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Sample records for double brachial arteries

  1. Traumatic Brachial Artery Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ergunes, Kazim; Yilik, Levent; Ozsoyler, Ibrahim; Kestelli, Mert; Ozbek, Cengiz; Gurbuz, Ali

    2006-01-01

    We performed this retrospective study to analyze our strategies for managing and surgically treating brachial artery injuries. Fifty-seven patients with a total of 58 traumatic brachial artery injuries underwent surgery at our institution, from August 1996 through November 2004. Fifty-four patients were male and 3 were female (age range, 7 to 75 years; mean, 29.4 years). Forty-four of the patients had penetrating injuries (18 had stab wounds; 16, window glass injuries; and 10, industrial accidents), 10 had blunt trauma injuries (traffic accidents), and 3 had gunshot injuries. Fourteen patients (24.6%) had peripheral nerve injury. All patients underwent Doppler ultrasonographic examination. The repair of the 58 arterial injuries involved end-to-end anastomosis for 32 injuries (55.2%), reverse saphenous vein graft interpositional grafts for 18 (31%), and primary repair for 8 (13.8%). Venous continuity was achieved in 11 (84.6%) of 13 patients who had major venous injuries. Nine of the 57 patients (15.8%) required primary fasciotomy. Follow-up showed that 5 of the 14 patients with peripheral nerve injury had apparent disabilities due to nerve injury. One patient underwent amputation. There were no deaths. We believe that good results can be achieved in patients with brachial artery injuries by use of careful physical examination, Doppler ultrasonography, and restoration of viability with vascular repair and dbridement of nonviable tissues. Traumatic neurologic injury frequently leads to disability of the extremities. PMID:16572866

  2. Crutch-induced bilateral brachial artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Takanori; Ohki, Shin-ichi; Saito, Tsutomu; Misawa, Yoshio

    2009-12-01

    A 57-year-old man, who was a chronic axillary crutch user as a result of childhood poliomyelitis, was referred to our hospital because of a sudden onset of right forearm ischemia. The right forearm had no pulse, and three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) showed an aneurysm of the right brachial artery associated with arterial occlusion. The thrombosed aneurysm of the brachial artery was resected and the brachial artery was successfully revascularized by interposing a saphenous vein graft. Postoperative 3DCT revealed an asymptomatic left brachial artery aneurysm. His postoperative course was uneventful under warfarin anticoagulation therapy.

  3. Treatment of peripheral arterial disease via percutaneous brachial artery access.

    PubMed

    Franz, Randall W; Tanga, Christopher F; Herrmann, Joseph W

    2017-08-01

    This review was conducted to evaluate the types of endovascular procedures that can be performed via brachial artery access, evaluate the access success rate, and determine the incidence of technical complications. A retrospective 10-year record review at a tertiary facility from January 1, 2005, through June 30, 2015, was completed. Patients who underwent attempted brachial artery access were eligible for review. Outcomes intended to be evaluated included ability to access the vessel, reach an identified lesion, and perform an indicated procedure, while describing the incidence and type of complications that occurred to clarify the utility and safety of brachial artery access. The review included 265 access cases in 179 patients. The access success rate was 98.9%. Intervention was performed in 223 cases (84.2%). Angioplasty was the most common intervention (59%, [154 cases]), with stents, atherectomy, coiling, and percutaneous thrombectomy having also been performed. Complications included hematoma (2.3%) and pseudoaneurysm (1.5%). Complications requiring intervention occurred in 1.9% of procedures. Interventions were performed on all major vessels as distal as the dorsalis pedis. Sheath sizes ranged from 4F to 7F. Intervention was performed on bilateral lower extremities in 38 cases (14.5%). A femoral bypass graft was present in 141 patients (53%) as the main indication for brachial artery access. Brachial access is a reliable and effective option for treatment of peripheral vascular disease and should be considered when femoral access is difficult or contraindicated and when a bypass graft is present in the femoral region. In addition, bilateral lesions may be approached easily through one brachial artery access site, making this approach advantageous when bilateral lesions are expected. The complication rate is similar to femoral access and can be minimized with ultrasound-guided access distally over the humerus, micropuncture access, and a dedicated

  4. The safety of brachial artery puncture for arterial blood sampling.

    PubMed

    Okeson, G C; Wulbrecht, P H

    1998-09-01

    This study was designed to determine the incidence of complications in a sample of 6,185 brachial artery punctures for arterial blood gas analysis. The study sample was comprised of adult patients who had arterial blood gas analysis ordered in the course of their clinical evaluations in a multispecialty clinic and hospital affiliated with a university school of medicine. Subjects were entered prospectively at the time the procedure was done. The overall incidence of all complications was 2.0%. Immediate limb pain or parenthesias occurred in 1.1%, while the onset of symptoms was delayed up to 24 h in 0.9%. Hematoma formation occurred in only 0.06%. None of the complications was considered to be of major impact, in that none was associated with limb ischemia or other objective abnormalities. Only one subject required analgesic medication to control pain that ultimately subsided spontaneously without deficit. We believe that brachial artery puncture, when properly performed, is a safe and reliable alternative route for obtaining arterial blood for gas analysis.

  5. Brachial Arterial Pressure Monitoring during Cardiac Surgery Rarely Causes Complications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Asha; Bahadorani, Bobby; Wakefield, Brett J; Makarova, Natalya; Kumar, Priya A; Tong, Michael Zhen-Yu; Sessler, Daniel I; Duncan, Andra E

    2017-06-01

    Brachial arterial catheters better estimate aortic pressure than radial arterial catheters but are used infrequently because complications in a major artery without collateral flow are potentially serious. However, the extent to which brachial artery cannulation promotes complications remains unknown. The authors thus evaluated a large cohort of cardiac surgical patients to estimate the incidence of related serious complications. The institutional Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database and Perioperative Health Documentation System Registry of the Cleveland Clinic were used to identify patients who had brachial artery cannulation between 2007 and 2015. Complications within 6 months after surgery were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnostic and procedural codes, Current Procedural Terminology procedure codes, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons variables. The authors reviewed electronic medical records to confirm that putative complications were related plausibly to brachial arterial catheterization. Complications were categorized as (1) vascular, (2) peripheral nerve injury, or (3) infection. The authors evaluated associations between brachial arterial complications and patient comorbidities and between complications and in-hospital mortality and duration of hospitalization. Among 21,597 qualifying patients, 777 had vascular or nerve injuries or local infections, but only 41 (incidence 0.19% [95% CI, 0.14 to 0.26%]) were potentially consequent to brachial arterial cannulation. Vascular complications occurred in 33 patients (0.15% [0.10 to 0.23%]). Definitely or possibly related infection occurred in 8 (0.04% [0.02 to 0.08%]) patients. There were no plausibly related neurologic complications. Peripheral arterial disease was associated with increased risk of complications. Brachial catheter complications were associated with prolonged hospitalization and in-hospital mortality. Brachial artery cannulation for

  6. An Analysis of Complications of Brachial and Axillary Artery Punctures.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhu; Gu, Yongquan; Guo, Lianrui; Guo, Jianming; Gao, Xixiang; Li, Jianxin; Wang, Zhonggao; Zhang, Jian

    2016-12-01

    To examine the complications of brachial and axillary artery punctures and the precautionary measures taken to lower their incidences. Retrospective analysis of 266 cases of brachial and axillary artery punctures was performed for angiography or angioplasty between January 2009 and December 2013 at the Department of Vascular Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University. Complications and their causes were assessed. Among all brachial artery punctures (n = 140), there were complications in 3.6 per cent of cases, including local hematoma in 1.4 per cent, pseudoaneurysm in 0.7 per cent, acute arterial thrombosis in 0.7 per cent, and median nerve injury in 0.7 per cent. Among all axillary artery punctures (n = 126), there were complications in 10.3 per cent of cases, including local hematoma in 4.8 per cent, pseudoaneurysm in 0.8 per cent, acute arterial thrombosis in 0.8 per cent, acute venous thrombosis in 0.8 per cent, and nerve injury in 3.2 per cent. The incidence of complications was significantly lower in brachial axillary artery puncture compared with axillary artery puncture (P < 0.05). The main factors associated with complications might be patient's vascular condition, perioperative medication, anatomical features of the artery, puncture site, successful rate of first-attempt puncture, and bandage strength. Incidence of complications of brachial and axillary artery punctures could be lowered by strengthening the choice of indications, improving the perioperative managements, being fully aware of the anatomical characteristics of the brachial and axillary arteries, and applying the standardized techniques of puncture and compression hemostasis.

  7. An arterial island pattern of the axillary and brachial arteries: a case report with clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Piagkou, Maria; Totlis, Trifon; Panagiotopoulos, Nikitas-Apollon; Natsis, Konstantinos

    2016-10-01

    The variability of axillary and brachial arteries is often associated with neural anomalies in arrangement of the brachial plexus. The current report is focused on the coexistence of two brachial arteries of axillary origin with an atypical median nerve formatted by three (two lateral and a medial) roots in the right arm of a 68-year-old male cadaver. Medially, the brachial artery located in front of the median nerve was named superficial brachial artery and anastomosed with the brachial artery situated posterolateral to the median nerve, hence it is referred as the main brachial artery or brachial artery. Subsequently, the two arteries were recombined and the created arterial complex, like an island pattern, ended dividing into radial and ulnar arteries, at the level of the radial neck. To our knowledge, the combination of the above-mentioned arterial pattern to an abnormally formatted median nerve has not yet been cited. The current neurovascular abnormalities followed by an embryological explanation may have clinical implications.

  8. Brachioradial arteries with anastomotic arteries connecting to brachial arteries bilaterally.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tong; Qiuhong, Dan; Haipeng, Cai

    2010-01-01

    We present a patient with a failed radial coronary angioplasty as a result of bilateral brachioradial arteries, the radial arteries anomalously originating from the axillary arteries. We review the literature concerning abnormal origins of the radial artery and propose the left ulnar artery as optimal access of choice in cases with a right brachioradial artery of relatively small size in its proximal part.

  9. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ta-Chen; Torng, Pao-Ling; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Ming-Fong; Liau, Chiau-Suong

    2011-01-01

    Background: Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited. Methods: This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD), compliance (BAC), and resistance (BAR). Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured. Results: Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity. Conclusion: Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than omnivores. Prevention of vitamin B12 deficiency might be beneficial for cardiovascular health in vegetarians. PMID:21915169

  10. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Su, Ta-Chen; Torng, Pao-Ling; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Ming-Fong; Liau, Chiau-Suong

    2011-01-01

    Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited. This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD), compliance (BAC), and resistance (BAR). Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured. Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity. Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than omnivores. Prevention of vitamin B12 deficiency might be beneficial for cardiovascular health in vegetarians.

  11. Iatrogenic brachial and femoral artery complications following venipuncture in children.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Omer Faruk; Demircin, Metin; Ucar, Ibrahim; Duman, Umit; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Boke, Erkmen

    2006-01-01

    Catheter- or noncatheter-related peripheral arterial complications such as arterial pseudoaneurysm, embolus, or arteriovenous fistula may be seen in the pediatric age group. The most common etiologies defined for arterial complications are peripheral arterial puncture performed for a routine arterial blood gas analysis, arterial catheters placed for invasive monitorization of children, or catheterization performed for diagnostic purposes through the peripheral arterial system, most commonly the femoral artery. Nine children with peripheral arterial complications, whose ages varied between 2 months and 2.5 years, were enrolled in this study. All patients were treated surgically. Following physical examination, Doppler ultrasonography, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, or digital subtraction angiography were used as diagnostic tools. We studied thrombophilic panels preoperatively. Six patients had brachial artery pseudoaneurysms that developed accidentally during venipuncture, I had a brachial arteriovenous fistula that developed after an accidental brachial artery puncture during routine peripheral blood analysis. In the remaining 2 patients, peripheral arterial embolic events were detected. One had a left brachial arterial embolus and the other had a sudden onset right femoral artery embolus that was detected via diagnostic interventions. No morbidity such as amputation, extremity loss, or mortality occurred due to the arterial events or surgery. All patients were discharged from the hospital in good clinical condition. In all patients, follow-up at 3 or 6 months revealed palpable peripheral artery pulsations of the ulnar and radial arteries at wrist level. Because the incidence of peripheral arterial complications is relatively low in children compared to adults, the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are extrapolated from the adult guidelines. We proposed that early diagnosis and surgical approach prevented the complications from

  12. Morphology of brachial plexus and axillary artery in bonobo (Pan paniscus).

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Y; Oishi, M; Shimizu, D

    2011-02-01

    A left brachial plexus and axillary artery of bonobo (Pan paniscus) were examined, and the interrelation between the brachial plexus and the axillary artery was discussed. This is the first report of the brachial plexus and the axillary artery of bonobo. The bonobo brachial plexus formed very similar pattern to that of other ape species and human. On the other hand, the branches of the bonobo axillary artery had uncommon architecture in comparison with human case. The axillary artery did not penetrate the brachial plexus and passes through all way along anterior to the brachial plexus. Only 4.9% of human forelimbs have this pattern. Moreover, the brachial artery runs through superficially anterior to branches of the brachial plexus.

  13. Median nerve neuropraxia by a large false brachial artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Lijftogt, Niki; Cancrinus, Ernst; Hoogervorst, Erwin L J; van de Mortel, Rob H W; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M

    2014-10-01

    Peripheral nerve compression is a rare complication of an iatrogenic false brachial artery aneurysm. We present a 72-year-old patient with median nerve compression due to a false brachial artery aneurysm after removal of an arterial catheter. Surgical exclusion of the false aneurysm was performed in order to release traction of the median nerve. At 3-month assessment, moderate hand recovery in function and sensibility was noted. In the case of neuropraxia of the upper extremity, following a history of hospital stay and arterial lining or catheterization, compression due to pseudoaneurysm should be considered a probable cause directly at presentation. Early recognition and treatment is essential to avoid permanent neurological deficit. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. Variations in brachial plexus with respect to concomitant accompanying aberrant arm arteries.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Horst; Schmitt, Oliver; Wree, Andreas; Schulze, Marko

    2016-11-01

    Variations in the brachial plexus are the rule rather than the exception. This fact is of special interest for the anesthetist when planning axillary block of brachial plexus. 167 cadaver arms were evaluated for variations in brachial plexus, with focus on the cords of the plexus, the loop of the median nerve, and the course of the median, musculocutaneous, ulnar, axillary and radial nerves. In addition, concomitant arterial variations were recorded. In 167 arms, variations were detected in 60 cases (36%). With 46 arms (28%) most variations concern the median nerve, followed by 13 cases (8%) which involved the musculocutaneous nerve. Ulnar, axillary and radial nerve variations were rare, amounting to 1.2% for each nerve. In median nerve conditions with a shifted loop of median nerve (12%), a hidden position of the loop or a hidden course of the beginning median nerve (8%) and a doubled loop of median nerve (17%) were observed. In musculocutaneous nerve conditions with a non-perforated coracobrachialis (1.8%), a doubled origin of the nerve (1.2%) and a giving back of branches to the median nerve (1.8%) were noted. Variations in ulnar, axillary and radial nerves concerned lower than normal diameters. It must be stressed that cases which showed a hidden position or a doubled expression of the loop of the median nerve, a hidden course of its beginning and variable interconnections between musculocutaneous and median nerves are of special interest for anesthetists and surgeons. Hence, it is important to note that variations of arm arteries can be associated with brachial plexus variations. For example, a common trunk of axillary artery followed by a hidden loop and course of the median nerve may result in incomplete axillary block of brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in coronary and brachial arteries in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Kajikawa, Masato; Nakashima, Ayumu; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Iwamoto, Akimichi; Oda, Nozomu; Kishimoto, Shinji; Matsui, Shogo; Higaki, Tadanao; Shimonaga, Takashi; Watanabe, Noriaki; Ikenaga, Hiroki; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kihara, Yasuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Goto, Chikara; Aibara, Yoshiki; Noma, Kensuke; Higashi, Yukihito

    2016-09-15

    Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation, an index of endothelium-independent vasodilation, is measured for the assessment of vascular smooth muscle cell function or alterations of vascular structure. Both coronary and brachial artery responses to nitroglycerine have been demonstrated to be independent prognostic markers of cardiovascular events. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in coronary and brachial arteries in the same patients. We measured nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in coronary and brachial arteries in 30 subjects with suspected coronary artery disease who underwent coronary angiography (19 men and 11 women; mean age, 69.0±8.8years; age range, 42-85years). The mean values of nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery, left anterior descending coronary artery, and left circumflex coronary artery were 12.6±5.2%, 11.6±10.3%, and 11.9±11.0%, respectively. Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery correlated significantly with that in the left anterior descending coronary artery (r=0.43, P=0.02) and that in the left circumflex coronary artery (r=0.49, P=0.006). There was also a significant correlation between nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the left anterior descending coronary artery and that in the left circumflex coronary artery (r=0.72, P<0.001). These findings suggest that vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction is a systemic disorder and thus impairment of endothelium-independent vasodilation in peripheral arteries and that in coronary arteries are simultaneously present. Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery could be used as a surrogate for that in a coronary artery and as a prognostic marker for cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Brachial artery aneurysms associated with arteriovenous access for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Chemla, Eric; Nortley, Mei; Morsy, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Brachial artery aneurysm (BAA) is a rare condition. We describe a series of cases of BAA with arteriovenous access. Thirteen patients were retrospectively identified between January 2006 and July 2009 using a patient database. All were associated with brachio-cephalic fistulas. Mean age was 51.2 +/- 13.8 years. Twelve males (93.3%) were identified. Characteristics were: diabetes 1, hypertension 8, hypercholesterolemia 2, ischemic heart disease 2, family history of aneurysmal disease 2. Five BAA developed after access ligation, eight while it was working, one after trauma. One was associated with a venous aneurysm. While the average life of the access was 161 +/- 115 months, the average time for BAA formation was 40 +/- 35.8 months. BAA was asymptomatic in three patients, whereas 10 presented with ischemic and neurologic symptoms. None presented with a rupture. All patients underwent surgical repair, seven an aneurysm excision and end-to-end reconstruction of the brachial artery. Venous conduits were utilized: four long saphenous veins, one cephalic, and one basilic vein. All patients had patent brachial arteries with a complete relief of symptoms at 14 months. BAA is a rare but significant complication of vascular access. The surgical approaches presented offer a reasonable outcome.

  17. Delayed rupture of a pseudoaneurysm in the brachial artery of a burn reconstruction patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A brachial artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare but serious condition that can be limb threatening. A number of reports have found that it may be the result of damage to the blood vessels around the brachial artery, either directly or indirectly, due to trauma or systemic diseases. We present our experience of delayed pseudoaneurysm rupture of the brachial artery in a rehabilitation patient with burns of the upper extremity who underwent fasciotomy and musculocutaneous flap coverage. We also provide a review of the brachial artery pseudoaneurysm. PMID:23758847

  18. Brachial artery aneurysms following brachio-cephalic AV fistula ligation.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Usman; Parkinson, Frances; Mohiuddin, Kamran; Davies, Paula; Woolgar, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery aneurysms proximal to a long-standing arteriovenous (AV) fistula can be a serious complication. It is important to be aware of this and manage it appropriately. Vascular access nurses input all data regarding patients undergoing dialysis access procedures into a securely held database prospectively. This was retrospectively reviewed to identify cases of brachial artery aneurysms over the last 3 years. In Morriston Hospital, around 200 forearm and arm AV fistulas are performed annually for vascular access in renal dialysis patients. Of these, approximately 15 (7.5%) are ligated. Three patients who had developed brachial artery aneurysms following AV fistula ligation were identified. All 3 patients had developed brachial artery aneurysms following ligation of a long-standing brachio-cephalic AV fistula. Two patients presented with pain and a pulsatile mass in the arm, and one presented with pins and needles and discoloration of fingertips. Two were managed with resection of the aneurysm and reconstruction with a reversed long saphenous vein interposition graft, the third simply required ligation of a feeding arterial branch. True aneurysm formation proximal to an AV fistula that has been ligated is a rare complication. There are several reasons for why these aneurysms develop in such patients, the most plausible one being the increase in blood flow and resistance following ligation of the AV fistula. Of note, all the patients in this study were on immunosuppressive therapy following successful renal transplantation. Vigilance by the vascular access team and nephrologists is paramount to identify those patients who may warrant further evaluation and investigation by the vascular surgeon.

  19. Anatomical Variations of Brachial Artery - Its Morphology, Embryogenesis and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    KS, Siddaraju; Venumadhav, Nelluri; Sharma, Ashish; Kumar, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of variation pattern of the major arteries of upper limb is of considerable practical importance in the conduct of reparative surgery in the arm, forearm and hand however brachial artery and its terminal branches variations are less common. Aim: Accordingly the present study was designed to evaluate the anatomical variations of the brachial artery and its morphology, embryogenesis and clinical implications. Materials and Methods: In an anatomical study 140 upper limb specimens of 70 cadavers (35 males and 35 females) were used and anatomical variations of the brachial artery have been documented. Results: Accessory brachial artery was noted in eight female cadavers (11.43%). Out of eight cadavers in three cadavers (4.29%) an unusual bilateral accessory brachial artery arising from the axillary artery and it is continuing in the forearm as superficial accessory ulnar artery was noted. Rare unusual variant unilateral accessory brachial artery and its reunion with the main brachial artery in the cubital fossa and its variable course in relation to the musculocutaneous nerve and median nerve were also noted in five cadavers (7.14%). Conclusion: As per our knowledge such anatomical variations of brachial artery and its terminal branches with their relation to the surrounding structures are not reported in the modern medical literature. An awareness of such a presence is valuable for the surgeons and radiologists in evaluation of angiographic images, vascular and re-constructive surgery or appropriate treatment for compressive neuropathies. PMID:25653931

  20. DOES BRACHIAL ARTERY FMD PROVIDE A BIOASSAY FOR NITRIC OXIDE?

    PubMed Central

    Wray, D. Walter; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Ives, Stephen J.; McDaniel, John; Trinity, Joel D.; Conklin, Jamie D.; Supiano, Mark A.; Richardson, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to better define the role of nitric oxide (NO) in brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) in young, healthy humans. Brachial artery blood velocity and diameter were determined (ultrasound Doppler) in eight volunteers (26 ± 1 yrs) before and after 5-min forearm circulatory occlusion with and without intra-arterial infusion of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor L-NMMA (0.48 mg/dl/min). Control (CON) and L-NMMA trials were performed with the occlusion cuff placed in the traditional distal position, as well as proximal to the measurement site. FMD was significantly reduced, but not abolished, by L-NMMA in the distal cuff trial (8.9 ± 1.3 to 6.0 ± 0.7%, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.02), with no effect of L-NMMA on FMD with proximal cuff placement (10.6 ± 1.2 to 12.4 ± 1.7%, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.39). When the reduction in shear stimulus following L-NMMA was taken into account, no drug difference was observed for either distal (0.26 ± 0.02 to 0.23 ± 0.03, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.40) or proximal (0.23 ± 0.08 to 0.23 ± 0.03, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.89) FMD trials. These findings challenge the assertion that NO is obligatory for brachial artery FMD, and call into question the sensitivity of this procedure for non-invasive determination of NO bioavailability in young, healthy humans. PMID:23774225

  1. Brachial artery injury following opened elbow dislocation associated with accessory brachial artery: two rare entities in a 17-year -old girl: case report.

    PubMed

    Hajji, Rita; Zrihni, Youssef; Naouli, Hamza; Bouarhroum, Abdellatif

    2015-01-01

    Elbow dislocations are the most frequently encountered after shoulder dislocations. In their vast majority, these injuries carry a good prognosis. Although, concomitant arterial injury is rare and make them more serious. In this paper, we report a case of a 17 year old woman with opened elbow dislocation with arterial injury associated to an artery variation: "accessory brachial artery".

  2. Brachial artery injury following opened elbow dislocation associated with accessory brachial artery: two rare entities in a 17-year –old girl: case report

    PubMed Central

    Hajji, Rita; Zrihni, Youssef; Naouli, Hamza; Bouarhroum, Abdellatif

    2015-01-01

    Elbow dislocations are the most frequently encountered after shoulder dislocations. In their vast majority, these injuries carry a good prognosis. Although, concomitant arterial injury is rare and make them more serious. In this paper, we report a case of a 17 year old woman with opened elbow dislocation with arterial injury associated to an artery variation: "accessory brachial artery" PMID:26161188

  3. Vascular patterns of upper limb: an anatomical study with accent on superficial brachial artery

    PubMed Central

    Kachlik, David; Konarik, Marek; Baca, Vaclav

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the terminal segmentation of the axillary artery and to present four cases of anomalous branching of the axillary artery, the superficial brachial artery (arteria brachialis superficialis), which is defined as the brachial artery that runs superficially to the median nerve. Totally, 130 cadaveric upper arms embalmed by classical formaldehyde technique from collections of the Department of Anatomy, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, were macroscopically dissected with special focus on the branching arrangement of the axillary artery. The most distal part of the axillary artery (infrapectoral part) terminated in four cases as a bifurcation into two terminal branches: the superficial brachial artery and profunda brachii artery, denominated according to their relation to the median nerve. The profunda brachii artery primarily gave rise to the main branches of the infrapectoral part of the axillary artery. The superficial brachial artery descended to the cubital fossa where it assumed the usual course of the brachial artery in two cases and in the other two cases its branches (the radial and ulnar arteries) passed superficially to the flexors. The incidence of the superficial brachial artery in our study was 5% of cases. The reported incidence is a bit contradictory, from 0.12% to 25% of cases. The anatomical knowledge of the axillary region is of crucial importance for neurosurgeons and specialists using the radiodiagnostic techniques, particularly in cases involving traumatic injuries. The improved knowledge would allow more accurate diagnostic interpretations and surgical treatment. PMID:21342134

  4. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity with Asymptomatic Intracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qain, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-08-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis is a common cause of ischemic stroke in Asians. We therefore sought to explore the relationship of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and intracranial arterial stenosis in 834 stroke-free hypertensive patients. Intracranial arterial stenosis was evaluated through computerized tomographic angiography. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was measured by an automated cuff device. The top decile of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was significantly associated with intracranial arterial stenosis (P = .027, odds ratio = 1.82; 95% confidence interval: 1.07-3.10). The patients with the top decile of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity showed 56% higher risk for the presence of intracranial arterial stenosis to the whole population, which was more significant in patients younger than 65 years old. We also found that brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity related to both intracranial arterial stenosis and homocysteine. Our study showed the association of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity with asymptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis in hypertension patients, especially in relative younger subjects. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity might be a relatively simple and repeatable measurement to detect hypertension patients in high risk of intracranial arterial stenosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Arterial compliance across the spectrum of ankle-brachial index: the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Scott M; Jacobs, David R; Kronmal, Richard; Bluemke, David A; Criqui, Michael; Lima, Joao; Allison, Matthew; Duprez, Daniel; Segers, Patrick; Chirinos, Julio A

    2014-04-01

    A low ankle-brachial index is associated with cardiovascular disease and reduced arterial compliance. A high ankle-brachial index is also associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. We tested the hypothesis that subjects with a high ankle-brachial index demonstrate a lower arterial compliance. In addition, we assessed whether pulse pressure amplification is increased among subjects with a high ankle-brachial index. We studied 6814 adults enrolled in the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis who were, by definition, free of clinical cardiovascular disease at baseline. Differences in total arterial compliance (ratio of stroke volume to pulse pressure), aortic and carotid distensibility (measured with magnetic resonance imaging and duplex ultrasound, respectively) were compared across ankle-brachial index subclasses (≤0.90, 0.91-1.29; ≥1.30) with analyses adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis. Peripheral arterial disease was detected in 230 (3.4%) and high ABI in 648 (9.6%) of subjects. Those with high ankle-brachial index demonstrated greater aortic/radial pulse pressure amplification than those with a normal ankle-brachial index. In adjusted models aortic and carotid distensibility as well as total arterial compliance, were lowest among those with ankle-brachial index≤0.9 (p<0.01 vs. all), but were not reduced in subjects with an ankle-brachial index≥1.3. Lower aortic, carotid and total arterial compliance is not present in subjects free of overt cardiovascular disease and with a high ankle-brachial index. However, increased pulse pressure amplification contributes to a greater ankle-brachial index in the general population and may allow better characterization of individuals with this phenotype. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Retrograde blood flow in the brachial and axillary arteries during routine radial arterial catheter flushing.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Glenn S; Szokol, Joseph W; Marymont, Jesse H; Avram, Michael J; Vender, Jeffery S; Kubasiak, John

    2006-09-01

    Flushing of radial arterial catheters may be associated with retrograde embolization of air or thrombus into the cerebral circulation. For embolization into the central circulation to occur, sufficient pressure must be generated during the flushing process to reverse antegrade blood flow in the arterial blood vessels of the upper extremity. This ultrasound study was designed to examine whether routine radial catheter flushing practices produce retrograde blood flow patterns in the brachial and proximal axillary arteries. Duplex ultrasound examinations of the brachial and axillary arteries were conducted in 100 surgical patients to quantify direction and velocity of blood flow during catheter flushing. After obtaining Doppler spectral images of brachial and axillary arterial flow patterns, manual flushing was performed by injecting 10 ml flush solution using a syringe at a rate reflecting standard clinical practices. The flow-regulating device on the pressurized (300 mmHg) arterial flushing-sampling system was then opened for 10 s to deliver a rapid bolus of fluid (flush valve opening). The rate of manual flush solution injection through the radial arterial catheter was related to the probability of retrograde flow in the axillary artery (P < 0.001). Reversed arterial flow was noted in the majority of subjects (33 of 51) at a manual flush rate of less than 9 s and in no subjects (0 of 48) at a rate 9 s or greater. Retrograde flow was observed less frequently during flush valve opening (2 of 99 patients; P < 0.001 vs. manual flushing). Rapid manual flushing of radial arterial catheters at rates faster than 1 ml/s produces retrograde flow in the proximal axillary artery.

  7. Gender differences in wall shear-mediated brachial artery vasoconstriction and vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Levenson, J; Pessana, F; Gariepy, J; Armentano, R; Simon, A

    2001-11-15

    We sought to investigate wall shear rate (WSR) and brachial artery diameter (BAD) changes simultaneously and to determine whether any gender differences exist in arterial reactivity. Wall shear rate/stress and arterial reactivity are rarely assessed at the same time. Furthermore, flow-mediated vasoconstriction has received less attention than flow-mediated vasodilation in humans. A new noninvasive evaluation of WSR in the brachial artery, using multigated, pulsed Doppler velocimeter and a double-transducer probe moved and fixed by a robotic system, was developed. The validity of the system was tested in vitro with calibrated tubes and showed a high correlation (r = 0.98, p < 0.001). In 10 men and 10 women of similar age, induction of low and high shear rates by forearm occlusion produced significant vasoconstriction and vasodilation, respectively. The time lag for maximal BAD changes was 3 min for vasoconstriction and 1 min for vasodilation. A greater half-time for vasodilation (96 +/- 6 for men and 86 +/- 12 s for women) than for shear rate (31 +/- 5 s for men and 34 +/- 4 s for women) was observed after discontinuation of occlusion. Relative BAD was correlated with WSR changes, showing a significantly higher slope in women than in men (p < 0.01). Moreover, a larger normalized arterial diameter per shear rate was observed for vasoconstriction (p < 0.01) and vasodilation (p < 0.01) in women than in men. Shear-mediated arterial vasodilation and vasoconstriction were more pronounced in women than in men, suggesting different gender-related sensitivity in the regulation of large-artery vascular tone.

  8. Double level arterial injury with neuropraxia following anterior shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Zaraa, Mourad; Sehli, Heithem; Mahjoub, Sabri; Dridi, Moez; Mbarek, Mondher

    2015-12-01

    Vascular and nervous complications are rare after shoulder dislocation. We report the case of a double level arterial injury with neuropraxia following anterior shoulder dislocation that was diagnosed by MultiDetector-row Computed Tomographic (MDCT) angiography and treated by surgical bypass graft and embolectomy. Our case is original, not only because of the rarity of these complications, but also because of the thromboembolism of brachial artery which could be undiagnosed and could compromise prognosis.

  9. Double level arterial injury with neuropraxia following anterior shoulder dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Zaraa, Mourad; Sehli, Heithem; Mahjoub, Sabri; Dridi, Moez; Mbarek, Mondher

    2015-01-01

    Vascular and nervous complications are rare after shoulder dislocation. We report the case of a double level arterial injury with neuropraxia following anterior shoulder dislocation that was diagnosed by MultiDetector-row Computed Tomographic (MDCT) angiography and treated by surgical bypass graft and embolectomy. Our case is original, not only because of the rarity of these complications, but also because of the thromboembolism of brachial artery which could be undiagnosed and could compromise prognosis. PMID:26566344

  10. Use of StarClose for brachial artery closure after percutaneous endovascular interventions.

    PubMed

    Puggioni, Alessandra; Boesmans, Evelyne; Deloose, Koen; Peeters, Patrick; Bosiers, Marc

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a percutaneous extravascular closure device (StarClose, Abbott Vascular, Redwood City, CA) after brachial endovascular approach. From 2004 to 2006, 29 patients received StarClose for brachial closure. Primary endpoints were successful deployment and absence of procedure-related morbidity, secondary endpoints were brachial artery patency on duplex and absence of late (> 30 days) complications. The device was successfully deployed in all patients. In two patients (6.8%) local complications occurred: one patient developed a large hematoma successfully treated with prolonged compression and a second patient presented with brachial artery occlusion requiring operative intervention. After a mean follow-up of 7.5+/-7.2 months, all patients had a palpable brachial/radial pulse; none had signs of infection, distal embolization or neurological deficits. On ultrasound b-mode imaging, the clip was visible as a 4 mm echolucent area at the outer anterior wall of the artery. Based on the peak systolic velocity ratios between the site of StarClose and proximal brachial artery (mean 1.08+/-0.2), none of the studied patients had a significant stenosis at the site of closure. StarClose is safe and effective in providing hemostasis following interventional procedures through the brachial artery; further advantages include patients comfort and early discharge.

  11. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a ...

  12. Visceral and Subcutaneous Adiposity and Brachial Artery Vasodilator Function

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Nisha I.; Keyes, Michelle J.; Larson, Martin G.; Pou, Karla M.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Vita, Joseph A.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Hoffmann, Udo; Fox, Caroline S.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2011-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction may link obesity to cardiovascular disease (CVD). We tested the hypothesis that visceral abdominal tissue (VAT) as compared with subcutaneous abdominal tissue (SAT) is more related to endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Among Framingham Offspring and Third Generation cohorts (n=3020, mean age 50 years, 47% women) We used multivariable linear regression adjusted for CVD and its risk factors to relate computed tomography-assessed VAT and SAT, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), with brachial artery measures. In multivariable-adjusted models, BMI, WC, VAT and SAT were positively related to baseline artery diameter and baseline mean flow velocity (all p<0.001), but not hyperemic mean flow velocity. In multivariable-adjusted models, BMI (p=0.002), WC (p=0.001) and VAT (p=0.01), but not SAT (p=0.24) were inversely associated with FMD%. However there was little incremental increase in the proportion of variability explained by VAT (R2=0.266) as compared to SAT (R2=0.265), above and beyond traditional risk factors. VAT, but not SAT was associated with FMD% after adjusting for clinical covariates. Nevertheless, the differential association with VAT as compared to SAT was minimal. PMID:19282819

  13. Use of a Collagen-Based Device for Closure of Low Brachial Artery Punctures

    SciTech Connect

    Belenky, A. Aranovich, D.; Greif, F.; Bachar, G.; Bartal, G.; Atar, E.

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To report our experience with the Angioseal vascular closure device for hemostasis of distal brachial artery puncture. Methods. Between September 2003 and August 2005, 64 Angioseal vascular closure devices were inserted in 64 patients (40 men, 24 women; mean age 65 years) immediately after diagnostic or therapeutic arterial angiographies performed through a 5 Fr to 7 Fr sheath via the distal brachial artery. Ultrasound examination of the brachial artery preceded the angiography in all cases and only arteries wider than 4 mm were closed by the Angioseal. In cases of a sonographically evident thin subcutaneous space of the cubital fossa, tissue tumescence, using 1% Lidocaine, was performed prior to the arterial closure. Results. The deployment success rate was 100%. No major complications were encountered; only 2 patients developed puncture site hematoma, and these were followed conservatively. Conclusions. Closure of low brachial artery punctures with the Angioseal is simple and safe. No additional manual compression is required. We recommend its use after brachial artery access interventions, through appropriately wide arteries, to improve early patient ambulation and potentially reduce possible puncture site complications.

  14. Intima-media thickness of brachial artery, vascular function, and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Yumiko; Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Fujii, Yuichi; Idei, Naomi; Fujimura, Noritaka; Mikami, Shinsuke; Kajikawa, Masato; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Kihara, Yasuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Noma, Kensuke; Nakashima, Ayumu; Higashi, Yukihito

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are associated with impaired flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) and increase in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Both FMD and IMT are independent predictors for cardiovascular outcomes. When measuring FMD and nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery, IMT can also be simultaneously assessed in the same brachial artery. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between IMT of the brachial artery, vascular function, and cardiovascular risk factors. We measured brachial IMT, FMD, and nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation by ultrasound in 388 subjects who underwent health examination (mean age, 45±22 years; age range, 19-86), including patients with cardiovascular diseases. Univariate regression analysis revealed that brachial IMT significantly correlated with age (r=0.71; P<0.001), body mass index (r=0.27; P<0.001), systolic blood pressure (r=0.40; P<0.001), diastolic blood pressure (r=0.31; P<0.001), heart rate (r=0.15; P=0.002), glucose level (r=0.18; P=0.01), and smoking pack-years (r=0.42; P<0.001), as well as Framingham risk score, a cumulative cardiovascular risk index for heart attack (r=0.49; P<0.001). FMD and nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation were inversely associated with brachial IMT (r=-0.39, P<0.001; r=-0.32, P<0.001, respectively). In addition, there was a significant relationship between brachial IMT and carotid IMT (r=0.58; P<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that age, sex, hypertension, and brachial artery diameter were independent predictors of brachial IMT. These findings suggest that brachial IMT may be a marker of the grade of atherosclerosis and may be used as a marker of vascular function, providing additive information for stratifying subjects with cardiovascular risk factors.

  15. Trifurcation of superficial brachial artery: a rare case with its clinico-embryological implications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, N; Anshu, A; Dada, R

    2014-01-01

    Literatures on vasculature of upper limbs are crammed with reports of distinctly deviant version of normally prevalent vessels having modified origins, altered branching and odd courses. A unique anatomical variation in vascular pattern was observed during routine dissection of right upper limb in gross anatomy laboratory, AIIMS, New Delhi, India. The brachial artery was placed superficial to median nerve in the arm and therefore it was called superficial brachial artery. In the cubital fossa, 2.8 cm distal to intercondylar line of elbow joint, this superficial brachial artery terminated by trifurcation into radial, common interosseous and ulnar branches. Strikingly the ulnar branch, after its origin ran superficially over the median nerve and epitrochlear superficial flexor group of muscles of forearm in succession for the initial third of its course in the forearm, consequently it was addressed as superficial ulnar artery. The existence of superficial brachial artery in place of normal brachial artery, its termination by trifurcation into radial, common interosseous and superficial ulnar arteries with remarkably different courses, leads to confusing disposition of structures in the arm, cubital fossa and in the forearm and collectively makes this myriad of anatomical variations even rarer. The clinico-embryological revelations for combination of these unconventional observations, apprises and guides the specialized medical personnel attempting blind and invasive procedures in brachium and ante-brachium. This case report depicts the anatomical perspective and clinical implications on confronting a rare variant vasculature architecture pattern of upper limb.

  16. Idiopathic true brachial artery aneurysm in a nine-month infant.

    PubMed

    Bahcivan, Muzaffer; Yuksel, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Upper extremity peripheral artery aneurysms are a rarely encountered arterial disorder. Brachial artery aneurysms seen in the pediatric age group are generally trauma resultant. A nine-month-old male infant patient presented with complaints of an asymptomatic mass in the arm. Following Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations, saccular aneurysm, originating from the left brachial artery was diagnosed in the patient without history of trauma. The aneurysm was resected by surgical intervention, and primary repair of the brachial artery was performed by end-to-end anastomosis. No complication was observed during the follow-up. Surgical intervention for upper extremity aneurysms should be initiated without delay in order to prevent extremity ischemia and amputation.

  17. Brachial plexus compression due to subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm from internal jugular vein catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Mol, T. N.; Gupta, A.; Narain, U.

    2017-01-01

    Internal jugular vein (IJV) catheterization has become the preferred approach for temporary vascular access for hemodialysis. However, complications such as internal carotid artery puncture, vessel erosion, thrombosis, and infection may occur. We report a case of brachial plexus palsy due to compression by right subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm as a result of IJV catheterization in a patient who was under maintenance hemodialysis. PMID:28356671

  18. Genetic contribution to brachial artery flow-mediated dilation: The Northern Manhattan Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keiko; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Rundek, Tanja; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Disla, Norbelina; Liu, Rui; Park, Naeun; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Homma, Shunichi

    2007-01-01

    Background Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a non-invasive measure of endothelial function. Endothelial dysfunction has been associated with traditional vascular risk factors and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The importance of genetic contribution to FMD and baseline brachial artery diameter has not been shown in Hispanic populations. The purpose of this study was to estimate the heritability of FMD. Methods Flow mediated dilation and brachial artery diameter were measured in a subset of Caribbean Hispanic families from the ongoing Northern Manhattan Family Study (NOMAFS), which studies the contribution of genetics to stroke and cardiovascular risk factors. The age- and sex-adjusted heritability of FMD was estimated using variance component methods. Results The current data include 620 subjects (97 probands and 523 relatives) from 97 families. The age and sex-adjusted heritability of brachial artery diameter was 0.57 (p < 0.01). The age- and sex-adjusted heritability of FMD was 0.20 (p = 0.01). After additional adjustment for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, smoking, lipid, diabetes mellitus, medication, and baseline brachial artery diameter, the heritability of FMD was 0.17 (p = 0.01). Conclusions We found modest heritability of FMD. FMD might be a reasonable phenotype for further investigation of genetic contribution to atherosclerosis. PMID:17462653

  19. Estimation of brachial artery volume flow by duplex ultrasound imaging predicts dialysis access maturation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sae Hee; Bandyk, Dennis F; Hodgkiss-Harlow, Kelley D; Barleben, Andrew; Lane, John

    2015-06-01

    This study validated duplex ultrasound measurement of brachial artery volume flow (VF) as predictor of dialysis access flow maturation and successful hemodialysis. Duplex ultrasound was used to image upper extremity dialysis access anatomy and estimate access VF within 1 to 2 weeks of the procedure. Correlation of brachial artery VF with dialysis access conduit VF was performed using a standardized duplex testing protocol in 75 patients. The hemodynamic data were used to develop brachial artery flow velocity criteria (peak systolic velocity and end-diastolic velocity) predictive of three VF categories: low (<600 mL/min), acceptable (600-800 mL/min), or high (>800 mL/min). Brachial artery VF was then measured in 148 patients after a primary (n = 86) or revised (n = 62) upper extremity dialysis access procedure, and the VF category correlated with access maturation or need for revision before hemodialysis usage. Access maturation was conferred when brachial artery VF was >600 mL/min and conduit imaging indicated successful cannulation based on anatomic criteria of conduit diameter >5 mm and skin depth <6 mm. Measurements of VF from the brachial artery and access conduit demonstrated a high degree of correlation (R(2) = 0.805) for autogenous vein (n = 45; R(2) = 0.87) and bridge graft (n = 30; R(2) = 0.78) dialysis accesses. Access VF of >800 mL/min was predicted when the brachial artery lumen diameter was >4.5 mm, peak systolic velocity was >150 cm/s, and the diastolic-to-systolic velocity ratio was >0.4. Brachial artery velocity spectra indicating VF <800 mL/min was associated (P < .0001) with failure of access maturation. Revision was required in 15 of 21 (71%) accesses with a VF of <600 mL/min, 4 of 40 accesses (10%) with aVF of 600 to 800 mL/min, and 2 of 87 accesses (2.3%) with an initial VF of >800 mL/min. Duplex testing to estimate brachial artery VF and assess the conduit for ease of cannulation can be performed in 5 minutes during the initial postoperative

  20. [Ultrasound-guided axillary block: anatomical variations of terminal branches of the brachial plexus in relation to the brachial artery].

    PubMed

    Silva, M G; Sala-Blanch, X; Marín, R; Espinoza, X; Arauz, A; Morros, C

    2014-01-01

    To describe the distribution of the terminal branches of the brachial plexus at the axillary level and define distribution patterns after ultrasound evaluation. Fifty volunteers underwent ultrasound bilateral axillary brachial plexus scanning exploration. Nerve distribution around the humeral artery was described and the distance between each nerve and the center of the artery was measured. The distance and relationship between the ulnar nerve and the humeral vein were also recorded. The median nerve was located in the anterolateral quadrant (-29±40°) and at a mean distance of 2.1±0.9mm from the artery (85%). The ulnar nerve was found at 53±26° and at 4.2±2.1mm from the artery in the anteromedial quadrant (90%), anterolateral to the vein in 46% of cases, and deep to it in 54%. The radial nerve was at 122±38° and at 3.3±1.7mm from the artery in the posteromedial quadrant (86%). The musculocutaneous nerve was found at -103±22° and 9.3±5.6mm from the artery in the posterolateral quadrant (90%) and in the anterolateral quadrant (-55±16°) at 4.8±2.7mm (10%). There were no differences regarding laterality, gender or overweight patients. Our results allow defining four different anatomical patterns, two based in the position of the musculocutaneous nerve and two based on the disposition of the ulnar nerve with respect to the humeral vein. These patterns were not related to laterality, gender or body weight. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Epithelioid hemangioma of brachial artery: report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Moira, Ragazzi; Giuseppe, Falco; Riccardo, Valli; Nicola, Rocco; Daniele, Bordoni; Pierfrancesco, Cadenelli; Antonio, Della Corte Gianni; Antonello, Accurso; Bruno, Amato; Giovanni, Casali; Guglielmo, Ferrari

    2015-01-01

    Epithelioid hemangioma (EH) is an uncommon benign vascular lesion, also known as angioblastic lymphoid (or angiolymphoid) hyperplasia with eosinophilia, characterized by an unclear etiopathogenesis. It usually affects young to middle-aged adults and develops in the head and neck region, as painless cutaneous or subcutaneous reddish papules or nodules. Large vessels involvement is extremely rare, and to date only two cases affecting the brachial artery have been cited in literature. In this report we present a further case of EH of the brachial artery and review the pertinent literature. PMID:28352744

  2. Exercise training attenuates progressive decline in brachial artery reactivity in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Braith, Randy W; Schofield, Richard S; Hill, James A; Casey, Darren P; Pierce, Gary L

    2008-01-01

    Heart transplantation normalizes central hemodynamics, but endothelial dysfunction persists after transplantation. To investigate the effects of aerobic exercise on arterial function, oxidative stress, lipid profile, and sympathetic nervous system activity, 20 heart transplant recipients (age, 54.3 +/- 9.1 years; 17 men, 3 women) were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of supervised treadmill exercise (Trained; n = 10) or standard medical care (Control; n = 10). Supervised exercise was initiated at 8 weeks after transplant. Brachial artery reactivity was assessed using flow-mediated dilation. The VO2 peak increased 26% in the Trained patients (15.4 +/- 4.3 vs 19.4 +/- 5.5 ml/kg/min; p < or = 0.05) but did not change in the Controls (16.2 +/- 5.2 vs 16.8 +/- 2.8 ml/kg/min; p > or = 0.05). Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (10.1% +/- 6.1% vs 9.6% +/- 6.2%) and absolute brachial diameter (0.48 +/- 0.22 vs 0.42 +/- 0.24 mm) did not change in Trained patients, but brachial flow-mediated dilation (10.5% +/- 2.8% vs 7.9% +/- 5.1%) and the absolute change in brachial diameter (0.48 +/- 0.16 vs 0.36 +/- 0.24 mm) decreased significantly (p < or = 0.05) in the Control patients. Resting norepinephrine decreased significantly (p < or = 0.05) after training (0.32 +/- 0.19 vs 0.22 +/- 0.22 ng/ml), but there was a nonsignificant trend toward increased norepinephrine in the Controls (0.26 +/- 0.17 vs 0.53 +/- 0.41 ng/ml; p = 0.07). The lipid profile and marker of oxidative stress did not differ between the groups before or after the intervention. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective, randomized study to investigate the effects of heart transplantation and aerobic exercise on peripheral artery function in the same cohort of heart transplant recipients. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation increased early in the post-operative period. Aerobic exercise preserved but did not improve brachial artery flow-mediated dilation. Heart transplant recipients who did not participate

  3. Mediastinal mass and brachial plexopathy caused by subclavian arterial aneurysm in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Yoo, W H; Kim, H K; Park, J H; Park, T S; Baek, H S

    2000-01-01

    Vascular involvement in Behçet's disease is divided into venous and arterial thrombosis and arterial aneurysmal formation. Subclavian arterial aneurysm rarely occurs in Behçet's disease; however, when it does occur, it causes serious aneurysmal rupture and local complications such as nerve compression and arterial ischemia. We describe the case of a 39-year-old male who presented with neurologic symptoms and signs of brachial plexopathy and mediastinal mass caused by Behçet's subclavian arterial aneurysm. This case shows that the occurrence of brachial plexopathy should be considered a manifestation of Behçet's disease, and that Behçet's aneurysm should be considered in the differential diagnosis of upper mediastinal mass.

  4. Decreased nitrate-mediated dilatation in patients with coronary artery ectasia: an ultrasonographic evaluation of brachial artery.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Yuksel; Acikgoz, Nusret; Sivri, Nasir; Bariskaner, Emrah; Akturk, Erdal; Turhan, Hasan; Yetkin, Ertan

    2006-05-01

    Coronary artery ectasia has been defined as localized or diffuse nonobstructive lesions of the epicardial coronary arteries with a luminal dilation exceeding the 1.5-fold of normal adjacent segment or vessel diameter. Although coronary artery disease is supposed to be responsible for more than 50% of coronary ectasia, the precise pathology of coronary artery ectasia is not clearly understood. The brachial artery ultrasound test for flow-mediated endothelial-dependent vasodilatory function includes administration of sublingual nitrates to examine the vasodilating effect of an exogenous source of nitric oxide. In the present study, we aimed to compare flow-mediated and nitrate-mediated responses of brachial artery in patients with coronary artery ectasia and patients with coronary artery disease. Thirty-six consecutive patients with coronary artery ectasia in combination with coronary artery disease and 42 age-matched and sex-matched patients with coronary artery disease alone were included in the study. Flow-mediated and nitrate-mediated dilatations were measured in all patients using a high-resolution B-mode ultrasonographic system. Baseline brachial artery diameters in patients with coronary artery ectasia were not statistically different from those in patients with coronary artery disease (4.2+/-0.6 vs. 4.0+/-0.6 mm, respectively, P=0.16). Although the forearm flow-mediated dilatation of the patients with coronary artery ectasia did not differ from that of patients with coronary artery disease alone (5.5+/-3.8 vs. 4.8+/-3.6%, respectively, P=0.41), nitrate-mediated dilatation was significantly lower than that of patients with coronary artery disease alone (7.9+/-5.2 vs. 10.9+/-5.4%, respectively, P=0.02). We have shown that patients with coronary artery ectasia have decreased nitrate-mediated response of brachial artery compared with patients with coronary artery disease alone, suggesting more severe dysfunction or, possibly, destruction of the media layer in

  5. Management of traumatic brachial artery injuries: A report on 49 patients

    PubMed Central

    Ekim, Hasan; Tuncer, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The brachial artery is the most frequently injured artery in the upper extremity due to its vulnerability. The purpose of our study was to review our experience with brachial artery injuries over a 9-year period, describing the type of injury, surgical procedures, complications, and associated injuries. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty-nine patients with brachial artery injury underwent surgical repair procedures at our hospital, from the beginning of May 1999 to the end of June 2008. The brachial artery injuries were diagnosed by physical examination and Doppler ultrasonography. Depending on the mode of presentation, patients were either taken immediately to the operating room for bleeding control and vascular repair or were assessed by preoperative duplex ultrasonography. RESULTS: This study group consisted of 43 males and 6 females, ranging in age from 6 to 65 years with a mean (SD) age of 27.9 (6.7) years. The mechanism of trauma was penetrating in 45 patients and blunt in the remaining 4 patients. Stab injury was the most frequent form of penetrating trauma (24 of 45). Treatment included primary arterial repair in 5 cases, end-to-end anastomosis in 28 cases, interposition vein graft in 15 cases, and interposition-ringed polytetrafluoroethylene graft in 1 case. Associated injuries were common and included venous injury (14), bone fracture (5), and peripheral nerve injury (11). Fifteen patients developed postoperative complications. One patient underwent an above-elbow amputation. CONCLUSIONS: Prompt and appropriate management of the brachial artery injuries, attention to associated injuries, and a readiness to revise the vascular repair early in the event of failure will maximize patient survival and upper extremity salvage. PMID:19318753

  6. A 12-year-old girl with absent radial pulse: arterial thoracic outlet syndrome with subclavian artery aneurysm and thrombosis of the brachial artery.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, S; Cannizzaro, E; Kellenberger, C J; Saurenmann, R K

    2012-11-01

    Brachial arterial occlusion is rare in children and adolescents. Once a traumatic cause is excluded, the differential diagnosis consists of a variety of rare conditions. We report the case of a 12-year-old girl whose presenting symptoms--an absent radial pulse and Raynaud's phenomenon of the right hand--could be easily mistaken for a vasculitis. She was found to have arterial thoracic outlet syndrome with right subclavian artery compression and aneurysm formation caused by an anomalous first rib and consecutive thromboembolic occlusion of the brachial artery. The diagnosis and differential diagnosis of this condition are reviewed.

  7. Comparison of brachial artery vasoreactivity in elite power athletes and age-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Michael A; Blalock, Paul; Credeur, Daniel P; Parish, Tracie R

    2013-01-01

    Elite endurance athletes typically have larger arteries contributing to greater skeletal muscle blood flow, oxygen and nutrient delivery and improved physical performance. Few studies have examined structural and functional properties of arteries in power athletes. To compare the size and vasoreactivity of the brachial artery of elite power athletes to age-matched controls. It was hypothesized brachial artery diameters of athletes would be larger, have less vasodilation in response to cuff occlusion, but more constriction after a cold pressor test than age-matched controls. Eight elite power athletes (age = 23 ± 2 years) and ten controls (age = 22 ± 1 yrs) were studied. High-resolution ultrasonography was used to assess brachial artery diameters at rest and following 5 minutes of forearm occlusion (Brachial Artery Flow Mediated Dilation = BAFMD) and a cold pressor test (CPT). Basic fitness measures included a handgrip test and 3-minute step test. Brachial arteries of athletes were larger (Athletes 5.39 ± 1.51 vs. 3.73 ± 0.71 mm, p<0.05), had greater vasodilatory (BAFMD%: Athletes: 8.21 ± 1.78 vs. 5.69 ± 1.56%) and constrictor (CPT %: Athletes: -2.95 ± 1.07 vs. -1.20 ± 0.48%) responses, compared to controls. Vascular operating range (VOR = Peak dilation+Peak Constriction) was also greater in athletes (VOR: Athletes: 0.55 ± 0.15 vs. 0.25 ± 0.18 mm, p<0.05). Athletes had superior handgrip strength (Athletes: 55.92 ± 17.06 vs. 36.77 ± 17.06 kg, p<0.05) but similar heart rate responses at peak (Athletes: 123 ± 16 vs. 130 ± 25 bpm, p>0.05) and 1 minute recovery (Athletes: 88 ± 21 vs. 98 ± 26 bpm, p>0.05) following the step test. Elite power athletes have larger brachial arteries, and greater vasoreactivity (greater vasodilatory and constrictor responses) than age-matched controls, contributing to a significantly greater VOR. These data extend the existence of an 'athlete's artery' as previously shown for elite endurance athletes to elite power athletes

  8. Surrogates of Large Artery versus Small Artery Stiffness and Ankle-Brachial Index

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Päivi; Syvänen, Kari; Aarnio, Pertti

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral artery tonometry (PAT) is a novel method for assessing arterial stiffness of small digital arteries. Pulse pressure can be regarded as a surrogate of large artery stiffness. When ankle-brachial index (ABI) is calculated using the higher of the two ankle systolic pressures as denominator (ABI-higher), leg perfusion can be reliably estimated. However, using the lower of the ankle pressures to calculate ABI (ABI-lower) identifies more patients with isolated peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in ankle arteries. We aimed to compare the ability of PAT, pulse pressure, and different calculations of ABI to detect atherosclerotic disease in lower extremities. We examined PAT, pulse pressure, and ABI in 66 cardiovascular risk subjects in whom borderline PAD (ABI 0.91 to 1.00) was diagnosed 4 years earlier. Using ABI-lower to diagnose PAD yielded 2-fold higher prevalence of PAD than using ABI-higher. Endothelial dysfunction was diagnosed in 15/66 subjects (23%). In a bivariate correlation analysis, pulse pressure was negatively correlated with ABI-higher (r = −0.347, p = 0.004) and with ABI-lower (r = −0.424, p < 0.001). PAT hyperemic response was not significantly correlated with either ABI-higher (r = −0.148, p = 0.24) or with ABI-lower (r = −0.208, p = 0.095). Measurement of ABI using the lower of the two ankle pressures is an efficient method to identify patients with clinical or subclinical atherosclerosis and worth performing on subjects with pulse pressure above 65 mm Hg. The usefulness of PAT measurement in detecting PAD is vague. PMID:22942632

  9. Brachial arterial pressure to assess cardiovascular structural damage: an overview and lessons from clinical trials.

    PubMed

    London, Gérald M

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have emphasized the relationship between blood pressure (BP) and the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Severity of hypertension was in the past judged on the basis of diastolic BP. More recent epidemiological studies have directed attention to systolic pressure as a better guide to cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Traditionally, hypertension was appreciated by measures of BP recorded in peripheral arteries, usually brachial artery which was assumed to reflect pressures in all parts of arterial system. All these studies neglected that peripheral systolic BP differs from pressure recorded in the aorta and central arteries. While mean and diastolic pressures are almost constant along the arterial tree, due to the stiffness and geometric heterogeneity of large arteries and the timing and magnitude of wave reflections systolic BP and pulse pressure are amplified from the aorta to peripheral arteries, and brachial systolic BP only indirectly reflects the systolic BP in the aorta and central arteries. Several recent studies have shown that the effects of antihypertensive drugs are not the same in peripheral and central arteries, fact which could account for different effects of various drugs on end-organ damage, such as regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. Moreover, it has been shown that aortic and central artery pressure (or their determinants) are stronger predictors of end-organ damage and cardiovascular outcome than conventionally measured brachial pressure. These studies have focused the attention on the physical properties of large arteries and on the way they influence the level of systolic and pulse pressures along the arterial tree.

  10. The impact of handgrip exercise duty cycle on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation.

    PubMed

    King, Trevor J; Slattery, David J; Pyke, Kyra E

    2013-07-01

    Endothelial function is essential for vasoprotection and regulation of vascular tone. Using handgrip exercise (HGEX) to increase blood flow-associated shear stress is an increasingly popular method for assessing brachial artery endothelial function via flow-mediated dilation (FMD). However, different exercise duty cycles [ratio of handgrip relaxation: contraction (seconds)] produce different patterns of brachial artery shear stress with distinct antegrade/retrograde magnitudes. To determine the impact of HGEX duty cycle on brachial artery %FMD, three distinct duty cycles were employed while maintaining a uniform mean shear stress. Brachial artery diameter and mean blood velocity were assessed via echo and Doppler ultrasound in 16 healthy male subjects. Shear stress was estimated as shear rate (SR = blood velocity/brachial artery diameter) and the target mean SR during HGEX was 75 s(-1). Subjects performed three 6-min HGEX trials on each of 2 days (like trials averaged). In each trial, subjects performed one of the three randomly ordered HGEX duty cycles (1:1, 3:1, 5:1). %FMD was calculated from baseline to the end of HGEX and (subset N = 10) during each minute of HGEX. Data are mean ± SD. As intended, mean SR was uniform across duty cycles (6 min HGEX average: 72.9 ± 4.9s(-1), 72.6 ± 3.6s(-1), 72.8 ± 3.5 s(-1), p = 0.835), despite differences in antegrade/retrograde SR (p < 0.001). End-exercise %FMD (4.0 ± 1.3 %, 4.1 ± 2.2 %, 4.2 ± 1.4 %, p = 0.860) and %FMD during exercise (p = 0.939) were not different between duty cycles. These data indicate that the endothelium responds to the mean shear stress and is not specifically sensitive to the contraction/relaxation or retrograde shear stress created by a range of HGEX protocols.

  11. [Transradial percutaneous approach for cardiac catheterization in patients with previous brachial artery cutdown].

    PubMed

    Magariños, Eduardo; Solioz, Germán; Cermesoni, Gabriel; Koretzky, Martín; Carnevalini, Mariana; González, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The percutaneous punction of the radial artery for catheterization procedures has gained acceptance lately. This was a consequence of achieving results similar to the femoral approach, with the benefits of a lower rate of complications and increased comfort for the patients post procedure. Recently it has gained an additional impulse with the better prognosis obtained in acute coronary syndromes. In this trial we have evaluated if the feasibility, results and advantages related with the use of the radial artery percutaneous approach to perform catheterization procedures, continues when used in patients who have had a previous brachial artery cutdown. Out of a total of 1356 percutaneous radial accesses, 53 were in patients with previous brachial artery cutdown. Through this access 71 catheterization procedures were performed, achieving access success in 96.2% (51/53) of the punctions. Once the access success was obtained, 93.6% (44/47) of the diagnostic procedures and 100% (24/24) of the therapeutics procedures were successful. During hospitalization, in this group of patients, no major adverse cardiac events occurred and there was a 1.4% (1/71) rate of minor events. At seven days follow up, no new complications were recorded. Although this is a small group, we believe that it is enough to show that percutaneous punctions of the radial artery to perform catheterization procedures, in patients with previous brachial artery cutdown, are feasible, allowing high access and procedure success rates, with a low frequency of complications.

  12. Superficial brachial artery: A possible cause for idiopathic median nerve entrapment neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nkomozepi, Pilani; Xhakaza, Nkosi; Swanepoel, Elaine

    2017-02-15

    Nerve entrapment syndromes occur because of anatomic constraints at specific locations in both upper and lower limbs. Anatomical locations prone to nerve entrapment syndromes include sites where a nerve courses through fibro-osseous or fibromuscular tunnels or penetrates a muscle. The median nerve (MN) can be entrapped by the ligament of Struthers; thickened biceps aponeurosis; between the superficial and deep heads of the pronator teres muscle and by a thickened proximal edge of flexor digitorum superficialis muscle. A few cases of MN neuropathies encountered are reported to be idiopathic. The superficial branchial artery (SBA) is defined as the artery running superficial to MN or its roots. This divergence from normal anatomy may be the possible explanation for idiopathic median nerve entrapment neuropathy. This study presents three cases with unilateral presence of the SBA encountered during routine undergraduate dissection at the University of Johannesburg. Case 1: SBA divided into radial and ulnar arteries. Brachial artery (BA) terminated as deep brachial artery. Case 2: SBA continued as radial artery (RA). BA terminated as ulnar artery (UA), anterior and posterior interosseous arteries. Case 3: SBA continued as UA. BA divided into radial and common interosseous arteries. Arteries that take an unusual course are more vulnerable to iatrogenic injury during surgical procedures and may disturb the evaluation of angiographic images during diagnosis. In particular, the presence of SBA may be a course of idiopathic neuropathies.

  13. Arterial cutdown reduces complications after brachial access for peripheral vascular intervention.

    PubMed

    Kret, Marcus R; Dalman, Ronald L; Kalish, Jeffrey; Mell, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Factors influencing risk for brachial access site complications after peripheral vascular intervention are poorly understood. We queried the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative to identify unique demographic and technical risks for such complications. The Vascular Quality Initiative peripheral vascular intervention data files from years 2010 to 2014 were analyzed to compare puncture site complication rates and associations encountered with either brachial or femoral arterial access for peripheral vascular intervention. Procedures requiring multiple access sites were excluded. Complications were defined as wound hematoma or access vessel stenosis/occlusion. Univariate and hierarchical logistic regression was used to identify independent factors associated with site complications after brachial access. Of 44,634 eligible peripheral vascular intervention procedures, 732 (1.6%) were performed through brachial access. Brachial access was associated with an increased complication rate compared with femoral access (9.0% vs 3.3%; P < .001), including more hematomas (7.2% vs 3.0%; P < .001) and access site stenosis/occlusion (2.1% vs 0.4%; P < .001). On univariate analysis, factors associated with brachial access complications included age, female gender, and sheath size. Complications occurred less frequently after arterial cutdown (4.1%) compared with either ultrasound-guided (11.8%) or fluoroscopically guided percutaneous access (7.3%; P = .07 across all variables). Neither surgeons' overall peripheral vascular intervention experience nor prior experience with brachial access predicted likelihood of adverse events. By multivariate analysis, male gender (odds ratio [OR], 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.28-0.84; P < .01) and arterial cutdown (OR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.07-0.87; P = .04) were associated with significantly decreased risk for access complications. Larger sheath sizes (>5F) were associated with increased risk of complications (OR

  14. Relationship Between Brachial Artery Flow-Mediated Dilation, Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness and Coronary Flow Reserve in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Fahrettin; Elitok, Ali; Bilge, Ahmet Kaya; Mercanoglu, Fehmi; Oflaz, Huseyin

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between brachial artery flow mediated dilation (FMD), carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and coronary flow reserve (CFR) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods Fifty patients with coronary artery disease, except left anterior descending artery (LAD), who showed no cardiac symptoms and 45 control subjects underwent assessment of brachial artery FMD, carotid artery intima-media thickness by high-resolution ultrasound. In addition, transthoracic second harmonic Doppler echocardiography was used to measure CFR. Results All of the parameters were found to be correlated with each other. CFR correlated with brachial artery FMD (r = 0.232, P < 0.05) and with carotid IMT (r = -0.403, P < 0.001). Carotid IMT correlated with brachial artery FMD (r = -0.211, P < 0.05). Conclusion Transthoracic CFR correlated with well-established noninvasive predictors of atherosclerosis and we suggest that it can be used as a surrogate for coronary atherosclerosis.

  15. Comparison of Brachial Artery Vasoreactivity in Elite Power Athletes and Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Michael A.; Blalock, Paul; Credeur, Daniel P.; Parish, Tracie R.

    2013-01-01

    Elite endurance athletes typically have larger arteries contributing to greater skeletal muscle blood flow, oxygen and nutrient delivery and improved physical performance. Few studies have examined structural and functional properties of arteries in power athletes. Purpose To compare the size and vasoreactivity of the brachial artery of elite power athletes to age-matched controls. It was hypothesized brachial artery diameters of athletes would be larger, have less vasodilation in response to cuff occlusion, but more constriction after a cold pressor test than age-matched controls. Methods Eight elite power athletes (age = 23±2 years) and ten controls (age = 22±1 yrs) were studied. High-resolution ultrasonography was used to assess brachial artery diameters at rest and following 5 minutes of forearm occlusion (Brachial Artery Flow Mediated Dilation = BAFMD) and a cold pressor test (CPT). Basic fitness measures included a handgrip test and 3-minute step test. Results Brachial arteries of athletes were larger (Athletes 5.39±1.51 vs. Controls: 3.73±0.71 mm, p<0.05), had greater vasodilatory (BAFMD%: Athletes: 8.21±1.78 vs. Controls: 5.69±1.56%) and constrictor (CPT %: Athletes: -2.95±1.07 vs. Controls: −1.20±0.48%) responses, compared to controls. Vascular operating range (VOR = Peak dilation+Peak Constriction) was also greater in athletes (VOR: Athletes: 0.55±0.15 vs. Controls: 0.25±0.18 mm, p<0.05). Athletes had superior handgrip strength (Athletes: 55.92±17.06 vs. Controls: 36.77±17.06 kg, p<0.05) but similar heart rate responses at peak (Athletes: 123±16 vs. Controls: 130±25 bpm, p>0.05) and 1 minute recovery (Athletes: 88±21 vs. Controls: 98±26 bpm, p>0.05) following the step test. Conclusion Elite power athletes have larger brachial arteries, and greater vasoreactivity (greater vasodilatory and constrictor responses) than age-matched controls, contributing to a significantly greater VOR. These data extend the existence of an

  16. Brachial artery reactivity in patients with severe sepsis: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound measurements of brachial artery reactivity in response to stagnant ischemia provide estimates of microvascular function and conduit artery endothelial function. We hypothesized that brachial artery reactivity would independently predict severe sepsis and severe sepsis mortality. Methods This was a combined case-control and prospective cohort study. We measured brachial artery reactivity in 95 severe sepsis patients admitted to the medical and surgical intensive care units of an academic medical center and in 52 control subjects without acute illness. Measurements were compared in severe sepsis patients versus control subjects and in severe sepsis survivors versus nonsurvivors. Multivariable analyses were also conducted. Results Hyperemic velocity (centimeters per cardiac cycle) and flow-mediated dilation (percentage) were significantly lower in severe sepsis patients versus control subjects (hyperemic velocity: severe sepsis = 34 (25 to 48) versus controls = 63 (52 to 81), P < 0.001; flow-mediated dilation: severe sepsis = 2.65 (0.81 to 4.79) versus controls = 4.11 (3.06 to 6.78), P < 0.001; values expressed as median (interquartile range)). Hyperemic velocity, but not flow-mediated dilation, was significantly lower in hospital nonsurvivors versus survivors (hyperemic velocity: nonsurvivors = 25 (16 to 28) versus survivors = 39 (30 to 50), P < 0.001; flow-mediated dilation: nonsurvivors = 1.90 (0.68 to 3.41) versus survivors = 2.96 (0.91 to 4.86), P = 0.12). Lower hyperemic velocity was independently associated with hospital mortality in multivariable analysis (odds ratio = 1.11 (95% confidence interval = 1.04 to 1.19) per 1 cm/cardiac cycle decrease in hyperemic velocity; P = 0.003). Conclusions Brachial artery hyperemic blood velocity is a noninvasive index of microvascular function that independently predicts mortality in severe sepsis. In contrast, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, reflecting conduit artery endothelial function

  17. Measuring FMD in the brachial artery: how important is QRS gating?

    PubMed Central

    Kizhakekuttu, Tinoy J.; Gutterman, David D.; Phillips, Shane A.; Jurva, Jason W.; Arthur, Emily I. L.; Das, Emon

    2010-01-01

    Recommendations for the measurement of brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) typically suggest images be obtained at identical times in the cardiac cycle, usually end diastole (QRS complex onset). This recommendation presumes that inter-individual differences in arterial compliance are minimized. However, published evidence is conflicting. Furthermore, ECG gating is not available on many ultrasound systems; it requires an expensive software upgrade or increased image processing time. We tested whether analysis of images acquired with QRS gating or with the more simplified method of image averaging would yield similar results. We analyzed FMD and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NMD) in 29 adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus and in 31 older adults and 12 young adults without diabetes, yielding a range of brachial artery distensibility. FMD and NMD were measured using recommended QRS-gated brachial artery diameter measurements and, alternatively, the average brachial diameters over the entire R-R interval. We found strong agreement between both methods for FMD and NMD (intraclass correlation coefficients = 0.88–0.99). Measuring FMD and NMD using average diameter measurements significantly reduced post-image-processing time (658.9 ± 71.6 vs. 1,024.1 ± 167.6 s for QRS-gated analysis, P < 0.001). FMD and NMD measurements based on average diameter measurements can be performed without reducing accuracy. This finding may allow for simplification of FMD measurement and aid in the development of FMD as a potentially useful clinical tool. PMID:20671033

  18. Measuring FMD in the brachial artery: how important is QRS gating?

    PubMed

    Kizhakekuttu, Tinoy J; Gutterman, David D; Phillips, Shane A; Jurva, Jason W; Arthur, Emily I L; Das, Emon; Widlansky, Michael E

    2010-10-01

    Recommendations for the measurement of brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) typically suggest images be obtained at identical times in the cardiac cycle, usually end diastole (QRS complex onset). This recommendation presumes that inter-individual differences in arterial compliance are minimized. However, published evidence is conflicting. Furthermore, ECG gating is not available on many ultrasound systems; it requires an expensive software upgrade or increased image processing time. We tested whether analysis of images acquired with QRS gating or with the more simplified method of image averaging would yield similar results. We analyzed FMD and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NMD) in 29 adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus and in 31 older adults and 12 young adults without diabetes, yielding a range of brachial artery distensibility. FMD and NMD were measured using recommended QRS-gated brachial artery diameter measurements and, alternatively, the average brachial diameters over the entire R-R interval. We found strong agreement between both methods for FMD and NMD (intraclass correlation coefficients = 0.88-0.99). Measuring FMD and NMD using average diameter measurements significantly reduced post-image-processing time (658.9 ± 71.6 vs. 1,024.1 ± 167.6 s for QRS-gated analysis, P < 0.001). FMD and NMD measurements based on average diameter measurements can be performed without reducing accuracy. This finding may allow for simplification of FMD measurement and aid in the development of FMD as a potentially useful clinical tool.

  19. Complete Brachial Artery Transection following closed Posterior Elbow Dislocation: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    C, JayanthKumar B; Sampath, Deepak; N, Hanumantha Reddy; Motukuru, Vishnu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Vascular injury associated withclosed posterior elbow dislocations is rare and it usually occurs along with open dislocation, anterior dislocation, penetrating injuries, dislocations associated with fracture. We report such a case of closed posterior elbow dislocation with complete brachial artery rupture. Case Report: A 58 years old lady sustained posterior dislocation of right elbow following a fall at home. She presented three days later with complaints of severe pain, swelling around the right elbow and numbness of fingers following a closed reduction done elsewhere. Computed graft angiography showed complete transection of brachialartery. Patient was treated with thrombectomy, right great saphenous vein graft interposition repair of brachial artery and forearm fasciotomy. Conclusion: Vascular injuries associated with posterior elbow dislocation are very rare, but high index of suspicion of arterial injury need to be thought off and repeated vascular examination during pre and post reduction stage should be done to prevent complications. PMID:27299092

  20. A True Distal Brachial Artery Aneurysm Treated with a Bifurcated Saphenous Vein Graft.

    PubMed

    Ben Mrad, Melek; Neifer, Chaouki; Ghedira, Faker; Ghorbel, Nesrine; Denguir, Raouf; Khayati, Adel

    2016-02-01

    Brachial artery aneurysms are rare, mostly consisting of false ones secondary to infectious, traumatic, or iatrogenic arterial lesions. True aneurysms of the brachial artery are even more uncommon. Here, we report a case of a 40-year-old fisherman, without any pathological antecedent, who presented with a painful pulsatile mass of the left anterior arm. There was a slight edema with no ischemic signs. The computed tomographic angiography revealed a true 3.7 × 4.2 × 6 cm aneurysm of the distal brachial artery, partially thrombosed, which extended to the bifurcation. A surgical repair was indicated. Intervention consisted of an aneurysmectomy with interposition of an autologous reversed bifurcated saphenous vein graft. Early outcome was good and a 1-year follow-up showed a patent graft with no aneurysmal recurrence. A review of the literature on this rare location of true artery aneurysm and treatment options is outlined in this work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [The value of brachial artery peak velocity variation during the Valsalva maneuver to predict fluid responsiveness].

    PubMed

    Sheng, L F; Yan, M; Zhang, F J; Ren, Q S; Yu, S H; Wu, M

    2017-02-14

    Objective: To evaluate whether brachial artery peak velocity variation(ΔVp) during a Valsalva maneuver(VM) could predict fluid responsiveness in spontaneously breathing patients. Methods: Ninety-six patients required radial artery catheter for elective surgery of Ningbo Yinzhou People's Hospital from December 2014 to June 2016 were enrolled. The brachial artery Doppler signal was recorded to measure the ΔVp while the VM was performed.Then doing the volume expansion (VE) , the cardiac output variation (ΔCO) before and after VE were measured.Pearson correlational analyses were conducted between ΔVp and ΔCO. Also the sensitivity and specificity of ΔVp were determined in predicting fluid responsiveness by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results: Patients were classified as group responders (n=24) and group non-responders (n=72). Responder was defined as cardiac output increased≥15% after VE.The ΔVp correlated well with ΔCO (r=0.792, P<0.01). The area under ROC curve was 0.903, with the ΔVp cut-off of 33%, the sensitivity of 87% and the specificity of 82%(P<0.01). Conclusion: Brachial artery peak velocity variation during a valsalva maneuver is a feasible method for predicting fluid responsiveness in spontaneously breathing patients.

  2. Prediction of early and late preeclampsia by flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery*

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Augusto Henriques Fulgêncio; Evangelista, Aline Aarão; Martins, Raphaela Menin Franco; Leite, Henrique Vítor; Cabral, Antônio Carlos Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the accuracy in the prediction of both early and late preeclampsia by flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery (FMD), a biophysical marker for endothelial dysfunction. Materials and Methods A total of 91 patients, considered at high risk for development of preeclampsia were submitted to brachial artery FMD between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. Results Nineteen out of the selected patients developed preeclampsia, 8 in its early form and 11 in the late form. With a cut-off value of 6.5%, the FMD sensitivity for early preeclampsia prediction was 75.0%, with specificity of 73.3%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 32.4% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 91.9%. For the prediction of late preeclampsia, sensitivity = 83.3%, specificity = 73.2%, PPV = 34.4% and NPV = 96.2% were observed. And for the prediction of all associated forms of preeclampsia, sensitivity = 84.2%, specificity = 73.6%, PPV = 45.7% and NPV = 94.6% were observed. Conclusion FMD of the brachial artery is a test with good accuracy in the prediction of both early and late preeclampsia, which may represent a positive impact on the follow-up of pregnant women at high risk for developing this syndrome. PMID:25741086

  3. Brachial artery injury due to closed posterior elbow dislocation: case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Checchia, Caio Santos; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2016-01-01

    An association between closed posterior elbow dislocation and traumatic brachial artery injury is rare. Absence of radial pulse on palpation is an important warning sign and arteriography is the gold-standard diagnostic test. Early diagnosis is essential for appropriate treatment to be provided. This consists of joint reduction and immobilization, along with urgent surgical restoration of arterial flow. Here, a case (novel to the Brazilian literature) of an association between these injuries (and the treatment implemented) in a 27-year-old male patient is reported. These injuries were sustained through physical assault. PMID:27069896

  4. Brachial artery injury due to closed posterior elbow dislocation: case report.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Checchia, Caio Santos; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2016-01-01

    An association between closed posterior elbow dislocation and traumatic brachial artery injury is rare. Absence of radial pulse on palpation is an important warning sign and arteriography is the gold-standard diagnostic test. Early diagnosis is essential for appropriate treatment to be provided. This consists of joint reduction and immobilization, along with urgent surgical restoration of arterial flow. Here, a case (novel to the Brazilian literature) of an association between these injuries (and the treatment implemented) in a 27-year-old male patient is reported. These injuries were sustained through physical assault.

  5. Double muscle transfer for upper extremity reconstruction following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Doi, K; Kuwata, N; Muramatsu, K; Hottori, Y; Kawai, S

    1999-11-01

    Recent interest in reconstruction of the upper limb following brachial plexus injuries has focused on the restoration of prehension following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. The authors use free muscle transfers for reconstruction of the upper limb to resolve the difficult problems in complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. This article describes the authors' updated technique--the double free muscle procedure. Reconstruction of prehension to achieve independent voluntary finger and elbow flexion and extension by the use of double free muscle and multiple nerve transfers following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus (nerve roots C5 to T1) is presented. The procedure involves transferring the first free muscle, neurotized by the spinal accessory nerve for elbow flexion and finger extension, a second free muscle transfer reinnervated by the fifth and sixth intercostal nerves for finger flexion, and neurotization of the triceps brachii via its motor nerve by the third and fourth intercostal motor nerves to extend and stabilize the elbow. Restoration of hand sensibility is obtained via the suturing of sensory rami from the intercostal nerves to the median nerve. Secondary reconstruction, including arthrodesis of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb and glenohumeral joint, and tenolysis of the transferred muscle and distal tendons, improve the functional outcome. Based on the long-term result, selection of the patient, donor muscle, and donor motor nerve were indicated. Most patients were able to achieve prehensile functions such as holding a can and lifting a heavy box. This double free muscle transfer has provided prehension for patients with complete avulsion of the brachial plexus and has given them new hope to be able to use their otherwise useless limbs.

  6. Brachial Artery Constriction during Brachial Artery Reactivity Testing Predicts Major Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Women with Suspected Myocardial Ischemia: Results from the NHLBI-Sponsored Women’s Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Pepine, Carl J.; Reis, Steven E.; Bairey Merz, C. Noel

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited brachial artery (BA) flow-mediated dilation during brachial artery reactivity testing (BART) has been linked to increased cardiovascular risk. We report on the phenomenon of BA constriction (BAC) following hyperemia. Objectives To determine whether BAC predicts adverse CV outcomes and/or mortality in the women’s ischemic Syndrome Evaluation Study (WISE). Further, as a secondary objective we sought to determine the risk factors associated with BAC. Methods We performed BART on 377 women with chest pain referred for coronary angiography and followed for a median of 9.5 years. Forearm ischemia was induced with 4 minutes occlusion by a cuff placed distal to the BA and inflated to 40mm Hg > systolic pressure. BAC was defined as >4.8% artery constriction following release of the cuff. The main outcome was major adverse events (MACE) including all-cause mortality, non-fatal MI, non-fatal stroke, or hospitalization for heart failure. Results BA diameter change ranged from -20.6% to +44.9%, and 41 (11%) women experienced BAC. Obstructive CAD and traditional CAD risk factors were not predictive of BAC. Overall, 39% of women with BAC experienced MACE vs. 22% without BAC (p=0.004). In multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression, BAC was a significant independent predictor of MACE (p=0.018) when adjusting for obstructive CAD and traditional risk factors. Conclusions BAC predicts almost double the risk for major adverse events compared to patients without BAC. This risk was not accounted for by CAD or traditional risk factors. The novel risk marker of BAC requires further investigation in women. PMID:24058592

  7. Ankle Brachial Index: simple non-invasive estimation of peripheral artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieniak, Marcin; Cieślicki, Krzysztof; Żyliński, Marek; Górski, Piotr; Murgrabia, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Gerard

    2014-11-01

    According to international guidelines, patients with Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) are burdened with high cardiovascular risk. One of the simplest, non-invasive methods for PAD detection is the ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement. The ABI is calculated as the ratio of systolic blood pressure at the ankle (pressure in the posterior tibial artery or the dorsal artery) to the systolic pressure in the arm (in the brachial artery) when the body is in a horizontal position. The physiological value of the ABI is assumed to be between 1 and 1.3; however, these limits vary from study to study. A value less than 0.9 indicates PAD. Some authors propose also measuring the ABI on both sides of the body to highlight possible differences in blood pressure between the opposite arterial segments. The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of the ABI diagnostic criteria used in different publications. Additionally, ABI measurements were performed on 19 healthy patients in age ranged from 20 to 63 years. The results showed a slight dependence between age and the differences between the values obtained from left and right sides of the body.

  8. Accurate quantitative measurements of brachial artery cross-sectional vascular area and vascular volume elastic modulus using automated oscillometric measurements: comparison with brachial artery ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Ochi, Noriki; Inoue, Mamiko; Nishida, Mutumi; Aziki, Kumi; Horie, Tatsunori; Katoh, Chietsugu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2015-01-01

    Increasing vascular diameter and attenuated vascular elasticity may be reliable markers for atherosclerotic risk assessment. However, previous measurements have been complex, operator-dependent or invasive. Recently, we developed a new automated oscillometric method to measure a brachial artery's estimated area (eA) and volume elastic modulus (VE). The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of new automated oscillometric measurement of eA and VE. Rest eA and VE were measured using the recently developed automated detector with the oscillometric method. eA was estimated using pressure/volume curves and VE was defined as follows (VE=Δ pressure/ (100 × Δ area/area) mm Hg/%). Sixteen volunteers (age 35.2±13.1 years) underwent the oscillometric measurements and brachial ultrasound at rest and under nitroglycerin (NTG) administration. Oscillometric measurement was performed twice on different days. The rest eA correlated with ultrasound-measured brachial artery area (r=0.77, P<0.001). Rest eA and VE measurement showed good reproducibility (eA: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.88, VE: ICC=0.78). Under NTG stress, eA was significantly increased (12.3±3.0 vs. 17.1±4.6 mm2, P<0.001), and this was similar to the case with ultrasound evaluation (4.46±0.72 vs. 4.73±0.75 mm, P<0.001). VE was also decreased (0.81±0.16 vs. 0.65±0.11 mm Hg/%, P<0.001) after NTG. Cross-sectional vascular area calculated using this automated oscillometric measurement correlated with ultrasound measurement and showed good reproducibility. Therefore, this is a reliable approach and this modality may have practical application to automatically assess muscular artery diameter and elasticity in clinical or epidemiological settings. PMID:25693851

  9. Brachial artery vasomotion and transducer pressure effect on measurements by active contour segmentation on ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Theodore W.; Sultan, Laith R.; Sehgal, Chandra M.; Reamer, Courtney B.; Mohler, Emile R.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To use feed-forward active contours (snakes) to track and measure brachial artery vasomotion on ultrasound images recorded in both transverse and longitudinal views; and to compare the algorithm's performance in each view. Methods: Longitudinal and transverse view ultrasound image sequences of 45 brachial arteries were segmented by feed-forward active contour (FFAC). The segmented regions were used to measure vasomotion artery diameter, cross-sectional area, and distention both as peak-to-peak diameter and as area. ECG waveforms were also simultaneously extracted frame-by-frame by thresholding a running finite-difference image between consecutive images. The arterial and ECG waveforms were compared as they traced each phase of the cardiac cycle. Results: FFAC successfully segmented arteries in longitudinal and transverse views in all 45 cases. The automated analysis took significantly less time than manual tracing, but produced superior, well-behaved arterial waveforms. Automated arterial measurements also had lower interobserver variability as measured by correlation, difference in mean values, and coefficient of variation. Although FFAC successfully segmented both the longitudinal and transverse images, transverse measurements were less variable. The cross-sectional area computed from the longitudinal images was 27% lower than the area measured from transverse images, possibly due to the compression of the artery along the image depth by transducer pressure. Conclusions: FFAC is a robust and sensitive vasomotion segmentation algorithm in both transverse and longitudinal views. Transverse imaging may offer advantages over longitudinal imaging: transverse measurements are more consistent, possibly because the method is less sensitive to variations in transducer pressure during imaging.

  10. Thrombin Injection for Treatment of Brachial Artery Pseudoaneurysm at the Site of a Hemodialysis Fistula: Report of Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Timothy W.I.; Abraham, Robert J.

    2000-09-15

    We report two patients with arteriovenous hemodialysis fistulas that were complicated by brachial artery pseudoaneurysms. Each pseudoanerysm was percutaneously thrombosed with an injection of thrombin, using techniques to prevent escape of thrombin into the native brachial artery. In one patient, an angioplasty balloon was inflated across the neck of the aneurysm during thrombin injection. In the second patient, thrombin was injected during ultrasound-guided compression of the neck of the pseudoaneurysm. Complete thrombosis of each pseudoaneurysm was achieved within 30 sec. No ischemic or embolic events occurred. This technique may be useful in treating pseudoaneurysms of smaller peripheral arteries.

  11. Reactivity to low-flow as a potential determinant for brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilatation.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Kunihiko; Elyas, Salim; Adingupu, Damilola D; Casanova, Francesco; Gooding, Kim M; Strain, W David; Shore, Angela C; Gates, Phillip E

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have reported a vasoconstrictor response in the radial artery during a cuff-induced low-flow condition, but a similar low-flow condition in the brachial artery results in nonuniform reactivity. This variable reactivity to low-flow influences the subsequent flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) response following cuff-release. However, it is uncertain whether reactivity to low-flow is important in data interpretation in clinical populations and older adults. This study aimed to determine the influence of reactivity to low-flow on the magnitude of brachial artery FMD response in middle-aged and older individuals with diverse cardiovascular risk profiles. Data were analyzed from 165 individuals, divided into increased cardiovascular risk (CVR: n = 115, 85M, 67.0 ± 8.8 years) and healthy control (CTRL: n = 50, 30M, 63.2 ± 7.2 years) groups. Brachial artery diameter and blood velocity data obtained from Doppler ultrasound were used to calculate FMD, reactivity to low-flow and estimated shear rate (SR) using semiautomated edge-detection software. There was a significant association between reactivity to low-flow and FMD in overall (r = 0.261), CTRL (r = 0.410) and CVR (r = 0.189, all P < 0.05) groups. Multivariate regression analysis found that reactivity to low-flow, peak SR, and baseline diameter independently contributed to FMD along with sex, the presence of diabetes, and smoking (total R(2) = 0.450). There was a significant association between reactivity to low-flow and the subsequent FMD response in the overall dataset, and reactivity to low-flow independently contributed to FMD These findings suggest that reactivity to low-flow plays a key role in the subsequent brachial artery FMD response and is important in the interpretation of FMD data. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  12. Axillary artery injury combined with delayed brachial plexus palsy due to compressive hematoma in a young patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Axillary artery injury in the shoulder region following blunt trauma without association with either shoulder dislocation or fracture of the humeral neck has been previously reported. Axillary artery injury might also be accompanied with brachial plexus injury. However, delayed onset of brachial plexus palsy caused by a compressive hematoma associated with axillary injury after blunt trauma in the shoulder region has been rarely reported. In previous reports, this condition only occurred in old patients with sclerotic vessels. We present a case of a young patient who suffered axillary artery injury associated with brachial plexus palsy that occurred tardily due to compressive hematoma after blunt trauma in the shoulder region without association of either shoulder dislocation or humeral neck fracture. Case presentation A 16-year-old male injured his right shoulder in a motorbike accident. On initial physical evaluation, the pulses on the radial and ulnar arteries in the affected arm were palpable. Paralysis developed later from 2 days after the injury. Functions in the right arm became significantly impaired. Angiography showed complete occlusion of the axillary artery. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass measuring 4 × 5 cm that was suspected to be a hematoma compressing the brachial plexus in a space between the subscapular muscle and the pectoralis minor muscle. Surgery was performed on the third day after injury. In intraoperative observations, the axillary artery was occluded with thrombus along 5 cm; a subscapular artery was ruptured; the brachial plexus was compressed by the hematoma. After evacuation of the hematoma, neurolysis of the brachial plexus, and revascularization of the axillary artery, the patient had an excellent functional recovery of the affected upper limb, postoperatively. Conclusion Surgeons should be aware that axillary artery injuries may even occur in young people after severe blunt trauma in the shoulder region

  13. Arteriovenous fistula combined with brachial artery superficialization is effective in patients with a high risk of maturation failure.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masaaki; Sakaguchi, Genichi; Mori, Noriko

    2017-02-01

    In patients with a high risk of fistula immaturity, we created arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) combined with brachial artery superficialization. With this procedure, the superficialized arteries are used as drawing routes and the AVFs as returning routes. This is a technical report about AVFs combined with brachial artery superficialization. Twenty-four consecutive patients with a high risk of fistula immaturity who underwent AVFs with brachial artery superficialization were included in this single-center retrospective study. High risk for maturation failure was defined with a combination of the vessel size measured by ultrasound and the length of the straight segment for cannulation. The indications were as follows: (1) a vein diameter of <2 mm or an artery diameter at the point of anastomosis of <2 mm (n = 9); and (2) a vein cannulation site of <10 cm long, which is too short for two cannulations (n = 15). Initially, after careful examination of the vessels by duplex ultrasound imaging, we created an AVF at an appropriate site. Subsequently, the brachial artery was exposed and the side branches were ligated. The brachial artery was mobilized to the ventral aspect of the upper arm, and the subcutaneous tissue under the brachial artery was sutured. A skin flap was then placed over the transposed brachial artery. One patient died of sepsis due to central venous catheter infection before the initial cannulation. All other patients underwent successful two-needle cannulation with a prescribed blood flow. The median age of the patients was 78 years. The first successful cannulation was achieved at a median of 17 days (range, 12-547) after AVF creation. Two patients underwent cannulation >30 days after surgery (58 and 547 days) because their vascular accesses were created before initiation of hemodialysis treatment. Median postoperative follow-up duration was 524 days (range, 15-1394 days). Nine patients (38%) died during follow-up of unrelated causes. At 12

  14. Adherence to guidelines strongly improves reproducibility of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation.

    PubMed

    Greyling, Arno; van Mil, Anke C C M; Zock, Peter L; Green, Daniel J; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Thijssen, Dick H

    2016-05-01

    Brachial artery FMD is widely used as a non-invasive measure of endothelial function. Adherence to expert guidelines is believed to be of vital importance to obtain reproducible measurements. We conducted a systematic review of studies reporting on the reproducibility of the FMD in order to determine the relation between adherence to current expert guidelines for FMD measurement and its reproducibility. Medline-database was searched through July 2015 and 458 records were screened for FMD reproducibility studies reporting the mean difference and variance of repeated FMD measurements. An adherence score was assigned to each of the included studies based on reported adherence to published guidelines on the assessment of brachial artery FMD. A Typical Error Estimate (TEE) of the FMD was calculated for each included study. The relation between the FMD TEE and the adherence score was investigated by means of Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple linear regression analysis. Twenty-seven studies involving 48 study groups and 1537 subjects were included in the analyses. The adherence score ranged from 2.4 to 9.2 (out of a maximum of 10) and was strongly and inversely correlated with FMD TEE (adjusted R(2) = 0.36, P < 0.01). Use of automated edge-detection software, continuous diameter measurement, true peak diameter for %FMD calculation, a stereostatic probe holder, and higher age emerged as factors associated with a lower FMD TEE. These data demonstrate that adherence to current expert consensus guidelines and applying contemporary techniques for measuring brachial artery FMD decreases its measurement error. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Brachial Artery Reconstruction in Trauma Using Reversed Arm Vein from the Injured Upper Limb

    PubMed Central

    Harnarayan, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brachial artery repair may be technically challenging with a paucity of guidelines. The use arm vein (AV) from the traumatized limb is herein described. Methods: Data were prospectively collected from 2002 to 2016 on brachial artery injury including age, sex, mechanism/site of injury, and repair technique. Categories included AV and non-arm vein (NAV) groups. One-year outcomes were noted. Results: All 31 cases studied were of men with an age range of 16 to 73 years (mean = 28). Injuries included 13 gunshots, 7 stabbings, 6 glass injuries, 2 dislocated elbows, 1 crush, 1 impalement, and 1 avulsion. Site of injuries included the antecubital region in 25, midbrachial in 5, and proximal brachial in 1, with 4 associated fractures. Repair was done using reversed AV from the traumatized limb in 15 cases and NAV in 16. In the AV group, the adjacent basilic vein was used in 9 cases, the adjacent cephalic vein in 3, and the distal (or wrist area) cephalic vein in 3. The limb salvage rates in the AV versus NAV groups were 100% and 94%, respectively (Fisher’s exact t test, P = 1.00), with no major technique-related complications. Conclusions: The outcomes of using reversed AV from the traumatized limb are equivalent to those of other standard techniques such as primary repair, polytetrafluoroethylene, or reversed great saphenous vein, with a 1-year limb salvage rate of 100%. Additionally, advantages include decreased wound complications, better vein graft--artery caliber match, and shorter operating times while maintaining acceptable patency rates. PMID:27826464

  16. Brachial artery Doppler flux parameters before and after hot flush in Mexican postmenopausal women: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Carranza-Lira, Sebastián; Rodríguez, Karina Vázquez; Ortiz, Sergio Rosales

    2016-03-01

    To analyse brachial artery flux parameters in postmenopausal women before and after hot flush. Two groups of postmenopausal women were studied: Group I, without vasomotor symptoms (n = 10) and Group II, with vasomotor symptoms (n = 10). In all them a brachial artery Doppler ultrasound was done, measuring before and after hyperaemic stimulus of the arterial diameter (AD), the pulsatility index (PI), and the resistive index (RI). In Group I, measurements were done at baseline and five minutes after. In Group II, measurements were at baseline, and one and five minutes after the hot-flush. Comparison between the groups was done with Mann-Whitney U test, and within the groups with Wilcoxon test. No differences were found among the groups in Doppler parameters. When comparing each group separately, in Group I, at baseline and at five minutes measurements, the AD was greater after the hyperaemic stimulus than before it. In group II at baseline, the PI was significantly greater after the hyperaemic stimulus than before to it. At the first and fifth minute, the AD was significantly greater after the hyperaemic stimulus than before to it. No differences were found between those who did not have and those who had hot flushes.

  17. Brachial artery Doppler flux parameters before and after hot flush in Mexican postmenopausal women: preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Karina Vázquez; Ortiz, Sergio Rosales

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse brachial artery flux parameters in postmenopausal women before and after hot flush. Material and methods Two groups of postmenopausal women were studied: Group I, without vasomotor symptoms (n = 10) and Group II, with vasomotor symptoms (n = 10). In all them a brachial artery Doppler ultrasound was done, measuring before and after hyperaemic stimulus of the arterial diameter (AD), the pulsatility index (PI), and the resistive index (RI). In Group I, measurements were done at baseline and five minutes after. In Group II, measurements were at baseline, and one and five minutes after the hot-flush. Comparison between the groups was done with Mann-Whitney U test, and within the groups with Wilcoxon test. Results No differences were found among the groups in Doppler parameters. When comparing each group separately, in Group I, at baseline and at five minutes measurements, the AD was greater after the hyperaemic stimulus than before it. In group II at baseline, the PI was significantly greater after the hyperaemic stimulus than before to it. At the first and fifth minute, the AD was significantly greater after the hyperaemic stimulus than before to it. Conclusions No differences were found between those who did not have and those who had hot flushes. PMID:27095957

  18. The Role of Ankle-Brachial Index for Predicting Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    RAC-ALBU, Marius; ILIUTA, Luminita; GUBERNA, Suzana Maria; SINESCU, Crina

    2014-01-01

    The presence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, regardless of gender or its clinical form of presentation (symptomatic or asymptomatic). PAD is considered an independent predictor for cardiovascular mortality, more important for survival than clinical history of coronary artery disease. The ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive and cost-effective screening tool for PAD. ABI is valuable for screening of peripheral artery disease in patients at risk and for diagnosing the disease in patients who present with lower-extremity symptoms. Compared to other diagnostic methods, ABI is superior because it is s a simple, noninvasive test, which could be routinely determined in all patients. Normal cut-off values for ABI are between 0.9 and 1.4. An abnormal ankle-brachial index- below 0.9-is a powerful independent marker of cardiovascular risk. There is an inverse correlation between ABI values, non-fatal cardiac events (myocardial infarction, stroke and heart failure exacerbation) and mortality (cardiovascular and global), the relation being nonlinear, patients with very low ABI (<0.3) having a significantly higher additional risk. Also, ABI values over 1.3-1.4 correlate with major adverse cardiovascular events. Therefore, ABI can be considered a generalized atherosclerotic predictor, identifying patients at high risk for developing cardio- or cerebrovascular events and should be incorporated into routine clinical practice. PMID:25705296

  19. Recurrent upper limb ischaemia due to a crutch-induced brachial artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kouji; Hayase, Takahiro; Yano, Mitsuhiro

    2013-07-01

    An 83-year old man who had used bilateral axillary crutches for 67 years was referred to our hospital for acute left upper limb ischaemia. He underwent successful recanalization through emergent catheter thromboembolectomy. However, a crutch-induced left brachial artery aneurysm was subsequently detected by computed tomography. Therefore, we performed aneurysm exclusion and subsequent saphenous vein bypass grafting. When a crutch user presents with upper limb ischaemia, a high index of suspicion and early identification of the crutch induced vascular injury are mandatory for appropriate treatment.

  20. Sonographic Evaluation of Endothelial Function in Brachial Arteries of Adult Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Omisore, Adeleye Dorcas; Ayoola, Oluwagbemiga Oluwole; Ibitoye, Bolanle Olubunmi; Fawale, Michael Bimbola; Adetiloye, Victor Adebayo

    2017-02-01

    Brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation on sonography is used to evaluate endothelial dysfunction, which is a key event in the development of atherosclerosis and predates structural atherosclerotic lesions by many years. Atherosclerosis has been implicated in the pathophysiologic mechanisms of ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to determine the association between brachial flow-mediated dilatation, the presence of cardiovascular risk factors, and acute stroke. We evaluated right brachial arteries of 150 participants (50 stroke patients, 50 patients with cardiovascular risk factors, and 50 healthy control individuals) with B-mode sonography before and 5 minutes after sphygmomanometer cuff application to their forearms. Analysis of variance for multiple comparisons was used between each group. Mean ages of the stroke, risk factor, and control groups ± SD were 57.5 ± 14.8, 52.4 ± 16.0, and 56.1 ± 14.9 years, respectively (P = .235). Flow-mediated dilatation rates were 4.37% ± 1.50%, 5.62% ± 1.23%, and 10.33% ± 1.96% in the stroke, risk factor, and control groups (P ≤ .001). Dilatation was 3.79% ± 0.92% in ischemic stroke compared with 6.02% ± 1.62% in intracerebral hemorrhage (P < .001), but there was no significant difference in dilatation between ischemic stroke subtypes according to the Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification (P = .301). Brachial flow-mediated dilatation was significantly lower in patients with acute stroke compared with controls matched for vascular risk factors and healthy controls. Decreased vascular endothelial function in stroke patients was particularly related to cerebral infarction compared with intracerebral hemorrhage. Brachial flow-mediated dilatation did not differentiate ischemic stroke subtypes by the Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification. Flow-mediated dilatation was therefore found to be a marker of cardiovascular risk

  1. Is Brachial Artery Blood Flow Measured by Sonography During Early Postoperative Periods Predictive of Arteriovenous Fistula Failure in Hemodialysis Patients?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu-Li; Ding, Hong; Fan, Pei-Li; Gu, Qi-Lan; Teng, Jie; Wang, Wen-Ping

    2016-09-01

    The aim of our study was to determine a brachial artery blood flow level measured by sonography during early postoperative periods that is predictive of arteriovenous fistula failure in hemodialysis patients. Doppler sonography was used to estimate the blood flow in the brachial artery of 103 patients at 1 and 14 days after arteriovenous fistula creation. The performance of brachial artery blood flow during early postoperative periods for predicting fistula failure was evaluated, and optimal cutoff values were determined. During a 6-month follow-up, 85 fistulas were classified as mature, and 18 were classified as failures. The reproducibility of blood flow measurements in the brachial artery was good (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.912). The blood flow in the failure group was significantly lower than that in the mature group at both 1 and 14 days after fistula creation (P < .05). During the first 2 postoperative weeks, the blood flow increased by 40.7% in the failure group versus 78.3% in the mature group. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of brachial artery blood flow for predicting failure were 0.77 (95% confidence interval, 0.66-0.87; optimal cutoff value, 310 mL/min)at 1 day and 0.91 (95% confidence interval, 0.83-0.99; 413 mL/min) at 14 days after fistula creation. Brachial artery blood flow measured by sonography during early postoperative periods may be predictive of forearm fistula failure. Blood flow of less than 310 mL/min at 1 day and 413 mL/min at 14 days after fistula creation may indicate a risk of failure to mature.

  2. Brachial artery transection associated with open elbow dislocation in a 12-year-old: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nazli, Yunus; Colak, Necmettin; Uras, Ismail; Komurcu, Mahmut; Cakir, Omer

    2013-02-01

    Although acute elbow dislocations are common orthopedic injuries, concomitant neurovascular injury is rare. Brachial artery transection can result from open elbow dislocation and responds well to vascular repair. Rapid evaluation and a high level of suspicion are essential to facilitate immediate treatment. Delay to identify vascular injury after elbow dislocation or reduction can potentially lead to limb ischemia, and potential loss of limb. We present a case of relatively rare transection of the brachial artery, with an accompanying traumatic open elbow dislocation in a 12-year-old boy.

  3. Bilateral variant testicular arteries with double renal arteries

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The testicular arteries normally arise from the abdominal aorta. There are reports about the variant origin of these arteries. Accessory renal arteries are also a common finding but their providing origin to testicular arteries is an important observation. The variations described here are unique and provide significant information to surgeons dissecting the abdominal cavity. Case presentation During routine dissection classes of abdominal region of a 60-year-old male cadaver, we observed bilateral variant testicular arteries and double renal arteries. Conclusion Awareness of variations of the testicular arteries such as those presented here becomes important during surgical procedures like varicocele and undescended testes. PMID:19187540

  4. Brachial artery retrograde flow increases with age: relationship to physical function

    PubMed Central

    Credeur, Daniel P.; Dobrosielski, Devon A.; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A.; Welsch, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the flow velocity pattern of the brachial artery and to determine its relationship to measures of physical function. Subjects from the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (n = 95; age = 84 ± 10 years) were evaluated. Brachial artery flow velocities and dimensions were measured using high-resolution ultrasonography. The continuous scale of physical function and performance test (CS-PFP10) was used to assess physical function. This test is based on the performance of 11 activities of daily living. Total CS-PFP10 score was 39.51 ± 21.21 U. Mean antegrade and retrograde velocities at rest were 14.2 ± 4.7 and 3.6 ± 2.2 cm/s, respectively. Ante-/retrograde ratio was 5.5 ± 4.6. Brachial artery diameter was 4.3 ± 0.7 mm. Pulse pressure and vascular conductance were 66 ± 18 mmHg, and 0.9 ± 0.5 ml/min/mmHg, respectively. Vascular conductance (r = −0.34), ante-/retrograde ratio (r = −0.42) and CS-PFP10 (r = −0.65) were inversely and retrograde velocity (r = 0.40) and pulse pressure (r = 0.36), were directly associated with age. Retrograde velocity was inversely related to vascular conductance (r = −0.27) and CS-PFP10 total score (r = −0.45). A MANOVA revealed that those with the higher CS-PFP10 scores had a lower retrograde velocity (P = 0.0001), but this association was, in part, age-dependent. Among nonagenarians (n = 52), those in the lower tertiles of the CS-PFP10 scores had significantly higher retrograde velocities compared to those in the higher tertiles (P = 0.035). These data indicate an increase in brachial retrograde velocity with age. These hemodynamic changes are related to a decline in physical function. PMID:19565260

  5. Exercise intensity modulates brachial artery retrograde blood flow and shear rate during leg cycling in hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Erika; Katayama, Keisho; Ishida, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of exercise intensity on retrograde blood flow and shear rate (SR) in an inactive limb during exercise under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The subjects performed two maximal exercise tests on a semi-recumbent cycle ergometer to estimate peak oxygen uptake (O2peak) while breathing normoxic (inspired oxygen fraction [FIO2 = 0.21]) and hypoxic (FIO2 = 0.12 or 0.13) gas mixtures. Subjects then performed four exercise bouts at the same relative intensities (30 and 60% O2peak) for 30 min under normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Brachial artery diameter and blood velocity were simultaneously recorded, using Doppler ultrasonography. Retrograde SR was enhanced with increasing exercise intensity under both conditions at 10 min of exercise. Thereafter, retrograde blood flow and SR in normoxia returned to pre-exercise levels, with no significant differences between the two exercise intensities. In contrast, retrograde blood flow and SR in hypoxia remained significantly elevated above baseline and was significantly greater at 60% than at 30% O2peak. We conclude that differences in exercise intensity affect brachial artery retrograde blood flow and SR during prolonged exercise under hypoxic conditions. PMID:26038470

  6. Exercise intensity modulates brachial artery retrograde blood flow and shear rate during leg cycling in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Erika; Katayama, Keisho; Ishida, Koji

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of exercise intensity on retrograde blood flow and shear rate (SR) in an inactive limb during exercise under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The subjects performed two maximal exercise tests on a semi-recumbent cycle ergometer to estimate peak oxygen uptake (V˙O2peak) while breathing normoxic (inspired oxygen fraction [FIO2 = 0.21]) and hypoxic (FIO2 = 0.12 or 0.13) gas mixtures. Subjects then performed four exercise bouts at the same relative intensities (30 and 60% V˙O2peak) for 30 min under normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Brachial artery diameter and blood velocity were simultaneously recorded, using Doppler ultrasonography. Retrograde SR was enhanced with increasing exercise intensity under both conditions at 10 min of exercise. Thereafter, retrograde blood flow and SR in normoxia returned to pre-exercise levels, with no significant differences between the two exercise intensities. In contrast, retrograde blood flow and SR in hypoxia remained significantly elevated above baseline and was significantly greater at 60% than at 30% V˙O2peak. We conclude that differences in exercise intensity affect brachial artery retrograde blood flow and SR during prolonged exercise under hypoxic conditions. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  7. Brachial Artery Conductance During Reactive Hyperemia is Increased in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raja-Khan, Nazia; Shuja, Showieb A.; Kunselman, Allen R.; Hogeman, Cynthia S.; Demers, Laurence M.; Gnatuk, Carol L.; Legro, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine changes in brachial artery conductance (BAC) during reactive hyperemia in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) compared to controls. Study Design This is a pilot case-control study performed at a single academic medical center. Changes in BAC during reactive hyperemia were evaluated in 31 women with PCOS and 11 healthy control women. Fasting glucose, insulin, lipids and androgen levels were also determined. A mixed-effects model was used to compare the PCOS curve to the control curve for change in BAC from baseline during reactive hyperemia. Results Body mass index (BMI) and testosterone levels were significantly increased in the PCOS group compared to controls (P < 0.05). In addition, the PCOS group had higher total and LDL cholesterol levels (P = 0.05 and 0.09, respectively). Change in BAC from baseline during reactive hyperemia was significantly increased in the PCOS group compared to controls even after adjusting for age, BMI and LDL cholesterol levels (P < 0.0001). There were no significant differences between the two groups in age, blood pressure, or fasting glucose or insulin levels. Conclusions Brachial artery conductance during reactive hyperemia is significantly increased in women with PCOS compared to controls and may be a novel early indicator of increased cardiovascular risk in women with PCOS. PMID:21112136

  8. Anatomic Variation of Subclavian Artery Visualized on Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Arunima; Banerjee, Sumantra Sarathi

    2014-01-01

    Use of ultrasonography for performance of nerve and plexus blocks has made the process simpler and safer. However, at times, variant anatomy of the visualized structures can lead to failure of blocks or complications such as intravascular injections. This is especially true in case of novice operators. We report a case of a variant branch of subclavian artery, possibly the dorsal scapular artery passing through the brachial plexus nerve bundles in the supraclavicular area. Since this variation in anatomy was visualized in the scout scan prior to the performance of the block, it was possible to avoid any accidental puncture. Hence, a thorough knowledge of the ultrasound anatomy is important in order to identify various aberrations and variations. It is also prudent to perform a preliminary scan, prior to performance of the block to localize the target area and avoid any inadvertent complications. PMID:25143765

  9. Blood pressure monitoring during arrhythmia: agreement between automated brachial cuff and intra-arterial measurements.

    PubMed

    Lakhal, K; Ehrmann, S; Martin, M; Faiz, S; Réminiac, F; Cinotti, R; Capdevila, X; Asehnoune, K; Blanloeil, Y; Rozec, B; Boulain, T

    2015-10-01

    Since arrhythmia induces irregular pulse waves, it is widely considered to cause flawed oscillometric brachial cuff measurements of blood pressure (BP). However, strong data are lacking. We assessed whether the agreement of oscillometric measurements with intra-arterial measurements is worse during arrhythmia than during regular rhythm. Among patients of three intensive care units (ICUs), a prospective comparison of three pairs of intra-arterial and oscillometric BP readings was performed among patients with arrhythmia and an arterial line already present. After each inclusion in the arrhythmia group, one patient with regular rhythm was included as a control. International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard validation required a mean bias <5 (sd 8) mm Hg. In 135 patients with arrhythmia, the agreement between oscillometric and intra-arterial measurements of systolic, diastolic and mean BP was similar to that observed in 136 patients with regular rhythm: for mean BP, similar mean bias [-0.1 (sd 5.2) and 1.9 (sd 5.9) mm Hg]. In both groups, the ISO standard was satisfied for mean and diastolic BP, but not for systolic BP (sd >10 mm Hg) in our ICU population. The ability of oscillometry to detect hypotension (systolic BP <90 mm Hg or mean BP <65 mm Hg), response to therapy (>10% increase in mean BP after cardiovascular intervention) and hypertension (systolic BP >140 mm Hg) was good and similar during arrhythmia and regular rhythm (respective areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves ranging from 0.89 to 0.96, arrhythmia vs regular rhythm between-group comparisons all associated with P>0.3). Contrary to widespread belief, arrhythmia did not cause flawed automated brachial cuff measurements. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Characterizing Methods of Measuring Flow-Mediated Dilation in the Brachial Artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callender, Ariane R.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of vascular tone is one of the many important functions of the vascular endothelium. Endothelial dysfunction is a critical early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and occurs in the absence of angiographic disease. Flow-Mediated Dilation (FMD) is a noninvasive technique commonly used to evaluate endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans and gauge the health of the cardiovascular system. Reductions in brachial artery FMD have been strongly correlated with disease progression and are predictive of future cardiac events. The flow stimulus for brachial artery FMD occurs as a result of the increased shear stress following deflation of an occlusion cuff around the upper arm. Using 2-dimensional ultrasound, changes in arterial diameter up to 5-minutes following cuff deflation are calculated from baseline image measurements. Along with pulsed Doppler measures of flow velocity through the artery, flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent vasodilation can be assessed. There is debate among investigators, however, about the proper positioning of the occlusion cuff during FMD testing. It is thought that placement of the cuff around the upper arm may not accurately reflect the impact of nitric oxide, a critically important molecule released as a result of the increased shear stress created by the FMD technique. Data suggest that the production of other endogenous metabolites may also contribute to FMD-related changes when positioning the cuff around the upper arm. To overcome the potential influence of such molecules, researchers now suggest that the occlusion cuff be placed below the elbow allowing a more precise estimate of nitric oxide mediated dilation. The purpose of this study is to compare the differences in FMD between the two methodologies of occlusion cuff placement. In addition, this study will determine the method that is easier for ultrasound technicians to perform and will produce a low coefficient of variance between technicians. Ultimately

  11. Double right coronary artery or split right coronary artery?

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Fu; Chien, Tsu-Ming; Chen, Chih-Wei; Lin, Ching-Cheng; Lee, Chee-Siong

    2012-02-09

    The prevalence of congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries (CAAs) is reported to be approximately 0.2-1.4% of the general population. Of them, The double right coronary artery (RCA) is one of the rarest coronary anomalies. Nonetheless, there is no consensus of the definition of a double RCA until now. Several concepts have been proposed in order to define what is and is not a double RCA. So far, it was been reported 37 times and in 44 cases after a comprehensive literature search through the PubMed database, using the keywords "double right coronary artery," "duplicated right coronary artery," "dual right coronary artery" and "split right coronary artery." Most of the published articles (28 of 37 articles) used the name "double right coronary artery." Nevertheless, some investigators contended that a split RCA is anatomically the same anomaly as the improperly named "double right coronary artery". The debate between those who favor "double RCA" and those who favor "split RCA" indicate the need for a consensus regarding the nomenclature as well diagnostic criteria of such coronary anomalies. It is the time we need to reach a consensus of the nomenclature of this congenital coronary anomaly. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dorsal Scapular Artery Variations and Relationship to the Brachial Plexus, and a Related Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Case

    PubMed Central

    Verenna, Anne-Marie A.; Alexandru, Daniela; Karimi, Afshin; Brown, Justin M.; Bove, Geoffrey M.; Daly, Frank J.; Pastore, Anthony M.; Pearson, Helen E.; Barbe, Mary F.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Knowledge of the relationship of the dorsal scapular artery (DSA) with the brachial plexus is limited. Objective We report a case of a variant DSA path, and revisit DSA origins and under-investigated relationship with the plexus in cadavers. Methods The DSA was examined in a male patient and 106 cadavers. Results In the case, we observed an unusual DSA compressing the lower plexus trunk, that resulted in intermittent radiating pain and paresthesia. In the cadavers, the DSA originated most commonly from the subclavian artery (71%), with 35% from the thyrocervical trunk. Nine sides of eight cadavers (seven females) had two DSA branches per side, with one branch from each origin. The most typical DSA path was a subclavian artery origin before passing between upper and middle brachial plexus trunks (40% of DSAs), versus between middle and lower trunks (23%), or inferior (4%) or superior to the plexus (1%). Following a thyrocervical trunk origin, the DSA passed most frequently superior to the plexus (23%), versus between middle and lower trunks (6%) or upper and middle trunks (4%). Bilateral symmetry in origin and path through the brachial plexus was observed in 13 of 35 females (37%) and 6 of 17 males (35%), with the most common bilateral finding of a subclavian artery origin and a path between upper and middle trunks (17%). Conclusion Variability in the relationship between DSA and trunks of the brachial plexus has surgical and clinical implications, such as diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome. PMID:28077957

  13. Brachial artery peak velocity variation to predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Although several parameters have been proposed to predict the hemodynamic response to fluid expansion in critically ill patients, most of them are invasive or require the use of special monitoring devices. The aim of this study is to determine whether noninvasive evaluation of respiratory variation of brachial artery peak velocity flow measured using Doppler ultrasound could predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. Methods We conducted a prospective clinical research in a 17-bed multidisciplinary ICU and included 38 mechanically ventilated patients for whom fluid administration was planned due to the presence of acute circulatory failure. Volume expansion (VE) was performed with 500 mL of a synthetic colloid. Patients were classified as responders if stroke volume index (SVi) increased ≥ 15% after VE. The respiratory variation in Vpeakbrach (ΔVpeakbrach) was calculated as the difference between maximum and minimum values of Vpeakbrach over a single respiratory cycle, divided by the mean of the two values and expressed as a percentage. Radial arterial pressure variation (ΔPPrad) and stroke volume variation measured using the FloTrac/Vigileo system (ΔSVVigileo), were also calculated. Results VE increased SVi by ≥ 15% in 19 patients (responders). At baseline, ΔVpeakbrach, ΔPPrad and ΔSVVigileo were significantly higher in responder than nonresponder patients [14 vs 8%; 18 vs. 5%; 13 vs 8%; P < 0.0001, respectively). A ΔVpeakbrach value >10% predicted fluid responsiveness with a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 95%. A ΔPPrad value >10% and a ΔSVVigileo >11% predicted volume responsiveness with a sensitivity of 95% and 79%, and a specificity of 95% and 89%, respectively. Conclusions Respiratory variations in brachial artery peak velocity could be a feasible tool for the noninvasive assessment of fluid responsiveness in patients with mechanical ventilatory support and acute circulatory failure. Trial Registration

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, brachial artery distensibility and blood pressure among children residing near an oil refinery

    PubMed Central

    Trasande, Leonardo; Urbina, Elaine M.; Khoder, Mamdouh; Alghamdi, Mansour; Shabaj, Ibrahim; Alam, Mohammed S.; Harrison, Roy M.; Shamy, Magdy

    2017-01-01

    Background Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are produced by the burning and processing of fuel oils, and have been associated with oxidant stress, insulin resistance and hypertension in adults. Few studies have examined whether adolescents are susceptible to cardiovascular effects of PAHs. Objective To study associations of PAH exposure with blood pressure (BP) and brachial artery distensibility (BAD), an early marker of arterial wall stiffness, in young boys attending three schools in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in varying proximity to an oil refinery. Methods Air samples collected from the three schools were analyzed for PAHs. PAH metabolites (total hydroxyphenanthrenes and 1-hydroxypyrene) were measured in urine samples from 184 adolescent males, in whom anthropometrics, heart rate, pulse pressure, brachial artery distensibility and blood pressure were measured. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariable analyses were performed to assess relationships of school location and urinary PAH metabolites with cardiovascular measures. Results Total suspended matter was significantly higher (444 ± 143 µg/m3) at the school near the refinery compared to a school located near a ring road (395 ± 65 µg/m3) and a school located away from vehicle traffic (232 ± 137 µg/m3), as were PAHs. Systolic (0.47 SD units, p = 0.006) and diastolic (0.53 SD units, p < 0.001) BP Z-scores were highest at the school near the refinery, with a 4.36-fold increase in prehypertension (p = 0.001), controlling for confounders. No differences in pulse pressure, BAD and heart rate were noted in relationship to school location. Urinary total hydroxyphenanthrenes and 1-hydroxypyrene were not associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Conclusions Proximity to an oil refinery in Saudi Arabia is associated with prehypertension and increases in PAH and particulate matter exposures. Further study including insulin resistance measurements, better control for confounding, and longitudinal measurement is

  15. Brachial artery adaptation to lower limb exercise training: role of shear stress.

    PubMed

    Birk, Gurpreet K; Dawson, Ellen A; Atkinson, Ceri; Haynes, Andrew; Cable, N Timothy; Thijssen, Dick H J; Green, Daniel J

    2012-05-01

    Lower limb exercise increases upper limb conduit artery blood flow and shear stress, and leg exercise training can enhance upper limb vascular function. We therefore examined the contribution of shear stress to changes in vascular function in the nonexercising upper limbs in response to lower limb cycling exercise training. Initially, five male subjects underwent bilateral brachial artery duplex ultrasound to measure blood flow and shear responses to 30-min cycling exercise at 80% of maximal heart rate. Responses in one forearm were significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated via cuff inflation throughout the exercise bout. An additional 11 subjects participated in an 8-wk cycle training study undertaken at a similar intensity, with unilateral cuff inflation around the forearm during each exercise bout. Bilateral brachial artery flow-mediated dilation responses to a 5-min ischemic stimulus (FMD%), an ischemic handgrip exercise stimulus (iEX), and endothelium-independent NO donor administration [glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)] were measured at 2, 4, and 8 wk. Cycle training increased FMD% in the noncuffed limb at week 2, after which time responses returned toward baseline levels (5.8 ± 4.1, 8.6 ± 3.8, 7.4 ± 3.5, 6.0 ± 2.3 at 0, 2, 4 and 8 wk, respectively; ANOVA: P = 0.04). No changes in FMD% were observed in the cuffed arm. No changes were evident in response to iEX or GTN in either the cuffed or noncuffed arms (P > 0.05) across the 8-wk intervention period. Our data suggest that lower limb cycle training induces a transient increase in upper limb vascular function in healthy young humans, which is, at least partly, mediated via shear stress.

  16. Sensitivity and Specificity of the Toe-Brachial Index for Detecting Peripheral Arterial Disease: Initial Findings.

    PubMed

    Tehan, Peta; Bray, Alan; Keech, Ruth; Rounsley, Richard; Carruthers, Angela; Chuter, Vivienne Helaine

    2015-10-01

    The toe-brachial index (TBI) is an alternative to the ankle-brachial index (ABI) in screening for peripheral arterial disease (PAD); however, there is limited evidence comparing their diagnostic accuracy. This study compared the diagnostic accuracy of the ABI and TBI in a population at risk of PAD. The sensitivity and specificity of the ABI and TBI were determined by color duplex sonography. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. A total of 119 participants were recruited (75 male and 44 female). The sensitivity for PAD was highest for the TBI (71%; ABI, 45%), and the specificity was highest for the ABI (93%; TBI, 78%). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated that the TBI (ROC area, 0.77; P = .0001) had greater clinical efficacy for diagnosis of PAD than the ABI (ROC area, 0.65; P = .005). In specific populations, the TBI may have greater clinical efficacy than the ABI for diagnosis of PAD. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  17. Endovascular salvage of a right brachial artery-right atrium hemodialysis graft using a covered endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Ismail, Nyla; Reardon, Michael J; Peden, Eric K

    2012-01-01

    Creation of a functional hemodialysis access in patients with exhausted peripheral access sites and concomitant central venous occlusive disease (CVOD) is a multifaceted challenge; often requiring complex, innovative solutions, not without their own complications. We present a 57-year-old hemodialysis patient with a history of hypercoagulable disorder and multiple failed arteriovenous accesses. Because of inadequate peripheral access sites and chronic occlusions in superior vena cava, brachiocephalic veins and inferior vena cava, in addition to multiple transhepatic catheter related issues; we decided to perform a right brachial artery to right atrium (RA) hemodialysis graft. The access was used without complications for 18 months at which point he had his first episode of thrombosis; open thrombectomy and percutaneous balloon angioplasty (PTA) at the atrial anastomosis were done with success. The following three months, he endured two more thrombectomies and PTAs. During the last intervention we performed an intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) through the atrial anastomosis, which demonstrated stenosis; and the decision was made to extend the outflow anastomosis with a covered stent into the atrium. Therefore a 10 cm x 10 mm Viabahn stent-graft (W. L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz.) was deployed and post dilated with 8 mm balloon within the graft component. Repeat injection and Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) demonstrated significant improvement and free outflow. The brachial-RA hemodialysis graft could be use immediately and at 5 months has remained fully functional and no reinterventions have been necessary.

  18. Correlation between ankle brachial index and coronary artery disease severity in elderly Egyptians.

    PubMed

    Amer, Moatasem S; Tawfik, Heba Mohamed; Elmoteleb, Ayman M Abd; Maamoun, Manar M A

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the association between ankle brachial index (ABI) and coronary heart disease (CHD) severity in elderly Egyptians using different measures. We conducted a case-control study from November 2010 to June 2012 including 200 male and female patients with ischemia≥60 years who were divided into 100 cases and 100 controls according to ABI and redivided according to age. They underwent coronary angiography followed by ABI measurement using a hand-held Doppler. The CHD severity was estimated using the SYNTAX and Jeopardy scores and number of diseased vessels, which increased significantly in patients with peripheral artery disease (P<.001) for all. All 3 measures had strong negative correlation with ABI (P≤.001 for Jeopardy, <.001 for SYNTAX scores, and .004 for number of diseased vessels) and were correlated with each other. We concluded that ABI can reflect CHD severity in elderly Egyptians.

  19. Unrecognized high brachial artery bifurcation is associated with higher rate of dialysis access failure.

    PubMed

    Kirksey, Lee

    2011-01-01

    A thorough consideration of all factors contributing to successful dialysis access creation is necessary to achieve optimal outcomes. A high bifurcation of the brachial artery (brachioradial variant) occurs in greater than 20% of patients. Dialysis access was created in 22 limbs with this variant--15 fistula, and 7 prosthetic grafts. Nonmaturation occurred in 33% of fistula. Early thromboses occurred in 29% of prosthetic bridge grafts. In this experience, the brachioradial variant is associated with a relatively higher rate of fistula nonmaturation and prosthetic graft thromboses. These findings reinforce the critical role of preoperative imaging studies in dialysis access creation. A sound algorithm for the surgical management of the brachioradial variation facilitates decision making and will improve dialysis access outcomes.

  20. Associations of Depressive Symptoms and Brachial Artery Reactivity among Police Officers

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Luenda E; Gu, Ja K; Burchfiel, Cecil M; Andrew, Michael E; Joseph, Parveen N; Dorn, Joan M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Mental health has been shown to be linked with certain underlying physiological mechanisms. The objective of this cross sectional study was to investigate the relationship between depressive symptoms and brachial artery reactivity (BAR) in an understudied population: police officers. Methods Participants were 351 police officers who were clinically examined in the Buffalo Cardio-Metabolic Police Stress (BCOPS) study. BAR was performed using standard B-Mode ultrasound procedures. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale. Mean values of the difference between the baseline and maximum diameters of the brachial artery were determined across three categories of CES-D score using the analysis of variance and the analysis of covariance. p-values for linear trends were obtained from linear regression models. Results The mean age (± standard deviation) of all officers was 40.9 ± 7.2 years. Women had a slightly higher mean CES-D score than men (8.9 ± 8.9 vs. 7.4 ± 6.4) and a slightly higher percentage increase of BAR than men (6.90 vs. 5.26%). Smoking status significantly modified the associations between depressive symptoms and BAR. Among current smokers, mean absolute values of BAR significantly decreased as depressive symptoms increased after adjustment for age, gender, race/ethnicity, hypertension, and diabetes; the multivariate-adjusted p-values were 0.033 (absolute) and 0.040 (%). Associations between depressive symptoms and BAR were not statistically significant among former smokers or never smokers. Conclusion Depressive symptoms were inversely associated with BAR among police officers who were current smokers and together may be considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease among police officers. Further prospective research is warranted. PMID:23516114

  1. Impaired handgrip exercise-induced brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in young obese males.

    PubMed

    Slattery, David J; Stuckless, Troy J R; King, Trevor J; Pyke, Kyra E

    2016-05-01

    Flow mediated dilation (FMD) stimulated by different shear stress stimulus profiles may recruit distinct transduction mechanisms, and provide distinct information regarding endothelial function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether obesity influences brachial artery FMD differently depending on the shear stress profile used for FMD assessment. The FMD response to a brief, intermediate, and sustained shear stress profile was assessed in obese (n = 9) and lean (n = 19) young men as follows: brief stimulus, standard reactive hyperemia (RH) following a 5 min forearm occlusion (5 min RH); intermediate stimulus, RH following a 15 min forearm occlusion (15 min RH); sustained stimulus, 10 min of handgrip exercise (HGEX). Brachial artery diameter and mean shear stress were assessed using echo and Doppler ultrasound, respectively, during each FMD test. There was no group difference in HGEX shear stress (p = 0.390); however, the obese group had a lower HGEX-FMD (5.2 ± 3.0% versus 11.5 ± 4.4%, p < 0.001). There was no group difference in 5 min RH-FMD (p = 0.466) or 15 min RH-FMD (p = 0.181); however, the shear stress stimulus was larger in the obese group. After normalization to the stimulus the 15 min RH-FMD (p = 0.002), but not the 5 min RH-FMD (p = 0.118) was lower in the obese group. These data suggest that obesity may have a more pronounced impact on the endothelium's ability to respond to prolonged increases in shear stress.

  2. Prevalence of Tibial Artery and Pedal Arch Patency by Angiography in Patients With Critical Limb Ischemia and Noncompressible Ankle Brachial Index.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Mandeep Singh; Reed, Grant W; Grafmiller, Kevin; Gornik, Heather L; Shishehbor, Mehdi H

    2017-05-01

    Approximately 20% of patients undergoing ankle brachial index testing for critical limb ischemia have noncompressible vessels because of tibial artery calcification. This represents a clinical challenge in determining tibial artery patency. We sought to identify the prevalence of tibial artery and pedal arch patency by angiography in these patients. One hundred twenty-five limbs (of 89 patients) with critical limb ischemia and ankle brachial index ≥1.4 who underwent lower extremity angiograms within 1 year were included. Reviewers of angiography were blinded to results of physiological testing. Tibial artery vessels were classified as completely occluded, significantly stenosed (≥50%), or patent (<50% stenosis). The sensitivity of toe brachial index and pulse volume recording to predict tibial artery disease was also determined. Of 125 limbs with noncompressible ankle brachial index, 72 (57.6%) anterior tibial and 80 (64%) posterior tibial arteries were occluded. Another 23 (18.4%) anterior tibial and 13 (10.4%) posterior tibial arteries had ≥50% stenosis. Pulse volume recording was moderate to severely dampened in 54 of 119 (45.4%) limbs. Toe brachial index <0.7 was found in 75 of 83 (90.4%) limbs. Moderate to severe pulse volume recording dampening was 43.6% sensitive, whereas toe brachial index <0.7 was 89.7% sensitive in diagnosing occluded or significantly stenotic tibial artery disease. The pedal arch was absent or incomplete in 86 of 103 (83.5%) limbs. Among patients with critical limb ischemia and noncompressible ankle brachial index results, the prevalence of occlusive tibial and pedal arch disease is very high. Toe brachial index <0.7 is more sensitive in diagnosing occluded and significantly stenotic tibial artery disease in these patients compared with ankle pulse volume recording. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Serum amyloid P (SAP) is associated with impaired brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in chronically HIV-1 infected adults on stable antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Zungsontiporn, Nath; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Mitchell, Brooks I; Stein, James H; Kallianpur, Kalpana J; Nakamoto, Beau; Keating, Sheila M; Norris, Philip J; Souza, Scott A; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Chow, Dominic C

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and endothelial dysfunction (ED), as measured by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). We conducted a cross-sectional analysis utilizing baseline data of 135 participants with HIV infection on stable antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the Hawaii Aging with HIV-Cardiovascular (HAHC-CVD) study who had available baseline inflammatory biomarkers and brachial artery FMD measurements. We observed significant associations between brachial artery FMD and baseline brachial artery diameter, age, male gender, traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors such as BMI, waist to hip ratio, hypertension, systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, and LDL cholesterol, and 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk estimated by Framingham risk score (FRS). Of all biomarkers tested, higher level of C-reactive protein (CRP) (beta =  - 0.695, P = 0.030) and serum amyloid P (SAP) (beta =  - 1.318, P = 0.021) were significantly associated with lower brachial artery FMD in univariable regression analysis. After adjusting for baseline brachial artery diameter, age, and selected traditional CVD risk factors in multivariable model, SAP remained significantly associated with brachial artery FMD (beta =  - 1.094, P = 0.030), while CRP was not (beta =  - 0.391, P = 0.181). Serum amyloid P was independently associated with impaired brachial artery FMD and may potentially relate to ED and increased CVD risk in HIV-infected patients on stable ART.

  4. Effects of handgrip training with venous restriction on brachial artery vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Credeur, Daniel P; Hollis, Brandon C; Welsch, Michael A

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that resistance training with restricted venous blood flow (Kaatsu) results in significant strength gains and muscle hypertrophy. However, few studies have examined the concurrent vascular responses following restrictive venous blood flow training protocols. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 4 wk of handgrip exercise training, with and without venous restriction, on handgrip strength and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (BAFMD). Twelve participants (mean +/- SD: age = 22 +/- 1 yr, men = 5, women = 7) completed 4 wk of bilateral handgrip exercise training (duration = 20 min, intensity = 60% of the maximum voluntary contraction, cadence = 15 grips per minute, frequency = three sessions per week). During each session, venous blood flow was restricted in one arm (experimental (EXP) arm) using a pneumatic cuff placed 4 cm proximal to the antecubital fossa and inflated to 80 mm Hg for the duration of each exercise session. The EXP and the control (CON) arms were randomly selected. Handgrip strength was measured using a hydraulic hand dynamometer. Brachial diameters and blood velocity profiles were assessed, using Doppler ultrasonography, before and after 5 min of forearm occlusion (200 mm Hg) before and at the end of the 4-wk exercise. After exercise training, handgrip strength increased 8.32% (P = 0.05) in the CON arm and 16.17% (P = 0.05) in the EXP arm. BAFMD increased 24.19% (P = 0.0001) in the CON arm and decreased 30.36% (P = 0.0001) in the EXP arm. The data indicate handgrip training combined with venous restriction results in superior strength gains but reduced BAFMD compared with the nonrestricted arm.

  5. Factors affecting the validity of the oscillometric ankle brachial index to detect peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Herráiz-Adillo, Ángel; Cavero-Redondo, Iván; Álvarez-Bueno, Celia; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Pozuelo-Carrascosa, Diana P; Notario-Pacheco, Blanca

    2017-09-08

    The use of oscillometric ankle brachial index (ABI) to diagnose peripheral arterial disease (PAD) has raised concern, especially due to a lack of agreement and sensitivity. This study aimed to evaluate those factors affecting the validity of oscillometric ABI in comparison to Doppler ABI to detect PAD. Through univariate and multivariate linear regression, we studied those factors affecting the differences between oscillometric and Doppler ABI; through univariate and multivariate logistic regression we analyzed the false negative rate of oscillometric ABI to detect PAD. We analyzed 197 consecutive subjects (394 legs) from two settings: Primary Care and Vascular Service. The means of oscillometric ABI and Doppler ABI were 1.094 (95%CI: 0.843-1.345) and 1.073 (95%CI: 0.769-1.374) (p<0.001), respectively. In men, covariates explaining the differences between oscillometric and Doppler ABI were Doppler ankle blood pressure (β=‒0.610, p<0.001), ankle circumference (β=0.176, p=0.004) and oscillometric brachial blood pressure (β=0.136, p=0.037); in women, those were weight (β=0.351, p<0.001) and Doppler ankle blood pressure (β=‒0.318, p<0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of oscillometric ABI to detect PAD were 80.6% and 97.4%, respectively, and covariates explaining the rate of false negatives in PAD population were setting (Exp(β)=17.21, p=0.009) and tobacco (packs/year) (Exp(β)=1.049, p=0.002). Although some factors influencing the lack of agreement between oscillometric and Doppler ABI were identified, the correction of oscillometric ABI seems impractical, since Doppler is needed, the bias is not always uniformly distributed and its clinical relevance is small. According to sensitivity, borderline oscillometric ABI in Primary Care settings and smokers suggest PAD.

  6. Effects of Handgrip Training With Venous Restriction on Brachial Artery Vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Credeur, Daniel P.; Hollis, Brandon C.; Welsch, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that resistance training with restricted venous blood flow (Kaatsu) results in significant strength gains and muscle hypertrophy. However, few studies have examined the concurrent vascular responses following restrictive venous blood flow training protocols. Purpose To examine the effects of 4 weeks of handgrip exercise training, with and without venous restriction, on handgrip strength and brachial artery flow mediated dilation (BAFMD). Methods Twelve participants (age=22±1yr; male = 5, female = 7), completed 4 weeks of bilateral handgrip exercise training (Duration: 20 min; Intensity: 60% of the MVC; Cadence: 15 grips*min−1; Frequency: 3 sessions*week−1). During each session venous blood flow was restricted in one arm (Experimental arm = EXP) using a pneumatic cuff placed 4 cm proximal to the antecubital fossa, and inflated to 80 mmHg for the duration of each exercise session. The EXP and control (CON) arm were randomly selected. Handgrip strength was measured using a hydraulic hand dynamometer. Brachial diameters and blood velocity profiles were assessed, using Doppler ultrasonography, before and after 5 min of forearm occlusion (200 mmHg), prior to and at the end of 4 weeks exercise. Results Following exercise training, handgrip strength increased 8.32% (p=0.05) in the CON arm and 16.17% (p=0.05) in the EXP arm. BAFMD increased 24.19% (p=0.0001) in the CON arm, and decreased 30.36% (p=0.0001) in the EXP arm. Conclusion The data indicate handgrip training combined with venous restriction results in superior strength gains, but reduced BAFMD compared to the non-restricted arm. PMID:20019641

  7. Double free-muscle transfer to restore prehension following complete brachial plexus avulsion.

    PubMed

    Doi, K; Sakai, K; Kuwata, N; Ihara, K; Kawai, S

    1995-05-01

    Restoration of finger flexion and extension as well as elbow flexion and extension with a double free-muscle and multiple nerve transfers following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus (nerve roots C5 to T1) is reported. The procedure combines (1) free-muscle transfer with reinnervation by the spinal accessory nerve to achieve elbow flexion and finger extension, (2) free-muscle transfer with reinnervation by the fifth and sixth intercostal nerves to restore finger flexion, (3) third and fourth intercostal motor nerve transfer to the triceps brachi to extend and stabilize the elbow, (4) nerve transfer of the supraclavicular nerve or nerve transfer of the sensory rami of the intercostal nerves to the median nerve to restore hand sensibility, and (5) glenohumeral arthrodesis. Seven of 10 patients recovered elbow function and finger flexion and extension. Five patients reported use of their hand in activities of daily living.

  8. Retraction Statement: Unrecognized High Brachial Artery Bifurcation is Associated with Higher Rate of Dialysis Access by Dr. Lee Kirksey.

    PubMed

    2017-03-01

    The above article from Seminars in Dialysis, published online on 4 September 2011 in Wiley Online Library (http://wileyonlinelibrary.com) has been retracted by agreement among the journal's Editor-in-Chief, Richard A. Sherman MD, the journal's North American editor of ASDIN content at the time, Arif Asif MD, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The decision to retract was agreed upon following notification by Dr. HeeJun Yang, the author of an article published in 2008, "Variations of the Superficial Brachial Artery in Korean Cadavers." Figure 1 (A & B) and Figure 2 (A-C) in the Kirksey article (1), which originally appeared in the 2008 article by Dr. Yang, were used without authorization or permission from Dr. Yang or the article's publisher. Reference Kirksey L: Unrecognized high brachial artery bifurcation is associated with higher rate of dialysis access. Semin Dial 24(6):698-702, 2011. doi: 10.1111/j.1525-139X.2011.00923.x.

  9. Brachial Artery Transection After a Closed Traumatic Isolated Medial Epicondyle Fracture in a Pediatric Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Brandon S; Paryavi, Ebrahim; Eglseder, W Andrew; Pensy, Raymond A; Abzug, Joshua M

    2017-09-01

    Medial epicondyle fractures in pediatric patients might be associated with an occult elbow dislocation and neurovascular damage. A single case of a medial epicondyle fracture presenting with brachial artery transection was reviewed. Presentation, clinical course, and early outcome are reported. A 14-year-old patient presenting with an apparently isolated medial epicondyle fracture was found to have examination and diagnostic test findings consistent with brachial artery transection. His injury was explored and repaired acutely, resulting in acute return of perfusion. Final follow-up revealed 0° to 130° of flexion-extension arc of motion and full pronation and supination with normal sensory and motor function of the hand. Pediatric medial epicondyle fractures should alert the clinician to the possibility of an occult dislocation of the elbow, and a full neurovascular assessment should be performed. Early recognition and repair of a vascular injury associated with this fracture can lead to a good outcome.

  10. Improved analysis of brachial artery ultrasound using a novel edge-detection software system.

    PubMed

    Woodman, R J; Playford, D A; Watts, G F; Cheetham, C; Reed, C; Taylor, R R; Puddey, I B; Beilin, L J; Burke, V; Mori, T A; Green, D

    2001-08-01

    Brachial artery ultrasound is commonly employed for noninvasive assessment of endothelial function. However, analysis is observer dependent and susceptible to errors. We describe studies on a computerized edge-detection and wall-tracking software program to allow more accurate and reproducible measurement. In study 1, three purpose-built Perspex phantom arteries, 3.00, 4.00, and 6.00 mm in diameter, were measured with the software. There was a mean bias of 11 microm (P < 0.001 at each level) between known and measured values; the mean resolving power of the software was estimated as 8.3 microm. In study 2, the mean intraobserver coefficient of variation of repeated measures of flow-mediated dilation (FMD) using the software (6.7%) was significantly lower than that for traditional manual measurements using the intima-lumen interfaces (24.8%, P < 0.05) and intima-media interfaces (32.5%, P < 0.05). In study 3, 24 healthy volunteers underwent repeat testing twice within 1 wk; the coefficients of variation for between-visit reproducibility of FMD and response to glyceryl trinitrate using the software were 14.7 and 17.6%, respectively. Assuming 80% power and an alpha of 0.05, eight subjects with matched controls would be required, in a parallel designed study, to detect an absolute 2.5% change in FMD. In summary, we have developed a semiautomated computerized vascular ultrasound analysis system that will improve the power of clinical intervention studies to detect small changes in arterial diameter.

  11. A comparison of Doppler waveform parameters versus flow-mediated vascular dilation of the brachial artery in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Landres, Inna V; Small, Maria; Sirjusingh, Adesh; Ramsewak, Samuel; Williams, Keith P

    2014-07-01

    Flow mediated dilation of the brachial artery is impaired with endothelial dysfunction. We previously identified that brachial artery waveforms were changed in preeclamptic women. We therefore sought to compare Doppler waveform analysis with flow mediated vascular dilation (FMVD) measurements in pregnant women. A cross sectional study of 71 pregnant women at >20weeks gestation comparing FMVD measurements with Doppler waveform parameters was performed. Research was conducted at three hospitals and two geographic settings; (1) Yale-New Haven Hospital in New Haven, CT, (2) Mount Hope Maternity and (3) Port of Spain General Hospital in Trinidad. Brachial artery Doppler waveform measurements were done at baseline and 90s post cuff-release. From the Doppler waveforms we assessed percent change in Peak Systolic Velocity (% ΔPSV), systolic acceleration, acceleration time and pulsatility index and compared them with the percent change in FMVD. Statistical analysis using Student's t tests and correlation coefficient was done as necessary. Correlation analysis between the % change in the Doppler waveform parameters and the % change in mean FMVD identified only the waveform parameter of % ΔPSV as significantly correlated (p=0.040). FMVD remains the gold standard for assessment of endothelial dysfunction. A correlation was observed between the Doppler measured % ΔPSV and FMVD, which may allow it to be used to assess endothelial dysfunction changes under different conditions was identified. Copyright © 2014 International Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-invasive assessment of peripheral arterial disease: Automated ankle brachial index measurement and pulse volume analysis compared to duplex scan.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jane Ea; Williams, Paul; Davies, Jane H

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to individually and cumulatively compare sensitivity and specificity of the (1) ankle brachial index and (2) pulse volume waveform analysis recorded by the same automated device, with the presence or absence of peripheral arterial disease being verified by ultrasound duplex scan. Patients (n=205) referred for lower limb arterial assessment underwent ankle brachial index measurement and pulse volume waveform recording using volume plethysmography, followed by ultrasound duplex scan. The presence of peripheral arterial disease was recorded if ankle brachial index <0.9; pulse volume waveform was graded as 2, 3 or 4; or if haemodynamically significant stenosis >50% was evident with ultrasound duplex scan. Outcome measure was agreement between the measured ankle brachial index and interpretation of pulse volume waveform for peripheral arterial disease diagnosis, using ultrasound duplex scan as the reference standard. Sensitivity of ankle brachial index was 79%, specificity 91% and overall accuracy 88%. Pulse volume waveform sensitivity was 97%, specificity 81% and overall accuracy 85%. The combined sensitivity of ankle brachial index and pulse volume waveform was 100%, specificity 76% and overall accuracy 85%. Combining these two diagnostic modalities within one device provided a highly accurate method of ruling out peripheral arterial disease, which could be utilised in primary care to safely reduce unnecessary secondary care referrals.

  13. Brachial artery responses to ambient pollution, temperature, and humidity in people with type 2 diabetes: a repeated-measures study.

    PubMed

    Zanobetti, Antonella; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Horton, Edward S; Cohen, Allison; Coull, Brent A; Hoffmann, Barbara; Schwartz, Joel D; Mittleman, Murray A; Li, Yongsheng; Stone, Peter H; de Souza, Celine; Lamparello, Brooke; Koutrakis, Petros; Gold, Diane R

    2014-03-01

    Extreme weather and air pollution are associated with increased cardiovascular risk in people with diabetes. In a population with diabetes, we conducted a novel assessment of vascular brachial artery responses both to ambient pollution and to weather (temperature and water vapor pressure, a measure of humidity). Sixty-four 49- to 85-year-old Boston residents with type 2 diabetes completed up to five study visits (279 repeated measures). Brachial artery diameter (BAD) was measured by ultrasound before and after brachial artery occlusion [i.e., flow-mediated dilation (FMD)] and before and after nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NMD). Ambient concentrations of fine particulate mass (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon, particle number, and sulfate were measured at our monitoring site; ambient concentrations of carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone were obtained from state monitors. Particle exposure in the home and during each trip to the clinic (home/trip exposure) was measured continuously and as a 5-day integrated sample. We used linear models with fixed effects for participants, adjusting for date, season, temperature, and water vapor pressure on the day of each visit, to estimate associations between our outcomes and interquartile range increases in exposure. Baseline BAD was negatively associated with particle pollution, including home/trip-integrated BC (-0.02 mm; 95% CI: -0.04, -0.003, for a 0.28 μg/m3 increase in BC), OC (-0.08 mm; 95% CI: -0.14, -0.03, for a 1.61 μg/m3 increase) as well as PM2.5, 5-day average ambient PM2.5, and BC. BAD was positively associated with ambient temperature and water vapor pressure. However, exposures were not consistently associated with FMD or NMD. Brachial artery diameter, a predictor of cardiovascular risk, decreased in association with particle pollution and increased in association with ambient temperature in our study population of adults with type 2 diabetes. Zanobetti A, Luttmann

  14. Hyperemic response of the brachial artery during the second half of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Veille, J C; Gorsuch, L; Weeks, W; Zaccaro, D

    1998-01-01

    To determine if women who developed preeclampsia had measurable differences in the vascular response postrelease of a 1-minute blood flow occlusion. A total of 33 nulliparous patients were enrolled in this study during the second half of the pregnancy. All had baseline Doppler flow velocities while resting in the left lateral decubitus. Subsequently, a blood pressure cuff was inflated for 60 seconds in the forearm so as to occlude blood flow. Doppler waveforms were analyzed immediately after the release of the blood pressure cuff and on a single beat occurring at 15 second intervals for a total of five readings. After a rest period, patients were asked to squeeze a handheld manometer at maximum strength as long as possible. Doppler waveforms were analyzed as above. The Doppler waveforms of all enrolled patients who subsequently developed preeclampsia any time after the study were compared to those who remained normotensive. 1) The "hyperemic response" that occurred immediately after release of the blood pressure occlusion of the forearm was significantly different between patients who subsequently developed preeclampsia compared with those who remained normotensive, 2) the hyperemic response that occurred after the isometric handgrip exercise was not significantly different between the two groups, and 3) sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values were high, but positive predictive values were low. There was a significant difference in the hyperemic response of the brachial artery to a short period of ischemia of the forearm (blood pressure occlusion) between normotensive patients and a group of patients who subsequently developed preeclampsia.

  15. Stroke volume obtained by electrical interrogation of the brachial artery: transbrachial electrical bioimpedance velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Donald P; Henry, Isaac C; Banet, Mathew J; Dittrich, Teri

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this study is to measure left ventricular stroke volume (SV) from the brachial artery (BA) using electrical bioimpedance. Doppler-derived SV was used for comparison. Twenty-nine healthy adults were recruited for study. Doppler echocardiographic-derived SV was obtained from the product of distal left ventricular outflow tract cross-sectional area and systolic velocity integral. SV from the BA was obtained by transbrachial electrical bioimpedance velocimetry (TBEV). Application of a current field across the left brachium was effected by injection of a constant magnitude, high frequency, low amperage, alternating current. Therein, a static voltage (U(0)) and pulsatile voltage change (ΔU(t)) were measured and converted to their corresponding impedances, Z(0) and ΔZ(t). TBEV-derived SV was obtained by multiplying a square root value of the normalized, acceleration-based, peak first time derivative of ΔZ(t) by a volume conductor and systolic flow time. Inter-method agreement was determined by the Bland-Altman method. To assess the contribution of blood resistivity variations to ΔZ(t), BA diameters were measured at end-diastole and peak systolic expansion. Results indicate that since the BA demonstrates parabolic, laminar flow, with minimal diameter changes, blood resistivity variations are likely responsible for the derived impedance changes. Bland-Altman analysis shows that SV is obtainable by TBEV from healthy humans at rest. © 2012 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine

  16. [Brachial artery pseudoaneurysm: a rare but serious complication in hemodialysis patients with arteriovenous fistula].

    PubMed

    Mancini, Andrea; Castriotta, Giuseppe; Angelini, Pernina; Bozzi, Michele; Giancaspro, Vincenzo; La Raia, Elvira; Nisi, Maria Teresa; Proscia, Anna Rita; Tarantino, Giuseppe; Vitale, Ottavia; Cuzzola, Cristoforo

    2017-06-01

    A pseudoaneurysm or false aneurysm of the brachial artery is an uncommon occurrence in patients receiving hemodialysis with arteriovenous fistula (AVF). We describe the case of a 76-year-old woman presenting with a large, tender, pulsatile mass in the right antecubital region 10 cm from the AVF. B-mode ultrasound examination revealed a saccular hematoma. Color doppler showed a recirculation movement of blood, creating a two colors image called "Korean flag". The patient was transferred to the surgical unit where she first underwent ultrasound-guided compression and then surgical repair of the pseudoaneurysm. Two weeks after surgery the AVF was used again as an access for hemodialysis. Differentiating between a false and a true aneurysm based on ultrasound is not always straightforward. Doppler ultrasound findings can be decisive for the early diagnosis of a pseudoaneurysm to ensure proper treatment planning given the dangerous complications of ruptures. Treatment options include: compression, percutaneous thrombin injection, endovascular exclusion with covered stents, aneurysmectomy and surgical repair. Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  17. The Effects of Exercise Training on Brachial Artery Flow-Mediated Dilation: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Early, Kate S; Stewart, Abigail; Johannsen, Neil; Lavie, Carl J; Thomas, Jerry R; Welsch, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Flow-mediated dilation, a barometer of cardiovascular (CV) health, is reported to increase with exercise training (ET); however, the potential moderating factors of ET are not clear to date. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ET assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (BAFMD). Authors searched PubMed between January 1999 and December 2013, bibliographies, and reviews to identify studies examining ET and BAFMD. Two independent reviewers extracted quality, descriptive, exercise, and outcome data of eligible studies. Data were presented as weighted effect sizes (ESs) and 95% confidence limits. Analysis included 66 studies reporting BAFMD data (1865 ET and 635 control subjects). Overall, ET had significant improvements in BAFMD compared with controls (P < .0001). Exercise training at higher ET intensities resulted in a greater increase in BAFMD (9.29; 95% CI, 5.09-13.47) than lower ET intensities (3.63; 95% CI, -0.56 to 7.83) or control (-0.42; 95% CI, -2.06 to 1.21). Subjects whose ET duration was ≥150 min/wk (11.33; 95% CI, 7.15-15.51) had a significant improvement in BAFMD compared with those with <150 min/wk (4.79; 95% CI, 3.08-6.51) or control (-0.30; 95% CI, -1.99 to 1.39). Age (P = .11) and baseline artery diameter (P = .31) did not modify the BAFMD response to ET. Exercise training contributes to a significant increase in BAFMD. These results provide indirect evidence that ET alters a well-known factor associated with the primary and secondary prevention of CV diseases. Exercise training interventions, including greater intensity and duration, may optimize the increase in BAFMD.

  18. Contribution of nitric oxide to brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Wray, D. Walter; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J.; Conklin, Jamie D.; Reese, Van; Richardson, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    The reduction in nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vascular function with age has largely been determined by flow-mediated dilation (FMD). However, in light of recent uncertainty surrounding the NO dependency of FMD and the recognition that brachial artery (BA) vasodilation during handgrip exercise is predominantly NO-mediated in the young, we sought to determine the contribution of NO to BA vasodilation in the elderly using the handgrip paradigm. BA vasodilation during progressive dynamic (1 Hz) handgrip exercise performed at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg was assessed with and without NO synthase (NOS) inhibition [intra-arterial NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA)] in seven healthy older subjects (69 ± 2 yr). Handgrip exercise in the control condition evoked significant BA vasodilation at 6 (4.7 ± 1.4%), 9 (6.5 ± 2.2%), and 12 kg (9.5 ± 2.7%). NOS inhibition attenuated BA vasodilation, as the first measurable increase in BA diameter did not occur until 9 kg (4.0 ± 1.8%), and the change in BA diameter at 12 kg was reduced by ∼30% (5.1 ± 2.2%), with unaltered shear rate (Control: 407 ± 57, l-NMMA: 427 ± 67 s−1). Although shifted downward, the slope of the relationship between BA diameter and shear rate during handgrip exercise was unchanged (Control: 0.0013 ± 0.0004, l-NMMA: 0.0011 ± 0.007, P = 0.6) as a consequence of NOS inhibition. Thus, progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly evokes a robust BA vasodilation, the magnitude of which was only minimally attenuated following NOS inhibition. This modest contribution of NO to BA vasodilation in the elderly supports the use of the handgrip exercise paradigm to assess NO-dependent vasodilation across the life span. PMID:23948773

  19. Contribution of nitric oxide to brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Trinity, Joel D; Wray, D Walter; Witman, Melissa A H; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Reese, Van; Richardson, Russell S

    2013-10-15

    The reduction in nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vascular function with age has largely been determined by flow-mediated dilation (FMD). However, in light of recent uncertainty surrounding the NO dependency of FMD and the recognition that brachial artery (BA) vasodilation during handgrip exercise is predominantly NO-mediated in the young, we sought to determine the contribution of NO to BA vasodilation in the elderly using the handgrip paradigm. BA vasodilation during progressive dynamic (1 Hz) handgrip exercise performed at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg was assessed with and without NO synthase (NOS) inhibition [intra-arterial N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA)] in seven healthy older subjects (69 ± 2 yr). Handgrip exercise in the control condition evoked significant BA vasodilation at 6 (4.7 ± 1.4%), 9 (6.5 ± 2.2%), and 12 kg (9.5 ± 2.7%). NOS inhibition attenuated BA vasodilation, as the first measurable increase in BA diameter did not occur until 9 kg (4.0 ± 1.8%), and the change in BA diameter at 12 kg was reduced by ∼30% (5.1 ± 2.2%), with unaltered shear rate ( 407 ± 57, l-NMMA: 427 ± 67 s(-1)). Although shifted downward, the slope of the relationship between BA diameter and shear rate during handgrip exercise was unchanged ( 0.0013 ± 0.0004, l-NMMA: 0.0011 ± 0.007, P = 0.6) as a consequence of NOS inhibition. Thus, progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly evokes a robust BA vasodilation, the magnitude of which was only minimally attenuated following NOS inhibition. This modest contribution of NO to BA vasodilation in the elderly supports the use of the handgrip exercise paradigm to assess NO-dependent vasodilation across the life span.

  20. Numerical validation of a new method to assess aortic pulse wave velocity from a single recording of a brachial artery waveform with an occluding cuff.

    PubMed

    Trachet, B; Reymond, P; Kips, J; Swillens, A; De Buyzere, M; Suys, B; Stergiopulos, N; Segers, P

    2010-03-01

    Recently a new method has been proposed as a tool to measure arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of the stiffness of the large arteries and an emerging parameter used as indicator of clinical cardiovascular risk. The method is based on measurement of brachial blood pressure during supra-systolic pressure inflation of a simple brachial cuff [the device is known as the Arteriograph (Tensiomed, Budapest, Hungary)]. This occlusion yields pronounced first and secondary peaks in the pressure waveform, the latter ascribed to a reflection from the aortic bifurcation, and PWV is calculated as the ratio of twice the jugulum-symphysis distance and the time difference between the two peaks. To test the validity of this working principle, we used a numerical model of the arterial tree to simulate pressures and flows in the normal configuration, and in a configuration with an occluded brachial artery. A pronounced secondary peak was indeed found in the brachial pressure signal of the occluded model, but its timing was only related to brachial stiffness and not to aortic stiffness. We also compared PWV's calculated with three different methods: PWVATG (approximately Arteriograph principle), PWVcar-fem (approximately carotid-femoral PWV, the current clinical gold standard method), and PWVtheor (approximately Bramwell-Hill equation). Both PWVATG (R2=0.94) and PWVcar-fem (R2=0.95) correlated well with PWVtheor, but their numerical values were lower (by 2.17+/-0.42 and 1.08+/-0.70 m/s for PWVATG and PWVcar-fem, respectively). In conclusion, our simulations question the working principle of the Arteriograph. Our data indicate that the method picks up wave reflection phenomena confined to the brachial artery, and derived values of PWV rather reflect the stiffness of the brachial arteries.

  1. Ultrasound assessment of endothelial-dependent flow-mediated vasodilation of the brachial artery in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Alley, Hugh; Owens, Christopher D; Gasper, Warren J; Grenon, S Marlene

    2014-10-22

    The vascular endothelium is a monolayer of cells that cover the interior of blood vessels and provide both structural and functional roles. The endothelium acts as a barrier, preventing leukocyte adhesion and aggregation, as well as controlling permeability to plasma components. Functionally, the endothelium affects vessel tone. Endothelial dysfunction is an imbalance between the chemical species which regulate vessel tone, thombroresistance, cellular proliferation and mitosis. It is the first step in atherosclerosis and is associated with coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, heart failure, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. The first demonstration of endothelial dysfunction involved direct infusion of acetylcholine and quantitative coronary angiography. Acetylcholine binds to muscarinic receptors on the endothelial cell surface, leading to an increase of intracellular calcium and increased nitric oxide (NO) production. In subjects with an intact endothelium, vasodilation was observed while subjects with endothelial damage experienced paradoxical vasoconstriction. There exists a non-invasive, in vivo method for measuring endothelial function in peripheral arteries using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound. The endothelial function of peripheral arteries is closely related to coronary artery function. This technique measures the percent diameter change in the brachial artery during a period of reactive hyperemia following limb ischemia. This technique, known as endothelium-dependent, flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) has value in clinical research settings. However, a number of physiological and technical issues can affect the accuracy of the results and appropriate guidelines for the technique have been published. Despite the guidelines, FMD remains heavily operator dependent and presents a steep learning curve. This article presents a standardized method for measuring FMD in the brachial artery on the upper arm and offers suggestions to reduce intra

  2. Brucella-mediated prosthetic valve endocarditis with brachial artery mycotic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Cakalagaoglu, C; Keser, N; Alhan, C

    1999-09-01

    A 39-year-old female with a Hall-Kaster mitral prosthesis developed fever, general malaise and arthralgia 15 years after valve replacement for rheumatic mitral valve disease. Prosthetic valve endocarditis was identified after serial laboratory, clinical and echocardiographic examinations. Penicillin G (40 x 106 units/day, i.v.) + gentamicin (240 mg/day, i.v.) was started as initial therapy. The patient showed no signs of recovery, and penicillin G was replaced with vancomycin (1,000 mg/day, i.v.). There was a gradual reduction in spiking fever, and prominent reductions in erythrocyte sedimentation rate and white cell count. Meanwhile, a tender and pulsatile mass developed in the anterior surface of the left arm; peripheral angiography yielded a diagnosis of brachial artery aneurysm. A successful aneurysmectomy with saphenous vein interposition was performed. Histopathology of the lesion revealed mycotic aneurysm. An initial control SAT for Brucella of 1/80(+) was found to increase. A detailed history showed the patient to have consumed unpasteurized dairy products. Doxycyline (200 mg/day, oral) + co-trimoxazole (2,700 mg/day, oral) + rifampicin (600 mg/day, oral) was administered to treat brucellosis. Later, doxycyline caused intolerable gastrointestinal side effects and was replaced by ciprofloxacin (1,000 mg/day, oral). Subsequently, the patient made an uneventful recovery within one week. Antibiotic treatment was continued for 12 months, with complete resolution of vegetation and paravalvular leakage. During a four-year follow up, the patient showed no signs of relapse.

  3. Blood flow in the brachial artery increases after intense cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Medbø, Jon Ingulf; Hisdal, Jonny; Stranden, Einar

    2009-01-01

    During cycling blood flow is redistributed from physically inactive tissues to working leg muscles. It is unknown how long this situation persists after very intense exercise or whether it differs between intense exhausting and non-exhausting exercise. It is also not known to what extent the redistribution differs between different types of non-active tissues. Therefore nine healthy young men cycled first for 2 min at 328 W (non-exhausting exercise, mean). Blood velocity in thigh and arm (ultrasound-doppler), perfusion of forearm skin (non-acral skin) and finger tip (acral skin, with arterio-venous anastomoses) were measured for 30 min after exercise (laser-doppler). To be able to study vascular resistance and central circulation, blood pressure (Finometer), heart rate (ECG), and stroke volume (ultrasound-doppler) were measured. Thereafter the subjects cycled at the same power to exhaustion (4 min), and the measurements were repeated. After both exercises mean blood pressure was unchanged (< or = 80 mm Hg) despite increased cardiac output (> or = + 30% vs. pre-exercise). Blood velocity in the brachial artery was higher during the whole recovery period than at rest (p< or =0.02; no differences between exercises). Blood perfusion of non-acral skin was unchanged from pre-exercise level after 2 min of non-exhausting exercise, but it was twice as high after 4 min cycling to exhaustion as at rest (p=0.02). Blood perfusion of acral skin rose after both exercises and did not differ between exhausting and non-exhausting exercise. In conclusion, arm blood flow increases above the pre-exercise level in the recovery period after short-lasting, strenuous exercise.

  4. Impact of acute exercise on brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation in young healthy people

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although chronic effects of exercise on endothelial function are established, the impact of acute exercise on flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of brachial artery has not been elucidated yet. Methods Eighty-six young healthy volunteers were prospectively enrolled from January 2011 to December 2011. The subjects completed FMD tests at rest and immediately after treadmill exercise test. Primary outcome was the impact of acute exercise on FMD, measured by the difference of FMD before and after exercise. Secondary outcomes were the relationship of gender and exercise habit with FMD. Results Seventy-four subjects who met the eligibility criteria were included for analysis. Thirty-five (47.3%) were male, and the mean age was 22.7±2.7 years. FMD was reduced after exercise (8.98±4.69 to 7.51±4.03%; P=0.017) and the reduction was found in female group (10.36±5.26 to 7.62±3.71%; P=0.002) but not in male group. Post-exercise FMD was significantly impaired in subjects who did not exercise regularly (6.92±3.13% versus 8.95±5.33%; P=0.003). The decrease of FMD after exercise was greater in female group (−2.75±5.28% versus 0.27±3.24%; P=0.003) and was associated with exercise habit (β=2.532; P=0.027). Conclusions In healthy young subjects, FMD was reduced after a bout of acute exercise. The impact of acute exercise showed significant differences according to gender and exercise habit. FMD impairment after acute exercise was observed in females and subjects without regular exercise. PMID:23031621

  5. Occult closed posterior elbow dislocation with intimal rupture of the brachial artery in a 71-year-old male†

    PubMed Central

    Dabboussi, Naji Abdallah; Fakih, Riad Rifaat; Kassar, Talal Adnan; Abtar, Houssam Khodor

    2014-01-01

    Posterior elbow dislocation with vascular injury is rarely encountered, but it is crucial for every emergency physician to diagnose it. Missing these injuries can result in neurovascular compromise, which in turn can lead to limb ischemia, compartment syndrome and potential limb loss. Having a normal X-ray on presentation makes this injury more difficult to diagnose. In this study, we present a case of occult posterior elbow dislocation with an intimal injury of the brachial artery. The rarity of these cases, the diagnostic modalities and the treatment options will be reviewed. PMID:25527603

  6. Occult closed posterior elbow dislocation with intimal rupture of the brachial artery in a 71-year-old male†.

    PubMed

    Dabboussi, Naji Abdallah; Fakih, Riad Rifaat; Kassar, Talal Adnan; Abtar, Houssam Khodor

    2014-12-19

    Posterior elbow dislocation with vascular injury is rarely encountered, but it is crucial for every emergency physician to diagnose it. Missing these injuries can result in neurovascular compromise, which in turn can lead to limb ischemia, compartment syndrome and potential limb loss. Having a normal X-ray on presentation makes this injury more difficult to diagnose. In this study, we present a case of occult posterior elbow dislocation with an intimal injury of the brachial artery. The rarity of these cases, the diagnostic modalities and the treatment options will be reviewed.

  7. Sex Specific Effects of Habitual Aerobic Exercise on Brachial Artery Flow-Mediated Dilation in Middle-Aged and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Gary L.; Eskurza, Iratxe; Walker, Ashley E.; Fay, Tara N.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is impaired with aging and is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We determined if regular aerobic exercise improves brachial artery FMD in middle-aged/older (MA/O) men and postmenopausal women. In sedentary MA/O adults (age 55 – 79 years) without CVD, 8 weeks of brisk walking (6 days/week for ~50 min/day; randomized, controlled design) increased treadmill time ~20% in both MA/O men (n=11) and postmenopausal women (n=15) (P<0.01), without altering body composition or circulating CVD risk factors. Brachial artery FMD increased > 50% in the MA/O men (4.6 ± 0.6 to 7.1 ± 0.6%, P < 0.01), but did not change in the postmenopausal women (5.1 ± 0.8 vs. 5.4 ± 0.7%, P = 0.50). No changes occurred in the non-exercising controls. In a separate cross-sectional study (n =167), brachial artery FMD was ~50% greater in endurance exercise-trained (6.4 ± 0.4%, n = 45) vs. sedentary (4.3 ± 0.3%, n = 60) MA/O men (P < 0.001), whereas there were no differences between endurance-trained (5.3 ± 0.7%, n = 20) and sedentary (5.6 ± 0.5%, n = 42) postmenopausal women (P = 0.70). Brachial artery lumen diameter, peak hyperemic shear rate and endothelium independent dilation did not differ with exercise intervention or in the endurance-exercise vs. sedentary groups. Regular aerobic exercise is consistently associated with enhanced brachial artery FMD in MA/O men, but not in postmenopausal women. Some postmenopausal women without CVD may be less responsive to habitual aerobic exercise than MA/O men. PMID:20642454

  8. Feed-forward active contour analysis for improved brachial artery reactivity testing.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Daniel N; Sehgal, Chandra M; Sultan, Laith R; Reamer, Courtney B; Mohler, Emile R

    2016-08-01

    The object of this study was to utilize a novel feed-forward active contour (FFAC) algorithm to find a reproducible technique for analysis of brachial artery reactivity. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is an important marker of vascular endothelial function but has not been adopted for widespread clinical use given its technical limitations, including inter-observer variability and differences in technique across clinical sites. We developed a novel FFAC algorithm with the goal of validating a more reliable standard. Forty-six healthy volunteers underwent FMD measurement according to the standard technique. Ultrasound videos lasting 5-10 seconds each were obtained pre-cuff inflation and at minutes 1 through 5 post-cuff deflation in longitudinal and transverse views. Automated segmentation using the FFAC algorithm with initial boundary definition from three different observers was used to analyze the images to measure diameter/cross-sectional area over the cardiac cycle. The %FMD was calculated for average, minimum, and maximum diameters/areas. Using the FFAC algorithm, the population-specific coefficient of variation (CV) at end-diastole was 3.24% for transverse compared to 9.96% for longitudinal measurements; the subject-specific CV was 15.03% compared to 57.41%, respectively. For longitudinal measurements made via the conventional method, the population-specific CV was 4.77% and subject-specific CV was 117.79%. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for transverse measurements was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95-0.98) compared to 0.90 (95% CI: 0.84-0.94) for longitudinal measurements with FFAC and 0.72 (95% CI: 0.51-0.84) for conventional measurements. In conclusion, transverse views using the novel FFAC method provide less inter-observer variability than traditional longitudinal views. Improved reproducibility may allow adoption of FMD testing in a clinical setting. The FFAC algorithm is a robust technique that should be evaluated further for its ability to replace the

  9. Repeated upper limb salvage in a case of severe traumatic soft-tissue and brachial artery defect.

    PubMed

    Noaman, Hassan Hamdy; Shiha, Anis Elsayed

    2002-01-01

    We present the case of a 9-year-old male patient who suffered a gunshot injury to the right arm. The patient arrived in shock, his right arm severely traumatized, with soft-tissue loss involving the anterior surface and both sides of the right arm. The humerus was exposed. There was brachial artery defect and damage to the lateral fibers of the median nerve. The mangled extremity severity score (MESS) was 8 points. The patient was treated with general resuscitation, blood transfusion, and debridement. A venous graft, 12 cm in length, to bridge the brachial artery defect, and tendon transfer, triceps to the biceps, was performed in one step. Postoperatively, there was a normal radial pulse, normal skin color, normal temperature, and normal movement of the fingers without pain. Unfortunately, the patient then sustained a second trauma to the right arm 3 weeks later, rupturing the graft. This time he lost 1,500 cc of blood. After another blood transfusion, we performed a second reverse saphenous vein graft. The patient stayed at the hospital for 3 weeks. At follow-up 12 months later, the limb has good function and, except for the presence of a scar and skin graft, is equal in appearance to the left side.

  10. [A pediatric case of rupture of the brachial artery and radial nerve palsy secondary to proximal humeral exostosis].

    PubMed

    Parratte, S; Launay, F; Jouve, J-L; Malikov, S; Petit, P; Bollini, G

    2007-04-01

    Rupture of the brachial artery associated with radial nerve palsy in a context of exostosis of the proximal humerus has not been described to date in the literature. Our patient was a fourteen-year-old girl with a history of violent pain occurring suddenly with no prodrome or triggering factor. The pain was localized at the level of the proximal left humerus. Physical examination revealed the presence of a hematoma and complete motor radial nerve palsy. The diagnosis was not confirmed by computed tomography with contrast injection but was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging which eliminated malignant transformation of the exostosis. After checking the neurovascular bundles and evacuating the hematoma, treatment consisted in resection of the exostosis and arterial repair with an autologous venous graft. We discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges which present vascular complications due to exostosis.

  11. Can a combination of handgrip exercise and prolonged forearm occlusion elicit a maximal brachial artery FMD response?

    PubMed

    Ku, Jennifer; McEvoy, Alana; Pyke, Kyra E

    2014-06-01

    The upper limit of brachial artery (BA) flow-mediated dilation (FMD) has not been thoroughly interrogated, and long duration occlusion + handgrip exercise may create larger shear stress stimuli than previous manipulations. To determine whether novel combinations of occlusion + handgrip exercise can extend the range of FMD stimulus-response relationship characterization and permit identification of a BA-FMD response ceiling. Ten healthy subjects performed eight reactive hyperemia (RH) FMD trials: 5, 10, and 15 min of occlusion (5RH, 10RH, 15RH); 5, 10 and 15 min of occlusion + 3-min ischemic exercise (IE) (5IE, 10IE, 15IE); 10 and 15 min of occlusion + 3-min IE + 4-min post-occlusion exercise (PE) (10IEPE, 15IEPE). Shear stress was estimated as shear rate (SR = blood velocity/BA diameter; (ultrasound assessment)) (SR stimulus = area under the curve (AUC) until peak diameter). Data are mean ± SE. There were no differences in SR-AUC among IE and IEPE trials (p > 0.70), however, IE consistently increased the SR-AUC (IE + IEPE trial average 17,845.1 ± 2,023.3 a.u.) vs. the 5RH and 10RH trials (4,943.0 ± 428.4 a.u., 6,800.6 ± 805.9 a.u.) (p < 0.05). The %FMD ranged from 7.3 ± 0.8% (5RH) to 19.1 ± 2.0% (15IEPE) (p < 0.001) with no differences among IE and IEPE trials (p > 0.16). FMD increased with increasing SR-AUC (all subjects, all trials: r(2) 0.36, p < 0.001) CONCLUSIONS: The stimulus created by brief (5 min) occlusion + ischemic exercise was not significantly enhanced by prolonging occlusion or continuing to exercise post-occlusion. The FMD response did not clearly plateau with increasing stimulus magnitude; however, the FMD capacity was shown to be more than double the FMD magnitude that was elicited with a standard 5-min occlusion test.

  12. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index as Predictors of Mortality in Residents of Metlika County, Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Mlačak, Blaž; Blinc, Aleš; Pohar, Maja; Stare, Janez

    2006-01-01

    Aim To test how the presence of peripheral arterial disease predicted mortality of middle-aged and elderly residents of Metlika county, a rural area in southeastern Slovenia. Methods In 1987, we interviewed and examined a representative cohort of 646 subjects aged 45-80 years at inclusion without overt coronary or cerebrovascular disease, for cardiovascular risk factors and measured the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI). Peripheral arterial disease was defined as ABPI<0.90. The subjects were followed up 15 years or until death. All-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality were assessed and compared between subjects with and without peripheral arterial disease in a multivariate model. Results There were 580 subjects with normal ABPI and 66 subjects with peripheral arterial disease, among which 49 were asymptomatic and 17 had intermittent claudication. Because subjects with peripheral arterial disease were on average 10 years older than those without peripheral arterial disease, the mere presence of peripheral arterial disease was not an independent predictor of mortality. However, there was a significant interaction of peripheral arterial disease with age, with a more pronounced adverse prognostic effect of peripheral arterial disease in younger than in older age groups. For a 55-year-old subject with peripheral arterial disease, the hazard ratio of dying from any cause in the follow-up period was 2.44 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-4.96) in comparison to an age-matched subject without peripheral arterial disease, but at 75 years of age, the hazard ratio decreased to only 0.71 (95% CI, 0.46-1.09). For cardiovascular mortality, the hazard ratio in the presence of peripheral arterial disease was 6.05 (95% CI, 1.87-16.27) at 55 years and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.54-1.52) at 75 years. Among patients with peripheral arterial disease, each decrement of ABPI at inclusion by 0.10 significantly increased the cardiovascular mortality after 15 years by 30% (P = 0

  13. User-guided automated segmentation of time-series ultrasound images for measuring vasoreactivity of the brachial artery induced by flow mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Chandra M.; Kao, Yen H.; Cary, Ted W.; Arger, Peter H.; Mohler, Emile R.

    2005-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction in response to vasoactive stimuli is closely associated with diseases such as atherosclerosis, hypertension and congestive heart failure. The current method of using ultrasound to image the brachial artery along the longitudinal axis is insensitive for measuring the small vasodilatation that occurs in response to flow mediation. The goal of this study is to overcome this limitation by using cross-sectional imaging of the brachial artery in conjunction with the User-Guided Automated Boundary Detection (UGABD) algorithm for extracting arterial boundaries. High-resolution ultrasound imaging was performed on rigid plastic tubing, on elastic rubber tubing phantoms with steady and pulsatile flow, and on the brachial artery of a healthy volunteer undergoing reactive hyperemia. The area of cross section of time-series images was analyzed by UGABD by propagating the boundary from one frame to the next. The UGABD results were compared by linear correlation with those obtained by manual tracing. UGABD measured the cross-sectional area of the phantom tubing to within 5% of the true area. The algorithm correctly detected pulsatile vasomotion in phantoms and in the brachial artery. A comparison of area measurements made using UGABD with those made by manual tracings yielded a correlation of 0.9 and 0.8 for phantoms and arteries, respectively. The peak vasodilatation due to reactive hyperemia was two orders of magnitude greater in pixel count than that measured by longitudinal imaging. Cross-sectional imaging is more sensitive than longitudinal imaging for measuring flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery, and thus may be more suitable for evaluating endothelial dysfunction.

  14. Relations of Arterial Stiffness and Brachial Flow-Mediated Dilation With New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation: The Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Amir Y; Wang, Na; Yin, Xiaoyan; Larson, Martin G; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Hamburg, Naomi M; Magnani, Jared W; Ellinor, Patrick T; Lubitz, Steven A; Mitchell, Gary F; Benjamin, Emelia J; McManus, David D

    2016-09-01

    The relations of measures of arterial stiffness, pulsatile hemodynamic load, and endothelial dysfunction to atrial fibrillation (AF) remain poorly understood. To better understand the pathophysiology of AF, we examined associations between noninvasive measures of vascular function and new-onset AF. The study sample included participants aged ≥45 years from the Framingham Heart Study offspring and third-generation cohorts. Using Cox proportional hazards regression models, we examined relations between incident AF and tonometry measures of arterial stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), wave reflection (augmentation index), pressure pulsatility (central pulse pressure), endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation), resting brachial arterial diameter, and hyperemic flow. AF developed in 407/5797 participants in the tonometry sample and 270/3921 participants in the endothelial function sample during follow-up (median 7.1 years, maximum 10 years). Higher augmentation index (hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.32; P=0.02), baseline brachial artery diameter (hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.43; P=0.04), and lower flow-mediated dilation (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.99; P=0.04) were associated with increased risk of incident AF. Central pulse pressure, when adjusted for age, sex, and hypertension (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.28; P=0.02) was associated with incident AF. Higher pulsatile load assessed by central pulse pressure and greater apparent wave reflection measured by augmentation index were associated with increased risk of incident AF. Vascular endothelial dysfunction may precede development of AF. These measures may be additional risk factors or markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease associated with increased risk of incident AF. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. A young man with intimomedial mucoid degeneration of the brachial artery.

    PubMed

    Raber, Menno H; Meerwaldt, Robbert; van Det, Rob J

    2011-03-01

    Intimomedial mucoid degeneration is a rare disorder and has been described as a distinctly different entity from Erdheim's cystic medial necrosis. Most studies show a strong predominance in African American females with hypertension. In our case report, we describe the presence of a large brachial aneurysm in a young white male with intimomedial mucoid degeneration.

  16. Anatomical and Functional Estimations of Brachial Artery Diameter and Elasticity Using Oscillometric Measurements with a Quantitative Approach.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Takeuchi, Keisuke; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-01

    Noninvasive vascular function measurement plays an important role in detecting early stages of atherosclerosis and in evaluating therapeutic responses. In this regard, recently, new vascular function measurements have been developed. These new measurements have been used to evaluate vascular function in coronary arteries, large aortic arteries, or peripheral arteries. Increasing vascular diameter represents vascular remodeling related to atherosclerosis. Attenuated vascular elasticity may be a reliable marker for atherosclerotic risk assessment. However, previous measurements for vascular diameter and vascular elasticity have been complex, operator-dependent, or invasive. Therefore, simple and reliable approaches have been sought. We recently developed a new automated oscillometric method to measure the estimated area (eA) of a brachial artery and its volume elastic modulus (VE). In this review, we further report on this new measurement and other vascular measurements. We report on the reliability of the new automated oscillometric measurement of eA and VE. Based on our findings, this measurement technique should be a reliable approach, and this modality may have practical application to automatically assess muscular artery diameter and elasticity in clinical or epidemiological settings. In this review, we report the characteristics of our new oscillometric measurements and other related vascular function measurements.

  17. Anatomical and Functional Estimations of Brachial Artery Diameter and Elasticity Using Oscillometric Measurements with a Quantitative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Takeuchi, Keisuke; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive vascular function measurement plays an important role in detecting early stages of atherosclerosis and in evaluating therapeutic responses. In this regard, recently, new vascular function measurements have been developed. These new measurements have been used to evaluate vascular function in coronary arteries, large aortic arteries, or peripheral arteries. Increasing vascular diameter represents vascular remodeling related to atherosclerosis. Attenuated vascular elasticity may be a reliable marker for atherosclerotic risk assessment. However, previous measurements for vascular diameter and vascular elasticity have been complex, operator-dependent, or invasive. Therefore, simple and reliable approaches have been sought. We recently developed a new automated oscillometric method to measure the estimated area (eA) of a brachial artery and its volume elastic modulus (VE). In this review, we further report on this new measurement and other vascular measurements. We report on the reliability of the new automated oscillometric measurement of eA and VE. Based on our findings, this measurement technique should be a reliable approach, and this modality may have practical application to automatically assess muscular artery diameter and elasticity in clinical or epidemiological settings. In this review, we report the characteristics of our new oscillometric measurements and other related vascular function measurements. PMID:27493898

  18. The effect of α1 -adrenergic blockade on post-exercise brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation at sea level and high altitude.

    PubMed

    Tymko, Michael M; Tremblay, Joshua C; Hansen, Alex B; Howe, Connor A; Willie, Chris K; Stembridge, Mike; Green, Daniel J; Hoiland, Ryan L; Subedi, Prajan; Anholm, James D; Ainslie, Philip N

    2017-03-01

    Our objective was to quantify endothelial function (via brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation) at sea level (344 m) and high altitude (3800 m) at rest and following both maximal exercise and 30 min of moderate-intensity cycling exercise with and without administration of an α1 -adrenergic blockade. Brachial endothelial function did not differ between sea level and high altitude at rest, nor following maximal exercise. At sea level, endothelial function decreased following 30 min of moderate-intensity exercise, and this decrease was abolished with α1 -adrenergic blockade. At high altitude, endothelial function did not decrease immediately after 30 min of moderate-intensity exercise, and administration of α1 -adrenergic blockade resulted in an increase in flow-mediated dilatation. Our data indicate that post-exercise endothelial function is modified at high altitude (i.e. prolonged hypoxaemia). The current study helps to elucidate the physiological mechanisms associated with high-altitude acclimatization, and provides insight into the relationship between sympathetic nervous activity and vascular endothelial function. We examined the hypotheses that (1) at rest, endothelial function would be impaired at high altitude compared to sea level, (2) endothelial function would be reduced to a greater extent at sea level compared to high altitude after maximal exercise, and (3) reductions in endothelial function following moderate-intensity exercise at both sea level and high altitude are mediated via an α1 -adrenergic pathway. In a double-blinded, counterbalanced, randomized and placebo-controlled design, nine healthy participants performed a maximal-exercise test, and two 30 min sessions of semi-recumbent cycling exercise at 50% peak output following either placebo or α1 -adrenergic blockade (prazosin; 0.05 mg kg( -1) ). These experiments were completed at both sea-level (344 m) and high altitude (3800 m). Blood pressure (finger photoplethysmography

  19. The Relation Between Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) and Coronary Artery Disease Severity and Risk Factors: An Angiographic Study.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Heidari, Ramin; Mostanfar, Baharak; Tavassoli, Aliakbar; Roghani, Farshad; Yazdekhasti, Safoura

    2011-01-01

    The current study aims to determine the relation between ankle-brachial index (ABI) and angiographic findings and major cardiovascular risk factors in patients with suspected coronary artery diseases (CAD) in Isfahan. In this cross-sectional descriptive-analytic research, patients with suspected CAD were studied. Characteristics of studied subjects including demographics, familial history, past medical history and atherosclerotic risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and smoking were obtained using a standard questionnaire. ABI was measured in all studied patients. ABI≤0.9 (ABI(+)) was considered as peripheral vessel disease and ABI>0.9 (ABI(-)) was considered as normal. Then, all studied patients underwent coronary artery angiography. The results of the questionnaire and angiographic findings were compared in ABI(+) and ABI(-) groups. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15 using ANOVA, t-test, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, and discriminant analysis. In this study, 125 patients were investigated. ABI≤0.9 was seen in 25 patients (20%). The prevalence of ABI(+) among men and women was 25.9% and 7.5%, respectively (P=0.01). The prevalence of atherosclerotic risk factors was significantly higher in ABI(+) patients than in ABI(-) ones (P<0.05). ABI(+) patients had more significant stenosis than ABI(-) ones. The mean of occlusion was significantly higher in ABI(+) patients with left main artery (LMA), right coronary artery (RCA), left anterior descending artery (LAD), diagonal artery 1 (D1) and left circumflex artery (LCX) involvements (P<0.05). The findings of this research indicated that ABI could be a useful method in assessing both the atherosclerotic risk factors and the degree of coronary involvements in suspected patients. However, in order to make more accurate decisions for using this method in diagnosing and preventing CAD, we should plan further studies in large sample sizes of general population.

  20. Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Hughes, Alun D; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-10-01

    Central augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) predict cardiovascular events and mortality, but underlying physiological mechanisms remain disputed. While traditionally believed to relate to wave reflections arising from proximal arterial impedance (and stiffness) mismatching, recent evidence suggests aortic reservoir function may be a more dominant contributor to AP and AIx. Our aim was therefore to determine relationships among aortic-brachial stiffness mismatching, AP, AIx, aortic reservoir function, and end-organ disease. Aortic (aPWV) and brachial (bPWV) pulse wave velocity were measured in 359 individuals (aged 61 ± 9, 49% male). Central AP, AIx, and aortic reservoir indexes were derived from radial tonometry. Participants were stratified by positive (bPWV > aPWV), negligible (bPWV ≈ aPWV), or negative stiffness mismatch (bPWV < aPWV). Left-ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured by two-dimensional-echocardiography. Central AP and AIx were higher with negative stiffness mismatch vs. negligible or positive stiffness mismatch (11 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 vs. 8 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.001 and 24 ± 10 vs. 24 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 13%, P = 0.042). Stiffness mismatch (bPWV-aPWV) was negatively associated with AP (r = -0.18, P = 0.001) but not AIx (r = -0.06, P = 0.27). Aortic reservoir pressure strongly correlated to AP (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and AIx (r = 0.62, P < 0.001) independent of age, sex, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and height (standardized β = 0.61 and 0.12, P ≤ 0.001). Aortic reservoir pressure independently predicted abnormal LVMI (β = 0.13, P = 0.024). Positive aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch does not result in higher AP or AIx. Aortic reservoir function, rather than discrete wave reflection from proximal arterial stiffness mismatching, provides a better model description of AP and AIx and also has clinical relevance as evidenced by an independent association of aortic reservoir pressure with LVMI.

  1. [Case of cerebellar and spinal cord infarction presenting with acute brachial diplegia due to right vertebral artery occlusion].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takayuki; Santa, Yo; Akutagawa, Noriko; Nagano, Sukehisa; Yoshimura, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted for evaluation of sudden onset of dizziness, bilateral shoulder pain, and brachial diplegia. Neurological examination revealed severe bilateral weakness of the triceps brachii, wrist flexor, and wrist extensor muscles. There was no paresis of the lower limbs. His gait was ataxic. Pinprick and temperature sensations were diminished at the bilateral C6-C8 dermatomes. Vibration and position senses were intact. An MRI of the head revealed a right cerebellar infarction and occlusion of the right vertebral artery. An MRI of the cervical spine on T₂ weighted imaging (T₂WI) showed cord compression at the C3/4-C5/6 level secondary to spondylotic degeneration without any intramedullary signal changes of the cord. On the following day, however, high-signal lesions on T₂WI appeared in the C5-C6 spinal cord, suggesting cord infarction. Unilateral vertebral artery occlusion does not usually result in cervical cord infarction because of anastomosis of arteries. Because of the long-term mechanical compression in our case, it was likely that cervical cord ischemia was present before the onset of symptoms. On the basis of chronic cord compression, our case suggests that occlusion of a unilateral vertebral artery could cause cervical cord infarction.

  2. [Brachial artery endothelial function in teenagers with obesity depending on severity of clinical, trophological and metabolic disorders].

    PubMed

    Maskova, G S; Chernaia, N L; Nagornova, E Iu; Fomina, O V; Byteva, T A

    2014-01-01

    We carried out complex examination of 68 adolescents aged 11-17 years with primary obesity which in addition to assessment of clinical-anamnestic, laboratory data and functional parameters of cardiovascular system included registration of reaction of brachial artery endothelium to reactive hyperemia. Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) was found in 66% of obese teenagers. Obesity in adolescents with VED was characterized by aggravated course with higher fat mass index (36.8 +/- 4.39%) and prevalence of hypothalamic (42%) and metabolic (8.8%) syndromes. Stable arterial hypertension (AH) found in 37% of examined adolescents was 1.5 times more often registered in those with VED. We distinguished 4 groups of adolescents with various degree of risk of development of cardiovascular disorders: with stable AH and VED (group I), with stable AH and normal function of vascular endothelium (group II), with normal or labile arterial pressure with VED (group III), with normal or labile arterial pressure with normal function of vascular endothelium. It is expedient to supplement examination of obese adolescents with assessment of the state of vascular endothelium aiming at determination of degree of risk of development of atherosclerosis and/or stable AH.

  3. [The avulsion of subclavian artery from brachiocephalic trunk and subclavian vein from right brachiocephalic vein with brachial plexus injury].

    PubMed

    Kasperczak, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    The detachment of subclavian artery from brachiocephalic trunk and subclavian vein from right brachiocephalic vein with brachial plexus injury. Traumas of large vessels of mediastinal and shoulder girdle cause significant life risk and constitute serious diagnostic and therapeutic problems because of lack of time for accurate treatment planning. Particularly difficult to treat are blunt trauma of large arteries in patients under the influence of drugs or with a progressive hypovolemic shock. The aim of this dissertation is presenting my own experience in treating a seventeen-year-old motorcyclist who was under the influence of alcohol suffered a detachment of subclavian artery and subclavian vein from mediastinal large vessels following a traffic accident. Seventeen-year-old motorcyclist who was under the influence of alcohol alcohol hit a concrete pole at a speed of 130 km/h. The patient was brought to the hospital in a state of hypovolemic shock, pulse 126/min, blood pressure 80/60 mmHg, without pulse on the right upper limb. The right upper limb was cold, without active movements, pressure and pain sense. The right shoulder was tumid. The right lung without audible murmurs. Pulses on carotid arteries were perceptible. The thoracic plain film x-ray showed a shading on right half of thorax, widening of the upper mediastinum, fracture of right clavicle and the rear right shoulder sprain. Passive movements in the right elbow were correct. The patient was taken to the operating theatre because of progressive hypovolemic shock and was operated in emergency regimen. The transverse thoracotomy was made by both the intercostals spaces between the second and third rib. The thoracotomy showed that subclavian artery from brachiocephalic trunk and subclavian vein from right brachiocephalic vein were detachment. The subclavian vein was ligated and the brachiocephalic vein was sewn (phleborrhaphy). The subclavian artery was connected with brachiocephalic trunk by a synthetic

  4. [Ankle-brachial index screening for peripheral artery disease in high cardiovascular risk patients. Prospective observational study of 370 asymptomatic patients at high cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    Rada, C; Oummou, S; Merzouk, F; Amarir, B; Boussabnia, G; Bougrini, H; Benzaroual, D; Elkarimi, S; Elhattaoui, M

    2016-12-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a marker of systemic atherosclerosis; it is associated with a high risk of cardiovascular disease. The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease by measuring the ankle-brachial pressure index in patients at high cardiovascular risk and to study the risk factors associated with this disease. This was a descriptive and analytic cross-sectional study which focused on 370 patients seen at the medical consultation for atherosclerosis prevention. The ankle-brachial index was measured with a portable Doppler (BIDOP 3) using 4 and 8Hz dual frequency probes. The standards were: normal ankle-brachial index 0.9 to 1.3; peripheral artery obstructive disease ankle-brachial index less than 0.9; poorly compressible artery (medial arterial calcification) ankle-brachial index greater than 1.3. Cardiovascular risk factors were also studied. Three hundred and seventy subjects (mean age 65.5±8.7years) were screened Cardiovascular risk factors were: sedentary lifestyle (91.5 %), hypertension (68.1 %), elevated LDL-cholesterolemia (36.3 %), diabetes (48.3 %) and tobacco smoking (33.8 %). The prevalence of peripheral artery disease was 32.4 % of which 77.5 % were asymptomatic. We found a significant correlation with smoking, diabetes, dyslipidemia and the presence of coronary artery disease or vascular cerebral disease. Screening for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) with the ankle-brachial index has increased the percentage of polyvascular patients from 6.2 to 29 %. Factors independently associated with PAD were advanced age, presence of cardiovascular disease, smoking and glycated hemoglobin. PAD is a common condition in people at high cardiovascular risk, the frequency of asymptomatic forms justifies the screening with pocket Doppler which is a simple, inexpensive and effective test to assess the overall cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Children and Adolescent Obesity Associates with Pressure-Dependent and Age-Related Increase in Carotid and Femoral Arteries' Stiffness and Not in Brachial Artery, Indicative of Nonintrinsic Arterial Wall Alteration

    PubMed Central

    García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Castro, Juan Manuel; Arana, Maite; Giachetto, Gustavo; Chiesa, Pedro; Zócalo, Yanina

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze if childhood obesity associates with changes in elastic, transitional, and/or muscular arteries' stiffness. Methods. 221 subjects (4–15 years, 92 females) were assigned to normal weight (NW, n = 137) or obesity (OB, n = 84) groups, considering their body mass index z-score. Age groups were defined: 4–8; 8–12; 12–15 years old. Carotid, femoral, and brachial artery local stiffness was determined through systodiastolic pressure-diameter and stress-strain relationships. To this end, arterial diameter and peripheral and aortic blood pressure (BP) levels and waveforms were recorded. Carotid-femoral, femoropedal, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities were determined to evaluate aortic, lower-limb, and upper-limb regional arterial stiffness, respectively. Correlation analysis between stiffness parameters and BP was done. Results. Compared to NW, OB subjects showed higher peripheral and central BP and carotid and femoral stiffness, reaching statistical significance in subjects aged 12 and older. Arterial stiffness differences disappeared when levels were normalized for BP. There were no differences in intrinsic arterial wall stiffness (elastic modulus), BP stiffness relationships, and regional stiffness parameters. Conclusion. OB associates with BP-dependent and age-related increase in carotid and femoral (but not brachial) stiffness. Stiffness changes would not be explained by intrinsic arterial wall alterations but could be associated with the higher BP levels observed in obese children. PMID:27066273

  6. Brachial artery vasoreactivity is associated with cross-sectional and longitudinal anatomical measures of atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Nicole M.; Hodis, Howard N.; Liu, Chao-Ran; Liu, Chi-Hua; Mack, Wendy J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The diagnostic and prognostic importance of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (BFMD) for cardiovascular disease (CVD) is not certain and associations between BFMD and recognized measures of atherosclerosis have not been well established. Methods We investigated cross-sectional and longitudinal correlations between repeated measures of BFMD and quantitative coronary artery angiographic (QCA) measurements of average percent diameter stenosis, number of lesions and minimum luminal diameter (MLD), and ultrasonographic measurement of carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT) in an ethnically diverse cohort of postmenopausal women (n = 132) with coronary artery disease (CAD). Subjects were participants in a 3-year randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial, testing the efficacy of hormone therapy on atherosclerosis progression. Associations between BFMD and QCA measures, and between BFMD and CIMT were examined using measurements from the same study visit. Results BFMD was significantly inversely correlated with coronary artery stenosis at baseline (β = −1.21% [S.E.(β) = 0.38], p = 0.002). BFMD levels significantly predicted rate of change in CIMT over the trial period (β = −0.76 μm/year [S.E.(β) = 0.29], p = 0.008). Conclusions Physiological and anatomical measures of atherosclerosis are correlated among postmenopausal women with CAD, which provides some validation of BFMD as a measure of atherosclerosis in high-risk populations. PMID:17803999

  7. Changes in brachial artery endothelial function and resting diameter with moderate-intensity continuous but not sprint interval training in sedentary men.

    PubMed

    Shenouda, Ninette; Gillen, Jenna B; Gibala, Martin J; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2017-10-01

    Moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) improves peripheral artery function in healthy adults, a phenomenon that reverses as continued training induces structural remodeling. Sprint interval training (SIT) elicits physiological adaptations similar to MICT, despite a lower exercise volume and time commitment; however, its effect on peripheral artery function and structure is largely unexplored. We compared peripheral artery responses to 12 wk of MICT and SIT in sedentary, healthy men (age = 27 ± 8 yr). Participants performed MICT (45 min of cycling at 70% peak heart rate; n = 10) or SIT (3 × 20-s "all out" cycling sprints with 2 min of recovery; n = 9), and responses were compared with a nontraining control group (CTL, n = 6). Allometrically scaled brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) increased 2.2% after 6 wk of MICT and returned to baseline levels by 12 wk, but did not change in SIT or CTL (group × time interaction, P = 0.04). Brachial artery diameter increased after 6 and 12 wk (main effect, P = 0.03), with the largest increases observed in MICT. Neither training protocol affected popliteal relative FMD and diameter, or central and lower limb arterial stiffness (carotid distensibility, central and leg pulse wave velocity) (P > 0.05 for all). Whereas earlier and more frequent measurements are needed to establish the potential presence and time course of arterial responses to low-volume SIT, our findings suggest that MICT was superior to the intense, but brief and intermittent SIT stimulus at inducing brachial artery responses in healthy men.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We compared the effects of 12 wk of moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) and sprint interval training (SIT) on peripheral artery endothelial function and diameter, and central and lower limb stiffness in sedentary, healthy men. Whereas neither training program affected the popliteal artery or stiffness indexes, we observed changes in brachial artery function and diameter with MICT but not SIT

  8. Change in Elasticity Caused by Flow-Mediated Dilation Measured Only for Intima-Media Region of Brachial Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Masataka; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step of arteriosclerosis [R. Ross: N. Engl. J. Med. 340 (2004) 115]. For the assessment of the endothelium function, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) caused by increased blood flow has been evaluated with ultrasonic diagnostic equipment. In the case of conventional methods, the change in artery diameter caused by FMD is measured [M. Hashimoto et al.: Circulation 92 (1995) 3431]. Although the arterial wall has a layered structure (intima, media, and adventitia), such a structure is not taken into account in conventional methods because the change in diameter depends on the characteristic of the entire wall. However, smooth muscle present only in the media contributes to FMD, whereas the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not contribute. In this study, we measure the change in elasticity of only the intima-media region including smooth muscle using the phased tracking method [H. Kanai et al.: IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 43 (1996) 791]. From the change in elasticity, FMD measured only for the intima-media region by our proposed method was found to be more sensitive than that measured for the entire wall by the conventional method.

  9. Double Distal Intraneural Fascicular Nerve Transfers for Lower Brachial Plexus Injuries.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyu; Reynolds, Michael; Satteson, Ellen; Nazir, Omar; Petit, James; Smith, Beth P

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate outcomes following transfer of the supinator motor branch of the radial nerve (SMB) to the posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) and the pronator teres motor branch of median (PTMB) to the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) in patients with lower brachial plexus injuries. Since December 2010, 4 patients have undergone combined transfer of the SMB to PIN and PTMB to AIN for lower brachial plexus palsies. The study was prospectively designed, and the patients were followed for 4 years to monitor their functional improvement. One patient failed to return after his 4-month postoperative visit. The other 3 patients all regained M4 thumb and finger extension, and 2 recovered M4 thumb and finger flexion at the final evaluation, a mean 30 months after the nerve transfer surgeries. Combined transfer of the SMB to PIN and PTMB to AIN may lead to successful recovery of digital extrinsic flexion and extension in lower brachial plexus injuries. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Associations of ankle-brachial index (ABI) with cerebral arterial disease and vascular events following ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Jennifer Justice F; De Silva, Deidre A; Pascual, Jose Leonard R; Chang, Hui-Meng; Wong, Meng-Cheong; Chen, Christopher P L H

    2012-07-01

    Low ankle-brachial index (ABI), indicative of peripheral arterial disease (PAD), is a risk factor for stroke. ABI has been shown to be associated with cerebral arterial disease and prognosis following stroke. We studied the associations of the degree of ABI lowering with extracranial carotid disease (ECD), intracranial large artery disease (ICLAD), and subsequent vascular events in a prospective cohort of acute ischemic stroke patients. ABI, extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries were assessed in a blinded manner. ABI was categorized into 0.9-1.3 (normal), 0.8-0.89 (mildly lowered) and <0.8 (severely lowered). Follow-up data at 1 year were obtained from standardized telephone interviews and verified with medical records. Among the 1311 patients, 73% had normal ABI, 13% had ABI 0.8-0.89 and 13% had ABI <0.8. Compared to patients with normal ABI, those with ABI<0.8 had higher prevalence of severe ECD (15% vs. 5%, p = 0.006) and ICLAD (72% vs. 48%, p = 0.003), even after adjustment for age, gender, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, smoking, ischemic heart disease and atrial fibrillation (severe ECD p < 0.001, ICLAD p < 0.001). At 1 year, patients with ABI <0.8 had a higher incidence of composite vascular events (19% vs. 11%, p = 0.02), stroke (15% vs. 10%, p = 0.06) and myocardial infarction (4% vs. 2%, p = 0.07) than patients with normal ABI. Among ischemic stroke patients, large cerebral arterial disease and incidence of subsequent vascular events at 1 year were associated with severe ABI lowering <0.8, but not with mild ABI lowering (0.8-0.89). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Flow-mediated dilatation, using time course data, shows maturation of the brachial artery from young children to mid-adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Anna; Pamula, Yvonne; Martin, James; Gent, Roger; Lushington, Kurt; Baumert, Mathias; Willoughby, Scott; Richardson, Malcolm; Couper, Jennifer; Kennedy, Declan

    2015-03-01

    Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) is a tool widely used to measure arterial responsiveness to sheer stress. However, there is scant literature to show how the peripheral arterial response changes as the vascular system matures. One reason for this is that the feasibility of measuring FMD in younger children has not been established. The aim of the present study was to assess brachial artery function at rest and during the FMD response after 4 min ischaemia of the forearm in children aged 6-15 years. Time to reach maximum FMD (FMDmax ) was found to be correlated with age (r = 0.4, P < 0.05), resting brachial artery diameter (r = 0.4, P < 0.05), height (r = 0.4, P < 0.05), body mass index (BMI; r = 0.45, P < 0.05), body surface area (r = 0.44, P < 0.05) and resting blood flow (r = 0.37, P < 0.05). However, there was no correlation between the traditional FMD response at 60 s or FMD maximal dilation and age, resting brachial artery diameter, height, weight, BMI, body surface area and resting blood flow. In conclusion, the time taken to reach the maximal dilation response is related to age, brachial artery luminal diameter and body habitus, but not the traditional measure of FMD response at 60 s or the maximal dilatation percentage. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Sex-specific effects of habitual aerobic exercise on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in middle-aged and older adults.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Gary L; Eskurza, Iratxe; Walker, Ashley E; Fay, Tara N; Seals, Douglas R

    2011-01-01

    Brachial artery FMD (flow-mediated dilation) is impaired with aging and is associated with an increased risk of CVD (cardiovascular disease). In the present study, we determined whether regular aerobic exercise improves brachial artery FMD in MA/O (middle-aged/older) men and post-menopausal women. In sedentary MA/O adults (age, 55-79 years) without CVD, 8 weeks of brisk walking (6 days/week for approx. 50 min/day; randomized controlled design) increased treadmill time approx. 20% in both MA/O men (n=11) and post-menopausal women (n=15) (P<0.01), without altering body composition or circulating CVD risk factors. Brachial artery FMD increased >50% in the MA/O men (from 4.6±0.6 to 7.1±0.6%; P<0.01), but did not change in the post-menopausal women (5.1±0.8 compared with 5.4±0.7%; P=0.50). No changes occurred in the non-exercising controls. In a separate cross-sectional study (n=167), brachial artery FMD was approx. 50% greater in endurance-exercise-trained (6.4±0.4%; n=45) compared with sedentary (4.3±0.3%; n=60) MA/O men (P<0.001), whereas there were no differences between endurance-trained (5.3±0.7%, n=20) and sedentary (5.6±0.5%, n=42) post-menopausal women (P=0.70). Brachial artery lumen diameter, peak hyperaemic shear rate and endothelium-independent dilation did not differ with exercise intervention or in the endurance exercise compared with sedentary groups. In conclusion, regular aerobic exercise is consistently associated with enhanced brachial artery FMD in MA/O men, but not in post-menopausal women. Some post-menopausal women without CVD may be less responsive to habitual aerobic exercise than MA/O men.

  13. High dietary sodium reduces brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in humans with salt-sensitive and salt-resistant blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Evan L; Brian, Michael S; Ramick, Meghan G; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon; Edwards, David G; Farquhar, William B

    2015-06-15

    Recent studies demonstrate that high dietary sodium (HS) impairs endothelial function in those with salt-resistant (SR) blood pressure (BP). The effect of HS on endothelial function in those with salt-sensitive (SS) BP is not currently known. We hypothesized that HS would impair brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) to a greater extent in SS compared with SR adults. Ten SR (age 42 ± 5 yr, 5 men, 5 women) and 10 SS (age 39 ± 5 yr, 5 men, 5 women) healthy, normotensive participants were enrolled in a controlled feeding study consisting of a run-in diet followed by a 7-day low dietary sodium (LS) (20 mmol/day) and a 7-day HS (300 mmol/day) diet in random order. Brachial artery FMD and 24-h BP were assessed on the last day of each diet. SS BP was individually assessed and defined as a change in 24-h mean arterial pressure (MAP) of >5 mmHg between the LS and HS diets (ΔMAP: SR -0.6 ± 1.2, SS 7.7 ± 0.4 mmHg). Brachial artery FMD was lower in both SS and SR individuals during the HS diet (P < 0.001), and did not differ between groups (P > 0.05) (FMD: SR LS 10.6 ± 1.3%, SR HS 7.2 ± 1.5%, SS LS 12.5 ± 1.7%, SS HS 7.8 ± 1.4%). These data indicate that an HS diet impairs brachial artery FMD to a similar extent in adults with SS BP and SR BP.

  14. High dietary sodium reduces brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in humans with salt-sensitive and salt-resistant blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Evan L.; Brian, Michael S.; Ramick, Meghan G.; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon; Edwards, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that high dietary sodium (HS) impairs endothelial function in those with salt-resistant (SR) blood pressure (BP). The effect of HS on endothelial function in those with salt-sensitive (SS) BP is not currently known. We hypothesized that HS would impair brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) to a greater extent in SS compared with SR adults. Ten SR (age 42 ± 5 yr, 5 men, 5 women) and 10 SS (age 39 ± 5 yr, 5 men, 5 women) healthy, normotensive participants were enrolled in a controlled feeding study consisting of a run-in diet followed by a 7-day low dietary sodium (LS) (20 mmol/day) and a 7-day HS (300 mmol/day) diet in random order. Brachial artery FMD and 24-h BP were assessed on the last day of each diet. SS BP was individually assessed and defined as a change in 24-h mean arterial pressure (MAP) of >5 mmHg between the LS and HS diets (ΔMAP: SR −0.6 ± 1.2, SS 7.7 ± 0.4 mmHg). Brachial artery FMD was lower in both SS and SR individuals during the HS diet (P < 0.001), and did not differ between groups (P > 0.05) (FMD: SR LS 10.6 ± 1.3%, SR HS 7.2 ± 1.5%, SS LS 12.5 ± 1.7%, SS HS 7.8 ± 1.4%). These data indicate that an HS diet impairs brachial artery FMD to a similar extent in adults with SS BP and SR BP. PMID:26078434

  15. Correlation between Patient-Reported Symptoms and Ankle-Brachial Index after Revascularization for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Je, Hyung Gon; Kim, Bo Hyun; Cho, Kyoung Im; Jang, Jae Sik; Park, Yong Hyun; Spertus, John

    2015-01-01

    Improvement in quality of life (QoL) is a primary treatment goal for patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The current study aimed to quantify improvement in the health status of PAD patients following peripheral revascularization using the peripheral artery questionnaire (PAQ) and ankle-brachial index (ABI), and to evaluate possible correlation between the two methods. The PAQ and ABI were assessed in 149 symptomatic PAD patients before, and three months after peripheral revascularization. Mean PAQ summary scores improved significantly three months after revascularization (+49.3 ± 15 points, p < 0.001). PAQ scores relating to patient symptoms showed the largest improvement following revascularization. The smallest increases were seen in reported treatment satisfaction (all p’s < 0.001). As expected the ABI of treated limbs showed significant improvement post-revascularization (p < 0.001). ABI after revascularization correlated with patient-reported changes in the physical function and QoL domains of the PAQ. Twenty-two percent of PAD patients were identified as having a poor response to revascularization (increase in ABI < 0.15). Interestingly, poor responders reported improvement in symptoms on the PAQ, although this was less marked than in patients with an increase in ABI > 0.15 following revascularization. In conclusion, data from the current study suggest a significant correlation between improvement in patient-reported outcomes assessed by PAQ and ABI in symptomatic PAD patients undergoing peripheral revascularization. PMID:25993299

  16. Correlation between Patient-Reported Symptoms and Ankle-Brachial Index after Revascularization for Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Je, Hyung Gon; Kim, Bo Hyun; Cho, Kyoung Im; Jang, Jae Sik; Park, Yong Hyun; Spertus, John

    2015-05-18

    Improvement in quality of life (QoL) is a primary treatment goal for patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The current study aimed to quantify improvement in the health status of PAD patients following peripheral revascularization using the peripheral artery questionnaire (PAQ) and ankle-brachial index (ABI), and to evaluate possible correlation between the two methods. The PAQ and ABI were assessed in 149 symptomatic PAD patients before, and three months after peripheral revascularization. Mean PAQ summary scores improved significantly three months after revascularization (+49.3 ± 15 points, p < 0.001). PAQ scores relating to patient symptoms showed the largest improvement following revascularization. The smallest increases were seen in reported treatment satisfaction (all p's < 0.001). As expected the ABI of treated limbs showed significant improvement post-revascularization (p < 0.001). ABI after revascularization correlated with patient-reported changes in the physical function and QoL domains of the PAQ. Twenty-two percent of PAD patients were identified as having a poor response to revascularization (increase in ABI < 0.15). Interestingly, poor responders reported improvement in symptoms on the PAQ, although this was less marked than in patients with an increase in ABI > 0.15 following revascularization. In conclusion, data from the current study suggest a significant correlation between improvement in patient-reported outcomes assessed by PAQ and ABI in symptomatic PAD patients undergoing peripheral revascularization.

  17. UBC-Nepal Expedition: Acute alterations in sympathetic nervous activity do not influence brachial artery endothelial function at sea-level and high-altitude.

    PubMed

    Tymko, Michael M; Tremblay, Joshua C; Steinback, Craig D; Moore, Jonathan P; Hansen, Alex B; Patrician, Alexander; Howe, Connor A; Hoiland, Ryan L; Green, Daniel J; Ainslie, Philip N

    2017-08-31

    Evidence indicates that increases in sympathetic nervous activity (SNA), and acclimatization to high-altitude (HA), may reduce endothelial function as assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD); however, it is unclear whether such changes in FMD are due to direct vascular constraint, or consequential altered hemodynamics (e.g. shear stress) associated with increased SNA as a consequence of exposure to HA. We hypothesized that: 1) at rest, SNA would be elevated and FMD would be reduced at HA compared to sea-level (SL); and 2) at SL and HA, FMD would be reduced when SNA was acutely increased, and elevated when SNA was acutely decreased. Using a novel, randomized experimental design, brachial artery FMD was assessed at SL (344m) and HA (5050m) in 14 participants during mild lower-body negative pressure (LBNP; -10 mmHg) and lower-body positive pressure (LBPP; +10 mmHg). Blood pressure (finger photoplethysmography), heart rate (electrodcardiogram), oxygen saturation (pulse oximetry), and brachial artery blood flow and shear rate (Duplex ultrasound) were recorded during LBNP, control, and LBPP trials. Muscle SNA was recorded (via microneurography) in a subset of participants (n=5). Our findings were: 1) at rest, SNA was elevated (P<0.01), and absolute FMD was reduced (P=0.024), but relative FMD remained unaltered (P=0.061), at HA compared to SL, and 2) despite significantly altering SNA with LBNP (+60.3±25.5%) and LBPP (-37.2±12.7%) (P<0.01), FMD was unaltered at SL (P=0.448), and HA (P=0.537). These data indicate that acute and mild changes in SNA do not directly influence brachial artery FMD at SL or HA. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  18. Delayed brachial artery dilation response and increased resting blood flow velocity in young children with mild sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Anna; van den Heuvel, Cameron; Pamula, Yvonne; Martin, James; Lushington, Kurt; Baumert, Mathias; Willoughby, Scott; Gent, Roger; Couper, Jenny; Kennedy, Declan

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether the vascular dysfunction perceived in adults with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) was also evident in children with snoring referred for evaluation of clinically suspected SDB. This study compared flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), measured at the brachial artery, at rest and during hyperaemic stress between children who snore [n = 23; mean standard deviation (SD) age = 7.51 (1.3) years] and healthy, non-snoring children [n = 11; age = 8.0 (1.3) years]. Children with suspected obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and healthy non-snoring controls underwent overnight polysomnography (PSG). Using standard techniques, non-invasive FMD and brachial arterial blood flow velocity during rest and hyperaemia were subsequently measured by ultrasound imaging Resting and hyperaemic velocity time integral (area under the curve of mean systolic velocity × ejection time), maximal dilation response (highest percentage difference from baseline diameter) and the time taken to reach maximal dilation were calculated. Children awaiting adenotonsillectomy compared to healthy non-snoring control children had higher velocity time integrals at rest (14 ± 3 m vs. 20 ± 8 m, p < 0.01) and during hyperaemic stress (56 ± 6m vs. 63 ± 13m, p < 0.01) despite having only mild SDB on polysomnographic assessment. Lower nadir oxygen saturation values during non-rapid eye movement sleep were negatively associated with higher resting (r = -0.58, p <0.001) and hyperaemic (r = -0.36, p < 0.05) velocity time integrals. Maximal FMD dilatation response was not significantly different between snoring and non-snoring groups, but the estimated time to reach maximal dilation was significantly delayed in children who snored (60.7 ± 28.4 vs. 39.2 ± 13.2 s, p < 0.05). Children with mild SDB showed increased blood flow velocity at rest and during hyperaemic stress suggesting altered cardiovascular and

  19. Heart failure patients demonstrate impaired changes in brachial artery blood flow and shear rate pattern during moderate-intensity cycle exercise.

    PubMed

    Benda, Nathalie M M; Seeger, Joost P H; van Lier, Dirk P T; Bellersen, Louise; van Dijk, Arie P J; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2015-04-01

    What is the central question of this study? We explored whether heart failure (HF) patients demonstrate different exercise-induced brachial artery shear rate patterns compared with control subjects. What is the main finding and its importance? Moderate-intensity cycle exercise in HF patients is associated with an attenuated increase in brachial artery anterograde and mean shear rate and skin temperature. Differences between HF patients and control subjects cannot be explained fully by differences in workload. HF patients demonstrate a less favourable shear rate pattern during cycle exercise compared with control subjects. Repeated elevations in shear rate (SR) in conduit arteries, which occur during exercise, represent a key stimulus to improve vascular function. We explored whether heart failure (HF) patients demonstrate distinct changes in SR in response to moderate-intensity cycle exercise compared with healthy control subjects. We examined brachial artery SR during 40 min of cycle exercise at a work rate equivalent to 65% peak oxygen uptake in 14 HF patients (65 ± 7 years old, 13 men and one woman) and 14 control subjects (61 ± 5 years old, 12 men and two women). Brachial artery diameter, SR and oscillatory shear index (OSI) were assessed using ultrasound at baseline and during exercise. The HF patients demonstrated an attenuated increase in mean and anterograde brachial artery SR during exercise compared with control subjects (time × group interaction, P = 0.003 and P < 0.001, respectively). Retrograde SR increased at the onset of exercise and remained increased throughout the exercise period in both groups (time × group interaction, P = 0.11). In control subjects, the immediate increase in OSI during exercise (time, P < 0.001) was normalized after 35 min of cycling. In contrast, the increase in OSI after the onset of exercise did not normalize in HF patients (time × group interaction, P = 0.029). Subgroup analysis of five HF patients and five control

  20. Diffuse aneurysmal degeneration of the brachial artery after long-standing high-flow arteriovenous fistula closure for hemodialysis at elbow level.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Francesco; Martini, Guido; Mani, Gabriele; Bernhard, Othmar

    2014-07-01

    While the possibility of development of a panarterial dilatation proximal to a long-standing high-flow posttraumatic arteriovenous fistula is well known, to the best of our knowledge, this event has never been described after vascular access for hemodialysis closure. We describe a man in whom a diffuse aneurysmal degeneration of the brachial artery has been highlighted 6 months after long-standing high-flow arteriovenous fistula closure. A 47-year-old man developed a painful pulsatile mass in the anterior distal third of his arm 6 months after long-standing high-flow arteriovenous fistula closure at the level of his elbow. A computed tomography scan revealed multiple "true" aneurysms of the brachial artery (BA) that appeared enlarged in toto. One of these aneurysms (near the BA bifurcation) presented with significant thrombus stratification. Surgery was recommended because of the major risk of peripheral embolization. Considering the anatomic characteristics of both the BA and aneurysm, no arterial substitution was performed and, after removal of the thrombus, the aneurysm diameter was reduced via direct arterial wall suture. The patient was discharged under oral anticoagulation. Aneurysmal degeneration of the donor artery after vascular access is relatively rare but represents a challenging problem. Operative or conservative management of these aneurysms should evaluate both the possible aneurysm-related complications and the feasibility of vascular reconstruction. In this context, the risk of additional donor artery and/or vascular reconstruction enlargement over time should also be considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 2D.08: COMPARISON OF CENTRAL HEMODYNAMIC INDICES FOR PREDICTING THE PRESENCE AND SEVERITY OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE USING A BRACHIAL CUFF-BASED OSCILLOMETRIC DEVICE.

    PubMed

    Nakagomi, A; Okada, S; Shoji, T; Kobayashi, Y

    2015-06-01

    Various indices of central hemodynamics, such as aortic pulsatility, pulse pressure amplification (PPA) and augmentation index, have been proposed as novel predictors for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it remains unknown which parameter is most appropriate for risk estimation. The aim of this study was to compare the predictive value of these indices using an easy-to-use, brachial cuff-based oscillometric device. Consecutive 139 patients undergoing elective coronary angiography were enrolled in this study. Augmentation index adjusted to 75 beats/min (Aix@75), brachial and aortic BP indices were measured with Mobil-O-Graph®. We defined fractional pulse pressure (FPP) as pulse pressure (PP) per mean BP and PPA as brachial PP minus aortic PP. Significant CAD was defined as having more than 50% stenosis in major coronary arteries, and the severity was evaluated with Gensini score. Compared with no CAD patients, CAD patients showed significantly higher PPs and FPPs (brachial PP 48.4 ± 15.5 vs 55.0 ± 16.2mmHg, aortic PP 51.7 ± 19.4 vs 62.2 ± 19.9mmHg, brachial FPP 0.42 ± 0.09 vs 0.49 ± 0.11, aortic FPP 0.46 ± 0.13 vs 0.57 ± 0.14; all p < 0.05) and lower PPA (-3.3 ± 8.7 vs -7.2 ± 7.8; p < 0.05). Other indices including Aix@75 did not differ significantly. Logistic regression analysis revealed aortic PP, brachial FPP, aortic FPP and PPA each correlated with the presence of CAD after adjustment for potential confounders (odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence interval]: aortic PP per 10 mmHg OR = 1.50 [1.08-2.08], brachial FPP per 0.1 OR = 2.26 [1.30-3.94], aortic FPP per 0.1 OR = 2.15 [1.35-3.42], PPA per 1 mmHg OR = 0.93 [0.87-0.99], respectively). However, when aortic FPP plus either aortic PP, brachial FPP, or PPA were included in the model, only aortic FPP remained significant. These indices were all associated with the severity of CAD expressed as Gensini score (correlation coefficient

  2. Doppler assessment of brachial artery flow as a measure of endothelial dysfunction in pediatric chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Gehan; Bughdady, Yasser; Kandil, Manal E; Bazaraa, Hafez M; Taher, Heba

    2008-11-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are highly prevalent among patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Endothelial dysfunction is regarded as the initial reversible step in the development of atherosclerosis and has been demonstrated in all stages of renal failure. Non-invasive techniques to assess endothelial function have been recently developed and have been proven to predict future mortality in adults. We aimed to assess endothelial function in children with stage 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD 4) on conservative treatment, using a-non invasive, high-resolution, ultrasound Doppler study of the brachial artery flow, correlating it with other clinical and laboratory parameters. This study included 34 children with CKD 4 on conservative treatment who were compared with 30 healthy controls. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), nitroglycerin-mediated dilatation (NTG-MD) and FMD/NTG-MD ratio were estimated. FMD was abnormal (< 5%) in 24 patients (71%). FMD and FMD/NTG-MD ratio were significantly lower in patients than in controls (P = 0.001 and P = 0.01, respectively). FMD correlated positively with serum calcium and negatively with alkaline phosphatase. We concluded that endothelial dysfunction is present in children with CKD 4 on conservative treatment and may reflect increased atherogenic and thrombogenic properties of the endothelium, contributing to subsequent adverse cardiovascular outcome.

  3. Ascorbic acid improves brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly through a nitric oxide-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Trinity, Joel D; Wray, D Walter; Witman, Melissa A H; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Reese, Van; Zhao, Jia; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-03-15

    The proposed mechanistic link between the age-related attenuation in vascular function and free radicals is an attractive hypothesis; however, direct evidence of free radical attenuation and a concomitant improvement in vascular function in the elderly is lacking. Therefore, this study sought to test the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA), administered intra-arterially during progressive handgrip exercise, improves brachial artery (BA) vasodilation in a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent manner, by mitigating free radical production. BA vasodilation (Doppler ultrasound) and free radical outflow [electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy] were measured in seven healthy older adults (69 ± 2 yr) during handgrip exercise at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg (∼13-52% of maximal voluntary contraction) during the control condition and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition via N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), AA, and coinfusion of l-NMMA + AA. Baseline BA diameter was not altered by any of the treatments, while L-NMMA and L-NMMA + AA diminished baseline BA blood flow and shear rate. AA improved BA dilation compared with control at 9 kg (control: 6.5 ± 2.2%, AA: 10.9 ± 2.5%, P = 0.01) and 12 kg (control: 9.5 ± 2.7%, AA: 15.9 ± 3.7%, P < 0.01). NOS inhibition blunted BA vasodilation compared with control and when combined with AA eliminated the AA-induced improvement in BA vasodilation. Free radical outflow increased with exercise intensity but, interestingly, was not attenuated by AA. Collectively, these results indicate that AA improves BA vasodilation in the elderly during handgrip exercise through an NO-dependent mechanism; however, this improvement appears not to be the direct consequence of attenuated free radical outflow from the forearm.

  4. Ascorbic acid improves brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly through a nitric oxide-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wray, D. Walter; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J.; Conklin, Jamie D.; Reese, Van; Zhao, Jia; Richardson, Russell S.

    2016-01-01

    The proposed mechanistic link between the age-related attenuation in vascular function and free radicals is an attractive hypothesis; however, direct evidence of free radical attenuation and a concomitant improvement in vascular function in the elderly is lacking. Therefore, this study sought to test the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA), administered intra-arterially during progressive handgrip exercise, improves brachial artery (BA) vasodilation in a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent manner, by mitigating free radical production. BA vasodilation (Doppler ultrasound) and free radical outflow [electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy] were measured in seven healthy older adults (69 ± 2 yr) during handgrip exercise at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg (∼13–52% of maximal voluntary contraction) during the control condition and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition via NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA), AA, and coinfusion of l-NMMA + AA. Baseline BA diameter was not altered by any of the treatments, while l-NMMA and l-NMMA + AA diminished baseline BA blood flow and shear rate. AA improved BA dilation compared with control at 9 kg (control: 6.5 ± 2.2%, AA: 10.9 ± 2.5%, P = 0.01) and 12 kg (control: 9.5 ± 2.7%, AA: 15.9 ± 3.7%, P < 0.01). NOS inhibition blunted BA vasodilation compared with control and when combined with AA eliminated the AA-induced improvement in BA vasodilation. Free radical outflow increased with exercise intensity but, interestingly, was not attenuated by AA. Collectively, these results indicate that AA improves BA vasodilation in the elderly during handgrip exercise through an NO-dependent mechanism; however, this improvement appears not to be the direct consequence of attenuated free radical outflow from the forearm. PMID:26801312

  5. A control systems approach to quantify wall shear stress normalization by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery.

    PubMed

    van Bussel, Frank C G; van Bussel, Bas C T; Hoeks, Arnold P G; Op 't Roodt, Jos; Henry, Ronald M A; Ferreira, Isabel; Vanmolkot, Floris H M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Reesink, Koen D

    2015-01-01

    Flow-mediated dilation is aimed at normalization of local wall shear stress under varying blood flow conditions. Blood flow velocity and vessel diameter are continuous and opposing influences that modulate wall shear stress. We derived an index FMDv to quantify wall shear stress normalization performance by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery. In 22 fasting presumed healthy men, we first assessed intra- and inter-session reproducibilities of two indices pFMDv and mFMDv, which consider the relative peak and relative mean hyperemic change in flow velocity, respectively. Second, utilizing oral glucose loading, we evaluated the tracking performance of both FMDv indices, in comparison with existing indices [i.e., the relative peak diameter increase (%FMD), the peak to baseline diameter ratio (Dpeak/Dbase), and the relative peak diameter increase normalized to the full area under the curve of blood flow velocity with hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC) or with area integrated to peak hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC_peak)]. Inter-session and intra-session reproducibilities for pFMDv, mFMDv and %FMD were comparable (intra-class correlation coefficients within 0.521-0.677 range). Both pFMDv and mFMDv showed more clearly a reduction after glucose loading (reduction of ~45%, p≤0.001) than the other indices (% given are relative reductions): %FMD (~11%, p≥0.074); Dpeak/Dbase (~11%, p≥0.074); FMD/shearAUC_peak (~20%, p≥0.016) and FMD/shearAUC (~38%, p≤0.038). Further analysis indicated that wall shear stress normalization under normal (fasting) conditions is already far from ideal (FMDv < 1), which (therefore) does not materially change with glucose loading. Our approach might be useful in intervention studies to detect intrinsic changes in shear stress normalization performance in conduit arteries.

  6. The combined influence of fat consumption and repeated mental stress on brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Poitras, Veronica J; Slattery, David J; Levac, Brendan M; Fergus, Stevenson; Gurd, Brendon J; Pyke, Kyra E

    2014-04-01

    Experienced separately, both acute mental stress and high-fat meal consumption can transiently impair endothelial function, and the purpose of the present study was to investigate their combined impact. On four separate days, 10 healthy men (23 years old) underwent brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) tests, before and hourly for 4 h post-consumption of a high-fat (HFM; 54 g fat) or low-fat meal (LFM; 0 g fat; each meal ∼ 1000 calories), with hourly mental stress (mental arithmetic, speech) or control (counting) tasks (conditions HFM+S, LFM+S, HFM and LFM). Data are presented as means ± SD. Plasma triglycerides increased and remained elevated after the high-fat but not the low-fat meal (P = 0.004) and were not affected by mental stress (P = 0.329). Indices of stress reactivity increased during mental stress tasks (mean arterial pressure, ∼ 20 mmHg; heart rate, ∼ 22 beats min(-1); salivary cortisol, ∼ 2.37 nmol l(-1); and plasma noradrenaline, ∼ 0.17 ng ml(-1)) and were not influenced by meal (P > 0.05). There was no effect of the type of meal on FMD (P = 0.562); however, FMD was 4.5 ± 0.5% in the control conditions and 5.8 ± 0.6% in the mental stress conditions (P = 0.087), and this difference was significant when normalized for the shear stress stimulus (FMD/area under the curve of shear stress, P = 0.045). Overall, these preliminary data suggest that postprandial FMD was augmented with mental stress irrespective of meal type. These results are contrary to previous reports of impaired endothelial function after mental stress or fat consumption independently and highlight the need to further investigate the mechanisms underlying the interactions between these factors.

  7. Characterization of endothelial function in the brachial artery via affine registration of ultrasonographic image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamata, Pablo; Laclaustra, Martin; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2003-05-01

    The assessment and characterization of the endothelial function is a current research topic as it may play an important role in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. Flow mediated dilatation may be used to investigate endothelial function, and B-mode ultrasonography is a cheap and non-invasive way to assess the vasodilation response. Computerized analysis techniques are very desirable to give higher accuracy and objectivity to the measurements. A new method is presented that solves some limitations of existing methods, which in general depend on accurate edge detection of the arterial wall. This method is based on a global image analysis strategy. The arterial vasodilation between two frames is modeled by a superposition of a rigid motion model and a stretching perpendicular to the artery. Both transformation models are recovered using an image registration algorithm based on normalized mutual information and a multi-resolution search framework. Temporal continuity of in the variation of the registration parameters is enforced with a Kalman filter, since the dilation process is known to be a gradual and continuous physiological phenomenon. The proposed method presents a negligible bias when compared with manual assessment. It also eliminates artifacts introduced by patient and probe motion, thus improving the accuracy of the measurements. Finally, it is also robust to typical problems of ultrasound, like speckle noise and poor image quality.

  8. Acute psychological and physical stress transiently enhances brachial artery flow-mediated dilation stimulated by exercise-induced increases in shear stress.

    PubMed

    Szijgyarto, Ingrid C; Poitras, Veronica J; Gurd, Brendon J; Pyke, Kyra E

    2014-08-01

    Exercise elevates conduit artery shear stress and stimulates flow-mediated dilation (FMD). However, little is known regarding the impact of acute psychological and physical stress on this response. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST (speech and arithmetic tasks)) and a cold pressor test (CPT) with and without social evaluation (SE) on exercise-induced brachial artery FMD (EX-FMD). A total of 59 healthy male subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: TSST, CPT, or CPT with SE. During 6 min of handgrip exercise, brachial artery EX-FMD was assessed before and 15 and 35 min poststress with echo and Doppler ultrasound. Shear stress was estimated as shear rate, calculated as brachial artery mean blood velocity/brachial artery diameter. Results are means ± SD. All conditions elicited significant physiological stress responses. Salivary cortisol increased from 4.6 ± 2.4 nmol/L to 10.0 ± 5.0 nmol/L (p < 0.001; condition effect: p = 0.292). Mean arterial pressure increased from 98.6 ± 12.1 mm Hg to 131.9 ± 18.7 mm Hg (p < 0.001; condition effect: p = 0.664). Exercise shear rate did not differ between conditions (p = 0.592), although it was modestly lower poststress (prestress: 72.3 ± 4.5 s(-1); 15 min poststress: 70.8 ± 5.4 s(-1); 35 min poststress: 70.6 ± 6.1 s(-1); trial effect: p = 0.011). EX-FMD increased from prestress to 15 min poststress in all conditions (prestress: 6.2% ± 2.8%; 15 min poststress: 7.9% ± 3.2%; 35 min poststress: 6.6% ± 2.9%; trial effect: p < 0.001; condition effect: p = 0.611). In conclusion, all conditions elicited similar stress responses that transiently enhanced EX-FMD. This response may help to support muscle perfusion during stress.

  9. Impact of Weight Loss on Ankle-Brachial Index and Inter-Artery Blood Pressures in Overweight and Obese Adults with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Espeland, Mark A.; Lewis, Cora E.; Bahnson, Judy; Knowler, William C.; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Gaussoin, Sarah A.; Beavers, Daniel; Johnson, Karen C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess whether weight loss improves markers of peripheral artery disease and vascular stenosis. Design and Methods The Action for Health in Diabetes randomized clinical trial compared intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss to a control condition of diabetes support and education (DSE) in overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Annual ankle and brachial blood pressures over four years were used compute ankle-brachial indices (ABIs) and to assess inter-artery blood pressure differences in 5018 participants. Results ILI, compared to DSE, produced 7.8% (Year 1) to 3.6% (Year 4) greater weight losses. These did not affect prevalence of low (<0.90) ABI (3.60% in DSE versus 3.14% in ILI; p=0.20) or elevated (>1.40) ABI (7.52% in DSE versus 7.59% in ILI: p=0.90), but produced smaller mean (SE) maximum inter-artery systolic blood pressure differences among ankle sites [19.7 (0.2) mmHg for ILI versus 20.6 (0.2) mmHg for DSE (p<0.001)] and between arms [5.8 (0.1) mmHg for ILI versus 6.1 (0.1) mmHg for DSE (p=0.01)]. Conclusions Four years of intensive behavioral weight loss intervention did not significantly alter prevalence of abnormal ABI, however it did reduce differences in systolic blood pressures among arterial sites. PMID:24174392

  10. Measurement of brachial artery endothelial function using a standard blood pressure cuff

    PubMed Central

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Tison, Geoffrey H; Alley, Hugh F; Budinger, Thomas F; Owens, Christopher D; Olgin, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The integrity of endothelial function in major arteries (EFMA) is a powerful independent predictor of heart attack and stroke. Existing ultrasound-based non-invasive assessment methods are technically challenging and suitable only for laboratory settings. EFMA, like blood pressure (BP), is both acutely and chronically affected by factors such as lifestyle and medication. Consequently, lab-based measurements cannot fully gauge the effects of medical interventions on EFMA. EFMA and BP have, arguably, comparable (but complementary) value in the assessment of cardiovascular health. Widespread deployment of EFMA assessment is thus a desirable clinical goal. To this end, we propose a device based on modifying the measurement protocol of a standard electronic sphygmomanometer. Methods The protocol involves inflating the cuff to sub-diastolic levels to enable recording of the pulse waveform before and after vasodilatory stimulus. The mechanical unloading of the arterial wall provided by the cuff amplifies the distension that occurs with each pulse, which is measured as a pressure variation in the cuff. We show that the height of the rising edge of each pulse is proportional to the change in lumen area between diastole and systole. This allows the effect of vasodilatory stimuli on the artery to be measured with high sensitivity. We compare the proposed cuff flow-mediated dilation (cFMD) method to ultrasound FMD (uFMD). Results We find significant correlation (r=0.55, p = 0.003, N=27) between cFMD- and uFMD-based metrics obtained when the release of a 5-minute cuff occlusion is employed to induce endothelial stimulus via reactive hyperemia. cFMD is approximately proportional to the square of uFMD, representing a typical increase in sensitivity to vasodilation of 300–600%. Conclusion This study illustrates the potential for an individual to conveniently measure his/her EFMA by using a low-cost reprogrammed home sphygmomanometer. PMID:26393958

  11. Non-invasive vascular assessment in the foot with diabetes: sensitivity and specificity of the ankle brachial index, toe brachial index and continuous wave Doppler for detecting peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Tehan, Peta Ellen; Bray, Alan; Chuter, Vivienne Helaine

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive lower limb vascular assessment in people at risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) including those with diabetes is crucial. There is evidence that standard assessment techniques such as the ankle-brachial index (ABI) may be less effective in people with diabetes. However there is limited evidence for other frequently used tests including continuous wave Doppler (CWD), and the toe-brachial index (TBI). The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of, ABI, CWD and TBI in a population with, and without diabetes. Participants with and without diabetes who met current guidelines for vascular screening were recruited, and CWD waveforms, an ABI and a TBI were obtained from the right lower limb. Diagnostic accuracy was determined using colour duplex ultrasound (CFDU). Receiver operating characteristic curves were calculated. 117 participants were recruited, seventy-two with diabetes and forty-five without diabetes. CWD had the highest sensitivity in people with diabetes (74%) and without (84%). CWD also had the highest specificity in people with diabetes (74%) and without (84%) compared to both TBI and ABI. In participants with diabetes, the ABI was a poor test, area under the curve: 0.58 (p=0.27). CWD waveform is more likely to detect significant PAD compared to ABI and TBI in people with and without diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation and carotid intima-media thickness in young ED patients with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Chen, S-F; Yao, F-J; Sun, X-Z; Wu, R-P; Huang, Y-P; Zheng, F-F; Yang, Q-Y; Han, D-Y; Xie, M-Q; Ding, M; Zhang, Y; Liu, G-H; Deng, C-H

    2016-09-01

    The evidence of a close relationship between cardiovascular disease and erectile dysfunction (ED) is well documented. The aim of this study is to investigate whether there is an early asymptomatic impairment of the peripheral vasculature in young ED patients without obvious cardiovascular disease. We studied a total of 261 ED patients (19-40 years old) and 40 age-matched healthy controls. All participants received questionnaires of cardiovascular risk factors and erectile function assessment, were subjected to lab tests of fasting blood sample, and underwent the ultrasonographic examination of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT). Insulin resistance (IR) was measured by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Compared with normal human controls, FMD was significantly lower, whereas the average c-IMT was significantly greater in ED patients. An inverse correlation was found between FMD and mean c-IMT. The ED patients had significantly higher levels of fasting glucose, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR index, but showed relatively lower total testosterone and prolactin levels than the controls. Both FMD and c-IMT showed a significant correlation with International Index of Erectile Function-5 questionnaire (IIEF-5) score, age and HOMA-IR. Multivariate stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that age, HOMA-IR and IIEF-5 score were the risk factors associated with FMD and c-IMT. In conclusion, young ED patients in association with IR display diminished FMD and increased c-IMT. Furthermore, ED, HOMA-IR and age are independent predictors of the two subclinical atherosclerotic markers.

  13. Reproducibility of near-infrared spectroscopy parameters measured during brachial artery occlusion and reactive hyperemia in healthy men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Sébastien; Gayda, Mathieu; Gremeaux, Vincent; Juneau, Martin; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Nigam, Anil

    2012-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive technique evaluating microvascular function. The aim of this study was to assess the reproducibility of NIRS parameters during reactive hyperemia induced by a 5 min brachial artery occlusion. Twenty-four healthy young males (mean 34+/-8 years old) had two microvascular function evaluations by NIRS over a 7 to 30-day period (mean 16+/-10 days). Intra-subject and inter-observer reproducibility were evaluated with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), coefficient of variation (CV), and standard error of measurement (SEM%) for every parameter. Mean NIRS parameters did not differ between both evaluations. Reproducibility was greatest for muscle oxygen consumption (ICC: 0.84; CV: 6.51% SEM: 7.11%), time to basal O2Hb (ICC: 0.63, CV: 20.04%, SEM 27.22%), time to maximal O2Hb (ICC: 0.71; CV: 15.61% SEM: 19.27%), peak of O2Hb (ICC: 0.63, CV: 6.68%, SEM 8.53%), time to maximal tHb (ICC: 0.73, CV: 19,61%, SEM 24.56%) and area under the O2Hb and tHb curves (ICC: 0.68, CV: 16.15%, SEM 22.93% and ICC: 0.62, CV: 18.59%, SEM 26.64%, respectively). Moreover, inter-observer reproducibility ranged from excellent to perfect (ICC from 0.85 to 1.00) for every parameter. NIRS parameters during reactive hyperemia are highly reproducible which enables their repeated measurement to study microvascular function in healthy subjects.

  14. Anterior humeral circumflex artery avulsion with brachial plexus injury following an isolated traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rohi; Koris, Jacob; Wazir, Akhlaq; Srinivasan, Shyamsundar S

    2016-03-11

    A 70-year-old man presented to accident and emergency with an isolated anteriorly dislocated shoulder, in the absence of a concomitant fracture. There was no neurovascular deficit at presentation, and the shoulder was reduced under sedation, using the Kocher's technique. Following this, the patient developed signs of hypovolaemic shock. Clinical examination revealed an expanding fullness in the deltopectoral area, with compromise of the limb neurovascular status. CT imaging confirmed an expanding haematoma from the axillary vessels, restricting left lung expansion. Once resuscitated, the patient was transferred to theatre for exploration of the bleeding vessels. Intraoperative findings included an avulsed anterior circumflex humeral artery that was subsequently ligated. Postoperatively, the patient developed axillary, radial, median and ulnar nerve neuropraxia, which improved clinically prior to discharge. The patient was ultimately discharged home after a lengthy inpatient stay. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. [Efficacy of a massage and exercise programme on the ankle-brachial index and blood pressure in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and peripheral arterial disease: a randomized clinical trial].

    PubMed

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Feriche-Fernández-Castanys, Belén; Sánchez Labraca, Nuria; Sánchez Joya, María del Mar

    2010-02-06

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent disease that can favour the development of peripheral arterial disease. The objective of this study was to analyse the efficacy of a massage and exercise programme on the ankle-brachial index and arterial pressure of patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and peripheral arterial disease. An experimental study with placebo control group was performed. Sixty-six type 2 diabetes patients with Leriche-Fontaine stage II peripheral arterial disease were randomly assigned to an intervention (exercise and massage) or placebo control (simulated magnetotherapy) group. Study variables were arterial pressure and ankle-brachial index. After 10 weeks of treatment, significant (P<0.05) differences between the intervention and placebo groups were found in right and left ankle-brachial index values and in systolic and diastolic pressures in right and left lower extremities. A combined programme of exercise and massage improves arterial blood pressure and ankle brachial index values in type 2 diabetics with peripheral arterial disease. Copyright 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of different edge detections and noise reduction on ultrasound images of carotid and brachial arteries using a speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion filter.

    PubMed

    Rafati, Mehravar; Arabfard, Masoud; Rafati-Rahimzadeh, Mehrdad

    2014-09-01

    Common carotid artery (CCA) ultrasound with measurement of intima-media thickness (IMT) is a safe and noninvasive technique for assessing subclinical atherosclerosis and determining cardiovascular risks. Moreover, the pattern of wall thickening in the brachial artery (BA) is rather diffuse compared to the carotid artery and may be a more sensitive indicator of long-term systemic exposure to risk factors. Therefore noninvasive evaluation of mechanical parameters changes of both arteries has gained the attention of researchers. The aim of this study was to compare different edge detection techniques with speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD) de-noising filter in ultrasound images of both arteries. In a cross-sectional design, an examination was performed on ten men with mean age of 40 ± 5 years from September 2012 to March 2013 through random sampling. An ultrasonic examination of the left CCA and BA was performed. The program was designed in the MATLAB software to extract consecutive images in JPEG format from the AVI. Another program was designed in the MATLAB software to apply regions of interest (ROI) on the IMT of the posterior wall of common carotid and brachial arteries. Next, different edge detections and SRAD filter were applied to the ROI, separately. Finally, the program measured mean-squared error (MSE) and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR). The lowest values of MSE and highest values of PSNR were achieved by Canny edge detection with de-noising SRAD filter for IMT of left CCA and BA in 90 frames. Based on the result, by measuring the MSE and PSNR, this study showed Canny edge detection with SRAD filter is better than other edge detections in terms of speckle suppression and details preservation in CCA and BA ultrasound images.

  17. Comparison of Different Edge Detections and Noise Reduction on Ultrasound Images of Carotid and Brachial Arteries Using a Speckle Reducing Anisotropic Diffusion Filter

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, Mehravar; Arabfard, Masoud; Rafati-Rahimzadeh, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Common carotid artery (CCA) ultrasound with measurement of intima-media thickness (IMT) is a safe and noninvasive technique for assessing subclinical atherosclerosis and determining cardiovascular risks. Moreover, the pattern of wall thickening in the brachial artery (BA) is rather diffuse compared to the carotid artery and may be a more sensitive indicator of long-term systemic exposure to risk factors. Therefore noninvasive evaluation of mechanical parameters changes of both arteries has gained the attention of researchers. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare different edge detection techniques with speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD) de-noising filter in ultrasound images of both arteries. Patients and Methods: In a cross-sectional design, an examination was performed on ten men with mean age of 40 ± 5 years from September 2012 to March 2013 through random sampling. An ultrasonic examination of the left CCA and BA was performed. The program was designed in the MATLAB software to extract consecutive images in JPEG format from the AVI. Another program was designed in the MATLAB software to apply regions of interest (ROI) on the IMT of the posterior wall of common carotid and brachial arteries. Next, different edge detections and SRAD filter were applied to the ROI, separately. Finally, the program measured mean-squared error (MSE) and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR). Results: The lowest values of MSE and highest values of PSNR were achieved by Canny edge detection with de-noising SRAD filter for IMT of left CCA and BA in 90 frames. Conclusions: Based on the result, by measuring the MSE and PSNR, this study showed Canny edge detection with SRAD filter is better than other edge detections in terms of speckle suppression and details preservation in CCA and BA ultrasound images. PMID:25593716

  18. Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral fracture of the distal radius associated with a brachial artery injury: A new pathological condition of traumatic origin.

    PubMed

    Trigo Lahoz, L; Lamas Gomez, C; Sarasquete Reiriz, J; de Caso Rodriguez, J; Proubasta Renart, I

    2016-11-25

    Elbow dislocation associated with ipsilateral fracture of the distal radius and a brachial artery injury is an uncommon traumatic entity. The two references of this injury combination appeared in 2015, although both authors did not realise that they were the first two cases published in the medical literature. Although mentioned in the text of the articles, no mention was made of the fracture of the distal radius in the titles. The purpose of this paper is to present three cases with this new traumatic pathological entity, explaining its pathogenetic mechanism, the treatment used, and the results obtained.

  19. Brachial plexus

    MedlinePlus

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that run from the lower neck through the upper shoulder area. ... Damage to the brachial plexus nerves can cause muscle and sensation problems that are often associated with pain in the same area. Symptoms ...

  20. Restoration of prehension with the double free muscle technique following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. Indications and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Doi, K; Muramatsu, K; Hattori, Y; Otsuka, K; Tan, S H; Nanda, V; Watanabe, M

    2000-05-01

    Recent interest in reconstruction of the upper limb following brachial plexus injuries has focused on the restoration of prehension following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. Double free muscle transfer was performed in patients who had complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. After initial exploration of the brachial plexus and (if possible) repair of the fifth cervical nerve root, the first free muscle, used to restore elbow flexion and finger extension, is transferred and reinnervated by the spinal accessory nerve. The second free muscle, transferred to restore finger flexion, is reinnervated by the fifth and sixth intercostal nerves. The motor branch of the triceps brachii is reinnervated by the third and fourth intercostal nerves to restore elbow extension. Hand sensibility is restored by suturing of the sensory rami of the intercostal nerves to the median nerve or the ulnar nerve component of the medial cord. Secondary reconstructive procedures, such as arthrodesis of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb, shoulder arthrodesis, and tenolysis of the transferred muscle and the distal tendons, may be required to improve the functional outcome. The early results were evaluated in thirty-two patients who had had reconstruction with use of the double free muscle procedure. Twenty-six of these patients were followed for at least twenty-four months (mean duration, thirty-nine months) after the second free muscle transfer, and they were assessed with regard to the long-term outcome as well. Satisfactory (excellent or good) elbow flexion was restored in twenty-five (96 percent) of the twenty-six patients and satisfactory prehension (more than 30 degrees of total active motion of the fingers), in seventeen (65 percent). Fourteen patients (54 percent) could position the hand in space, negating simultaneous flexion of the elbow, while moving the fingers at least 30 degrees and could use the reconstructed hand for activities requiring the use of two hands, such

  1. Endothelial Dysfunction and Brachial Intima-Media Thickness: Long Term Cardiovascular Risk with Claudication Related to Peripheral Arterial Disease: A Prospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hafner, Franz; Kieninger, Andrea; Meinitzer, Andreas; Gary, Thomas; Froehlich, Harald; Haas, Elke; Hackl, Gerald; Eller, Philipp; Brodmann, Marianne; Seinost, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endothelial dysfunction plays a key role in the development, progression, and clinical manifestation of atherosclerosis, and in symptomatic peripheral arterial disease, endothelial dysfunction and enlarged intima-media thickness might be associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Flow-mediated dilatation and serologic parameters are used to evaluate individual endothelial function. Brachial intima-media thickness, a less recognized parameter of cardiovascular risk, is independently associated with coronary artery disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of ultrasound and serologic parameters of endothelial function in relation to cardiovascular mortality in peripheral arterial disease. Design monocentric, prospective cohort study. Methods Flow mediated dilatation and brachial intima-media thickness were assessed in 184 (124 male) patients with peripheral arterial disease (Rutherford stages 2–3). Serologic parameters of endothelial function included asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), and L-homoarginine. Cardiovascular events were recorded during a follow-up of 99.1±11.1 months. Subjects who died of noncardiovascular causes were excluded from further analysis. Results Eighty-two patients (44.6%) died during follow-up after a mean duration of 49.7±28.3 months. There were 49 cardiovascular deaths (59.8%) and 33 other deaths (40.2%). Flow mediated dilatation was associated with cardiovascular death [1.17% (0.0, 4.3) vs. 4.1% (1.2, 6.4), p<0.001]. Intima-media thickness was greater in patients who succumbed to cardiovascular disease [0.37 mm (0.30, 0.41)] than in survivors [0.21 mm (0.15, 0.38), p<0.001]. Brachial intima-media thickness above 0.345 mm was most predictive of cardiovascular death, with sensitivity and specificity values of 0.714 and 0.657, respectively (p<0.001). Furthermore, ADMA levels above 0.745 µmol/l and SDMA levels above 0.825 µmol/l were significantly associated with

  2. Brachial plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khadilkar, Satish V.; Khade, Snehaldatta S.

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury can occur as a result of trauma, inflammation or malignancies, and associated complications. The current topic is concerned with various forms of brachial plexopathy, its clinical features, pathophysiology, imaging findings, and management. Idiopathic brachial neuritis (IBN), often preceded with antecedent events such as infection, commonly present with abruptonset painful asymmetric upper limb weakness with associated wasting around the shoulder girdle and arm muscles. Idiopathic hypertrophic brachial neuritis, a rare condition, is usually painless to begin with, unlike IBN. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of paralysis and sensory disturbances in an affected limb, which is preceded by severe pain. While the frequency of the episodes tends to decrease with age, affected individuals suffer from residual deficits. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome affects the lower trunk of the brachial plexus. It is diagnosed on the basis of electrophysiology and is amenable to surgical intervention. Cancer-related brachial plexopathy may occur secondary to metastatic infiltration or radiation therapy. Traumatic brachial plexus injury is commonly encountered in neurology, orthopedic, and plastic surgery set-ups. Trauma may be a direct blow or traction or stretch injury. The prognosis depends on the extent and site of injury as well as the surgical expertise. PMID:23661957

  3. Relation of high cytomegalovirus antibody titres to blood pressure and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in young men: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

    PubMed

    Haarala, A; Kähönen, M; Lehtimäki, T; Aittoniemi, J; Jylhävä, J; Hutri-Kähönen, N; Taittonen, L; Laitinen, T; Juonala, M; Viikari, J; Raitakari, O T; Hurme, M

    2012-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease in immunocompromised organ transplant patients. It has been linked with the pathogenesis of elevated arterial blood pressure. However, controversy exists as to whether CMV infection is associated with endothelial function, and little is known about its role as a potential risk factor for early atherosclerosis development at a young age. We aimed to discover if CMV antibody titres are associated with early vascular changes (carotid intima-media thickness, carotid artery distensibility and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation), blood pressure elevation or other traditional cardiovascular risk factors. CMV antibody titres were measured in 1074 women and 857 men (aged 24-39 years) taking part in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study. CMV antibody titres were significantly higher in women compared to men. In men, high CMV antibody titres were associated directly with age (P < 0·001) and systolic (P = 0·053) and diastolic (P = 0·002) blood pressure elevation, and associated inversely with flow-mediated dilation (P = 0·014). In women, CMV antibody titres did not associate with any of the analysed parameters. In a multivariate regression model, which included traditional atherosclerotic risk factors, CMV antibody titres were independent determinants for systolic (P = 0·029) and diastolic (P = 0·004) blood pressure elevation and flow-mediated dilation (P = 0·014) in men. High CMV antibody titres are associated independently with blood pressure and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in young men. This association supports the hypothesis that common CMV infection and/or an immune response to CMV may lead to impaired vascular function at a young age. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2012 British Society for Immunology.

  4. Occluded Brescia-Cimino Hemodialysis Fistulas: Endovascular Treatment with Both Brachial Arterial and Venous Access Using the Pull-Through Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Matsui, Osamu; Taki, Keiichi; Minami, Tetsuya; Shinmura, Rieko; Ito, Chiharu; Takamatsu, Shigeyuki; Kobayashi, Miki; Ushiogi, Yashuyuki

    2005-12-15

    We retrospectively evaluated the usefulness of both arterial and venous access with the pull-through technique in endovascular treatment of totally occluded Brescia-Cimino fistulas. We treated 26 patients (17 men, 9 women; age range 43-82 years, mean age 66 years) with occluded Brescia-Cimino fistulas. First, the occluded segment was traversed from the antegrade brachial arterial access using a microcatheter-guidewire system. Second, the vein was retrogradely punctured after confirmation of all diseased segments, and a 0.014- or 0.016-inch guidewire was pulled through the venous access when the occluded segment was long. All interventions including thrombolysis, thromboaspiration, angioplasty, and stent placement were performed via the venous access. The occlusion was successfully crossed via the brachial arterial access in 23 patients (88%). In 2 patients it was done from the venous approach. In the remaining patient it was not possible to traverse the occluded segment. The pull-through technique was successful in all 19 attempts. Clinical success was achieved in 96%, the primary patency rates at 6, 12, and 18 months were 83%, 78%, and 69%, the primary assisted patency rates were 92%, 92%, and 72%, and the secondary patency rates were 92%, 92%, and 92%, respectively. Minor complications in 5 patients included venous perforation in 2 (8%), venous rupture in 1 (4%), and regional hematoma in 2 (8%). Our study suggests that endovascular treatments with both arterial and venous access using the pull-through technique are highly effective in restoring function in totally occluded Brescia-Cimino fistulas.

  5. Effect of dexamethasone in low volume supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A double-blinded randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Alarasan, Arun Kumar; Agrawal, Jitendre; Choudhary, Bhanu; Melhotra, Amrita; Uike, Satyendre; Mukherji, Arghya

    2016-01-01

    With the use of ultrasound, a minimal effective volume of 20 ml has been described for supraclavicular brachial plexus block. However achieving a long duration of analgesia with this minimal volume remains a challenge. We aimed to determine the effect of dexamethasone on onset and duration of analgesia in low volume supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each. Group C received saline (2 ml) + 20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine and Group D received dexamethasone (8 mg) + 20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Hemodynamic variables and visual analog scale (VAS) score were noted at regular intervals until 450 min. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block were measured. The incidence of "Halo" around brachial plexus was observed. Student's t-test and Chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. The onset of sensory and motor block was significantly earlier in dexamethasone group (10.36 ± 1.99 and 12 ± 1.64) minutes compared to control group (12.9 ± 2.23 and 18.03 ± 2.41) minutes. The duration of sensory and motor block was significantly prolonged in dexamethasone group (366 ± 28.11 and 337.33 ± 28.75) minutes compared to control group (242.66 ± 26.38 and 213 ± 26.80) minutes. The VAS score was significantly lower in dexamethasone group after 210 min. "Halo" was present around the brachial plexus in all patients in both the groups. Dexamethasone addition significantly increases the duration of analgesia in patients receiving low volume supraclavicular brachial plexus block. No significant side-effects were seen in patients receiving dexamethasone as an adjunct.

  6. [Ankle brachial index measurement].

    PubMed

    Rucigaj, Tanja Planinsek

    2014-10-01

    Ultrasound examinations are noninvasive diagnostic methods which, along with appropriate history and clinical examination, provide basic information on the etiology and spread of the disease, as well as on treatment options required in patients with chronic venous insufficiency and arterial flow impairment. Doppler flow meter offers useful data on venous blood return, primarily in great veins, while both deep and superficial veins as well as arteries can be visualized and data on venous and arterial hemodynamics obtained by duplex ultrasonography. In addition, Doppler flow meter provides data on the peripheral arterial system action through ankle brachial index measurement, which will guide the choice of compression therapy when deciding on the treatment of peripheral arterial disease and mixed arteriovenous leg ulcers. However, diagnosis of arterial insufficiency requires additional examinations.

  7. Technical aspects of double-skeletonized internal mammary artery grafting.

    PubMed

    Gurevitch, J; Kramer, A; Locker, C; Shapira, I; Paz, Y; Matsa, M; Mohr, R

    2000-03-01

    Bilateral internal mammary artery (IMA) grafting is performed to provide complete arterial myocardial revascularization with the intention of decreasing postoperative return of angina and the need for reoperation. We present here technical views of double-skeletonized IMA grafting, and evaluate its clinical outcome. Skeletonized IMA is harvested gently with scissors and silver clips, without use of cauterization, and embedded in a small syringe filled with papaverine. Three strategies for arterial revascularization were employed in 762 consecutive patients: (1) the cross arrangement (242 patients, 32%), where the in situ right internal mammary artery (RIMA) is used for the left anterior descending artery (LAD), in situ left internal mammary artery (LIMA) to circumflex marginal branches and the gastroepiploic artery for the right coronary artery (RCA); (2) the composite arrangement (476 patients, 62%), where free IMA is attached end-to-side to the other in situ IMA; and (3) the natural arrangement (44 patients, 6%), where the in situ RIMA is connected to the RCA and in situ LIMA to LAD. Mean age was 66 years (range 30 to 92). Two hundred ninety-two patients (38%) were older than 70, and 229 (30%) were diabetic. Operative mortality was 2.5% (n = 19). The mortality of urgent and elective cases was 1.2% (8 of 663), and that of emergency operation was 11% (11 of 99). There were 9 (1.2%) perioperative myocardial infarctions, and 10 patients (1.3%) sustained strokes. Sternal wound infection occurred in 14 (1.8%). The three strategies described here provide the surgeon with the versatility required for arterial revascularization with bilateral IMAs in most patients referred for coronary artery bypass grafting.

  8. Associations of Non-Invasive Measures of Arterial Compliance and Ankle-Brachial Index: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, John T.; McDermott, Mary M.; Liu, Kiang; Chan, Cheeling; Criqui, Michael H.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The association between measures of arterial compliance and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is unclear. Early changes in arterial wall compliance could be a useful marker of patients at high risk for developing lower extremity atherosclerosis. Methods We used linear and logistic regression models on baseline data from 2803 female and 2558 male participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) to study associations between tonometry-derived baseline measures of arterial compliance (large artery compliance [C1] and small artery compliance [C2]) and the baseline ankle-brachial index (ABI), as well as change in the ABI over approximately 3 years of follow up. Results In cross-sectional analyses, lower C1 and C2 values, indicating poorer arterial compliance, were associated with lower ABI. There were significant linear trends across strata of ABI, especially in C2 which ranged from 3.7ml/mmHg × 100 (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.3 to 4.2) in women with an ABI < 0.90 to 4.2ml/mmHg × 100 (95% CI 4.1 to 4.3 p<0.001) in women with ABI 1.10 - <1.40. Similar significant trends (p<0.001) were seen in men. In prospective analyses, those with the lowest tertile of C2 values at baseline had a greater multivariable-adjusted odds for decline in ABI of ≥ 0.15 over 3 years compared to those with the highest C2 values at baseline (OR 1.80 95% CI 1.23–2.64). Conclusions We observed that less compliant arteries were significantly associated with low ABI in cross-sectional analysis and with greater decline in ABI over time. PMID:22357412

  9. Diagnostic Accuracy Study of an Oscillometric Ankle-Brachial Index in Peripheral Arterial Disease: The Influence of Oscillometric Errors and Calcified Legs

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Cavero-Redondo, Iván; Álvarez-Bueno, Celia; Garrido-Miguel, Miriam; Notario-Pacheco, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an indicator of widespread atherosclerosis. However, most individuals with PAD, in spite of being at high cardiovascular risk, are asymptomatic. This fact, together with the limitations of the Doppler ankle-brachial index (ABI), contributes to PAD underdiagnose. The aim of this study was to compare oscillometric ABI and Doppler ABI to diagnose peripheral arterial disease, and also to examine the influence of oscillometric errors and calcified legs on the PAD diagnoses. Methods and Findings We measured the ankle-brachial indexes of 90 volunteers (n = 180 legs, age 70 ± 14 years, 43% diabetics) using both oscillometer OMRON-M3 and Doppler. For concordance analyses we used the Bland and Altman method, and also estimated the intraclass correlation coefficient. Receiver Operating Characteristic Curves were used to examine the diagnostic performance of both methods. The ABI means were 1.06 ± 0.14 and 1.04 ± 0.16 (p = 0.034) measured by oscillometer and Doppler ABIs respectively, with limits of agreement of ± 0.20 and intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.769. Oscillometer yielded 23 “error” measurements, and also overestimated the measurements in low ankle pressures. Using Doppler as gold standard, oscillometer performance for diagnosis of PAD showed an Area Under Curve = 0.944 (sensitivity: 66.7%, specificity: 96.8%). Moreover, when considered calcified legs and oscillometric “error” readings as arteriopathy equivalents, sensitivity rose to 78.2%, maintaining specificity in 96%. The best oscillometer cut-off point was 0.96 (sensitivity: 87%, specificity: 91%, positive likelihood ratio: 9.66 and negative likelihood ratio: 0.14). Conclusion Despite its limitations, oscillometric ABI could be a useful tool for the diagnosis of PAD, particularly when considering calcified legs and oscillometric “errors” readings as peripheral arterial disease equivalents. PMID:27898734

  10. Functional outcome and quality of life after traumatic total brachial plexus injury treated by nerve transfer or single/double free muscle transfers: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Satbhai, N G; Doi, K; Hattori, Y; Sakamoto, S

    2016-02-01

    Between 2002 and 2011, 81 patients with a traumatic total brachial plexus injury underwent reconstruction by double free muscle transfer (DFMT, 47 cases), single muscle transfer (SMT, 16 cases) or nerve transfers (NT, 18 cases). They were evaluated for functional outcome and quality of life (QoL) using the Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, both pre- and post-operatively. The three groups were compared and followed-up for at least 24 months. The mean shoulder abduction and flexion were comparable in all groups, but external rotation was significantly better in the DFMT group as were range and quantitative power of elbow flexion. Patients who had undergone DFMT had reasonable total active finger movement and hook grip strength. All groups showed improvement in function at a level greater than a minimum clinically important difference. The DFMT group showed the greatest improvement. Patients in the DFMT group had a better functional outcome and QoL recovery than those in the NT and SMT groups. Double free muscle transfer procedure is capable of restoring maximum function in patients of total brachial plexus palsy. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  11. Association between temporal mean arterial pressure and brachial noninvasive blood pressure during shoulder surgery in the beach chair position during general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Triplet, Jacob J; Lonetta, Christopher M; Everding, Nathan G; Moor, Molly A; Levy, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of cerebral perfusion pressure during elective shoulder surgery in the beach chair position is regularly performed by noninvasive brachial blood pressure (NIBP) measurements. The relationship between brachial mean arterial pressure and estimated temporal mean arterial pressure (eTMAP) is not well established and may vary with patient positioning. Establishing a ratio between eTMAP and NIBP at varying positions may provide a more accurate estimation of cerebral perfusion using noninvasive measurements. This prospective study included 57 patients undergoing elective shoulder surgery in the beach chair position. All patients received an interscalene block and general anesthesia. After the induction of general anesthesia, values for eTMAP and NIBP were recorded at 0°, 30°, and 70° of incline. A statistically significant, strong, and direct correlation between NIBP and eTMAP was found at 0° (r = 0.909, P ≤ .001), 30° (r = 0.874, P < .001), and 70° (r = 0.819, P < .001) of incline. The mean ratios of eTMAP to NIBP at 0°, 30°, and 70° of incline were 0.939 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.915-0.964), 0.738 (95% CI, 0.704-0.771), and 0.629 (95% CI, 0.584-0.673), respectively. There was a statistically significant decrease in the eTMAP/NIBP ratio as patient incline increased from 0° to 30° (P < .001) and from 30° to 70° (P < .001). The eTMAP-to-NIBP ratio decreases as an anesthetized patient is placed into the beach chair position. Awareness of this phenomenon is important to ensure adequate cerebral perfusion and prevent hypoxic-related injuries. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Dexmedetomidine as an Adjuvant to 0.75% Ropivacaine in Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block Using Nerve Stimulator: A Prospective, Randomized Double-blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Rashmi, H. D.; Komala, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ropivacaine, a newer local anesthetic (LA), has been increasingly used nowadays in different concentrations for peripheral nerve blocks. It has lesser cardiac toxicity and higher safety margin when compared to bupivacaine. Dexmedetomidine, a novel α2 agonist, is widely used as adjuvant to LA in peripheral nerve blocks to decrease the time of onset and increase the duration of the block. In this study, we evaluated the effect of dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant with 0.75% ropivacaine for interscalene brachial plexus block using nerve stimulator. Aim: This study aims to know the effect of using dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to 0.75% ropivacaine in interscalene brachial plexuses block using nerve stimulator. Settings and Designs: Sixty patients scheduled for elective orthopedic surgery of the upper limb under interscalene block were considered in this prospective randomized controlled double-blind study. The study population was randomly divided into two groups with thirty patients in each group by using computerized randomization. Materials and Methods: Group R received 30 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 0.5 ml normal saline and Group RD received 30 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 50 μg of dexmedetomidine. The onset of sensory and motor blocks, duration of sensory and motor block, and patient satisfaction score were observed. Results: Both the groups were comparable in demographic characteristics. The onset of the sensory and motor block is earlier and statistically significant in Group RD (P < 0.05) when compared to Group R. The duration of sensory and motor blockade were significantly prolonged in Group RD (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Addition of dexmedetomidine to 0.75% ropivacaine in interscalene brachial plexus block significantly shortened the time of onset of the block and prolongs the duration sensory and motor blockade. PMID:28298772

  13. Diastolic versus systolic ankle-brachial pressure index using ultrasound imaging & automated oscillometric measurement in diabetic patients with calcified and non-calcified lower limb arteries.

    PubMed

    Asbeutah, Akram M; AlMajran, Abdullah A; Asfar, Sami K

    2016-10-26

    Ankle-brachial pressure index-systolic (ABI-s) can be falsely elevated in the presence of calcified lower limb arteries in some diabetic patients and therefore loses its value in this cohort of patients. We aim at investigating the feasibility of using the diastolic (ABI-d) instead of ABI-s to calculate the ABI in diabetic patients with calcified limb arteries. A total of 51 patients were chosen from the diabetic foot clinic. Twenty six of these patients had calcified leg arteries by Duplex scan (Group A) and 25 patients did not have calcifications in their leg arteries (Group B). Twenty five healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study for group C and they were matched with other participants from group B and A in age and sex. ABI measurement was performed using "boso ABI-system 100 machine". Systolic ABI (ABI-s) and diastolic ABI (ABI-d) were calculated based on bilateral brachial and ankle oscillometric pressures. ABI is considered normal when it is ≥0.9. Repeated measures ANOVA test was used to test for comparing mean scores for ABI-s and ABI-d across the three groups. Statistical significance is considered when P < .05. The mean age of all participants (±SD) was 64.30 ± 7.1 years (range, 50-82 years). ABI-s mean ± SD was 1.3 ± 0.10 (range, 1.18-1.58) in group A patients, 1.07 ± 0.05 (range, 1-1.16) in group B patients, and 1.06 ± 0.05 (range, 1-1.16) in group C volunteers. While ABI-d mean ± SD was 1.07 ± 0.05 (range, 1.1-1.17) in group A patients, 1.06 ± 0.05 (1-1.14) in group B patients, and 1.05 ± 0.04 (range, 1.01-1.14) in group C volunteers. In group A, repeated measures ANOVA test showed statistical significant difference between ABI-s and ABI-d (P < 0.001) whereas in group B & C was not (P > 0.05). ABI-d may be helpful and can be used as a complementary measure instead of ABI-s in falsely elevated ABI caused by partial incompressible vessel.

  14. The azygos anterior cerebral artery bypass: double reimplantation technique for giant anterior communicating artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Sanai, Nader; Lawton, Michael T

    2011-04-01

    The authors introduce the azygos anterior cerebral artery (ACA) bypass as an option for revascularizing distal ACA territories, as part of a strategy to trap giant anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms. In this procedure, the aneurysm is exposed with an orbitozygomatic-pterional craniotomy and distal ACA vessels are exposed with a bifrontal craniotomy. The uninvolved contralateral A(2) segment of the ACA serves as a donor vessel for a short radial artery graft. The contralateral pericallosal artery (PcaA) and the callosomarginal artery (CmaA) are connected to the graft in the interhemispheric fissure using the double reimplantation technique. Three anastomoses create an azygos system supplying the entire ACA territory, enabling the surgeon to trap the aneurysm incompletely. Retrograde flow from the CmaA supplies the ipsilateral recurrent artery of Heubner, and the aneurysm lumen thromboses. The azygos bypass was successfully performed to treat a 47-year-old woman with a giant, thrombotic ACoA aneurysm supplied by the A(1) segment of the left ACA, with left PcaA and CmaA originating from the aneurysm base. The authors conclude that the azygos ACA bypass is a novel option for revascularizing PcaA and CmaA, as part of the overall treatment of giant ACoA aneurysms.

  15. A rare case of multiple bronchial artery aneurysms associated with a double aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Rameysh Danovani; Chen, Zhi Yong; Low, Teck Boon; Ng, Keng Sin

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial artery aneurysm is uncommon, and the occurrence of multiple aneurysms arising from a bronchial artery is even rarer. To date, there has been only one published case report describing double bronchial artery aneurysms. We herein describe a case of three aneurysms arising from a left bronchial artery, accompanied by multiple bilateral hypertrophied bronchial and intercostobronchial arteries, as well as a double aortic arch. Bronchial artery aneurysm is potentially life-threatening, and immediate treatment is recommended to minimise the potential risk of rupture. The aneurysms in our case were successfully treated via transcatheter arterial embolisation using coils. PMID:25820859

  16. Supraclavicular brachial plexus block: Comparison of varying doses of dexmedetomidine combined with levobupivacaine: A double-blind randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Nallam, Srinivasa Rao; Chiruvella, Sunil; Karanam, Swetha

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: The ideal dose of dexmedetomidine for brachial plexus block is a matter of debate. This study was carried out to evaluate 50 μg or 100 μg of dexmedetomidine added to 0.5% levobupivacaine, with regard to the duration of analgesia. Our study also sought to assess the onset and duration of sensorimotor blockade, haemodynamic effects, sedation and adverse effects. Methods: One hundred adult patients undergoing upper limb surgeries under supraclavicular brachial plexus block were randomly allocated into two groups. Group LD50 received 29 ml of 0.5% levobupivacaine plus 50 μg of dexmedetomidine diluted in 1 ml of normal saline. Group LD100 received 29 ml of 0.5% levobupivacaine plus 100 μg of dexmedetomidine diluted in 1 ml of normal saline. Duration of analgesia was the primary outcome. Onset and duration of sensorimotor blockade, haemodynamic variables, sedation score, and adverse effects were secondary outcomes. The data were analysed with Students' t-test and Chi-square test. Results: The onset of sensory block and motor block was 14.82 ± 3.8 min and 19.75 ± 6.3 min, respectively, in group LD50, while it was 11.15 ± 1.7 min and 14.3 ± 4.2 min, respectively, in group LD100. The duration of analgesia was significantly prolonged in group LD100 (1033.6 ± 141.6 vs. 776.4 ± 138.6 min; P = 0.001). The incidence of bradycardia and sedation was observed in significantly more patients in group LD100. Significantly fewer patients in group LD100 required rescue analgesia. Conclusion: The 100 μg dose of dexmedetomidine in brachial plexus block hastens the onset and prolongs the duration of sensorimotor blockade and analgesia, but with higher incidence of bradycardia and sedation. PMID:28405041

  17. Accuracy of Physical Examination, Ankle-Brachial Index, and Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Arterial Injury in Patients With Penetrating Extremity Trauma: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    deSouza, Ian S; Benabbas, Roshanak; McKee, Sean; Zangbar, Bardiya; Jain, Ashika; Paladino, Lorenzo; Boudourakis, Leon; Sinert, Richard

    2017-08-01

    Penetrating Extremity Trauma (PET) may result in arterial injury, a rare but limb- and life-threatening surgical emergency. Timely, accurate diagnosis is essential for potential intervention in order to prevent significant morbidity. Using a systematic review/meta-analytic approach, we determined the utility of physical examination, Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI), and Ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of arterial injury in emergency department (ED) patients who have sustained PET. We applied a test-treatment threshold model to determine which evaluations may obviate CT Angiography (CTA). We searched PubMed, Embase, and Scopus from inception to November 2016 for studies of ED patients with PET. We included studies on adult and pediatric subjects. We defined the reference standard to include CTA, catheter angiography, or surgical exploration. When low-risk patients did not undergo the reference standard, trials must have specified that patients were observed for at least 24 hours. We used the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) to evaluate bias and applicability of the included studies. We calculated positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+ and LR-) of physical examination ("hard signs" of vascular injury), US, and ABI. Using established CTA test characteristics (sensitivity = 96.2%, specificity = 99.2%) and applying the Pauker-Kassirer method, we developed a test-treatment threshold model (testing threshold = 0.14%, treatment threshold = 72.9%). We included eight studies (n = 2,161, arterial injury prevalence = 15.5%). Studies had variable quality with most at high risk for partial and double verification bias. Some studies investigated multiple index tests: physical examination (hard signs) in three studies (n = 1,170), ABI in five studies (n = 1,040), and US in four studies (n = 173). Due to high heterogeneity (I(2)  > 75%) of the results, we could not calculate LR+ or LR- for hard signs or LR+ for ABI. The

  18. Reduced High-Density Lipoprotein Level is Linked to Worse Ankle Brachial Index and Peak Oxygen Uptake in Postmenopausal Women with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mauer, Karin; Exaire, J. Emilio; Stoner, Julie A.; Guthery, Leslie D.; Montgomery, Polly S.; Gardner, Andrew W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Lipid abnormalities are associated with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD), and contribute to vascular damage and functional impairment. Women with PAD have more limited walking and physical function than men, but the mechanisms for their lower exercise performance are not clear. We determined if alterations in individual lipid components, such as decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), are associated with worsening lower extremity claudication in postmenopausal women with PAD. Methods This cross-sectional cohort study included 69 postmenopausal women with intermittent claudication (Fontaine stage II PAD). Lower extremity walking performance was assessed using a validated treadmill test to measure initial claudication distance (ICD), absolute claudication distance (ACD), peak oxygen uptake, and ankle systolic blood pressure. The lipid profile was determined from a standard lipid panel drawn in a fasted state to obtain cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-C, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Results HDL-C was positively correlated with ankle brachial index (r = 0.29, p = 0.019). No other individual components of the lipid profile were associated with exercise performance and hemodynamic measures. Among women with impaired HDL-C (below 50 mg/dL, n=43), the median peak oxygen uptake level was significantly lower (p=0.021) relative to women with normal HDL-C (above 50 mg/dL, n=26). Conclusion Lower HDL-C levels are associated with worse ankle brachial index and decreased peak oxygen uptake in post-menopausal women with PAD. PMID:20529977

  19. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Ankle-Brachial Index Abnormalites in Young and Middle-Aged HIV-Positive Patients in Lower Silesia, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Wiesława; Knysz, Brygida; Arczyńska, Katarzyna; Drelichowska, Justyna; Czarnecki, Marcin; Gąsiorowski, Jacek; Karczewski, Maciej; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a clinical manifestation of atherosclerosis and mainly refers to elderly patients, having a negative impact on their functionality and quality of life. The findings of previous studies in HIV-infected patients have shown that cardiovascular risk is higher and PAD occurs more frequently than in the general population. There are also contradictory observations. Much less is known about the ankle-brachial index (ABI) value in asymptomatic HIV-infected patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PAD and ankle-brachial index abnormalities as well as to determine risk factors related to the disease in a group of Polish HIV–positive patients. Methods and Findings One hundred and eleven young to middle aged HIV–positive subjects and 40 noninfected subjects were enrolled into the study. Resting ABI measurements were performed and cardiovascular risk was analysed as well. Subgroups were created according to the ABI values: low (PAD), borderline, normal, high and altered ABI. Symptomatic PAD was observed in 2 HIV–positive patients, asymptomatic PAD was not diagnosed. The ABI value is lower and more varied, in 22.5% of the study group altered ABI values were found. Six subjects demonstrated borderline ABI, and 15 high ABI, including >1.4. In the control group no low or very high values were reported. A relation between low ABI and cardiovascular family history and between altered ABI and high–density–lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL–C) level was demonstrated. Conclusions In young and middle–aged HIV–positive patients, symptomatic PAD prevalence is comparable to that observed in the overall population. Among asymptomatic patients PAD is not reported. The ABI value in HIV–positive patients is more varied compared to the HIV–negative subjects; the altered ABI shows a strong relation with low HDL–C levels and metabolic syndrome. PMID:25503743

  20. The ankle-brachial pressure index and a standardized questionnaire are easy and useful tools to detect peripheral arterial disease in non-claudicating patients at high risk.

    PubMed

    Sprynger, M; Fassotte, C; Verhaeghe, R

    2007-09-01

    This observational study (Survey of Peripheral Arterial Disease Epidemiology, SPADE) evaluated the prevalence of asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in general practice. PAD was determined as an ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) <0.9 measured with Doppler ultrasound. Included patients had a history of ischemic events and/or risk factors for PAD, but no spontaneous complaints of intermittent claudication. Patients with an ABI <0.9 filled in a standardized questionnaire and their drug use was registered. A total of 4 536 patients was included. The prevalence of PAD was 18.7% for the total population, 26.5% for those with a history of ischemic events and 15.2% for those without such history. The prevalence increased with age, but was independent of gender. A standard questionnaire revealed leg pain when walking uphill or when hurrying in 2/3 of patients with an ABI <0.9 and in 45% criteria for claudication were met. ABI detects PAD in a considerable number of asymptomatic patients at increased risk and followed in general practice. When properly questioned almost half of these patients appear to have intermittent claudication.

  1. Concordance between automated oscillometric measurement of ankle-brachial index and traditional measurement by eco-Doppler in patients without peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Roca, Gustavo C; Villarín-Castro, Alejandro; Carrasco-Flores, Javier; Artigao-Rodenas, Luis M; Carbayo-Herencia, Julio A; Escobar-Cervantes, Carlos; Alonso-Moreno, Francisco J; Segura-Fragoso, Antonio; Gómez-Serranillos, Manuel; Hernández-Moreno, Julio

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the concordance between automated oscillometric measurement (WatchBP® Office ABI) of the ankle- brachial index (ABI) and the traditional measurement by eco-Doppler in a Spanish population without peripheral artery disease attended in primary care. The ABI was determined by both methods in a general population aged ≥ 18 years, from the RICARTO study. The intraclass correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the concordance between both techniques and the Bland-Altman plot was determined to analyze the agreement between them. A total of 322 subjects (mean age 47.7 ± 16.0 years; 54.3% women) were included in the study. With regard to cardiovascular risk factors, 70.5% of subjects had dyslipidemia, 26.7% hypertension, 24.8% obesity, 8.4% diabetes and 25.5% were smokers. Mean ABI measured by eco-Doppler and the automated method were 1.17 ± 0.1 and 1.2 ± 0.1, respectively (mean differences - 0.03 ± 0.09; p < 0.001). The Pearson correlation coefficient and the intraclass correlation coefficient were in both cases 0.70. The automated oscillometric measurement of ABI is a reliable and useful alternative to conventional eco-Doppler determination in the general population without peripheral artery disease attended in primary care.

  2. Use of living donor liver grafts with double or triple arteries.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Hideaki; Shirabe, Ken; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Ikegami, Toru; Soejima, Yuji; Yamashita, Yoichi; Kawanaka, Hirofumi; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Morita, Masaru; Oki, Eiji; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2014-06-15

    Hepatic grafts used in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) sometimes have two or more arteries, in which surgeons are required to perform complex arterial reconstruction. The aim of the current study was to demonstrate whether selecting living donor liver grafts with double or triple arteries yielded the same outcomes as grafts with a single artery. We retrospectively investigated the outcomes of LDLT focusing on the numbers of arteries on grafts. Four hundred forty-six cases of LDLT performed between October 1996 and October 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. The cases were divided into the following three groups according to the number of arteries on a graft: the single (n=331), the double (n=108), and the triple (n=7) groups. Artery-related complications occurred in five cases in the single group, two cases in the double group, and no case in the triple group. Although the overall graft survival was comparable among the three groups, there was a tendency of worsened graft survival and increased incidence of anastomotic biliary stricture after liver transplantation in right hepatic grafts with double arteries. The use of grafts with double or triple arteries yielded favorable outcomes with minimum artery-related complications compared with grafts with a single artery. However, the use of right hepatic grafts with double arteries is discouraging in the current study.

  3. Transradial artery coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, F; Laarman, G J; de Melker, E

    1995-01-01

    This study explored the feasibility and safety of percutaneous coronary balloon angioplasty (PTCA) with miniaturized PTCA equipment via the radial artery. Coronary angioplasty (PTCA) via the femoral or brachial arteries may be associated with rare vascular complications such as bleeding and damage to the artery and adjacent structures. It was postulated that PTCA via the radial artery with miniaturized angioplasty equipment is feasible and that no major puncture site-related complications occur because hemostasis is obtained easily and because no major structures are near the radial artery. With double blood supply to the hand, radial artery occlusion is well tolerated. In 100 patients with collateral blood supply to the right hand, PTCA was attempted with 6F guiding catheters and rapid-exchange balloon catheters for exertional angina (87 patients) or nonexertional angina (13 patients). Angioplasty was attempted in 122 lesions (type A n = 67 [55%], Type B n = 37 [30%], and type C n = 18 [15%]). Pre- and post-PTCA computerized quantitative coronary analysis was performed. Radial artery function and structure were assessed clinically and with Doppler and two-dimensional ultrasound on the day of discharge. Coronary catheterization via the radial artery was successful in 94 patients (94%). The 6 remaining patients had successful PTCA via the femoral artery (n = 5) or the brachial artery (n = 1). Procedural success (120 of 122 lesions) was achieved in 92 patients (98%) via the radial artery and in 98 patients of the total study population.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Combination of pulse volume recording (PVR) parameters and ankle-brachial index (ABI) improves diagnostic accuracy for peripheral arterial disease compared with ABI alone.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Tomoko; Ichihashi, Shigeo; Iwakoshi, Shinichi; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2016-06-01

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement is widely used as a screening tool to detect peripheral arterial disease (PAD). With the advent of the oscillometric ABI device incorporating a system for the measurement of pulse volume recording (PVR), not only ABI but also other parameters, such as the percentage of mean arterial pressure (%MAP) and the upstroke time (UT), can be obtained automatically. The purpose of the present study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy for PAD with ABI alone with that of a combination of ABI, %MAP and UT. This study included 108 consecutive patients on whom 216 limb measurements were performed. The sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of ABI, %MAP, UT and their combination were evaluated and compared with CT angiography that was used as a gold standard for the detection of PAD. The diagnostic accuracy as well as the optimal cutoff values of %MAP and UT were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The combination of ABI, %MAP and UT achieved higher sensitivity, negative predictive value and accuracy than ABI alone, particularly for mild stenosis. The areas under the ROC curve for the detection of 50% stenosis with UT and %MAP were 0.798 and 0.916, respectively. The optimal UT and %MAP values to detect ≧50% stenosis artery were 183 ms and 45%, respectively. The combination of ABI, %MAP and UT contributed to the improvement of the diagnostic accuracy for PAD. Consideration of the values of %MAP and UT in addition to ABI may have a significant impact on the detection of early PAD lesions.

  5. Single, double or multiple-injection techniques for non-ultrasound guided axillary brachial plexus block in adults undergoing surgery of the lower arm.

    PubMed

    Chin, Ki Jinn; Cubillos, Javier E; Alakkad, Husni

    2016-09-02

    Regional anaesthesia comprising axillary block of the brachial plexus is a common anaesthetic technique for distal upper limb surgery. This is an update of a review first published in 2006 and previously updated in 2011 and 2013. To compare the relative effects (benefits and harms) of three injection techniques (single, double and multiple) of axillary block of the brachial plexus for distal upper extremity surgery. We considered these effects primarily in terms of anaesthetic effectiveness; the complication rate (neurological and vascular); and pain and discomfort caused by performance of the block. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1946 to April Week 1 2016), Embase (1947 to April 18 2016) and reference lists of trials. We contacted trial authors. The date of the last search was April 2016 (updated from March 2013). We included randomized controlled trials that compared double with single-injection techniques, multiple with single-injection techniques, or multiple with double-injection techniques for axillary block in adults undergoing surgery of the distal upper limb. We excluded trials using ultrasound-guided techniques. Independent study selection, 'Risk of bias' assessment and data extraction were performed by at least two investigators. We undertook meta-analysis. We included one new trial involving 45 participants in this updated review. In total we included 22 trials involving a total of 2193 participants who received regional anaesthesia for hand, wrist, forearm or elbow surgery. 'Risk of bias' assessment indicated that trial design and conduct were generally adequate; the most common areas of weakness were in blinding and allocation concealment.Nine trials comparing double versus single injections showed a statistically significant decrease in primary anaesthesia failure (risk ratio (RR) 0.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34 to 0.89, high-quality evidence). Subgroup analysis by method of

  6. Screening for peripheral artery disease and cardiovascular disease risk assessment with the ankle-brachial index in adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-09-03

    Update of the 2005 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for peripheral artery disease (PAD). The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the use of resting ankle-brachial index (ABI) as a screening test for PAD or as a risk predictor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The review focused on resting ABI as the sole screening method; the diagnostic performance of ABI testing in primary care populations, unselected populations, and asymptomatic populations; the predictive value of ABI testing for major CVD outcomes in primary care or unselected populations; and the effect of treatment on general CVD and PAD-specific morbidity in patients with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic PAD. This recommendation applies to asymptomatic adults who do not have a known diagnosis of PAD, CVD, severe chronic kidney disease, or diabetes. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for PAD and CVD risk assessment with the ABI in adults. (I statement).

  7. Effect of cocoa/chocolate ingestion on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and its relevance to cardiovascular health and disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Kevin D

    2012-11-15

    Prospective studies indicate that high intake of dietary flavanols, such as those contained in cocoa/chocolate, are associated with reduced rates of cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in humans. Numerous mechanisms may underlie these associations such as favorable effects of flavanols on blood pressure, platelet aggregation, thrombosis, inflammation, and the vascular endothelium. The brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) technique has emerged as a robust method to quantify endothelial function in humans. Collectively, the preponderance of evidence indicates that FMD is a powerful surrogate measure for firm cardiovascular endpoints, such as cardiovascular-related mortality, in humans. Thus, literally thousands of studies have utilized this technique to document group differences in FMD, as well as to assess the effects of various interventions on FMD. In regards to the latter, numerous studies indicate that both acute and chronic ingestion of cocoa/chocolate increases FMD in humans. Increases in FMD after cocoa/chocolate ingestion appear to be dose-dependent such that greater increases in FMD are observed after ingestion of larger quantities. The mechanisms underlying these responses are likely diverse, however most data suggest an effect of increased nitric oxide bioavailability. Thus, positive vascular effects of cocoa/chocolate on the endothelium may underlie (i.e., be linked mechanistically to) reductions in cardiovascular risk in humans.

  8. Abnormal origin of the left subclavian artery from the left pulmonary artery in a patient with double outlet right ventricle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngok; Hong, Seong Wook

    2014-02-01

    Anomalous aortic origin of the left subclavian artery (LSCA) from the left pulmonary artery (LPA) is a rare congenital cardiac malformation. We describe a case of LSCA from the LPA via ductus arteriosus in association with a double-outlet right ventricle, which never has been reported previously in Korea.

  9. Additional Value of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity to Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyeongmin; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Park, Miri; Oh, Sohee; Oh, So Won; Lim, Woo-Hyun; Seo, Jae-Bin; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Zo, Joo-Hee; Kim, Myung-A

    2017-08-24

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether information on arterial stiffness can improve the value of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). A total of 233 patients (age: 62.2±10.8 years, 60.3% males) with detected ischemia on SPECT undergoing invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) measurement within a month was retrospectively reviewed. Of the 233 patients, 190 (81.5%) had obstructive CAD (≥50% luminal stenosis). The difference in baPWV according to the presence of obstructive CAD was significant in patients in the mild ischemia group [summed stress score (SSS): 4-8] (1,770±364 cm versus 1,490±328 cm, p<0.001) but not in the moderate (SSS: 9-13) or severe (SSS: ≥14) ischemia groups (p>0.05 for each). Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed that the diagnostic value of baPWV for obstructive CAD was significant only in patients in the mild ischemia group (area under curve: 0.714; p=0.001) but not in the moderate or severe ischemia groups (p>0.05 for each). Adding information on baPWV to SPECT results and clinical parameters significantly increased diagnostic accuracy in the detection of obstructive CAD in patients with mild ischemia (integrated discrimination improvement p=0.006) but not in those with moderate or severe ischemia on SPECT (p>0.05 for each). The results of this study suggest that baPWV may have additional value to SPECT for the detection of obstructive CAD, especially in patients with mild ischemia on SPECT.

  10. Change in Ankle-Brachial Index Over Time in a Screened Japanese Cohort - The Okinawa Peripheral Arterial Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Toma, Yuichiro; Ishida, Akio; Kinjo, Kozen; Ohya, Yusuke

    2016-08-25

    The temporal change in ankle-brachial index (ABI) in the general population, especially in those aged <40 years, remains unclear. ABIs of 23,673 individuals were measured in 1-day health checkups between 2003 and 2010. Among them, 1,117 participants aged 28-76 years (mean 53±9 years) whose ABI was measured at least twice within an interval of ≥4 years (mean: 4.9 years) were selected for this study. Baseline ABI was the lowest at age <40 years and increased with age. ABI significantly increased in participants aged <40 and 40-49 years, but not in participants aged 50-59 and ≥60 years. ABI increased in participants with borderline-low baseline ABI (0.9

  11. Derivation and validation of REASON: a risk score identifying candidates to screen for peripheral arterial disease using ankle brachial index.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Rafel; Baena-Díez, Jose Miguel; Quesada, Miquel; Solanas, Pascual; Subirana, Isaac; Sala, Joan; Alzamora, Maite; Forès, Rosa; Masiá, Rafel; Elosua, Roberto; Grau, María; Cordón, Ferran; Pera, Guillem; Rigo, Fernando; Martí, Ruth; Ponjoan, Anna; Cerezo, Carlos; Brugada, Ramon; Marrugat, Jaume

    2011-02-01

    The recommendation of screening with ankle brachial index (ABI) in asymptomatic individuals is controversial. The aims of the present study were to develop and validate a pre-screening test to select candidates for ABI measurement in the Spanish population 50-79 years old, and to compare its predictive capacity to current Inter-Society Consensus (ISC) screening criteria. Two population-based cross-sectional studies were used to develop (n = 4046) and validate (n = 3285) a regression model to predict ABI < 0.9. The validation dataset was also used to compare the model's predictive capacity to that of ISC screening criteria. The best model to predict ABI < 0.9 included age, sex, smoking, pulse pressure and diabetes. Assessment of discrimination and calibration in the validation dataset demonstrated a good fit (AUC: 0.76 [95% CI 0.73-0.79] and Hosmer-Lemeshow test: χ(2): 10.73 (df = 6), p-value = 0.097). Predictions (probability cut-off value of 4.1) presented better specificity and positive likelihood ratio than the ABI screening criteria of the ISC guidelines, and similar sensitivity. This resulted in fewer patients screened per diagnosis of ABI < 0.9 (10.6 vs. 8.75) and a lower proportion of the population aged 50-79 years candidate to ABI screening (63.3% vs. 55.0%). This model provides accurate ABI < 0.9 risk estimates for ages 50-79, with a better predictive capacity than that of ISC criteria. Its use could reduce possible harms and unnecessary work-ups of ABI screening as a risk stratification strategy in primary prevention of peripheral vascular disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Brachial neuritis.

    PubMed

    Dillin, L; Hoaglund, F T; Scheck, M

    1985-07-01

    Brachial neuritis is an unusual syndrome of unknown etiology that can be confused with other causes of pain or weakness, or both, of the shoulder and arm. It is important to distinguish this disorder because of its dramatic symptoms and relatively good prognosis. Sharp pain, usually in the elbow or shoulder, marks the onset of brachial neuritis, but is relatively short-lived. Weakness generally occurs as the pain is subsiding and most frequently involves the deltoid, spinati, serratus anterior, biceps, and triceps. Paresthesias, atrophy, and sensory loss are inconstant features. Electromyographic findings of fibrillation potentials and positive waves characteristically are found in a pattern indicating combined nerve-root and peripheral nerve involvement. Electromyography more frequently than clinical examination shows that the lesion is bilateral, and also is of both diagnostic and prognostic value. Other laboratory studies serve only to exclude other causes of shoulder pain. The clinical course is variable, but in 90 per cent of patients complete recovery occurs within three years. Recurrences are uncommon.

  13. Double outlet right ventricle with unilateral absence of left pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Ugurlucan, Murat; Arslan, Ahmet H; Yildiz, Yahya; Ay, Sibel; Cicek, Sertac

    2013-06-01

    Congenital absence of unilateral pulmonary artery, either as a primary defect or in combination with other congenital cardiovascular malformations, is very rare. Double outlet right ventricle pathology in combination with unilateral absence of pulmonary artery has only been reported once in the literature. In this report, we present our experience with double outlet right ventricle with unilateral absence of left pulmonary artery in a 3-year-old female patient who underwent a palliative procedure and was scheduled for correction.

  14. Affective Measures of Anger and Hostility and Brachial Artery Endothelial Function during Mental Stress and Forearm Occlusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-06

    New England Journal of Medicine . 323( I). 22. Patterson. S.M., Krantz, D.S., and Jochum, S. (1995). Time course and mechanisms of...R. (1986). The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis - an update. The New England Journal of Medicine . 8. 488. Rozanski , A. , Bairey, C.N., Krantz, D.S...induction of silent myocardial ischemia in patients with coronary artery disease . The New England Journal of Medicine . 318(16), 1005.

  15. A registration-based approach to quantify flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery in ultrasound image sequences.

    PubMed

    Frangi, Alejandro F; Laclaustra, Martín; Lamata, Pablo

    2003-11-01

    Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) offers a mechanism to characterize endothelial function and, therefore, may play a role in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. Computerized analysis techniques are very desirable to give accuracy and objectivity to the measurements. Virtually all methods proposed up to now to measure FMD rely on accurate edge detection of the arterial wall, and they are not always robust in the presence of poor image quality or image artifacts. A novel method for automatic dilation assessment based on a global image analysis strategy is presented. We model interframe arterial dilation as a superposition of a rigid motion and a scaling factor perpendicular to the artery. Rigid motion can be interpreted as a global compensation for patient and probe movements, an aspect that has not been sufficiently studied before. The scaling factor explains arterial dilation. The ultrasound sequence is analyzed in two phases using image registration to recover both transformation models. Temporal continuity in the registration parameters along the sequence is enforced with a Kalman filter since the dilation process is known to be a gradual physiological phenomenon. Comparing automated and gold standard measurements (average of manual measurements) we found a negligible bias (0.05%FMD) and a small standard deviation (SD) of the differences (1.05%FMD). These values are comparable with those obtained from manual measurements (bias = 0.23%FMD, SD(intra-obs) = 1.13%FMD, SD(inter-obs) 1.20%FMD). The proposed method offers also better reproducibility (CV = 0.40%) than the manual measurements (CV = 1.04%).

  16. [Risk of cardiovascular diseases in lead-exposed workers of crystal glassworks. Part II. Lead impact on the cardiovascular system based on ultrasound assessment of carotid arteries, electrocardiograms and ankle-brachial index].

    PubMed

    Doroszko, Adrian; Skoczyńska, Anna; Drozdz, Katarzyna; Kreczyńska, Bogusława

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the most common causes of the prevalence and mortality in the general population. Progressing pollution of the environment, as well as occupational exposure to heavy metals, including lead, may potentially accelerate the development of these disorders. Lead is a well known risk factor of arterial hypertension, and may be involved in atherogenesis. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of occupational lead exposure on the activity of cardiovascular system (CVS). The study group comprised 153 potentially healthy volunteers, working in a crystal glass foundry. They were examined using ultrasound assessment of carotid arteries, electrocardiograms and ankle-brachial index (ABI). The toxicological assessment of the study group for occupational lead poisoning was performed. Correlations between the degree of intoxication and functional changes in CVS were analyzed. A negative linear correlation between blood lead level or fluorethylenepropylene (FEP) concentration and ABI values was shown, but only in a subgroup with normal lipid pattern. In the persons with higher blood lead levels, the higher values of arterial blood pressure and longer QT-space in electrocardiogram were evidenced. In addition, the right bundle branch block was more frequently observed (in 23% of workers). Lead may be an independent risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, especially in workers with normal lipid parameters. An increased arterial blood pressure and a decreased ankle-brachial index in the persons with normal cholesterol level can be regarded as a marker of this risk.

  17. Femoral Artery Atherosclerosis Is Associated With Physical Function Across the Spectrum of the Ankle-Brachial Index: The San Diego Population Study.

    PubMed

    Wassel, Christina L; Ellis, Alicia M; Suder, Natalie C; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Rifkin, Dena E; Forbang, Nketi I; Denenberg, Julie O; Marasco, Antoinette M; McQuaide, Belinda J; Jenny, Nancy S; Allison, Matthew A; Ix, Joachim H; Criqui, Michael H

    2017-07-20

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is inadequate to detect early-stage atherosclerotic disease, when interventions to prevent functional decline may be the most effective. We determined associations of femoral artery atherosclerosis with physical functioning, across the spectrum of the ABI, and within the normal ABI range. In 2007-2011, 1103 multiethnic men and women participated in the San Diego Population Study, and completed all components of the summary performance score. Using Doppler ultrasound, superficial and common femoral intima media thickness and plaques were ascertained. Logistic regression was used to assess associations of femoral atherosclerosis with the summary performance score and its individual components. Models were adjusted for demographics, lifestyle factors, comorbidities, lipids, and kidney function. In adjusted models, among participants with a normal-range ABI (1.00-1.30), the highest tertile of superficial intima media thickness was associated with lower odds of a perfect summary performance score of 12 (odds ratio=0.56 [0.36, 0.87], P=0.009), and lower odds of a 4-m walk score of 4 (0.34 [0.16, 0.73], P=0.006) and chair rise score of 4 (0.56 [0.34, 0.94], P=0.03). Plaque presence (0.53 [0.29, 0.99], P=0.04) and greater total plaque burden (0.61 [0.43, 0.87], P=0.006) were associated with worse 4-m walk performance in the normal-range ABI group. Higher superficial intima media thickness was associated with lower summary performance score in all individuals (P=0.02). Findings suggest that use of femoral artery atherosclerosis measures may be effective in individuals with a normal-range ABI, especially, for example, those with diabetes mellitus or a family history of peripheral artery disease, when detection can lead to earlier intervention to prevent functional declines and improve quality of life. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  18. The Association Between Physical Activity and Both Incident Coronary Artery Calcification and Ankle Brachial Index Progression: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Joseph A C; Jensky, Nicole E.; Criqui, Michael H.; Whitt-Glover, Melicia C.; Lima, João A. C.; Allison, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Both coronary artery calcification (CAC) and the ankle brachial index (ABI) are measures of subclinical atherosclerotic disease. The influence of physical activity on the longitudinal change in these measures remains unclear. To assess this we examined the association between these measures and self-reported physical activity in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Methods At baseline, the MESA participants were free of clinically evident cardiovascular disease. We included all participants with an ABI between 0.90 and 1.40 (n=5656). Predictor variables were based on self-reported measures with physical activity being assessed using the Typical Week Physical Activity Survey from which metabolic equivalent-minutes/week of activity were calculated. We focused on physical activity intensity, intentional exercise, sedentary behavior, and conditioning. Incident peripheral artery disease (PAD) was defined as the progression of ABI to values below 0.90 (given the baseline range of 0.90 to 1.40). Incident CAC was defined as a CAC score >0 Agatston units upon follow up with a baseline score of 0 Agatston units. Results Mean age was 61 years, 53% were female, and mean body mass index was 28 kg/m2. After adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic factors, intentional exercise was protective for incident peripheral artery disease (Relative Risk (RR)= 0.85, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.74 to 0.98). After adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic factors, there was a significant association between vigorous PA and incident CAC (RR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.94 to 1.00). There was also a significant association between sedentary behavior and increased amount of CAC among participants with CAC at baseline (Δlog(Agatston Units +25)=0.027, 95% CI 0.002, 0.052). Conclusions These data suggest that there is an association between physical activity/sedentary behavior and the progression of two different measures

  19. Autonomic nervous activation triggered during induction of reactive hyperemia exerts a greater influence on the measured reactive hyperemia index by peripheral arterial tonometry than on flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery in patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Yoshida, Masanobu; Higashi, Yukihito; Takase, Bonpei; Furumoto, Tomoo; Kario, Kazuomi; Ohya, Yusuke; Yamashina, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery (FMD) and reactive hyperemia index (RHI) measured by peripheral arterial tonometry are known to be weakly associated with one another, but the mechanisms underlying this weak association remain to be clarified. We examined whether the autonomic nervous activation induced by the 5 min forearm clamping used to induce reactive hyperemia might exert any influence on the FMD and RHI in subjects with hypertension. In 115 subjects with hypertension (age 61±1 years), the FMD and RHI were measured simultaneously, and the heart rate variability (HRV) parameters (low-frequency component (LF), high-frequency component (HF), and the ratio (LF/HF) between the two) were calculated from the electrocardiographic recordings obtained before and after the start of forearm clamping. A multivariate linear regression analysis with adjustments for confounding variables demonstrated that the RHI, but not the FMD, was significantly associated with the percent change of the LF/HF associated with forearm clamping (beta=-0.204, P=0.043). In conclusion, autonomic nervous system activation, especially sympathetic activation, induced by 5-min forearm clamping utilized to provoke reactive hyperemia may significantly affect the RHI rather than FMD in subjects with hypertension.

  20. Pulse volume recordings to identify falsely elevated ankle brachial index.

    PubMed

    Shirasu, Takuro; Hoshina, Katsuyuki; Akagi, Daisuke; Miyahara, Takuya; Yamamoto, Kota; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-07-01

    Ankle brachial index can be falsely elevated in cases of medial arterial calcification, and its clinical use should be limited, especially in patients with diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential role of pulse volume recording in detecting falsely elevated ankle brachial index. Two parameters of the pulse waveform were automatically calculated: upstroke time and percentage mean artery pressure. Pulse volume recordings were retrospectively evaluated in 171 consecutive patients (342 limbs); 73 (43%) had a diagnosis of diabetes. On multivariate analysis, diabetes (hazard ratio = 1.7), ankle brachial index ≤ 0.90 (hazard ratio = 4.4), upstroke time ≥ 180 ms (hazard ratio = 2.1), and percentage mean artery pressure ≥ 45% (hazard ratio = 2.8) were significantly related to toe brachial index < 0.60. Further analysis for falsely elevated ankle brachial index was performed in 196 limbs (146 patients) with ankle brachial index > 0.90. The difference between ankle brachial index and toe brachial index differentiated the limbs of diabetic patients, with percentage mean artery pressure ≥ 45%, from controls (0.45 ± 0.17 vs. 0.35 ± 0.16, p = 0.03); upstroke time was not found to be a discriminating factor. Although measurement of ankle brachial index remains the gold standard for diagnosing peripheral arterial disease, percentage mean artery pressure, automatically obtained in ankle brachial index measurement, may be useful to detect falsely elevated ankle brachial index, especially in patients with diabetes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Daily blueberry consumption improves blood pressure and arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah A; Figueroa, Arturo; Navaei, Negin; Wong, Alexei; Kalfon, Roy; Ormsbee, Lauren T; Feresin, Rafaela G; Elam, Marcus L; Hooshmand, Shirin; Payton, Mark E; Arjmandi, Bahram H

    2015-03-01

    Postmenopausal women have a high prevalence of hypertension and often develop arterial stiffness thereby increasing cardiovascular disease risk. Although antihypertensive drug therapies exist, increasing numbers of people prefer natural therapies. In vivo studies and a limited number of clinical studies have demonstrated the antihypertensive and vascular-protective effects of blueberries. To examine the effects of daily blueberry consumption for 8 weeks on blood pressure and arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension. This was an 8-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Forty-eight postmenopausal women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension recruited from the greater Tallahassee, FL, area participated. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either 22 g freeze-dried blueberry powder or 22 g control powder. Resting brachial systolic and diastolic blood pressures were evaluated and arterial stiffness was assessed using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. C-reactive protein, nitric oxide, and superoxide dismutase were measured at baseline, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using a split plot model of repeated measures analysis of variance. After 8 weeks, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure (131±17 mm Hg [P<0.05] and 75±9 mm Hg [P<0.01], respectively) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (1,401±122 cm/second; P<0.01) were significantly lower than baseline levels (138±14 mm Hg, 80±7 mm Hg, and 1,498±179 cm/second, respectively), with significant (P<0.05) group×time interactions in the blueberry powder group, whereas there were no changes in the group receiving the control powder. Nitric oxide levels were greater (15.35±11.16 μmol/L; P<0.01) in the blueberry powder group at 8 weeks compared with baseline values (9.11±7.95 μmol/L), whereas there were no changes in the control group. Daily blueberry consumption may

  2. Double inter-internal carotid artery communication through intercavernous anastomosis and posterior communicating artery associated with multiple intracranial artery segmental agenesis/aplasia.

    PubMed

    Park, Yae Won; Yoo, Joonsang; Kim, Dong Joon

    2017-07-19

    Segmental internal carotid artery (ICA) and basilar artery (BA) agenesis/aplasia are rare vascular anomalies. We report an extremely rare case of combined ICA, BA, and A1 segmental absence presenting with double inter-ICA collateral communication through the intercavernous anastomosis and posterior communicating arteries. The patient presented with diplopia and transient ischemic attack. The pathogenesis of the anatomic anomalies and clinical symptoms are discussed.

  3. The accuracy of an oscillometric ankle-brachial index in the diagnosis of lower limb peripheral arterial disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Herráiz-Adillo, Ángel; Cavero-Redondo, Iván; Álvarez-Bueno, Celia; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Pozuelo-Carrascosa, Diana P; Notario-Pacheco, Blanca

    2017-08-29

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remains underdiagnosed and undertreated, partly because of limitations in the Doppler ankle-brachial index (ABI), the non-invasive gold standard. This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the oscillometric ABI and the Doppler ABI, and to examine the influence of two approaches to analysis: legs vs subjects and inclusion of oscillometric errors as PAD equivalents vs exclusion. Systematic searches in EMBASE, MEDLINE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library databases were performed, from inception to February 2017. Random-effects models were computed with the Moses-Littenberg constant. Hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic curves (HSROC) were used to summarise the overall test performance. Twenty studies (1263 subjects and 3695 legs) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled diagnostic odds ratio (dOR) for the oscillometric ABI was 32.49 (95% CI: 19.6-53.8), with 65% sensitivity (95% CI: 57-74) and 96% specificity (95%CI: 93-99). In the subgroup analysis, the "per subjects" group showed a better performance than the "per legs" group (dOR 36.44 vs 29.03). Similarly, an analysis considering oscillometric errors as PAD equivalents improved diagnostic performance (dOR 31.48 vs 28.29). The time needed for the oscillometric ABI was significantly shorter than that required for the Doppler ABI (5.90 vs 10.06 minutes, respectively). The oscillometric ABI showed an acceptable diagnostic accuracy and feasibility, potentially making it a useful tool for PAD diagnosis. We recommend considering oscillometric errors as PAD equivalents, and a "per subject" instead of a "per leg" approach, in order to improve sensitivity. Borderline oscillometric ABI values in diabetic population should raise concern of PAD. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Association of Far-Infrared Radiation Therapy and Ankle-Brachial Index of Patients on Hemodialysis with Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Kuo, I-Ching; Mai, Hsiu-Chin; Kuo, Po-Lin; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is recognized to be a good marker for atherosclerosis, and is useful in the diagnosis of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) which is prevalent among patients on hemodialysis (HD). Methods: This randomized trial aimed to evaluate the effect of far-infrared radiation (FIR) therapy on ABI in HD patients with PAOD. PAOD was defined as patients with ABI < 0.95. One hundred and eight HD patients were enrolled, including 50 in the control group and 58 in the FIR group. A WS TY101 FIR emitter was applied for 40 minutes during each HD session, three times per week for six months. The ABI was measured before and after the FIR therapy. Results: Regardless of FIR therapy, the bilateral ABI decreased (in the FIR group, left: 0.88±0.22 to 0.85±0.24, p = 0.188; right: 0.92±0.20 to 0.90±0.23, p = 0.372; in control group, left: 0.91±0.23 to 0.88±0.21, p = 0144; right: 0.93±0.17 to 0.89±0.21, p = 0.082). Multivariate logistic analysis of the FIR group revealed that high uric acid (odds ratio [OR]: 2.335; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.117-4.882; p=0.024) and aspirin use (OR: 16.463; 95% CI: 1.787-151.638; p=0.013) were independently associated with increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that ABI is not increased after FIR therapy in HD patients with PAOD. However, in the FIR group, patients with higher uric acid level or those who used aspirin have increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy. PMID:27994503

  5. Association of Far-Infrared Radiation Therapy and Ankle-Brachial Index of Patients on Hemodialysis with Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Kuo, I-Ching; Mai, Hsiu-Chin; Kuo, Po-Lin; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is recognized to be a good marker for atherosclerosis, and is useful in the diagnosis of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) which is prevalent among patients on hemodialysis (HD). Methods: This randomized trial aimed to evaluate the effect of far-infrared radiation (FIR) therapy on ABI in HD patients with PAOD. PAOD was defined as patients with ABI < 0.95. One hundred and eight HD patients were enrolled, including 50 in the control group and 58 in the FIR group. A WS TY101 FIR emitter was applied for 40 minutes during each HD session, three times per week for six months. The ABI was measured before and after the FIR therapy. Results: Regardless of FIR therapy, the bilateral ABI decreased (in the FIR group, left: 0.88±0.22 to 0.85±0.24, p = 0.188; right: 0.92±0.20 to 0.90±0.23, p = 0.372; in control group, left: 0.91±0.23 to 0.88±0.21, p = 0144; right: 0.93±0.17 to 0.89±0.21, p = 0.082). Multivariate logistic analysis of the FIR group revealed that high uric acid (odds ratio [OR]: 2.335; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.117-4.882; p=0.024) and aspirin use (OR: 16.463; 95% CI: 1.787-151.638; p=0.013) were independently associated with increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that ABI is not increased after FIR therapy in HD patients with PAOD. However, in the FIR group, patients with higher uric acid level or those who used aspirin have increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy.

  6. Independent Factors of Changes of Ankle-Brachial Index in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease in Elderly Patients with or without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bąk, Ewelina; Marcisz, Czesław; Kadłubowska, Monika; Michalik, Anna; Krawczyk, Bożena; Dobrzyń-Matusiak, Dorota; Krzemińska, Sylwia; Fiałkowski, Tomasz; Glądys, Elżbieta; Drosdzol-Cop, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) belongs to the commonly-occurring pathologies associated with elderly age. A simple tool for defining the severity of PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The purpose of this research was to determine independent factors of changes of ABI in elderly patients with occlusive PAD disease (PAOD) with and without diabetes. The research was carried out on 49 elderly patients with PAOD, including 29 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 20 patients without diabetes. The concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6), E-selectin, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood serum was marked. In all patients, the independent factors of changes of ABI were determined with the use of the multiple logistic regression analysis. Our results show that in the group of patients with PAOD suffering from diabetes, it was demonstrated that the ABI was related to age, the duration of the symptoms of PAD, body mass index (BMI), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fibrinogen, and sex (determination coefficient R2 = 0.699). In patients with PAOD without diabetes, the ABI was related to age, the duration of the symptoms of PAD, the levels of CRP, E-selectin, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the glomerular filtration rate(determination coefficient R2 = 0.844). We conclude that in elderly patients with PAOD with and without diabetes, the participation of independent factors related to the ABI is diversified; in patients with diabetes, the concentration of IL-6 and fibrinogen is lower, and the concentration of E-selectin is higher than in patients without diabetes. PMID:27834825

  7. Assessment of flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery: effects of technical aspects of the FMD measurement on the FMD response.

    PubMed

    Bots, Michiel L; Westerink, Jan; Rabelink, Ton J; de Koning, Eelco J P

    2005-02-01

    The ability to assess endothelial function non-invasively with B-mode ultrasound has lead to its widespread application in a variety of studies. However, the absolute values obtained using this approach vary considerably across studies. We studied whether technical aspects of the methodology can explain the wide variety in absolute values across studies. A literature search was performed to identify published reports on flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery published between 1992 and 2001. Information on type of equipment (wall track/B-mode), location of the measurement (antecubital fossa/upper arm), occlusion site (lower/upper arm), occlusion duration (min), and occlusion pressure was extracted. Patient characteristics were also extracted. For the healthy populations, mean FMD varied from 0.20 to 19.2%; for the coronary heart disease (CHD) patients FMD varied from -1.3 to 14%; for subjects with diabetes mellitus FMD varied from 0.75 to 12%. Compared with occlusion at the upper arm, lower arm occlusion was related to decreased FMD (mean difference in FMD -2.47%; 95% CI 0.55-4.39). An occlusion duration of > or =4.5 min was related to an increased FMD compared with an occlusion time of < or =4 min (mean difference 1.30%; 95% CI 0.35-2.46). These findings were adjusted for other technical aspects of the methodology and for differences in risk factors between populations. Mean FMD differs widely between studies. There is a great overlap between populations (healthy, CHD, diabetics). Our findings suggest that the technical aspects of the measurements, the location, and the duration of the occlusion may explain some of these differences, whereas type of equipment, location of the measurement, and occlusion pressure do not.

  8. [Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in healthy men, men with risk factors, and men with acute myocardial infarction. Importance of occlusion-cuff position].

    PubMed

    Dalli, Ernesto; Segarra, Leopoldo; Ruvira, Jorge; Esteban, Esther; Cabrera, Abraham; Lliso, Ramón; López, Esther; Llopis, Enric; Sotillo, José F

    2002-09-01

    Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is endothelium-dependent and can be assessed by ultrasound in the brachial artery. We sought to determine the most suitable position for the occlusion cuff for the study of FMD in three groups of adult men. We included 160 subjects, mean age 58.5 7.8 years: 40 healthy subjects, 80 with cardiovascular risk factors, and 40 patients with AMI. In a subgroup of 60 subjects, the first 10, 30, and 20 of each group, respectively, FMD was evaluated twice, after upper arm occlusion and forearm occlusion to induce hyperemia. In the initial substudy, the FMD after upper arm occlusion was 7.6 2.4% in healthy subjects, 5.1 2.2% in men with risk factors (p < 0.0001), and 3.5 2.2% in AMI patients (p < 0.041, with respect to the risk-factor group). FMD after forearm occlusion was 4.6 1.5%, 2.3 2.1% (p < 0.006), and 2.2 1.9%, respectively, with no significant statistical differences between the risk-factor and AMI groups. Only upper arm occlusion was performed in the remaining participants, as planned, because it provided the most accurate information. Overall, the FMD was, respectively, 7.8 3.1%, 5 2.6% (p < 0.0001) and 3.3 3% (p < 0.004, with respect to the risk-factor group). FMD was directly related to HDL cholesterol and inversely related to resting diameter and number of risk factors. The best approach to studying FMD is proximal occlusion since it allows for a better stratification of the with endothelial dysfunction. With this technique, a worsening of endothelial function in acute myocardial infarction can be demonstrated.

  9. High Central Aortic Rather than Brachial Blood Pressure is Associated with Carotid Wall Remodeling and Increased Arterial Stiffness in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Peluso, Gonzalo; García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Marota, Marco; Castro, Juan; Chiesa, Pedro; Giachetto, Gustavo; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina

    2017-03-01

    In adults, central blood pressure (cBP) is reported to associate target organ damages (TODs) rather than peripheral blood pressure (pBP). However, data regarding the association of pre-clinical TODs with cBP and pBP in pediatric populations are scarce. To evaluate in children and adolescents the importance of cBP and pBP levels, in terms of their association with hemodynamic and vascular changes. 315 subjects [age (mean/range) 12/8-18 years] were included. pBP (oscillometry, Omron-HEM433INT and Mobil-O-Graph), cBP levels and waveforms (oscillometry, Mobil-O-Graph; applanation tonometry, SphygmoCor), aortic wave reflection-related parameters, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and carotid (elastic modulus, stiffness-index) and aortic stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, PWV). Four groups were defined considering pBP and cBP percentiles (th): cBP ≥90th, cBP <90th, pBP ≥90th, pBP <90th. In each group, haemodynamic and vascular parameters were compared for subgroups defined considering the level of the remaining blood pressure (cBP or pBP). Subgroups were matched for anthropometric and cardiovascular risk factors (propensity matching-score). Subjects with high cBP showed a worse cardiovascular risk profile in addition to worse peripheral hemodynamic conditions. The CIMT, carotid and aortic stiffness levels were also higher in those subjects. CIMT and carotid stiffness remained statistically higher when subjects were matched for pBP and other cardiovascular risk factors. There were no differences in arterial properties when subjects were analyzed (compared) considering similar pBP levels, during normal and high cBP conditions. Compared with pBP, the cBP levels show a greater association with vascular alterations (high CIMT and arterial stiffness), in children and adolescents.

  10. Onset Time of 2% Lidocaine and 0.5% Bupivacaine Mixture versus 0.5% Bupivacaine Alone using Ultrasound and Double Nerve Stimulation for Infraclavicular Brachial Plexus Anesthesia in ESRD Patients Undergoing Arteriovenous Fistula Creation.

    PubMed

    Pongraweewan, Orawan; Inchua, Nipa; Kitsiripant, Chanatthee; Kongmuang, Benchawan; Tiwirach, Wannapa

    2016-05-01

    To reduce the onset of 0.5% bupivacaine by adding 2% lidocaine with 0.5% bupivacaine for ultrasound-guided and double stimulation technique at musculocutaneous and radial nerve for infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Prospective randomized double-blinded, controlled trial study. 90 patients undergoing creation of arteriovenous fistula under ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block were randomized into 2 groups. Gr B (46 patients) received 0.5% bupivacaine 30 mL and Gr BL (44 patients) received mixture of 0.5% bupivacaine 20 mL and 2% lidocaine 10 mL. The onset of sensory block were assessed by response to pinprick (grading: 0 = no sensation, 1 = hypoesthesia, and 2 = normal sensation). Rescue analgesia during the operation, duration of sensory and motor blockade were recorded. Surgeon and patient satisfactions are also evaluated using 6-point scale (0 = dissatisfied to 5 = very satisfied). There were no significant difference in the onset time of either group. Duration of sensory and motor block was not different. Surgeons' and patients' satisfaction were also not significantly different between the groups. Mixing 2% lidocaine with 0.5% bupivacaine to the final concentration of 0.67%for lidocaine and 0.33% for bupivacaine does not reduce the onset of ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block.

  11. High-frequency ultrasonographic imaging of the endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in a brachial artery: normative ranges in a group of low CV risk subjects of different ages.

    PubMed

    Ryliskyte, Ligita; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Plantinga, Yvonne; Janaviciene, Silvija; Petrulioniene, Zaneta; Laucevicius, Aleksandras; Gintautas, Jonas

    2004-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasonographic imaging of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in a brachial artery, as non-invasive technique, was used for the clinical evaluation of endothelial function (EF) in 115 subjects (ages 44.19+/-12.23 (26 to 83) free of coronary heart disease or its equivalents. Our aim was to study the normative ranges for FMD in subjects of different age groups with low cardiovascular risk factors. The mean FMD was 8.23+/-4.51% (0 to 20.9). Multivariate analysis revealed that there were only two independent predictors of FMD: resting vessel diameter (r = -0.45, p<0.0001) and age (r = -0.55, p<0.0001). The multiple regression equation for this data was FMD = 25.5-0.17 x age-2.6 x resting vessel diameter. Our study demonstrates that FMD in low cardiovascular risk patients inversely correlates with age as well as brachial artery diameter. Normative ranges of FMD could be predicted for different age groups. In addition to conventional methods for the assessment of cardiovascular risk by using a population-based approach (score indexes such as SCORE, FRAMINGH, PROCAM), high-frequency ultrasonographic imaging of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in the brachial artery is now becoming an accepted method for the assessment of an individual patient's cardiovascular risk. Although preliminary guidelines have been published, this technique has interpretive limitations. In a study that was published earlier, the authors estimated diameter-related normal ranges of FMD. Several articles reported cut points between control and diseased groups. Data about the impact of age on FMD are also available in the literature. However, this is the first attempt to classify normal values into groups according to age and diameter.

  12. [Complications in brachial plexus surgery].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Fernando; Pinazzo, Samantha; Moragues, Rodrigo; Suarez, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Although traumatic brachial plexus injuries are relatively rare in trauma patients, their effects on the functionality of the upper limb can be very disabling. The authors' objective was to assess the complications in a series of patients operated for brachial plexus injuries. This was a retrospective evaluation of patients operated on by the authors between August 2009 and March 2013. We performed 36 surgeries on 33 patients. The incidence of complications was 27.7%. Of these, only 1 (2.7%) was considered serious and associated with the procedure (iatrogenic injury of brachial artery). There was another serious complication (hypoxia in patients with airway injury) but it was not directly related to the surgical procedure. All other complications were considered minor (wound dehiscence, hematoma, infection). There was no mortality in our series. The complications in our series are similar to those reported in the literature. Serious complications (vascular, neural) are rare and represent less than 5% in all the different series. Given the rate of surgical complications and the poor functional perspective for a brachial plexus injury without surgery, we believe that surgery should be the treatment of choice. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by damage to those nerves. Symptoms ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can occur as a result of shoulder trauma, ...

  14. Brachial plexus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that originate from the neck region and branch off to give ... movement in the upper limb. Injuries to the brachial plexus are common and can be debilitating. If ...

  15. Efficacy of Early Superficial Temporal Artery-Middle Cerebral Artery Double Anastomoses for Atherosclerotic Occlusion in Patients with Progressing Stroke.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Akihiro; Kohno, Kanehisa; Iwata, Shinji; Ohue, Shiro; Ozaki, Saya; Ninomiya, Satoko; Tomita, Hitomi; Kamogawa, Kenji; Okamoto, Kensho; Fukumoto, Shinya; Ichikawa, Haruhisa; Onoue, Shinji; Nakamura, Yawara; Okuda, Bungo

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the efficacy of early superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) double anastomoses for patients with progressing stroke due to atherosclerotic occlusion. Nine consecutive patients who underwent early STA-MCA double anastomoses were enrolled. All patients presented with progressing stroke despite maximal medical treatment. Cerebral blood flow in 7 patients was analyzed by single-photon emission tomography. Clinical outcomes were investigated postoperatively, and we evaluated the utility of early STA-MCA double anastomoses. Nine patients in the present study included those with middle cerebral artery occlusion (n = 6) and internal carotid artery occlusion (n = 3). The mean age was 58.4 years. Subjects comprised 1 female (11.1%) and 8 males (88.9%). The cause was low perfusion ischemia due to atherosclerotic occlusion with a small infarct. The mean regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) ratio in the middle cerebral artery territory compared to the normal side was 69.6 ± 5.3%. The duration from onset to surgery was 1-8 days (median, 3.11 days). All patients underwent early STA-MCA double anastomoses, and no reperfusion-induced hemorrhage occurred. All of them slowly achieved obvious remission compared to symptoms on admission and achieved a good functional outcome. Early STA-MCA double anastomoses were safe and effective, and early revascularization resulted in rapid neurological improvement. We recommend this procedure for patients with progressive ischemia due to main trunk artery occlusion, when the rCBF flow ratio with the normal side was 70 ± 10%, even at the subacute stage. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of repeated increases in shear stress via reactive hyperemia and handgrip exercise: no evidence of systematic changes in brachial artery FMD.

    PubMed

    Pyke, K E; Jazuli, F

    2011-03-01

    Reactive hyperemia (RH) creates an uncontrolled, transient increase in brachial artery (BA) shear stress (SS) for flow-mediated dilation (FMD) assessment. In contrast, handgrip exercise (HGEX) can create similar, sustained SS increases over repeated trials. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of repeated SS elevation via RH or HGEX and the relationship between RH and HGEX %FMD. BA diameter and blood velocity were assessed with echo and Doppler ultrasound in 20 healthy subjects. Visit A consisted of four 6-min HGEX trials (HGEX trials 1-4) at the intensity required to achieve a shear rate (SR = mean blood velocity/BA diameter; an estimate of SS) of 65 s(-1). Visit B consisted of four RH trials (RH trials 1-4). The RH SR area under the curve (AUC) was higher in trial 1 versus trial 3 and trial 4 (P = 0.019 and 0.047). The HGEX mean SR was similar across trials (mean SR = 66.1 ± 5.8 s(-1), P = 0.152). There were no differences in %FMD across trials or tests (RH trial 1: 6.9 ± 3.5%, trial 2: 6.9 ± 2.3%, trial 3: 7.1 ± 3.5%, and trial 4: 7.0 ± 2.8%; HGEX trial 1: 7.3 ± 3.6%, trial 2: 7.0 ± 3.6%, trial 3: 6.5 ± 3.5%, and trial 4: 6.8 ± 2.9%, P = 0.913). No relationship between subject's RH %FMD and HGEX %FMD was detected (r(2) = 0.12, P = 0.137). However, with response normalization, a relationship emerged (RH %FMD/SR AUC vs. HGEX %FMD/mean SR, r(2) = 0.44, P = 0.002). In conclusion, with repeat trials, there were no systematic changes in RH or HGEX %FMD. The relationship between normalized RH and HGEX %FMD suggests that endothelial responses to different SS profiles provide related information regarding endothelial function.

  17. Soluble P-selectin Predicts Lower Extremity Peripheral Artery Disease Incidence and Change in the Ankle Brachial Index: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Wassel, Christina L.; Berardi, Cecilia; Pankow, James S.; Larson, Nicholas B.; Decker, Paul A.; Hanson, Naomi Q.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Criqui, Michael H.; Allison, Matthew A.; Bielinski, Suzette J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of circulating P-selectin with prevalent and incident peripheral artery disease (PAD), the ankle brachial index (ABI), and change in the ABI. Methods The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) is a prospective population-based cohort study including 6814 European descent, African American, Hispanic and Chinese men and women aged 45–84 at baseline. Four clinical exams took place after the baseline exam. After excluding those with ABI>1.4, prevalent and incident PAD were defined as an ABI≤0.90. ABI progression was defined as progression from a normal ABI (0.91–1.4) to abnormal (≤0.90 or >1.4) at a later exam. Results In adjusted models, each SD (13 ng/mL) higher P-selectin was significantly associated with 0.007 lower ABI (95% CI ((−0.011, −0.004)), p<0.001), and an average change in the ABI of − 0.006 ((−0.010, −0.003, p<0.001). P-selectin was significantly associated with a 1.17-fold greater odds of prevalent PAD ((1.02, 1.33), p=0.03), and a 30% greater risk of incident PAD ((1.11, 1.53), p=0.001), as well as progression from a normal ABI to an ABI≤ 0.90 (p=0.003), but not to an ABI>1.4 (p=0.96). Addition of P-selectin to models containing traditional PAD risk factors and markers of inflammation/coagulation significantly improved the net reclassification for ABI progression (p=0.03), but was only marginally significant for incident PAD (p=0.06). Conclusions P-selectin is significantly associated with the development of PAD. However, further research is needed in population-based studies to confirm prospective associations of P-selectin with incident PAD and change in the ABI, as well as its potential predictive ability. PMID:25682040

  18. Perineural Nalbuphine in Ambulatory Upper Limb Surgery: A Comparison of Effects of Levobupivacaine with and without Nalbuphine as Adjuvant in Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block – A Prospective, Double-blinded, Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anjan; RoyBasunia, Sandip; Mukherjee, Anindya; Biswas, Hirak; Biswas, Rajasree; Mitra, Tapobrata; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Mandal, Subrata Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Various opioid additives have been trialed to prolong brachial plexus block. We evaluated the effect of adding nalbuphine hydrochloride to levobupivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus blockade. The primary end-points were the onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks and duration of analgesia. Materials and Methods: Seventy-eight patients (aged 25–45 years) posted for ambulatory forearm and hand surgery under supraclavicular brachial plexus block were divided into two equal groups (Groups LN and LC) in a randomized, double-blind fashion. In Group LN (n = 39), 30 ml 0.5% levobupivacaine + 10 mg (diluted in 2 ml 0.9% saline) nalbuphine hydrochloride, and in Group LC (n = 39), 30 ml 0.5% levobupivacaine + 2 ml normal saline (0.9%) were administered in supraclavicular block. Sensory and motor block onset times and block durations, time to first analgesic use, total analgesic need, postoperative visual analog scale (VAS), hemodynamics, and side effects were recorded for each patient. Results: Although with similar demographic profile and block (sensory and motor) onset time, sensory and motor block duration and time to first analgesic use were significantly longer and the total need for rescue analgesics was lower in Group LN (P < 0.05) than Group LC. Postoperative VAS value at 24 h was significantly lower in Group LN (P < 0.05). Intraoperative hemodynamics was comparable between two groups, and no any appreciable side effect was noted throughout the study period. Conclusion: It can be concluded that adding nalbuphine hydrochloride to supraclavicular brachial plexus block increases the sensory and motor block duration and time to first analgesic use, and decreases total analgesic use with no side effects. PMID:28298754

  19. Atypical Double Right Coronary Artery Presenting With Acute Coronary Syndrome, Cardiogenic Shock and Complete Heart Block

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Shravan; Chaturvedi, Vikash; Agrawal, Puneet; Razi, Mahmadula; Mahrotra, Anupam; Mishra, Vikas; Kumar, Mukesh; Abdali, Nasar; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Thakur, Ramesh; Varma, Chandra Mohan; Pandey, Umeshwar

    2017-01-01

    Double right coronary artery (RCA) is an extremely rare coronary artery anomaly. We here report an atherosclerotic double RCA which appeared after primary percutaneous intervention performed to treat a 34-year-old male presenting with acute inferior myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock and complete heart block. This is an unusual case as double RCA had been hidden by total atherosclerotic occlusion of the proximal part of the RCA and complete restoration of patency led complete heart block back to normal sinus rhythm. PMID:28179971

  20. [Brachial plexus sleep palsy].

    PubMed

    Fourcade, G; Taieb, G; Renard, D; Labauge, P; Pradal-Prat, D

    2011-01-01

    Brachial plexus is rarely involved in "Saturday night palsy". A young man was admitted for numbness and weakness of his right upper limb after awaking from sleep. Neurophysiological studies, consistent with brachial plexopathy, revealed presence of proximal conduction blocks. Patient presented spontaneous clinical and neurophysiological improvement. Diagnosis of compressive brachial plexopathy needs to eliminate other causes of neuropathy with conduction block. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Extrafascial injection for interscalene brachial plexus block reduces respiratory complications compared with a conventional intrafascial injection: a randomized, controlled, double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Palhais, N; Brull, R; Kern, C; Jacot-Guillarmod, A; Charmoy, A; Farron, A; Albrecht, E

    2016-04-01

    Hemidiaphragmatic paresis after ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block is reported to occur in up to 100% of patients. We tested the hypothesis that an injection lateral to the brachial plexus sheath reduces the incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis compared with a conventional intrafascial injection, while providing similar analgesia. Forty ASA I-III patients undergoing elective shoulder and clavicle surgery under general anaesthesia were randomized to receive an ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block for analgesia, using 20 ml bupivacaine 0.5% with epinephrine 1:200 000 injected either between C5 and C6 within the interscalene groove (conventional intrafascial injection), or 4 mm lateral to the brachial plexus sheath (extrafascial injection). The primary outcome was incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis (diaphragmatic excursion reduction >75%), measured by M-mode ultrasonography, before and 30 min after the procedure. Secondary outcomes were forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and peak expiratory flow. Additional outcomes included time to first opioid request and pain scores at 24 h postoperatively (numeric rating scale, 0-10). The incidences of hemidiaphragmatic paresis were 90% (95% CI: 68-99%) and 21% (95% CI: 6-46%) in the conventional and extrafascial injection groups, respectively (P<0.0001). Other respiratory outcomes were significantly better preserved in the extrafascial injection group. The mean time to first opioid request was similar between groups (conventional: 802 min [95% CI: 620-984 min]; extrafascial: 973 min [95% CI: 791-1155 min]; P=0.19) as were pain scores at 24 h postoperatively (conventional: 1.6 [95% CI: 0.9-2.2]; extrafascial: 1.6 [95% CI: 0.8-2.4]; P=0.97). Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block with an extrafascial injection reduces the incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis and impact on respiratory function while providing similar analgesia, when compared with a

  2. Quantification of Adventitial Vasa Vasorum Vascularization in Double-injury Restenotic Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Meng; Zhang, Bai-Gen; Zhang, Lan; Xie, Hui; Zhang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence indicates a potential role of adventitial vasa vasorum (VV) dysfunction in the pathophysiology of restenosis. However, characterization of VV vascularization in restenotic arteries with primary lesions is still missing. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the response of adventitial VV to vascular injury resulting from balloon angioplasty in diseased arteries. Methods: Primary atherosclerotic-like lesions were induced by the placement of an absorbable thread surrounding the carotid artery of New Zealand rabbits. Four weeks following double-injury induced that was induced by secondary balloon dilation, three-dimensional patterns of adventitial VV were reconstructed; the number, density, and endothelial surface of VV were quantified using micro-computed tomography. Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed in order to examine the development of intimal hyperplasia. Results: Results from our study suggest that double injured arteries have a greater number of VV, increased luminal surface, and an elevation in the intima/media ratio (I/M), along with an accumulation of macrophages and smooth muscle cells in the intima, as compared to sham or single injury arteries. I/M and the number of VV were positively correlated (R2 = 0.82, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Extensive adventitial VV neovascularization occurs in injured arteries after balloon angioplasty, which is associated with intimal hyperplasia. Quantitative assessment of adventitial VV response may provide insight into the basic biological process of postangioplasty restenosis. PMID:26228224

  3. Microanatomy of the brachial plexus roots and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li-Yuan; Wang, Ai-Ping; Hong, Li; Chen, Sheng-Hua; Wang, Xian-Qin; Lv, Yun-Cheng; Peng, Tian-Hong

    2017-06-01

    To provide the anatomical basis of brachial plexus roots for the diagnosis and treatment of brachial plexus root avulsion injury. The morphological features of brachial plexus roots were observed and measured on 15 cervicothoracic spine of adult cadavers. The relationship of brachial plexus nerve roots and the surrounding tissues also were observed, as well as the blood supply of anterior and posterior roots of the brachial plexus. Origination of the nerve roots in the dorsal-ventral direction from the midline was fine-tuned at each level along the spinal cord. The minimum distance of the origin of the nerve root to midline was 2.2 mm at C 5, while the maximum was 3.1 mm at T 1. Inversely, the distance between the origin of the posterior root and the midline of the spinal cord gradually decreased, the maximum being 4.2 mm at C 5 and minimum 2.7 mm at T 1. Meanwhile, there was complicated fibrous connection among posterior roots of the brachial plexus. The C 5-6 nerve roots interlaced with tendons of the scalenus anterior and scalenus medius and fused with the transverse-radicular ligaments in the intervertebral foramina. However, these ligaments were not seen in C 7-8, and T 1. The blood supply of the anterior and posterior roots of the brachial plexus was from the segmental branches of the vertebral artery, deep cervical artery and ascending cervical artery, with a mean outer diameter of 0.61 mm. The systematic and comprehensive anatomic data of the brachial plexus roots provides the anatomical basis to diagnose and treat the brachial plexus root avulsion injury.

  4. Recurrent antepartum compression of a single artery double nuchal cord necessitating emergency cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Sherer, David M; Khoury-Collado, Fady; Dalloul, Mudar; Osho, Joseph A; Lamarque, Madelene D; Fomitcheva, Larissa; Abulafia, Ovadia

    2005-11-01

    Fetuses with a single umbilical artery are considered at increased risk for chromosomal and structural abnormalities, and increased adverse perinatal outcome. A young nulliparous patient was followed with weekly nonstress testing due to well-controlled gestational diabetes, a single umbilical artery, and a double nuchal cord. At 31 weeks gestation, following the occurrence of a severe prolonged variable deceleration of the fetal heart rate the patient was hospitalized for close fetal surveillance with consideration that the deceleration may represent recurring intermittent compression of the single umbilical artery. Continuous fetal monitoring depicted recurrent severe variable decelerations of the fetal heart rate. Thirty-six hours after admission, prolonged fetal bradycardia to 60 bpm necessitated emergency cesarean delivery of a nonhypoxic nonacidotic fetus, which subsequently did well. This case suggests that fetuses with a single umbilical artery nuchal cord(s) may be at increased risk of significant umbilical cord compression.

  5. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with multivessel cervical artery dissections and a double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Nouh, Amre; Ruland, Sean; Schneck, Michael J; Pasquale, David; Biller, José

    2014-02-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) has been associated with exposure to vasoactive substances and few reports with cervical arterial dissections (CADs). We evaluated a 32-year-old woman with history of depression, migraines without aura, and cannabis use who presented with a thunderclap headache unresponsive to triptans. She was found to have bilateral occipital infarcts, bilateral extracranial vertebral artery dissections, bilateral internal carotid artery dissecting aneurysms, and extensive distal multifocal segmental narrowing of the anterior and posterior intracranial circulation with a "sausage on a string-like appearance" suggestive of RCVS. Subsequently, she was found to have a distal thrombus of the basilar artery, was anticoagulated, and discharged home with no residual deficits. We highlight the potential association of CADs and RCVS. The association of RCVS and a double aortic arch has not been previously reported. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. N-terminal Pro-B-type Natriuretic Peptide is Associated with Arterial Stiffness as Measured According to the Brachial-ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Patients with Takayasu Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Dang, Ai-Min; Chen, Bing-Wei; Lv, Na-Qiang; Wang, Xu; Zheng, De-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Takayasu arteritis (TA) is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the degree of arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality in a variety of diseases. In addition, the levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), a marker of ventricular dysfunction, have been found to be higher in patients with TA than in healthy controls. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between the plasma NT-proBNP levels and arterial stiffness in patients with TA. Seventy-two patients with TA were recruited in this study. The participants were analyzed with respect to the NT-proBNP levels, cardiovascular risk factors, TA-related variables and arterial stiffness assessed according to the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). The patients were divided into two groups based on the mean baPWV, and the association between the NT-proBNP and baPWV values was tested using uni- and multivariate analyses. Twenty-four patients (33.3%) were classified into the high-baPWV group. The body mass index (p=0.035), systolic blood pressure (p<0.001), diastolic blood pressure (p=0.001), mean blood pressure (p<0.001), plasma NT-proBNP levels (p=0.036) and total cholesterol levels (p=0.030) were significantly higher in the high-baPWV group than in the low-baPWV group. A stepwise multiple linear regression analysis revealed the mean blood pressure (p<0.001), age (p=0.002), and NT-proBNP level (p=0.002) to be independent determinants of the ba-PWV after adjusting for other confounding factors. The plasma NT-proBNP levels are independently associated with the degree of arterial stiffness measured according to the baPWV in patients with TA.

  7. Transposition of the great arteries associated with a double left ventricular outflow tract.

    PubMed Central

    Kinsley, R H; Levin, S E; O'Donovan, T G

    1979-01-01

    A case is described in which, at semilunar valve level, the aorta and pulmonary artery arose from inappropriate ventricles. Despite this, the outflow tracts to both vessels originated from the left ventricle. Embryologically, it is speculated that this anomaly is the result of normal rotation of the proximal conus, without concomitant truncal inversion, and excessive leftward shift of the proximal conus and conal septum or anterior and rightward deviation of the anterior segment of the ventricular septum. Surgical repair using a double conduit between the right ventricle and pulmonary artery and left ventricle and aorta, respectively, was unsuccessful. Images PMID:508480

  8. Ankle-Brachial Index

    MedlinePlus

    ... to getting your blood pressure taken in a routine visit to your doctor. You may feel some ... mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/ankle-brachial-index/basics/definition/PRC-20014625 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  9. Recurrent brachial plexus neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bradley, W G; Madrid, R; Thrush, D C; Campbell, M J

    1975-09-01

    The clinical, electrophysiological and pathological changes in 3 patients with recurrent attacks of non-traumatic brachial plexus neuropathy have been described. Two had recurrent attacks and a dominant family history of similar attacks, together with evidence of lesser degrees of nerve involvement outside the brachial plexus. In one patient the attacks were moderately painful, while in the other there was little or no pain. Only one showed undue slowing of motor nerve conduction during ischaemia, but in both cases the sural nerves had the changes of tomaculous neuropathy, with many sausage-shaped swellings of the myelin sheaths, and extensive segmental demyelination and remyelination. The third patient had two attacks of acute brachial plexus neuropathy which were both extremely painful. The clinical features were compatible with a diagnosis of neuralgic amuotrophy. In the second attack, there was vagus nerve involvement and the sural nerve showed evidence of healed extensive segmental demyelination. The various syndromes presenting with acute non-traumatic brachial plexus neuropathy are reviewed, and a tentative nonsological classification advanced. Most patients fall into the category of acute, painful paralysis with amyotrophy, with no family history and no evidence of lesions outside the brachial plexus. It is suggested that the term "neuralgic amyotrophy" be restricted to this group. Patients with features outside this clinical picture probably suffer from other disease entities presenting with brachial plexus neuropathy. The familial cases constitute one or more aetioliogical subgroups, differing from neuralgic amyotrophy in the frequency of recurrences, the relative freedom from pain in the attacks, the frequency of nerve lesions outside the brachial plexus, and of hypotelorism. Individual attacks of acute brachial plexus neuropathy, however, may be identical in patients with the different diseases, and further pathological and biochemical studies are

  10. Comparison of Nerve Stimulation-guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Block, Single Injection versus Four Injections: A Prospective Randomized Double-blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Badiger, Santoshi V.; Desai, Sameer N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: A variety of techniques have been described for the axillary block using nerve stimulator, either with single injection, two, three, or four separate injections. Identification of all the four nerves is more difficult and time-consuming than other methods. Aims: Aim of the present study is to compare success rate, onset, and duration of sensory and motor anesthesia of axillary block using nerve stimulator, either with single injection after identification of any one of the four nerves or four separate injections following identification of each of nerve. Setting and Design: Prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Patients undergoing forearm and hand surgeries under axillary block. Methodology: One hundred patients, aged 18–75 years, were randomly allocated into two groups of 50 each. Axillary block was performed under the guidance of nerve stimulator with a mixture of 18 ml of 1.5% lignocaine and 18 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. In the first group (n = 50), all 36 ml of local anesthetic was injected after the identification of motor response to any one of the nerves and in Group 2, all the four nerves were identified by the motor response, and 9 ml of local anesthetic was injected at each of the nerves. The success rate of the block, onset, and duration of sensory and motor block was assessed. Statistical Analysis: Categorical variables were compared using the Chi-square test, and continuous variables were compared using independent t-test. Results: The success rate of the block with four injection technique was higher compared to single-injection technique (84% vs. 56%, P = 0.02). Four injection groups had a faster onset of sensory and motor block and prolonged duration of analgesia compared to single-injection group (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the incidence of accidental arterial puncture and hemodynamic parameter between the groups. Conclusion: Identification of all the four nerves produced higher success rate and better

  11. Intracranial Aneurysms Associated with a Double Origin of the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery

    PubMed Central

    Padovani Trivelato, F.; Salles Rezende, M.T.; Brito Santos, R.; Hilton Vieira Madeira, T.; Cardoso Campos, R.; Cordeiro Ulhûa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) frequently has a variable course and target territory. However, double origin PICA is a rare finding. Its significance is uncertain, but it has been associated with intracranial aneurysms localized at the PICA proper or at a distant site. The presence of this variation imposes specific challenges. We describe two cases of double origin PICA, one of them associated with an ipsilateral PICA aneurysm. The role of this finding was critically reviewed. A literature search identified 23 cases of double origin PICA, including both cases reported in this paper. Intracranial aneurysms were strongly associated with double origin PICA (71% in 21 detailed cases of double origin PICA). The current patient harboring a PICA aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular trapping. In the setting of double origin PICA aneurysms, this variation beneficially affects the treatment choice once the two limbs enable the safe sacrifice of the channel involved, with preservation of blood flow through the other channel. PMID:22005699

  12. The run-off resistance (ROR) assessed on MR angiograms may serve as a valid scoring system in patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and correlates with the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI).

    PubMed

    Gorny, O; Santner, W; Fraedrich, G; Jaschke, W; Greiner, A; Schocke, M F

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the correlation between the hemodynamic parameter ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) and the run-off resistance (ROR) assessed on MR angiograms (MRA) in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) Fontaine Stage I and II and its potential as reliable reporting system in clinical routine. Contrast-enhanced MRA was performed in 321 PAD patients using a 1.5T MR scanner with moving bed technique. The ROR and resting ABI were determined in each patient's leg and correlation analysis was performed using the Pearson test. A significant negative correlation (r = -.513; p<.001) between ROR (mean 11.03±5.42) and resting ABI (mean .81±.26) was identified. An even more pronounced correlation was found in patients younger than median age who had higher ABI values (r = -.608; p<.001). The ROR scoring system evaluated in this series correlates better with the ABI than previously published scoring systems and could be suggested as reporting system for routine MRA evaluation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Early intervention of long-acting nifedipine GITS reduces brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and improves arterial stiffness in Chinese patients with mild hypertension: a 24-week, single-arm, open-label, prospective study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jidong; Wang, Yan; Hu, Haijuan; Yang, Xiaohong; Tian, Zejun; Liu, Demin; Gu, Guoqiang; Zheng, Hongmei; Xie, Ruiqin; Cui, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nifedipine gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) is used to treat angina and hypertension. The authors aimed to study the early intervention impact on arterial stiffness and pulse wave velocity (PWV) independent of its blood-pressure-(BP) lowering effect in mild hypertensive patients. This single-center, single-arm, open-label, prospective, Phase IV study recruited patients with mild hypertension and increased PWV from December 2013 to December 2014 (N=138; age, 18-75 years; systolic blood pressure, 140-160 mmHg; diastolic BP, 90-100 mmHg; increased brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity [baPWV, ≥12 m/s]). Nifedipine GITS (30 mg/d) was administered for 24 weeks to achieve target BP of <140/90 mmHg. The dose was uptitrated at 60 mg/d in case of unsatisfactory BP reduction after 4 weeks. Primary study end point was the change in baPWV after nifedipine GITS treatment. Hemodynamic parameters (office BP, 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, and heart rate and adverse events) were evaluated at baseline and followed-up at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 weeks. Majority of patients (n=117; 84.8%) completed the study. baPWV decreased significantly at 4 weeks compared with baseline (1,598.87±239.82 vs 1,500.89±241.15 cm/s, P<0.001), was stable at 12 weeks (1,482.24±215.14 cm/s, P<0.001), and remained steady through 24 weeks (1,472.58±205.01 cm/s, P<0.001). Office BP reduced from baseline to week 4 (154/95 vs 136/85 mmHg) and remained steady until 24 weeks. Nifedipine GITS significantly decreased 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (P<0.001) after 24 weeks from baseline. Mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure were lowered significantly after 4, 12, and 24 weeks of treatment (P<0.001). These changes in baPWV were significantly correlated with changes in systolic blood pressure, diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure (P<0.05), but not with changes in pulse pressure (P>0.05). There were no other drug-related serious adverse events. Nifedipine GITS was considerably effective in

  14. Peripheral Arterial Disease in Older People with Intellectual Disability in The Netherlands Using the Ankle-Brachial Index: Results of the HA-ID Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, C. F.; Bastiaanse, L. P.; Kranendonk, S. E.; Hilgenkamp, T. I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Older people with an intellectual disability (ID) have been shown to have similar to increased cardiovascular risks as compared to the general population. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD), atherosclerosis distal from the aortic bifurcation, is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of PAD has not been…

  15. Peripheral Arterial Disease in Older People with Intellectual Disability in The Netherlands Using the Ankle-Brachial Index: Results of the HA-ID Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, C. F.; Bastiaanse, L. P.; Kranendonk, S. E.; Hilgenkamp, T. I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Older people with an intellectual disability (ID) have been shown to have similar to increased cardiovascular risks as compared to the general population. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD), atherosclerosis distal from the aortic bifurcation, is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of PAD has not been…

  16. Anatomical Study of the Brachial Plexus in the Common Marmoset (Callithrix Jacchus).

    PubMed

    Emura, Kenji; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Terashima, Toshio

    2017-07-01

    To elucidate the forelimb phylogeny of primates, anatomical analysis of the brachial plexus in platyrrhines is beneficial. In the present study, six brachial plexuses and the surrounding arteries of four common marmosets were dissected. In five specimens, the brachial plexus consisted of five ventral rami from the fifth cervical nerve (C5) to the first thoracic nerve (T1). In one specimen, the ventral ramus of the fourth cervical nerve joined with the brachial plexus. In five specimens, the upper trunk was composed of C5 and the sixth cervical nerve (C6). In one specimen, the ventral division of C6 merged with the ventral branch of the middle trunk to constitute the lateral cord. The seventh cervical nerve constituted the middle trunk, and the eighth cervical nerve and T1 formed the lower trunk in all specimens. The lateral cord gave rise to the musculocutaneous nerve, and the remaining component merged with the medial cord. The confluence of the lateral and medial cords immediately bifurcated into the median and ulnar nerves. These branching patterns of the musculocutaneous, median, and ulnar nerves were consistent and similar to the human counterparts. In the dorsal division, the single posterior cord as observed in the human brachial plexus was not observed. The axillary artery did not pass between the medial and lateral roots of the median nerve, and the axillary artery bifurcated into the brachial artery and the superficial brachial artery. Anat Rec, 300:1299-1306, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Romaña, M C; Rogier, A

    2013-01-01

    Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy is considered to be the result of a trauma during the delivery, even if there remains some controversy surrounding the causes. Although most babies recover spontaneously in the first 3 months of life, a small number remains with poor recovery which requires surgical brachial plexus exploration. Surgical indications depend on the type of lesion (producing total or partial palsy) and particularly the nonrecovery of biceps function by the age of 3 months. In a global palsy, microsurgery will be mandatory and the strategy for restoration will focus first on hand reinnervation and secondarily on providing elbow flexion and shoulder stability. Further procedures may be necessary during growth in order to avoid fixed contractured deformities or to give or increase strength of important muscle functions like elbow flexion or wrist extension. The author reviews the history of obstetrical brachial plexus injury, epidemiology, and the specifics of descriptive and functional anatomy in babies and children. Clinical manifestations at birth are directly correlated with the anatomical lesion. Finally, operative procedures are considered, including strategies of reconstruction with nerve grafting in infants and secondary surgery to increase functional capacity at later ages. However, normal function is usually not recovered, particularly in total brachial plexus palsy.

  18. Subintimal Double-Barrel Restenting of an Occluded Primary Stented Superficial Femoral Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Duterloo, Dirk Lohle, Paul N.M.; Lampmann, Leo E.H.

    2007-06-15

    In-stent re-stenosis is a frequent complication of endovascular stents, especially in the superficial femoral artery (SFA). Endovascular re-intervention of in- or peri-stent occlusive disease consists of recanilization through the occluded stent. In our case report, we describe the endovascular treatment of a previously placed stent in the SFA. We unintentionally passed the affected stent subintimally, in a double barrel fashion next to the first stent. The procedure was without any complications and with a successful angiographic result. At one year follow-up the patient still has no complaints and the stent is still patent.

  19. CASE REPORT A Double Thoracodorsal Artery Perforator Flap Technique for the Treatment of Pectus Excavatum

    PubMed Central

    Sinna, Raphaël; Perignon, David; Qassemyar, Quentin; Benhaim, Thomas; Dodreanu, Codrin N.; Berna, Pascal; Delay, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pectus excavatum is a common congenital deformity involving the anterior thoracic wall. It can be treated with several surgical approaches. Material and methods: To our best of knowledge, this is the first case of pectus excavatum repair via a 2-stage double thoracodorsal artery perforator flap procedure in a 37-year-old patient. Results: We obtained a satisfactory result in which the missing volume was correctly replaced in the absence of dorsal sequelae. The patient was very satisfied despite the dorsal scars. Conclusion: This new approach broadens the surgeon's options for the correction of thoracic deformities. PMID:20458352

  20. Subintimal Double-Barrel Restenting of an Occluded Primary Stented Superficial Femoral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Lohle, Paul N.M.; Lampmann, Leo E.H.

    2007-01-01

    In-stent re-stenosis is a frequent complication of endovascular stents, especially in the superficial femoral artery (SFA). Endovascular re-intervention of in- or peri-stent occlusive disease consists of recanilization through the occluded stent. In our case report, we describe the endovascular treatment of a previously placed stent in the SFA. We unintentionally passed the affected stent subintimally, in a double barrel fashion next to the first stent. The procedure was without any complications and with a successfull angiographic result. At one year follow-up the patient still has no complaints and the stent is still patent. PMID:17410397

  1. An Integrative Model of the Cardiovascular System Coupling Heart Cellular Mechanics with Arterial Network Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Tae; Lee, Jeong Sang; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Sung

    2013-01-01

    The current study proposes a model of the cardiovascular system that couples heart cell mechanics with arterial hemodynamics to examine the physiological role of arterial blood pressure (BP) in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). We developed a comprehensive multiphysics and multiscale cardiovascular model of the cardiovascular system that simulates physiological events, from membrane excitation and the contraction of a cardiac cell to heart mechanics and arterial blood hemodynamics. Using this model, we delineated the relationship between arterial BP or pulse wave velocity and LVH. Computed results were compared with existing clinical and experimental observations. To investigate the relationship between arterial hemodynamics and LVH, we performed a parametric study based on arterial wall stiffness, which was obtained in the model. Peak cellular stress of the left ventricle and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the brachial and central arteries also increased; however, further increases were limited for higher arterial stiffness values. Interestingly, when we doubled the value of arterial stiffness from the baseline value, the percentage increase of SBP in the central artery was about 6.7% whereas that of the brachial artery was about 3.4%. It is suggested that SBP in the central artery is more critical for predicting LVH as compared with other blood pressure measurements. PMID:23960442

  2. Perinatal brachial plexus palsy

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, John; Watt, Joe; Olson, Jaret; Van Aerde, John

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP) is a flaccid paralysis of the arm at birth that affects different nerves of the brachial plexus supplied by C5 to T1 in 0.42 to 5.1 infants per 1000 live births. OBJECTIVES To identify antenatal factors associated with PBPP and possible preventive measures, and to review the natural history as compared with the outcome after primary or secondary surgical interventions. METHODS A literature search on randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses on the prevention and treatment of PBPP was performed. EMBASE, Medline, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were searched until June 2005. Key words for searches included ‘brachial plexus’, ‘brachial plexus neuropathy’, ‘brachial plexus injury’, ‘birth injury’ and ‘paralysis, obstetric’. RESULTS There were no prospective studies on the cause or prevention of PBPP. Whereas birth trauma is said to be the most common cause, there is some evidence that PBPP may occur before delivery. Shoulder dystocia and PBPP are largely unpredictable, although associations of PBPP with shoulder dystocia, infants who are large for gestational age, maternal diabetes and instrumental delivery have been reported. The various forms of PBPP, clinical findings and diagnostic measures are described. Recent evidence suggests that the natural history of PBPP is not all favourable, and residual deficits are estimated at 20% to 30%, in contrast with the previous optimistic view of full recovery in greater than 90% of affected children. There were no randomized controlled trials on nonoperative management. There was no conclusive evidence that primary surgical exploration of the brachial plexus supercedes conservative management for improved outcome. However, results from nonrandomized studies indicated that children with severe injuries do better with surgical repair. Secondary surgical reconstructions were inferior to primary intervention, but could still improve arm

  3. Structure of the brachial plexus root and adjacent regions displayed by ultrasound imaging☆

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengyi; Xia, Xun; Rong, Xiaoming; Tang, Yamei; Xu, Dachuan

    2012-01-01

    Brachial plexuses of 110 healthy volunteers were examined using high resolution color Doppler ultrasound. Ultrasonic characteristics and anatomic variation in the intervertebral foramen, interscalene, supraclavicular and infraclavicular, as well as the axillary brachial plexus were investigated. Results confirmed that the normal brachial plexus on cross section exhibited round or elliptic hypoechoic texture. Longitudinal section imaging showed many parallel linear hypo-moderate echoes, with hypo-echo. The transverse processes of the seventh cervical vertebra, the scalene space, the subclavian artery and the deep cervical artery are important markers in an examination. The display rates for the interscalene, and supraclavicular and axillary brachial plexuses were 100% each, while that for the infraclavicular brachial plexus was 97%. The region where the normal brachial plexus root traversed the intervertebral foramen exhibited a regular hypo-echo. The display rate for the C5-7 nerve roots was 100%, while those for C8 and T1 were 83% and 68%, respectively. A total of 20 of the 110 subjects underwent cervical CT scan. High-frequency ultrasound can clearly display the outline of the transverse processes of the vertebrae, which were consistent with CT results. These results indicate that high-frequency ultrasound provides a new method for observing the morphology of the brachial plexus. The C7 vertebra is a marker for identifying the position of brachial plexus nerve roots. PMID:25624836

  4. Correlation between brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and endothelial microparticle levels for identifying endothelial dysfunction in children with Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yue-Yue; Ren, Yan; Feng, Xing; Xu, Qiu-Qin; Sun, Ling; Zhang, Jian-Min; Dou, Ji-Juan; Lv, Hai-Tao; Yan, Wen-Hua

    2014-03-01

    We investigated vascular endothelial dysfunction by sonographic features of flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and circulating endothelial microparticles (EMPs) in Kawasaki disease (KD). Twenty-eight patients with KD were prospectively grouped according to stage of disease: acute, subacute, and convalescent. In addition, 28 healthy children and 28 febrile children were selected as controls. And cases in the convalescent phase were divided into two subgroups: coronary artery lesion (CAL) and no coronary lesion (NCAL). CD144(+)/CD42b(-), CD62E(+), and CD105(+) EMPs were measured by flow cytometry; FMD was obtained by sonography. There were significant differences in FMD among the five groups. When compared with healthy controls, there were significantly greater numbers of CD144(+)/CD42b(-), CD62E(+), and CD105(+) EMPs and a higher proportion of CD62E(+) EMPs in KD patients. The proportions and numbers of CD144(+)/CD42b(-), CD62E(+), and CD105(+) EMPs in KD patients were not statistically different than in febrile controls. There were no significant differences in FMD and EMPs between the CAL and NCAL subgroups. There were significantly negative correlations between the values of FMD and EMPs in the three phases of KD. The increased levels of EMPs have significant correlation with decreased values of FMD, both of which may reflect endothelial dysfunction in child KD.

  5. Complete transposition of the great arteries with double outlet right ventricle in a dog.

    PubMed

    Koo, S T; LeBlanc, N L; Scollan, K F; Sisson, D D

    2016-06-01

    A 2-year old intact male Collie dog presented to the cardiology service at Oregon State University for evaluation of cyanosis and suspected congenital cardiac disease. Echocardiography revealed a constellation of cardiac abnormalities including a single large vessel exiting the right ventricle with a diminutive left ventricular outflow tract, a ventricular septal defect, and marked concentric right ventricular hypertrophy with moderate right atrial dilation. Cardiac-gated computed tomography confirmed the previous anomalies in addition to supporting a diagnosis of complete transposition of the great arteries, double outlet right ventricle, and pulmonic hypoplasia with a single coronary ostium. Prominent bronchoesophageal collateral vessels were concurrently identified. Clinically, the dog was stable despite mild cyanosis that worsened with exercise; no intervention was elected at the time. This case report describes a rare combination of congenital cardiac defects and the usefulness of cardiac-gated cross-sectional imaging in the anatomic diagnosis.

  6. Relationship of levels of Vitamin D with flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery in patients of myocardial infarction and healthy control: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Sarthak; Giri, Subhash; Madhu, S. V.; Rathi, Vinita; Banerjee, B. D.; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) remain the leading cause of death worldwide. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to increased risk of adverse CV events. Vitamin D deficiency may be responsible for endothelial dysfunction which in turn affects the onset and progression of coronary artery disease and its risk factors, directly or indirectly through various mechanisms. Materials and Methods: It was case–control study. A total of 50 cases of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (aged 40–60 years), admitted to medicine emergency/CCU, were taken as per ACC/AHA 2007 guidelines. An equal number of age- and sex-matched controls were also taken. Risk factors of AMI, flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), and 25(OH)D levels were studied in all cases and controls. Correlation was also studied between FMD and 25(OH)D. Results: The mean values of FMD were 18.86 ± 5.39% and 10.35 ± 4.90% in controls and cases, respectively (P < 0.05). The endothelial dilatation after glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) was also studied and was found to be 26.175 ± 4.25% and 18.80 ± 5.72% in controls and cases, respectively (P < 0.05). The mean levels of 25(OH)D in controls and cases were 25.45 ± 12.17 and 14.53 ± 8.28 ng/ml, respectively. In this study, 56% of subjects were Vitamin D deficient, 25% were Vitamin D insufficient, and only 19% had Vitamin D in normal range. A positive correlation coefficient was found between FMD and 25(OH) Vitamin D levels (r = 0.841, P < 0.01). In this study, a positive correlation coefficient was also found between endothelial dilatation after GTN and 25(OH)D levels (r = 0.743, P < 0.01). Conclusion: In this study, it was found that FMD was markedly impaired in patients of AMI when compared to controls. It was also found that majority of the study population was Vitamin D deficient; however, the deficiency was more severe in patients of AMI. We also found out that FMD was positively correlated (r = 0.841) to the deficiency state of Vitamin D in all the study

  7. [Perinatal brachial plexus palsy].

    PubMed

    Macko, Jozef

    2010-08-01

    Upper limbs palsy as a result of affliction of plexus brachialis nervous bunch is disorder, whose frequency moves among 0.42-5.1 / 1000 liveborn children. Delivery mechanism itself certain weighty, no however only cause rising paralysis. Some way paralysis rise already intrauterinne, some way then at surgical childbirth per sectionem caeseream. Brachial plexus palsy isn't benign disorder. If isn't this disorder in time diagnosed and accordingly treated, child threatens late aftermath, especially significant limitation of limbs movement with functional consequencies.

  8. [Obstetric brachial plexus injury].

    PubMed

    Pondaag, Willem; van Dijk, J Gert; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Malessy, Martijn J A

    2014-01-01

    Obstetric palsy is a birth injury that occurs when the brachial plexus is damaged by traction. In the majority of patients spontaneous recovery will occur; however, in case of incomplete spontaneous recovery early neurosurgical intervention may be indicated. We present 3 case reports in this article, as well as describing the strategy favoured in our clinic. We recommend referring patients who have incomplete spontaneous recovery at the age of 1 month. At that age a good prediction of prognosis can be made by combining neurological examination with needle electromyography (EMG) of the biceps muscle.

  9. Clinical Outcome of Double Kissing Crush Versus Provisional Stenting of Coronary Artery Bifurcation Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Santoso, Teguh; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Ye, Fei; Xu, Ya-Wei; Fu, Qiang; Kan, Jing; Zhang, Feng-Fu; Zhou, Yong; Xie, Du-Jiang; Kwan, Tak W.

    2017-01-01

    Background— Provisional stenting is effective for anatomic simple bifurcation lesions. Double kissing crush stenting reduces the 1-year rate of target lesion revascularization. This study aimed to investigate the 5-year clinical results of the DKCRUSH-II study (Randomized Study on Double Kissing Crush Technique Versus Provisional Stenting Technique for Coronary Artery Bifurcation Lesions). Methods and Results— A total of 370 patients with coronary bifurcation lesions who were randomly assigned to either the double kissing crush or provisional stenting group in the DKCRUSH-II study were followed for 5 years. The primary end point was the occurrence of a major adverse cardiac event at 5 years. Patients were classified by simple and complex bifurcation lesions according to the DEFINITION criteria (Definitions and Impact of Complex Bifurcation Lesions on Clinical Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Using Drug-Eluting Stents). At 5 years, the major adverse cardiac event rate (23.8%) in the provisional stenting group was insignificantly different to that of the double kissing group (15.7%; P=0.051). However, the difference in the target lesion revascularization rate between 2 groups was sustained through the 5-year follow-up (16.2% versus 8.6%; P=0.027). The definite and probable stent thrombosis rate was 2.7% in each group (P=1.0). Complex bifurcation was associated with a higher rate of target lesion revascularization (21.6%) at 5 years compared with 11.1% in patients with a simple bifurcation (P=0.037), with an extremely high rate in the provisional stenting group (36.8% versus 12.5%, P=0.005) mainly because of final kissing balloon inflation (19.4% versus 5.2%; P=0.036). Conclusions— The double kissing crush stenting technique for coronary bifurcation lesions is associated with a lower rate of target lesion revascularization. The optimal stenting approach based on the lesions’ complexity may improve the revascularization for patients with

  10. Resting and Post-Exercise Ankle-Brachial Index Measurements to Diagnose Asymptomatic Peripheral Arterial Disease in Middle Aged and Elderly Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Alagiakrishnan, Kannayiram; Brokop, Michael; Cave, Andrew; Rowe, Brian H.; Wong, Eric; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are at risk for asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) because smoking is a risk factor for COPD and PAD. The objectives of this study were to determine the proportion of COPD patients with asymptomatic PAD and to investigate whether the estimated risk of asymptomatic PAD in subjects with COPD differs using resting and exercise ankle-brachial index (ABI) in smokers. Methods Using a cross-sectional study design, consecutive smokers > 50 years old were recruited over 2 months from the inpatient units and the outpatient clinics. Subjects previously diagnosed with PAD, unstable angina, recent (< 3 months) myocardial infarction or abdominal, intracranial, eye or lung surgery, and palliative care patients were excluded. Vascular risk factors, ABI (supine and post-3-minute walk supine), self-reported PAD symptoms, and spirometry were obtained. Two measurements of systolic blood pressure on all limbs were obtained using a sphygmomanometer and a Doppler ultrasound, and the ABI was calculated. Data were expressed as means ± standard deviation (SD). Dichotomous outcomes were assessed using Chi-square statistics; P-values of < 0.05 were considered significant. Results Thirty patients with no previous diagnosis of PAD were recruited. Mean age was 67.7 years (SD: 10.5). Overall, 21 subjects (70%) had spirometry-proven COPD. Significant ABI for PAD (< 0.9) was seen in 7/21 COPD (33.5%) and 0/9 non-COPD subjects in the supine resting position (P = 0.07), and in 9/21 COPD (42.9%) vs. 0/9 non-COPD subjects after exercise (P = 0.03). Conclusions A significant proportion of patients with spirometry-proven COPD screened positive for asymptomatic PAD after exercise. Resting ABI may not be very sensitive to diagnose asymptomatic PAD in COPD subjects. ABI may be a reliable, sensitive and practical screening tool to assess cardiovascular risk in COPD patients. Future large-scale studies are required to confirm this

  11. Causes of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Daniel T

    2011-01-01

    The causes of brachial plexus palsy in neonates should be classified according to their most salient associated feature. The causes of brachial plexus palsy are obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, familial congenital brachial plexus palsy, maternal uterine malformation, congenital varicella syndrome, osteomyelitis involving the proximal head of the humerus or cervical vertebral bodies, exostosis of the first rib, tumors and hemangioma in the region of the brachial plexus, and intrauterine maladaptation. Kaiser Wilhelm syndrome, neonatal brachial plexus palsy due to placental insufficiency, is probably not a cause of brachial plexus palsy. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, the most common alleged cause of neonatal brachial plexus palsy, occurs when the forces generated during labor stretch the brachial plexus beyond its resistance. The probability of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy is directly proportional to the magnitude, acceleration, and cosine of the angle formed by the direction of the vector of the stretching force and the axis of the most vulnerable brachial plexus bundle, and inversely proportional to the resistance of the must vulnerable brachial plexus bundle and of the shoulder girdle muscles, joints, and bones. Since in most nonsurgical cases neither the contribution of each of these factors to the production of the obstetrical brachial plexus palsy nor the proportion of traction and propulsion contributing to the stretch force is known, we concur with prior reports that the term of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy should be substituted by the more inclusive term of birth-related brachial plexus palsy.

  12. Double vs single internal thoracic artery harvesting in diabetic patients: role in perioperative infection rate

    PubMed Central

    Agrifoglio, Marco; Trezzi, Matteo; Barili, Fabio; Dainese, Luca; Cheema, Faisal H; Topkara, Veli K; Ghislandi, Chiara; Parolari, Alessandro; Polvani, Gianluca; Alamanni, Francesco; Biglioli, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of this prospective study is to evaluate the role in the onset of surgical site infections of bilateral internal thoracic arteries harvesting in patients with decompensated preoperative glycemia. Methods 81 consecutive patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus underwent elective CABG harvesting single or double internal thoracic arteries. Single left ITA was harvested in 41 patients (Group 1, 50.6%), BITAs were harvested in 40 (Group 2, 49.4%). The major clinical end points analyzed in this study were infection rate, type of infection, duration of infection, infection relapse rate and total hospital length of stay. Results Five patients developed sternal SSI in the perioperative period, 2 in group 1 and 3 in group 2 without significant difference. All sternal SSIs were superficial with no sternal dehiscence. The development of infection from the time of surgery took 18.5 ± 2.1 and 7.3 ± 3.0 days for Groups 1 and 2 respectively. The infections were treated with wound irrigation and debridement, and with VAC therapy as well as with antibiotics. The VAC system was removed after a mean of 12.8 ± 5.1 days, when sterilization was achieved. The overall survival estimate at 1 year was 98.7%. Only BMI was a significant predictor of SSI using multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis (Odds Ratio: 1.34; 95%Conficdence Interval: 1.02–1.83; p value: 0.04). In the model, the use of BITA was not an independent predictor of SSI. Conclusion CABG with bilateral pedicled ITAs grafting could be performed safely even in diabetics with poor preoperative glycaemic control. PMID:18573201

  13. Brachial-brachial autogenous arteriovenous fistula in a dialysis patient with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichi; Miyamoto, Masahito; Yazawa, Masahiko; Nakazawa, Ryuto; Sasaki, Hideo; Miyano, Satetsu; Tsutsumi, Hisashi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya

    2010-04-01

    As the number of patients on hemodialysis increases, there will also be an increase in the number of patients with inadequate superficial veins for the creation of an autogenous arteriovenous fistula (AVF). In those patients, medical devices such as vascular prostheses or tunneled-cuffed catheters are necessary to maintain dialysis access. However, these devices are frequently associated with bacterial infection. We recently encountered a dialysis patient who underwent tunneled-cuffed catheter insertion because of the lack of usable superficial veins for autogenous access, and this patient subsequently developed catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia with multiple metastatic infections. Despite immediate removal of the catheter, the infection persisted over an extended period, which was a condition precluding the further use of catheters or other prosthetic materials. To handle this situation, we utilized the deep brachial vein to construct an autogenous AVF. After ligating numerous branches, the vein was anastomosed to the brachial artery and then transposed to the subcutaneous space. The newly constructed autogenous AVF, which successfully kept the patient free from foreign materials, greatly contributed to the relief of persistent infection. Although the brachial vein is rarely used for AVF creation, we suggest that it can serve as an option to create an alternative AVF in a patient with inadequate superficial veins.

  14. Digital infarction in a hemodialysis patient due to embolism from a thrombosed brachial arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Yj, Anupama

    2015-10-01

    Acute onset of digital ischemia and infarction is an unusual complication in patients undergoing hemodialysis. This is a report of a patient on regular hemodialysis who presented with acute distal extremity ischemia, progressing to digital infarction and on evaluation was found to have thrombosis of brachial arteriovenous fistula with embolization to the distal arteries causing digital artery occlusion.

  15. Brachial plexus injury in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brachial plexus can be affected during a difficult delivery. Injury may be caused by: The infant's head and neck pulling toward the side as the shoulders pass through the birth canal Stretching of the infant's shoulders during a ...

  16. Heart-lung vs. double-lung transplantation for idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hill, Charles; Maxwell, Bryan; Boulate, David; Haddad, Francois; Ha, Richard; Afshar, Kamyar; Weill, David; Dhillon, Gundeep S

    2015-12-01

    Patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) have improved survival after heart-lung transplantation (HLT) and double-lung transplantation (DLT). However, the optimal procedure for patients with IPAH undergoing transplantation remains unclear. We hypothesized that critically ill IPAH patients, defined by admission to the intensive care units (ICU), would demonstrate improved survival with HLT vs. DLT. All adult IPAH patients (>18 yr) in the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) database, who underwent either HLT or DLT between 1987 and 2012, were included. Baseline characteristics, survival, and adjusted survival were compared between the HLT and DLT groups. Similar analyses were performed for the subgroups as defined by the recipients' hospitalization status. A total of 928 IPAH patients (667 DLT, 261 HLT) were included in this analysis. The HLT recipients were younger, more likely to be admitted to the ICU, and have had their transplant in previous eras. Overall, the adjusted survivals after HLT or DLT were similar. For recipients who were hospitalized in the ICU, DLT was associated with worse outcomes (HR 1.827; 95% CI 1.018-3.279). In IPAH patients, the overall survival after HLT or DLT is comparable. HLT may provide improved outcomes in critically ill IPAH patients admitted to the ICU at time of transplantation.

  17. Double stent technique for the treatment of an internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysm caused by zone III stab injury.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yuzo; Kiyosue, Hiro; Kashiwagi, Junichi; Asano, Tomoshige; Shuto, Rieko; Matsumoto, Yushi; Nagatomi, Hirofumi; Mori, Hiromu

    2007-10-01

    A 77-year-old man was transferred to the hospital with swelling of his neck and oropharynx after a stab injury to his oral cavity with pruning shears. Findings at complete neurologic examination were normal. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and angiography revealed a pseudoaneurysm at the pharyngeal portion of the right internal carotid artery. Endovascular treatment was undertaken by using the double bare stent technique. The pseudoaneurysm was completely occluded immediately after the procedure. There were no complications. There were no further symptoms or evidence of recurrence of the aneurysm during the 18-month follow-up period. The double bare stent technique is safe and effective for the treatment of zone III carotid artery stab injuries.

  18. Surgical technique of double switch procedure: Senning with arterial switch operation for congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries with ventricular septal defect.

    PubMed

    Ilin, Alexey S; Teplov, Pavel V; Sakovich, Valeriy A; Ohye, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 12-month-old boy with congenitally corrected transposition of great arteries with L-looped ventricles and L-transposition of great arteries and ventricular septal defect. When admitted to the hospital, the patient had the appearance of congestive heart failure due to moderate to severe tricuspid valve regurgitation and right ventricle dysfunction. The pulmonary artery (PA) banding was required first because of low systolic pressure in the morphological left ventricle less than 70% confirmed by catheterization. Three months later, the patient appeared to be a good candidate for anatomical repair and a double switch procedure-Senning with arterial switch-was performed. The early postoperative period was relatively smooth and uneventful. Tricuspid valve insufficiency was resolved immediately after surgery. Mild systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle with mild mitral insufficiency was confirmed by the 2D strain method of echocardiography on the second day of the postoperative period and it improved over the next 21 days. Thirty days later after the procedure, the patient underwent catheterization of his superior vena cava tunnel because of the slightly increased blood flow velocity diagnosed by echocardiography. In 3 months after the surgery, the boy was asymptomatic and was doing well. The patient's functional status was I according to the NYHA classification.

  19. Relationship between ankle brachial index and ejection fraction in elderly Egyptians with ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Amer, Moatasem S; Tawfik, Heba M; Abd Elmotteleb, Ayman M; Maamoun, Manar M A

    2015-04-01

    There is a high prevalence of combined peripheral and coronary artery disease, with increasing morbidity and decline in cardiac function. The aim of the present study was to find an association between ankle brachial index, a non-invasive measure of peripheral artery disease, and ejection fraction in elderly patients with severe coronary artery disease. A case-control study recruiting 200 elderly male and female ischemic patients in Ain Shams University hospitals was carried out. All participants had significant coronary artery disease lesions in coronary angiography carried out before the study. Cases and controls were divided according to ankle brachial index, with further subdivision of each group according to age. Measurements include: ankle brachial index using Bistos handheld vascular Doppler (BT 200V,8 MHz), electrocardiography and echocardiography showing left ventricular ejection fraction. Coronary artery disease severity was estimated using the number of diseased vessels. The mean age of our study group was 67 years. Although our participants had mild to moderate peripheral artery disease, ejection fraction statistically decreased with decreasing ankle brachial index, being the lowest in participants aged > 70 years (46.84 ± 9.82 years) and the highest in controls aged >70 years (53.02 ± 5.53 years; P = 0.009). Ejection fraction was positively correlated with ankle brachial index (P = 0.011, 0.006) for cases and controls, respectively. Ankle brachial index can correlate with ejection fraction in elderly ischemic Egyptians with more severe coronary artery disease. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  20. Amiodarone prophylaxis for tachycardias after coronary artery surgery: a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, J; Harriss, D R; Sinclair, M; Westaby, S

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Arrhythmias are a common cause of morbidity after cardiac surgery. This study assessed the efficacy of prophylactic amiodarone in reducing the incidence of atrial fibrillation or flutter and ventricular arrhythmias after coronary artery surgery. METHODS--A double blind, randomised, placebo controlled trial. 60 patients received a 24 hour intravenous infusion of amiodarone (15 mg/kg started after removal of the aortic cross clamp) followed by 200 mg orally three times daily for 5 days, and 60 patients received placebo. RESULTS--6 patients (10%) in the amiodarone group and 14 (23%) in the placebo group needed treatment for arrhythmias (95% confidence interval (95% CI) for the difference between groups was 0 to 26%, p = 0.05). The incidence of supraventricular tachycardia detected clinically and requiring treatment was lower in the amiodarone group (8% amiodarone v 20% placebo, 95% CI 0 to 24%, p = 0.07). The incidence detected by 24 hour Holter monitoring was similar (17% amiodarone v 20% placebo). Untreated arrhythmias in the amiodarone group were either clinically benign and undetected (n = 3) or the ventricular response rate was slow (n = 2). Age > 60 years was a positive risk factor for the development of supraventricular tachycardia in the amiodarone group but not in the placebo group. Fewer patients had episodes of ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation recorded on Holter monitoring in the amiodarone group (15% amiodarone v 33% placebo, 95% CI 3 to 33%, p = 0.02). Bradycardia (78% amiodarone v 48% placebo, 95% CI 14% to 46%, p < 0.005) and pauses (7% amiodarone v 0% placebo) occurred in more amiodarone treated patients. Bradycardia warranted discontinuation of treatment in one patient treated with amiodarone. CONCLUSIONS--The incidence of clinically significant tachycardia was reduced by amiodarone. The ventricular response rate was slowed in supraventricular tachycardia, but the induction of bradycardia may preclude the routine use of amiodarone

  1. Anatomic Basis for Brachial Plexus Block at the Costoclavicular Space: A Cadaver Anatomic Study.

    PubMed

    Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Reina, Miguel Angel; Pangthipampai, Pawinee; Karmakar, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The costoclavicular space (CCS), which is located deep and posterior to the midpoint of the clavicle, may be a better site for infraclavicular brachial plexus block than the traditional lateral paracoracoid site. However, currently, there is paucity of data on the anatomy of the brachial plexus at the CCS. We undertook this cadaver anatomic study to define the anatomy of the cords of the brachial plexus at the CCS and thereby establish the anatomic basis for ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block at this proximal site. The anatomy and topography of the cords of the brachial plexus at the CCS was evaluated in 8 unembalmed (cryopreserved), thawed, fresh adult human cadavers using anatomic dissection, and transverse anatomic and histological sections, of the CCS. The cords of the brachial plexus were located lateral and parallel to the axillary artery at the CCS. The topography of the cords, relative to the axillary artery and to one another, in the transverse (axial) plane was also consistent at the CCS. The lateral cord was the most superficial of the 3 cords and it was always anterior to both the medial and posterior cords. The medial cord was directly posterior to the lateral cord but medial to the posterior cord. The posterior cord was the lateral most of the 3 cords at the CCS and it was immediately lateral to the medial cord but posterolateral to the lateral cord. The cords of the brachial plexus are clustered together lateral to the axillary artery, and share a consistent relation relative to one another and to the axillary artery, at the CCS.

  2. Double Stent Assist Coiling of Ruptured Large Saccular Aneurysm in Proximal Basilar Artery Fenestration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woong Bae; Huh, Joon; Cho, Chul Bum; Yang, Seung Ho; Kim, Il Sup; Hong, Jae Taek; Lee, Sang Won

    2015-01-01

    Basilar artery fenestration is infrequent and even rarer in association with a large aneurysm. With proximity to brain stem and vital perforators, endovascular coiling can be considered first. If the large ruptured aneurysm with a wide neck originated from fenestra of the proximal basilar artery and the fenestration loop has branches of posterior circulation, therapeutic consideration should be thorough and fractionized. We report endovascular therapeutic details for a case of a ruptured large saccular aneurysm in proximal basilar artery fenestration. PMID:26523257

  3. Double-outlet technique for tetralogy of Fallot-type disease with an anomalous coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Asano, M; Saito, T; Nomura, N; Mishima, A

    2005-01-01

    To reduce the right ventricular (RV) pressure and the pressure gradient between the RV and the pulmonary artery (PA) in Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) with small pulmonary annulus, it is inevitable to enlarge the small annulus by incising and patching from RV to PA via PA annulus. If the anomalous coronary artery exists in the RV outflow tract, the procedure can not be done.

  4. Alveolar antral artery isolation during sinus lift procedure with the double window technique.

    PubMed

    Maridati, Paolo; Stoffella, Enrico; Speroni, Stefano; Cicciu, Marco; Maiorana, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The sinus lift technique, introduced in 1976 by Tatum and subsequently described by Boyne in 1980, is nowadays considered a safe and reliable procedure for the rehabilitation of the atrophic upper posterior maxilla. The alveolar antral artery (AAA) is anastomoses between the posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAA) and the infraorbital artery (IOA) and may be present in the sinusal antrostomy. The haemorrhage of this vascular bundle represents the second intra-operatory complication in term of frequency during sinus lift procedure. Purpose of this study was to illustrate and describe a new technique allowing the AAA isolation during sinus lift procedure in cases in which the artery is clearly present inside the surgical area, detectable through CT scan exam. Presence, course and possible identification of the alveolar antral artery are also discussed, according to the studies present in the literature.

  5. Association of fibroblast growth factor-23 with arterial stiffness in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jeffrey J.; Katz, Ronit; Ix, Joachim H.; de Boer, Ian H.; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Serum fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet the mechanisms remain uncertain. Our objective was to determine whether higher FGF-23 concentrations are associated with arterial stiffness. Methods In this cross-sectional study, serum FGF-23 concentrations were measured in 5977 participants without known CVD in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. The primary outcomes of interest were large (LAE) and small artery elasticity (SAE), pulse pressure and ankle-brachial index (ABI) > 1.30. LAE and SAE were measured by pulse contour analysis of the radial artery. Pulse pressure was measured with an automated sphygmomanometer using the average of two resting blood pressure measurements. ABI was calculated as the ratio of the ankle and brachial systolic blood pressures. Results Serum FGF-23 concentrations were not significantly associated with LAE [relative difference (RD) per doubling: 0%; 95% confidence interval (CI): −2–1%], SAE (RD per doubling: 0%; 95% CI: −3–2%), pulse pressure (β per doubling: 0.44; 95% CI: −0.31–1.19), or a high ABI (odds ratio per doubling: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.84–1.55). Findings were similar irrespective of chronic kidney disease status. Conclusions Higher serum FGF-23 concentrations are not associated with arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse pressure, LAE, SAE or high ABI, in a community-based population without CVD. PMID:24782533

  6. Aortic-Brachial Pulse Wave Velocity Ratio: A Blood Pressure-Independent Index of Vascular Aging.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Catherine; Sidibé, Aboubacar; Desjardins, Marie-Pier; Marquis, Karine; De Serres, Sacha A; Mac-Way, Fabrice; Agharazii, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Aortic stiffness, a cardiovascular risk factor, depends on the operating mean arterial pressure (MAP). The impact of aortic stiffness on cardiovascular outcomes is proposed to be mediated by the attenuation or the reversal of the arterial stiffness gradient. We hypothesized that arterial stiffness gradient is less influenced by changes in MAP. We aimed to study the relationship between MAP and aortic stiffness, brachial stiffness, and arterial stiffness gradient. In a cross-sectional study of a dialysis cohort (group A, n=304) and a cohort of hypertensive or kidney transplant recipient with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of >45 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (group B, n=114), we assessed aortic and brachial stiffness by measuring carotid-femoral and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities (PWV). We used aortic-brachial PWV ratio as a measure of arterial stiffness gradient. Although there was a positive relationship between MAP and carotid-femoral PWV (R(2)=0.10 and 0.08; P<0.001 and P=0.003) and MAP and carotid-radial PWV (R(2)=0.22 and 0.12; P<0.001 and P<0.001), there was no statistically or clinically significant relationship between MAP and aortic-brachial PWV ratio (R(2)=0.0002 and 0.0001; P=0.8 and P=0.9) in group A and B, respectively. Dialysis status and increasing age increased the slope of the relationship between MAP and cf-PWV. However, we found no modifying factor (age, sex, dialysis status, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and class of antihypertensive drugs) that could affect the lack of relationship between MAP and aortic-brachial PWV ratio. In conclusion, these results suggest that aortic-brachial PWV ratio could be considered as a blood pressure-independent measure of vascular aging. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Ectopia cordis with a double outlet right ventricle, large ventricular septal defect, malposed great arteries and left ventricular hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Malik, Rabiya; Zilberman, Mark V; Tang, Liwen; Miller, Susan; Pandian, Natesa G

    2015-03-01

    Ectopia cordis, defined as partial or complete displacement of the heart outside of the thoracic cavity, is a rare congenital malformation. If not surgically corrected during the early years of life, ectopia cordis can prove to be a fatal abnormality. However, due to the presence of multiple intracardiac and extracardiac malformations, a corrective surgery might not always be successful. The pathology of ectopia cordis with a double outlet right ventricle, large ventricular septal defect, malposed great arteries and left ventricular hypoplasia is discussed, highlighting the complexities involved in such a rare disorder. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Brachial plexus injuries and dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, H S

    1988-05-01

    The brachial plexus and its associated structures demonstrate a propensity for certain disease processes not common to other areas of the nervous system. Brachial plexus disease produces a gait disturbance that may mimic musculoskeletal disease. When evaluating a case with possible traumatic brachial plexus disease, one relies heavily on historical, physical, and neurologic information when differentiating musculoskeletal disorders, although both may sometimes be present simultaneously in the same limb. With inflammatory disease, electromyography is extremely helpful, although an empiric dietary change may help confirm a suspicion. Brachial plexus surgery requires careful planning and meticulous technique. Attempts to remove malignant schwannomas have not been as successful as one would hope (Table 2). To a large extent, these dogs are treated late in the course of their disease because they are often treated for extended periods of time for musculoskeletal disease first. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention would help many of these dogs. New histopathologic techniques, electrodiagnostic equipment, and radiographic techniques are helping to define peripheral nerve disease in the companion animal. These techniques will help us categorize and treat these diseases with greater success in the future.

  9. Extremal states of energy of a double-layered thick-walled tube - application to residually stressed arteries.

    PubMed

    Waffenschmidt, Tobias; Menzel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Various biological tissues are designed to optimally support external loads for complex geometries and mechanobiological structures. This results in complex microstructures of such materials. The design of, for instance, (healthy) arteries, which are in the focus of this work, is characterised by a residually stressed fibre-reinforced multi-layered composite with highly non-linear elastic response. The complex interaction of material properties with the geometry and residual stress effects enables the optimal support under different blood pressures, respectively blood flow, within the vessel. The fibres reinforcing the arterial wall, as well as residual stresses present in the vessel, strongly influence its overall behaviour and performance. Turn-over and remodelling processes of the collagenous fibres occurring in the respective layers - either resulting from natural growth phenomena or from artificially induced changes in loading condition such as stent deployment - support the optimisation of the multi-layered composite structure of arteries for the particular loading conditions present in the artery. Within this contribution, the overall energetic properties of an artery are discussed by means of the inflation, bending and extension of a double-layered cylindrical tube. Different states of residual stresses and different fibre orientations are considered so that, for instance, representative fibre angles that result in extremal states of the total potential energy can be identified. In view of turn-over and remodelling processes, these orientations are considered to constitute preferred directions of fibre alignment. In summary, the main goal of this work is to calculate optimal material, structural and loading parameters by concepts of energy-minimisation. Several numerical studies show that the obtained values - such as the fibre orientations, the residual axial stretch and the opening angle - are in good agreement with respective physiological parameters

  10. A rare variant of the ulnar artery with important clinical implications: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Variations in the major arteries of the upper limb are estimated to be present in up to one fifth of people, and may have significant clinical implications. Case presentation During routine cadaveric dissection of a 69-year-old fresh female cadaver, a superficial brachioulnar artery with an aberrant path was found bilaterally. The superficial brachioulnar artery originated at midarm level from the brachial artery, pierced the brachial fascia immediately proximal to the elbow, crossed superficial to the muscles that originated from the medial epicondyle, and ran over the pronator teres muscle in a doubling of the antebrachial fascia. It then dipped into the forearm fascia, in the gap between the flexor carpi radialis and the palmaris longus. Subsequently, it ran deep to the palmaris longus muscle belly, and superficially to the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, reaching the gap between the latter and the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle, where it assumed is usual position lateral to the ulnar nerve. Conclusion As far as the authors could determine, this variant of the superficial brachioulnar artery has only been described twice before in the literature. The existence of such a variant is of particular clinical significance, as these arteries are more susceptible to trauma, and can be easily confused with superficial veins during medical and surgical procedures, potentially leading to iatrogenic distal limb ischemia. PMID:23194303

  11. Acute effect of caffeine on arterial stiffness and aortic pressure waveform.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, A; Feely, J

    2001-08-01

    Caffeine acutely increases blood pressure and peripheral vascular resistance, in part because of sympathetic stimulation. Its effects on large artery properties are largely unknown. In a double-blind crossover study, 7 healthy subjects 26+/-2.6 years of age (mean+/-SEM) were studied for 90 minutes while in the supine position on 2 occasions separated by a week in random order after ingestion of 250 mL caffeinated (150 mg) and decaffeinated (<2 mg) coffee. Compared with baseline, arterial stiffness measured by carotid femoral pulse wave velocity increased progressively from 7.2+/-0.41 to 8.0+/-0.6 m/s (P<0.05) at 90 minutes after caffeine intake, an effect that may be independent of changes in blood pressure. In addition, arterial wave reflection, measured by applanation tonometry from the aortic pressure waveform, also increased from -5.7+/-7.6% to 5.28%+/-5.6 (P<0.01). No such changes were seen with decaffeinated coffee intake. Although the integral of the brachial systolic and diastolic blood pressure values over the 90 minutes was larger (P<0.05) after caffeinated than decaffeinated coffee intake, the effect on aortic systolic and diastolic blood pressures was more pronounced (P<0.05) than on the brachial artery. These results show a significant effect of caffeine intake on arterial tone and function and suggest that caffeine acutely increases arterial stiffness.

  12. Validity of pulse pressure and augmentation index as surrogate measures of arterial stiffness during beta-adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lemogoum, Daniel; Flores, Gabriella; Van den Abeele, Wouter; Ciarka, Agnieszka; Leeman, Marc; Degaute, Jean Paul; van de Borne, Philippe; Van Bortel, Luc

    2004-03-01

    Increased arterial stiffness is a determinant of cardiovascular mortality. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a direct measure of arterial stiffness. Aortic augmentation index (AI) and pulse pressure (PP) are surrogate measures of arterial stiffness. Both PWV, AI and PP increase with cardiovascular risk factors. The aim of this study was to test the validity of AI and PP as surrogate measures of arterial stiffness compared with PWV, during beta-adrenergic stimulation with Isoprenaline (Iso). A total of 41 healthy volunteers entered a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. In random order, subjects were given intravenous infusion in equal volume of Iso 8 microg/kg per min (dissolved in glucose 5%) and placebo (glucose 5%). A wash-out period of 25 min was observed between the infusions. Measurements included blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), PWV, and AI. PWV were determined using complior (Complior, Artech-Medical, Paris, France). AI and aortic PP were obtained from pulse wave analysis of radial applanation tonometry, using transfer function (SphygmoCor Windows software). Baseline AI increased (P < 0.05) with aging, a lower height and a larger diastolic BP (DBP). Iso increased (P < 0.0001) HR, brachial SBP, brachial and aortic PP as compared with placebo. In contrast, Iso decreased (P < 0.05) AI, brachial DBP, peripheral PWV, but not aortic PWV. Decrease of AI induced by Iso was not related to PWV. In stepwise multiple regression changes in HR, brachial SBP and DBP were independent determinants of AI response to Iso (r = 0.78, P < 0.0001). Our findings show that AI and PP fail as surrogate measures of arterial stiffness during beta-adrenergic stimulation.

  13. Multiple composite grafts (k, π or double-Y) in coronary artery surgery: a choice or a necessity?

    PubMed

    Mannacio, Vito; Cirillo, Plinio; Mannacio, Luigi; Antignano, Anita; Mottola, Michele; Vosa, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Composite grafts allow complete arterial revascularization with minimal aortic manipulations. The Y-T configuration supplies all distal branches adequately, whereas it is unclear whether complex composite configurations (K, Π or double-Y) are equally at rest or when challenged by maximal requirements. Forty-seven patients who underwent off-pump coronary artery revascularization by multiple arterial composite grafts (K, Π or double-Y) were retrospectively evaluated. Indication for this surgical option was porcelain aorta or conduit unavailability. Composite systems were evaluated by intraoperative flow measurements and perioperative transthoracic Doppler ultrasonography, 12 months later also by exercise test, sestamibi scintigraphy at rest and during induced hyperaemia and by 64-slice multidetector CT angiography. A total of 141 distal anastomoses were implanted as composite grafts. Perioperative flow measurements and 12-month Doppler ultrasonography were adequate at rest. At stress test, chest pain and/or induced ECG evidence of ischaemia are found in 16 patients (39%). During dipyridamole-induced hyperaemia, single-photon emission computed tomography image revealed that mean summed stress score was 7.2 ± 5.7, summed difference score 5.3 ± 4.2 and coronary flow reserve 1.7 ± 0.2. Multiple composite grafts, albeit adequate at rest, were unable to meet flow requirements during maximal hyperaemia. In daily practice, their use must be not a choice but rather a necessity in those patients without alternative options. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  14. The correlation between the ankle-brachial index and the metabolic syndrome. .

    PubMed

    Mitu, F; Mitu, O; Leon, Maria-Magdalena; Jitaru, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    On a global scale, the cardiovascular diseases constitute the prime factor of death and invalidity. The premature mortality percentage caused by these varies from 4% in high developed countries to 40% in underdeveloped countries. Atherosclerosis is the most important etiological factor. The presence of various degrees of atherosclerosis in a certain vascular area (in our case, the lower limb arteries), increases the probability of affecting other areas as well (coronary, cerebral, renal, mesenteric arteries). The evaluation and description of the correlations between the ankle-brachial index levels and the cardiovascular risk factors, taken individually or as part of the metabolic syndrome. The values of the ankle-brachial index were divided in normal and abnormal. The evaluated cardiovascular risk factors were: age, sex, arterial hypertension, obesity, smoking, high levels of cholesterol and basal glucose, low levels of HDL-cholesterol. There were significant statistical differences between the normal ankle-brachial index lot and the one with abnormal values, specifically in patients with diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. More so, the study demonstrates that the ankle-brachial index is considerably smaller in patients with metabolic syndrome. The simple measurement of the afore mentioned index, as a atherosclerosis marker for the lower limb arteries, represents an independent prediction over the metabolic syndrome and the conventional risk factors, in the development of the cardiovascular diseases. The routine measurement of this parameter in medical practice might imply the early diagnosis of high risk manifested cardiovascular disease patients.

  15. Association of hemoglobin with ankle-brachial index in general population.

    PubMed

    Chenglong, Zhang; Jing, Lei; Xia, Ke; Yang, Tianlun

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that both low and high hemoglobin concentrations are predictive of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in various populations. However, an association of hemoglobin with the ankle-brachial index, which is widely used as a screening test for peripheral arterial disease, has not yet been identified. We examined 786 subjects (236 women and 550 men) who received routine physical check-ups. The ankle-brachial index and several hematological parameters, including the hemoglobin level, hematocrit and red blood cell count and other demographic and biochemical characteristics were collected. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationships between the ankle-brachial index and the independent determinants. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was conducted to calculate the cut-off level of hemoglobin for detecting a relatively low ankle-brachial index (less than 20% of all subjects, which was 1.02). The hemoglobin level, hematocrit and red blood cell count were correlated with the ankle-brachial index in the males (r=-0.274, r=-0.224 and r=-0.273, respectively, p<0.001 for all), but these associations were not significant in the females. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that the independent determinants of the ankle-brachial index included age, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and the white blood cell count for the females and age, hypertension, total cholesterol and hemoglobin (β=-0.001, p<0.001) for the males after adjusting for confounding factors. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the cut-off level of hemoglobin for predicting a low ankle-brachial index was 156.5 g/L in the males. A high hemoglobin concentration was independently correlated with a low ankle-brachial index in the healthy males, indicating that an elevation in this level may be associated with an increased atherosclerosis risk.

  16. The association of ankle-brachial index with silent cerebral small vessel disease: results of the Atahualpa Project.

    PubMed

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Sedler, Mark J; Mera, Robertino M; Lama, Julio; Gruen, Jadry A; Phelan, Kelsie J; Cusick, Elizabeth H; Zambrano, Mauricio; Brown, David L

    2015-06-01

    An abnormal ankle-brachial index has been associated with overt stroke and coronary heart disease, but little is known about its relationship with silent cerebral small vessel disease. To assess the value of ankle-brachial index as a predictor of silent small vessel disease in an Ecuadorian geriatric population. Stroke-free Atahualpa residents aged ≥60 years were identified during a door-to-door survey. Ankle-brachial index determinations and brain magnetic resonance imaging were performed in consented persons. Ankle-brachial index ≤0.9 and ≥1.4 were proxies of peripheral artery disease and noncompressible arteries, respectively. Using logistic regression models adjusted for age, gender, and cardiovascular health status, we evaluated the association between abnormal ankle-brachial index with silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and cerebral microbleeds. Mean age of the 224 participants was 70 ± 8 years, 60% were women, and 80% had poor cardiovascular health status. Ankle-brachial index was ≤0.90 in 37 persons and ≥1.4 in 17. Magnetic resonance imaging showed lacunar infarcts in 27 cases, moderate-to-severe white matter hyperintensities in 47, and cerebral microbleeds in 26. Adjusted models showed association of lacunar infarcts with ankle-brachial index ≤ 0.90 (OR: 3.72, 95% CI: 1.35-10.27, P = 0.01) and with ankle-brachial index ≥ 1.4 (OR: 3·85, 95% CI: 1.06-14.03, P = 0.04). White matter hyperintensities were associated with ankle-brachial index ≤ 0.90 (P = 0.03) and ankle-brachial index ≥ 1.4 (P = 0.02) in univariate analyses. There was no association between ankle-brachial index groups and cerebral microbleeds. In this population-based study conducted in rural Ecuador, apparently healthy individuals aged ≥60 years with ankle-brachial index values ≤0.90 and ≥1.4 are almost four times more likely to have a silent lacunar infarct. Ankle-brachial index screening might allow recognition

  17. Central blood pressure estimation by using N-point moving average method in the brachial pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Rie; Horinaka, Shigeo; Yagi, Hiroshi; Ishimura, Kimihiko; Honda, Takeharu

    2015-05-01

    Recently, a method of estimating the central systolic blood pressure (C-SBP) using an N-point moving average method in the radial or brachial artery waveform has been reported. Then, we investigated the relationship between the C-SBP estimated from the brachial artery pressure waveform using the N-point moving average method and the C-SBP measured invasively using a catheter. C-SBP using a N/6 moving average method from the scaled right brachial artery pressure waveforms using VaSera VS-1500 was calculated. This estimated C-SBP was compared with the invasively measured C-SBP within a few minutes. In 41 patients who underwent cardiac catheterization (mean age: 65 years), invasively measured C-SBP was significantly lower than right cuff-based brachial BP (138.2 ± 26.3 vs 141.0 ± 24.9 mm Hg, difference -2.78 ± 1.36 mm Hg, P = 0.048). The cuff-based SBP was significantly higher than invasive measured C-SBP in subjects with younger than 60 years old. However, the estimated C-SBP using a N/6 moving average method from the scaled right brachial artery pressure waveforms and the invasively measured C-SBP did not significantly differ (137.8 ± 24.2 vs 138.2 ± 26.3 mm Hg, difference -0.49 ± 1.39, P = 0.73). N/6-point moving average method using the non-invasively acquired brachial artery waveform calibrated by the cuff-based brachial SBP was an accurate, convenient and useful method for estimating C-SBP. Thus, C-SBP can be estimated simply by applying a regular arm cuff, which is greatly feasible in the practical medicine.

  18. Borderline ankle-brachial index is associated with increased prevalence of micro- and macrovascular complications in type 2 diabetes: A cross-sectional analysis of 12,772 patients from the Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation Program.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bryan P; Zhang, Yuying; Kong, Alice P S; Luk, Andrea O Y; Ozaki, Risa; Yeung, Roseanne; Tong, Peter C Y; Chan, Wing Ban; Tsang, Chiu-Chi; Lau, Kam-Piu; Cheung, Yu; Wolthers, Troels; Lyubomirsky, Greg; So, Wing-Yee; Ma, Ronald C W; Chow, Francis C C; Chan, Juliana C N

    2015-09-01

    Borderline ankle-brachial index is increasingly recognised as a marker of cardiovascular risk. We evaluated the impact of borderline ankle-brachial index in 12,772 Chinese type 2 diabetes patients from the Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation Program between 2007 and 2012. Cardiovascular risk factors, complications and health-related quality of life were compared between patients with normal ankle-brachial index (1.0-1.4), borderline ankle-brachial index (0.90-0.99) and peripheral arterial disease (ankle-brachial index < 0.9). The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease and borderline ankle-brachial index was 4.6% and 9.6%, respectively. Borderline ankle-brachial index patients were older, more likely to be smokers and hypertensive, had longer duration of diabetes, poorer kidney function and poorer health-related quality of life than patients with normal ankle-brachial index. After adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, borderline ankle-brachial index was an independent predictor of diabetes-related micro- and macrovascular complications including retinopathy (odd ratios: 1.19 (95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.37)), macroalbuminuria (1.31 (1.10-1.56)), chronic kidney disease (1.22 (1.00-1.50)) and stroke (1.31 (1.05-1.64)). These findings suggest that patients with diabetes and borderline ankle-brachial index are at increased cardiovascular risk and may benefit from more intensive management. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. [A case of double cancer of gastric and hepatocellular carcinoma associated with cirrhosis treated by hepatic resection after intra-hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Une, Y; Nagabuchi, E; Ogasawara, K; Kamiyama, T; Sato, Y; Kawamukai, Y; Sato, N; Nakajima, Y; Uchino, J

    1990-08-01

    A case of double cancer, early gastric cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma, was reported. The patient was diabetic and had liver cirrhosis. After gastrectomy for gastric cancer which was hemorrhagic, he was treated by intra-hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy followed by hepatic resection. Histopathologically, about half of the main tumor showed necrosis, but very viable new cancer cell nests were seen around the main nodule. The patient is in good condition without recurrence of hepatic lesion 1 year after resection. The usefulness of arterial infusion chemotherapy was demonstrated in the case of double cancer, in which it is difficult to resect both cancers simultaneously.

  20. Menaquinone-7 supplementation improves arterial stiffness in healthy postmenopausal women. A double-blind randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Knapen, Marjo H J; Braam, Lavienja A J L M; Drummen, Nadja E; Bekers, Otto; Hoeks, Arnold P G; Vermeer, Cees

    2015-05-01

    Observational data suggest a link between menaquinone (MK, vitamin K2) intake and cardiovascular (CV) health. However, MK intervention trials with vascular endpoints are lacking. We investigated long-term effects of MK-7 (180 µg MenaQ7/day) supplementation on arterial stiffness in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Healthy postmenopausal women (n=244) received either placebo (n=124) or MK-7 (n=120) for three years. Indices of local carotid stiffness (intima-media thickness IMT, Diameter end-diastole and Distension) were measured by echotracking. Regional aortic stiffness (carotid-femoral and carotid-radial Pulse Wave Velocity, cfPWV and crPWV, respectively) was measured using mechanotransducers. Circulating desphospho-uncarboxylated matrix Gla-protein (dp-ucMGP) as well as acute phase markers Interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and markers for endothelial dysfunction Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule (VCAM), E-selectin, and Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) were measured. At baseline dp-ucMGP was associated with IMT, Diameter, cfPWV and with the mean z-scores of acute phase markers (APMscore) and of markers for endothelial dysfunction (EDFscore). After three year MK-7 supplementation cfPWV and the Stiffness Index βsignificantly decreased in the total group, whereas distension, compliance, distensibility, Young's Modulus, and the local carotid PWV (cPWV) improved in women having a baseline Stiffness Index β above the median of 10.8. MK-7 decreased dp-ucMGP by 50 % compared to placebo, but did not influence the markers for acute phase and endothelial dysfunction. In conclusion, long-term use of MK-7 supplements improves arterial stiffness in healthy postmenopausal women, especially in women having a high arterial stiffness.

  1. Automated analysis of brachial ultrasound time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Weidong; Browning, Roger L.; Lauer, Ronald M.; Sonka, Milan

    1998-07-01

    Atherosclerosis begins in childhood with the accumulation of lipid in the intima of arteries to form fatty streaks, advances through adult life when occlusive vascular disease may result in coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Non-invasive B-mode ultrasound has been found useful in studying risk factors in the symptom-free population. Large amount of data is acquired from continuous imaging of the vessels in a large study population. A high quality brachial vessel diameter measurement method is necessary such that accurate diameters can be measured consistently in all frames in a sequence, across different observers. Though human expert has the advantage over automated computer methods in recognizing noise during diameter measurement, manual measurement suffers from inter- and intra-observer variability. It is also time-consuming. An automated measurement method is presented in this paper which utilizes quality assurance approaches to adapt to specific image features, to recognize and minimize the noise effect. Experimental results showed the method's potential for clinical usage in the epidemiological studies.

  2. [Obstetric brachial palsy, a historical review].

    PubMed

    Collado-Vazquez, S; Jimenez-Antona, C; Carrillo, J M

    2012-11-16

    Lesions of the peripheral nerves have been known since ancient times, but there are few references to the treatments that were used in the past. AIM. To analyse obstetric brachial palsy and its treatments throughout history. There are a number of different references to the peripheral nerves and their lesions, although little is known about the treatments that were applied in the past. William Smellie first reported obstetric brachial palsy in 1764 and the term was coined by Duchenne de Boulogne in 1872. In 1877, Erb analysed four cases of obstetric brachial palsy and conducted studies on the excitation of the brachial plexus with electric currents. In 1885, Klumpke described palsy of the lower roots of the brachial plexus. In the late 19th century pathophysiology studies were carried out and at the beginning of the 20th century the first surgical interventions were performed. Today, microsurgery techniques, protocols on how to proceed, and rehabilitation treatment of this lesion are all available and offer good outcomes. Since the first clinical description of obstetric brachial palsy by Smellie and the reports of the different types of brachial palsy by Duchenne, Erb and Klumpke, many pathophysiological studies have been conducted. Notable developments have been made in conservative and surgical treatments, with very favourable recoveries being observed in children with obstetric brachial palsy.

  3. Anomalous superficial ulnar artery based flap

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, C. V.; Kundagulwar, Girish K.; Prabha, Yadav S.; Dushyanth, Jaiswal

    2014-01-01

    Upper limb shows a large number of arterial variations. This case report describes the presence of additional superficial ulnar artery which was used to raise a pedicle flap to cover an arm defect thus avoided using the main vessel of the forearm - radial or ulnar artery. Vascular anomalies occurring in the arm and forearm tend to increase the likelihood of damaging the superficial anomalous arteries during surgery. Superficial ulnar or radial arteries have been described to originate from the upper third of the brachial artery; here we report the origin of the anomalous superficial ulnar artery originating from the brachial artery at the level of elbow with the concomitant presence of normal deep radial and ulnar arteries. PMID:24987217

  4. OCT/PS-OCT imaging of brachial plexus neurovascular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, David T.; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yaoping; Chen, Zhongping; Miller, Carol; Zhou, Li

    2004-07-01

    Introduction: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows high-resolution imaging (less than 10 microns) of tissue structures. A pilot study with OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) was undertaken to image ex-vivo neurovascular structures (vessels, nerves) of the canine brachial plexus. Methods: OCT is an interferometry-based optical analog of B-mode ultrasound, which can image through non-transparent biological tissues. With approval of the USC Animal Care and Use Committee, segments of the supra- and infraclavicular brachial plexus were excised from euthanized adult dogs, and the ex-vivo specimens were placed in cold pH-buffered physiologic solution. An OCT beam, in micrometer translational steps, scanned the fixed-position bisected specimens in transverse and longitudinal views. Two-dimensional images were obtained from identified arteries and nerves, with specific sections of interest stained with hematoxylin-eosin for later imaging through a surgical microscope. Results: with the beam scan direction transverse to arteries, the resulting OCT images showed an identifiable arterial lumen and arterial wall tissue layers. By comparison, transverse beam OCT images of nerves revealed a multitude of smaller nerve bundles contained within larger circular-shaped fascicles. PS-OCT imaging was helpful in showing the characteristic birefringence exhibited by arrayed neural structures. Discussion: High-resolution OCT imaging may be useful in the optical identification of neurovascular structures during attempted regional nerve blockade. If incorporated into a needle-shaped catheter endoscope, such a technology could prevent intraneural and intravascular injections immediately prior to local anesthetic injection. The major limitation of OCT is that it can form a coherent image of tissue structures only to a depth of 1.5 - 2 mm.

  5. Secondary prevention of cardiogenic arterial thromboembolism in the cat: The double-blind, randomized, positive-controlled feline arterial thromboembolism; clopidogrel vs. aspirin trial (FAT CAT).

    PubMed

    Hogan, Daniel F; Fox, Philip R; Jacob, Kristin; Keene, Bruce; Laste, Nancy J; Rosenthal, Steven; Sederquist, Kimberly; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2015-12-01

    To determine if clopidogrel administration is associated with a reduced likelihood of recurrent cardiogenic arterial thromboembolism (CATE) in cats compared to aspirin administration. Secondary aims were to determine if clopidogrel administration had an effect on the composite endpoint of recurrent CATE and cardiac death and to identify adverse effects of chronic clopidogrel or aspirin therapy. Seventy-five cats that survived a CATE event. Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, positive-controlled study. Cats were assigned to clopidogrel (18.75 mg/cat PO q 24 h) or aspirin (81 mg/cat PO q 72 h). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were created for each endpoint and the log rank test performed to compare treatment groups with respect to time to event and the likelihood of the event occurring. The mean age of all cats was 8.0 ± 3.5 yr and 57/75 (76%) were male (p < 0.001); 62/75 (83%) were mixed breed with the remainder including Persian, Abyssinian, American Shorthair, Bengal, Birman, Himalayan, Maine Coon, Ragdoll, Snowshoe, and Sphynx breeds. Only 15% (11/75) of cats had a history of heart disease recorded prior to the CATE event. Clopidogrel administration was associated with significantly reduced likelihood of recurrent CATE compared to aspirin (p = 0.024) and had a longer median time to recurrence [443 (95% CI 185-990) days vs. 192 (95% CI 62-364) days, respectively]. Clopidogrel was also associated with a significantly reduced likelihood of the composite endpoint of recurrent CATE or cardiac death (p = 0.033) with a longer median time to event [346 (95% CI 146-495) days vs. 128 (95% CI 58-243) days]. Clopidogrel administration significantly reduces the likelihood of recurrent CATE compared with aspirin in cats; both drugs were well tolerated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of spironolactone in resistant arterial hypertension: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (ASPIRANT-EXT).

    PubMed

    Václavík, Jan; Sedlák, Richard; Jarkovský, Jiří; Kociánová, Eva; Táborský, Miloš

    2014-12-01

    This study was designed to assess the effect of the addition of low-dose spironolactone on blood pressure (BP) in patients with resistant arterial hypertension. Patients with office systolic blood pressure (SBP) >140 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) >90 mm Hg despite treatment with at least 3 antihypertensive drugs, including a diuretic, were enrolled in this double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial. One hundred sixty-one patients in outpatient internal medicine departments of 6 hospitals in the Czech Republic were randomly assigned to receive 25 mg of spironolactone (N = 81) or a placebo (N = 80) once daily as an add-on to their antihypertensive medication, using simple randomization. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00524615. A nalyses were done with 150 patients who finished the follow-up (74 in the spironolactone and 76 in the placebo group). At 8 weeks, BP values were decreased more by spironolactone, with differences in mean fall of SBP of -9.8, -13.0, -10.5, and -9.9 mm Hg (P < 0.001 for all) in daytime, nighttime, and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring and in the office. The respective DBP differences were -3.2, -6.4, -3.5, and -3.0 mm Hg (P = 0.013, P < 0.001, P = 0.005, and P = 0.003). Adverse events in both groups were comparable. The office SBP goal <14 mm Hg at 8 weeks was reached in 73% of patients using spironolactone and 41% using placebo (P = 0.001). Spironolactone in patients with resistant arterial hypertension leads to a significant decrease of both SBP and DBP and markedly improves BP control.

  7. Double labeling of vagal preganglionic and sympathetic postganglionic fibers in celiac ganglion, superior mesenteric arteries and myenteric plexus.

    PubMed

    Ting, Shi-Jane; Kao, Chih-Kuan; Wang, Feng-Bin

    2017-02-28

    Sympathetic efferents regulate the “fight-or-flight” response and sympathetic and vagal fibers have been suggested to retrogradely and centrally spread pathogens associated with Parkinson’s disease. To examine the arrangement of the vagal and sympathetic motor fibers in the celiac ganglion (CG), gastrointestinal tract, and along the superior mesenteric artery and its sub-branches, we double-labeled the vagal efferents by injecting Dextran-Texas Red into the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and the sympathetic postganglionics with tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 18). The laser scanning confocal microscope was used for image analysis. Vagal nerve endings were densely distributed around the CG neurons, and the right CG received more. Vagal and sympathetic efferent endings formed various ring or string shapes that tangled closely in the myenteric plexus of the forestomach, duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Vagal and sympathetic efferents coursed within the same nerve bundles before reaching the myenteric plexus, had in-apposition varicosities, and ran parallel with the superior mesenteric artery and its sub-branches. Although a complete sympathetic tracing and an incomplete tracing and/or damage to the vagal preganglionic neurons may lead to a sampling bias, the sympathetic innervations in the blood vessels and myenteric plexus are stronger than in the vagus. The in-apposition innervation varicosities of the vagal and sympathetic efferents within the same nerve bundles and in the myenteric plexus of the gut with complex innervation patterns may offer a network to automatically control gastrointestinal functions and an infection route of the Parkinson’s disease between the autonomic efferent endings.

  8. Brachial Plexopathy After Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Than, Khoi D; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective, multicenter case-series study and literature review. To determine the prevalence of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery and to review the literature to better understand the etiology and risk factors of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery. A retrospective case-series study of 12 903 patients at 21 different sites was performed to analyze the prevalence of several different complications, including brachial plexopathy. A literature review of the US National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health (PubMed) database was conducted to identify articles pertaining to brachial plexopathy following cervical spine surgery. In our total population of 12 903 patients, only 1 suffered from postoperative brachial plexopathy. The overall prevalence rate was thus 0.01%, but the prevalence rate at the site where this complication occurred was 0.07%. Previously reported risk factors for postoperative brachial plexopathy include age, anterior surgical procedures, and a diagnosis of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The condition can also be due to patient positioning during surgery, which can generally be detected via the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring. Brachial plexopathy following cervical spine surgery is rare and merits further study.

  9. Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries in American Football.

    PubMed

    Daly, Charles A; Payne, S Houston; Seiler, John G

    2016-11-01

    This article reports a series of severe permanent brachial plexus injuries in American football players. The authors describe the mechanisms of injury and outcomes from a more contemporary treatment approach in the form of nerve transfer tailored to the specific injuries sustained. Three cases of nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury in American football players are discussed in detail. Two of these patients regained functional use of the extremity, but 1 patient with a particularly severe injury did not regain significant function. Brachial plexus injuries are found along a spectrum of brachial plexus stretch or contusion that includes the injuries known as "stingers." Early identification of these severe brachial plexus injuries allows for optimal outcomes with timely treatment. Diagnosis of the place of a given injury along this spectrum is difficult and requires a combination of imaging studies, nerve conduction studies, and close monitoring of physical examination findings over time. Although certain patients may be at higher risk for stingers, there is no evidence to suggest that this correlates with a higher risk of severe brachial plexus injury. Unfortunately, no equipment or strengthening program has been shown to provide a protective effect against these severe injuries. Patients with more severe injuries likely have less likelihood of functional recovery. In these patients, nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury offers the best possibility of meaningful recovery without significant morbidity. [ Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1188-e1192.].

  10. Ischaemic stroke and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Attiya Sabeen; Akhtar, Syed Wasim; Jamal, Qaiser; Sultana, Nuzhat; Siddiqui, Muhammad Asadullah; Hassan, Ziaul

    2017-08-01

    To determine the frequency of atherosclerosis by ankle brachial index in patients with an ischaemic stroke and to assess the association of carotid artery stenosis and ankle brachial index in ischaemic stroke. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Abbasi Shaheed Hospital, Karachi, from July 2011 to May 2014, and comprised patients with ischaemic stroke. The patients were classified according to the Asian stroke criteria for classification of brain infarction. Primary outcome measures included carotid artery stenosis and ankle brachial index. The other independent variables were age, gender, body mass index and waist circumference. SPSS 20 was used for data analysis. A total of 327 patients were enrolled. The overall mean age was 57.6±12.8 years. Besides, 168(51.3%) participants were males. Peripheral artery disease was found in 60(18.3%) patients. Mild carotid artery stenosis was found in 182(55.6%) patients, moderate in 140(42.8%), severe in 3(0.9%) and complete occlusion in 2(0.6%) patients. In patients having mild carotid artery stenosis, 32(17.5%) had peripheral artery disease, whereas in patients with moderate carotid artery stenosis, 25(17.8%) had peripheral artery disease. Abnormally low ankle brachial index suggesting subclinical peripheral artery disease was 18%.

  11. Bilateral transit time assessment of upper and lower limbs as a surrogate ankle brachial index marker.

    PubMed

    Foo, Jong Yong Abdiel

    2008-01-01

    Ankle brachial index is useful in monitoring the pathogenesis of peripheral arterial occlusive diseases. Sphygmomanometer is the standard instrument widely used but frequent prolonged monitoring can be less comfortable for patients. Pulse transit time is known to be inversely correlated with blood pressure and a ratio-based pulse transit time measurement has been proposed as a surrogate ankle brachial index marker. In this study, 17 normotensive adults (9 men; aged 25.4 +/- 3.9 years) were recruited. Two postural change test activities were performed to induce changes in the stiffness of the arterial wall of the moved periphery. Results showed that only readings from the limbs that adopted a new posture registered significant blood pressure and pulse transit time changes (P < .05). Furthermore, there was significant correlation between the ankle brachial index and pulse transit time ratio measure for both test activities (R(2) > or = 0.704). The findings herein suggest that pulse transit time ratio is a surrogate and accommodating ankle brachial index marker.

  12. Cross-chest radial nerve transfer in brachial plexus injuries. Experimental and anatomical basis.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, J A; Guizoni, M F; Dos Santos, A R; Calixto, J B; Duarte, H E

    1999-01-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion injuries are devastating injuries to the upper limb, and nerve transfer remains the only option in reconstruction. Despite the encouraging results concerning recovery of shoulder and elbow function, no option is available for treatment of the paralytic hand. In rats, we sectioned the radial nerve in the elbow region and transferred it across the chest to reinnervate the lesioned contralateral medial cord of the brachial plexus. Rats were then evaluated for motor and sensory recovery, electrophysiologically, behaviorally and morphologically. Forepaw functional recovery was estimated to be 90%. In cadavers, the radial nerve and profunda brachii artery were dissected. It was observed that the radial nerve vascularized by the profunda brachii artery was able to reach the contralateral brachial plexus distal to the shoulder region without nerve grafts. After sectioning the radial nerve, sensory loss is minimal and motor palsy can be easily restored by tendon transfers. The results of tendon transfer for radial nerve palsy are better than for any other nerve. Cross-chest radial nerve transfer might be of clinical interest in the reconstruction of hand function in entire injury to the brachial plexus.

  13. Prospective evaluation of ischemia in brachial-basilic and forearm prosthetic arteriovenous fistulas for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Keuter, X H A; Kessels, A G H; de Haan, M H; van der Sande, F M; Tordoir, J H M

    2008-05-01

    Ischemia is a devastating complication after arteriovenous fistula (AVF) creation. When not timely corrected, it may lead to amputation. Symptomatic ischemia occurs in 3.7-5% of the hemodialysis population. Upper arm AVFs have a higher incidence of ischemia compared to forearm AVFs. As more patients may need upper arm AVFs in the growing and older hemodialysis population, occurrence of symptomatic ischemia may increase. The purpose of this study is to identify predictors for occurrence of ischemia. A prospective evaluation of ischemia was performed in patients randomised for either a brachial-basilic (BB-) AVF or a prosthetic forearm loop AVF. Clinical parameters, preoperative vessel diameters, access flows, digital blood pressures, digit-to-brachial indices (DBI) and interventions for ischemia were recorded. Sixty-one patients (BB-AVF 28) were studied. Seventeen patients (BB-AVF 8) developed ischemic symptoms. Six patients (BB-AVF 3) needed interventions for severe symptoms. Age, history of peripheral arterial reconstruction and radial artery volume flow were significant predictors for the occurrence of ischemia. Symptomatic ischemia occurred in 28% of patients with brachial-basilic and prosthetic forearm AVFs. Age, history of peripheral arterial reconstruction and radial artery volume flow might be important for prediction of ischemia.

  14. Exposure of the retroclavicular brachial plexus by clavicle suspension for birth brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Tse, Raymond; Pondaag, Willem; Malessy, Martijn

    2014-06-01

    Surgical exploration and reconstruction of the brachial plexus requires adequate exposure beyond the zone of injury. In the case of extensive lesions, some authors advocate clavicle osteotomy for an extensile approach. Such an osteotomy introduces further morbidity and may impact upon the delicate nerve reconstruction. A new simple but effective method of clavicle elevation is described that provides access to the retroclavicular brachial plexus during exploration for birth brachial plexus palsy.

  15. Brachial-to-radial systolic blood pressure amplification in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Climie, R E D; Picone, D S; Keske, M A; Sharman, J E

    2016-06-01

    Brachial-to-radial-systolic blood pressure amplification (Bra-Rad-SBPAmp) can affect central SBP estimated by radial tonometry. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have vascular irregularities that may alter Bra-Rad-SBPAmp. By comparing T2DM with non-diabetic controls, we aimed to determine the (1) magnitude of Bra-Rad-SBPAmp; (2) haemodynamic factors related to Bra-Rad-SBPAmp; and (3) effect of Bra-Rad-SBPAmp on estimated central SBP. Twenty T2DM (64±8 years) and 20 non-diabetic controls (60±8 years; 50% male both) underwent simultaneous cuff deflation and two-dimensional ultrasound imaging of the brachial and radial arteries. The first Korotkoff sound (denoting SBP) was identified from the first inflection point of Doppler flow during cuff deflation. Bra-Rad-SBPAmp was calculated by radial minus brachial SBP. Upper limb and systemic haemodynamics were recorded by tonometry and ultrasound. Radial SBP was higher than brachial SBP for T2DM (136±19 vs 127±17 mm Hg; P<0.001) and non-diabetic controls (135±12 vs 121±11 mm Hg; P<0.001), but Bra-Rad-SBPAmp was significantly lower in T2DM (9±8 vs 14±7 mm Hg; P=0.042). The product of brachial mean flow velocity × brachial diameter was inversely and independently correlated with Bra-Rad-SBPAmp in T2DM (β=-0.033 95% confidence interval -0.063 to -0.004, P=0.030). When radial waveforms were calibrated using radial, compared with brachial SBP, central SBP was significantly higher in both groups (T2DM, 116±13 vs 125±15 mm Hg; and controls, 112±10 vs 124±11 mm Hg; P<0.001 both) and there was a significant increase in the number of participants classified with 'central hypertension' (SBP⩾130 mm Hg; P=0.004). Compared with non-diabetic controls, Bra-Rad-SBPAmp is significantly lower in T2DM. Regardless of disease status, radial SBP is higher than brachial SBP and this results in underestimation of central SBP using brachial-BP-calibrated radial tonometry.

  16. Clinical usefulness and limitations of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in the evaluation of cardiovascular complications in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Ito, Norihisa; Ohishi, Mitsuru; Takagi, Takashi; Terai, Minako; Shiota, Atsushi; Hayashi, Norihiro; Rakugi, Hiromi; Ogihara, Toshio

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this study was to clarify the clinical usefulness and limitations of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) to evaluate hypertensive complications, in comparison with carotid-femoral PWV. Patients with essential hypertension (n=296, male/female=161/135; age=61.1+/-0.7 years) were enrolled. We measured brachial-ankle PWV, femoral-ankle PWV and carotid-femoral PWV simultaneously, and evaluated target organ damage and associated clinical conditions (cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease) using the World Health Organization classification modified in 1999. Carotid-femoral PWV (p<0.0001; r=0.521) and brachial-ankle PWV (p<0.0001; r=0.478) but not femoral-ankle PWV were significantly correlated with age. Carotid-femoral PWV was significantly higher in patients with associated clinical conditions compared with that in patients with target organ damage (p<0.05) and those with no complications (p<0.0001). Brachial-ankle PWV was significantly higher in patients with associated clinical conditions (p<0.05) and target organ damage (p<0.05) compared to those with no complications, but there was no significant difference in brachial-ankle PWV between these two groups. Moreover, femoral-ankle PWV was significantly lower in patients with associated clinical conditions compared with that in patients with target organ damage (p<0.05). These data suggest that brachial-ankle PWV could underestimate arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients with a history of cardiovascular events.

  17. Interleukin-22 Might Act as a Double-Edged Sword in Type 2 Diabetes and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jin; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Mengyao; Liu, Jingning; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are both characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation. The role of Th17 and its related cytokines in T2DM and CAD is unclear. Here we investigated the serum levels of five Th17-related cytokines (IL-17, IL-22, MIP-3α, IL-9, and IL-27) in T2DM, CAD, and T2DM-CAD comorbidity patients. IL-22 was found to be elevated in all three conditions. Elevated serum IL-22 was independently associated with the incidence of T2DM and CAD. Conversely, IL-22 was found to protect endothelial cells from glucose- and lysophosphatidylcholine- (LPC-) induced injury, and IL-22R1 expression on endothelial cells was increased upon treatment with high glucose and LPC. Blocking of IL-22R1 with IL-22R1 antibody diminished the protective role of IL-22. Our results suggest that IL-22 functions as a double-edged sword in T2DM and CAD and that IL-22 may be used in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases such as T2DM and CAD. PMID:27829708

  18. Topographical anatomy of superficial veins, cutaneous nerves, and arteries at venipuncture sites in the cubital fossa.

    PubMed

    Mikuni, Yuko; Chiba, Shoji; Tonosaki, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    We investigated correlations among the superficial veins, cutaneous nerves, arteries, and venous valves in 128 cadaveric arms in order to choose safe venipuncture sites in the cubital fossa. The running patterns of the superficial veins were classified into four types (I-IV) and two subtypes (a and b). In types I and II, the median cubital vein (MCV) was connected obliquely between the cephalic and basilic veins in an N-shape, while the median antebrachial vein (MAV) opened into the MCV in type I and into the basilic vein in type II. In type III, the MCV did not exist. In type IV, additional superficial veins above the cephalic and basilic veins were developed around the cubital fossa. In types Ib-IVb, the accessory cephalic vein was developed under the same conditions as seen in types Ia-IVa, respectively. The lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm descended deeply along the cephalic vein in 124 cases (97 %), while the medial cutaneous nerve of the forearm descended superficially along the basilic vein in 94 (73 %). A superficial brachial artery was found in 27 cases (21 %) and passed deeply under the ulnar side of the MCV. A median superficial antebrachial artery was found in 1 case (1 %), which passed deeply under the ulnar side of the MCV and ran along the MAV. Venous valves were found at 239 points in 28 cases with superficial veins, with a single valve seen at 79 points (33 %) and double valves at 160 points (67 %). At the time of intravenous injection, caution is needed regarding the locations of cutaneous nerves, brachial and superficial brachial arteries, and venous valves. The area ranging from the middle segment of the MCV to the confluence between the MCV and cephalic vein appears to be a relatively safe venipuncture site.

  19. Brachial Pressure Control Fails to Account for Most Distending Pressure-Independent, Age-Related Aortic Hemodynamic Changes in Adults.

    PubMed

    Hodson, Bryan; Norton, Gavin R; Booysen, Hendrik L; Sibiya, Moekanyi J; Raymond, Andrew; Maseko, Muzi J; Majane, Olebogeng H I; Libhaber, Elena; Sareli, Pinhas; Woodiwiss, Angela J

    2016-05-01

    Although several characteristics of aortic function, which are largely determined by age, predict outcomes beyond brachial blood pressure (BP), the extent to which brachial BP control accounts for age-related variations in aortic function is uncertain. We aimed to determine the extent to which brachial BP control in the general population (systolic/diastolic BP < 140/90 mm Hg) accounts for age-related aortic hemodynamic changes across the adult lifespan. Central aortic pulse pressure (PPc), backward wave pressure (Pb), pulse wave velocity (PWV), and PP amplification (PPamp) (applanation tonometry and SphygmoCor software) were determined in 1,185 participants from a community sample (age >16 years; 36.4% uncontrolled BP). With adjustments for distending pressure (mean arterial pressure, MAP), no increases in PPc, Pb, or PWV and decreases in PPamp were noted in those with an uncontrolled brachial BP younger than 50 years. In those older than 50 years with an uncontrolled brachial BP, MAP-adjusted aortic hemodynamic variables were only modestly different to those with a controlled brachial BP (PPc, 46±14 vs. 42±15 mm Hg, P < 0.02, Pb, 23±8 vs. 21±8 mm Hg, PWV, 8.42±3.21 vs. 8.19±3.37 m/second, PPamp, 1.21±0.17 vs. 1.21±0.14). Nonetheless, with adjustments for MAP, marked age-related increases in PPc, Pb, and PWV and decreases in PPamp were noted in those with uncontrolled and controlled brachial BP across the adult lifespan (P < 0.0001). Brachial BP control in the general population fails to account for most distending pressure-independent, age-related changes in aortic hemodynamics across the adult lifespan. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Neurinomas of the brachial plexus: case report.

    PubMed

    Forte, A; Gallinaro, L S; Bertagni, A; Montesano, G; Prece, V; Illuminati, G

    1999-01-01

    Neurinomas, also referred to as neurilemmomas and schwannomas, are rare benign tumours of the peripheral nerves, a low proportion of which arise from the brachial plexus. Authors report a case of an ancient schwannoma arising from the brachial plexus. The tumour, usually asymptomatic, may cause sensory radicular symptoms, or rarely motor deficits in the involved arm. Enucleation of the tumour from the nerve without damage to any of the fascicles is the correct treatment.

  1. Multisoliton solutions in terms of double Wronskian determinant for a generalized variable-coefficient nonlinear Schroedinger equation from plasma physics, arterial mechanics, fluid dynamics and optical communications

    SciTech Connect

    Lue Xing Zhu Hongwu; Yao Zhenzhi; Meng Xianghua; Zhang Cheng; Zhang Chunyi; Tian Bo

    2008-08-15

    In this paper, the multisoliton solutions in terms of double Wronskian determinant are presented for a generalized variable-coefficient nonlinear Schroedinger equation, which appears in space and laboratory plasmas, arterial mechanics, fluid dynamics, optical communications and so on. By means of the particularly nice properties of Wronskian determinant, the solutions are testified through direct substitution into the bilinear equations. Furthermore, it can be proved that the bilinear Baecklund transformation transforms between (N - 1)- and N-soliton solutions.

  2. A variant of the classical superficial brachioulnoradial artery: morphology and clinical significances.

    PubMed

    Ariyo, Olutayo; Fenderson, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    We report a superficial brachioulnoradial artery (SBURA) presenting as a variant of the normal, originating from the proximal third of the right brachial artery of a 75-year-old female cadaver which bifurcated yielding a brachiointerosseous artery laterally and a SBURA medially, and the latter bifurcating 5 cm proximal to the elbow yielding a brachioradial artery laterally and the superficial brachioulnar artery medially, resulting in the formation of three instead of two brachial arteries as in the classical SBURA said to bifurcate at the elbow into the radial and ulnar arteries. Clinical implications of this variant are discussed.

  3. Microsurgically critical anomaly of the anterior communicating artery complex during the pterional approach to a ruptured aneurysm: double fenestration of the proximal A2 segments.

    PubMed

    Namiki, Jun; Doumoto, Youichi

    2003-06-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with a ruptured aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery (ACoA) complex anomaly with the neck of the aneurysm located in the upper ACoA. The right pterional approach was performed 2 days after admission. Retraction of the frontal lobe exposed the lower half of the ACoA complex consisting of the origins of the bilateral A2 segments, and the apparent neck of the aneurysm was clipped. However, further exposure of the bilateral A2 segments revealed double fenestration of the proximal A2 segments, a subtype of duplication of the ACoA accompanied by a bridging artery between the upper and lower ACoA. The limited visualization of this ACoA complex anomaly with an aneurysm had led to the proximal origin of the bridging artery being mistaken for the neck of the aneurysm. Such double fenestration of the proximal A2 segments is a microsurgically critical anomaly of the ACoA complex, because the bridging artery mimics the neck of an aneurysm when visualized by the pterional approach.

  4. Comparison of invasive and brachial cuff-based noninvasive measurements for the assessment of blood pressure amplification.

    PubMed

    Nakagomi, Atsushi; Okada, Sho; Shoji, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2017-03-01

    Our aim was to assess the discrepancy in the blood pressure amplification (BPA) value defined as the aortic-to-brachial increase in systolic BP (SBP) between invasive and noninvasive brachial cuff-based methods. In 45 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization, BP in the brachial artery and ascending aorta were measured with an invasive catheter and a brachial cuff-based oscillometric device. To calculate aortic SBP, brachial waveforms were calibrated by the brachial systolic and diastolic BP (DBP) (C1 calibration) or by the brachial mean BP and DBP (C2 calibration). C1 calibration underestimated aortic SBP (-17.7 mm Hg (95% confidence interval: -21.9 to -13.5)), whereas C2 calibration generated an approximately accurate aortic SBP (1.8 mm Hg (-2.4 to 5.9)). Regarding brachial SBP, noninvasively measured values were markedly underestimated (22.2 mm Hg (-26.4 to -18.0)), resulting in a slightly low BPA value in C1 calibration (11.9±6.3 mm Hg) and a paradoxical negative BPA value in C2 calibration (-7.6±6.7 mm Hg). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the cuff-catheter difference of BPA was positively correlated with the cuff-catheter difference of brachial SBP in both calibrations (C1 calibration: β=0.51; C2 calibration: β=0.50; both P<0.01). Although noninvasively measured BPA was associated with invasively measured BPA only in C1 calibration (r=0.33, P=0.03), when using invasively measured brachial SBP instead of a cuff-based measurement, the BPA was well associated with invasively measured BPA in both calibrations (C1 calibration: r=0.57; C2 calibration: r=0.52; both P<0.001). In conclusion, there was a trade-off in accuracy between brachial cuff-based noninvasive aortic SBP and BPA because of the inherent inaccuracies in the cuff-based method. This finding should be fully considered in establishing standardized reference values for aortic BP.

  5. Quantification of the Interrelationship between Brachial-Ankle and Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity in a Workplace Population.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Bang; Li, Yan; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-04-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) is increasingly used for the measurement of arterial stiffness. In the present study, we quantified the interrelationship between brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV in a workplace population, and investigated the associations with cardiovascular risk factors and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were measured using the Omron-Colin VP1000 and SphygmoCor devices, respectively. We investigated the interrelationship by the Pearson's correlation analysis and Bland-Altman plot, and performed sensitivity and specificity analyses. The 954 participants (mean ± standard deviation age 42.6 ± 14.2 years) included 630 (66.0%) men and 203 (21.3%) hypertensive patients. Brachial-ankle (13.4 ± 2.7 m/s) and carotid-femoral PWV (7.3 ± 1.6 m/s) were significantly correlated in all subjects (r = 0.75) as well as in men (r = 0.72) and women (r = 0.80) separately. For arterial stiffness defined as a carotid-femoral PWV of 10 m/s or higher, the sensitivity and specificity of brachial-ankle PWV of 16.7 m/s or higher were 72 and 94%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.953. In multiple stepwise regression, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with age (partial r = 0.33 and 0.34, respectively) and systolic blood pressure (partial r = 0.71 and 0.66, respectively). In addition, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with carotid IMT (r = 0.57 and 0.55, respectively) in unadjusted analysis, but not in analysis adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (p ≥ 0.08). Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were closely correlated, and had similar determinants. Brachial-ankle PWV can behave as an ease-of-use alternative measure of arterial stiffness for assessing cardiovascular risk.

  6. Quantification of the Interrelationship between Brachial-Ankle and Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity in a Workplace Population

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Bang; Li, Yan; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) is increasingly used for the measurement of arterial stiffness. In the present study, we quantified the interrelationship between brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV in a workplace population, and investigated the associations with cardiovascular risk factors and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Methods Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were measured using the Omron-Colin VP1000 and SphygmoCor devices, respectively. We investigated the interrelationship by the Pearson's correlation analysis and Bland-Altman plot, and performed sensitivity and specificity analyses. Results The 954 participants (mean ± standard deviation age 42.6 ± 14.2 years) included 630 (66.0%) men and 203 (21.3%) hypertensive patients. Brachial-ankle (13.4 ± 2.7 m/s) and carotid-femoral PWV (7.3 ± 1.6 m/s) were significantly correlated in all subjects (r = 0.75) as well as in men (r = 0.72) and women (r = 0.80) separately. For arterial stiffness defined as a carotid-femoral PWV of 10 m/s or higher, the sensitivity and specificity of brachial-ankle PWV of 16.7 m/s or higher were 72 and 94%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.953. In multiple stepwise regression, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with age (partial r = 0.33 and 0.34, respectively) and systolic blood pressure (partial r = 0.71 and 0.66, respectively). In addition, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with carotid IMT (r = 0.57 and 0.55, respectively) in unadjusted analysis, but not in analysis adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (p ≥ 0.08). Conclusions Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were closely correlated, and had similar determinants. Brachial-ankle PWV can behave as an ease-of-use alternative measure of arterial stiffness for assessing cardiovascular risk. PMID:27195246

  7. Long-Term Outcome of Brachial Plexus Reimplantation After Complete Brachial Plexus Avulsion Injury.

    PubMed

    Kachramanoglou, Carolina; Carlstedt, Thomas; Koltzenburg, Martin; Choi, David

    2017-07-01

    Complete brachial plexus avulsion injury is a severe disabling injury due to traction to the brachial plexus. Brachial plexus reimplantation is an emerging surgical technique for the management of complete brachial plexus avulsion injury. We assessed the functional recovery in 15 patients who underwent brachial plexus reimplantation surgery after complete brachial plexus avulsion injury with clinical examination and electrophysiological testing. We included all patients who underwent brachial plexus reimplantation in our institution between 1997 and 2010. Patients were assessed with detailed motor and sensory clinical examination and motor and sensory electrophysiological tests. We found that patients who had reimplantation surgery demonstrated an improvement in Medical Research Council power in the deltoid, pectoralis, and infraspinatous muscles and global Medical Research Council score. Eight patients achieved at least grade 3 MRC power in at least one muscle group of the arm. Improved reinnervation by electromyelography criteria was found in infraspinatous, biceps, and triceps muscles. There was evidence of ongoing innervation in 3 patients. Sensory testing in affected dermatomes also showed better recovery at C5, C6, and T1 dermatomes. The best recovery was seen in the C5 dermatome. Our results demonstrate a definite but limited improvement in motor and sensory recovery after reimplantation surgery in patients with complete brachial plexus injury. We hypothesize that further improvement may be achieved by using regenerative cell technologies at the time of repair. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dexamethasone added to lidocaine prolongs axillary brachial plexus blockade.

    PubMed

    Movafegh, Ali; Razazian, Mehran; Hajimaohamadi, Fatemeh; Meysamie, Alipasha

    2006-01-01

    Different additives have been used to prolong regional blockade. We designed a prospective, randomized, double-blind study to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone added to lidocaine on the onset and duration of axillary brachial plexus block. Sixty patients scheduled for elective hand and forearm surgery under axillary brachial plexus block were randomly allocated to receive either 34 mL lidocaine 1.5% with 2 mL of isotonic saline chloride (control group, n = 30) or 34 mL lidocaine 1.5% with 2 mL of dexamethasone (8 mg) (dexamethasone group, n = 30). Neither epinephrine nor bicarbonate was added to the treatment mixture. We used a nerve stimulator and multiple stimulations technique in all of the patients. After performance of the block, sensory and motor blockade of radial, median, musculocutaneous, and ulnar nerves were recorded at 5, 15, and 30 min. The onset time of the sensory and motor blockade was defined as the time between last injection and the total abolition of the pinprick response and complete paralysis. The duration of sensory and motor blocks were considered as the time interval between the administration of the local anesthetic and the first postoperative pain and complete recovery of motor functions. Sixteen patients were excluded because of unsuccessful blockade. The duration of surgery and the onset times of sensory and motor block were similar in the two groups. The duration of sensory (242 +/- 76 versus 98 +/- 33 min) and motor (310 +/- 81 versus 130 +/- 31 min) blockade were significantly longer in the dexamethasone than in the control group (P < 0.01). We conclude that the addition of dexamethasone to lidocaine 1.5% solution in axillary brachial plexus block prolongs the duration of sensory and motor blockade.

  9. Transscalene brachial plexus block: a new posterolateral approach for brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoang C; Fath, Erwin; Wirtz, Sebastian; Bey, Tareg

    2007-09-01

    Depending on the approach to the upper brachial plexus, severe complications have been reported. We describe a novel posterolateral approach for brachial plexus block which, from an anatomical and theoretical point of view, seems to offer advantages. Twenty-seven patients were scheduled to undergo elective major surgery of the upper arm or shoulder using this new transscalene brachial plexus block. The success rate was 85.2% for surgery. Two patients required additional analgesia with IV sufentanil. In two others, regional anesthesia was inadequate. The side effects of this technique included reversible recurrent laryngeal nerve blockade in two patients and a reversible Horner syndrome in one patient. Further studies are needed to compare the transscalene brachial plexus block with other approaches to the brachial plexus.

  10. A rare case report of subscapular artery.

    PubMed

    Khaki, Amir Afshin; Shoja, M A Mohagjel; Khaki, Arash

    2011-01-01

    Axillary artery is one of the most important arteries of the upper limb, which is a continua- tion of the subclavian artery. It begins at the lateral border of the first rib and ends at the inferior border of the teres major where it becomes the brachial artery. Axillary artery has six important branches included: 1) Superior thoracic artery 2) Thoracoacromial artery 3) Lateral thoracic artery 4) Subscapular artery 5) Posterior circumflex humeral artery 6) Anterior circumflex humeral artery. Subscapular artery arises from the third part of axillary artery normally and then divides into cir- cumflex scapular artery that extremely enters the triangular space. The other branch of subscapular artery, the thoracodorsal artery, accompanies thracodorsal nerve to lateral border of scapula and supplies and innervates that region. In this case the subscapular artery was absent in both sides and instead of that the circumflex scapular artery was directly derived from axillary artery and the thoracodorsal artery is separated from circumflex scapular artery as a thin and short branch, too. It seemed that the lateral thoracic artery, which was thicker than its normal condition, supplied the muscles of the lateral part of scapula and the thoracodorsal muscle. Other branches of the axillary artery demonstrated without any abnormally. Since axillary artery has the highest rate of rapture and damage coming after the popliteal artery, knowing the variations is important and essential for surgeons, radiologist and anatomist.

  11. Treatment with double dose of omeprazole increases β-endorphin plasma level in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Pulkowski, Grzegorz; Kłopocka, Maria; Augustyńska, Beata; Sinkiewicz, Anna; Suppan, Karol; Fabisiak, Jacek; Majer, Marcin; Świątkowski, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The proton pump inhibitor empirical trial, besides the analysis of symptoms, is the main method in the diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease-related chest pain. β-Endorphin acts as an endogenous analgesia system. The aim of the study was verify whether β-endorphin plasma level is affected by omeprazole administration and influences the severity of anginal symptoms and outcome of the “omeprazole test” in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and chest pain of suspected non-cardiac origin. Material and methods Omeprazole was administered to 48 patients with CAD in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study design. At the beginning of the study, and again after the 14-day omeprazole and placebo treatment, the β-endorphin plasma concentration was determined. Results The level of plasma β-endorphin after the administration of omeprazole was significantly greater than at the start of the study and following the placebo. Responders to omeprazole had an average lower β-endorphin plasma concentration than subjects who failed to respond to this therapy. Subjects with symptoms in class III (according to the Canadian Cardiovascular Society classification) after omeprazole administration had a greater β-endorphin plasma level than subjects in class II for anginal symptom severity. Conclusions Fourteen-day therapy with a double omeprazole dose significantly increases the β-endorphin plasma concentration in patients with CAD. Circulating β-endorphin does not seem to be involved in the mechanism for the “omeprazole test” outcome, although an individually different effect on pain threshold cannot be excluded. PMID:22371748

  12. [Neurological complication after a vertical infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Case report of possible differential diagnoses of a neurological deficit].

    PubMed

    Ehrenberg, R; Bucher, M; Graf, B

    2009-08-01

    A 72-year-old man with an obliteration of the brachial artery received a vertical infraclavicular block (VIP) for vascular surgery but 20 h after the operation a complete paresis of the affected extremity occurred. A new vascular obliteration could be excluded. During the diagnostic examination the patient noticed a snapping noise in the cervical column when moving his head and an abrupt recovery of the neurological deficits occurred. The radiological diagnostic provided no indication of cerebral ischemia or lesions of the brachial plexus. An additional diagnostic finding was a profound herniated vertebral disc with compression of the myelon. Fortunately, the neurological deficits completely returned to normal.

  13. Dermatoglyphs and brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Polovina, Svetislav; Cvjeticanin, Miljenko; Milicić, Jasna; Proloscić, Tajana Polovina

    2006-09-01

    Perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP) is a handicap quite commonly encountered in daily routine. Although birth trauma is considered to be the major cause of the defect, it has been observed that PBPP occurs only in some infants born under identical or nearly identical conditions. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of genetic predisposition for PBPP. It is well known that digito-palmar dermatoglyphs can be used to determine hereditary roots of some diseases. Thus, we found it meaningful to do a study analysis of digito-palmar dermatoglyphs in this disease as well, conducting it on 140 subjects (70 males and 70 females) diagnosed with PBPP. The control group was composed of fingerprints obtained from 400 adult and phenotypically healthy subjects (200 males and 200 females) from the Zagreb area. The results of multivariate and univariate analysis of variance have shown statistically significant differences between the groups observed. In spite of lower percentage of accurately classified female subjects by discriminant analysis, the results of quantitative analysis of digito-palmar dermatoglyphs appeared to suggest a genetic predisposition for the occurrence of PBPP.

  14. Effect of upper arm brachial basilic and prosthetic forearm arteriovenous fistula on left ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Keuter, X H A; Kooman, J P; Habets, J; Van Der Sande, F M; Kessels, A G H; Cheriex, E C; Tordoir, J H M

    2007-01-01

    Creation of an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) may increase left ventricular hypertrophy in the hemodialysis population. Aim of this study was to compare the effects of a brachial-basilic (BB) AVF and the prosthetic brachial-antecubital forearm loop access (PTFE) on cardiac performance. Patients were randomized to receive BB-AVF or prosthetic brachial-antecubital forearm loop access. Before and three months after AVF creation patients underwent an echocardiographic examination. Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare relative increase between the measured cardiac parameters for the two groups. Twenty-seven patients participated in the study. The relative increase in left ventricular parameters was not significantly different between the two groups. Only left ventricular end-diastolic diameter tended to be of significance. Mean blood flow through the brachial artery was 1680+/-156 and 1450+/-221 mL/min three months after surgery for the PTFE and the BB-AVF group, respectively. After three months of follow-up, changes in cardiac structure were comparable between patients with BB and PTFE AVFs. Also access flow was comparable at this time. In general, the effects of creation of a fistula on LV structure were limited. Longer follow up time may be needed to explore the long term effects of different vascular accesses on cardiac function.

  15. Brachial plexus injury: the London experience with supraclavicular traction lesions.

    PubMed

    Birch, Rolfe

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author details the experiences of his hospital and other London hospitals in treating brachial plexus injury. As noted, important advances have been made in methods of diagnosis and repair. Myelography was replaced by CT scan and later by MRI. Among the topics the author explores are diagnosis (including pain, the presence or absence of the Tinel sign, and the irradiation of pins and needles) and the principles of repair. The author emphasizes that it is imperative that ruptured nerves be repaired as soon as possible, with the closed traction lesion coming, in urgency, close behind reattachment of the amputated hand or repair of a great artery and a trunk nerve in the combined lesion. Finally, the article concludes that the surgeon must be actively engaged in the whole process of rehabilitation and treatment of pain. This is part of a Point-Counterpoint discussion with Dr. David G. Kline's presentation of "A Personal Experience."

  16. Brachial plexus trauma: the morbidity of hemidiaphragmatic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Franko, O I; Khalpey, Z; Gates, J

    2008-09-01

    Phrenic nerve palsy has previously been associated with brachial plexus root avulsion; severe unilateral phrenic nerve injury is not uncommonly associated with brachial plexus injury. Brachial plexus injuries can be traumatic (gunshot wounds, lacerations, stretch/contusion and avulsion injuries) or non-traumatic in aetiology (supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block, subclavian vein catheterisation, cardiac surgeries, or obstetric complications such as birth palsy). Despite the known association, the incidence and morbidity of a phrenic nerve injury and hemidiaphragmatic paralysis associated with traumatic brachial plexus stretch injuries remains ill-defined. The incidence of an associated phrenic nerve injury with brachial plexus trauma ranges from 10% to 20%; however, because unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis often presents without symptoms at rest, a high number of phrenic nerve injuries are likely to be overlooked in the setting of brachial plexus injury. A case report is presented of a unilateral phrenic nerve injury associated with brachial plexus stretch injury presenting with a recalcitrant left lower lobe pneumonia.

  17. Ankle-Brachial Index Testing at the Time of Stress Testing in Patients Without Known Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Narula, Amar; Benenstein, Ricardo J; Duan, Daisy; Zagha, David; Li, Lilun; Choy-Shan, Alana; Konigsberg, Matthew W; Lau, Ginger; Phillips, Lawrence M; Saric, Muhamed; Vreeland, Lisa; Reynolds, Harmony R

    2016-01-01

    Individuals referred for stress testing to identify coronary artery disease may have nonobstructive atherosclerosis, which is not detected by stress tests. Identification of increased risk despite a negative stress test could inform prevention efforts. Abnormal ankle-brachial index (ABI) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Routine ABI testing in the stress laboratory will identify unrecognized peripheral arterial disease in some patients. Participants referred for stress testing without known history of atherosclerotic disease underwent ABI testing (n = 451). Ankle-brachial index was assessed via simultaneous arm and leg pressure using standard measurement, automated blood-pressure cuffs at rest. Ankle-brachial index was measured after exercise in 296 patients and 30 healthy controls. Abnormal postexercise ABI was defined as a >20% drop in ABI or fall in ankle pressure by >30 mm Hg. Overall, 2.0% of participants had resting ABI ≤0.90, 3.1% had ABI ≥1.40, and 5.5% had borderline ABI. No patient with abnormal or borderline ABI had an abnormal stress test. Participants who met peripheral arterial disease screening criteria (age ≥65 or 50-64 with diabetes or smoking) tended toward greater frequency of low ABI (2.9% vs 1.0%; P = 0.06) and were more likely to have borderline ABI (0.91 to 0.99; 7.8% vs 2.9%; P = 0.006). Postexercise ABI was abnormal in 29.4% of patients and 30.0% of controls (P not significant). Ankle-brachial index screening at rest just before stress testing detected low ABI in 2.0% of participants, all of whom had negative stress tests. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The results of a two-stage double switch operation for congenital corrected transposition of the great arteries with a deconditioned morphologically left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Cui, Bin; Li, Shoujun; Yan, Jun; Shen, Xiangdong; Wang, Xu; Yang, Keming; Hua, Zhongdong; Wang, Qiang; Tian, Meice

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate a two-stage double switch operation, morphological left ventricular (mLV) retraining followed by an atrial-arterial switch operation, in the management of patients with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA) and a deconditioned mLV. Between May 2005 and May 2011, 14 patients with CCTGA and a deconditioned mLV anomaly underwent the two-stage double switch operation. There were eight males and six females aged between 2.5 and 72 months (mean: 34.4 ± 24.0 months) old and weighing from 5 to 23 kg (mean: 12.7 ± 4.9 kg). The major associated malformations included: tricuspid regurgitation (TR, n = 13); restrictive ventricular septal defect (n = 10); atrial septal defect or patent foramen ovale (n = 7); mild pulmonary stenosis (n = 5) and patent ductus arteriosus (n = 4). These patients underwent morphological left ventricular retraining by means of pulmonary artery banding under general anaesthesia, which was then followed by a double switch operation under general anaesthesia and cardiopulmonary bypass. There were no deaths or complications during the hospital stay or follow-up for the mLV retraining. In comparison with preoperative conditions, the mLV end-diastolic diameter (mLVEDd), the posterior wall thickness of the mLV and the mLV/mRV pressure ratio were all increased; the interventricular septum had moved partially to the midline position and TR had decreased. After the atrial-arterial switch procedure, 2 patients died during the perioperative period. The causes of death included serious cardiac arrhythmia with circulatory collapse and sudden death. The others were followed up for 2-8 years: 1 patient died from serious cardiac arrhythmias with circulatory collapse in the follow-up period. With regard to the others, 8 were evaluated as New York Heart Association Functional Class I, and the other 3 as Class II. Moderate aortic valve regurgitation was noted in 3 patients and

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Atherosclerotic Iliac Stenosis: Local and Systemic Complications of the Open Brachial Access.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Bahaa; Albert, Bénédicte; David, Charles-Henri; Khalifa, Ahmed; El Aridi, Layal; Badra, Ali; Braesco, Jacques; Gouny, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    The femoral access is the approach of reference for iliac angioplasty. In the current context of an early ambulation and a minimization of in-hospital stay period, the brachial access seems to be an appropriate approach, especially that long and small diameter equipments are available. Furthermore, it is extremely useful in case of inappropriate or unavailable femoral access. The aim of this study was to evaluate the complication risk factors of the brachial approach in the treatment of iliac stenosis. Between January 2012 and December 2013, we performed 281 iliac transluminal angioplasties of which 57 (20%) consecutive left brachial artery accesses were performed in 54 patients. The choice of brachial access was justified in 68% of the cases by an unavailable femoral access, in 29% of the cases by the presence of bilateral iliac lesions, and in 3% of the cases after failure of retrograde femoral approach. The patients were of a male majority (81%) with a mean age of 66 ± 9 years. The procedure was performed under local anesthesia in 65% of the cases. No upper limb ischemia or nervous complications had been reported. No cerebrovascular stroke has been identified. One patient presented with dysarthria associated with disorientation without the presence of cerebrovascular ischemia on the computed tomography scan and on the magnetic resonance imaging. There were 3 major hematomas at the brachial access site, which required reoperation; these 3 patients were on dialysis. There was no statistically significant relationship between a complication occurrence and the diameter or length of the introducer. The mean in-hospital stay period was 2 days. The procedure was considered successful in 91% of the cases. We reported 5 cases of failure: 4 of which was due to a difficulty in crossing the lesion and 1 due to a very short material. The only significant risk factor of failure was the thrombosis of the iliac axis (odds ratio 23.3, 95% confidence interval 2.5-264.6, P

  20. A novel platelet-rich arterial thrombosis model in rabbits. Simple, reproducible, and dynamic real-time measurement by using double-opposing inverted-sutures model.

    PubMed

    Shieh, S J; Chiu, H Y; Shi, G Y; Wu, C M; Wang, J C; Chen, C H; Wu, H L

    2001-09-01

    Though numerous animal thrombosis models have been introduced, an easy, reliable, and reproducible arterial thrombosis model remains a continuing challenge prior to a thrombolytic study. In an effort to evaluate the efficiency of various recombinant thrombolytic agents with specific affinity to activated platelets in vivo, we developed a novel double-opposing inverted-sutures model to create a platelet-rich thrombus in the femoral artery of rabbits. The arteriotomy was done semicircumferentially, and variously sized microsurgical sutures were introduced intraluminally in a double-opposing inverted manner. The animals were divided into three groups according to the double-opposing inverted-sutures used: Group 1 with 10-0 nylon (n=6), Group 2 with 9-0 nylon (n=6), and Group 3 with 8-0 nylon (n=22). The superficial epigastric branch was cannulated with a thin polyethylene (PE) tube for intraarterial administration of the studied thrombolytic agent. The blood flow was continuously measured with a real-time ultrasonic flow meter. Within 2 h of installation of the sutures, there was no thrombus formation in either Group 1 or 2. In Group 3, the thrombosis rate was 91% (20 of 22) under a steady baseline flow (with an average of 12.23+/-2.40 ml/min). It was highly statistically significant with a P-value of .0000743 using Fisher's Exact Test. The averaged time to thrombosis was 21.8+/-9.8 min. The ultrasonic flow meter to record the dynamic real-time measurement of blood flow was a guideline for thrombus formation or dissolution, which was correlated with the morphological findings of stenotic status of the vessel detected by the Doppler sonography. The components of the thrombus were proven to be platelet-rich predominant by histological examination via hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To confirm that the double-opposing inverted-sutures model would be useful for a study of thrombolytic agents, we evaluated the effects of

  1. [Diagnosing venous and venous/arterial ulcers].

    PubMed

    Perceau, Géraldine

    2012-01-01

    A venous ulcer can be diagnosed on the basis of elements arising from the questioning and the clinical examination of the patient. A venous Doppler ultrasound can specify the type of reverse flow (superficial and/or deep). Measuring the ankle brachial pressure index helps to eliminate or confirm any arterial involvement. Depending on the systolic pressure index, the ulcer will be considered as purely venous, mixed (arterial-venous) or predominantly arterial.

  2. Systematic evaluation of brachial plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Haynes, S

    1993-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries offer a unique challenge to the athletic trainer because of their relatively high frequency rate in contact sports and because of the complexity of the neuroanatomy in the cervical area. During a game, athletic trainers must make a fast, accurate decision regarding a player's return to competition. It is imperative that the athletic trainer be able to quickly differentiate between minor injuries and more serious injuries warranting removal from the game and/or physician referral. A systematic approach to the evaluation of a brachial plexus injury is essential to ensure proper treatment. This paper will present a structured approach to an on-the-field assessment of brachial plexus injuries.

  3. Ambrisentan for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension: results of the ambrisentan in pulmonary arterial hypertension, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, efficacy (ARIES) study 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Galiè, Nazzareno; Olschewski, Horst; Oudiz, Ronald J; Torres, Fernando; Frost, Adaani; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Badesch, David B; McGoon, Michael D; McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Roecker, Ellen B; Gerber, Michael J; Dufton, Christopher; Wiens, Brian L; Rubin, Lewis J

    2008-06-10

    Ambrisentan is a propanoic acid-based, A-selective endothelin receptor antagonist for the once-daily treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Ambrisentan in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter, Efficacy Study 1 and 2 (ARIES-1 and ARIES-2) were concurrent, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies that randomized 202 and 192 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, respectively, to placebo or ambrisentan (ARIES-1, 5 or 10 mg; ARIES-2, 2.5 or 5 mg) orally once daily for 12 weeks. The primary end point for each study was change in 6-minute walk distance from baseline to week 12. Clinical worsening, World Health Organization functional class, Short Form-36 Health Survey score, Borg dyspnea score, and B-type natriuretic peptide plasma concentrations also were assessed. In addition, a long-term extension study was performed. The 6-minute walk distance increased in all ambrisentan groups; mean placebo-corrected treatment effects were 31 m (P=0.008) and 51 m (P<0.001) in ARIES-1 for 5 and 10 mg ambrisentan, respectively, and 32 m (P=0.022) and 59 m (P<0.001) in ARIES-2 for 2.5 and 5 mg ambrisentan, respectively. Improvements in time to clinical worsening (ARIES-2), World Health Organization functional class (ARIES-1), Short Form-36 score (ARIES-2), Borg dyspnea score (both studies), and B-type natriuretic peptide (both studies) were observed. No patient treated with ambrisentan developed aminotransferase concentrations >3 times the upper limit of normal. In 280 patients completing 48 weeks of treatment with ambrisentan monotherapy, the improvement from baseline in 6-minute walk at 48 weeks was 39 m. Ambrisentan improves exercise capacity in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Improvements were observed for several secondary end points in each of the studies, although statistical significance was more variable. Ambrisentan is well tolerated and is associated with a low risk of aminotransferase

  4. Herpetic Brachial Plexopathy: Application of Brachial Plexus Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasound-Guided Corticosteroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Gil; Chung, Sun G

    2016-05-01

    Herpes zoster, commonly known as shingles, is an infectious viral disease characterized by painful, unilateral skin blisters occurring in specific sensory dermatomes. Motor paresis is reported in 0.5% to 5% of patients. Although the mechanism of zoster paresis is still unclear, the virus can spread from the dorsal root ganglia to the anterior horn cell or anterior spinal nerve roots. It rarely involves the brachial plexus. We report a case of brachial plexitis following herpes zoster infection in which pathological lesions were diagnosed using brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging and treated with ultrasound-guided perineural corticosteroid injection.

  5. Magnetic resonance neurography of the brachial plexus

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Vaishali; Upadhyaya, Divya Narain; Kumar, Adarsh; Pandey, Ashok Kumar; Gujral, Ratni; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is being increasingly recognised all over the world as the imaging modality of choice for brachial plexus and peripheral nerve lesions. Recent refinements in MRI protocols have helped in imaging nerve tissue with greater clarity thereby helping in the identification, localisation and classification of nerve lesions with greater confidence than was possible till now. This article on Magnetic Resonance Neurography (MRN) is based on the authors’ experience of imaging the brachial plexus and peripheral nerves using these protocols over the last several years. PMID:26424974

  6. A randomized, prospective, double-blind trial comparing 3% chloroprocaine followed by 0.5% bupivacaine to 2% lidocaine followed by 0.5% bupivacaine for interscalene brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Soheila; Kalstein, Allison I; Nasrullah, Habib M; Hedayatnia, Mehrdad; Yarmush, Joel M; SchianodiCola, Joseph

    2008-11-01

    The combination of 2-chloroprocaine and bupivacaine (C/B) for regional anesthesia has been described, but its use was largely abandoned due to equivocal results in efficacy. In this prospective, double-blind, randomized study, we compared the onset of an interscalene block using C/B versus a combination of lidocaine and bupivacaine (L/B). Thirty patients scheduled for shoulder arthroscopy under interscalene block were divided into two groups of 15 each. One group (C/B) received 3% 2-chloroprocaine combined with bicarbonate and epinephrine, immediately followed by 0.5% bupivacaine and epinephrine, whereas the other group (L/B) received 2% lidocaine instead of 3% 2-chloroprocaine. Motor and sensory block were assessed every 15 s. The primary end-point was the time of onset to complete motor block. Time-to-event (survival) statistical analysis tests were applied. One L/B patient had a failed block, and was excluded. The median time to motor block for C/B and L/B was 90 (15-575) and 180 (15-3720) s, respectively (P = 0.0325), and to sensory block for C/B and L/B was 90 (30-600) and 210 (30-3900) s, respectively (P = 0.0185). Survival analysis showed that in 5 min, 13 of 15 patients from the C/B group but only 7 of 14 from the L/B group had a successful motor block. In 10 min, 15 of 15 patients from the C/B group but only 10 of 14 from the L/B group had a successful motor block. It took as long as 60 min to assess block success/failure for blocks in the L/B group. This study demonstrates that a successful block was more rapid using C/B than L/B for interscalene blocks.

  7. What has changed in brachial plexus surgery?

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Silva, Gustavo Bersani; de Paula, Emygdio José Leomil; Junior, Rames Mattar; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries, in all their severity and complexity, have been extensively studied. Although brachial plexus injuries are associated with serious and often definitive sequelae, many concepts have changed since the 1950s, when this pathological condition began to be treated more aggressively. Looking back over the last 20 years, it can be seen that the entire approach, from diagnosis to treatment, has changed significantly. Some concepts have become better established, while others have been introduced; thus, it can be said that currently, something can always be offered in terms of functional recovery, regardless of the degree of injury. Advances in microsurgical techniques have enabled improved results after neurolysis and have made it possible to perform neurotization, which has undoubtedly become the greatest differential in treating brachial plexus injuries. Improvements in imaging devices and electrical studies have allowed quick decisions that are reflected in better surgical outcomes. In this review, we intend to show the many developments in brachial plexus surgery that have significantly changed the results and have provided hope to the victims of this serious injury. PMID:23644864

  8. [Idiopathic brachial neuralgia after cesarean section].

    PubMed

    Rihane, B; Le Borgne, J M; Bélair, C

    2002-11-01

    We report a case of idiopathic brachial nevralgia of the right shoulder in a 30-year-old female, after caesarean section, under spinal anaesthesia. Two days after surgery, intense cervical pain appeared on the second day, associated with rapid collapse of muscular shoulder belt. Full recovery occurred in four months.

  9. MR neurography in traumatic brachial plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Vaishali; Upadhyaya, Divya N; Kumar, Adarsh; Gujral, Ratni B

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of the brachial plexus has come a long way and has progressed from plain radiography to CT and CT myelography to MRI. Evolution of MR imaging sequences has enabled good visualization of the small components of the plexus. The purpose of our study was to correlate the results of MR neurography (MRN) in patients with traumatic brachial plexopathy with their operative findings. We wanted to determine the usefulness of MRN and how it influenced surgical planning and outcome. Twenty patients with features of traumatic brachial plexopathy who were referred to the MRI section of the Department of Radiology between September 2012 and January 2014 and subsequently underwent exploration were included in the study. MR neurography and operative findings were recorded at three levels of the brachial plexus-roots, trunks and cords. Findings at the level of roots and trunks were noted in 14 patients each and at the level of the cords in 16 patients. 10 patients had involvement at all levels. Axillary nerve involvement as a solitary finding was noted in two patients. These patients were subsequently operated and their studies were assigned a score based on the feedback from the operating surgeons. The MRN study was scored as three (good), two (average) or one (poor) depending on whether the MR findings correlated with operative findings at all three levels, any two levels or at any one level, respectively. MR neurography is an extremely useful modality to image the traumatized brachial plexus. It influences both surgical planning and outcome/prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of Arterial Mechanics During Head-Down-Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Morgan B.; Martin, David S.; Westby, Christian M.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Carotid, brachial, and tibial arteries reacted differently to HDTBR. Previous studies have not analyzed the mechanical properties of the human brachial or anterior tibial arteries. After slight variations during bed-rest, arterial mechanical properties and IMT returned to pre-bed rest values, with the exception of tibial stiffness and PSE, which continued to be reduced post-bed rest while the DC remained elevated. The tibial artery remodeling was probably due to decreased pressure and volume. Resulting implications for longer duration spaceflight are unclear. Arterial health may be affected by microgravity, as shown by increased thoracic aorta stiffness in other ground based simulations (Aubert).

  11. A "double crossover technique" in an obese patient undergoing transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation: How to accomplish hemostasis percutaneously?

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hirokazu; Naganuma, Toru; Nakamura, Sunao

    2017-09-01

    Percutaneous transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) is generally an acceptable procedure but may be associated with vascular complications at femoral access sites, particularly in obese patients. This report aimed to describe a case of successful performance of our "double crossover technique" in an obese patient undergoing TF-TAVI with a percutaneous transfemoral intra-aortic balloon pump (TF-IABP). A 75-year-old man presented with heart failure due to a left ventricular ejection fraction of 35% and low-flow, low-gradient severe aortic stenosis. The logistic EuroSCORE and STS-PROM score were 31.38% and 7.311%, respectively. Right TF-TAVI using a 14-Fr expandable sheath and a left TF-IABP using an 8-Fr sheath were scheduled. The patient was obese, with a body mass index of 31.7kg/m(2), and we expected access site-related vascular complications to occur. Subsequently, we performed a femoral and brachial crossover technique, called the "double crossover technique," at the completion of the TAVI procedure: first, for the right common femoral artery (CFA) through the sheath in the left CFA and second, for the left CFA through the sheath in the right brachial artery. In the crossover technique, an 8.0-mm-diameter over-the-wire balloon was advanced to an external iliac artery and was subsequently inflated when the sheath was removed. For the right CFA, a double preclose technique was used with the crossover technique. There was no evidence of access site-related vascular complications following TAVI. The double crossover technique was effective at achieving hemostasis and avoiding access site-related vascular complications in an obese patient undergoing TF-TAVI with a TF-IABP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Axillary artery injury as a complication of proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, J A; Light, R; Lustrin, I

    1998-01-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are common injuries and represent approximately 5% of all fractures. These fractures are infrequently associated with neurovascular injuries. Brachial plexus injuries are uncommon, whereas axillary artery injuries are rare. A review of 19 previously reported cases of axillary artery injury after proximal humerus fracture revealed that 84% occurred in patients older than 50 years, 53% were associated with brachial plexus injury, and 21% resulted in upper extremity amputation. This study describes a case of axillary artery injury after proximal humerus fracture and, on the basis of a literature review, offers suggestions for the early diagnosis and effective treatment of this uncommon injury.

  13. Measuring Arterial Blood Pressure. A Self-Contained Instructional Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Chris Ellen

    This self-contained instructional module is designed to help adult caregivers learn how to measure arterial blood pressure in the home. The module includes the following parts: objectives; pretest (with answers); four sections of instructional material covering (1) equipment, (2) cuff placement and locating the brachial artery, (3) measuring blood…

  14. Ankle brachial index values, leg symptoms, and functional performance among community-dwelling older men and women in the lifestyle interventions and independence for elders study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The prevalence and significance of low normal and abnormal ankle brachial index (ABI) values in a community dwelling population of sedentary, older individuals is unknown. We describe the prevalence of categories of definite peripheral artery disease (PAD), borderline ABI, low-normal ABI and no PAD...

  15. The impact of dark chocolate intake on arterial elasticity in individuals with HIV/AIDS undergoing ART: a randomized, double-blind, crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Andrea Mariana Nunes da Costa; Luzia, Liania Alves; de Souza, Suelen Jorge; de Almeida Petrilli, Aline; Pontilho, Patrícia de Moraes; de Souza, Jose Maria Pacheco; Segurado, Aluísio Augusto Cotrim; Efraim, Priscila; Picone, Camila de Melo; Rondo, Patrícia Helen de Carvalho

    2017-06-21

    An increase in the frequency of cardiovascular diseases has been observed in the HIV/AIDS population. Studies involving healthy subjects or subjects with other diseases have shown benefits of chocolate supplementation on endothelial function and vasodilation. We evaluate the impact of chocolate consumption on arterial elasticity in people living with human immunodeficiency virus - PLHIV. A double-blind, crossover trial including 110 PLHIV (19 to 59 years) on antiretroviral therapy - ART for at least 6 months and with a viral load of <500 copies per mL was conducted. All subjects were randomly assigned to 15-d dietary supplements containing dark chocolate or placebo with a 15-d washout period. Each participant received one of the two sequences: A (dark chocolate, placebo chocolate); B (placebo chocolate, dark chocolate). Arterial elasticity was measured using the HDI/PulseWave™ CR-2000 CardioVascular Profiling System®. Body composition, lipid profile, C-reactive protein, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were also assessed. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures using the Stata 11.0® program was used for cross-over analysis. Most subjects were men (59.0%) and Caucasian (46.1%) and the mean age was 44.6 ± 7.1 years. The mean time since diagnosis of HIV infection was 13.7 ± 5.3 years and the mean duration of ART was 12.9 ± 4.2 years. Chocolate consumption resulted in significant alterations in the large artery elasticity index - LAEI (p = 0.049) and the mean concentration of HDL-c was higher after supplementation with dark chocolate (p = 0.045). This is the first study to evaluate the effect of chocolate on arterial elasticity in PLHIV. The results showed that dark chocolate consumption for 15 days improved the elastic properties of the LAEI in PLHIV. These findings, added to the noninvasive method used, may expand the knowledge of CVDs in this population.

  16. Comparison between the effect of L-propionylcarnitine, L-acetylcarnitine and nitroglycerin in chronic peripheral arterial disease: a haemodynamic double blind echo-Doppler study.

    PubMed

    Sabbá, C; Berardi, E; Antonica, G; Ferraioli, G; Buonamico, P; Godi, L; Brevetti, G; Albano, O

    1994-10-01

    The haemodynamic effects on the peripheral vascular bed of L-acetylcarnitine, L-propionylcarnitine, and nitroglycerin were tested by echo-Doppler in a double blind cross-over study. Eleven male patients suffering from peripheral arterial obliterative disease (PAOD) in the second stage of Fontaine's classification, and 11 matched control subjects were enrolled in the study. Each subject received one of three different treatments on each day of the study in a different order following a random assignment. The treatments were either 30 mg x kg of L-acetylcarnitine (LAC) or 30 mg x kg of L-propionylcarnitine (LPC) or nitroglycerin (NTG) 1.25 mg given as a single i.v. bolus injected over 3 min. Echo-Doppler measurements of blood flow velocity, and cross-sectional area of the femoral artery were performed at baseline and 10, 20, and 30 min after injection of the drugs. Pulsatility Index (an index derived from the blood flow velocity and related to vascular resistance: PI = Vmax - Vmin/Vmean) was also obtained each time. Results were analysed using a Student's t-test for paired data. L-acetylcarnitine and L-propionylcarnitine showed no haemodynamic effects in either group of subjects (controls and PAOD patients) whether blood flow or vascular resistance was considered. There were haemodynamic changes (a decrease in blood flow velocity and an increase in arterial systemic resistance) only after NTG administration. The changes were more evident in controls than in PAOD patients. Femoral artery cross-sectional area showed no statistically significant effect as regards treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Advanced cardiac examination: the arterial pulse.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Christopher

    2014-07-29

    The pulse is a significant indicator of health and can provide valuable information to help make an accurate diagnosis. All nurses should be competent in taking and interpreting the pulse, and developing their expertise in this vital sign. Arterial pulses can be examined at various sites, and this article focuses on techniques for palpating radial, brachial and carotid pulses.

  18. Myokymia in obstetrically related brachial plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Sclar, Gary; Maniker, Allen; Danto, Joseph

    2004-06-01

    Myokymic discharges are spontaneous bursts of semirhythmic potentials that are sometimes correlated with rippling movements of skin and muscle. They have been reported in limb muscles in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome, spinal stenosis, nerve root and nerve compression, and envenomations. They commonly occur with radiation induced plexopathies (approximately 60% of patients), but have not been reported in obstetrically related brachial plexopathies. We report 2 instances of myokymia in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsies. Each child was studied twice, and it was only at the later study, when the child was 10 or 11 months of age, that these potentials were noted. This could represent ongoing recovery from lesions incurred at birth or developmental changes. The final common pathway of all causes of myokymia could be to generate axonal membrane hyperexcitability.

  19. Microsurgical reconstruction of obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Gu, Yu-Dong; Wang, Huan

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of obstetric brachial plexus palsy is not declining. Heavy birth weight of the infant and breech delivery are considered two important risk factors and Caesarean section delivery seems to be a protective factor. There are two clinical appearances, that is, paralysis of the upper roots and that of total roots, and Klumpke's palsy involving the C8 and T1 roots is rarely seen. Computed tomography myelography (CTM) is still the best way of visualizing nerve roots. Surgical intervention is needed for 20-25% of all patients and clinical information is decisive for the indication of surgery. Most often, a conducting neuroma of the upper trunk is encountered, and it is believed that neuroma resection followed by microsurgical reconstruction of the brachial plexus gives the best results. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Microsurgery, 2008.

  20. Time and reliability issues associated with automatic vs. manual measurements of Ankle to Brachial pressure Index (ABI) following heavy load exercise.

    PubMed

    Congnard, Florian; Bruneau, Antoine; Abraham, Pierre; Colas-Ribas, Christophe; Picquet, Jean; Noury-Desvaux, Benedicte

    2015-11-01

    Ankle to brachial index after heavy load exercise is the most accurate way of diagnosing minor arterial lesions in athletes, such as endofibrosis. The reliability and practical aspects of ankle to brachial index measurements after heavy-load exercise have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to analyze the interest of oscillometric automatic vs. manual Doppler measurements, for the calculation of ankle to brachial index, after heavy-load exercise in athletes. Prospective single-center study. Fifteen healthy trained athletes performed an incremental test twice. Ankle to brachial index measurements were performed at Rest, as soon as possible after exercise (Rec-0), and then started at the 3rd minute of recovery (Rec-3), by two operators using each one of the two ankle to brachial index measurement methods. Mean times for automatic vs. manual ankle to brachial availability were 99 ± 18 s vs. 113 ± 25 s (p = 0.005) and 44 ± 25 s vs. 53 ± 12 s (p = 0.001) respectively at Rec-0 and Rec-3. Ankle to brachial index values from the two methods were highly correlated (r = 0.89). Mean absolute differences of automatic vs. manual ankle to brachial values from test-retest were 0.04 ± 0.05 vs. 0.08 ± 0.08 (p > 0.05) and 0.07 ± 0.05 vs. 0.09 ± 0.10 (p > 0.05) at Rest and Rec-0. Automatic method allows obtaining faster and simultaneously post-exercise ankle to brachial index measurement compare to the manual Doppler. This time issue does not result in a significant change in absolute ankle to brachial index values, nor in the absolute differences of these in test-retest. Nevertheless, the test-retest variability of post-exercise ankle to brachial index results seems smaller with the automatic than the manual method. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Treatment Options for Brachial Plexus Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Vasileios I.; Badilas, Nikolaos K.; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A.; Mazis, George; Kotoulas, Helias K.; Kyriakopoulos, Stamatios; Tagkalegkas, Ioannis; Sofianos, Ioannis P.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of brachial plexus injuries is rapidly growing due to the increasing number of high-speed motor-vehicle accidents. These are devastating injuries leading to significant functional impairment of the patients. The purpose of this review paper is to present the available options for conservative and operative treatment and discuss the correct timing of intervention. Reported outcomes of current management and future prospects are also analysed. PMID:24967125

  2. Brachial blood flow under relative levels of blood flow restriction is decreased in a nonlinear fashion.

    PubMed

    Mouser, J Grant; Ade, Carl J; Black, Christopher D; Bemben, Debra A; Bemben, Michael G

    2017-04-12

    Blood flow restriction (BFR), the application of external pressure to occlude venous return and restrict arterial inflow, has been shown to increase muscular size and strength when combined with low-load resistance exercise. BFR in the research setting uses a wide range of pressures, applying a pressure based upon an individual's systolic pressure or a percentage of occlusion pressure; not a directly determined reduction in blood flow. The relationship between relative pressure and blood flow has not been established. To measure blood flow in the arm under relative levels of BFR. Forty-five people (18-40 years old) participated. Arterial occlusion pressure in the right arm was measured using a 5-cm pneumatic cuff. Blood flow in the brachial artery was measured at rest and at pressures between 10% and 90% of occlusion using ultrasound. Blood flow decreased in a nonlinear, stepped fashion. Blood flow decreased at 10% of occlusion and remained constant until decreasing again at 40%, where it remained until 90% of occlusion. The decrease in brachial blood flow is not proportional to the applied relative pressure. The prescription of blood flow restriction should take into account the stimulus provided at each relative level of blood flow. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Qualitative dermatoglyphic traits in brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Polovina, Svetislav; Milicić, Jasna; Cvjeticanin, Miljenko; Proloscić, Tajana Polovina

    2007-12-01

    It has been considered for many years that the cause of perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP) is excessive lateral traction applied to the fetal head at delivery, in association with anterior shoulder dystocia, but this do not explain all cases of brachial plexus palsy. The incidence found in several family members could be suggestive for inheritance with variable expression. The aim of this study was to prove early found confirmations of genetic predisposition for PBPP In the previous studies, the quantitative dermatoglyphic analysis showed some differences in digito-palmar dermatoglyphs between patients with PBPP and healthy controls. Now this qualitative analysis will try to determine hereditary of those diseases. We analyzed digito-palmar dermatoglyphics from 140 subjects (70 males and 70 females) diagnosed with PBPP and 400 phenotypically healthy adults (200 males and 200 females) from Zagreb area as control group. The results of Chi-square test showed statistically significant differences for frequencies of patterns on fingers in females between the groups observed. Statistically significant differences were found on palms in III and IV interdigital areas in both males and females and in thenar and I interdigital area only in females. As it was found in previous researches on quantitative dermatoglyphic traits, more differences are found between females with PBPP and control group, than between males. The fact, that the main presumed cause of PBPP is obstetrical trauma, it could be associated with congenital variability in formation of brachial plexus.

  4. Intrauterine shoulder weakness and obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Israel; Papazian, Oscar; Shuhaiber, Hans; Yaylali, Ilker; Grossman, John A I

    2004-09-01

    Obstetrical brachial plexus injury occurs when the forces preventing the stretch of the brachial plexus are overcome by the forces stretching it. This report describes an 8-day-old male delivered by uncomplicated cesarean section with right obstetrical brachial plexus palsy and congenital arm atrophy. The patient had a history of decreased right arm movement detected by fetal ultrasound at 18 to 20 weeks of gestation. The purpose of this article is to report that stretching of brachial plexus at birth sufficient to produce a plexus injury may occur in a patient with a vulnerable plexus even in the absence of traction during delivery.

  5. Double-blind controlled study of the efficacy and pharmacological properties of heparan sulfate in patients with occlusive arterial disease of the lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Strano, A; Pinto, A; Galati, D

    1990-01-01

    The effect of a 60 day administration of 200 mg heparan sulfate (Hemovasal 100 b.i.d.) or 100 mg mesoglycan (50 mg b.i.d.) was assessed under double blind design in forty patients (thirty-six males and four females) with peripheral occlusive arterial disease with respect to pain-free walking distance and various haemorheological and haemostasiological variables, platelet aggregation and blood chemistry. The pain-free walking distance significantly improved with heparan sulfate (up 67% from baseline 200.0 +/- 22.5 m and up 34%, with mesoglycan from baseline 207.7 +/- 23.4 m). Heparan sulfate significantly stimulated fibrinolysis and reduced platelet aggregability: these findings suggest an action of heparan sulfate on the endothelial cells, thus reducing their thrombogenicity. The results of the study thus confirm the activity of heparan sulfate in peripheral vascular disease, correcting the conditions which constitute the basis of increased thrombotic risk.

  6. Aortic Pulse Pressure Amplification Imputed From Simple Clinical Measures Adds to the Ability of Brachial Pressure to Predict Survival.

    PubMed

    Bursztyn, Michael; Norton, Gavin R; Ben-Dov, Iddo Z; Booysen, Hendrik L; Sibiya, Moekanyi J; Sareli, Pinhas; Woodiwiss, Angela J

    2016-06-01

    Although aortic-to-brachial pulse pressure amplification (PPamp) may offer prognostic information beyond brachial blood pressure (BP), this approach is limited in resource-limited settings. We aimed to derive an equation to impute central aortic PP (PPc) from simple clinical measures and assess whether imputed PPamp adds to the ability of brachial BP to predict mortality. An imputation equation for PPc, incorporating brachial PP, age, mean arterial pressure, and pulse rate, was identified from multivariate modeling of the factors associated with radial applanation tonometry-derived (measured) PPc in 1,179 community participants and validated in a clinical sample of 351 patients. We applied the equation to ambulatory awake BP and pulse rate values in a separate group of 4,796 patients referred for ambulatory monitoring and evaluated the impact on all-cause mortality. Imputed PPc values closely approximated measured PPc (r (2) = 0.96, mean difference ± (2 × SD) = 1.4±6.2mm Hg). In adjusted Cox proportional models including adjustments for awake brachial PP during 47,111 person-years of follow-up, where 648 patients died, hazards ratio for all-cause mortality per SD of awake PPamp was 0.79 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.68-0.93, P < 0.005). The hazards ratio for brachial PP with (1.49, CI = 1.36-1.64, P < 0.0001) or without (1.46, CI = 1.35-1.59, P < 0.0001) PPamp in the model was similar. Awake PPamp also predicted survival independent of awake brachial systolic BP (P < 0.0001). PPc imputed from simple clinical assessments closely approximates measured PPc. PPamp derived from imputed PPc adds to the ability of brachial BP to predict survival. In resource-limited settings, an imputation equation may be employed to approximate aortic BP and enhance risk prediction. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Accuracy of ankle-brachial index obtained by automated blood pressure measuring devices in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ena, Javier; Lozano, Teresa; Verdú, Gema; Argente, Carlos R; González, Victor L

    2011-06-01

    Upper arm automated blood pressure devices are widely available and could be used to estimate the ankle-brachial index. We conducted a trial to determine the equivalence of ankle-brachial index estimated by an upper arm blood pressure measuring device as index method compared to the handheld Doppler method as the reference standard. A total of 110 patients with diabetes mellitus were sequentially examined by two methods. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease was 32%. The index method obtained valid measurements in 104 (95%) patients. Ankle-brachial index was lower with the index method compared to the reference standard (mean difference: -0.05; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.50 to 0.39). This confidence interval was above the boundaries clinically established as equivalence margins in our study. The kappa agreement between two methods was 0.45. The performance of the index method was: sensitivity: 67%; specificity: 87%; positive likelihood ratio: 5.25; negative likelihood ratio: 0.18; positive predictive value: 71%; negative predictive value: 85%; and the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve: 0.87 (95% CI: 0.78-0.93). Upper arm automated blood pressure measuring devices cannot replace the handheld Doppler method to estimate the ankle-brachial index in patients with diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Arterial switch.

    PubMed

    Planche, C; Lacour-Gayet, F; Serraf, A

    1998-01-01

    A relatively large spectra of anatomic variations are found within the unifying features of discordant ventriculoarterial connections. Variants that lend themselves to anatomic repair by the arterial switch operation are discussed, these include transposition of the great arteries with intact ventricular septum (TGA IVS), TGA associated with a ventricular septal defect (TGA VSD), double-outlet right ventricle with subpulmonary VSD (DORV VSD), and TGA or DORV with VSD associated with coarctation. Double discordance with VSD, which is currently treated by double switch or Rastelli and atrial switch and which probably represents, in our department, the only remaining indication for atrial switch, is not discussed. Also, we exclude TGA associated with pulmonary stenosis, which is treated by Rastelli or REV operation.

  9. Arterial double-contrast dual-energy MDCT: in-vivo rabbit atherosclerosis with iodinated nanoparticles and gadolinium agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmi, Raz; Kafri, Galit; Altman, Ami; Goshen, Liran; Planer, David; Sosna, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    An in-vivo feasibility study of potentially improved atherosclerosis CT imaging is presented. By administration of two different contrast agents to rabbits with induced atherosclerotic plaques we aim at identifying both soft plaque and vessel lumen simultaneously. Initial injection of iodinated nanoparticle (INP) contrast agent (N1177 - Nanoscan Imaging), two to four hours before scan, leads to its later accumulation in macrophage-rich soft plaque, while a second gadolinium contrast agent (Magnevist) injected immediately prior to the scan blends with the aortic blood. The distinction between the two agents in a single scan is achieved with a double-layer dual-energy MDCT (Philips Healthcare) following material separation analysis using the reconstructed images of the different x-ray spectra. A single contrast agent injection scan, where only INP was injected two hours prior to the scan, was compared to a double-contrast scan taken four hours after INP injection and immediately after gadolinium injection. On the single contrast agent scan we observed along the aorta walls, localized iodine accumulation which can point on INP uptake by atherosclerotic plaque. In the double-contrast scan the gadolinium contributes a clearer depiction of the vessel lumen in addition to the lasting INP presence. The material separation shows a good correlation to the pathologies inferred from the conventional CT images of the two different scans while performing only a single scan prevents miss-registration problems and reduces radiation dose. These results suggest that a double-contrast dual-energy CT may be used for advanced clinical diagnostic applications.

  10. [Analysis of risk factors for perinatal brachial plexus palsy].

    PubMed

    Gosk, Jerzy; Rutowski, Roman

    2005-04-01

    Risk factors of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy include: (1) large birth weight, (2) shoulder dystocia and prolonged second stage of labour, (3) instrumental vaginal delivery (forceps delivery, vacuum extraction), (4) diabetes mellitus and mother's obesity, (5) breech presentation, (6) delivery and infant with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy in antecedent delivery. The purpose was analysis of the classical risk factors for brachial plexus palsy based on our own clinical material. Clinical material consists of 83 children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy treated at the Department of Trauma and Hand Surgery (surgically--54, conservatively--29). Control group consists of 56 healthy newborns. Data recorded included: birth weight, body length, head and chest circumference, Apgar test at 1 min., type of brachial palsy and side affected, type of birth, presentation, duration of delivery (II stage), age of mother, mother's diseases, parity. The infants treated surgically have had a significantly higher birth weight, body height, head and chest circumference, in compression with control group and group treated conservatively. The differences were statistically important. Shoulder dystocia occurred in 32.9% of all vaginal delivery. Instrumental vaginal delivery was observed in 11.3% and breech presentation in 4.9% cases. There were no incidences of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy recurrence. Diabetes mellitus and mother's obesity was found in 3 cases. (1) Fetal macrosomia is the important risk factor of the obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. (2) Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy may occur also in the absence of the classical risk factors.

  11. Ivabradine for patients with stable coronary artery disease and left-ventricular systolic dysfunction (BEAUTIFUL): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, P Gabriel; Tendera, Michal; Ferrari, Roberto

    2008-09-06

    Ivabradine specifically inhibits the I(f) current in the sinoatrial node to lower heart rate, without affecting other aspects of cardiac function. We aimed to test whether lowering the heart rate with ivabradine reduces cardiovascular death and morbidity in patients with coronary artery disease and left-ventricular systolic dysfunction. Between December, 2004, and December, 2006, we screened 12 473 patients at 781 centres in 33 countries. We enrolled 10 917 eligible patients who had coronary artery disease and a left-ventricular ejection fraction of less than 40% in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. 5479 patients received 5 mg ivabradine, with the intention of increasing to the target dose of 7.5 mg twice a day, and 5438 received matched placebo in addition to appropriate cardiovascular medication. The primary endpoint was a composite of cardiovascular death, admission to hospital for acute myocardial infarction, and admission to hospital for new onset or worsening heart failure. We analysed patients by intention to treat. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00143507. Mean heart rate at baseline was 71.6 (SD 9.9) beats per minute (bpm). Median follow-up was 19 months (IQR 16-24). Ivabradine reduced heart rate by 6 bpm (SE 0.2) at 12 months, corrected for placebo. Most (87%) patients were receiving beta blockers in addition to study drugs, and no safety concerns were identified. Ivabradine did not affect the primary composite endpoint (hazard ratio 1.00, 95% CI 0.91-1.1, p=0.94). 1233 (22.5%) patients in the ivabradine group had serious adverse events, compared with 1239 (22.8%) controls (p=0.70). In a prespecified subgroup of patients with heart rate of 70 bpm or greater, ivabradine treatment did not affect the primary composite outcome (hazard ratio 0.91, 95% CI 0.81-1.04, p=0.17), cardiovascular death, or admission to hospital for new-onset or worsening heart failure. However, it did reduce secondary

  12. Anatomical architecture of the brachial plexus in the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) with special reference to the derivation and course of its unique branches.

    PubMed

    Yoshitomi, S; Kawashima, T; Murakami, K; Takayanagi, M; Inoue, Y; Aoyagi, R; Sato, F

    2012-08-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus in the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), which has not been previously reported, was first examined bilaterally in a newborn hippopotamus. Our observations clarified the following: (1) the brachial plexus comprises the fifth cervical (C5) to first thoracic (T1) nerves. These formed two trunks, C5-C6 and C7-T1; in addition, the axillary artery passed in between C6 and C7, (2) unique branches to the brachialis muscle and those of the lateral cutaneous antebrachii nerves ramified from the median nerve, (3) nerve fibre analysis revealed that these unique nerve branches from the median nerve were closely related and structurally similar to the musculocutaneous (MC) nerve; however, they had changed course from the MC to the median nerve, and (4) this unique branching pattern is likely to be a common morphological feature of the brachial plexus in amphibians, reptiles and certain mammals. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. [Digital subtract arteriographic characteristics of carotid artery, vertebral artery, subclavian artery and renal artery in type 2 diabetic patients with lower extremities peripheral arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Chen, Da-Wei; Lu, Wu-Sheng; Wang, Chun; Jiao, He; Tian, Hao-Ming; Ran, Xing-Wu

    2012-09-01

    To investigate angiographical characteristics of carotid, vertebral, subclavian, and renal arteries in the type 2 diabetic patients with lower extremities peripheral arterial disease (LEPAD). There were 104 type 2 diabetic patients with LEPAD recruited in this study, who received digital subtract arteriography (DSA). Ankle-brachial index (ABI) assessment was also performed in 50 participants. Dependent upon the stenosis degree of vertebral artery, subclavian artery and renal artery measured by DSA, the patients were divided into normal group (stenosis < or = 50%) or pathological group(stenosis > 50% or blocked lesions). The angiographic features of carotid, vertebral, subclavian, and renal arteries were analyzed and the relationship between arterial stenosis and ABI was explored. DSA results of 104 patients showed that the most common lesion in the arteries was plaque. The stenosis degrees of 51%-74% and 75%-99% were most commonly observed in renal artery, with incidence of 22.1% and 5.8%, respectively. Arterial occlusion was most commonly observed in vertebral artery, with incidence of 27.9%. The patients with stenosis or occlusion of arteries had lower ABI (P = 0.000), and the patients with stenosis or occlusion of vertebral and renal arteries also had lower ABI (P = 0.003 and 0.02, respectively), compared with those without stenosis. ABI < 0.9 indicated higher risk of stenosis or occlusion of vertebral and renal arteries (P = 0.008 and 0.047 respectively). Between the patients with subclavian arterial stenosis and those without this artery stenosis, there was no statistical significant difference observed in ABI level. Type 2 diabetic patients with LEPAD can affect multiple arteries, showing plaque formation, multi-segmental stenosis and occlusion of arteries. The patients with ABI < 0.9 have higher risk of multiple arterial stenosis or occlusion lesions.

  14. RELATION OF BRACHIAL AND DIGITAL MEASURES OF VASCULAR FUNCTION IN THE COMMUNITY: THE FRAMINGHAM HEART STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Hamburg, Naomi M.; Palmisano, Joseph; Larson, Martin G.; Sullivan, Lisa M.; Lehman, Birgitta T.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Levy, Daniel; Mitchell, Gary F.; Vita, Joseph A.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2011-01-01

    Impaired vascular function contributes to the development of clinical cardiovascular disease. The relation between vasodilator function assessed non-invasively in the brachial and digital arteries remains incompletely defined. In the Framingham Offspring, Third Generation and Omni cohorts, we measured flow-mediated dilation (FMD) (n=7031, age 48±13 years, 19-88 years, 54% women) and peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT) ratio (n=4352, 55±16 years, 19-90 years, 51% women). Abnormal vascular function for each measure was defined by the sex-specific 5th percentile in a reference group free of conventional cardiovascular risk factors. The prevalence of abnormal FMD but not abnormal PAT ratio was higher with advancing age. In multivariable models, higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with a higher prevalence of both abnormal FMD and PAT ratio. Additional correlates of abnormal FMD included increasing age and higher systolic blood pressure. In contrast, correlates of abnormal PAT ratio included lower systolic blood pressure, increasing total/HDL cholesterol ratio, diabetes, smoking, and lipid-lowering medication. Whereas women had higher FMD and PAT ratio compared with men, using sex-specific reference values women had a higher prevalence of abnormal brachial and digital vascular function. In participants who had concurrent testing (n=1843), PAT ratio was not significantly associated with FMD in multivariable models. In this large, community-based cohort, brachial and digital measures of vascular function had differing relations with cardiovascular risk factors and were nearly uncorrelated with each other. These results suggest that FMD and PAT provide distinct information regarding vascular function in conduit versus smaller digital vessels. PMID:21263120

  15. Alternative ankle-brachial index method identifies additional at-risk individuals

    PubMed Central

    Nead, Kevin T.; Cooke, John P.; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Leeper, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether utilization of an alternative ankle-brachial index (ABI) calculation method improves mortality risk prediction compared to traditional methods. Background The ABI is used to diagnose peripheral arterial disease (PAD), and to identify those at risk for cardiovascular events. Traditionally, the ABI is calculated using the higher of the dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial ankle arteries. Studies directly comparing calculation methods are limited. Methods The ABI was calculated at baseline in 1,413 study participants undergoing non-emergent coronary angiography subsequently followed for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. There were 224 individuals assigned to the traditional-PAD group (ABI < 0.90) using the traditional ABI method. Of those remaining, an alternative ABI method utilizing the lower of the two ankle pressures assigned 282 patients to the alternative-PAD group. The 862 individuals not assigned to PAD by either method were the no-PAD group. Results There were 163 mortalities during a median follow-up of 5.0 years. Adjusted Cox regression models showed that the alternative-PAD group had an increased risk for all-cause (HR=1.49; 95% CI, 1.01-2.19) and cardiovascular mortality (HR=3.21; 95% CI, 1.53-6.37) versus the no-PAD group. Additionally, in the no-PAD group, there was an 11% (HR=1.11; 95% CI, 1.05-1.17) increased risk of all-cause mortality per 1mm Hg increased difference between the left and right brachial systolic pressures. Conclusion The implementation of an alternative ABI method and use of the brachial difference identifies individuals at an increased risk for mortality who are currently missed using traditional ABI methods. Current ABI protocols may need to be evaluated. PMID:23707317

  16. Arachnoid cyst masquerading as obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, Natarajan; Santhanakrishnan, Alwar Govindan; Sivakumar, Krishnaswamy

    2012-07-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy is not uncommon. However, lesions masquerading as obstetric brachial plexus palsy are rare. A child with a cervicothoracic arachnoid cyst masquerading as obstetric brachial plexus palsy is presented, and the relevant literature is reviewed. A girl born by vaginal delivery at full term without any antecedent risk factors for obstetric brachial plexus palsy was noted to have decreased movements of the right upper extremity. After 7 months, there was no improvement. An MRI scan was obtained, which revealed a cervicothoracic spinal extradural arachnoid cyst. During surgery, the cyst was found to communicate with the dura at the axilla of the C-7 nerve root. The cyst was excised in toto. Six months later, there was improvement in the infant's neurological status. This case illustrates that spinal arachnoid cysts should be entertained in the differential diagnosis when a child presents with obstetric brachial plexus palsy without known antecedent risk factors for obstetric palsy.

  17. Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Amita N.; Kasundra, Gaurav M.; Khichar, Subhakaran; Bhushan, Bharat S. K.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered. PMID:25288846

  18. Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Amita N; Kasundra, Gaurav M; Khichar, Subhakaran; Bhushan, Bharat S K

    2014-10-01

    We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered.

  19. Brachial plexopathy: recurrent cancer or radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lederman, R.J.; Wilbourn, A.J.

    1984-10-01

    We reviewed clinical and electrodiagnostic features of 16 patients with neoplastic brachial plexopathy (NBP) and 17 patients with radiation-induced plexopathy (RBP). The groups were similar in symptom-free interval after cancer diagnosis and location of the plexus lesions. NBP patients had pain and Horner's syndrome; RBP patients had paresthesias, but rarely Horner's. NBP patients presented earlier after symptom onset and had a shorter course. RBP patients more frequently had abnormal sensory and normal motor nerve conduction studies and characteristically had fasciculations or myokymia on EMG.

  20. Case report. Bee sting brachial block.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, S M; Hay, F A; Austwick, D H

    1992-01-01

    A case of brachial plexus block is presented, following a bee sting in the posterior triangle of the neck. The onset of neurological symptoms was rapid as was their subsequent resolution. Delayed peripheral neurological symptoms believed to have an immunological basis have been reported in response to stings from bees and other Hymenoptera both in the central and peripheral nervous systems (Goldstein et al., 1960; Means et al., 1973; Bachman et al., 1982; Weatherall et al., 1987; Van Antwerpen et al., 1988), but to the authors' knowledge no similar case of immediate peripheral block has been reported. PMID:1492899

  1. Impact of weight loss on ankle-brachial index and interartery blood pressures.

    PubMed

    Espeland, Mark A; Lewis, Cora E; Bahnson, Judy; Knowler, William C; Regensteiner, Judith G; Gaussoin, Sarah A; Beavers, Daniel; Johnson, Karen C

    2014-04-01

    To assess whether weight loss improves markers of peripheral artery disease and vascular stenosis. The Action for Health in Diabetes randomized clinical trial compared intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss to a control condition of diabetes support and education (DSE) in overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Annual ankle and brachial blood pressures over four years were used to compute ankle-brachial indices (ABIs) and to assess interartery blood pressure differences in 5018 participants. ILI, compared to DSE, produced 7.8% (Year 1) to 3.6% (Year 4) greater weight losses. These did not affect prevalence of low (<0.90) ABI (3.60% in DSE versus 3.14% in ILI; P = 0.20) or elevated (>1.40) ABI (7.52% in DSE versus 7.59% in ILI: P = 0.90), but produced smaller mean (SE) maximum interartery systolic blood pressure differences among ankle sites [19.7 (0.2) mmHg for ILI versus 20.6 (0.2) mmHg for DSE (P < 0.001)] and between arms [5.8 (0.1) mmHg for ILI versus 6.1 (0.1) mmHg for DSE (P = 0.01)]. Four years of intensive behavioral weight loss intervention did not significantly alter prevalence of abnormal ABI, however, it did reduce differences in systolic blood pressures among arterial sites. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  2. Assessment of distributed arterial network models.

    PubMed

    Segers, P; Stergiopulos, N; Verdonck, P; Verhoeven, R

    1997-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the relative importance of elastic non-linearities, viscoelasticity and resistance vessel modelling on arterial pressure and flow wave contours computed with distributed arterial network models. The computational results of a non-linear (time-domain) and a linear (frequency-domain) mode were compared using the same geometrical configuration and identical upstream and downstream boundary conditions and mechanical properties. pressures were computed at the ascending aorta, brachial and femoral artery. In spite of the identical problem definition, computational differences were found in input impedance modulus (max. 15-20%), systolic pressure (max. 5%) and pulse pressure (max. 10%). For the brachial artery, the ratio of pulse pressure to aortic pulse pressure was practically identical for both models (3%), whereas for the femoral artery higher values are found for the linear model (+10%). The aortic/brachial pressure transfer function indicates that pressure harmonic amplification is somewhat higher in the linear model for frequencies lower than 6 Hz while the opposite is true for higher frequencies. These computational disparities were attributed to conceptual model differences, such as the treatment of geometric tapering, rather than to elastic or convective non-linearities. Compared to the effect of viscoelasticity, the discrepancy between the linear and non-linear model is of the same importance. At peripheral locations, the correct representation of terminal impedance outweight the computational differences between the linear and non-linear models.

  3. Reduced artery diameters in Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Foresta, C; Caretta, N; Palego, P; Ferlin, A; Zuccarello, D; Lenzi, A; Selice, R

    2012-10-01

    Various epidemiological studies in relatively large cohorts of patients with Klinefelter syndrome (KS) described the increased morbidity and mortality in these subjects. Our aim was to study the structure and function of arteries in different districts to investigate in these subjects possible alterations. A total of 92 patients having non-mosaic KS, diagnosed in Centre for Human Reproduction Pathology at the University of Padova, and 50 age-matched healthy male controls were studied. Klinefelter syndrome subjects and controls evaluation included complete medical history, physical examination, measurement of concentrations of the reproductive hormones, lipidic and glycidic metabolism, AR function and sensitivity, ultrasound examinations (diameters, carotid intima-media thickness and brachial flow-mediated dilation) of brachial, common carotid and common femoral artery and abdominal aorta. Klinefelter syndrome patients showed significantly reduced artery diameters in all districts evaluated. On the contrary no statistically significant difference was found in cIMT and brachial FMD values between KS patients and controls. Furthermore, we found no statistically significant correlation of artery diameters with reproductive hormones, metabolic parameters, anthropometric measures and weighted CAG repeats. To our knowledge, this is the first study finding a reduced artery diameter in several districts in KS patients compared with that of normal male subjects and overlapping to that of female subjects. We have not an explanation for this phenomenon, even if a possible involvement of genes controlling the development of vascular system might be hypothesized, and further research is required to verify this hypothesis.

  4. Reproducibility and reliability of the ankle-brachial index as assessed by vascular experts, family physicians and nurses.

    PubMed

    Holland-Letz, Tim; Endres, Heinz G; Biedermann, Stefanie; Mahn, Matthias; Kunert, Joachim; Groh, Sabine; Pittrow, David; von Bilderling, Peter; Sternitzky, Reinhardt; Diehm, Curt

    2007-05-01

    The reliability of ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurements performed by different observer groups in primary care has not yet been determined. The aims of the study were to provide precise estimates for all effects influencing the variability of the ABI (patients' individual variability, intra- and inter-observer variability), with particular focus on the performance of different observer groups. Using a partially balanced incomplete block design, 144 unselected individuals aged > or = 65 years underwent double ABI measurements by one vascular surgeon or vascular physician, one family physician and one nurse with training in Doppler sonography. Three groups comprising a total of 108 individuals were analyzed (only two with ABI < 0.90). Errors for two repeated measurements for all three observer groups did not differ (experts 8.5%, family physicians 7.7%, and nurses 7.5%, p = 0.39). There was no relevant bias among observer groups. Intra-observer variability expressed as standard deviation divided by the mean was 8%, and inter-observer variability was 9%. In conclusion, reproducibility of the ABI measurement was good in this cohort of elderly patients who almost all had values in the normal range. The mean error of 8-9% within or between observers is smaller than with established screening measures. Since there were no differences among observers with different training backgrounds, our study confirms the appropriateness of ABI assessment for screening peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and generalized atherosclerosis in the primary case setting. Given the importance of the early detection and management of PAD, this diagnostic tool should be used routinely as a standard for PAD screening. Additional studies will be required to confirm our observations in patients with PAD of various severities.

  5. Lateral approach for supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, DK; Sahu, Anjana

    2010-01-01

    A lateral approach described by Volker Hempel and Dr. Dilip Kotharihas been further studied, evaluated and described in detail in the present study. The aim of this study was to evaluate lateral approach of supraclavicular brachial plexus block, mainly in terms of successes rate and complication rate. The study was conducted in secondary level hospital and tertiary level hospital from 2004 to 2008. It was a prospective nonrandomized open-level study. Eighty-two patients of both sexes, aged between 18 and 65 years with ASA Grade I and II scheduled to undergo elective major surgery of the upper limb below the midarm, were selected for this new lateral approach of brachial plexus block. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block, any complications and need for supplement anaesthesia were observed. Success and complication rate were calculated in percentage. Average onset and duration of sensory and motor block was calculated as mean ± SD and percentage. Out of 82 patients, 75 (92%) have got successful block with no significant complication in any case. PMID:20885867

  6. Shoulder pain and isolated brachial plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kishan, Amar U; Syed, Sana; Fiorito-Torres, Franchesca; Thakore-James, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    Pancoast syndrome, classically considered as a constellation of (1) pain along the C8–T2 dermatomes, (2) weakness and atrophy of the hand and (3) Horner's syndrome, often presents a diagnostic challenge. In fact, it may manifest as a singular orthopaedic complaint, prompting a futile barrage of tests and referrals. The authors present the case of an elderly man who initially presented with severe shoulder pain. Due to progressive pain and weakness, he was referred to rheumatology and was treated with corticosteroid injections for a presumed musculoskeletal lesion. Ultimately, he manifested gross muscular atrophy and worsening pain, prompting a referral to neurology. An electromyogram (EMG) suggested a lower brachial plexopathy, and a follow-up brachial plexus MRI identified a large Pancoast tumour. Unfortunately, his disease was rapidly progressive, and he passed away within 2 months. While the MRI remains the gold standard for diagnosing Pancoast syndrome, an EMG can facilitate diagnosis in difficult cases such as this one. PMID:22744250

  7. Motor Cortex Neuroplasticity Following Brachial Plexus Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dimou, Stefan; Biggs, Michael; Tonkin, Michael; Hickie, Ian B.; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity, once thought only to exist in the early stages of life, does indeed continue on into adulthood. Brain plasticity is now acknowledged as a core principle of brain function and describes the ability of the central nervous system to adapt and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response to functional demand. In this clinical case study we describe how we used neuroimaging techniques to observe the functional topographical expansion of a patch of cortex along the sensorimotor cortex of a 27-year-old woman following brachial plexus transfer surgery to re-innervate her left arm. We found bilateral activations present in the thalamus, caudate, insula as well as across the sensorimotor cortex during an elbow flex motor task. In contrast we found less activity in the sensorimotor cortex for a finger tap motor task in addition to activations lateralized to the left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus and bilaterally for the insula. From a pain perspective the patient who had experienced extensive phantom limb pain (PLP) before surgery found these sensations were markedly reduced following transfer of the right brachial plexus to the intact left arm. Within the context of this clinical case the results suggest that functional improvements in limb mobility are associated with increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex as well as reduced PLP. PMID:23966938

  8. The Senning procedure as part of the double-switch operations for congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries.

    PubMed

    Barron, David J; Jones, Timothy J; Brawn, William J

    2011-01-01

    Anatomic correction of congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (ccTGA) has brought about the renaissance of the atrial switch. The Senning procedure has become the most widely used variant because of the lower incidence of pathway obstruction, baffle leak, and significant late arrhythmias. It is for this reason the Senning is discussed in detail here. The technical steps of the Senning are both ingenious and unique amongst cardiac surgical procedures. They must be made as safe and reproducible as possible because the procedure is no longer commonly performed and trainee surgeons may have only very limited exposure to these types of operation. In addition to its infrequency, there are additional technical issues regarding the atrial switch in the setting of ccTGA, particularly in relation to associated malposition of the heart and the conduction system. Outcomes for the Senning procedure in ccTGA have been very good, with early complications being extremely rare. Obstruction to the superior vena cava pathway has been recorded in less than 3% of cases and can usually be managed by interventional catheterization. Late problems with atrial arrhythmias have not been widely reported, but this may reflect the relatively short follow-up for these patient cohorts compared with older series in d-TGA.

  9. Single vs double antiplatelet therapy in acute coronary syndrome: Predictors of bleeding after coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Tarzia, Vincenzo; Bortolussi, Giacomo; Buratto, Edward; Paolini, Carla; Dal Lin, Carlo; Rizzoli, Giulio; Bottio, Tomaso; Gerosa, Gino

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the contribution of anti-platelet therapy and derangements of pre-operative classical coagulation and thromboelastometry parameters to major bleeding post-coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). METHODS: Two groups of CABG patients were studied: Group A, treated with aspirin alone (n = 50), and Group B treated with aspirin and clopidogrel (n = 50). Both had similar preoperative, clinical, biologic characteristics and operative management. Classic coagulation parameters and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) profiles were determined preoperatively for both groups and the same heparin treatment was administered. ROTEM profiles (INTEM and EXTEM assays) were analyzed, both for traditional parameters, and thrombin generation potential, expressed by area-under-curve (AUC). RESULTS: There was no significant difference between rates of major bleeding between patients treated with aspirin alone, compared with those treated with aspirin and clopidogrel (12% vs 16%, P = 0.77). In the 14 cases of major bleeding, pre-operative classic coagulation and traditional ROTEM parameters were comparable. Conversely we observed that the AUC in the EXTEM test was significantly lower in bleeders (5030 ± 1115 Ohm*min) than non-bleeders (6568 ± 548 Ohm*min) (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: We observed that patients with a low AUC value were at a significantly higher risk of bleeding compared to patients with higher AUC, regardless of antiplatelet treatment. This suggests that thrombin generation potential, irrespective of the degree of platelet inhibition, correlates with surgical bleeding. PMID:26413234

  10. Two-stage brachial-basilic transposition fistula provides superior patency rates for dialysis access in a safety-net population

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Eduardo; Kashuk, Jeffry L.; Moore, Ernest E.; Linas, Stuart; Sauaia, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Background Guidelines of the National Kidney Foundation recommending aggressive pursuit of autogenous fistulae for dialysis access in lieu of prosthetic arteriovenous grafts have stimulated a renewed interest in transposed brachial-basilic fistulae as an alternative technique for upper arm access in patients who may not be candidates for a lower arm radial-cephalic or forearm brachial-cephalic fistula. We hypothesized that in our safety-net population, where radial-cephalic and brachial-cephalic often are not possible, brachial-basilic would provide patency rates superior to arteriovenous grafts and equivalent to radial-cephalic and brachial-cephalic fistulae. Methods We analyzed retrospectively our most recent 2.5-year experience with dialysis access procedures at our metropolitan safety-net hospital. Procedures were grouped as follows: radial-cephalic, brachial-cephalic, brachial-basilic, and arteriovenous grafts. The access outcomes measured were primary failure, time to use, need for intervention, and primary as well as secondary patency. Differences in age, sex, race, renal function (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease), baseline diagnoses (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, coronary artery disease, and peripheral vascular disease), as well as the number of previous accesses, were adjusted in the analysis. Logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of primary failure, and Kaplan-Meier plots assessed differences in primary patency rates. A log of the time variables was used to approximate normal distribution. Results In all, 193 patients were included in this study as follows: radial-cephalic, 75 (39%) patients; brachial-cephalic, 35 (18%) patients; brachial-basilic, 33 (17%) patients; and arteriovenous grafts, 50 (26%) patients. Primary patency means differed marginally between groups (P = .08), and when grafts were excluded from the analysis, no difference was found between primary patency in all autogenous fistula techniques (P = .88

  11. Arterial endothelial function measurement method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F

    2014-03-04

    A "relaxoscope" (100) detects the degree of arterial endothelial function. Impairment of arterial endothelial function is an early event in atherosclerosis and correlates with the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. An artery (115), such as the brachial artery (BA) is measured for diameter before and after several minutes of either vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. The change in arterial diameter is a measure of flow-mediated vasomodification (FMVM). The relaxoscope induces an artificial pulse (128) at a superficial radial artery (115) via a linear actuator (120). An ultrasonic Doppler stethoscope (130) detects this pulse 10-20 cm proximal to the point of pulse induction (125). The delay between pulse application and detection provides the pulse transit time (PTT). By measuring PTT before (160) and after arterial diameter change (170), FMVM may be measured based on the changes in PTT caused by changes in vessel caliber, smooth muscle tone and wall thickness.

  12. Acute EGCG Supplementation Reverses Endothelial Dysfunction in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Widlansky, Michael E.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Anter, Elad; Holbrook, Monika; Kahn, David F.; Elliott, James G.; Keaney, John F.; Vita, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies demonstrate an inverse relation between dietary flavonoid intake and cardiovascular risk. Recent studies with flavonoid-containing beverages suggest that the benefits of these nutrients may relate, in part, to improved endothelial function. Objective We hypothesized that dietary supplementation with epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major catechin in tea, would improve endothelial function in humans. Design We examined the effects of EGCG on endothelial function in a double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design study. We measured brachial artery flow-mediated dilation by vascular ultrasound at six time points: prior to treatment with EGCG or placebo, two hours after an initial dose of EGCG (300 mg) or placebo, and after two weeks of treatment with EGCG (150 mg twice daily) or placebo. The order of treatments (EGCG or placebo) was randomized and there was a one-week washout period between treatments. Results A total of 42 subjects were enrolled, and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation improved from 7.1±4.1 to 8.6±4.7% two hours after the first dose of 300mg of EGCG (P=0.01), but was similar to baseline (7.8±4.2%, P=0.12) after two weeks of treatment with the final measurements made approximately 14 hours after the last dose. Placebo treatment had no significant effect, and there were no changes in reactive hyperemia or the response to sublingual nitroglycerin. The changes in vascular function paralleled plasma EGCG concentrations, which increased from 2.6±10.9 to 92.8±78.7 ng/ml after acute EGCG (P<0.001), but were unchanged from baseline after two weeks of treatment (3.4±13.1 ng/ml). Conclusion EGCG acutely improves endothelial function in humans with coronary artery disease, and may account for a portion of the beneficial effects of flavonoid-rich food on endothelial function. PMID:17536120

  13. Acute EGCG supplementation reverses endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Widlansky, Michael E; Hamburg, Naomi M; Anter, Elad; Holbrook, Monika; Kahn, David F; Elliott, James G; Keaney, John F; Vita, Joseph A

    2007-04-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate an inverse relation between dietary flavonoid intake and cardiovascular risk. Recent studies with flavonoid-containing beverages suggest that the benefits of these nutrients may relate, in part, to improved endothelial function. We hypothesized that dietary supplementation with epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major catechin in tea, would improve endothelial function in humans. We examined the effects of EGCG on endothelial function in a double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design study. We measured brachial artery flow-mediated dilation by vascular ultrasound at six time points: prior to treatment with EGCG or placebo, two hours after an initial dose of EGCG (300 mg) or placebo, and after two weeks of treatment with EGCG (150 mg twice daily) or placebo. The order of treatments (EGCG or placebo) was randomized and there was a one-week washout period between treatments. A total of 42 subjects completed the study, and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation improved from 7.1 +/- 4.1 to 8.6 +/- 4.7% two hours after the first dose of 300 mg of EGCG (P = 0.01), but was similar to baseline (7.8 +/- 4.2%, P = 0.12) after two weeks of treatment with the final measurements made approximately 14 hours after the last dose. Placebo treatment had no significant effect, and there were no changes in reactive hyperemia or the response to sublingual nitroglycerin. The changes in vascular function paralleled plasma EGCG concentrations, which increased from 2.6 +/- 10.9 to 92.8 +/- 78.7 ng/ml after acute EGCG (P < 0.001), but were unchanged from baseline after two weeks of treatment (3.4 +/- 13.1 ng/ml). EGCG acutely improves endothelial function in humans with coronary artery disease, and may account for a portion of the beneficial effects of flavonoid-rich food on endothelial function.

  14. Exercise-mediated changes in conduit artery wall thickness in humans: role of shear stress.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Dawson, Ellen A; van den Munckhof, Inge C L; Tinken, Toni M; den Drijver, Evert; Hopkins, Nicola; Cable, N Timothy; Green, Daniel J

    2011-07-01

    Episodic increases in shear stress have been proposed as a mechanism that induces training-induced adaptation in arterial wall remodeling in humans. To address this hypothesis in humans, we examined bilateral brachial artery wall thickness using high-resolution ultrasound in healthy men across an 8-wk period of bilateral handgrip training. Unilaterally, shear rate was attenuated by cuff inflation around the forearm to 60 mmHg. Grip strength, forearm volume, and girth improved similarly between the limbs. Acute bouts of handgrip exercise increased shear rate (P < 0.005) in the noncuffed limb, whereas cuff inflation successfully decreased exercise-induced increases in shear. Brachial blood pressure responses similarly increased during exercise in both the cuffed and noncuffed limbs. Handgrip training had no effect on baseline brachial artery diameter, blood flow, or shear rate but significantly decreased brachial artery wall thickness after 6 and 8 wk (ANOVA, P < 0.001) and wall-to-lumen ratio after week 8 (ANOVA, P = 0.005). The magnitude of decrease in brachial artery wall thickness and wall-to-lumen ratio after exercise training was similar in the noncuffed and cuffed arms. These results suggest that exercise-induced changes in shear rate are not obligatory for arterial wall remodeling during a period of 8 wk of exercise training in healthy humans.

  15. Report of an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations in a cadaveric upper limb

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations discovered during dissection of cervical, axillary and brachial area of a cadaver is described. Variations are thoroughly described and literature is briefly reviewed. Lateral cord of brachial plexus was not formed; Eight Cervical root divided into anterior and posterior division before uniting with First Thoracic root and Upper Trunk was unusually short. Axillary artery gave origin to a superficial brachial artery and then continued as deep brachial artery. Multiple variations in typical axillary artery branches were present including existence of inferior pectoral artery. Cephalic vein was absent. A variety of interventions, from relative simple as central venous catheter placement to most complicated as brachial plexus injury repair demand thorough knowledge of area’s regional anatomy. Familiarity with anatomic variations allows more precise and careful interventions. Research on these variations is valuable for anatomists and embryologists but also for clinicians because it may provide useful information for non - typical cases but also helps in raising a high level of suspicion. PMID:24495850

  16. The effect of lavender essential oil on anxiety level in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery: A double-blinded randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Seifi, Zahra; Beikmoradi, Ali; Oshvandi, Khodayar; Poorolajal, Jalal; Araghchian, Malihe; Safiaryan, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Open heart surgery can cause high levels of anxiety in patients. Nowadays, lavender essential oil is widely used in medical research. This study was conducted with an aim to investigate the effects of lavender essential oil to reduce the anxiety of patients after coronary artery bypass surgery. Materials and Methods: This research is double-blinded randomized controlled trial on 60 patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery in a 2-day intervention targeting reduction of anxiety. This study was conducted in Ekbatan Therapeutic and Educational Center, Hamadan city, Iran, in 2013. The patients in the inhalation aromatherapy group inhaled two drops of 2% lavender essential oil and those in the control group inhaled two drops of distilled water as placebo for 20 min on the 2nd and 3rd days after surgery. The level of anxiety was evaluated by Spielberger's State Anxiety questionnaire before and after intervention and the vital signs were documented as well. Data were analyzed using Stata 11 (Stata Corp., College Station, TX, USA) by independent t-test for continuous variables and Chi-square test for categorical variables. Results: The mean score of anxiety in the aromatherapy group was 48.73 ± 5.08 and in the control group was 48 ± 6.98 before the intervention (P = 0.64), which reduced after the intervention to 42.6 ± 5.44 and 42.73 ± 7.30, respectively. On the 3rd day after surgery, the mean score of anxiety in the aromatherapy group was 46.76 ± 4.07 and in the control group was 46.53 ± 7.05 before the intervention, which reduced to 41.33 ± 3.65 and 41.56 ± 6.18, respectively, after the intervention. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the mean scores of anxiety between the aromatherapy and control groups. Conclusions: Lavender essential oil has no significant effect on anxiety in patients after coronary artery bypass surgery, although it decreased the level of anxiety in the patients. PMID:25558253

  17. Effect of upper body aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness in older adults.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Kunihiko; Mendelsohn, Marissa E; Overend, Tom J; Petrella, Robert J

    2009-10-01

    The authors evaluated the effects of acute arm-cycling exercise on arterial stiffness of the brachial artery (BA: working limb) and posterior tibial artery (PTA: nonworking limb) in healthy older participants. Eleven participants were tested to evaluate BA and PTA stiffness. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and arterial stiffness indices of the BA and PTA measured by Doppler ultrasound were determined before and 10 min after graded arm-cycling exercise to volitional fatigue on 2 separate days. After the exercise, although BA diameter, brachial systolic BP, pulse pressure, and HR increased significantly (all p < .05), arterial stiffness indices of the BA remained unchanged. Similarly, arterial stiffness indices of the PTA remained unchanged after the exercise, whereas HR increased significantly (p < .05). These results show that acute arm-cycling exercise failed to modify arterial stiffness of the BA and PTA, suggesting that it has no systemic effect on arterial stiffness in healthy older adults.

  18. An anatomical study and ontogenetic explanation of 23 cases with variations in the main pattern of the human brachio-antebrachial arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Baeza, A; Nebot, J; Ferreira, B; Reina, F; Pérez, J; Sañudo, J R; Roig, M

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-three cases with variations in the brachio-antebrachial arterial pattern of the human upper limb are reported. According to the artery which showed a variation, 4 groups were recognised: (1) isolated persistence of the median artery; (2) high origin of the ulnar artery; (3) high origin of the radial artery; and (4) duplication of the brachial artery, either with or without anastomosis at the cubital fossa. In addition, in groups 2, 3 and 4 the median artery may have persisted. Based on these arterial variations an anatomical and embryological correlation was established from a morphogenetic pattern which is proposed as being normal. Thus the terminal branches of the superficial brachial artery take part in the development of the radial, ulnar and median arteries, joining with the trunks of deep origin of these arteries in the primitive axial artery. Regression of the superficial arterial segments located proximal to this anastomosis gives rise to the definitive arterial pattern. Either the total or partial persistence of the superficial arterial segments explains those cases of high origin of either the radial or ulnar arteries as well as the duplications of the brachial artery. We postulate that the persistence of the median artery is independent of the presence or absence of any other variation in the arterial pattern. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7592009

  19. Noninvasive assessment of arterial compliance of human cerebral arteries with short inversion time arterial spin labeling

    PubMed Central

    Warnert, Esther AH; Murphy, Kevin; Hall, Judith E; Wise, Richard G

    2015-01-01

    A noninvasive method of assessing cerebral arterial compliance (AC) is introduced in which arterial spin labeling (ASL) is used to measure changes in arterial blood volume (aBV) occurring within the cardiac cycle. Short inversion time pulsed ASL (PASL) was performed in healthy volunteers with inversion times ranging from 250 to 850 ms. A model of the arterial input function was used to obtain the cerebral aBV. Results indicate that aBV depends on the cardiac phase of the arteries in the imaging volume. Cerebral AC, estimated from aBV and brachial blood pressure measured noninvasively in systole and diastole, was assessed in the flow territories of the basal cerebral arteries originating from the circle of Willis: right and left middle cerebral arteries (RMCA and LMCA), right and left posterior cerebral arteries (RPCA and LPCA), and the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). Group average AC values calculated for the RMCA, LMCA, ACA, RPCA, and LPCA were 0.56%±0.2%, 0.50%±0.3%, 0.4%±0.2%, 1.1%±0.5%, and 1.1%±0.3% per mm Hg, respectively. The current experiment has shown the feasibility of measuring AC of cerebral arteries with short inversion time PASL. PMID:25515216

  20. Localization of the brachial plexus: Sonography versus anatomic landmarks.

    PubMed

    Falyar, Christian R; Shaffer, Katherine M; Perera, Robert A

    2016-09-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus blocks are performed for perioperative management of surgeries involving the shoulder. Historically, these procedures employed anatomic landmarks (AL) to determine the location of the brachial plexus as it passes between the anterior and middle scalene muscles in the neck. In this study, we compared the actual location of the brachial plexus as found with sonography (US) to the anticipated location using AL. The location of the brachial plexus was evaluated using US and AL in 96 subjects. The distance between the two locations was measured. A multivariate analysis of variance was used to determine the significance of the difference and a 2 × 2 analysis of variance was used to compare differences in gender, height, and body mass index. The brachial plexus was located on average 1.8 cm inferior (p = 0.0001) and 0.2 cm lateral (p = 0.09) to the location determined with AL. A significant difference was also associated with gender (p = 0.03), but not with height or body mass index. US is a reliable method that accurately pinpoints the roots of the brachial plexus. The brachial plexus is often located inferior to the location anticipated using AL. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:411-415, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Brachiomedian artery (arteria brachiomediana) revisited: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Kachlik, David; Konarik, Marek; Riedlova, Jitka; Baca, Vaclav

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews in detail the superficial brachiomedian artery (arteria brachiomediana superficialis), a very rare variant of the main arterial trunks of the upper limb. It branches either from the axillary artery or the brachial artery, descends superficially in the arm (similar to the course of the superficial brachial artery) and continues across the cubital fossa, runs superficially in the forearm, approaches the median nerve and enters the carpal canal to reach the hand. It usually terminates in the superficial palmar arch. The first drawing was published, in 1830, and the first description was published, in 1844. Altogether, to our knowledge, only 31 cases of a true, superficial brachiomedian artery have been reported (Some cases are incorrectly reported as superficial brachioradiomedian artery or superficial brachioulnomedian artery). Based on a meta-analysis of known, available studies, the incidence is 0.23% in Caucasians and 1.48% in Mongolians. Knowing whether or not this arterial variant is present is important in clinical medicine and relevant for: The catheterization via the radial or ulnar artery; harvesting the vascular pedicle for a forearm flap based on the radial, ulnar or superficial brachiomedian arteries; the possible collateral circulation in cases of the arterial closure; and the surgical management of carpal tunnel syndrome. Its presence can elevate the danger of an injury to the superficially located variant artery or of an accidental injection. PMID:27131025

  2. [Essential arterial hypertension and quality of life. Comparative crossed double-blind study of labetalol and captopril].

    PubMed

    Carre, A; Petetin, N; Jouvent, R; Baruch, P; d'Allens, H; Pappo, M

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this multicenter randomised, double-blind and cross-over study was to compare the antihypertensive effects of labetalol (L) and captopril (C) in 42 moderate hypertensive patients (mean age: 52 years). The drugs were given during two 4-weeks periods at the end of which the systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP) were measured at rest in supine and standing positions. The assessment of the quality of life was realized with 4 scales completed by the practitioner [anxiety, depression, well-being, visual analog scale (VAS)] and 4 scales of auto-assessment completed by the patient [2 VAS, well-being, sub-scale of pleasure]. At the end of the first treatment's period (D28), both drugs had decreased significantly supine SBP and DBP (p less than 0.001), standing DBP (L = p less than 0.01; C = p less than 0.05), while only L lowered supine SBP (p less than 0.01). The cross-over analysis was unable to conclude, due to the number of patients and a significant interaction which reduced its power. Thus the effect of the first treatment's period seemed to influence the efficacy of the second one. The percentages of patients with a controlled BP were respectively: after 4 weeks of treatment, L = 61 p. 100 vs C = 42 p. 100 and at the end of study (D56), L = 67 p. 100 vs C = 64 p. 100.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Folate supplementation fails to affect vascular function and carotid artery intima media thickness in cyclosporin A-treated renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Austen, S K; Fassett, R G; Geraghty, D P; Coombes, J S

    2006-11-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA)-treated renal transplant recipients (RTR) exhibit relative hyperhomocystinemia and vascular dysfunction. Folate supplementation lowers homocysteine and has been shown to improve vascular function in healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of 3 months of folate supplementation (5 mg/day) on vascular function and structure in RTR. A double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study was conducted in 10 CsA-treated RTR. Vascular structure was measured as carotid artery intima media thickness (IMT) and function was assessed as changes in brachial artery diameter during reactive hyperemia (RH) and in response to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN). Function data were analyzed as absolute and percent change from baseline and area under the diameter/time curve. Blood samples were collected before and after supplementation and analyzed for total plasma homocysteine, folate, vitamin B12 and asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA) in addition to regular measures of hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and serum creatinine. Folate supplementation significantly increased plasma folate by 687% (p < 0.005) and decreased homocysteine by 37% (p < 0.05) with no changes (p > 0.05) in vitamin B12 or ADMA. There were no significant (p > 0.05) changes in vascular structure or function during the placebo or the folate supplementation phases; IMT; placebo pre mean +/- SD, 0.52 +/- 0.12, post 0.50 +/- 0.11; folate pre 0.55 +/- 0.17, post 0.49 +/- 0.20 mm, 5% change in brachial artery diameter (RH, placebo pre 10 +/- 8, post 6 +/- 5; folate pre 9 +/- 7, post 7 +/- 5; GTN, placebo pre 18 +/- 10, post 17 +/- 9, folate pre 16 +/- 9, post-supplementation 18 +/- 8). Three months of folate supplementation decreases plasma homocysteine but has no effect on endothelial function or carotid artery IMT in RTR.

  4. An overlooked association of brachial plexus palsy: diaphragmatic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Karabiber, Hamza; Ozkan, K Ugur; Garipardic, Mesut; Parmaksiz, Gonul

    2004-01-01

    Diaphragmatic paralysis in newborns is related to brachial plexus palsy. It can be overlooked if thorough examination isn't done. We present a two-weeks-old baby with a birth weight of 3800 grams who had a left-sided brachial plexus palsy and torticollis with an undiagnosed left diaphragmatic paralysis even though he was examined by different physicians several times. The role of physical examination, the chest x-rays of patients with brachial paralysis and the treatment modalities of diaphragmatic paralysis due to obstetrical factors are discussed.

  5. Transcutaneous measurement of the arterial input function in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Litton, J.E.; Eriksson, L. )

    1990-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides a powerful tool in medical research. Biochemical function can be both precisely localized and quantitatively measured. To achieve reliable quantitation it is necessary to know the time course of activity concentration in the arterial blood during the measurement. In this study the arterial blood curve from the brachial artery is compared to the activity measured in the internal carotid artery with a new transcutaneous detector.

  6. Ketamine does not inhibit interleukin-6 synthesis in hepatic resections requiring a temporary porto-arterial occlusion (Pringle manoeuvre): a controlled, prospective, randomized, double-blinded study

    PubMed Central

    Bonofiglio, Francisco Carlos; Molmenti, Ernesto P; de Santibañes, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have shown that interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels correlated with mortality in critically ill patients. Goal To determine the effect of ketamine on IL-6 levels in liver resections patients with a temporary porto-arterial occlusion (Pringle manoeuvre). Materials and methods Controlled, prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. One group (n = 21) received ketamine whereas the other group (n = 17) received placebo. IL-6 levels were obtained at baseline, 4, 12, 24 h, 3 and 5 days. Results There were no significant differences in IL-6 levels between the groups (basal P = 089, 4 h P = 0.83, 12 h P = 0.39, 24 h, P = 0.55, 3 days P = 0.80 and 5 days P = 0.45). Both groups had elevated IL-6 levels that became almost undetectable by day 5. There was no major morbidity and no mortality in either group. Conclusions Ketamine does not seem to have an effect on plasma levels of IL-6. This could be interpreted as a potential finding associated with outcome as we did not encounter any deaths or major complications. Further studies will likely be needed to determine the range of IL-6 levels associated with survival and mortality, and whether it could be a predictor of survival. PMID:21929671

  7. Cadmium Exposure and Incident Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tellez-Plaza, Maria; Guallar, Eliseo; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Howard, Barbara V.; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Devereux, Richard B.; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background Cadmium has been associated with peripheral arterial disease in cross-sectional studies but prospective evidence is lacking. Our goal was to evaluate the association of urine cadmium concentrations with incident peripheral arterial disease in a large population-based cohort. Methods and Results A prospective cohort study was performed with 2,864 adult American Indians 45-74 years old from Arizona, Oklahoma and North and South Dakota who participated in the Strong Heart Study in 1989-91 and were followed through two follow-up examination visits in 1993-1995 and 1997-1999. Participants were free of peripheral arterial disease, defined as an ankle brachial index <0.9 or >1.4, at baseline and had complete baseline information on urine cadmium, potential confounders and ankle brachial index determinations in the follow-up examinations. Urine cadmium was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and corrected for urinary dilution by normalization to urine creatinine.. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were computed using Cox-proportional hazards models for interval-censored data. A total of 470 cases of incident peripheral arterial disease, defined as an ankle brachial index <0.9 or >1.4, were identified. After adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors including smoking status and pack-years, the hazard ratio comparing the 80th to the 20th percentile of urine cadmium concentrations was 1.41 (1.05, 1.81). The hazard ratio comparing the highest to the lowest tertile was 1.96 (1.32, 2.81). The associations persisted after excluding participants with ankle brachial index > 1.4 only as well as in subgroups defined by sex and smoking status. Conclusions Urine cadmium, a biomarker of long-term cadmium exposure, was independently associated with incident peripheral arterial disease, providing further support for cadmium as a cardiovascular disease risk factor. PMID:24255048

  8. Bilateral obstetric brachial plexus paralysis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dragu, A; Horch, R E; Wirth, S; Ingianni, G

    2009-01-01

    Whereas cases of unilateral obstetric brachial plexus paralysis have been sufficiently described and discussed in the literature cases of bilateral obstetric brachial plexus paralysis are extremely rare and so far have not been mentioned and discussed satisfactorily. We present a case of bilateral obstetric brachial plexus paralysis in an 8-months-old white boy. We performed a neurotisation of the Nervus suprascapularis with the Nervus accessorius and an Oberlin procedure on both sides in two operative steps. In an early follow-up 6 months after the second operation and intensive physiotherapy the little patient was able to crawl with the active help of both arms. Bilateral obstetric brachial plexus paralysis is a very rare incidence in infants. An interdisciplinary approach including paediatrics, plastic surgeons, neurosurgeons, neurologists, radiologists and physiotherapists is essential for the success of treatment strategies in such cases.

  9. Birth brachial plexus palsy: a race against time.

    PubMed

    Patra, Sambeet; Narayana Kurup, Jayakrishnan K; Acharya, Ashwath M; Bhat, Anil K

    2016-07-11

    A 5-year-old child presented to us with weakness of the left upper limb since birth. With the given history of obstetric trauma and limb examination, a diagnosis of birth brachial plexus palsy was made. Brachial plexus exploration along with microsurgery was performed at the same time which included extrinsic neurolysis of the roots and trunks and nerve transfer for better shoulder external rotation and elbow flexion. Both the movements were severely restricted previously due to co-contractures with the shoulder internal rotators and triceps. The problem of birth brachial plexus palsy is proving to be a global health burden both in developed countries and in developing countries such as India. The lack of awareness among the general public and primary healthcare providers and inadequate orthopaedic and neurosurgeons trained to treat the condition have worsened the prognosis. This case lays stress on the delayed complications in birth brachial palsy and its effective management. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Brachial plexopathy as a rare presenting manifestation of scorpion envenomation.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Devon I; Vavra, Michael

    2011-07-01

    We report a patient who experienced a rare manifestation of an acute, severe brachial plexopathy as the initial complication of scorpion (presumed Hemiscorpius lepturus species) envenomation. Features suggesting conduction block, due to either proximal demyelination or ion channel dysfunction, along with axonal loss were seen on serial electrophysiological studies. Possible mechanisms of the brachial plexopathy include direct compression from tissue edema or a toxic effect on the membrane channels along the nerve.

  11. Long-term magnesium supplementation improves arterial stiffness in overweight and obese adults: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Joris, Peter J; Plat, Jogchum; Bakker, Stephan Jl; Mensink, Ronald P

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies have suggested a protective effect of magnesium intake on cardiovascular disease risk. However, intervention trials of magnesium supplementation on blood pressure and conventional cardiometabolic risk markers are inconsistent. Effects on vascular function markers related to cardiovascular disease risk have rarely been studied. The objective was to evaluate the effects of long-term magnesium supplementation on arterial stiffness. We performed a 24-wk, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention study. Fifty-two overweight and slightly obese individuals (30 men and 22 postmenopausal women, mean ± SD age: 62 ± 6 y) were randomly allocated to receive either 3 times daily magnesium (3 × 117 mg or 350 mg/d) or placebo capsules. Twenty-four-hour urine collections and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure assessments were performed at the start and end of the study. Carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWVc-f) was assessed at baseline, after 12 wk, and at week 24. Serum magnesium concentrations did not differ after 12 wk but tended to increase after 24-wk magnesium supplementation compared with placebo by 0.02 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.00, 0.04 mmol/L; P = 0.09). Twenty-four-hour urinary magnesium excretion increased by 2.01 mmol (95% CI: 1.22, 2.93 mmol; P < 0.001) at week 24. PWVc-f was not changed after 12 wk (0.0 m/s; 95% CI: -0.6, 0.5 m/s; P = 0.90) but was improved in the magnesium compared with the placebo group by 1.0 m/s (95% CI: 0.4, 1.6 m/s; P = 0.001) after 24 wk. Office and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure levels were not changed. No adverse events were observed. Our data indicate that a daily magnesium supplement of 350 mg for 24 wk in overweight and obese adults reduces arterial stiffness, as estimated by a decrease in PWVc-f, suggesting a potential mechanism by which an increased dietary magnesium intake beneficially affects cardiovascular health. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02235805. © 2016 American

  12. Risk factors for clavicle fracture concurrent with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Karahanoglu, Ertugrul; Kasapoglu, Taner; Ozdemirci, Safak; Fadıloglu, Erdem; Akyol, Aysegul; Demirdag, Erhan; Yalvac, E Serdar; Kandemir, N Omer

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for clavicle fracture concurrent with brachial plexus injuries. A retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary centre. The hospital records of 62,288 vaginal deliveries were evaluated retrospectively. There were 35 cases of brachial plexus injury. Of these patients, nine had brachial plexus injuries with clavicle fracture and 26 without clavicle fracture. The analysed risk factors for clavicle fracture concurrent with brachial plexus injury were gestational diabetes, labour induction and augmentation, prolonged second stage of labour, estimated foetal weight above 4000 g, birth weight above 4000 g, risky working hours, and the requirement of manoeuvres to free the impacted shoulder from behind the symphysis pubis. Labour augmentation with oxytocin increased the risk of clavicle fracture in cases of brachial plexus injury (OR 6.67; 95% CI 1.26-35.03). A birth weight higher than 4000 g also increased the risk of clavicle fracture. Risky working hours, gestational diabetes, estimated foetal weight higher than 4000 g, and requirement of shoulder dystocia manoeuvres did not increase the risk of clavicle fracture. Labour augmentation and actual birth weight higher than 4000 g were identified as risk factors for clavicle fracture in cases of brachial plexus injury.

  13. Limb preference in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lynda J-S; Anand, Praveen; Birch, Rolfe

    2005-07-01

    Brachial plexus palsy affects children differently than adults. In children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy, motor development must depend on nervous system adaptation. Previous studies report sensory plasticity in these children. This noninvasive study provides support for neural plasticity (the general ability of the brain to reorganize neural pathways based on new experiences) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy by considering upper limb preference. As in the general population, we expect that 90% of children would prefer their right upper limb. However, only 17% of children affected by right obstetric brachial plexus palsy prefer the right upper limb for overall movement; children with left obstetric brachial plexus palsy did not significantly differ from the general population in upper limb preference. This study also provides the first evidence of a significant correlation between actual task performance and select obstetric brachial plexus palsy outcome measurement systems, thereby justifying the routine use of these outcome measurement systems as a reflection of the practical utility of the affected limb to the patient.

  14. Clinical Outcome of Double Kissing Crush Versus Provisional Stenting of Coronary Artery Bifurcation Lesions: The 5-Year Follow-Up Results From a Randomized and Multicenter DKCRUSH-II Study (Randomized Study on Double Kissing Crush Technique Versus Provisional Stenting Technique for Coronary Artery Bifurcation Lesions).

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Liang; Santoso, Teguh; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Ye, Fei; Xu, Ya-Wei; Fu, Qiang; Kan, Jing; Zhang, Feng-Fu; Zhou, Yong; Xie, Du-Jiang; Kwan, Tak W

    2017-02-01

    Provisional stenting is effective for anatomic simple bifurcation lesions. Double kissing crush stenting reduces the 1-year rate of target lesion revascularization. This study aimed to investigate the 5-year clinical results of the DKCRUSH-II study (Randomized Study on Double Kissing Crush Technique Versus Provisional Stenting Technique for Coronary Artery Bifurcation Lesions). A total of 370 patients with coronary bifurcation lesions who were randomly assigned to either the double kissing crush or provisional stenting group in the DKCRUSH-II study were followed for 5 years. The primary end point was the occurrence of a major adverse cardiac event at 5 years. Patients were classified by simple and complex bifurcation lesions according to the DEFINITION criteria (Definitions and Impact of Complex Bifurcation Lesions on Clinical Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Using Drug-Eluting Stents). At 5 years, the major adverse cardiac event rate (23.8%) in the provisional stenting group was insignificantly different to that of the double kissing group (15.7%; P=0.051). However, the difference in the target lesion revascularization rate between 2 groups was sustained through the 5-year follow-up (16.2% versus 8.6%; P=0.027). The definite and probable stent thrombosis rate was 2.7% in each group (P=1.0). Complex bifurcation was associated with a higher rate of target lesion revascularization (21.6%) at 5 years compared with 11.1% in patients with a simple bifurcation (P=0.037), with an extremely high rate in the provisional stenting group (36.8% versus 12.5%, P=0.005) mainly because of final kissing balloon inflation (19.4% versus 5.2%; P=0.036). The double kissing crush stenting technique for coronary bifurcation lesions is associated with a lower rate of target lesion revascularization. The optimal stenting approach based on the lesions' complexity may improve the revascularization for patients with complex bifurcations. URL: http://www.chictr.org. Unique

  15. Correlations between brachial endothelial function and cardiovascular risk factors: a survey of 2,511 Chinese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping-Ting; Yuan, Hong; Wang, Ya-Qin; Cao, Xia; Wu, Liu-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Objective We examined the relationship of several cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) to brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in Chinese subjects. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. In 2,511 Chinese adults (age 46.86±9.52 years, 1,891 men and 620 women) recruited from people who underwent health screening at The Third Xiangya Hospital, patients’ CVRF [age, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), blood pressure (BP), cholesterol parameters, creatinine (Cr), uric acid (UA), glucose level and smoking] and prevalence of present disease (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease and hyperlipidemia) were investigated. Results Multivariate analysis revealed that FMD negative correlated with age (β=–0.29, P<0.001), gender (β=–0.12, P<0.001), BMI (β=–0.12, P=0.001), WC (β=–0.10, P=0.011), systolic BP (SBP) (β=–0.12, P<0.001), fasting glucose (β=–0.04, P=0.009), total cholesterol (TC) (β=–0.04, P=0.014), smoking (β=–0.05, P=0.003), and baseline brachial artery diameter (β=–0.35, P<0.001). FMD decreased with increasing age in both genders. In women, FMD was higher than men and age-related decline in FMD was steepest after age 40; FMD was similar in men above 55 years old. Conclusions In Chinese subjects, FMD may be a usefully marker of CVRF. Age, gender, BMI, WC, SBP, fasting glucose, TC, smoking, and baseline brachial artery diameter were independent variables related to the impairment of FMD. The influence of CVRF on endothelial function is more in women than men. PMID:25364521

  16. Effects of age, sex and smoking on ankle-brachial index in a Finnish population at risk for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Syvänen, Kari; Aarnio, Pertti; Jaatinen, Pekka; Korhonen, Päivi

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Smoking is a well-known risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Data regarding differences in the prevalence of PAD between sexes are somewhat controversial. In addition, most studies indicate that the prevalence of PAD increases with age in both sexes. In the present study, the effects of sex, age and smoking on the ankle-brachial index (ABI) in a Finnish cardiovascular risk population were investigated. OBJECTIVES To investigate the relationship between the ankle-brachial index, and age, sex and smoking in a Finnish population at risk for cardiovascular disease. METHODS All men and women between 45 and 70 years of age living in a rural town (Harjavalta, Finland; total population 7700) were invited to participate in a population survey (Harmonica study). Patients with previously diagnosed diabetes or vascular disease were excluded. In total, 2856 patients were invited to participate in the study. From these subjects, a cardiovascular risk population was screened. Complete data were available from 1028 persons. ABI (the ratio between the posterior tibial or dorsalis pedis artery and brachial artery pressures) was measured, and questionnaires were used to detect smoking status and relevant medical history. Only current smoking status was taken into account. RESULTS The mean ABI for the entire study population was 1.10 (range 0.56 to 1.64). Current smokers had a lower mean ABI (1.06; P<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in ABI values among age groups, although the majority of patients with ABI values below 0.9 were older than 60 years of age. There was no statistically significant difference in ABI between sexes. CONCLUSION As previously reported, the present study shows the significant effect of smoking in the development of PAD. No statistically significant difference was found among age groups, but the tendency was toward lower ABIs in the oldest age groups. Sex had a minimal effect on the ABI. PMID:22477327

  17. Effects of age, sex and smoking on ankle-brachial index in a Finnish population at risk for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Syvänen, Kari; Aarnio, Pertti; Jaatinen, Pekka; Korhonen, Päivi

    2007-01-01

    Smoking is a well-known risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Data regarding differences in the prevalence of PAD between sexes are somewhat controversial. In addition, most studies indicate that the prevalence of PAD increases with age in both sexes. In the present study, the effects of sex, age and smoking on the ankle-brachial index (ABI) in a Finnish cardiovascular risk population were investigated. To investigate the relationship between the ankle-brachial index, and age, sex and smoking in a Finnish population at risk for cardiovascular disease. All men and women between 45 and 70 years of age living in a rural town (Harjavalta, Finland; total population 7700) were invited to participate in a population survey (Harmonica study). Patients with previously diagnosed diabetes or vascular disease were excluded. In total, 2856 patients were invited to participate in the study. From these subjects, a cardiovascular risk population was screened. Complete data were available from 1028 persons. ABI (the ratio between the posterior tibial or dorsalis pedis artery and brachial artery pressures) was measured, and questionnaires were used to detect smoking status and relevant medical history. Only current smoking status was taken into account. The mean ABI for the entire study population was 1.10 (range 0.56 to 1.64). Current smokers had a lower mean ABI (1.06; P<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in ABI values among age groups, although the majority of patients with ABI values below 0.9 were older than 60 years of age. There was no statistically significant difference in ABI between sexes. As previously reported, the present study shows the significant effect of smoking in the development of PAD. No statistically significant difference was found among age groups, but the tendency was toward lower ABIs in the oldest age groups. Sex had a minimal effect on the ABI.

  18. Oral trehalose supplementation improves resistance artery endothelial function in healthy middle-aged and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Hill, Sierra D.; Bispham, Nina Z.; Santos-Parker, Jessica R.; Nowlan, Molly J.; Snyder, Laura L.; Chonchol, Michel; LaRocca, Thomas J.; McQueen, Matthew B.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that supplementation with trehalose, a disaccharide that reverses arterial aging in mice, would improve vascular function in middle-aged and older (MA/O) men and women. Thirty-two healthy adults aged 50-77 years consumed 100 g/day of trehalose (n=15) or maltose (n=17, isocaloric control) for 12 weeks (randomized, double-blind). In subjects with Δbody mass<2.3kg (5 lb.), resistance artery endothelial function, assessed by forearm blood flow to brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (FBFACh), increased ∼30% with trehalose (13.3±1.0 vs. 10.5±1.1 AUC, P=0.02), but not maltose (P=0.40). This improvement in FBFACh was abolished when endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production was inhibited. Endothelium-independent dilation, assessed by FBF to sodium nitroprusside (FBFSNP), also increased ∼30% with trehalose (155±13 vs. 116±12 AUC, P=0.03) but not maltose (P=0.92). Changes in FBFACh and FBFSNP with trehalose were not significant when subjects with Δbody mass≥2.3kg were included. Trehalose supplementation had no effect on conduit artery endothelial function, large elastic artery stiffness or circulating markers of oxidative stress or inflammation (all P>0.1) independent of changes in body weight. Our findings demonstrate that oral trehalose improves resistance artery (microvascular) function, a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, in MA/O adults, possibly through increasing NO bioavailability and smooth muscle sensitivity to NO. PMID:27208415

  19. Changes in arterial stiffness and nitric oxide production with Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation in middle-aged and older individuals

    PubMed Central

    Otsuki, Takeshi; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Chlorella is a unicellular green alga, which contains a variety of nutrients including amino acids, dietary fibers, n-3 unsaturated fatty acid, vitamins, and minerals. We previously demonstrated that Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation decreases arterial stiffness in young men. However, mechanisms underlying the reduction in arterial stiffness by Chlorella-derived supplementation and the effect in middle-aged and older individuals have remained unexplored. This study tested our hypothesis that Chlorella-derived supplementation improves arterial stiffness via an increase in nitric oxide (NO, a endothelium-derived relaxing factor) production in middle-aged and older individuals. Thirty-two subjects between 45 and 75 years of age assigned to placebo and Chlorella groups in a double-blinded manner and took respective tablets for 4 weeks. Before and after the supplementations, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, an index of arterial stiffness) and plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx, end product of NO) concentration were measured. There was no difference in baPWV between before and after the placebo intake, but baPWV decreased after the Chlorella supplementation. Changes in baPWV with the Chlorella supplementation were correlated with those in plasma NOx concentration. We concluded that Chlorella-derived multicomponent supplementation decreases arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older individuals. It may be associated with increase in NO production by vascular endothelium. PMID:26566309

  20. Assessing Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) by using automated oscillometric devices.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Takao

    2008-05-01

    Assessing Ankle-Brachial Index is an essential procedure in clinical settings, but since its measurement by the gold standard Doppler Ultrasonic (DU) technique is impaired by technical difficulties, it is underperformed. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of an automated oscillometric device (AOD) by performing Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) assessments and to suggest delta brachial-brachial (delta-BB) and delta-ABI as markers of cardiovascular risk. In this observational and descriptive study, 247 patients (56.2% females, mean age 62.0 years) had their arterial blood pressure (ABP) measured for ABI calculation. Two AOD (OMRON-HEM705CP) devices were used for simultaneous measurements of the ABP, first of the two arms and then of the arm with higher systolic ABP and a leg, first the left and then the right one. When leg ABP measurements were not possible, ABI determination was performed by using the standard Doppler Ultrasonic (DU) technique. Patients were designated to Group N (normal ABI: 0.91 to 1.30) or Group A (abnormal ABI: < or =0.90 or >1.30). Other indexes were also calculated: delta-BB (absolute difference in mmHg of systolic ABP between arms) and delta-ABI (absolute difference of ABI between legs) and the results were compared. In most patients (90.7%), it was possible to determine the ABI. Group N data allowed calculation of the 95th percentile reference values (RV) of delta-BB (0 to 8 mmHg) and delta-ABI (0 to 0.13). When compared to Group N, Group A had a significantly higher prevalence of high values greater than the RVs of delta-ABI (30 of 52 and 10 of 195, respectively; Odds Ratio = 25.23; p<0.0001) and delta-BB (13 of 52 and 7 of 195, respectively; Odds Ratio = 8.95; p<0.0001). In most patients, the ABI could be measured by AOD. Both indexes, delta-BB and delta-ABI greater than the RVs, were significantly more prevalent in patients with abnormal ABI values, and their usefulness as new markers of cardiovascular disease should be further

  1. Effect of Bosentan on Claudication Distance and Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilation in Hispanic Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    De Haro, Joaquin; Bleda, Silvia; Varela, Cesar; Esparza, Leticia; Acin, Francisco

    2016-01-15

    Endothelin (ET) is involved in the etiopathogenesis of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We hypothesized that ET antagonism might improve the endothelial function, inflammatory status, and symptoms in PAD. This pilot randomized clinical trial was designed to determine the clinical efficacy, pleiotropic effects, and safety of dual ET-receptor antagonist bosentan in Hispanic patients with PAD presenting intermittent claudication. The Bosentan Population-Based Randomized Trial for Clinical and Endothelial Function Assessment on Endothelin Antagonism Therapy was a 12-month, randomized, controlled, parallel-group, double-blind, proof-of-concept pilot study evaluating the effect of bosentan on absolute claudication distance (primary efficacy end point), flow-mediated arterial dilation, and C-reactive protein levels (primary pleiotropic end points) in patients with PAD with Rutherford category 1 to 2 of recent diagnosis. Secondary end points included ankle-brachial index, subjective claudication distance, and safety. Of the 629 screened subjects, 56 patients were randomized 1:1 to receive bosentan for 12 weeks (n = 27) or placebo (n = 29). Six months after the initiation, a significant treatment effect in flow-mediated arterial dilation of 2.43 ± 0.3% (95% CI 1.75 to 3.12; p = 0.001), absolute claudication distance of 283 ± 23 m (95% CI 202 to 366; p = 0.01), ankle-brachial index of 0.16 ± 0.03 (95% CI 0.09 to 0.23; p = 0.001), and a decrease in C-reactive protein levels of -2.0 ± 0.5 mg/L (95% CI -2.8 to -1.1; p = 0.02) were observed in the bosentan-treated group compared to the control group. No severe adverse effects were found in the bosentan group. In conclusion, in Hispanic patients with intermittent claudication, bosentan was well tolerated and improved endothelial function and claudication distance as well as inflammatory and hemodynamic states.

  2. The Effect of Prophylactic Phenylephrine and Ephedrine Infusions on Umbilical Artery Blood pH in Women With Preeclampsia Undergoing Cesarean Delivery With Spinal Anesthesia: A Randomized, Double-Blind Trial.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Nicole; Fitzgerald, Paul C; van Dyk, Dominique; Dyer, Robert A; Rodriguez, Natalie; McCarthy, Robert J; Wong, Cynthia A

    2017-09-25

    Spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery is associated with a high incidence of hypotension. Phenylephrine results in higher umbilical artery pH than ephedrine when used to prevent or treat hypotension in healthy women. We hypothesized that phenylephrine compared to ephedrine would result in higher umbilical artery pH in women with preeclampsia undergoing cesarean delivery with spinal anesthesia. This study was a randomized double-blind clinical trial. Nonlaboring women with preeclampsia scheduled for cesarean delivery with spinal anesthesia at Prentice Women's Hospital of Northwestern Medicine were randomized to receive prophylactic infusions of phenylephrine or ephedrine titrated to maintain systolic blood pressure >80% of baseline. Spinal anesthesia consisted of hyperbaric 0.75% bupivacaine 12 mg, fentanyl 15 µg, and morphine 150 µg. The primary outcome was umbilical arterial blood pH and the secondary outcome was umbilical artery base excess. One hundred ten women were enrolled in the study and 54 per group were included in the analysis. There were 74 and 72 infants delivered in the ephedrine and phenylephrine groups, respectively. The phenylephrine:ephedrine ratio for umbilical artery pH was 1.002 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.997-1.007). Mean [standard deviation] umbilical artery pH was not different between the ephedrine 7.20 [0.10] and phenylephrine 7.22 [0.07] groups (mean difference -0.02, 95% CI of the difference -0.06 to 0.07; P = .38). Median (first, third quartiles) umbilical artery base excess was -3.4 mEq/L (-5.7 to -2.0 mEq/L) in the ephedrine group and -2.8 mEq/L (-4.6 to -2.2mEq/L) in the phenylephrine group (difference -0.6 mEq/L, 95% CI of the difference -1.6 to 0.3 mEq/L; P = .10). When adjusted for gestational age and infant gender, umbilical artery pH did not differ between groups. There were also no differences in the umbilical artery pH stratified by magnesium therapy or by the severity of preeclampsia. We were unable to demonstrate a

  3. Subclavian artery stenosis caused by a prominent first rib

    PubMed Central

    Van Bael, Kobe; Speybrouck, Sabrina; Van Der Tempel, Geerhardus

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a mechanical space problem in which the brachial plexus and/or subclavian vessels are compressed. Arterial compression is least common and almost always associated with a bony anomaly. We present a case of a 49-year-old woman with a prominent first rib which caused a subclavian artery stenosis. There are many options for subclavian artery repair through open surgery. In high-risk patients, minimal invasive techniques are favorable. To date, few case reports exist on an endovascular artery repair combined with open first rib resection. While long-term follow-up will be necessary, our preliminary results seem promising. PMID:27489685

  4. Traction injury of the brachial plexus confused with nerve injury due to interscalene brachial block: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ferrero-Manzanal, Francisco; Lax-Pérez, Raquel; López-Bernabé, Roberto; Betancourt-Bastidas, José Ramiro; Iñiguez de Onzoño-Pérez, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder surgery is often performed with the patient in the so called "beach-chair position" with elevation of the upper part of the body. The anesthetic procedure can be general anesthesia and/or regional block, usually interscalenic brachial plexus block. We present a case of brachial plexus palsy with a possible mechanism of traction based on the electromyographic and clinical findings, although a possible contribution of nerve block cannot be excluded. We present a case of a 62 year-old female, that suffered from shoulder fracture-dislocation. Open reduction and internal fixation were performed in the so-called "beach-chair" position, under combined general-regional anesthesia. In the postoperative period complete motor brachial plexus palsy appeared, with neuropathic pain. Conservative treatment included analgesic drugs, neuromodulators, B-vitamin complex and physiotherapy. Spontaneous recovery appeared at 11 months. DISCUSION: in shoulder surgery, there may be complications related to both anesthetic technique and patient positioning/surgical maneuvers. Regional block often acts as a confusing factor when neurologic damage appears after surgery. Intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus, and may be favored by the fixed position of the head using the accessory of the operating table in the beach-chair position. When postoperative brachial plexus palsy appears, nerve block is a confusing factor that tends to be attributed as the cause of palsy by the orthopedic surgeon. The beach chair position may predispose brachial plexus traction injury. The head and neck position should be regularly checked during long procedures, as intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. The construction of arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis in patients with chronic obstructive arterial disease in the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Linardi, Fábio; Costa, Jose A; Angelieri, Fernanda R; Marabezzi, Maria G; Bevilacqua, Jose L

    2017-03-21

    Describe the construction of arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis in chronic renal patient on hemodialysis who presented chronic arterial obstruction in the upper limb. A surgical procedure was performed on a patient with obstruction of the brachial artery in its proximal third. The procedure was carried out by the construction of a bypass with autologous vein between the proximal brachial and distal brachial arteries and the performing of an arteriovenous fistula with superficialized and anteriorized basilic vein, with anastomosis in the bypass at the same surgical procedure. There was good immediate result and arteriovenous fistula presented function for 43 months. Even when faced with chronic obstructive arterial disease in the arm, there is the possibility of creating a new arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis.

  6. [Cervico-omo-brachial pain and disability in a person of advanced age].

    PubMed

    Usui, M

    1997-07-01

    A person of advanced age usually has degenerative changes of bone, joint and ligament, which can be causes of cervico-omo-brachial pain and disability. He or she may also suffer from metastatic bone tumor of cervical spine or upper extremity. This article described pathology, signs and symptoms and recent treatment of these diseases. Cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy, which are most common causes of cervico-omo-brachial symptoms, are sometimes accompanied by peripheral entrapment neuropathy such as cubital tunnel syndrome or carpal tunnel syndrome (double crush syndrome). In this complicated situation, decompression of neural tissue in both cervical spine and carpal tunnel are necessary. In treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome, release of transverse carpal ligament under an arthroscope has proven to be useful and has been becoming popular. This minimally invasive surgery is also useful in shoulder surgery such as subacromial decompression in aged patients with rotator cuff tear and removal of calcium deposit in the shoulder joint. Osteoarthritis of the elbow also cause pain or disability of the elbow and the hand. Some metastatic bone tumors are treated by tumor resection and reconstruction with instruments, prosthesis or composite grafts, which are attempted not to cure the disease but to maintain or improve the quality of life of the patient.

  7. Perineural administration of dexmedetomidine in combination with ropivacaine prolongs axillary brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Chang-Song; Shi, Jing-Hui; Sun, Bo; Liu, Shu-Jie; Li, Peng; Li, En-You

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis that adding dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine prolongs axillary brachial plexus block. Forty-five patients of ASA I~II and aged 25-60 yr who were scheduled for elective forearm and hand surgery were randomly divided into 3 equal groups and received 40 ml of 0.33% ropivacaine + 1 ml dexmedetomidine (50 μg) (Group DR1), 40 ml of 0.33% ropivacaine + 1 ml dexmedetomidine (100 μg) (group DR2) or 40 ml of 0.33% ropivacaine + 1 ml saline (group R) in a double-blind fashion. The onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks and side effects were recorded. The demographic data and surgical characteristics were similar in each group. Sensory and motor block onset times were the same in the three groups. Sensory and motor blockade durations were longer in group DR2 than in group R (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the sensory blockade duration between group DR1 and group R. Bradycardia, hypertension and hypotension were not observed in group R and occurred more often in group DR2 than in group DR1. Dexmedetomidine added to ropivacaine for an axillary brachial plexus block prolongs the duration of the block. However, dexmedetomidine may also lead to side effects such as bradycardia, hypertension, and hypotension.

  8. [Treatment of early and late obstetric brachial plexus palsy].

    PubMed

    Degliūte, Ramune; Pranckevicius, Sigitas; Cekanauskas, Emilis; Buinauskiene, Jūrate; Kalesinskas, Romas Jonas

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review and to analyze treatment patterns of early and late obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Eighty-one children with early and late obstetric brachial plexus palsy were treated in the Department of Pediatric Orthopedics and in the Postintensive Care Unit within the period 1988-2002. Children were classified into 2 groups according to age: Ist group (67 newborns) was treated conservatively, and IInd group (14 children with late obstetric brachial plexus palsy with deformity) underwent operative treatment. Active hand movements and innervation were evaluated before and after treatment. Thirty newborns had full recovery, 32 newborns had incomplete recovery, and in 5 cases no improvement was seen. Fourteen children with late obstetric brachial plexus palsy underwent the following operations: rotation osteotomy of the humerus was performed in 10 cases, lengthening of biceps and brachialis muscle tendons--in 6 cases, transposition of triceps muscle tendon--in 1 case, transposition of pectoralis major tendon--in 3 cases and flexor carpi transposition--in 1 case. There was an improvement in active hand movements after operative treatment and rehabilitation. According to our experience, in most cases newborns recover spontaneously or after conservative treatment. Secondary reconstructive surgery of late brachial plexus palsy can improve the condition of these patients.

  9. Effects of cranberry juice consumption on vascular function in patients with coronary artery disease123

    PubMed Central

    Dohadwala, Mustali M; Holbrook, Monika; Hamburg, Naomi M; Shenouda, Sherene M; Chung, William B; Titas, Megan; Kluge, Matthew A; Wang, Na; Palmisano, Joseph; Milbury, Paul E; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Vita, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cranberry juice contains polyphenolic compounds that could improve endothelial function and reduce cardiovascular disease risk. Objective: The objective was to examine the effects of cranberry juice on vascular function in subjects with coronary artery disease. Design: We completed an acute pilot study with no placebo (n = 15) and a chronic placebo-controlled crossover study (n = 44) that examined the effects of cranberry juice on vascular function in subjects with coronary artery disease. Results: In the chronic crossover study, subjects with coronary heart disease consumed a research preparation of double-strength cranberry juice (54% juice, 835 mg total polyphenols, and 94 mg anthocyanins) or a matched placebo beverage (480 mL/d) for 4 wk each with a 2-wk rest period between beverages. Beverage order was randomly assigned, and participants refrained from consuming other flavonoid-containing beverages during the study. Vascular function was measured before and after each beverage, with follow-up testing ≥12 h after consumption of the last beverage. Mean (±SD) carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, a measure of central aortic stiffness, decreased after cranberry juice (8.3 ± 2.3 to 7.8 ± 2.2 m/s) in contrast with an increase after placebo (8.0 ± 2.0 to 8.4 ± 2.8 m/s) (P = 0.003). Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, digital pulse amplitude tonometry, blood pressure, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity did not change. In the uncontrolled pilot study, we observed improved brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (7.7 ± 2.9% to 8.7 ± 3.1%, P = 0.01) and digital pulse amplitude tonometry ratio (0.10 ± 0.12 to 0.23 ± 0.16, P = 0.001) 4 h after consumption of a single 480-mL portion of cranberry juice. Conclusions: Chronic cranberry juice consumption reduced carotid femoral pulse wave velocity—a clinically relevant measure of arterial stiffness. The uncontrolled pilot study suggested an acute benefit; however, no chronic effect on measures of

  10. Association between arterial stiffness and peripheral artery disease as measured by radial artery tonometry.

    PubMed

    Zahner, Greg J; Gruendl, Magdalena A; Spaulding, Kimberly A; Schaller, Melinda S; Hills, Nancy K; Gasper, Warren J; Grenon, S Marlene

    2017-07-26

    Arterial stiffness and peripheral artery disease (PAD) are both associated with an elevated risk of major adverse cardiac events; however, the association between arterial stiffness and PAD is less well characterized. The goal of this study was to examine the association between parameters of radial artery tonometry, a noninvasive measure of arterial stiffness, and PAD. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 134 vascular surgery outpatients (controls, 33; PAD, 101) using arterial applanation tonometry. Central augmentation index (AIX) normalized to 75 beats/min and peripheral AIX were measured using radial artery pulse wave analysis. Pulse wave velocity was recorded at the carotid and femoral arteries. PAD was defined as symptomatic claudication with an ankle-brachial index of <0.9 or a history of peripheral revascularization. Controls had no history of atherosclerotic vascular disease and an ankle-brachial index ≥0.9. Among the 126 participants with high-quality tonometry data, compared with controls (n = 33), patients with PAD (n = 93) were older, with higher rates of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and smoking (P < .05). Patients with PAD also had greater arterial stiffness as measured by central AIX, peripheral AIX, and pulse wave velocity (P < .05). In a multivariable model, a significantly increased odds of PAD was associated with each 10-unit increase in central AIX (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.9; P = .03) and peripheral AIX (odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.2; P = .01). In addition, central and peripheral AIX were highly correlated (r120 = 0.76; P < .001). In a cross-sectional analysis, arterial stiffness as measured by the AIX is independently associated with PAD, even when adjusting for several atherosclerotic risk factors. Further prospective data are needed to establish whether radial artery tonometry could be a tool for risk stratification in the PAD population. Copyright © 2017 Society for

  11. Simple fast noninvasive technique for measuring brachial wall mechanics during flow mediated vasodilatation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Frisbee, Jefferson C.; D'Audiffret, Alexandre; Mukdadi, Osama M.

    2009-02-01

    Measurement of flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) in brachial and other conduit arteries has become a common method to asses the status of endothelial function in vivo. In spite of the direct relationship between the arterial wall multi-component strains and FMD responses, direct measurement of wall strain tensor due to FMD has not yet been reported in the literature. In this work, a noninvasive direct ultrasound-based strain tensor measuring (STM) technique is presented to assess changes in the mechanical parameters of the vascular wall during FMD. The STM technique utilizes only sequences of B-mode ultrasound images, and starts with segmenting a region of interest within the artery and providing the acquisition parameters. Then a block matching technique is employed to measure the frame to frame local velocities. Displacements, diameter change, multi-component strain tensor and strain rates are then calculated by integrating or differentiating velocity components. The accuracy of the STM algorithm was assessed using a phantom study, and was further validated using in vivo data from human subjects. Results indicate the validity and versatility of the STM algorithm, and describe how parameters other than the diameter change are sensitive to pre- and post-occlusion, which can then be used for accurate assessment of atherosclerosis.

  12. Electroacupuncture stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy side promotes brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in the ischemic cerebral cortex of a rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zongjun; Wang, Lumin

    2012-07-25

    A rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion was established by suture occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery. In situ hybridization results showed that the number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA-positive cells in the ischemic rat cerebral cortex increased after cerebral ischemia/ reperfusion injury. Low frequency continuous wave electroacupuncture (frequency 2-6 Hz, current intensity 2 mA) stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy (right) side increased the number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA-positive cells in the ischemic cerebral cortex 14 days after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. At the same time, electroacupuncture stimulation of the healthy brachial plexus truck significantly decreased neurological function scores and alleviated neurological function deficits. These findings suggest that electroacupuncture stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy (right) side can greatly increase brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression and improve neurological function.

  13. Discordant effects of beta-blockade on central aortic systolic and brachial systolic blood pressure: considerations beyond the cuff.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Benjamin J; Anderson, Shawn

    2007-09-01

    The role of beta-blockers in uncomplicated hypertension has been challenged recently. Compared with other antihypertensives, beta-blockers are less effective for preventing cardiovascular events in patients with uncomplicated hypertension. Moreover, a recent meta-analysis of placebo-controlled clinical trials concluded that atenolol is not more efficacious than placebo for preventing cardiovascular events in patients with hypertension. Although these agents lower blood pressure measured conventionally over the brachial artery with a blood pressure cuff, they do not exert a commensurate effect on blood pressure in the central aorta. Central aortic blood pressure and aortic augmentation index are strong predictors of left ventricular hypertrophy, an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events. Emerging data are illuminating the antihypertensive paradox whereby antihypertensive agents may elicit discordant effects on central and peripheral blood pressure and hemodynamics. Vasodilatory antihypertensives, such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors and calcium channel blockers, elicit reductions in central aortic blood pressure equal to or greater than that in the brachial artery. Conversely, beta-blockers lower central aortic blood pressure to a lesser degree even when blood pressure measured by sphygmomanometry is reduced substantially. Given the strong relationship between central aortic blood pressure and target organ damage, the effectiveness of beta-blockers may be overestimated in practice on the basis of conventional blood pressure measurements alone. Differences in central and peripheral blood pressure may account for the lack of cardiovascular protection afforded by beta-blockers in clinical trials and could account for a portion of the apparent "benefit beyond blood pressure" reduction with other classes of antihypertensive agents. Future studies should aim to better clarify the role of central aortic blood pressure in the treatment of

  14. Peripheral arterial disease in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ayman A; Habib, Hisham M; Eissa, Ashraf A

    2013-06-01

    The aim of our study was to: (i) map out the presence of peripheral vascular disease in a sample of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients; and (ii) correlate our findings with disease characteristics, activity indices, traditional risk factors of atherosclerosis and thrombotic variables. The study population comprised 120 SLE patients and 100 controls. Clinical data were collected for patients and controls with stress on clinical issues of SLE patients, including British Isles Lupus Assessment Group index score, anti-double stranded DNA titer C3 and C4 levels, and treatment taken, mainly steroids. Measurements of thrombotic variables were performed. Non-invasive arterial assessment was performed, including carotid duplex scanning and measurement of carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and peripheral arterial assessment and measurement of ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI). The mean age of SLE patients was 32 years and mean disease duration was 8 years. There were no statistically significant differences in the traditional vascular risk factors measured between SLE patients and controls. There were significantly higher plasma levels of thrombotic variables in SLE patients. The average IMT was statistically significantly greater in SLE patients compared to controls. Thirty SLE patients (25%) had an ABPI < 1.0 compared with six controls (6%), which was statistically significant. This study showed an increased prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in SLE patients as shown by the higher carotid artery IMT and lower ABPI in such patients compared with controls. Multiple risk factors are likely to be involved in such findings. © 2013 The Authors International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Tolerance of the Brachial Plexus to High-Dose Reirradiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Allen M; Yoshizaki, Taeko; Velez, Maria A; Mikaeilian, Argin G; Hsu, Sophia; Cao, Minsong

    2017-05-01

    To study the tolerance of the brachial plexus to high doses of radiation exceeding historically accepted limits by analyzing human subjects treated with reirradiation for recurrent tumors of the head and neck. Data from 43 patients who were confirmed to have received overlapping dose to the brachial plexus after review of radiation treatment plans from the initial and reirradiation courses were used to model the tolerance of this normal tissue structure. A standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy believed to be related to brachial plexus injury was utilized to screen for toxicity. Cumulative dose was calculated by fusing the initial dose distributions onto the reirradiation plan, thereby creating a composite plan via deformable image registration. The median elapsed time from the initial course of radiation therapy to reirradiation was 24 months (range, 3-144 months). The dominant complaints among patients with symptoms were ipsilateral pain (54%), numbness/tingling (31%), and motor weakness and/or difficulty with manual dexterity (15%). The cumulative maximum dose (Dmax) received by the brachial plexus ranged from 60.5 Gy to 150.1 Gy (median, 95.0 Gy). The cumulative mean (Dmean) dose ranged from 20.2 Gy to 111.5 Gy (median, 63.8 Gy). The 1-year freedom from brachial plexus-related neuropathy was 67% and 86% for subjects with a cumulative Dmax greater than and less than 95.0 Gy, respectively (P=.05). The 1-year complication-free rate was 66% and 87%, for those reirradiated within and after 2 years from the initial course, respectively (P=.06). The development of brachial plexus-related symptoms was less than expected owing to repair kinetics and to the relatively short survival of the subject population. Time-dose factors were demonstrated to be predictive of complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Primary Brachial Plexus Tumors: Clinical Experiences of 143 Cases.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaotian; Yang, Jianyun; Chen, Lin; Yu, Cong; Kondo, Tadashi

    2016-09-01

    Primary brachial plexus tumors are extremely rare and the treatment is challengeable. Our aim is to share the experiences in the treatment of primary brachial plexus tumors. A retrospective analysis of 143 patients with primary brachial plexus tumors was made in our department from January 2001 to December 2012. The clinical presentation of the patients, the characteristics and pathological results of the tumors and the prognosis were described. Seventy-eight males and sixty-five female were enrolled. The mean age was 48.17 years old. A palpable mass was the most common clinical presentation occurred in 129 patients. The trunks of the brachial plexus were the locations where the tumors originated with high possibility, with 68 cases. Benign tumors were composed of 119 schwannomas and 12 neurofibromas, while malignant tumors were composed of 8 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 2 malignant granular cell tumors, 1 synovial sarcoma and 1 peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Appropriate surgical method, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were used according to the condition during operation, preoperative examinations and pathological result. The survival rate was 50.00% with a 3-year follow-up. Local recurrence happened in 7 patients. Five patients presented Metastasis. Appropriate surgical method is the key for the treatment of different brachial plexus tumors. Surgery has a great effect on the treatment of benign tumors. For malignant tumors, adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy should be used according to the pathological result. The general prognosis for malignant brachial plexus tumors is less than ideal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Permanent upper trunk plexopathy after interscalene brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Avellanet, Merce; Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Rodrigo, Lidia; Gonzalez-Viejo, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) has been widely used in shoulder surgical procedures. The incidence of postoperative neural injury has been estimated to be as high as 3 %. We report a long-term neurologic deficit after a nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. A 55 year-old male, with right shoulder impingement syndrome was scheduled for elective surgery. The patient was given an oral dose of 10 m