Science.gov

Sample records for double brachial arteries

  1. Traumatic Brachial Artery Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ergunes, Kazim; Yilik, Levent; Ozsoyler, Ibrahim; Kestelli, Mert; Ozbek, Cengiz; Gurbuz, Ali

    2006-01-01

    We performed this retrospective study to analyze our strategies for managing and surgically treating brachial artery injuries. Fifty-seven patients with a total of 58 traumatic brachial artery injuries underwent surgery at our institution, from August 1996 through November 2004. Fifty-four patients were male and 3 were female (age range, 7 to 75 years; mean, 29.4 years). Forty-four of the patients had penetrating injuries (18 had stab wounds; 16, window glass injuries; and 10, industrial accidents), 10 had blunt trauma injuries (traffic accidents), and 3 had gunshot injuries. Fourteen patients (24.6%) had peripheral nerve injury. All patients underwent Doppler ultrasonographic examination. The repair of the 58 arterial injuries involved end-to-end anastomosis for 32 injuries (55.2%), reverse saphenous vein graft interpositional grafts for 18 (31%), and primary repair for 8 (13.8%). Venous continuity was achieved in 11 (84.6%) of 13 patients who had major venous injuries. Nine of the 57 patients (15.8%) required primary fasciotomy. Follow-up showed that 5 of the 14 patients with peripheral nerve injury had apparent disabilities due to nerve injury. One patient underwent amputation. There were no deaths. We believe that good results can be achieved in patients with brachial artery injuries by use of careful physical examination, Doppler ultrasonography, and restoration of viability with vascular repair and dbridement of nonviable tissues. Traumatic neurologic injury frequently leads to disability of the extremities. PMID:16572866

  2. Brachioradial arteries with anastomotic arteries connecting to brachial arteries bilaterally.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tong; Qiuhong, Dan; Haipeng, Cai

    2010-01-01

    We present a patient with a failed radial coronary angioplasty as a result of bilateral brachioradial arteries, the radial arteries anomalously originating from the axillary arteries. We review the literature concerning abnormal origins of the radial artery and propose the left ulnar artery as optimal access of choice in cases with a right brachioradial artery of relatively small size in its proximal part.

  3. Morphology of brachial plexus and axillary artery in bonobo (Pan paniscus).

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Y; Oishi, M; Shimizu, D

    2011-02-01

    A left brachial plexus and axillary artery of bonobo (Pan paniscus) were examined, and the interrelation between the brachial plexus and the axillary artery was discussed. This is the first report of the brachial plexus and the axillary artery of bonobo. The bonobo brachial plexus formed very similar pattern to that of other ape species and human. On the other hand, the branches of the bonobo axillary artery had uncommon architecture in comparison with human case. The axillary artery did not penetrate the brachial plexus and passes through all way along anterior to the brachial plexus. Only 4.9% of human forelimbs have this pattern. Moreover, the brachial artery runs through superficially anterior to branches of the brachial plexus.

  4. Brachial artery aneurysms associated with arteriovenous access for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Chemla, Eric; Nortley, Mei; Morsy, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Brachial artery aneurysm (BAA) is a rare condition. We describe a series of cases of BAA with arteriovenous access. Thirteen patients were retrospectively identified between January 2006 and July 2009 using a patient database. All were associated with brachio-cephalic fistulas. Mean age was 51.2 +/- 13.8 years. Twelve males (93.3%) were identified. Characteristics were: diabetes 1, hypertension 8, hypercholesterolemia 2, ischemic heart disease 2, family history of aneurysmal disease 2. Five BAA developed after access ligation, eight while it was working, one after trauma. One was associated with a venous aneurysm. While the average life of the access was 161 +/- 115 months, the average time for BAA formation was 40 +/- 35.8 months. BAA was asymptomatic in three patients, whereas 10 presented with ischemic and neurologic symptoms. None presented with a rupture. All patients underwent surgical repair, seven an aneurysm excision and end-to-end reconstruction of the brachial artery. Venous conduits were utilized: four long saphenous veins, one cephalic, and one basilic vein. All patients had patent brachial arteries with a complete relief of symptoms at 14 months. BAA is a rare but significant complication of vascular access. The surgical approaches presented offer a reasonable outcome.

  5. Delayed rupture of a pseudoaneurysm in the brachial artery of a burn reconstruction patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A brachial artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare but serious condition that can be limb threatening. A number of reports have found that it may be the result of damage to the blood vessels around the brachial artery, either directly or indirectly, due to trauma or systemic diseases. We present our experience of delayed pseudoaneurysm rupture of the brachial artery in a rehabilitation patient with burns of the upper extremity who underwent fasciotomy and musculocutaneous flap coverage. We also provide a review of the brachial artery pseudoaneurysm. PMID:23758847

  6. Brachial artery injury following opened elbow dislocation associated with accessory brachial artery: two rare entities in a 17-year -old girl: case report.

    PubMed

    Hajji, Rita; Zrihni, Youssef; Naouli, Hamza; Bouarhroum, Abdellatif

    2015-01-01

    Elbow dislocations are the most frequently encountered after shoulder dislocations. In their vast majority, these injuries carry a good prognosis. Although, concomitant arterial injury is rare and make them more serious. In this paper, we report a case of a 17 year old woman with opened elbow dislocation with arterial injury associated to an artery variation: "accessory brachial artery".

  7. Brachial artery injury following opened elbow dislocation associated with accessory brachial artery: two rare entities in a 17-year –old girl: case report

    PubMed Central

    Hajji, Rita; Zrihni, Youssef; Naouli, Hamza; Bouarhroum, Abdellatif

    2015-01-01

    Elbow dislocations are the most frequently encountered after shoulder dislocations. In their vast majority, these injuries carry a good prognosis. Although, concomitant arterial injury is rare and make them more serious. In this paper, we report a case of a 17 year old woman with opened elbow dislocation with arterial injury associated to an artery variation: "accessory brachial artery" PMID:26161188

  8. Vascular patterns of upper limb: an anatomical study with accent on superficial brachial artery

    PubMed Central

    Kachlik, David; Konarik, Marek; Baca, Vaclav

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the terminal segmentation of the axillary artery and to present four cases of anomalous branching of the axillary artery, the superficial brachial artery (arteria brachialis superficialis), which is defined as the brachial artery that runs superficially to the median nerve. Totally, 130 cadaveric upper arms embalmed by classical formaldehyde technique from collections of the Department of Anatomy, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, were macroscopically dissected with special focus on the branching arrangement of the axillary artery. The most distal part of the axillary artery (infrapectoral part) terminated in four cases as a bifurcation into two terminal branches: the superficial brachial artery and profunda brachii artery, denominated according to their relation to the median nerve. The profunda brachii artery primarily gave rise to the main branches of the infrapectoral part of the axillary artery. The superficial brachial artery descended to the cubital fossa where it assumed the usual course of the brachial artery in two cases and in the other two cases its branches (the radial and ulnar arteries) passed superficially to the flexors. The incidence of the superficial brachial artery in our study was 5% of cases. The reported incidence is a bit contradictory, from 0.12% to 25% of cases. The anatomical knowledge of the axillary region is of crucial importance for neurosurgeons and specialists using the radiodiagnostic techniques, particularly in cases involving traumatic injuries. The improved knowledge would allow more accurate diagnostic interpretations and surgical treatment. PMID:21342134

  9. Use of StarClose for brachial artery closure after percutaneous endovascular interventions.

    PubMed

    Puggioni, Alessandra; Boesmans, Evelyne; Deloose, Koen; Peeters, Patrick; Bosiers, Marc

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a percutaneous extravascular closure device (StarClose, Abbott Vascular, Redwood City, CA) after brachial endovascular approach. From 2004 to 2006, 29 patients received StarClose for brachial closure. Primary endpoints were successful deployment and absence of procedure-related morbidity, secondary endpoints were brachial artery patency on duplex and absence of late (> 30 days) complications. The device was successfully deployed in all patients. In two patients (6.8%) local complications occurred: one patient developed a large hematoma successfully treated with prolonged compression and a second patient presented with brachial artery occlusion requiring operative intervention. After a mean follow-up of 7.5+/-7.2 months, all patients had a palpable brachial/radial pulse; none had signs of infection, distal embolization or neurological deficits. On ultrasound b-mode imaging, the clip was visible as a 4 mm echolucent area at the outer anterior wall of the artery. Based on the peak systolic velocity ratios between the site of StarClose and proximal brachial artery (mean 1.08+/-0.2), none of the studied patients had a significant stenosis at the site of closure. StarClose is safe and effective in providing hemostasis following interventional procedures through the brachial artery; further advantages include patients comfort and early discharge.

  10. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a ...

  11. Use of a Collagen-Based Device for Closure of Low Brachial Artery Punctures

    SciTech Connect

    Belenky, A. Aranovich, D.; Greif, F.; Bachar, G.; Bartal, G.; Atar, E.

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To report our experience with the Angioseal vascular closure device for hemostasis of distal brachial artery puncture. Methods. Between September 2003 and August 2005, 64 Angioseal vascular closure devices were inserted in 64 patients (40 men, 24 women; mean age 65 years) immediately after diagnostic or therapeutic arterial angiographies performed through a 5 Fr to 7 Fr sheath via the distal brachial artery. Ultrasound examination of the brachial artery preceded the angiography in all cases and only arteries wider than 4 mm were closed by the Angioseal. In cases of a sonographically evident thin subcutaneous space of the cubital fossa, tissue tumescence, using 1% Lidocaine, was performed prior to the arterial closure. Results. The deployment success rate was 100%. No major complications were encountered; only 2 patients developed puncture site hematoma, and these were followed conservatively. Conclusions. Closure of low brachial artery punctures with the Angioseal is simple and safe. No additional manual compression is required. We recommend its use after brachial artery access interventions, through appropriately wide arteries, to improve early patient ambulation and potentially reduce possible puncture site complications.

  12. Double level arterial injury with neuropraxia following anterior shoulder dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Zaraa, Mourad; Sehli, Heithem; Mahjoub, Sabri; Dridi, Moez; Mbarek, Mondher

    2015-01-01

    Vascular and nervous complications are rare after shoulder dislocation. We report the case of a double level arterial injury with neuropraxia following anterior shoulder dislocation that was diagnosed by MultiDetector-row Computed Tomographic (MDCT) angiography and treated by surgical bypass graft and embolectomy. Our case is original, not only because of the rarity of these complications, but also because of the thromboembolism of brachial artery which could be undiagnosed and could compromise prognosis. PMID:26566344

  13. Trifurcation of superficial brachial artery: a rare case with its clinico-embryological implications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, N; Anshu, A; Dada, R

    2014-01-01

    Literatures on vasculature of upper limbs are crammed with reports of distinctly deviant version of normally prevalent vessels having modified origins, altered branching and odd courses. A unique anatomical variation in vascular pattern was observed during routine dissection of right upper limb in gross anatomy laboratory, AIIMS, New Delhi, India. The brachial artery was placed superficial to median nerve in the arm and therefore it was called superficial brachial artery. In the cubital fossa, 2.8 cm distal to intercondylar line of elbow joint, this superficial brachial artery terminated by trifurcation into radial, common interosseous and ulnar branches. Strikingly the ulnar branch, after its origin ran superficially over the median nerve and epitrochlear superficial flexor group of muscles of forearm in succession for the initial third of its course in the forearm, consequently it was addressed as superficial ulnar artery. The existence of superficial brachial artery in place of normal brachial artery, its termination by trifurcation into radial, common interosseous and superficial ulnar arteries with remarkably different courses, leads to confusing disposition of structures in the arm, cubital fossa and in the forearm and collectively makes this myriad of anatomical variations even rarer. The clinico-embryological revelations for combination of these unconventional observations, apprises and guides the specialized medical personnel attempting blind and invasive procedures in brachium and ante-brachium. This case report depicts the anatomical perspective and clinical implications on confronting a rare variant vasculature architecture pattern of upper limb.

  14. Brachial plexus compression due to subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm from internal jugular vein catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Mol, T. N.; Gupta, A.; Narain, U.

    2017-01-01

    Internal jugular vein (IJV) catheterization has become the preferred approach for temporary vascular access for hemodialysis. However, complications such as internal carotid artery puncture, vessel erosion, thrombosis, and infection may occur. We report a case of brachial plexus palsy due to compression by right subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm as a result of IJV catheterization in a patient who was under maintenance hemodialysis. PMID:28356671

  15. Genetic contribution to brachial artery flow-mediated dilation: The Northern Manhattan Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keiko; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Rundek, Tanja; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Disla, Norbelina; Liu, Rui; Park, Naeun; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Homma, Shunichi

    2007-01-01

    Background Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a non-invasive measure of endothelial function. Endothelial dysfunction has been associated with traditional vascular risk factors and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The importance of genetic contribution to FMD and baseline brachial artery diameter has not been shown in Hispanic populations. The purpose of this study was to estimate the heritability of FMD. Methods Flow mediated dilation and brachial artery diameter were measured in a subset of Caribbean Hispanic families from the ongoing Northern Manhattan Family Study (NOMAFS), which studies the contribution of genetics to stroke and cardiovascular risk factors. The age- and sex-adjusted heritability of FMD was estimated using variance component methods. Results The current data include 620 subjects (97 probands and 523 relatives) from 97 families. The age and sex-adjusted heritability of brachial artery diameter was 0.57 (p < 0.01). The age- and sex-adjusted heritability of FMD was 0.20 (p = 0.01). After additional adjustment for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, smoking, lipid, diabetes mellitus, medication, and baseline brachial artery diameter, the heritability of FMD was 0.17 (p = 0.01). Conclusions We found modest heritability of FMD. FMD might be a reasonable phenotype for further investigation of genetic contribution to atherosclerosis. PMID:17462653

  16. Epithelioid hemangioma of brachial artery: report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Moira, Ragazzi; Giuseppe, Falco; Riccardo, Valli; Nicola, Rocco; Daniele, Bordoni; Pierfrancesco, Cadenelli; Antonio, Della Corte Gianni; Antonello, Accurso; Bruno, Amato; Giovanni, Casali; Guglielmo, Ferrari

    2015-01-01

    Epithelioid hemangioma (EH) is an uncommon benign vascular lesion, also known as angioblastic lymphoid (or angiolymphoid) hyperplasia with eosinophilia, characterized by an unclear etiopathogenesis. It usually affects young to middle-aged adults and develops in the head and neck region, as painless cutaneous or subcutaneous reddish papules or nodules. Large vessels involvement is extremely rare, and to date only two cases affecting the brachial artery have been cited in literature. In this report we present a further case of EH of the brachial artery and review the pertinent literature. PMID:28352744

  17. Mediastinal mass and brachial plexopathy caused by subclavian arterial aneurysm in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Yoo, W H; Kim, H K; Park, J H; Park, T S; Baek, H S

    2000-01-01

    Vascular involvement in Behçet's disease is divided into venous and arterial thrombosis and arterial aneurysmal formation. Subclavian arterial aneurysm rarely occurs in Behçet's disease; however, when it does occur, it causes serious aneurysmal rupture and local complications such as nerve compression and arterial ischemia. We describe the case of a 39-year-old male who presented with neurologic symptoms and signs of brachial plexopathy and mediastinal mass caused by Behçet's subclavian arterial aneurysm. This case shows that the occurrence of brachial plexopathy should be considered a manifestation of Behçet's disease, and that Behçet's aneurysm should be considered in the differential diagnosis of upper mediastinal mass.

  18. Surrogates of Large Artery versus Small Artery Stiffness and Ankle-Brachial Index

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Päivi; Syvänen, Kari; Aarnio, Pertti

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral artery tonometry (PAT) is a novel method for assessing arterial stiffness of small digital arteries. Pulse pressure can be regarded as a surrogate of large artery stiffness. When ankle-brachial index (ABI) is calculated using the higher of the two ankle systolic pressures as denominator (ABI-higher), leg perfusion can be reliably estimated. However, using the lower of the ankle pressures to calculate ABI (ABI-lower) identifies more patients with isolated peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in ankle arteries. We aimed to compare the ability of PAT, pulse pressure, and different calculations of ABI to detect atherosclerotic disease in lower extremities. We examined PAT, pulse pressure, and ABI in 66 cardiovascular risk subjects in whom borderline PAD (ABI 0.91 to 1.00) was diagnosed 4 years earlier. Using ABI-lower to diagnose PAD yielded 2-fold higher prevalence of PAD than using ABI-higher. Endothelial dysfunction was diagnosed in 15/66 subjects (23%). In a bivariate correlation analysis, pulse pressure was negatively correlated with ABI-higher (r = −0.347, p = 0.004) and with ABI-lower (r = −0.424, p < 0.001). PAT hyperemic response was not significantly correlated with either ABI-higher (r = −0.148, p = 0.24) or with ABI-lower (r = −0.208, p = 0.095). Measurement of ABI using the lower of the two ankle pressures is an efficient method to identify patients with clinical or subclinical atherosclerosis and worth performing on subjects with pulse pressure above 65 mm Hg. The usefulness of PAT measurement in detecting PAD is vague. PMID:22942632

  19. Brachial arterial pressure to assess cardiovascular structural damage: an overview and lessons from clinical trials.

    PubMed

    London, Gérald M

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have emphasized the relationship between blood pressure (BP) and the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Severity of hypertension was in the past judged on the basis of diastolic BP. More recent epidemiological studies have directed attention to systolic pressure as a better guide to cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Traditionally, hypertension was appreciated by measures of BP recorded in peripheral arteries, usually brachial artery which was assumed to reflect pressures in all parts of arterial system. All these studies neglected that peripheral systolic BP differs from pressure recorded in the aorta and central arteries. While mean and diastolic pressures are almost constant along the arterial tree, due to the stiffness and geometric heterogeneity of large arteries and the timing and magnitude of wave reflections systolic BP and pulse pressure are amplified from the aorta to peripheral arteries, and brachial systolic BP only indirectly reflects the systolic BP in the aorta and central arteries. Several recent studies have shown that the effects of antihypertensive drugs are not the same in peripheral and central arteries, fact which could account for different effects of various drugs on end-organ damage, such as regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. Moreover, it has been shown that aortic and central artery pressure (or their determinants) are stronger predictors of end-organ damage and cardiovascular outcome than conventionally measured brachial pressure. These studies have focused the attention on the physical properties of large arteries and on the way they influence the level of systolic and pulse pressures along the arterial tree.

  20. The impact of handgrip exercise duty cycle on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation.

    PubMed

    King, Trevor J; Slattery, David J; Pyke, Kyra E

    2013-07-01

    Endothelial function is essential for vasoprotection and regulation of vascular tone. Using handgrip exercise (HGEX) to increase blood flow-associated shear stress is an increasingly popular method for assessing brachial artery endothelial function via flow-mediated dilation (FMD). However, different exercise duty cycles [ratio of handgrip relaxation: contraction (seconds)] produce different patterns of brachial artery shear stress with distinct antegrade/retrograde magnitudes. To determine the impact of HGEX duty cycle on brachial artery %FMD, three distinct duty cycles were employed while maintaining a uniform mean shear stress. Brachial artery diameter and mean blood velocity were assessed via echo and Doppler ultrasound in 16 healthy male subjects. Shear stress was estimated as shear rate (SR = blood velocity/brachial artery diameter) and the target mean SR during HGEX was 75 s(-1). Subjects performed three 6-min HGEX trials on each of 2 days (like trials averaged). In each trial, subjects performed one of the three randomly ordered HGEX duty cycles (1:1, 3:1, 5:1). %FMD was calculated from baseline to the end of HGEX and (subset N = 10) during each minute of HGEX. Data are mean ± SD. As intended, mean SR was uniform across duty cycles (6 min HGEX average: 72.9 ± 4.9s(-1), 72.6 ± 3.6s(-1), 72.8 ± 3.5 s(-1), p = 0.835), despite differences in antegrade/retrograde SR (p < 0.001). End-exercise %FMD (4.0 ± 1.3 %, 4.1 ± 2.2 %, 4.2 ± 1.4 %, p = 0.860) and %FMD during exercise (p = 0.939) were not different between duty cycles. These data indicate that the endothelium responds to the mean shear stress and is not specifically sensitive to the contraction/relaxation or retrograde shear stress created by a range of HGEX protocols.

  1. [Transradial percutaneous approach for cardiac catheterization in patients with previous brachial artery cutdown].

    PubMed

    Magariños, Eduardo; Solioz, Germán; Cermesoni, Gabriel; Koretzky, Martín; Carnevalini, Mariana; González, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The percutaneous punction of the radial artery for catheterization procedures has gained acceptance lately. This was a consequence of achieving results similar to the femoral approach, with the benefits of a lower rate of complications and increased comfort for the patients post procedure. Recently it has gained an additional impulse with the better prognosis obtained in acute coronary syndromes. In this trial we have evaluated if the feasibility, results and advantages related with the use of the radial artery percutaneous approach to perform catheterization procedures, continues when used in patients who have had a previous brachial artery cutdown. Out of a total of 1356 percutaneous radial accesses, 53 were in patients with previous brachial artery cutdown. Through this access 71 catheterization procedures were performed, achieving access success in 96.2% (51/53) of the punctions. Once the access success was obtained, 93.6% (44/47) of the diagnostic procedures and 100% (24/24) of the therapeutics procedures were successful. During hospitalization, in this group of patients, no major adverse cardiac events occurred and there was a 1.4% (1/71) rate of minor events. At seven days follow up, no new complications were recorded. Although this is a small group, we believe that it is enough to show that percutaneous punctions of the radial artery to perform catheterization procedures, in patients with previous brachial artery cutdown, are feasible, allowing high access and procedure success rates, with a low frequency of complications.

  2. Superficial brachial artery: A possible cause for idiopathic median nerve entrapment neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nkomozepi, Pilani; Xhakaza, Nkosi; Swanepoel, Elaine

    2017-02-15

    Nerve entrapment syndromes occur because of anatomic constraints at specific locations in both upper and lower limbs. Anatomical locations prone to nerve entrapment syndromes include sites where a nerve courses through fibro-osseous or fibromuscular tunnels or penetrates a muscle. The median nerve (MN) can be entrapped by the ligament of Struthers; thickened biceps aponeurosis; between the superficial and deep heads of the pronator teres muscle and by a thickened proximal edge of flexor digitorum superficialis muscle. A few cases of MN neuropathies encountered are reported to be idiopathic. The superficial branchial artery (SBA) is defined as the artery running superficial to MN or its roots. This divergence from normal anatomy may be the possible explanation for idiopathic median nerve entrapment neuropathy. This study presents three cases with unilateral presence of the SBA encountered during routine undergraduate dissection at the University of Johannesburg. Case 1: SBA divided into radial and ulnar arteries. Brachial artery (BA) terminated as deep brachial artery. Case 2: SBA continued as radial artery (RA). BA terminated as ulnar artery (UA), anterior and posterior interosseous arteries. Case 3: SBA continued as UA. BA divided into radial and common interosseous arteries. Arteries that take an unusual course are more vulnerable to iatrogenic injury during surgical procedures and may disturb the evaluation of angiographic images during diagnosis. In particular, the presence of SBA may be a course of idiopathic neuropathies.

  3. Comparison of Brachial Artery Vasoreactivity in Elite Power Athletes and Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Michael A.; Blalock, Paul; Credeur, Daniel P.; Parish, Tracie R.

    2013-01-01

    Elite endurance athletes typically have larger arteries contributing to greater skeletal muscle blood flow, oxygen and nutrient delivery and improved physical performance. Few studies have examined structural and functional properties of arteries in power athletes. Purpose To compare the size and vasoreactivity of the brachial artery of elite power athletes to age-matched controls. It was hypothesized brachial artery diameters of athletes would be larger, have less vasodilation in response to cuff occlusion, but more constriction after a cold pressor test than age-matched controls. Methods Eight elite power athletes (age = 23±2 years) and ten controls (age = 22±1 yrs) were studied. High-resolution ultrasonography was used to assess brachial artery diameters at rest and following 5 minutes of forearm occlusion (Brachial Artery Flow Mediated Dilation = BAFMD) and a cold pressor test (CPT). Basic fitness measures included a handgrip test and 3-minute step test. Results Brachial arteries of athletes were larger (Athletes 5.39±1.51 vs. Controls: 3.73±0.71 mm, p<0.05), had greater vasodilatory (BAFMD%: Athletes: 8.21±1.78 vs. Controls: 5.69±1.56%) and constrictor (CPT %: Athletes: -2.95±1.07 vs. Controls: −1.20±0.48%) responses, compared to controls. Vascular operating range (VOR = Peak dilation+Peak Constriction) was also greater in athletes (VOR: Athletes: 0.55±0.15 vs. Controls: 0.25±0.18 mm, p<0.05). Athletes had superior handgrip strength (Athletes: 55.92±17.06 vs. Controls: 36.77±17.06 kg, p<0.05) but similar heart rate responses at peak (Athletes: 123±16 vs. Controls: 130±25 bpm, p>0.05) and 1 minute recovery (Athletes: 88±21 vs. Controls: 98±26 bpm, p>0.05) following the step test. Conclusion Elite power athletes have larger brachial arteries, and greater vasoreactivity (greater vasodilatory and constrictor responses) than age-matched controls, contributing to a significantly greater VOR. These data extend the existence of an

  4. Brachial artery reactivity in patients with severe sepsis: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound measurements of brachial artery reactivity in response to stagnant ischemia provide estimates of microvascular function and conduit artery endothelial function. We hypothesized that brachial artery reactivity would independently predict severe sepsis and severe sepsis mortality. Methods This was a combined case-control and prospective cohort study. We measured brachial artery reactivity in 95 severe sepsis patients admitted to the medical and surgical intensive care units of an academic medical center and in 52 control subjects without acute illness. Measurements were compared in severe sepsis patients versus control subjects and in severe sepsis survivors versus nonsurvivors. Multivariable analyses were also conducted. Results Hyperemic velocity (centimeters per cardiac cycle) and flow-mediated dilation (percentage) were significantly lower in severe sepsis patients versus control subjects (hyperemic velocity: severe sepsis = 34 (25 to 48) versus controls = 63 (52 to 81), P < 0.001; flow-mediated dilation: severe sepsis = 2.65 (0.81 to 4.79) versus controls = 4.11 (3.06 to 6.78), P < 0.001; values expressed as median (interquartile range)). Hyperemic velocity, but not flow-mediated dilation, was significantly lower in hospital nonsurvivors versus survivors (hyperemic velocity: nonsurvivors = 25 (16 to 28) versus survivors = 39 (30 to 50), P < 0.001; flow-mediated dilation: nonsurvivors = 1.90 (0.68 to 3.41) versus survivors = 2.96 (0.91 to 4.86), P = 0.12). Lower hyperemic velocity was independently associated with hospital mortality in multivariable analysis (odds ratio = 1.11 (95% confidence interval = 1.04 to 1.19) per 1 cm/cardiac cycle decrease in hyperemic velocity; P = 0.003). Conclusions Brachial artery hyperemic blood velocity is a noninvasive index of microvascular function that independently predicts mortality in severe sepsis. In contrast, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, reflecting conduit artery endothelial function

  5. Relationship Between Brachial Artery Flow-Mediated Dilation, Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness and Coronary Flow Reserve in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Fahrettin; Elitok, Ali; Bilge, Ahmet Kaya; Mercanoglu, Fehmi; Oflaz, Huseyin

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between brachial artery flow mediated dilation (FMD), carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and coronary flow reserve (CFR) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods Fifty patients with coronary artery disease, except left anterior descending artery (LAD), who showed no cardiac symptoms and 45 control subjects underwent assessment of brachial artery FMD, carotid artery intima-media thickness by high-resolution ultrasound. In addition, transthoracic second harmonic Doppler echocardiography was used to measure CFR. Results All of the parameters were found to be correlated with each other. CFR correlated with brachial artery FMD (r = 0.232, P < 0.05) and with carotid IMT (r = -0.403, P < 0.001). Carotid IMT correlated with brachial artery FMD (r = -0.211, P < 0.05). Conclusion Transthoracic CFR correlated with well-established noninvasive predictors of atherosclerosis and we suggest that it can be used as a surrogate for coronary atherosclerosis.

  6. Complete Brachial Artery Transection following closed Posterior Elbow Dislocation: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    C, JayanthKumar B; Sampath, Deepak; N, Hanumantha Reddy; Motukuru, Vishnu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Vascular injury associated withclosed posterior elbow dislocations is rare and it usually occurs along with open dislocation, anterior dislocation, penetrating injuries, dislocations associated with fracture. We report such a case of closed posterior elbow dislocation with complete brachial artery rupture. Case Report: A 58 years old lady sustained posterior dislocation of right elbow following a fall at home. She presented three days later with complaints of severe pain, swelling around the right elbow and numbness of fingers following a closed reduction done elsewhere. Computed graft angiography showed complete transection of brachialartery. Patient was treated with thrombectomy, right great saphenous vein graft interposition repair of brachial artery and forearm fasciotomy. Conclusion: Vascular injuries associated with posterior elbow dislocation are very rare, but high index of suspicion of arterial injury need to be thought off and repeated vascular examination during pre and post reduction stage should be done to prevent complications. PMID:27299092

  7. [The value of brachial artery peak velocity variation during the Valsalva maneuver to predict fluid responsiveness].

    PubMed

    Sheng, L F; Yan, M; Zhang, F J; Ren, Q S; Yu, S H; Wu, M

    2017-02-14

    Objective: To evaluate whether brachial artery peak velocity variation(ΔVp) during a Valsalva maneuver(VM) could predict fluid responsiveness in spontaneously breathing patients. Methods: Ninety-six patients required radial artery catheter for elective surgery of Ningbo Yinzhou People's Hospital from December 2014 to June 2016 were enrolled. The brachial artery Doppler signal was recorded to measure the ΔVp while the VM was performed.Then doing the volume expansion (VE) , the cardiac output variation (ΔCO) before and after VE were measured.Pearson correlational analyses were conducted between ΔVp and ΔCO. Also the sensitivity and specificity of ΔVp were determined in predicting fluid responsiveness by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results: Patients were classified as group responders (n=24) and group non-responders (n=72). Responder was defined as cardiac output increased≥15% after VE.The ΔVp correlated well with ΔCO (r=0.792, P<0.01). The area under ROC curve was 0.903, with the ΔVp cut-off of 33%, the sensitivity of 87% and the specificity of 82%(P<0.01). Conclusion: Brachial artery peak velocity variation during a valsalva maneuver is a feasible method for predicting fluid responsiveness in spontaneously breathing patients.

  8. Brachial artery injury due to closed posterior elbow dislocation: case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Checchia, Caio Santos; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2016-01-01

    An association between closed posterior elbow dislocation and traumatic brachial artery injury is rare. Absence of radial pulse on palpation is an important warning sign and arteriography is the gold-standard diagnostic test. Early diagnosis is essential for appropriate treatment to be provided. This consists of joint reduction and immobilization, along with urgent surgical restoration of arterial flow. Here, a case (novel to the Brazilian literature) of an association between these injuries (and the treatment implemented) in a 27-year-old male patient is reported. These injuries were sustained through physical assault. PMID:27069896

  9. Brachial artery injury due to closed posterior elbow dislocation: case report.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Checchia, Caio Santos; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2016-01-01

    An association between closed posterior elbow dislocation and traumatic brachial artery injury is rare. Absence of radial pulse on palpation is an important warning sign and arteriography is the gold-standard diagnostic test. Early diagnosis is essential for appropriate treatment to be provided. This consists of joint reduction and immobilization, along with urgent surgical restoration of arterial flow. Here, a case (novel to the Brazilian literature) of an association between these injuries (and the treatment implemented) in a 27-year-old male patient is reported. These injuries were sustained through physical assault.

  10. Accurate quantitative measurements of brachial artery cross-sectional vascular area and vascular volume elastic modulus using automated oscillometric measurements: comparison with brachial artery ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Ochi, Noriki; Inoue, Mamiko; Nishida, Mutumi; Aziki, Kumi; Horie, Tatsunori; Katoh, Chietsugu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2015-01-01

    Increasing vascular diameter and attenuated vascular elasticity may be reliable markers for atherosclerotic risk assessment. However, previous measurements have been complex, operator-dependent or invasive. Recently, we developed a new automated oscillometric method to measure a brachial artery's estimated area (eA) and volume elastic modulus (VE). The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of new automated oscillometric measurement of eA and VE. Rest eA and VE were measured using the recently developed automated detector with the oscillometric method. eA was estimated using pressure/volume curves and VE was defined as follows (VE=Δ pressure/ (100 × Δ area/area) mm Hg/%). Sixteen volunteers (age 35.2±13.1 years) underwent the oscillometric measurements and brachial ultrasound at rest and under nitroglycerin (NTG) administration. Oscillometric measurement was performed twice on different days. The rest eA correlated with ultrasound-measured brachial artery area (r=0.77, P<0.001). Rest eA and VE measurement showed good reproducibility (eA: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.88, VE: ICC=0.78). Under NTG stress, eA was significantly increased (12.3±3.0 vs. 17.1±4.6 mm2, P<0.001), and this was similar to the case with ultrasound evaluation (4.46±0.72 vs. 4.73±0.75 mm, P<0.001). VE was also decreased (0.81±0.16 vs. 0.65±0.11 mm Hg/%, P<0.001) after NTG. Cross-sectional vascular area calculated using this automated oscillometric measurement correlated with ultrasound measurement and showed good reproducibility. Therefore, this is a reliable approach and this modality may have practical application to automatically assess muscular artery diameter and elasticity in clinical or epidemiological settings. PMID:25693851

  11. Brachial artery vasomotion and transducer pressure effect on measurements by active contour segmentation on ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Theodore W.; Sultan, Laith R.; Sehgal, Chandra M.; Reamer, Courtney B.; Mohler, Emile R.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To use feed-forward active contours (snakes) to track and measure brachial artery vasomotion on ultrasound images recorded in both transverse and longitudinal views; and to compare the algorithm's performance in each view. Methods: Longitudinal and transverse view ultrasound image sequences of 45 brachial arteries were segmented by feed-forward active contour (FFAC). The segmented regions were used to measure vasomotion artery diameter, cross-sectional area, and distention both as peak-to-peak diameter and as area. ECG waveforms were also simultaneously extracted frame-by-frame by thresholding a running finite-difference image between consecutive images. The arterial and ECG waveforms were compared as they traced each phase of the cardiac cycle. Results: FFAC successfully segmented arteries in longitudinal and transverse views in all 45 cases. The automated analysis took significantly less time than manual tracing, but produced superior, well-behaved arterial waveforms. Automated arterial measurements also had lower interobserver variability as measured by correlation, difference in mean values, and coefficient of variation. Although FFAC successfully segmented both the longitudinal and transverse images, transverse measurements were less variable. The cross-sectional area computed from the longitudinal images was 27% lower than the area measured from transverse images, possibly due to the compression of the artery along the image depth by transducer pressure. Conclusions: FFAC is a robust and sensitive vasomotion segmentation algorithm in both transverse and longitudinal views. Transverse imaging may offer advantages over longitudinal imaging: transverse measurements are more consistent, possibly because the method is less sensitive to variations in transducer pressure during imaging.

  12. Thrombin Injection for Treatment of Brachial Artery Pseudoaneurysm at the Site of a Hemodialysis Fistula: Report of Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Timothy W.I.; Abraham, Robert J.

    2000-09-15

    We report two patients with arteriovenous hemodialysis fistulas that were complicated by brachial artery pseudoaneurysms. Each pseudoanerysm was percutaneously thrombosed with an injection of thrombin, using techniques to prevent escape of thrombin into the native brachial artery. In one patient, an angioplasty balloon was inflated across the neck of the aneurysm during thrombin injection. In the second patient, thrombin was injected during ultrasound-guided compression of the neck of the pseudoaneurysm. Complete thrombosis of each pseudoaneurysm was achieved within 30 sec. No ischemic or embolic events occurred. This technique may be useful in treating pseudoaneurysms of smaller peripheral arteries.

  13. Reactivity to low-flow as a potential determinant for brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilatation.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Kunihiko; Elyas, Salim; Adingupu, Damilola D; Casanova, Francesco; Gooding, Kim M; Strain, W David; Shore, Angela C; Gates, Phillip E

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have reported a vasoconstrictor response in the radial artery during a cuff-induced low-flow condition, but a similar low-flow condition in the brachial artery results in nonuniform reactivity. This variable reactivity to low-flow influences the subsequent flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) response following cuff-release. However, it is uncertain whether reactivity to low-flow is important in data interpretation in clinical populations and older adults. This study aimed to determine the influence of reactivity to low-flow on the magnitude of brachial artery FMD response in middle-aged and older individuals with diverse cardiovascular risk profiles. Data were analyzed from 165 individuals, divided into increased cardiovascular risk (CVR: n = 115, 85M, 67.0 ± 8.8 years) and healthy control (CTRL: n = 50, 30M, 63.2 ± 7.2 years) groups. Brachial artery diameter and blood velocity data obtained from Doppler ultrasound were used to calculate FMD, reactivity to low-flow and estimated shear rate (SR) using semiautomated edge-detection software. There was a significant association between reactivity to low-flow and FMD in overall (r = 0.261), CTRL (r = 0.410) and CVR (r = 0.189, all P < 0.05) groups. Multivariate regression analysis found that reactivity to low-flow, peak SR, and baseline diameter independently contributed to FMD along with sex, the presence of diabetes, and smoking (total R(2) = 0.450). There was a significant association between reactivity to low-flow and the subsequent FMD response in the overall dataset, and reactivity to low-flow independently contributed to FMD These findings suggest that reactivity to low-flow plays a key role in the subsequent brachial artery FMD response and is important in the interpretation of FMD data.

  14. Brachial Artery Reconstruction in Trauma Using Reversed Arm Vein from the Injured Upper Limb

    PubMed Central

    Harnarayan, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brachial artery repair may be technically challenging with a paucity of guidelines. The use arm vein (AV) from the traumatized limb is herein described. Methods: Data were prospectively collected from 2002 to 2016 on brachial artery injury including age, sex, mechanism/site of injury, and repair technique. Categories included AV and non-arm vein (NAV) groups. One-year outcomes were noted. Results: All 31 cases studied were of men with an age range of 16 to 73 years (mean = 28). Injuries included 13 gunshots, 7 stabbings, 6 glass injuries, 2 dislocated elbows, 1 crush, 1 impalement, and 1 avulsion. Site of injuries included the antecubital region in 25, midbrachial in 5, and proximal brachial in 1, with 4 associated fractures. Repair was done using reversed AV from the traumatized limb in 15 cases and NAV in 16. In the AV group, the adjacent basilic vein was used in 9 cases, the adjacent cephalic vein in 3, and the distal (or wrist area) cephalic vein in 3. The limb salvage rates in the AV versus NAV groups were 100% and 94%, respectively (Fisher’s exact t test, P = 1.00), with no major technique-related complications. Conclusions: The outcomes of using reversed AV from the traumatized limb are equivalent to those of other standard techniques such as primary repair, polytetrafluoroethylene, or reversed great saphenous vein, with a 1-year limb salvage rate of 100%. Additionally, advantages include decreased wound complications, better vein graft--artery caliber match, and shorter operating times while maintaining acceptable patency rates. PMID:27826464

  15. The Role of Ankle-Brachial Index for Predicting Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    RAC-ALBU, Marius; ILIUTA, Luminita; GUBERNA, Suzana Maria; SINESCU, Crina

    2014-01-01

    The presence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, regardless of gender or its clinical form of presentation (symptomatic or asymptomatic). PAD is considered an independent predictor for cardiovascular mortality, more important for survival than clinical history of coronary artery disease. The ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive and cost-effective screening tool for PAD. ABI is valuable for screening of peripheral artery disease in patients at risk and for diagnosing the disease in patients who present with lower-extremity symptoms. Compared to other diagnostic methods, ABI is superior because it is s a simple, noninvasive test, which could be routinely determined in all patients. Normal cut-off values for ABI are between 0.9 and 1.4. An abnormal ankle-brachial index- below 0.9-is a powerful independent marker of cardiovascular risk. There is an inverse correlation between ABI values, non-fatal cardiac events (myocardial infarction, stroke and heart failure exacerbation) and mortality (cardiovascular and global), the relation being nonlinear, patients with very low ABI (<0.3) having a significantly higher additional risk. Also, ABI values over 1.3-1.4 correlate with major adverse cardiovascular events. Therefore, ABI can be considered a generalized atherosclerotic predictor, identifying patients at high risk for developing cardio- or cerebrovascular events and should be incorporated into routine clinical practice. PMID:25705296

  16. Brachial artery Doppler flux parameters before and after hot flush in Mexican postmenopausal women: preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Karina Vázquez; Ortiz, Sergio Rosales

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse brachial artery flux parameters in postmenopausal women before and after hot flush. Material and methods Two groups of postmenopausal women were studied: Group I, without vasomotor symptoms (n = 10) and Group II, with vasomotor symptoms (n = 10). In all them a brachial artery Doppler ultrasound was done, measuring before and after hyperaemic stimulus of the arterial diameter (AD), the pulsatility index (PI), and the resistive index (RI). In Group I, measurements were done at baseline and five minutes after. In Group II, measurements were at baseline, and one and five minutes after the hot-flush. Comparison between the groups was done with Mann-Whitney U test, and within the groups with Wilcoxon test. Results No differences were found among the groups in Doppler parameters. When comparing each group separately, in Group I, at baseline and at five minutes measurements, the AD was greater after the hyperaemic stimulus than before it. In group II at baseline, the PI was significantly greater after the hyperaemic stimulus than before to it. At the first and fifth minute, the AD was significantly greater after the hyperaemic stimulus than before to it. Conclusions No differences were found between those who did not have and those who had hot flushes. PMID:27095957

  17. Recurrent upper limb ischaemia due to a crutch-induced brachial artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kouji; Hayase, Takahiro; Yano, Mitsuhiro

    2013-07-01

    An 83-year old man who had used bilateral axillary crutches for 67 years was referred to our hospital for acute left upper limb ischaemia. He underwent successful recanalization through emergent catheter thromboembolectomy. However, a crutch-induced left brachial artery aneurysm was subsequently detected by computed tomography. Therefore, we performed aneurysm exclusion and subsequent saphenous vein bypass grafting. When a crutch user presents with upper limb ischaemia, a high index of suspicion and early identification of the crutch induced vascular injury are mandatory for appropriate treatment.

  18. Brachial artery transection associated with open elbow dislocation in a 12-year-old: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nazli, Yunus; Colak, Necmettin; Uras, Ismail; Komurcu, Mahmut; Cakir, Omer

    2013-02-01

    Although acute elbow dislocations are common orthopedic injuries, concomitant neurovascular injury is rare. Brachial artery transection can result from open elbow dislocation and responds well to vascular repair. Rapid evaluation and a high level of suspicion are essential to facilitate immediate treatment. Delay to identify vascular injury after elbow dislocation or reduction can potentially lead to limb ischemia, and potential loss of limb. We present a case of relatively rare transection of the brachial artery, with an accompanying traumatic open elbow dislocation in a 12-year-old boy.

  19. Brachial Artery Conductance During Reactive Hyperemia is Increased in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raja-Khan, Nazia; Shuja, Showieb A.; Kunselman, Allen R.; Hogeman, Cynthia S.; Demers, Laurence M.; Gnatuk, Carol L.; Legro, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine changes in brachial artery conductance (BAC) during reactive hyperemia in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) compared to controls. Study Design This is a pilot case-control study performed at a single academic medical center. Changes in BAC during reactive hyperemia were evaluated in 31 women with PCOS and 11 healthy control women. Fasting glucose, insulin, lipids and androgen levels were also determined. A mixed-effects model was used to compare the PCOS curve to the control curve for change in BAC from baseline during reactive hyperemia. Results Body mass index (BMI) and testosterone levels were significantly increased in the PCOS group compared to controls (P < 0.05). In addition, the PCOS group had higher total and LDL cholesterol levels (P = 0.05 and 0.09, respectively). Change in BAC from baseline during reactive hyperemia was significantly increased in the PCOS group compared to controls even after adjusting for age, BMI and LDL cholesterol levels (P < 0.0001). There were no significant differences between the two groups in age, blood pressure, or fasting glucose or insulin levels. Conclusions Brachial artery conductance during reactive hyperemia is significantly increased in women with PCOS compared to controls and may be a novel early indicator of increased cardiovascular risk in women with PCOS. PMID:21112136

  20. Anatomic Variation of Subclavian Artery Visualized on Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Arunima; Banerjee, Sumantra Sarathi

    2014-01-01

    Use of ultrasonography for performance of nerve and plexus blocks has made the process simpler and safer. However, at times, variant anatomy of the visualized structures can lead to failure of blocks or complications such as intravascular injections. This is especially true in case of novice operators. We report a case of a variant branch of subclavian artery, possibly the dorsal scapular artery passing through the brachial plexus nerve bundles in the supraclavicular area. Since this variation in anatomy was visualized in the scout scan prior to the performance of the block, it was possible to avoid any accidental puncture. Hence, a thorough knowledge of the ultrasound anatomy is important in order to identify various aberrations and variations. It is also prudent to perform a preliminary scan, prior to performance of the block to localize the target area and avoid any inadvertent complications. PMID:25143765

  1. Characterizing Methods of Measuring Flow-Mediated Dilation in the Brachial Artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callender, Ariane R.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of vascular tone is one of the many important functions of the vascular endothelium. Endothelial dysfunction is a critical early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and occurs in the absence of angiographic disease. Flow-Mediated Dilation (FMD) is a noninvasive technique commonly used to evaluate endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans and gauge the health of the cardiovascular system. Reductions in brachial artery FMD have been strongly correlated with disease progression and are predictive of future cardiac events. The flow stimulus for brachial artery FMD occurs as a result of the increased shear stress following deflation of an occlusion cuff around the upper arm. Using 2-dimensional ultrasound, changes in arterial diameter up to 5-minutes following cuff deflation are calculated from baseline image measurements. Along with pulsed Doppler measures of flow velocity through the artery, flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent vasodilation can be assessed. There is debate among investigators, however, about the proper positioning of the occlusion cuff during FMD testing. It is thought that placement of the cuff around the upper arm may not accurately reflect the impact of nitric oxide, a critically important molecule released as a result of the increased shear stress created by the FMD technique. Data suggest that the production of other endogenous metabolites may also contribute to FMD-related changes when positioning the cuff around the upper arm. To overcome the potential influence of such molecules, researchers now suggest that the occlusion cuff be placed below the elbow allowing a more precise estimate of nitric oxide mediated dilation. The purpose of this study is to compare the differences in FMD between the two methodologies of occlusion cuff placement. In addition, this study will determine the method that is easier for ultrasound technicians to perform and will produce a low coefficient of variance between technicians. Ultimately

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, brachial artery distensibility and blood pressure among children residing near an oil refinery

    PubMed Central

    Trasande, Leonardo; Urbina, Elaine M.; Khoder, Mamdouh; Alghamdi, Mansour; Shabaj, Ibrahim; Alam, Mohammed S.; Harrison, Roy M.; Shamy, Magdy

    2017-01-01

    Background Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are produced by the burning and processing of fuel oils, and have been associated with oxidant stress, insulin resistance and hypertension in adults. Few studies have examined whether adolescents are susceptible to cardiovascular effects of PAHs. Objective To study associations of PAH exposure with blood pressure (BP) and brachial artery distensibility (BAD), an early marker of arterial wall stiffness, in young boys attending three schools in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in varying proximity to an oil refinery. Methods Air samples collected from the three schools were analyzed for PAHs. PAH metabolites (total hydroxyphenanthrenes and 1-hydroxypyrene) were measured in urine samples from 184 adolescent males, in whom anthropometrics, heart rate, pulse pressure, brachial artery distensibility and blood pressure were measured. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariable analyses were performed to assess relationships of school location and urinary PAH metabolites with cardiovascular measures. Results Total suspended matter was significantly higher (444 ± 143 µg/m3) at the school near the refinery compared to a school located near a ring road (395 ± 65 µg/m3) and a school located away from vehicle traffic (232 ± 137 µg/m3), as were PAHs. Systolic (0.47 SD units, p = 0.006) and diastolic (0.53 SD units, p < 0.001) BP Z-scores were highest at the school near the refinery, with a 4.36-fold increase in prehypertension (p = 0.001), controlling for confounders. No differences in pulse pressure, BAD and heart rate were noted in relationship to school location. Urinary total hydroxyphenanthrenes and 1-hydroxypyrene were not associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Conclusions Proximity to an oil refinery in Saudi Arabia is associated with prehypertension and increases in PAH and particulate matter exposures. Further study including insulin resistance measurements, better control for confounding, and longitudinal measurement is

  3. Brachial artery peak velocity variation to predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Although several parameters have been proposed to predict the hemodynamic response to fluid expansion in critically ill patients, most of them are invasive or require the use of special monitoring devices. The aim of this study is to determine whether noninvasive evaluation of respiratory variation of brachial artery peak velocity flow measured using Doppler ultrasound could predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. Methods We conducted a prospective clinical research in a 17-bed multidisciplinary ICU and included 38 mechanically ventilated patients for whom fluid administration was planned due to the presence of acute circulatory failure. Volume expansion (VE) was performed with 500 mL of a synthetic colloid. Patients were classified as responders if stroke volume index (SVi) increased ≥ 15% after VE. The respiratory variation in Vpeakbrach (ΔVpeakbrach) was calculated as the difference between maximum and minimum values of Vpeakbrach over a single respiratory cycle, divided by the mean of the two values and expressed as a percentage. Radial arterial pressure variation (ΔPPrad) and stroke volume variation measured using the FloTrac/Vigileo system (ΔSVVigileo), were also calculated. Results VE increased SVi by ≥ 15% in 19 patients (responders). At baseline, ΔVpeakbrach, ΔPPrad and ΔSVVigileo were significantly higher in responder than nonresponder patients [14 vs 8%; 18 vs. 5%; 13 vs 8%; P < 0.0001, respectively). A ΔVpeakbrach value >10% predicted fluid responsiveness with a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 95%. A ΔPPrad value >10% and a ΔSVVigileo >11% predicted volume responsiveness with a sensitivity of 95% and 79%, and a specificity of 95% and 89%, respectively. Conclusions Respiratory variations in brachial artery peak velocity could be a feasible tool for the noninvasive assessment of fluid responsiveness in patients with mechanical ventilatory support and acute circulatory failure. Trial Registration

  4. Correlation between ankle brachial index and coronary artery disease severity in elderly Egyptians.

    PubMed

    Amer, Moatasem S; Tawfik, Heba Mohamed; Elmoteleb, Ayman M Abd; Maamoun, Manar M A

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the association between ankle brachial index (ABI) and coronary heart disease (CHD) severity in elderly Egyptians using different measures. We conducted a case-control study from November 2010 to June 2012 including 200 male and female patients with ischemia≥60 years who were divided into 100 cases and 100 controls according to ABI and redivided according to age. They underwent coronary angiography followed by ABI measurement using a hand-held Doppler. The CHD severity was estimated using the SYNTAX and Jeopardy scores and number of diseased vessels, which increased significantly in patients with peripheral artery disease (P<.001) for all. All 3 measures had strong negative correlation with ABI (P≤.001 for Jeopardy, <.001 for SYNTAX scores, and .004 for number of diseased vessels) and were correlated with each other. We concluded that ABI can reflect CHD severity in elderly Egyptians.

  5. Unrecognized high brachial artery bifurcation is associated with higher rate of dialysis access failure.

    PubMed

    Kirksey, Lee

    2011-01-01

    A thorough consideration of all factors contributing to successful dialysis access creation is necessary to achieve optimal outcomes. A high bifurcation of the brachial artery (brachioradial variant) occurs in greater than 20% of patients. Dialysis access was created in 22 limbs with this variant--15 fistula, and 7 prosthetic grafts. Nonmaturation occurred in 33% of fistula. Early thromboses occurred in 29% of prosthetic bridge grafts. In this experience, the brachioradial variant is associated with a relatively higher rate of fistula nonmaturation and prosthetic graft thromboses. These findings reinforce the critical role of preoperative imaging studies in dialysis access creation. A sound algorithm for the surgical management of the brachioradial variation facilitates decision making and will improve dialysis access outcomes.

  6. Associations of Depressive Symptoms and Brachial Artery Reactivity among Police Officers

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Luenda E; Gu, Ja K; Burchfiel, Cecil M; Andrew, Michael E; Joseph, Parveen N; Dorn, Joan M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Mental health has been shown to be linked with certain underlying physiological mechanisms. The objective of this cross sectional study was to investigate the relationship between depressive symptoms and brachial artery reactivity (BAR) in an understudied population: police officers. Methods Participants were 351 police officers who were clinically examined in the Buffalo Cardio-Metabolic Police Stress (BCOPS) study. BAR was performed using standard B-Mode ultrasound procedures. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale. Mean values of the difference between the baseline and maximum diameters of the brachial artery were determined across three categories of CES-D score using the analysis of variance and the analysis of covariance. p-values for linear trends were obtained from linear regression models. Results The mean age (± standard deviation) of all officers was 40.9 ± 7.2 years. Women had a slightly higher mean CES-D score than men (8.9 ± 8.9 vs. 7.4 ± 6.4) and a slightly higher percentage increase of BAR than men (6.90 vs. 5.26%). Smoking status significantly modified the associations between depressive symptoms and BAR. Among current smokers, mean absolute values of BAR significantly decreased as depressive symptoms increased after adjustment for age, gender, race/ethnicity, hypertension, and diabetes; the multivariate-adjusted p-values were 0.033 (absolute) and 0.040 (%). Associations between depressive symptoms and BAR were not statistically significant among former smokers or never smokers. Conclusion Depressive symptoms were inversely associated with BAR among police officers who were current smokers and together may be considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease among police officers. Further prospective research is warranted. PMID:23516114

  7. Impaired handgrip exercise-induced brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in young obese males.

    PubMed

    Slattery, David J; Stuckless, Troy J R; King, Trevor J; Pyke, Kyra E

    2016-05-01

    Flow mediated dilation (FMD) stimulated by different shear stress stimulus profiles may recruit distinct transduction mechanisms, and provide distinct information regarding endothelial function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether obesity influences brachial artery FMD differently depending on the shear stress profile used for FMD assessment. The FMD response to a brief, intermediate, and sustained shear stress profile was assessed in obese (n = 9) and lean (n = 19) young men as follows: brief stimulus, standard reactive hyperemia (RH) following a 5 min forearm occlusion (5 min RH); intermediate stimulus, RH following a 15 min forearm occlusion (15 min RH); sustained stimulus, 10 min of handgrip exercise (HGEX). Brachial artery diameter and mean shear stress were assessed using echo and Doppler ultrasound, respectively, during each FMD test. There was no group difference in HGEX shear stress (p = 0.390); however, the obese group had a lower HGEX-FMD (5.2 ± 3.0% versus 11.5 ± 4.4%, p < 0.001). There was no group difference in 5 min RH-FMD (p = 0.466) or 15 min RH-FMD (p = 0.181); however, the shear stress stimulus was larger in the obese group. After normalization to the stimulus the 15 min RH-FMD (p = 0.002), but not the 5 min RH-FMD (p = 0.118) was lower in the obese group. These data suggest that obesity may have a more pronounced impact on the endothelium's ability to respond to prolonged increases in shear stress.

  8. Contribution of nitric oxide to brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Wray, D. Walter; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J.; Conklin, Jamie D.; Reese, Van; Richardson, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    The reduction in nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vascular function with age has largely been determined by flow-mediated dilation (FMD). However, in light of recent uncertainty surrounding the NO dependency of FMD and the recognition that brachial artery (BA) vasodilation during handgrip exercise is predominantly NO-mediated in the young, we sought to determine the contribution of NO to BA vasodilation in the elderly using the handgrip paradigm. BA vasodilation during progressive dynamic (1 Hz) handgrip exercise performed at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg was assessed with and without NO synthase (NOS) inhibition [intra-arterial NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA)] in seven healthy older subjects (69 ± 2 yr). Handgrip exercise in the control condition evoked significant BA vasodilation at 6 (4.7 ± 1.4%), 9 (6.5 ± 2.2%), and 12 kg (9.5 ± 2.7%). NOS inhibition attenuated BA vasodilation, as the first measurable increase in BA diameter did not occur until 9 kg (4.0 ± 1.8%), and the change in BA diameter at 12 kg was reduced by ∼30% (5.1 ± 2.2%), with unaltered shear rate (Control: 407 ± 57, l-NMMA: 427 ± 67 s−1). Although shifted downward, the slope of the relationship between BA diameter and shear rate during handgrip exercise was unchanged (Control: 0.0013 ± 0.0004, l-NMMA: 0.0011 ± 0.007, P = 0.6) as a consequence of NOS inhibition. Thus, progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly evokes a robust BA vasodilation, the magnitude of which was only minimally attenuated following NOS inhibition. This modest contribution of NO to BA vasodilation in the elderly supports the use of the handgrip exercise paradigm to assess NO-dependent vasodilation across the life span. PMID:23948773

  9. Numerical validation of a new method to assess aortic pulse wave velocity from a single recording of a brachial artery waveform with an occluding cuff.

    PubMed

    Trachet, B; Reymond, P; Kips, J; Swillens, A; De Buyzere, M; Suys, B; Stergiopulos, N; Segers, P

    2010-03-01

    Recently a new method has been proposed as a tool to measure arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of the stiffness of the large arteries and an emerging parameter used as indicator of clinical cardiovascular risk. The method is based on measurement of brachial blood pressure during supra-systolic pressure inflation of a simple brachial cuff [the device is known as the Arteriograph (Tensiomed, Budapest, Hungary)]. This occlusion yields pronounced first and secondary peaks in the pressure waveform, the latter ascribed to a reflection from the aortic bifurcation, and PWV is calculated as the ratio of twice the jugulum-symphysis distance and the time difference between the two peaks. To test the validity of this working principle, we used a numerical model of the arterial tree to simulate pressures and flows in the normal configuration, and in a configuration with an occluded brachial artery. A pronounced secondary peak was indeed found in the brachial pressure signal of the occluded model, but its timing was only related to brachial stiffness and not to aortic stiffness. We also compared PWV's calculated with three different methods: PWVATG (approximately Arteriograph principle), PWVcar-fem (approximately carotid-femoral PWV, the current clinical gold standard method), and PWVtheor (approximately Bramwell-Hill equation). Both PWVATG (R2=0.94) and PWVcar-fem (R2=0.95) correlated well with PWVtheor, but their numerical values were lower (by 2.17+/-0.42 and 1.08+/-0.70 m/s for PWVATG and PWVcar-fem, respectively). In conclusion, our simulations question the working principle of the Arteriograph. Our data indicate that the method picks up wave reflection phenomena confined to the brachial artery, and derived values of PWV rather reflect the stiffness of the brachial arteries.

  10. Ultrasound assessment of endothelial-dependent flow-mediated vasodilation of the brachial artery in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Alley, Hugh; Owens, Christopher D; Gasper, Warren J; Grenon, S Marlene

    2014-10-22

    The vascular endothelium is a monolayer of cells that cover the interior of blood vessels and provide both structural and functional roles. The endothelium acts as a barrier, preventing leukocyte adhesion and aggregation, as well as controlling permeability to plasma components. Functionally, the endothelium affects vessel tone. Endothelial dysfunction is an imbalance between the chemical species which regulate vessel tone, thombroresistance, cellular proliferation and mitosis. It is the first step in atherosclerosis and is associated with coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, heart failure, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. The first demonstration of endothelial dysfunction involved direct infusion of acetylcholine and quantitative coronary angiography. Acetylcholine binds to muscarinic receptors on the endothelial cell surface, leading to an increase of intracellular calcium and increased nitric oxide (NO) production. In subjects with an intact endothelium, vasodilation was observed while subjects with endothelial damage experienced paradoxical vasoconstriction. There exists a non-invasive, in vivo method for measuring endothelial function in peripheral arteries using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound. The endothelial function of peripheral arteries is closely related to coronary artery function. This technique measures the percent diameter change in the brachial artery during a period of reactive hyperemia following limb ischemia. This technique, known as endothelium-dependent, flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) has value in clinical research settings. However, a number of physiological and technical issues can affect the accuracy of the results and appropriate guidelines for the technique have been published. Despite the guidelines, FMD remains heavily operator dependent and presents a steep learning curve. This article presents a standardized method for measuring FMD in the brachial artery on the upper arm and offers suggestions to reduce intra

  11. Blood flow in the brachial artery increases after intense cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Medbø, Jon Ingulf; Hisdal, Jonny; Stranden, Einar

    2009-01-01

    During cycling blood flow is redistributed from physically inactive tissues to working leg muscles. It is unknown how long this situation persists after very intense exercise or whether it differs between intense exhausting and non-exhausting exercise. It is also not known to what extent the redistribution differs between different types of non-active tissues. Therefore nine healthy young men cycled first for 2 min at 328 W (non-exhausting exercise, mean). Blood velocity in thigh and arm (ultrasound-doppler), perfusion of forearm skin (non-acral skin) and finger tip (acral skin, with arterio-venous anastomoses) were measured for 30 min after exercise (laser-doppler). To be able to study vascular resistance and central circulation, blood pressure (Finometer), heart rate (ECG), and stroke volume (ultrasound-doppler) were measured. Thereafter the subjects cycled at the same power to exhaustion (4 min), and the measurements were repeated. After both exercises mean blood pressure was unchanged (< or = 80 mm Hg) despite increased cardiac output (> or = + 30% vs. pre-exercise). Blood velocity in the brachial artery was higher during the whole recovery period than at rest (p< or =0.02; no differences between exercises). Blood perfusion of non-acral skin was unchanged from pre-exercise level after 2 min of non-exhausting exercise, but it was twice as high after 4 min cycling to exhaustion as at rest (p=0.02). Blood perfusion of acral skin rose after both exercises and did not differ between exhausting and non-exhausting exercise. In conclusion, arm blood flow increases above the pre-exercise level in the recovery period after short-lasting, strenuous exercise.

  12. Occult closed posterior elbow dislocation with intimal rupture of the brachial artery in a 71-year-old male†

    PubMed Central

    Dabboussi, Naji Abdallah; Fakih, Riad Rifaat; Kassar, Talal Adnan; Abtar, Houssam Khodor

    2014-01-01

    Posterior elbow dislocation with vascular injury is rarely encountered, but it is crucial for every emergency physician to diagnose it. Missing these injuries can result in neurovascular compromise, which in turn can lead to limb ischemia, compartment syndrome and potential limb loss. Having a normal X-ray on presentation makes this injury more difficult to diagnose. In this study, we present a case of occult posterior elbow dislocation with an intimal injury of the brachial artery. The rarity of these cases, the diagnostic modalities and the treatment options will be reviewed. PMID:25527603

  13. Occult closed posterior elbow dislocation with intimal rupture of the brachial artery in a 71-year-old male†.

    PubMed

    Dabboussi, Naji Abdallah; Fakih, Riad Rifaat; Kassar, Talal Adnan; Abtar, Houssam Khodor

    2014-12-19

    Posterior elbow dislocation with vascular injury is rarely encountered, but it is crucial for every emergency physician to diagnose it. Missing these injuries can result in neurovascular compromise, which in turn can lead to limb ischemia, compartment syndrome and potential limb loss. Having a normal X-ray on presentation makes this injury more difficult to diagnose. In this study, we present a case of occult posterior elbow dislocation with an intimal injury of the brachial artery. The rarity of these cases, the diagnostic modalities and the treatment options will be reviewed.

  14. Repeated upper limb salvage in a case of severe traumatic soft-tissue and brachial artery defect.

    PubMed

    Noaman, Hassan Hamdy; Shiha, Anis Elsayed

    2002-01-01

    We present the case of a 9-year-old male patient who suffered a gunshot injury to the right arm. The patient arrived in shock, his right arm severely traumatized, with soft-tissue loss involving the anterior surface and both sides of the right arm. The humerus was exposed. There was brachial artery defect and damage to the lateral fibers of the median nerve. The mangled extremity severity score (MESS) was 8 points. The patient was treated with general resuscitation, blood transfusion, and debridement. A venous graft, 12 cm in length, to bridge the brachial artery defect, and tendon transfer, triceps to the biceps, was performed in one step. Postoperatively, there was a normal radial pulse, normal skin color, normal temperature, and normal movement of the fingers without pain. Unfortunately, the patient then sustained a second trauma to the right arm 3 weeks later, rupturing the graft. This time he lost 1,500 cc of blood. After another blood transfusion, we performed a second reverse saphenous vein graft. The patient stayed at the hospital for 3 weeks. At follow-up 12 months later, the limb has good function and, except for the presence of a scar and skin graft, is equal in appearance to the left side.

  15. User-guided automated segmentation of time-series ultrasound images for measuring vasoreactivity of the brachial artery induced by flow mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Chandra M.; Kao, Yen H.; Cary, Ted W.; Arger, Peter H.; Mohler, Emile R.

    2005-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction in response to vasoactive stimuli is closely associated with diseases such as atherosclerosis, hypertension and congestive heart failure. The current method of using ultrasound to image the brachial artery along the longitudinal axis is insensitive for measuring the small vasodilatation that occurs in response to flow mediation. The goal of this study is to overcome this limitation by using cross-sectional imaging of the brachial artery in conjunction with the User-Guided Automated Boundary Detection (UGABD) algorithm for extracting arterial boundaries. High-resolution ultrasound imaging was performed on rigid plastic tubing, on elastic rubber tubing phantoms with steady and pulsatile flow, and on the brachial artery of a healthy volunteer undergoing reactive hyperemia. The area of cross section of time-series images was analyzed by UGABD by propagating the boundary from one frame to the next. The UGABD results were compared by linear correlation with those obtained by manual tracing. UGABD measured the cross-sectional area of the phantom tubing to within 5% of the true area. The algorithm correctly detected pulsatile vasomotion in phantoms and in the brachial artery. A comparison of area measurements made using UGABD with those made by manual tracings yielded a correlation of 0.9 and 0.8 for phantoms and arteries, respectively. The peak vasodilatation due to reactive hyperemia was two orders of magnitude greater in pixel count than that measured by longitudinal imaging. Cross-sectional imaging is more sensitive than longitudinal imaging for measuring flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery, and thus may be more suitable for evaluating endothelial dysfunction.

  16. A young man with intimomedial mucoid degeneration of the brachial artery.

    PubMed

    Raber, Menno H; Meerwaldt, Robbert; van Det, Rob J

    2011-03-01

    Intimomedial mucoid degeneration is a rare disorder and has been described as a distinctly different entity from Erdheim's cystic medial necrosis. Most studies show a strong predominance in African American females with hypertension. In our case report, we describe the presence of a large brachial aneurysm in a young white male with intimomedial mucoid degeneration.

  17. Anatomical and Functional Estimations of Brachial Artery Diameter and Elasticity Using Oscillometric Measurements with a Quantitative Approach.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Takeuchi, Keisuke; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-01

    Noninvasive vascular function measurement plays an important role in detecting early stages of atherosclerosis and in evaluating therapeutic responses. In this regard, recently, new vascular function measurements have been developed. These new measurements have been used to evaluate vascular function in coronary arteries, large aortic arteries, or peripheral arteries. Increasing vascular diameter represents vascular remodeling related to atherosclerosis. Attenuated vascular elasticity may be a reliable marker for atherosclerotic risk assessment. However, previous measurements for vascular diameter and vascular elasticity have been complex, operator-dependent, or invasive. Therefore, simple and reliable approaches have been sought. We recently developed a new automated oscillometric method to measure the estimated area (eA) of a brachial artery and its volume elastic modulus (VE). In this review, we further report on this new measurement and other vascular measurements. We report on the reliability of the new automated oscillometric measurement of eA and VE. Based on our findings, this measurement technique should be a reliable approach, and this modality may have practical application to automatically assess muscular artery diameter and elasticity in clinical or epidemiological settings. In this review, we report the characteristics of our new oscillometric measurements and other related vascular function measurements.

  18. Anatomical and Functional Estimations of Brachial Artery Diameter and Elasticity Using Oscillometric Measurements with a Quantitative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Takeuchi, Keisuke; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive vascular function measurement plays an important role in detecting early stages of atherosclerosis and in evaluating therapeutic responses. In this regard, recently, new vascular function measurements have been developed. These new measurements have been used to evaluate vascular function in coronary arteries, large aortic arteries, or peripheral arteries. Increasing vascular diameter represents vascular remodeling related to atherosclerosis. Attenuated vascular elasticity may be a reliable marker for atherosclerotic risk assessment. However, previous measurements for vascular diameter and vascular elasticity have been complex, operator-dependent, or invasive. Therefore, simple and reliable approaches have been sought. We recently developed a new automated oscillometric method to measure the estimated area (eA) of a brachial artery and its volume elastic modulus (VE). In this review, we further report on this new measurement and other vascular measurements. We report on the reliability of the new automated oscillometric measurement of eA and VE. Based on our findings, this measurement technique should be a reliable approach, and this modality may have practical application to automatically assess muscular artery diameter and elasticity in clinical or epidemiological settings. In this review, we report the characteristics of our new oscillometric measurements and other related vascular function measurements. PMID:27493898

  19. Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Hughes, Alun D; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-10-01

    Central augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) predict cardiovascular events and mortality, but underlying physiological mechanisms remain disputed. While traditionally believed to relate to wave reflections arising from proximal arterial impedance (and stiffness) mismatching, recent evidence suggests aortic reservoir function may be a more dominant contributor to AP and AIx. Our aim was therefore to determine relationships among aortic-brachial stiffness mismatching, AP, AIx, aortic reservoir function, and end-organ disease. Aortic (aPWV) and brachial (bPWV) pulse wave velocity were measured in 359 individuals (aged 61 ± 9, 49% male). Central AP, AIx, and aortic reservoir indexes were derived from radial tonometry. Participants were stratified by positive (bPWV > aPWV), negligible (bPWV ≈ aPWV), or negative stiffness mismatch (bPWV < aPWV). Left-ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured by two-dimensional-echocardiography. Central AP and AIx were higher with negative stiffness mismatch vs. negligible or positive stiffness mismatch (11 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 vs. 8 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.001 and 24 ± 10 vs. 24 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 13%, P = 0.042). Stiffness mismatch (bPWV-aPWV) was negatively associated with AP (r = -0.18, P = 0.001) but not AIx (r = -0.06, P = 0.27). Aortic reservoir pressure strongly correlated to AP (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and AIx (r = 0.62, P < 0.001) independent of age, sex, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and height (standardized β = 0.61 and 0.12, P ≤ 0.001). Aortic reservoir pressure independently predicted abnormal LVMI (β = 0.13, P = 0.024). Positive aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch does not result in higher AP or AIx. Aortic reservoir function, rather than discrete wave reflection from proximal arterial stiffness mismatching, provides a better model description of AP and AIx and also has clinical relevance as evidenced by an independent association of aortic reservoir pressure with LVMI.

  20. [Case of cerebellar and spinal cord infarction presenting with acute brachial diplegia due to right vertebral artery occlusion].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takayuki; Santa, Yo; Akutagawa, Noriko; Nagano, Sukehisa; Yoshimura, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted for evaluation of sudden onset of dizziness, bilateral shoulder pain, and brachial diplegia. Neurological examination revealed severe bilateral weakness of the triceps brachii, wrist flexor, and wrist extensor muscles. There was no paresis of the lower limbs. His gait was ataxic. Pinprick and temperature sensations were diminished at the bilateral C6-C8 dermatomes. Vibration and position senses were intact. An MRI of the head revealed a right cerebellar infarction and occlusion of the right vertebral artery. An MRI of the cervical spine on T₂ weighted imaging (T₂WI) showed cord compression at the C3/4-C5/6 level secondary to spondylotic degeneration without any intramedullary signal changes of the cord. On the following day, however, high-signal lesions on T₂WI appeared in the C5-C6 spinal cord, suggesting cord infarction. Unilateral vertebral artery occlusion does not usually result in cervical cord infarction because of anastomosis of arteries. Because of the long-term mechanical compression in our case, it was likely that cervical cord ischemia was present before the onset of symptoms. On the basis of chronic cord compression, our case suggests that occlusion of a unilateral vertebral artery could cause cervical cord infarction.

  1. [Brachial artery endothelial function in teenagers with obesity depending on severity of clinical, trophological and metabolic disorders].

    PubMed

    Maskova, G S; Chernaia, N L; Nagornova, E Iu; Fomina, O V; Byteva, T A

    2014-01-01

    We carried out complex examination of 68 adolescents aged 11-17 years with primary obesity which in addition to assessment of clinical-anamnestic, laboratory data and functional parameters of cardiovascular system included registration of reaction of brachial artery endothelium to reactive hyperemia. Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) was found in 66% of obese teenagers. Obesity in adolescents with VED was characterized by aggravated course with higher fat mass index (36.8 +/- 4.39%) and prevalence of hypothalamic (42%) and metabolic (8.8%) syndromes. Stable arterial hypertension (AH) found in 37% of examined adolescents was 1.5 times more often registered in those with VED. We distinguished 4 groups of adolescents with various degree of risk of development of cardiovascular disorders: with stable AH and VED (group I), with stable AH and normal function of vascular endothelium (group II), with normal or labile arterial pressure with VED (group III), with normal or labile arterial pressure with normal function of vascular endothelium. It is expedient to supplement examination of obese adolescents with assessment of the state of vascular endothelium aiming at determination of degree of risk of development of atherosclerosis and/or stable AH.

  2. Children and Adolescent Obesity Associates with Pressure-Dependent and Age-Related Increase in Carotid and Femoral Arteries' Stiffness and Not in Brachial Artery, Indicative of Nonintrinsic Arterial Wall Alteration

    PubMed Central

    García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Castro, Juan Manuel; Arana, Maite; Giachetto, Gustavo; Chiesa, Pedro; Zócalo, Yanina

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze if childhood obesity associates with changes in elastic, transitional, and/or muscular arteries' stiffness. Methods. 221 subjects (4–15 years, 92 females) were assigned to normal weight (NW, n = 137) or obesity (OB, n = 84) groups, considering their body mass index z-score. Age groups were defined: 4–8; 8–12; 12–15 years old. Carotid, femoral, and brachial artery local stiffness was determined through systodiastolic pressure-diameter and stress-strain relationships. To this end, arterial diameter and peripheral and aortic blood pressure (BP) levels and waveforms were recorded. Carotid-femoral, femoropedal, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities were determined to evaluate aortic, lower-limb, and upper-limb regional arterial stiffness, respectively. Correlation analysis between stiffness parameters and BP was done. Results. Compared to NW, OB subjects showed higher peripheral and central BP and carotid and femoral stiffness, reaching statistical significance in subjects aged 12 and older. Arterial stiffness differences disappeared when levels were normalized for BP. There were no differences in intrinsic arterial wall stiffness (elastic modulus), BP stiffness relationships, and regional stiffness parameters. Conclusion. OB associates with BP-dependent and age-related increase in carotid and femoral (but not brachial) stiffness. Stiffness changes would not be explained by intrinsic arterial wall alterations but could be associated with the higher BP levels observed in obese children. PMID:27066273

  3. Change in Elasticity Caused by Flow-Mediated Dilation Measured Only for Intima-Media Region of Brachial Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Masataka; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step of arteriosclerosis [R. Ross: N. Engl. J. Med. 340 (2004) 115]. For the assessment of the endothelium function, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) caused by increased blood flow has been evaluated with ultrasonic diagnostic equipment. In the case of conventional methods, the change in artery diameter caused by FMD is measured [M. Hashimoto et al.: Circulation 92 (1995) 3431]. Although the arterial wall has a layered structure (intima, media, and adventitia), such a structure is not taken into account in conventional methods because the change in diameter depends on the characteristic of the entire wall. However, smooth muscle present only in the media contributes to FMD, whereas the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not contribute. In this study, we measure the change in elasticity of only the intima-media region including smooth muscle using the phased tracking method [H. Kanai et al.: IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 43 (1996) 791]. From the change in elasticity, FMD measured only for the intima-media region by our proposed method was found to be more sensitive than that measured for the entire wall by the conventional method.

  4. High dietary sodium reduces brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in humans with salt-sensitive and salt-resistant blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Evan L; Brian, Michael S; Ramick, Meghan G; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon; Edwards, David G; Farquhar, William B

    2015-06-15

    Recent studies demonstrate that high dietary sodium (HS) impairs endothelial function in those with salt-resistant (SR) blood pressure (BP). The effect of HS on endothelial function in those with salt-sensitive (SS) BP is not currently known. We hypothesized that HS would impair brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) to a greater extent in SS compared with SR adults. Ten SR (age 42 ± 5 yr, 5 men, 5 women) and 10 SS (age 39 ± 5 yr, 5 men, 5 women) healthy, normotensive participants were enrolled in a controlled feeding study consisting of a run-in diet followed by a 7-day low dietary sodium (LS) (20 mmol/day) and a 7-day HS (300 mmol/day) diet in random order. Brachial artery FMD and 24-h BP were assessed on the last day of each diet. SS BP was individually assessed and defined as a change in 24-h mean arterial pressure (MAP) of >5 mmHg between the LS and HS diets (ΔMAP: SR -0.6 ± 1.2, SS 7.7 ± 0.4 mmHg). Brachial artery FMD was lower in both SS and SR individuals during the HS diet (P < 0.001), and did not differ between groups (P > 0.05) (FMD: SR LS 10.6 ± 1.3%, SR HS 7.2 ± 1.5%, SS LS 12.5 ± 1.7%, SS HS 7.8 ± 1.4%). These data indicate that an HS diet impairs brachial artery FMD to a similar extent in adults with SS BP and SR BP.

  5. Correlation between Patient-Reported Symptoms and Ankle-Brachial Index after Revascularization for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Je, Hyung Gon; Kim, Bo Hyun; Cho, Kyoung Im; Jang, Jae Sik; Park, Yong Hyun; Spertus, John

    2015-01-01

    Improvement in quality of life (QoL) is a primary treatment goal for patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The current study aimed to quantify improvement in the health status of PAD patients following peripheral revascularization using the peripheral artery questionnaire (PAQ) and ankle-brachial index (ABI), and to evaluate possible correlation between the two methods. The PAQ and ABI were assessed in 149 symptomatic PAD patients before, and three months after peripheral revascularization. Mean PAQ summary scores improved significantly three months after revascularization (+49.3 ± 15 points, p < 0.001). PAQ scores relating to patient symptoms showed the largest improvement following revascularization. The smallest increases were seen in reported treatment satisfaction (all p’s < 0.001). As expected the ABI of treated limbs showed significant improvement post-revascularization (p < 0.001). ABI after revascularization correlated with patient-reported changes in the physical function and QoL domains of the PAQ. Twenty-two percent of PAD patients were identified as having a poor response to revascularization (increase in ABI < 0.15). Interestingly, poor responders reported improvement in symptoms on the PAQ, although this was less marked than in patients with an increase in ABI > 0.15 following revascularization. In conclusion, data from the current study suggest a significant correlation between improvement in patient-reported outcomes assessed by PAQ and ABI in symptomatic PAD patients undergoing peripheral revascularization. PMID:25993299

  6. Diffuse aneurysmal degeneration of the brachial artery after long-standing high-flow arteriovenous fistula closure for hemodialysis at elbow level.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Francesco; Martini, Guido; Mani, Gabriele; Bernhard, Othmar

    2014-07-01

    While the possibility of development of a panarterial dilatation proximal to a long-standing high-flow posttraumatic arteriovenous fistula is well known, to the best of our knowledge, this event has never been described after vascular access for hemodialysis closure. We describe a man in whom a diffuse aneurysmal degeneration of the brachial artery has been highlighted 6 months after long-standing high-flow arteriovenous fistula closure. A 47-year-old man developed a painful pulsatile mass in the anterior distal third of his arm 6 months after long-standing high-flow arteriovenous fistula closure at the level of his elbow. A computed tomography scan revealed multiple "true" aneurysms of the brachial artery (BA) that appeared enlarged in toto. One of these aneurysms (near the BA bifurcation) presented with significant thrombus stratification. Surgery was recommended because of the major risk of peripheral embolization. Considering the anatomic characteristics of both the BA and aneurysm, no arterial substitution was performed and, after removal of the thrombus, the aneurysm diameter was reduced via direct arterial wall suture. The patient was discharged under oral anticoagulation. Aneurysmal degeneration of the donor artery after vascular access is relatively rare but represents a challenging problem. Operative or conservative management of these aneurysms should evaluate both the possible aneurysm-related complications and the feasibility of vascular reconstruction. In this context, the risk of additional donor artery and/or vascular reconstruction enlargement over time should also be considered.

  7. Doppler assessment of brachial artery flow as a measure of endothelial dysfunction in pediatric chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Gehan; Bughdady, Yasser; Kandil, Manal E; Bazaraa, Hafez M; Taher, Heba

    2008-11-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are highly prevalent among patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Endothelial dysfunction is regarded as the initial reversible step in the development of atherosclerosis and has been demonstrated in all stages of renal failure. Non-invasive techniques to assess endothelial function have been recently developed and have been proven to predict future mortality in adults. We aimed to assess endothelial function in children with stage 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD 4) on conservative treatment, using a-non invasive, high-resolution, ultrasound Doppler study of the brachial artery flow, correlating it with other clinical and laboratory parameters. This study included 34 children with CKD 4 on conservative treatment who were compared with 30 healthy controls. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), nitroglycerin-mediated dilatation (NTG-MD) and FMD/NTG-MD ratio were estimated. FMD was abnormal (< 5%) in 24 patients (71%). FMD and FMD/NTG-MD ratio were significantly lower in patients than in controls (P = 0.001 and P = 0.01, respectively). FMD correlated positively with serum calcium and negatively with alkaline phosphatase. We concluded that endothelial dysfunction is present in children with CKD 4 on conservative treatment and may reflect increased atherogenic and thrombogenic properties of the endothelium, contributing to subsequent adverse cardiovascular outcome.

  8. Ascorbic acid improves brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly through a nitric oxide-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Trinity, Joel D; Wray, D Walter; Witman, Melissa A H; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Reese, Van; Zhao, Jia; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-03-15

    The proposed mechanistic link between the age-related attenuation in vascular function and free radicals is an attractive hypothesis; however, direct evidence of free radical attenuation and a concomitant improvement in vascular function in the elderly is lacking. Therefore, this study sought to test the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA), administered intra-arterially during progressive handgrip exercise, improves brachial artery (BA) vasodilation in a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent manner, by mitigating free radical production. BA vasodilation (Doppler ultrasound) and free radical outflow [electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy] were measured in seven healthy older adults (69 ± 2 yr) during handgrip exercise at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg (∼13-52% of maximal voluntary contraction) during the control condition and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition via N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), AA, and coinfusion of l-NMMA + AA. Baseline BA diameter was not altered by any of the treatments, while L-NMMA and L-NMMA + AA diminished baseline BA blood flow and shear rate. AA improved BA dilation compared with control at 9 kg (control: 6.5 ± 2.2%, AA: 10.9 ± 2.5%, P = 0.01) and 12 kg (control: 9.5 ± 2.7%, AA: 15.9 ± 3.7%, P < 0.01). NOS inhibition blunted BA vasodilation compared with control and when combined with AA eliminated the AA-induced improvement in BA vasodilation. Free radical outflow increased with exercise intensity but, interestingly, was not attenuated by AA. Collectively, these results indicate that AA improves BA vasodilation in the elderly during handgrip exercise through an NO-dependent mechanism; however, this improvement appears not to be the direct consequence of attenuated free radical outflow from the forearm.

  9. Ascorbic acid improves brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly through a nitric oxide-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wray, D. Walter; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J.; Conklin, Jamie D.; Reese, Van; Zhao, Jia; Richardson, Russell S.

    2016-01-01

    The proposed mechanistic link between the age-related attenuation in vascular function and free radicals is an attractive hypothesis; however, direct evidence of free radical attenuation and a concomitant improvement in vascular function in the elderly is lacking. Therefore, this study sought to test the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA), administered intra-arterially during progressive handgrip exercise, improves brachial artery (BA) vasodilation in a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent manner, by mitigating free radical production. BA vasodilation (Doppler ultrasound) and free radical outflow [electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy] were measured in seven healthy older adults (69 ± 2 yr) during handgrip exercise at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg (∼13–52% of maximal voluntary contraction) during the control condition and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition via NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA), AA, and coinfusion of l-NMMA + AA. Baseline BA diameter was not altered by any of the treatments, while l-NMMA and l-NMMA + AA diminished baseline BA blood flow and shear rate. AA improved BA dilation compared with control at 9 kg (control: 6.5 ± 2.2%, AA: 10.9 ± 2.5%, P = 0.01) and 12 kg (control: 9.5 ± 2.7%, AA: 15.9 ± 3.7%, P < 0.01). NOS inhibition blunted BA vasodilation compared with control and when combined with AA eliminated the AA-induced improvement in BA vasodilation. Free radical outflow increased with exercise intensity but, interestingly, was not attenuated by AA. Collectively, these results indicate that AA improves BA vasodilation in the elderly during handgrip exercise through an NO-dependent mechanism; however, this improvement appears not to be the direct consequence of attenuated free radical outflow from the forearm. PMID:26801312

  10. A control systems approach to quantify wall shear stress normalization by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery.

    PubMed

    van Bussel, Frank C G; van Bussel, Bas C T; Hoeks, Arnold P G; Op 't Roodt, Jos; Henry, Ronald M A; Ferreira, Isabel; Vanmolkot, Floris H M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Reesink, Koen D

    2015-01-01

    Flow-mediated dilation is aimed at normalization of local wall shear stress under varying blood flow conditions. Blood flow velocity and vessel diameter are continuous and opposing influences that modulate wall shear stress. We derived an index FMDv to quantify wall shear stress normalization performance by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery. In 22 fasting presumed healthy men, we first assessed intra- and inter-session reproducibilities of two indices pFMDv and mFMDv, which consider the relative peak and relative mean hyperemic change in flow velocity, respectively. Second, utilizing oral glucose loading, we evaluated the tracking performance of both FMDv indices, in comparison with existing indices [i.e., the relative peak diameter increase (%FMD), the peak to baseline diameter ratio (Dpeak/Dbase), and the relative peak diameter increase normalized to the full area under the curve of blood flow velocity with hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC) or with area integrated to peak hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC_peak)]. Inter-session and intra-session reproducibilities for pFMDv, mFMDv and %FMD were comparable (intra-class correlation coefficients within 0.521-0.677 range). Both pFMDv and mFMDv showed more clearly a reduction after glucose loading (reduction of ~45%, p≤0.001) than the other indices (% given are relative reductions): %FMD (~11%, p≥0.074); Dpeak/Dbase (~11%, p≥0.074); FMD/shearAUC_peak (~20%, p≥0.016) and FMD/shearAUC (~38%, p≤0.038). Further analysis indicated that wall shear stress normalization under normal (fasting) conditions is already far from ideal (FMDv < 1), which (therefore) does not materially change with glucose loading. Our approach might be useful in intervention studies to detect intrinsic changes in shear stress normalization performance in conduit arteries.

  11. Characterization of endothelial function in the brachial artery via affine registration of ultrasonographic image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamata, Pablo; Laclaustra, Martin; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2003-05-01

    The assessment and characterization of the endothelial function is a current research topic as it may play an important role in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. Flow mediated dilatation may be used to investigate endothelial function, and B-mode ultrasonography is a cheap and non-invasive way to assess the vasodilation response. Computerized analysis techniques are very desirable to give higher accuracy and objectivity to the measurements. A new method is presented that solves some limitations of existing methods, which in general depend on accurate edge detection of the arterial wall. This method is based on a global image analysis strategy. The arterial vasodilation between two frames is modeled by a superposition of a rigid motion model and a stretching perpendicular to the artery. Both transformation models are recovered using an image registration algorithm based on normalized mutual information and a multi-resolution search framework. Temporal continuity of in the variation of the registration parameters is enforced with a Kalman filter, since the dilation process is known to be a gradual and continuous physiological phenomenon. The proposed method presents a negligible bias when compared with manual assessment. It also eliminates artifacts introduced by patient and probe motion, thus improving the accuracy of the measurements. Finally, it is also robust to typical problems of ultrasound, like speckle noise and poor image quality.

  12. Impact of Weight Loss on Ankle-Brachial Index and Inter-Artery Blood Pressures in Overweight and Obese Adults with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Espeland, Mark A.; Lewis, Cora E.; Bahnson, Judy; Knowler, William C.; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Gaussoin, Sarah A.; Beavers, Daniel; Johnson, Karen C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess whether weight loss improves markers of peripheral artery disease and vascular stenosis. Design and Methods The Action for Health in Diabetes randomized clinical trial compared intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss to a control condition of diabetes support and education (DSE) in overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Annual ankle and brachial blood pressures over four years were used compute ankle-brachial indices (ABIs) and to assess inter-artery blood pressure differences in 5018 participants. Results ILI, compared to DSE, produced 7.8% (Year 1) to 3.6% (Year 4) greater weight losses. These did not affect prevalence of low (<0.90) ABI (3.60% in DSE versus 3.14% in ILI; p=0.20) or elevated (>1.40) ABI (7.52% in DSE versus 7.59% in ILI: p=0.90), but produced smaller mean (SE) maximum inter-artery systolic blood pressure differences among ankle sites [19.7 (0.2) mmHg for ILI versus 20.6 (0.2) mmHg for DSE (p<0.001)] and between arms [5.8 (0.1) mmHg for ILI versus 6.1 (0.1) mmHg for DSE (p=0.01)]. Conclusions Four years of intensive behavioral weight loss intervention did not significantly alter prevalence of abnormal ABI, however it did reduce differences in systolic blood pressures among arterial sites. PMID:24174392

  13. Measurement of brachial artery endothelial function using a standard blood pressure cuff

    PubMed Central

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Tison, Geoffrey H; Alley, Hugh F; Budinger, Thomas F; Owens, Christopher D; Olgin, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The integrity of endothelial function in major arteries (EFMA) is a powerful independent predictor of heart attack and stroke. Existing ultrasound-based non-invasive assessment methods are technically challenging and suitable only for laboratory settings. EFMA, like blood pressure (BP), is both acutely and chronically affected by factors such as lifestyle and medication. Consequently, lab-based measurements cannot fully gauge the effects of medical interventions on EFMA. EFMA and BP have, arguably, comparable (but complementary) value in the assessment of cardiovascular health. Widespread deployment of EFMA assessment is thus a desirable clinical goal. To this end, we propose a device based on modifying the measurement protocol of a standard electronic sphygmomanometer. Methods The protocol involves inflating the cuff to sub-diastolic levels to enable recording of the pulse waveform before and after vasodilatory stimulus. The mechanical unloading of the arterial wall provided by the cuff amplifies the distension that occurs with each pulse, which is measured as a pressure variation in the cuff. We show that the height of the rising edge of each pulse is proportional to the change in lumen area between diastole and systole. This allows the effect of vasodilatory stimuli on the artery to be measured with high sensitivity. We compare the proposed cuff flow-mediated dilation (cFMD) method to ultrasound FMD (uFMD). Results We find significant correlation (r=0.55, p = 0.003, N=27) between cFMD- and uFMD-based metrics obtained when the release of a 5-minute cuff occlusion is employed to induce endothelial stimulus via reactive hyperemia. cFMD is approximately proportional to the square of uFMD, representing a typical increase in sensitivity to vasodilation of 300–600%. Conclusion This study illustrates the potential for an individual to conveniently measure his/her EFMA by using a low-cost reprogrammed home sphygmomanometer. PMID:26393958

  14. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation and carotid intima-media thickness in young ED patients with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Chen, S-F; Yao, F-J; Sun, X-Z; Wu, R-P; Huang, Y-P; Zheng, F-F; Yang, Q-Y; Han, D-Y; Xie, M-Q; Ding, M; Zhang, Y; Liu, G-H; Deng, C-H

    2016-09-01

    The evidence of a close relationship between cardiovascular disease and erectile dysfunction (ED) is well documented. The aim of this study is to investigate whether there is an early asymptomatic impairment of the peripheral vasculature in young ED patients without obvious cardiovascular disease. We studied a total of 261 ED patients (19-40 years old) and 40 age-matched healthy controls. All participants received questionnaires of cardiovascular risk factors and erectile function assessment, were subjected to lab tests of fasting blood sample, and underwent the ultrasonographic examination of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT). Insulin resistance (IR) was measured by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Compared with normal human controls, FMD was significantly lower, whereas the average c-IMT was significantly greater in ED patients. An inverse correlation was found between FMD and mean c-IMT. The ED patients had significantly higher levels of fasting glucose, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR index, but showed relatively lower total testosterone and prolactin levels than the controls. Both FMD and c-IMT showed a significant correlation with International Index of Erectile Function-5 questionnaire (IIEF-5) score, age and HOMA-IR. Multivariate stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that age, HOMA-IR and IIEF-5 score were the risk factors associated with FMD and c-IMT. In conclusion, young ED patients in association with IR display diminished FMD and increased c-IMT. Furthermore, ED, HOMA-IR and age are independent predictors of the two subclinical atherosclerotic markers.

  15. Brachial plexopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the muscles Weakness of hand flexing A detailed history may help determine the cause of the brachial plexopathy. Age and sex are important, because some brachial plexus problems are more common in certain groups. For example, young men more often have inflammatory or post-viral ...

  16. Comparison of Different Edge Detections and Noise Reduction on Ultrasound Images of Carotid and Brachial Arteries Using a Speckle Reducing Anisotropic Diffusion Filter

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, Mehravar; Arabfard, Masoud; Rafati-Rahimzadeh, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Common carotid artery (CCA) ultrasound with measurement of intima-media thickness (IMT) is a safe and noninvasive technique for assessing subclinical atherosclerosis and determining cardiovascular risks. Moreover, the pattern of wall thickening in the brachial artery (BA) is rather diffuse compared to the carotid artery and may be a more sensitive indicator of long-term systemic exposure to risk factors. Therefore noninvasive evaluation of mechanical parameters changes of both arteries has gained the attention of researchers. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare different edge detection techniques with speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD) de-noising filter in ultrasound images of both arteries. Patients and Methods: In a cross-sectional design, an examination was performed on ten men with mean age of 40 ± 5 years from September 2012 to March 2013 through random sampling. An ultrasonic examination of the left CCA and BA was performed. The program was designed in the MATLAB software to extract consecutive images in JPEG format from the AVI. Another program was designed in the MATLAB software to apply regions of interest (ROI) on the IMT of the posterior wall of common carotid and brachial arteries. Next, different edge detections and SRAD filter were applied to the ROI, separately. Finally, the program measured mean-squared error (MSE) and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR). Results: The lowest values of MSE and highest values of PSNR were achieved by Canny edge detection with de-noising SRAD filter for IMT of left CCA and BA in 90 frames. Conclusions: Based on the result, by measuring the MSE and PSNR, this study showed Canny edge detection with SRAD filter is better than other edge detections in terms of speckle suppression and details preservation in CCA and BA ultrasound images. PMID:25593716

  17. Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral fracture of the distal radius associated with a brachial artery injury: A new pathological condition of traumatic origin.

    PubMed

    Trigo Lahoz, L; Lamas Gomez, C; Sarasquete Reiriz, J; de Caso Rodriguez, J; Proubasta Renart, I

    2016-11-25

    Elbow dislocation associated with ipsilateral fracture of the distal radius and a brachial artery injury is an uncommon traumatic entity. The two references of this injury combination appeared in 2015, although both authors did not realise that they were the first two cases published in the medical literature. Although mentioned in the text of the articles, no mention was made of the fracture of the distal radius in the titles. The purpose of this paper is to present three cases with this new traumatic pathological entity, explaining its pathogenetic mechanism, the treatment used, and the results obtained.

  18. Brachial plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khadilkar, Satish V.; Khade, Snehaldatta S.

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury can occur as a result of trauma, inflammation or malignancies, and associated complications. The current topic is concerned with various forms of brachial plexopathy, its clinical features, pathophysiology, imaging findings, and management. Idiopathic brachial neuritis (IBN), often preceded with antecedent events such as infection, commonly present with abruptonset painful asymmetric upper limb weakness with associated wasting around the shoulder girdle and arm muscles. Idiopathic hypertrophic brachial neuritis, a rare condition, is usually painless to begin with, unlike IBN. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of paralysis and sensory disturbances in an affected limb, which is preceded by severe pain. While the frequency of the episodes tends to decrease with age, affected individuals suffer from residual deficits. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome affects the lower trunk of the brachial plexus. It is diagnosed on the basis of electrophysiology and is amenable to surgical intervention. Cancer-related brachial plexopathy may occur secondary to metastatic infiltration or radiation therapy. Traumatic brachial plexus injury is commonly encountered in neurology, orthopedic, and plastic surgery set-ups. Trauma may be a direct blow or traction or stretch injury. The prognosis depends on the extent and site of injury as well as the surgical expertise. PMID:23661957

  19. Endothelial Dysfunction and Brachial Intima-Media Thickness: Long Term Cardiovascular Risk with Claudication Related to Peripheral Arterial Disease: A Prospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hafner, Franz; Kieninger, Andrea; Meinitzer, Andreas; Gary, Thomas; Froehlich, Harald; Haas, Elke; Hackl, Gerald; Eller, Philipp; Brodmann, Marianne; Seinost, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endothelial dysfunction plays a key role in the development, progression, and clinical manifestation of atherosclerosis, and in symptomatic peripheral arterial disease, endothelial dysfunction and enlarged intima-media thickness might be associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Flow-mediated dilatation and serologic parameters are used to evaluate individual endothelial function. Brachial intima-media thickness, a less recognized parameter of cardiovascular risk, is independently associated with coronary artery disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of ultrasound and serologic parameters of endothelial function in relation to cardiovascular mortality in peripheral arterial disease. Design monocentric, prospective cohort study. Methods Flow mediated dilatation and brachial intima-media thickness were assessed in 184 (124 male) patients with peripheral arterial disease (Rutherford stages 2–3). Serologic parameters of endothelial function included asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), and L-homoarginine. Cardiovascular events were recorded during a follow-up of 99.1±11.1 months. Subjects who died of noncardiovascular causes were excluded from further analysis. Results Eighty-two patients (44.6%) died during follow-up after a mean duration of 49.7±28.3 months. There were 49 cardiovascular deaths (59.8%) and 33 other deaths (40.2%). Flow mediated dilatation was associated with cardiovascular death [1.17% (0.0, 4.3) vs. 4.1% (1.2, 6.4), p<0.001]. Intima-media thickness was greater in patients who succumbed to cardiovascular disease [0.37 mm (0.30, 0.41)] than in survivors [0.21 mm (0.15, 0.38), p<0.001]. Brachial intima-media thickness above 0.345 mm was most predictive of cardiovascular death, with sensitivity and specificity values of 0.714 and 0.657, respectively (p<0.001). Furthermore, ADMA levels above 0.745 µmol/l and SDMA levels above 0.825 µmol/l were significantly associated with

  20. [Ankle brachial index measurement].

    PubMed

    Rucigaj, Tanja Planinsek

    2014-10-01

    Ultrasound examinations are noninvasive diagnostic methods which, along with appropriate history and clinical examination, provide basic information on the etiology and spread of the disease, as well as on treatment options required in patients with chronic venous insufficiency and arterial flow impairment. Doppler flow meter offers useful data on venous blood return, primarily in great veins, while both deep and superficial veins as well as arteries can be visualized and data on venous and arterial hemodynamics obtained by duplex ultrasonography. In addition, Doppler flow meter provides data on the peripheral arterial system action through ankle brachial index measurement, which will guide the choice of compression therapy when deciding on the treatment of peripheral arterial disease and mixed arteriovenous leg ulcers. However, diagnosis of arterial insufficiency requires additional examinations.

  1. Diagnostic Accuracy Study of an Oscillometric Ankle-Brachial Index in Peripheral Arterial Disease: The Influence of Oscillometric Errors and Calcified Legs

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Cavero-Redondo, Iván; Álvarez-Bueno, Celia; Garrido-Miguel, Miriam; Notario-Pacheco, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an indicator of widespread atherosclerosis. However, most individuals with PAD, in spite of being at high cardiovascular risk, are asymptomatic. This fact, together with the limitations of the Doppler ankle-brachial index (ABI), contributes to PAD underdiagnose. The aim of this study was to compare oscillometric ABI and Doppler ABI to diagnose peripheral arterial disease, and also to examine the influence of oscillometric errors and calcified legs on the PAD diagnoses. Methods and Findings We measured the ankle-brachial indexes of 90 volunteers (n = 180 legs, age 70 ± 14 years, 43% diabetics) using both oscillometer OMRON-M3 and Doppler. For concordance analyses we used the Bland and Altman method, and also estimated the intraclass correlation coefficient. Receiver Operating Characteristic Curves were used to examine the diagnostic performance of both methods. The ABI means were 1.06 ± 0.14 and 1.04 ± 0.16 (p = 0.034) measured by oscillometer and Doppler ABIs respectively, with limits of agreement of ± 0.20 and intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.769. Oscillometer yielded 23 “error” measurements, and also overestimated the measurements in low ankle pressures. Using Doppler as gold standard, oscillometer performance for diagnosis of PAD showed an Area Under Curve = 0.944 (sensitivity: 66.7%, specificity: 96.8%). Moreover, when considered calcified legs and oscillometric “error” readings as arteriopathy equivalents, sensitivity rose to 78.2%, maintaining specificity in 96%. The best oscillometer cut-off point was 0.96 (sensitivity: 87%, specificity: 91%, positive likelihood ratio: 9.66 and negative likelihood ratio: 0.14). Conclusion Despite its limitations, oscillometric ABI could be a useful tool for the diagnosis of PAD, particularly when considering calcified legs and oscillometric “errors” readings as peripheral arterial disease equivalents. PMID:27898734

  2. Effect of Dexmedetomidine as an Adjuvant to 0.75% Ropivacaine in Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block Using Nerve Stimulator: A Prospective, Randomized Double-blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Rashmi, H. D.; Komala, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ropivacaine, a newer local anesthetic (LA), has been increasingly used nowadays in different concentrations for peripheral nerve blocks. It has lesser cardiac toxicity and higher safety margin when compared to bupivacaine. Dexmedetomidine, a novel α2 agonist, is widely used as adjuvant to LA in peripheral nerve blocks to decrease the time of onset and increase the duration of the block. In this study, we evaluated the effect of dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant with 0.75% ropivacaine for interscalene brachial plexus block using nerve stimulator. Aim: This study aims to know the effect of using dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to 0.75% ropivacaine in interscalene brachial plexuses block using nerve stimulator. Settings and Designs: Sixty patients scheduled for elective orthopedic surgery of the upper limb under interscalene block were considered in this prospective randomized controlled double-blind study. The study population was randomly divided into two groups with thirty patients in each group by using computerized randomization. Materials and Methods: Group R received 30 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 0.5 ml normal saline and Group RD received 30 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 50 μg of dexmedetomidine. The onset of sensory and motor blocks, duration of sensory and motor block, and patient satisfaction score were observed. Results: Both the groups were comparable in demographic characteristics. The onset of the sensory and motor block is earlier and statistically significant in Group RD (P < 0.05) when compared to Group R. The duration of sensory and motor blockade were significantly prolonged in Group RD (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Addition of dexmedetomidine to 0.75% ropivacaine in interscalene brachial plexus block significantly shortened the time of onset of the block and prolongs the duration sensory and motor blockade. PMID:28298772

  3. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Ankle-Brachial Index Abnormalites in Young and Middle-Aged HIV-Positive Patients in Lower Silesia, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Wiesława; Knysz, Brygida; Arczyńska, Katarzyna; Drelichowska, Justyna; Czarnecki, Marcin; Gąsiorowski, Jacek; Karczewski, Maciej; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a clinical manifestation of atherosclerosis and mainly refers to elderly patients, having a negative impact on their functionality and quality of life. The findings of previous studies in HIV-infected patients have shown that cardiovascular risk is higher and PAD occurs more frequently than in the general population. There are also contradictory observations. Much less is known about the ankle-brachial index (ABI) value in asymptomatic HIV-infected patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PAD and ankle-brachial index abnormalities as well as to determine risk factors related to the disease in a group of Polish HIV–positive patients. Methods and Findings One hundred and eleven young to middle aged HIV–positive subjects and 40 noninfected subjects were enrolled into the study. Resting ABI measurements were performed and cardiovascular risk was analysed as well. Subgroups were created according to the ABI values: low (PAD), borderline, normal, high and altered ABI. Symptomatic PAD was observed in 2 HIV–positive patients, asymptomatic PAD was not diagnosed. The ABI value is lower and more varied, in 22.5% of the study group altered ABI values were found. Six subjects demonstrated borderline ABI, and 15 high ABI, including >1.4. In the control group no low or very high values were reported. A relation between low ABI and cardiovascular family history and between altered ABI and high–density–lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL–C) level was demonstrated. Conclusions In young and middle–aged HIV–positive patients, symptomatic PAD prevalence is comparable to that observed in the overall population. Among asymptomatic patients PAD is not reported. The ABI value in HIV–positive patients is more varied compared to the HIV–negative subjects; the altered ABI shows a strong relation with low HDL–C levels and metabolic syndrome. PMID:25503743

  4. Supraclavicular brachial plexus block: Comparison of varying doses of dexmedetomidine combined with levobupivacaine: A double-blind randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Nallam, Srinivasa Rao; Chiruvella, Sunil; Karanam, Swetha

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: The ideal dose of dexmedetomidine for brachial plexus block is a matter of debate. This study was carried out to evaluate 50 μg or 100 μg of dexmedetomidine added to 0.5% levobupivacaine, with regard to the duration of analgesia. Our study also sought to assess the onset and duration of sensorimotor blockade, haemodynamic effects, sedation and adverse effects. Methods: One hundred adult patients undergoing upper limb surgeries under supraclavicular brachial plexus block were randomly allocated into two groups. Group LD50 received 29 ml of 0.5% levobupivacaine plus 50 μg of dexmedetomidine diluted in 1 ml of normal saline. Group LD100 received 29 ml of 0.5% levobupivacaine plus 100 μg of dexmedetomidine diluted in 1 ml of normal saline. Duration of analgesia was the primary outcome. Onset and duration of sensorimotor blockade, haemodynamic variables, sedation score, and adverse effects were secondary outcomes. The data were analysed with Students' t-test and Chi-square test. Results: The onset of sensory block and motor block was 14.82 ± 3.8 min and 19.75 ± 6.3 min, respectively, in group LD50, while it was 11.15 ± 1.7 min and 14.3 ± 4.2 min, respectively, in group LD100. The duration of analgesia was significantly prolonged in group LD100 (1033.6 ± 141.6 vs. 776.4 ± 138.6 min; P = 0.001). The incidence of bradycardia and sedation was observed in significantly more patients in group LD100. Significantly fewer patients in group LD100 required rescue analgesia. Conclusion: The 100 μg dose of dexmedetomidine in brachial plexus block hastens the onset and prolongs the duration of sensorimotor blockade and analgesia, but with higher incidence of bradycardia and sedation.

  5. Transradial artery coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, F; Laarman, G J; de Melker, E

    1995-01-01

    This study explored the feasibility and safety of percutaneous coronary balloon angioplasty (PTCA) with miniaturized PTCA equipment via the radial artery. Coronary angioplasty (PTCA) via the femoral or brachial arteries may be associated with rare vascular complications such as bleeding and damage to the artery and adjacent structures. It was postulated that PTCA via the radial artery with miniaturized angioplasty equipment is feasible and that no major puncture site-related complications occur because hemostasis is obtained easily and because no major structures are near the radial artery. With double blood supply to the hand, radial artery occlusion is well tolerated. In 100 patients with collateral blood supply to the right hand, PTCA was attempted with 6F guiding catheters and rapid-exchange balloon catheters for exertional angina (87 patients) or nonexertional angina (13 patients). Angioplasty was attempted in 122 lesions (type A n = 67 [55%], Type B n = 37 [30%], and type C n = 18 [15%]). Pre- and post-PTCA computerized quantitative coronary analysis was performed. Radial artery function and structure were assessed clinically and with Doppler and two-dimensional ultrasound on the day of discharge. Coronary catheterization via the radial artery was successful in 94 patients (94%). The 6 remaining patients had successful PTCA via the femoral artery (n = 5) or the brachial artery (n = 1). Procedural success (120 of 122 lesions) was achieved in 92 patients (98%) via the radial artery and in 98 patients of the total study population.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. The azygos anterior cerebral artery bypass: double reimplantation technique for giant anterior communicating artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Sanai, Nader; Lawton, Michael T

    2011-04-01

    The authors introduce the azygos anterior cerebral artery (ACA) bypass as an option for revascularizing distal ACA territories, as part of a strategy to trap giant anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms. In this procedure, the aneurysm is exposed with an orbitozygomatic-pterional craniotomy and distal ACA vessels are exposed with a bifrontal craniotomy. The uninvolved contralateral A(2) segment of the ACA serves as a donor vessel for a short radial artery graft. The contralateral pericallosal artery (PcaA) and the callosomarginal artery (CmaA) are connected to the graft in the interhemispheric fissure using the double reimplantation technique. Three anastomoses create an azygos system supplying the entire ACA territory, enabling the surgeon to trap the aneurysm incompletely. Retrograde flow from the CmaA supplies the ipsilateral recurrent artery of Heubner, and the aneurysm lumen thromboses. The azygos bypass was successfully performed to treat a 47-year-old woman with a giant, thrombotic ACoA aneurysm supplied by the A(1) segment of the left ACA, with left PcaA and CmaA originating from the aneurysm base. The authors conclude that the azygos ACA bypass is a novel option for revascularizing PcaA and CmaA, as part of the overall treatment of giant ACoA aneurysms.

  7. Brachial neuritis.

    PubMed

    Dillin, L; Hoaglund, F T; Scheck, M

    1985-07-01

    Brachial neuritis is an unusual syndrome of unknown etiology that can be confused with other causes of pain or weakness, or both, of the shoulder and arm. It is important to distinguish this disorder because of its dramatic symptoms and relatively good prognosis. Sharp pain, usually in the elbow or shoulder, marks the onset of brachial neuritis, but is relatively short-lived. Weakness generally occurs as the pain is subsiding and most frequently involves the deltoid, spinati, serratus anterior, biceps, and triceps. Paresthesias, atrophy, and sensory loss are inconstant features. Electromyographic findings of fibrillation potentials and positive waves characteristically are found in a pattern indicating combined nerve-root and peripheral nerve involvement. Electromyography more frequently than clinical examination shows that the lesion is bilateral, and also is of both diagnostic and prognostic value. Other laboratory studies serve only to exclude other causes of shoulder pain. The clinical course is variable, but in 90 per cent of patients complete recovery occurs within three years. Recurrences are uncommon.

  8. A rare case of multiple bronchial artery aneurysms associated with a double aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Rameysh Danovani; Chen, Zhi Yong; Low, Teck Boon; Ng, Keng Sin

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial artery aneurysm is uncommon, and the occurrence of multiple aneurysms arising from a bronchial artery is even rarer. To date, there has been only one published case report describing double bronchial artery aneurysms. We herein describe a case of three aneurysms arising from a left bronchial artery, accompanied by multiple bilateral hypertrophied bronchial and intercostobronchial arteries, as well as a double aortic arch. Bronchial artery aneurysm is potentially life-threatening, and immediate treatment is recommended to minimise the potential risk of rupture. The aneurysms in our case were successfully treated via transcatheter arterial embolisation using coils. PMID:25820859

  9. Effect of cocoa/chocolate ingestion on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and its relevance to cardiovascular health and disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Kevin D

    2012-11-15

    Prospective studies indicate that high intake of dietary flavanols, such as those contained in cocoa/chocolate, are associated with reduced rates of cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in humans. Numerous mechanisms may underlie these associations such as favorable effects of flavanols on blood pressure, platelet aggregation, thrombosis, inflammation, and the vascular endothelium. The brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) technique has emerged as a robust method to quantify endothelial function in humans. Collectively, the preponderance of evidence indicates that FMD is a powerful surrogate measure for firm cardiovascular endpoints, such as cardiovascular-related mortality, in humans. Thus, literally thousands of studies have utilized this technique to document group differences in FMD, as well as to assess the effects of various interventions on FMD. In regards to the latter, numerous studies indicate that both acute and chronic ingestion of cocoa/chocolate increases FMD in humans. Increases in FMD after cocoa/chocolate ingestion appear to be dose-dependent such that greater increases in FMD are observed after ingestion of larger quantities. The mechanisms underlying these responses are likely diverse, however most data suggest an effect of increased nitric oxide bioavailability. Thus, positive vascular effects of cocoa/chocolate on the endothelium may underlie (i.e., be linked mechanistically to) reductions in cardiovascular risk in humans.

  10. The Association Between Physical Activity and Both Incident Coronary Artery Calcification and Ankle Brachial Index Progression: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Joseph A C; Jensky, Nicole E.; Criqui, Michael H.; Whitt-Glover, Melicia C.; Lima, João A. C.; Allison, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Both coronary artery calcification (CAC) and the ankle brachial index (ABI) are measures of subclinical atherosclerotic disease. The influence of physical activity on the longitudinal change in these measures remains unclear. To assess this we examined the association between these measures and self-reported physical activity in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Methods At baseline, the MESA participants were free of clinically evident cardiovascular disease. We included all participants with an ABI between 0.90 and 1.40 (n=5656). Predictor variables were based on self-reported measures with physical activity being assessed using the Typical Week Physical Activity Survey from which metabolic equivalent-minutes/week of activity were calculated. We focused on physical activity intensity, intentional exercise, sedentary behavior, and conditioning. Incident peripheral artery disease (PAD) was defined as the progression of ABI to values below 0.90 (given the baseline range of 0.90 to 1.40). Incident CAC was defined as a CAC score >0 Agatston units upon follow up with a baseline score of 0 Agatston units. Results Mean age was 61 years, 53% were female, and mean body mass index was 28 kg/m2. After adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic factors, intentional exercise was protective for incident peripheral artery disease (Relative Risk (RR)= 0.85, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.74 to 0.98). After adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic factors, there was a significant association between vigorous PA and incident CAC (RR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.94 to 1.00). There was also a significant association between sedentary behavior and increased amount of CAC among participants with CAC at baseline (Δlog(Agatston Units +25)=0.027, 95% CI 0.002, 0.052). Conclusions These data suggest that there is an association between physical activity/sedentary behavior and the progression of two different measures

  11. Autonomic nervous activation triggered during induction of reactive hyperemia exerts a greater influence on the measured reactive hyperemia index by peripheral arterial tonometry than on flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery in patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Yoshida, Masanobu; Higashi, Yukihito; Takase, Bonpei; Furumoto, Tomoo; Kario, Kazuomi; Ohya, Yusuke; Yamashina, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery (FMD) and reactive hyperemia index (RHI) measured by peripheral arterial tonometry are known to be weakly associated with one another, but the mechanisms underlying this weak association remain to be clarified. We examined whether the autonomic nervous activation induced by the 5 min forearm clamping used to induce reactive hyperemia might exert any influence on the FMD and RHI in subjects with hypertension. In 115 subjects with hypertension (age 61±1 years), the FMD and RHI were measured simultaneously, and the heart rate variability (HRV) parameters (low-frequency component (LF), high-frequency component (HF), and the ratio (LF/HF) between the two) were calculated from the electrocardiographic recordings obtained before and after the start of forearm clamping. A multivariate linear regression analysis with adjustments for confounding variables demonstrated that the RHI, but not the FMD, was significantly associated with the percent change of the LF/HF associated with forearm clamping (beta=-0.204, P=0.043). In conclusion, autonomic nervous system activation, especially sympathetic activation, induced by 5-min forearm clamping utilized to provoke reactive hyperemia may significantly affect the RHI rather than FMD in subjects with hypertension.

  12. Independent Factors of Changes of Ankle-Brachial Index in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease in Elderly Patients with or without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bąk, Ewelina; Marcisz, Czesław; Kadłubowska, Monika; Michalik, Anna; Krawczyk, Bożena; Dobrzyń-Matusiak, Dorota; Krzemińska, Sylwia; Fiałkowski, Tomasz; Glądys, Elżbieta; Drosdzol-Cop, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) belongs to the commonly-occurring pathologies associated with elderly age. A simple tool for defining the severity of PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The purpose of this research was to determine independent factors of changes of ABI in elderly patients with occlusive PAD disease (PAOD) with and without diabetes. The research was carried out on 49 elderly patients with PAOD, including 29 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 20 patients without diabetes. The concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6), E-selectin, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood serum was marked. In all patients, the independent factors of changes of ABI were determined with the use of the multiple logistic regression analysis. Our results show that in the group of patients with PAOD suffering from diabetes, it was demonstrated that the ABI was related to age, the duration of the symptoms of PAD, body mass index (BMI), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fibrinogen, and sex (determination coefficient R2 = 0.699). In patients with PAOD without diabetes, the ABI was related to age, the duration of the symptoms of PAD, the levels of CRP, E-selectin, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the glomerular filtration rate(determination coefficient R2 = 0.844). We conclude that in elderly patients with PAOD with and without diabetes, the participation of independent factors related to the ABI is diversified; in patients with diabetes, the concentration of IL-6 and fibrinogen is lower, and the concentration of E-selectin is higher than in patients without diabetes. PMID:27834825

  13. Association of Far-Infrared Radiation Therapy and Ankle-Brachial Index of Patients on Hemodialysis with Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Kuo, I-Ching; Mai, Hsiu-Chin; Kuo, Po-Lin; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is recognized to be a good marker for atherosclerosis, and is useful in the diagnosis of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) which is prevalent among patients on hemodialysis (HD). Methods: This randomized trial aimed to evaluate the effect of far-infrared radiation (FIR) therapy on ABI in HD patients with PAOD. PAOD was defined as patients with ABI < 0.95. One hundred and eight HD patients were enrolled, including 50 in the control group and 58 in the FIR group. A WS TY101 FIR emitter was applied for 40 minutes during each HD session, three times per week for six months. The ABI was measured before and after the FIR therapy. Results: Regardless of FIR therapy, the bilateral ABI decreased (in the FIR group, left: 0.88±0.22 to 0.85±0.24, p = 0.188; right: 0.92±0.20 to 0.90±0.23, p = 0.372; in control group, left: 0.91±0.23 to 0.88±0.21, p = 0144; right: 0.93±0.17 to 0.89±0.21, p = 0.082). Multivariate logistic analysis of the FIR group revealed that high uric acid (odds ratio [OR]: 2.335; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.117-4.882; p=0.024) and aspirin use (OR: 16.463; 95% CI: 1.787-151.638; p=0.013) were independently associated with increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that ABI is not increased after FIR therapy in HD patients with PAOD. However, in the FIR group, patients with higher uric acid level or those who used aspirin have increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy. PMID:27994503

  14. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by damage to those nerves. Symptoms ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can occur as a result of shoulder trauma, ...

  15. Perineural Nalbuphine in Ambulatory Upper Limb Surgery: A Comparison of Effects of Levobupivacaine with and without Nalbuphine as Adjuvant in Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block – A Prospective, Double-blinded, Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anjan; RoyBasunia, Sandip; Mukherjee, Anindya; Biswas, Hirak; Biswas, Rajasree; Mitra, Tapobrata; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Mandal, Subrata Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Various opioid additives have been trialed to prolong brachial plexus block. We evaluated the effect of adding nalbuphine hydrochloride to levobupivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus blockade. The primary end-points were the onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks and duration of analgesia. Materials and Methods: Seventy-eight patients (aged 25–45 years) posted for ambulatory forearm and hand surgery under supraclavicular brachial plexus block were divided into two equal groups (Groups LN and LC) in a randomized, double-blind fashion. In Group LN (n = 39), 30 ml 0.5% levobupivacaine + 10 mg (diluted in 2 ml 0.9% saline) nalbuphine hydrochloride, and in Group LC (n = 39), 30 ml 0.5% levobupivacaine + 2 ml normal saline (0.9%) were administered in supraclavicular block. Sensory and motor block onset times and block durations, time to first analgesic use, total analgesic need, postoperative visual analog scale (VAS), hemodynamics, and side effects were recorded for each patient. Results: Although with similar demographic profile and block (sensory and motor) onset time, sensory and motor block duration and time to first analgesic use were significantly longer and the total need for rescue analgesics was lower in Group LN (P < 0.05) than Group LC. Postoperative VAS value at 24 h was significantly lower in Group LN (P < 0.05). Intraoperative hemodynamics was comparable between two groups, and no any appreciable side effect was noted throughout the study period. Conclusion: It can be concluded that adding nalbuphine hydrochloride to supraclavicular brachial plexus block increases the sensory and motor block duration and time to first analgesic use, and decreases total analgesic use with no side effects. PMID:28298754

  16. Atypical Double Right Coronary Artery Presenting With Acute Coronary Syndrome, Cardiogenic Shock and Complete Heart Block

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Shravan; Chaturvedi, Vikash; Agrawal, Puneet; Razi, Mahmadula; Mahrotra, Anupam; Mishra, Vikas; Kumar, Mukesh; Abdali, Nasar; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Thakur, Ramesh; Varma, Chandra Mohan; Pandey, Umeshwar

    2017-01-01

    Double right coronary artery (RCA) is an extremely rare coronary artery anomaly. We here report an atherosclerotic double RCA which appeared after primary percutaneous intervention performed to treat a 34-year-old male presenting with acute inferior myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock and complete heart block. This is an unusual case as double RCA had been hidden by total atherosclerotic occlusion of the proximal part of the RCA and complete restoration of patency led complete heart block back to normal sinus rhythm. PMID:28179971

  17. Recurrent brachial plexus neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bradley, W G; Madrid, R; Thrush, D C; Campbell, M J

    1975-09-01

    The clinical, electrophysiological and pathological changes in 3 patients with recurrent attacks of non-traumatic brachial plexus neuropathy have been described. Two had recurrent attacks and a dominant family history of similar attacks, together with evidence of lesser degrees of nerve involvement outside the brachial plexus. In one patient the attacks were moderately painful, while in the other there was little or no pain. Only one showed undue slowing of motor nerve conduction during ischaemia, but in both cases the sural nerves had the changes of tomaculous neuropathy, with many sausage-shaped swellings of the myelin sheaths, and extensive segmental demyelination and remyelination. The third patient had two attacks of acute brachial plexus neuropathy which were both extremely painful. The clinical features were compatible with a diagnosis of neuralgic amuotrophy. In the second attack, there was vagus nerve involvement and the sural nerve showed evidence of healed extensive segmental demyelination. The various syndromes presenting with acute non-traumatic brachial plexus neuropathy are reviewed, and a tentative nonsological classification advanced. Most patients fall into the category of acute, painful paralysis with amyotrophy, with no family history and no evidence of lesions outside the brachial plexus. It is suggested that the term "neuralgic amyotrophy" be restricted to this group. Patients with features outside this clinical picture probably suffer from other disease entities presenting with brachial plexus neuropathy. The familial cases constitute one or more aetioliogical subgroups, differing from neuralgic amyotrophy in the frequency of recurrences, the relative freedom from pain in the attacks, the frequency of nerve lesions outside the brachial plexus, and of hypotelorism. Individual attacks of acute brachial plexus neuropathy, however, may be identical in patients with the different diseases, and further pathological and biochemical studies are

  18. Quantification of Adventitial Vasa Vasorum Vascularization in Double-injury Restenotic Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Meng; Zhang, Bai-Gen; Zhang, Lan; Xie, Hui; Zhang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence indicates a potential role of adventitial vasa vasorum (VV) dysfunction in the pathophysiology of restenosis. However, characterization of VV vascularization in restenotic arteries with primary lesions is still missing. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the response of adventitial VV to vascular injury resulting from balloon angioplasty in diseased arteries. Methods: Primary atherosclerotic-like lesions were induced by the placement of an absorbable thread surrounding the carotid artery of New Zealand rabbits. Four weeks following double-injury induced that was induced by secondary balloon dilation, three-dimensional patterns of adventitial VV were reconstructed; the number, density, and endothelial surface of VV were quantified using micro-computed tomography. Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed in order to examine the development of intimal hyperplasia. Results: Results from our study suggest that double injured arteries have a greater number of VV, increased luminal surface, and an elevation in the intima/media ratio (I/M), along with an accumulation of macrophages and smooth muscle cells in the intima, as compared to sham or single injury arteries. I/M and the number of VV were positively correlated (R2 = 0.82, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Extensive adventitial VV neovascularization occurs in injured arteries after balloon angioplasty, which is associated with intimal hyperplasia. Quantitative assessment of adventitial VV response may provide insight into the basic biological process of postangioplasty restenosis. PMID:26228224

  19. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with multivessel cervical artery dissections and a double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Nouh, Amre; Ruland, Sean; Schneck, Michael J; Pasquale, David; Biller, José

    2014-02-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) has been associated with exposure to vasoactive substances and few reports with cervical arterial dissections (CADs). We evaluated a 32-year-old woman with history of depression, migraines without aura, and cannabis use who presented with a thunderclap headache unresponsive to triptans. She was found to have bilateral occipital infarcts, bilateral extracranial vertebral artery dissections, bilateral internal carotid artery dissecting aneurysms, and extensive distal multifocal segmental narrowing of the anterior and posterior intracranial circulation with a "sausage on a string-like appearance" suggestive of RCVS. Subsequently, she was found to have a distal thrombus of the basilar artery, was anticoagulated, and discharged home with no residual deficits. We highlight the potential association of CADs and RCVS. The association of RCVS and a double aortic arch has not been previously reported.

  20. Comparison of Nerve Stimulation-guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Block, Single Injection versus Four Injections: A Prospective Randomized Double-blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Badiger, Santoshi V.; Desai, Sameer N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: A variety of techniques have been described for the axillary block using nerve stimulator, either with single injection, two, three, or four separate injections. Identification of all the four nerves is more difficult and time-consuming than other methods. Aims: Aim of the present study is to compare success rate, onset, and duration of sensory and motor anesthesia of axillary block using nerve stimulator, either with single injection after identification of any one of the four nerves or four separate injections following identification of each of nerve. Setting and Design: Prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Patients undergoing forearm and hand surgeries under axillary block. Methodology: One hundred patients, aged 18–75 years, were randomly allocated into two groups of 50 each. Axillary block was performed under the guidance of nerve stimulator with a mixture of 18 ml of 1.5% lignocaine and 18 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. In the first group (n = 50), all 36 ml of local anesthetic was injected after the identification of motor response to any one of the nerves and in Group 2, all the four nerves were identified by the motor response, and 9 ml of local anesthetic was injected at each of the nerves. The success rate of the block, onset, and duration of sensory and motor block was assessed. Statistical Analysis: Categorical variables were compared using the Chi-square test, and continuous variables were compared using independent t-test. Results: The success rate of the block with four injection technique was higher compared to single-injection technique (84% vs. 56%, P = 0.02). Four injection groups had a faster onset of sensory and motor block and prolonged duration of analgesia compared to single-injection group (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the incidence of accidental arterial puncture and hemodynamic parameter between the groups. Conclusion: Identification of all the four nerves produced higher success rate and better

  1. Transposition of the great arteries associated with a double left ventricular outflow tract.

    PubMed Central

    Kinsley, R H; Levin, S E; O'Donovan, T G

    1979-01-01

    A case is described in which, at semilunar valve level, the aorta and pulmonary artery arose from inappropriate ventricles. Despite this, the outflow tracts to both vessels originated from the left ventricle. Embryologically, it is speculated that this anomaly is the result of normal rotation of the proximal conus, without concomitant truncal inversion, and excessive leftward shift of the proximal conus and conal septum or anterior and rightward deviation of the anterior segment of the ventricular septum. Surgical repair using a double conduit between the right ventricle and pulmonary artery and left ventricle and aorta, respectively, was unsuccessful. Images PMID:508480

  2. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Romaña, M C; Rogier, A

    2013-01-01

    Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy is considered to be the result of a trauma during the delivery, even if there remains some controversy surrounding the causes. Although most babies recover spontaneously in the first 3 months of life, a small number remains with poor recovery which requires surgical brachial plexus exploration. Surgical indications depend on the type of lesion (producing total or partial palsy) and particularly the nonrecovery of biceps function by the age of 3 months. In a global palsy, microsurgery will be mandatory and the strategy for restoration will focus first on hand reinnervation and secondarily on providing elbow flexion and shoulder stability. Further procedures may be necessary during growth in order to avoid fixed contractured deformities or to give or increase strength of important muscle functions like elbow flexion or wrist extension. The author reviews the history of obstetrical brachial plexus injury, epidemiology, and the specifics of descriptive and functional anatomy in babies and children. Clinical manifestations at birth are directly correlated with the anatomical lesion. Finally, operative procedures are considered, including strategies of reconstruction with nerve grafting in infants and secondary surgery to increase functional capacity at later ages. However, normal function is usually not recovered, particularly in total brachial plexus palsy.

  3. Peripheral Arterial Disease in Older People with Intellectual Disability in The Netherlands Using the Ankle-Brachial Index: Results of the HA-ID Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, C. F.; Bastiaanse, L. P.; Kranendonk, S. E.; Hilgenkamp, T. I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Older people with an intellectual disability (ID) have been shown to have similar to increased cardiovascular risks as compared to the general population. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD), atherosclerosis distal from the aortic bifurcation, is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of PAD has not been…

  4. An Integrative Model of the Cardiovascular System Coupling Heart Cellular Mechanics with Arterial Network Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Tae; Lee, Jeong Sang; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Sung

    2013-01-01

    The current study proposes a model of the cardiovascular system that couples heart cell mechanics with arterial hemodynamics to examine the physiological role of arterial blood pressure (BP) in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). We developed a comprehensive multiphysics and multiscale cardiovascular model of the cardiovascular system that simulates physiological events, from membrane excitation and the contraction of a cardiac cell to heart mechanics and arterial blood hemodynamics. Using this model, we delineated the relationship between arterial BP or pulse wave velocity and LVH. Computed results were compared with existing clinical and experimental observations. To investigate the relationship between arterial hemodynamics and LVH, we performed a parametric study based on arterial wall stiffness, which was obtained in the model. Peak cellular stress of the left ventricle and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the brachial and central arteries also increased; however, further increases were limited for higher arterial stiffness values. Interestingly, when we doubled the value of arterial stiffness from the baseline value, the percentage increase of SBP in the central artery was about 6.7% whereas that of the brachial artery was about 3.4%. It is suggested that SBP in the central artery is more critical for predicting LVH as compared with other blood pressure measurements. PMID:23960442

  5. Intracranial Aneurysms Associated with a Double Origin of the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery

    PubMed Central

    Padovani Trivelato, F.; Salles Rezende, M.T.; Brito Santos, R.; Hilton Vieira Madeira, T.; Cardoso Campos, R.; Cordeiro Ulhûa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) frequently has a variable course and target territory. However, double origin PICA is a rare finding. Its significance is uncertain, but it has been associated with intracranial aneurysms localized at the PICA proper or at a distant site. The presence of this variation imposes specific challenges. We describe two cases of double origin PICA, one of them associated with an ipsilateral PICA aneurysm. The role of this finding was critically reviewed. A literature search identified 23 cases of double origin PICA, including both cases reported in this paper. Intracranial aneurysms were strongly associated with double origin PICA (71% in 21 detailed cases of double origin PICA). The current patient harboring a PICA aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular trapping. In the setting of double origin PICA aneurysms, this variation beneficially affects the treatment choice once the two limbs enable the safe sacrifice of the channel involved, with preservation of blood flow through the other channel. PMID:22005699

  6. Subintimal Double-Barrel Restenting of an Occluded Primary Stented Superficial Femoral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Lohle, Paul N.M.; Lampmann, Leo E.H.

    2007-01-01

    In-stent re-stenosis is a frequent complication of endovascular stents, especially in the superficial femoral artery (SFA). Endovascular re-intervention of in- or peri-stent occlusive disease consists of recanilization through the occluded stent. In our case report, we describe the endovascular treatment of a previously placed stent in the SFA. We unintentionally passed the affected stent subintimally, in a double barrel fashion next to the first stent. The procedure was without any complications and with a successfull angiographic result. At one year follow-up the patient still has no complaints and the stent is still patent. PMID:17410397

  7. CASE REPORT A Double Thoracodorsal Artery Perforator Flap Technique for the Treatment of Pectus Excavatum

    PubMed Central

    Sinna, Raphaël; Perignon, David; Qassemyar, Quentin; Benhaim, Thomas; Dodreanu, Codrin N.; Berna, Pascal; Delay, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pectus excavatum is a common congenital deformity involving the anterior thoracic wall. It can be treated with several surgical approaches. Material and methods: To our best of knowledge, this is the first case of pectus excavatum repair via a 2-stage double thoracodorsal artery perforator flap procedure in a 37-year-old patient. Results: We obtained a satisfactory result in which the missing volume was correctly replaced in the absence of dorsal sequelae. The patient was very satisfied despite the dorsal scars. Conclusion: This new approach broadens the surgeon's options for the correction of thoracic deformities. PMID:20458352

  8. Relationship of levels of Vitamin D with flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery in patients of myocardial infarction and healthy control: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Sarthak; Giri, Subhash; Madhu, S. V.; Rathi, Vinita; Banerjee, B. D.; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) remain the leading cause of death worldwide. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to increased risk of adverse CV events. Vitamin D deficiency may be responsible for endothelial dysfunction which in turn affects the onset and progression of coronary artery disease and its risk factors, directly or indirectly through various mechanisms. Materials and Methods: It was case–control study. A total of 50 cases of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (aged 40–60 years), admitted to medicine emergency/CCU, were taken as per ACC/AHA 2007 guidelines. An equal number of age- and sex-matched controls were also taken. Risk factors of AMI, flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), and 25(OH)D levels were studied in all cases and controls. Correlation was also studied between FMD and 25(OH)D. Results: The mean values of FMD were 18.86 ± 5.39% and 10.35 ± 4.90% in controls and cases, respectively (P < 0.05). The endothelial dilatation after glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) was also studied and was found to be 26.175 ± 4.25% and 18.80 ± 5.72% in controls and cases, respectively (P < 0.05). The mean levels of 25(OH)D in controls and cases were 25.45 ± 12.17 and 14.53 ± 8.28 ng/ml, respectively. In this study, 56% of subjects were Vitamin D deficient, 25% were Vitamin D insufficient, and only 19% had Vitamin D in normal range. A positive correlation coefficient was found between FMD and 25(OH) Vitamin D levels (r = 0.841, P < 0.01). In this study, a positive correlation coefficient was also found between endothelial dilatation after GTN and 25(OH)D levels (r = 0.743, P < 0.01). Conclusion: In this study, it was found that FMD was markedly impaired in patients of AMI when compared to controls. It was also found that majority of the study population was Vitamin D deficient; however, the deficiency was more severe in patients of AMI. We also found out that FMD was positively correlated (r = 0.841) to the deficiency state of Vitamin D in all the study

  9. Resting and Post-Exercise Ankle-Brachial Index Measurements to Diagnose Asymptomatic Peripheral Arterial Disease in Middle Aged and Elderly Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Alagiakrishnan, Kannayiram; Brokop, Michael; Cave, Andrew; Rowe, Brian H.; Wong, Eric; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are at risk for asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) because smoking is a risk factor for COPD and PAD. The objectives of this study were to determine the proportion of COPD patients with asymptomatic PAD and to investigate whether the estimated risk of asymptomatic PAD in subjects with COPD differs using resting and exercise ankle-brachial index (ABI) in smokers. Methods Using a cross-sectional study design, consecutive smokers > 50 years old were recruited over 2 months from the inpatient units and the outpatient clinics. Subjects previously diagnosed with PAD, unstable angina, recent (< 3 months) myocardial infarction or abdominal, intracranial, eye or lung surgery, and palliative care patients were excluded. Vascular risk factors, ABI (supine and post-3-minute walk supine), self-reported PAD symptoms, and spirometry were obtained. Two measurements of systolic blood pressure on all limbs were obtained using a sphygmomanometer and a Doppler ultrasound, and the ABI was calculated. Data were expressed as means ± standard deviation (SD). Dichotomous outcomes were assessed using Chi-square statistics; P-values of < 0.05 were considered significant. Results Thirty patients with no previous diagnosis of PAD were recruited. Mean age was 67.7 years (SD: 10.5). Overall, 21 subjects (70%) had spirometry-proven COPD. Significant ABI for PAD (< 0.9) was seen in 7/21 COPD (33.5%) and 0/9 non-COPD subjects in the supine resting position (P = 0.07), and in 9/21 COPD (42.9%) vs. 0/9 non-COPD subjects after exercise (P = 0.03). Conclusions A significant proportion of patients with spirometry-proven COPD screened positive for asymptomatic PAD after exercise. Resting ABI may not be very sensitive to diagnose asymptomatic PAD in COPD subjects. ABI may be a reliable, sensitive and practical screening tool to assess cardiovascular risk in COPD patients. Future large-scale studies are required to confirm this

  10. Digital infarction in a hemodialysis patient due to embolism from a thrombosed brachial arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Yj, Anupama

    2015-10-01

    Acute onset of digital ischemia and infarction is an unusual complication in patients undergoing hemodialysis. This is a report of a patient on regular hemodialysis who presented with acute distal extremity ischemia, progressing to digital infarction and on evaluation was found to have thrombosis of brachial arteriovenous fistula with embolization to the distal arteries causing digital artery occlusion.

  11. Brachial plexus injury in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    Gentle massage of the arm and range-of-motion exercises are recommended for mild cases. The infant ... the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Task Force on Neonatal Brachial Plexus Palsy. Obstet Gynecol . 2014 ...

  12. Complete transposition of the great arteries with double outlet right ventricle in a dog.

    PubMed

    Koo, S T; LeBlanc, N L; Scollan, K F; Sisson, D D

    2016-06-01

    A 2-year old intact male Collie dog presented to the cardiology service at Oregon State University for evaluation of cyanosis and suspected congenital cardiac disease. Echocardiography revealed a constellation of cardiac abnormalities including a single large vessel exiting the right ventricle with a diminutive left ventricular outflow tract, a ventricular septal defect, and marked concentric right ventricular hypertrophy with moderate right atrial dilation. Cardiac-gated computed tomography confirmed the previous anomalies in addition to supporting a diagnosis of complete transposition of the great arteries, double outlet right ventricle, and pulmonic hypoplasia with a single coronary ostium. Prominent bronchoesophageal collateral vessels were concurrently identified. Clinically, the dog was stable despite mild cyanosis that worsened with exercise; no intervention was elected at the time. This case report describes a rare combination of congenital cardiac defects and the usefulness of cardiac-gated cross-sectional imaging in the anatomic diagnosis.

  13. Clinical Outcome of Double Kissing Crush Versus Provisional Stenting of Coronary Artery Bifurcation Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Santoso, Teguh; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Ye, Fei; Xu, Ya-Wei; Fu, Qiang; Kan, Jing; Zhang, Feng-Fu; Zhou, Yong; Xie, Du-Jiang; Kwan, Tak W.

    2017-01-01

    Background— Provisional stenting is effective for anatomic simple bifurcation lesions. Double kissing crush stenting reduces the 1-year rate of target lesion revascularization. This study aimed to investigate the 5-year clinical results of the DKCRUSH-II study (Randomized Study on Double Kissing Crush Technique Versus Provisional Stenting Technique for Coronary Artery Bifurcation Lesions). Methods and Results— A total of 370 patients with coronary bifurcation lesions who were randomly assigned to either the double kissing crush or provisional stenting group in the DKCRUSH-II study were followed for 5 years. The primary end point was the occurrence of a major adverse cardiac event at 5 years. Patients were classified by simple and complex bifurcation lesions according to the DEFINITION criteria (Definitions and Impact of Complex Bifurcation Lesions on Clinical Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Using Drug-Eluting Stents). At 5 years, the major adverse cardiac event rate (23.8%) in the provisional stenting group was insignificantly different to that of the double kissing group (15.7%; P=0.051). However, the difference in the target lesion revascularization rate between 2 groups was sustained through the 5-year follow-up (16.2% versus 8.6%; P=0.027). The definite and probable stent thrombosis rate was 2.7% in each group (P=1.0). Complex bifurcation was associated with a higher rate of target lesion revascularization (21.6%) at 5 years compared with 11.1% in patients with a simple bifurcation (P=0.037), with an extremely high rate in the provisional stenting group (36.8% versus 12.5%, P=0.005) mainly because of final kissing balloon inflation (19.4% versus 5.2%; P=0.036). Conclusions— The double kissing crush stenting technique for coronary bifurcation lesions is associated with a lower rate of target lesion revascularization. The optimal stenting approach based on the lesions’ complexity may improve the revascularization for patients with

  14. Double vs single internal thoracic artery harvesting in diabetic patients: role in perioperative infection rate

    PubMed Central

    Agrifoglio, Marco; Trezzi, Matteo; Barili, Fabio; Dainese, Luca; Cheema, Faisal H; Topkara, Veli K; Ghislandi, Chiara; Parolari, Alessandro; Polvani, Gianluca; Alamanni, Francesco; Biglioli, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of this prospective study is to evaluate the role in the onset of surgical site infections of bilateral internal thoracic arteries harvesting in patients with decompensated preoperative glycemia. Methods 81 consecutive patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus underwent elective CABG harvesting single or double internal thoracic arteries. Single left ITA was harvested in 41 patients (Group 1, 50.6%), BITAs were harvested in 40 (Group 2, 49.4%). The major clinical end points analyzed in this study were infection rate, type of infection, duration of infection, infection relapse rate and total hospital length of stay. Results Five patients developed sternal SSI in the perioperative period, 2 in group 1 and 3 in group 2 without significant difference. All sternal SSIs were superficial with no sternal dehiscence. The development of infection from the time of surgery took 18.5 ± 2.1 and 7.3 ± 3.0 days for Groups 1 and 2 respectively. The infections were treated with wound irrigation and debridement, and with VAC therapy as well as with antibiotics. The VAC system was removed after a mean of 12.8 ± 5.1 days, when sterilization was achieved. The overall survival estimate at 1 year was 98.7%. Only BMI was a significant predictor of SSI using multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis (Odds Ratio: 1.34; 95%Conficdence Interval: 1.02–1.83; p value: 0.04). In the model, the use of BITA was not an independent predictor of SSI. Conclusion CABG with bilateral pedicled ITAs grafting could be performed safely even in diabetics with poor preoperative glycaemic control. PMID:18573201

  15. Heart-lung vs. double-lung transplantation for idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hill, Charles; Maxwell, Bryan; Boulate, David; Haddad, Francois; Ha, Richard; Afshar, Kamyar; Weill, David; Dhillon, Gundeep S

    2015-12-01

    Patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) have improved survival after heart-lung transplantation (HLT) and double-lung transplantation (DLT). However, the optimal procedure for patients with IPAH undergoing transplantation remains unclear. We hypothesized that critically ill IPAH patients, defined by admission to the intensive care units (ICU), would demonstrate improved survival with HLT vs. DLT. All adult IPAH patients (>18 yr) in the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) database, who underwent either HLT or DLT between 1987 and 2012, were included. Baseline characteristics, survival, and adjusted survival were compared between the HLT and DLT groups. Similar analyses were performed for the subgroups as defined by the recipients' hospitalization status. A total of 928 IPAH patients (667 DLT, 261 HLT) were included in this analysis. The HLT recipients were younger, more likely to be admitted to the ICU, and have had their transplant in previous eras. Overall, the adjusted survivals after HLT or DLT were similar. For recipients who were hospitalized in the ICU, DLT was associated with worse outcomes (HR 1.827; 95% CI 1.018-3.279). In IPAH patients, the overall survival after HLT or DLT is comparable. HLT may provide improved outcomes in critically ill IPAH patients admitted to the ICU at time of transplantation.

  16. Surgical technique of double switch procedure: Senning with arterial switch operation for congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries with ventricular septal defect.

    PubMed

    Ilin, Alexey S; Teplov, Pavel V; Sakovich, Valeriy A; Ohye, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 12-month-old boy with congenitally corrected transposition of great arteries with L-looped ventricles and L-transposition of great arteries and ventricular septal defect. When admitted to the hospital, the patient had the appearance of congestive heart failure due to moderate to severe tricuspid valve regurgitation and right ventricle dysfunction. The pulmonary artery (PA) banding was required first because of low systolic pressure in the morphological left ventricle less than 70% confirmed by catheterization. Three months later, the patient appeared to be a good candidate for anatomical repair and a double switch procedure-Senning with arterial switch-was performed. The early postoperative period was relatively smooth and uneventful. Tricuspid valve insufficiency was resolved immediately after surgery. Mild systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle with mild mitral insufficiency was confirmed by the 2D strain method of echocardiography on the second day of the postoperative period and it improved over the next 21 days. Thirty days later after the procedure, the patient underwent catheterization of his superior vena cava tunnel because of the slightly increased blood flow velocity diagnosed by echocardiography. In 3 months after the surgery, the boy was asymptomatic and was doing well. The patient's functional status was I according to the NYHA classification.

  17. Double stent technique for the treatment of an internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysm caused by zone III stab injury.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yuzo; Kiyosue, Hiro; Kashiwagi, Junichi; Asano, Tomoshige; Shuto, Rieko; Matsumoto, Yushi; Nagatomi, Hirofumi; Mori, Hiromu

    2007-10-01

    A 77-year-old man was transferred to the hospital with swelling of his neck and oropharynx after a stab injury to his oral cavity with pruning shears. Findings at complete neurologic examination were normal. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and angiography revealed a pseudoaneurysm at the pharyngeal portion of the right internal carotid artery. Endovascular treatment was undertaken by using the double bare stent technique. The pseudoaneurysm was completely occluded immediately after the procedure. There were no complications. There were no further symptoms or evidence of recurrence of the aneurysm during the 18-month follow-up period. The double bare stent technique is safe and effective for the treatment of zone III carotid artery stab injuries.

  18. Association of fibroblast growth factor-23 with arterial stiffness in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jeffrey J.; Katz, Ronit; Ix, Joachim H.; de Boer, Ian H.; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Serum fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet the mechanisms remain uncertain. Our objective was to determine whether higher FGF-23 concentrations are associated with arterial stiffness. Methods In this cross-sectional study, serum FGF-23 concentrations were measured in 5977 participants without known CVD in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. The primary outcomes of interest were large (LAE) and small artery elasticity (SAE), pulse pressure and ankle-brachial index (ABI) > 1.30. LAE and SAE were measured by pulse contour analysis of the radial artery. Pulse pressure was measured with an automated sphygmomanometer using the average of two resting blood pressure measurements. ABI was calculated as the ratio of the ankle and brachial systolic blood pressures. Results Serum FGF-23 concentrations were not significantly associated with LAE [relative difference (RD) per doubling: 0%; 95% confidence interval (CI): −2–1%], SAE (RD per doubling: 0%; 95% CI: −3–2%), pulse pressure (β per doubling: 0.44; 95% CI: −0.31–1.19), or a high ABI (odds ratio per doubling: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.84–1.55). Findings were similar irrespective of chronic kidney disease status. Conclusions Higher serum FGF-23 concentrations are not associated with arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse pressure, LAE, SAE or high ABI, in a community-based population without CVD. PMID:24782533

  19. Amiodarone prophylaxis for tachycardias after coronary artery surgery: a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, J; Harriss, D R; Sinclair, M; Westaby, S

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Arrhythmias are a common cause of morbidity after cardiac surgery. This study assessed the efficacy of prophylactic amiodarone in reducing the incidence of atrial fibrillation or flutter and ventricular arrhythmias after coronary artery surgery. METHODS--A double blind, randomised, placebo controlled trial. 60 patients received a 24 hour intravenous infusion of amiodarone (15 mg/kg started after removal of the aortic cross clamp) followed by 200 mg orally three times daily for 5 days, and 60 patients received placebo. RESULTS--6 patients (10%) in the amiodarone group and 14 (23%) in the placebo group needed treatment for arrhythmias (95% confidence interval (95% CI) for the difference between groups was 0 to 26%, p = 0.05). The incidence of supraventricular tachycardia detected clinically and requiring treatment was lower in the amiodarone group (8% amiodarone v 20% placebo, 95% CI 0 to 24%, p = 0.07). The incidence detected by 24 hour Holter monitoring was similar (17% amiodarone v 20% placebo). Untreated arrhythmias in the amiodarone group were either clinically benign and undetected (n = 3) or the ventricular response rate was slow (n = 2). Age > 60 years was a positive risk factor for the development of supraventricular tachycardia in the amiodarone group but not in the placebo group. Fewer patients had episodes of ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation recorded on Holter monitoring in the amiodarone group (15% amiodarone v 33% placebo, 95% CI 3 to 33%, p = 0.02). Bradycardia (78% amiodarone v 48% placebo, 95% CI 14% to 46%, p < 0.005) and pauses (7% amiodarone v 0% placebo) occurred in more amiodarone treated patients. Bradycardia warranted discontinuation of treatment in one patient treated with amiodarone. CONCLUSIONS--The incidence of clinically significant tachycardia was reduced by amiodarone. The ventricular response rate was slowed in supraventricular tachycardia, but the induction of bradycardia may preclude the routine use of amiodarone

  20. Double Stent Assist Coiling of Ruptured Large Saccular Aneurysm in Proximal Basilar Artery Fenestration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woong Bae; Huh, Joon; Cho, Chul Bum; Yang, Seung Ho; Kim, Il Sup; Hong, Jae Taek; Lee, Sang Won

    2015-01-01

    Basilar artery fenestration is infrequent and even rarer in association with a large aneurysm. With proximity to brain stem and vital perforators, endovascular coiling can be considered first. If the large ruptured aneurysm with a wide neck originated from fenestra of the proximal basilar artery and the fenestration loop has branches of posterior circulation, therapeutic consideration should be thorough and fractionized. We report endovascular therapeutic details for a case of a ruptured large saccular aneurysm in proximal basilar artery fenestration. PMID:26523257

  1. Central blood pressure estimation by using N-point moving average method in the brachial pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Rie; Horinaka, Shigeo; Yagi, Hiroshi; Ishimura, Kimihiko; Honda, Takeharu

    2015-05-01

    Recently, a method of estimating the central systolic blood pressure (C-SBP) using an N-point moving average method in the radial or brachial artery waveform has been reported. Then, we investigated the relationship between the C-SBP estimated from the brachial artery pressure waveform using the N-point moving average method and the C-SBP measured invasively using a catheter. C-SBP using a N/6 moving average method from the scaled right brachial artery pressure waveforms using VaSera VS-1500 was calculated. This estimated C-SBP was compared with the invasively measured C-SBP within a few minutes. In 41 patients who underwent cardiac catheterization (mean age: 65 years), invasively measured C-SBP was significantly lower than right cuff-based brachial BP (138.2 ± 26.3 vs 141.0 ± 24.9 mm Hg, difference -2.78 ± 1.36 mm Hg, P = 0.048). The cuff-based SBP was significantly higher than invasive measured C-SBP in subjects with younger than 60 years old. However, the estimated C-SBP using a N/6 moving average method from the scaled right brachial artery pressure waveforms and the invasively measured C-SBP did not significantly differ (137.8 ± 24.2 vs 138.2 ± 26.3 mm Hg, difference -0.49 ± 1.39, P = 0.73). N/6-point moving average method using the non-invasively acquired brachial artery waveform calibrated by the cuff-based brachial SBP was an accurate, convenient and useful method for estimating C-SBP. Thus, C-SBP can be estimated simply by applying a regular arm cuff, which is greatly feasible in the practical medicine.

  2. A rare variant of the ulnar artery with important clinical implications: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Variations in the major arteries of the upper limb are estimated to be present in up to one fifth of people, and may have significant clinical implications. Case presentation During routine cadaveric dissection of a 69-year-old fresh female cadaver, a superficial brachioulnar artery with an aberrant path was found bilaterally. The superficial brachioulnar artery originated at midarm level from the brachial artery, pierced the brachial fascia immediately proximal to the elbow, crossed superficial to the muscles that originated from the medial epicondyle, and ran over the pronator teres muscle in a doubling of the antebrachial fascia. It then dipped into the forearm fascia, in the gap between the flexor carpi radialis and the palmaris longus. Subsequently, it ran deep to the palmaris longus muscle belly, and superficially to the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, reaching the gap between the latter and the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle, where it assumed is usual position lateral to the ulnar nerve. Conclusion As far as the authors could determine, this variant of the superficial brachioulnar artery has only been described twice before in the literature. The existence of such a variant is of particular clinical significance, as these arteries are more susceptible to trauma, and can be easily confused with superficial veins during medical and surgical procedures, potentially leading to iatrogenic distal limb ischemia. PMID:23194303

  3. Double-outlet technique for tetralogy of Fallot-type disease with an anomalous coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Asano, M; Saito, T; Nomura, N; Mishima, A

    2005-01-01

    To reduce the right ventricular (RV) pressure and the pressure gradient between the RV and the pulmonary artery (PA) in Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) with small pulmonary annulus, it is inevitable to enlarge the small annulus by incising and patching from RV to PA via PA annulus. If the anomalous coronary artery exists in the RV outflow tract, the procedure can not be done.

  4. Ectopia cordis with a double outlet right ventricle, large ventricular septal defect, malposed great arteries and left ventricular hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Malik, Rabiya; Zilberman, Mark V; Tang, Liwen; Miller, Susan; Pandian, Natesa G

    2015-03-01

    Ectopia cordis, defined as partial or complete displacement of the heart outside of the thoracic cavity, is a rare congenital malformation. If not surgically corrected during the early years of life, ectopia cordis can prove to be a fatal abnormality. However, due to the presence of multiple intracardiac and extracardiac malformations, a corrective surgery might not always be successful. The pathology of ectopia cordis with a double outlet right ventricle, large ventricular septal defect, malposed great arteries and left ventricular hypoplasia is discussed, highlighting the complexities involved in such a rare disorder.

  5. Automated analysis of brachial ultrasound time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Weidong; Browning, Roger L.; Lauer, Ronald M.; Sonka, Milan

    1998-07-01

    Atherosclerosis begins in childhood with the accumulation of lipid in the intima of arteries to form fatty streaks, advances through adult life when occlusive vascular disease may result in coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Non-invasive B-mode ultrasound has been found useful in studying risk factors in the symptom-free population. Large amount of data is acquired from continuous imaging of the vessels in a large study population. A high quality brachial vessel diameter measurement method is necessary such that accurate diameters can be measured consistently in all frames in a sequence, across different observers. Though human expert has the advantage over automated computer methods in recognizing noise during diameter measurement, manual measurement suffers from inter- and intra-observer variability. It is also time-consuming. An automated measurement method is presented in this paper which utilizes quality assurance approaches to adapt to specific image features, to recognize and minimize the noise effect. Experimental results showed the method's potential for clinical usage in the epidemiological studies.

  6. OCT/PS-OCT imaging of brachial plexus neurovascular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, David T.; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yaoping; Chen, Zhongping; Miller, Carol; Zhou, Li

    2004-07-01

    Introduction: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows high-resolution imaging (less than 10 microns) of tissue structures. A pilot study with OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) was undertaken to image ex-vivo neurovascular structures (vessels, nerves) of the canine brachial plexus. Methods: OCT is an interferometry-based optical analog of B-mode ultrasound, which can image through non-transparent biological tissues. With approval of the USC Animal Care and Use Committee, segments of the supra- and infraclavicular brachial plexus were excised from euthanized adult dogs, and the ex-vivo specimens were placed in cold pH-buffered physiologic solution. An OCT beam, in micrometer translational steps, scanned the fixed-position bisected specimens in transverse and longitudinal views. Two-dimensional images were obtained from identified arteries and nerves, with specific sections of interest stained with hematoxylin-eosin for later imaging through a surgical microscope. Results: with the beam scan direction transverse to arteries, the resulting OCT images showed an identifiable arterial lumen and arterial wall tissue layers. By comparison, transverse beam OCT images of nerves revealed a multitude of smaller nerve bundles contained within larger circular-shaped fascicles. PS-OCT imaging was helpful in showing the characteristic birefringence exhibited by arrayed neural structures. Discussion: High-resolution OCT imaging may be useful in the optical identification of neurovascular structures during attempted regional nerve blockade. If incorporated into a needle-shaped catheter endoscope, such a technology could prevent intraneural and intravascular injections immediately prior to local anesthetic injection. The major limitation of OCT is that it can form a coherent image of tissue structures only to a depth of 1.5 - 2 mm.

  7. Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries in American Football.

    PubMed

    Daly, Charles A; Payne, S Houston; Seiler, John G

    2016-11-01

    This article reports a series of severe permanent brachial plexus injuries in American football players. The authors describe the mechanisms of injury and outcomes from a more contemporary treatment approach in the form of nerve transfer tailored to the specific injuries sustained. Three cases of nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury in American football players are discussed in detail. Two of these patients regained functional use of the extremity, but 1 patient with a particularly severe injury did not regain significant function. Brachial plexus injuries are found along a spectrum of brachial plexus stretch or contusion that includes the injuries known as "stingers." Early identification of these severe brachial plexus injuries allows for optimal outcomes with timely treatment. Diagnosis of the place of a given injury along this spectrum is difficult and requires a combination of imaging studies, nerve conduction studies, and close monitoring of physical examination findings over time. Although certain patients may be at higher risk for stingers, there is no evidence to suggest that this correlates with a higher risk of severe brachial plexus injury. Unfortunately, no equipment or strengthening program has been shown to provide a protective effect against these severe injuries. Patients with more severe injuries likely have less likelihood of functional recovery. In these patients, nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury offers the best possibility of meaningful recovery without significant morbidity. [ Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1188-e1192.].

  8. Anomalous superficial ulnar artery based flap

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, C. V.; Kundagulwar, Girish K.; Prabha, Yadav S.; Dushyanth, Jaiswal

    2014-01-01

    Upper limb shows a large number of arterial variations. This case report describes the presence of additional superficial ulnar artery which was used to raise a pedicle flap to cover an arm defect thus avoided using the main vessel of the forearm - radial or ulnar artery. Vascular anomalies occurring in the arm and forearm tend to increase the likelihood of damaging the superficial anomalous arteries during surgery. Superficial ulnar or radial arteries have been described to originate from the upper third of the brachial artery; here we report the origin of the anomalous superficial ulnar artery originating from the brachial artery at the level of elbow with the concomitant presence of normal deep radial and ulnar arteries. PMID:24987217

  9. [A case of double cancer of gastric and hepatocellular carcinoma associated with cirrhosis treated by hepatic resection after intra-hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Une, Y; Nagabuchi, E; Ogasawara, K; Kamiyama, T; Sato, Y; Kawamukai, Y; Sato, N; Nakajima, Y; Uchino, J

    1990-08-01

    A case of double cancer, early gastric cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma, was reported. The patient was diabetic and had liver cirrhosis. After gastrectomy for gastric cancer which was hemorrhagic, he was treated by intra-hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy followed by hepatic resection. Histopathologically, about half of the main tumor showed necrosis, but very viable new cancer cell nests were seen around the main nodule. The patient is in good condition without recurrence of hepatic lesion 1 year after resection. The usefulness of arterial infusion chemotherapy was demonstrated in the case of double cancer, in which it is difficult to resect both cancers simultaneously.

  10. Bilateral transit time assessment of upper and lower limbs as a surrogate ankle brachial index marker.

    PubMed

    Foo, Jong Yong Abdiel

    2008-01-01

    Ankle brachial index is useful in monitoring the pathogenesis of peripheral arterial occlusive diseases. Sphygmomanometer is the standard instrument widely used but frequent prolonged monitoring can be less comfortable for patients. Pulse transit time is known to be inversely correlated with blood pressure and a ratio-based pulse transit time measurement has been proposed as a surrogate ankle brachial index marker. In this study, 17 normotensive adults (9 men; aged 25.4 +/- 3.9 years) were recruited. Two postural change test activities were performed to induce changes in the stiffness of the arterial wall of the moved periphery. Results showed that only readings from the limbs that adopted a new posture registered significant blood pressure and pulse transit time changes (P < .05). Furthermore, there was significant correlation between the ankle brachial index and pulse transit time ratio measure for both test activities (R(2) > or = 0.704). The findings herein suggest that pulse transit time ratio is a surrogate and accommodating ankle brachial index marker.

  11. Menaquinone-7 supplementation improves arterial stiffness in healthy postmenopausal women. A double-blind randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Knapen, Marjo H J; Braam, Lavienja A J L M; Drummen, Nadja E; Bekers, Otto; Hoeks, Arnold P G; Vermeer, Cees

    2015-05-01

    Observational data suggest a link between menaquinone (MK, vitamin K2) intake and cardiovascular (CV) health. However, MK intervention trials with vascular endpoints are lacking. We investigated long-term effects of MK-7 (180 µg MenaQ7/day) supplementation on arterial stiffness in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Healthy postmenopausal women (n=244) received either placebo (n=124) or MK-7 (n=120) for three years. Indices of local carotid stiffness (intima-media thickness IMT, Diameter end-diastole and Distension) were measured by echotracking. Regional aortic stiffness (carotid-femoral and carotid-radial Pulse Wave Velocity, cfPWV and crPWV, respectively) was measured using mechanotransducers. Circulating desphospho-uncarboxylated matrix Gla-protein (dp-ucMGP) as well as acute phase markers Interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and markers for endothelial dysfunction Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule (VCAM), E-selectin, and Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) were measured. At baseline dp-ucMGP was associated with IMT, Diameter, cfPWV and with the mean z-scores of acute phase markers (APMscore) and of markers for endothelial dysfunction (EDFscore). After three year MK-7 supplementation cfPWV and the Stiffness Index βsignificantly decreased in the total group, whereas distension, compliance, distensibility, Young's Modulus, and the local carotid PWV (cPWV) improved in women having a baseline Stiffness Index β above the median of 10.8. MK-7 decreased dp-ucMGP by 50 % compared to placebo, but did not influence the markers for acute phase and endothelial dysfunction. In conclusion, long-term use of MK-7 supplements improves arterial stiffness in healthy postmenopausal women, especially in women having a high arterial stiffness.

  12. Neurinomas of the brachial plexus: case report.

    PubMed

    Forte, A; Gallinaro, L S; Bertagni, A; Montesano, G; Prece, V; Illuminati, G

    1999-01-01

    Neurinomas, also referred to as neurilemmomas and schwannomas, are rare benign tumours of the peripheral nerves, a low proportion of which arise from the brachial plexus. Authors report a case of an ancient schwannoma arising from the brachial plexus. The tumour, usually asymptomatic, may cause sensory radicular symptoms, or rarely motor deficits in the involved arm. Enucleation of the tumour from the nerve without damage to any of the fascicles is the correct treatment.

  13. Dexamethasone added to lidocaine prolongs axillary brachial plexus blockade.

    PubMed

    Movafegh, Ali; Razazian, Mehran; Hajimaohamadi, Fatemeh; Meysamie, Alipasha

    2006-01-01

    Different additives have been used to prolong regional blockade. We designed a prospective, randomized, double-blind study to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone added to lidocaine on the onset and duration of axillary brachial plexus block. Sixty patients scheduled for elective hand and forearm surgery under axillary brachial plexus block were randomly allocated to receive either 34 mL lidocaine 1.5% with 2 mL of isotonic saline chloride (control group, n = 30) or 34 mL lidocaine 1.5% with 2 mL of dexamethasone (8 mg) (dexamethasone group, n = 30). Neither epinephrine nor bicarbonate was added to the treatment mixture. We used a nerve stimulator and multiple stimulations technique in all of the patients. After performance of the block, sensory and motor blockade of radial, median, musculocutaneous, and ulnar nerves were recorded at 5, 15, and 30 min. The onset time of the sensory and motor blockade was defined as the time between last injection and the total abolition of the pinprick response and complete paralysis. The duration of sensory and motor blocks were considered as the time interval between the administration of the local anesthetic and the first postoperative pain and complete recovery of motor functions. Sixteen patients were excluded because of unsuccessful blockade. The duration of surgery and the onset times of sensory and motor block were similar in the two groups. The duration of sensory (242 +/- 76 versus 98 +/- 33 min) and motor (310 +/- 81 versus 130 +/- 31 min) blockade were significantly longer in the dexamethasone than in the control group (P < 0.01). We conclude that the addition of dexamethasone to lidocaine 1.5% solution in axillary brachial plexus block prolongs the duration of sensory and motor blockade.

  14. A variant of the classical superficial brachioulnoradial artery: morphology and clinical significances.

    PubMed

    Ariyo, Olutayo; Fenderson, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    We report a superficial brachioulnoradial artery (SBURA) presenting as a variant of the normal, originating from the proximal third of the right brachial artery of a 75-year-old female cadaver which bifurcated yielding a brachiointerosseous artery laterally and a SBURA medially, and the latter bifurcating 5 cm proximal to the elbow yielding a brachioradial artery laterally and the superficial brachioulnar artery medially, resulting in the formation of three instead of two brachial arteries as in the classical SBURA said to bifurcate at the elbow into the radial and ulnar arteries. Clinical implications of this variant are discussed.

  15. Brachial plexus injury: the London experience with supraclavicular traction lesions.

    PubMed

    Birch, Rolfe

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author details the experiences of his hospital and other London hospitals in treating brachial plexus injury. As noted, important advances have been made in methods of diagnosis and repair. Myelography was replaced by CT scan and later by MRI. Among the topics the author explores are diagnosis (including pain, the presence or absence of the Tinel sign, and the irradiation of pins and needles) and the principles of repair. The author emphasizes that it is imperative that ruptured nerves be repaired as soon as possible, with the closed traction lesion coming, in urgency, close behind reattachment of the amputated hand or repair of a great artery and a trunk nerve in the combined lesion. Finally, the article concludes that the surgeon must be actively engaged in the whole process of rehabilitation and treatment of pain. This is part of a Point-Counterpoint discussion with Dr. David G. Kline's presentation of "A Personal Experience."

  16. Double labeling of vagal preganglionic and sympathetic postganglionic fibers in celiac ganglion, superior mesenteric arteries and myenteric plexus.

    PubMed

    Ting, Shi-Jane; Kao, Chih-Kuan; Wang, Feng-Bin

    2017-02-28

    Sympathetic efferents regulate the “fight-or-flight” response and sympathetic and vagal fibers have been suggested to retrogradely and centrally spread pathogens associated with Parkinson’s disease. To examine the arrangement of the vagal and sympathetic motor fibers in the celiac ganglion (CG), gastrointestinal tract, and along the superior mesenteric artery and its sub-branches, we double-labeled the vagal efferents by injecting Dextran-Texas Red into the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and the sympathetic postganglionics with tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 18). The laser scanning confocal microscope was used for image analysis. Vagal nerve endings were densely distributed around the CG neurons, and the right CG received more. Vagal and sympathetic efferent endings formed various ring or string shapes that tangled closely in the myenteric plexus of the forestomach, duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Vagal and sympathetic efferents coursed within the same nerve bundles before reaching the myenteric plexus, had in-apposition varicosities, and ran parallel with the superior mesenteric artery and its sub-branches. Although a complete sympathetic tracing and an incomplete tracing and/or damage to the vagal preganglionic neurons may lead to a sampling bias, the sympathetic innervations in the blood vessels and myenteric plexus are stronger than in the vagus. The in-apposition innervation varicosities of the vagal and sympathetic efferents within the same nerve bundles and in the myenteric plexus of the gut with complex innervation patterns may offer a network to automatically control gastrointestinal functions and an infection route of the Parkinson’s disease between the autonomic efferent endings.

  17. Effect of spironolactone in resistant arterial hypertension: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (ASPIRANT-EXT).

    PubMed

    Václavík, Jan; Sedlák, Richard; Jarkovský, Jiří; Kociánová, Eva; Táborský, Miloš

    2014-12-01

    This study was designed to assess the effect of the addition of low-dose spironolactone on blood pressure (BP) in patients with resistant arterial hypertension. Patients with office systolic blood pressure (SBP) >140 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) >90 mm Hg despite treatment with at least 3 antihypertensive drugs, including a diuretic, were enrolled in this double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial. One hundred sixty-one patients in outpatient internal medicine departments of 6 hospitals in the Czech Republic were randomly assigned to receive 25 mg of spironolactone (N = 81) or a placebo (N = 80) once daily as an add-on to their antihypertensive medication, using simple randomization. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00524615. A nalyses were done with 150 patients who finished the follow-up (74 in the spironolactone and 76 in the placebo group). At 8 weeks, BP values were decreased more by spironolactone, with differences in mean fall of SBP of -9.8, -13.0, -10.5, and -9.9 mm Hg (P < 0.001 for all) in daytime, nighttime, and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring and in the office. The respective DBP differences were -3.2, -6.4, -3.5, and -3.0 mm Hg (P = 0.013, P < 0.001, P = 0.005, and P = 0.003). Adverse events in both groups were comparable. The office SBP goal <14 mm Hg at 8 weeks was reached in 73% of patients using spironolactone and 41% using placebo (P = 0.001). Spironolactone in patients with resistant arterial hypertension leads to a significant decrease of both SBP and DBP and markedly improves BP control.

  18. Systematic evaluation of brachial plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Haynes, S

    1993-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries offer a unique challenge to the athletic trainer because of their relatively high frequency rate in contact sports and because of the complexity of the neuroanatomy in the cervical area. During a game, athletic trainers must make a fast, accurate decision regarding a player's return to competition. It is imperative that the athletic trainer be able to quickly differentiate between minor injuries and more serious injuries warranting removal from the game and/or physician referral. A systematic approach to the evaluation of a brachial plexus injury is essential to ensure proper treatment. This paper will present a structured approach to an on-the-field assessment of brachial plexus injuries.

  19. A rare case report of subscapular artery.

    PubMed

    Khaki, Amir Afshin; Shoja, M A Mohagjel; Khaki, Arash

    2011-01-01

    Axillary artery is one of the most important arteries of the upper limb, which is a continua- tion of the subclavian artery. It begins at the lateral border of the first rib and ends at the inferior border of the teres major where it becomes the brachial artery. Axillary artery has six important branches included: 1) Superior thoracic artery 2) Thoracoacromial artery 3) Lateral thoracic artery 4) Subscapular artery 5) Posterior circumflex humeral artery 6) Anterior circumflex humeral artery. Subscapular artery arises from the third part of axillary artery normally and then divides into cir- cumflex scapular artery that extremely enters the triangular space. The other branch of subscapular artery, the thoracodorsal artery, accompanies thracodorsal nerve to lateral border of scapula and supplies and innervates that region. In this case the subscapular artery was absent in both sides and instead of that the circumflex scapular artery was directly derived from axillary artery and the thoracodorsal artery is separated from circumflex scapular artery as a thin and short branch, too. It seemed that the lateral thoracic artery, which was thicker than its normal condition, supplied the muscles of the lateral part of scapula and the thoracodorsal muscle. Other branches of the axillary artery demonstrated without any abnormally. Since axillary artery has the highest rate of rapture and damage coming after the popliteal artery, knowing the variations is important and essential for surgeons, radiologist and anatomist.

  20. Interleukin-22 Might Act as a Double-Edged Sword in Type 2 Diabetes and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jin; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Mengyao; Liu, Jingning; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are both characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation. The role of Th17 and its related cytokines in T2DM and CAD is unclear. Here we investigated the serum levels of five Th17-related cytokines (IL-17, IL-22, MIP-3α, IL-9, and IL-27) in T2DM, CAD, and T2DM-CAD comorbidity patients. IL-22 was found to be elevated in all three conditions. Elevated serum IL-22 was independently associated with the incidence of T2DM and CAD. Conversely, IL-22 was found to protect endothelial cells from glucose- and lysophosphatidylcholine- (LPC-) induced injury, and IL-22R1 expression on endothelial cells was increased upon treatment with high glucose and LPC. Blocking of IL-22R1 with IL-22R1 antibody diminished the protective role of IL-22. Our results suggest that IL-22 functions as a double-edged sword in T2DM and CAD and that IL-22 may be used in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases such as T2DM and CAD. PMID:27829708

  1. Magnetic resonance neurography of the brachial plexus

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Vaishali; Upadhyaya, Divya Narain; Kumar, Adarsh; Pandey, Ashok Kumar; Gujral, Ratni; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is being increasingly recognised all over the world as the imaging modality of choice for brachial plexus and peripheral nerve lesions. Recent refinements in MRI protocols have helped in imaging nerve tissue with greater clarity thereby helping in the identification, localisation and classification of nerve lesions with greater confidence than was possible till now. This article on Magnetic Resonance Neurography (MRN) is based on the authors’ experience of imaging the brachial plexus and peripheral nerves using these protocols over the last several years. PMID:26424974

  2. What has changed in brachial plexus surgery?

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Silva, Gustavo Bersani; de Paula, Emygdio José Leomil; Junior, Rames Mattar; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries, in all their severity and complexity, have been extensively studied. Although brachial plexus injuries are associated with serious and often definitive sequelae, many concepts have changed since the 1950s, when this pathological condition began to be treated more aggressively. Looking back over the last 20 years, it can be seen that the entire approach, from diagnosis to treatment, has changed significantly. Some concepts have become better established, while others have been introduced; thus, it can be said that currently, something can always be offered in terms of functional recovery, regardless of the degree of injury. Advances in microsurgical techniques have enabled improved results after neurolysis and have made it possible to perform neurotization, which has undoubtedly become the greatest differential in treating brachial plexus injuries. Improvements in imaging devices and electrical studies have allowed quick decisions that are reflected in better surgical outcomes. In this review, we intend to show the many developments in brachial plexus surgery that have significantly changed the results and have provided hope to the victims of this serious injury. PMID:23644864

  3. [Idiopathic brachial neuralgia after cesarean section].

    PubMed

    Rihane, B; Le Borgne, J M; Bélair, C

    2002-11-01

    We report a case of idiopathic brachial nevralgia of the right shoulder in a 30-year-old female, after caesarean section, under spinal anaesthesia. Two days after surgery, intense cervical pain appeared on the second day, associated with rapid collapse of muscular shoulder belt. Full recovery occurred in four months.

  4. [Diagnosing venous and venous/arterial ulcers].

    PubMed

    Perceau, Géraldine

    2012-01-01

    A venous ulcer can be diagnosed on the basis of elements arising from the questioning and the clinical examination of the patient. A venous Doppler ultrasound can specify the type of reverse flow (superficial and/or deep). Measuring the ankle brachial pressure index helps to eliminate or confirm any arterial involvement. Depending on the systolic pressure index, the ulcer will be considered as purely venous, mixed (arterial-venous) or predominantly arterial.

  5. Ankle brachial index values, leg symptoms, and functional performance among community-dwelling older men and women in the lifestyle interventions and independence for elders study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prevalence and significance of low normal and abnormal ankle brachial index (ABI) values in a community dwelling population of sedentary, older individuals is unknown. We describe the prevalence of categories of definite peripheral artery disease (PAD), borderline ABI, low-normal ABI and no PAD...

  6. A novel platelet-rich arterial thrombosis model in rabbits. Simple, reproducible, and dynamic real-time measurement by using double-opposing inverted-sutures model.

    PubMed

    Shieh, S J; Chiu, H Y; Shi, G Y; Wu, C M; Wang, J C; Chen, C H; Wu, H L

    2001-09-01

    Though numerous animal thrombosis models have been introduced, an easy, reliable, and reproducible arterial thrombosis model remains a continuing challenge prior to a thrombolytic study. In an effort to evaluate the efficiency of various recombinant thrombolytic agents with specific affinity to activated platelets in vivo, we developed a novel double-opposing inverted-sutures model to create a platelet-rich thrombus in the femoral artery of rabbits. The arteriotomy was done semicircumferentially, and variously sized microsurgical sutures were introduced intraluminally in a double-opposing inverted manner. The animals were divided into three groups according to the double-opposing inverted-sutures used: Group 1 with 10-0 nylon (n=6), Group 2 with 9-0 nylon (n=6), and Group 3 with 8-0 nylon (n=22). The superficial epigastric branch was cannulated with a thin polyethylene (PE) tube for intraarterial administration of the studied thrombolytic agent. The blood flow was continuously measured with a real-time ultrasonic flow meter. Within 2 h of installation of the sutures, there was no thrombus formation in either Group 1 or 2. In Group 3, the thrombosis rate was 91% (20 of 22) under a steady baseline flow (with an average of 12.23+/-2.40 ml/min). It was highly statistically significant with a P-value of .0000743 using Fisher's Exact Test. The averaged time to thrombosis was 21.8+/-9.8 min. The ultrasonic flow meter to record the dynamic real-time measurement of blood flow was a guideline for thrombus formation or dissolution, which was correlated with the morphological findings of stenotic status of the vessel detected by the Doppler sonography. The components of the thrombus were proven to be platelet-rich predominant by histological examination via hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To confirm that the double-opposing inverted-sutures model would be useful for a study of thrombolytic agents, we evaluated the effects of

  7. Analysis of Arterial Mechanics During Head-Down-Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Morgan B.; Martin, David S.; Westby, Christian M.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Carotid, brachial, and tibial arteries reacted differently to HDTBR. Previous studies have not analyzed the mechanical properties of the human brachial or anterior tibial arteries. After slight variations during bed-rest, arterial mechanical properties and IMT returned to pre-bed rest values, with the exception of tibial stiffness and PSE, which continued to be reduced post-bed rest while the DC remained elevated. The tibial artery remodeling was probably due to decreased pressure and volume. Resulting implications for longer duration spaceflight are unclear. Arterial health may be affected by microgravity, as shown by increased thoracic aorta stiffness in other ground based simulations (Aubert).

  8. Axillary artery injury as a complication of proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, J A; Light, R; Lustrin, I

    1998-01-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are common injuries and represent approximately 5% of all fractures. These fractures are infrequently associated with neurovascular injuries. Brachial plexus injuries are uncommon, whereas axillary artery injuries are rare. A review of 19 previously reported cases of axillary artery injury after proximal humerus fracture revealed that 84% occurred in patients older than 50 years, 53% were associated with brachial plexus injury, and 21% resulted in upper extremity amputation. This study describes a case of axillary artery injury after proximal humerus fracture and, on the basis of a literature review, offers suggestions for the early diagnosis and effective treatment of this uncommon injury.

  9. Treatment Options for Brachial Plexus Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Vasileios I.; Badilas, Nikolaos K.; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A.; Mazis, George; Kotoulas, Helias K.; Kyriakopoulos, Stamatios; Tagkalegkas, Ioannis; Sofianos, Ioannis P.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of brachial plexus injuries is rapidly growing due to the increasing number of high-speed motor-vehicle accidents. These are devastating injuries leading to significant functional impairment of the patients. The purpose of this review paper is to present the available options for conservative and operative treatment and discuss the correct timing of intervention. Reported outcomes of current management and future prospects are also analysed. PMID:24967125

  10. Persistent median artery in the carpal tunnel and anastomosis with superficial palmar arch

    PubMed Central

    Bijannejad, Dariush; Azandeh, Saeed; Javadnia, Fatemeh; Gholami, Mohammad Reza; Gharravi, Anneh Mohammad; zhaleh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Persistent median artery (PMA) in present cadaver originated from the brachial artery and anastomosed with the superficial palmar arch (SPA). As the PMA may be the cause of carpal tunnel syndrome and SPA is the main source of arterial supply, knowledge of which are important for the hand surgical interventions. PMID:27583265

  11. Anatomical architecture of the brachial plexus in the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) with special reference to the derivation and course of its unique branches.

    PubMed

    Yoshitomi, S; Kawashima, T; Murakami, K; Takayanagi, M; Inoue, Y; Aoyagi, R; Sato, F

    2012-08-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus in the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), which has not been previously reported, was first examined bilaterally in a newborn hippopotamus. Our observations clarified the following: (1) the brachial plexus comprises the fifth cervical (C5) to first thoracic (T1) nerves. These formed two trunks, C5-C6 and C7-T1; in addition, the axillary artery passed in between C6 and C7, (2) unique branches to the brachialis muscle and those of the lateral cutaneous antebrachii nerves ramified from the median nerve, (3) nerve fibre analysis revealed that these unique nerve branches from the median nerve were closely related and structurally similar to the musculocutaneous (MC) nerve; however, they had changed course from the MC to the median nerve, and (4) this unique branching pattern is likely to be a common morphological feature of the brachial plexus in amphibians, reptiles and certain mammals.

  12. Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Amita N; Kasundra, Gaurav M; Khichar, Subhakaran; Bhushan, Bharat S K

    2014-10-01

    We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered.

  13. Brachial plexopathy: recurrent cancer or radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lederman, R.J.; Wilbourn, A.J.

    1984-10-01

    We reviewed clinical and electrodiagnostic features of 16 patients with neoplastic brachial plexopathy (NBP) and 17 patients with radiation-induced plexopathy (RBP). The groups were similar in symptom-free interval after cancer diagnosis and location of the plexus lesions. NBP patients had pain and Horner's syndrome; RBP patients had paresthesias, but rarely Horner's. NBP patients presented earlier after symptom onset and had a shorter course. RBP patients more frequently had abnormal sensory and normal motor nerve conduction studies and characteristically had fasciculations or myokymia on EMG.

  14. Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Amita N.; Kasundra, Gaurav M.; Khichar, Subhakaran; Bhushan, Bharat S. K.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered. PMID:25288846

  15. Shoulder pain and isolated brachial plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kishan, Amar U; Syed, Sana; Fiorito-Torres, Franchesca; Thakore-James, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    Pancoast syndrome, classically considered as a constellation of (1) pain along the C8–T2 dermatomes, (2) weakness and atrophy of the hand and (3) Horner's syndrome, often presents a diagnostic challenge. In fact, it may manifest as a singular orthopaedic complaint, prompting a futile barrage of tests and referrals. The authors present the case of an elderly man who initially presented with severe shoulder pain. Due to progressive pain and weakness, he was referred to rheumatology and was treated with corticosteroid injections for a presumed musculoskeletal lesion. Ultimately, he manifested gross muscular atrophy and worsening pain, prompting a referral to neurology. An electromyogram (EMG) suggested a lower brachial plexopathy, and a follow-up brachial plexus MRI identified a large Pancoast tumour. Unfortunately, his disease was rapidly progressive, and he passed away within 2 months. While the MRI remains the gold standard for diagnosing Pancoast syndrome, an EMG can facilitate diagnosis in difficult cases such as this one. PMID:22744250

  16. Lateral approach for supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, DK; Sahu, Anjana

    2010-01-01

    A lateral approach described by Volker Hempel and Dr. Dilip Kotharihas been further studied, evaluated and described in detail in the present study. The aim of this study was to evaluate lateral approach of supraclavicular brachial plexus block, mainly in terms of successes rate and complication rate. The study was conducted in secondary level hospital and tertiary level hospital from 2004 to 2008. It was a prospective nonrandomized open-level study. Eighty-two patients of both sexes, aged between 18 and 65 years with ASA Grade I and II scheduled to undergo elective major surgery of the upper limb below the midarm, were selected for this new lateral approach of brachial plexus block. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block, any complications and need for supplement anaesthesia were observed. Success and complication rate were calculated in percentage. Average onset and duration of sensory and motor block was calculated as mean ± SD and percentage. Out of 82 patients, 75 (92%) have got successful block with no significant complication in any case. PMID:20885867

  17. Reproducibility and reliability of the ankle-brachial index as assessed by vascular experts, family physicians and nurses.

    PubMed

    Holland-Letz, Tim; Endres, Heinz G; Biedermann, Stefanie; Mahn, Matthias; Kunert, Joachim; Groh, Sabine; Pittrow, David; von Bilderling, Peter; Sternitzky, Reinhardt; Diehm, Curt

    2007-05-01

    The reliability of ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurements performed by different observer groups in primary care has not yet been determined. The aims of the study were to provide precise estimates for all effects influencing the variability of the ABI (patients' individual variability, intra- and inter-observer variability), with particular focus on the performance of different observer groups. Using a partially balanced incomplete block design, 144 unselected individuals aged > or = 65 years underwent double ABI measurements by one vascular surgeon or vascular physician, one family physician and one nurse with training in Doppler sonography. Three groups comprising a total of 108 individuals were analyzed (only two with ABI < 0.90). Errors for two repeated measurements for all three observer groups did not differ (experts 8.5%, family physicians 7.7%, and nurses 7.5%, p = 0.39). There was no relevant bias among observer groups. Intra-observer variability expressed as standard deviation divided by the mean was 8%, and inter-observer variability was 9%. In conclusion, reproducibility of the ABI measurement was good in this cohort of elderly patients who almost all had values in the normal range. The mean error of 8-9% within or between observers is smaller than with established screening measures. Since there were no differences among observers with different training backgrounds, our study confirms the appropriateness of ABI assessment for screening peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and generalized atherosclerosis in the primary case setting. Given the importance of the early detection and management of PAD, this diagnostic tool should be used routinely as a standard for PAD screening. Additional studies will be required to confirm our observations in patients with PAD of various severities.

  18. Reduced artery diameters in Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Foresta, C; Caretta, N; Palego, P; Ferlin, A; Zuccarello, D; Lenzi, A; Selice, R

    2012-10-01

    Various epidemiological studies in relatively large cohorts of patients with Klinefelter syndrome (KS) described the increased morbidity and mortality in these subjects. Our aim was to study the structure and function of arteries in different districts to investigate in these subjects possible alterations. A total of 92 patients having non-mosaic KS, diagnosed in Centre for Human Reproduction Pathology at the University of Padova, and 50 age-matched healthy male controls were studied. Klinefelter syndrome subjects and controls evaluation included complete medical history, physical examination, measurement of concentrations of the reproductive hormones, lipidic and glycidic metabolism, AR function and sensitivity, ultrasound examinations (diameters, carotid intima-media thickness and brachial flow-mediated dilation) of brachial, common carotid and common femoral artery and abdominal aorta. Klinefelter syndrome patients showed significantly reduced artery diameters in all districts evaluated. On the contrary no statistically significant difference was found in cIMT and brachial FMD values between KS patients and controls. Furthermore, we found no statistically significant correlation of artery diameters with reproductive hormones, metabolic parameters, anthropometric measures and weighted CAG repeats. To our knowledge, this is the first study finding a reduced artery diameter in several districts in KS patients compared with that of normal male subjects and overlapping to that of female subjects. We have not an explanation for this phenomenon, even if a possible involvement of genes controlling the development of vascular system might be hypothesized, and further research is required to verify this hypothesis.

  19. Assessment of distributed arterial network models.

    PubMed

    Segers, P; Stergiopulos, N; Verdonck, P; Verhoeven, R

    1997-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the relative importance of elastic non-linearities, viscoelasticity and resistance vessel modelling on arterial pressure and flow wave contours computed with distributed arterial network models. The computational results of a non-linear (time-domain) and a linear (frequency-domain) mode were compared using the same geometrical configuration and identical upstream and downstream boundary conditions and mechanical properties. pressures were computed at the ascending aorta, brachial and femoral artery. In spite of the identical problem definition, computational differences were found in input impedance modulus (max. 15-20%), systolic pressure (max. 5%) and pulse pressure (max. 10%). For the brachial artery, the ratio of pulse pressure to aortic pulse pressure was practically identical for both models (3%), whereas for the femoral artery higher values are found for the linear model (+10%). The aortic/brachial pressure transfer function indicates that pressure harmonic amplification is somewhat higher in the linear model for frequencies lower than 6 Hz while the opposite is true for higher frequencies. These computational disparities were attributed to conceptual model differences, such as the treatment of geometric tapering, rather than to elastic or convective non-linearities. Compared to the effect of viscoelasticity, the discrepancy between the linear and non-linear model is of the same importance. At peripheral locations, the correct representation of terminal impedance outweight the computational differences between the linear and non-linear models.

  20. Report of an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations in a cadaveric upper limb

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations discovered during dissection of cervical, axillary and brachial area of a cadaver is described. Variations are thoroughly described and literature is briefly reviewed. Lateral cord of brachial plexus was not formed; Eight Cervical root divided into anterior and posterior division before uniting with First Thoracic root and Upper Trunk was unusually short. Axillary artery gave origin to a superficial brachial artery and then continued as deep brachial artery. Multiple variations in typical axillary artery branches were present including existence of inferior pectoral artery. Cephalic vein was absent. A variety of interventions, from relative simple as central venous catheter placement to most complicated as brachial plexus injury repair demand thorough knowledge of area’s regional anatomy. Familiarity with anatomic variations allows more precise and careful interventions. Research on these variations is valuable for anatomists and embryologists but also for clinicians because it may provide useful information for non - typical cases but also helps in raising a high level of suspicion. PMID:24495850

  1. Exercise-mediated changes in conduit artery wall thickness in humans: role of shear stress.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Dawson, Ellen A; van den Munckhof, Inge C L; Tinken, Toni M; den Drijver, Evert; Hopkins, Nicola; Cable, N Timothy; Green, Daniel J

    2011-07-01

    Episodic increases in shear stress have been proposed as a mechanism that induces training-induced adaptation in arterial wall remodeling in humans. To address this hypothesis in humans, we examined bilateral brachial artery wall thickness using high-resolution ultrasound in healthy men across an 8-wk period of bilateral handgrip training. Unilaterally, shear rate was attenuated by cuff inflation around the forearm to 60 mmHg. Grip strength, forearm volume, and girth improved similarly between the limbs. Acute bouts of handgrip exercise increased shear rate (P < 0.005) in the noncuffed limb, whereas cuff inflation successfully decreased exercise-induced increases in shear. Brachial blood pressure responses similarly increased during exercise in both the cuffed and noncuffed limbs. Handgrip training had no effect on baseline brachial artery diameter, blood flow, or shear rate but significantly decreased brachial artery wall thickness after 6 and 8 wk (ANOVA, P < 0.001) and wall-to-lumen ratio after week 8 (ANOVA, P = 0.005). The magnitude of decrease in brachial artery wall thickness and wall-to-lumen ratio after exercise training was similar in the noncuffed and cuffed arms. These results suggest that exercise-induced changes in shear rate are not obligatory for arterial wall remodeling during a period of 8 wk of exercise training in healthy humans.

  2. An anatomical study and ontogenetic explanation of 23 cases with variations in the main pattern of the human brachio-antebrachial arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Baeza, A; Nebot, J; Ferreira, B; Reina, F; Pérez, J; Sañudo, J R; Roig, M

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-three cases with variations in the brachio-antebrachial arterial pattern of the human upper limb are reported. According to the artery which showed a variation, 4 groups were recognised: (1) isolated persistence of the median artery; (2) high origin of the ulnar artery; (3) high origin of the radial artery; and (4) duplication of the brachial artery, either with or without anastomosis at the cubital fossa. In addition, in groups 2, 3 and 4 the median artery may have persisted. Based on these arterial variations an anatomical and embryological correlation was established from a morphogenetic pattern which is proposed as being normal. Thus the terminal branches of the superficial brachial artery take part in the development of the radial, ulnar and median arteries, joining with the trunks of deep origin of these arteries in the primitive axial artery. Regression of the superficial arterial segments located proximal to this anastomosis gives rise to the definitive arterial pattern. Either the total or partial persistence of the superficial arterial segments explains those cases of high origin of either the radial or ulnar arteries as well as the duplications of the brachial artery. We postulate that the persistence of the median artery is independent of the presence or absence of any other variation in the arterial pattern. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7592009

  3. Arterial endothelial function measurement method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F

    2014-03-04

    A "relaxoscope" (100) detects the degree of arterial endothelial function. Impairment of arterial endothelial function is an early event in atherosclerosis and correlates with the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. An artery (115), such as the brachial artery (BA) is measured for diameter before and after several minutes of either vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. The change in arterial diameter is a measure of flow-mediated vasomodification (FMVM). The relaxoscope induces an artificial pulse (128) at a superficial radial artery (115) via a linear actuator (120). An ultrasonic Doppler stethoscope (130) detects this pulse 10-20 cm proximal to the point of pulse induction (125). The delay between pulse application and detection provides the pulse transit time (PTT). By measuring PTT before (160) and after arterial diameter change (170), FMVM may be measured based on the changes in PTT caused by changes in vessel caliber, smooth muscle tone and wall thickness.

  4. Effect of upper body aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness in older adults.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Kunihiko; Mendelsohn, Marissa E; Overend, Tom J; Petrella, Robert J

    2009-10-01

    The authors evaluated the effects of acute arm-cycling exercise on arterial stiffness of the brachial artery (BA: working limb) and posterior tibial artery (PTA: nonworking limb) in healthy older participants. Eleven participants were tested to evaluate BA and PTA stiffness. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and arterial stiffness indices of the BA and PTA measured by Doppler ultrasound were determined before and 10 min after graded arm-cycling exercise to volitional fatigue on 2 separate days. After the exercise, although BA diameter, brachial systolic BP, pulse pressure, and HR increased significantly (all p < .05), arterial stiffness indices of the BA remained unchanged. Similarly, arterial stiffness indices of the PTA remained unchanged after the exercise, whereas HR increased significantly (p < .05). These results show that acute arm-cycling exercise failed to modify arterial stiffness of the BA and PTA, suggesting that it has no systemic effect on arterial stiffness in healthy older adults.

  5. Arterial double-contrast dual-energy MDCT: in-vivo rabbit atherosclerosis with iodinated nanoparticles and gadolinium agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmi, Raz; Kafri, Galit; Altman, Ami; Goshen, Liran; Planer, David; Sosna, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    An in-vivo feasibility study of potentially improved atherosclerosis CT imaging is presented. By administration of two different contrast agents to rabbits with induced atherosclerotic plaques we aim at identifying both soft plaque and vessel lumen simultaneously. Initial injection of iodinated nanoparticle (INP) contrast agent (N1177 - Nanoscan Imaging), two to four hours before scan, leads to its later accumulation in macrophage-rich soft plaque, while a second gadolinium contrast agent (Magnevist) injected immediately prior to the scan blends with the aortic blood. The distinction between the two agents in a single scan is achieved with a double-layer dual-energy MDCT (Philips Healthcare) following material separation analysis using the reconstructed images of the different x-ray spectra. A single contrast agent injection scan, where only INP was injected two hours prior to the scan, was compared to a double-contrast scan taken four hours after INP injection and immediately after gadolinium injection. On the single contrast agent scan we observed along the aorta walls, localized iodine accumulation which can point on INP uptake by atherosclerotic plaque. In the double-contrast scan the gadolinium contributes a clearer depiction of the vessel lumen in addition to the lasting INP presence. The material separation shows a good correlation to the pathologies inferred from the conventional CT images of the two different scans while performing only a single scan prevents miss-registration problems and reduces radiation dose. These results suggest that a double-contrast dual-energy CT may be used for advanced clinical diagnostic applications.

  6. Brachiomedian artery (arteria brachiomediana) revisited: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Kachlik, David; Konarik, Marek; Riedlova, Jitka; Baca, Vaclav

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews in detail the superficial brachiomedian artery (arteria brachiomediana superficialis), a very rare variant of the main arterial trunks of the upper limb. It branches either from the axillary artery or the brachial artery, descends superficially in the arm (similar to the course of the superficial brachial artery) and continues across the cubital fossa, runs superficially in the forearm, approaches the median nerve and enters the carpal canal to reach the hand. It usually terminates in the superficial palmar arch. The first drawing was published, in 1830, and the first description was published, in 1844. Altogether, to our knowledge, only 31 cases of a true, superficial brachiomedian artery have been reported (Some cases are incorrectly reported as superficial brachioradiomedian artery or superficial brachioulnomedian artery). Based on a meta-analysis of known, available studies, the incidence is 0.23% in Caucasians and 1.48% in Mongolians. Knowing whether or not this arterial variant is present is important in clinical medicine and relevant for: The catheterization via the radial or ulnar artery; harvesting the vascular pedicle for a forearm flap based on the radial, ulnar or superficial brachiomedian arteries; the possible collateral circulation in cases of the arterial closure; and the surgical management of carpal tunnel syndrome. Its presence can elevate the danger of an injury to the superficially located variant artery or of an accidental injection. PMID:27131025

  7. Brachial plexopathy as a rare presenting manifestation of scorpion envenomation.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Devon I; Vavra, Michael

    2011-07-01

    We report a patient who experienced a rare manifestation of an acute, severe brachial plexopathy as the initial complication of scorpion (presumed Hemiscorpius lepturus species) envenomation. Features suggesting conduction block, due to either proximal demyelination or ion channel dysfunction, along with axonal loss were seen on serial electrophysiological studies. Possible mechanisms of the brachial plexopathy include direct compression from tissue edema or a toxic effect on the membrane channels along the nerve.

  8. Cadmium Exposure and Incident Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tellez-Plaza, Maria; Guallar, Eliseo; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Howard, Barbara V.; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Devereux, Richard B.; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background Cadmium has been associated with peripheral arterial disease in cross-sectional studies but prospective evidence is lacking. Our goal was to evaluate the association of urine cadmium concentrations with incident peripheral arterial disease in a large population-based cohort. Methods and Results A prospective cohort study was performed with 2,864 adult American Indians 45-74 years old from Arizona, Oklahoma and North and South Dakota who participated in the Strong Heart Study in 1989-91 and were followed through two follow-up examination visits in 1993-1995 and 1997-1999. Participants were free of peripheral arterial disease, defined as an ankle brachial index <0.9 or >1.4, at baseline and had complete baseline information on urine cadmium, potential confounders and ankle brachial index determinations in the follow-up examinations. Urine cadmium was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and corrected for urinary dilution by normalization to urine creatinine.. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were computed using Cox-proportional hazards models for interval-censored data. A total of 470 cases of incident peripheral arterial disease, defined as an ankle brachial index <0.9 or >1.4, were identified. After adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors including smoking status and pack-years, the hazard ratio comparing the 80th to the 20th percentile of urine cadmium concentrations was 1.41 (1.05, 1.81). The hazard ratio comparing the highest to the lowest tertile was 1.96 (1.32, 2.81). The associations persisted after excluding participants with ankle brachial index > 1.4 only as well as in subgroups defined by sex and smoking status. Conclusions Urine cadmium, a biomarker of long-term cadmium exposure, was independently associated with incident peripheral arterial disease, providing further support for cadmium as a cardiovascular disease risk factor. PMID:24255048

  9. Ozonized autohemotransfusion does not affect arterial vasodilation in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Antonino; Coppola, Ludovico; Luongo, Carlo; Arciello, Alessandro; Cacciapuoti, Federico; Lama, Diana; Luongo, Margherita; Ruggiero, Luigi; Pastore, Agostino; Gombos, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    Ozonized autohemotransfusion has been used as a complementary therapy in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). To determine whether ozone therapy could acutely modify artery vasodilatory capacity, a flow-mediated dilation test was performed at the brachial artery level before and after an ozonized autohemotransfusion in 16 patients with PAD, mean (± SD) age 55±1.8 years, and 14 healthy volunteers matched for age, sex and body mass index. Before ozonized autohemotransfusion, the mean baseline diameter of the brachial artery was higher in PAD patients than in healthy subjects (4.6±0.54 mm versus 3.6±0.54 mm, P<0.001) while mean flow-mediated brachial artery dilation and percentage of increase in flow were significantly lower in PAD patients than in controls (6.3±6.1% versus 11.8±2.4%, P<0.02; 433±61% versus 580±46%, P<0.02, respectively). No significant changes were observed after ozonized autohemotransfusion, indicating that ozonized autohemotransfusion does not modify endothelium-dependent ischemia-induced vascular reactivity. PMID:22477241

  10. Correlations between brachial endothelial function and cardiovascular risk factors: a survey of 2,511 Chinese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping-Ting; Yuan, Hong; Wang, Ya-Qin; Cao, Xia; Wu, Liu-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Objective We examined the relationship of several cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) to brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in Chinese subjects. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. In 2,511 Chinese adults (age 46.86±9.52 years, 1,891 men and 620 women) recruited from people who underwent health screening at The Third Xiangya Hospital, patients’ CVRF [age, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), blood pressure (BP), cholesterol parameters, creatinine (Cr), uric acid (UA), glucose level and smoking] and prevalence of present disease (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease and hyperlipidemia) were investigated. Results Multivariate analysis revealed that FMD negative correlated with age (β=–0.29, P<0.001), gender (β=–0.12, P<0.001), BMI (β=–0.12, P=0.001), WC (β=–0.10, P=0.011), systolic BP (SBP) (β=–0.12, P<0.001), fasting glucose (β=–0.04, P=0.009), total cholesterol (TC) (β=–0.04, P=0.014), smoking (β=–0.05, P=0.003), and baseline brachial artery diameter (β=–0.35, P<0.001). FMD decreased with increasing age in both genders. In women, FMD was higher than men and age-related decline in FMD was steepest after age 40; FMD was similar in men above 55 years old. Conclusions In Chinese subjects, FMD may be a usefully marker of CVRF. Age, gender, BMI, WC, SBP, fasting glucose, TC, smoking, and baseline brachial artery diameter were independent variables related to the impairment of FMD. The influence of CVRF on endothelial function is more in women than men. PMID:25364521

  11. Effects of age, sex and smoking on ankle-brachial index in a Finnish population at risk for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Syvänen, Kari; Aarnio, Pertti; Jaatinen, Pekka; Korhonen, Päivi

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Smoking is a well-known risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Data regarding differences in the prevalence of PAD between sexes are somewhat controversial. In addition, most studies indicate that the prevalence of PAD increases with age in both sexes. In the present study, the effects of sex, age and smoking on the ankle-brachial index (ABI) in a Finnish cardiovascular risk population were investigated. OBJECTIVES To investigate the relationship between the ankle-brachial index, and age, sex and smoking in a Finnish population at risk for cardiovascular disease. METHODS All men and women between 45 and 70 years of age living in a rural town (Harjavalta, Finland; total population 7700) were invited to participate in a population survey (Harmonica study). Patients with previously diagnosed diabetes or vascular disease were excluded. In total, 2856 patients were invited to participate in the study. From these subjects, a cardiovascular risk population was screened. Complete data were available from 1028 persons. ABI (the ratio between the posterior tibial or dorsalis pedis artery and brachial artery pressures) was measured, and questionnaires were used to detect smoking status and relevant medical history. Only current smoking status was taken into account. RESULTS The mean ABI for the entire study population was 1.10 (range 0.56 to 1.64). Current smokers had a lower mean ABI (1.06; P<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in ABI values among age groups, although the majority of patients with ABI values below 0.9 were older than 60 years of age. There was no statistically significant difference in ABI between sexes. CONCLUSION As previously reported, the present study shows the significant effect of smoking in the development of PAD. No statistically significant difference was found among age groups, but the tendency was toward lower ABIs in the oldest age groups. Sex had a minimal effect on the ABI. PMID:22477327

  12. Single vs double antiplatelet therapy in acute coronary syndrome: Predictors of bleeding after coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Tarzia, Vincenzo; Bortolussi, Giacomo; Buratto, Edward; Paolini, Carla; Dal Lin, Carlo; Rizzoli, Giulio; Bottio, Tomaso; Gerosa, Gino

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the contribution of anti-platelet therapy and derangements of pre-operative classical coagulation and thromboelastometry parameters to major bleeding post-coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). METHODS: Two groups of CABG patients were studied: Group A, treated with aspirin alone (n = 50), and Group B treated with aspirin and clopidogrel (n = 50). Both had similar preoperative, clinical, biologic characteristics and operative management. Classic coagulation parameters and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) profiles were determined preoperatively for both groups and the same heparin treatment was administered. ROTEM profiles (INTEM and EXTEM assays) were analyzed, both for traditional parameters, and thrombin generation potential, expressed by area-under-curve (AUC). RESULTS: There was no significant difference between rates of major bleeding between patients treated with aspirin alone, compared with those treated with aspirin and clopidogrel (12% vs 16%, P = 0.77). In the 14 cases of major bleeding, pre-operative classic coagulation and traditional ROTEM parameters were comparable. Conversely we observed that the AUC in the EXTEM test was significantly lower in bleeders (5030 ± 1115 Ohm*min) than non-bleeders (6568 ± 548 Ohm*min) (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: We observed that patients with a low AUC value were at a significantly higher risk of bleeding compared to patients with higher AUC, regardless of antiplatelet treatment. This suggests that thrombin generation potential, irrespective of the degree of platelet inhibition, correlates with surgical bleeding. PMID:26413234

  13. The effect of lavender essential oil on anxiety level in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery: A double-blinded randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Seifi, Zahra; Beikmoradi, Ali; Oshvandi, Khodayar; Poorolajal, Jalal; Araghchian, Malihe; Safiaryan, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Open heart surgery can cause high levels of anxiety in patients. Nowadays, lavender essential oil is widely used in medical research. This study was conducted with an aim to investigate the effects of lavender essential oil to reduce the anxiety of patients after coronary artery bypass surgery. Materials and Methods: This research is double-blinded randomized controlled trial on 60 patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery in a 2-day intervention targeting reduction of anxiety. This study was conducted in Ekbatan Therapeutic and Educational Center, Hamadan city, Iran, in 2013. The patients in the inhalation aromatherapy group inhaled two drops of 2% lavender essential oil and those in the control group inhaled two drops of distilled water as placebo for 20 min on the 2nd and 3rd days after surgery. The level of anxiety was evaluated by Spielberger's State Anxiety questionnaire before and after intervention and the vital signs were documented as well. Data were analyzed using Stata 11 (Stata Corp., College Station, TX, USA) by independent t-test for continuous variables and Chi-square test for categorical variables. Results: The mean score of anxiety in the aromatherapy group was 48.73 ± 5.08 and in the control group was 48 ± 6.98 before the intervention (P = 0.64), which reduced after the intervention to 42.6 ± 5.44 and 42.73 ± 7.30, respectively. On the 3rd day after surgery, the mean score of anxiety in the aromatherapy group was 46.76 ± 4.07 and in the control group was 46.53 ± 7.05 before the intervention, which reduced to 41.33 ± 3.65 and 41.56 ± 6.18, respectively, after the intervention. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the mean scores of anxiety between the aromatherapy and control groups. Conclusions: Lavender essential oil has no significant effect on anxiety in patients after coronary artery bypass surgery, although it decreased the level of anxiety in the patients. PMID:25558253

  14. [Essential arterial hypertension and quality of life. Comparative crossed double-blind study of labetalol and captopril].

    PubMed

    Carre, A; Petetin, N; Jouvent, R; Baruch, P; d'Allens, H; Pappo, M

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this multicenter randomised, double-blind and cross-over study was to compare the antihypertensive effects of labetalol (L) and captopril (C) in 42 moderate hypertensive patients (mean age: 52 years). The drugs were given during two 4-weeks periods at the end of which the systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP) were measured at rest in supine and standing positions. The assessment of the quality of life was realized with 4 scales completed by the practitioner [anxiety, depression, well-being, visual analog scale (VAS)] and 4 scales of auto-assessment completed by the patient [2 VAS, well-being, sub-scale of pleasure]. At the end of the first treatment's period (D28), both drugs had decreased significantly supine SBP and DBP (p less than 0.001), standing DBP (L = p less than 0.01; C = p less than 0.05), while only L lowered supine SBP (p less than 0.01). The cross-over analysis was unable to conclude, due to the number of patients and a significant interaction which reduced its power. Thus the effect of the first treatment's period seemed to influence the efficacy of the second one. The percentages of patients with a controlled BP were respectively: after 4 weeks of treatment, L = 61 p. 100 vs C = 42 p. 100 and at the end of study (D56), L = 67 p. 100 vs C = 64 p. 100.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Ketamine does not inhibit interleukin-6 synthesis in hepatic resections requiring a temporary porto-arterial occlusion (Pringle manoeuvre): a controlled, prospective, randomized, double-blinded study

    PubMed Central

    Bonofiglio, Francisco Carlos; Molmenti, Ernesto P; de Santibañes, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have shown that interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels correlated with mortality in critically ill patients. Goal To determine the effect of ketamine on IL-6 levels in liver resections patients with a temporary porto-arterial occlusion (Pringle manoeuvre). Materials and methods Controlled, prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. One group (n = 21) received ketamine whereas the other group (n = 17) received placebo. IL-6 levels were obtained at baseline, 4, 12, 24 h, 3 and 5 days. Results There were no significant differences in IL-6 levels between the groups (basal P = 089, 4 h P = 0.83, 12 h P = 0.39, 24 h, P = 0.55, 3 days P = 0.80 and 5 days P = 0.45). Both groups had elevated IL-6 levels that became almost undetectable by day 5. There was no major morbidity and no mortality in either group. Conclusions Ketamine does not seem to have an effect on plasma levels of IL-6. This could be interpreted as a potential finding associated with outcome as we did not encounter any deaths or major complications. Further studies will likely be needed to determine the range of IL-6 levels associated with survival and mortality, and whether it could be a predictor of survival. PMID:21929671

  16. Oral trehalose supplementation improves resistance artery endothelial function in healthy middle-aged and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Hill, Sierra D.; Bispham, Nina Z.; Santos-Parker, Jessica R.; Nowlan, Molly J.; Snyder, Laura L.; Chonchol, Michel; LaRocca, Thomas J.; McQueen, Matthew B.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that supplementation with trehalose, a disaccharide that reverses arterial aging in mice, would improve vascular function in middle-aged and older (MA/O) men and women. Thirty-two healthy adults aged 50-77 years consumed 100 g/day of trehalose (n=15) or maltose (n=17, isocaloric control) for 12 weeks (randomized, double-blind). In subjects with Δbody mass<2.3kg (5 lb.), resistance artery endothelial function, assessed by forearm blood flow to brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (FBFACh), increased ∼30% with trehalose (13.3±1.0 vs. 10.5±1.1 AUC, P=0.02), but not maltose (P=0.40). This improvement in FBFACh was abolished when endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production was inhibited. Endothelium-independent dilation, assessed by FBF to sodium nitroprusside (FBFSNP), also increased ∼30% with trehalose (155±13 vs. 116±12 AUC, P=0.03) but not maltose (P=0.92). Changes in FBFACh and FBFSNP with trehalose were not significant when subjects with Δbody mass≥2.3kg were included. Trehalose supplementation had no effect on conduit artery endothelial function, large elastic artery stiffness or circulating markers of oxidative stress or inflammation (all P>0.1) independent of changes in body weight. Our findings demonstrate that oral trehalose improves resistance artery (microvascular) function, a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, in MA/O adults, possibly through increasing NO bioavailability and smooth muscle sensitivity to NO. PMID:27208415

  17. [Cervico-omo-brachial pain and disability in a person of advanced age].

    PubMed

    Usui, M

    1997-07-01

    A person of advanced age usually has degenerative changes of bone, joint and ligament, which can be causes of cervico-omo-brachial pain and disability. He or she may also suffer from metastatic bone tumor of cervical spine or upper extremity. This article described pathology, signs and symptoms and recent treatment of these diseases. Cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy, which are most common causes of cervico-omo-brachial symptoms, are sometimes accompanied by peripheral entrapment neuropathy such as cubital tunnel syndrome or carpal tunnel syndrome (double crush syndrome). In this complicated situation, decompression of neural tissue in both cervical spine and carpal tunnel are necessary. In treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome, release of transverse carpal ligament under an arthroscope has proven to be useful and has been becoming popular. This minimally invasive surgery is also useful in shoulder surgery such as subacromial decompression in aged patients with rotator cuff tear and removal of calcium deposit in the shoulder joint. Osteoarthritis of the elbow also cause pain or disability of the elbow and the hand. Some metastatic bone tumors are treated by tumor resection and reconstruction with instruments, prosthesis or composite grafts, which are attempted not to cure the disease but to maintain or improve the quality of life of the patient.

  18. Perineural administration of dexmedetomidine in combination with ropivacaine prolongs axillary brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Chang-Song; Shi, Jing-Hui; Sun, Bo; Liu, Shu-Jie; Li, Peng; Li, En-You

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis that adding dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine prolongs axillary brachial plexus block. Forty-five patients of ASA I~II and aged 25-60 yr who were scheduled for elective forearm and hand surgery were randomly divided into 3 equal groups and received 40 ml of 0.33% ropivacaine + 1 ml dexmedetomidine (50 μg) (Group DR1), 40 ml of 0.33% ropivacaine + 1 ml dexmedetomidine (100 μg) (group DR2) or 40 ml of 0.33% ropivacaine + 1 ml saline (group R) in a double-blind fashion. The onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks and side effects were recorded. The demographic data and surgical characteristics were similar in each group. Sensory and motor block onset times were the same in the three groups. Sensory and motor blockade durations were longer in group DR2 than in group R (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the sensory blockade duration between group DR1 and group R. Bradycardia, hypertension and hypotension were not observed in group R and occurred more often in group DR2 than in group DR1. Dexmedetomidine added to ropivacaine for an axillary brachial plexus block prolongs the duration of the block. However, dexmedetomidine may also lead to side effects such as bradycardia, hypertension, and hypotension.

  19. Effect of Bosentan on Claudication Distance and Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilation in Hispanic Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    De Haro, Joaquin; Bleda, Silvia; Varela, Cesar; Esparza, Leticia; Acin, Francisco

    2016-01-15

    Endothelin (ET) is involved in the etiopathogenesis of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We hypothesized that ET antagonism might improve the endothelial function, inflammatory status, and symptoms in PAD. This pilot randomized clinical trial was designed to determine the clinical efficacy, pleiotropic effects, and safety of dual ET-receptor antagonist bosentan in Hispanic patients with PAD presenting intermittent claudication. The Bosentan Population-Based Randomized Trial for Clinical and Endothelial Function Assessment on Endothelin Antagonism Therapy was a 12-month, randomized, controlled, parallel-group, double-blind, proof-of-concept pilot study evaluating the effect of bosentan on absolute claudication distance (primary efficacy end point), flow-mediated arterial dilation, and C-reactive protein levels (primary pleiotropic end points) in patients with PAD with Rutherford category 1 to 2 of recent diagnosis. Secondary end points included ankle-brachial index, subjective claudication distance, and safety. Of the 629 screened subjects, 56 patients were randomized 1:1 to receive bosentan for 12 weeks (n = 27) or placebo (n = 29). Six months after the initiation, a significant treatment effect in flow-mediated arterial dilation of 2.43 ± 0.3% (95% CI 1.75 to 3.12; p = 0.001), absolute claudication distance of 283 ± 23 m (95% CI 202 to 366; p = 0.01), ankle-brachial index of 0.16 ± 0.03 (95% CI 0.09 to 0.23; p = 0.001), and a decrease in C-reactive protein levels of -2.0 ± 0.5 mg/L (95% CI -2.8 to -1.1; p = 0.02) were observed in the bosentan-treated group compared to the control group. No severe adverse effects were found in the bosentan group. In conclusion, in Hispanic patients with intermittent claudication, bosentan was well tolerated and improved endothelial function and claudication distance as well as inflammatory and hemodynamic states.

  20. Electroacupuncture stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy side promotes brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in the ischemic cerebral cortex of a rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zongjun; Wang, Lumin

    2012-07-25

    A rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion was established by suture occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery. In situ hybridization results showed that the number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA-positive cells in the ischemic rat cerebral cortex increased after cerebral ischemia/ reperfusion injury. Low frequency continuous wave electroacupuncture (frequency 2-6 Hz, current intensity 2 mA) stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy (right) side increased the number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA-positive cells in the ischemic cerebral cortex 14 days after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. At the same time, electroacupuncture stimulation of the healthy brachial plexus truck significantly decreased neurological function scores and alleviated neurological function deficits. These findings suggest that electroacupuncture stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy (right) side can greatly increase brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression and improve neurological function.

  1. Discordant effects of beta-blockade on central aortic systolic and brachial systolic blood pressure: considerations beyond the cuff.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Benjamin J; Anderson, Shawn

    2007-09-01

    The role of beta-blockers in uncomplicated hypertension has been challenged recently. Compared with other antihypertensives, beta-blockers are less effective for preventing cardiovascular events in patients with uncomplicated hypertension. Moreover, a recent meta-analysis of placebo-controlled clinical trials concluded that atenolol is not more efficacious than placebo for preventing cardiovascular events in patients with hypertension. Although these agents lower blood pressure measured conventionally over the brachial artery with a blood pressure cuff, they do not exert a commensurate effect on blood pressure in the central aorta. Central aortic blood pressure and aortic augmentation index are strong predictors of left ventricular hypertrophy, an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events. Emerging data are illuminating the antihypertensive paradox whereby antihypertensive agents may elicit discordant effects on central and peripheral blood pressure and hemodynamics. Vasodilatory antihypertensives, such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors and calcium channel blockers, elicit reductions in central aortic blood pressure equal to or greater than that in the brachial artery. Conversely, beta-blockers lower central aortic blood pressure to a lesser degree even when blood pressure measured by sphygmomanometry is reduced substantially. Given the strong relationship between central aortic blood pressure and target organ damage, the effectiveness of beta-blockers may be overestimated in practice on the basis of conventional blood pressure measurements alone. Differences in central and peripheral blood pressure may account for the lack of cardiovascular protection afforded by beta-blockers in clinical trials and could account for a portion of the apparent "benefit beyond blood pressure" reduction with other classes of antihypertensive agents. Future studies should aim to better clarify the role of central aortic blood pressure in the treatment of

  2. Massive hemothorax: A rare complication after supraclavicular brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shiv Kumar; Katyal, Surabhi; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    Plexus block is the preferred anesthesia plan for upper limb surgeries. Among the known complications, hematoma formation following the vascular trauma is often occur but this complication is frequently underreported. We present a case where a massive hemothorax developed post operatively in a patient who underwent resection of giant cell tumor of the right hand radius bone followed by arthroplasty under brachial plexus block using supraclavicular approach. This case report attempts to highlight the essence of remaining vigilant postoperatively for first initial days after brachial plexus block, especially after failed or multiple attempts. Ultrasound guided technique in combination with nerve stimulator has proven to be more reliable and safer than traditional techniques.

  3. Acute presentation of brachial plexus schwannoma secondary to infarction.

    PubMed

    Sidani, Charif; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Lyapichev, Kirill A; Nadji, Mehrdad; Levi, Allan D

    2015-06-01

    Schwannomas of the brachial plexus are rare and typically present as slowly growing masses. We describe a case of a 37-year-old female who presented with acute onset of severe left upper extremity pain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 2.3 × 2.1 cm peripherally enhancing centrally cystic lesion in the left axilla, along the cords of the left brachial plexus, with significant surrounding edema and enhancement. The mass was surgically removed. Pathology was consistent with a schwannoma with infarction. The pain completely resolved immediately after surgery.

  4. Posterior subscapular dissection: An improved approach to the brachial plexus for human anatomy students.

    PubMed

    Hager, Shaun; Backus, Timothy Charles; Futterman, Bennett; Solounias, Nikos; Mihlbachler, Matthew C

    2014-05-01

    Students of human anatomy are required to understand the brachial plexus, from the proximal roots extending from spinal nerves C5 through T1, to the distal-most branches that innervate the shoulder and upper limb. However, in human cadaver dissection labs, students are often instructed to dissect the brachial plexus using an antero-axillary approach that incompletely exposes the brachial plexus. This approach readily exposes the distal segments of the brachial plexus but exposure of proximal and posterior segments require extensive dissection of neck and shoulder structures. Therefore, the proximal and posterior segments of the brachial plexus, including the roots, trunks, divisions, posterior cord and proximally branching peripheral nerves often remain unobserved during study of the cadaveric shoulder and brachial plexus. Here we introduce a subscapular approach that exposes the entire brachial plexus, with minimal amount of dissection or destruction of surrounding structures. Lateral retraction of the scapula reveals the entire length of the brachial plexus in the subscapular space, exposing the brachial plexus roots and other proximal segments. Combining the subscapular approach with the traditional antero-axillary approach allows students to observe the cadaveric brachial plexus in its entirety. Exposure of the brachial dissection in the subscapular space requires little time and is easily incorporated into a preexisting anatomy lab curriculum without scheduling additional time for dissection.

  5. The natural history and management of brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Buterbaugh, Kristin L; Shah, Apurva S

    2016-12-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is an upper extremity paralysis that occurs due to traction injury of the brachial plexus during childbirth. Approximately 20 % of children with brachial plexus birth palsy will have residual neurologic deficits. These permanent and significant impacts on upper limb function continue to spur interest in optimizing the management of a problem with a highly variable natural history. BPBP is generally diagnosed on clinical examination and does not typically require cross-sectional imaging. Physical examination is also the best modality to determine candidates for microsurgical reconstruction of the brachial plexus. The key finding on physical examination that determines need for microsurgery is recovery of antigravity elbow flexion by 3-6 months of age. When indicated, both microsurgery and secondary shoulder and elbow procedures are effective and can substantially improve functional outcomes. These procedures include nerve transfers and nerve grafting in infants and secondary procedures in children, such as botulinum toxin injection, shoulder tendon transfers, and humeral derotational osteotomy.

  6. Multiple variations of the arterial pattern in upper extremities: a case report and embryological pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Klimek-Piotrowska, Wiesława; Pacholczak, Renata; Walocha, Jerzy

    2013-11-01

    During a routine dissection at the Department of Anatomy, Collegium Medicum, Jagiellonian University, one cadaver was found to have multiple variations of the arteries of the upper limbs. The variations pertained to the course of the brachial artery as well as to its distribution. An unusual formation of the superficial palmar arch was observed in both upper limbs. The anatomical peculiarities encountered included: in the left upper limb-the brachioradial artery, which formed the superficial palmar arch by turning to the palmar side of the hand and connecting with the ulnar artery and in the right upper limb-a subscapular-circumflex humeral-deep brachial trunk that correlated with a high division of the brachial artery (in the upper third of the biceps brachii muscle), a large anastomosis between the radial and the ulnar artery, the presence of a persistent median artery, and the unusual formation of the superficial palmar arch, which was created by the median, ulnar, and radial arteries. In this report, we will trace the path of the axillary artery and its branches in detail and emphasize its embryological significance.

  7. Superficial brachioradial artery (radial artery originating from the axillary artery): a case-report and its embryological background.

    PubMed

    Konarik, M; Knize, J; Baca, V; Kachlik, D

    2009-08-01

    A case of anomalous terminal branching of the axillary artery, concerning the variant called superficial brachioradial artery (arteria brachioradialis superficialis) was described, with special regard to its embryological origin. The left upper limb of a male cadaver was dissected in successive steps from the axillary fossa distally to the palmar region. A variant artery, stemming from the end of the third segment of the axillary artery, followed a superficial course distally. It skipped the cubital fossa, ran on the lateral side of the forearm, crossed ventrally to the palm, and terminated in the deep palmar arch. This vessel is a case of so-called "brachioradial artery" (inexactly called a "radial artery with a high origin"). The origin of the brachioradial artery directly from the axillary artery belongs to the rare variants of the arterial pattern of the upper limb. Its incidence is approximately 3%. Moreover, this vascular variant was associated with another one concerning the brachial plexus. The medial cutaneous nerve of the forearm joined the median nerve in the middle third of the arm and ran further distally as a common trunk, as the normal median nerve does. Anatomical knowledge of the axillary region is crucial for radiodiagnostic and surgical procedures, especially in cases of trauma. The superficially located artery brings an elevated risk of bleeding complications in unexpected situations.

  8. Vascular Accesses for Haemodialysis in the Upper Arm Cause Greater Reduction in the Carotid-Brachial Stiffness than Those in the Forearm: Study of Gender Differences

    PubMed Central

    Bia, Daniel; Cabrera-Fischer, Edmundo I.; Zócalo, Yanina; Galli, Cintia; Graf, Sebastián; Valtuille, Rodolfo; Pérez-Cámpos, Héctor; Saldías, María; Álvarez, Inés; Armentano, Ricardo L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate in chronically haemodialysed patients (CHPs), if: (1) the vascular access (VA) position (upper arm or forearm) is associated with differential changes in upper limb arterial stiffness; (2) differences in arterial stiffness exist between genders associated with the VA; (3) the vascular substitute (VS) of choice, in biomechanical terms, depends on the previous VA location and CHP gender. Methods. 38 CHPs (18 males; VA in upper arm: 18) were studied. Left and right carotid-brachial pulse wave velocity (PWVc-b) was measured. In in vitro studies, PWV was obtained in ePTFE prostheses and in several arterial and venous homografts obtained from donors. The biomechanical mismatch (BM) between CHP native vessel (NV) and VS was calculated. Results/Conclusions. PWVc-b in upper limbs with VA was lower than in the intact contralateral limbs (P < 0.05), and differences were higher (P < 0.05) when the VA was performed in the upper arm. Differences between PWVc-b in upper limbs with VA (in the upper arm) with respect to intact upper limbs were higher (P < 0.05) in males. Independently of the region in which the VA was performed, the homograft that ensured the minimal BM was the brachial artery. The BM was highly dependent on gender and the location in the upper limb in which the VA was performed. PMID:22567282

  9. Coronary Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... and animations for grades K-6. The Coronary Arteries Coronary Circulation The heart muscle, like every other ... into two main coronary blood vessels (also called arteries). These coronary arteries branch off into smaller arteries, ...

  10. Comparative evaluation of ropivacaine and ropivacaine with dexamethasone in supraclavicular brachial plexus block for postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Palaria, Urmila; Sinha, Ajay K.; Punera, D. C.; Pandey, Vijita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mixing of various adjuvants has been tried with local anesthetics in an attempt to prolong anesthesia from peripheral nerve blocks but have met with inconclusive success. More recent studies indicate that 8 mg dexamethasone added to perineural local anesthetic injections augment the duration of peripheral nerve block analgesia. Aims: Evaluating the hypothesis that adding dexamethasone to ropivacaine significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia in supraclavicular brachial plexus block compared with ropivacaine alone. Patients and Methods: It was a randomized, prospective, and double-blind clinical trial. Eighty patients of ASA I and II of either sex, aged 16-60 years, undergoing elective upper limb surgeries were equally divided into two groups and given supraclavicular nerve block. Group R patients (n = 40) received 30 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine with distilled water (2 ml)-control group whereas Group D patients (n = 40) received 30 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine with 8 mg dexamethasone (2 ml)-study group. The primary outcome was measured as duration of analgesia that was defined as the interval between the onset of sensory block and the first request for analgesia by the patient. The secondary outcome included maximum visual analogue scale (VAS), total analgesia consumption, surgeon satisfaction, and side effects. Results: Group R patients required first rescue analgesia earlier (557 ± 58.99 min) than those of Group D patients (1179.4 ± 108.60 min), which was found statistically significant in Group D (P < 0.000). The total dose of rescue analgesia was higher in Group R as compared to Group D, which was statistically significant (P < 0.00). Conclusion: Addition of dexamethasone (8 mg) to ropivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus approach significantly and safely prolongs motor blockade and postoperative analgesia (sensory) that lasted much longer than that produced by local anesthetic alone. PMID:25886227

  11. Brachial plexus lesions in patients with cancer: 100 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kori, S.H.; Foley, K.M.; Posner, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    In patients with cancer, brachial plexus signs are usually caused by tumor infiltration or injury from radiation therapy (RT). We analyzed 100 cases of brachial plexopathy to determine which clinical criteria helped differentiate tumor from radiation injury. Seventy-eight patients had tumor and 22 had radiation injury. Severe pain occurred in 80% of tumor patients but in only 19% of patients with radiation injury. The lower trunk was involved in 72% of the tumors. Seventy-eight percent of the radiation injuries affected the upper plexus (C5-6). Horner syndrome was more common in tumor, and lymphedema in radiation injury. The time from RT to onset of plexus symptoms, and the dose of RT, also differed.

  12. Recent advances in the management of brachial plexus injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Prem Singh; Maurya, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Management of brachial plexus injury is a demanding field of hand and upper extremity surgery. With currently available microsurgical techniques, functional gains are rewarding in upper plexus injuries. However, treatment options in the management of flail and anaesthetic limb are still evolving. Last three decades have witnessed significant developments in the management of these injuries, which include a better understanding of the anatomy, advances in the diagnostic modalities, incorporation of intra-operative nerve stimulation techniques, more liberal use of nerve grafts in bridging nerve gaps, and the addition of new nerve transfers, which selectively neurotise the target muscles close to the motor end plates. Newer research works on the use of nerve allografts and immune modulators (FK 506) are under evaluation in further improving the results in nerve reconstruction. Direct reimplantation of avulsed spinal nerve roots into the spinal cord is another area of research in brachial plexus reconstruction. PMID:25190913

  13. Massive hemothorax: A rare complication after supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shiv Kumar; Katyal, Surabhi; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    Plexus block is the preferred anesthesia plan for upper limb surgeries. Among the known complications, hematoma formation following the vascular trauma is often occur but this complication is frequently underreported. We present a case where a massive hemothorax developed post operatively in a patient who underwent resection of giant cell tumor of the right hand radius bone followed by arthroplasty under brachial plexus block using supraclavicular approach. This case report attempts to highlight the essence of remaining vigilant postoperatively for first initial days after brachial plexus block, especially after failed or multiple attempts. Ultrasound guided technique in combination with nerve stimulator has proven to be more reliable and safer than traditional techniques. PMID:25886347

  14. Ultrasonographic evaluation of brachial plexus tumors in five dogs.

    PubMed

    Rose, Scott; Long, Craig; Knipe, Marguerite; Hornof, Bill

    2005-01-01

    Five dogs with unilateral thoracic limb lameness, neurologic deficits, muscle atrophy, and pain, or a combination of these signs, were examined using ultrasonograghy. Large, hypoechoic tubular masses that displaced vessels and destroyed the normal architecture were found in each dog. The affected axilla of each patient was then imaged with computed tomography or magnetic resonance to fully assess the extent of the masses. We describe the use of ultrasound in screening patients for brachial plexus tumors.

  15. Balloon Occlusion of the Contralateral Iliac Artery to Assist Recanalization of the Ipsilateral Iliac Artery in Total Aortoiliac Occlusion: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Jaffan, Abdel Aziz A.

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular recanalization of chronic total aortoiliac occlusion is technically challenging. Inability to reenter the true aortic lumen, following retrograde iliac recanalization, is one of the most common causes of failure. We describe a case of a total aortoiliac occlusion where balloon occlusion of the right common iliac artery, following its recanalization from a brachial approach, was used to facilitate antegrade recanalization of the occluded contralateral left common iliac artery. PMID:23762730

  16. Flow-through anastomosis using a T-shaped vascular pedicle for gracilis functioning free muscle transplantation in brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yi; Yang, Jiantao; Yang, Yi; Qin, Bengang; Fu, Guo; Li, Xiangming; Gu, Liqiang; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Qingtang; Qi, Jian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In gracilis functioning free muscle transplantation, the limited caliber of the dominant vascular pedicle increases the complexity of the anastomosis and the risk of vascular compromise. The purpose of this study was to characterize the results of using a T-shaped vascular pedicle for flow-through anastomosis in gracilis functioning free muscle transplantation for brachial plexus injury. METHODS: The outcomes of patients with brachial plexus injury who received gracilis functioning free muscle transplantation with either conventional end-to-end anastomosis or flow-through anastomosis from 2005 to 2013 were retrospectively compared. In the flow-through group, the pedicle comprised a segment of the profunda femoris and the nutrient artery of the gracilis. The recipient artery was interposed by the T-shaped pedicle. RESULTS: A total of 46 patients received flow-through anastomosis, and 25 patients received conventional end-to-end anastomosis. The surgical time was similar between the groups. The diameter of the arterial anastomosis in the flow-through group was significantly larger than that in the end-to-end group (3.87 mm vs. 2.06 mm, respectively, p<0.001), and there were significantly fewer cases of vascular compromise in the flow-through group (2 [4.35%] vs. 6 [24%], respectively, p=0.019). All flaps in the flow-through group survived, whereas 2 in the end-to-end group failed. Minimal donor-site morbidity was noted in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Flow-through anastomosis in gracilis functioning free muscle transplantation for brachial plexus injury can decrease the complexity of anastomosis, reduce the risk of flap loss, and allow for more variation in muscle placement. PMID:26247666

  17. Evaluation of an education day for families of children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Ho, Emily S; Ulster, Alissa A

    2011-09-01

    Children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy may have chronic physical impairment in their affected upper extremity. Affected children and their families may benefit from psychosocial interventions including therapeutic relationships with health professionals, meeting other families living with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, support groups, and social work. One method of addressing psychosocial needs is through a support and education day. The purpose of this quality improvement project is to evaluate parental perceptions of a support and education day called the "Brachial Plexus Family Day." Families of children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy who attended the Brachial Plexus Family Day completed a questionnaire to evaluate the different programs offered during the day. The families also ranked the importance of different psychosocial supports offered in the clinic. Sixty-three out of 69 families completed the questionnaire. Each program of the Brachial Plexus Family Day was rated as good or excellent by the respondents. Ninety-seven percent of respondents rated meeting other families and children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy as helpful supports. Attending a Brachial Plexus Family day event (86%), followed by connecting with a doctor (60%), and physical or occupational therapist (59%) were the highest ranked supports reported by the families. The parents and caregivers that attended the Brachial Plexus Family Day rated the program highly. This group also valued the opportunity to connect with other families and children affected with the same condition.

  18. [Modified grant method protocol for dissecting and identifying the brachial plexus].

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Takamitsu; Setsu, Tomiyoshi; Terashima, Toshio

    2004-03-01

    Dissection of the brachial plexus is an important part in the anatomical course, but it is difficult for medical students to identify individual nerves of the brachial plexus due to its complexity and numerous variations. We have recently adopted the Grant method (1991) to guide students in the successful identification of this plexus. However, according to the Grant method the part of the upper limb including the brachial plexus is dissected before the neck part, which makes it impossible to identify the roots, trunks, and cords of the brachial plexus, and to identify the nerve branches extending from the brachial plexus. Here, we propose of anatomical dissection protocol of the brachial plexus a modified Grant method for medical students and instructors. The points of the modified protocols are: (1) to dissect the brachial plexus after the dissection of the neck part, (2) to identify the nerve trunks at the scalenus gap after dissecting the lateral, medial and posterior cords. The modified Grant method can be adapted to any other dissecting protocol of the brachial plexus, and will allow students to cope with many variations of the brachial plexus when they occur.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic and non-traumatic brachial plexopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yiru Lorna; Othman, Mohamad Isham Bin; Dubey, Niraj; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset brachial plexopathy can be classified into traumatic and non-traumatic aetiologies. Traumatic brachial plexopathies can affect the pre- or postganglionic segments of the plexus. Non-traumatic brachial plexopathies may be due to neoplasia, radiotherapy, thoracic outlet syndrome and idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to localise the area of injury or disease, and identify the likely cause. This review discusses some of the common causes of adult-onset brachial plexopathy and their imaging features on MRI. We also present a series of cases to illustrate some of these causes and their MRI findings. PMID:27779278

  20. Arterial Stiffness and Renal Replacement Therapy: A Controversial Topic

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Edmundo Cabrera; Zócalo, Yanina; Galli, Cintia; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The increase of arterial stiffness has been to have a significant impact on predicting mortality in end-stage renal disease patients. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a noninvasive, reliable parameter of regional arterial stiffness that integrates the vascular geometry and arterial wall intrinsic elasticity and is capable of predicting cardiovascular mortality in this patient population. Nevertheless, reports on PWV in dialyzed patients are contradictory and sometimes inconsistent: some reports claim the arterial wall stiffness increases (i.e., PWV increase), others claim that it is reduced, and some even state that it augments in the aorta while it simultaneously decreases in the brachial artery pathway. The purpose of this study was to analyze the literature in which longitudinal or transversal studies were performed in hemodialysis and/or peritoneal dialysis patients, in order to characterize arterial stiffness and the responsiveness to renal replacement therapy. PMID:26064684

  1. Behaviour of an artery enclosed within a normal or hypertrophic callus of a long-bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Komnenou, A T; Symeonides, P P; Dessiris, A K

    2000-07-01

    The behaviour of the brachial artery enclosed in a hypertrophic or a normal callus was investigated in experimentally produced fractures of the humerus in 22 dogs. The brachial artery was displaced in a bony groove created at the fractured ends of the bone. The fracture was immobilized with a metal plate and four screws. The progress of the callus formation was studied and the patency of the artery was evaluated. In 15 out of the 22 animals a medium-sized or hypertrophic callus had developed that engulfed the brachial artery without obstructing its lumen and blood flow. In five dogs the fracture site was infected and the resultant osteomyelitis obstructed the artery. In the remaining two dogs the arterial lumen was extremely narrowed, due to breaking of the plate and formation of pseudarthrosis in one and injury of the artery in the other. Unless complicated by infection resulting in vascular occlusion, callus at the fracture site may engulf an artery without interference in its patency and blood flow. The possible involvement of a functioning artery within a callus or a mass of heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans) should be kept in mind during surgical treatment of old fractures, hypertrophic callus with pseudarthrosis or extensive heterotopic ossification.

  2. A comparative study of clonidine and dexmedetomidine as an adjunct to bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Archana; Sharma, Khushboo; Somvanshi, Mukesh; Samal, Rajib Lochan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Various additives are mixed with local anesthetic agents to increase the quality of block in regional anesthesia. We compared clonidine and dexmedetomidine as an adjunct to bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block with respect to the onset and duration of sensory and motor block and duration of analgesia. Material and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists Grades I and II patients scheduled for various orthopedic surgeries of the upper limb under supraclavicular brachial plexus block were divided into two equal groups in a randomized, double-blind manner. Patients were assigned randomly to one of the two groups. In Group C (n = 30), 39 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine plus 1 ml (1 μg/kg) clonidine and in Group D (n = 30), 39 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine plus 1 ml (1 μg/kg) dexmedetomidine were given. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block, duration of analgesia, and quality of anesthesia were studied in both the groups. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the onset of sensory and motor block in both the groups. The durations of sensory and motor block were 316.67 ± 45.21 and 372.67 ± 44.48 min, respectively, in Group C, whereas they were 502.67 ± 43.78 and 557.67 ± 38.83 min, respectively, in Group D. The duration of analgesia was 349.33 ± 42.91 min, significantly less in Group C compared to 525.33 ± 42.89 min in Group D (P < 0.001). The quality of anesthesia was significantly better in dexmedetomidine group compared to clonidine group (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The addition of dexmedetomidine prolongs the durations of sensory and motor block and duration of analgesia and improves the quality of anesthesia as compared with clonidine when injected with bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block. PMID:27625483

  3. [Effect of different tests with physical exercise to change of the ankle-brachial index in aged patients].

    PubMed

    Sumin, A N; Krasilova, T A; Masin, A N

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to study the dynamics of ankle-brachial index (ABI) after treadmill test, after six-minute walk test (SWT) and after electric muscle stimulation (EMS) in aged patients. We conducted a survey of 80 aged patients (73,0 +/- 16,0 years). ABI was determined at rest and immediately after the following tests: 1) treadmill-test for five minutes, 2) SWT, and 3) EMS for five minutes. Atherosclerotic lesions of lower limb arteries was absent only in 21,3% of patients according to color duplex scanning. ABI significantly decreased on both limbs after treadmill-test ant after SWT. During EMS, in contrast, ABI was increased. Thus, you can use SWT in the diagnosis of subclinical atherosclerosis in a general clinical practice as an alternative to treadmill-tests. Good tolerability of EMS patients and ABI increase show the availability of EMS in physical rehabilitation of aged patients with peripheral atherosclerosis.

  4. Embolisation of a leaking pseudoaneurysm of the main artery supplying a replanted arm: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tan, J J; Low, C K

    1999-07-01

    A 51-year-old patient suffered a near amputation of the right arm. Replant of the arm was performed and the brachial artery was grafted with a vein. A week later, there was severe bleeding from a leaking pseudoaneurysm at the proximal junction of the grafted artery. This was managed with embolization using coils and resulted in successful obliteration of the pseudoaneurysm without necrosis of the replanted arm.

  5. Rhomboid nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve for shoulder reanimation in brachial plexus palsy: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Goubier, J-N; Teboul, F

    2016-10-01

    Recovery of shoulder function is a real challenge in cases of partial brachial plexus palsy. Currently, in C5-C6 root injuries, transfer of the long head of the triceps brachii branch is done to revive the deltoid muscle. Spinal accessory nerve transfer is typically used for reanimation of the suprascapular nerve. We propose an alternative technique in which the nerve of the rhomboid muscles is transferred to the suprascapular nerve. A 33-year-old male patient with a C5-C6 brachial plexus injury with shoulder and elbow flexion palsy underwent surgery 7 months after the injury. The rhomboid nerve was transferred to the suprascapular nerve and the long head of the triceps brachii branch to the axillary nerve for shoulder reanimation. A double transfer of fascicles was performed, from the ulnar and median nerves to the biceps brachii branch and brachialis branch, respectively, for elbow flexion. At 14 months' follow-up, elbow flexion was rated M4. Shoulder elevation was 85 degrees and rated M4, and external rotation was 80 degrees and rated M4. After performing a cadaver study showing that transfer of the rhomboid nerve to the suprascapular nerve is technically possible, here we report and discuss the clinical outcomes of this new transfer technique.

  6. Automated oscillometric determination of the ankle-brachial index provides accuracy necessary for office practice.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Joshua A; Higgins, Caitlin O; Gerhard-Herman, Marie

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remains underdiagnosed by primary care and cardiovascular physicians. The office-based assessment of PAD is limited by the need for specialized equipment and the time required for performance of the ankle-brachial index (ABI). We explored whether the accuracy of automated ABI measurement by oscillometry compared favorably with the gold-standard method using continuous-wave Doppler ultrasound. Consecutive patients referred to our university hospital noninvasive vascular laboratory for ABI measurement were invited for participation. Of 205 patients, 201 participated, including 55 with PAD. The ABI was measured by automated oscillometry and Doppler ultrasound. The test of trends revealed a correlation coefficient of 0.78 in the left leg and 0.78 in the right leg (P<0.01 for both). The mean ABI difference between methods was 0.04+/-0.01 and 0.06+/-0.01, respectively, in the left and right legs. The differences between the methods followed a normal distribution. Oscillometric determination of the ABI provides an accurate determination of the ABI in an outpatient population. Our findings show automated oscillometry to be a reliable and easier method of ABI measurement, lowering the barrier to incorporation of this diagnostic test into clinical practice.

  7. [A case of brachial plexus neuropathy who presented with acute paralysis of the hand after sleep].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Makiko; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Ohizumi, Hideki; Fujishima, Kenji; Goto, Keigo; Mizuno, Yoshikuni

    2002-09-01

    We report a 46-year-old woman who presented with acute paresis of the right hand and arm. She was well until when she noted a paresis and dysesthesia in her right hand in the morning. Neurological examination revealed weakness in the muscles which were supplied by lower cervical segments, with increased deep tendon reflexes in the right arm. Allen's test and Wright's test were positive. The nerve conduction studies disclosed a reduced CMAPs more severely by right median than ulnar nerve stimulation. The frequency and amplitude of the F waves was also reduced. Needle electromyogram showed a mild neurogenic pattern in the right hand muscles. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a tapering of the subclavian artery when the right arm was abducted. She underwent decompression surgery. A remarkable improvement of the symptoms was observed after surgery. Our patient suggests that brachial plexus neuropathy should be considered in the acute paresis of the hand after sleep, and that surgical procedure would lead to a successful outcome.

  8. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    PubMed

    van Geffen, Geert J; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Jörgen; Scheffer, Gert J; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound sonoanatomy is provided.

  9. Perforator arteries of the medial upper arm: anatomical basis of a new flap donor site.

    PubMed

    Perignon, D; Havet, E; Sinna, R

    2013-01-01

    The development of perforator flaps' concept based on knowledge on vascular anatomy of the skin represents a major improvement in reconstructive surgery. Succeeding description about vascular territories and anatomical basics of the main donor sites, the study of hidden donor sites, such as medial upper arm, constitutes a new step and an additional refinement. 20 upper limbs of 10 fresh adult cadavers were studied with colored latex injections. The origin and distribution of the perforator arteries of the superior ulnar collateral artery and the brachial artery were investigated. We have noted constant perforator arteries and described the limits of vascular territories of the medial upper arm.

  10. Effect of Enhanced External Counter Pulsation Treatment on Aortic Blood Pressure, Arterial Stiffness and Ejection Fraction in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sushma; Meyyappan, Chokkalingam; Ganesh, N; Chandrakasu, Arumugam; Nayar, Pradeep G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Enhanced External Counter Pulsation (EECP) is a non-invasive treatment option for patients with Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). The treatment has shown to augment diastolic pressure and reduce Left Ventricular (LV) after-load by reducing systemic vascular resistance. The effect of EECP in standard brachial blood pressure and central haemodynamic parameters are not known. Aim We hypothesized that EECP may have differential effect in CAD patients with low systolic blood pressure when compared to normal systolic pressure and the mechanism underlying this differential effect may be due to improvement in LV function. Materials and Methods A total of 72 consecutive patients who underwent EECP treatment for symptomatic CAD with LV dysfunction were divided into two groups based on cut-off value of 100mmHg for systolic blood pressure. First group had patients with brachial systolic blood pressure of >100mmHg and second group had patients with brachial systolic blood pressure of ≤100mmHg. We measured central aortic systolic pressure, pulse pressure, augmentation index and augmentation pressure by SphygmoCor device and Ejection Fraction (EF) was measured by echo-cardiography. All these measurements were carried out prior to and after completion of 35 days of EECP sessions. Results Central systolic pressure, brachial systolic pressure, aortic pulse pressure, augmentation pressure and augmentation index significantly decreased in patients with normal brachial systolic pressure with baseline moderate LV dysfunction. Brachial systolic, aortic systolic and aortic pulse pressure significantly increased with no change in augmentation index and pressure is observed in patients with baseline severe LV dysfunction associated with low systolic pressure post EECP treatment. Conclusion EECP treatment has haemodynamically favourable differential effect in normal and low brachial systolic pressure and this is mainly driven by improvement in LV function in patients with

  11. Genetically elevated levels of circulating triglycerides and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Yao, W-M; Zhang, H-F; Zhu, Z-Y; Zhou, Y-L; Liang, N-X; Xu, D-J; Zhou, F; Sheng, Y-H; Yang, R; Gong, L; Yin, Z-J; Chen, F-K; Cao, K-J; Li, X-L

    2013-04-01

    Elevated levels of circulating triglycerides and increased arterial stiffness are associated with cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies have reported an association between levels of circulating triglycerides and arterial stiffness. We used Mendelian randomization to test whether this association is causal. We investigated the association between circulating triglyceride levels, the apolipoprotein A-V (ApoA5) -1131T>C single nucleotide polymorphism and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) by examining data from 4421 subjects aged 18-74 years who were recruited from the Chinese population. baPWV was significantly associated with the levels of circulating triglycerides after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure, heart rate, waist-to-hip ratio, antihypertensive treatment and diabetes mellitus status. The -1131C allele was associated with a 5% (95% confidence interval 3-8%) increase in circulating triglycerides (adjusted for age, sex, BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, diabetes mellitus and antihypertensive treatment). Instrumental variable analysis showed that genetically elevated levels of circulating triglycerides were not associated with increased baPWV. These results do not support the hypothesis that levels of circulating triglycerides have a causal role in the development of arterial stiffness.

  12. Ruptured Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysm Associated with Median Arcuate Ligament Compression and Aortic Dissection Successfully Treated with Embolotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Takuro; Tamaki, Masato

    2015-01-01

    A 51-year-old man with a ruptured pancreaticoduodenal artery (PDA) aneurysm caused by compression of the celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament and aortic dissection involving the celiac axis was transferred to our hospital for endovascular treatment. A 4-F catheter was advanced into the superior mesenteric artery through the narrow true lumen via the left brachial artery, and coil embolization of the aneurysm was successfully performed. In this case, rapid increase of blood flow in the superior mesenteric artery, which compensated for the decreased celiac blood flow by aortic dissection, increased hemodynamic stress on the PDA, leading to aneurysmal rupture. PMID:25848431

  13. Finger movement at birth in brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Benyahia, Mohamed; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the finger movement at birth is a better predictor of the brachial plexus birth injury. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study reviewing pre-surgical records of 87 patients with residual obstetric brachial plexus palsy in study 1. Posterior subluxation of the humeral head (PHHA), and glenoid retroversion were measured from computed tomography or Magnetic resonance imaging, and correlated with the finger movement at birth. The study 2 consisted of 141 obstetric brachial plexus injury patients, who underwent primary surgeries and/or secondary surgery at the Texas Nerve and Paralysis Institute. Information regarding finger movement was obtained from the patient’s parent or guardian during the initial evaluation. RESULTS: Among 87 patients, 9 (10.3%) patients who lacked finger movement at birth had a PHHA > 40%, and glenoid retroversion < -12°, whereas only 1 patient (1.1%) with finger movement had a PHHA > 40%, and retroversion < -8° in study 1. The improvement in glenohumeral deformity (PHHA, 31.8% ± 14.3%; and glenoid retroversion 22.0° ± 15.0°) was significantly higher in patients, who have not had any primary surgeries and had finger movement at birth (group 1), when compared to those patients, who had primary surgeries (nerve and muscle surgeries), and lacked finger movement at birth (group 2), (PHHA 10.7% ± 15.8%; Version -8.0° ± 8.4°, P = 0.005 and P = 0.030, respectively) in study 2. No finger movement at birth was observed in 55% of the patients in this study group. CONCLUSION: Posterior subluxation and glenoid retroversion measurements indicated significantly severe shoulder deformities in children with finger movement at birth, in comparison with those lacked finger movement. However, the improvement after triangle tilt surgery was higher in patients who had finger movement at birth. PMID:23362472

  14. Postoperative analgesia comparing levobupivacaine and ropivacaine for brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kunitaro; Tokumine, Joho; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Moriyama, Kumi; Sakamoto, Hideaki; Inoue, Tetsuo; Yorozu, Tomoko

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: On a pharmacologic basis, levobupivacaine is expected to last longer than ropivacaine. However, most reports of these anesthetics for brachial plexus block do not suggest a difference in analgesic effect. The aim of this study is to compare the postoperative analgesic effects of levobupivacaine and ropivacaine when used for treating ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block. Methods: A total of 62 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery procedures were prospectively enrolled and randomized to receive levobupivacaine (group L, N = 31) or ropivacaine (group R, N = 31). The duration of analgesia, offset time of motor block, need for rescue analgesics, and sleep disturbance on the night of surgery were recorded. Pain score was recorded on the day of surgery, and on postoperative days 1 and 2. Results: There was no difference in the time interval until the first request for pain medication comparing the two groups (group L: 15.6 [11.4, 16.8] hours; group R: 12.5 [9.4, 16.0] hours, P = 0.32). There was no difference in the duration of motor block (group L: 12.2 [7.6, 14.4] hours; group R: 9.4 [7.9, 13.2] hours, P = 0.44), pain score (P = 0.92), need for rescue analgesics (group L: 55%; group R: 65%, P = 0.6), or rate of sleep disturbance (group L: 61%, group R: 58%, P = 1.0) on comparing the two groups. Conclusions: There was no difference in postoperative analgesia comparing levobupivacaine and ropivacaine when used for brachial plexus block. PMID:28328862

  15. Arterial insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most common causes of arterial insufficiency is atherosclerosis or "hardening of the arteries." Fatty material (called ... Images Arteries of the brain Developmental process of atherosclerosis References Hansson GK, Hamsten A. Atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and ...

  16. Ticagrelor versus Clopidogrel in Symptomatic Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, William R; Fowkes, F Gerry R; Heizer, Gretchen; Berger, Jeffrey S; Baumgartner, Iris; Held, Peter; Katona, Brian G; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Norgren, Lars; Jones, W Schuyler; Blomster, Juuso; Millegård, Marcus; Reist, Craig; Patel, Manesh R

    2017-01-05

    Background Peripheral artery disease is considered to be a manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis with associated adverse cardiovascular and limb events. Data from previous trials have suggested that patients receiving clopidogrel monotherapy had a lower risk of cardiovascular events than those receiving aspirin. We wanted to compare clopidogrel with ticagrelor, a potent antiplatelet agent, in patients with peripheral artery disease. Methods In this double-blind, event-driven trial, we randomly assigned 13,885 patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease to receive monotherapy with ticagrelor (90 mg twice daily) or clopidogrel (75 mg once daily). Patients were eligible if they had an ankle-brachial index (ABI) of 0.80 or less or had undergone previous revascularization of the lower limbs. The primary efficacy end point was a composite of adjudicated cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or ischemic stroke. The primary safety end point was major bleeding. The median follow-up was 30 months. Results The median age of the patients was 66 years, and 72% were men; 43% were enrolled on the basis of the ABI and 57% on the basis of previous revascularization. The mean baseline ABI in all patients was 0.71, 76.6% of the patients had claudication, and 4.6% had critical limb ischemia. The primary efficacy end point occurred in 751 of 6930 patients (10.8%) receiving ticagrelor and in 740 of 6955 (10.6%) receiving clopidogrel (hazard ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92 to 1.13; P=0.65). In each group, acute limb ischemia occurred in 1.7% of the patients (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.79 to 1.33; P=0.85) and major bleeding in 1.6% (hazard ratio, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.43; P=0.49). Conclusions In patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease, ticagrelor was not shown to be superior to clopidogrel for the reduction of cardiovascular events. Major bleeding occurred at similar rates among the patients in the two trial groups. (Funded by Astra

  17. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus.

  18. Endothelial function in a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ankle–brachial index

    PubMed Central

    Syvänen, Kari; Korhonen, Päivi; Partanen, Auli; Aarnio, Pertti

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) can be made by measuring the ankle–brachial index (ABI). Traditionally ABI values > 1.00–1.40 have been considered normal and ABI ≤ 0.90 defines PAD. Recent studies, however, have shown that individuals with ABI values between 0.90–1.00 are also at risk of cardiovascular events. We studied this cardiovascular risk population subgroup in order to determine their endothelial function using peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT). Methods: We selected 66 individuals with cardiovascular risk and borderline ABI. They all had hypertension, newly diagnosed glucose disorder, metabolic syndrome, obesity, or a ten year risk of cardiovascular disease death of 5% or more according to the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation System (SCORE). Subjects with previously diagnosed diabetes or cardiovascular disease were excluded. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring the reactive hyperemia index (RHI) from fingertips using an Endo-PAT device. Results: The mean ABI was 0.95 and mean RHI 2.11. Endothelial dysfunction, defined as RHI < 1.67, was detected in 15/66 (23%) of the subjects. There were no statistically significant differences in RHI values between subjects with different cardiovascular risk factors. The only exception was that subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) had slightly lower RHI values (mean RHI 1.91) than subjects without IFG (mean RHI 2.24) (P = 0.02). Conclusions: In a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ABI nearly every fourth subject had endothelial dysfunction, indicating an elevated risk of cardiovascular events. This might point out a subgroup of individuals in need of more aggressive treatment for their risk factors. PMID:21415923

  19. Association of Aortic Compliance and Brachial Endothelial Function with Cerebral Small Vessel Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: Assessment with High-Resolution MRI

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Yan; Zeng, Mengsu; Lin, Huandong; Yan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the possible association of aortic compliance and brachial endothelial function with cerebral small vessel disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients by using 3.0 T high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods. Sixty-two clinically confirmed DM2 patients (25 women and 37 men; mean age: 56.8 ± 7.5 years) were prospectively enrolled for noninvasive MR examinations of the aorta, brachial artery, and brain. Aortic arch pulse wave velocity (PWV), flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of brachial artery, lacunar brain infarcts, and periventricular and deep white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) were assessed. Pearson and Spearman correlation analysis were performed to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with clinical data and biochemical test results. Univariable logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with cerebral small vessel disease. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to find out the independent predictive factors of cerebral small vessel disease. Results. Mean PWV was 6.73 ± 2.00 m/s and FMD was 16.67 ± 9.11%. After adjustment for compounding factors, PWV was found significantly associated with lacunar brain infarcts (OR = 2.00; 95% CI: 1.14–3.2; P < 0.05) and FMD was significantly associated with periventricular WMHs (OR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.71–0.95; P < 0.05). Conclusions. Quantitative evaluation of aortic compliance and endothelial function by using high-resolution MRI may be potentially useful to stratify DM2 patients with risk of cerebral small vessel disease. PMID:27525261

  20. Influence of detraining on temporal changes in arterial stiffness in endurance athletes: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Koshiba, Hiroya; Maeshima, Etsuko

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We examined the effects of detraining on temporal changes in arterial stiffness in endurance athletes. [Subjects] Eighteen female university athletes requiring high endurance exercise capabilities were classified into 2 groups: 10 retired players (detraining group) and 8 active players (training group). [Methods] Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, an index of arterial stiffness, was measured a total of 6 times: immediately before retirement of the detraining group and at 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months after retirement. [Results] Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was measured in the training group at the same 6 points to allow comparison with the detraining group. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in the detraining group increased significantly at 3 and 12 months as compared with that at 0 months and showed a significant increase at 12 months compared with that at 1 month. Moreover, the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in the detraining group was significantly higher at 3, 6, and 12 months than in the training group. [Conclusion] These results revealed that detraining may result in increased arterial stiffness from 3 months onward in endurance athletes. PMID:26834331

  1. Acromioclavicular joint dislocation with associated brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Charles Alexander; Blakeney, William; Zellweger, René

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 32-year-old female who sustained a left acromioclavicular (AC) joint type V injury and brachial plexus injury. The patient's AC joint injury was identified 6 days after she was involved in a motorbike accident where she sustained multiple other injuries. She required operative fixation of the AC joint using a locking compression medial proximal tibial plate. At 3 months post operatively, the patient was found to have a subluxed left shoulder as a result of an axonal injury to the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. In addition, the tibial plate had cut out. The plate was subsequently removed. At 8 months the glenohumeral articulation had been restored and the patient had clinically regained significant shoulder function. After 15 months the patient was pain free and could complete all her activities of daily living without impediment. She returned to playing competitive pool after 24 months. PMID:24855076

  2. Two anatomic variations of the vertebral artery in four patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Meixiong; Xiaodong, Xie; Wang, Chaohua; You, Chao; Mao, Boyong; He, Min; Zhang, Changwei

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we present four cases of rare anomalous aortic arch and vertebral arteries and discuss the possible embryologic etiologies. These include two cases in which the right vertebral artery originated from the right common carotid artery associated with an aberrant right subclavian artery originating from the middle of the aortic arch and two cases in which the left vertebral artery had a double origin from the left subclavian artery and aortic arch.

  3. Perineural versus intravenous dexamethasone as adjuncts to local anaesthetic brachial plexus block for shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, D M; Ivancic, M G; Hattrup, S J; Renfree, K J; Watkins, A R; Hentz, J G; Gorlin, A W; Spiro, J A; Trentman, T L

    2016-04-01

    This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the effect of perineural with intravenous dexamethasone, both administered concomitantly with interscalene brachial plexus block for shoulder surgery. Patients received 8 mg dexamethasone mixed with ropivacaine in the block injection (n = 42), 8 mg dexamethasone intravenously at the time of the block (n = 37), or intravenous saline (n = 41) at the time of the block. Perineural and intravenous dexamethasone resulted in prolonged mean (SD) duration of block to 16.9 (5.2) h and 18.2 (6.4) h, respectively, compared with 13.8 (3.8) h for saline (p = 0.001). Mean (SD) opioid consumption (morphine equivalents) during the first 24 h after postanaesthesia recovery arrival was 12.2 (9.3) mg in the perineural dexamethasone, 17.1 (15.9) mg in the intravenous dexamethasone and 24.1 (14.3) mg in the saline groups (p = 0.001). Dexamethasone via either route reduced anti-emetic use (p = 0.046). There was no effect on patient satisfaction. These results suggest that both perineural and intravenous dexamethasone are useful adjuncts to ropivacaine interscalene block, with the intravenous route preferred as this avoids the possibility of neural toxicity of dexamethasone.

  4. Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, Arya; Yang Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan; McBurney, Michelle L.; Erasmus, Jeremy; Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James; Dong, Lei; Welsh, James

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56-87.5 Gy; 1.5-2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade {>=}2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4-37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512-67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm{sup 3} of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966-24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267-17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future prospective

  5. Distinction between neoplastic and radiation-induced brachial plexopathy, with emphasis on the role of EMG

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, C.M. Jr.; Thomas, J.E.; Cascino, T.L.; Litchy, W.J.

    1989-04-01

    The results of clinical, radiologic, and electrophysiologic studies are retrospectively reviewed for 55 patients with neoplastic and 35 patients with radiation-induced brachial plexopathy. The presence or absence of pain as the presenting symptom, temporal profile of the illness, presence of a discrete mass on CT of the plexus, and presence of myokymic discharges on EMG contributed significantly to the prediction of the underlying cause of the brachial plexopathy. The distribution of weakness and the results of nerve conduction studies were of no help in distinguishing neoplastic from radiation-induced brachial plexopathy.

  6. Avulsion of the brachial plexus in a great horned owl (Bubo virginaus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, M.P.; Stauber, E.; Thomas, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Avulsion of the brachial plexus was documented in a Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus). A fractured scapula was also present. Cause of these injuries was not known but was thought to be due to trauma. Differentiation of musculoskeletal injury from peripheral nerve damage can be difficult in raptors. Use of electromyography and motor nerve conduction velocity was helpful in demonstrating peripheral nerve involvement. A brachial plexus avulsion was suspected on the basis of clinical signs, presence of electromyographic abnormalities in all muscles supplied by the nerves of the brachial plexus and absence of median-ulnar motor nerve conduction velocities.

  7. Arterial endofibrosis in professional cyclists

    PubMed Central

    VERALDI, G.F.; MACRÌ, M.; CRISCENTI, P.; SCORSONE, L.; ZINGARETTI, C.C.; GNONI, M.; MEZZETTO, L.

    2015-01-01

    External Iliac Artery Endofibrosis (EIAE) is an uncommon disease usually affecting young, otherwise healthy, patients. It usually involves cyclists but cases have been reported in other groups of endurance athletes. The external iliac artery is the most affected anatomical site but other locations are described too. The precise pathophysiology and long-term evolution of the disease still remain unknown. The diagnosis may be challenging and delayed as the patients usually present symptoms only in extreme conditions and physical and instrumental examinations may be normal at rest. We present two cases of young professional cyclists who suffered of exercise-induced leg pain which led them to reduce running. Both patients were firstly treated with balloon angioplasty that rapidly failed to improve their symptoms. The successive open surgery with endofibrosectomy and autologous saphenous vein closure patch completely resolved physical limitations. EIAE is a rare disease that can induce arterial stenosis, thrombosis, dissection and secondary atheroma. After-exercise ankle-brachial index represents a useful diagnostic criterion. Careful observation of angio-CT may strengthen the suspect. Knowledge of the these features allows a better pre-operative assessment and an early effective treatment. Surgical revascularization remains the gold standard approach. PMID:26888703

  8. Short-term effects of trans fatty acids from ruminant and industrial sources on surrogate markers of cardiovascular risk in healthy men and women: A randomized, controlled, double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Radtke, Thomas; Schmid, Alexandra; Trepp, Anja; Dähler, Frieda; Coslovsky, Michael; Eser, Prisca; Wilhelm, Matthias; Saner, Hugo

    2017-03-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine short-term effects of trans fatty acid (TFA) intake from ruminant and industrial sources on surrogate markers of cardiovascular risk in the context of a balanced diet with 30-36% of daily energy from fat. Design Prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel-design study. Methods In this study, 142 healthy volunteers aged 45 to 69 years were randomly allocated to three different diets: either a diet enriched with 2% of daily energy intake from ruminant TFA (rTFA) or with industrial TFA (iTFA), or a diet without TFA (wTFA), for a duration of four weeks. The primary outcome parameter was endothelial function measured by brachial artery flow mediated dilation (FMD). Secondary outcome parameters included biomarkers for inflammation, coagulation and endothelial function and lipid profiles. One hundred and twenty-nine participants completed the study. Results Neither alpine butter with TFA from ruminant source nor margarine with industrially produced TFA showed significant effects on brachial artery FMD (FMD% differences: rTFA vs. iTFA 0.04 (95% confidence interval 0.91 to 0.98), rTFA vs. wTFA -0.98 (-2.00 to 0.04) and iTFA vs. wTFA -1.04 (-2.38 to 0.30). With rTFA, there was a small but significant increase of total cholesterol: rTFA over wTFA 1.04 (1.00 to 1.07 mmol/l) and LDL-cholesterol: rTFA over wTFA 1.08 (1.03 to 1.14 mmol/l) without concomitant increase of biomarkers for inflammation or coagulation. Conclusions Short-term intake of TFA at 2% of total daily energy intake from neither ruminant nor industrially produced sources does not have any negative impact on brachial artery FMD, inflammation and coagulation markers in healthy subjects.

  9. Penetrating arterial trauma to the limbs: outcome of a modified protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Penetrating arterial injuries to the limbs are common injuries in high volume trauma centers. Their overall surgical results reported in the literature are satisfactory - apart of those of the popliteal artery that still may lead to a significant incidence in amputations. With the present study we assessed our outcome with penetrating arterial injuries to the limb as to see if the direct involvement of vascular surgeons in the management of popliteal artery injuries leads to an improved (lowered) amputation rate. Results were benchmarked with our published results from previous years. Methods All patients sustaining penetrating arterial injuries to the limbs admitted to the Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital during an 18- month period ending in September 2011 were included in this study. Axillary, brachial and femoral artery injuries were operated on by the trauma surgeons as in the past. All popliteal artery injuries were operated on by the vascular surgeons (new). Results There were a total of 113 patients with 116 injuries, as some patients had multiple vascular injuries: 10 axillary, 47 brachial, 34 femoral and 25 popliteal artery injuries. Outcome of axillary, brachial and femoral artery injury repair were excellent and not significantly different from our previous reported experience. Injury to the popliteal artery showed a diminished re-exploration rate from 34% down to 10% (p = 0,049) and a decrease of amputation rate from 16% to 11% which was statistically not significant (p = 0,8). Conclusion Penetrating arterial trauma to the axillary, brachial and femoral artery is followed by excellent results when operated by trauma surgeons. In the case of popliteal artery injury operated by the vascular surgeons, the results of this study do not show any statistically significant difference related to amputation rate from our previous reported studies when operated by trauma surgeons. Taking into consideration the diminished re

  10. Lack of evidence of the effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants (under the age of two years) diagnosed with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Gelding, Bronwyn

    2006-12-01

    Background  Obstetric brachial plexus palsy, which occurs in 1-3 per 1000 live births, results from traction and/or compression of the brachial plexus in utero, during descent through the birth canal or during delivery. This results in a spectrum of injuries that range in extent of damage and severity and can lead to a lifelong impairment and functional difficulties associated with the use of the affected upper limb. Most infants diagnosed with obstetric brachial plexus palsy receive treatment, such as surgery to the brachial plexus, physiotherapy or occupational therapy, within the first months of life. However, there is controversy regarding the most effective form of management. This review follows on from our previous systematic review which investigated the effectiveness of primary conservative management in infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. This systematic review focuses on the effects of primary surgery. Objectives  The objective of this review was to systematically assess and collate all available evidence on effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Search strategy  A systematic literature search was performed using 13 databases: TRIP, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Proquest 5000, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, Expanded Academic ASAP, Meditext, Science Direct, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Proquest Digital Dissertations, Open Archives Initiative Search Engine, the Australian Digital Thesis program. Those studies that were reported in English and published between July 1992 to June 2004 were included in this review. Selection criteria  Quantitative studies that investigated the effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were eligible for inclusion into this review. This excluded studies where infants were solely managed conservatively or with pharmacological agents, or underwent surgery for the management of

  11. Upper Limb Multifactorial Movement Analysis in Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bahm, Jorg

    2016-01-01

    Multifactorial motion analysis was first established for gait and then developed in the upper extremity. Recordings of infrared light reflecting sensitive passive markers in space, combined with surface eletromyographic recordings and/or transmitted forces, allow eclectic study of muscular coordination in the upper limb. Brachial plexus birth injury is responsible for various patterns of muscle weakness, imbalance, and/or simultaneous activation, soft tissue contractures, and bone-joint deformities, leading to individual motion patterns and adaptations, which we studied by means of motion analysis tools. We describe the technical development and examination setup to evaluate motion impairment and present first clinical results. Motion analysis is a reliable objective assessment tool allowing precise pre- and postoperative multimodal evaluation of upper limb function. Level of evidence: II. PMID:28077954

  12. Surgical treatment of brachial plexus injuries in adults.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Monreal

    2005-12-01

    We carried out a retrospective review of 32 consecutive patients (30 adults and two children) with total or partial lesions of the brachial plexus who had surgical repair using nerve grafting, neurotisation, and neurolysis between January 1991 and December 2003. The outcome measures of muscular strength were correlated with the type of lesion, age, preoperative time, length and number of grafts, and time to reinnervation of the biceps. The function of the upper limb was also evaluated. There was a significant correlation between muscular strength after surgical repair and both the preoperative time and the length of the nerve graft. There was also a significant correlation between muscular strength and the number of grafts. Muscular strength was better when the neurolysis was done before six months. When neurosurgical repair and reconstructive procedures were performed, the function of the upper limb was improved.

  13. Echocardiographic evaluation of external iliac artery Doppler waveform in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, Grzegorz; Szmigielski, Cezary; Kaczynska, Anna; Kuch-Wocial, Agnieszka

    2014-04-01

    Visual interpretation of the Doppler waveform in the common femoral or distal external iliac artery (EIA) was reported to be useful in screening for proximal peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) in patients with lower limb ischemia. Commonly patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) referred for echocardiography have coexistent arterial pathology. Therefore, we decided to study whether echocardiographic evaluation of the distal EIA flow can be useful for detection of PAOD in patients with CAD. We studied 150 consecutive patients (pts) with CAD referred for echocardiography. At the end of an echocardiographic examination, evaluation of the flow in the distal EIA with an echocardiographic probe was performed. The Doppler waveform was classified as normal-with early diastolic flow reversal or abnormal-without early diastolic flow reversal. Echocardiographic findings were compared in a blinded fashion with the results of the ankle brachial index measurements (ABI). Based on the ABI ≤ 0.9, peripheral artery disease was diagnosed in 54 pts (36%) and abnormal external iliac Doppler waveform was found in 27 pts (18%). Sensitivity of abnormal external iliac Doppler waveform in predicting PAOD was 48%, specificity 99%, positive predictive value (PPV) 96%, and negative predictive value 77%. Peripheral arterial occlusive disease is common in patients with CAD referred for echocardiographic study. Echocardiographic assessment of distal EIA Doppler waveform has low sensitivity, but high specificity and high PPV in the diagnosis of peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

  14. Left ventricular remodelling and systolic function measurement with 64 multi-slice computed tomography versus second harmonic echocardiography in patients with coronary artery disease: a double blind study.

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; Cademartiri, Filippo; Geleijnse, Marcel L; Meijboom, Bob; Pugliese, Francesca; Soliman, Osama; Calabrò, Anna; Nuti, Ranuccio; de Feyter, Pim

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated LV volumes, ejection fraction (LVEF) and stroke volume (SV) obtained by 64-MDCT and to compare these data with those obtained by second harmonic 2D Echo, in patients referred for non-invasive coronary vessels evaluation. The most common technique in daily clinical practice used for determination of LV function is two-dimensional echocardiography (2D-TTE). Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) is an emerging new technique to detect coronary artery disease (CAD) and was recently proposed to assess LV function. 93 patients underwent to 64-MDCT for LV function and volumes assessment by segmental reconstruction algorithm (Argus) and compared with recent (2 months) 2D-TTE, all images were processed and interpreted by two observers blinded to the Echo and MDCT results. A close correlation between TTE and 64 MDCT was demonstrated for the ejection fraction LVEF (r=0.84), end-diastolic volume LVEDV (r=0.80) and end-systolic volume LVESV (r=0.85); acceptable correlation was recruited for stroke volume LVSV (r=0.58). Optimal results were recruited for inter-observer variability for 64-MDCT measured in 45 patients: LVESV (r=0.82, p<0.001), LVEDV (r=0.83, p<0.001), LVEF (r=0.69, p<0.002) and SV (r=0.66, p<0.001). Our results, showed that functional and temporal information contained in a coronary 64-MDCT study can be used to assess left ventricular (LV) systolic function and LV dimensions with good reproducibility and acceptable correlation respect to 2D-TTE. The combination of non-invasive coronary artery imaging and assessment of global LV function might became in the future a fast and conclusive cardiac work-up in patients with CAD.

  15. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. Setting The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and children, and all specialists treating upper extremity injuries. Participants The evidence interpretation and recommendation consensus team (Canadian OBPI Working Group) was composed of clinicians representing each of Canada's 10 multidisciplinary centres. Outcome measures An electronic modified Delphi approach was used for consensus, with agreement criteria defined a priori. Quality indicators for referral to a multidisciplinary centre were established by consensus. An original meta-analysis of primary nerve repair and review of Canadian epidemiology and burden were previously completed. Results 7 recommendations address clinical gaps and guide identification, referral, treatment and outcome assessment: (1) physically examine for OBPI in newborns with arm asymmetry or risk factors; (2) refer newborns with OBPI to a multidisciplinary centre by 1 month; (3) provide pregnancy/birth history and physical examination findings at birth; (4) multidisciplinary centres should include a therapist and peripheral nerve surgeon experienced with OBPI; (5) physical therapy should be advised by a multidisciplinary team; (6) microsurgical nerve repair is indicated in root avulsion and other OBPI meeting centre operative criteria; (7) the common data set includes the Narakas classification, limb length, Active Movement Scale (AMS) and Brachial Plexus Outcome Measure (BPOM) 2 years after birth/surgery. Conclusions The process established a new network of opinion leaders and researchers for further

  16. Morphometric Atlas Selection for Automatic Brachial Plexus Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, Joris; Wouters, Johan; Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Duprez, Fréderic; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of atlas selection based on different morphometric parameters, on the accuracy of automatic brachial plexus (BP) segmentation for radiation therapy planning. The segmentation accuracy was measured by comparing all of the generated automatic segmentations with anatomically validated gold standard atlases developed using cadavers. Methods and Materials: Twelve cadaver computed tomography (CT) atlases (3 males, 9 females; mean age: 73 years) were included in the study. One atlas was selected to serve as a patient, and the other 11 atlases were registered separately onto this “patient” using deformable image registration. This procedure was repeated for every atlas as a patient. Next, the Dice and Jaccard similarity indices and inclusion index were calculated for every registered BP with the original gold standard BP. In parallel, differences in several morphometric parameters that may influence the BP segmentation accuracy were measured for the different atlases. Specific brachial plexus-related CT-visible bony points were used to define the morphometric parameters. Subsequently, correlations between the similarity indices and morphometric parameters were calculated. Results: A clear negative correlation between difference in protraction-retraction distance and the similarity indices was observed (mean Pearson correlation coefficient = −0.546). All of the other investigated Pearson correlation coefficients were weak. Conclusions: Differences in the shoulder protraction-retraction position between the atlas and the patient during planning CT influence the BP autosegmentation accuracy. A greater difference in the protraction-retraction distance between the atlas and the patient reduces the accuracy of the BP automatic segmentation result.

  17. Recurrent arterial aneurysm rupture of the upper extremity in a patient with vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Koji; Tajiri, Nobuhisa; Nakai, Mikizo; Shimizu, Shuji

    2014-10-01

    Arterial aneurysm rupture is one of the most critical complications in patients with vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS). Here, we report a case of recurrent aneurysm rupture successfully treated by endovascular embolization. A 38-year old woman who underwent brachial artery ligation for a ruptured aneurysm was diagnosed postoperatively with vEDS. Impending rupture of a collateral artery aneurysm was encountered 5 months after the initial open surgery. Endovascular embolization with a liquid embolic agent was successfully performed. Given that arterial rupture can occur repeatedly in patients with vEDS, careful life-long follow-up is necessary.

  18. Restoration and protection of brachial plexus injury: hot topics in the last decade.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaizhi; Lv, Zheng; Liu, Jun; Zhu, He; Li, Rui

    2014-09-15

    Brachial plexus injury is frequently induced by injuries, accidents or birth trauma. Upper limb function may be partially or totally lost after injury, or left permanently disabled. With the development of various medical technologies, different types of interventions are used, but their effectiveness is wide ranging. Many repair methods have phasic characteristics, i.e., repairs are done in different phases. This study explored research progress and hot topic methods for protection after brachial plexus injury, by analyzing 1,797 articles concerning the repair of brachial plexus injuries, published between 2004 and 2013 and indexed by the Science Citation Index database. Results revealed that there are many methods used to repair brachial plexus injury, and their effects are varied. Intervention methods include nerve transfer surgery, electrical stimulation, cell transplantation, neurotrophic factor therapy and drug treatment. Therapeutic methods in this field change according to the hot topic of research.

  19. Restoration and protection of brachial plexus injury: hot topics in the last decade

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kaizhi; Lv, Zheng; Liu, Jun; Zhu, He; Li, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is frequently induced by injuries, accidents or birth trauma. Upper limb function may be partially or totally lost after injury, or left permanently disabled. With the development of various medical technologies, different types of interventions are used, but their effectiveness is wide ranging. Many repair methods have phasic characteristics, i.e., repairs are done in different phases. This study explored research progress and hot topic methods for protection after brachial plexus injury, by analyzing 1,797 articles concerning the repair of brachial plexus injuries, published between 2004 and 2013 and indexed by the Science Citation Index database. Results revealed that there are many methods used to repair brachial plexus injury, and their effects are varied. Intervention methods include nerve transfer surgery, electrical stimulation, cell transplantation, neurotrophic factor therapy and drug treatment. Therapeutic methods in this field change according to the hot topic of research. PMID:25374596

  20. Reliability of 3D upper limb motion analysis in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Judy; Malone, Ailish; Kiernan, Damien; Meldrum, Dara

    2017-03-01

    Kinematics, measured by 3D upper limb motion analysis (3D-ULMA), can potentially increase understanding of movement patterns by quantifying individual joint contributions. Reliability in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) has not been established.

  1. Contralateral Spinal Accessory Nerve Transfer: A New Technique in Panavulsive Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    PubMed

    Zermeño-Rivera, Jaime; Gutiérrez-Amavizca, Bianca Ethel

    2015-06-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion results from excessive stretching and can occur secondary to motor vehicle accidents, mainly in motorcyclists. In a 28-year-old man with panavulsive brachial plexus palsy, we describe an alternative technique to repair brachial plexus avulsion and to stabilize and preserve shoulder function by transferring the contralateral spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve. We observed positive clinical and electromyographic results in sternocleidomastoid, trapezius, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, pectoralis, triceps, and biceps, with good outcome and prognosis for shoulder function at 12 months after surgery. This technique provides a unique opportunity for patients suffering from severe brachial plexus injuries and lacking enough donor nerves to obtain shoulder stability and mobility while avoiding bone fusion and preserving functionality of the contralateral shoulder with favorable postoperative outcomes.

  2. Neuroanatomy of the brachial plexus: normal and variant anatomy of its formation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Elizabeth O; Vekris, Marios; Demesticha, Theano; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2010-03-01

    The brachial plexus is the complex network of nerves, extending from the neck to the axilla, which supplies motor, sensory, and sympathetic fibers to the upper extremity. Typically, it is formed by the union of the ventral primary rami of the spinal nerves, C5-C8 & T1, the so-called "roots" of the brachial plexus. By examining the neural architecture of the brachial plexus, the most constant arrangement of nerve fibers can be delineated, and the most predominate variations in the neural architecture defined. A thorough understanding of the neuroanatomy of the brachial plexus, with an appreciation of the possible anatomic variations that may occur is necessary for effective clinical practice.

  3. Brachial Plexus Injury from CT-Guided RF Ablation Under General Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, Sridhar Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal; Flanagan, Hugh L.; Whang, Edward E.

    2005-06-15

    Brachial plexus injury in a patient under general anesthesia (GA) is not uncommon, despite careful positioning and, particularly, awareness of the possibility. The mechanism of injury is stretching and compression of the brachial plexus over a prolonged period. Positioning the patient within the computed tomography (CT) gantry for abdominal or chest procedures can simulate a surgical procedure, particularly when GA is used. The potential for brachial plexus injury is increased if the case is prolonged and the patient's arms are raised above the head to avoid CT image degradation from streak artifacts. We report a case of profound brachial plexus palsy following a CT-guided radiofrequency ablation procedure under GA. Fortunately, the patient recovered completely. We emphasize the mechanism of injury and detail measures to combat this problem, such that radiologists are aware of this potentially serious complication.

  4. Investigation of brachial plexus traction lesions by peripheral and spinal somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S J

    1979-01-01

    Peripheral, spinal and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded in 26 patients with unilateral traction injuries of the brachial plexus ganglia. Of 10 cases explored surgically the recordings correctly anticipated the major site of the lesion in eight. PMID:422958

  5. Assessment of central haemomodynamics from a brachial cuff in a community setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Large artery stiffening and wave reflections are independent predictors of adverse events. To date, their assessment has been limited to specialised techniques and settings. A new, more practical method allowing assessment of central blood pressure from waveforms recorded using a conventional automated oscillometric monitor has recently been validated in laboratory settings. However, the feasibility of this method in a community based setting has not been assessed. Methods One-off peripheral and central haemodynamic (systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) and pulse pressure) and wave reflection parameters (augmentation pressure (AP) and index, AIx) were obtained from 1,903 volunteers in an Austrian community setting using a transfer-function like method (ARCSolver algorithm) and from waveforms recorded with a regular oscillometric cuff. We assessed these parameters for known differences and associations according to gender and age deciles from <30 years to >80 years in the whole population and a subset with a systolic BP < 140 mmHg. Results We obtained 1,793 measures of peripheral and central BP, PP and augmentation parameters. Age and gender associations with central haemodynamic and augmentation parameters reflected those previously established from reference standard non-invasive techniques under specialised settings. Findings were the same for patients with a systolic BP below 140 mmHg (i.e. normotensive). Lower values for AIx in the current study are possibly due to differences in sampling rates, detection frequency and/or averaging procedures and to lower numbers of volunteers in younger age groups. Conclusion A novel transfer-function like algorithm, using brachial cuff-based waveform recordings, provides robust and feasible estimates of central systolic pressure and augmentation in community-based settings. PMID:22734820

  6. The Effect of Intravenous Dexmedetomidine Compared to Propofol on Patients Hemodynamics as a Sedative in Brachial Plexus Block: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amarjeet; Sinha, Chandni; Kumar, Ajeet; Kumari, Poonam

    2017-01-01

    Background: The quest for an ideal sedative during regional anesthesia is on. Although propofol has been accepted as a sedative intraoperatively, it can be associated with troublesome hemodynamic changes. Dexmedetomidine is a new alpha 2 agonist used widely for sedation. Aims: In this study, we tried to compare equivalent doses of dexmedetomidine infusion with propofol with emphasis on their effect on the hemodynamics. Settings and Design: Prospective, single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Materials and Methods: In a single blinded study, 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I and II patients scheduled for forearm surgeries under brachial plexus block were randomized to receive either propofol (Group I) or dexmedetomidine (Group II) infusion. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block was given in all the patients. After confirming adequate motor and sensory blockade, they were administered an initial loading dose of the drug over 10 min followed by a maintenance dose till the end of the surgery. The rate of infusion was titrated to maintain Ramsay sedation score of 2–4. Intraoperative hemodynamic and respiratory effects were documented along with surgeon and patient satisfaction. Any adverse effect such as hypotension, bradycardia, nausea, and vomiting was also noted. Statistical Analysis Used: The data collected were evaluated using Stata version 10. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Heart rate decreased significantly in Group II (dexmedetomidine) while mean arterial pressure decreased significantly in Group I (propofol). There was no increase in the incidence of bradycardia or hypotension in either groups. Patient satisfaction score was significantly greater in Group II (dexmedetomidine) while surgeon satisfaction score was similar in both the groups. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine at equivalent doses of propofol has a similar hemodynamic and respiratory effect, similar surgeon's satisfaction score, higher

  7. Arterial Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... The arterial catheter allows accurate, second-to-second measurement of the blood pressure; repeated meas- urement is ... pressure must be lowered gradually in steps, and measurements with an arterial catheter help guide the treatment. ■ ...

  8. Rationale and design of a Phase II clinical trial of aspirin and simvastatin for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension: ASA-STAT

    PubMed Central

    Kawut, Steven M.; Bagiella, Emilia; Shimbo, Daichi; Lederer, David J.; Al-Naamani, Nadine; Roberts, Kari E.; Barr, R. Graham; Post, Wendy; Horn, Evelyn; Tracy, Russell; Hassoun, Paul; Girgis, Reda

    2011-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease which causes exercise limitation, heart failure, and death. Aspirin and simvastatin are highly effective and safe therapies for other cardiovascular diseases characterized by platelet activation and endothelial dysfunction, but have not been formally studied in PAH. Methods ASA-STAT is a Phase II, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 2 × 2 factorial clinical trial of aspirin and simvastatin in patients with PAH. A total of 92 subjects were to be randomized to aspirin or aspirin placebo and simvastatin or simvastatin placebo. The primary outcome is the distance walked in six minutes at six months after randomization. Secondary measures include brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, circulating biomarkers of platelet and endothelial function, functional class, quality-of-life, and time to clinical end points. The incidence of adverse events will be compared between treatment groups. Screening and Enrollment We screened a total of 712 individuals with PAH. Sixty-five subjects were enrolled when the trial was terminated for futility in reaching the primary end point for simvastatin. Conclusions This study aims to determine whether aspirin or simvastatin have beneficial biologic or clinical effects in patients with PAH. The safety and side effects of these commonly prescribed cardiovascular drugs will also be assessed. PMID:21146637

  9. The Hypolipidemic and Pleiotropic Effects of Rosuvastatin Are Not Enhanced by Its Association with Zinc and Selenium Supplementation in Coronary Artery Disease Patients: A Double Blind Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Sena-Evangelista, Karine Cavalcanti Maurício; Pedrosa, Lucia Fatima Campos; Paiva, Maria Sanali Moura Oliveira; Dias, Paula Cristina Silveira; Ferreira, Diana Quitéria Cabral; Cozzolino, Sílvia Maria Franciscato; Faulin, Tanize Espírito Santo; Abdalla, Dulcinéia Saes Parra

    2015-01-01

    Objective Statins treatment may modify the levels of zinc and selenium, minerals that can improve vascular function and reduce oxidative damage and inflammation in atherosclerotic patients. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of rosuvastatin, alone or associated with zinc and selenium supplementation, on lipid profile, antioxidant enzymes and mineral status in coronary artery disease patients. Material and Methods A double-blind randomized clinical trial was performed in which patients (n = 76) were treated with 10 mg rosuvastatin over 4 months associated or not with zinc (30 mg/d) and selenium (150 μg/d) supplementation. The following parameters were analyzed before and after the intervention: anthropometric measurements, lipid profile, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), electronegative low density lipoprotein (LDL(-)) concentrations, activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), zinc and selenium concentrations in blood plasma and erythocytes. Significance was determined using an α of 5% (two-tailed). Results We found that rosuvastatin therapy was efficient in reducing total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and hs-CRP independently of mineral supplementation. Neither treatment was associated with significant changes in LDL(-). Similarly, the antioxidant enzymes GPx and SOD activity were unchanged by treatments. Neither treatment was associated with significant differences in concentrations of zinc or selenium in blood plasma and erythocytes of studied groups. Conclusion Rosuvastatin treatment did not affect zinc and selenium levels in coronary artery disease patients. The zinc and selenium supplementation at doses used in this study did not change lipid profile or SOD and GPx activity in patients receiving rosuvastatin. Further studies should be focused on testing alternative doses and supplements in different populations to contribute for a consensus on the ideal choice of antioxidants

  10. Q10 supplementation effects on cardiac enzyme CK-MB and troponin in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Moludi, Jalal; Keshavarz, Seyedali; Tabaee, Ali Sadeghpour; Safiri, Saeid; Pakzad, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) is associated with ischemia-reperfusion injury and tissue damage. CoQ10 as an antioxidant has an important role and may have cardio-protective effects after myocardial dysfunction and CABG. We aimed to evaluate whether CoQ10 has a myocardial cardio protective impact on cardiac biomarkers after CABG. Methods: In this double-blind study, 80 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent CABG surgery were divided into intervention and control groups and received Q10 supplement or placebo, respectively. The surgical characteristics of the patients in the two groups were similar. The intervention group received 150 mg of Q10 supplement per day for 7 days before the surgery. The control group received placebo capsule. After operation the inter- and intra-group blood levels of CK-MB and troponin, before and after supplementation and 12 hours after the CABG, and postoperative outcomes such as intensive care unit (ICU) stay and hospital stay were compared. Results: In this study, 40 subjects were located in each group. The participation rate was 97.5% and men and women accounted for 52.5% and 47.5% respectively. The mean age of the subjects was 58.17 ± 8.55. The two groups were not significantly different in terms of basic variables. Within-group comparison showed a significant increase in the level of troponin enzymes over time (P < 0.001) and CK-MB (P < 0.001). However, between-group comparison showed no significant difference between the two groups in terms of CK-MB (P = 0.384) and troponin (P = 0.115). In the end, no interaction was observed between the intervention and time on CK-MB (P = 0.095) and troponin (P = 0.198) variables. Conclusion: Q10 supplementation 7 days before surgery was not effective in reducing CK-MB and troponin after CABG. PMID:27069560

  11. Effect of yohimbine hydrochloride on erectile impotence: a double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Susset, J G; Tessier, C D; Wincze, J; Bansal, S; Malhotra, C; Schwacha, M G

    1989-06-01

    A double-blind, partial crossover study on the therapeutic effect of yohimbine hydrochloride on erectile dysfunction was done in 82 sexually impotent patients. All patients underwent a multifactorial evaluation, including determination of penile brachial blood pressure index, cavernosography, sacral evoked response, testosterone and prolactin determination, Derogatis sexual dysfunction inventory and daytime arousal test. After 1 month of treatment with a maximum of 42.0 mg. oral yohimbine hydrochloride daily 14 per cent of the patients experienced restoration of full and sustained erections, 20 per cent reported a partial response to the therapy and 65 per cent reported no improvement. Three patients reported a positive placebo effect. Maximum effect takes 2 to 3 weeks to manifest itself. Yohimbine was active in some patients with arterial insufficiency and a unilateral sacral reflex arc lesion, and in 1 with low serum testosterone levels. The 34 per cent response is encouraging, particularly in a Veterans Administration population presenting with a high incidence of diabetes and vascular pathological conditions not found in regular office patients. Only few and benign side effects were recorded, which makes this medication worth an attempt, often as a first line of treatment even at a dose of 8 tablets.

  12. Ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block versus local infiltration anesthesia for arteriovenous fistula creation at the forearm for hemodialysis in patients with chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Nofal, WH; El Fawal, SM; Shoukry, AA; Sabek, EAS; Malak, WFA

    2017-01-01

    Background: The primary failure rate for arteriovenous fistula (AVF) creation under local anesthesia for hemodialysis is about 30%. Axillary brachial plexus block (BPB) may improve blood flow through blood vessels used in fistula creation; it may improve the AVF blood flow and thus may reduce the primary failure rate after 3 months. Methods: Hundred and forty patients with chronic renal failure scheduled for AVF creation for hemodialysis were divided into two equal groups; Group 1 (AxBP-G) received ultrasound (US) guided axillary BPB, and Group 2 (LI-G) received local infiltration. We recorded the measurements of the brachial and radial arteries before and after anesthesia and the AVF blood flow in both groups at three different time points. Furthermore, the primary failure rate was recorded in each group and compared. Results: After anesthesia, the mean radial artery blood flow in the AxBP-group was 3.52 ml/min more than the LI-group, and the brachial artery diameter was also 0.68 mm more than in the LI-group, both differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05). There were significant increases (P < 0.05) in the AVF blood flow in the AxBP-group more than the LI-group with mean differences of 29.6, 69.8, and 27.2 ml/min at 4 h, 1 week, and 3 months, respectively. The overall mean of AVF blood flow was 42.21 ml/min more in the AxBP group than the LI-group a difference which is statistically significant (P < 0.001). The primary failure rate was 17% in the AxBP group versus 30% in the LI-group; however, this difference is not significant statistically (P = 0.110). Conclusion: The US-guided axillary block increases AVF blood flow significantly more than local infiltration and nonsignificantly decreases the primary failure rate of the AVF after 3 months. PMID:28217059

  13. Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity is Associated with Composite Carotid and Coronary Atherosclerosis in a Middle-Aged Asymptomatic Population

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Cho, Sang-A; Cho, Jae-Young; Lee, Seunghun; Park, Jae Hyoung; Hwang, Sung Ho; Hong, Soon Jun; Yu, Cheol Woong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Although arterial stiffness has been associated with the development of atherosclerosis, the role of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) for diagnosing composite coronary and carotid atherosclerosis has not been completely elucidated. Method: We enrolled 773 asymptomatic individuals who were referred from 25 public health centers in Seoul and who underwent carotid ultrasonography and coronary computed tomography. Noninvasive hemodynamic parameters, including baPWV, were also measured. Composite coronary and carotid atherosclerosis was defined as follows: 1) coronary artery calcium (CAC) score ≥ 100, 2) coronary artery stenosis (CAS) ≥ 50% of diameter stenosis, 3) carotid intima medial thickness (CIMT) ≥ 0.9 mm, or 4) presence of carotid artery plaque (CAP). Results: The incidence of composite coronary and carotid atherosclerosis was 28.2%. Coronary atherosclerosis (CAC and CAS) was significantly associated with carotid atherosclerosis (CIMT and CAP). Subjects with higher baPWV (highest quartile) had a higher prevalence of composite coronary and carotid atherosclerosis (p < .001). Although multivariate analysis failed to show baPWV as an independent predictor for composite atherosclerosis, baPWV had moderate diagnostic power to detect a subject with more than two positive subclinical atherosclerosis exams [area under the curve (AUC), 0.692]. Conclusion: baPWV was associated with the composite coronary and carotid atherosclerotic burden in a community-based asymptomatic population. PMID:27251176

  14. Conservative and Surgical Treatment Improves Pain and Ankle-Brachial Index in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Masaomi; Murata, Yasuaki; Eguchi, Yawara; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ataka, Hiromi; Hirayama, Jiro; Ozawa, Tomoyuki; Morinaga, Tatsuo; Arai, Hajime; Mimura, Masaya; Kamoda, Hiroto; Orita, Sumihisa; Miyagi, Masayuki; Miyashita, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Yuzuru; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Sameda, Hiroaki; Kinoshita, Tomoaki; Hanaoka, Eiji; Suzuki, Miyako; Suzuki, Munetaka; Aihara, Takato; Ito, Toshinori; Inoue, Gen; Yamagata, Masatsune; Toyone, Tomoaki; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The pathological mechanism of lumbar spinal stenosis is reduced blood flow in nerve roots and degeneration of nerve roots. Exercise and prostaglandin E1 is used for patients with peripheral arterial disease to increase capillary flow around the main artery and improve symptoms; however, the ankle-brachial index (ABI), an estimation of blood flow in the main artery in the leg, does not change after treatment. Lumbar spinal nerve roots contain somatosensory, somatomotor, and unmyelinated autonomic nerves. Improved blood flow by medication with prostaglandin E1 and decompression surgery in these spinal nerve roots may improve the function of nerve fibers innervating muscle, capillary, and main vessels in the lower leg, resulting in an increased ABI. The purpose of the study was to examine whether these treatments can improve ABI. Materials and Methods One hundred and seven patients who received conservative treatment such as exercise and medication (n=56) or surgical treatment (n=51) were included. Low back pain and leg pain scores, walking distance, and ABI were measured before treatment and after 3 months of conservative treatment alone or surgical treatment followed by conservative treatment. Results Low back pain, leg pain, and walking distance significantly improved after both treatments (p<0.05). ABI significantly increased in each group (p<0.05). Conclusion This is the first investigation of changes in ABI after treatment in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Improvement of the spinal nerve roots by medication and decompression surgery may improve the supply of blood flow to the lower leg in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:23709437

  15. Infrared thermography as option for evaluating the treatment effect of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty by patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Staffa, Erik; Bernard, Vladan; Kubicek, Lubos; Vlachovsky, Robert; Vlk, Daniel; Mornstein, Vojtech; Bourek, Ales; Staffa, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the possible use of infrared thermography as a supplementary method to the ankle-brachial index used in assessing the treatment effect of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. The study included 21 patients, mean age was 60.22 years. Healthy control group included 20 persons, mean age was 55.60 years. Patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (Fontaine stages I-III) were admitted for endovascular treatment by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Thermal images and ankle-brachial index values were obtained before and after treatment by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Median temperature change in the treated limb was 0.4℃, for non-treated limb was -0.5℃. The median value of ankle-brachial index in the treated limb increased by 0.17 from 0.81 after the procedure. The median value of ankle-brachial index in the non-treated limb decreased by 0.03 from the value of 1.01. Significant difference between treated limb and non-treated limb in change of ankle-brachial index was found with p value = .0035. The surface temperature obtained by the infrared thermography correlates with ankle-brachial index. We present data showing that the increase of ankle-brachial index is associated with increase of skin temperature in the case of limbs treated by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Our results also suggest potential of the use of infrared thermography for monitoring foot temperature as a means of early detection of onset of foot ischemic disorders.

  16. MRI of the Brachial Plexus: Modified Imaging Technique Leading to a Better Characterization of Its Anatomy and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Carlos; Mailley, Kathleen; del Carpio O’Donovan, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of the brachial plexus due to its superior soft tissue resolution and multiplanar capabilities. The evaluation of the brachial plexus however represents a diagnostic challenge for the clinician and the radiologist. The imaging assessment of the brachial plexus, in particular, has been traditionally challenging due to the complexity of its anatomy, its distribution in space and due to technical factors. Herein, we describe a modified technique used in our institution for the evaluation of the brachial plexus which led to a substantial decrease in scanning time and to better visualization of all the segments of the brachial plexus from the roots to the branches, in only one or two images, facilitating therefore the understanding of the anatomy and the interpretation of the study. To our knowledge, we are the first group to describe this technique of imaging the brachial plexus. We illustrate the benefit of this modified technique with an example of a patient with a lesion in the proximal branches of the left brachial plexus that was clinically suspected but missed on conventional brachial plexus imaging for six consecutive years. In addition, we review the common and infrequent benign and malignant pathology that can affect the brachial plexus. PMID:24355190

  17. Noninvasive Measurement of Central Vascular Pressures With Arterial Tonometry: Clinical Revival of the Pulse Pressure Waveform?

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Matthew R.; Stepanek, Jan; Cevette, Michael; Covalciuc, Michael; Hurst, R. Todd; Tajik, A. Jamil

    2010-01-01

    The arterial pulse has historically been an essential source of information in the clinical assessment of health. With current sphygmomanometric and oscillometric devices, only the peak and trough of the peripheral arterial pulse waveform are clinically used. Several limitations exist with peripheral blood pressure. First, central aortic pressure is a better predictor of cardiovascular outcome than peripheral pressure. Second, peripherally obtained blood pressure does not accurately reflect central pressure because of pressure amplification. Lastly, antihypertensive medications have differing effects on central pressures despite similar reductions in brachial blood pressure. Applanation tonometry can overcome the limitations of peripheral pressure by determining the shape of the aortic waveform from the radial artery. Waveform analysis not only indicates central systolic and diastolic pressure but also determines the influence of pulse wave reflection on the central pressure waveform. It can serve as a useful adjunct to brachial blood pressure measurements in initiating and monitoring hypertensive treatment, in observing the hemodynamic effects of atherosclerotic risk factors, and in predicting cardiovascular outcomes and events. Radial artery applanation tonometry is a noninvasive, reproducible, and affordable technology that can be used in conjunction with peripherally obtained blood pressure to guide patient management. Keywords for the PubMed search were applanation tonometry, radial artery, central pressure, cardiovascular risk, blood pressure, and arterial pulse. Articles published from January 1, 1995, to July 1, 2009, were included in the review if they measured central pressure using radial artery applanation tonometry. PMID:20435839

  18. Treatment of acute embolic occlusions of the subclavian and axillary arteries using a rotational thrombectomy device.

    PubMed

    Zeller, T; Frank, U; Bürgelin, K; Sinn, L; Horn, B; Schwarzwälder, U; Roskamm, H; Neumann, F J

    2003-05-01

    Acute embolic or local thrombotic ischaemia of the upper limbs can be treated by embolectomy or by endovascular techniques. We report here on the endovascular thrombectomy of acute embolic occlusions of subclavian and axillary arteries in two patients using a rotational thrombectomy device and give an overview about the actual literature. Two female patients, each with a history of multivessel coronary disease and intermittent atrial fibrillation, complained of sudden onset of pain at rest and paleness of the left and right arm, respectively. Duplex ultrasound showed a localized embolic occlusion of the left subclavian artery and the bifurcation of the brachial artery in the first patient and a localized embolic occlusion of the distal right subclavian and axillary artery in the second patient. In the first patient, the left subclavian artery was reopened using a 8F-Rotarex device via the femoral access, while the bifurcation of the brachial artery was reopened by local thrombolysis using 25 mg rt-PA because of the insufficient length of the thrombectomy device of 80 cm. In the second patient, the right subclavian and axillary arteries were reopened using a 6F-Rotarex device. Follow-up examinations before discharge and after 6 months showed normalized perfusion of the arms of both patients.

  19. Preoperative interscalene brachial plexus block aids in perioperative temperature management during arthroscopic shoulder surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Se Hun; Lee, Wonjin; Park, JaeGwan; Kim, Myoung-hun; Cho, Kwangrae; Lee, Jeong Han; Cheong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypothermia is common during arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia, and anesthetic-impaired thermoregulation is thought to be the major cause of hypothermia. This prospective, randomized, double-blind study was designed to compare perioperative temperature during arthroscopic shoulder surgery with interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) followed by general anesthesia vs. general anesthesia alone. Methods Patients scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were randomly allocated to receive IBPB followed by general anesthesia (group GB, n = 20) or general anesthesia alone (group GO, n = 20), and intraoperative and postoperative body temperatures were measured. Results The initial body temperatures were 36.5 ± 0.3℃ vs. 36.4 ± 0.4℃ in group GB vs. GO, respectively (P = 0.215). The body temperature at 120 minutes after induction of anesthesia was significantly higher in group GB than in group GO (35.8 ± 0.3℃ vs. 34.9 ± 0.3℃; P < 0.001). The body temperatures at 60 minutes after admission to the post-anesthesia care unit were 35.8 ± 0.3℃ vs. 35.2 ± 0.2℃ in group GB vs. GO, respectively (P < 0.001). The concentrations of desflurane at 0, 15, and 120 minutes after induction of anesthesia were 6.0 vs. 6.0% (P = 0.330), 5.0 ± 0.8% vs. 5.8 ± 0.4% (P = 0.001), and 3.4 ± 0.4% vs. 7.1 ± 0.9% (P < 0.001) in group GB vs. GO, respectively. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that preoperative IBPB could reduce both the intraoperative concentration of desflurane and the reduction in body temperature during and after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. PMID:27482313

  20. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  1. Limb exsanguination. I. The arm: effect of angle of elevation and arterial compression.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, P. J.; Hardiman, P. J.; Woolf, V. J.

    1992-01-01

    Limb exsanguination before tourniquet inflation is usually accomplished using mechanical devices although, where their use is contraindicated, exsanguination by elevation alone may be employed. Advice regarding duration of elevation within the literature is a little confusing with recommendations ranging from 20 s to 5 min. Volume changes, during elevation at 45 degrees and 90 degrees, were measured using strain gauge plethysmography in seven male volunteers. In addition, the superimposed effect of brachial arterial compression on elevation at 90 degrees was investigated. To achieve maximal exsanguination it is recommended that the arm should be elevated for 5 min at 90 degrees before tourniquet inflation. Supplementary brachial arterial compression is not recommended as this tends to attenuate changes in volume. Images Figure 1 PMID:1416703

  2. Compromising abnormalities of the brachial plexus as displayed by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Collins, J D; Shaver, M L; Disher, A C; Miller, T Q

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images (MRI) of brachial plexus anatomy bilaterally, not possible by plain radiographs or CT, were presented to the Vascular Surgery, Neurology, and the Neurosurgery departments. Patients were requested for MRI of their brachial plexus. They were referred for imaging and the imaging results were presented to the faculty and housestaff. Our technique was accepted and adopted to begin referrals for MRI evaluation of brachial plexopathy. Over 175 patients have been studied. Eighty-five patients were imaged with the 1.5 Tesla magnet (Signa; General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) 3-D reconstruction MRI. Coronal, transverse (axial), oblique transverse, and sagittal plane T1-weighted and selected T2-weighted pulse sequences were obtained at 4-5 mm slice thickness, 40-45 full field of view, and a 512 x 256 size matrix. Saline water bags were used to enhance the signal between the neck and the thorax. Sites of brachial plexus compromise were demonstrated. Our technique with 3-D reconstruction increased the definition of brachial plexus pathology. The increased anatomical definition enabled the vascular surgeons and neurosurgeons to improve patient care. Brachial plexus in vivo anatomy as displayed by MRI, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and 3-D reconstruction offered an opportunity to augment the teaching of clinical anatomy to medical students and health professionals. Selected case presentations (bodybuilder, anomalous muscle, fractured clavicle, thyroid goiter, silicone breast implant rupture, and cervical rib) demonstrated compromise of the brachial plexus displayed by MRI. The MRI and 3-D reconstruction techniques, demonstrating the bilateral landmark anatomy, increased the definition of the clinical anatomy and resulted in greater knowledge of patient care management.

  3. Impact of reduced daily physical activity on conduit artery flow-mediated dilation and circulating endothelial microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Leryn J.; Credeur, Daniel P.; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Padilla, Jaume; Leidy, Heather J.; Thyfault, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Physical inactivity promotes the development of cardiovascular diseases. However, few data exist examining the vascular consequences of short-term reductions in daily physical activity. Thus we tested the hypothesis that popliteal and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) would be reduced and concentrations of endothelial microparticles (EMPs) would be elevated following reduced daily physical activity. To examine this, popliteal and brachial artery FMD and plasma levels of EMPs suggestive of apoptotic and activated endothelial cells (CD31+/CD42b− and CD62E+ EMPs, respectively) were measured at baseline and during days 1, 3, and 5 of reduced daily physical activity in 11 recreationally active men (25 ± 2 yr). Subjects were instructed to reduce daily physical activity by taking <5,000 steps/day and refraining from planned exercise. Popliteal artery FMD decreased with reduced activity (baseline: 4.7 ± 0.98%, reduced activity day 5: 1.72 ± 0.68%, P < 0.05), whereas brachial artery FMD was unchanged. In contrast, baseline (pre-FMD) popliteal artery diameter did not change, whereas brachial artery diameter decreased (baseline: 4.35 ± 0.12, reduced activity day 5: 4.12 ± 0.11 P < 0.05) following 5 days of reduced daily physical activity. CD31+/CD42b− EMPs were significantly elevated with reduced activity (baseline: 17.6 ± 9.4, reduced activity day 5: 104.1 ± 43.1 per μl plasma, P < 0.05), whereas CD62E+ EMPs were unaltered. Collectively, our results provide evidence for the early and robust deleterious impact of reduced daily activity on vascular function and highlight the vulnerability of the vasculature to a sedentary lifestyle. PMID:24072406

  4. Pharyngeal-cervical-brachial variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wakerley, Benjamin R; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-03-01

    The pharyngeal-cervical-brachial (PCB) variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome is defined by rapidly progressive oropharyngeal and cervicobrachial weakness associated with areflexia in the upper limbs. Serial nerve conduction studies suggest that PCB represents a localised subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome characterised by axonal rather than demyelinating neuropathy. Many neurologists are unfamiliar with PCB, which is often misdiagnosed as brainstem stroke, myasthenia gravis or botulism. The presence of additional ophthalmoplegia and ataxia indicates overlap with Fisher syndrome. Half of patients with PCB carry IgG anti-GT1a antibodies which often cross-react with GQ1b, whereas most patients with Fisher syndrome carry IgG anti-GQ1b antibodies which always cross-react with GT1a. Significant overlap between the clinical and serological profiles of these patients supports the view that PCB and Fisher syndrome form a continuous spectrum. In this review, we highlight the clinical features of PCB and outline new diagnostic criteria.

  5. Does conduit artery diameter vary according to the anthropometric characteristics of children or men?

    PubMed

    Hopkins, N D; Green, D J; Tinken, T M; Sutton, L; McWhannell, N; Thijssen, D H J; Cable, N T; Stratton, G; George, K

    2009-12-01

    Arterial measurements are commonly undertaken to assess acute and chronic adaptations to exercise. Despite the widespread adoption of scaling practices in cardiac research, the relevance of scaling for body size and/or composition has not been addressed for arterial measures. We therefore investigated the relationships between brachial artery diameter and body composition in 129 children aged 9 to 10 yr (75 girls and 54 boys), and 50 men aged 16-49 yr. Body composition variables (total, lean, and fat mass in the whole body, arm, and forearm) were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and brachial artery diameter was measured using high-resolution ultrasound. Bivariate correlations were performed, and arterial diameter was then scaled using simple ratios (y/x) and allometric approaches after log-log least squares linear regression and production of allometric exponents (b) and construction of power function ratios (y/xb). Size independence was checked via bivariate correlations (x:y/x; x:y/xb). As a result, significant correlations existed between brachial artery diameter and measures of body mass and lean mass in both cohorts (r=0.21-0.48, P<0.05). There were no significant relationships between diameter and fat mass. All b exponents were significantly different from 1 (0.08-0.50), suggesting that simple ratio scaling approaches were likely to be flawed. This was confirmed when ratio scaling produced negative residual size correlations, whereas allometric scaling produced size-independent indexes (r=0.00 to 0.03, P>0.05). In conclusion, when between- or within-group comparisons are performed under circumstances where it is important to control for differences in body size or composition, allometric scaling of artery diameter should be adopted rather than ratio scaling. Our data also suggest that scaling for lean or total mass may be more appropriate than scaling for indexes of fat mass.

  6. Ankle-brachial index and extent of atherosclerosis in patients from the Middle East (the AGATHA-ME study): a cross-sectional multicenter study.

    PubMed

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Amin, Haitham; Rashdan, Ibrahim; Souliman, Kadhim; Deleu, Dirk; Saadat, Kamran; Al Mahmeed, Wael; Bakir, Sharif; Wasif, Adel; Ben Brek, Azan; Bazargani, Nooshin; Ahmed Abdel Aziz; Singh, Rajvir; Hatou, Iman; Mahmoud, Hisham; Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2009-01-01

    To assess the extent of atherothrombosis and the use of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) in populations from the Middle East, we conducted a multicenter study similar to AGATHA (a Global Atherothrombosis Assessment), AGATHA-ME, which included 1341 patients from 18 centers from 5 countries (United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain, and Oman). Patients were assigned to 2 groups: the with-disease and at-risk groups. Abnormal ABI (< or =0.9) was seen in 31.5% of at-risk patients and 28.2% of with-disease patients. Patients with peripheral arterial disease had the highest frequency of abnormal ABI (77.6%), with 97.8 negative predictive value. The AGATHA-ME study confirms that atherothrombosis disease often occurs at more than 1 site. The ABI is related to the risk factor profile and to the site and extent of atherothrombosis. Gender and diabetes mellitus are associated with the worst parameters.

  7. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic subjects in south-west Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    OlaOlorun, Akintayo D.; Odeigah, Louis O.; Amole, Isaac O.; Adediran, Olufemi S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is rarely sought for and generally under-diagnosed even in diabetics in developing countries like Nigeria. PAD is easily detected and diagnosed by the ankle-brachial index, a simple and reliable test. Objectives To determine the prevalence of PAD in diabetic subjects aged 50–89 years and the value of ankle-brachial index measurement in the detection of PAD. Method A cross-sectional descriptive study of 219 diabetic subjects aged 50–89 years was carried out. The participants were administered a pre-tested questionnaire and measurement of ankle-brachial index (ABI) was done. The ankle-brachial index < 0.90 was considered equivalent to peripheral arterial disease. Results The overall prevalence of PAD was 52.5%. The prevalence of symptomatic PAD was 28.7% whilst that of asymptomatic PAD was 71.3%. There were a number of associations with PAD which included, age (p < 0.05), sex (p < 0.05), and marital status (p < 0.05). The use of the ankle-brachial index in the detection of PAD was clearly more reliable than the clinical methods like history of intermittent claudication and absence or presence of pedal pulses. Conclusion The prevalence of PAD is relatively high in diabetic subjects in the south-western region of Nigeria. Notable is the fact that a higher proportion was asymptomatic. Also the use of ABI is of great value in the detection of PAD as evidenced by a clearly more objective assessment of PAD compared to both intermittent claudication and absent pedal pulses.

  8. Bilateral Brachial Plexus Home Going Catheters After Digital Amputation for Patient With Upper Extremity Digital Gangrene

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A; Seif, John; Guirguis, Maged; Zaky, Sherif; Mounir-Soliman, Loran

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheter placement is used to control surgical pain. Performing bilateral brachial plexus block with catheters is not frequently performed; and in our case sending patient home with bilateral brachial plexus catheters has not been reported up to our knowledge. Our patient is a 57 years old male patient presented with bilateral upper extremity digital gangrene on digits 2 through 4 on both sides with no thumb involvement. The plan was to do the surgery under sequential axillary blocks. On the day of surgery a right axillary brachial plexus block was performed under ultrasound guidance using 20 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine. Patient was taken to the OR and the right fingers amputation was carried out under mild sedation without problems. Left axillary brachial plexus block was then done as the surgeon was closing the right side, two hours after the first block was performed. The left axillary block was done also under ultrasound using 20 ml of 2% mepivacaine. The brachial plexus blocks were performed in a sequential manner. Surgery was unremarkable, and patient was transferred to post anesthetic care unit in stable condition. Over that first postoperative night, the patient complained of severe pain at the surgical sites with minimal pain relief with parentral opioids. We placed bilateral brachial plexus catheters (right axillary and left infra-clavicular brachial plexus catheters). Ropivacaine 0.2% infusion was started at 7 ml per hour basal rate only with no boluses on each side. The patient was discharged home with the catheters in place after receiving the appropriate education. On discharge both catheters were connected to a single ON-Q (I-flow Corporation, Lake Forest, CA) ball pump with a 750 ml reservoir using a Y connection and were set to deliver a fixed rate of 7 ml for each catheter. The brachial plexus catheters were removed by the patient on day 5 after surgery without any difficulty. Patient's postoperative course was otherwise unremarkable

  9. Above Elbow Amputation Under Brachial Plexus Block at Supraclavicular and Interscalene Levels

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Hassan; Yadagiri, Manjula; Macrosson, Duncan; Majeed, Amer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The brachial plexus block is a commonly performed procedure in the anesthetic practice today. It is performed for analgesia as well as anesthesia for upper limb procedures. It has been used for amputation and replantation surgeries of the upper limb. Case presentation: We present the case of a 68-year-old gentleman who had brachial plexus block at supraclavicular and interscalene levels as the sole anesthetic for undergoing above elbow amputation. He was deemed to be very high risk for a general anesthetic as he suffered from severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and a very poor exercise tolerance (NYHA Class III). The supraclavicular brachial plexus block was supplemented with an interscalene brachial plexus block due to inadequate surgical anesthesia encountered with the former. The procedure was successfully completed under regional anesthesia. Conclusions: The brachial plexus block can be performed at different levels in the same patient to achieve desired results, while employing sound anatomical knowledge and adhering to the maximum safe dose limit of the local anesthetic. PMID:26705518

  10. A case of relapsing-remitting facial palsy and ipsilateral brachial plexopathy caused by HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Alstadhaug, Karl B; Kvarenes, Hanne W; Prytz, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2016-05-01

    The etiologies of Bell's palsy and brachial neuritis remain uncertain, and the conditions rarely co-occur or reoccur. Here we present a woman in her twenties who had several relapsing-remitting episodes with left-sided facial palsy and brachial neuropathy. The episodes always started with painful left-sided oral blisters. Repeat PCRs HSV-1 DNA from oral vesicular lesions were positive. Extensive screening did not reveal any other underlying cause. Findings on MRI T2-weighted brachial plexus STIR images, using a 3.0-Tesla scanner during an episode, were compatible with brachial plexus neuritis. Except a mannose-binding lectin deficiency, a congenital complement deficiency that is frequently found in the general Caucasian population, no other immunodeficiency was demonstrated in our patient. In vitro resistance to acyclovir was tested negative, but despite prophylactic treatment with the drug in high doses, relapses recurred. To our knowledge, this is the first ever reported documentation of relapsing-remitting facial and brachial plexus neuritis caused by HSV-1.

  11. Appendicular arterial tumor embolization in two cats with pulmonary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ibarrola, Patricia; German, Alexander J; Stell, Anneliese J; Fox, Richard; Summerfield, Nuala J; Blackwood, Laura

    2004-10-01

    A 13-year-old neutered male Persian cat and an 11-year-old neutered female Persian cat were examined because of an acute onset of lameness. In both cats, conscious proprioception and reflexes were diminished in the affected limb. In 1 cat, no blood flow was detected in the left brachial artery with a Doppler ultrasonic flow detector, whereas blood flow in the right brachial artery was easily documented. In the other cat, the right femoral pulse was not palpable. Neither cat had any echocardiographic evidence of cardiac disease. In both cats, treatment was primarily supportive. One cat died, and the other was euthanatized. At necropsy, lung lobe consolidation was seen. Microscopically, there was multifocal infiltration of the lung parenchyma with cuboidal to columnar neoplastic epithelial cells. Neoplastic epithelial cells of similar morphology were identified in nodular masses in sections of muscle, and intravascular tumor emboli were identified obliterating small and large arterioles. Immunohistochemical staining of pulmonary and muscular tissue for pan-cytokeratin antigen revealed intense cytoplasmic staining of neoplastic cells. Staining for factor VIII-related antigen confirmed that clusters of neoplastic cells represented intravascular emboli. Clinical signs in the cats were attributed to arterial occlusion by tumor emboli.

  12. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Two Single-Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buesch, Francisca Eugster

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy and receive preliminary information about functional improvements. Two patients (age 12 years) with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included for a 126-h home-based CIMT…

  13. Hand Function in Children with an Upper Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Results of the Nine-Hole Peg Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Immerman, Igor; Alfonso, Daniel T.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Grossman, Leslie A.; Alfonso, Israel; Ditaranto, Patricia; Grossman, John A. I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate hand function in children with Erb upper brachial plexus palsy. Method: Hand function was evaluated in 25 children (eight males; 17 females) with a diagnosed upper (C5/C6) brachial plexus birth injury. Of these children, 22 had undergone primary nerve reconstruction and 13 of the 25 had undergone…

  14. Characteristic features of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) presenting with brachial plexopathy in soldiers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Eun

    2014-11-15

    A brachial plexus lesion is not common in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP). We report the clinical and electrodiagnostic features of young soldiers with HNPP presenting with brachial plexopathy. By reviewing 2year medical records from Korean military hospitals, we identified soldiers with brachial plexus lesions. Among them, patients diagnosed with HNPP were determined and clinical and electrophysiological findings were compared between HNPP and non-HNPP patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Thirteen patients (6.8%) were diagnosed with HNPP among 189 patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Push-ups, as either a punishment or an exercise, was the most frequent preceding event in HNPP patients (76.9%), whereas it was rare in non-HNPP patients. The distal motor latency of the median nerve showed the highest sensitivity (90.9%) and specificity (100%) for HNPP in patients with a brachial plexus lesion. In conclusion, HNPP should be suspected in patients with brachial plexopathy if brachial plexopathy develops after push-ups or if the distal motor latency of median nerves is prolonged.

  15. Arterial surgery for arm ischemia. A survey of 136 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Holleman, J H; Hardy, J D; Williamson, J W; Raju, S; Neely, W A

    1980-01-01

    A series of 136 patients with upper extremity ischemia requiring operative correction is presented. Causes of the ischemia included trauma, atherosclerosis, embolism, iatrogenic causes, radiation injury, and cervical rib syndrome. Operations included primary repair, various bypass grafts and embolectomy. Illustrative case reports are used to emphasize important points. The subclavian, axillary and brachial arteries have been considered separately. In general, ischemia of the arm caused by a discrete lesion is amenable to surgical correction with an excellent change of success. Images Fig. 1. Figs. 5a and b. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:7387235

  16. Effect of Addition of Fentanyl to Xylocaine Hydrochloride in Brachial Plexus Block by Supraclavicular Approach

    PubMed Central

    Paluvadi, Venkata Raghavendra; Manne, Venkata Sesha Sai Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to quantitatively compare the effects of 1.5% xylocaine with 1.5% xylocaine and fentanyl (1 μg/kg) mixture for supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients between the age group of 20–60 and scheduled for upper limb surgery were divided into two groups (xylocaine group and xylocaine plus fentanyl group). After performing supraclavicular brachial plexus block, an assessment was made for onset of analgesia, duration and degree of analgesia, block intensity, and for any other side effects. Results: Mean duration of analgesia is Group I is 2.1 h and in Group II is 8.1 h; a four-fold increase in duration of analgesia. Conclusion: Addition of fentanyl to xylocaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus block has no significant effect on onset or quality of analgesia, but duration of analgesia is significantly prolonged. PMID:28298769

  17. Different Learning Curves for Axillary Brachial Plexus Block: Ultrasound Guidance versus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Luyet, C.; Schüpfer, G.; Wipfli, M.; Greif, R.; Luginbühl, M.; Eichenberger, U.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the learning of the skills needed to perform ultrasound- or nerve stimulator-guided peripheral nerve blocks. The aim of this study was to compare the learning curves of residents trained in ultrasound guidance versus residents trained in nerve stimulation for axillary brachial plexus block. Ten residents with no previous experience with using ultrasound received ultrasound training and another ten residents with no previous experience with using nerve stimulation received nerve stimulation training. The novices' learning curves were generated by retrospective data analysis out of our electronic anaesthesia database. Individual success rates were pooled, and the institutional learning curve was calculated using a bootstrapping technique in combination with a Monte Carlo simulation procedure. The skills required to perform successful ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block can be learnt faster and lead to a higher final success rate compared to nerve stimulator-guided axillary brachial plexus block. PMID:21318138

  18. Arterial calcifications

    PubMed Central

    Rennenberg, Roger J M W; Schurgers, Leon J; Kroon, Abraham A; Stehouwer, Coen D A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Arterial calcifications as found with various imaging techniques, like plain X-ray, computed tomography or ultrasound are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The prevalence of arterial calcification increases with age and is stimulated by several common cardiovascular risk factors. In this review, the clinical importance of arterial calcification and the currently known proteins involved are discussed. Arterial calcification is the result of a complex interplay between stimulating (bone morphogenetic protein type 2 [BMP-2], RANKL) and inhibitory (matrix Gla protein, BMP-7, osteoprotegerin, fetuin-A, osteopontin) proteins. Vascular calcification is especially prevalent and related to adverse outcome in patients with renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. We address the special circumstances and mechanisms in these patient groups. Treatment and prevention of arterial calcification is possible by the use of specific drugs. However, it remains to be proven that reduction of vascular calcification in itself leads to a reduced cardiovascular risk. PMID:20716128

  19. Does C5 or C6 Radiculopathy Affect the Signal Intensity of the Brachial Plexus on Magnetic Resonance Neurography?

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Tae Gyu; Kim, In-Soo; Son, Eun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Patients with C5 or C6 radiculopathy complain of shoulder area pain or shoulder girdle weakness. Typical idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is also characterized by severe shoulder pain, followed by paresis of shoulder girdle muscles. Recent studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of the brachial plexus and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in patients with INA show high signal intensity (HSI) or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle. We evaluated the value of brachial plexus MRN and shoulder MRI in four patients with typical C5 or C6 radiculopathy. HSI of the brachial plexus was noted in all patients and intramuscular changes were observed in two patients who had symptoms over 4 weeks. Our results suggest that HSI or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle on MRN and MRI may not be specific for INA. PMID:27152289

  20. Relationship between radial and central arterial pulse wave and evaluation of central aortic pressure using the radial arterial pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Takazawa, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shindo, Naohisa; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Yamashina, Akira

    2007-03-01

    Since a decrease of central aortic pressure contributes to the prevention of cardiovascular events, simple measurement of not only brachial blood pressure but also central aortic pressure may be useful in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we simultaneously measured radial artery pulse waves non-invasively and ascending aortic pressure invasively, before and after the administration of nicorandil. We then compared changes in central aortic pressure and radial arterial blood pressure calibrated with brachial blood pressure in addition to calculating the augmentation index (AI) at the aorta and radial artery. After nicorandil administration, the reduction in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (Deltaa-SBP) was -14+/-15 mmHg, significantly larger than that in early systolic pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP) (-9+/-12 mmHg). The reduction in late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP2) was -15+/-14 mmHg, significantly larger than Deltar-SBP, but not significantly different from Deltaa-SBP. There were significant relationships between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP (r=0.81, p<0.001), and between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP2 (r=0.91, p<0.001). The slope of the correlation regression line with Deltar-SBP2 (0.83) was larger and closer to 1 than that with Deltar-SBP (0.63), showing that the relationship was close to 1:1. Significant correlations were obtained between aortic AI (a-AI) and radial AI (r-AI) (before nicorandil administration: r=0.91, p<0.001; after administration: r=0.70, p<0.001). These data suggest that the measurement of radial artery pulse wave and observation of changes in the late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (r-SBP2) in addition to the ordinary measurement of brachial blood pressure may enable a more accurate evaluation of changes in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (a-SBP).

  1. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy Presenting as an Acute Brachial Plexopathy: A Lover's Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Wedderburn, Sarah; Pateria, Puraskar; Panegyres, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    It is generally regarded that patients with hereditary neuropathy to pressure palsies, due to a deletion in the PMP22 gene, show recurrent pressure palsy and generalised peripheral neuropathy (pes cavus and hammer toes sometimes develop). Brachial plexopathy is rarely identified as a first presentation of hereditary neuropathy to pressure palsies. We describe a young man who developed a painless flail upper limb with a clinical diagnosis of a brachial plexopathy after his partner slept on his arm – a PMP22 deletion was found. His father, who had a symmetrical polyneuropathy without recurrent mononeuropathies, shared the PMP22 deletion. PMID:25685136

  2. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  3. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... the aorta, the main artery from the heart. Hardening of the arteries occurs when fat, cholesterol, and ...

  4. Opposing effects of shear-mediated dilation and myogenic constriction on artery diameter in response to handgrip exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Ceri L; Carter, Howard H; Naylor, Louise H; Dawson, Ellen A; Marusic, Petra; Hering, Dagmara; Schlaich, Markus P; Thijssen, Dick H J; Green, Daniel J

    2015-10-15

    While the impact of changes in blood flow and shear stress on artery function are well documented, the acute effects of increases in arterial pressure are less well described in humans. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of 30 min of elevated blood pressure, in the absence of changes in shear stress or sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation, on conduit artery diameter. Ten healthy male subjects undertook three sessions of 30 min unilateral handgrip exercise at 5, 10, and 15% of maximal voluntary contractile (MVC) strength. Brachial artery shear rate and blood flow profiles were measured simultaneously during exercise in the active and contralateral resting arms. Bilateral brachial artery diameter was simultaneously assessed before and immediately postexercise. In a second experiment, six subjects repeated the 15% MVC condition while continuous vascular measurements were collected during muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) assessment using peroneal microneurography. We found that unilateral handgrip exercise at 5, 10, and 15% MVC strength induced stepwise elevations in blood pressure (P < 0.01, Δmean arterial pressure: 7.06 ± 2.44, 8.50 ± 2.80, and 18.35 ± 3.52 mmHg, P < 0.01). Whereas stepwise increases were evident in shear rate in the exercising arm (P < 0.001), no changes were apparent in the nonexercising limb (P = 0.42). Brachial artery diameter increased in the exercising arm (P = 0.02), but significantly decreased in the nonexercising arm (P = 0.03). At 15% MVC, changes in diameter were significantly different between arms (interaction effect: P = 0.01), whereas this level of exertion produced no significant changes in MSNA. We conclude that acute increases in transmural pressure, independent of shear rate and changes in SNS activation, reduce arterial caliber in normotensive humans in vivo. These changes in diameter were mitigated by exercise-induced elevations in shear rate in the active limb.

  5. Endovascular repair of a ruptured subclavian artery aneurysm in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome using a sandwich technique.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sapan S; Codreanu, Maria; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Safi, Hazim; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2014-10-01

    We present the case of a type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome patient with a ruptured right subclavian artery aneurysm and associated arteriovenous fistula who underwent successful endovascular repair requiring simultaneous stent graft repair of the innominate artery using a sandwich technique. A 17-year-old man with known type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome developed right neck and shoulder swelling. CTA study demonstrated a 17 × 13-cm ruptured subclavian artery aneurysm with an associated internal jugular vein arteriovenous fistula. In the hybrid suite, a 7 mm × 15-cm stent graft (Viabahn, WL Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) was advanced from the right brachial approach into the innominate artery. A separate wire was placed into the right carotid artery via the right femoral approach (7 Fr), and a 7 mm × 10-cm stent graft (Viabahn) was advanced into the innominate artery. An additional 8 mm × 10-cm stent graft (Viabahn) was placed from the right brachial approach to obtain a distal-landing zone in the axillary artery. Complex vascular anatomy, in which graft seal creation may be challenging, does not exclude endovascular approaches as the sandwich technique can be utilized as a suitable alternative to open repair.

  6. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy: Neurological follow-up in 161 recurrence-free breast cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Johannsen, L.; Schroder, H.; Rose, C. )

    1993-04-30

    The purpose was to assess the incidence and clinical manifestations of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy in breast cancer patients, treated according to the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group protocols. One hundred and sixty-one recurrence-free breast cancer patients were examined for radiation-induced brachial plexopathy after a median follow-up period of 50 months (13-99 months). After total mastectomy and axillary node sampling, high-risk patients were randomized to adjuvant therapy. One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy with 50 Gy in 25 daily fractions over 5 weeks. In addition, 82 of these patients received cytotoxic therapy (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) and 46 received tamoxifen. Five percent and 9% of the patients receiving radiotherapy had disabling and mild radiation-induced brachial plexopathy, respectively. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy was more frequent in patients receiving cytotoxic therapy (p = 0.04) and in younger patients (p = 0.04). The clinical manifestations were paraesthesia (100%), hypaesthesia (74%), weakness (58%), decreased muscle stretch reflexes (47%), and pain (47%). The brachial plexus is more vulnerable to large fraction size. Fractions of 2 Gy or less are advisable. Cytotoxic therapy adds to the damaging effect of radiotherapy. Peripheral nerves in younger patients seems more vulnerable. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy occurs mainly as diffuse damage to the brachial plexus. 24 refs., 9 tabs.

  7. Luxation de l’épaule compliquée de paralysie du plexus brachial

    PubMed Central

    Lukulunga, Loubet Unyendje; Moussa, Abdou Kadri; Mahfoud, Mustapha; EL Bardouni, Ahmed; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Les auteurs rapportent l'observation d'une paralysie totale du plexus brachial survenue trois mois après un épisode de luxation antéro-interne sous coracoïdienne associée à une fracture du trochiter chez une patiente âgée de 88 ans. PMID:25426187

  8. Cost analysis of brachial plexus injuries: variability of compensation by insurance companies before and after surgery.

    PubMed

    Felici, N; Zaami, S; Ciancolini, G; Marinelli, E; Tagliente, D; Cannatà, C

    2014-04-01

    Traumatic paralysis of the brachial plexus is an extremely disabling pathology. The type of trauma most frequently suffered by this group of patients is due to motorcycle injuries. It therefore affects a population of young patients. In the majority of cases, these patients receive compensation for permanent damage from insurance companies. Surgery of the brachial plexus enables various forms of functional recovery, depending on the number of roots of the brachial plexus involved in the injury. The aim of this study is to compare the functional deficit and the extent of the related compensation before and after surgical intervention, and to evaluate the saving in economic terms (understood as the cost of compensation paid by insurance companies) obtainable through surgical intervention. The authors analysed the functional recovery obtained through surgery in 134 patients divided into 4 groups on the basis of the number of injured roots. The levels of compensation payable to the patient before surgical intervention, and 3 years after, were then compared. The results showed that the saving obtainable through surgical treatment of brachial plexus injuries may exceed 65% of the economic value of the compensation that would have been attributable to the same patients if they had not undergone surgical treatment.

  9. Mononeuritis multiplex with brachial plexus neuropathy coincident with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Kidron, D; Barron, S A; Mazliah, J

    1989-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection has been associated with a variety of neurologic complications involving the central nervous system, the peripheral nervous system and muscle. We present a patient who developed a previously unreported complication: mononeuritis multiplex. This consisted of a severe brachial plexus neuropathy with contralateral cervical monoradiculopathy.

  10. Robot-Assisted Surgery of the Shoulder Girdle and Brachial Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Facca, Sybille; Hendriks, Sarah; Mantovani, Gustavo; Selber, Jesse C.; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    New developments in the surgery of the brachial plexus include the use of less invasive surgical approaches and more precise techniques. The theoretical advantages of the use of robotics versus endoscopy are the disappearance of physiological tremor, three-dimensional vision, high definition, magnification, and superior ergonomics. On a fresh cadaver, a dissection space was created and maintained by insufflation of CO2. The supraclavicular brachial plexus was dissected using the da Vinci robot (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). A segment of the C5 nerve root was grafted robotically. A series of eight clinical cases of nerve damage around the shoulder girdle were operated on using the da Vinci robot. The ability to perform successful microneural repair was confirmed in both the authors' clinical and experimental studies, but the entire potential of robotically assisted microneural surgery was not realized during these initial cases because an open incision was still required. Robotic-assisted surgery of the shoulder girdle and brachial plexus is still in its early stages. It would be ideal to have even finer and more suitable instruments to apply fibrin glue or electrostimulation in nerve surgery. Nevertheless, the prospects of minimally invasive techniques would allow acute and subacute surgical approach of traumatic brachial plexus palsy safely, without significant and cicatricial morbidity. PMID:24872778

  11. Changes in Spinal Cord Architecture after Brachial Plexus Injury in the Newborn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korak, Klaus J.; Tam, Siu Lin; Gordon, Tessa; Frey, Manfred; Aszmann, Oskar C.

    2004-01-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy is a devastating birth injury. While many children recover spontaneously, 20-25% are left with a permanent impairment of the affected limb. So far, concepts of pathology and recovery have focused on the injury of the peripheral nerve. Proximal nerve injury at birth, however, leads to massive injury-induced…

  12. Anomalous median nerve associated with persistent median artery.

    PubMed Central

    Sañudo, J R; Chikwe, J; Evans, S E

    1994-01-01

    A right human forearm showed persistence of the median artery in combination with anomalies of the median nerve and of the palmar circulation. The median nerve formed a ring enclosing the median artery, gave off its 3rd palmar digital branch in the forearm, and had a high palmar cutaneous nerve origin and a double thenar supply. The superficial palmar arch was incomplete. The median artery extended into the hand, providing the 2nd common palmar digital artery and the artery to the radial side of the index finger. It anastomosed with the radial artery in the 1st web space. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7961153

  13. Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment of Chronic Iliac Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, F. C. De Blas, Mariano; Merino, Santiago; Egana, Jose M.; Caldas, Jose G.M.P.

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiological long-term results of recanalization of chronic occluded iliac arteries with balloon angioplasty and stent placement.Methods: Sixty-nine occluded iliac arteries (mean length 8.1 cm; range 4-16 cm) in 67 patients were treated by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement. Evaluations included clinical assesment according to Fontaine stages, Doppler examinations with ankle-brachial index (ABI) and bilateral lower extremity arteriograms. Wallstent and Cragg vascular stents were inserted for iliac artery recanalization under local anesthesia. Follow-up lasted 1-83 months (mean 29.5 months).Results: Technical success rate was 97.1% (67 of 69). The mean ABI increased from 0.46 to 0.85 within 30 days after treatment and was 0.83 at the most recent follow-up. Mean hospitalization time was 2 days and major complications included arterial thrombosis (3%), arterial rupture (3%) and distal embolization (1%). During follow-up 6% stenosis and 9% thrombosis of the stents were observed. Clinical improvement occurred in 92% of patients. Primary and secondary patency rates were 75% and 95%, respectively.Conclusion: The long-term patency rates and clinical benefits suggest that percutaneous endovascular revascularization with metallic stents is a safe and effective treatment for patients with chronic iliac artery occlusion.

  14. Development of the arterial pattern in the upper limb of staged human embryos: normal development and anatomic variations

    PubMed Central

    RODRÍGUEZ-NIEDENFÜHR, M.; BURTON, G. J.; DEU, J.; SAÑUDO, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    A total of 112 human embryos (224 upper limbs) between stages 12 and 23 of development were examined. It was observed that formation of the arterial system in the upper limb takes place as a dual process. An initial capillary plexus appears from the dorsal aorta during stage 12 and develops at the same rate as the limb. At stage 13, the capillary plexus begins a maturation process involving the enlargement and differentiation of selected parts. This remodelling process starts in the aorta and continues in a proximal to distal sequence. By stage 15 the differentiation has reached the subclavian and axillary arteries, by stage 17 it has reached the brachial artery as far as the elbow, by stage 18 it has reached the forearm arteries except for the distal part of the radial, and finally by stage 21 the whole arterial pattern is present in its definitive morphology. This differentiation process parallels the development of the skeletal system chronologically. A number of arterial variations were observed, and classified as follows: superficial brachial (7.7%), accessory brachial (0.6%), brachioradial (14%), superficial brachioulnar (4.7%), superficial brachioulnoradial (0.7%), palmar pattern of the median (18.7%) and superficial brachiomedian (0.7%) arteries. They were observed in embryos belonging to stages 17–23 and were not related to a specific stage of development. Statistical comparison with the rates of variations reported in adults did not show significant differences. It is suggested that the variations arise through the persistence, enlargement and differentiation of parts of the initial network which would normally remain as capillaries or even regress. PMID:11693301

  15. Flow Mediated Dilatation, Carotid Intima Media Thickness, Ankle Brachial Pressure Index and Pulse Pressure in Young Male Post Myocardial Infarction Patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Subhash; Rathi, Vinita; Ranga, Gajender Singh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to increase in Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) at a younger age, we should try to diagnose atherosclerotic process and population at risk, at the earliest. Flow Mediated Dilatation (FMD), Carotid Intima-Media Thickness (CIMT) and Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index (ABI) are probable markers for early atherosclerosis and may be useful in coronary risk stratification. Aim To compare and correlate the FMD, CIMT, ABI and Pulse Pressure (PP) in young male patients of Myocardial Infarction (MI) with age and sex matched healthy controls. Materials and Methods Eighty male patients of MI aged ≤45 years, who presented to the Cardiac Care Unit and Department of Medicine of Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital, Delhi, India, from November 2010 to April 2012 were recruited consecutively for this case control study and same number of age and sex matched healthy controls were also analyzed. Six weeks after MI, FMD of the brachial artery, intima media thickness of carotid artery, ABPI and PP were measured in the cases and compared with healthy controls. Results The FMD was lower among young patients of MI than controls (p<0.001). CIMT was higher among cases than controls (p=0.001). ABI was lower among cases than controls (p<0.001). Compared to controls, PP was higher among cases (p=0.001). In all subjects, a negative correlation between FMD and CIMT (r=–0.220, p=0.005) and a positive correlation between FMD and ABPI (r=0.304, p<0.001) was found. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between endothelial dependent FMD and PP among cases and control groups (r=–0.209, p=0.007). Conclusion Biophysical parameters were deranged in young post MI patients. Majority of our young male patients fell in low risk Framingham risk score but still they manifested with CAD. Despite six weeks of treatment among young male patients of MI, various biophysical parameters were still deranged. PMID:27891375

  16. Radiation dose to the brachial plexus in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy: An increased risk of an excessive dose to the brachial plexus adjacent to gross nodal disease

    PubMed Central

    FENG, GUOSHENG; LU, HEMING; LIANG, YUAN; CHEN, HUASHENG; SHU, LIUYANG; LU, SHUI; ZHU, JIANFANG; GAO, WEIWEI

    2012-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the dose to the brachial plexus in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Twenty-eight patients were selected and the brachial plexus was delineated retrospectively. Brachial plexus adjacent/not adjacent to nodes were defined and abbreviated as BPAN and BPNAN, respectively. Dose distribution was recalculated and a dose-volume histogram was generated based on the original treatment plan. The maximum dose to the left brachial plexus was 59.12–78.47 Gy, and the percentage of patients receiving the maximum dose exceeding 60, 66 and 70 Gy was 96.4, 57.1 and 25.0%, respectively; the maximum dose to the right brachial plexus was 59.74–80.31 Gy, and the percentage of patients exposed to a maximum dose exceeding 60, 66 and 70 Gy was 96.4, 64.3 and 39.3%, respectively. For the left brachial plexus, the maximum doses to the BPANs and the BPNANs were 72.84±3.91 and 64.81±3.47 Gy, respectively (p<0.001). For the right brachial plexus, the maximum doses to the BPANs and the BPNANs were 72.91±4.74 and 64.91±3.52 Gy, respectively (p<0.001). The difference between the left BPANs and the left BPNANs was statistically significant not only for V60 (3.60 vs. 1.01 cm3, p=0.028) but also for V66 (1.26 vs. 0.11 cm3, p=0.046). There were significant differences in V60 (3.68 vs. 1.16 cm3, p<0.001) and V66 (1.83 vs. 1.23 cm3, p=0.012) between the right BPANs and the right BPNANs. In conclusion, a large proportion of patients were exposed to the maximum dose to the brachial plexus exceeding the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-recommended restraints when the brachial plexus was not outlined. The BPANs are at a significantly higher risk of receiving an excessive radiation dose when compared to the BPNANs. A further study is underway to test whether brachial plexus contouring assists in the dose reduction to the brachial plexus for IMRT optimization. PMID:22970028

  17. Regional block anesthesia in a patient with factor V Leiden mutation and axillary artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Erkalp, Kerem; Comlekci, Mevlut; Inan, Bekir; Basaranoglu, Gokcen; Ozdemir, Haluk; Saidoglu, Leyla

    2011-01-01

    Anesthetic management of patients with coagulation disorders presents safety and technical challenges. This case describes a 58-year-old woman with factor V Leiden mutation who required distal saphenous vein harvest and axillo-brachial bypass to treat axillary artery occlusion. The patient underwent surgery with satisfactory anesthesia using infraclavicular brachial plexus block, thoracic paravertebral block, and unilateral subarachnoid block. These three regional anesthetic interventions were performed in lieu of general anesthesia to minimize risks of thrombotic events, pain, and to decrease recovery time. Despite higher failure rates of regional anesthesia, longer time required for procedures, and added discomforts during surgery, the benefits may outweigh risks for selected high-risk patients, including those with factor V Leiden mutations. PMID:22915885

  18. Diagnostic Value and Surgical Implications of the 3D DW-SSFP MRI On the Management of Patients with Brachial Plexus Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ben-Gang; Yang, Jian-Tao; Yang, Yi; Wang, Hong-Gang; Fu, Guo; Gu, Li-Qiang; Li, Ping; Zhu, Qing-Tang; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Zhu, Jia-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession (3D DW-SSFP) of high-resolution magnetic resonance has emerged as a promising method to visualize the peripheral nerves. In this study, the application value of 3D DW-SSFP brachial plexus imaging in the diagnosis of brachial plexus injury (BPI) was investigated. 33 patients with BPI were prospectively examined using 3D DW-SSFP MR neurography (MRN) of brachial plexus. Results of 3D DW-SSFP MRN were compared with intraoperative findings and measurements of electromyogram (EMG) or somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) for each injured nerve root. 3D DW-SSFP MRN of brachial plexus has enabled good visualization of the small components of the brachial plexus. The postganglionic section of the brachial plexus was clearly visible in 26 patients, while the preganglionic section of the brachial plexus was clearly visible in 22 patients. Pseudomeningoceles were commonly observed in 23 patients. Others finding of MRN of brachial plexus included spinal cord offset (in 16 patients) and spinal cord deformation (in 6 patients). As for the 3D DW-SSFP MRN diagnosis of preganglionic BPI, the sensitivity, the specificity and the accuracy were respectively 96.8%, 90.29%, and 94.18%. 3D DW-SSFP MRN of brachial plexus improve visualization of brachial plexus and benefit to determine the extent of injury. PMID:27782162

  19. Avulsive axillary artery injury in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Nathaniel C; Beck, John D; Harter, G Dean

    2014-01-01

    In addition to neurologic injuries such as peripheral nerve palsy, axillary vessel injury should be recognized as a possible complication of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Limb lengthening associated with Grammont-type reverse total shoulder arthroplasty places tension across the brachial plexus and axillary vessels and may contribute to observed injuries. The Grammont-type reverse total shoulder arthroplasty prosthesis reverses the shoulder ball and socket, shifts the shoulder center of rotation distal and medial, and lengthens the arm. This alteration of native anatomy converts shearing to compressive glenohumeral joint forces while augmenting and tensioning the deltoid lever arm. Joint stability is enhanced; shoulder elevation is enabled in the rotator cuff–deficient shoulder. Arm lengthening associated with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty places a longitudinal strain on the brachial plexus and axillary vessels. Peripheral nerve palsies and other neurologic complications of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty have been documented. The authors describe a patient with rotator cuff tear arthropathy and a history of radioulnar synostosis who underwent reverse total shoulder arthroplasty complicated by intraoperative injury to the axillary artery and postoperative radial, ulnar, and musculocutaneous nerve palsies. Following a seemingly unremarkable placement of reverse shoulder components, brisk arterial bleeding was encountered while approximating the incised subscapularis tendon in preparation for wound closure. Further exploration revealed an avulsive-type injury of the axillary artery. After an unsuccessful attempt at primary repair, a synthetic arterial bypass graft was placed. Reperfusion of the right upper extremity was achieved and has been maintained to date. Postoperative clinical examination and electromyographic studies confirmed ongoing radial, ulnar, and musculocutaneous neuropathies.

  20. Venous thrombosis in subclavian, axillary, brachial veins with extension to internal jugular vein, right sigmoid sinus and simultaneous pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Tamizifar, Babak; Beigi, Arash; Rismankarzadeh, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare case of Venous Thrombosis in Subclavian, Axillary, Brachial Veins with extension to Internal Jugular vein, right sigmoid sinus and simultaneous Pulmonary embolism during the treatment with low molecular weight heparin. PMID:23901341

  1. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting? Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is ... bypass multiple coronary arteries during one surgery. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Figure A shows the location of ...

  2. Neointimal hyperplasia and calcification in medium sized arteries in adult patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chitalia, Nihil; Ross, Louise; Krishnamoorthy, Mahesh; Kapustin, Alexander; Shanahan, Catherine M; Kaski, Juan Carlos; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Chemla, Eric; Banerjee, Debasish

    2015-01-01

    The nature of arterial changes resulting in cardiovascular events and dialysis vascular access failures in adult predialysis patients is not well known. This study examined intimal changes, calcium deposition, and consequent stiffness in brachial and radial arteries of adult CKD patients. Ten brachial-artery and seven radial-artery specimens were obtained during fistula creation from nine predialysis and eight dialysis-dependent, nondiabetic patients; and age-gender matched controls undergoing coronary bypass grafts (6 radial) or kidney donation (6 renal). Arterial stiffness was measured at baseline. Vessel histology, morphometric analysis of intima-media, and direct quantification of calcium load was performed using standard techniques. Both predialysis and dialysis patients demonstrated significant arterial intimal hyperplasia with intima:media ratio higher than controls (0.13 ± 0.12 vs. 0.02 ± 0.05, p = 0.01). Calcium deposition was demonstrated on histology and the calcium content in patients was higher than controls (34.68 ± 26.86 vs. 10.95 ± 9.18 μg/μg, p = 0.003). The blood vessel calcium content correlated with arterial stiffness (r = 0.64, p = 0.018). This study for the first time describes, and suggests mechanistic linkage between, intimal hyperplasia, pathological calcium deposition, and increased functional arterial stiffness in dialysis and predialysis patients. Our research could serve as a unique window into the in vivo status of the uremic vasculature impacting fistula maturation and cardiovascular disease.

  3. Regulation of vascular tone and pulse wave velocity in human muscular conduit arteries: selective effects of nitric oxide donors to dilate muscular arteries relative to resistance vessels.

    PubMed

    Fok, Henry; Jiang, Benyu; Clapp, Brian; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2012-11-01

    Arterial tone in muscular conduit arteries may influence pressure wave reflection through changes in diameter and pulse wave velocity. We examined the relative specificity of vasodilator drugs for radial artery and forearm resistance vessels during intrabrachial arterial infusion. The nitric oxide (NO) donors, nitroglycerine and nitroprusside, and brain natriuretic peptide were compared with the α-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine, calcium-channel antagonist verapamil, and hydralazine. Radial artery diameter was measured by high resolution ultrasound, forearm blood flow by strain gauge plethysmography, and pulse wave velocity by pressure recording cuffs placed over the distal brachial and radial arteries. Norepinephrine was used to constrict the radial artery to generate a greater range of vasodilator tone when examining pulse wave velocity. Despite dilating resistance vasculature, phentolamine and verapamil had little effect on radial artery diameter (mean dilation <9%). By contrast, for comparable actions on resistance vessels, nitroglycerine and nitroprusside but not brain natriuretic peptide had powerful actions to dilate the radial artery (dilations of 31.3 ± 3.6%, 23.6 ± 3.1%, and 9.8 ± 2.0% for nitroglycerine, nitroprusside, and brain natriuretic peptide, respectively). Changes in pulse wave velocity followed those in arterial diameter irrespective of the signaling pathway used to modulate arterial tone (R=-0.89, P<0.05). Basal tone in human muscular arteries is relatively unaffected by α-adrenergic or calcium-channel blockade, but is functionally or directly antagonized by NO donors. The differential response to NO donors suggests that there is potential to manipulate the downstream pathway to confer greater specificity for large arteries with a resultant decrease in pressure wave reflection and systolic blood pressure.

  4. Association between functional performance and executive cognitive functions in an elderly population including patients with low ankle–brachial index

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Naomi Vidal; Cunha, Paulo Jannuzzi; da Costa, Danielle Irigoyen; dos Santos, Fernando; Costa, Fernando Oliveira; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral arterial disease, as measured by the ankle–brachial index (ABI), is prevalent among the elderly, and is associated with functional performance, assessed by the 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Executive cognitive function (ECF) impairments are also prevalent in this population, but no existing study has investigated the association between ECF and functional performance in an elderly population including individuals with low ABI. Aim To investigate the association between functional performance, as measured by the 6MWT, and loss in ECF, in an elderly sample including individuals with low ABI. Method The ABI group was formed by 26 elderly individuals with low ABI (mean ABI: 0.63±0.19), and the control group was formed by 40 elderly individuals with normal ABI (mean ABI: 1.08±0.07). We analyzed functional performance using the 6MWT, global cognition using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and ECF using the Digit Span for assessing attention span and working memory, the Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT) for assessing information processing speed and inhibitory control/impulsivity, and the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT) for assessing semantic verbal fluency and phonemic verbal fluency. We also used a factor analysis on all of the ECF tests (global ECF). Results Before adjustment, the ABI group performed worse on global cognition, attention span, working memory, inhibitory control/impulsivity, semantic verbal fluency, and phonemic verbal fluency. After adjustment, the ABI group performance remained worse for working memory and semantic verbal fluency. In a simple correlation analysis including all of the subjects, the 6MWT was associated with global cognition, attention span, working memory, information processing speed, inhibitory control/impulsivity, semantic verbal fluency, and global ECF. After adjustment, all the associations remained statistically significant. Conclusion This study found an independent association between

  5. Repeated Remote Ischemic Conditioning Effect on Ankle-brachial Index in Diabetic Patients - A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shahvazian, Najmeh; Rafiee, Mansour; Rahmanian, Masoud; Razavi-ratki, Seyed Kazem; Farahzadi, Mohammad Hadi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is a phenomenon where a short period of ischemia in one organ protects against further ischemia in the other organs. We hypothesized that RIPC occurring in diabetic patients with ankle brachial index (ABI) between 0.70 and 0.90 were included with peripheral arterial disease, would make the better coronary flow resulted in the increasing ABI. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial study was done in the Afshar Cardiovascular Hospital in Yazd between 2013 and 2014. Sixty participants were randomly divided into two groups (intervention and control groups). The intervention group was undergoing RIPC, and the control group was tested without RIPC. RIPC was stimulated by giving three cycles of 5 min of ischemia followed by 5 min of reperfusion of both upper arms using a blood pressure cuff inflated to 200 mm Hg (n = 30). This was compared with no RIPC group which consisted of placing a deflated blood pressure cuff on the upper limbs (n = 30). Results: The mean of ABI level before intervention in the RIPC and control group group was 0.82 ± 0.055 and 0.83 ± 0.0603 (P = 0.347) respectively, with no significant difference. It was 0.86 ± 0.066 in the RIPC group compared the control 0.83 ± 0.0603 (P = 0.046). So levels of ABI were greater after intervention in the RIPC group. The mean of ABI level increase from 0.82 ± 0.05 to 0.86 ± 0.06 in RIPC group (P = 0.008). So the intervention group showed a significant increase in ABI. Conclusions: RIPC through using a simple, noninvasive technique, composing three cycles of 5 min-ischemia of both upper arms, showing a significant increase in ABI level in diabetic patients.

  6. Arterial embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... for embolization (especially to the brain) is mitral stenosis . Endocarditis (infection of the inside of the heart) can also cause arterial emboli. A common source for an embolus is from areas of hardening (atherosclerosis) in the aorta and other large blood vessels. These clots can ...

  7. rt-PA Thrombolysis in Acute Thromboembolic Upper-Extremity Arterial Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Cejna, Manfred; Salomonowitz, Erich; Wohlschlager, Helmut; Zwrtek, Karin; Boeck, Rudolf; Zwrtek, Ronald

    2001-07-15

    Purpose: Retrospective analysis of the results of rt-PA thrombolysis in the treatment of acute thromboembolic occlusion of the upper limb.Methods: Of 55 patients with demonstrated acute embolic arterial occlusion, rt-PA thrombolysis was performed on 40 occlusions in 38 patients (23 women with a mean age of 62 years, range 32-85 years; 15 men with a mean age of 65 years, range 32-92 years) according to the following design: 6 mg rt-PA/hr for 30 min, 3 mg rt-PA/hr for the next 30 min, 1 mg rt-PA/hr for 7 hr, and 0.4 mg rt-PA/hr until the end of lysis. Onset of symptoms varied from 1 to 14 days. Included were three isolated upper-arm occlusions, nine combined brachial and forearm occlusions, and 28 forearm and hand artery occlusions.Results: The overall success rate was 55%. The lysis results for isolated upper arm, combined brachial and forearm occlusions, and forearm and hand artery occlusions were 100%, 66%, and 46%, respectively. In eight patients surgical embolectomy had to be performed after failed thrombolysis. No amputation was required in the follow-up period. No lethal complications occurred.Conclusions: Interventional rt-PA treatment of proximal upper-extremity arterial occlusions may be performed with comparable success rates to surgical embolectomy and without severe complications. For distal occlusions the results are inferior to the success rates obtained with surgery.

  8. Acute effects of aerobic exercise intensity on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in young men.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryota; Hashimoto, Yuto; Hatakeyama, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Takanobu

    2016-10-18

    Arterial stiffness increases after glucose ingestion. Acute low- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise decreases arterial stiffness. However, the acute effects of 30 min of cycling at low- and moderate-intensity [25% (LE trial) and 65% (ME trial) peak oxygen uptake, respectively] on arterial stiffness at 30, 60 and 120 min of a postexercise glucose ingestion. Ten healthy young men (age, 22·4 ± 0·5 years) performed LE and ME trials on separate days in a randomized controlled crossover fashion. Carotid-femoral (aortic) pulse wave velocity (PWV), femoral-ankle (leg) PWV, carotid augmentation index (AIx) and carotid blood pressure (BP) (applanation tonometry), brachial and ankle BP (oscillometric device), heart rate (HR) (electrocardiography), blood glucose (UV-hexokinase method) and blood insulin (CLEIA method) levels were measured at before (baseline) and at 30, 60 and 120 min after the 75-g OGTT. Leg PWV, ankle pulse pressure and BG levels significantly increased from baseline after the 75-g OGTT in the LE trial (P<0·05), but not in the ME trial. Insulin levels and HR significantly increased from baseline after the 75-g OGTT in both trials (P<0·05). Aortic PWV, carotid AIx, brachial BP and carotid BP did not change from baseline after the 75-g OGTT in both trials. The present findings indicate that aerobic exercise at moderate intensity before glucose ingestion suppresses increases leg arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion.

  9. Underrecognized Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus in Thailand: We Must Consider Neuroischemic Foot Ulcers From This Fallout.

    PubMed

    Rerkasem, Kittipan; Kosachunhanun, Natapong; Sony, Kiran; Inpankaew, Nimit; Mani, Raj

    2015-06-01

    A range of prevalence of peripheral artery disease in diabetic patients has been estimated using the measurement of ankle brachial pressure index and clinical features in Asian countries. These data may be underestimates and hence underrecognized, raising questions about the numbers of patients with neuroischemic feet who are also at risk of diabetic foot ulcers. Underrecognition of these lesions may well increase the high levels of chronic wound burden resulting from peripheral artery disease as well as neuroischemic foot lesions. Improved education and training of clinical staff (nurses and family physicians) is required to combat these serious issues.

  10. Ultrasound guided therapeutic injections of the cervical spine and brachial plexus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Recent applications in ultrasound imaging include ultrasound assessment and ultrasound guided therapeutic injections of the spine and brachial plexus. Discussion: Ultrasound is an ideal modality for these regions as it allows accurate safe and quick injection of single or multiple sites. It has the added advantages of lack of ionising radiation, and can be done without requiring large expensive radiology equipment. Conclusion: Brachial plexus pathology may be present in patients presenting for shoulder symptoms where very little is found at imaging the shoulder. It is important to understand the anatomy and normal variants that may exist to be able to recognise when pathology is present. When pathology is demonstrated it is easy to do a trial of therapy with ultrasound guided injection of steroid around the nerve lesion. This review will outline the normal anatomy and variants and common pathology, which can be amenable to ultrasound guided injection of steroid. PMID:28191203

  11. Respiratory distress in a one-month-old child suffering brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Héritier, Odile; Vasseur Maurer, Sabine; Reinberg, Olivier; Cotting, Jacques; Perez, Marie-Hélène

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a one-month-old girl presenting with respiratory and growth failure due to diaphragmatic paralysis associated with left brachial plexus palsy after forceps delivery. Despite continuous positive pressure ventilation and nasogastric feeding, the situation did not improve and a laparoscopic diaphragmatic plication had to be performed. When dealing with a child born with brachial plexus palsy, one must think of this possible association and if necessary proceed to the complementary radiological examinations. The treatment must avoid complications like feeding difficulties and failure to thrive, respiratory infections or atelectasis. It includes intensive support and a good evaluation of the prognosis of the lesion to decide the best moment for a surgical therapy.

  12. Medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve injury after brachial plexus block: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mi Jin; Byun, Ha Young; Lee, Chang Hee; Moon, Seung Won; Oh, Min-Kyun; Shin, Heesuk

    2013-12-01

    Medial antebrachial cutaneous (MABC) nerve injury associated with iatrogenic causes has been rarely reported. Local anesthesia may be implicated in the etiology of such injury, but has not been reported. Two patients with numbness and painful paresthesia over the medial aspect of the unilateral forearm were referred for electrodiagnostic study, which revealed MABC nerve lesion in each case. The highly selective nature of the MABC nerve injuries strongly suggested that they were the result of direct nerve injury by an injection needle during previous brachial plexus block procedures. Electrodiagnostic studies can be helpful in evaluating cases of sensory disturbance after local anesthesia. To our knowledge, these are the first documented cases of isolated MABC nerve injury following ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  13. Effectiveness of primary conservative management for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Kurlowicz, Kirsty; Vladusic, Sharon; Grimmer, Karen

    2005-03-01

    Background  Obstetric brachial plexus palsy, a complication of childbirth, occurs in 1-3 per 1000 live births internationally. Traction and/or compression of the brachial plexus is thought to be the primary mechanism of injury and this may occur in utero, during the descent through the birth canal or during delivery. This results in a spectrum of injuries that vary in severity, extent of damage and functional use of the affected upper limb. Most infants receive treatment, such as conservative management (physiotherapy, occupational therapy) or surgery; however, there is controversy regarding the most appropriate form of management. To date, no synthesised evidence is available regarding the effectiveness of primary conservative management for obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Objectives  The objective of this review was to systematically assess the literature and present the best available evidence that investigated the effectiveness of primary conservative management for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Search strategy  A systematic literature search was performed using 14 databases: TRIP, MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, Web of Science, Proquest 5000, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, Expanded Academic ASAP, Meditext, Science Direct, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Proquest Digital Dissertations, Open Archives Initiative Search Engine, Australian Digital Thesis Program. Those studies that were reported in English and published over the last decade (July 1992 to June 2003) were included in this review. Selection criteria  Quantitative studies that investigated the effectiveness of primary conservative management for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were eligible for inclusion in this review. This excluded studies that solely investigated the effect of primary surgery for these infants, management of secondary deformities and the investigation of the effects of pharmacological agents, such as botulinum toxin. Data collection and analysis

  14. Brachial vs. central systolic pressure and pulse wave transmission indicators: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Joseph L

    2014-12-01

    This critique is intended to provide background for the reader to evaluate the relative clinical utilities of brachial cuff systolic blood pressure (SBP) and its derivatives, including pulse pressure, central systolic pressure, central augmentation index (AI), and pulse pressure amplification (PPA). The critical question is whether the newer indicators add sufficient information to justify replacing or augmenting brachial cuff blood pressure (BP) data in research and patient care. Historical context, pathophysiology of variations in pulse wave transmission and reflection, issues related to measurement and model errors, statistical limitations, and clinical correlations are presented, along with new comparative data. Based on this overview, there is no compelling scientific or practical reason to replace cuff SBP with any of the newer indicators in the vast majority of clinical situations. Supplemental value for central SBP may exist in defining patients with exaggerated PPA ("spurious systolic hypertension"), managing cardiac and aortic diseases, and in studies of cardiovascular drugs, but there are no current standards for these possibilities.

  15. Vibration sensation as an indicator of surgical anesthesia following brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Seema; Sidhu, Gurkaran Kaur; Sood, Dinesh; Grewal, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Background: Local anesthetic instillation in close vicinity to nerves anywhere in body blocks sensations in the same order as in central neuraxial blockade. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of vibration sense as criteria to determine the onset of surgical anesthesia following brachial plexus block and its correlation with loss of sensory and motor power. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included fifty patients of American Society of Anaesthesiologist physical status I and II, aged between 18 and 45 years, undergoing elective upper limb surgery under brachial plexus block by supraclavicular approach. The baseline values of vibration sense perception using 128 Hz Rydel–Seiffer tuning fork, motor power using formal motor power of wrist flexion and wrist extension, and sensory score by pinprick method were recorded preoperatively and every 5 min after giving block till the onset of complete surgical anesthesia. Results: The mean ± standard deviation of time (in minutes) for sensory, motor, and vibration block was 13.33 ± 3.26, 21.10 ± 3.26, and 25.50 ± 2.02, respectively (P < 0.05). Although all the patients achieved complete sensory and motor block after 25 min, 14% of the patients still had vibration sensations intact and 100% of the patients achieved complete sensory, motor, and vibration block after 30 min. Conclusions: Vibration sense serves as a reliable indicator for the onset of surgical anesthesia following brachial plexus block. Vibration sense testing with 128 Hz Rydel–Seiffer tuning fork along with motor power assessment should be used as an objective tool to assess the onset of surgical anesthesia following brachial plexus block. PMID:27833488

  16. Familial long thoracic nerve palsy: a manifestation of brachial plexus neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, L H

    1986-09-01

    Long thoracic nerve palsy causes weakness of the serratus anterior muscle and winging of the scapula. It is usually traumatic in origin. Isolated long thoracic nerve palsy has not been recognized as the major manifestation of familial brachial plexus neuropathy, but I have studied the syndrome in four members of three generations of one family. One individual suffered an episode of facial paresis. The inheritance pattern was autosomal dominant.

  17. Sensory Evaluation of the Hands in Children with Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmgren, Tove; Peltonen, Jari; Linder, Tove; Rautakorpi, Sanna; Nietosvaara, Yrjana

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine sensory changes of the hand in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI). Ninety-five patients (43 females, 52 males) comprising two age groups, 6 to 8 years (mean age 7y 6mo) and 12 to 14 years (mean age 13y 2mo), were included. Sixty-four had upper (cervical [C] 5-6), 19 upper and middle (C5-7), and 12 had total…

  18. Newborn brachial plexus injuries: The twisting and extension of the fetal head as contributing causes.

    PubMed

    Sandmire, H; Morrison, J; Racinet, C; Hankins, G; Pecorari, D; Gherman, R

    2008-02-01

    The exact mechanism of the causation of brachial plexus injury (BPI) has long been a matter of controversy. It is our opinion that the twisting and the extension of the fetal head, during the labour and delivery process, will increase the stretching of the neck, thus contributing to the labour forces as the cause of BPI. Our opinions are offered to other researchers and readers for their consideration of how the labour forces can cause BPI.

  19. A Comparative Study in the Use of Brachial Photoplethysmography and the QRS Complex as Timing References in Determination of Pulse Transit Time

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    splinted in each case to keep the brachial archery prominent. The probes were connected with flexible cable to the data acquisition unit. The subject was...pressure. A sample of data was taken during this period. A measurement of the distance from the detection point on the brachial archery to the...brachial archery , at the elbow, and produced a strong, if elusive, plethysmograph. The wider focus of this work is to explore a means for non

  20. Large Artery Stiffness Assessment Using SphygmoCor Technology

    PubMed Central

    Butlin, Mark; Qasem, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Large artery stiffness assessment has been an integral part of the SphygmoCor technology since 1998. Aortic stiffness is approximated with non-invasive measurement of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, with improvements made with time to make the assessment procedure quicker and more user independent. Also standard in the devices is the ability to reliably calculate the central aortic waveform shape from a peripheral pressure waveform from either the brachial or radial artery. This waveform contains much information beyond peak and trough (systolic and diastolic pressure). Relative waveform features such as the augmentation index, wave reflection magnitude, reflection time index, and subendocardial viability ratio are parameters that are influenced by the stiffness of systemic arteries. This article briefly describes these parameters related to large artery stiffness and provides reference to validation and repeatability studies relative to the clinical use of the SphygmoCor devices. It is beyond the scope to review here the 424 original research articles that have employed SphygmoCor devices in measuring arterial stiffness. Instead, the method of measurement across the devices is described, including tonometry, volumetric displacement through cuff placement around limbs, and ambulatory monitoring. Key population and subpopulation studies are cited where the average stiffness parameter progression with age and gender, as measured by SphygmoCor devices, is quantified in the healthy and general population. Finally, with reference to guidelines from working groups on arterial stiffness and hypertension, the clinical utility of large artery stiffness measurement is discussed in the context of the arterial stiffness parameters provided by the SphygmoCor systems. PMID:28229053

  1. The specific role of gravitational accelerations for arterial adaptations.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tobias; Ducos, Michel; Mulder, Edwin; Herrera, Frankyn; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Jörn

    2013-02-01

    It is mostly agreed that arterial adaptations occur, among others, in response to changes in mechanical stimuli. Models like bed rest, spinal cord injury, or limb suspension have been applied to study vascular adaptations to unloading in humans. However, these models cannot distinguish the role of muscle contractions and the role of gravitational accelerations for arterial adaptation. The HEPHAISTOS orthosis allows normal ambulation, while it significantly reduces force generation in the lower leg muscles. Eleven subjects wore HEPHAISTOS unilaterally for 56 days and were followed up for another 4 wk. Arterial diameters, intima media thickness (IMT), flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and resting blood flow (BF(rest)) were measured using high-frequency ultrasonography. Arterial adaptations were investigated in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), the brachial artery (BA), and the carotid artery (CA). Mean SFA resting diameter was decreased from 6.57 mm (SD = 0.74 mm) at baseline to 5.77 mm (SD = 0.87 mm) at the end of the intervention (P < 0.001), whereas SFA wall-to-lumen ratio, SFA BF(rest), and SFA FMD remained unaffected throughout the study. The application of HEPHAISTOS had no effect on structure and function of the systemic control sites, the BA, and the CA. Our findings highlight the importance of muscular contractions for arterial diameter adaptations. Moreover, we propose that FMD and wall-to-lumen ratio are unaffected by ambulating with the HEPHAISTOS orthosis, which is suggestive of habitual acceleration profiles in the lower leg constituting an important stimulus for the maintenance of FMD and wall-to-lumen ratio.

  2. Gross anatomy of the brachial plexus in the giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).

    PubMed

    Souza, P R; Cardoso, J R; Araujo, L B M; Moreira, P C; Cruz, V S; Araujo, E G

    2014-10-01

    Ten forelimbs of five Myrmecophaga tridactyla were examined to study the anatomy of the brachial plexus. The brachial plexuses of the M. tridactyla observed in the present study were formed by the ventral rami of the last four cervical spinal nerves, C5 through C8, and the first thoracic spinal nerve, T1. These primary roots joined to form two trunks: a cranial trunk comprising ventral rami from C5-C7 and a caudal trunk receiving ventral rami from C8-T1. The nerves originated from these trunks and their most constant arrangement were as follows: suprascapular (C5-C7), subscapular (C5-C7), cranial pectoral (C5-C8), caudal pectoral (C8-T1), axillary (C5-C7), musculocutaneous (C5-C7), radial (C5-T1), median (C5-T1), ulnar (C5-T1), thoracodorsal (C5-C8), lateral thoracic (C7-T1) and long thoracic (C6-C7). In general, the brachial plexus in the M. tridactyla is similar to the plexuses in mammals, but the number of rami contributing to the formation of each nerve in the M. tridactyla was found to be larger than those of most mammals. This feature may be related to the very distinctive anatomical specializations of the forelimb of the anteaters.

  3. Surgical outcomes of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot wounds in adults

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The management of brachial plexus injuries due to gunshot wounds is a surgical challenge. Better surgical strategies based on clinical and electrophysiological patterns are needed. The aim of this study is to clarify the factors which may influence the surgical technique and outcome of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries. Methods Two hundred and sixty five patients who had brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries were included in this study. All of them were male with a mean age of 22 years. Twenty-three patients were improved with conservative treatment while the others underwent surgical treatment. The patients were classified and managed according to the locations, clinical and electrophysiological findings, and coexisting lesions. Results The wounding agent was shrapnel in 106 patients and bullet in 159 patients. Surgical procedures were performed from 6 weeks to 10 months after the injury. The majority of the lesions were repaired within 4 months were improved successfully. Good results were obtained in upper trunk and lateral cord lesions. The outcome was satisfactory if the nerve was intact and only compressed by fibrosis or the nerve was in-contunuity with neuroma or fibrosis. Conclusion Appropriate surgical techniques help the recovery from the lesions, especially in patients with complete functional loss. Intraoperative nerve status and the type of surgery significantly affect the final clinical outcome of the patients. PMID:19627573

  4. Brachial Plexus in the Pampas Fox (Lycalopex gymnocercus): a Descriptive and Comparative Analysis.

    PubMed

    de Souza Junior, Paulo; da Cruz de Carvalho, Natan; de Mattos, Karine; Abidu Figueiredo, Marcelo; Luiz Quagliatto Santos, André

    2017-03-01

    Twenty thoracic limbs of ten Lycalopex gymnocercus were dissected to describe origin and distribution of the nerves forming brachial plexuses. The brachial plexus resulted from the connections between the ventral branches of the last three cervical nerves (C6, C7, and C8) and first thoracic nerve (T1). These branches connected the suprascapular, subscapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, radial, median and ulnar nerves to the intrinsic musculature and connected the brachiocephalic, thoracodorsal, lateral thoracic, long thoracic, cranial pectoral and caudal pectoral nerves to the extrinsic musculature. The C7 ventral branches contribute most to the formation of the nerves (62.7%), followed by C8 (58.8%), T1 (40.0%) and C6 (24.6%). Of the 260 nerves dissected, 69.2% resulted from a combination of two or three branches, while only 30.8% originated from a single branch. The origin and innervation area of the pampas fox brachial plexus, in comparison with other domestic and wild species, were most similar to the domestic dog and wild canids from the neotropics. The results of this study can serve as a base for comparative morphofunctional analysis involving this species and development of nerve block techniques. Anat Rec, 300:537-548, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Results of ulnar nerve neurotization to biceps brachii muscle in brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Marcelo Rosa De; Rabelo, Neylor Teofilo Araújo; Silveira, Clóvis Castanho; Petersen, Pedro Araújo; Paula, Emygdio José Leomil De; Mattar, Rames

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the factors influencing the results of ulnar nerve neurotization at the motor branch of the brachii biceps muscle, aiming at the restoration of elbow flexion in patients with brachial plexus injury. METHODS: 19 patients, with 18 men and 1 woman, mean age 28.7 years. Eight patients had injury to roots C5-C6 and 11, to roots C5-C6-C7. The average time interval between injury and surgery was 7.5 months. Four patients had cervical fractures associated with brachial plexus injury. The postoperative follow-up was 15.7 months. RESULTS: Eight patients recovered elbow flexion strength MRC grade 4; two, MRC grade 3 and nine, MRC <3. There was no impairment of the previous ulnar nerve function. CONCLUSION: The surgical results of ulnar nerve neurotization at the motor branch of brachii biceps muscle are dependent on the interval between brachial plexus injury and surgical treatment, the presence of associated fractures of the cervical spine and occipital condyle, residual function of the C8-T1 roots after the injury and the involvement of the C7 root. Signs of reinnervation manifested up to 3 months after surgery showed better results in the long term. Level of Evidence: IV, Case Series. PMID:24453624

  6. Modification over time of pulse wave velocity parallel to changes in aortic BP, as well as in 24-h ambulatory brachial BP.

    PubMed

    Oliveras, A; Segura, J; Suarez, C; García-Ortiz, L; Abad-Cardiel, M; Vigil, L; Gómez-Marcos, M A; Sans Atxer, L; Martell-Claros, N; Ruilope, L M; de la Sierra, A

    2016-03-01

    Arterial stiffness as assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is a marker of preclinical organ damage and a predictor of cardiovascular outcomes, independently of blood pressure (BP). However, limited evidence exists on the association between long-term variation (Δ) on aortic BP (aoBP) and ΔcfPWV. We aimed to evaluate the relationship of ΔBP with ΔcfPWV over time, as assessed by office and 24-h ambulatory peripheral BP, and aoBP. AoBP and cfPWV were evaluated in 209 hypertensive patients with either diabetes or metabolic syndrome by applanation tonometry (Sphygmocor) at baseline(b) and at 12 months of follow-up(fu). Peripheral BP was also determined by using validated oscillometric devices (office(o)-BP) and on an outpatient basis by using a validated (Spacelabs-90207) device (24-h ambulatory BP). ΔcfPWV over time was calculated as follows: ΔcfPWV=[(cfPWVfu-cfPWVb)/cfPWVb] × 100. ΔBP over time resulted from the same formula applied to BP values obtained with the three different measurement techniques. Correlations (Spearman 'Rho') between ΔBP and ΔcfPWV were calculated. Mean age was 62 years, 39% were female and 80% had type 2 diabetes. Baseline office brachial BP (mm Hg) was 143±20/82±12. Follow-up (12 months later) office brachial BP (mm Hg) was 136±20/79±12. ΔcfPWV correlated with ΔoSBP (Rho=0.212; P=0.002), Δ24-h SBP (Rho=0.254; P<0.001), Δdaytime SBP (Rho=0.232; P=0.001), Δnighttime SBP (Rho=0.320; P<0.001) and ΔaoSBP (Rho=0.320; P<0.001). A multiple linear regression analysis included the following independent variables: ΔoSBP, Δ24-h SBP, Δdaytime SBP, Δnighttime SBP and ΔaoSBP. ΔcfPWV was independently associated with Δ24-h SBP (β-coefficient=0.195; P=0.012) and ΔaoSBP (β-coefficient= 0.185; P=0.018). We conclude that changes in both 24-h SBP and aoSBP more accurately reflect changes in arterial stiffness than do office BP measurements.

  7. The effect of acute and chronic nicardipine therapy on forearm arterial haemodynamics in essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Levenson, J.; Simon, A. Ch.; Bouthier, J.; Maarek, B. C.; Safar, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    1 By using simultaneous recording curves obtained with pulsed Doppler velocimetry and strain gauge mechanography, forearm arterial haemodynamics were studied in 26 patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension. Fifteen patients received a single oral dose of nicardipine 40 mg, and 11 patients were treated with nicardipine 30 mg three times daily for 3 months. 2 In both groups of patients there was a similar and significant (P < 0.001) reduction in mean, systolic, and diastolic pressures. There was a slight increase in heart rate (P < 0.05) after the single dose, but no change after 3 months of treatment. 3 The diameter, blood velocity, and blood flow of the brachial artery increased significantly in both treatment groups. The decrease in forearm vascular resistance was significant for both treatment groups. 4 Brachial artery compliance increased (P < 0.01) and characteristic impedance decreased (P < 0.01) after both single-dose and long-term therapy with nicardipine. 5 In patients who received nicardipine for 3 months, there were close correlations between the baseline serum calcium level and the percent change in vascular resistance (r = -0.73, P < 0.01), blood flow (r = 0.89, P < 0.001), and blood velocity (r = 0.91. P < 0.001) of the forearm. No correlation was found between the baseline serum calcium and the change in arterial pressure. 6 This study provided evidence that the blood-pressure-lowering effect of nicardipine was accompanied by a direct vasodilatory action in the small and large arteries of the forearm. An increase in peripheral blood flow with concomitant improvement of arterial compliance are the consequences of these arterial actions. PMID:4027144

  8. [Outcomes of surgical revascularization in patients after stenting of lower-limb arteries].

    PubMed

    Gavrilenko, A V; Kotov, A E; Shatalova, D V

    2016-01-01

    The authors analysed immediate and remote results of primary "open" reconstructive operations and arterial reconstructions performed after previous stenting of lower-limb arteries. The study comprised a total of 93 patients presenting with lower-limb critical ischaemia. Group One consisted of 46 patients with localization of the lesion of lower-limb arteries above the inguinal ligament. Group Two was composed of 47 patients with localization of lower-limb arteries lesions below the inguinal ligament. Each group was subdivided into two subgroups: subgroups Ia and IIa included patients with previously endured stenting of arteries of the respective segment (23 and 22 patients, respectively), subgroups Ib and IIb included patients previously not subjected to either endovascular or surgical treatment (23 and 25 patients, respectively). All patients underwent "open" reconstructive vascular operations. The outcomes of intervention were assessed at the hospital stage, as well as at 6, 12 and 36 months of consecutive follow up. After 8 months of follow up patency of the shunts in all patients amounted to 100%, with the lower-limb salvage rate of 100%. After 1 year, despite differences between subgroups in each group, they were not statistically significant (p>0.05). After 3 years differences in shunts' patency and lower limb salvage rate in subgroups IIa and IIb were statistically significant (p<0.05). By the increment of the ankle-brachial index, the best result after 3 years was achieved in patients with primary arterial reconstruction (subgroups Ib and IIb) as compared to patients with previously endured endovascular interventions. The conclusion was drawn that shunts patency, limb salvage rate and increment of the ankle-brachial index in the remote period after performing primary arterial reconstructions below the Poupart's ligament were better than in patients with previously endured endovascular interventions.

  9. Influence of Postprandial Hyperglycemic Conditions on Arterial Stiffness in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gordin, Daniel; Saraheimo, Markku; Tuomikangas, Jaana; Soro-Paavonen, Aino; Forsblom, Carol; Paavonen, Karri; Steckel-Hamann, Birgit; Vandenhende, Francois; Nicolaou, Loizos; Pavo, Imre; Koivisto, Veikko

    2016-01-01

    Context: Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether postprandial hyperglycemia affects arterial function in T2D. Design: A single-center, open-label study of three groups of men were studied: 1) T2D patients with albuminuria (n = 22), 2) T2D patients without albuminuria (n = 24), and 3) nondiabetic controls (n = 25). Patients were randomized to a two-period crossover study schedule, ingesting breakfast, with or without insulin lispro (to induce low or high postprandial glycemia). Main Outcome Measures: Arterial stiffness was assessed by calculating pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index using applanation tonometry, and endothelial dysfunction was assessed using peripheral arterial tonometry, 30 minutes before breakfast and up to 240 minutes after breakfast. Results: At baseline, arterial stiffness was increased in patients. When adjusted for age and body mass index, in a combined group of patients with and without albuminuria, brachial PWV was higher during low (P = .032) and high (P = .038) postprandial glycemia vs controls. These differences were driven by the albuminuria group vs controls during low (P = .014) and high (P = .018) postprandial glycemia. No differences were observed in aortic PWV, augmentation index, or peripheral arterial tonometry ratio between patients and controls. Endothelin-1 and IL-6 were higher, and superoxide dismutase was lower, during postprandial hyperglycemia in T2D patients vs controls. Conclusions: In patients with T2D and albuminuria, brachial PWV was higher under postprandial hyperglycemic conditions, relative to controls. These data suggest that hyperglycemia induces an increase in stiffness of intermediate-sized arteries. We found no changes in other parts of the arterial bed. PMID:26731258

  10. Imaging of vascular dynamics within the foot using dynamic diffuse optical tomography to diagnose peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Hoi, J. W.; Kim, I.; Dayal, R.; Shrikande, G.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is the narrowing of the functional area of the artery generally due to atherosclerosis. It affects between 8-12 million people in the United States and if untreated this can lead to ulceration, gangrene and ultimately amputation. The current diagnostic method for PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The ABI is a ratio of the patient's systolic blood pressure in the foot to that of the brachial artery in the arm, a ratio below 0.9 is indicative of affected vasculature. However, this method is ineffective in patients with calcified arteries (diabetic and end-stage renal failure patients), which falsely elevates the ABI recording resulting in a false negative reading. In this paper we present our results in a pilot study to deduce optical tomography's ability to detect poor blood perfusion in the foot. We performed an IRB approved 30 patient study, where we imaged the feet of the enrolled patients during a five stage dynamic imaging sequence. The patients were split up into three groups: 10 healthy subjects, 10 PAD patients and 10 PAD patients with diabetes and they were imaged while applying a pressure cuff to their thigh. Differences in the magnitude of blood pooling in the foot and rate at which the blood pools in the foot are all indicative of arterial disease.

  11. Carotid artery elasticity decreases during pregnancy - the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aims were to evaluate the effect of pregnancy on carotid artery elasticity and determine the associations between maternal lipids, endothelial function and arterial elasticity during pregnancy. Methods We examined 99 pregnant and 99 matched non-pregnant control women as part of a population-based prospective cohort study. Carotid artery elasticity indexes; carotid artery distensibility (CAD), Young’s elastic modulus (YEM) and stiffness index (SI) as well as brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were assessed using ultrasound; serum lipid levels were also determined. Results SI was 57% and YEM 75% higher and CAD 36% lower in the third trimester group than the corresponding values in the first trimester group. Serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in women at the end of the pregnancy than at the beginning of pregnancy (P < 0.001) and in controls (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, gestational age was the only independent correlate of arterial elasticity in pregnant women. In controls, age (P ≤ 0.001) and common carotid diameter (P = 0.001-0.029) were associated with SI, YEM and CAD. Conclusions The present study revealed that carotid artery elasticity declined towards the end of the pregnancy; this neither is straight correlating with maternal hyperlipidemia or the diameter of the carotid artery nor is it associated with changes in endothelial function. PMID:24602149

  12. Effect of acute aerobic exercise and histamine receptor blockade on arterial stiffness in African Americans and Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huimin; Ranadive, Sushant M; Lane-Cordova, Abbi D; Kappus, Rebecca M; Behun, Michael A; Cook, Marc D; Woods, Jeffrey A; Wilund, Kenneth R; Baynard, Tracy; Halliwill, John R; Fernhall, Bo

    2017-02-01

    African Americans (AA) exhibit exaggerated central blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) in response to an acute bout of maximal exercise compared with Caucasians (CA). However, whether potential racial differences exist in central BP, elastic, or muscular arterial distensibility after submaximal aerobic exercise remains unknown. Histamine receptor activation mediates sustained postexercise hyperemia in CA but the effect on arterial stiffness is unknown. This study sought to determine the effects of an acute bout of aerobic exercise on central BP and arterial stiffness and the role of histamine receptors, in AA and CA. Forty-nine (22 AA, 27 CA) young and healthy subjects completed the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to take either histamine receptor antagonist or control placebo. Central blood BP and arterial stiffness measurements were obtained at baseline, and at 30, 60, and 90 min after 45 min of moderate treadmill exercise. AA exhibited greater central diastolic BP, elevated brachial PWV, and local carotid arterial stiffness after an acute bout of submaximal exercise compared with CA, which may contribute to their higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Unexpectedly, histamine receptor blockade did not affect central BP or PWV in AA or CA after exercise, but it may play a role in mediating local carotid arterial stiffness. Furthermore, histamine may mediate postexercise carotid arterial dilation in CA but not in AA. These observations provide evidence that young and healthy AA exhibit an exaggerated hemodynamic response to exercise and attenuated vasodilator response compared with CA.NEW & NOTEWORTHY African Americans are at greater risk for developing cardiovascular disease than Caucasians. We are the first to show that young and healthy African Americans exhibit greater central blood pressure, elevated brachial stiffness, and local carotid arterial stiffness following an acute bout of submaximal exercise

  13. New technique for the preservation of the left common carotid artery in zone 2a endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Juszkat, Robert; Kulesza, Jerzy; Zarzecka, Anna; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Majewski, Wacław

    2011-02-01

    To describe a technique for the preservation of the left common carotid artery (CCA) in zone 2 endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm. This technique involves the placement of a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment to enable precise visualization and protection of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Of the 107 patients with thoracic endovascular aortic repair in our study, 32 (30%) had the left subclavian artery intentionally covered (landing zone 2). Eight (25%) of those 32 had landing zone 2a-the segment distally the origin of the left CCA, halfway between the origin of the left CCA and the left subclavian artery. In all patients, a guide wire was positioned into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment. It is a retrospective study in design. In seven patients, stent grafts were positioned precisely. In the remaining patient, the positioning was imprecise; the origin of the left CCA was partially covered by the graft. A stent was implanted into the left CCA to restore the flow into the vessel. All procedures were performed successfully. The technique of placing a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment is a safe and effective method that enables the precise visualization of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Moreover, in case of inadvertent complete or partial coverage of the origin of the left CCA, it supplies safe and quick access to the artery for stent implantation.

  14. α-adrenergic vasoconstriction contributes to the age-related increase in conduit artery retrograde and oscillatory shear.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Padilla, Jaume; Joyner, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    Aging is associated with increased retrograde and oscillatory shear in peripheral conduit arteries of humans. Although the mechanisms responsible for these age-related changes are not completely understood, augmented downstream α-adrenergic tone likely plays a significant role in this phenomenon. Therefore, in protocol 1, brachial artery diameter and blood velocity were measured via Doppler ultrasound during (1) rest (control), (2) endogenous norepinephrine release via intra-arterial infusions of tyramine, and (3) α-adrenergic blockade via infusions of phentolamine in young healthy humans (n=12). Tyramine increased brachial artery retrograde (-4.0±1.4 to -9.5±1.4 s(-1)) and oscillatory shear (0.05±0.02 to 0.18±0.05 arbitrary units), whereas phentolamine abolished retrograde and oscillatory shear (P<0.05). Additionally, in protocol 2, we examined brachial artery shear patterns in young (n=12; 29±2 years) and older (n=13; 69±2 years) healthy adults during (1) rest (control), (2) sympathetic activation via lower body negative pressure, and (3) infusion of phentolamine. At rest, older adults exhibited greater brachial artery retrograde and oscillatory shear (-9.9±2.7 s(-1) and 0.11±0.03 arbitrary units, respectively) compared with younger adults (-3.1±1.0 s(-1) and 0.05±0.02 arbitrary units, respectively; P<0.05 for both). Lower body negative pressure increased retrograde and oscillatory shear in young (P<0.05), but not older adults (P=0.85-0.97), such that differences between young and older were eliminated (P>0.05). During infusion of phentolamine, retrograde and oscillatory shear were abolished in young adults (P<0.05) and markedly reduced, yet still persistent, in older adults (P<0.01). Our data indicate that α-adrenergic vasoconstriction is a major contributor to age-related discrepancies in conduit artery shear-rate patterns at rest.

  15. Brachial plexus morphology and vascular supply in the wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Angélica-Almeida, Maria; Casal, Diogo; Mafra, Manuela; Mascarenhas-Lemos, Luís; Martins-Ferreira, José; Ferraz-Oliveira, Mário; Amarante, José; Goyri-O'Neill, João

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: O rato é provavelmente a espécie animal mais utilizada em estudos experimentais de reparação nervosa. Com este trabalho pretendeu-se aprofundar o conhecimento da morfologia e da vascularização do plexo braquial do rato.Material e Métodos: Trinta ratos adultos foram estudados relativamente à morfologia e vascularização do plexo braquial. As técnicas usadas foram a injecção intravascular e dissecção sob microscópio operatório, bem como técnicas de microscopia óptica e microscopia electrónica de varrimento.Resultados: Morfologicamente, o plexo braquial do rato é um pouco diferente do plexo braquial humano. O suprimento arterial e venoso do plexo braquial do rato deriva direta ou indiretamente dos vasos vizinhos. Estes vasos formam plexos vasculares densos e interconectados no epinervo, perinervo e endonervo. Vários componentes do plexo braquial do rato são acompanhados durante um trajecto relativamente longo por vasos sanguíneos relativamente calibrosos e constantes que fornecem o seu plexo epineural, tornando o seu levantamento como retalhos nervosos possível.Discussão: A vascularização do plexo braquial do rato não é muito diferente da reportada na espécie humana, tornando o rato um modelo animal útil para o estudo experimental da fisiopatologia e tratamento da patologia do nervo periférico.Conclusão: Os nossos resultados apoiam a homologia entre o rato e o Homem em termos de morfologia e vascularização do plexo braquial. Este trabalho sugere que vários componentes do plexo braquial do rato podem ser utilizados como retalhos nervosos, incluindo fibras predominantemente motoras, sensitivas ou fibras mistas.

  16. Lower extremity and carotid artery disease in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Linnhoff, Fabian; van Essen, Fabian; Pingel, Simon; Schaefer, Christian Alexander; Schahab, Nadjib; Fimmers, Rolf; Nickenig, Georg; Skowasch, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    In view of their common chronic inflammatory process, we sought to determine the linkage between peripheral artery disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). 107 COPD patients (mean±sd age 64.6±10.4 years, 52.2% male) and 22 control smokers without previously diagnosed peripheral artery disease underwent standardised angiological examination for lower extremity artery disease (LEAD) and carotid artery disease. LEAD was significantly more prevalent in COPD patients than in controls (80.4% versus 54.5%, p=0.002). Among COPD patients, 57.0%, 12.2%, 10.3% and 0.9% were found to be in Fontaine stages I, IIA, IIB and III, respectively. As with carotid artery disease, its frequency increased from 36.4% in controls to 58.9% in COPD patients (p=0.003). Carotid plaque burden, LEAD Fontaine degrees as well as pulse wave index and ankle–brachial index manifested significant impairment over percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 % pred) (p=0.02, p<0.001, p=0.01 and p<0.001, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that COPD Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease status was the strongest independent predictor for the presence of plaque in lower extremity arteries (odds ratio 1.63, 95% CI 1.19–2.25, p=0.003) and carotids (odds ratio 1.66, 95% CI 1.14–2.44, p=0.009). As compared with control smokers, peripheral artery disease is diagnosed in a sizeable proportion of COPD patients and exhibits significant distributive differences over FEV1 % pred that exceed the susceptibility conferred by common cardiovascular stressors. PMID:28053972

  17. Lower extremity and carotid artery disease in COPD.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Carmen; Linnhoff, Fabian; van Essen, Fabian; Pingel, Simon; Schaefer, Christian Alexander; Schahab, Nadjib; Fimmers, Rolf; Nickenig, Georg; Skowasch, Dirk

    2016-10-01

    In view of their common chronic inflammatory process, we sought to determine the linkage between peripheral artery disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). 107 COPD patients (mean±sd age 64.6±10.4 years, 52.2% male) and 22 control smokers without previously diagnosed peripheral artery disease underwent standardised angiological examination for lower extremity artery disease (LEAD) and carotid artery disease. LEAD was significantly more prevalent in COPD patients than in controls (80.4% versus 54.5%, p=0.002). Among COPD patients, 57.0%, 12.2%, 10.3% and 0.9% were found to be in Fontaine stages I, IIA, IIB and III, respectively. As with carotid artery disease, its frequency increased from 36.4% in controls to 58.9% in COPD patients (p=0.003). Carotid plaque burden, LEAD Fontaine degrees as well as pulse wave index and ankle-brachial index manifested significant impairment over percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 % pred) (p=0.02, p<0.001, p=0.01 and p<0.001, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that COPD Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease status was the strongest independent predictor for the presence of plaque in lower extremity arteries (odds ratio 1.63, 95% CI 1.19-2.25, p=0.003) and carotids (odds ratio 1.66, 95% CI 1.14-2.44, p=0.009). As compared with control smokers, peripheral artery disease is diagnosed in a sizeable proportion of COPD patients and exhibits significant distributive differences over FEV1 % pred that exceed the susceptibility conferred by common cardiovascular stressors.

  18. Blockade of the brachial plexus abolishes activation of specific brain regions by electroacupuncture at LI4: a functional MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Weidong; Jiang, Wei; He, Jingwei; Liu, Songbin; Wang, Zhaoxin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to test the hypothesis that electroacupuncture (EA) at acupuncture point LI4 activates specific brain regions by nerve stimulation that is mediatied through a pathway involving the brachial plexus. Methods Twelve acupuncture naive right-handed volunteers were allocated to receive three sessions of EA at LI4 in a random different order (crossover): (1) EA alone (EA); EA after injection of local anaesthetics into the deltoid muscle (EA+LA); and (3) EA after blockade of the brachial plexus (EA+NB). During each session, participants were imaged in a 3 T MRI scanner. Brain regions showing change in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal (activation) were identified. Subjective acupuncture sensation was quantified after functional MRI scanning was completed. Results were compared between the three sessions for each individual, and averaged. Results Blockade of the brachial plexus inhibited acupuncture sensation during EA. EA and EA+LA activated the bilateral thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum and left putamen, whilst no significant activation was observed during EA+NB. The BOLD signal of the thalamus correlated significantly with acupuncture sensation score during EA. Conclusions Blockade of the brachial plexus completely abolishes patterns of brain activation induced by EA at LI4. The results suggest that EA activates specific brain regions through stimulation of the local nerves supplying the tissues at LI4, which transmit sensory information via the brachial plexus. Trial registration number ChiCTR-OO-13003389. PMID:26464415

  19. Acquired Brachial Cutaneous Dyschromatosis in a 60-Year-Old Male: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Foering, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Acquired brachial cutaneous dyschromatosis is an acquired pigmentary disorder that has been described in only 20 patients but likely affects many more. This case of a man with acquired brachial cutaneous dyschromatosis is unique as most reports are in women. We report the case of a 60-year-old male who presents with an asymptomatic eruption characterized by hyperpigmented and telangiectatic macules coalescing into patches on the bilateral extensor aspects of the forearms which is consistent clinically and histopathologically with acquired brachial cutaneous dyschromatosis. Given its presence in patients with clinical evidence of chronic sun exposure and its histopathological finding of solar elastosis, acquired brachial cutaneous dyschromatosis is likely a disorder caused by cumulative UV damage. However, a possible association between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and acquired brachial cutaneous dyschromatosis exists. Further investigation is needed to elucidate both the pathogenesis of the disorder and forms of effective management. Treatment of the disorder should begin with current established treatments for disorders of dyspigmentation. PMID:25610668

  20. Acute effects of firefighting on arterial stiffness and blood flow.

    PubMed

    Fahs, Christopher A; Yan, Huimin; Ranadive, Sushant; Rossow, Lindy M; Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Echols, George; Smith, Denise; Horn, Gavin P; Rowland, Thomas; Lane, Abbi; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-04-01

    Sudden cardiac events are responsible for 40-50% of line-of-duty firefighter fatalities, yet the exact cause of these events is unknown. Likely, combinations of thermal, physical, and mental factors impair cardiovascular function and trigger such events. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the impact of firefighting activities on vascular function. Sixty-nine young (28 ± 1 years) male firefighters underwent 3 hours of firefighting activities. Carotid, aortic, and brachial blood pressures (BP), heart rate (HR), augmentation index (AIx), wave reflection timing (TR), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), forearm blood flow (FBF), and forearm reactive hyperemia (RH) were measured before and after firefighting activities. Paired samples t-tests revealed significant (p < 0.05) increases in aortic diastolic BP, HR, AIx, PWV, RH, and FBF, and significant decreases in brachial and aortic pulse pressure and TR following firefighting activities. In conclusion, these results suggest that 3 hours of firefighting activities increase both arterial stiffness and vasodilation.

  1. Comparison of central artery elasticity in swimmers, runners, and the sedentary.

    PubMed

    Nualnim, Nantinee; Barnes, Jill N; Tarumi, Takashi; Renzi, Christopher P; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2011-03-01

    Although swimming is one of the most popular, most practiced, and most recommended forms of physical activity, little information is available regarding the influence of regular swimming on vascular disease risks. Using a cross-sectional study design, key measurements of vascular function were performed in middle-aged and older swimmers, runners, and sedentary controls. There were no group differences in age, height, dietary intake, and fasting plasma concentrations of glucose, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Runners and swimmers were not different in their weekly training volume. Brachial systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure were higher (p <0.05) in swimmers than in sedentary controls and runners. Runners and swimmers had lower (p <0.05) carotid systolic blood pressure and carotid pulse pressure than sedentary controls. Carotid arterial compliance was higher (p <0.05) and β-stiffness index was lower (p <0.05) in runners and swimmers than in sedentary controls. There were no significant group differences between runners and swimmers. Cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity was greater (p <0.05) in runners than in sedentary controls and swimmers and baroreflex sensitivity tended to be higher in swimmers than in sedentary controls (p = 0.07). Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation was significant greater (p <0.05) in runners compared with sedentary controls and swimmers. In conclusion, our present findings are consistent with the notion that habitual swimming exercise may be an effective endurance exercise for preventing loss in central arterial compliance.

  2. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  3. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection

    MedlinePlus

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Spontaneous coronary artery dissection — sometimes referred to as SCAD — is an ... the blood vessels in the heart. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) can slow or block blood flow ...

  4. Coronary artery fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart defect - coronary artery fistula; Birth defect heart - coronary artery fistula ... A coronary artery fistula is often congenital, meaning that it is present at birth. It generally occurs when one of the ...

  5. Goldenhar Syndrome Associated with Extensive Arterial Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Modica, Renee Frances; Barbeau, L. Daphna Yasova; Co-Vu, Jennifer; Beegle, Richard D.; Williams, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Goldenhar Syndrome is characterized by craniofacial, ocular and vertebral defects secondary to abnormal development of the 1st and 2nd branchial arches and vertebrae. Other findings include cardiac and vascular abnormalities. Though these associations are known, the specific anomalies are not well defined. We present a 7-month-old infant with intermittent respiratory distress that did not improve with respiratory interventions. Echocardiogram suggested a double aortic arch. Cardiac CT angiogram confirmed a right arch and aberrant, stenotic left subclavian artery, dilation of the main pulmonary artery, and agenesis of the left thyroid lobe. Repeat echocardiograms were concerning for severely dilated coronary arteries. Given dilation, a rheumatologic workup ensued, only identifying few weakly positive autoantibodies. Further imaging demonstrated narrowing of the aorta below the renal arteries and extending into the common iliac arteries and proximal femoral arteries. Given a physical exam devoid of rheumatologic findings, only weakly positive autoantibodies, normal inflammatory markers, and presence of the coronary artery dilation, the peripheral artery narrowings were not thought to be vasculitic. This case illustrates the need to identify definitive anomalies related to Goldenhar Syndrome. Although this infant's presentation is rare, recognition of specific vascular findings will help differentiate Goldenhar Syndrome from other disease processes. PMID:26688769

  6. Fractures of the clavicle and injuries of the sub-clavian artery. Report of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Natali, J; Maraval, M; Kieffer, E; Petrovic, P

    1975-01-01

    During four years, the authors have observed ten lesions of the sub-clavian artery associated with a fracture of the clavicle. The clinical picture in one case out of two was that of an acute ischemia of the upper limb. The surgical repair has been performed in 8 cases. The thoracic approach was necessary three times. The clavicle was resected in most cases. The prognosis of these lesions depends on the rapidity of their recognition, and of their treatment, and on the fact whether the brachial plexus is involved or not

  7. The impact of ankle brachial index and pulse wave velocity on cardiovascular risk according to SCORE and Framingham scales and sex differences.

    PubMed

    Woźnicka-Leśkiewicz, L; Posadzy-Małaczyńska, A; Juszkat, R

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of ankle brachial index (ABI) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) in patients with or without coronary artery disease (CAD) and hypertension (HT) in cardiovascular risk prediction. We studied 200 patients randomized to one of four groups: CAD+HT+; CAD+HT-; CAD-HT+; CAD-HT- (Department of Hypertensiology, Angiology and Internal Diseases, Poznan, Poland: 2009-2012). We evaluated: patient age, lipids profile, ABI and PWV. The cardiovascular risks according to SCORE and Framingham scales were assessed. Statistical calculations were performed in StatSoft Statistica 10. The most interesting aspects of this study were: logistic regression model evaluated the simultaneously influence of ABI and PWV on cardiovascular risk by the SCORE scale and logistic regression model evaluated the influence of ABI and PWV on cardiovascular risk according to the Framingham scale. They showed the possibility (SCORE) of more accurate estimation of cardiovascular risk in an individual patient and graduation of this risk in the exemplary patients. Analysis of the assessment of both: ABI and PWV in predicting of cardiovascular risk according to SCORE and Framingham scales using a logistic regression model indicates that the Framingham scale is less precise than the SCORE scale because it underestimates the real high cardiovascular risk.

  8. Hardening of the arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis; Arteriosclerosis; Plaque buildup - arteries; Hyperlipidemia - atherosclerosis; Cholesterol - atherosclerosis ... cause of heart attack and stroke. High blood cholesterol levels can cause hardening of the arteries at ...

  9. Long term follow-up results of dorsal root entry zone lesions for intractable pain after brachial plexus avulsion injuries.

    PubMed

    Chen, H J; Tu, Y K

    2006-01-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion injury is one of the major complications after traffic, especially motorcycle accidents and machine injuries. Intractable pain and paralysis of the affected limbs are the major neurological deficits. During the past 18 years, we have encountered and treated more than 500 cases with brachial plexus avulsion injuries. Dorsal root entry zone lesions (DREZ) made by thermocoagulation were performed for intractable pain in 60 cases. Forty cases were under regular follow-up for 5-18 years. In early postoperative stage, the pain relief rate was excellent or good in 32 cases (80%). The pain relief rate dropped to 60% in 5 year follow-up period and only 9 cases (50%) had excellent or good result in 10 year follow-up. Reconstructive procedures were performed in almost all patients in the last 10 years. Dorsal root entry zone lesion is an effective procedure for pain control after brachial plexus avulsion injuries.

  10. Growth hormone (GH) and atherosclerosis: changes in morphology and function of major arteries during GH treatment.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B

    1999-04-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have increased carotid artery intima-media thickness and reduced arterial distensibility. The effect of 2 years of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy on these parameters was studied in 11 GH-deficient men (age range, 24-49 years) with hypopituitarism and compared with 12 healthy, age-matched men with no evidence of pituitary or vascular disease. Before treatment the intima-media of the common carotid arteries and the carotid bifurcations were significantly thicker in patients (P < 0.001) than in the control group. Treatment with GH normalized the intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery within 6 months and of the carotid bifurcation within 3 months. The changes in intima-media thickness of the carotid artery were negatively correlated with changes in serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I during treatment. There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent dilation of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6, 18 and 24 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). Thus, GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient men reverses early morphological and functional atherosclerotic changes in major arteries, and may reduce rates of vascular morbidity and mortality.

  11. Estimation of central aortic pressure waveform features derived from the brachial cuff volume displacement waveform.

    PubMed

    Butlin, Mark; Qasem, Ahmad; Avolio, Alberto P

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing interest in non-invasive estimation of central aortic waveform parameters in the clinical setting. However, controversy has arisen around radial tonometric based systems due to the requirement of a trained operator or lack of ease of use, especially in the clinical environment. A recently developed device utilizes a novel algorithm for brachial cuff based assessment of aortic pressure values and waveform (SphygmoCor XCEL, AtCor Medical). The cuff was inflated to 10 mmHg below an individual's diastolic blood pressure and the brachial volume displacement waveform recorded. The aortic waveform was derived using proprietary digital signal processing and transfer function applied to the recorded waveform. The aortic waveform was also estimated using a validated technique (radial tonometry based assessment, SphygmoCor, AtCor Medical). Measurements were taken in triplicate with each device in 30 people (17 female) aged 22 to 79 years of age. An average for each device for each individual was calculated, and the results from the two devices were compared using regression and Bland-Altman analysis. A high correlation was found between the devices for measures of aortic systolic (R(2)=0.99) and diastolic (R(2)=0.98) pressure. Augmentation index and subendocardial viability ratio both had a between device R(2) value of 0.82. The difference between devices for measured aortic systolic pressure was 0.5±1.8 mmHg, and for augmentation index, 1.8±7.0%. The brachial cuff based approach, with an individualized sub-diastolic cuff pressure, provides an operator independent method of assessing not only systolic pressure, but also aortic waveform features, comparable to existing validated tonometric-based methods.

  12. Décompression chirurgicale du syndrome de défilé thoraco-brachial

    PubMed Central

    Lukulunga, Loubet Unyendje; Moussa, Abdou Kadri; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Ismael, Farid; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Le syndrome de défilé thoraco-brachial est une pathologie souvent méconnue à cause de diagnostic difficile par manque des signes pathognomoniques conduisant souvent à des errances. Les manifestations cliniques dépendent selon qu'il s'agit d'une compression nerveuse, vasculaire ou vasculo-nerveuse. Le but de cette étude est de décrire certains aspects cliniques particuliers et évaluer le résultat fonctionnel après la décompression chirurgicale du paquet vasculo-nerveux. Notre étude rétrospective a porté sur l'analyse des données cliniques, radiologiques, IRM et EMG sur les patients opérés entre janvier 2010 et juillet 2013 du syndrome de défilé thoraco-brachial dans le service de traumatologie orthopédie de l'hôpital Ibn Sina de Rabat. 15 cas ont été colligés: 12 cas post traumatiques (fracture de la clavicule) et 3 cas d'origines congénitales, dont l’âge moyen était 35 ans (20 à 50 ans) avec 9 femmes et 6 hommes. A la fin du traitement, le score de Dash est passé de 109 (46% Normal=0) à 70 (20%), et le stress test de Roos était de 70/100 à 80/100. Le résultat était excellent dans 12 cas soit (80%) et moins bon dans dans 3 cas (20%). En définitive, la résection de malformations osseuses, l'excision des brides et la neurolyse du plexus brachial suivie de la rééducation a donné une bonne évolution fonctionnelle. PMID:25709735

  13. Ankle-brachial index (ABI), abdominal aortic calcification (AAC), and coronary artery calcification (CAC): the Jackson heart study.

    PubMed

    Tullos, Bobby W; Sung, Jung Hye; Lee, Jae Eun; Criqui, Michael H; Mitchell, Marc E; Taylor, Herman A

    2013-04-01

    To examine the associations of peripheral atherosclerosis, assessed by the ABI at baseline with the extent of AAC and with CAC measured by MDCT at follow-up examination in the Jackson Heart Study cohort. Four categories of ABI: <0.90, 0.90-0.99, 1.00-1.39; >1.40. Presence of CAC/AAC was defined as scoring above the 75th percentile among participants with non-zero CT calcium scores. We conducted multivariable log-binomial models for this analysis examining the relationship between ABI and the presence of CAC or AAC using normal ABI (1.0 ≤ ABI ≤ 1.39) as the reference group. We estimated prevalence ratios adjusted for age, smoking, HTN, DM, BMI, LDL, HDL, CRP, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and use of lipid-lowering medication. There were 2,398 patients in this analysis (women: 65 %, average age 55 years). AAC scores were not significantly different between sex. CAC scores were significantly higher in males than females regardless of ABI groups. The prevalence of significant AAC was 1.7 times higher for ABI < 0.90 (PR = 1.70; 95 % CI = 1.26-2.28; p = 0.0004) and 1.57 times higher for ABI 0.90-0.99 (PR = 1.57; 95 % CI = 1.20-2.03; p = 0.0008) than the normal ABI; AAC prevalence did not differ between subjects with ABI > 1.40 compared to those with normal ABI. The prevalence of the significant CAC was higher for ABI < 0.90 (PR = 1.55; 95 % CI = 1.12-2.14; p value = 0.0081) and ABI 0.90-0.99 (PR = 1.60; 95 % CI = 1.05-2.46; p = 0.0402) compared to normal ABI; CAC prevalence did not differ between subjects with ABI > 1.40 compared to those with normal ABI. Lower ABI was significantly associated with the extent of AAC and CAC in this cohort. ABI can provide clinicians with an inexpensive additional tool to assess vascular health and cardiovascular risk without exposing the patient to ionizing radiation.

  14. Successful management of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 using single injection interscalene brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Fallatah, Summayah M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type 1 of the upper limb is a painful and debilitating condition. Interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) in conjugation with other modalities was shown to be a feasible therapy with variable success. We reported a case of CRPS type 1 as diagnosed by International Association for the Study of Pain criteria in which pharmacological approaches failed to achieve adequate pain relief and even were associated with progressive dysfunction of the upper extremity. Single injection ISB, in combination with physical therapy and botulinum toxin injection, was successful to alleviate pain with functional restoration. PMID:25422619

  15. [Current concepts in perinatal brachial plexus palsy. Part 2: late phase. Shoulder deformities].

    PubMed

    Dogliotti, Andrés Alejandro

    2011-10-01

    The incidence of obstetric brachial palsy is high and their sequelaes are frequent. Physiotherapy, microsurgical nerve reconstruction and secondary corrections are used together to improve the shoulder function. The most common posture is shoulder in internal rotation and adduction, because of the antagonist weakness. The muscle forces imbalance over the osteoarticular system, will result in a progressive glenohumeral joint deformity which can be recognized with a magnetic resonance image. Tendon transfers of the internal rotators towards the external abductor/rotator muscles, has good results, but has to be combined with antero-inferior soft-tissue releases, if passive range of motion is limited.

  16. Nerve transfers in brachial plexus birth palsies: indications, techniques, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H

    2008-11-01

    The advent of nerve transfers has greatly increased surgical options for children who have brachial plexus birth palsies. Nerve transfers have considerable advantages, including easier surgical techniques, avoidance of neuroma resection, and direct motor and sensory reinnervation. Therefore, any functioning nerve fibers within the neuroma are preserved. Furthermore, a carefully selected donor nerve results in little or no clinical deficit. However, some disadvantages and unanswered questions remain. Because of a lack of head-to-head comparison between nerve transfers and nerve grafting, the window of opportunity for nerve grafting may be missed, which may degrade the ultimate outcome. Time will tell the ultimate role of nerve transfer or nerve grafting.

  17. Heralding Extramedullary Blast Crisis: Horner's Syndrome with Brachial Plexopathy in a Patient with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sadanand I.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) blast crisis is an ominous clinical event that is challenging to treat. This can develop at extramedullary sites rarely and is defined as the infiltration of blasts outside the bone marrow irrespective of proliferation of blasts within the bone marrow. We aim to report an unusual clinical presentation characterized by Horner's syndrome, ipsilateral arm weakness, and cervical lymphadenopathy as the first signs of extramedullary blast crisis in a CML patient. To the best of our knowledge, the extramedullary locations involving the brachial plexus along with cervicothoracic paraspinal chloroma have not been previously reported in the literature. PMID:28096817

  18. Effect of salt intake and potassium supplementation on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in Chinese subjects: an interventional study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Mu, J.J.; Geng, L.K.; Wang, D.; Ren, K.Y.; Guo, T.S.; Chu, C.; Xie, B.Q.; Liu, F.Q.; Yuan, Z.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has suggested that high salt and potassium might be associated with vascular function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of salt intake and potassium supplementation on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) in Chinese subjects. Forty-nine subjects (28-65 years of age) were selected from a rural community of northern China. All subjects were sequentially maintained on a low-salt diet for 7 days (3.0 g/day NaCl), a high-salt diet for an additional 7 days (18.0 g/day NaCl), and a high-salt diet with potassium supplementation for a final 7 days (18.0 g/day NaCl+4.5 g/day KCl). Brachial-ankle PWV was measured at baseline and on the last day of each intervention. Blood pressure levels were significantly increased from the low-salt to high-salt diet, and decreased from the high-salt diet to high-salt plus potassium supplementation. Baseline brachial-ankle PWV in salt-sensitive subjects was significantly higher than in salt-resistant subjects. There was no significant change in brachial-ankle PWV among the 3 intervention periods in salt-sensitive, salt-resistant, or total subjects. No significant correlations were found between brachial-ankle PWV and 24-h sodium and potassium excretions. Our study indicates that dietary salt intake and potassium supplementation, at least in the short term, had no significant effect on brachial-ankle PWV in Chinese subjects. PMID:25493387

  19. Brachial Plexopathy in Apical Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation: Dosimetric Analysis and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Eblan, Michael J.; Corradetti, Michael N.; Lukens, J. Nicholas; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Mitra, Nandita; Christodouleas, John P.; Grover, Surbhi; Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Langer, Corey J.; Evans, Tracey L.; Stevenson, James; Rengan, Ramesh; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Data are limited on the clinical significance of brachial plexopathy in patients with apical non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation therapy. We report the rates of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) and tumor-related brachial plexopathy (TRBP) and associated dosimetric parameters in apical NSCLC patients. Methods and Materials: Charts of NSCLC patients with primary upper lobe or superiorly located nodal disease who received {>=}50 Gy of definitive conventionally fractionated radiation or chemoradiation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of brachial plexopathy and categorized as RIBP, TRBP, or trauma-related. Dosimetric data were gathered on ipsilateral brachial plexuses (IBP) contoured according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group atlas guidelines. Results: Eighty patients were identified with a median follow-up and survival time of 17.2 and 17.7 months, respectively. The median prescribed dose was 66.6 Gy (range, 50.4-84.0), and 71% of patients received concurrent chemotherapy. RIBP occurred in 5 patients with an estimated 3-year rate of 12% when accounting for competing risk of death. Seven patients developed TRBP (estimated 3-year rate of 13%), comprising 24% of patients who developed locoregional failures. Grade 3 brachial plexopathy was more common in patients who experienced TRBP than RIBP (57% vs 20%). No patient who received {<=}78 Gy to the IBP developed RIBP. On multivariable competing risk analysis, IBP V76 receiving {>=}1 cc, and primary tumor failure had the highest hazard ratios for developing RIBP and TRBP, respectively. Conclusions: RIBP is a relatively uncommon complication in patients with apical NSCLC tumors receiving definitive doses of radiation, while patients who develop primary tumor failures are at high risk for developing morbid TRBP. These findings suggest that the importance of primary tumor control with adequate doses of radiation outweigh the risk of RIBP in this population of

  20. The relationship of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity to future cardiovascular disease events in the general Japanese population: the Takashima Study.

    PubMed

    Takashima, N; Turin, T C; Matsui, K; Rumana, N; Nakamura, Y; Kadota, A; Saito, Y; Sugihara, H; Morita, Y; Ichikawa, M; Hirose, K; Kawakani, K; Hamajima, N; Miura, K; Ueshima, H; Kita, Y

    2014-05-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is a non-invasive measure of arterial stiffness obtained using an automated system. Although baPWVs have been widely used as a non-invasive marker for evaluation of arterial stiffness, evidence for the prognostic value of baPWV in the general population is scarce. In this study, we assessed the association between baPWV and future cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence in a Japanese population. From 2002 to 2009, baPWV was measured in a total of 4164 men and women without a history of CVD, and they were followed up until the end of 2009 with a median follow-up period of 6.5 years. Hazard ratios (HRs) for CVD incidence according to baPWV levels were calculated using a Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for potential confounding factors, including seated or supine blood pressure (BP). During the follow-up period, we observed 40 incident cases of CVD. In multivariable-adjusted model, baPWV as a continuous variable was not significantly associated with future CVD risk after adjustment for supine BP. However, compared with lower baPWV category (<18 m s(-1)), higher baPWV (< or = 18.0 m s(-1)) was significantly associated with an increased CVD risk (HR: 2.70, 95% confidence interval: 1.18-6.19). Higher baPWV (< or = 18.0 m s(-1)) would be an independent predictor of future CVD event in the general Japanese population.

  1. Brachial blood pressure-independent relations between radial late systolic shoulder-derived aortic pressures and target organ changes.

    PubMed

    Norton, Gavin R; Majane, Olebogeng H I; Maseko, Muzi J; Libhaber, Carlos; Redelinghuys, Michelle; Kruger, Deirdre; Veller, Martin; Sareli, Pinhas; Woodiwiss, Angela J

    2012-04-01

    Central aortic blood pressure (BP; BPc) predicts outcomes beyond brachial BP. In this regard, the application of a generalized transfer function (GTF) to radial pulse waves for the derivation of BPc is an easy and reproducible measurement technique. However, the use of the GTF may not be appropriate in all circumstances. Although the peak of the second shoulder of the radial waveform (P2) is closely associated with BPc, and, hence, BPc may be assessed without the need for a GTF, whether P2-derived BPc is associated with adverse cardiovascular changes independent of brachial BP is uncertain. Thus, P2- and GTF-derived aortic BPs were assessed using applanation tonometry and SphygmoCor software. Left ventricular mass was indexed for height(1.7) (n=678) and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT; n=462) was determined using echocardiography and vascular ultrasound. With adjustments for nurse-derived brachial pulse pressure (PP), P2-derived central PP was independently associated with left ventricular mass indexed for height(1.7) (partial r=0.18; P<0.0001) and IMT (partial r=0.40; P<0.0001). These relations were similar to nurse-derived brachial PP-independent relations between GTF-derived central PP and target organ changes (left ventricular mass indexed for height(1.7): partial r=0.17, P<0.0001; IMT: partial r=0.37, P<0.0001). In contrast, with adjustments for central PP, nurse-derived brachial PP-target organ relations were eliminated (partial r=-0.21 to 0.05). Twenty-four-hour, day, and night PP-target organ relations did not survive adjustments for nurse-derived brachial BP. In conclusion, central PP derived from P2, which does not require a GTF, is associated with cardiovascular target organ changes independent of brachial BP. Thus, when assessing adverse cardiovascular effects of aortic BP independent of brachial BP, P2-derived measures may complement GTF-derived measures of aortic BP.

  2. Novel Uses of Office-Based Measures of Arterial Compliance

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.

    2015-01-01

    Office-based blood pressure monitoring has been the primary way of managing the cardiovascular risk associated with a diagnosis of hypertension. As research unfolds the nature in which the pulse waveform is generated, additional insights beyond standard measures of systolic and diastolic blood pressure have emerged to help reclassify the cardiovascular risk of patients or point out patterns that have, in longitudinal cohort studies, shown promise as predictors of outcomes such as heart failure. In this review, we focus on the pressure profile in the proximal aorta that can be obtained easily and noninvasively from the radial or brachial artery during a clinical office encounter and the potential value of these measures in outcomes such as left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure. PMID:27057290

  3. Arterial stiffness, central hemodynamics, and cardiovascular risk in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Palatini, Paolo; Casiglia, Edoardo; Gąsowski, Jerzy; Głuszek, Jerzy; Jankowski, Piotr; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Saladini, Francesca; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Van Bortel, Luc; Wojciechowska, Wiktoria; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes several scientific contributions at the recent Satellite Symposium of the European Society of Hypertension, held in Milan, Italy. Arterial stiffening and its hemodynamic consequences can be easily and reliably measured using a range of noninvasive techniques. However, like blood pressure (BP) measurements, arterial stiffness should be measured carefully under standardized patient conditions. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has been proposed as the gold standard for arterial stiffness measurement and is a well recognized predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcome. Systolic BP and pulse pressure in the ascending aorta may be lower than pressures measured in the upper limb, especially in young individuals. A number of studies suggest closer correlation of end-organ damage with central BP than with peripheral BP, and central BP may provide additional prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk. Moreover, BP-lowering drugs can have differential effects on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics compared with brachial BP. This may explain the greater beneficial effect provided by newer antihypertensive drugs beyond peripheral BP reduction. Although many methodological problems still hinder the wide clinical application of parameters of arterial stiffness, these will likely contribute to cardiovascular assessment and management in future clinical practice. Each of the abovementioned parameters reflects a different characteristic of the atherosclerotic process, involving functional and/or morphological changes in the vessel wall. Therefore, acquiring simultaneous measurements of different parameters of vascular function and structure could theoretically enhance the power to improve risk stratification. Continuous technological effort is necessary to refine our methods of investigation in order to detect early arterial abnormalities. Arterial stiffness and its consequences represent the great challenge of the twenty-first century for

  4. Robotic-assisted double-sleeve lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Tong; Zhao, Yandong; Xuan, Yunpeng

    2017-01-01

    Double-sleeve lobectomy, which includes bronchoplasty and pulmonary arterial angioplasty, is required for certain cases of central-type lung cancer. It is usually done by open surgery or video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). In recently, da Vinci system and robotic surgery have been applied in such complicated cases. Here we describe the details associated with robotic-assisted double-sleeve lobectomy. PMID:28203433

  5. Carotid artery anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four carotid arteries, two on each side of the neck: right and left internal carotid arteries, and right and left external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the head and brain.

  6. Symptomatic Type IV Dual Left Anterior Descending Coronary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Kyriacos; Georgiou, Georgios M.; Nicolaides, Evagoras

    2016-01-01

    Dual left anterior descending coronary artery is a rare congenital anomaly with 4 subtypes. Double left anterior descending coronary artery originating from the left main stem and the right coronary artery (type IV dual left anterior descending artery) has been reported to occur in 0.01% to 0.7% of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. We report a case of a 49-year-old woman who was found to have this anomaly during coronary angiography. The patient had been complaining of chest pain that mimics angina pectoris and exercise tolerance test was positive for myocardial ischemia. PMID:28203572

  7. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  8. Association of Arterial Pressure Volume Index With the Presence of Significantly Stenosed Coronary Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Takashi; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Suematsu, Yasunori; Shiga, Yuhei; Kuwano, Takashi; Sugihara, Makoto; Ike, Amane; Iwata, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Fujimi, Kanta; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-01-01

    Background A blood pressure (BP) monitoring system (PASESA®) can be used to easily analyze the characteristics of central and peripheral arteries during the measurement of brachial BP. Methods We enrolled 108 consecutive patients (M/F = 86/22, age 70 ± 10 years) who underwent coronary angiography (CAG) due to suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) in whom we could measure various parameters using PASESA® in addition to brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). The patients were divided into two groups: patients who did not have significantly stenosed coronary vessel disease (n = 33, non-SVD group) and those who had at least one significantly stenosed coronary vessel (n = 75, SVD group). The characteristics of central and peripheral arteries (arterial velocity pulse index (AVI) and arterial pressure volume index (API), respectively) and baPWV were measured. Estimated central BP (eCBP) was calculated from the data obtained from PASESA®, and CBP was also measured simultaneously by invasive catheterization. Results API, but not AVI and baPWV, in the SVD group was significantly higher than that in the non-SVD group. Although eCBP was significantly associated with CBP, there was no difference in eCBP between the groups. There were significant associations among API, AVI and baPWV, albeit these associations were relatively weak. A multivariate logistic regression revealed that API and β-blocker were significant independent variables that were associated with the presence of significant coronary stenosis. The cut-off level of API that gave the greatest sensitivity and specificity for the presence of SVD was 24 units (sensitivity 0.636 and specificity 0.667). Conclusion In conclusion, API, but not AVI or baPWV, is associated with the presence of significant coronary stenosis. PMID:27429681

  9. Variations of the origin of collateral branches emerging from the posterior aspect of the brachial plexus

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background The frequency of variation found in the arrangement and distribution of the branches in the brachial plexus, make this anatomical region extremely complicated. The medical concerns involved with these variations include anesthetic blocks, surgical approaches, interpreting tumor or traumatic nervous compressions having unexplained clinical symptoms (sensory loss, pain, wakefulness and paresis), and the possibility of these structures becoming compromised. The clinical importance of these variations is discussed in the light of their differential origins. Methods The anatomy of brachial plexus structures from 46 male and 11 female cadaverous specimens were studied. The 40–80 year-old specimens were obtained from the Universidad Industrial de Santander's Medical Faculty's Anatomy Department (dissection laboratory). Parametric measures were used for calculating results. Results Almost half (47.1%) of the evaluated plexuses had collateral variations. Subscapular nerves were the most varied structure, including the presence of a novel accessory nerve. Long thoracic nerve variations were present, as were the absence of C5 or C7 involvement, and late C7 union with C5–C6. Conclusion Further studies are needed to confirm the existence of these variations in a larger sample of cadaver specimens. PMID:17587464

  10. Shoulder tendon transfer options for adult patients with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Elhassan, Bassem; Bishop, Alan; Shin, Alexander; Spinner, Robert

    2010-07-01

    Enhancement of upper-extremity function, specifically shoulder function, after brachial plexus injury requires a good understanding of nerve repair and transfer, with their expected outcome, as well as shoulder anatomy and biomechanics enabling the treating surgeon to use available functioning muscles around the shoulder for transfer, to improve shoulder function. Surgical treatment should address painful shoulder subluxation in addition to improvement of function. The literature focuses on improving shoulder abduction, but improving shoulder external rotation should take priority because this function, even if isolated, will allow patients to position their hand in front of their body. With a functional elbow and hand, patients will be able to do most activities of daily living. The lower trapezius has been shown to be a good transfer to restore external rotation of the shoulder. Other parts of the trapezius, levator scapulae, rhomboids, and, when available, the latissimus dorsi, pectoralis major, teres major, biceps, triceps, and serratus anterior muscles can all be used to replace the rotator cuff and deltoid muscle function. To optimize the results, a close working relationship is required between surgeons reconstructing brachial plexus injury and shoulder specialists.

  11. Tick paralysis with atypical presentation: isolated, reversible involvement of the upper trunk of brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Engin, A; Elaldi, N; Bolayir, E; Dokmetas, I; Bakir, M

    2006-07-01

    Tick paralysis is a disease that occurs worldwide. It is a relatively rare but potentially fatal condition. The only way to establish the diagnosis is to carefully search for the tick paralysis. It is caused by a neurotoxin secreted by engorged female ticks. Tick paralysis generally begins in the lower extremities and ascends symmetrically to involve the trunk, upper extremities and head within a few hours. Although early-onset prominent bulbar palsy and isolated facial weakness without generalised paralysis are rare, there is no report in the English literature concerning isolated, reversible involvement of the upper trunk of brachial plexus caused by tick bite. We report a case of isolated, reversible involvement of the upper trunk of brachial plexus as a variant of tick paralysis. Diagnosis was confirmed with needle electromyography and nerve conduction examination. Within 2 weeks, the patient was fully recovered. The purpose of presenting this case is to remind clinicians that tick paralysis should be considered even in cases with atypical neurological findings admitted to the emergency department.

  12. Variations of Cords of Brachial Plexus and Branching Pattern of Nerves Emanating From Them.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajani

    2017-03-01

    Brachial plexus is complex network of nerves, formed by joining and splitting of ventral rami of spinal nerves C5, C6, C7, C8, and T1 forming trunks, divisions, and cords. The nerves emerging from trunks and cords innervate the upper limb and to some extent pectoral region. Scanty literature describes the variations in the formation of cords and nerves emanating from them. Moreover, the variations of cords of brachial plexus and nerves emanating from them have iatrogenic implications in the upper limb and pectoral region. Hence study has been carried out. Twenty-eight upper limbs and posterior triangles from 14 cadavers fixed in formalin were dissected and rare and new variations of cords were observed. Most common variation consisted of formation of posterior cord by fusion of posterior division of upper and middle trunk and lower trunk continued as medial cord followed by originating of 2 pectoral nerves from anterior divisions of upper and middle trunk. Other variations include anterior division of upper trunk continued as lateral cord and pierced the coracobrachialis, upper and middle trunk fused to form common cord which divided into lateral and posterior cords, upper trunk gave suprascapular nerve and abnormal lateral pectoral nerve and formation of median nerve by 3 roots. These variations were analyzed for diagnostic and clinical significance making the study relevant for surgeons, radiologists in arresting failure patients and anatomists academically in medical education.

  13. Pan-brachial plexus neuropraxia following lightning: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Ashis; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar; Jha, Menka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neurological complications following lightning are rare and occur in form of temporary neurological deficits of central origin. Involvement of peripheral nervous system is extremely rare and only a few cases have been described in the literature. Isolated unilateral pan-brachial plexus neuropraxia has never been reported in the literature. Steroids have long been used for treatment of neuropraxia. However, their use in lightning neural injury is unique and requires special mention. Case Description: We report a rare case of lightning-induced unilateral complete flaccid paralysis along with sensory loss in a young patient. Lightning typically causes central nervous involvement in various types of motor and sensory deficit. Surprisingly, the nerve conduction study showed the involvement of peripheral nervous system involvement. Steroids were administered and there was significant improvement in neurological functions within a short span of days. Patients’ functions in the affected limb were normal in one month. Conclusion: Our case was interesting since it is the first such case in the literature where lightning has caused such a rare instance of unilateral pan-brachial plexus lesion. Such cases when seen, raises the possibility of more common central nervous system pathology rather than peripheral involvement. However, such lesions can be purely benign forms of peripheral nerve neuropraxia, which can be managed by steroid treatment without leaving any long-term neurological deficits. PMID:25883854

  14. Tick paralysis with atypical presentation: isolated, reversible involvement of the upper trunk of brachial plexus

    PubMed Central

    Engin, A; Elaldi, N; Bolayir, E; Dokmetas, I; Bakir, M

    2006-01-01

    Tick paralysis is a disease that occurs worldwide. It is a relatively rare but potentially fatal condition. The only way to establish the diagnosis is to carefully search for the tick paralysis. It is caused by a neurotoxin secreted by engorged female ticks. Tick paralysis generally begins in the lower extremities and ascends symmetrically to involve the trunk, upper extremities and head within a few hours. Although early‐onset prominent bulbar palsy and isolated facial weakness without generalised paralysis are rare, there is no report in the English literature concerning isolated, reversible involvement of the upper trunk of brachial plexus caused by tick bite. We report a case of isolated, reversible involvement of the upper trunk of brachial plexus as a variant of tick paralysis. Diagnosis was confirmed with needle electromyography and nerve conduction examination. Within 2 weeks, the patient was fully recovered. The purpose of presenting this case is to remind clinicians that tick paralysis should be considered even in cases with atypical neurological findings admitted to the emergency department. PMID:16794084

  15. Pressure-specified sensory device versus electrodiagnostic testing in brachial plexus upper trunk injury.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul Kumar; Bowen, Margaret Elaine; Eichhorn, Mitchell George

    2010-05-01

    Brachial plexus upper trunk injury is associated with winged scapula owing to the close anatomical course of the long thoracic nerve and upper trunk. Needle electromyography is a common diagnostic test for this injury; however, it does not detect injury in most patients with upper trunk damage. The pressure-specified sensory device may be an alternative to needle electromyography. Thirty patients with winged scapula and upper trunk injury were evaluated with needle electromyography (EMG) and pressure-specified sensory device (PSSD) tests. EMG testing of the biceps muscle was compared with PSSD testing of the dorsal hand skin (C6 damage), and EMG testing of the deltoid and spinati muscles was compared with PSSD testing of the deltoid skin (C5 damage). PSSD pressure values were significantly higher on the affected arm. On the basis of published and calculated threshold values the PSSD was found to be significantly more sensitive than EMG. The PSSD tests consistently identified injuries that were not detected by needle EMG tests. These findings provide strong evidence that the PSSD is more effective than needle EMG in the detection of brachial plexus upper trunk injury.

  16. Impaired endothelial progenitor cell activity is associated with reduced arterial elasticity in patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Chen, Long; Su, Chen; Xia, Wen-Hao; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jie-Mei; Chen, Fei; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Fang; Xu, Shi-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Lin; Tao, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is related to reduced arterial elasticity in patients with essential hypertension. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), an important endogenous repair approach for endothelial injury, is altered in hypertensive patients. However, the association between alteration in circulating EPCs and hypertension-related reduced arterial elasticity has not been reported. The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between alteration in circulating EPCs and hypertension-related reduced arterial elasticity. We measured the artery elasticity profiles including brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) and C1 large and C2 small artery elasticity indices in patients with essential hypertension (n = 20) and age-matched normotensive subjects (n = 21). The number and activity of circulating EPCs isolated from peripheral blood were determined. Compared to normotensive subjects, the patients with hypertension exhibited decreased C1 large and C2 small artery elasticity indices, as well as increased baPWV. The number of circulating EPCs did not differ between the two groups. The migratory and proliferative activities of circulating EPCs in hypertensive patients were lower than those in normotensive subjects. Both proliferatory and migratory activities of circulating EPCs closely correlated with arterial elasticity profiles, including baPWV and C1 large and C2 small artery elasticity indices. Multivariate analysis identified both proliferative and migratory activities of circulating EPCs as independent predictors of the artery elasticity profiles. The present study demonstrates for the first time that impaired activity of circulating EPCs is associated with reduced arterial elasticity in patients with hypertension. The fall in endogenous repair capacity of vascular endothelium may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension-related vascular injury.

  17. Relationship of Inflammatory Biomarkers with Severity of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The pentraxin family, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum amyloid P (SAP), and pentraxin 3 (PTX3), has been identified as playing a key role in inflammatory reactions such as in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we examined the relationship between peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and serum levels of pentraxins. Methods. This study was undertaken via a retrospective review of PAD patients with surgical intervention for lesions of the common femoral artery. We evaluated the preoperative patient conditions, hemodynamic status, such as ankle brachial index (ABI), and clinical ischemic conditions according to Rutherford classification. Preoperatively, we collected blood samples for determining the serum levels of hs-CRP, SAP, and PTX3. Results. Twelve PAD patients with common femoral arterial lesions were treated and examined. The hemodynamic severity of PAD was not negatively correlated with hs-CRP, SAP, or PTX3. The clinical severity evaluated by Rutherford classification was significantly positively correlated with the serum level of PTX3 (p = 0.019). Conclusion. We demonstrated that PTX3 might be a better marker of PAD than hs-CRP and SAP. Furthermore, PTX3 might be a prognostic marker to evaluate the severity of PAD. PMID:27559483

  18. Effects of safflower seed extract on arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsuya; Tsubaki, Shigekazu; Fujita, Masami; Koyama, Naoto; Takahashi, Michio; Takazawa, Kenji

    2010-11-03

    Safflower seed extract (SSE) contains characteristic polyphenols and serotonin derivatives (N-( p-coumaroyl) serotonin and N-feruloylserotonin), which are reported to inhibit oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), formation of atherosclerotic plaques, and improve arterial stiffness as assessed by pulse wave analysis in animal models. The effects of long-term supplementation with SSE on arterial stiffness in human subjects were evaluated. This doubleblind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 77 males (35-65 years) and 15 postmenopausal females (55-65 years) with high-normal blood pressure or mild hypertension who were not undergoing treatment. Subjects received SSE (70 mg/day as serotonin derivatives) or placebo for 12 weeks, and pulse wave measurements, ie, second derivative of photoplethysmogram (SDPTG), augmentation index, and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were conducted at baseline, and at weeks 4, 8, and 12. Vascular age estimated by SDPTG aging index improved in the SSE-supplemented group when compared with the placebo group at four (P = 0.0368) and 12 weeks (P = 0.0927). The trend of augmentation index reduction (P = 0.072 versus baseline) was observed in the SSE-supplemented group, but reduction of baPWV by SSE supplementation was not observed. The SSE-supplemented group also showed a trend towards a lower malondialdehyde-modified-LDL autoantibody titer at 12 weeks from baseline. These results suggest long-term ingestion of SSE in humans could help to improve arterial stiffness.

  19. Association of Peripheral Arterial and Cardiovascular Diseases in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carolina; Miname, Marcio; Makdisse, Marcia; Kalil, Roberto; Santos, Raul D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an elevation in the serum levels of total cholesterol and of low-density lipoproteins (LDL- c). Known to be closely related to the atherosclerotic process, FH can determine the development of early obstructive lesions in different arterial beds. In this context, FH has also been proposed to be a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Objective This observational cross-sectional study assessed the association of PAD with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease, in patients with heterozygous FH. Methods The diagnosis of PAD was established by ankle-brachial index (ABI) values ≤ 0.90. This study assessed 202 patients (35% of men) with heterozygous FH (90.6% with LDL receptor mutations), mean age of 51 ± 14 years and total cholesterol levels of 342 ± 86 mg /dL. Results The prevalences of PAD and previous CVD were 17% and 28.2 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an independent association between CVD and the diagnosis of PAD was observed (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.004 - 6.230; p = 0.049). Conclusion Systematic screening for PAD by use of ABI is feasible to assess patients with FH, and it might indicate an increased risk for CVD. However, further studies are required to determine the role of ABI as a tool to assess the cardiovascular risk of those patients. PMID:25029472

  20. [Double responses].

    PubMed

    Motté, G; Dinanian, S; Sebag, C; Drieu, L; Slama, M

    1995-12-01

    Double response is a rare electrocardiographic phenomenon requiring two atrioventricular conduction pathways with very different electrophysiological properties. Double ventricular responses are the usual manifestation: an atrial depolarisation (spontaneous or provoked, anticipated or not) is followed by a first ventricular response dependent on an accessory pathway or a rapid nodal pathway and then a second response resulting from sufficiently delayed transmission through a nodal pathway for the ventricles to have recovered their excitability when the second wave of activation reaches them. A simple curiosity when isolated and occurring under unusual conditions, particularly during electrophysiological investigation of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the double response may initiate symptomatic non-reentrant junctional tachycardia when associated with nodal duality and repeating from atria in sinus rhythm. The functional incapacity and resistance to antiarrhythmic therapy may require referral for ablation of the slow pathway.

  1. Cutting Balloon-Assisted Angioplasty of an Anastomotic Carotid-Brachial Bypass Graft Stenosis: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhudesai, Vikramaditya; Orme, Richard Fox, Anthony D.

    2004-08-15

    Neointimal hyperplasia leads to anastomotic stenosis in bypass grafts. These stenoses are often resistant to conventional balloon dilatation. We present a case of a carotid-brachial bypass graft stenosis, which was treated by a 5-mm cutting balloon angioplasty with a good angiographic and clinical result.

  2. Comparison Between Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular and Interscalene Brachial Plexus Blocks in Patients Undergoing Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Taeha; Kil, Byung Tae; Kim, Jong Hae

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although supraclavicular brachial plexus block (SCBPB) was repopularized by the introduction of ultrasound, its usefulness in shoulder surgery has not been widely reported. The objective of this study was to compare motor and sensory blockades, the incidence of side effects, and intraoperative opioid analgesic requirements between SCBPB and interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups (ISBPB group: n = 47; SCBPB group: n = 46). The side effects of the brachial plexus block (Horner's syndrome, hoarseness, and subjective dyspnea), the sensory block score (graded from 0 [no cold sensation] to 100 [intact sensation] using an alcohol swab) for each of the 5 dermatomes (C5–C8 and T1), and the motor block score (graded from 0 [complete paralysis] to 6 [normal muscle force]) for muscle forces corresponding to the radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous nerves were evaluated 20 min after the brachial plexus block. Fentanyl was administered in 50 μg increments when the patients complained of pain that was not relieved by the brachial plexus block. There were no conversions to general anesthesia due to a failed brachial plexus block. The sensory block scores for the C5 to C8 dermatomes were significantly lower in the ISBPB group. However, the percentage of patients who received fentanyl was comparable between the 2 groups (27.7% [ISBPB group] and 30.4% [SCBPB group], P = 0.77). SCBPB produced significantly lower motor block scores for the radial, ulnar, and median nerves than did ISBPB. A significantly higher incidence of Horner's syndrome was observed in the ISBPB group (59.6% [ISBPB group] and 19.6% [SCBPB group], P < 0.001). No patient complained of subjective dyspnea. Despite the weaker degree of sensory blockade provided by SCBPB in comparison to ISBPB, opioid analgesic requirements are similar during arthroscopic shoulder surgery under

  3. Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Hall, William H.; Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6-135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose-response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

  4. Repair of Multiple Subclavian and Axillary Artery Aneurysms in a 58-Year-Old Man with Marfan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dolapoglu, Ahmet; Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S.

    2016-01-01

    Dilation of the ascending aorta and aortic dissections are often seen in Marfan syndrome; however, true aneurysms of the subclavian and axillary arteries rarely seem to develop in patients who have this disease. We present the case of a 58-year-old man with Marfan syndrome who had undergone a Bentall procedure and thoracoabdominal aortic repair for an aortic dissection and who later developed multiple aneurysmal dilations of his right subclavian and axillary arteries. The aneurysms were successfully repaired by means of a surgical bypass technique in which a Dacron graft was placed between the carotid and brachial arteries. We also discuss our strategy for determining the optimal surgical approach in these patients. PMID:27777529

  5. Physical exercise improves arterial stiffness after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hubli, Michèle; Currie, Katharine D.; West, Christopher R.; Gee, Cameron M.; Krassioukov, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective/background Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), the gold-standard assessment of central arterial stiffness, has prognostic value for cardiovascular disease risk in able-bodied individuals. The aim of this study was to compare aortic PWV in athletes and non-athletes with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Cross-sectional comparison. Methods Aortic PWV was assessed in 20 individuals with motor-complete, chronic SCI (C2–T5; 18 ± 8 years post-injury) using applanation tonometry at the carotid and femoral arterial sites. Ten elite hand-cyclists were matched for sex to 10 non-athletes; age and time since injury were comparable between the groups. Heart rate and discrete brachial blood pressure measurements were collected throughout testing. Outcome measures Aortic PWV, blood pressure, heart rate. Results Aortic PWV was significantly lower in athletes vs. non-athletes (6.9 ± 1.0 vs. 8.7 ± 2.5 m/second, P = 0.044). There were no significant between-group differences in resting supine mean arterial blood pressure (91 ± 19 vs. 81 ± 10 mmHg) and heart rate (60 ± 10 vs. 58 ± 6 b.p.m.). Conclusion Athletes with SCI exhibited improved central arterial stiffness compared to non-athletes, which is in agreement with the previous able-bodied literature. This finding implies that chronic exercise training may improve arterial health and potentially lower cardiovascular disease risk in the SCI population. PMID:24976366

  6. Cooled artery extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artery vapor trap. A heat pipe artery is constructed with an extension protruding from the evaporator end of the heat pipe beyond the active area of the evaporator. The vapor migrates into the artery extension because of gravity or liquid displacement, and cooling the extension condenses the vapor to liquid, thus preventing vapor lock in the working portion of the artery by removing vapor from within the active artery. The condensed liquid is then transported back to the evaporator by the capillary action of the artery extension itself or by wick located within the extension.

  7. [A case of subacute necrotizing lymphadenitis complicated with brachial plexus neuritis].

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, A; Araki, E; Arakawa, K; Kikuchi, H; Iwaki, T; Yamada, T; Kira, J

    1998-01-01

    A 22-year-old female noted a low grade fever and swelling of the cervical lymph nodes in May 1997, and later developed a dry cough. She was diagnosed to have interstitial pneumonitis, and then administration of corticosteroids alleviated her symptoms. On February 6, 1998, however, a high fever recurred and her swollen cervical lymph node on the right side was biopsied on February 9, 1998. A histological examination revealed an increased number of histiocytes and karyorrhexis of the lymphocytes in the paracortical areas, and she was therefore diagnosed to have histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis. She could not fully elevate her arm on February 16, 1998. On admission, her cervical lymph node was swollen on the left side. A neurological examination revealed a marked weakness of the right deltoid muscle, moderate weakness of the right latissimus dorsi, triceps and brachioradialis muscles and also a mild weakness of the serratus anterior, supra- and infra-spinatus, and biceps brachii muscles. The muscle power of the other muscles were normal and no muscle atrophy was evident. Winging of the right scapula was observed. The deep tendon reflexes were normal in all four limbs, and her sensation was also normal. No cerebellar sign was found. The Jackson, Spurling, Allen, Morley and Adson tests were all negative. ESR was mildly elevated to 18 mm/hr, but CRP was negative. RF, ANA and anti-SS-A and SS-B antibodies were positive, whereas LE-test, direct and indirect Coombs tests and other autoantibodies were negative. Needle EMG disclosed fasciculation potentials in the right triceps muscle and polyphasic waves in the right deltoid muscle. MRI showed gadolinium-enhancement of the right brachial plexus. Although an abnormal accumulation of gallium was detected in the right parotid and bilateral submandibular glands, no sicca symptoms were found and the Schirmer test findings were normal. Oral prednisolone (50 mg/day with gradual tapering) alleviated both her symptoms and the

  8. Detecting lower extremity vascular dynamics in patients with peripheral artery disease using diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Michael A.; Kim, Hyun-Keol K.; Kim, In-Kyong; Dayal, Rajeev; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2011-02-01

    Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) affects over 10 million Americans and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. While in many cases the ankle-brachial index (ABI) can be used for diagnosing the disease, this parameter is not dependable in the diabetic and elderly population. These populations tend to have calcified arteries, which leads to elevated ABI values. Dynamic optical tomography (DDOT) promises to overcome the limitations of the current diagnostic techniques and has the potential to initiate a paradigm shift in the diagnosis of vascular disease. We have performed initial pilot studies involving 5 PAD patients and 3 healthy volunteers. The time traces and tomographic reconstruction obtained from measurements on the feet show significant differences between healthy and affected vasculatures. In addition, we found that DOT is capable of identifying PAD in diabetic patients, who are misdiagnosed by the traditional ABI screening.

  9. The effects of atorvastatin therapy on endothelıal function in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Ahmet; Cakar, M Akif; Baskurt, Murat; Okcun, Barıs; Guzelsoy, Deniz; Coskun, Ugur

    2007-01-01

    Background Statins improve the endothelial function in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, they contribute to the substantial decrease in coronary heart disease by reducing plasma cholesterol levels. They also, reduce oxidative stress, stabilize the atherosclerotic plaque and inhibit inflammatory response. These functions of statins have been briefly described as pleiotropic effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of atorvastatin therapy on endothelial functions in patients with CAD. Methods Fourty-nine patients (40 men, 9 women, mean age 59 +/- 11 years) with diagnosed CAD were selected as the study group. The patients were given 10 mg/day atorvastatin for 12 weeks. If the target cholesterol levels has not been achieved 6 weeks after the treatment, then the daily atorvastatin dosage has been increased. The endothelial function was evaluated by flow mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery. Results It has been figured out that 12 weeks later, atorvastatin caused a statistically significant decrease in the plasma levels of LDL-cholesterol and total cholesterol (p < 0,0001). Meanwhile, it was determined that the FMD got statistically significant improved 12 weeks after the atorvastatin therapy (8,1%–4,2%, p < 0,001). However there was no statistically significant change in non-endothelium dependent dilatation (NID). Conclusion Endothelium derived vasodilatation (EBD), which was non-invasively detected via brachial artery ultrasonography, had statistically significant improvment within 12 weeks of atorvastatin therapy whereas non-endothelium dependent dilatation (NID) had no change. PMID:18163915

  10. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Arterial Stiffness: Tsunami Effect in the Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Saji, Naoki; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel diseases, including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, pose a risk for cerebrovascular disease, cognitive impairment, and the geriatric syndrome via effects on arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological, and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness in cerebral small vessel diseases remain unclear. Summary Arterial stiffness can be assessed using various indicators such as the ankle-brachial index, pulse wave velocity, cardio-ankle vascular index, and augmentation index. Arterial stiffness is independently associated with all components of cerebral small vessel disease including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, although there are some methodological differences between the various surrogate markers. Evidence of arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. Further, vascular narrowing due to atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness due to lipohyalinosis can accelerate the pulse waves. This hemodynamic stress, pulsatile pressure, or blood pressure variability can cause a ‘tsunami effect’ towards the cerebral parenchyma and lead to cerebral small vessel disease. Previous studies have shown that silent lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are strongly associated with arterial stiffness. However, the association between microbleeds and arterial stiffness remains controversial, as there are two vessel mechanisms related to microbleeds: cerebral amyloid angiopathy and hypertensive small vessel disease. Key Messages Cerebral small vessel disease with associated arterial stiffness is a risk factor for silent cerebral lesions, stroke, and cognitive impairment. Improvement of the living environment, management of risk factors, and innovation and development of novel drugs that improve arterial stiffness may suppress the progression of cerebral small vessel disease, and may reduce

  11. Brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome: A problem of liability. A presentation of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hornillo, M; de la Riva, M C; Ojeda, R

    2016-01-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy, brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a rare neuromuscular involvement of unknown aetiology. When it onsets in connection with a health care act, such as childbirth or surgery, a malpractice argument is often used as a cause of adverse outcome, usually due to an incorrect position of the patient on the operating table, a circumstance which directly involves the anesthesia area. Three cases are presented of Parsonage-Turner syndrome following very different surgery, with different results as regards prognosis. A review and discussion of bibliography is presented on the possibility that such circumstances are the subject of malpractice claims. Special emphasis is placed on the most currently accepted aetiopathogenic theories, and the relationship of this syndrome with the surgical act as a determining medico-legal aspect. Valuation parameters are proposed.

  12. Clinical Assessment of the Infant and Child Following Perinatal Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Susan V.; DeMatteo, Carol

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Literature review INTRODUCTION After perinatal brachial plexus injury (PBPI), clinicians play an important role in injury classification as well as the assessment of recovery and secondary conditions. Early assessment guides the initial plan of care and influences follow-up and long-term outcome. PURPOSE To review methods used to assess, classify and monitor the extent and influence of PBPI with an emphasis on guidelines for clinicians. METHODS We use The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) model to provide a guide to assessment after PBPI for rehabilitation clinicians. DISCUSSION With information gained from targeted assessments, clinicians can design interventions to increase the opportunities infants and children have for optimal recovery and to attain skills that allow participation in areas of interest. PMID:25840493

  13. [Brachial plexus compression from supraclavicular encapsulated fat necrosis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Páez, Miguel; de Miguel-Pueyo, Luis; Marín-Salido, Esteban José; Carrasco-Brenes, Antonio; Martín-Gallego, Alvaro; Arráez-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 44-year-old male, lacking clinical history of previous illness, who had surgery at our hospital to treat a mass in the supraclavicular space. The patient presented with a 1-month progressive distal paresis of the left arm. The histo-pathological examination of the mass revealed an encapsulated fat necrosis. Fat necrosis is characterised by cystic architecture, encapsulation with fat necrosis within, and inflammatory infiltration of its walls. Neural structure compression secondary to this tumour mass is very rare. Fat necrosis is more frequent in the lower limbs, in areas exposed to trauma. This article is the first report of brachial plexus compression due to supraclavicular fat necrosis.

  14. Hypotensive bradycardic events during shoulder arthroscopic surgery under interscalene brachial plexus blocks

    PubMed Central

    Song, Seok Young

    2012-01-01

    Sudden, profound hypotensive and bradycardic events (HBEs) have been reported in more than 20% of patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy in the sitting position. Although HBEs may be associated with the adverse effects of interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) in the sitting position, the underlying mechanisms responsible for HBEs during the course of shoulder surgery are not well understood. The basic mechanisms of HBEs may be associated with the underlying mechanisms responsible for vasovagal syncope, carotid sinus hypersensitivity or orthostatic syncope. In this review, we discussed the possible mechanisms of HBEs during shoulder arthroscopic surgery, in the sitting position, under ISBPB. In particular, we focused on the relationship between HBEs and various types of syncopal reactions, the relationship between HBEs and the Bezold-Jarisch reflex, and the new contributing factors for the occurrence of HBEs, such as stellate ganglion block or the intraoperative administration of intravenous fentanyl. PMID:22474545

  15. Radiological Imaging Findings of a Case with Vertebral Osteoid Osteoma Leading to Brachial Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Erkan; Ayan, Erdoğan; Çelikyay, Fatih; Acu, Berat

    2013-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a small, benign osteoblastic tumor consisting of a highly vascularized nidus of connective tissue surrounded by sclerotic bone. Three-quarters of osteoid osteomas are located in the long bones, and only 7-12% in the vertebral column. The classical clinical presentation of spinal osteoid osteoma is that of painful scoliosis. Other clinical features include nerve root irritation and night pain. Osteoid osteoma has characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings. Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the osteoid osteomas causing intense perinidal edema can be confusing, these patients should be evaluated with clinical findings and other imaging techniques. In this study, we present X-ray, CT, and MRI findings of a case with osteoid osteoma located in thoracic 1 vertebra left lamina and transverse process junction leading to brachial neuralgia symptoms. PMID:24404413

  16. Multimodality imaging of peripheral neuropathies of the upper limb and brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Linda, Dorota Dominika; Harish, Srinivasan; Stewart, Brian G; Finlay, Karen; Parasu, Naveen; Rebello, Ryan Paul

    2010-09-01

    The peripheral nerves of the upper limb are affected by a number of entrapment and compression neuropathies. These discrete syndromes involve the brachial plexus as well as the musculocutaneous, axillary, suprascapular, ulnar, radial, and median nerves. Clinical examination and electrophysiologic studies are the traditional mainstay of diagnostic work-up; however, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging provide spatial information regarding the affected nerve and its surroundings, often assisting in narrowing the differential diagnosis and guiding treatment. Imaging is particularly valuable in complex cases with discrepant nerve function test results. Familiarity with the clinical features of various peripheral neuropathies of the upper extremity, the relevant anatomy, and the most common sites and causes of nerve entrapment assists in diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Attenuation of brain grey matter volume in brachial plexus injury patients.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yechen; Liu, Hanqiu; Hua, Xuyun; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong; Shen, Yundong

    2016-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury (BPI) causes functional changes in the brain, but the structural changes resulting from BPI remain unknown. In this study, we compared grey matter volume between nine BPI patients and ten healthy controls by means of voxel-based morphometry. This was the first study of cortical morphology in BPI. We found that brain regions including the cerebellum, anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral inferior, medial, superior frontal lobe, and bilateral insula had less grey matter in BPI patients. Most of the affected brain regions of BPI patients are closely related to motor function. We speculate that the loss of grey matter in multiple regions might be the neural basis of the difficulties in the motor rehabilitation of BPI patients. The mapping result might provide new target regions for interventions of motor rehabilitation.

  18. Postoperative monitoring in free muscle transfers for reconstruction in brachial plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Dodakundi, Chaitanya; Doi, Kazuteru; Hattori, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Soutetsu; Yonemura, Hiroshi; Fujihara, Yuki

    2012-03-01

    Free gracilis transfers are done for reanimation of the upper limb in traumatic total brachial plexus palsy. Because of buried nature of the free muscle and monitoring skin flap in the axillary or infraclavicular region, it is always a tricky situation for continuous and repeated monitoring to assess vascular status. Critical ischemia times vary between the muscle and monitoring skin flap because of which signs of ischemic changes in the monitoring skin flap are always delayed with respect to the muscle. We describe a novel method that uses the principle of evoked potentials from the muscle to assess the vascular status of the free muscle and detects vascular compromise early before the skin changes are apparent.

  19. Radiological imaging findings of a case with vertebral osteoid osteoma leading to brachial neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Erkan; Ayan, Erdoğan; Celikyay, Fatih; Acu, Berat

    2013-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a small, benign osteoblastic tumor consisting of a highly vascularized nidus of connective tissue surrounded by sclerotic bone. Three-quarters of osteoid osteomas are located in the long bones, and only 7-12% in the vertebral column. The classical clinical presentation of spinal osteoid osteoma is that of painful scoliosis. Other clinical features include nerve root irritation and night pain. Osteoid osteoma has characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings. Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the osteoid osteomas causing intense perinidal edema can be confusing, these patients should be evaluated with clinical findings and other imaging techniques. In this study, we present X-ray, CT, and MRI findings of a case with osteoid osteoma located in thoracic 1 vertebra left lamina and transverse process junction leading to brachial neuralgia symptoms.

  20. Double Layers in Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Alton C. (Editor); Moorehead, Tauna W. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: laboratory double layers; ion-acoustic double layers; pumping potential wells; ion phase-space vortices; weak double layers; electric fields and double layers in plasmas; auroral double layers; double layer formation in a plasma; beamed emission from gamma-ray burst source; double layers and extragalactic jets; and electric potential between plasma sheet clouds.

  1. Association of T Cell and Macrophage Activation with Arterial Vascular Health in HIV.

    PubMed

    Grome, Heather N; Barnett, Louise; Hagar, Cindy C; Harrison, David G; Kalams, Spyros A; Koethe, John R

    2017-02-01

    HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the arterial vascular functions affected by persistent innate and cellular immune activation are not well described. We assessed the relationship between immunologic and vascular parameters in 70 HIV-infected adults on efavirenz, tenofovir, and emtricitabine with more than 2 years of virologic suppression and no history of CVD. We measured brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) using ultrasound and circulating intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) by multiple immunoassay. We also measured circulating naive (CD45RO(-)CCR7(+)CD27(+)), activated (CD38(+) and CD38(+)DR(+)), exhausted (PD1(+)), senescent (CD57(+)), and memory (CD45RO(+)) CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell subsets by flow cytometry, and macrophage activation markers by ELISA and multiple immunoassay. Regression models were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, duration of antiretroviral therapy (ART), and body mass index. Median age was 45 years (IQR 39, 50), median CD4(+) count 701 cells/μl (IQR 540, 954), and 43% were female. Lower brachial FMD was associated with a higher percentage of activated CD8(+) T cells (p < .01), but not associated with macrophage activation. In contrast, higher ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were associated with sCD163 (p < = .01 for both), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (p < = .02 for both), and sCD14 (p = .01 for ICAM-1 only). These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that circulating CD8(+) T cell activation may impair arterial smooth muscle relaxation, while macrophage activation has a role in the expression of endothelial cell proteins involved in immune cell translocation. Both innate and cellular immune activation appear to promote arterial vascular disease in HIV-infected persons on ART using differing mechanisms.

  2. Impact of excess body weight on arterial structure, function, and blood pressure in firefighters.

    PubMed

    Fahs, Christopher A; Smith, Denise L; Horn, Gavin P; Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Rossow, Lindy M; Echols, George; Heffernan, Kevin S; Fernhall, Bo

    2009-11-15

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among firefighters. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of excess body weight on arterial structure and function and blood pressure (BP) in relatively young, apparently healthy, firefighters. The body mass index, brachial BP, carotid BP, aortic BP, radial augmentation index, central pulse wave velocity, forearm blood flow, forearm vasodilatory capacity, carotid arterial compliance, carotid intima-media thickness, and brachial flow-mediated dilation were assessed in 110 firefighters (aged 29.7 +/- 8.0 years). The group was divided into equal tertiles according to the body mass index (<25.9, 25.9 to 29.4, and >or=29.5 kg/m(2)). Group differences in hemodynamics, anthropometrics, microvascular function, and macrovascular structure and function were tested using multivariate analysis of variance. The obese group was older, heavier, and had a larger waist circumference compared to the lean and overweight groups (p <0.05). The overweight group was also older, heavier, and had a larger waist circumference than the lean group (p <0.05). Compared to the lean group, the overweight and obese groups had a greater systolic BP (p <0.05). The obese group also had a significantly greater mean arterial BP and carotid systolic BP than the lean group (p <0.05). The obese group had greater beta stiffness and elastic modulus compared to the lean and overweight groups (p <0.05), but no group differences were found in endothelial function. In conclusion, in a population of relatively young firefighters, an increased body mass index was associated with elevated peripheral BP and arterial stiffness, with no apparent decrements in endothelial function.

  3. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a process called atherosclerosis ...

  4. Carotid artery surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100124.htm Carotid artery surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... out of 4 Overview There are four carotid arteries, with a pair located on each side of ...

  5. Peripheral artery bypass - leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007394.htm Peripheral artery bypass - leg To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Peripheral artery bypass is surgery to reroute the blood supply ...

  6. Coronary Artery Bypass

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview Aneurysm Repair Balloon Angioplasty and Stents Carotid Artery Angioplasty and Stents Carotid Endarterectomy Catheter Ablation Heart ... Limited-Access Heart Surgery Maze Surgery Pacemakers Radial Artery Access Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization Valve Repair or Replacement ...

  7. Uterine artery embolization - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000161.htm Uterine artery embolization - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had uterine artery embolization (UAE). UAE is a procedure to treat ...

  8. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened ...

  9. Retinal artery occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... These blockages are more likely if there is hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ) in the eye. Clots ... Blindness and vision loss Blood clots Diabetes Glaucoma Hardening of the arteries High blood cholesterol levels High ...

  10. Radial Artery Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the radial artery for cardiac catheterization procedures. Advantages of Radial Artery Catheterization Any catheter placement into ... walk, and eat immediately. This is a particular advantage for patients with back problems because there is ...

  11. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... sites within the artery. This process is called atherosclerosis. Carotid arteries that are clogged with plaques are ... at greater risk of high blood pressure and atherosclerosis. High blood-fat levels. High levels of low- ...

  12. What Is Peripheral Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Peripheral Artery Disease? Peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.) is ... that affects blood flow to the legs. Normal Artery and Artery With Plaque Buildup The illustration shows ...

  13. Extended Long-Term (5 Years) Outcomes of Triangle Tilt Surgery in Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the "extended" long-term (5 years) functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients, who underwent triangle tilt surgery between February 2005 and January 2008. Methods: Twenty two children (9 girls and 13 boys, mean age at surgery was 5.8 years; ranging 2.1-11.8 years old), who initially presented with medial rotation contracture and scapula deformity secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury were included in this study. Functional movements were evaluated pre-operatively, and 5 years following triangle tilt surgery by modified Mallet scale. Results: Here, we report long-term (5 years) follow-up of triangle tilt surgery for 22 OBPI patients. Upper extremity functional movements such as, external rotation (2.5±0.6 to 4.1±0.8, p<0.0001), hand-to-spine (2.6±0.6 to 3.4±1.1, p<0.005), hand-to-neck (2.7±0.7 to 4.3±0.7, p<0.0001), hand-to-mouth (2.3±0.9 (92º±33) to 4.2±0.5 (21º±16), p<0.0001), and supination (2.6±1.1 (-8.2º ±51) to 4.1±0.7 (61±32)) were significantly improved (p<0.0001), and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years). Total modified Mallet functional score was also shown to improve from 14.1±2.7 to 20.3±2.5. Conclusions: The triangle tilt surgery improved all shoulder functions significantly, and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years) in these patients. PMID:23730369

  14. Double screening

    SciTech Connect

    Gratia, Pierre; Hu, Wayne; Joyce, Austin; Ribeiro, Raquel H.

    2016-06-15

    Attempts to modify gravity in the infrared typically require a screening mechanism to ensure consistency with local tests of gravity. These screening mechanisms fit into three broad classes; we investigate theories which are capable of exhibiting more than one type of screening. Specifically, we focus on a simple model which exhibits both Vainshtein and kinetic screening. We point out that due to the two characteristic length scales in the problem, the type of screening that dominates depends on the mass of the sourcing object, allowing for different phenomenology at different scales. We consider embedding this double screening phenomenology in a broader cosmological scenario and show that the simplest examples that exhibit double screening are radiatively stable.

  15. Biological artificial vessel graft in distal arterial bypass for treating diabetic lower limb ischemia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yong-Quan; Wu, Ying-Feng; Qi, Li-Xing; Guo, Lian-Ri; Li, Xue-Feng; Cui, Shi-Jun; Tong, Zhu; Guo, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Jian

    2011-10-01

    A 68-year-old female patient was treated for unhealed ulcer in the fourth toe of the left foot. Clinical examinations identified severe stenosis of the proximal segment and occlusion of the distal segment of the left anterior tibial artery, and occlusion of the left posterior tibial artery and the peroneal artery. The proximal stenotic segment of the left anterior tibial artery was dilated, but the distal occlusive part failed to be re-canalized. Left anterior tibial artery to dorsal pedal artery bypass was performed on the patient with an epoxide-crosslinked, special radicals antigen-sealed, porcine-derived biological graft; debridement of the left 4th digiti pedis was also performed. Postoperation course was uneventful. The pulse of the left dorsal pedal artery was strong. The ankle brachial index (ABI) increased from 0.60 to 1.09. Warfarin and two antiplatelet drugs were given after the operation. Six months after operation, computed tomographic angiogram (CTA) identified the patent graft.

  16. Serum phosphorus levels and the spectrum of ankle-brachial index in older men: the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jerry; Wassel, Christina L; Kestenbaum, Bryan R; Collins, Tracie C; Criqui, Michael H; Lewis, Cora E; Cummings, Steve R; Ix, Joachim H

    2010-04-15

    A higher serum phosphorus level is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) events among community-living populations. Mechanisms are unknown. The ankle-brachial index (ABI) provides information on both atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. In this cross-sectional study (2000-2002), the authors evaluated the association of serum phosphorus levels with low (<0.90) and high (> or =1.40 or incompressible) ABI as compared with intermediate ABI in 5,330 older US men, among whom the mean serum phosphorus level was 3.2 mg/dL (standard deviation, 0.4), 6% had a low ABI, and 5% had a high ABI. Each 1-mg/dL increase in serum phosphorus level was associated with a 1.6-fold greater prevalence of low ABI (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2, 2.1; P < 0.001) and a 1.4-fold greater prevalence of high ABI (95% CI: 1.0, 1.9; P = 0.03) in models adjusted for demographic factors, traditional CVD risk factors, and kidney function. However, the association of phosphorus with high ABI differed by chronic kidney disease (CKD) status (in persons with CKD, prevalence ratio = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.61, 5.45; in persons without CKD, prevalence ratio = 1.14, 95% CI: 0.81, 1.61; interaction P = 0.04). In conclusion, among community-living older men, higher phosphorus levels are associated with low ABI and are also associated with high ABI in persons with CKD. These associations may explain the link between serum phosphorus levels and CVD events.

  17. Association of serum osteoprotegerin with ankle-brachial index and urine albumin: creatinine ratio in African-Americans and non-Hispanic whites.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zeenat; Ellington, Allison A; Mosley, Thomas H; Kullo, Iftikhar J

    2009-10-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a member of tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, has been implicated in vascular disease. We investigated the association of serum OPG with the ankle-brachial index (ABI) and urine albumin:creatinine ratio (UACR), in a bi-ethnic cohort of 1324 African-Americans (mean age 64 years, 71% women) and 1237 non-Hispanic whites (mean age 59 years, 57% women) belonging to hypertensive sibships. Serum levels of OPG were measured by solid phase sandwich immunoassay. ABI was measured using a standard protocol and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) defined as ABI<0.90. UACR was expressed as mg albumin/gm creatinine. Multivariable regression analysis using generalized estimating equations (GEE) were performed to assess whether serum OPG levels were associated with ABI and UACR. After adjustment for conventional risk factors (age, sex, diabetes, waist circumference, history of smoking, total and HDL cholesterol, hypertension), prior history of myocardial infarction or stroke, and medication (renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors, statins, aspirin, estrogen) use, higher OPG levels were significantly associated with lower ABI and higher UACR in African-Americans (P=0.001 and P<0.0001, respectively) and non-Hispanic whites (P=0.017 and P=0.002, respectively); the association remained significant after further adjustment for plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) in both ethnic groups. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, higher OPG levels were associated with PAD in African-Americans, independent of the covariates listed above (P=0.026); the association remained significant after additional adjustment for plasma CRP (P=0.047). In non-Hispanic whites, the association of higher OPG levels with PAD was of borderline significance after adjustment for the relevant covariates (P=0.106). We conclude that higher OPG levels are associated with lower ABI and higher UACR, independent of conventional risk factors and plasma CRP.

  18. Different methods of calculating ankle-brachial index in mid-elderly men and women: the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    PubMed

    Miname, M; Bensenor, I M; Lotufo, P A

    2016-01-01

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis related to health-adverse outcomes. ABI is inexpensive compared to other indexes, such as coronary calcium score and determination of carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). Our objective was to identify how the ABI can be applied to primary care. Three different methods of calculating the ABI were compared among 13,921 men and women aged 35 to 74 years who were free of cardiovascular diseases and enrolled in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). The ABI ratio had the same denominator for the three categories created (the highest value for arm systolic blood pressure), and the numerator was based on the four readings for leg systolic blood pressure: the highest (ABI-HIGH), the mean (ABI-MEAN), and the lowest (ABI-LOW). The cut-off for analysis was ABI<1.0. All determinations of blood pressure were done with an oscillometric device. The prevalence of ABI<1% was 0.5, 0.9, and 2.7 for the categories HIGH, MEAN and LOW, respectively. All methods were associated with a high burden of cardiovascular risk factors. The association with IMT was stronger for ABI-HIGH than for the other categories. The proportion of participants with a 10-year Framingham Risk Score of coronary heart disease >20% without the inclusion of ABI<1.0 was 4.9%. For ABI-HIGH, ABI-MEAN and ABI-LOW, the increase in percentage points was 0.3, 0.7, and 2.3%, respectively, and the relative increment was 6.1, 14.3, and 46.9%. In conclusion, all methods were acceptable, but ABI-LOW was more suitable for prevention purposes.

  19. Different methods of calculating ankle-brachial index in mid-elderly men and women: the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)

    PubMed Central

    Miname, M.; Bensenor, I.M.; Lotufo, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis related to health-adverse outcomes. ABI is inexpensive compared to other indexes, such as coronary calcium score and determination of carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). Our objective was to identify how the ABI can be applied to primary care. Three different methods of calculating the ABI were compared among 13,921 men and women aged 35 to 74 years who were free of cardiovascular diseases and enrolled in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). The ABI ratio had the same denominator for the three categories created (the highest value for arm systolic blood pressure), and the numerator was based on the four readings for leg systolic blood pressure: the highest (ABI-HIGH), the mean (ABI-MEAN), and the lowest (ABI-LOW). The cut-off for analysis was ABI<1.0. All determinations of blood pressure were done with an oscillometric device. The prevalence of ABI<1% was 0.5, 0.9, and 2.7 for the categories HIGH, MEAN and LOW, respectively. All methods were associated with a high burden of cardiovascular risk factors. The association with IMT was stronger for ABI-HIGH than for the other categories. The proportion of participants with a 10-year Framingham Risk Score of coronary heart disease >20% without the inclusion of ABI<1.0 was 4.9%. For ABI-HIGH, ABI-MEAN and ABI-LOW, the increase in percentage points was 0.3, 0.7, and 2.3%, respectively, and the relative increment was 6.1, 14.3, and 46.9%. In conclusion, all methods were acceptable, but ABI-LOW was more suitable for prevention purposes. PMID:27901176

  20. Dose–Volume Modeling of Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Findings From a Prospective Screening Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Daly, Megan E.; Cui, Jing; Hall, William H.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Phillips, Theodore L.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Purdy, James A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Data from a prospective screening protocol administered for patients previously irradiated for head-and-neck cancer was analyzed to identify dosimetric predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred fifty-two patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were prospectively screened from August 2007 to April 2013 using a standardized self-administered instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from radiation therapy was 40 months (range, 6-111 months). A total of 177 patients (50%) underwent neck dissection. Two hundred twenty-one patients (63%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Fifty-one patients (14%) reported brachial plexus-related neuropathic symptoms with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), and motor weakness and/or muscle atrophy (25%). The 3- and 5-year estimates of freedom from brachial plexus-associated neuropathy were 86% and 81%, respectively. Clinical/pathological N3 disease (P<.001) and maximum radiation dose to the ipsilateral brachial plexus (P=.01) were significantly associated with neuropathic symptoms. Cox regression analysis revealed significant dose–volume effects for brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. The volume of the ipsilateral brachial plexus receiving >70 Gy (V70) predicted for symptoms, with the incidence increasing with V70 >10% (P<.001). A correlation was also observed for the volume receiving >74 Gy (V74) among patients treated without neck dissection, with a cutoff of 4% predictive of symptoms (P=.038). Conclusions: Dose–volume guidelines were developed for radiation planning that may limit brachial plexus-related neuropathies.

  1. Does metformin improve vascular heath in children with type 1 diabetes? Protocol for a one year, double blind, randomised, placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Vascular dysfunction is an early and critical event in the development of cardiovascular disease. Children with T1D have vascular dysfunction therefore early interventions to improve vascular health are essential to reduce cardiovascular mortality in T1D. Metformin is an insulin sensitising agent which is known to improve vascular health outcomes in type 2 diabetes (T2D) and other individuals with insulin resistance. It has been used safely in children and adolescents with T2D for over 10 years. This study aims to assess the effect of metformin on vascular health in children with T1D. Methods/Design This study is a 12 month, double blind, randomised, placebo controlled trial to determine the effect of metformin on vascular health in children (age 8–18) with T1D. The sample size is 76 with 38 children in the metformin group and 38 children in the placebo group. Vascular health and biochemical markers will be measured at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Vascular function will be measured using flow mediated dilatation and glyceryl trinitrate mediated dilatation of the brachial artery and vascular structure will be measured with carotid and aortic intima media thickness, using standardised protocols. Discussion This study will be the first to investigate the effect of metformin on vascular health in children with T1D. It will provide important information on a potential intervention to improve cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in this population at high risk from cardiovascular disease. Trial registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000148976 PMID:23865839

  2. Biomechanics of Ergometric Stress Test: regional and local effects on elastic, transitional and muscular human arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valls, G.; Torrado, J.; Farro, I.; Bia, D.; Zócalo, Y.; Lluberas, S.; Craiem, D.; Armentano, Rl

    2011-09-01

    Ergometric exercise stress tests (EST) give important information about the cardiovascular (CV) response to increased demands. The expected EST-related changes in variables like blood pressure and heart rate are known, but those in the arterial biomechanics are controversial and incompletely characterized. In this context, this work aims were to characterize the regional and local arterial biomechanical behaviour in response to EST; to evaluate its temporal profile in the post-EST recovery phase; and to compare the biomechanical response of different to EST. Methods: In 16 non-trained healthy young subjects the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and the carotid, femoral and brachial arterial distensibility were non-invasively evaluated before (Rest) and after EST. Main results: The EST resulted in an early increase in the arterial stiffness, evidenced by both, regional and local parameters (pulse wave velocity increase and distensibility reduction). When analyzing conjunctly the different post-EST recovery stages there were quali-quantitative differences among the arterial local stiffness response to EST. The biomechanical changes could not be explained only by blood pressure variations.

  3. Assessment of Arterial Stiffness Using the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Toru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of outcomes for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although measurement of pulse wave velocity is a widely accepted, noninvasive approach for the assessment of arterial stiffness, its accuracy is affected by changes in blood pressure. Summary The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is an index of the overall stiffness of the artery from the origin of the aorta to the ankle and is theoretically independent of blood pressure at the time of measurement. CAVI increases linearly with age and is elevated even in mild arteriosclerotic disease. It can identify differences in the degree of arteriosclerosis among patients with severe arteriosclerotic disease and better reflects the severity of disease of the coronary artery than does brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. Patients with higher CAVI values show a poor prognosis compared with those with lower CAVI values. Furthermore, CAVI can be lowered by controlling diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Key Messages The primary aims of assessing arterial stiffness using CAVI are to assist in the early detection of arteriosclerosis, allowing timely treatment and lifestyle modification, and to quantitatively evaluate the progression of disease and the effectiveness of treatment. Whether CAVI-guided therapy can improve prognosis in high-risk patients needs to be further examined to confirm the clinical usefulness of this measure. PMID:27493899

  4. Double jeopardy.

    PubMed

    Cullington, Damien; Dunford, Natalie; Beer, Stephen; Hobson, Neil; Chattopadhyay, Sudipta; John, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Torsades de pointes ("twisting of points") (TdP) is a broad complex tachyarrhythmia which was first described in 1966 by Francois Dessertenne and usually results from prolongation of the QT interval.(1) A wide variety of drugs have been shown to prolong the QT interval in susceptible individuals.(2) We present the case of a former intravenous heroin user presenting with several episodes of TdP which were caused by QT prolongation due to methadone treatment and exacerbated by hepatitis B/C infection. Despite aggressive medical treatment and withdrawal of methadone, he had recurrent episodes of TdP which required continuous temporary cardiac pacing for six days. He was found to have moderate LV dysfunction on his echocardiogram and unobstructed coronary arteries on coronary angiography. He underwent implantation of a defibrillator due to concerns about further episodes of ventricular arrhythmias which could recur even in the absence of further methadone use.

  5. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  6. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  7. Renal artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    González, J; Esteban, M; Andrés, G; Linares, E; Martínez-Salamanca, J I

    2014-01-01

    A renal artery aneurysm is defined as a dilated segment of renal artery that exceeds twice the diameter of a normal renal artery. Although rare, the diagnosis and incidence of this entity have been steadily increasing due to the routine use of cross-sectional imaging. In certain cases, renal artery aneurysms may be clinically important and potentially lethal. However, knowledge of their occurrence, their natural history, and their prognosis with or without treatment is still limited. This article aims to review the recent literature concerning renal artery aneurysms, with special consideration given to physiopathology, indications for treatment, different technical options, post-procedure complications and treatment outcomes.

  8. Extracranial vertebral artery intervention.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debabrata; Pineda, Guillermo

    2007-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is the commonest cause of vertebral artery stenosis and has a predilection for the origin and proximal section of the extracranial portion of the vessel and also the intracranial portion of the vessel. Although it has generally been thought that extracranial vertebral artery (ECVA) disease has a more benign outcome compared to intracranial vertebral artery disease, significant occlusive disease of the proximal vertebral artery is the primary cause of vertebral artery ischemia in a significant proportion of patients. We focus on the interventional management of patients with proximal ECVA disease in this article.

  9. Civil and war peripheral arterial trauma: review of risk factors associated with limb loss.

    PubMed

    Davidovic, Lazar B; Cinara, Ilijas S; Ille, Tanja; Kostic, Dusan M; Dragas, Marko V; Markovic, Dragan M

    2005-01-01

    We sought to analyze the early results of civil and war peripheral arterial injury treatment and to identify risk factors associated with limb loss. Between 1992 and 2001, data collected retrospectively and prospectively on 413 patients with 448 peripheral arterial injuries were analyzed. Of these, there were 140 patients with war injuries and 273 patients with civil injuries. The mechanism of injury was gunshot in 40%, blunt injury in 24%, explosive trauma in 20.3%, and stabbing in 15.7% of the cases. The most frequently injured vessels were the femoral arteries (37.3%), followed by the popliteal (27.8%), axillary and brachial (23.5%), and crural arteries (6.5%). Associated injuries, which included bone, nerve, and remote injuries affecting the head, chest, or abdomen, were present in 60.8% of the cases. Surgery was carried out on all patients, with a limb salvage rate of 89.1% and a survival rate of 97.3%. In spite of a rising trend in peripheral arterial injuries, our total and delayed amputation rates remained stable. On statistical analysis, significant risk factors for amputation were found to be failed revascularization, associated injuries, secondary operation, explosive injury, war injury (p < .01) and arterial contusion with consecutive thrombosis, popliteal artery injury, and late surgery (p < .05). Peripheral arterial injuries, if inadequately treated, carry a high amputation rate. Explosive injuries are the most likely to lead to amputations, whereas stab injuries are the least likely to do so. The most significant independent risk factor for limb loss was failed revascularization.

  10. [Arterial rigidity and endothelial dysfunction in obese children].

    PubMed

    Aggoun, Y; Tounian, P; Dabbas-Tyan, M; Massih, T Abdel; Girardet, J P; Ricour, C; Sidi, D; Bonnet, D

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is a cardiovascular risk factor in adults. Poorly is known about effect of obesity on cardiovascular system in children. Mechanical properties of a great elastic trunk, the common carotid artery (CCA) and endothelium function of the brachial artery were studied in 130 obese children (age: 12 +/- 3 years, body mass index (BMI): 29 +/- 5.5 kg/m2, without hypertension (115 +/- 19/58 +/- 8 mmHg). These patients had a vascular high resolution echographical analysis. Cross sectional compliance (CSC), cross sectional distensibility (CSD) and incremental elastic modulus (Einc) were analysed at the CCA site. The brachial artery dilation was measured after hyperthemia (flow mediated dilation, FMD), an endothelium dependent function and after sublingually glyceryl trinitrate (GTNMD), an independent endothelium function. Fat mass composition and distribution were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 70 patients. In 50 obese patients an oral glucose tolerance test was done to determine insulin resistance. The obese children had significantly lower CSC and CSD than the healthy controls (respectively 0.12 +/- 0.04 vs 0.14 +/- 0.05 mm2.mmHg-1; p < 0.05 and 0.5 +/- 0.2 vs 0.8 +/- 0.4 mmHg(-1).10(-2); p < 0.001). Obese children had higher value than the controls for Einc (2.4 +/- 0.4 vs 1 +/- 0.24 mmHg.10(3); p < 0.001) that correlated poorly with fasting insulin concentrations (r = 0.34; p < 0.06) and BMI (r = 0.34; p < 0.01). FMD was significantly lower in obese children than in controls (6 +/- 3 vs 8 +/- 4%, p < 0.01) without modification of GTNMD (17 +/- 6 vs 18 +/- 7%, NS). These two parameters were respectively correlated with the android fat distribution (r = 0.36; p < 0.01; r = 0.49; p < 0.001). The CCA stiffness of obese children is linked to the amount of the overweight and to insulin resistance. The android fat distribution is related to endothelium dysfunction.

  11. The brachial plexus branches to the pectoral muscles in adult rats: morphological aspects and morphometric normative data.

    PubMed

    Riva, Nilo; Domi, Teuta; Lopez, Ignazio Diego; Triolo, Daniela; Fossaghi, Andrea; Dina, Giorgia; Podini, Paola; Comi, Giancarlo; Quattrini, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Animal models provide an important tool to investigate the pathogenesis of neuromuscular disorders. In the present study, we analyze fiber composition of the brachial plexus branches to the pectoral muscles: the medial anterior thoracic nerve (MATN) and the lateral anterior thoracic nerve (LATN). The morphological and morphometric characteristics and the percentage of motor fibers within each nerve are here reported, adding information to microscopic anatomy knowledge of the rat brachial plexus. As control, we employed the quadriceps nerve, commonly used for the evaluation of motor fibers at hindlimbs. We demonstrated that the MATN and the LATN are predominantly composed of large motor fibers and therefore could be employed to evaluate the peripheral nervous system (PNS) involvement at forelimbs in neurological diseases models, predominantly affecting the motor fiber compartment.

  12. The brachial plexus branches to the pectoral muscles in adult rats: morphological aspects and morphometric normative data

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Nilo; Domi, Teuta; Lopez, Ignazio Diego; Triolo, Daniela; Fossaghi, Andrea; Dina, Giorgia; Podini, Paola; Comi, Giancarlo; Quattrini, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Animal models provide an important tool to investigate the pathogenesis of neuromuscular disorders. In the present study, we analyze fiber composition of the brachial plexus branches to the pectoral muscles: the medial anterior thoracic nerve (MATN) and the lateral anterior thoracic nerve (LATN). The morphological and morphometric characteristics and the percentage of motor fibers within each nerve are here reported, adding information to microscopic anatomy knowledge of the rat brachial plexus. As control, we employed the quadriceps nerve, commonly used for the evaluation of motor fibers at hindlimbs. We demonstrated that the MATN and the LATN are predominantly composed of large motor fibers and therefore could be employed to evaluate the peripheral nervous system (PNS) involvement at forelimbs in neurological diseases models, predominantly affecting the motor fiber compartment. PMID:23087618

  13. Bilateral variations of brachial plexus involving the median nerve and lateral cord: An anatomical case study with clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Butz, James J; Shiwlochan, Devina G; Brown, Kevin C; Prasad, Alathady M; Murlimanju, Bukkambudhi V; Viswanath, Srikanteswara

    2014-01-01

    During the routine dissection of upper limbs of a Caucasian male cadaver, variations were observed in the brachial plexus. In the right extremity, the lateral cord was piercing the coracobrachialis muscle. The musculocutaneous nerve and lateral root of the median nerve were observed to be branching inferior to the lower attachment of coracobrachialis muscle. The left extremity exhibited the passage of the median nerve through the flat tendon of the coracobrachialis muscle near its distal insertion into the medial surface of the body of humerus. A variation in the course and branching of the nerve might lead to variant or dual innervation of a muscle and, if inappropriately compressed, could result in a distal neuropathy. Identification of these variants of brachial plexus plays an especially important role in both clinical diagnosis and surgical practice.

  14. Elective cesarean section to prevent anal incontinence and brachial plexus injuries associated with macrosomia--a decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Culligan, Patrick J; Myers, John A; Goldberg, Roger P; Blackwell, Linda; Gohmann, Stephan F; Abell, Troy D

    2005-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the cost-effectiveness of a policy of elective C-section for macrosomic infants to prevent maternal anal incontinence, urinary incontinence, and newborn brachial plexus injuries. We used a decision analytic model to compare the standard of care with a policy whereby all primigravid patients in the United States would undergo an ultrasound at 39 weeks gestation, followed by an elective C-section for any fetus estimated at > or =4500 g. The following clinical consequences were considered crucial to the analysis: brachial plexus injury to the newborn; maternal anal and urinary incontinence; emergency hysterectomy; hemorrhage requiring blood transfusion; and maternal mortality. Our outcome measures included (1) number of brachial plexus injuries or cases of incontinence averted, (2) incremental monetary cost per 100,000 deliveries, (3) expected quality of life of the mother and her child, and (4) "quality-adjusted life years" (QALY) associated with the two policies. For every 100,000 deliveries, the policy of elective C-section resulted in 16.6 fewer permanent brachial plexus injuries, 185.7 fewer cases of anal incontinence, and cost savings of $3,211,000. Therefore, this policy would prevent one case of anal incontinence for every 539 elective C-sections performed. The expected quality of life associated with the elective C-section policy was also greater (quality of life score 0.923 vs 0.917 on a scale from 0.0 to 1.0 and 53.6 QALY vs 53.2). A policy whereby primigravid patients in the United States have a 39 week ultrasound-estimated fetal weight followed by C-section for any fetuses > or =4500 g appears cost effective. However, the monetary costs in our analysis were sensitive to the probability estimates of urinary incontinence following C-section and vaginal delivery and the cost estimates for urinary incontinence, vaginal delivery, and C-section.

  15. Association Between Chromosome 9p21 Variants and the Ankle-Brachial Index Identified by a Meta-Analysis of 21 Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Murabito, Joanne M.; White, Charles C.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sun, Yan V.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Nambi, Vijay; Lamina, Claudia; Schillert, Arne; Coassin, Stefan; Bis, Joshua C.; Broer, Linda; Crawford, Dana C.; Franceschini, Nora; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Haun, Margot; Holewijn, Suzanne; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kiechl, Stefan; Kollerits, Barbara; Montasser, May E.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Rudock, Megan E.; Senft, Andrea; Teumer, Alexander; van der Harst, Pim; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wood, Andrew R.; Wassel, Christina L.; Absher, Devin M.; Allison, Matthew A.; Amin, Najaf; Arnold, Alice; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barbalic, Maja; Boban, Mladen; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Couper, David J.; Criqui, Michael H.; Dehghan, Abbas; Heijer, Martin den; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Ding, Jingzhong; Dörr, Marcus; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Felix, Stephan B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fraedrich, Gustav; Gibson, Quince; Goodloe, Robert; Gunjaca, Grgo; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Heiss, Gerardo; Hofman, Albert; Kieback, Arne; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Lackner, Karl J.; Li, Xiaohui; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lohman, Kurt; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Mohler, Emile R; Mudnic, Ivana; Mueller, Thomas; Navis, Gerjan; Oberhollenzer, Friedrich; Olin, Jeffrey W.; O’Connell, Jeff; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W.; Petersmann, Astrid; Polasek, Ozren; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rantner, Barbara; Rice, Ken; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seldenrijk, Adrie; Stadler, Marietta; Summerer, Monika; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Wild, Sarah H.; Wild, Philipp S.; Willeit, Johann; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boerwinkle, Eric; Campbell, Harry; Cooke, John P.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Herrington, David; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Anna; Münzel, Thomas; Newman, Anne; Oostra, Ben A.; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Snieder, Harold; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Völker, Uwe; Wright, Alan F.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Liu, Yongmei; Hayward, Caroline; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Ziegler, Andreas; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kronenberg, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic determinants of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remain largely unknown. To identify genetic variants associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), a noninvasive measure of PAD, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 21 population-based cohorts. Methods and Results Continuous ABI and PAD (ABI≤0.9) phenotypes adjusted for age and sex were examined. Each study conducted genotyping and imputed data to the ~2.5 million SNPs in HapMap. Linear and logistic regression models were used to test each SNP for association with ABI and PAD using additive genetic models. Study-specific data were combined using fixed-effects inverse variance weighted meta-analyses. There were a total of 41,692 participants of European ancestry (~60% women, mean ABI 1.02 to 1.19), including 3,409 participants with PAD and with GWAS data available. In the discovery meta-analysis, rs10757269 on chromosome 9 near CDKN2B had the strongest association with ABI (β= −0.006, p=2.46x10−8). We sought replication of the 6 strongest SNP associations in 5 population-based studies and 3 clinical samples (n=16,717). The association for rs10757269 strengthened in the combined discovery and replication analysis (p=2.65x10−9). No other SNP associations for ABI or PAD achieved genome-wide significance. However, two previously reported candidate genes for PAD and one SNP associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) were associated with ABI : DAB21P (rs13290547, p=3.6x10−5); CYBA (rs3794624, p=6.3x10−5); and rs1122608 (LDLR, p=0.0026). Conclusions GWAS in more than 40,000 individuals identified one genome-wide significant association on chromosome 9p21 with ABI. Two candidate genes for PAD and 1 SNP for CAD are associated with ABI. PMID:22199011

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the canine brachial plexus in 18 dogs.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Susan; Ehrhart, E J; Gall, David; Klopp, Lisa; Gavin, Patrick; Tucker, Russ; Bagley, Rod; Kippenes, Hege; DeHaan, Constance; Pedroia, Vince; Partington, Beth; Olby, Natasha

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations from 18 dogs with a histologically confirmed peripheral nerve sheath tumor (PNST) of the brachial plexus were assessed retrospectively. Almost half (8/18) had a diffuse thickening of the brachial plexus nerve(s), six of which extended into the vertebral canal. The other 10/18 dogs had a nodule or mass in the axilla (1.2-338 cm3). Seven of those 10 masses also had diffuse nerve sheath thickening, three of which extended into the vertebral canal. The majority of tumors were hyperintense to muscle on T2-weighted images and isointense on T1-weighted images. Eight of 18 PNSTs had only minimal to mild contrast enhancement and many (13/18) enhanced heterogeneously following gadolinium DTPA administration. Transverse plane images with a large enough field of view (FOV) to include both axillae and the vertebral canal were essential, allowing in-slice comparison to detect lesions by asymmetry of structures. Higher resolution, smaller FOV, multiplanar examination of the cervicothoracic spine was important for appreciating nerve root and foraminal involvement. Short tau inversion recovery, T2-weighted, pre and postcontrast T1-weighted pulse sequences were all useful. Contrast enhancement was critical to detecting subtle diffuse nerve sheath involvement or small isointense nodules, and for accurately identifying the full extent of disease. Some canine brachial plexus tumors can be challenging to detect, requiring a rigorous multiplanar multi-pulse sequence MRI examination.

  17. Unusual and Unique Variant Branches of Lateral Cord of Brachial Plexus and its Clinical Implications- A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Padur, Ashwini Aithal; Shanthakumar, Swamy Ravindra; Shetty, Surekha Devadas; Prabhu, Gayathri Sharath; Patil, Jyothsna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adequate knowledge on variant morphology of brachial plexus and its branches are important in clinical applications pertaining to trauma and surgical procedures of the upper extremity. Aim Current study was aimed to report variations of the branches of the lateral cord of brachial plexus in the axilla and their possible clinical complications. Materials and Methods Total number of 82 upper limbs from 41 formalin embalmed cadavers was dissected. Careful observation was made to note the formation and branching pattern of lateral cord. Meticulous inspection for absence of branches, presence of additional or variant branches and presence of abnormal communications between its branches or with branches of other cords was carried out. Results In the present study, we noted varied branching pattern of lateral cord in 6 out of 82 limbs (7%). In one of the limb, the median nerve was formed by three roots; two from lateral cord and one from medial cord. Two limbs had absence of lateral pectoral nerve supplemented by medial pectoral nerves. One of which had an atypical ansa pectoralis. In 2 upper limbs, musculocutaneous nerve was absent and in both cases it was supplemented by median nerve. In one of the limb, coracobrachialis had dual nerve supply by musculocutaneous nerve and by an additional branch from the lateral cord. Conclusion Variations of brachial plexus and its branches could pose both intraoperative and postoperative complications which eventually affect the normal sensory and motor functions of the upper limb. PMID:27190783

  18. Median artery of the forearm in human fetuses in northeastern Brazil: anatomical study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Aragão, José Aderval; da Silva, Ana Caroline Ferreira; Anunciação, Caio Barretto; Reis, Francisco Prado

    2017-01-01

    A persistent median artery is a rare anomaly. It accompanies the median nerve along its course in the forearm and is of variable origin. It is associated with other local anatomical variations and may contribute significantly towards formation of the superficial palmar arch. In embryos, it is responsible mainly for the blood supply to the hand. The objective of this study was to research the frequency, type (forearm or palmar) and origin of the median artery in fetuses, correlating its presence with sex and body side. Red-colored latex was injected into 32 brachial arteries of human fetuses until its arrival in the hand could be seen. Twenty-four hours after the injection, the median arteries were dissected without the aid of optical instruments. Among the 32 forearms dissected, the median artery was present in 81.25 % (26) of the cases, and it was found more frequently in females and on the left side. Regarding origin, most of the median arteries originated in the common interosseous artery (38.5 %) and anterior interosseous artery (34.6 %). The mean length of the median arteries was 21.1 mm for the palmar type and 19.8 mm for the forearm type. The median artery has a high rate of persistence. It is important to be aware of this anatomical variation, since its presence may give rise to difficulties during routine surgical procedures on the wrist. Its presence may cause serious functional complications in the carpal tunnel, anterior interosseous nerve, round pronator syndromes, and ischemia of the hand.

  19. Regional tissue oximetry reflects changes in arterial flow in porcine chronic heart failure treated with venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Hála, P; Mlček, M; Ošťádal, P; Janák, D; Popková, M; Bouček, T; Lacko, S; Kudlička, J; NeuŽil, P; Kittnar, O

    2016-12-22

    Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) is widely used in treatment of decompensated heart failure. Our aim was to investigate its effects on regional perfusion and tissue oxygenation with respect to extracorporeal blood flow (EBF). In five swine, decompensated low-output chronic heart failure was induced by long-term rapid ventricular pacing. Subsequently, VA ECMO was introduced and left ventricular (LV) volume, aortic blood pressure, regional arterial flow and tissue oxygenation were continuously recorded at different levels of EBF. With increasing EBF from minimal to 5 l/min, mean arterial pressure increased from 47+/-22 to 84+/-12 mm Hg (P<0.001) and arterial blood flow increased in carotid artery from 211+/-72 to 479+/-58 ml/min (P<0.01) and in subclavian artery from 103+/-49 to 296+/-54 ml/min (P<0.001). Corresponding brain and brachial tissue oxygenation increased promptly from 57+/-6 to 74+/-3 % and from 37+/-6 to 77+/-6 %, respectively (both P<0.01). Presented results confirm that VA ECMO is a capable form of heart support. Regional arterial flow and tissue oxygenation suggest that partial circulatory support may be sufficient to supply brain and peripheral tissue by oxygen.

  20. Exercise training improves conduit vessel function in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jennifer H; Bilsborough, William; Maiorana, Andrew; Best, Matthew; O'Driscoll, Gerard J; Taylor, Roger R; Green, Daniel J

    2003-07-01

    It is well established that endothelial dysfunction is present in coronary artery disease (CAD), although few studies have determined the effect of training on peripheral conduit vessel function in patients with CAD. A randomized, crossover design determined the effect of 8 wk of predominantly lower limb, combined aerobic and resistance training, in 10 patients with treated CAD. Endothelium-dependent dilation of the brachial artery was determined, by using high-resolution vascular ultrasonography, from flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) after ischemia. Endothelium-independent vasodilation was measured after administration of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN). Baseline function was compared with that of 10 control subjects. Compared with matched healthy control subjects, FMD and GTN responses were significantly impaired in the untrained CAD patients [3.0 +/- 0.8 (SE) vs. 5.8 +/- 0.8% and 14.5 +/- 1.9 vs. 20.4 +/- 1.5%, respectively; both P < 0.05]. Training significantly improved FMD in the CAD patients (from 3.0 +/- 0.8 to 5.7 +/- 1.1%; P < 0.05) but not responsiveness to GTN (14.5 +/- 1.9 vs. 12.1 +/- 1.4%; P = not significant). Exercise training improves endothelium-dependent conduit vessel dilation in subjects with CAD, and the effect, evident in the brachial artery, appears to be generalized rather than limited to vessels of exercising muscle beds. These results provide evidence for the benefit of exercise training, as an adjunct to routine therapy, in patients with a history of CAD.

  1. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery - discharge; PTA - peripheral artery - discharge; Angioplasty - peripheral artery - discharge; Balloon angioplasty - peripheral artery- discharge; PAD - PTA discharge; PVD - PTA discharge

  2. Efficacy of two cannabis based medicinal extracts for relief of central neuropathic pain from brachial plexus avulsion: results of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Berman, Jonathan S; Symonds, Catherine; Birch, Rolfe

    2004-12-01

    The objective was to investigate the effectiveness of cannabis-based medicines for treatment of chronic pain associated with brachial plexus root avulsion. This condition is an excellent human model of central neuropathic pain as it represents an unusually homogenous group in terms of anatomical location of injury, pain descriptions and patient demographics. Forty-eight patients with at least one avulsed root and baseline pain score of four or more on an 11-point ordinate scale participated in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three period crossover study. All patients had intractable symptoms regardless of current analgesic therapy. Patients entered a baseline period of 2 weeks, followed by three, 2-week treatment periods during each of which they received one of three oromucosal spray preparations. These were placebo and two whole plant extracts of Cannabis sativa L.: GW-1000-02 (Sativex), containing Delta(9)tetrahydrocannabinol (THC):cannabidiol (CBD) in an approximate 1:1 ratio and GW-2000-02, containing primarily THC. The primary outcome measure was the mean pain severity score during the last 7 days of treatment. Secondary outcome measures included pain related quality of life assessments. The primary outcome measure failed to fall by the two points defined in our hypothesis. However, both this measure and measures of sleep showed statistically significant improvements. The study medications were generally well tolerated with the majority of adverse events, including intoxication type reactions, being mild to moderate in severity and resolving spontaneously. Studies of longer duration in neuropathic pain are required to confirm a clinically relevant, improvement in the treatment of this condition.

  3. Duplicated middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion.

  4. Palmar artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Shutze, Ryan A.; Liechty, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Aneurysms of the hand are rarely encountered and more rarely reported. The least common locations of these aneurysms are the palmar and digital arteries. The etiologies of these entities are quite varied, although they usually present as a pulsatile mass. Following a thorough evaluation, including arterial anatomic imaging, they should be repaired. The reported results following repair have been good. Herein we report a girl with a spontaneous palmar artery aneurysm and its management. PMID:28127131

  5. Arterial waveform analysis.

    PubMed

    Esper, Stephen A; Pinsky, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    The bedside measurement of continuous arterial pressure values from waveform analysis has been routinely available via indwelling arterial catheterization for >50 years. Invasive blood pressure monitoring has been utilized in critically ill patients, in both the operating room and critical care units, to facilitate rapid diagnoses of cardiovascular insufficiency and monitor response to treatments aimed at correcting abnormalities before the consequences of either hypo- or hypertension are seen. Minimally invasive techniques to estimate cardiac output (CO) have gained increased appeal. This has led to the increased interest in arterial waveform analysis to provide this important information, as it is measured continuously in many operating rooms and intensive care units. Arterial waveform analysis also allows for the calculation of many so-called derived parameters intrinsically created by this pulse pressure profile. These include estimates of left ventricular stroke volume (SV), CO, vascular resistance, and during positive-pressure breathing, SV variation, and pulse pressure variation. This article focuses on the principles of arterial waveform analysis and their determinants, components of the arterial system, and arterial pulse contour. It will also address the advantage of measuring real-time CO by the arterial waveform and the benefits to measuring SV variation. Arterial waveform analysis has gained a large interest in the overall assessment and management of the critically ill and those at a risk of hemodynamic deterioration.

  6. Buckling instability in arteries.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Rebecca M

    2015-04-21

    Arteries can become tortuous in response to abnormal growth stimuli, genetic defects and aging. It is suggested that a buckling instability is a mechanism that might lead to artery tortuosity. Here, the buckling instability in arteries is studied by examining asymmetric modes of bifurcation of two-layer cylindrical structures that are residually stressed. These structures are loaded by an axial force, internal pressure and have nonlinear, anisotropic, hyperelastic responses to stresses. Strain-softening and reduced opening angle are shown to lower the critical internal pressure leading to buckling. In addition, the ratio of the media thickness to the adventitia thickness is shown to have a dramatic impact on arterial instability.

  7. Single Umbilical Artery

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, J. David; McKee, James

    1964-01-01

    A prospective study of 2000 obstetrical deliveries was undertaken to establish the incidence of single umbilical artery in the newborn and the frequency of congenital malformations reported to be associated with this disorder. Twenty cases of single umbilical artery were discovered; two proved to have an associated congenital malformation. In neither of these cases was medical management affected by the discovery of a single artery. In addition, the vascular arrangement in the cords of 31 concurrently occurring congenitally malformed babies was examined, and in no instance was a single umbilical artery found. PMID:14214230

  8. Metals in urine and peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Navas-Acien, Ana; Silbergeld, Ellen K; Sharrett, Richey; Calderon-Aranda, Emma; Selvin, Elizabeth; Guallar, Eliseo

    2005-02-01

    Exposure to metals may promote atherosclerosis. Blood cadmium and lead were associated with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the 1999-2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In the present study we evaluated the association between urinary levels of cadmium, lead, barium, cobalt, cesium, molybdenum, antimony, thallium, and tungsten with PAD in a cross-sectional analysis of 790 participants > or =40 years of age in NHANES 1999-2000. PAD was defined as a blood pressure ankle brachial index < 0.9 in at least one leg. Metals were measured in casual (spot) urine specimens by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. After multivariable adjustment, subjects with PAD had 36% higher levels of cadmium in urine and 49% higher levels of tungsten compared with noncases. The adjusted odds ratio for PAD comparing the 75th to the 25th percentile of the cadmium distribution was 3.05 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.97 to 9.58]; that for tungsten was 2.25 (95% CI, 0.97 to 5.24). PAD risk increased sharply at low levels of antimony and remained elevated beyond 0.1 microg/L. PAD was not associated with other metals. In conclusion, urinary cadmium, tungsten, and possibly antimony were associated with PAD in a representative sample of the U.S. population. For cadmium, these results strengthen previous findings using blood cadmium as a biomarker, and they support its role in atherosclerosis. For tungsten and antimony, these results need to be interpreted cautiously in the context of an exploratory analysis but deserve further study. Other metals in urine were not associated with PAD at the levels found in the general population.

  9. Metals in Urine and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Navas-Acien, Ana; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Sharrett, A. Richey; Calderon-Aranda, Emma; Selvin, Elizabeth; Guallar, Eliseo

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to metals may promote atherosclerosis. Blood cadmium and lead were associated with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the 1999–2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In the present study we evaluated the association between urinary levels of cadmium, lead, barium, cobalt, cesium, molybdenum, antimony, thallium, and tungsten with PAD in a cross-sectional analysis of 790 participants ≥40 years of age in NHANES 1999–2000. PAD was defined as a blood pressure ankle brachial index < 0.9 in at least one leg. Metals were measured in casual (spot) urine specimens by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry. After multivariable adjustment, subjects with PAD had 36% higher levels of cadmium in urine and 49% higher levels of tungsten compared with noncases. The adjusted odds ratio for PAD comparing the 75th to the 25th percentile of the cadmium distribution was 3.05 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.97 to 9.58]; that for tungsten was 2.25 (95% CI, 0.97 to 5.24). PAD risk increased sharply at low levels of antimony and remained elevated beyond 0.1 μg/L. PAD was not associated with other metals. In conclusion, urinary cadmium, tungsten, and possibly antimony were associated with PAD in a representative sample of the U.S. population. For cadmium, these results strengthen previous findings using blood cadmium as a biomarker, and they support its role in atherosclerosis. For tungsten and antimony, these results need to be interpreted cautiously in the context of an exploratory analysis but deserve further study. Other metals in urine were not associated with PAD at the levels found in the general population. PMID:15687053

  10. Development of a novel experimental rat model for neonatal pre-ganglionic upper brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Hidenobu; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Mishima, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Tetsuya; Aoo, Naoya; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Fujiwara, Michihiro; Ikenoue, Tsuyomu; Nakano, Shinichi; Wakisaka, Shinichiro

    2002-09-15

    A neonatal upper brachial plexus injury, referred to as Erb's palsy, is a serious obstetric problem. Some surgical methods are used to treat this injury, but they are inadequate. To seek new treatments for Erb's palsy, we used a model for cervical preganglionic root transection in neonate rats and evaluated the behavioral and histological compatibility of this model with Erb's palsy. Two groups were used in this study. In the group, receiving the Erb operation, the left anterior and posterior roots of spinal vertebra C5-C7 were transected at the preganglionic level, and the results were compared with those of a group that received a sham operation. In the group, receiving the Erb operation, walking difficulties and behavioral abnormalities were observed. These observations were noted on the side where the transection took place, and the problems were attributed to proximal muscle weakness in the forelimb. Additionally, the forepaw grip was not impaired. Furthermore, in this group, the number of anterior horn cells in the cervical cord on the transected side was significantly lower than that on the contralateral side (P < 0.001). The results of this study indicate that the model fulfills the criteria for the clinical symptoms of Erb's palsy and that it may also serve as a new method for enabling treatment of the condition.

  11. Imaging assessment of glenohumeral dysplasia secondary to brachial plexus birth palsy*

    PubMed Central

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete; Dalto, Vitor Faeda; Crema, Michel Daoud; Waters, Peter M.; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Mazzer, Nilton; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess imaging parameters related to the morphology of the glenohumeral joint in children with unilateral brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), in comparison with those obtained for healthy shoulders. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective search for cases of unilateral BPBP diagnosed at our facility. Only patients with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral BPBP were included, and the final study sample consisted of 10 consecutive patients who were assessed with cross-sectional imaging. The glenoid version, the translation of the humeral head, and the degrees of glenohumeral dysplasia were assessed. Results The mean diameter of the affected humeral heads was 1.93 cm, compared with 2.33 cm for those of the normal limbs. In two cases, there was no significant posterior displacement of the humeral head, five cases showed posterior subluxation of the humeral head, and the remaining three cases showed total luxation of the humeral head. The mean glenoid version angle of the affected limbs (90-α) was -9.6º, versus +1.6º for the normal, contralateral limbs. Conclusion The main deformities found in this study were BPBP-associated retroversion of the glenoid cavity, developmental delay of the humeral head, and posterior translation of the humeral head. PMID:27403013

  12. Balance Impairments after Brachial Plexus Injury as Assessed through Clinical and Posturographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Lidiane; Lemos, Thiago; Silva, Débora C.; de Oliveira, José M.; Guedes Corrêa, José F.; Tavares, Paulo L.; Oliveira, Laura A.; Rodrigues, Erika C.; Vargas, Claudia D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether a sensorimotor deficit of the upper limb following a brachial plexus injury (BPI) affects the upright balance. Design: Eleven patients with a unilateral BPI and 11 healthy subjects were recruited. The balance assessment included the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the number of feet touches on the ground while performing a 60 s single-leg stance and posturographic assessment (eyes open and feet placed hip-width apart during a single 60 s trial). The body weight distribution (BWD) between the legs was estimated from the center of pressure (COP) lateral position. The COP variability was quantified in the anterior-posterior and lateral directions. Results: BPI patients presented lower BBS scores (p = 0.048) and a higher frequency of feet touches during the single-leg stance (p = 0.042) compared with those of the healthy subjects. An asymmetric BWD toward the side opposite the affected arm was shown by 73% of BPI patients. Finally, higher COP variability was observed in BPI patients compared with healthy subjects for anterior-posterior (p = 0.020), but not for lateral direction (p = 0.818). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that upper limb sensorimotor deficits following BPI affect body balance, serving as a warning for the clinical community about the need to prevent and treat the secondary outcomes of this condition. PMID:26834610

  13. Electrostimulation with or without ultrasound-guidance in interscalene brachial plexus block for shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Salem, Mohamed H; Winckelmann, Jörg; Geiger, Peter; Mehrkens, Hans-Hinrich; Salem, Khaled H

    2012-08-01

    In a prospective controlled trial to compare conventional interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) using anatomic landmarks and electro-stimulation with a combined technique of ultrasound guidance followed by nerve stimulation, 60 patients were randomized into 2 matched equal groups: Group A using nerve stimulation (NS) alone and Group B using the combination of ultrasound and NS. The time to detect the plexus (3.9 ± 4 min in Group A and 3.3 ± 1.4 min in Group B) was not significantly different. We needed to reposition the needle once (n = 13) or twice (n = 4) in Group B. First-shot motor response was achieved in all but one patient in Group A; here we were only able to locate the plexus by use of ultrasound. None of the patients needed general anaesthesia. There were no significant differences between postoperative pain, motor power, or patient's satisfaction. ISBPB seems similarly effective using electro-stimulation and ultrasound if performed by experienced anesthesiologists.

  14. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular approach for regional anesthesia of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Kapral, S; Krafft, P; Eibenberger, K; Fitzgerald, R; Gosch, M; Weinstabl, C

    1994-03-01

    We prospectively studied 40 patients (ASA grades I-III) undergoing surgery of the forearm and hand, to investigate the use of ultrasonic cannula guidance for supraclavicular brachial plexus block and its effect on success rate and frequency of complications. Patients were randomized into Group S (supraclavicular paravascular approach; n = 20) and Group A (axillary approach; n = 20). Ultrasonographic study of the plexus sheath was done. After visualization of the anatomy, the plexus sheath was penetrated using a 24-gauge cannula. Plexus block was performed using 30 mL bupivacaine 0.5%. Onset of sensory and motor block of the radial, ulnar, and median nerves was recorded in 10-min intervals for 1 h. Satisfactory surgical anesthesia was attained in 95% of both groups. In Group A, 25% showed an incomplete sensory block of the musculocutaneous nerve, whereas all patients in Group S had a block of this nerve. Complete sensory block of the radial, median, and ulnar nerves was attained after an average of 40 min without a significant difference between the two groups. Because of the direct ultrasonic view of the cervical pleura, we had no cases of pneumothorax. An accidental puncture of subclavian or axillary vessels, as well as neurologic damage, was avoided in all cases. An ultrasonography-guided approach for supraclavicular block combines the safety of axillary block with the larger extent of block of the supraclavicular approach.

  15. [Percutaneous exclusion of traumatic abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm from a brachial approach].

    PubMed

    Gamboa, Ricardo; Ríos-Méndez, Raúl E; Solernó, Raúl; Giachello, Federico; Videla-Lynch, Ángeles; Sarmiento, Ricardo A

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm (AAP) is a rare lesion, although traumatic aortic injury is described as one of the main causes; both the rupture as the surgical treatment of the defect has high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, endovascular treatment either by chemical embolization or exclusion of defect with devices has emerged as an alternative treatment. However, there are risks such as occlusion of visceral vessels near the neck of the defect, embolization material or aortic rupture. Therefore, the choice of material and method of approach should be planned carefully in each case. We report a patient who ten years after abdominal wound firearm was diagnosed with AAP 17 x 13 cm, with short neck originated close to the ostium of the celiac trunk at an acute angle with the aortic axis. We perform the exclusion of the defect with a device designed for closing atrial septal defect from the left brachial access due to the angulation of the neck defect. There were no complications. At 72 hours was granted discharge. A month later, CT scan control showed the false aneurysm of equal size and no residual flow. The monitoring to date is five months and the patient remained asymptomatic.

  16. Brain Reorganization in Patients with Brachial Plexus Injury: A Longitudinal Functional MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto; Tajiri, Yasuhito; Satake, Yoshirou; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess plastic changes of the sensorimotor cortex (SMC) in patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty patients with traumatic BPI underwent fMRI using blood oxygen level-dependent technique with echo-planar imaging before the operation. Sixteen patients underwent their second fMRI at approximately one year after injury. The subjects performed two tasks: a flexion-extension task of the affected elbow and a task of the unaffected elbow. After activation, maps were generated, the number of significantly activated voxels in SMC contralateral to the elbow movement in the affected elbow task study (Naf) and that in the unaffected task study (Nunaf) were counted. An asymmetry index (AI) was calculated, where AI = (Naf − Nunaf)/(Naf + Nunaf). Ten healthy volunteers were also included in this fMRI study. The AI of the first fMRI of the patients with BPI was significantly lower than that of the healthy subjects (P = 0.035). The AI of the second fMRI significantly decreased compared with that of the first fMRI (P = 0.045). Brain reorganization associates with peripheral nervous changes after BPI and after operation for functional reconstruction. PMID:22623904

  17. Numerical validation of a suprasystolic brachial cuff-based method for estimating aortic pressure.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fuyou

    2014-01-01

    Central aortic pressures are better predictors of cardiovascular events than peripheral pressures. However, central aortic blood pressures cannot be measured noninvasively; for this reason, estimating aortic pressures from noninvasive measurements of peripheral pressures has been the subject of numerous studies. In the present study, a novel method was proposed to noninvasively estimate aortic pressures from the oscillometric wave of a suprasystolic brachial cuff. The errors of estimation were evaluated in relation to various cardiovascular properties using an integrated cardiovascular-cuff model. Obtained results demonstrated that the estimation errors are affected mainly by aortic stiffness. The estimation errors for aortic systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, pulse pressure and wave shape under the assumed cardiovascular conditions were 5.84 ± 1.58 mmHg, -0.28 ± 0.41 mmHg, 6.12 ± 1.42 mmHg and 1.72 ± 0.57 mmHg, respectively, all of which fell within the error ranges established by existing devices. Since the method is easy to be automated and bases the estimation fully on patient-specific information, its clinical application is promising, although further clinical studies are awaited to validate the method in vivo.

  18. Reduced functional connectivity within the primary motor cortex of patients with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Fraiman, D; Miranda, M F; Erthal, F; Buur, P F; Elschot, M; Souza, L; Rombouts, S A R B; Schimmelpenninck, C A; Norris, D G; Malessy, M J A; Galves, A; Vargas, C D

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at the effects of traumatic brachial plexus lesion with root avulsions (BPA) upon the organization of the primary motor cortex (M1). Nine right-handed patients with a right BPA in whom an intercostal to musculocutaneous (ICN-MC) nerve transfer was performed had post-operative resting state fMRI scanning. The analysis of empirical functional correlations between neighboring voxels revealed faster correlation decay as a function of distance in the M1 region corresponding to the arm in BPA patients as compared to the control group. No differences between the two groups were found in the face area. We also investigated whether such larger decay in patients could be attributed to a gray matter diminution in M1. Structural imaging analysis showed no difference in gray matter density between groups. Our findings suggest that the faster decay in neighboring functional correlations without significant gray matter diminution in BPA patients could be related to a reduced activity in intrinsic horizontal connections in M1 responsible for upper limb motor synergies.

  19. The effects of changes in the metabolic syndrome detection status on arterial stiffening: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Hirayama, Yoji; Hashimoto, Hideki; Yambe, Minoru; Yamada, Jiko; Koji, Yutaka; Motobe, Kohki; Shiina, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Yamashinai, Akira

    2006-09-01

    We conducted a prospective study to examine the effects of alterations of the metabolic syndrome detection status on the rate of progression of arterial stiffness, which is recognized as a marker of arterial damage and an indicator of cardiovascular risk. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity as an index of arterial stiffening was recorded twice over a 3-year period in 2080 Japanese men (age, 42 +/- 9 years). At the start of the prospective study, pulse wave velocity was higher in the subjects with metabolic syndrome (n=125) than in those without metabolic syndrome (n=1,955) even after adjusting for mean blood pressure. The annual rate of increase of the pulse wave velocity was higher in the group with persistent metabolic syndrome (27 +/- 51 cm/s/year, n=71) than in the group with regression of metabolic syndrome (6 +/- 39 cm/s/year, n=54) or the group in which metabolic syndrome was absent (13 +/- 37 cm/s/year, n=1843; p < 0.05) after adjustment for changes in blood pressure. In conclusion, the changes in the metabolic syndrome detection status of the subjects during the study period affected the annual rate of progression of arterial stiffening, and persistent metabolic syndrome during the study period was associated with acceleration of arterial stiffening in middle-aged Japanese men. On the other hand, resolution of metabolic syndrome may be associated with attenuation of the progression of arterial damage. Therefore, the increased cardiovascular risk associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome may be at least partly mediated by acceleration of the progression of arterial stiffening.

  20. Splenic Artery Syndrome After Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: Treatment With the Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, M. H.; Mogl, M. T.; Podrabsky, P.; Denecke, T.; Grieser, C.; Froeling, V.; Scheurig-Muenkler, C.; Guckelberger, O.; Kroencke, T. J.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the Amplatzer vascular plug (AVP) for embolization of the splenic artery in patients with hepatic hypoperfusion after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Materials and Methods: Thirteen patients (9 men and 4 women) with a mean age of 56 years (range 22-70) who developed splenic artery syndrome after OLT with decreased liver perfusion and clinically relevant impairment of liver function (increased transaminase or serum bilirubin levels, thrombocytopenia, and/or therapy-refractory ascites) were treated by embolization of the proximal third of the splenic artery using the AVP. The plugs ranged in diameter from 6 to 16 mm, and they were introduced through femoral (n = 9), axillary (n = 3), or brachial (n = 1) access using a 5F or 8F guiding catheter. Results: The plugs were successfully placed, and complete occlusion of the splenic artery was achieved in all patients. Placement of two plugs was necessary for complete occlusion in 3 of the 13 patients. Occlusion took on average 10 min (range 4-35). There was no nontarget embolization or plug migration into more distal segments of the splenic artery. All patients showed improved arterial perfusion, including the liver periphery, on postinterventional angiogram. After embolization, liver function parameters (transaminase and bilirubin levels) improved with normalization of concomitant thrombocytopenia and a decrease in ascites volume. Conclusion: Our initial experience in a small patient population with SAS suggests that the AVP enables precise embolization of the proximal splenic artery, thus providing safe and effective treatment for poor liver perfusion after OLT due to SAS.

  1. Characterization and calibration of the central arterial pressure waveform obtained from vibrocardiographic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casacanditella, L.; Cosoli, G.; Casaccia, S.; Rohrbaugh, J. W.; Scalise, L.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2016-06-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) has been demonstrated to be a non-contact technique with high sensitivity, able to measure the skin vibrations related to cardiac activity. The obtainable mechanical signal (i.e. a velocity signal), VibroCardioGram (VCG), is able to provide significant physiological parameters, such as Heart Rate (HR). In this work, the authors aim to present a non-contact measurement method to obtain the arterial blood pressure signal from the mechanical vibrations assessed by LDV, in a central district of the arterial tree, such as carotid artery. In fact, in this way it is possible to indirectly assess Central Arterial Blood Pressure (CABP), which indicates the hemodynamic load on the heart, so that it is considered an important index predicting the cardiac risk of a subject. The measurement setup involves the use of an oscillometric cuff, to measure peripheral blood pressure at the radial artery level. Diastolic and Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) at radial level were used to calibrate the integrated LDV signal (i.e. a displacement signal). As regard calibration, an exponential mathematical model was adopted to derive the pressure waveform from the displacement of the vessel detected by LDV. Results show an average difference of around 20% between systolic pressure measured at brachial level (i.e. peripheral pressure value) and systolic pressure derived from VCG signal measured over the carotid artery (i.e. central pressure). This is a physiological difference, consistent with the literature about the physiological increase of Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP) and Pressure Pulse (PP) at increased distances from the heart. However, this non-contact technique is affected by movement artifacts and by reflection phenomena not related to the studied vessel and so it is necessary to account of such issues in the results.

  2. Laser double Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poffo, L.; Goujon, J.-M.; Le Page, R.; Lemaitre, J.; Guendouz, M.; Lorrain, N.; Bosc, D.

    2014-05-01

    The Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a non-invasive method for estimating the tissular blood flow and speed at a microscopic scale (microcirculation). It is used for medical research as well as for the diagnosis of diseases related to circulatory system tissues and organs including the issues of microvascular flow (perfusion). It is based on the Doppler effect, created by the interaction between the laser light and tissues. LDF measures the mean blood flow in a volume formed by the single laser beam, that penetrate into the skin. The size of this measurement volume is crucial and depends on skin absorption, and is not directly reachable. Therefore, current developments of the LDF are focused on the use of always more complex and sophisticated signal processing methods. On the other hand, laser Double Doppler Flowmeter (FL2D) proposes to use two laser beams to generate the measurement volume. This volume would be perfectly stable and localized at the intersection of the two laser beams. With FL2D we will be able to determine the absolute blood flow of a specific artery. One aimed application would be to help clinical physicians in health care units.

  3. Peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes and postprandial lipidaemia: Is there a link?

    PubMed Central

    Valdivielso, Pedro; Ramírez-Bollero, José; Pérez-López, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease, manifested as intermittent claudication or critical ischaemia, or identified by an ankle/brachial index < 0.9, is present in at least one in every four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Several reasons exist for peripheral arterial disease in diabetes. In addition to hyperglycaemia, smoking and hypertension, the dyslipidaemia that accompanies type 2 diabetes and is characterised by increased triglyceride levels and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations also seems to contribute to this association. Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in postprandial lipidaemia, as a result of various prospective studies showing that non-fasting triglycerides predict the onset of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease better than fasting measurements do. Additionally, the use of certain specific postprandial particle markers, such as apolipoprotein B-48, makes it easier and more simple to approach the postprandial phenomenon. Despite this, only a few studies have evaluated the role of postprandial triglycerides in the development of peripheral arterial disease and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to examine the epidemiology and risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in type 2 diabetes, focusing on the role of postprandial triglycerides and particles. PMID:25317236

  4. Large Artery Calcification on Dialysis Patients Is Located in the Intima and Related to Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Coll, Blai; Betriu, Angels; Martínez-Alonso, Montserrat; Amoedo, Maria Luisa; Arcidiacono, Maria Vittoria; Borras, Merce; Valdivielso, Jose Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Vascular calcification (VC) has a significant effect in cardiovascular diseases on dialysis patients. However, VC is assessed with x-ray-based techniques, which do not inform about calcium localization (intima, media, atherosclerosis-related). The aim of this work is to study VC and its related factors using arterial ultrasound to report the exact location of calcium. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was an observational, cross-sectional, case-control study that included 232 patients in dialysis and 208 age- and sex-matched controls with normal kidney function. Demographic data and laboratory values were collated. Carotid, femoral, and brachial ultrasounds were performed to assess VC and atherosclerosis burden using a standardized protocol. Results Cardiovascular risk factors were predominantly found in controls, although the burden of atherosclerosis was higher in the dialysis group. VC was significantly more prevalent in the group of patients on dialysis than control subjects, and in both groups the most prevalent pattern of VC was linear calcification located in the intima of the artery wall. Age and undergoing dialysis (with or without previous cardiovascular diseases) were positively and significantly associated with linear calcification. Conversely, the absence of atherosclerosis and low levels of C-reactive protein and phosphorus significantly impeded the development of linear calcification. Conclusions VC in large, conduit arteries is more prevalent in patients on dialysis than controls and is predominantly located in a linear fashion in the intima of the arteries. PMID:20930091

  5. Traumatic subclavian arterial rupture: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Subclavian artery injuries represent an uncommon complication of blunt chest trauma, this structure being protected by subclavius muscle, the clavicle, the first rib, and the deep cervical fascia as well as the costo-coracoid ligament, a clavi-coraco-axillary fascia portion. Subclavian artery injury appears early after trauma, and arterial rupture may cause life-treatening haemorrages, pseudo-aneurysm formation and compression of brachial plexus. These clinical eveniences must be carefully worked out by accurate physical examination of the upper limb: skin color, temperature, sensation as well as radial pulse and hand motility represent the key points of physical examination in this setting. The presence of large hematomas and pulsatile palpable mass in supraclavicular region should raise the suspicion of serious vascular injury. Since the first reports of endovascular treatment for traumatic vascular injuries in the 90’s, an increasing number of vascular lesions have been treated this way. We report a case of traumatic subclavian arterial rupture after blunt chest trauma due to a 4 meters fall, treated by endovascular stent grafting, providing a complete review of the past twenty years’ literature. PMID:22710070

  6. Fracture and Collapse of Balloon-Expandable Stents in the Bilateral Common Iliac Arteries Due to Shiatsu Massage

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihashi, Shigeo Higashiura, Wataru; Itoh, Hirofumi; Sakaguchi, Shoji; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2012-12-15

    We report a case of stent fracture and collapse of balloon-expandable stents caused by shiatsu massage. A 76-year-old man presented with complaints of intermittent claudication of the right lower extremity. Stenoses of the bilateral common iliac arteries (CIAs) were detected. Balloon-expandable stents were deployed in both CIAs, resulting in resolution of symptoms. Five months later, pelvis x-ray showed collapse of both stents. Despite the stent collapse, the patient was asymptomatic, and his ankle brachial index values were within the normal range. Further history showed that the patient underwent daily shiatsu therapy in the umbilical region, which may have triggered collapse of the stent. Physicians should advise patients to avoid compression of the abdominal wall after implantation of a stent in the iliac artery.

  7. Stenting for Peripheral Artery Disease of the Lower Extremities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    ), stroke and cardiovascular death. Annually, approximately 10% of ischemic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events can be attributed to the progression of PAD. Compared with patients without PAD, the 10-year risk of all-cause mortality is 3-fold higher in patients with PAD with 4-5 times greater risk of dying from cardiovascular event. The risk of coronary heart disease is 6 times greater and increases 15-fold in patients with advanced or severe PAD. Among subjects with diabetes, the risk of PAD is often severe and associated with extensive arterial calcification. In these patients the risk of PAD increases two to four fold. The results of the Canadian public survey of knowledge of PAD demonstrated that Canadians are unaware of the morbidity and mortality associated with PAD. Despite its prevalence and cardiovascular risk implications, only 25% of PAD patients are undergoing treatment. The diagnosis of PAD is difficult as most patients remain asymptomatic for many years. Symptoms do not present until there is at least 50% narrowing of an artery. In the general population, only 10% of persons with PAD have classic symptoms of claudication, 40% do not complain of leg pain, while the remaining 50% have a variety of leg symptoms different from classic claudication. The severity of symptoms depends on the degree of stenosis. The need to intervene is more urgent in patients with limb threatening ischemia as manifested by night pain, rest pain, ischemic ulcers or gangrene. Without successful revascularization those with critical ischemia have a limb loss (amputation) rate of 80-90% in one year. Diagnosis of PAD is generally non-invasive and can be performed in the physician offices or on an outpatient basis in a hospital. Most common diagnostic procedure include: 1) Ankle Brachial Index (ABI), a ratio of the blood pressure readings between the highest ankle pressure and the highest brachial (arm) pressure; and 2) Doppler ultrasonography, a diagnostic imaging procedure that uses

  8. Measuring How Elastic Arteries Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMont, M. Edwin; MacGillivray, Patrick S.; Davison, Ian G.; McConnell, Colin J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a procedure used to measure force and pressure in elastic arteries. Discusses the physics of the procedure and recommends the use of bovine arteries. Explains the preparation of the arteries for the procedure. (DDR)

  9. Living with Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Carotid Artery Disease If you have carotid artery disease, you can take steps to manage the ... treatment plan, and getting ongoing care. Having carotid artery disease raises your risk of having a stroke . ...

  10. What Is Carotid Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease is a disease in ... blood to your face, scalp, and neck. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows the location of the right ...

  11. Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Peripheral Artery Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 People with ... developing atherosclerosis, the most common cause of peripheral artery disease (PAD) . And individuals with PAD have a ...

  12. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for carotid artery stenosis: Health professionals ... blood flow through the arteries. Potential Benefits and Harms of Carotid Artery Stenosis Screening and Treatment The ...

  13. Coronary artery stent (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open. ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open.

  14. Arterial Pressure Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusner, A. A.; Tracy, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a simple hydraulic analog which allows students to explore some physical aspects of the cardiovascular system and provides them with a means to visualize and conceptualize these basic principles. Simulates the behavior of arterial pressure in response to changes in heart rate, stroke volume, arterial compliance, and peripheral…

  15. [Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Bourry, N; Chabrot, P; Jeannin, G; Filaire, M; Charpy, C; Bay, J O; Kemeny, J L; Caillaud, D; Escande, G; Boyer, L

    2008-02-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma is a rare tumor. We present a case of intimal sarcoma arising from right pulmonary artery and left lower pulmonary vein observed in a 44-year-old man with a non-productive cough. Computed tomographic scans and magnetic resonance imaging showing filling defect enhancement contributed early, suggesting the diagnosis of primary vascular tumor, hypothesis confirmed by pathologist findings.

  16. Coronary artery disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... through these arteries is critical for the heart. Coronary artery disease usually results from the build-up of fatty material and plaque, a condition called atherosclerosis. As the ... blood to the heart can slow or stop, causing chest pain (stable ...

  17. Genetics in Arterial Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Rutsch, Frank; Nitschke, Yvonne; Terkeltaub, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Artery calcification reflects an admixture of factors such as ectopic osteochondral differentiation with primary host pathological conditions. We review how genetic factors, as identified by human genome-wide association studies, and incomplete correlations with various mouse studies, including knockout and strain analyses, fit into “pieces of the puzzle” in intimal calcification in human atherosclerosis, and artery tunica media calcification in aging, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. We also describe in sharp contrast how ENPP1, CD73, and ABCC6 serve as “cogs in a wheel” of arterial calcification. Specifically, each is a minor component in the function of a much larger network of factors that exert balanced effects to promote and suppress arterial calcification. For the network to normally suppress spontaneous arterial calcification, the “cogs” ENPP1, CD73, and ABCC6 must be present and in working order. Monogenic ENPP1, CD73, and ABCC6 deficiencies each drive a molecular pathophysiology of closely related but phenotypically different diseases (generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI), pseudoxan-thoma elasticum (PXE) and arterial calcification caused by CD73 deficiency (ACDC)), in which premature onset arterial calcification is a prominent but not the sole feature. PMID:21852556

  18. Clarifying the anatomy of the fifth arch artery

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Gulati, Gurpreet Singh; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    The artery allegedly forming in the fifth pharyngeal arch has increasingly been implicated as responsible for various vascular malformations in patients with congenitally malformed hearts. Observations from studies on developing embryos, however, have failed to provide support to substantiate several of these inferences such that the very existence of the fifth arch artery remains debatable. To the best of our knowledge, in only a solitary human embryo has a vascular channel been found that truly resembled the artery of the fifth arch. Despite the meager evidence to support its existence, the fifth arch artery has been invoked to explain the morphogenesis of double-barreled aorta, some unusual forms of aortopulmonary communications, and abnormalities of the brachiocephalic arteries. In most of these instances, the interpretations have proved fallible when examined in the light of existing knowledge of cardiac development. In our opinion, there are more plausible alternative explanations for the majority of these descriptions. Double-barreled aorta is more likely to result from retention of the recently identified dorsal collateral channels while abnormalities of brachiocephalic arteries are better explained on the basis of extensive remodeling of aortic arches during fetal development. Some examples of aortopulmonary communications, nonetheless, may well represent persistence of the developing artery of the fifth pharyngeal arch. We here present one such case — a patient with tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia, in whom the fifth arch artery provided a necessary communication between the ascending aorta and the pulmonary arteries. In this light, we discuss the features we consider to be essential before attaching the tag of “fifth arch artery” to a candidate vascular channel. PMID:27011696

  19. Poor trunk flexibility is associated with arterial stiffening.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Kawano, Hiroshi; Gando, Yuko; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Murakami, Haruka; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Tanimoto, Michiya; Ohmori, Yumi; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Tabata, Izumi; Miyachi, Motohiko

    2009-10-01

    Flexibility is one of the components of physical fitness as well as cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular strength and endurance. Flexibility has long been considered a major component in the preventive treatment of musculotendinous strains. The present study investigated a new aspect of flexibility. Using a cross-sectional study design, we tested the hypothesis that a less flexible body would have arterial stiffening. A total of 526 adults, 20 to 39 yr of age (young), 40 to 59 yr of age (middle-aged), and 60 to 83 yr of age (older), participated in this study. Subjects in each age category were divided into either poor- or high-flexibility groups on the basis of a sit-and-reach test. Arterial stiffness was assessed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Two-way ANOVA indicated a significant interaction between age and flexibility in determining baPWV (P < 0.01). In middle-aged and older subjects, baPWV was higher in poor-flexibility than in high-flexibility groups (middle-aged, 1,260 +/- 141 vs. 1,200 +/- 124 cm/s, P < 0.01; and older, 1,485 +/- 224 vs. 1,384 +/- 199 cm/s, P < 0.01). In young subjects, there was no significant difference between the two flexibility groups. A stepwise multiple-regression analysis (n = 316) revealed that among the components of fitness (cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength, and flexibility) and age, all components and age were independent correlates of baPWV. These findings suggest that flexibility may be a predictor of arterial stiffening, independent of other components of fitness.

  20. Seeing Double

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesic, Peter

    2003-10-01

    The separateness and connection of individuals is perhaps the central question of human life: What, exactly, is my individuality? To what degree is it unique? To what degree can it be shared, and how? To the many philosophical and literary speculations about these topics over time, modern science has added the curious twist of quantum theory, which requires that the elementary particles of which everything consists have no individuality at all. All aspects of chemistry depend on this lack of individuality, as do many branches of physics. From where, then, does our individuality come? In Seeing Double, Peter Pesic invites readers to explore this intriguing set of questions. He draws on literary and historical examples that open the mind (from Homer to Martin Guerre to Kafka), philosophical analyses that have helped to make our thinking and speech more precise, and scientific work that has enabled us to characterize the phenomena of nature. Though he does not try to be all-inclusive, Pesic presents a broad range of ideas, building toward a specific point of view: that the crux of modern quantum theory is its clash with our ordinary concept of individuality. This represents a departure from the usual understanding of quantum theory. Pesic argues that what is bizarre about quantum theory becomes more intelligible as we reconsider what we mean by individuality and identity in ordinary experience. In turn, quantum identity opens a new perspective on us. Peter Pesic is a Tutor and Musician-in-Residence at St. John's College, Santa Fe, New Mexico. He has a Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University.

  1. Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tao; Zhang, Chong; Feng, Zhiying; Ni, Yiming

    2008-08-01

    Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is an uncommon tumor. We report a case of a 73-year-old male patient with a two-week history of palpitations and shortness of breath, aggravated for two days and was believed to be pulmonary hypertension. Emergency heart ultrasound after admission presented a massive pulmonary embolism in the pulmonary artery. The patient's condition was successfully managed with urgent pulmonary artery embolectomy. The patient demonstrated improvement in hemodynamics after the operation. Histologic and immunohistochemical assays were performed and a diagnosis was made as primary pulmonary artery sarcoma arising from the left pulmonary artery. Resection of the tumor is recommended for the treatment of this rare malignant tumor. The corresponding chemotherapy, follow-up and prognosis are described as well in this case report.

  2. Double inlet ventricle. Lung biopsy findings and implications for management.

    PubMed Central

    Juaneda, E; Haworth, S G

    1985-01-01

    The lung was biopsied in 20 children with double inlet ventricle and pulmonary hypertension aged 2 months to 14 years. Eleven patients had two patent atrioventricular valves, three atresia of the right valve, and six hypoplasia of the left valve. Severe pulmonary arterial medial hypertrophy occurred in the nine children less than 1 year of age. The findings did not suggest a period of normality after birth when the pulmonary artery might have been banded most effectively. Of the 11 older patients, eight had medial hypertrophy and three intimal proliferation with medial atrophy. Six patients with medial hypertrophy had some reduction in pulmonary arterial pressure after banding. It is recommended that the pulmonary artery be banded as early as possible, and rebanded early if a satisfactory result is not obtained, particularly in patients destined for a Fontan-Kreutzer procedure. Early atrial septectomy should reduce the arterial and venous abnormalities seen in left atrioventricular valve hypoplasia. PMID:3994865

  3. Double Your Major, Double Your Return?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Rossi, Alison F.; Hersch, Joni

    2008-01-01

    We use the 2003 National Survey of College Graduates to provide the first estimates of the effect on earnings of having a double major. Overall, double majoring increases earnings by 2.3% relative to having a single major among college graduates without graduate degrees. Most of the gains from having a double major come from choosing fields across…

  4. A Systematic Review of Outcomes of Contralateral C7 for the Treatment of Traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury: Part 1-Overall outcomes of contralateral C7 transfer for traumatic brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Chang, Kate W.-C.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Contralateral C7 (CC7) transfer has been used for treating traumatic brachial plexus injury. However, the effectiveness of CC7 transfer remains a subject of debate. We performed a systematic review to study the overall outcomes of CC7 transfer to different recipient nerves in traumatic brachial plexus injuries. Methods A literature search was conducted using PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify original articles related to CC7 transfer for traumatic brachial plexus injury. The data extracted were study/ patient characteristics, and objective outcomes of CC7 transfer to the recipient nerves. We normalized modifications of MRC and other outcome measures into an MRC-based outcome scale for comparisons. Results Thirty-nine studies were identified. The outcomes were categorized based on the three major recipient nerves: median, musculocutaneous, and radial/triceps nerves. Regarding overall functional recovery, 11% of patients achieved MRC grade M4 wrist flexion and 38% achieved M3. Grade M4 finger flexion was achieved by 7% of patients whereas 36% achieved M3. Finally, 56% of patients achieved ≥S3 sensory recovery in the median nerve territories. In the musculocutaneous nerve group, 38% of patients regained elbow flexor strength to M4 and 37% regained to M3. In the radial/triceps nerve group, 25% regained elbow or wrist extension strength to an MRC grade M4 and 25% regained to M3. Conclusions Outcome measures in the included studies were not consistently reported to uncover true patient-related benefits from the CC7 transfer. Reliable and validated outcome instruments should be applied to critically evaluate patients undergoing CC7 transfer. PMID:26397253

  5. Endovascular Repair of a Right-Sided Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Associated with a Right Aortic Arch and a Left Subclavian Artery Arising from a Kommerell's Diverticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Avgerinos, Efthimios D.; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Psarros, Vasileios; Bastounis, Elias

    2009-07-15

    This case report describes the endovascular repair of a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with a right aortic arch and an aberrant left subclavian artery. A 76-year-old male with multiple comorbidities was incidentally found to have a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm with a maximum diameter of 6.2 cm. Additionally, there was a right aortic arch with a retroesophageal segment and separate arch branches arising in the following order: left common carotid artery, right common carotid artery, right subclavian artery, and left subclavian artery that was aberrant, arising from a Kommerrell's diverticulum. The aneurysm was successfully excluded by deployment of a Zenith TX1 36 x 32 x 20-mm stent-graft using wire traction technique via the left femoral and right brachial arteries in order to deal with two severe aortic angulations. At 18-month follow-up the patient was doing well, with aneurysm sac shrinkage to 5.9 cm and no signs of endoleak or migration. Endovascular repair of right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysms with a right arch and aberrant left subclavian artery is feasible, safe, and effective. In such rare configurations, which demand considerably increased technical dexterity and center experience, endovascular repair emerges as an attractive therapeutic option.

  6. Degree of Contracture Related to Residual Muscle Shoulder Strength in Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Lesions

    PubMed Central

    van Gelein Vitringa, Valerie M.; van Noort, Arthur; Ritt, Marco J. P. F.; van Royen, Barend J.; van der Sluijs, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives  Little is known about the relation between residual muscle strength and joint contracture formation in neuromuscular disorders. This study aimed to investigate the relation between residual muscle strength and shoulder joint contractures in children with sequelae of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL). In OBPL a shoulder joint contracture is a frequent finding. We hypothesize that residual internal and external rotator strength and their balance are related to the extent of shoulder joint contracture. Methods  Clinical assessment was performed in 34 children (mean 10.0 years) with unilateral OBPL and Narakas classes I–III. External and internal rotation strengths were measured with the shoulder in neutral position using a handheld dynamometer. Strength on the affected side was given as percentage of the normal side. Contracture was assessed by passive internal and external rotations in degrees (in 0° abduction). Mallet classification was used for active shoulder function. Results  External and internal rotation strengths on the affected side were approximately 50% of the normal side and on average both equally affected: 56% (SD 18%) respectively 51% (SD 27%); r = 0.600, p = 0.000. Residual strengths were not related to passive internal or external rotation (p > 0.200). Internal rotation strength (r =  − 0.425, p <0.05) was related to Narakas class. Mallet score was related to external and internal rotation strengths (r = 0.451 and r = 0.515, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusion  The intuitive notion that imbalances in residual muscle strength influence contracture formation cannot be confirmed in this study. Our results are of interest for the understanding of contracture formation in OBPL. PMID:27917235

  7. Cortical plasticity after brachial plexus injury and repair: a resting-state functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Indira Devi, B; Bharti, Komal; Panda, Rajanikant

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors aimed to understand the alterations of brain resting-state networks (RSNs) in patients with pan-brachial plexus injury (BPI) before and after surgery, which might provide insight into cortical plasticity after peripheral nerve injury and regeneration. METHODS Thirty-five patients with left pan-BPI before surgery, 30 patients after surgery, and 25 healthy controls underwent resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI). The 30 postoperative patients were subdivided into 2 groups: 14 patients with improvement in muscle power and 16 patients with no improvement in muscle power after surgery. RSNs were extracted using independent component analysis to evaluate connectivity at a significance level of p < 0.05 (familywise error corrected). RESULTS The patients with BPI had lower connectivity in their sensorimotor network (SMN) and salience network (SN) and greater connectivity in their default mode network (DMN) before surgery than the controls. Connectivity of the left supplementary motor cortex in the SMN and medial frontal gyrus and in the anterior cingulate cortex in the SN increased in patients whose muscle power had improved after surgery, whereas no significant changes were noted in the unimproved patients. There was a trend toward reduction in DMN connectivity in all the patients after surgery compared with that in the preoperative patients; however, this result was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study highlight the fact that peripheral nerve injury, its management, and successful treatment cause dynamic changes within the brain's RSNs, which includes not only the obvious SMN but also the higher cognitive networks such as the SN and DMN, which indicates brain plasticity and compensatory mechanisms at work.

  8. Coordination and Balance in Children with Birth-Related Brachial Plexus Injury: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Bucevska, Marija; Verchere, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Most children with severe birth-related brachial plexus injury (BRBPI) have some functional impairment, but information on the impact of BRBPI on coordination and balance is limited. The study's purpose was to determine whether children with BRBPI exhibit deficits in body coordination and balance. Method: A prospective cohort study involving 39 children with BRBPI aged 5–15 years was conducted. Range of motion, strength, active movement, and balance and coordination motor skills were assessed using the Bruininks–Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, Second Edition (BOT-2), and the Movement Assessment Battery for Children—Second Edition (MABC-2). A self-report measure of physical disability, the Activities Scale for Kids—Performance Version (ASKp), was also administered. Results: Participants scored a mean of 44.72 on the BOT-2 Body Coordination composite subtest; scores can range from 20 to 80. Eleven participants (28.2%) scored below average on this test. Participants scored a mean of 7.3 on the Balance subtest of the MABC-2; scores can range from 1 to 19. Twenty-six participants (66.7%) scored below average on this test. Of 38 participants, 25 (65.8%) had an ASKp score indicating some level of disability (<95/100); we found a statistically significant difference in balance (p=0.007) between these 25 participants and those without disability (ASKp score 95–100). Conclusions: The majority of our study population scored in the categories of at risk or significant difficulty for balance on the MABC-2. Balance rehabilitation may be a valuable treatment adjunct for children with BRBPI. PMID:25931660

  9. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, Joris; Audenaert, Emmanuel; Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Mulliez, Thomas; Vandemaele, Pieter; Achten, Eric; Kerckaert, Ingrid; D'Herde, Katharina; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a s