chamber, the performance of the dosimeter for a particular application can be optimized through the selection of appropriate wall materials. The use of the floating gate of a MOSFET as one of the electrodes of the ion chamber allows the miniaturization of the device to the size of a dosimetry badge and avoids the use of power supplies during dose accumulation. The concept of the device, underlying physics and the design of the DIS dosimeter are discussed. The results of preliminary testing of the device are also provided.

  18. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  19. A dosimetry study of deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowers, Daniel A.

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo Neutron Activation Analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator which produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 x 108 +/-30% s-1. A moderator/reflector/shielding (5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite & 5.7 cm borated HDPE) assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeter (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and photon dose by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10 min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 +/- 0.8 mSv for neutron and 4.2 +/- 0.2 mSv for photon for 10 mins; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  20. A Dosimetry Study of Deuterium-Deuterium Neutron Generator-based In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Daniel; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Blake, Scott; Nie, Linda H

    2015-12-01

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator that produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 × 10(8) ± 30% s(-1). A moderator/reflector/shielding [5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite and 5.7 cm borated (HDPE)] assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeters (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and the photon dose was measured by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10-min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 ± 0.8 mSv for neutrons and 4.2 ± 0.2 mSv for photons for 10 min; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  1. SU-F-P-21: Study of Dosimetry Accuracy of Small Passively Scattered Proton Beam Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y; Gautam, A; Kerr, M; Martin, C; Poenisch, F; Zhang, X; Li, H; Wu, R; Zhu, X; Gillin, M; Sahoo, N

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the accuracy of the dose distribution of very small irregular fields of passively scattered proton beams calculated by the analytical pencil beam model of the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: An irregular field with a narrow region (width < 1 cm) that was used for the treatment of a small volume adjacent to a previously treated area were chosen for this investigation. Point doses at different locations inside the field were measured with a small volume ion chamber (A26, Standard Imaging). 2-D dose distributions were measured using a 2-D ion chamber array (MatriXX, IBA). All the measurements were done in plastic water phantom. The measured dose distributions were compared with the verification plan dose calculated in a water like phantom for the patient treatment field without the use of the compensator. Results: Point doses measured with the ion chamber in the narrowest section of the field were found to differ as much as 10% from the Eclipse calculated dose at some of the points. The 2-D dose distribution measured with the MatriXX which was validated by comparison with limited film measurement, at the proximal 95%, center of the spread out Bragg Peak and distal 90% depths agreed reasonably well with the TPS calculated dose distribution with more than 92% of the pixels passing the 2% / 2 mm dose distance agreement. Conclusion: The dose calculated by the pencil beam model of the Eclipse TPS for narrow irregular fields may not be accurate within 5% at some locations of the field, especially at the points close to the field edge due to the limitation of the dose calculation model. Overall accuracy of the calculated 2-D dose distribution was found to be acceptable for the 2%/2 mm dose/distance agreement with the measurement.

  2. Long-term epidemiological studies of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki: study populations, dosimetry and summary of health effects.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Toshiteru

    2012-10-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation succeeded 28 years' worth of activities of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission on long-term epidemiological studies in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It has three major cohorts of atomic bomb survivors, i.e. the Life Span Study (LSS) of 120,000 people, the In Utero Cohort of 3600 and the Second Generation Study (F(1)) of 77,000. The LSS and F(1) studies include a periodic health examination for each sub-cohort, i.e. the Adult Health Study and the F(1) Clinical Study, respectively. An extensive individual dose estimation was conducted and the system was published as the Dosimetry System established in 2002 (DS02). As results of these studies, increases of cancers in relation to dose were clearly shown. Increases of other mortality causes were also observed, including heart and respiratory diseases. There has been no evidence of genetic effects in the survivors' children, including cancer and other multi-factorial diseases. The increase in the expected mortality number in the next 10 y would allow the analyses of further details of the observed effects related to atomic bomb exposures.

  3. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Amanda E. Schwint; John K. Hartwell; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica Trivillin; Jorge Castillo; Luis Wentzeis; Patrick Sloan; Charles A. Wemple

    2004-10-01

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  4. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Schwint, A.E.; Hartwell, J.K.; Heber, E.M.; Trivillin, V.; Castillo, J.; Wentzeis, L.; Sloan, P.; Wemple, C.A.

    2004-10-04

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  5. Preliminary evaluation of optical CT scanning versus MRI for nPAG gel dosimetry: The Ghent experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Jan; DeDeene, Yves

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fast laser-scanning optical CT versus MRI for an nPAG gel dosimeter in terms of accuracy and precision. Three small cylindrical volumetric gel phantoms were fabricated and irradiated with photon beams. The gel dosimeters were scanned with an MR scanner and an in house developed laser scanning optical CT scanner. A comparison between MRI and optical CT scanning was performed based on the reconstructed images. Preliminary results show a fair correspondence in the MRI acquired and optical CT acquired dose maps. Still, ringing artifacts contaminate the reconstructed optical CT images. These may be related to sub-pixel misalignments between the blank projection and the acquired transmission projection of the gel phantom. Another artifact may be caused by refraction near the edges of the field. Further optimisation of our optical CT scanner is required to obtain the same accuracy as with MRI. To make a comparison between the two imaging modalities in terms of precision, the intrinsic dose precision on readout (IPD) was calculated which is independent of spatial resolution and acquisition time. It is shown that optical CT has a better intrinsic dose precision.

  6. A unique alpha dosimetry technique using Gafchromic EBT3® film and feasibility study for an activity calibrator for alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Yaser H; Bhonsle, Uday; Hentschel, Reinhard; Khachan, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To develop an alpha dosimetry technique for activity calibration of alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals using the Gafchromic® EBT3 (Gaf-EBT3) radiochromic film (International Speciality product, Wayne, NJ). Methods: The Gaf-EBT3 has a tissue equivalent radiosensitive layer (approximately 28 μm) sandwiched between two 100-μm thick polyester sheaths, thereby making it insensitive to alpha particles. We have split a Gaf-EBT3 sheet using a surgical scalpel to remove one of the polyester protective layers and covered the radiosensitive layer with thin Mylar® foil (Goodfellow Cambridge Limited, Huntingdon, UK) (2.5 μm). Small pieces of modified film were exposed at contact with a 560-Bq thin 241Am source for 5, 10, 24 and 94 h. The optical density of the films was evaluated using an optical densitometer. The alpha energy spectra of the 241Am source were recorded using a Si(Li) surface barrier detector. Results: Time-integrated specific alpha surface activity (kBq cm−2 h) was represented as a function of optical density. Conclusion: By removing one of the 100 μm thick polyester protective layers, the authors have modified the Gaf-EBT3 film to a sensitive alpha dosemeter. The calibration function relevant to a 241Am reference source was evaluated from the optical densities of the dosemeter foils. Furthermore, calibration functions for important alpha emitters such as 223Ra, 225Ac or 210Bi were parameterized from the 241Am reference data. Advances in knowledge: The authors have developed and tested the principle of a clinical alpha dosemeter using Gaf-EBT3 radiochromic films originally developed for photon dosimetry. This novel, user-friendly technique could be implemented in quality assurance and calibration procedures of important alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals prior to their clinical applications. PMID:26440547

  7. A unique alpha dosimetry technique using Gafchromic EBT3(®) film and feasibility study for an activity calibrator for alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bhaskar; Gholami, Yaser H; Bhonsle, Uday; Hentschel, Reinhard; Khachan, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    To develop an alpha dosimetry technique for activity calibration of alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals using the Gafchromic(®) EBT3 (Gaf-EBT3) radiochromic film (International Speciality product, Wayne, NJ). The Gaf-EBT3 has a tissue equivalent radiosensitive layer (approximately 28 μm) sandwiched between two 100-μm thick polyester sheaths, thereby making it insensitive to alpha particles. We have split a Gaf-EBT3 sheet using a surgical scalpel to remove one of the polyester protective layers and covered the radiosensitive layer with thin Mylar(®) foil (Goodfellow Cambridge Limited, Huntingdon, UK) (2.5 μm). Small pieces of modified film were exposed at contact with a 560-Bq thin (241)Am source for 5, 10, 24 and 94 h. The optical density of the films was evaluated using an optical densitometer. The alpha energy spectra of the (241)Am source were recorded using a Si(Li) surface barrier detector. Time-integrated specific alpha surface activity (kBq cm(-2) h) was represented as a function of optical density. By removing one of the 100 μm thick polyester protective layers, the authors have modified the Gaf-EBT3 film to a sensitive alpha dosemeter. The calibration function relevant to a (241)Am reference source was evaluated from the optical densities of the dosemeter foils. Furthermore, calibration functions for important alpha emitters such as (223)Ra, (225)Ac or (210)Bi were parameterized from the (241)Am reference data. The authors have developed and tested the principle of a clinical alpha dosemeter using Gaf-EBT3 radiochromic films originally developed for photon dosimetry. This novel, user-friendly technique could be implemented in quality assurance and calibration procedures of important alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals prior to their clinical applications.

  8. Advances in personnel neutron dosimetry: part 3

    SciTech Connect

    Vallario, E.J.; Faust, L.G.

    1983-09-01

    DOE-sponsored evaluation and upgrading of personnel neutron dosimetry includes a review of new devices involving unique concepts: resonance ionization spectroscopy and organic semiconductor detectors. Resonance ionization spectroscopy uses a laser to detect atoms released by neutron interactions, while organic semiconductors contain large amounts of hydrogen. Although these and other research and evaluation projects reviewed in the first two articles appear promising, there is much more research needed, such as finding a chemically stable organic semiconductor that will be suitable.

  9. Exposure to mobile telecommunication networks assessed using personal dosimetry and well-being in children and adolescents: the German MobilEe-study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Silke; Kühnlein, Anja; Heinrich, Sabine; Praml, Georg; von Kries, Rüdiger; Radon, Katja

    2008-11-04

    Despite the increase of mobile phone use in the last decade and the growing concern whether mobile telecommunication networks adversely affect health and well-being, only few studies have been published that focussed on children and adolescents. Especially children and adolescents are important in the discussion of adverse health effects because of their possibly higher vulnerability to radio frequency electromagnetic fields. We investigated a possible association between exposure to mobile telecommunication networks and well-being in children and adolescents using personal dosimetry. A population-based sample of 1.498 children and 1.524 adolescents was assembled for the study (response 52%). Participants were randomly selected from the population registries of four Bavarian (South of Germany) cities and towns with different population sizes. During a Computer Assisted Personal Interview data on participants' well-being, socio-demographic characteristics and potential confounder were collected. Acute symptoms were assessed three times during the study day (morning, noon, evening).Using a dosimeter (ESM-140 Maschek Electronics), we obtained an exposure profile over 24 hours for three mobile phone frequency ranges (measurement interval 1 second, limit of determination 0.05 V/m) for each of the participants. Exposure levels over waking hours were summed up and expressed as mean percentage of the ICNIRP (International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection) reference level. In comparison to non-participants, parents and adolescents with a higher level of education who possessed a mobile phone and were interested in the topic of possible adverse health effects caused by mobile telecommunication network frequencies were more willing to participate in the study. The median exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields of children and adolescents was 0.18% and 0.19% of the ICNIRP reference level respectively. In comparison to previous studies this is one of

  10. Exposure to mobile telecommunication networks assessed using personal dosimetry and well-being in children and adolescents: the German MobilEe-study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Silke; Kühnlein, Anja; Heinrich, Sabine; Praml, Georg; von Kries, Rüdiger; Radon, Katja

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite the increase of mobile phone use in the last decade and the growing concern whether mobile telecommunication networks adversely affect health and well-being, only few studies have been published that focussed on children and adolescents. Especially children and adolescents are important in the discussion of adverse health effects because of their possibly higher vulnerability to radio frequency electromagnetic fields. Methods We investigated a possible association between exposure to mobile telecommunication networks and well-being in children and adolescents using personal dosimetry. A population-based sample of 1.498 children and 1.524 adolescents was assembled for the study (response 52%). Participants were randomly selected from the population registries of four Bavarian (South of Germany) cities and towns with different population sizes. During a Computer Assisted Personal Interview data on participants' well-being, socio-demographic characteristics and potential confounder were collected. Acute symptoms were assessed three times during the study day (morning, noon, evening). Using a dosimeter (ESM-140 Maschek Electronics), we obtained an exposure profile over 24 hours for three mobile phone frequency ranges (measurement interval 1 second, limit of determination 0.05 V/m) for each of the participants. Exposure levels over waking hours were summed up and expressed as mean percentage of the ICNIRP (International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection) reference level. Results In comparison to non-participants, parents and adolescents with a higher level of education who possessed a mobile phone and were interested in the topic of possible adverse health effects caused by mobile telecommunication network frequencies were more willing to participate in the study. The median exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields of children and adolescents was 0.18% and 0.19% of the ICNIRP reference level respectively. Conclusion In

  11. In vivo dosimetry for IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Vial, Philip

    2011-05-05

    In vivo dosimetry has a well established role in the quality assurance of 2D radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy. The role of in vivo dosimetry for IMRT is not as well established. IMRT introduces a range of technical issues that complicate in vivo dosimetry. The first decade or so of IMRT implementation has largely relied upon pre-treatment phantom based dose verification. During that time, several new devices and techniques for in vivo dosimetry have emerged with the promise of providing the ultimate form of IMRT dose verification. Solid state dosimeters continue to dominate the field of in vivo dosimetry in the IMRT era. In this report we review the literature on in vivo dosimetry for IMRT, with an emphasis on clinical evidence for different detector types. We describe the pros and cons of different detectors and techniques in the IMRT setting and the roles that they are likely to play in the future.

  12. Dosimetry of an Implantable 252 Californium Source

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, G.D. Jr.

    2001-08-29

    The radiation dose from 252 Californium needles designed for use as a source of neutrons for radiotherapy has been measured. The dosimetry information presented in this paper will enable clinical studies of neutron radiotherapy with 252 Californium needles to be planned and begun.

  13. Distribution effectiveness for space radiation dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    A simplified risk basis and a theory of hematological response are presented and applied to the problem of dosimetry in the manned space program. Unlike previous studies, the current work incorporates radiation exposure distribution effects into its definition of dose equivalent. The fractional cell lethality model for prediction of hematological response is integral in the analysis.

  14. Experimental analysis of a novel and low-cost pin photodiode dosimetry system for diagnostic radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazififard, Mohammad; Suh, Kune Y.; Mahmoudieh, Afshin

    2016-07-01

    Silicon PIN photodiode has recently found broad and exciting applications in the ionizing radiation dosimetry. In this study a compact and novel dosimetry system using a commercially available PIN photodiode (BPW34) has been experimentally tested for diagnostic radiology. The system was evaluated with clinical beams routinely used for diagnostic radiology and calibrated using a secondary reference standard. Measured dose with PIN photodiode (Air Kerma) varied from 10 to 430 μGy for tube voltages from 40 to 100 kVp and tube current from 0.4 to 40 mAs. The minimum detectable organ dose was estimated to be 10 μGy with 20% uncertainty. Results showed a linear correlation between the PIN photodiode readout and dose measured with standard dosimeters spanning doses received. The present dosimetry system having advantages of suitable sensitivity with immediate readout of dose values, low cost, and portability could be used as an alternative to passive dosimetry system such as thermoluminescent dosimeter for dose measurements in diagnostic radiology.

  15. Experimental analysis of a novel and low-cost pin photodiode dosimetry system for diagnostic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Nazififard, Mohammad Mahmoudieh, Afshin; Suh, Kune Y.

    2016-07-15

    Silicon PIN photodiode has recently found broad and exciting applications in the ionizing radiation dosimetry. In this study a compact and novel dosimetry system using a commercially available PIN photodiode (BPW34) has been experimentally tested for diagnostic radiology. The system was evaluated with clinical beams routinely used for diagnostic radiology and calibrated using a secondary reference standard. Measured dose with PIN photodiode (Air Kerma) varied from 10 to 430 μGy for tube voltages from 40 to 100 kVp and tube current from 0.4 to 40 mAs. The minimum detectable organ dose was estimated to be 10 μGy with 20% uncertainty. Results showed a linear correlation between the PIN photodiode readout and dose measured with standard dosimeters spanning doses received. The present dosimetry system having advantages of suitable sensitivity with immediate readout of dose values, low cost, and portability could be used as an alternative to passive dosimetry system such as thermoluminescent dosimeter for dose measurements in diagnostic radiology.

  16. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Retrospective Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Romanyukha, Alex; Trompier, Francois

    2011-05-05

    Necessity for, principles of, and general concepts of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) retrospective dosimetry are presented. Also presented and given in details are examples of EPR retrospective dosimetry applications in tooth enamel, bone, and fingernails with focus on general approaches for solving technical and methodological problems. Advantages, drawbacks, and possible future developments are discussed and an extensive bibliography on EPR retrospective dosimetry is provided.

  17. International intercomparison for criticality dosimetry: the case of biological dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Roy, L; Buard, V; Delbos, M; Durand, V; Paillole, N; Grégoire, E; Voisin, P

    2004-01-01

    The Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) organized a biological dosimetry international intercomparison with the purpose of comparing (i) dicentrics yield produced in human lymphocytes; (ii) the gamma and neutron dose estimate according to the corresponding laboratory calibration curve. The experimental reactor SILENE was used with different configurations: bare source 4 Gy, lead shield 1 and 2 Gy and a 60Co source 2 Gy. An increasing variation of dicentric yield per cell was observed between participants when there were more damages in the samples. Doses were derived from the observed dicentric rates according to the dose-effect relationship provided by each laboratory. Differences in dicentric rate values are more important than those in the corresponding dose values. The doses obtained by the participants were found to be in agreement with the given physical dose within 20%. The evaluation of the respective gamma and neutron dose was achieved only by four laboratories, with some small variations among them.

  18. Prostate PDT dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We provide a review of the current state of dosimetry in prostate photodynamic therapy (PDT). PDT of the human prostate has been performed with a number of different photosensitizers and with a variety of dosimetry schemes. The simplest clinical light dose prescription is to quantify the total light energy emitted per length (J/cm) of cylindrical diffusing fibers (CDF) for patients treated with a defined photosensitizer injection per body weight. However, this approach does not take into account the light scattering by tissue and usually underestimates the local light fluence rate, and consequently the fluence. Techniques have been developed to characterize tissue optical properties and light fluence rates in vivo using interstitial measurements during prostate PDT. Optical methods have been developed to characterize tissue absorption and scattering spectra, which in turn provide information about tissue oxygenation and drug concentration. Fluorescence techniques can be used to quantify drug concentrations and photobleaching rates of photosensitizers. PMID:25046988

  19. Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H.

    1991-10-01

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database.

  20. Retrospective dosimetry analyses of reactor vessel cladding samples

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L. R.; Soderquist, C. Z.; Fero, A. H.

    2011-07-01

    Reactor pressure vessel cladding samples for Ringhals Units 3 and 4 in Sweden were analyzed using retrospective reactor dosimetry techniques. The objective was to provide the best estimates of the neutron fluence for comparison with neutron transport calculations. A total of 51 stainless steel samples consisting of chips weighing approximately 100 to 200 mg were removed from selected locations around the pressure vessel and were sent to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for analysis. The samples were fully characterized and analyzed for radioactive isotopes, with special interest in the presence of Nb-93m. The RPV cladding retrospective dosimetry results will be combined with a re-evaluation of the surveillance capsule dosimetry and with ex-vessel neutron dosimetry results to form a comprehensive 3D comparison of measurements to calculations performed with 3D deterministic transport code. (authors)

  1. Evaluation of GAFCHROMIC EBT2 dosimetry for the low dose range using a flat-bed scanner with the reflection mode.

    PubMed

    Gotanda, Tatsuhiro; Katsuda, Toshizo; Akagawa, Takuya; Gotanda, Rumi; Tabuchi, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Kenyu; Kuwano, Tadao; Yatake, Hidetoshi; Yabunaka, Koichi; Takeda, Yoshihiro

    2013-03-01

    Recently developed radiochromic films can easily be used to measure absorbed doses because they do not need development processing and indicate a density change that depends on the absorbed dose. However, in GAFCHROMIC EBT2 dosimetry (GAF-EBT2) as a radiochromic film, the precision of the measurement was compromised, because of non-uniformity problems caused by image acquisition using a flat-bed scanner with a transmission mode. The purpose of this study was to improve the precision of the measurement using a flat-bed scanner with a reflection mode at the low absorbed dose dynamic range of GAF-EBT2. The calibration curves of the absorbed dose versus the film density for GAF-EBT2 were provided. X-rays were exposed in the range between ~0 and 120 mGy in increments of about 12 mGy. The results of the method using a flat-bed scanner with the transmission mode were compared with those of the method using the same scanner with the reflection mode. The results should that the determination coefficients (r (2) ) for the straight-line approximation of the calibration curve using the reflection mode were higher than 0.99, and the gradient using the reflection mode was about twice that of the one using the transmission mode. The non-uniformity error that is produced by a flat-bed scanner with the transmission mode setting could be almost eliminated by converting from the transmission mode to the reflection mode. In light of these findings, the method using a flat-bed scanner with the reflection mode (only using uniform white paper) improved the precision of the measurement for the low absorbed dose range.

  2. CT-ultrasound fusion prostate brachytherapy: a dynamic dosimetry feedback and improvement method. A report of 54 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Donald B; Jin, Haoran; Koziol, James A; Feng, Anne C

    2005-01-01

    The authors describe a prostate brachytherapy technique with dynamic dosimetry feedback, using coregistered CT and ultrasound (US) images, to map initial dosimetry deficiencies and guide remedial source placement. Fifty-four consecutive patients treated with this method were analyzed for coregistration accuracy and dosimetry outcomes by evaluating the prostate V100, V150, D90, and urethral D50 and D10. Dosimetric improvements created by remedial source placement and preplan/postplan prostate D90 agreement were evaluated. Median CT-US coregistration discrepancy with this technique ranged from 0 to 4mm, with the posterior midline prostate and base prostate providing the least consistent and the urethra providing the most consistent coregistration agreement. Final prostate V100 values ranged from 96.1% to 99.8% for all patients. The addition of remedial sources directed by CT-US fusion produced V100 and D90 improvements whose magnitude inversely correlated with the initial result and exceeded the effect of adding quantitatively identical randomly distributed increased millicuries. The final prostate D90 result agreed within (-) 5% to (+) 10% of the preplan result in 98% of all patients. CT-US fusion prostate brachytherapy represents a dynamic dosimetry feedback and remediation method that consistently produced high prostate V100 and D90 values with acceptably low urethra D50 and D10 values in our study. The degree of prostate V100 and D90 dosimetry improvement created by remedial source placement effectively matched the degree of initial dosimetry deficiency. This method produced a high level of correlation between the preplan and final prostate D90 values.

  3. Dosimetry of Auger emitters: Physical and phenomenological approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.S.R.; Howell, R.W.; Rao, D.V.; Mylavarapu, V.B.; Kassis, A.I.; Adelstein, S.J.; Wright, H.A.; Hamm, R.N.; Turner, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Recent radiobiological studies have demonstrated that Auger cascades can cause severe biological damage contrary to expectations based on conventional dosimetry. Several determinants govern these effects, including the nature of the Auger electron spectrum; localized energy deposition; cellular geometry; chemical form of the carrier; cellular localization, concentration, and subcellular distribution of the radionuclide. Conventional dosimetry is inadequate in that these considerations are ignored. Our results provide the basis for biophysical approaches toward subcellular dosimetry of Auger emitters in vitro and in vivo. 12 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Historical Evaluation of Film Badge Dosimetry Y-12 Plant: Part 2–Neutron Radiation ORAUT-OTIB-0045

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr GD, Frome EL, Watkins JP, Tankersley WG

    2009-12-14

    A summary of the major neutron sources involved in radiation exposures to Y-12 workers is presented in this TIB. Graphical methods are used to evaluate available neutron dose data from quarterly exposures to Y-12 workers and to determine how the data could be used to derive neutron-to-gamma dose ratios for dose reconstruction purposes. This TIB provides estimates of neutron-to-gamma dose ratios for specific departments and a default value for the neutron-to-gamma dose ratio based on the pooled neutron dose data for all Y-12 departments.

  5. Monte Carlo study of conversion factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in solid slab phantoms for MV photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Dong-wook; Lee, Jai-ki

    2016-08-01

    For high energy photon beams, solid phantom to water dose conversion factors were calculated by using a Monte Carlo method, and the result were compared with measurements and published data. Based on the absorbed dose to water dosimetry protocol, the conversion factor was theoretically divided into stopping powers ratios, perturbation factors and ratios of absorbed dose to water and that to solid phantom. Data for a Farmer-type chamber and a solid phantom based on polystyrene which is one of the most common material were applied to calculate the conversion factors for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. All measurements were conducted after 10 Gy pre-irradiation and thermal equilibrium had been established with solid slabs in a treatment room. The calculated and the measured conversion factors were in good agreement and could be used to confirm the feasibility of the solid phantom as a substitute for water for high energy photon beam.

  6. Verification of the pure alanine in PMMA tube dosimeter applicability for dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Al-Karmi, Anan M; Ayaz, Ali Asghar H; Al-Enezi, Mamdouh S; Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Dwaikat, Nidal

    2015-09-01

    Alanine dosimeters in the form of pure alanine powder in PMMA plastic tubes were investigated for dosimetry in a clinical application. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure absorbed radiation doses by detection of signals from radicals generated in irradiated alanine. The measurements were performed for low-dose ranges typical for single-fraction doses often used in external photon beam radiotherapy. First, the dosimeters were irradiated in a solid water phantom to establish calibration curves in the dose range from 0.3 to 3 Gy for 6 and 18 MV X-ray beams from a clinical linear accelerator. Next, the dosimeters were placed at various locations in an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom to measure the dose delivery of a conventional four-field box technique treatment plan to the pelvis. Finally, the doses measured with alanine dosimeters were compared against the doses calculated with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). The results showed that the alanine dosimeters have a highly sensitive dose response with good linearity and no energy dependence in the dose range and photon beams used in this work. Also, a fairly good agreement was found between the in-phantom dose measurements with alanine dosimeters and the TPS dose calculations. The mean value of the ratios of measured to calculated dose values was found to be near unity. The measured points in the in-field region passed dose-difference acceptance criterion of 3% and those in the penumbral region passed distance-to-agreement acceptance criterion of 3 mm. These findings suggest that the pure alanine powder in PMMA tube dosimeter is a suitable option for dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams.

  7. From ``micro`` to ``macro`` internal dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    Radiation dose is the amount of radiation energy deposited per unit mass of absorbing tissue. Internal dosimetry applies to assessments of dose to internal organs from penetrating radiation sources outside the body and from radionuclides taken into the body. Dosimetry is essential for correlating energy deposition with biological effects that are observed when living tissues are irradiated. Dose-response information provides the basis for radiation protection standards and risk assessment. Radiation interactions with living matter takes place on a microscopic scale, and the manifestation of damage may be evident at the cellular, multi-cellular, and even organ levels of biological organization. The relative biological effectiveness of ionization radiation is largely determined by the spatial distribution of energy deposition events within microscopic as well as macroscopic biological targets of interest. The spatial distribution of energy imparted is determined by the spatial distribution of radionuclides and properties of the emitted charged-particle radiation involved. The nonuniformity of energy deposition events in microscopic volumes, particularly from high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, results in large variations in the amount of energy imparted to very small volumes or targets. Microdosimetry is the study of energy deposition events at the cellular level. Macrodosimetry is a term for conventional dose averaging at the tissue or organ level. In between is a level of dosimetry sometimes referred to as multi-cellular dosimetry. The distinction between these terms and their applications in assessment of dose from internally deposited radionuclides is described.

  8. Development of A-bomb survivor dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    An all important datum in risk assessment is the radiation dose to individual survivors of the bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The first set of dose estimates for survivors was based on a dosimetry system developed in 1957 by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These Tentative 1957 Doses (T57D) were later replaced by a more extensive and refined set of Tentative 1965 Doses (T65D). The T65D system of dose estimation for survivors was also developed at ORNL and served as a basis for risk assessment throughout the 1970s. In the late 1970s, it was suggested that there were serious inadequacies with the T65D system, and these inadequacies were the topic of discussion at two symposia held in 1981. In early 1983, joint US- Japan research programs were established to conduct a thorough review of all aspects of the radiation dosimetry for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. A number of important contributions to this review were made by ORNL staff members. The review was completed in 1986 and a new Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) was adopted for use. This paper discusses the development of the various systems of A-bomb survivor dosimetry, and the status of the current DS86 system as it is being applied in the medical follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors and their offspring.

  9. 8-Isoprostane is a dose-related biomarker for photo-oxidative ultraviolet (UV) B damage in vivo: a pilot study with personal UV dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Schneider, L A; Bloch, W; Kopp, K; Hainzl, A; Rettberg, P; Wlaschek, M; Horneck, G; Scharffetter-Kochanek, K

    2006-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) B irradiation causes visible erythema, which has been linked with DNA damage. However, besides such direct photochemical conformation changes, UVB also induces many indirect photochemical effects in the skin. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) is in this context one of the major pathways by which photo-oxidative stress disturbs cell signalling and promotes photocarcinogenesis and photoageing. So far we lack techniques for visualizing photo-oxidative stress in the skin. Furthermore, LPO has never been linked with individually acquired UVB doses measured by personal dosimetry. Measuring the skin reaction and photo-oxidative damage by LPO in vivo after UVB exposure in a pilot study surveyed by personal dosimetry in order to allow for a correlation analysis of acquired dose, skin reaction and amount of LPO. UVB exposure was measured with the opto-electronic X2000-1 (Gigahertz Optik, Puchheim, Germany) and the biological DLR Biofilm (German Aerospace Center DLR, Cologne, Germany) portable dosimeter. The skin reaction following UVB exposure was quantified with a Minolta chromameter (Minolta, Tokyo, Japan) and LPO in vivo was measured by 8-isoprostane generation by means of densitometric analysis of immunohistochemical samples obtained 30 min post-UVB irradiation. Regression analysis revealed significant linear relations between UVB exposures recorded by the dosimeters and colorimetry parameters of the skin reaction. Furthermore, an even better linear relation with higher significance was found between the generation of 8-isoprostane in the skin and the dosimeter readouts. LPO measured by the generation of 8-isoprostane provides a suitable intrinsic biomarker for photo-oxidative UVB damage in vivo. This study provides a new approach to visualizing photo-oxidative stress in the skin in vivo. Furthermore, future dosimeter readouts can now be set into relation to the expected increase of LPO that can be calculated within the limits of our study.

  10. Evaluation of singlet oxygen explicit dosimetry for predicting treatment outcomes of benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A-mediated photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2017-02-01

    Existing dosimetric quantities do not fully account for the dynamic interactions between the key components of photodynamic therapy (PDT) or the varying PDT oxygen consumption rates for different fluence rates. Using a macroscopic model, reacted singlet oxygen ([) was calculated and evaluated for its effectiveness as a dosimetric metric for PDT outcome. Mice bearing radiation-induced fibrosarcoma tumors were treated with benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD) at a drug-light interval of 3 h with various in-air fluences (30 to 350 J/cm2) and in-air fluence rates (50 to 150 mW/cm2). Explicit measurements of BPD concentration and tissue optical properties were performed and used to calculate [, photobleaching ratio, and PDT dose. For four mice, in situ measurements of O23 and BPD concentration were monitored in real time and used to validate the in-vivo photochemical parameters. Changes in tumor volume following treatment were used to determine the cure index, CI=1-k/kctr, where k and kctr are the tumor regrowth rates with PDT and without PDT, respectively. The correlation between CI and the dose metrics showed that the calculated [ at 3 mm is an effective dosimetric quantity for predicting treatment outcome and a clinically relevant tumor regrowth endpoint.

  11. Effect of different breathing patterns in the same patient on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy dosimetry for primary renal cell carcinoma: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Siva, Shankar

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) targets requires motion management strategies to verify dose delivery. This case study highlights the effect of a change in patient breathing amplitude on the dosimetry to organs at risk and target structures. A 73-year-old male patient was planned for receiving 26 Gy of radiation in 1 fraction of SABR for a left primary RCC. The patient was simulated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and the tumor internal target volume (ITV) was delineated using the 4DCT maximum intensity projection. However, the initially planned treatment was abandoned at the radiation oncologist's discretion after pretreatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) motion verification identified a greater than 50% reduction in superior to inferior diaphragm motion as compared with the planning 4DCT. This patient was resimulated with respiratory coaching instructions. To assess the effect of the change in breathing on the dosimetry to the target, each plan was recalculated on the data set representing the change in breathing condition. A change from smaller to larger breathing showed a 46% loss in planning target volume (PTV) coverage, whereas a change from larger breathing to smaller breathing resulted in an 8% decrease in PTV coverage. ITV coverage was similarly reduced by 8% in both scenarios. This case study highlights the importance of tools to verify breathing motion prior to treatment delivery. 4D image guided radiation therapy verification strategies should focus on not only verifying ITV margin coverage but also the effect on the surrounding organs at risk.

  12. Effect of different breathing patterns in the same patient on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy dosimetry for primary renal cell carcinoma: a case study.

    PubMed

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Siva, Shankar

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) targets requires motion management strategies to verify dose delivery. This case study highlights the effect of a change in patient breathing amplitude on the dosimetry to organs at risk and target structures. A 73-year-old male patient was planned for receiving 26Gy of radiation in 1 fraction of SABR for a left primary RCC. The patient was simulated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and the tumor internal target volume (ITV) was delineated using the 4DCT maximum intensity projection. However, the initially planned treatment was abandoned at the radiation oncologist's discretion after pretreatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) motion verification identified a greater than 50% reduction in superior to inferior diaphragm motion as compared with the planning 4DCT. This patient was resimulated with respiratory coaching instructions. To assess the effect of the change in breathing on the dosimetry to the target, each plan was recalculated on the data set representing the change in breathing condition. A change from smaller to larger breathing showed a 46% loss in planning target volume (PTV) coverage, whereas a change from larger breathing to smaller breathing resulted in an 8% decrease in PTV coverage. ITV coverage was similarly reduced by 8% in both scenarios. This case study highlights the importance of tools to verify breathing motion prior to treatment delivery. 4D image guided radiation therapy verification strategies should focus on not only verifying ITV margin coverage but also the effect on the surrounding organs at risk.

  13. PEG spacer gel and adaptive planning vs single plan in external prostate radiotherapy—clinical dosimetry evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Spacer gel is used to reduce the rectal dose in prostate radiotherapy. It is injected to increase the distance between the prostate and rectum. During the course of external radiotherapy treatment, physiological changes in rectal volume exist. When using polyethylene glycol material, such as DuraSeal® (Covidien, Mansfield, MA), gel resorption also occurs. Together, these factors alter the original dose plan distribution. Methods: External dose planning and calculations were simulated using images acquired from 10 patients who were treated with brachytherapy and gel. The CT series was taken relative to gel injection: pre 1 day, post 1 day, post 1 month and post 2 months. Adaptive planning was compared with a single plan. Results: Adaptive planning shows better results compared with the single plan used in the total treatment course; however, the effect is minor. Conclusion: Gel usage is clearly favourable to rectal DVH. Using adaptive planning with gel improves rectal DVH but is not necessary according to this study. Advances in knowledge: Spacer gel is used in prostate radiotherapy to increase distance between the prostate and the rectum, thus reducing the rectal doses. During the treatment course, gel resorption exists which affects the rectal doses. The usefulness of adaptive planning to compensate this resorption effect has not been studied before. PMID:26370300

  14. WE-EF-BRA-02: A Monte Carlo Study of Macroscopic and Microscopic Dose Descriptors for Kilovoltage Cellular Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, P; Thomson, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate how doses to cellular (microscopic) targets depend on cell morphology, and how cellular doses relate to doses to bulk tissues and water for 20 to 370 keV photon sources using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Simulation geometries involve cell clusters, single cells, and single nuclear cavities embedded in various healthy and cancerous bulk tissue phantoms. A variety of nucleus and cytoplasm elemental compositions are investigated. Cell and nucleus radii range from 5 to 10 microns and 2 to 9 microns, respectively. Doses to water and bulk tissue cavities are compared to nucleus and cytoplasm doses. Results: Variations in cell dose with simulation geometry are most pronounced for lower energy sources. Nuclear doses are sensitive to the surrounding geometry: the nuclear dose in a multicell model differs from the dose to a cavity of nuclear medium in an otherwise homogeneous bulk tissue phantom by more than 7% at 20 keV. Nuclear doses vary with cell size by up to 20% at 20 keV, with 10% differences persisting up to 90 keV. Bulk tissue and water cavity doses differ from cellular doses by up to 16%. MC results are compared to cavity theory predictions; large and small cavity theories qualitatively predict nuclear doses for energies below and above 50 keV, respectively. Burlin’s (1969) intermediate cavity theory best predicts MC results with an average discrepancy of 4%. Conclusion: Cellular doses vary as a function of source energy, subcellular compartment size, elemental composition, and tissue morphology. Neither water nor bulk tissue is an appropriate surrogate for subcellular targets in radiation dosimetry. The influence of microscopic inhomogeneities in the surrounding environment on the nuclear dose and the importance of the nucleus as a target for radiation-induced cell death emphasizes the potential importance of cellular dosimetry for understanding radiation effects. Funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

  15. Internal dosimetry: towards harmonisation and coordination of research.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M A; Etherington, G; Castellani, C M; Franck, D; Hurtgen, C; Marsh, J W; Nosske, D; Breustedt, B; Blanchardon, E; Andrasi, A; Bailey, M R; Balashazy, I; Battisti, P; Bérard, P; Birchall, A; Broggio, D; Challeton-de-Vathaire, C; Cruz-Suarez, R; Doerfel, H; Giussani, A; Hodgson, A; Koukouliou, V; Kramer, G H; Le Guen, B; Luciani, A; Malatova, I; Molokanov, A; Moraleda, M; Muikku, M; Oeh, U; Puncher, M; Rahola, T; Stradling, N; Vrba, T

    2008-01-01

    The CONRAD Project is a Coordinated Network for Radiation Dosimetry funded by the European Commission 6th Framework Programme. The activities developed within CONRAD Work Package 5 ('Coordination of Research on Internal Dosimetry') have contributed to improve the harmonisation and reliability in the assessment of internal doses. The tasks carried out included a study of uncertainties and the refinement of the IDEAS Guidelines associated with the evaluation of doses after intakes of radionuclides. The implementation and quality assurance of new biokinetic models for dose assessment and the first attempt to develop a generic dosimetric model for DTPA therapy are important WP5 achievements. Applications of voxel phantoms and Monte Carlo simulations for the assessment of intakes from in vivo measurements were also considered. A Nuclear Emergency Monitoring Network (EUREMON) has been established for the interpretation of monitoring data after accidental or deliberate releases of radionuclides. Finally, WP5 group has worked on the update of the existing IDEAS bibliographic, internal contamination and case evaluation databases. A summary of CONRAD WP5 objectives and results is presented here.

  16. Vapor Dosimetry in the Nose and Upper Airways of Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Thrall, Karla D.

    2010-04-01

    A number of methodologies have been reported for measuring vapor uptake efficiencies in the upper respiratory tract of experimental animals (1). Hybrid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, as described by Frederick et al. (2) that incorporate information on the anatomy of both rats and humans have been used to improve interspecies dosimetric corrections for human health risk assessments. However, validation of these models requires sufficient experimental data, and robust data defining the role of the upper respiratory tract in modulating the absorption of gases and vapors in human volunteers, are lacking. A survey of the available literature shows a limited number of experimental studies to evaluate the dosimetry of vapors in the nose and upper airways of humans. The scarcity of literature data undoubtedly reflects the complication of conducting controlled studies in human volunteers, and with the exception of a few limited studies, little experimental data is available. This chapter will highlight studies specific for nasal dosimetry data from humans and briefly review modeling approaches for predictive extrapolations from animal data.

  17. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.; MacLellan, J.A.; Long, M.P.

    1994-07-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project, as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy and its Hanford contractors. Project services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessment of potential intakes and internal dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. Specific chapters deal with the following subjects: practices of the project, including interpretation of applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for assessment, documentation, and reporting of doses; assessment of internal dose, including summary explanations of when and how assessments are performed; recording and reporting practices for internal dose; selection of workers for bioassay monitoring and establishment of type and frequency of bioassay measurements; capability and scheduling of bioassay monitoring services; recommended dosimetry response to potential internal exposure incidents; quality control and quality assurance provisions of the program.

  18. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained.

  19. Fast neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period.

  20. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL,; MOMENI, H.

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for application to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.

  1. Home Start Evaluation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    High/Scope Educational Research Foundation, Ypsilanti, MI.

    Case studies of eight Home Start programs are given as the third section of an evaluation study. Communities involved are Binghamton, New York; Franklin, North Carolina; Cleveland, Ohio; Harrogate, Tennessee; Houston, Texas; Weslaco, Texas; Millville, Utah; Parkersburg, West Virginia. Although each study varies in format, each describes in detail…

  2. Computational methods in radionuclide dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardiès, M.; Myers, M. J.

    1996-10-01

    The various approaches in radionuclide dosimetry depend on the size and spatial relation of the sources and targets considered in conjunction with the emission range of the radionuclide used. We present some of the frequently reported computational techniques on the basis of the source/target size. For whole organs, or for sources or targets bigger than some centimetres, the acknowledged standard was introduced 30 years ago by the MIRD committee and is still being updated. That approach, based on the absorbed fraction concept, is mainly used for radioprotection purposes but has been updated to take into account the dosimetric challenge raised by therapeutic use of vectored radiopharmaceuticals. At this level, the most important computational effort is in the field of photon dosimetry. On the millimetre scale, photons can often be disregarded, and or electron dosimetry is generally reported. Heterogeneities at this level are mainly above the cell level, involving groups of cell or a part of an organ. The dose distribution pattern is often calculated by generalizing a point source dose distribution, but direct calculation by Monte Carlo techniques is also frequently reported because it allows media of inhomogeneous density to be considered. At the cell level, and electron (low-range or Auger) are the predominant emissions examined. Heterogeneities in the dose distribution are taken into account, mainly to determine the mean dose at the nucleus. At the DNA level, Auger electrons or -particles are considered from a microdosimetric point of view. These studies are often connected with radiobiological experiments on radionuclide toxicity.

  3. EPR DOSIMETRY STUDY FOR POPULATION RESIDING IN THE VICINITY OF FALLOUT TRACE FOR NUCLEAR TEST ON 7 AUGUST 1962.

    PubMed

    Zhumadilov, Kassym Sh; Ivannikov, Alexander I; Stepanenko, Valeriy F; Toyoda, Shin; Skvortsov, Valeriy G; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2016-12-01

    The method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry using extracted teeth has been applied to human tooth enamel to obtain individual absorbed doses of residents of settlements in the vicinity of the central axis of radioactive fallout trace from the contaminating surface nuclear test on 7 August 1962. Most of the settlements (Kurchatov, Akzhar, Begen, Buras, Grachi, Mayskoe, Semenovka) are located from 70 to 120 km to the North-East from the epicenter of the explosion at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS). This region is basically an agricultural region. A total of 57 teeth samples were collected from these sites. Eight teeth from residents of the Kokpekty settlement, which was not subjected to any radioactive contamination and located 400 km to the Southeast from SNTS, were chosen as a control. The principal findings, using this method, were that the average excess dose obtained after subtraction of the natural background radiation was 13 mGy and ranged up to about 100 mGy all for residents in this region.

  4. Detection and dosimetry studies on the response of silicon diodes to an 241Am-Be source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfi, Y.; Zaki Dizaji, H.; Abbasi Davani, F.

    2014-06-01

    Silicon diode detectors show potential for the development of an active personal dosimeter for neutron and photon radiation. Photons interact with the constituents of the diode detector and produce electrons. Fast neutrons interact with the constituents of the diode detector and converter, producing recoil nuclei and causing (n,α) and (n,p) reactions. These photon- and neutron-induced charged particles contribute to the response of diode detectors. In this work, a silicon pin diode was used as a detector to produce pulses created by photon and neutron. A polyethylene fast neutron converter was used as a recoil proton source in front of the detector. The total registered photon and neutron efficiency and the partial contributions of the efficiency, due to interactions with the diode and converter, were calculated. The results show that the efficiency of the converter-diode is a function of the incident photon and neutron energy. The optimized thicknesses of the converter for neutron detection and neutron dosimetry were found to be 1 mm and 0.1 mm respectively. The neutron records caused by the (n,α) and (n,p) reactions were negligible. The photon records were strongly dependent upon the energy and the depletion layer of the diode. The photons and neutrons efficiency of the diode-based dosimeter was calculated by the MCNPX code, and the results were in good agreement with experimental results for photons and neutrons from an 241Am-Be source.

  5. Dosimetry and stability studies of the boron neutron capture therapy agent F-BPA-Fr using PET and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyke, Jonathan Paul

    The treatment of deep seated brain tumors such as glioblastoma Multiforme has been unsuccessful for many patients. Surgical debulking, chemotherapy and standard radiotherapy have met with limited success. Boron neutron capture therapy offers a binary mode brachytherapy based on the following capture reaction that may provide an innovative alternative to standard forms of treatment:10B + n /to/ 11B /to 7Li + 4He + 2.31 MeVBoron is chemically attached to a tumor binding compound creating a non-toxic neutron absorber. A dose of epithermal neutrons provides the catalyst to produce the lithium and alpha particles which destroy any tissue within a length of one cell diameter from the boron compound. This dissertation uses 19F-MRI and 18F-PET to provide answers to the localization and biodistribution questions that arise in such a treatment modality. Practical patient dosimetry and actual treatment planning using the PET data is also examined. Finally, theoretical work done in the areas of compartmental modelling dealing with pharmacokinetic uptake of the PET radiotracer and dose analysis in microdosimetry is also presented.

  6. Develop real-time dosimetry concepts and instrumentation for long term missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braby, L. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a rugged portable dosimetry system, based on microdosimetry techniques, which will measure dose and evaluate dose equivalent in a mixed radiation field is described. Progress in the desired dosimetry system can be divided into three distinct areas: development of the radiation detector, and electron system are presented. The mathematical techniques required are investigated.

  7. Dosimetry in Mammography: Average Glandular Dose Based on Homogeneous Phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, Luis A.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that a clinical dosimetry protocol that utilizes a dosimetric breast phantom series based on population anthropometric measurements can reliably predict the average glandular dose (AGD) imparted to the patient during a routine screening mammogram. AGD was calculated using entrance skin exposure and dose conversion factors based on fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness, mammography unit parameters and modifying parameters for homogeneous phantom (phantom factor), compressed breast lateral dimensions (volume factor) and anatomical features (anatomical factor). The patient fibroglandular content was evaluated using a calibrated modified breast tissue equivalent homogeneous phantom series (BRTES-MOD) designed from anthropomorphic measurements of a screening mammography population and whose elemental composition was referenced to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 44 and 46 tissues. The patient fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness along with unit parameters and spectrum half-value layer were used to derive the currently used dose conversion factor (DgN). The study showed that the use of a homogeneous phantom, patient compressed breast lateral dimensions and patient anatomical features can affect AGD by as much as 12%, 3% and 1%, respectively. The protocol was found to be superior to existing methodologies. The clinical dosimetry protocol developed in this study can reliably predict the AGD imparted to an individual patient during a routine screening mammogram.

  8. Dosimetry in Mammography: Average Glandular Dose Based on Homogeneous Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Benevides, Luis A.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2011-05-05

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that a clinical dosimetry protocol that utilizes a dosimetric breast phantom series based on population anthropometric measurements can reliably predict the average glandular dose (AGD) imparted to the patient during a routine screening mammogram. AGD was calculated using entrance skin exposure and dose conversion factors based on fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness, mammography unit parameters and modifying parameters for homogeneous phantom (phantom factor), compressed breast lateral dimensions (volume factor) and anatomical features (anatomical factor). The patient fibroglandular content was evaluated using a calibrated modified breast tissue equivalent homogeneous phantom series (BRTES-MOD) designed from anthropomorphic measurements of a screening mammography population and whose elemental composition was referenced to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 44 and 46 tissues. The patient fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness along with unit parameters and spectrum half-value layer were used to derive the currently used dose conversion factor (DgN). The study showed that the use of a homogeneous phantom, patient compressed breast lateral dimensions and patient anatomical features can affect AGD by as much as 12%, 3% and 1%, respectively. The protocol was found to be superior to existing methodologies. The clinical dosimetry protocol developed in this study can reliably predict the AGD imparted to an individual patient during a routine screening mammogram.

  9. Mixed radiation field dosimetry utilizing Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hintenlang, D.

    1991-12-31

    This project has proposed to develop a novel dosimetry system that is capable of directly evaluating the chemical/biological damage caused by neutrons, photons, or both in a single measurement. The dosimeter itself will consist of a small volume of biological equivalent material that is probed for radiation damage with Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques. NQR has previously been utilized as a sensitive probe of structural and chemical changes at the molecular level for a variety of organic compounds. The biological equivalent materials used in this study will not only have a density similar to tissue (tissue equivalent) but will have the same atomic components as tissue. This is a significant requirement if the important neutron interactions that occur in tissue are to occur in the dosimeter as well. The overall objective of this study is to investigate a methodology to perform accurate mixed-field (neutron and photon) dosimetry for biological systems.

  10. Study of the Impact of Tissue Density Heterogeneities on 3-Dimensional Abdominal Dosimetry: Comparison Between Dose Kernel Convolution and Direct Monte Carlo Methods

    PubMed Central

    Dieudonné, Arnaud; Hobbs, Robert F.; Lebtahi, Rachida; Maurel, Fabien; Baechler, Sébastien; Wahl, Richard L.; Boubaker, Ariane; Le Guludec, Dominique; Sgouros, Georges; Gardin, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Dose kernel convolution (DK) methods have been proposed to speed up absorbed dose calculations in molecular radionuclide therapy. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of tissue density heterogeneities (TDH) on dosimetry when using a DK method and to propose a simple density-correction method. Methods This study has been conducted on 3 clinical cases: case 1, non-Hodgkin lymphoma treated with 131I-tositumomab; case 2, a neuroendocrine tumor treatment simulated with 177Lu-peptides; and case 3, hepatocellular carcinoma treated with 90Y-microspheres. Absorbed dose calculations were performed using a direct Monte Carlo approach accounting for TDH (3D-RD), and a DK approach (VoxelDose, or VD). For each individual voxel, the VD absorbed dose, DVD, calculated assuming uniform density, was corrected for density, giving DVDd. The average 3D-RD absorbed dose values, D3DRD, were compared with DVD and DVDd, using the relative difference ΔVD/3DRD. At the voxel level, density-binned ΔVD/3DRD and ΔVDd/3DRD were plotted against ρ and fitted with a linear regression. Results The DVD calculations showed a good agreement with D3DRD. ΔVD/3DRD was less than 3.5%, except for the tumor of case 1 (5.9%) and the renal cortex of case 2 (5.6%). At the voxel level, the ΔVD/3DRD range was 0%–14% for cases 1 and 2, and −3% to 7% for case 3. All 3 cases showed a linear relationship between voxel bin-averaged ΔVD/3DRD and density, ρ: case 1 (Δ = −0.56ρ + 0.62, R2 = 0.93), case 2 (Δ = −0.91ρ + 0.96, R2 = 0.99), and case 3 (Δ = −0.69ρ + 0.72, R2 = 0.91). The density correction improved the agreement of the DK method with the Monte Carlo approach (ΔVDd/3DRD < 1.1%), but with a lesser extent for the tumor of case 1 (3.1%). At the voxel level, the ΔVDd/3DRD range decreased for the 3 clinical cases (case 1, −1% to 4%; case 2, −0.5% to 1.5%, and −1.5% to 2%). No more linear regression existed for cases 2 and 3, contrary to case 1 (Δ = 0.41ρ − 0.38, R2 = 0.88) although

  11. LWR pressure vessel surveillance dosimetry improvement program: LWR power reactor surveillance physics-dosimetry data base compendium

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, W.N.

    1985-08-01

    This NRC physics-dosimetry compendium is a collation of information and data developed from available research and commercial light water reactor vessel surveillance program (RVSP) documents and related surveillance capsule reports. The data represents the results of the HEDL least-squares FERRET-SAND II Code re-evaluation of exposure units and values for 47 PWR and BWR surveillance capsules for W, B and W, CE, and GE power plants. Using a consistent set of auxiliary data and dosimetry-adjusted reactor physics results, the revised fluence values for E > 1 MeV averaged 25% higher than the originally reported values. The range of fluence values (new/old) was from a low of 0.80 to a high of 2.38. These HEDL-derived FERRET-SAND II exposure parameter values are being used for NRC-supported HEDL and other PWR and BWR trend curve data development and testing studies. These studies are providing results to support Revision 2 of Regulatory Guide 1.99. As stated by Randall (Ra84), the Guide is being updated to reflect recent studies of the physical basis for neutron radiation damage and efforts to correlate damage to chemical composition and fluence.

  12. Internal dosimetry--a review.

    PubMed

    Potter, Charles A

    2004-11-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  13. A STUDY ON THE UNCERTAINTY FOR THE ROUTINE DOSIMETRY SERVICE AT THE LEBANESE ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION USING HARSHAW 8814 DOSEMETERS.

    PubMed

    Rizk, C; Vanhavere, F

    2016-09-01

    The personal dosimetry service at the Lebanese Atomic Energy Commission uses Harshaw 8814 cards with LiF:Mg,Ti detectors. The dosemeters are read in a Harshaw 6600 TLD reader. In the process of accreditation for the ISO 17025 standard((1)), different influence factors are investigated and the uncertainty has been determined. The Individual Monitoring Service Laboratory-LAEC reads the dosemeters once it receives them from the customer, and new cards are immediately given for the next wearing period. The wearing period is 2 months. The dosemeter results are reported to the customers without background subtraction. Both Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) are reported. For this paper, only the uncertainty on Hp(10) will be focussed. The following factors are taken into account for the uncertainty: calibration factor, dosemeter homogeneity and repeatability, energy and angular dependence, non-linearity, temperature dependence, etc. Also the detection limit was determined. One of the important factors is the correction for fading. This fading correction depends on the procedure used such as storage temperatures, the time-temperature profile of the read-out, pre-heat and annealing conditions. Pre- and post-irradiation fading curves were measured for a storage period up to 182 d at room temperature (15-25°C). The resulting final combined standard uncertainty on the reported doses is of the order of 24 % for doses of ∼1 mSv. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Patient-specific dosimetry in radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Maria; Lagopati, Nefeli; Charalambatou, Paraskevi; Vamvakas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    This study presents an attempt to compare individualised palliative treatment absorbed doses, by planar images data and Monte Carlo simulation, in two in vivo treatment cases, one of bone metastases and the other of liver lesions. Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema was employed to estimate the absorbed doses. Radiopharmaceutical volume distributions and absorbed doses in the lesions as well as in critical organs were also calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. Individualised planar data calculations remain the method of choice in internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine, but with the disadvantage of attenuation and scatter corrections lack and organ overlay. The overall error is about 7 % for planar data calculations compared with that using Monte Carlo simulation. Patient-specific three-dimensional dosimetric calculations using single-photon emission computed tomography with a parallel computed tomography study is proposed as an accurate internal dosimetry with the additional use of dose-volume histograms, which express dose distributions in cases with obvious inhomogeneity.

  15. Trigeminal neuralgia treatment dosimetry of the Cyberknife

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Anthony; Lo, Anthony T.; Dieterich, Sonja; Soltys, Scott G.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steve G.; Adler, John R.

    2012-04-01

    There are 2 Cyberknife units at Stanford University. The robot of 1 Cyberknife is positioned on the patient's right, whereas the second is on the patient's left. The present study examines whether there is any difference in dosimetry when we are treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia when the target is on the right side or the left side of the patient. In addition, we also study whether Monte Carlo dose calculation has any effect on the dosimetry. We concluded that the clinical and dosimetric outcomes of CyberKnife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia are independent of the robot position. Monte Carlo calculation algorithm may be useful in deriving the dose necessary for trigeminal neuralgia treatments.

  16. Improved dosimetry techniques for intravascular brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Varun

    Coronary artery disease leads to the accumulation of atheromatous plaque leading to coronary stenosis. Coronary intervention techniques such as balloon angioplasty and atherectomy are used to address coronary stenosis and establish a stable lumen thus enhancing blood flow to the myocardium. Restenosis or re-blockage of the arteries is a major limitation of the above mentioned interventional techniques. Neointimal hyperplasia or proliferation of cells in response to the vascular injury as a result of coronary intervention is considered to be one of the major causes of restenosis. Recent studies indicated that irradiation of the coronary lesion site, with radiation doses ranging from 15 to 30 Gy, leads to diminishing neointimal hyperplasia with subsequent reduction in restenosis. The radiation dose is given by catheter-based radiation delivery systems using beta-emitters 90Sr/90Y, 32P and gamma-emitting 192Ir among others. However the dose schema used for dose prescription for these sources are relatively simplistic, and are based on calculations using uniform homogenous water or tissue media and simple cylinder geometry. Stenotic coronary vessels are invariably lined with atheromatous plaque of heterogeneous composition, the radiation dose distribution obtained from such dosimetry data can cause significant variations in the actual dose received by a given patient. Such discrepancies in dose calculation can introduce relatively large uncertainties in the limits of dose window for effective and safe application of intravascular brachytherapy, and consequently in the clinical evaluation of the efficacy of this modality. In this research study we investigated the effect of different geometrical and material heterogeneities, including residual plaque, catheter non-centering, lesion eccentricity and cardiac motion on the radiation dose delivered at the lesion site. Correction factors including dose perturbation factors and dose variation factors have been calculated

  17. Permethrin Exposure Dosimetry: Biomarkers and Modifiable Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    the effect of body weight/BMI and total energy expenditure on permethrin absorption and dose, as determined by measurement of urinary biomarkers...Data collection for Study 2 is in progress. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Permethrin, biomarkers, military, dose, exposure dosimetry, military, energy expenditure...body weight/BMI and total energy expenditure on permethrin absorption and dose, as determined by measurement of urinary biomarkers (3PBA and cis- and

  18. Clinical investigations of a CVD diamond detector for radiotherapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Betzel, G T; Lansley, S P; Baluti, F; Reinisch, L; Meyer, J

    2012-04-01

    X-ray detectors based on single crystal diamond film made via chemical vapor deposition were investigated to evaluate their performance under clinically relevant conditions for radiotherapy dosimetry. Studies focused on repeatability, dose rate dependence, tissue phantom ratios, output factors and beam profiling. Repeatability experiments revealed a temporary loss in sensitivity due to charge detrapping effects following irradiation, which was modeled to make corrections that improved short-term precision. Dose rate dependence was observed (Fowler fitting parameter Δ = 0.96 ± 0.2) using dose rates up to ~2 Gy min(-1). The detector statistically distinguished (n = 5, P < 0.05) between dose values separated by 7.7 × 10(-3) Gy (1 MU). Depth dose measurements from 1 to 15 cm and output factors using 3 × 3 to 10 × 10 cm2 field sizes compared well with a Farmer ion chamber (<1.3% difference). Output factor measurements indicate encouraging results for fields sizes <4 × 4 cm2. Off-axis measurements showed that perturbation of the beam could be reduced when the detector is used in the edge-on orientation due to its thin-film sandwich configuration and ~200 nm thick Ag contacts. This relatively inexpensive detector has potential to be used for routine dosimetry using conventional radiotherapy instrumentation. Copyright © 2011 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nonuniform irradiation of the canine intestine. II. Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, G.H.; Mohaupt, T.H.; Taylor, P.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Dubois, A.; Vigneulle, R.M. )

    1990-01-01

    An experimental model has been developed for quantitative studies of radiobiological damage to the canine small intestine following partial-body nonuniform irradiation. Animals were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays to simulate the nonuniform irradiation which do occur in victims of radiation accidents. The model used a short source-to-surface distance for unilateral irradiations to produce a dose gradient of a factor of two laterally across the canine intestinal region. The remainder of the animal's body was shielded to prevent lethal damage to the bone marrow. In situ dosimetry measurements were made using thermoluminescent dosimeters to determine the radiation dose delivered as a function of position along a segment of the small intestine. This system made it possible to correlate the radiation dose delivered at a specific point along the small intestine with the macroscopic and microscopic appearance of the intestinal mucosa at that point, as determined by direct observation and biopsy using a fiberoptic endoscope. A key feature of this model is that dosimetry data for multiple sites, which receive a graded range of radiation doses, can be correlated with biological measurements to obtain a dose-response curve. This model is being used to evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutic procedures to improve survival following nonuniform irradiation.

  20. Student Perceptions of an Online Medical Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lenards, Nishele

    2011-07-01

    The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse offers the first online medical dosimetry program in the nation. There is no data to research a program of this type. This research consisted of the evaluation of other distance education programs including health profession programs in addition to face-to-face medical dosimetry programs. There was a need to collect and analyze student perceptions of online learning in medical dosimetry. This research provided a guide for future implementation by other programs as well as validated the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse program. Methodology used consisted of an electronic survey sent to all previous and currently enrolled students in the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse medical dosimetry program. The survey was both quantitative and qualitative in demonstrating attitudinal perceptions of students in the program. Quantitative data was collected and analyzed using a 5-point Likert scale. Qualitative data was gathered based on the open-ended responses and the identifying themes from the responses. The results demonstrated an overall satisfaction with this program, the instructor, and the online courses. Students felt a sense of belonging to the courses and the program. Considering that a majority of the students had never taken an online course previously, the students felt there were no technology issues. Future research should include an evaluation of board exam statistics for students enrolled in the online and face-to-face medical dosimetry programs.

  1. The impact of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields on chronic well-being in young people--a cross-sectional study based on personal dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Sabine; Thomas, Silke; Heumann, Christian; von Kries, Rüdiger; Radon, Katja

    2011-01-01

    A possible influence of radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF EMF) exposure on health outcomes was investigated in various studies. The main problem of previous studies was exposure assessment. The aim of our study was the investigation of a possible association between RF EMF and chronic well-being in young persons using personal dosimetry. 3022 children and adolescents were randomly selected from the population registries of four Bavarian cities in Germany (participation 52%). Personal interview data on chronic symptoms, socio-demographic characteristics and potential confounders were collected. A 24-h radio frequency exposure profile was generated using a personal dosimeter. Exposure levels over waking hours were expressed as mean percentage of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) reference level. Half of the children and nearly every adolescent owned a mobile phone which was used only for short durations per day. Measured exposure was far below the current ICNIRP reference levels. The most reported chronic symptom in children and adolescents was fatigue. No statistically significant association between measured exposure and chronic symptoms was observed. Our results do not indicate an association between measured exposure to RF EMF and chronic well-being in children and adolescents. Prospective studies investigating potential long-term effects of RF EMF are necessary to confirm our results. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. EANM Dosimetry Committee guidelines for bone marrow and whole-body dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Hindorf, Cecilia; Glatting, Gerhard; Chiesa, Carlo; Lindén, Ola; Flux, Glenn

    2010-06-01

    The level of administered activity in radionuclide therapy is often limited by haematological toxicity resulting from the absorbed dose delivered to the bone marrow. The purpose of these EANM guidelines is to provide advice to scientists and clinicians on data acquisition and data analysis related to bone-marrow and whole-body dosimetry. The guidelines are divided into sections "Data acquisition" and "Data analysis". The Data acquisition section provides advice on the measurements required for accurate dosimetry including blood samples, quantitative imaging and/or whole-body measurements with a single probe. Issues specific to given radiopharmaceuticals are considered. The Data analysis section provides advice on the calculation of absorbed doses to the whole body and the bone marrow. The total absorbed dose to the bone marrow consists of contributions from activity in the bone marrow itself (self-absorbed dose) and the cross-absorbed dose to the bone marrow from activity in bone, larger organs and the remainder of the body. As radionuclide therapy enters an era where patient-specific dosimetry is used to guide treatments, accurate bone-marrow and whole-body dosimetry will become an essential element of treatment planning. We hope that these guidelines will provide a basis for the optimization and standardization of the treatment of cancer with radiopharmaceuticals, which will facilitate single- and multi-centre radionuclide therapy studies.

  3. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Marchetto, F.; Sacchi, R.; Giordanengo, S.; Monaco, V.

    2013-07-01

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  4. Handbook for the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program for personnel dosimetry systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The program contained in this Handbook provides a significant advance in the field of radiation protection through a structured means for assuring the quality of personnel dosimetry performance. Since personnel dosimetry performance is directly related to the assurance of worker safety, it has been of key interest to the Department of Energy. Studies conducted over the past three decades have clearly demonstrated a need for personnel dosimetry performance criteria, related testing programs, and improvements in dosimetry technology. In responding to these needs, the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (EH) has developed and initiated a DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) which is intended to improve the quality of personnel dosimetry through (1) performance testing, (2) dosimetry and calibration intercomparisons, and (3) applied research. In the interest of improving dosimetry technology, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is also designed to encourage cooperation and technical interchange between DOE laboratories. Dosimetry intercomparison programs have been scheduled which include the use of transport standard instruments, transport standard radioactive sources and special dosimeters. The dosimeters used in the intercomparison program are designed to obtain optimum data on the comparison of dosimetry calibration methodologies and capabilities. This data is used in part to develop enhanced calibration protocols. In the interest of overall calibration update, assistance and guidance for the calibration of personnel dosimeters is available through the DOELAP support laboratories. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Static magnetic field therapy: dosimetry considerations.

    PubMed

    Colbert, Agatha P; Markov, Marko S; Souder, James S

    2008-06-01

    The widespread use of static magnetic field (SMF) therapy as a self-care physical intervention has led to the conduct of numerous randomized controlled trials (RCTs). A recent systematic review of SMF trials for pain reduction concluded that the evidence does not support the use of permanent magnets for pain relief. We argue that this conclusion is unwarranted if the SMF dosage was inadequate or inappropriate for the clinical condition treated. The purpose of this communication is to (1) provide a rationale and an explanation for each of 10 essential SMF dosing parameters that should be considered when conducting trials of SMF therapy, and (2) advocate for the conduct of Phase I studies to optimize SMF dosimetry for each condition prior to implementing a large-scale RCT. A previous critical review of SMF dosimetry in 56 clinical studies found that reporting SMF dosages in a majority of those studies was of such poor quality that the magnetic field exposure at the target tissue could not be characterized. Without knowing what magnetic field actually reached the target, it is impossible to judge dosage adequacy. In order to quantify SMF exposure at the site of pathology (target tissue/s), that site must be clearly named; the distance of the permanent magnet surface from the target must be delineated; the physical parameters of the applied permanent magnet must be described; and the dosing regimen must be precisely reported. If the SMF dosimetry is inadequate, any inferences drawn from reported negative findings are questionable.

  6. Fifth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, E.E.; Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.

    1992-05-01

    This meeting was held to exchange information on how to get better estimates of the radiation absorbed dose. There seems to be a high interest of late in patient dosimetry; discussions were held in the light of revised risk estimates for radiation. Topics included: Strategies of Dose Assessment; Dose Estimation for Radioimmunotherapy; Dose Calculation Techniques and Models; Dose Estimation for Positron Emission Tomography (PET); Kinetics for Dose Estimation; and Small Scale Dosimetry and Microdosimetry. (VC)

  7. The International Reactor Dosimetry File.

    SciTech Connect

    DUNFORD, CHARLIE

    2008-08-07

    Version 01 The International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-2002) contains recommended neutron cross-section data to be used for reactor neutron dosimetry by foil activation and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. It also contains selected recom�mended values for radiation damage cross-sections and benchmark neutron spectra. Two related programs available from NEADB and RSICC are: SPECTER-ANL (PSR-263) & STAY’SL (PSR-113).

  8. Remote optical fiber dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, A. L.; Justus, B. L.; Falkenstein, P. L.; Miller, R. W.; Ning, H.; Altemus, R.

    2001-09-01

    Optical fibers offer a unique capability for remote monitoring of radiation in difficult-to-access and/or hazardous locations. Optical fiber sensors can be located in radiation hazardous areas and optically interrogated from a safe distance. A variety of remote optical fiber radiation dosimetry methods have been developed. All of the methods take advantage of some form of radiation-induced change in the optical properties of materials such as: radiation-induced darkening due to defect formation in glasses, luminescence from native defects or radiation-induced defects, or population of metastable charge trapping centers. Optical attenuation techniques are used to measure radiation-induced darkening in fibers. Luminescence techniques include the direct measurement of scintillation or optical excitation of radiation-induced luminescent defects. Optical fiber radiation dosimeters have also been constructed using charge trapping materials that exhibit thermoluminescence or optically stimulated luminescence (OSL).

  9. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-01

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  10. Dosimetry considerations in phototherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Profio, A.E.; Doiron, D.R.

    1981-03-01

    Dosimetry in phototherapy involves a determination of the energy absorbed per unit mass of tissue, corrected for the quantum yield in a photochemical reaction. The dose rate in photochemotherapy of cancer with hematoporphyrin derivative and visible light is related to the extinction coefficient, quantum yield for singlet oxygen production, concentration of sensitizer and energy flux density at depth. Data or methods of determining these quantities are presented. Calculations have been performed for the energy flux density at depth, as a function of the total attenuation coefficient and ratio of scattering coefficient to total attenuation coefficient, for isotropic scattering in slab geometry. For small absorption, these depth dose curves exhibit a maximum within the tissue followed by an exponential decrease.

  11. Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine.

    PubMed

    Chu, R Y; Ekeh, S; Basmadjian, G

    1989-01-01

    Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine labeled with radioactive iodine was determined by measuring the biodistribution of 131I-iodoantipyrine in 41 female rabbits. Following administration of the radiopharmaceutical, subjects were killed at 0.5, 6, 12, 17, 24, 36, and 48 h. Organs and samples of tissues and body fluids were assayed. Results were corrected for physical decay. Exponential functions were employed to describe the time-concentration curves; representative value would be the biological half life of 9.96 +/- 0.55 h for blood. Cumulated activity estimates for 123I, 125I and 131I were then computed. Extrapolation to absorbed dose in humans followed the formulation of the Medical International Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The whole body absorbed doses are 7 mu Gray, 5 mu Gray and 29 mu Gray per MBq of 123I, 125I, and 131I administered respectively.

  12. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-05

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  13. Pyrolysis system evaluation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of two different pyrolysis concepts which recover energy from solid waste was conducted in order to determine the merits of each concept for integration into a Integrated Utility System (IUS). The two concepts evaluated were a Lead Bath Furnace Pyrolysis System and a Slagging Vertical Shaft, Partial Air Oxidation Pyrolysis System. Both concepts will produce a fuel gas from the IUS waste and sewage sludge which can be used to offset primary fuel consumption in addition to the sanitary disposal of the waste. The study evaluated the thermal integration of each concept as well as the economic impact on the IUS resulting from integrating each pyrolysis concepts. For reference, the pyrolysis concepts were also compared to incineration which was considered the baseline IUS solid waste disposal system.

  14. p-type silicon detector for brachytherapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Piermattei, A; Azario, L; Monaco, G; Soriani, A; Arcovito, G

    1995-06-01

    The sensitivity of a cylindrical p-type silicon detector was studied by means of air and water measurements using different photon beams. A lead filter cap around the diode was used to minimize the dependence of the detector response as a function of the brachytherapy photon energy. The radial dose distribution of a high-activity 192Ir source in a brachytherapy phantom was measured by means of the shielded diode and the agreement of these data with theoretical evaluations confirms the method used to compensate diode response in the intermediate energy range. The diode sensitivity was constant over a wide range of dose rates of clinical interest; this allowed one to have a small detector calibrated in terms of absorbed dose in a medium. Theoretical evaluations showed that a single shielding filter around the p-type diode is sufficient to obtain accurate dosimetry for 192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co brachytherapy sources.

  15. Skin-sparing Helical Tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal Radiotherapy for Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy: In Vivo Skin Dosimetry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, Lisa; Warkentin, Heather; MacKenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan; Amanie, John; Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew; Abdulkarim, Bassam

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. Results: With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P<.001; r = 0.44, P=.03, respectively) and the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.73, P<.001; r = 0.88, P<.001, respectively). With 3D-CRT there was a significant correlation in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.45, P=.03; r = 0.68, P<.001, respectively); the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.62, P=.001; r = 0.86, P<.001, respectively); and the mid neck (r = 0.42, P=.04, respectively). On average, HT-calculated dose overestimated the measured dose by 14%; 3D-CRT underestimated the dose by 0.4%. There was a borderline association between highest measured skin dose and moist desquamation (P=.05). Skin-sparing HT had greater skin homogeneity (homogeneity index of 1.39 vs 1.65, respectively; P=.005) than 3D-CRT plans. HT plans had a lower skin{sub V50} (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin{sub V40} and skin{sub V30} (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. Conclusion: The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients

  16. Skin-sparing helical tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal radiotherapy for adjuvant breast radiotherapy: in vivo skin dosimetry study.

    PubMed

    Capelle, Lisa; Warkentin, Heather; Mackenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan; Amanie, John; Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew; Abdulkarim, Bassam

    2012-08-01

    We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P<.001; r = 0.44, P=.03, respectively) and the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.73, P<.001; r = 0.88, P<.001, respectively). With 3D-CRT there was a significant correlation in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.45, P=.03; r = 0.68, P<.001, respectively); the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.62, P=.001; r = 0.86, P<.001, respectively); and the mid neck (r = 0.42, P=.04, respectively). On average, HT-calculated dose overestimated the measured dose by 14%; 3D-CRT underestimated the dose by 0.4%. There was a borderline association between highest measured skin dose and moist desquamation (P=.05). Skin-sparing HT had greater skin homogeneity (homogeneity index of 1.39 vs 1.65, respectively; P=.005) than 3D-CRT plans. HT plans had a lower skin(V50) (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin(V40) and skin(V30) (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients receiving adjuvant breast RT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All

  17. 1983 international intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimetry systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Greene, R.T.; Sims, C.S.

    1985-04-01

    An international intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimetry systems was conducted during September 12-16, 1983, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the Health Physics Research Reactor operated in the pulse mode to simulate criticality accidents. This study marked the twentieth in a series of annual accident dosimetry intercomparisons conducted at ORNL. Participants from ten organizations attended this intercomparison and measured neutron and gamma doses at area monitoring stations and on phantoms for three different shield conditions. Results of this study indicate that foil activation techniques are the most popular and accurate method of determining accident-level neutron doses at area monitoring stations. For personnel monitoring, foil activation, blood sodium activation, and thermoluminescent (TL) methods are all capable of providing accurate dose estimates in a variety of radiation fields. All participants in this study used TLD's to determine gamma doses with very good results on the average. Chemical dosemeters were also shown to be capable of yielding accurate estimates of total neutron plus gamma doses in a variety of radiation fields. While 83% of all neutron measurements satisfied regulatory standards relative to reference values, only 39% of all gamma results satisfied corresponding guidelines for gamma measurements. These results indicate that continued improvement in accident dosimetry evaluation and measurement techniques is needed.

  18. Dosimetry tools and techniques for IMRT.

    PubMed

    Low, Daniel A; Moran, Jean M; Dempsey, James F; Dong, Lei; Oldham, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) poses a number of challenges for properly measuring commissioning data and quality assurance (QA) radiation dose distributions. This report provides a comprehensive overview of how dosimeters, phantoms, and dose distribution analysis techniques should be used to support the commissioning and quality assurance requirements of an IMRT program. The proper applications of each dosimeter are described along with the limitations of each system. Point detectors, arrays, film, and electronic portal imagers are discussed with respect to their proper use, along with potential applications of 3D dosimetry. Regardless of the IMRT technique utilized, some situations require the use of multiple detectors for the acquisition of accurate commissioning data. The overall goal of this task group report is to provide a document that aids the physicist in the proper selection and use of the dosimetry tools available for IMRT QA and to provide a resource for physicists that describes dosimetry measurement techniques for purposes of IMRT commissioning and measurement-based characterization or verification of IMRT treatment plans. This report is not intended to provide a comprehensive review of commissioning and QA procedures for IMRT. Instead, this report focuses on the aspects of metrology, particularly the practical aspects of measurements that are unique to IMRT. The metrology of IMRT concerns the application of measurement instruments and their suitability, calibration, and quality control of measurements. Each of the dosimetry measurement tools has limitations that need to be considered when incorporating them into a commissioning process or a comprehensive QA program. For example, routine quality assurance procedures require the use of robust field dosimetry systems. These often exhibit limitations with respect to spatial resolution or energy response and need to themselves be commissioned against more established dosimeters. A chain of

  19. Bayesian Methods for Radiation Detection and Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Peter G. Groer

    2002-09-29

    We performed work in three areas: radiation detection, external and internal radiation dosimetry. In radiation detection we developed Bayesian techniques to estimate the net activity of high and low activity radioactive samples. These techniques have the advantage that the remaining uncertainty about the net activity is described by probability densities. Graphs of the densities show the uncertainty in pictorial form. Figure 1 below demonstrates this point. We applied stochastic processes for a method to obtain Bayesian estimates of 222Rn-daughter products from observed counting rates. In external radiation dosimetry we studied and developed Bayesian methods to estimate radiation doses to an individual with radiation induced chromosome aberrations. We analyzed chromosome aberrations after exposure to gammas and neutrons and developed a method for dose-estimation after criticality accidents. The research in internal radiation dosimetry focused on parameter estimation for compartmental models from observed compartmental activities. From the estimated probability densities of the model parameters we were able to derive the densities for compartmental activities for a two compartment catenary model at different times. We also calculated the average activities and their standard deviation for a simple two compartment model.

  20. WAZA-ARI: computational dosimetry system for X-ray CT examinations. I. Radiation transport calculation for organ and tissue doses evaluation using JM phantom.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Sato, Kaoru; Endo, Akira; Ono, Koji; Yoshitake, Takayasu; Hasegawa, Takayuki; Katsunuma, Yasushi; Ban, Nobuhiko; Kai, Michiaki

    2011-07-01

    A web system of WAZA-ARI is being developed to assess radiation dose to a patient in a computed tomography examination. WAZA-ARI uses one of organ dose data sets corresponding to the options selected by a user to describe examination conditions. The organ dose data have been derived by the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code system, combined with Japanese male (JM) phantom. The configuration of JM phantom is adjusted to the averaged JM adult. In addition, a new phantom is introduced by removing arms from JM phantom to take into account for dose calculations in torso examinations. Some of the organ doses by JM phantom without arms are compared with results obtained by using a MIRD-type phantom, which was applied in some previous dosimetry systems.

  1. A comparative radiation study at ALBA synchrotron facility between Monte Carlo modeling and radiation monitors dosimetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devienne, A.; Aymerich, N.; García-Fusté, M. J.; Queralt, X.

    2015-11-01

    ALBA is the Spanish synchrotron facility formed with a 3 GeV electron synchrotron accelerator generating bright beams of synchrotron radiation, located in Cerdanyola del Vallès (Spain). The aim of this work is to study the origin of the radiation produced inside and outside the optical hutch of BOREAS beamline, an experimental station dedicated to study the resonant absorption and scattering of the photons. The objective is to characterize the radiation at the beamline, evaluating in particular the solid bremsstrahlung component of the radiation. The results are obtained after comparing radiation monitors detectors data with Monte Carlo modeling (FLUKA), giving the characteristics of the shielding required to consider the outside of the hutch as a public zone.

  2. Development of a software tool for an internal dosimetry using MIRD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaichana, A.; Tocharoenchai, C.

    2016-03-01

    Currently, many software packages for the internal radiation dosimetry have been developed. Many of them do not provide sufficient tools to perform all of the necessary steps from nuclear medicine image analysis for dose calculation. For this reason, we developed a CALRADDOSE software that can be performed internal dosimetry using MIRD method within a single environment. MATLAB software version 2015a was used as development tool. The calculation process of this software proceeds from collecting time-activity data from image data followed by residence time calculation and absorbed dose calculation using MIRD method. To evaluate the accuracy of this software, we calculate residence times and absorbed doses of 5 Ga- 67 studies and 5 I-131 MIBG studies and then compared the results with those obtained from OLINDA/EXM software. The results showed that the residence times and absorbed doses obtained from both software packages were not statistically significant differences. The CALRADDOSE software is a user-friendly, graphic user interface-based software for internal dosimetry. It provides fast and accurate results, which may be useful for a routine work.

  3. A method for estimating occupational radiation dose to individuals, using weekly dosimetry data

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.J.; Ostrouchov, G.; Frome, E.L.; Kerr, G.D.

    1993-12-01

    Statistical analyses of data from epidemiologic studies of workers exposed to radiation have been based on recorded annual radiation doses. It is usually assumed that the annual dose values are known exactly, although it is generally recognized that the data contain uncertainty due to measurement error and bias. We propose the use of a probability distribution to describe an individual`s dose during a specific period of time. Statistical methods for estimating this dose distribution are developed. The methods take into account the ``measurement error`` that is produced by the dosimetry system, and the bias that was introduced by policies that lead to right censoring of small doses as zero. The method is applied to a sample of dose histories obtained from hard copy dosimetry records at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The result of this evaluation raises serious questions about the validity of the historical personnel dosimetry data that is currently being used in low-dose studies of nuclear industry workers. In particular, it appears that there was a systematic underestimation of doses for ORNL workers. This could result in biased estimates of dose-response coefficients and their standard errors.

  4. Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1991-01-01

    This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations.

  5. Monte Carlo and experimental internal radionuclide dosimetry in RANDO head phantom.

    PubMed

    Ghahraman Asl, Ruhollah; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Parach, Ali Asghar; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Momennezhad, Mehdi; Davenport, David

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo techniques are widely employed in internal dosimetry to obtain better estimates of absorbed dose distributions from irradiation sources in medicine. Accurate 3D absorbed dosimetry would be useful for risk assessment of inducing deterministic and stochastic biological effects for both therapeutic and diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine. The goal of this study was to experimentally evaluate the use of Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) Monte Carlo package for 3D internal dosimetry using the head portion of the RANDO phantom. GATE package (version 6.1) was used to create a voxel model of a human head phantom from computed tomography (CT) images. Matrix dimensions consisted of 319 × 216 × 30 voxels (0.7871 × 0.7871 × 5 mm(3)). Measurements were made using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100). One rod-shaped source with 94 MBq activity of (99m)Tc was positioned in the brain tissue of the posterior part of the human head phantom in slice number 2. The results of the simulation were compared with measured mean absorbed dose per cumulative activity (S value). Absorbed dose was also calculated for each slice of the digital model of the head phantom and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each slice from the simulation data. The S-values calculated by GATE and TLD methods showed a significant correlation (correlation coefficient, r(2) ≥ 0.99, p < 0.05) with each other. The maximum relative percentage differences were ≤14% for most cases. DVHs demonstrated dose decrease along the direction of movement toward the lower slices of the head phantom. Based on the results obtained from GATE Monte Carlopackage it can be deduced that a complete dosimetry simulation study, from imaging to absorbed dose map calculation, is possible to execute in a single framework.

  6. Preclinical acute toxicity studies and rodent-based dosimetry estimates of the novel sigma-1 receptor radiotracer [(18)F]FPS.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, Rikki N; Stabin, Michael G; Page, John G

    2003-07-01

    [(18)F]1-(Fluoropropyl)-4-[(4-cyanophenoxy)methyl]piperidine ([(18)F]FPS) is a novel high affinity (KD = 0.5 nM) sigma receptor radioligand that exhibits saturable and selective in vivo binding to sigma receptors in rats, mice and non-human primates. In order to support an IND application for the characterization of [(18)F]FPS through PET imaging studies in humans, single organ and whole body radiation adsorbed doses associated with [(18)F]FPS injection were estimated from distribution data obtained in rats. In addition, acute toxicity studies were conducted in rats and rabbits and limited toxicity analyses were performed in dogs. Radiation dosimetry estimates obtained using rat biodistribution analysis of [(18)F]FPS suggest that most organs would receive around 0.012-0.015 mGy/MBq. The adrenal glands, brain, kidneys, lungs, and spleen would receive slightly higher doses (0.02-0.03 mGy/MBq). The adrenal glands were identified as the organs receiving the greatest adsorbed radiation dose. The total exposure resulting from a 5 mCi administration of [(18)F]FPS is well below the FDA defined limits for yearly cumulative and per study exposures to research participants. Extended acute toxicity studies in rats and rabbits, and limited acute toxicity studies in beagle dogs suggest at least a 175-fold safety margin in humans at a mass dose limit of 2.8 microg per intravenous injection. This estimate is based on the measured no observable effect doses (in mg/m(2)) in these species. These data support the expectation that [(18)F]FPS will be safe for use in human PET imaging studies at a maximum administration of 5 mCi and a mass dose equal to or less than 2.8 microg FPS per injection.

  7. Performance testing of personnel-dosimetry services. Final report of test No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Plato, P.; Miklos, J.

    1983-02-01

    In September, 1977, the University of Michigan began a pilot study of the Health Physics Society Standards Committee (HPSSC) Standard titled, Criteria for Testing Personnel Dosimetry Performance. Approximately 70 dosimetry processors volunteered to participate in one or more of three tests of the HPSSC Standard. The results from Tests No. 1 and No. 2 were used to evaluate and revise the Standard which was then adopted by the HPSSC in June, 1981. The Standard was also adopted by the American National Standards Institute as ANSI N13.11-1982 in June, 1982. Test No. 3 of the revised HPSSC Standard was conducted from November, 1981 to April, 1982. The objectives of Test No. 3 were to determine if the Standard is acceptable for future testing programs, and to provide experience with the final version of the Standard. The passing rate among all the processors for Test No. 3 was 75% compared to passing rates of 48% and 62% for Tests No. 1 and No. 2, respectively, with adjustments made for changes in the Standard following Test o. 2. Among all the individual dosimeters irradiated during Test No. 3, 89% had a reported dose within +- 50% of the delivered dose compared to 79% and 86% of the dosimeters irradiated for Test No. 1 and No. 2. The HPSSC Standard was found to be an acceptable measure of minimum performance and an appropriate basis for a regulatory program to accredit dosimetry processors.

  8. 4.2 Methods for Internal Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.2 Methods for Internal Dosimetry' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy' with the contents:

  9. Initial radiation dosimetry at Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    The dosimetry of A-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki is discussed in light of the new dosimetry developed in 1980 by the author. The important changes resulting from the new dosimetry are the ratios of neutron to gamma doses, particularly at Hiroshima. The implications of these changes in terms of epidemiology and radiation protection standards are discussed. (ACR)

  10. Photovoltaic evaluation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G.; Heikkilae, M.; Melasuo, T.; Spanner, S.

    Realizing the value and potential of PV-power as well as the growing need for increased cooperation and sharing of knowledge in the field of photovoltaics, FINNIDA and UNICEF decided to undertake a study of selected PV-projects. There were two main objectives for the study: To gather, compile, evaluate and share information on the photovoltaic technology appropriate to developing countries, and to promote the interest and competence of Finnish research institutes, consultants and manufacturers in photovoltaic development. For this purpose a joint evaluation of significant, primarily UN-supported projects providing for the basic needs of rural communities was undertaken. The Gambia and Kenya offered a variety of such projects, and were chosen as target countries for the study. The projects were chosen to be both comparable and complimentary. In the Gambia, the main subject was a partially integrated health and telecommunications project, but a long-operating drinking water pumping system was also studied. In Kenya, a health project in the Turkana area was examined, and also a large scale water pumping installation for fish farming. Field visits were made in order to verify and supplement the data gathered through document research and earlier investigations. Individual data gathering sheets for the project form the core of this study and are intended to give the necessary information in an organized and accessible format. The findings could practically be condensed into one sentence: PV-systems work very well, if properly designed and installed, but the resources and requirements of the recipients must be considered to a higher degree.

  11. Relationship between student selection criteria and learner success for medical dosimetry students.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jamie; Tucker, Debra; Raynes, Edilberto; Aitken, Florence; Allen, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Medical dosimetry education occupies a specialized branch of allied health higher education. Noted international shortages of health care workers, reduced university funding, limitations on faculty staffing, trends in learner attrition, and increased enrollment of nontraditional students force medical dosimetry educational leadership to reevaluate current admission practices. Program officials wish to select medical dosimetry students with the best chances of successful graduation. The purpose of the quantitative ex post facto correlation study was to investigate the relationship between applicant characteristics (cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA), science grade point average (SGPA), prior experience as a radiation therapist, and previous academic degrees) and the successful completion of a medical dosimetry program, as measured by graduation. A key finding from the quantitative study was the statistically significant positive correlation between a student׳s previous degree and his or her successful graduation from the medical dosimetry program. Future research investigations could include a larger research sample, representative of more medical dosimetry student populations, and additional studies concerning the relationship of previous work as a radiation therapist and the effect on success as a medical dosimetry student. Based on the quantitative correlation analysis, medical dosimetry leadership on admissions committees could revise student selection rubrics to place less emphasis on an applicant׳s undergraduate cumulative GPA and increase the weight assigned to previous degrees.

  12. Relationship between student selection criteria and learner success for medical dosimetry students

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Jamie; Tucker, Debra; Raynes, Edilberto; Aitken, Florence; Allen, Pamela

    2016-04-01

    Medical dosimetry education occupies a specialized branch of allied health higher education. Noted international shortages of health care workers, reduced university funding, limitations on faculty staffing, trends in learner attrition, and increased enrollment of nontraditional students force medical dosimetry educational leadership to reevaluate current admission practices. Program officials wish to select medical dosimetry students with the best chances of successful graduation. The purpose of the quantitative ex post facto correlation study was to investigate the relationship between applicant characteristics (cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA), science grade point average (SGPA), prior experience as a radiation therapist, and previous academic degrees) and the successful completion of a medical dosimetry program, as measured by graduation. A key finding from the quantitative study was the statistically significant positive correlation between a student's previous degree and his or her successful graduation from the medical dosimetry program. Future research investigations could include a larger research sample, representative of more medical dosimetry student populations, and additional studies concerning the relationship of previous work as a radiation therapist and the effect on success as a medical dosimetry student. Based on the quantitative correlation analysis, medical dosimetry leadership on admissions committees could revise student selection rubrics to place less emphasis on an applicant's undergraduate cumulative GPA and increase the weight assigned to previous degrees.

  13. In-vivo dosimetry with Gafchromic films for multi-isocentric VMAT irradiation of total marrow lymph-nodes: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Pierina; Reggiori, Giacomo; Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella; Gaudino, Anna; Lobefalo, Francesca; Paganini, Lucia; Palumbo, Valentina; Sarina, Barbara; Stravato, Antonella; Castagna, Luca; Tomatis, Stefano; Scorsetti, Marta

    2015-04-12

    Total marrow (lymph-nodes) irradiation (TMI-TMLI) by volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was shown to be feasible by dosimetric feasibility studies. It was demonstrated that several partially overlapping arcs with different isocenters are required to achieve the desired coverage of the hematopoietic or lymphoid tissues targets and to spare the neighbouring healthy tissues. The effect of isocenter shifts was investigated with the treatment planning system but an in- vivo verification of the procedure was not carried out. The objective of this study was the in-vivo verification of the consistency between the delivered and planned doses using bi-dimensional GafChromic EBT3 films. In a first phase a phantom study was carried out to quantify the uncertainties under controlled conditions. In a second phase three patients treated with TMLI were enrolled for in-vivo dosimetry. The dose prescription was 2Gy in single fraction. Ten arcs paired on 4-6 isocenters were used to cover the target. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) was used to verify the patient positioning at each isocenter. GafChromic EBT3 films were placed below the patient on the top of a dedicated immobilization system specifically designed. The dose maps measured with the EBT3 films were compared with the corresponding calculations along the patient support couch. Gamma Agreement Index (GAI) with dose difference of 5% and distance to agreement of 5 mm was computed. In the phantom study, optimal target coverage and healthy tissue sparing was observed. GAI(5%,5 mm) was 99.4%. For the patient-specific measurements, GAI(5%,5 mm) was greater than 95% and GAI (5%,3 mm) > 90% for all patients. In vivo measurements demonstrated the delivered dose to be in good agreement with the planned one for the TMI-TMLI protocol where partially overlapping arcs with different isocenters are required.

  14. SU-E-J-69: Iterative Deconvolution of the Initial Photon Fluence for EPID Dosimetry: A Monte Carlo Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, D; Voigts-Rhetz, P von; Shishechian, D Uchimura; Zink, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Developing a fast and accurate calculation model to reconstruct the applied photon fluence from an external photon radiation therapy treatment based on an image recorded by an electronic portal image device (EPID). Methods: To reconstruct the initial photon fluence the 2D EPID image was corrected for scatter from the patient/phantom and EPID to generate the transmitted primary photon fluence. This was done by an iterative deconvolution using precalculated point spread functions (PSF). The transmitted primary photon fluence was then backprojected through the patient/phantom geometry considering linear attenuation to receive the initial photon fluence applied for the treatment.The calculation model was verified using Monte Carlo simulations performed with the EGSnrc code system. EPID images were produced by calculating the dose deposition in the EPID from a 6 MV photon beam irradiating a water phantom with air and bone inhomogeneities and the ICRP anthropomorphic voxel phantom. Results: The initial photon fluence was reconstructed using a single PSF and position dependent PSFs which depend on the radiological thickness of the irradiated object. Appling position dependent point spread functions the mean uncertainty of the reconstructed initial photon fluence could be reduced from 1.13 % to 0.13 %. Conclusion: This study presents a calculation model for fluence reconstruction from EPID images. The{sup Result} show a clear advantage when position dependent PSF are used for the iterative reconstruction. The basic work of a reconstruction method was established and further evaluations must be made in an experimental study.

  15. Dosimetry in 131I-mIBG therapy: moving toward personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, C; Castellani, R; Mira, M; Lorenzoni, A; Flux, G D

    2013-06-01

    Internal dosimetry was developed as a basis for 131I-mIBG treatment at an early stage and has continued to develop for over the last 20 years. Whole-body dosimetry was introduced to prevent hematological toxicity. It will be the basis for a forthcoming European multicentre trial, in which the activity of a second administration is determined according to the results calculated from the first. Lesion dosimetry has also been performed in a small number of centres. The major goal of dosimetry now is to establish dose-effect correlation studies, which will be the basis for individualized treatment planning. The aim of this paper is to analyse previously published studies and to consider the potential for improvement in order to obtain a stronger predictive power of dosimetry. The intrinsic radiobiological limits of dosimetry are also illustrated. Due to the development and dissemination of methods of internal dosimetry and radiobiology over the last two decades, and to the increasing availability of quantitative 124I PET imaging, dosimetry could provide in the near future a more systematic basis for standardization and individualization of mIBG therapy. This will however require a number of multicentre trials which are performed under good instrumental and scientific methodology.

  16. Flat Ge-doped optical fibres for food irradiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Noor, N. Mohd; Jusoh, M. A.; Razis, A. F. Abdull; Alawiah, A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2015-04-24

    Exposing food to radiation can improve hygiene quality, germination control, retard sprouting, and enhance physical attributes of the food product. To provide for food safety, radiation dosimetry in irradiated food is required. Herein, fabricated germanium doped (Ge-doped) optical fibres have been used. The fibres have been irradiated using a gamma source irradiator, doses in the range 1 kGy to 10 kGy being delivered. Using Ge-doped optical fibres of variable size, type and dopant concentration, study has been made of linearity, reproducibility, and fading. The thermoluminescence (TL) yield of the fibres were obtained and compared. The fibres exhibit a linear dose response over the investigated range of doses, with mean reproducibility to within 2.69 % to 8.77 %, exceeding the dose range of all commercial dosimeters used in evaluating high doses for the food irradiation industry. TL fading of the Ge-doped flat fibres has been found to be < 13%.

  17. Flat Ge-doped optical fibres for food irradiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, N. Mohd; Jusoh, M. A.; Razis, A. F. Abdull; Alawiah, A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Exposing food to radiation can improve hygiene quality, germination control, retard sprouting, and enhance physical attributes of the food product. To provide for food safety, radiation dosimetry in irradiated food is required. Herein, fabricated germanium doped (Ge-doped) optical fibres have been used. The fibres have been irradiated using a gamma source irradiator, doses in the range 1 kGy to 10 kGy being delivered. Using Ge-doped optical fibres of variable size, type and dopant concentration, study has been made of linearity, reproducibility, and fading. The thermoluminescence (TL) yield of the fibres were obtained and compared. The fibres exhibit a linear dose response over the investigated range of doses, with mean reproducibility to within 2.69 % to 8.77 %, exceeding the dose range of all commercial dosimeters used in evaluating high doses for the food irradiation industry. TL fading of the Ge-doped flat fibres has been found to be < 13%.

  18. SU-E-T-82: A Study On Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) Dosimetry Using 2D Seven29 Ion Chamber Array Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Syam; Aparna

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric properties of Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) using PTW Seven29 ion chamber array Methods: PTW Seven29 ion chamber array and Solid Water phantoms for different depths were used for the study. The study was carried out in Varian Clinac ix with photon energies, 6MV & 15MV. Primarily the solid water phantoms with the 2D array were scanned using a CT scanner (GE Optima 580) at different depths. These scanned images were used for EDW planning in an Eclipse treatment planning system (version 10). Planning was done for different wedge angles and for different depths for 6MV & 15MV. A dose of 100 CGy was delivered in each cases. For each delivery, calculated the Monitoring Unit (MU) required. Same set-up was created before delivering the plans in Varian Clinac-ix. For each clinically relevant depth and for different wedge angles, the same MU was delivered as calculated. Different wedged dose distributions where reconstructed from the measured 2D array data using the in-house developed excel program. Results: It is observed that the shoulder like region in the profile which reduces as depth increases. For the same depth and energy, the percentage difference between planned and measured dose is lesser than 3%. For smaller wedge angles, the percentage difference is found to be greater than 3% for the largest wedge angle. Standard deviation between measured doses at shoulder region for planned and measured profiles is 0.08 and 0.02 respectively. Standard deviations between planned and measured wedge factors for different depths (2.5cm, 5cm, 10cm, and 15cm) are (0.0021, 0.0007, 0.0050, 0.0001) for 6MV and (0.0024, 0.0191, 0.0013, 0.0005) for 15MV respectively. Conclusion: The 2D Seven29 ion chamber array is a good tool for the Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) dosimetry.

  19. Motion effects in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) dosimetry of bone metastases: case study using homogeneous and inhomogeneous CIRS phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asril, Y. S.; Wibowo, W. E.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2017-05-01

    The Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for bone metastases has been implemented in radiotherapy center in Indonesia. In this study, we simulated and explored the effect of target motion in SBRT on bone metastases using the homogeneous (002 H9K) and inhomogeneous (002 LFC) CIRS phantom to simulate the presence of inhomogeneous medium near the target, with the holder for chamber. Both phantoms have the interchangeable rod for ionisation chamber, while for TLD and gafchromic EBT3, a holder was devised using Teflon material. In order to evaluate the impact of target motion, the measurements were performed in static and superior-inferior motion with the amplitude of 5, 10, and 20 mm. The measurement in the static condition has the standard deviation of <1.5 for gafchromic film EBT3 and <0.2 for PTW N30013. For the measurement of superior-inferior dynamic motion, we obtained a decrease in the dose of the target volume with increasing amplitudes of the movements. In addition, the standard deviation of dynamic measurement results was in the range of 1.13 to 11.7, 9.5 to 28.6, and 0.05 to 7.21 for gafchromic film EBT3, exradin A16 and PTW N30013, respectively.

  20. Intercomparison study on (152)Eu gamma ray and (36)Cl AMS measurements for development of the new Hiroshima-Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02).

    PubMed

    Hoshi, M; Endo, S; Tanaka, K; Ishikawa, M; Straume, T; Komura, K; Rühm, W; Nolte, E; Huber, T; Nagashima, Y; Seki, R; Sasa, K; Sueki, K; Fukushima, H; Egbert, S D; Imanaka, T

    2008-07-01

    In the process of developing a new dosimetry system for atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki (DS02), an intercomparison study between (152)Eu and (36)Cl measurements was proposed, to reconcile the discrepancy previously observed in the Hiroshima data between measurements and calculations of thermal neutron activation products. Nine granite samples, exposed to the atomic-bomb radiation in Hiroshima within 1,200 m of the hypocenter, as well as mixed standard solutions containing known amounts of europium and chlorine that were neutron-activated by a (252)Cf source, were used for the intercomparison. Gamma-ray spectrometry for (152)Eu was carried out with ultra low-background Ge detectors at the Ogoya Underground Laboratory, Kanazawa University, while three laboratories participated in the (36)Cl measurement using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS): The Technical University of Munich, Germany, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA and the University of Tsukuba, Japan. Measured values for the mixed standard solutions showed good agreement among the participant laboratories. They also agreed well with activation calculations, using the neutron fluences monitored during the (252)Cf irradiation, and the corresponding activation cross-sections taken from the JENDL-3.3 library. The measured-to-calculated ratios obtained were 1.02 for (152)Eu and 0.91-1.02 for (36)Cl, respectively. Similarly, the results of the granite intercomparison indicated good agreement with the DS02 calculation for these samples. An average measured-to-calculated ratio of 0.98 was obtained for all granite intercomparison measurements. The so-called neutron discrepancy that was previously observed and that which included increasing measured-to-calculated ratios for thermal neutron activation products for increasing distances beyond 1,000 m from the hypocenter was not seen in the results of the intercomparison study. The previously claimed discrepancy could be explained by

  1. FURTHER STUDIES ON UNCERTAINTY, CONFOUNDING, AND VALIDATION OF THE DOSES IN THE TECHA RIVER DOSIMETRY SYSTEM: Concluding Progress Report on the Second Phase of Project 1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2009-10-23

    This is the concluding Progress Report for Project 1.1 of the U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER). An overwhelming majority of our work this period has been to complete our primary obligation of providing a new version of the Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS), which we call TRDS-2009D; the D denotes deterministic. This system provides estimates of individual doses to members of the Extended Techa River Cohort (ETRC) and post-natal doses to members of the Techa River Offspring Cohort (TROC). The latter doses were calculated with use of the TRDS-2009D. The doses for the members of the ETRC have been made available to the American and Russian epidemiologists in September for their studies in deriving radiogenic risk factors. Doses for members of the TROC are being provided to European and Russian epidemiologists, as partial input for studies of risk in this population. Two of our original goals for the completion of this nine-year phase of Project 1.1 were not completed. These are completion of TRDS-2009MC, which was to be a Monte Carlo version of TRDS-2009 that could be used for more explicit analysis of the impact of uncertainty in doses on uncertainty in radiogenic risk factors. The second incomplete goal was to be the provision of household specific external doses (rather than village average). This task was far along, but had to be delayed due to the lead investigator’s work on consideration of a revised source term.

  2. Patient dosimetry in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Sören

    2015-07-01

    In diagnostic nuclear medicine, the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical (actually of the radionuclide) is determined for a number of representative patients. At therapy, it is essential to determine the patient's individual biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical in order to calculate the absorbed doses to critical normal organs/tissues and to the target volume(s) with high accuracy. For the diagnostic situations, there is still a lack of quantitative determinations of the organ/tissue contents of radiopharmaceuticals and their variation with time. Planar gamma camera imaging using the conjugate view technique combined with a limited number of SPECT/CT images is the main method for such studies. In a similar way, PET/CT is used for 3D image-based internal dosimetry for PET substances. The transition from stylised reference phantoms to voxel phantoms will lead to improved dose estimates for diagnostic procedures. Examples of dose coefficients and effective doses for diagnostic substances are given. For the therapeutic situation, a pre-therapeutic low activity administration is used for quantitative measurements of organ/tissue distribution data by a gamma camera or a SPECT- or PET-unit. Together with CT and/or MR images this will be the base for individual dose calculations using Monte Carlo technique. Treatments based on administered activity should only be used if biological variations between patients are small or if a pre-therapeutic activity administration is impossible.

  3. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research.

  4. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research.

  5. SU-E-T-214: Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Based On Passively Scattered Protons and Multi-Leaf Collimation: Prototype TPS and Dosimetry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, D; Carabe-Fernandez, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose. Intensity-modulated proton therapy is usually implemented with multi-field optimization of pencil-beam scanning (PBS) proton fields. However, at the view of the experience with photon-IMRT, proton facilities equipped with double-scattering (DS) delivery and multi-leaf collimation (MLC) could produce highly conformal dose distributions (and possibly eliminate the need for patient-specific compensators) with a clever use of their MLC field shaping, provided that an optimal inverse TPS is developed. Methods. A prototype TPS was developed in MATLAB. The dose calculation process was based on a fluence-dose algorithm on an adaptive divergent grid. A database of dose kernels was precalculated in order to allow for fast variations of the field range and modulation during optimization. The inverse planning process was based on the adaptive simulated annealing approach, with direct aperture optimization of the MLC leaves. A dosimetry study was performed on a phantom formed by three concentrical semicylinders separated by 5 mm, of which the inner-most and outer-most were regarded as organs at risk (OARs), and the middle one as the PTV. We chose a concave target (which is not treatable with conventional DS fields) to show the potential of our technique. The optimizer was configured to minimize the mean dose to the OARs while keeping a good coverage of the target. Results. The plan produced by the prototype TPS achieved a conformity index of 1.34, with the mean doses to the OARs below 78% of the prescribed dose. This Result is hardly achievable with traditional conformal DS technique with compensators, and it compares to what can be obtained with PBS. Conclusion. It is certainly feasible to produce IMPT fields with MLC passive scattering fields. With a fully developed treatment planning system, the produced plans can be superior to traditional DS plans in terms of plan conformity and dose to organs at risk.

  6. A new formulation of UMC and an Evaluation of the {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}){sup 56}Mn Dosimetry Reaction Cross Section (a.k.a. 'Toy Story 4')

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R.; Smith, D.L.; Trkov, A.; Meghzifene, M.

    2011-07-01

    Two relatively new approaches to neutron cross section data evaluation are described. They are known collectively as Unified Monte Carlo (versions UMC-G and UMC-B). Comparisons are made between these two methods, as well as with the well-known generalized least-squares (GLSQ) technique, through the use of simple, hypothetical (toy) examples. These new Monte Carlo methods are based on stochastic sampling of probability functions that are constructed with the use of theoretical and experimental data by applying the principle of maximum entropy. No further assumptions are involved in either UMC-G or UMC-B. However, the GLSQ procedure requires the linearization of non-linear terms, such as those that occur when cross section ratio data are included in an evaluation. It is shown that these two stochastic techniques yield results that agree well with each other, and with the GLSQ method, when linear data are involved, or when the perturbations due to data discrepancies and nonlinearity effects are small. Otherwise, there can be noticeable differences. The present investigation also demonstrates, as observed in earlier work, that the least-squares approach breaks down when these conditions are not satisfied. This paper also presents an actual evaluation of the {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}) {sup 56}Mn neutron dosimetry reaction cross section in the energy range from 100 keV to 20 MeV, which was performed using both GLSQ and UMC-G approaches. (authors)

  7. A THIN-LAYER LIF THERMOLUMINESCENCE DOSEMETER SYSTEM WITH FAST READOUT FOR THE USE IN PERSONAL DOSIMETRY SERVICES.

    PubMed

    Walbersloh, J; Busch, F

    2016-09-01

    A newly developed thermoluminescence dosemeter system is presented that is suitable for application in fields where personal monitoring of a large number of users is required. The system presented here is intended to be used as the upcoming main dosemeter for whole body dosimetry at the dosimetry service of the MPA NRW (Germany) with ∼110,000 evaluations per month.

  8. Optical-CT gel-dosimetry I: basic investigations.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Mark; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Kumar, Sai; Wong, John; Jaffray, David A

    2003-04-01

    Comprehensive verification of the intricate dose distributions associated with advanced radiation treatments is now an immediate and substantial problem. The task is challenging using traditional dosimeters because of restrictions to point measurements (ion chambers, diodes, TLD, etc.) or planar measurements (film). In essence, rapid advances in the technology to deliver radiation treatments have not been paralleled by corresponding advances in the ability to verify these treatments. A potential solution has emerged in the form of water equivalent three dimensional (3D) gel-dosimetry. In this paper we present basic characterization and performance studies of a prototype optical-CT scanning system developed in our laboratory. An analysis of the potential role or scope of gel dosimetry, in relation to other dosimeters, and to verification across the spectrum of therapeutic techniques is also given. The characterization studies enabled the determination of nominal operating conditions for optical-CT scanning. "Finger" phantoms are introduced as a powerful and flexible tool for the investigation of optical-CT performance. The modulation-transfer function (MTF) of the system is determined to be better than 10% out to 1 mm(-1), confirming sub-mm imaging ability. System performance is demonstrated by the acquisition of a 1 x 1 x 1 mm3 dataset through the dose distribution delivered by an x-ray lens that focuses x rays in the energy range 40-80 KeV. This 3D measurement would be extremely difficult to achieve with other dosimetry techniques and highlights some of the strengths of gel dosimetry. Finally, an optical Monte Carlo model is introduced and shown to have potential to model light transport through gel-dosimetry systems, and to provide a tool for the study and optimization of optical-CT gel dosimetry. The model utilizes Mie scattering theory and requires knowledge of the variation of the particle size distribution with dose. The latter was determined here using the

  9. Dosimetry applications in GATE Monte Carlo toolkit.

    PubMed

    Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis

    2017-02-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are a well-established method for studying physical processes in medical physics. The purpose of this review is to present GATE dosimetry applications on diagnostic and therapeutic simulated protocols. There is a significant need for accurate quantification of the absorbed dose in several specific applications such as preclinical and pediatric studies. GATE is an open-source MC toolkit for simulating imaging, radiotherapy (RT) and dosimetry applications in a user-friendly environment, which is well validated and widely accepted by the scientific community. In RT applications, during treatment planning, it is essential to accurately assess the deposited energy and the absorbed dose per tissue/organ of interest, as well as the local statistical uncertainty. Several types of realistic dosimetric applications are described including: molecular imaging, radio-immunotherapy, radiotherapy and brachytherapy. GATE has been efficiently used in several applications, such as Dose Point Kernels, S-values, Brachytherapy parameters, and has been compared against various MC codes which are considered as standard tools for decades. Furthermore, the presented studies show reliable modeling of particle beams when comparing experimental with simulated data. Examples of different dosimetric protocols are reported for individualized dosimetry and simulations combining imaging and therapy dose monitoring, with the use of modern computational phantoms. Personalization of medical protocols can be achieved by combining GATE MC simulations with anthropomorphic computational models and clinical anatomical data. This is a review study, covering several dosimetric applications of GATE, and the different tools used for modeling realistic clinical acquisitions with accurate dose assessment. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Monte Carlo dosimetry study of vaginal {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy applications with a shielded cylindrical applicator set

    SciTech Connect

    Lymperopoulou, G.; Pantelis, E.; Papagiannis, P.; Rozaki-Mavrouli, H.; Sakelliou, L.; Baltas, D.; Karaiskos, P.

    2004-11-01

    A durable recommendation for brachytherapy treatment planning systems to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exists. As different proposed approaches have not been integrated in clinical treatment planning routine yet, currently utilized systems disregard or, most commonly, do not fully account for the aforementioned effects. Therefore, it is of interest to evaluate the efficacy of current treatment planning in clinical applications susceptible to errors due to heterogeneities. In this work the effect of the internal structure as well as the shielding used with a commercially available cylindrical shielded applicator set (Nucletron part no. 084.320) for vaginal and rectum treatments is studied using three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation for a clinical treatment plan involving seven source dwell positions of the classic microSelectron HDR {sup 192}Ir source. Results are compared to calculations of a treatment planning system (Plato BPS v.14.2.7), which assumes homogeneous water medium and applies a constant, multiplicative transmission factor only at points lying in the shadow of the shield. It is found that the internal structure of the applicator (which includes stainless steel, air and plastic materials) with no shield loaded does not affect the dose distribution relative to homogeneous water. In the unshielded side of the applicator with a 90 deg., 180 deg., or 270 deg. tungsten alloy shield loaded, an overestimation of treatment planning system calculations relative to Monte Carlo results was observed which is both shield and position dependent. While significant (up to 15%) at increased distances, which are not of major clinical importance, this overestimation does not affect dose prescription distances by more than 3%. The inverse effect of approx. 3% dose increase at dose prescription distances is observed for stainless steel shields. Regarding the shielded side of the applicator, it is shown that the

  11. Testing of a sag of a dosimetry system rotating with a gantry using the interplay effect between detector motion and MLC motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawska-Kaczyńska, Marzena; Dąbrowski, Ryszard; Drozdyk, Izabela; Kukołowicz, Paweł

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: An interplay between detector motion and MLC motion is a source of measurement error, when dose for dynamic arc is measured using a dosimetry system moving relative to the beam central axis during its rotation with a gantry. The purpose of this study is to develop and to evaluate a method of quantitative testing of a sag/flex of such dosimetry systems. Methods: The method is based on evaluation of relative differences between signals measured for two single arc beams, where a narrow slit field is sliding during gantry movement in opposite directions. The component of a measurement error related to the interplay effect was first assessed based on theoretical computer simulations and then on measurements for four dosimetry systems. The sag pattern of EPID and 2D array was extracted from the measurement results. Results: The simulations showed a 4 mm difference in field width and 3.3% difference in relative signals at beam axis between test beams where the slit field swept over 19 cm in opposite directions ( sinusoidal sag pattern with amplitude of 1 mm was assumed). The signal differences exceeding 4% and 5% were measured for EPID and 2D array, respectively. Conclusions: Even relatively small detector sag (less than 1 mm) can produce significant measurement error; therefore, the detector sag test should be an obligatory component of a validation of rotating dosimetry systems used for QA of dynamic arcs.

  12. Using exposure prediction tools to link exposure and dosimetry for risk-based decisions: A case study with phthalates

    EPA Science Inventory

    A few different exposure prediction tools were evaluated for use in the new in vitro-based safety assessment paradigm using di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and dibutyl phthalate (DnBP) as case compounds. Daily intake of each phthalate was estimated using both high-throughput (HT...

  13. Model selection for radiochromic film dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Méndez, I

    2015-05-21

    The purpose of this study was to find the most accurate model for radiochromic film dosimetry by comparing different channel independent perturbation models. A model selection approach based on (algorithmic) information theory was followed, and the results were validated using gamma-index analysis on a set of benchmark test cases. Several questions were addressed: (a) whether incorporating the information of the non-irradiated film, by scanning prior to irradiation, improves the results; (b) whether lateral corrections are necessary when using multichannel models; (c) whether multichannel dosimetry produces better results than single-channel dosimetry; (d) which multichannel perturbation model provides more accurate film doses. It was found that scanning prior to irradiation and applying lateral corrections improved the accuracy of the results. For some perturbation models, increasing the number of color channels did not result in more accurate film doses. Employing Truncated Normal perturbations was found to provide better results than using Micke-Mayer perturbation models. Among the models being compared, the triple-channel model with Truncated Normal perturbations, net optical density as the response and subject to the application of lateral corrections was found to be the most accurate model. The scope of this study was circumscribed by the limits under which the models were tested. In this study, the films were irradiated with megavoltage radiotherapy beams, with doses from about 20-600 cGy, entire (8 inch  × 10 inch) films were scanned, the functional form of the sensitometric curves was a polynomial and the different lots were calibrated using the plane-based method.

  14. In vivo light dosimetry for pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimofte, Andreea; Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Culligan, Melissa; Edmonds, Christine E.; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Cengel, Keith; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2009-02-01

    In-vivo light Dosimetry for patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the important dosimetry quantities critical for predicting PDT outcome. This study examines the light fluence (rate) delivered to patients undergoing pleural PDT as a function of treatment time, treatment volume and surface area, and its accuracy as a function of the calibration accuracies of each isotropic detector and the calibration integrating sphere. The patients studied here were enrolled in Phase II clinical trial of Photofrin-mediated PDT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with pleural effusion. The ages of the patients studied varied from 34 to 69 year old. All patients were administered 2mg per kg body weight Photoprin 24 hours before the surgery. Patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) are treated with laser light with a light fluence of 60 J/cm^2 at 630nm. Fluence rate (mW/cm^2) and cumulative fluence (J/cm^2) was monitored at 7 different sites during the entire light treatment delivery. Isotropic detectors were used for in-vivo light dosimetry. The anisotropy of each isotropic detector was found to be within 30%. The mean fluence rate delivery varied from 37.84 to 94.05 mW/cm^2 and treatment time varied from 1762 to 5232s. We have established a correlation between the treatment time and the treatment volume. The results are discussed using an integrating sphere theory and the measured tissue optical properties. The result can be used as a clinical guideline for future pleural PDT treatment.

  15. Faraday cup: absolute dosimetry for ELIMED beam line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leanza, R.; Romano, F.; Scuderi, V.; Amico, A. G.; Cuttone, G.; Larosa, G.; Margarone, D.; Milluzzo, G.; Petringa, G.; Pipek, J.; Schillaci, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.

    2017-03-01

    The scientific community has shown a growing interest towards multidisciplinary applications of laser-driven beams. In this framework, the ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical and multidisciplinary applications) beamline will be the first transport beamline dedicated to the medical and multidisciplinary studies with laser-accelerated ion beams. Detectors for dosimetry represent one of key-element of the ELIMED beamline, allowing a dose delivering with good result as required in the clinical applications. In this contribution, a Faraday Cup for absolute dosimetry, designed and realized at INFN-LNS, is described.

  16. Preclinical pharmacokinetic, biodistribution, toxicology, and dosimetry studies of 111In-DTPA-human epidermal growth factor: an auger electron-emitting radiotherapeutic agent for epidermal growth factor receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Raymond M; Chen, Paul; Wang, Judy; Scollard, Deborah; Cameron, Ross; Vallis, Katherine A

    2006-06-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, normal tissue distribution, radiation dosimetry, and toxicology of human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) labeled with (111)In ((111)In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid [DTPA]-hEGF) in mice and rabbits. (111)In-DTPA-hEGF (3.6 MBq; 1.3 or 13 microg) was administered intravenously to BALB/c mice. The blood concentration-time data were fitted to a 3-compartment model. Acute toxicity was studied with female BALB/c mice at 42 times the maximum planned human dose (MBq/kg) or with New Zealand White rabbits at 1 times the maximum planned human dose (MBq/kg) for a phase I clinical trial. Toxicity was evaluated by monitoring body weight, by determination of hematology and clinical biochemistry parameters, and by morphologic examination of tissues. Radiation dosimetry projections in humans were estimated on the basis of the residence times in mice by use of the OLINDA version 1.0 computer program. The largest amounts of radioactivity were taken up by the liver (41.3 +/- 7.8 [mean +/- SD] percentage injected dose [%ID] at 1 h after injection and decreasing to 4.9 +/- 0.3 %ID at 72 h after injection) and kidneys (18.6 +/- 0.8 %ID at 1 h and decreasing to 4.5 +/- 0.2 %ID at 72 h after injection). (111)In-DTPA-hEGF was cleared rapidly from the blood, with a half-life at alpha-phase of 2.7-6.2 min and a half-life at beta-phase of 24.0-36.3 min. The half-life of the long terminal phase could not be accurately determined. The volume of distribution of the central compartment was 340-375 mL/kg, and the volume of distribution at steady state was 430-685 mL/kg. There was no significant difference in the ratio of body weight at 15 d to pretreatment weight for mice administered (111)In-DTPA-hEGF (1.02 +/- 0.01) and mice administered unlabeled DTPA-hEGF (1.01 +/- 0.01). Erythrocyte, leukocyte, and platelet counts and serum alanine aminotransferase and creatinine levels remained in the normal ranges. No morphologic changes were observed

  17. SU-E-T-399: Evaluation of Selection Criteria for Computational Human Phantoms for Use in Out-Of-Field Organ Dosimetry for Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, C; Jung, J; Lee, C; Pyakuryal, A; Lee, C; Kim, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric uncertainty due to organ position errors when using height and weight as phantom selection criteria in the UF/NCI Hybrid Phantom Library for the purpose of out-of-field organ dose reconstruction. Methods: Four diagnostic patient CT images were used to create 7-field IMRT plans. For each patient, dose to the liver, right lung, and left lung were calculated using the XVMC Monte Carlo code. These doses were taken to be the ground truth. For each patient, the phantom with the most closely matching height and weight was selected from the body size dependent phantom library. The patient plans were then transferred to the computational phantoms and organ doses were recalculated. Each plan was also run on 4 additional phantoms with reference heights and or weights. Maximum and mean doses for the three organs were computed, and the DVHs were extracted and compared. One sample t-tests were performed to compare the accuracy of the height and weight matched phantoms against the additional phantoms in regards to both maximum and mean dose. Results: For one of the patients, the height and weight matched phantom yielded the most accurate results across all three organs for both maximum and mean doses. For two additional patients, the matched phantom yielded the best match for one organ only. In 13 of the 24 cases, the matched phantom yielded better results than the average of the other four phantoms, though the results were only statistically significant at the .05 level for three cases. Conclusion: Using height and weight matched phantoms does yield better results in regards to out-of-field dosimetry than using average phantoms. Height and weight appear to be moderately good selection criteria, though this selection criteria failed to yield any better results for one patient.

  18. SU-D-213-05: Design, Evaluation and First Applications of a Off-Site State-Of-The-Art 3D Dosimetry System

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm, J; Mein, S; McNiven, A; Letourneau, D; Oldham, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To design, construct and commission a prototype in-house three dimensional (3D) dose verification system for stereotatic body radiotherapy (SBRT) verification at an off-site partner institution. To investigate the potential of this system to achieve sufficient performance (1mm resolution, 3% noise, within 3% of true dose reading) for SBRT verification. Methods: The system was designed utilizing a parallel ray geometry instigated by precision telecentric lenses and an LED 630nm light source. Using a radiochromic dosimeter, a 3D dosimetric comparison with our gold-standard system and treatment planning software (Eclipse) was done for a four-field box treatment, under gamma passing criteria of 3%/3mm/10% dose threshold. Post off-site installation, deviations in the system’s dose readout performance was assessed by rescanning the four-field box irradiated dosimeter and using line-profiles to compare on-site and off-site mean and noise levels in four distinct dose regions. As a final step, an end-to-end test of the system was completed at the off-site location, including CT-simulation, irradiation of the dosimeter and a 3D dosimetric comparison of the planned (Pinnacle{sup 3}) to delivered dose for a spinal SBRT treatment(12 Gy per fraction). Results: The noise level in the high and medium dose regions of the four field box treatment was relatively 5% pre and post installation. This reflects the reduction in positional uncertainty through the new design. This At 1mm dose voxels, the gamma pass rates(3%,3mm) for our in-house gold standard system and the off-site system were comparable at 95.8% and 93.2% respectively. Conclusion: This work will describe the end-to-end process and results of designing, installing, and commissioning a state-of-the-art 3D dosimetry system created for verification of advanced radiation treatments including spinal radiosurgery.

  19. Water and tissue equivalence of a new PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} formulation for 3D proton beam dosimetry: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Gorjiara, Tina; Kuncic, Zdenka; Doran, Simon; Adamovics, John; Baldock, Clive

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the water and tissue equivalence of a new PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} 3D dosimeter for proton therapy. Methods: The GEANT4 software toolkit was used to calculate and compare total dose delivered by a proton beam with mean energy 62 MeV in a PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} dosimeter, water, and soft tissue. The dose delivered by primary protons and secondary particles was calculated. Depth-dose profiles and isodose contours of deposited energy were compared for the materials of interest. Results: The proton beam range was found to be Almost-Equal-To 27 mm for PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign }, 29.9 mm for soft tissue, and 30.5 mm for water. This can be attributed to the lower collisional stopping power of water compared to soft tissue and PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign }. The difference between total dose delivered in PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} and total dose delivered in water or tissue is less than 2% across the entire water/tissue equivalent range of the proton beam. The largest difference between total dose in PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} and total dose in water is 1.4%, while for soft tissue it is 1.8%. In both cases, this occurs at the distal end of the beam. Nevertheless, the authors find that PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} dosimeter is overall more tissue-equivalent than water-equivalent before the Bragg peak. After the Bragg peak, the differences in the depth doses are found to be due to differences in primary proton energy deposition; PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} and soft tissue stop protons more rapidly than water. The dose delivered by secondary electrons in the PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} differs by less than 1% from that in soft tissue and water. The contribution of secondary particles to the total dose is less than 4% for electrons and Almost-Equal-To 1% for protons in all the materials of interest. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that the new PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} formula may be considered both a tissue- and water

  20. TU-C-BRE-04: 3D Gel Dosimetry Using ViewRay On-Board MR Scanner: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L; Du, D; Green, O; Rodriguez, V; Wooten, H; Xiao, Z; Yang, D; Hu, Y; Li, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: MR based 3D gel has been proposed for radiation therapy dosimetry. However, access to MR scanner has been one of the limiting factors for its wide acceptance. Recent commercialization of an on-board MR-IGRT device (ViewRay) may render the availability issue less of a concern. This work reports our attempts to simulate MR based dose measurement accuracy on ViewRay using three different gels. Methods: A spherical BANG gel dosimeter was purchased from MGS Research. Cylindrical MAGIC gel and Fricke gel were fabricated in-house according to published recipes. After irradiation, BANG and MAGIC were imaged using a dual-echo spin echo sequence for T2 measurement on a Philips 1.5T MR scanner, while Fricke gel was imaged using multiple spin echo sequences. Difference between MR measured and TPS calculated dose was defined as noise. The noise power spectrum was calculated and then simulated for the 0.35 T magnetic field associated with ViewRay. The estimated noise was then added to TG-119 test cases to simulate measured dose distributions. Simulated measurements were evaluated against TPS calculated doses using gamma analysis. Results: Given same gel, sequence and coil setup, with a FOV of 180×90×90 mm3, resolution of 3×3×3 mm3, and scanning time of 30 minutes, the simulated measured dose distribution using BANG would have a gamma passing rate greater than 90% (3%/3mm and absolute). With a FOV 180×90×90 mm3, resolution of 4×4×5 mm3, and scanning time of 45 minutes, the simulated measuremened dose distribution would have a gamma passing rate greater than 97%. MAGIC exhibited similar performance while Fricke gel was inferior due to much higher noise. Conclusions: The simulation results demonstrated that it may be feasible to use MAGIC and BANG gels for 3D dose verification using ViewRay low-field on-board MRI scanner.

  1. SU-E-J-71: Feasibility Study On MRI-Based BANG3 Gel Dosimetry Using Dual-Source Parallel RF Transmission System

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Lee, J; Lee, D; Lee, S; Choe, B; Baek, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this work, we present the feasibility of use of the parallel RF transmission with multiple RF source (MultiTransmit) imaging in MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry. Methods: The commercially available BANG3 gel was used for gel dosimetry. Spin-spin relaxation rate R2 was used to quantify the absorbed dose. The image quality (signal-to-noise ratio, SNR; image uniformity) and B1 field inhomogeneity between conventional single-source and MultiTransmit MR imaging were compared. Finally, the estimated R2 uncertainty σ(R2) and dosimetric performance (i.e., dose resolution) between conventional single-source and MultiTransmit MR imaging were compared. Results: Image quality and B1 field homogeneity within each calibration vial and large phantom was statistically better in MultiTransmit imaging than in conventional single-source RF transmission imaging (P < 0.005 for all calibration vials). In particular, σ(R2) (defined as the standard uncertainty of R2) was lower on the MultiTransmit images than on the conventional single-source images. Furthermore, the MultiTransmit measurement gives a lower than that obtained using the conventional single-source method. Conclusion: The improved image quality and B1 homogeneity resulted in reduced dose uncertainty (i.e., σ(R2) and dose resolution) in MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry, suggesting that MultiTransmit MR imaging has potential benefits for use in clinical 3D gel dosimetry without the need for the complicated B1 field correction method.

  2. Correlation Between Pre- and Postimplant Dosimetry for Iodine-125 Seed Implants for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar; Witteveen, Thelma Carey, Brendan; Henry, Ann; Bottomley, David; Smith, Jonathan; Franks, Kevin; Bownes, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: In order to evaluate implant quality for permanent prostate brachytherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer, American Brachytherapy Society and ESTRO guidelines recommend that postimplant dosimetry should be performed. To understand more about the relationship between pre- and postimplant dosimetry, a comparison was made of patients who received iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) brachytherapy between March 1995 and the end of 2004, using a preplan technique. Methods and Materials: CT postimplant dosimetry