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Sample records for double differential cross

  1. Double differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun-fei, Yao; Zhang-jin, Chen

    1999-03-01

    The double differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of helium at incident energies of 200 eV, 100 eV and 64.6 eV have been calculated in the BBK model. The present results are found to be in generally good agreement with the latest measurements of Röder et al. and the theoretical results of the convergent close-coupling method although some quantitative discrepancy remains.

  2. Covariance Matrix of a Double-Differential Doppler-broadened Elastic Scattering Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Arbanas, Goran; Becker, B.; Dagan, R; Dunn, Michael E; Larson, Nancy M; Leal, Luiz C; Williams, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    Legendre moments of a double-differential Doppler-broadened elastic neutron scattering cross section on {sup 238}U are computed near the 6.67 eV resonance at temperature T = 10{sup 3} K up to angular order 14. A covariance matrix of these Legendre moments is computed as a functional of the covariance matrix of the elastic scattering cross section. A variance of double-differential Doppler-broadened elastic scattering cross section is computed from the covariance of Legendre moments.

  3. Differential cross-sections for the double photoionization of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheifets, A. S.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, Igor; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2012-11-01

    We apply the convergent close-coupling (CCC) and time-dependent close- coupling (TDCC) methods to describe energy and angular resolved double photoionization (DPI) of lithium at arbitrary energy sharing. By doing so, we are able to evaluate the recoil ion momentum distribution of DPI of Li and make a comparison with recent measurements of Zhu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 103008 (2009)].

  4. Differential cross sections of double photoionization of lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, A. S.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2010-08-15

    We extend our previous application of the convergent close-coupling (CCC) and time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) methods [Phys. Rev. A 81, 023418 (2010)] to describe energy and angular resolved double photoionization (DPI) of lithium at arbitrary energy sharing. By doing so, we are able to evaluate the recoil ion momentum distribution of DPI of Li and make a comparison with recent measurements of Zhu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 103008 (2009)].

  5. Differential cross sections of double photoionization of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheifets, A. S.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2010-08-01

    We extend our previous application of the convergent close-coupling (CCC) and time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) methods [Phys. Rev. A10.1103/PhysRevA.81.023418 81, 023418 (2010)] to describe energy and angular resolved double photoionization (DPI) of lithium at arbitrary energy sharing. By doing so, we are able to evaluate the recoil ion momentum distribution of DPI of Li and make a comparison with recent measurements of Zhu [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.103008 103, 103008 (2009)].

  6. Single and Triple Differential Cross Sections for DoublePhotoionization of H-

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Frank L.; Horner, Daniel A.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno,Thomas N.

    2007-02-15

    The hydride anion H- would not be bound in the absence ofelectron correlation. Electron correlation drives the doublephotoionization process and, thus should impact double photoionizationresults most strongly for H-. We present fully differential crosssections for the three-body breakup of H- by single photon absorption.The absolute triple-differential and single-differential cross sectionswere yielded by ab initio calculations making use of exterior complexscaling within a discrete variable representation partialwave basis.Results calculated at photon energies of 18eV and 30eV are compared withreported cross sections for helium calculated at 20eV above the doubleionization threshold. These comparisons show a clear signature of initialstate correlation that differentiate the He and H- cases.

  7. First Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic Double Differential Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Anderson, C.E.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; /Yale U. /Columbia U.

    2010-02-01

    A high-statistics sample of charged-current muon neutrino scattering events collected with the MiniBooNE experiment is analyzed to extract the first measurement of the double differential cross section (d{sup 2}{sigma}/dT{sub {mu}}d cos {theta}{sub {mu}}) for charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) scattering on carbon. This result features minimal model dependence and provides the most complete information on this process to date. With the assumption of CCQE scattering, the absolute cross section as a function of neutrino energy ({sigma}[E{sub {nu}}]) and the single differential cross section (d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}) are extracted to facilitate comparison with previous measurements. These quantities may be used to characterize an effective axial-vector form factor of the nucleon and to improve the modeling of low-energy neutrino interactions on nuclear targets. The results are relevant for experiments searching for neutrino oscillations.

  8. Convergence of Legendre Expansion of Doppler-Broadened Double Differential Elastic Scattering Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Arbanas, Goran; Dunn, Michael E; Larson, Nancy M; Leal, Luiz C; Williams, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    Convergence properties of Legendre expansion of a Doppler-broadened double-differential elastic neutron scattering cross section of {sup 238}U near the 6.67 eV resonance at temperature 10{sup 3} K are studied. A variance of Legendre expansion from a reference Monte Carlo computation is used as a measure of convergence and is computed for as many as 15 terms in the Legendre expansion. When the outgoing energy equals the incoming energy, it is found that the Legendre expansion converges very slowly. Therefore, a supplementary method of computing many higher-order terms is suggested and employed for this special case.

  9. Electron-atom bremsstrahlung: Double-differential cross section and polarization correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerokhin, Vladimir A.; Surzhykov, Andrey

    2010-12-01

    The leading-order electron-atom bremsstrahlung is investigated within the rigorous relativistic approach based on the partial-wave representation of the Dirac wave functions in the external atomic field. Approximating the atomic target by an effective local potential, we calculate the double-differential cross section and the polarization correlations in a wide range of the impact energies. Connection between the bremsstrahlung at the hard-photon end point of the spectrum and the continuum-threshold limit of the radiative recombination is studied. A detailed analysis of the screening effect and the energy dependence of the polarization correlations is presented, with the main focus on the high-impact-energy region.

  10. Double ionization of helium by bare ions: Theoretical study of the fully differential cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, S. D.; Garibotti, C. R.; Otranto, S.

    2011-06-15

    This work presents a theoretical study of fully differential cross sections (FDCSs) for the double ionization of an He target by ion impact within a distorted wave model. The initial atomic system is described by two approximated wave functions of different accuracy proposed by Bonham and Kohl. For the final channel several models are considered based upon improvements and simplifications of the well-known three-body Coulomb (3C) model. The influence of the receding projectile on the resulting fragments is also studied by implementing a model with effective charges that depend on the momenta of the four particles. The FDCSs resulting for different electron energy sharing are discussed. The sensitivity of the FDCSs to the projectile charge sign and magnitude is explored over the energy range 700 keV/amu through 6 MeV/amu.

  11. Measurements of differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text][Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Lauwers, J; Luyckx, S; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dobur, D; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Grebenyuk, A; Léonard, A; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Randle-Conde, A; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; 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Santaolalla, J; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Dogra, S; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Aleksandrov, A; Genchev, V; Hadjiiska, R; Iaydjiev, P; Marinov, A; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Cheng, T; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Plestina, R; Romeo, F; Tao, J; Wang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Li, Q; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Xu, Z; Zou, W; Avila, C; Cabrera, A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Ellithi Kamel, A; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; 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    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections in the dielectron and dimuon channels are presented. They are based on proton-proton collision data at [Formula: see text] recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7[Formula: see text]. The measured inclusive cross section in the [Formula: see text] peak region (60-120[Formula: see text]), obtained from the combination of the dielectron and dimuon channels, is [Formula: see text], where the statistical uncertainty is negligible. The differential cross section [Formula: see text] in the dilepton mass range 15-2000[Formula: see text] is measured and corrected to the full phase space. The double-differential cross section [Formula: see text] is also measured over the mass range 20 to 1500[Formula: see text] and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4. In addition, the ratios of the normalized differential cross sections measured at [Formula: see text] and 8[Formula: see text] are presented. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) orders using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs). The results agree with the NNLO theoretical predictions computed with fewz 3.1 using the CT10 NNLO and NNPDF2.1 NNLO PDFs. The measured double-differential cross section and ratio of normalized differential cross sections are sufficiently precise to constrain the proton PDFs.

  12. Computation of Temperature-Dependent Legendre Moments of a Double-Differential Elastic Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Arbanas, Goran; Dunn, Michael E; Larson, Nancy M; Leal, Luiz C; Williams, Mark L; Becker, B.; Dagan, R

    2011-01-01

    A general expression for temperature-dependent Legendre moments of a double-differential elastic scattering cross section was derived by Ouisloumen and Sanchez [Nucl. Sci. Eng. 107, 189-200 (1991)]. Attempts to compute this expression are hindered by the three-fold nested integral, limiting their practical application to just the zeroth Legendre moment of an isotropic scattering. It is shown that the two innermost integrals could be evaluated analytically to all orders of Legendre moments, and for anisotropic scattering, by a recursive application of the integration by parts method. For this method to work, the anisotropic angular distribution in the center of mass is expressed as an expansion in Legendre polynomials. The first several Legendre moments of elastic scattering of neutrons on U-238 are computed at T=1000 K at incoming energy 6.5 eV for isotropic scattering in the center of mass frame. Legendre moments of the anisotropic angular distribution given via Blatt-Biedenharn coefficients are computed at ~1 keV. The results are in agreement with those computed by the Monte Carlo method.

  13. Double-differential cross sections for single ionization of helium by bare ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, S.; Samanta, R.; Purkait, M.

    2013-11-01

    Double-differential cross sections (DDCS) for single ionization of helium by impact of proton and highly charged carbon ion have been calculated in the framework of four-body formalism using the three-Coulomb wave model (3C-4B) and first Born approximation (FBA-4B), respectively. The correlated motion of the particles interacting through long-range Coulomb potential is properly taken into account in the final state. In this paper, the energy and angular distributions of DDCS of low- and high-energy electron emission for ground-state helium atoms have been investigated. The ejected electrons are affected by the two-center field of the target and the projectile ion. The two-center effects are confined to comparison with other theoretical results. The results obtained, both from the 3C-4B and FBA-4B models, are compared with other theoretical and experimental findings. The present results are found to reproduce the peak structure of the experimental observations. Large discrepancy occurs between the present two theories at forward and backward angles except about the emission angle 90°. The present computed results obtained by the 3C-4B model are in good agreement with the available experimental findings.

  14. A general algorithm for fitting efficiently triple differential cross sections of atomic double photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argenti, Luca; Colle, Renato

    2008-12-01

    We propose an effective procedure to fit triple differential cross sections of atomic double photoionization processes, which is based on a general expression of the transition amplitude between arbitrary states of the target atom and the parent ion, with the transition operator expressed at any order of its multipolar expansion. The major advantage of our expression, which in the dipole approximation is equivalent to those of Manakov (1996 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 29 2711) and Malegat (1997 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 30 251), is that it is expressed only in terms of elementary angular functions (Clebsch-Gordan coefficients, spherical harmonics and 6 - j factors). Therefore our expression can be easily implemented in a general code for any kinematic condition and any order of the multipolar expansion of the transition operator. Our fitting procedure takes into account also the finite instrumental resolution in measuring energies and angles. Test calculations on helium and argon show that this further capability is often essential to remove important discrepancies between simulated and measured angular distributions.

  15. Nondipole effects in the triply differential cross section for double photoionization of He

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, Andrei Y.; Starace, Anthony F.; Manakov, N.L.; Meremianin, A.V.

    2005-05-15

    Lowest-order nondipole effects are studied systematically in double photoionization (DPI) of the He atom. Ab initio parametrizations of the quadrupole transition amplitude for DPI from the {sup 1}S{sub 0} state are presented in terms of the exact two-electron radial matrix elements. Analytic expressions for these matrix elements within lowest-order perturbation theory (LOPT) in the interelectron interaction are also given. The corresponding parametrizations for the dipole-quadrupole triply differential cross section (TDCS) are presented for the case of an elliptically polarized photon. A general analysis of retardation-induced asymmetries of the TDCS including the circular dichroism effect at equal energy sharing is presented. Numerical LOPT estimates of nondipole asymmetries in photoelectron angular distributions for the cases of linear and circular polarization and of the circular dichroism effect at equal energy sharing are presented. We find that experimental observation of nondipole effects at excess energies of the order of tens to hundreds of eV should be feasible in TDCS measurements. Our numerical results exhibit a nondipole forward-backward asymmetry in the TDCS for DPI of He at an excess energy of 450 eV that is in qualitative agreement with existing experimental data.

  16. Measurements of differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Mittag, G.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Strologas, J.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D’Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Biasotto, M.; Branca, A.; Dall’Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Fantinel, S.; Fanzago, F.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell’Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D’imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Ryu, M. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Moon, D. H.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D’Alfonso, M.; d’Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Guida, R.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rojo, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Musella, P.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W. -S.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R. -S.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A. -M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Wu, Z.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Negrete, M. Olmedo; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D’Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O’Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O’Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y. -J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Smith, G.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.; Collaboration, The CMS

    2015-04-09

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in the dielectron and dimuon channels are presented. They are based on proton–proton collision data at √s = 8TeV recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z peak region (60–120GeV), obtained from the combination of the dielectron and dimuon channels, is 1138 ± 8 (exp) ± 25 (theo) ± 30 (lumi)\\,pb, where the statistical uncertainty is negligible. The differential cross section dσ/dm in the dilepton mass range 15–2000GeV is measured and corrected to the full phase space. The double-differential cross section d2σ/dmd|y| is also measured over the mass range 20 to 1500GeV and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4. In addition, the ratios of the normalized differential cross sections measured at √s = 7 and 8TeV are presented. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) orders using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs). The results agree with the NNLO theoretical predictions computed with FEWZ 3.1 using the CT10 NNLO and NNPDF2.1 NNLO PDFs. Furthermore, the measured double-differential cross section and ratio of normalized differential cross sections are sufficiently precise to constrain the proton PDFs.

  17. Measurements of differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2015-04-09

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in the dielectron and dimuon channels are presented. They are based on proton–proton collision data at √s = 8TeV recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z peak region (60–120GeV), obtained from the combination of the dielectron and dimuon channels, is 1138 ± 8 (exp) ± 25 (theo) ± 30 (lumi)\\,pb, where the statistical uncertainty is negligible. The differential cross section dσ/dm in the dilepton mass range 15–2000GeV is measured and corrected to the fullmore » phase space. The double-differential cross section d2σ/dmd|y| is also measured over the mass range 20 to 1500GeV and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4. In addition, the ratios of the normalized differential cross sections measured at √s = 7 and 8TeV are presented. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) orders using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs). The results agree with the NNLO theoretical predictions computed with FEWZ 3.1 using the CT10 NNLO and NNPDF2.1 NNLO PDFs. Furthermore, the measured double-differential cross section and ratio of normalized differential cross sections are sufficiently precise to constrain the proton PDFs.« less

  18. Measurement of the differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections in proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.,

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections are presented using an integrated luminosity of 4.5(4.8) inverse femtobarns in the dimuon (dielectron) channel of proton-proton collision data recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z-peak region (60-120 GeV) is \\sigma(\\ell \\ell) = 986.4 +/- 0.6 (stat.) +/- 5.9 (exp. syst.) +/- 21.7 (th. syst.) +/- 21.7 (lum.) pb for the combination of the dimuon and dielectron channels. Differential cross sections $d\\sigma/dm$ for the dimuon, dielectron, and combined channels are measured in the mass range 15 to 1500 GeV and corrected to the full phase space. Results are also presented for the measurement of the double-differential cross section d^2\\sigma/dm d |y| in the dimuon channel over the mass range 20 to 1500 GeV and absolute dimuon rapidity from 0 to 2.4. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading orders using various sets of parton distribution functions.

  19. First Measurement of the Muon Anti-Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic Double-Differential Cross-Section

    SciTech Connect

    Grange, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation presents the first measurement of the muon antineutrino charged current quasi-elastic double-differential cross section. These data significantly extend the knowledge of neutrino and antineutrino interactions in the GeV range, a region that has recently come under scrutiny due to a number of conflicting experimental results. To maximize the precision of this measurement, three novel techniques were employed to measure the neutrino background component of the data set. Representing the first measurements of the neutrino contribution to an accelerator-based antineutrino beam in the absence of a magnetic field, the successful execution of these techniques carry implications for current and future neutrino experiments.

  20. Measurement of the double-differential inclusive jet cross section in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

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Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Barbieri, R; Baty, A; Bi, R; Bierwagen, K; Brandt, S; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Demiragli, Z; Di Matteo, L; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Hsu, D; Iiyama, Y; Innocenti, G M; Klute, M; Kovalskyi, D; Krajczar, K; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Marini, A C; Mcginn, C; Mironov, C; Narayanan, S; Niu, X; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Stephans, G S F; Sumorok, K; Tatar, K; Varma, M; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wang, J; Wang, T W; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Zhukova, V; Benvenuti, A C; Chatterjee, R M; Evans, A; Finkel, A; Gude, A; Hansen, P; Kalafut, S; Kao, S C; Kubota, Y; Lesko, Z; Mans, J; Nourbakhsh, S; Ruckstuhl, N; Rusack, R; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bartek, R; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Fangmeier, C; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kamalieddin, R; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Malta Rodrigues, A; Meier, F; Monroy, J; Siado, J E; Snow, G R; Stieger, B; Alyari, M; Dolen, J; George, J; Godshalk, A; Harrington, C; 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Eusebi, R; Gilmore, J; Huang, T; Juska, E; Kamon, T; Krutelyov, V; Mueller, R; Pakhotin, Y; Patel, R; Perloff, A; Perniè, L; Rathjens, D; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Tatarinov, A; Ulmer, K A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kunori, S; Lamichhane, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Undleeb, S; Volobouev, I; Wang, Z; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Janjam, R; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Ni, H; Sheldon, P; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Xu, Q; Arenton, M W; Barria, P; Cox, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Neu, C; Sinthuprasith, T; Sun, X; Wang, Y; Wolfe, E; Xia, F; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Gomber, B; Grothe, M; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ruggles, T; Savin, A; Sharma, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Verwilligen, P; Woods, N; Collaboration, Authorinst The Cms

    2016-01-01

    A measurement of the double-differential inclusive jet cross section as a function of jet transverse momentum [Formula: see text] and absolute jet rapidity [Formula: see text] is presented. The analysis is based on proton-proton collisions collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 13[Formula: see text]. The data samples correspond to integrated luminosities of 71 and 44[Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively. Jets are reconstructed with the anti-[Formula: see text] clustering algorithm for two jet sizes, R, of 0.7 and 0.4, in a phase space region covering jet [Formula: see text] up to 2[Formula: see text] and jet rapidity up to [Formula: see text] = 4.7. Predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order precision, complemented with electroweak and nonperturbative corrections, are used to compute the absolute scale and the shape of the inclusive jet cross section. The cross section difference in R, when going to a smaller jet size of 0.4, is best described by Monte Carlo event generators with next-to-leading order predictions matched to parton showering, hadronisation, and multiparton interactions. In the phase space accessible with the new data, this measurement provides a first indication that jet physics is as well understood at [Formula: see text] as at smaller centre-of-mass energies.

  1. Measurement of the Antineutrino Double-Differential Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering Cross Section at MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments, such as DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande, hope to measure charge-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector. In order to do this, they must dramatically reduce their current levels of uncertainty, particularly those due to neutrino-nucleus interaction models. As CP violation is a measure of the difference between the oscillation properties of neutrinos and antineutrinos, data about how the less-studied antineutrinos interact is especially valuable. We present the MINERvA experiment's first double-differential scattering cross sections for antineutrinos on scintillator, in the few-GeV range relevant to experiments such as DUNE and NOvA. We also present total antineutrino-scintillator quasi-elastic cross sections as a function of energy, which we compare to measurements from previous experiments. As well as being useful to help reduce oscillation experiments' uncertainty, our data can also be used to study the prevalence of various cor relation and final-state interaction effects within the nucleus. We compare to models produced by different model generators, and are able to draw first conclusions about the predictions of these models.

  2. Measurement of the antineutrino double-differential charged-current quasi-elastic scattering cross section at MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Cheryl Elizabeth

    Next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments, such as DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande, hope to measure charge-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector. In order to do this, they must dramatically reduce their current levels of uncertainty, particularly those due to neutrino-nucleus interaction models. As CP violation is a measure of the difference between the oscillation properties of neutrinos and antineutrinos, data about how the less-studied antineutrinos interact is especially valuable. We present the MINERvA experiment's first double-differential scattering cross sections for antineutrinos on scintillator, in the few-GeV range relevant to experiments such as DUNE and NOvA. We also present total antineutrino-scintillator quasi-elastic cross sections as a function of energy, which we compare to measurements from previous experiments. As well as being useful to help reduce oscillation experiments' uncertainty, our data can also be used to study the prevalence of various correlation and final-state interaction effects within the nucleus. We compare to models produced by different model generators, and are able to draw first conclusions about the predictions of these models.

  3. Fully Differential Cross Sections for Photo-Double-Ionization of D2_

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Th.; Czasch, A.; Jagutzki, O.; Müller, A.; Mergel, V.; Kheifets, A.; Feagin, J.; Rotenberg, E.; Meigs, G.; Prior, M. H.; Daveau, S.; Landers, A. L.; Cocke, C. L.; Osipov, T.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Dörner, R.

    2004-04-01

    We report the first kinematically complete study of the four-body fragmentation of the D2 molecule following absorption of a single photon. For equal energy sharing of the two electrons and a photon energy of 75.5eV, we observed the relaxation of one of the selection rules valid for He photo-double-ionization and a strong dependence of the electron angular distribution on the orientation of the molecular axis. This effect is reproduced by a model in which a pair of photoionization amplitudes is introduced for the light polarization parallel and perpendicular to the molecular axis.

  4. Neutrino CC0π Double Differential Cross-section on Hydrocarbon at T2K On-axis Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilain, Benjamin

    Interactions through the quasi-elastic charged-current channel are the dominant interactions of neutrinos from long-baseline neutrino experiments. However, relatively large discrepancies have been observed between the measurements from various experiments (MiniBooNE, MINERvA, NOMAD). These lead to a large uncertainty in the interaction model and therefore on the measurement of neutrino oscillations. The Proton Module (PM) is a detector located on-axis in the T2K experiment at 280 m from the target, made uniquely from scintillator planes. The incident neutrino flux covers both the MiniBooNE energy region ( ≲ 2 GeV) and the higher energy region covered by NOMAD measurements. This makes the PM complementary to the ND280 off-axis detector that probes the lower energy region and hence the PM is ideally adapted to probe this apparent discrepancy in the 1-3 GeV region. However, having no magnetic field, only a flux-integrated measurement has been provided so far. In this Monte-Carlo (MC) study, we present first the muon momentum determination in the on-axis detector using the downstream iron module. We show then the first double differential CC0π neutrino cross-section MC study using muon angle and momentum observables.

  5. Double differential cross sections for proton induced electron emission from molecular analogues of DNA constituents for energies in the Bragg peak region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudek, Benedikt; Bennett, Daniel; Bug, Marion U.; Wang, Mingjie; Baek, Woon Yong; Buhr, Ticia; Hilgers, Gerhard; Champion, Christophe; Rabus, Hans

    2016-09-01

    For track structure simulations in the Bragg peak region, measured electron emission cross sections of DNA constituents are required as input for developing parameterized model functions representing the scattering probabilities. In the present work, double differential cross sections were measured for the electron emission from vapor-phase pyrimidine, tetrahydrofuran, and trimethyl phosphate that are structural analogues to the base, the sugar, and the phosphate residue of the DNA, respectively. The range of proton energies was from 75 keV to 135 keV, the angles ranged from 15° to 135°, and the electron energies were measured from 10 eV to 200 eV. Single differential and total electron emission cross sections are derived by integration over angle and electron energy and compared to the semi-empirical Hansen-Kocbach-Stolterfoht (HKS) model and a quantum mechanical calculation employing the first Born approximation with corrected boundary conditions (CB1). The CB1 provides the best prediction of double and single differential cross section, while total cross sections can be fitted with semi-empirical models. The cross sections of the three samples are proportional to their total number of valence electrons.

  6. Bethe binary-encounter peaks in the double-differential cross sections for high-energy electron-impact ionization of H2 and He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Agnihotri, A. N.; Stia, C. R.; Fojón, O. A.; Rivarola, R. D.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2010-11-01

    We study the Bethe binary-encounter (BE) region in the ejected-electron double-differential emission spectrum of H2 and He targets in collisions with 8-keV electrons. We compare the absolute cross sections for these isoelectronic systems at high emission energies. The experimental data are analyzed in terms of a state-of-the-art theoretical model based on a two-effective-center approximation. In the case of the H2 molecule the binary peak in the double-differential cross sections (DDCS) is enhanced due to the two-center Young-type interference. The observed undulation in the DDCS ratio is explained in terms of the combined contributions of the Compton profile mismatch and the interference effect. The influence of the interference effect is thus observed for higher-energy electrons compared to most of the earlier studies which focused on low-energy electrons produced in soft collisions.

  7. Bethe binary-encounter peaks in the double-differential cross sections for high-energy electron-impact ionization of H{sub 2} and He

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, S.; Agnihotri, A. N.; Tribedi, L. C.; Stia, C. R.; Fojon, O. A.; Rivarola, R. D.

    2010-11-15

    We study the Bethe binary-encounter (BE) region in the ejected-electron double-differential emission spectrum of H{sub 2} and He targets in collisions with 8-keV electrons. We compare the absolute cross sections for these isoelectronic systems at high emission energies. The experimental data are analyzed in terms of a state-of-the-art theoretical model based on a two-effective-center approximation. In the case of the H{sub 2} molecule the binary peak in the double-differential cross sections (DDCS) is enhanced due to the two-center Young-type interference. The observed undulation in the DDCS ratio is explained in terms of the combined contributions of the Compton profile mismatch and the interference effect. The influence of the interference effect is thus observed for higher-energy electrons compared to most of the earlier studies which focused on low-energy electrons produced in soft collisions.

  8. Double-differential fragmentation cross-section measurements of 95 MeV/nucleon 12C beams on thin targets for hadron therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudouet, J.; Juliani, D.; Labalme, M.; Cussol, D.; Angélique, J. C.; Braunn, B.; Colin, J.; Finck, Ch.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Guérin, H.; Henriquet, P.; Krimmer, J.; Rousseau, M.; Saint-Laurent, M. G.; Salvador, S.

    2013-08-01

    During therapeutic treatment with heavy ions like carbon, the beam undergoes nuclear fragmentation and secondary light charged particles, in particular protons and α particles, are produced. To estimate the dose deposited into the tumors and the surrounding healthy tissues, an accurate prediction on the fluences of these secondary fragments is necessary. Nowadays, a very limited set of double differential carbon fragmentation cross sections are being measured in the energy range used in hadron therapy (40 to 400 MeV/nucleon). Therefore, new measurements are performed to determine the double differential cross section of carbon on different thin targets. This work describes the experimental results of an experiment performed on May 2011 at GANIL. The double differential cross sections and the angular distributions of secondary fragments produced in the 12C fragmentation at 95 MeV/nucleon on thin targets (C, CH2, Al, Al2O3, Ti, and PMMA) have been measured. The experimental setup will be precisely described, the systematic error study will be explained and all the experimental data will be presented.

  9. Measurement of double differential charged-particle emission cross sections for reactions induced by 26 MeV protons and FKK model analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y.; Aoto, A.; Kashimoto, H.

    1994-06-01

    Double differential charged-particle emission cross sections of proton-induced reactions have been measured for {sup nat}C, {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Si, {sup 98}Mo, {sup 106}Pd, {sup 159}Tb and {sup 181}Ta at energies around 26 MeV. Several (p,p{prime}) and (p,n) data for {sup 98}Mo and {sup 106}Pd in the incident energy range from 12 to 26 MeV are analysed in terms of the Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin model, in order to study preequilibrium nucleon emission from nucleon-induced reactions.

  10. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  11. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  12. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  13. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  14. Sensitivity studies based on the EFT parametrization in the double differential cross section for the H↦ ZZ * ↦4 l decay channel at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, G.

    2016-01-01

    After the Higgs boson discovery, great interest was given to the measurements of its properties and studies have been performed to test its nature and probe whether it is the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson or not. In this scenario, a set of pseudo-observables characterizing the properties of the Higgs decays are defined in generic extensions of the SM with no new particles below the Higgs mass. A phenomenological study is presented in the context of the Effective Field Theory (EFT) approach to the Higgs Physics. The expected sensitivity with the next LHC runs to the EFT parameters has been evaluated using the measurement of the double differential cross section for the H↦ ZZ * ↦4 l decay channel.

  15. Measurement of J/ψ and ψ(2S) Prompt Double-Differential Cross Sections in pp Collisions at sqrt[s]=7 TeV.

    PubMed

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    2015-05-15

    The double-differential cross sections of promptly produced J/ψ and ψ(2S) mesons are measured in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=7 TeV, as a function of transverse momentum p_{T} and absolute rapidity |y|. The analysis uses J/ψ and ψ(2S) dimuon samples collected by the CMS experiment, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.55 and 4.90 fb^{-1}, respectively. The results are based on a two-dimensional analysis of the dimuon invariant mass and decay length, and extend to p_{T}=120 and 100 GeV for the J/ψ and ψ(2S), respectively, when integrated over the interval |y|<1.2. The ratio of the ψ(2S) to J/ψ cross sections is also reported for |y|<1.2, over the range 10cross sections and ratio have been measured.

  16. Measurement of J / ψ and ψ ( 2 S ) Prompt Double-Differential Cross Sections in p p Collisions at s = 7 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2015-05-14

    The double-differential cross sections of promptly produced J/ψ and ψ(2S) mesons are measured in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV, as a function of transverse momentum pT and absolute rapidity |y|. The analysis uses J/ψ and ψ(2S) dimuon samples collected by the CMS experiment, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.55 and 4.90 fb⁻¹, respectively. The results are based on a two-dimensional analysis of the dimuon invariant mass and decay length, and extend to pT=120 and 100 GeV for the J/ψ and ψ(2S), respectively, when integrated over the interval |y|<1.2. The ratio of the ψ(2S) to J/ψ cross sections is also reportedmore » for |y|<1.2, over the range 10T<100 GeV. These are the highest pT values for which the cross sections and ratio have been measured.« less

  17. Measurement of the double-differential inclusive jet cross section in proton-proton collisions at √{s} = 13 {TeV}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Visscher, S. De; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Forthomme, L.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, J.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Elgammal, S.; Mohamed, A.; Mohammed, Y.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.

    2016-08-01

    A measurement of the double-differential inclusive jet cross section as a function of jet transverse momentum pT and absolute jet rapidity |y | is presented. The analysis is based on proton-proton collisions collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 {TeV}. The data samples correspond to integrated luminosities of 71 and 44 {pb}^ {-1} for |y |<3 and 3.2<|y |<4.7, respectively. Jets are reconstructed with the anti-kt clustering algorithm for two jet sizes, R, of 0.7 and 0.4, in a phase space region covering jet pT up to 2 {TeV} and jet rapidity up to |y | = 4.7. Predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order precision, complemented with electroweak and nonperturbative corrections, are used to compute the absolute scale and the shape of the inclusive jet cross section. The cross section difference in R, when going to a smaller jet size of 0.4, is best described by Monte Carlo event generators with next-to-leading order predictions matched to parton showering, hadronisation, and multiparton interactions. In the phase space accessible with the new data, this measurement provides a first indication that jet physics is as well understood at √{s}=13 {TeV} as at smaller centre-of-mass energies.

  18. Measurement of the double-differential inclusive jet cross section in proton-proton collisions at √s = 13 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-08-11

    Here, a measurement of the double-differential inclusive jet cross section as a function of jet transverse momentum pT and absolute jet rapidity |y| is presented. The analysis is based on proton-proton collisions collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The data samples correspond to integrated luminosities of 71 and 44 inverse picobarns for |y| < 3 and 3.2 < |y| < 4.7, respectively. Jets are reconstructed with the anti-kt clustering algorithm for two jet sizes, R, of 0.7 and 0.4, in a phase space region covering jet pT up to 2 TeV and jet rapidity up to |y| = 4.7. Predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order precision, complemented with electroweak and nonperturbative corrections, are used to compute the absolute scale and the shape of the inclusive jet cross section. The cross section difference in R, when going to a smaller jet size of 0.4, is best described by Monte Carlo event generators with next-to-leading order predictions matched to parton showering, hadronisation, and multiparton interactions. In the phase space accessible with the new data, this measurement provides a first indication that jet physics is as well understood at √s = 13 TeV as at smaller centre-of-mass energies.

  19. Measurement of the double-differential inclusive jet cross section in proton-proton collisions at √s = 13 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-08-11

    Here, a measurement of the double-differential inclusive jet cross section as a function of jet transverse momentum pT and absolute jet rapidity |y| is presented. The analysis is based on proton-proton collisions collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The data samples correspond to integrated luminosities of 71 and 44 inverse picobarns for |y| < 3 and 3.2 < |y| < 4.7, respectively. Jets are reconstructed with the anti-kt clustering algorithm for two jet sizes, R, of 0.7 and 0.4, in a phase space region covering jet pT up to 2 TeVmore » and jet rapidity up to |y| = 4.7. Predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order precision, complemented with electroweak and nonperturbative corrections, are used to compute the absolute scale and the shape of the inclusive jet cross section. The cross section difference in R, when going to a smaller jet size of 0.4, is best described by Monte Carlo event generators with next-to-leading order predictions matched to parton showering, hadronisation, and multiparton interactions. In the phase space accessible with the new data, this measurement provides a first indication that jet physics is as well understood at √s = 13 TeV as at smaller centre-of-mass energies.« less

  20. Measurement and QCD analysis of double-differential inclusive jet cross sections in pp collisions at s=8$$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV and cross section ratios to 2.76 and 7 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2017-03-01

    A measurement of the double-differential inclusive jet cross section as a function of the jet transverse momentum pT and the absolute jet rapidity abs(y) is presented. Data from LHC proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns, have been collected with the CMS detector. Jets are reconstructed using the anti-kT clustering algorithm with a size parameter of 0.7 in a phase space region covering jet pT from 74 GeV up to 2.5 TeV and jet absolute rapidity up to abs(y) = 3.0. The low-pT jet range between 21 and 74 GeV ismore » also studied up to abs(y) = 4.7, using a dedicated data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 inverse picobarns. The measured jet cross section is corrected for detector effects and compared with the predictions from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order (NLO) using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDF). Cross section ratios to the corresponding measurements performed at 2.76 and 7 TeV are presented. From the measured double-differential jet cross section, the value of the strong coupling constant evaluated at the Z mass is alpha[S(M[Z]) = 0.1164 +0.0060 -0.0043, where the errors include the PDF, scale, nonperturbative effects and experimental uncertainties, using the CT10 NLO PDFs. Improved constraints on PDFs based on the inclusive jet cross section measurement are presented.« less

  1. Measurement of pion induced neutron-production double-differential cross sections on Fe and Pb at 870 MeV and 2.1 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Y.; Shigyo, N.; Satoh, D.; Kunieda, S.; Watanabe, T.; Ishimoto, S.; Tenzou, H.; Maehata, K.; Ishibashi, K.; Nakamoto, T.; Numajiri, M.; Meigo, S.; Takada, H.

    2004-08-01

    Neutron-production double-differential cross sections for 870 MeV π+ and π- and 2.1 GeV π+ mesons incident on iron and lead targets were measured with NE213 liquid scintillators by time-of-flight technique. NE213 liquid scintillators 12.7 cm in diameter and 12.7 cm thick were placed in directions of 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150° . The typical flight path length was 1.5 m . Neutron detection efficiencies were evaluated by calculation results of SCINFUL and CECIL codes. The experimental results were compared with JAERI quantum molecular dynamics code. For the meson incident reactions, adoption of NN in-medium effects was slightly useful for reproducing 870 MeV π+ -incident neutron yields at neutron energies of 10 30 MeV , as was the case for proton incident reactions. The π- incident reaction generates more neutrons than π+ incidence as the number of nucleons in targets decrease.

  2. Measurement of the double differential diject mass cross section in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the analysis of the double differential dijet mass cross section, measured at the D0 detector in Batavia, IL, using p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center of mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. The dijet mass was calculated using the two highest pT jets in the event, with approximately 0.7 fb-1 of data collected between 2004 and 2005. The analysis was presented in bins of dijet mass (MJJ) and rapidity (y), and extends the measurement farther in MJJ and y than any previous measurement. Corrections due to detector effects were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation and applied to data. The errors on the measurement consist of statistical and systematic errors, of which the Jet Energy Scale was the largest. The final result was compared to next-to-leading order theory and good agreement was found. These results may be used in the determination of the proton parton distribution functions and to set limits on new physics.

  3. Charge and energy-dependence of the Gaussian description of the triply differential cross sections for equal-energy sharing photo-double-ionization of two-electrons ions

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S.; Garibotti, C.R.

    2005-03-01

    We evaluate triply differential cross sections (TDCSs) for the photo-double-ionization (PDI) of He-like ions, and equal electron energy sharing, by using the SC3 model for the three-body final state. These cross sections are fitted with the usual dipolar Gaussian form which is found able to describe the theoretical TDCS, and could be applied for the interpretation of experimental data even at intermediate photon energies. We determine the dependence of the correlation factor on the excess energy (E{sub f}) and target nuclear charge (Z). We find that its width has an E{sub f}{sup 1/4} dependence near the atomic double-ionization threshold but departs from this law and attains a plateau as the excess energy increases. We compare our results with the predictions of classical and semiclassical Wannier approaches.

  4. Measurement of the double-differential high-mass Drell-Yan cross section in pp collisions at √{s}=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the double-differential cross section for the Drell-Yan Z/γ ∗ → ℓ + ℓ - and photon-induced γγ → ℓ + ℓ - processes where ℓ is an electron or muon. The measurement is performed for invariant masses of the lepton pairs, m ℓℓ, between 116 GeV and 1500 GeV using a sample of 20 .3 fb-1 of pp collisions data at centre-of-mass energy of √{s}=8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2012. The data are presented double differentially in invariant mass and absolute dilepton rapidity as well as in invariant mass and absolute pseudorapidity separation of the lepton pair. The single-differential cross section as a function of m ℓℓ is also reported. The electron and muon channel measurements are combined and a total experimental precision of better than 1% is achieved at low m ℓℓ. A comparison to next-to-next-to-leading order perturbative QCD predictions using several recent parton distribution functions and including next-to-leading order electroweak effects indicates the potential of the data to constrain parton distribution functions. In particular, a large impact of the data on the photon PDF is demonstrated. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Measurement of the double-differential high-mass Drell-Yan cross section in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-08-01

    This study presents a measurement of the double-differential cross section for the Drell-Yan Z/γ* → ℓ+ℓ– and photon-induced γγ → ℓ+ℓ– processes where ℓ is an electron or muon. The measurement is performed for invariant masses of the lepton pairs, mℓℓ, between 116 GeV and 1500 GeV using a sample of 20.3 fb–1 of pp collisions data at centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2012. The data are presented double differentially in invariant mass and absolute dilepton rapidity as well as in invariant mass and absolute pseudorapidity separation of themore » lepton pair. The single-differential cross section as a function of mℓℓ is also reported. The electron and muon channel measurements are combined and a total experimental precision of better than 1% is achieved at low mℓℓ. A comparison to next-to-next-to-leading order perturbative QCD predictions using several recent parton distribution functions and including next-to-leading order electroweak effects indicates the potential of the data to constrain parton distribution functions. In particular, a large impact of the data on the photon PDF is demonstrated.« less

  6. Measurement of the double-differential high-mass Drell-Yan cross section in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s}=8 $ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’amen, G.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dumancic, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisen, M.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghneimat, M.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuli, F.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; Gongadze, A.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goudet, C. R.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gravila, P. M.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Groh, S.; Grohs, J. P.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guan, W.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Hadef, A.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hartmann, N. M.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J. J.; Heinrich, L.; Heinz, C.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Henkelmann, S.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn’ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S. -C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huo, P.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ito, F.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanneau, F.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G. -Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, H.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, S.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Juste Rozas, A.; Köhler, M. K.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kaluza, A.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneti, S.; Kanjir, L.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Kato, C.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Kentaro, K.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kido, S.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M. H.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. 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B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-08-01

    This study presents a measurement of the double-differential cross section for the Drell-Yan Z/γ* → ℓ+ and photon-induced γγ → ℓ+ processes where ℓ is an electron or muon. The measurement is performed for invariant masses of the lepton pairs, mℓℓ, between 116 GeV and 1500 GeV using a sample of 20.3 fb–1 of pp collisions data at centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2012. The data are presented double differentially in invariant mass and absolute dilepton rapidity as well as in invariant mass and absolute pseudorapidity separation of the lepton pair. The single-differential cross section as a function of mℓℓ is also reported. The electron and muon channel measurements are combined and a total experimental precision of better than 1% is achieved at low mℓℓ. A comparison to next-to-next-to-leading order perturbative QCD predictions using several recent parton distribution functions and including next-to-leading order electroweak effects indicates the potential of the data to constrain parton distribution functions. In particular, a large impact of the data on the photon PDF is demonstrated.

  7. Measurement and QCD analysis of double-differential inclusive jet cross-sections in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 8 TeV and ratios to 2.76 and 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-09-17

    A measurement of the double-differential inclusive jet cross section as a function of the jet transverse momentum $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ and the absolute jet rapidity $|y|$ is presented. Data from LHC proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} = $ 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$, have been collected with the CMS detector. Jets are reconstructed using the anti-$k_{\\mathrm{T}}$ clustering algorithm with a size parameter of 0.7 in a phase space region covering jet $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ from 74 GeV up to 2.5 TeV and jet absolute rapidity up to $|y|= $ 3.0. The low-$p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ jet range between 21 and 74 GeV is also studied up to $|y|= $ 4.7, using a dedicated data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 pb$^{-1}$. The measured jet cross section is corrected for detector effects and compared with the predictions from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order (NLO) using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDF). Cross section ratios to the corresponding measurements performed at 2.76 and 7 TeV are presented. From the measured double-differential jet cross section, the value of the strong coupling constant evaluated at the Z mass is $\\alpha_\\mathrm{S}(M_{\\mathrm{ Z }}) = 0.1164^{+0.0060}_{-0.0043}$, where the errors include the PDF, scale, nonperturbative effects and experimental uncertainties, using the CT10 NLO PDFs. Improved constraints on PDFs based on the inclusive jet cross section measurement are presented.

  8. Computing Determinants by Double-Crossing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leggett, Deanna; Perry, John; Torrence, Eve

    2011-01-01

    Dodgson's method of computing determinants is attractive, but fails if an interior entry of an intermediate matrix is zero. This paper reviews Dodgson's method and introduces a generalization, the double-crossing method, that provides a workaround for many interesting cases.

  9. Fully differential single-photon double photoionization of atomic magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, F. L.; Rescigno, T. N.; McCurdy, C. W.

    2016-12-01

    The valence-shell double ionization of atomic magnesium is calculated using a grid-based representation of the 3 s2 electron configuration in the presence of a fully occupied frozen-core configuration of the remaining ten electrons. Atomic orbitals are constructed from an underlying finite-element discrete variable representation that facilitates accurate representation of the interaction between the inner-shell electrons with those entering the continuum. Length and velocity gauge results are compared with recent theoretical calculations and experimental measurements for the total double-, single-, and triple-differential cross sections, particularly at the photon energy of 55.49 eV for the last one. Comparison between the similar processes of double ionization of the n s2 atoms helium, beryllium, and magnesium further illuminates the role of valence-shell electron correlation in atomic targets with heliumlike electronic configurations and symmetry.

  10. The cross section for double Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Employing elementary methods in nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics, the cross section for gamma sub 0 + e yields e + gamma + gamma is computed for arbitrary energy in the spectrum of the outgoing photons. The final result is given, differential in the energy of one of these photons, for the case where the incident photon is unpolarized and has energy E sub 0 much less than mc-squared, a polarization sum and angular integration being performed for the final-state photons. The cross section has a simple algebraic form resulting from contributions from the sum of squared direct and exchange amplitudes; interference terms from these amplitudes do not contribute to the angular-integrated cross section.

  11. Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Double-Differential Charged Current Quasi-Elastic Like Cross Section on a Hydrocarbon Target at Ev ~ 3.5 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The MINERvA Experiment (Main Injector Experiment v ₋ A interaction) [1] is a highly segmented detector of neutrinos, able to record events with high precision (over than thirteen million event in a four year run), using the NuMI Beam (Neutrino Main Injector) at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory [2]. This thesis presents a measurement of the Charged Current Quasi-Elastic Like1 vμ interaction on polystyrene scintillator (CH) in the MINERvA experiment with neutrino energies between 1.5 and 10 GeV. We use data taken between2 March 2010 and April 2012. The interactions were selected by requiring a negative muon, a reconstructed and identified proton, no michel electrons in the final state (in order to get rid of soft pions decaying) and a low calorimetric recoil energy away from the interaction vertex. The analysis is performed on 66,214 quasi-elastic like event candidates in the detectors tracker region with an estimated purity of 74%. The final measurement reported is a double differential cross sections in terms of the muon longitudinal and transversal momentum observables.

  12. View of double floor boards with mortises cross beams, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of double floor boards with mortises cross beams, showing spikes and flooring nails (Lower board layer exposed) - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  13. View of cross beam with mortise and underlying double floor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of cross beam with mortise and underlying double floor boards, following removal of structural members from stream - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  14. Nuclear Recoil Cross Sections from Time-dependent Studies of Two-Photon Double Ionization of Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, Daniel A.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2009-12-21

    We examine the sensitivity of nuclear recoil cross sections produced by two-photon double ionization of helium to the underlying triple differential cross sections (TDCS) used in their computation. We show that this sensitivity is greatest in the energy region just below the threshold for sequential double ionization. Accurate TDCS, extracted from non-perturbative solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, are used here in new computations of the nuclear recoil cross section.

  15. Doubly differential cross sections for galactic heavy-ion fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Norbury, John W.; Khandelwal, Govind S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1987-01-01

    An abrasion-ablation T-matrix formulation is applied to the calculation of double differential-cross sections in projectile fragmentation of 2.1 GeV/nucleon O-16 on Be-9 and 86 MeV/nucleon C-12 on C-12 and Ag-108. An exponential parameterization of the ablation T-matrix is used and the total width of the intermediate states is taken as a parameter. Fitted values of the total width to experimental results are used to predict the lifetime of the ablation stage and indicate a decay time on the order of 10 to the -19th power sec.

  16. Cross sections for non-sequential two-photon double ionization of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feist, Johannes; Nagele, Stefan; Pazourek, Renate; Persson, Emil; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Schneider, Barry; Collins, Lee

    2008-05-01

    The generalized cross sections for non-sequential two-photon double ionization of helium at photon energies from 39.5,V to 54.4,V have been the subject of several recent theoretical studies. Quantitative agreement between the different approaches has not yet been reached. In this contribution, we present converged results for the total integrated and triply differential cross sections for the above process, which are based on the direct integration of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation. We compare our data with calculations from other authors and investigate to what extent electronic correlation in the representation of the double continuum affects the cross sections. We also study the influence of the pulse shape on the value of the cross sections extracted from time-dependent approaches.

  17. Local Deplanation Of Double Reinforced Beam Cross Section Under Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltov, Anguel; Yanakieva, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Bending of beams, double reinforced by means of thin composite layers, is considered in the study. Approximate numerical solution is proposed, considering transitional boundary areas, where smooth quadratic transition of the elasticity modulus and deformations take place. Deplanation of the cross section is also accounted for in the areas. Their thickness is found equalizing the total stiffness of the cross section and the layer stiffness. Deplanation of the cross section of the transitional area is determined via the longitudinal deformation in the reinforcing layer, accounting for the equilibrium between the internal and the external moment, generated by the longitudinal stresses in the cross section. A numerical example is given as an illustration demonstrating model's plausibility. The model allows the design and the calculation of recycled concrete beams double reinforced by means of thin layers. The approach is in agreement with modern design of nearly zero energy buildings (NZEB).

  18. Diallel crossing among doubled haploids of cucumber reveals significant reciprocal-cross differences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumber is an excellent plant for studying organellar effects on phenotypes because chloroplasts show maternal and mitochondria paternal transmission. We produced doubled haploids (DH) from divergent cucumber populations, generated reciprocal crosses in a diallel mating scheme, measured fresh and d...

  19. Washington Double Star Catalog Cross Index (1950 position sort)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A machine-readable version of the Washington Catalog of Visual Double Stars (WDS) was prepared in 1984 on the basis of a data file that was collected and maintained for more than a century by a succession of double-star observers. Although this catalog is being continually updated, a new copy for distribution is not expected to be available for a few years. The WDS contains DM numbers, but many of these are listed only in the notes, which makes it difficult to search for double-star information, except by position. Hence, a cross index that provides complete DM identifications is desirable, and it appears useful to add HD numbers for systems in that catalog. Aitken Double Star (ADS) numbers were retained from the WDS, but no attempt was made to correct these except for obvious errors.

  20. Parametrizations and dynamical analysis of angle-integrated cross sections for double photoionization including nondipole effects

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, Andrei Y.; Starace, Anthony F.; Manakov, N. L.; Meremianin, A. V.; Kheifets, A. S.; Bray, Igor

    2005-11-15

    Similarly to differential cross sections for one-electron photoionization, the doubly differential cross section for double photoionization (DPI) may be conveniently described by four parameters: the singly differential (with respect to energy sharing) cross section ({sigma}{sub 0}), the dipole asymmetry parameter ({beta}), and two nondipole asymmetry parameters ({gamma} and {delta}). Here we derive two model-independent representations for these parameters for DPI from a {sup 1}S{sub 0} atomic bound state: (i) in terms of one-dimensional integrals of the polarization-invariant DPI amplitudes and (ii) in terms of the exact two-electron reduced matrix elements. For DPI of He at excess energies, E{sub exc}, of 100 eV, 450 eV, and 1 keV, we present numerical results for the asymmetry parameters within the framework of the convergent close-coupling theory and compare them with results of lowest-order (in the interelectron interaction) perturbation theory (LOPT). The results for E{sub exc}=1 keV exhibit a nondipole asymmetry that is large enough to be easily measured experimentally. We find excellent agreement between our LOPT results and other theoretical predictions and experimental data for total cross sections and ratios of double to single ionization cross sections for K-shell DPI from several multielectron atoms.

  1. Negative differential photovoltage in a biased double heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žukauskas, A.; Meškauskas, D.; Jakštas, V.; Vitta, P.

    2013-02-01

    We report on negative differential photovoltage (DPV), which is observed under modulated photoexcitation of a double heterojunction, when the common positive photovoltage increment due to photocurrent modulation is suppressed by high bias current. The negative DPV was shown to be due to the effect of photoconductivity on the series resistance of the heterojunction and due to the modulation of junction temperature. In AlGaInP double heterojunction light-emitting diodes, the magnitudes of negative DPV in the range of -10 μV correspond to the estimated variation of series resistance and junction temperature as low as ˜10-3 Ω and ˜10-2 K, respectively.

  2. Factorization of differential expansion for antiparallel double-braid knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.

    2016-09-01

    Continuing the quest for exclusive Racah matrices, which are needed for evaluation of colored arborescent-knot polynomials in Chern-Simons theory, we suggest to extract them from a new kind of a double-evolution — that of the antiparallel double-braids, which is a simple two-parametric family of two-bridge knots, generalizing the one-parametric family of twist knots. In the case of rectangular representations R = [ r s ] we found an evidence that the corresponding differential expansion miraculously factorizes and can be obtained from that for the twist knots. This reduces the problem of rectangular exclusive Racah to constructing the answers for just a few twist knots. We develop a recent conjecture on the structure of differential expansion for the simplest members of this family (the trefoil and the figure-eight knot) and provide the exhaustive answer for the first unknown case of R = [33]. The answer includes HOMFLY of arbitrary twist and double-braid knots and Racah matrices overline{S} and S — what allows to calculate [33]-colored polynomials for arbitrary arborescent (double-fat) knots. For generic rectangular representations fully described are only the contributions of the single-floor pyramids. One step still remains to be done.

  3. Computer analysis of the negative differential resistance switching phenomenon of double-injection devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, Tsay-Jiu

    1989-01-01

    By directly solving the semiconductor differential equations for the double-injection (DI) devices involving two interacting deep levels, the authors studied the negative differential resistance switching characteristic and its relationship with the device dimension, doping level, and dependence on the deep impurity profile. Computer simulation showed that although one can increase the threshold voltage by increasing the device length, the excessive holding voltage that would follow would put this device in a very limited application such as pulse power source. The excessive leakage current in the low conductance state also jeopardizes the attempt to use the device for any practical purpose. Unless there are new materials and deep impurities found that have a great differential hole and electron capture cross sections and a reasonable energy bandgap for low intrinsic carrier concentration, no big improvement in the fate of DI devices is expected in the near future.

  4. Low Frequency NQR using Double Contact Cross-relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, David; Smith, John A. S.

    2000-02-01

    A cross-relaxation technique is described which involves two spin contacts per double reso-nance cycle. The result is an improvement in signal to noise ratio particularly at low frequencies. Experimental spectra and analyses are presented: 14N in ammonium sulphate showing that the tech-nique gives essentially the same information as previous studies; 14N in ammonium dichromate determining e2Qq/h as (76±3) kHz and η = 0.84±.04; 7Li in lithium acetylacetonate for which the spectrum (corrected for Zeeman distortion) yields e2Qq/h = (152 ±5) kHz and η=.5 ±.2. Calculated spectra are presented to demonstrate the η dependence of the line shapes for 7Li.

  5. Toward multi-differential cross sections: measuring two angularities on a single jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2014-09-01

    The analytic study of differential cross sections in QCD has typically focused on individual observables, such as mass or thrust, to great success. Here, we present a first study of double differential jet cross sections considering two recoil-free angularities measured on a single jet. By analyzing the phase space defined by the two angularities and using methods from soft-collinear effective theory, we prove that the double differential cross section factorizes at the boundaries of the phase space. We also show that the cross section in the bulk of the phase space cannot be factorized using only soft and collinear modes, excluding the possibility of a global factorization theorem in soft-collinear effective theory. Nevertheless, we are able to define a simple interpolation procedure that smoothly connects the factorization theorem at one boundary to the other. We present an explicit example of this at next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy and show that the interpolation is unique up to α {/s 4} order in the exponent of the cross section, under reasonable assumptions. This is evidence that the interpolation is sufficiently robust to account for all logarithms in the bulk of phase space to the accuracy of the boundary factorization theorem. We compare our analytic calculation of the double differential cross section to Monte Carlo simulation and find qualitative agreement. Because our arguments rely on general structures of the phase space, we expect that much of our analysis would be relevant for the study of phenomenologically well-motivated observables, such as N -subjettiness, energy correlation functions, and planar flow.

  6. Benchmark Calculations of Electron-Impact Differential Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, I.; Bostock, C. J.; Fursa, D. V.; Hines, C. W.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2011-05-11

    The calculation of electron-atom excitation and ionization cross section is considered in both the non-relativistic and relativistic scattering theory. We consider electron collisions with H, He, Cs, and Hg. Differential cross sections for elastic scattering and ionization are presented.

  7. Projectile and Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Electromagnetic Dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Adamczyk, Anne; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Differential cross sections for electromagnetic dissociation in nuclear collisions are calculated for the first time. In order to be useful for three - dimensional transport codes, these cross sections have been calculated in both the projectile and lab frames. The formulas for these cross sections are such that they can be immediately used in space radiation transport codes. Only a limited amount of data exists, but the comparison between theory and experiment is good.

  8. Double Cross-Validation in Multiple Regression: A Method of Estimating the Stability of Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, R. Kevin

    In multiple regression analysis, where resulting predictive equation effectiveness is subject to shrinkage, it is especially important to evaluate result replicability. Double cross-validation is an empirical method by which an estimate of invariance or stability can be obtained from research data. A procedure for double cross-validation is…

  9. High Energy Measurement of the Deuteron Photodisintegration Differential Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Elaine

    2002-05-01

    New measurements of the high energy deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section were made at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia. Two experiments were performed. Experiment E96-003 was performed in experimental Hall C. The measurements were designed to extend the highest energy differential cross section values to 5.5 GeV incident photon energy at forward angles. This builds upon previous high energy measurements in which scaling consistent with the pQCD constituent counting rules was observed at 90 degrees and 70 degrees in the center of mass. From the new measurements, a threshold for the onset of constituent counting rule scaling seems present at transverse momentum approximately 1.3 GeV/c. The second experiment, E99-008, was performed in experimental Hall A. The measurements were designed to explore the angular distribution of the differential cross section at constant energy. The measurements were made symmetric about 90 degrees

  10. Differential cross sections for the single ionization of H2 by 75 keV proton impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, A.; Gulyás, L.

    2017-02-01

    We have calculated the double and triple differential cross sections for electron ejection with energy of 14.6 eV in single ionization of H2 by 75 keV proton impact. A molecular version of the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state approach is applied, where the interaction between the projectile and the residual molecular ion is considered more properly than in previous applications of the method. For triple differential cross sections, the present results are in better agreement with the experimental data than those of other descriptions when large momentum transfer values are considered. For double differential cross sections the experimental data are reproduced quite well for both coherent and incoherent proton beams.

  11. Cross Coursing in Mathematics: Physical Modelling in Differential Equations Crossing to Discrete Dynamical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    We give an example of cross coursing in which a subject or approach in one course in undergraduate mathematics is used in a completely different course. This situation crosses falling body modelling in an upper level differential equations course into a modest discrete dynamical systems unit of a first-year mathematics course. (Contains 1 figure.)

  12. Differential cross sections for positron-xenon elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, J. P.; Surko, C. M.; McEachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    2006-06-15

    Absolute measurements of differential cross sections for the elastic scattering of positrons from xenon are made at 2, 5 and 8 eV using a trap-based beam and the technique of measuring scattering cross sections in a strong magnetic field. Calculations are carried out using the relativistic Dirac equations with a static plus polarization potential. Generally good absolute agreement is found between experiment and theory.

  13. Differentiating of cross-reactions in patients with latex allergy with the use of ISAC test

    PubMed Central

    Chełmińska, Marta; Różyło, Anna; Kołakowska, Agata; Jassem, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Differentiating between cross-reactivity and double sensitization is still a challenging issue in allergology. Aim To differentiate cross-reactions accompanying latex allergy with the use of the ISAC test. Material and methods Thirty-nine patients reporting immediate allergic reactions to latex were enrolled into the study (group A). The control group was comprised of 41 patients with allergic diseases not associated with latex (group B) and 20 healthy individuals (group C). Their history was recorded and skin prick tests were performed with latex, airborne and food allergens. Specific IgE against food allergens, latex (k82) and recombined latex allergens were determined. ImmunoCAP ISAC test was performed with 103 molecules. Results Sensitization to latex was found by means of skin tests in 16 cases and sIgE against latex was revealed in 12 cases (including 10 positive in both SPT and sIgE). In the ISAC test antibodies against recombined latex allergens were found in 8 patients with rHev b 6 as the most common. All the patients positive for rHev b 1, 5, 6, 8 had allergy or asymptomatic sensitization to food allergens cross-reacting with latex. Some reactions could not have been differentiated due to the lack of allergens in the ISAC test. Others, not related to latex-fruits syndrome were explained by cross-reactivity with other profilins or PR-10 proteins. Conclusions ImmunoCAP ISAC test could be useful in differentiating between cross-reactions and double sensitizations. However, in the case of latex its advantages are limited due to a small panel of allergens. PMID:27279821

  14. Exploring Crossing Differential Item Functioning by Gender in Mathematics Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Yoke Mooi; Williams, Julian; Lamprianou, Iasonas

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore crossing differential item functioning (DIF) in a test drawn from a national examination of mathematics for 11-year-old pupils in England. An empirical dataset was analyzed to explore DIF by gender in a mathematics assessment. A two-step process involving the logistic regression (LR) procedure for…

  15. Cross sections for short pulse single and double ionization ofhelium

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, Alicia; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2007-11-27

    In a previous publication, procedures were proposed for unambiguously extracting amplitudes for single and double ionization from a time-dependent wavepacket by effectively propagating for an infinite time following a radiation pulse. Here we demonstrate the accuracy and utility of those methods for describing two-photon single and one-photon double ionization of helium. In particular it is shown how narrow features corresponding to autoionizing states are easily resolved with these methods.

  16. Measurement of the differential dijet production cross section in proton–proton collisions at

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-06-01

    A measurement of the double-differential inclusive dijet production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV is presented as a function of the dijet invariant mass and jet rapidity. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns, recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement covers the dijet mass range 0.2 TeV to 3.5 TeV and jet rapidities up to |y|=2.5. It is found to be in good agreement with next-to-leading-order QCD predictions.

  17. Differential Cross Sections for Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Dick, Frank; Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering is investigated within the framework of the one pion exchange model in an attempt to model nucleon-nucleon interactions spanning the large range of energies important to cosmic ray shielding. A quantum field theoretic calculation is used to compute both differential and total cross sections. A scalar theory is then presented and compared to the one pion exchange model. The theoretical cross sections are compared to proton-proton scattering data to determine the validity of the models.

  18. Proposal and simulation of differential double-pulse pair Brillouin optical time-domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianguan; Luo, Wenping; Chen, Beiqing; Guo, Huiyong; Zhang, Cui

    2013-09-01

    A differential double-pulse pair Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (DDP-BOTDA) combined with the double-pulsed technique and the differential pulse-width pair technique is proposed and simulated to detect small temperature and strain changes. Using a symmetrical double-pulse pair, the system can detect small Brillouin shift with high spatial resolution and large dynamic range. Sub-meter spatial resolution is decided by the difference between the pulse-width and the peak and valley of the spectrum which is derived from differential pump depletion signals, and detectable Brillouin shift is less than 1 MHz.

  19. Differential cross sections for muonic atom scattering from hydrogenic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczak, Andrzej

    2006-10-15

    The differential cross sections for low-energy muonic hydrogen atom scattering from hydrogenic molecules are directly expressed by the corresponding amplitudes for muonic atom scattering from hydrogen-isotope nuclei. The energy and angular dependence of these three-body amplitudes is thus taken naturally into account in scattering from molecules, without involving any pseudopotentials. Effects of the internal motion of nuclei inside the target molecules are included for every initial rotational-vibrational state. These effects are very significant as the considered three-body amplitudes often vary strongly within the energy interval < or approx. 0.1 eV. The differential cross sections, calculated using the presented method, have been successfully used for planning and interpreting many experiments in low-energy muon physics. Studies of {mu}{sup -} nuclear capture in p{mu} and the measurement of the Lamb shift in p{mu} atoms created in H{sub 2} gaseous targets are recent examples.

  20. The Synergy of Double Cross-linking Agents on the Properties of Styrene Butadiene Rubber Foams

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Liang; Ji, Zhan-You; Ma, Jian-Zhong; Xue, Chao-Hua; Ma, Zhong-Lei; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur (S) cross-linking styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) foams show high shrinkage due to the cure reversion, leading to reduced yield and increased processing cost. In this paper, double cross-linking system by S and dicumyl peroxide (DCP) was used to decrease the shrinkage of SBR foams. Most importantly, the synergy of double cross-linking agents was reported for the first time to our knowledge. The cell size and its distribution of SBR foams were investigated by FESEM images, which show the effect of DCP content on the cell structure of the SBR foams. The relationships between shrinkage and crystalline of SBR foams were analyzed by the synergy of double cross-linking agents, which were demonstrated by FTIR, Raman spectra, XRD, DSC and TGA. When the DCP content was 0.6 phr, the SBR foams exhibit excellent physical and mechanical properties such as low density (0.223 g/cm3), reduced shrinkage (2.25%) and compression set (10.96%), as well as elevated elongation at break (1.78 × 103%) and tear strength (54.63 N/mm). The results show that these properties are related to the double cross-linking system of SBR foams. Moreover, the double cross-linking SBR foams present high electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding properties compared with the S cross-linking SBR foams. PMID:27841307

  1. The Synergy of Double Cross-linking Agents on the Properties of Styrene Butadiene Rubber Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Liang; Ji, Zhan-You; Ma, Jian-Zhong; Xue, Chao-Hua; Ma, Zhong-Lei; Zhang, Jing

    2016-11-01

    Sulfur (S) cross-linking styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) foams show high shrinkage due to the cure reversion, leading to reduced yield and increased processing cost. In this paper, double cross-linking system by S and dicumyl peroxide (DCP) was used to decrease the shrinkage of SBR foams. Most importantly, the synergy of double cross-linking agents was reported for the first time to our knowledge. The cell size and its distribution of SBR foams were investigated by FESEM images, which show the effect of DCP content on the cell structure of the SBR foams. The relationships between shrinkage and crystalline of SBR foams were analyzed by the synergy of double cross-linking agents, which were demonstrated by FTIR, Raman spectra, XRD, DSC and TGA. When the DCP content was 0.6 phr, the SBR foams exhibit excellent physical and mechanical properties such as low density (0.223 g/cm3), reduced shrinkage (2.25%) and compression set (10.96%), as well as elevated elongation at break (1.78 × 103%) and tear strength (54.63 N/mm). The results show that these properties are related to the double cross-linking system of SBR foams. Moreover, the double cross-linking SBR foams present high electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding properties compared with the S cross-linking SBR foams.

  2. Differential collision cross-sections for atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    Differential collision cross-sections of O on N2 and other gases were measured to understand vehicle-environmental contamination effects in orbit. The following subject areas are also covered: groundbased scientific observations of rocket releases during NICARE-1; data compression study for the UVI; science priorities for UV imaging in the mid-1990's; and assessment of optimizations possible in UV imaging systems.

  3. A Cross Racial Study of Double Consciousness Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussewell, Deborah Ridley

    The double consciousness model represents Black self-concept as being comprised of three primary cognitive structures: the "I," the "me," and the "we" self-referents. A study was conducted to examine three assumptions pertaining to the "we" self-referent: (1) that it reflects attitudes and behaviors developed because of Black Americans' African…

  4. A Differential Resonant Accelerometer with Low Cross-Interference and Temperature Drift

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Cun; Cheng, Rongjun; Sun, Dengqiang; Wang, Songli

    2017-01-01

    Presented in this paper is a high-performance resonant accelerometer with low cross-interference, low temperature drift and digital output. The sensor consists of two quartz double-ended tuning forks (DETFs) and a silicon substrate. A new differential silicon substrate is proposed to reduce the temperature drift and cross-interference from the undesirable direction significantly. The natural frequency of the quartz DETF is theoretically calculated, and then the axial stress on the vibration beams is verified through finite element method (FEM) under a 100 g acceleration which is loaded on x-axis, y-axis and z-axis, respectively. Moreover, sensor chip is wire-bonded to a printed circuit board (PCB) which contains two identical oscillating circuits. In addition, a steel shell is selected to package the sensor for experiments. Benefiting from the distinctive configuration of the differential structure, the accelerometer characteristics such as temperature drift and cross-interface are improved. The experimental results demonstrate that the cross-interference is lower than 0.03% and the temperature drift is about 18.16 ppm/°C. PMID:28106798

  5. Differential network analysis from cross-platform gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Ou-Yang, Le; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Yan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the structure of gene dependency network changes between two patient-specific groups is an important task for genomic research. Although many computational approaches have been proposed to undertake this task, most of them estimate correlation networks from group-specific gene expression data independently without considering the common structure shared between different groups. In addition, with the development of high-throughput technologies, we can collect gene expression profiles of same patients from multiple platforms. Therefore, inferring differential networks by considering cross-platform gene expression profiles will improve the reliability of network inference. We introduce a two dimensional joint graphical lasso (TDJGL) model to simultaneously estimate group-specific gene dependency networks from gene expression profiles collected from different platforms and infer differential networks. TDJGL can borrow strength across different patient groups and data platforms to improve the accuracy of estimated networks. Simulation studies demonstrate that TDJGL provides more accurate estimates of gene networks and differential networks than previous competing approaches. We apply TDJGL to the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in ovarian tumors to build differential networks associated with platinum resistance. The hub genes of our inferred differential networks are significantly enriched with known platinum resistance-related genes and include potential platinum resistance-related genes. PMID:27677586

  6. Double-targeted polymersomes and liposomes for multiple barrier crossing.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Purrà, M; Ramos, V; Petrenko, V A; Torchilin, V P; Borrós, S

    2016-09-25

    In order to treat metastasis in the brain, drug delivery systems must overcome multiple physical barriers between the point of administration and the target, such as the Blood-brain barrier, that hinder their free access across them. Multiple targeting approaches arise as a promising alternative to this barrier and target certain tissues inside the brain at a time. Herein, two surface modification methods are presented to obtain dual-targeted vesicle-like carriers functionalized with an MCF-7-specific phage protein and a BBB-specific peptide, providing the system the ability to cross a BBB model, target breast cancer cells and deliver its payload. The aim of this study was to compare new designed polymersomes with liposomes, a well-established delivery vehicle, in terms of drug loading, targeting, release and tumor cell killing. The bilayer structure of both systems allowed the conjugation with different ligands both by insertion and covalent binding. Different behaviour was observed in release, uptake and tumor cell killing corresponding to differences in membrane permeability of both vehicles and type of targeting and ligands' combination. Preliminary results showed that both formulations were able to cross the BBB monolayer without harming it, showing cytotoxic activity in the abluminal compartment.

  7. Phased psoralen cross-links do not bend the DNA double helix

    SciTech Connect

    Haran, T.E.; Crothers, D.M.

    1988-09-06

    Although the chemical reaction of psoralens with nucleic acids is well understood, the structure of psoralen-DNA cross-linked products is still not clear. Model building studies based on the crystal structure of the psoralen-thymine monoadduct suggest that each cross-link bends the DNA double helix by 46.5/sup 0/. Here the authors use gel electrophoresis to test the validity of the current models. They have synthesized a series of DNA fragments (21-24 base pairs in length), each containing one unique T-A site for 4'-(hydroxymethyl)-4,5'8-trimethylpsoralen (HMT) cross-linking. Because of an estimated 28/sup 0/ unwinding of the helix by HMT, one expects that the 22-bp cross-linked fragment will be repeated nearly in phase with the average helical screw when multimerized. In that sequence ligation will maximally amplify any deformation to the double helix. They find that the ligated multimers of cross-linked DNA migrate close to the multimers of non-cross-linked DNA on polyacrylamide gels. These observations place an upper limit of 10/sup 0/ on DNA bending induced by psoralen cross-linking and indicate unwinding by about 1 bp, as well as stiffening of the double helix. These properties are not unexpected for classical intercalators.

  8. Double diffractive cross-section measurement in the forward region at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Antchev, G; Aspell, P; Atanassov, I; Avati, V; Baechler, J; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Bossini, E; Bottigli, U; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F S; Catanesi, M G; Covault, C; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Deile, M; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; Garcia, F; Giani, S; Greco, V; Grzanka, L; Heino, J; Hilden, T; Karev, A; Kašpar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrát, V; Kurvinen, K; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, T; Lippmaa, E; Lippmaa, J; Lokajíček, M; Losurdo, L; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodríguez, F; Macrí, M; Mäki, T; Mercadante, A; Minafra, N; Minutoli, S; Nemes, F; Niewiadomski, H; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Österberg, K; Palazzi, P; Procházka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Ruggiero, G; Saarikko, H; Scribano, A; Smajek, J; Snoeys, W; Sziklai, J; Taylor, C; Turini, N; Vacek, V; Vítek, M; Welti, J; Whitmore, J; Wyszkowski, P

    2013-12-27

    The first double diffractive cross-section measurement in the very forward region has been carried out by the TOTEM experiment at the LHC with a center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s]=7  TeV. By utilizing the very forward TOTEM tracking detectors T1 and T2, which extend up to |η|=6.5, a clean sample of double diffractive pp events was extracted. From these events, we determined the cross section σDD=(116±25)  μb for events where both diffractive systems have 4.7<|η|min<6.5.

  9. Cross-diffusion-driven hydrodynamic instabilities in a double-layer system: General classification and nonlinear simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budroni, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Cross diffusion, whereby a flux of a given species entrains the diffusive transport of another species, can trigger buoyancy-driven hydrodynamic instabilities at the interface of initially stable stratifications. Starting from a simple three-component case, we introduce a theoretical framework to classify cross-diffusion-induced hydrodynamic phenomena in two-layer stratifications under the action of the gravitational field. A cross-diffusion-convection (CDC) model is derived by coupling the fickian diffusion formalism to Stokes equations. In order to isolate the effect of cross-diffusion in the convective destabilization of a double-layer system, we impose a starting concentration jump of one species in the bottom layer while the other one is homogeneously distributed over the spatial domain. This initial configuration avoids the concurrence of classic Rayleigh-Taylor or differential-diffusion convective instabilities, and it also allows us to activate selectively the cross-diffusion feedback by which the heterogeneously distributed species influences the diffusive transport of the other species. We identify two types of hydrodynamic modes [the negative cross-diffusion-driven convection (NCC) and the positive cross-diffusion-driven convection (PCC)], corresponding to the sign of this operational cross-diffusion term. By studying the space-time density profiles along the gravitational axis we obtain analytical conditions for the onset of convection in terms of two important parameters only: the operational cross-diffusivity and the buoyancy ratio, giving the relative contribution of the two species to the global density. The general classification of the NCC and PCC scenarios in such parameter space is supported by numerical simulations of the fully nonlinear CDC problem. The resulting convective patterns compare favorably with recent experimental results found in microemulsion systems.

  10. Combination of differential D∗± cross-section measurements in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Belousov, A.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Buniatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Avila, K. B. Cantun; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Figiel, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hladky, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Morozov, A.; Muhammad Nasir, N.; Müller, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Perez, E.; Perlanski, W.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Przybycien, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shushkevich, S.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Stanco, L.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Thompson, P. D.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Traynor, D.; Trofymov, A.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Wünsch, E.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Žáček, J.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2015-09-01

    H1 and ZEUS have published single-differential cross sections for inclusive D ∗±-meson production in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from their respective final data sets. These cross sections are combined in the common visible phase-space region of photon virtuality Q 2 > 5 GeV2, electron inelasticity 0 .02 < y < 0 .7 and the D ∗± meson's transverse momentum p T( D ∗) > 1 .5 GeV and pseudorapidity | η( D ∗)| < 1 .5. The combination procedure takes into account all correlations, yielding significantly reduced experimental uncertainties. Double-differential cross sections d2 σ/d Q 2d y are combined with earlier D ∗± data, extending the kinematic range down to Q 2 > 1 .5 GeV2. Perturbative next-to-leading-order QCD predictions are compared to the results.

  11. DNA double-strand break repair: Genetic determinants of flanking crossing-over

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, Kohji; Sunohara, Yukari; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Takahashi, Noriko; Yoshikura, Hiroshi )

    1994-02-01

    Whether or not homologous interaction of two DNA molecules results in crossing-over of the flanking sequences is an important decision in view of genome organization. Several homologous recombination models, including the double-strand break repair models, explain this decision as choice between two alternative modes of resolution of Holliday-type intermediates. The authors have demonstrated that a double-strand gap can be repaired through gene conversion copying a homologous duplex, as predicted by the double-strand break repair models, in the RecE pathway of Escherichia coli. This gap repair is often accompanied by crossing-over of the flanking sequences. Mutations in ruvC and recG, whose products interact with Holliday structures in vitro, do not block double-strand gap repair or its association with flanking crossing-over. However, two mutations in the recJ gene, which encodes a single-strand 5[prime][yields]3[prime] exonuclease, severely decrease association of flanking crossing-over. Two mutations in the recQ gene, which encodes a helicase, moderately decrease association of flanking crossing-over by themselves and suppress the severe effect of a recJ mutation. Similar relationships of recJ and recQ mutations are observed in cell survival after ultraviolet light irradiation, [gamma]-ray irradiation, and H[sub 2]O[sub 2] treatment. The authors discuss how cooperation of the recQ gene product and the recJ gene product brings about double-strand break repair accompanied by flanking crossing-over. They also discuss how this reaction is related to repair of chromosome damages.

  12. Triple differential cross sections of magnesium in doubly symmetric geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Y. Sun; X, Y. Miao; Xiang-Fu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    A dynamically screened three-Coulomb-wave (DS3C) method is applied to study the single ionization of magnesium by electron impact. Triple differential cross sections (TDCS) are calculated in doubly symmetric geometry at incident energies of 13.65, 17.65, 22.65, 27.65, 37.65, 47.65, 57.65, and 67.65 eV. Comparisons are made with experimental data and theoretical predictions from a three-Coulomb-wave function (3C) approach and distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA). The overall agreement between the predictions of the DS3C model and the DWBA approach with the experimental data is satisfactory. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274215).

  13. Comparative genetic analysis of lint yield and fiber quality among single, three-way, and double crosses in upland cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decisions on the appropriate crossing systems to employ for genetic improvement of quantitative traits are critical in cotton breeding. Determination of genetic variance for lint yield and fiber quality in three different crossing schemes, i.e., single cross (SC), three-way cross (TWC), and double ...

  14. Comparison of experimental and theoretical electron-impact-ionization triple-differential cross sections for ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Esam; Nixon, Kate; Murray, Andrew; Ning, Chuangang; Colgan, James; Madison, Don

    2015-10-01

    We have recently examined electron-impact ionization of molecules that have one large atom at the center, surrounded by H nuclei (H2O , N H3 , C H4 ). All of these molecules have ten electrons; however, they vary in their molecular symmetry. We found that the triple-differential cross sections (TDCSs) for the highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs) were similar, as was the character of the HOMO orbitals which had a p -type "peanut" shape. In this work, we examine ethane (C2H6 ) which is a molecule that has two large atoms surrounded by H nuclei, so that its HOMO has a double-peanut shape. The experiment was performed using a coplanar symmetric geometry (equal final-state energies and angles). We find the TDCS for ethane is similar to the single-center molecules at higher energies, and is similar to a diatomic molecule at lower energies.

  15. Reliability and validity of a new double poling ergometer for cross-country skiers.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Nilsson, Johnny

    2008-01-15

    Thirty-eight competitive cross-country skiers were divided into three groups to assess the reliability and validity of a new double poling ergometer. Group A (n = 22) performed two maximal 60-s tests, Group B (n = 8) repeated peak oxygen uptake tests on the double poling ergometer, and Group C (n = 8) performed a maximal 6-min test on the double poling ergometer and a double poling time-trial on snow. The correlation between the power calculated at the flywheel and the power applied at the base of the poles was r = 0.99 (P < 0.05). The power at the poles was 50-70% higher than that at the flywheel. There was a high test-retest reliability in the two 60-s power output tests (coefficient of variation = 3.0%) and no significant difference in peak oxygen uptake in the two 6-min all-out tests (coefficient of variation = 2.4%). There was a strong correlation between the absolute (W) and relative power (W x kg(-1)) output in the 6-min double poling ergometer test and the double poling performance on snow (r = 0.86 and 0.89 respectively; both P < 0.05). In conclusion, our results show that the double poling ergometer has both high reliability and validity. However, the power calculated at the flywheel underestimated the total power produced and needs to be corrected for in ergonomic estimations.

  16. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry and cross section for inclusivejet production in polarized proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-08-10

    We report a measurement of the longitudinal double-spinasymmetry A_LL and the differential cross section for inclusivemidrapidity jet production in polarized proton collisions at sqrt(s)=200GeV. The cross section data cover transverse momenta 5

  17. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry and cross section for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Mazumdar, M R Dutta; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-12-22

    We report a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A(LL) and the differential cross section for inclusive midrapidity jet production in polarized proton collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV. The cross section data cover transverse momenta 5 < pT < 50 GeV/c and agree with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD evaluations. The A(LL) data cover 5 < pT < 17 GeV/c and disfavor at 98% C.L. maximal positive gluon polarization in the polarized nucleon.

  18. Relative partial cross sections for single, double, and triple photoionization of C60 and C70.

    PubMed

    Mitsuke, Koichiro; Katayanagi, Hideki; Kafle, Bhim P; Huang, Chaoqun; Yagi, Hajime; Prodhan, Md Serajul I; Kubozono, Yoshihiro

    2007-08-30

    Partial cross sections for the photoion formation from C(60) and C(70) were determined from the yields of singly, doubly, and triply charged ions which were measured by mass spectrometry combined with tunable synchrotron radiation at hnu = 25-120 eV. The dependence of the detection efficiencies on the mass-to-charge ratio was evaluated by using the formula proposed by Twerenbold et al. Corrections of the detection efficiency were found to be critical for obtaining accurate partial cross sections for photoionization of fullerenes. Revisions were made of the partial cross-section curves for single and double photoionization of C(60) and C(70). The curve for triple photoionization of C(70) was newly proposed. The ratios between the cross sections for double and single photoionization increase with hnu and reach saturated values of 0.78 at 85 eV for C(60) and approximately 1.3 at 100 eV for C(70). In contrast, the ratios at 120 eV between the cross sections for triple and single photoionization of C(60) and C(70) amount to 0.14 and approximately 0.38, respectively. The formation mechanism of multiply charged fullerene ions was discussed in terms of valence-electron excitation to antibonding unoccupied orbitals and/or spherical standing waves inside the cavity of a fullerene. This excitation could be followed by Spectator Auger processes and transmission of the excess electronic energy among numerous vibrational degrees of freedom.

  19. Analytical Born Completion of Inelastic Differential Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boydstun, Olen E., Jr.; Morrison, Michael A.

    1998-05-01

    To calculate accurate differential cross sections (DCS) for electron scattering from atoms and molecules, one must include a huge number of partial waves in the expansion of the scattering amplitude in spherical harmonics.(D. G. Thompson, Proc. Roy. Soc. A294), 160 (1966). The required number far exceeds the number of low-order partial waves included in, for example, a coupled state solution of the Schrödinger equation. By extending the method developed Isaacs & Morrison for elastic electron-molecule scattering,(William A. Isaacs and Michael A. Morrison, Phys. Rev. A 53), 4215 (1996). we have used the Born approximation to analytically complete the infinite sum over partial waves for vibrationally inelastic scattering. This method allows accurate approximation of the infinity of high-order partial waves without the computational cost of evaluating these terms numerically. We shall demonstrate the importance of this approximation for vibrationally inelastic scattering of electrons from H2 and N_2, both near and well above the excitation thresholds.

  20. Theoretical Fully Differential Cross Sections for Four-Body Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. L.; Peacher, J. L.; Schulz, M.; Madison, D. H.

    2008-04-01

    Atomic collisions present a valuable opportunity to study the few body problem. Advances on the theoretical side now allow for an essentially exact numerical calculation of one of the simplest the few-body problems - the three-body problem. However, study of the four-body problem is still in its infancy, and the agreement between experiment and theory for kinematically complete experiments is far from satisfactory. The simplest four-body problem is a charged particle collision with helium in which both atomic electrons change state. Two theoretical models will be discussed for several possible outcomes of this type of collision. The first Born approximation (FBA) treats the projectile as a plane wave, and ignores the post collision Coulomb interaction between the two final state continuum electrons. The more sophisticated four-body distorted wave (4DW) model treats all continuum particles as distorted waves and explicitly includes the post collision Coulomb interaction between the two outgoing electrons. Fully differential cross sections calculated using the FBA and 4DW models will be compared to absolute experimental results, as well as other theories.

  1. Double blind cross-over study of a new appetite suppressant AN 448.

    PubMed

    Haugen, H N

    1975-01-01

    The effects of a new appetite suppressant, AN 448, and a placebo have been compared in 30 obese individuals using a fully randomized double-blind cross-over design. 1 mg of AN 448 t.i.d. produced a significant degree of appetite suppression and a mean weight loss of more than 4 kg per individual over a 6 week period. Side effects were few and no haematological, renal or hepatic damage was observed.

  2. Linkage analysis and map construction in genetic populations of clonal F1 and double cross.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luyan; Li, Huihui; Wang, Jiankang

    2015-01-15

    In this study, we considered four categories of molecular markers based on the number of distinguishable alleles at the marker locus and the number of distinguishable genotypes in clonal F1 progenies. For two marker loci, there are nine scenarios that allow the estimation of female, male, and/or combined recombination frequencies. In a double cross population derived from four inbred lines, five categories of markers are classified and another five scenarios are present for recombination frequency estimation. Theoretical frequencies of identifiable genotypes were given for each scenario, from which the maximum likelihood estimates of one or more of the three recombination frequencies could be estimated. If there was no analytic solution, then Newton-Raphson method was used to acquire a numerical solution. We then proposed to use an algorithm in Traveling Salesman Problem to determine the marker order. Finally, we proposed a procedure to build the two haploids of the female parent and the two haploids of the male parent in clonal F1. Once the four haploids were built, clonal F1 hybrids could be exactly regarded as a double cross population. Efficiency of the proposed methods was demonstrated in simulated clonal F1 populations and one actual maize double cross. Extensive comparisons with software JoinMap4.1, OneMap, and R/qtl show that the methodology proposed in this article can build more accurate linkage maps in less time.

  3. Resummed Differential Cross Sections for Top-Quark Pairs at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Pecjak, Benjamin D; Scott, Darren J; Wang, Xing; Yang, Li Lin

    2016-05-20

    We present state of the art resummation predictions for differential cross sections in top-quark pair production at the LHC. They are derived from a formalism which allows the simultaneous resummation of both soft and small-mass logarithms, which endanger the convergence of fixed-order perturbative series in the boosted regime, where the partonic center-of-mass energy is much larger than the mass to the top quark. We combine such a double resummation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic^{'} (NNLL^{'}) accuracy with standard soft-gluon resummation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy and with next-to-leading-order calculations, so that our results are applicable throughout the whole phase space. We find that the resummation effects on the differential distributions are significant, bringing theoretical predictions into better agreement with experimental data compared to fixed-order calculations. Moreover, such effects are not well described by the next-to-next-to-leading-order approximation of the resummation formula, especially in the high-energy tails of the distributions, highlighting the importance of all-orders resummation in dedicated studies of boosted top production.

  4. A non-contact FBG vibration sensor with double differential temperature compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianliang; Tan, Yuegang; Zhou, Zude; Zheng, Kai

    2016-02-01

    This paper has presented a non-contact fiber Bragg grating (FBG) vibration sensor with double differential temperature compensation. Two FBGs and two states of the sensor have been employed to achieve double differential temperature compensation. Based on magnetic coupling and FBG sensing principle, it can be used to realize non-contact measurement of vibration of the rotating shaft. Experimental results show that the working band ranges are within 0-150 Hz; the sensitivity is -0.67 pm/µm, and the linearity is 3.87 % within a range of 2-2.6 mm. The fitting equation of temperature compensation which is caused by structural inflation can be expressed as: Δ λ 1' - Δ λ 2' = 1.51 × T - 32.97. When used to amend a temperature error, the sensor's temperature error will be reduced to 1.19 % in the range of 25-60 °C.

  5. Solid lipid nanoparticles coated with cross-linked polymeric double layer for oral delivery of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Taoran; Ma, Xiaoyu; Lei, Yu; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-12-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are regarded as promising carriers to improve the safety and effectiveness of delivery for drugs and nutrients, however, the clinic applications for oral administration are limited by their poor stability in gastrointestinal conditions. In this study, surface modification was explored to confer new physicochemical properties to SLNs and thus achieve enhanced functionalities. Novel SLNs with biopolymeric double layer (DL) coating using two natural biopolymers, i.e. caseinate (NaCas) and pectin, were prepared to encapsulate and deliver curcumin, a lipophilic bioactive compound studied as a model drug/nutrient. The DL coating was chemically cross-linked by creating covalent bonds between NaCas and pectin, using two different cross-linkers, i.e. glutaraldehyde (GA) and 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-Hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS). Prior to cross-linking, the mean particle size, polydispersity index and zeta potential of DL-SLNs were 300-330nm, 0.25-0.30, -45-40mV, respectively. It was found that cross-linking with GA had a more prominent effect on particle size and polydispersity index than EDC/NHS. The cross-linking process significantly improved physicochemical properties of DL-SLNs, resulting in higher encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity, better stability and slower release profile in simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Particularly, an optimal zero-order release kinetic was observed for EDC/NHS crosslinked DL-SLNs. The electron microscopy revealed that both cross-linked DL-SLNs exhibited spherical shape with homogeneous size and smooth surface. Encapsulation of curcumin in SLNs dramatically enhanced its antioxidant activity in aqueous condition. The cross-linking process further helped spray drying of SLNs by forming homogenous powder particles. These results indicated that coating with cross-linked polymers could significantly improve the physicochemical properties of SLNs and expand their potentials as

  6. Differential Brillouin fiber sensor based on phase difference on double-sideband pump wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wenqiao; Hong, Xiaobin; Yang, Zhisheng; Wu, Jian; Lin, Jintong

    2015-06-01

    A configuration based on phase difference on a double-sideband pump wave is proposed to detect the differential variation of temperature or strain in single-mode optical fibers. In our configuration, a probe wave only experiences a differential Brillouin gain contributed by the perturbation of temperature or strain in the sensing fiber. As a result, the power limitation of the probe wave can be alleviated and the photodetector in our configuration does not easily become saturated in the case of a longer sensing range. The spatial resolution is determined by the duration of the phase difference on the two sidebands and the signal-to-noise of our system is nearly twice as high as that of a differential pulse-width pair Brillouin optical time domain analysis sensor since a π-phase shift on the pump wave is employed. The properties and performances of our method are also theoretically derived and experimentally validated.

  7. Absolute doubly differential cross sections for ionization of adenine by 1.0-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Iriki, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Imai, M.; Itoh, A.

    2011-09-15

    Double-differential ionization cross sections of adenine (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5}) by 1.0-MeV protons have been measured using a vapor-phase adenine target. Ejected electrons were analyzed by a 45 deg. parallel-plate electrostatic spectrometer in an electron energy range from 1 to 1000 eV at electron emission angles from 15 deg. to 165 deg. The effective target thickness of adenine was determined by a Rutherford forward scattering method and a vapor deposition method. Present data are in good agreement with recent calculations. Comparisons were made with other data on various hydrocarbon molecules. It was found that the ionization cross sections of these molecules can be scaled fairly well in terms of the total number of valence electrons.

  8. Experimental differential cross sections, level densities, and spin cutoffs as a testing ground for nuclear reaction codes

    DOE PAGES

    Voinov, Alexander V.; Grimes, Steven M.; Brune, Carl R.; ...

    2013-11-08

    Proton double-differential cross sections from 59Co(α,p)62Ni, 57Fe(α,p)60Co, 56Fe(7Li,p)62Ni, and 55Mn(6Li,p)60Co reactions have been measured with 21-MeV α and 15-MeV lithium beams. Cross sections have been compared against calculations with the empire reaction code. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the Gilbert and Cameron [A. Gilbert and A. G. W. Cameron, Can. J. Phys. 43, 1446 (1965)] level density model is best to reproduce experimental data. Level densities and spin cutoff parameters for 62Ni and 60Co above the excitation energy range of discrete levels (in continuum) have been obtained with a Monte Carlo technique. Furthermore,more » excitation energy dependencies were found to be inconsistent with the Fermi-gas model.« less

  9. Reliability of the double-folding potential for fusion cross sections of light systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Azni Abdul; Yusof, Norhasliza; Firihu, Muhammad Zamrun; Kassim, Hasan Abu

    2015-01-01

    We study the fusion reaction of light systems with one-dimensional barrier penetration model using the α -α double-folding cluster (DFC) potential. We especially analyze the fusion cross sections of the 12C+12C,16O,24Mg,28Si,16O+16O,24Mg+24Mg,28Si , and 28Si+28Si reactions. The results are compared with the one obtained with M3Y double folding (DFM) and the Akyüz-Winther (A-W) potentials. It is found that the calculations with DFM and DFC potentials can reproduce the experimental data much better than the calculations using the A-W potential. We also carried out an analysis on the astrophysical aspect of the 12C+12C,16O , and 16O+16O reactions. The calculations using DFC and DFM potentials could fit the S -factor data reasonably well. However, the calculated reaction rates are lower than the compilation of Caughlan and Fowler at low temperatures. In the important range of temperatures in stellar evolution, the DFC potential reproduces very satisfactory fitting to the experimental cross section and the S -factor data and gives a consistent prediction of astrophysical reaction rates. This finding indicates that the DFC potential could be used as an alternative potential to study the fusion reactions in the astrophysical interest.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of short-period double-layer cross-grating with holographic lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cunbao; Yan, Shuhua; You, Fusheng

    2017-01-01

    A cross-grating with short period and double layer is designed, and a method combining holographic lithography and lithography-etch-lithography-etch is proposed to manufacture it. The scalar diffraction theory and the rigorous coupled wave analysis are employed to analyze the diffraction characteristics of the double-layer cross-grating (DLCG). It reveals that the efficiencies of the (±1,±1) orders possess perfect complementarity under normal incidence. The equivalent high efficiency for TE and TM polarization can be realized which means the high signal-to-noise ratio and fringe contrast can be simultaneously achieved for heterodyne grating interferometers (HGIs). Furthermore, a gold-coated DLCG with grating pitch of 2 μm and pattern area of 60 mm×60 mm etched on the quartz substrate is fabricated with the proposed method. The displacement resolution, measurement range and long-term stability can be reliably guaranteed for HGIs with this grating. The characteristics of the DLCG are also experimentally tested and compared with the theoretical analysis. Reasonable consistency is obtained and the capabilities of both the DLCG and the fabrication method are verified.

  11. Differential two-body compound nuclear cross section, including the width-fluctuation corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.; Herman, M.

    2014-09-02

    We figure out the compound angular differential cross sections, following mainly Fröbrich and Lipperheide, but with the angular momentum couplings that make sense for optical model work. We include the width-fluctuation correction along with calculations.

  12. Skeletal analysis and differential gene expression in Runx2/Osterix double heterozygous embryos.

    PubMed

    Baek, Ji-Eun; Choi, Je-Yong; Kim, Jung-Eun

    2014-08-29

    The transcription factors, Runx2 and Osterix (Osx), act downstream in the BMP2 pathway, and they are essential for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. While Runx2 expression is normal in Osx-null mice, Osx is not expressed in Runx2-null mice, indicating that Osx acts downstream of Runx2 during bone formation. Runx2 and Osx are also independently regulated during bone formation. To define the unknown correlation between Runx2 and Osx in the regulation of bone formation, we analyzed the bone of Runx2/Osx double heterozygotes generated by mating heterozygous Runx2 and Osx mice and elucidated the differential gene expressions due to the lack of Runx2 and Osx in bone. Compared to the Runx2 and Osx heterozygous embryos, Runx2/Osx double heterozygous embryos showed reduced bone length in the humerus and femur as well as hypoplastic or complete absence of the maxillary and palatine shelf, presphenoid bone, zygomatic bone, and tympanic ring. Severe inward bending was observed in the ribs and humerus. Histological analysis showed an expanded region of hypertrophic chondrocytes and a reduced area of mineralized bones in the Runx2/Osx double heterozygous embryos. DNA microarray analysis of the calvaria of embryos allowed gene classification based on similarities in the upregulated and downregulated expression patterns. Clusters 1 and 2 include 68 downregulated genes and 18 upregulated genes, respectively, in the Runx2/Osx double heterozygous embryos. Finally, the skeletal analysis and gene expression profiles obtained by clustering may facilitate the understanding of the correlation between Runx2 and Osx in skeletal development.

  13. DSMC Implementation of Experimentally-Based Xe++Xe Differential Cross Sections for Electric Propulsion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfe, Michelle K.; Koo, Justin; Azarnia, Gregory

    2011-05-01

    Published differential cross section data for heavy particle collisions between xenon ions and neutral xenon has been incorporated into plasma simulations for electric propulsion modeling. A fit has been made to the published data in order to estimate the relative contribution from charge exchange and elastic collisions and to reduce the computational cost of utilizing the differential cross section in existing numerical models. Since the published profiles do not include scattering data near 0 degrees, the differential cross section was assumed to be constant at low angles. The angle at which the differential cross section was assumed to transition from the constant profile to the fit was chosen such that the differential cross section integrated to the published total cross section value for xenon scattering. In order to make the resulting differential scattering curve generally applicable to other types of collisions with dissimilar collision partners, the profile was converted from the laboratory frame into center of mass coordinates. Each time a scattering event was determined to take place in the electric propulsion modeling codes, a scattering angle of the incident particle was chosen using a cumulative distribution function. The behavior of the target particle was determined using conservation of energy and momentum.

  14. Nonlinear free vibrations of curved double walled carbon nanotubes using differential quadrature method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigeroglu, Ender; Samandari, Hamed

    2014-11-01

    Nonlinear free vibration analysis of curved double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) embedded in an elastic medium is studied in this study. Nonlinearities considered are due to large deflection of carbon nanotubes (geometric nonlinearity) and nonlinear interlayer van der Waals forces between inner and outer tubes. The differential quadrature method (DQM) is utilized to discretize the partial differential equations of motion in spatial domain, which resulted in a nonlinear set of algebraic equations of motion. The effect of nonlinearities, different end conditions, initial curvature, and stiffness of the surrounding elastic medium, and vibrational modes on the nonlinear free vibration of DWCNTs is studied. Results show that it is possible to detect different vibration modes occurring at a single vibration frequency when CNTs vibrate in the out-of-phase vibration mode. Moreover, it is observed that boundary conditions have significant effect on the nonlinear natural frequencies of the DWCNT including multiple solutions.

  15. Electrical double layers and differential capacitance in molten salts from density functional theory

    DOE PAGES

    Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Halligan, Deaglan O.; Parks, Michael L.

    2014-08-05

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the structure of the electrical double layer and the differential capacitance of model molten salts. The DFT is shown to give good qualitative agreement with Monte Carlo simulations in the molten salt regime. The DFT is then applied to three common molten salts, KCl, LiCl, and LiKCl, modeled as charged hard spheres near a planar charged surface. The DFT predicts strong layering of the ions near the surface, with the oscillatory density profiles extending to larger distances for larger electrostatic interactions resulting from either lower temperature or lower dielectric constant. Inmore » conclusion, overall the differential capacitance is found to be bell-shaped, in agreement with recent theories and simulations for ionic liquids and molten salts, but contrary to the results of the classical Gouy-Chapman theory.« less

  16. Electrical double layers and differential capacitance in molten salts from density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Halligan, Deaglan O.; Parks, Michael L.

    2014-08-05

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the structure of the electrical double layer and the differential capacitance of model molten salts. The DFT is shown to give good qualitative agreement with Monte Carlo simulations in the molten salt regime. The DFT is then applied to three common molten salts, KCl, LiCl, and LiKCl, modeled as charged hard spheres near a planar charged surface. The DFT predicts strong layering of the ions near the surface, with the oscillatory density profiles extending to larger distances for larger electrostatic interactions resulting from either lower temperature or lower dielectric constant. In conclusion, overall the differential capacitance is found to be bell-shaped, in agreement with recent theories and simulations for ionic liquids and molten salts, but contrary to the results of the classical Gouy-Chapman theory.

  17. Neutron capture cross-section studies of Tellurium isotopes for neutrinoless double beta decay applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhike, Megha; Tornow, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The CUORE detector at Gran Sasso, aimed at searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 130Te, employs an array of TeO2 bolometer modules. To understand and identify the contribution of muon and (α,n) induced neutrons to the CUORE background, fast neutron cature cross-section data of the tellurium isotopes 126Te, 128Te and 130Te have been measured with the activation method at eight different energies in the neutron energy range 0.5-7.5 MeV. Plastic pill boxes of diameter 1.6 cm and width 1 cm containing Te were irradiated with mono-energetic neutrons produced via the 3H(p,n)3He and 2H(d,n)3He reactions. The cross-sections were determined relative to the 197Au(n, γ)198Au and 115In(n,n')115m In standard cross sections. The activities of the products were measured using 60% lead-shielded HPGe detectors at TUNL's low background counting facility. The present results are compared with the evaluated data from TENDL-2012, ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2 and JENDL-4.0, as well as with literature data.

  18. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  19. A novel sandwich differential capacitive accelerometer with symmetrical double-sided serpentine beam-mass structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, D. B.; Li, Q. S.; Hou, Z. Q.; Wang, X. H.; Chen, Z. H.; Xia, D. W.; Wu, X. Z.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a novel differential capacitive silicon micro-accelerometer with symmetrical double-sided serpentine beam-mass sensing structure and glass-silicon-glass sandwich structure. The symmetrical double-sided serpentine beam-mass sensing structure is fabricated with a novel pre-buried mask fabrication technology, which is convenient for manufacturing multi-layer sensors. The glass-silicon-glass sandwich structure is realized by a double anodic bonding process. To solve the problem of the difficulty of leading out signals from the top and bottom layer simultaneously in the sandwich sensors, a silicon pillar structure is designed that is inherently simple and low-cost. The prototype is fabricated and tested. It has low noise performance (the peak to peak value is 40 μg) and μg-level Allan deviation of bias (2.2 μg in 1 h), experimentally demonstrating the effectiveness of the design and the novel fabrication technology.

  20. Airborne 2-micron double-pulsed integrated path differential absorption lidar for column CO2 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 mJ and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 µs and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-µm direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-μm IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  1. Resolving the double tension: Toward a new approach to measurement modeling in cross-national research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Tait Runnfeldt

    The increasing global reach of survey research provides sociologists with new opportunities to pursue theory building and refinement through comparative analysis. However, comparison across a broad array of diverse contexts introduces methodological complexities related to the development of constructs (i.e., measurement modeling) that if not adequately recognized and properly addressed undermine the quality of research findings and cast doubt on the validity of substantive conclusions. The motivation for this dissertation arises from a concern that the availability of cross-national survey data has outpaced sociologists' ability to appropriately analyze and draw meaningful conclusions from such data. I examine the implicit assumptions and detail the limitations of three commonly used measurement models in cross-national analysis---summative scale, pooled factor model, and multiple-group factor model with measurement invariance. Using the orienting lens of the double tension I argue that a new approach to measurement modeling that incorporates important cross-national differences into the measurement process is needed. Two such measurement models---multiple-group factor model with partial measurement invariance (Byrne, Shavelson and Muthen 1989) and the alignment method (Asparouhov and Muthen 2014; Muthen and Asparouhov 2014)---are discussed in detail and illustrated using a sociologically relevant substantive example. I demonstrate that the former approach is vulnerable to an identification problem that arbitrarily impacts substantive conclusions. I conclude that the alignment method is built on model assumptions that are consistent with theoretical understandings of cross-national comparability and provides an approach to measurement modeling and construct development that is uniquely suited for cross-national research. The dissertation makes three major contributions: First, it provides theoretical justification for a new cross-national measurement model and

  2. Double strand-breaks and DNA-to-protein cross-links induced by fast neutrons in bacteriophage DNA.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, R B

    1979-01-01

    Coliphage T7 was suspended in tryptone broth and exposed to a mixture of fast neutrons and gamma radiation. Plaque survival, double strand-breaks and DNA-to-protein cross-linkage were examined and the results compared with those found in phage exposed to gamma radiation alone. Neutral sucrose density sedimentation patterns indicate that neutron-induced double strand-breaks sometimes occur in clusters of more than 100 in the same phage and that the effeciency with which double strand-breaks form is about 50 times that of gamma-induced double strand-breaks. Neutron-induced protein-to-DNA cross-links probably also occur in clusters with enhanced efficiency relative to low LET radiation.

  3. Comparison of a Double Poling Ergometer and Field Test for Elite Cross Country Sit Skiers

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Scott C.; Craven, Bruce; Bhambhani, Yagesh

    2010-01-01

    Background Sport specific ergometers are important for laboratory testing (i.e. peak oxygen consumption (VO2)) and out of season training. Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare cardiorespiratory variables during exercise on a double poling ergometer to a field test in elite sit skiers. Methods Three male and four female athletes from the Canadian National / Developmental team (17-54 years of age, six with complete paraplegia and one with cerebral palsy) completed a field test and a double poling ergometer protocol separated by at least 24 hours. Both protocols consisted of three maximal trials of skiing of three minutes duration separated by 1.5 minutes of rest. A wireless metabolic system and heart rate monitor were used to measure cardiorespiratory responses [peak heart rate, peak VO2, and peak respiratory exchange ratio (RER)] during each test. Arterialized blood lactate was measured before the beginning of exercise, after each trial and at 5, 10 and 15 minutes post exercise. Results No significant differences existed between the field and ergometer tests for peak oxygen consumption (VO2) (field=34.7±5.5 mL·kg−1·min−1 vs. ergometer=33.4±6.9 mL·kg−1·min−1). Significantly higher peak heart rate and RER were found during the ergometer test. Significantly higher lactates were found during the ergometer test after trial 2 and trial 3. Conclusion The double poling ergometer is similar to a field test for evaluating peak VO2 in elite cross country sit skiers; however, the ergometer test elicits a higher heart rate and anaerobic response. PMID:21589660

  4. Measurement of differential cross sections for top quark pair production using the lepton+jets final state in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-10-13

    Differential and double-differential cross sections for the production of top quark pairs in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV are measured as a function of jet multiplicity and of kinematic variables of the top quarks and the top quark-antiquark system. This analysis is based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.3 inverse femtobarns. The measurements are performed in the lepton+jets decay channels with a single muon or electron in the final state. The differential cross sections are presented at particle level, within a phase space close to the experimental acceptance, and at parton level in the full phase space. The results are compared to several standard model predictions.

  5. Medication double-checking procedures in clinical practice: a cross-sectional survey of oncology nurses' experiences

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Yvonne; Taxis, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Background Double-checking is widely recommended as an essential method to prevent medication errors. However, prior research has shown that the concept of double-checking is not clearly defined, and that little is known about actual practice in oncology, for example, what kind of checking procedures are applied. Objective To study the practice of different double-checking procedures in chemotherapy administration and to explore nurses' experiences, for example, how often they actually find errors using a certain procedure. General evaluations regarding double-checking, for example, frequency of interruptions during and caused by a check, or what is regarded as its essential feature was assessed. Methods In a cross-sectional survey, qualified nurses working in oncology departments of 3 hospitals were asked to rate 5 different scenarios of double-checking procedures regarding dimensions such as frequency of use in practice and appropriateness to prevent medication errors; they were also asked general questions about double-checking. Results Overall, 274 nurses (70% response rate) participated in the survey. The procedure of jointly double-checking (read-read back) was most commonly used (69% of respondents) and rated as very appropriate to prevent medication errors. Jointly checking medication was seen as the essential characteristic of double-checking—more frequently than ‘carrying out checks independently’ (54% vs 24%). Most nurses (78%) found the frequency of double-checking in their department appropriate. Being interrupted in one's own current activity for supporting a double-check was reported to occur frequently. Regression analysis revealed a strong preference towards checks that are currently implemented at the responders' workplace. Conclusions Double-checking is well regarded by oncology nurses as a procedure to help prevent errors, with jointly checking being used most frequently. Our results show that the notion of independent checking needs to be

  6. State Crossing in Cu/Co/Cu(100) Double Quantum Well System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, W. L.; Choi, H. J.; Wolfe, J. H.; Toyama, F.; Paik, S.; Qiu, Z. Q.; Rotenberg, E.; Smith, N. V.

    2001-03-01

    It has been shown that oscillatory magnetic interlayer coupling between two ferromagnetic layers across a non-magnetic spacer layer comes from the Quantum Well (QW) states in the spacer layer. While most works have been focused on single QW systems, little is known about the interaction between quantum wells in a heterostructure. We here report the results of our study on a double QW system. Two Cu QWs, separated by 1ML Co, were grown on Co/Cu(100) and investigated by photoemission at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of Lawrence Berkeley Nat. Lab. (LBNL). Energy spectra of the valence band from one Cu QW were measured as a function of the other Cu QW thickness. The results show that these two Cu QWs are strongly coupled through the 1ML Co. Moreover, we observed that whenever the QW states of the two individual Cu layer reach the same energy level, the coupling of the two QWs generates a crossing from states v to states v+1. Phase accumulation model was developed to explain this state crossing effect.

  7. Photoproduction of η mesons from the neutron: Cross sections and double polarization observable E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witthauer, L.; Dieterle, M.; Afzal, F.; Anisovich, A. V.; Bantes, B.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Bichow, M.; Brinkmann, K.-T.; Böse, S.; Challand, Th.; Crede, V.; Dutz, H.; Eberhardt, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Fornet-Ponse, K.; Friedrich, St.; Frommberger, F.; Funke, Ch.; Goertz, St.; Gottschall, M.; Gridnev, A.; Grüner, M.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hammann, Ch.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, J.; Hillert, W.; Hoffmeister, Ph.; Honisch, Ch.; Jude, T.; Kaiser, D.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kalischewski, F.; Kammer, S.; Käser, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; Klassen, P.; Kleber, V.; Klein, F.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lang, M.; Lopatin, I.; Mahlberg, Ph.; Makonyi, K.; Metag, V.; Meyer, W.; Müller, J.; Müllers, J.; Nanova, M.; Nikonov, V.; Piontek, D.; Reicherz, G.; Rostomyan, T.; Sarantsev, A.; Schmidt, Ch.; Schmieden, H.; Seifen, T.; Sokhoyan, V.; Spieker, K.; Thiel, A.; Thoma, U.; Urban, M.; van Pee, H.; Walford, N. K.; Walther, D.; Wendel, Ch.; Werthmüller, D.; Wilson, A.; Winnebeck, A.

    2017-03-01

    Results from measurements of the photoproduction of η mesons from quasifree protons and neutrons are summarized. The experiments were performed with the CBELSA/TAPS detector at the electron accelerator ELSA in Bonn using the η→ 3π0→ 6γ decay. A liquid deuterium target was used for the measurement of total cross sections and angular distributions. The results confirm earlier measurements from Bonn and the MAMI facility in Mainz about the existence of a narrow structure in the excitation function of γ n→ nη. The current angular distributions show a forward-backward asymmetry, which was previously not seen, but was predicted by model calculations including an additional narrow P_{11} state. Furthermore, data obtained with a longitudinally polarized, deuterated butanol target and a circularly polarized photon beam were analyzed to determine the double polarization observable E. Both data sets together were also used to extract the helicity-dependent cross sections σ_{1/2} and σ_{3/2}. The narrow structure in the excitation function of γ n→ nη appears associated with the helicity-1/2 component of the reaction.

  8. Analysis and Simple Circuit Design of Double Differential EMG Active Electrode.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Federico Nicolás; Spinelli, Enrique Mario; Haberman, Marcelo Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the voltage amplifier needed for double differential (DD) sEMG measurements and a novel, very simple circuit for implementing DD active electrodes. The three-input amplifier that standalone DD active electrodes require is inherently different from a differential amplifier, and general knowledge about its design is scarce in the literature. First, the figures of merit of the amplifier are defined through a decomposition of its input signal into three orthogonal modes. This analysis reveals a mode containing EMG crosstalk components that the DD electrode should reject. Then, the effect of finite input impedance is analyzed. Because there are three terminals, minimum bounds for interference rejection ratios due to electrode and input impedance unbalances with two degrees of freedom are obtained. Finally, a novel circuit design is presented, including only a quadruple operational amplifier and a few passive components. This design is nearly as simple as the branched electrode and much simpler than the three instrumentation amplifier design, while providing robust EMG crosstalk rejection and better input impedance using unity gain buffers for each electrode input. The interference rejection limits of this input stage are analyzed. An easily replicable implementation of the proposed circuit is described, together with a parameter design guideline to adjust it to specific needs. The electrode is compared with the established alternatives, and sample sEMG signals are obtained, acquired on different body locations with dry contacts, successfully rejecting interference sources.

  9. Analysis and Simple Circuit Design of Double Differential EMG Active Electrode.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Federico Nicolas; Spinelli, Enrique Mario; Haberman, Marcelo Alejandro

    2015-12-22

    In this paper we present an analysis of the voltage amplifier needed for double differential (DD) sEMG measurements and a novel, very simple circuit for implementing DD active electrodes. The three-input amplifier that standalone DD active electrodes require is inherently different from a differential amplifier, and general knowledge about its design is scarce in the literature. First, the figures of merit of the amplifier are defined through a decomposition of its input signal into three orthogonal modes. This analysis reveals a mode containing EMG crosstalk components that the DD electrode should reject. Then, the effect of finite input impedance is analyzed. Because there are three terminals, minimum bounds for interference rejection ratios due to electrode and input impedance unbalances with two degrees of freedom are obtained. Finally, a novel circuit design is presented, including only a quadruple operational amplifier and a few passive components. This design is nearly as simple as the branched electrode and much simpler than the three instrumentation amplifier design, while providing robust EMG crosstalk rejection and better input impedance using unity gain buffers for each electrode input. The interference rejection limits of this input stage are analyzed. An easily replicable implementation of the proposed circuit is described, together with a parameter design guideline to adjust it to specific needs. The electrode is compared with the established alternatives, and sample sEMG signals are obtained, acquired on different body locations with dry contacts, successfully rejecting interference sources.

  10. Double-differential recording and AGC using microcontrolled variable gain ASIC.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Robert; Deng, Shin-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Low-power wearable recording of biopotentials requires acquisition front-ends with high common-mode rejection for interference suppression and adjustable gain to provide an optimum signal range to a cascading analogue-to-digital stage. A microcontroller operated double-differential (DD) recording setup and automatic gain control circuit (AGC) are discussed which reject common-mode interference and provide tunable gain, thus compensating for imbalance and variation in electrode interface impedance. Custom-designed variable gain amplifiers (ASIC) are used as part of the recording setup. The circuit gain and balance is set by the timing of microcontroller generated clock signals. Measured results are presented which confirm that improved common-mode rejection is achieved compared to a single differential amplifier in the presence of input network imbalance. Practical measured examples further validate gain control suitable for biopotential recording and power-line rejection for wearable ECG and EMG recording. The prototype front-end consumes 318 μW including amplifiers and microcontroller.

  11. Melatonin improves sleep in children with epilepsy: randomized, double-blind cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sejal V; Horn, Paul S; Simakajornboon, Narong; Beebe, Dean W; Holland, Katherine; Byars, Anna W; Glauser, Tracy A

    2015-01-01

    Objective Insomnia, especially maintenance insomnia is widely prevalent in epilepsy. Although melatonin is commonly used, limited data address its efficacy. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to identify the effects of melatonin on sleep and seizure control in children with epilepsy. Methods Eleven pre-pubertal, developmentally normal children aged 6–11 years with epilepsy were randomized by software algorithm to receive placebo or 9 mg sustained release melatonin for 4 weeks, followed by a 1-week washout and 4-week crossover condition. The pharmacy performed blinding; patients, parents and study staff other than a statistician were blinded. Primary outcomes were sleep onset latency and wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO) measured on polysomnography. Secondary outcomes included seizure frequency, epileptiform spike density per hour of sleep on EEG and reaction time measures on psychomotor vigilance task. Statistical tests appropriate for cross-over designs were used for analysis. Results Data were analyzed from ten subjects who completed the study. Melatonin decreased sleep latency (Mean difference (MD): 11.4 min, p= 0.02) and WASO (MD 22 min, p=0.04) as compared to placebo. No worsening of spike density or seizure frequency was seen. Additionally, Slow-wave sleep duration and REM latency were increased with melatonin and REM sleep duration was decreased. These changes were statistically significant. Worsening of headache was noted in one subject with migraine on melatonin. Conclusion Sustained-release melatonin resulted in statistically significant decreases in sleep latency and WASO. No clear effects on seizures were observed but the study was too small to allow any conclusions to be drawn in this regard. PMID:25862116

  12. All orders results for self-crossing Wilson loops mimicking double parton scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Dixon, Lance J.; Esterlis, Ilya

    2016-07-21

    Loop-level scattering amplitudes for massless particles have singularities in regions where tree amplitudes are perfectly smooth. For example, a 2 → 4 gluon scattering process has a singularity in which each incoming gluon splits into a pair of gluons, followed by a pair of 2 → 2 collisions between the gluon pairs. This singularity mimics double parton scattering because it occurs when the transverse momentum of a pair of outgoing gluons vanishes. The singularity is logarithmic at fixed order in perturbation theory. We exploit the duality between scattering amplitudes and polygonal Wilson loops to study six-point amplitudes in this limitmore » to high loop order in planar N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory. The singular configuration corresponds to the limit in which a hexagonal Wilson loop develops a self-crossing. The singular terms are governed by an evolution equation, in which the hexagon mixes into a pair of boxes; the mixing back is suppressed in the planar (large N c) limit. Because the kinematic dependence of the box Wilson loops is dictated by (dual) conformal invariance, the complete kinematic dependence of the singular terms for the self-crossing hexagon on the one nonsingular variable is determined to all loop orders. The complete logarithmic dependence on the singular variable can be obtained through nine loops, up to a couple of constants, using a correspondence with the multi-Regge limit. As a byproduct, we obtain a simple formula for the leading logs to all loop orders. Furthermore, we also show that, although the MHV six-gluon amplitude is singular, remarkably, the transcendental functions entering the non-MHV amplitude are finite in the same limit, at least through four loops.« less

  13. All orders results for self-crossing Wilson loops mimicking double parton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Lance J.; Esterlis, Ilya

    2016-07-21

    Loop-level scattering amplitudes for massless particles have singularities in regions where tree amplitudes are perfectly smooth. For example, a 2 → 4 gluon scattering process has a singularity in which each incoming gluon splits into a pair of gluons, followed by a pair of 2 → 2 collisions between the gluon pairs. This singularity mimics double parton scattering because it occurs when the transverse momentum of a pair of outgoing gluons vanishes. The singularity is logarithmic at fixed order in perturbation theory. We exploit the duality between scattering amplitudes and polygonal Wilson loops to study six-point amplitudes in this limit to high loop order in planar N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory. The singular configuration corresponds to the limit in which a hexagonal Wilson loop develops a self-crossing. The singular terms are governed by an evolution equation, in which the hexagon mixes into a pair of boxes; the mixing back is suppressed in the planar (large N c) limit. Because the kinematic dependence of the box Wilson loops is dictated by (dual) conformal invariance, the complete kinematic dependence of the singular terms for the self-crossing hexagon on the one nonsingular variable is determined to all loop orders. The complete logarithmic dependence on the singular variable can be obtained through nine loops, up to a couple of constants, using a correspondence with the multi-Regge limit. As a byproduct, we obtain a simple formula for the leading logs to all loop orders. Furthermore, we also show that, although the MHV six-gluon amplitude is singular, remarkably, the transcendental functions entering the non-MHV amplitude are finite in the same limit, at least through four loops.

  14. All orders results for self-crossing Wilson loops mimicking double parton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Lance J.; Esterlis, Ilya

    2016-07-01

    Loop-level scattering amplitudes for massless particles have singularities in regions where tree amplitudes are perfectly smooth. For example, a 2 → 4 gluon scattering process has a singularity in which each incoming gluon splits into a pair of gluons, followed by a pair of 2 → 2 collisions between the gluon pairs. This singularity mimics double parton scattering because it occurs when the transverse momentum of a pair of outgoing gluons vanishes. The singularity is logarithmic at fixed order in perturbation theory. We exploit the duality between scattering amplitudes and polygonal Wilson loops to study six-point amplitudes in this limit to high loop order in planar {N} = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory. The singular configuration corresponds to the limit in which a hexagonal Wilson loop develops a self-crossing. The singular terms are governed by an evolution equation, in which the hexagon mixes into a pair of boxes; the mixing back is suppressed in the planar (large N c) limit. Because the kinematic dependence of the box Wilson loops is dictated by (dual) conformal invariance, the complete kinematic dependence of the singular terms for the self-crossing hexagon on the one nonsingular variable is determined to all loop orders. The complete logarithmic dependence on the singular variable can be obtained through nine loops, up to a couple of constants, using a correspondence with the multi-Regge limit. As a byproduct, we obtain a simple formula for the leading logs to all loop orders. We also show that, although the MHV six-gluon amplitude is singular, remarkably, the transcendental functions entering the non-MHV amplitude are finite in the same limit, at least through four loops.

  15. Absolute differential cross sections for electron capture and loss by kilo-electron-volt hydrogen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. J.; Johnson, L. K.; Gao, R. S.; Smith, K. A.; Stebbings, R. F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of absolute differential cross sections for electron capture and loss for fast hydrogen atoms incident on H2, N2, O2, Ar, and He. Cross sections have been determined in the 2.0- to 5.0-keV energy range over the laboratory angular range 0.02-2 deg, with an angular, resolution of 0.02 deg. The high angular resolution allows observation of the structure at small angles in some of the cross sections. Comparison of the present results with those of other authors generally shows very good agreement.

  16. Single- and double-ion type cross-linked polysiloxane solid electrolytes for lithium cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, Hiromori; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Morita, Masayuki; Matsuda, Yoshiharu; Nakamura, Takashi; Asai, Hiroyuki

    Polymeric solid electrolytes, that have poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PMS) backbone and cross-linked network, were applied to a rechargeable lithium battery system. Single- (PMS-Li) and double-ion type (PMS-LiClO 4) electrolytes were prepared from the same prepolymers. Lithium electrode in the both electrolytes showed reversible stripping and deposition of lithium. Intercalation and deintercalation processes of lithium ion between lithium-manganese composite oxide (Li xMnO 2) electrode and the electrolytes were also confirmed by cyclic voltammetry, however, peak current decreased with several cycles in both cases. The model cell, Li/PMS-Li/Li xMnO 2 cell had 1.4 mA h g -1 (per 1 g of active material, current density: 3.77 μA cm -2), and the Li/PMS-LiClO 4/Li xMnO 2 cell had 1.6 mA h g -1 (current density: 75.3 μA cm -2).

  17. 2D array of cold-electron nanobolometers with double polarised cross-dipole antennas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A novel concept of the two-dimensional (2D) array of cold-electron nanobolometers (CEB) with double polarised cross-dipole antennas is proposed for ultrasensitive multimode measurements. This concept provides a unique opportunity to simultaneously measure both components of an RF signal and to avoid complicated combinations of two schemes for each polarisation. The optimal concept of the CEB includes a superconductor-insulator-normal tunnel junction and an SN Andreev contact, which provides better performance. This concept allows for better matching with the junction gate field-effect transistor (JFET) readout, suppresses charging noise related to the Coulomb blockade due to the small area of tunnel junctions and decreases the volume of a normal absorber for further improvement of the noise performance. The reliability of a 2D array is considerably increased due to the parallel and series connections of many CEBs. Estimations of the CEB noise with JFET readout give an opportunity to realise a noise equivalent power (NEP) that is less than photon noise, specifically, NEP = 4 10−19 W/Hz1/2 at 7 THz for an optical power load of 0.02 fW. PMID:22512950

  18. Evaluation of Model Selection Strategies for Cross-Level Two-Way Differential Item Functioning Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patarapichayatham, Chalie; Kamata, Akihito; Kanjanawasee, Sirichai

    2012-01-01

    Model specification issues on the cross-level two-way differential item functioning model were previously investigated by Patarapichayatham et al. (2009). Their study clarified that an incorrect model specification can easily lead to biased estimates of key parameters. The objective of this article is to provide further insights on the issue by…

  19. Theoretical and experimental study on electron interactions with chlorobenzene: Shape resonances and differential cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Varella, Márcio T. do N.; Sanchez, Sergio d'A.; Ameixa, João; Blanco, Francisco; García, Gustavo; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Ferreira da Silva, Filipe; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we report theoretical and experimental cross sections for elastic scattering of electrons by chlorobenzene (ClB). The theoretical integral and differential cross sections (DCSs) were obtained with the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with pseudopotentials (SMCPP) and the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR). The calculations with the SMCPP method were done in the static-exchange (SE) approximation, for energies above 12 eV, and in the static-exchange plus polarization approximation, for energies up to 12 eV. The calculations with the IAM-SCAR method covered energies up to 500 eV. The experimental differential cross sections were obtained in the high resolution electron energy loss spectrometer VG-SEELS 400, in Lisbon, for electron energies from 8.0 eV to 50 eV and angular range from 7∘ to 110∘. From the present theoretical integral cross section (ICS) we discuss the low-energy shape-resonances present in chlorobenzene and compare our computed resonance spectra with available electron transmission spectroscopy data present in the literature. Since there is no other work in the literature reporting differential cross sections for this molecule, we compare our theoretical and experimental DCSs with experimental data available for the parent molecule benzene.

  20. Differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for elastic electron scattering by neon - 5 to 100 eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Register, D. F.; Trajmar, S.

    1984-01-01

    Relative elastic-scattering differential cross sections were measured in the 5-100-eV impact energy and 10-145 deg angular ranges. Normalization of these cross sections was achieved by utilizing accurate total electron-scattering cross sections. A phase-shift analysis of the angular distributions in terms of real phase shifts has been carried out. From the differential cross sections, momentum-transfer cross sections were obtained and the values of the critical energy and angle were established (associated with the lowest value of the differential cross section) as 62.5 + or - 2.5 eV and 101.7 deg + or - 1.5 deg, respectively. The present phase shifts, the critical parameters, and differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections are compared to previous experimental and theoretical results. The error associated with the present data is about 10 percent.

  1. Photoacoustic detection by means of a differential double resonator cell applied to security and defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallespi, Arturo; Slezak, Verónica; Peuriot, Alejandro; González, Francisco; Pereyra, Andrea; Santiago, Guillermo

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a sensitive optical system for immediate detection of traces of ammonia by means of photoacoustic spectroscopy and study some properties with both a pulsed CO2 laser (TEA) and a CW CO2 laser. The laser beam is aimed to an innovative dual resonator differential cell, which lowest resonant frequency is the first longitudinal mode at 1205 Hz, filled with a flowing NH3 and N2 mixture. The chosen cell's material is polypropylene, suitable for reducing the effects of adsorption. As a result of physical adsorption-desorption studies, based on a pulsed CO2 laser, 5 % PA signal decay from an enclosed sample of 248 ppmV of NH3 in N2 is recorded within 1 hour. The setup for CW CO2 laser excitation takes advantage of a differential microphone connected to both resonators by picking up out of phase signals. For this purpose, the beam is modulated at the cell's resonance by means of a chopper with a special blade which allows both reflection and transmission of the laser beam; the direct and the reflected beam are alternatively aimed to one resonator and the other. The measurements show that for the double resonator configuration a signal increase is achieved, as expected from the study of the sensitivity of both resonators separately, which have been previously characterized. Measurements with this system indicate a limit of detection of 13ppbV at the 10P(32) laser line, deduced from one standard deviation of the PA signal from pure N2.

  2. Differential Photoproduction Cross Sections of the Sigma0(1385), Lambda(1405), and Lambda(1520)

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Kei; Schumacher, Reinhard A.

    2013-10-01

    We report the exclusive photoproduction cross sections for the Sigma(1385), Lambda(1405), and Lambda(1520) in the reactions gamma + p -> K+ + Y* using the CLAS detector for energies from near the respective production thresholds up to a center-of-mass energy W of 2.85 GeV. The differential cross sections are integrated to give the total exclusive cross sections for each hyperon. Comparisons are made to current theoretical models based on the effective Lagrangian approach and fitted to previous data. The accuracy of these models is seen to vary widely. The cross sections for the Lambda(1405) region are strikingly different for the Sigma+pi-, Sigma0 pi0, and Sigma- pi+ decay channels, indicating the effect of isospin interference, especially at W values close to the threshold.

  3. Experimental differential cross sections, level densities, and spin cutoffs as a testing ground for nuclear reaction codes

    SciTech Connect

    Voinov, Alexander V.; Grimes, Steven M.; Brune, Carl R.; Burger, Alexander; Gorgen, Andreas; Guttormsen, Magne; Larsen, Ann -Cecilie; Massey, Thomas N.; Siem, Sunniva

    2013-11-08

    Proton double-differential cross sections from 59Co(α,p)62Ni, 57Fe(α,p)60Co, 56Fe(7Li,p)62Ni, and 55Mn(6Li,p)60Co reactions have been measured with 21-MeV α and 15-MeV lithium beams. Cross sections have been compared against calculations with the empire reaction code. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the Gilbert and Cameron [A. Gilbert and A. G. W. Cameron, Can. J. Phys. 43, 1446 (1965)] level density model is best to reproduce experimental data. Level densities and spin cutoff parameters for 62Ni and 60Co above the excitation energy range of discrete levels (in continuum) have been obtained with a Monte Carlo technique. Furthermore, excitation energy dependencies were found to be inconsistent with the Fermi-gas model.

  4. Pion and Kaon Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Intermediate Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes require accurate models for hadron production in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Codes require cross sections to be written in terms of lab frame variables and it is important to be able to verify models against experimental data in the lab frame. Several models are compared to lab frame data. It is found that models based on algebraic parameterizations are unable to describe intermediate energy differential cross section data. However, simple thermal model parameterizations, when appropriately transformed from the center of momentum to the lab frame, are able to account for the data.

  5. Medium effects in K+ nucleus interaction from consistent analysis of integral and differential cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    1997-02-01

    Self-consistency in the analysis of transmission measurements for K+ on several nuclei in the momentum range of 500-700 MeV/c is achieved with a `teff(ρ)ρ' potential and new results are derived for total cross sections. The imaginary part of the teff amplitude is found to increase linearly with the average nuclear density in excess of a threshold value of 0.088+/-0.004 fm-3. This phenomenological density dependence of the K+ nucleus optical potential also gives rise to good agreement with recent measurements of differential cross sections for elastic scattering of 715 MeV/c K+ by 6Li and C.

  6. The dijet differential cross section, M{sub jj} and {alpha}{sub s}

    SciTech Connect

    Chlebana, F.S.; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

    1998-06-01

    A preliminary measurement of the inclusive dijet differential cross section obtained from p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV by the CDF collaboration is presented. Results are presented from CDF and D0 for the dijet mass distribution and compared to QCD calculations. The effect of changing the renormalization scale and the choice of the parton density function on the predicted cross section is shown. An estimate of {alpha}{sub s} is obtained from the inclusive jet data.

  7. Quantitative trait locus mapping with background control in genetic populations of clonal F1 and double cross.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luyan; Li, Huihui; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Jianyu; Wang, Jiankang

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we considered five categories of molecular markers in clonal F1 and double cross populations, based on the number of distinguishable alleles and the number of distinguishable genotypes at the marker locus. Using the completed linkage maps, incomplete and missing markers were imputed as fully informative markers in order to simplify the linkage mapping approaches of quantitative trait genes. Under the condition of fully informative markers, we demonstrated that dominance effect between the female and male parents in clonal F1 and double cross populations can cause the interactions between markers. We then developed an inclusive linear model that includes marker variables and marker interactions so as to completely control additive effects of the female and male parents, as well as the dominance effect between the female and male parents. The linear model was finally used for background control in inclusive composite interval mapping (ICIM) of quantitative trait locus (QTL). The efficiency of ICIM was demonstrated by extensive simulations and by comparisons with simple interval mapping, multiple-QTL models and composite interval mapping. Finally, ICIM was applied in one actual double cross population to identify QTL on days to silking in maize.

  8. Quantitative trait locus mapping with background control in genetic populations of clonal F1 and double cross

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luyan; Li, Huihui; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Jianyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we considered five categories of molecular markers in clonal F1 and double cross populations, based on the number of distinguishable alleles and the number of distinguishable genotypes at the marker locus. Using the completed linkage maps, incomplete and missing markers were imputed as fully informative markers in order to simplify the linkage mapping approaches of quantitative trait genes. Under the condition of fully informative markers, we demonstrated that dominance effect between the female and male parents in clonal F1 and double cross populations can cause the interactions between markers. We then developed an inclusive linear model that includes marker variables and marker interactions so as to completely control additive effects of the female and male parents, as well as the dominance effect between the female and male parents. The linear model was finally used for background control in inclusive composite interval mapping (ICIM) of quantitative trait locus (QTL). The efficiency of ICIM was demonstrated by extensive simulations and by comparisons with simple interval mapping, multiple‐QTL models and composite interval mapping. Finally, ICIM was applied in one actual double cross population to identify QTL on days to silking in maize. PMID:25881980

  9. CCC calculated differential cross sections of electron-H2 scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fursa, Dmitry; Zammit, Mark; Savage, Jeremy; Bray, Igor

    2016-09-01

    Recently we applied the molecular convergent close-coupling (CCC) method to electron scattering from molecular hydrogen H2. Convergence of the major differential cross sections has been explicitly demonstrated in the fixed-nuclei approximation. A large close-coupling expansion that coupled highly excited states and ionization channels proved to be important to obtain convergent results. Here we present benchmark elastic and electronic excitation differential cross sections for b3Σu+ , a3Σg+ , c3Πu , B1Σu+ , EF1Σg+ , C1Πu , and e3Σu+ states and compare with available experiment and previous calculations. Work supported by Los Alamos National Laboratory and Curtin University.

  10. Measurement of the absolute differential cross section of proton–proton elastic scattering at small angles

    DOE PAGES

    Mchedlishvili, D.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; ...

    2016-02-03

    The differential cross section for proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured at a beam kinetic energy of 1.0 GeV and in 200 MeV steps from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV for centre-of-mass angles in the range from 12°-16° to 25°-30°, depending on the energy. A precision in the overall normalisation of typically 3% was achieved by studying the energy losses of the circulating beam of the COSY storage ring as it passed repeatedly through the windowless hydrogen target of the ANKE magnetic spectrometer. It is shown that the data have a significant impact upon the results of a partial wave analysis.more » Furthermore, after extrapolating the differential cross sections to the forward direction, the results are broadly compatible with the predictions of forward dispersion relations.« less

  11. Measurement of the absolute differential cross section of proton–proton elastic scattering at small angles

    SciTech Connect

    Mchedlishvili, D.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Bagdasarian, Z.; Barsov, S.; Gebel, R.; Gou, B.; Hartmann, M.; Kacharava, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; Khoukaz, A.; Kulessa, P.; Kulikov, A.; Lehrach, A.; Lomidze, N.; Lorentz, B.; Maier, R.; Macharashvili, G.; Merzliakov, S.; Mikirtychyants, S.; Nioradze, M.; Ohm, H.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Serdyuk, V.; Schroer, D.; Shmakova, V.; Stassen, R.; Stein, H. J.; Stockhorst, H.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Stroher, H.; Tabidze, M.; Taschner, A.; Trusov, S.; Tsirkov, D.; Uzikov, Yu.; Valdau, Yu.; Wilkin, C.; Workman, R. L.; Wustner, P.

    2016-02-03

    The differential cross section for proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured at a beam kinetic energy of 1.0 GeV and in 200 MeV steps from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV for centre-of-mass angles in the range from 12°-16° to 25°-30°, depending on the energy. A precision in the overall normalisation of typically 3% was achieved by studying the energy losses of the circulating beam of the COSY storage ring as it passed repeatedly through the windowless hydrogen target of the ANKE magnetic spectrometer. It is shown that the data have a significant impact upon the results of a partial wave analysis. Furthermore, after extrapolating the differential cross sections to the forward direction, the results are broadly compatible with the predictions of forward dispersion relations.

  12. DIFFERENTIAL CROSS SECTION ANALYSIS IN KAON PHOTOPRODUCTION USING ASSOCIATED LEGENDRE POLYNOMIALS

    SciTech Connect

    P. T. P. HUTAURUK, D. G. IRELAND, G. ROSNER

    2009-04-01

    Angular distributions of differential cross sections from the latest CLAS data sets,6 for the reaction γ + p→K+ + Λ have been analyzed using associated Legendre polynomials. This analysis is based upon theoretical calculations in Ref. 1 where all sixteen observables in kaon photoproduction can be classified into four Legendre classes. Each observable can be described by an expansion of associated Legendre polynomial functions. One of the questions to be addressed is how many associated Legendre polynomials are required to describe the data. In this preliminary analysis, we used data models with different numbers of associated Legendre polynomials. We then compared these models by calculating posterior probabilities of the models. We found that the CLAS data set needs no more than four associated Legendre polynomials to describe the differential cross section data. In addition, we also show the extracted coefficients of the best model.

  13. Communication: State-to-state differential cross sections for H2O(tilde B) photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; Xie, Daiqian; Guo, Hua

    2011-06-01

    Quantum state-to-state differential cross sections, along with the absorption spectrum and product internal state distributions, have been calculated for the photodissociation of H2O in its B band on a new set of ab initio potential energy surfaces in a diabatic representation. The theoretical attributes are in good agreement with the recent experimental data, shedding light on the non-adiabatic dissociation dynamics.

  14. Positron interactions with water–total elastic, total inelastic, and elastic differential cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tattersall, Wade; Chiari, Luca; Machacek, J. R.; Anderson, Emma; Sullivan, James P.; White, Ron D.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, Stephen J.; Garcia, Gustavo; Blanco, Francisco

    2014-01-28

    Utilising a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam, we have measured both elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons from water vapour. The measurements comprise differential elastic, total elastic, and total inelastic (not including positronium formation) absolute cross sections. The energy range investigated is from 1 eV to 60 eV. Comparison with theory is made with both R-Matrix and distorted wave calculations, and with our own application of the Independent Atom Model for positron interactions.

  15. Serological Differentiation of Murine Typhus and Epidemic Typhus Using Cross-Adsorption and Western Blotting

    PubMed Central

    La Scola, Bernard; Rydkina, Lena; Ndihokubwayo, Jean-Bosco; Vene, Sirkka; Raoult, Didier

    2000-01-01

    Differentiation of murine typhus due to Rickettsia typhi and epidemic typhus due to Rickettsia prowazekii is critical epidemiologically but difficult serologically. Using serological, epidemiological, and clinical criteria, we selected sera from 264 patients with epidemic typhus and from 44 patients with murine typhus among the 29,188 tested sera in our bank. These sera cross-reacted extensively in indirect fluorescent antibody assays (IFAs) against R. typhi and R. prowazekii, as 42% of the sera from patients with epidemic typhus and 34% of the sera from patients with murine typhus exhibited immunoglobulin M (IgM) and/or IgG titers against the homologous antigen (R. prowazekii and R. typhi, respectively) that were more than one dilution higher than those against the heterologous antigen. Serum cross-adsorption studies and Western blotting were performed on sera from 12 selected patients, 5 with murine typhus, 5 with epidemic typhus, and 2 suffering from typhus of undetermined etiology. Differences in IFA titers against R. typhi and R. prowazekii allowed the identification of the etiological agent in 8 of 12 patients. Western blot studies enabled the identification of the etiological agent in six patients. When the results of IFA and Western blot studies were considered in combination, identification of the etiological agent was possible for 10 of 12 patients. Serum cross-adsorption studies enabled the differentiation of the etiological agent in all patients. Our study indicates that when used together, Western blotting and IFA are useful serological tools to differentiate between R. prowazekii and R. typhi exposures. While a cross-adsorption study is the definitive technique to differentiate between infections with these agents, it was necessary in only 2 of 12 cases (16.7%), and the high costs of such a study limit its use. PMID:10882661

  16. Measurement of inelastic, single- and double-diffraction cross sections in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with ALICE.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B; Adam, J; Adamová, D; Adare, A M; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agocs, A G; Agostinelli, A; Aguilar Salazar, S; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad Masoodi, A; Ahmad, N; Ahn, S A; Ahn, S U; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alfaro Molina, R; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Almaráz Aviña, E; Alme, J; Alt, T; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Altsybeev, I; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anielski, J; Anson, C; Antičić, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arbor, N; Arcelli, S; Arend, A; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Arslandok, M; Asryan, A; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Äystö, J; Azmi, M D; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldini Ferroli, R; Baldisseri, A; Baldit, A; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Bán, J; Baral, R C; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Bastid, N; Basu, S; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batyunya, B; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Behera, N K; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; Bellwied, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Bencedi, G; Beole, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdnikov, Y; Berenyi, D; Bergognon, A A E; Berzano, D; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhom, J; Bianchi, N; Bianchi, L; Bianchin, C; Bielčík, J; Bielčíková, J; Bilandzic, A; Bjelogrlic, S; Blanco, F; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Boccioli, M; Bock, N; Böttger, S; Bogdanov, A; Bøggild, H; Bogolyubsky, M; Boldizsár, L; Bombara, M; Book, J; Borel, H; Borissov, A; Bose, S; Bossú, F; Botje, M; Botta, E; Boyer, B; Braidot, E; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bregant, M; Breitner, T; Browning, T A; Broz, M; Brun, R; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bufalino, S; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Caballero Orduna, D; Caffarri, D; Cai, X; Caines, H; Calvo Villar, E; Camerini, P; Canoa Roman, V; Cara Romeo, G; Carena, F; Carena, W; Carlin Filho, N; Carminati, F; Casanova Díaz, A; Castillo Castellanos, J; Castillo Hernandez, J F; Casula, E A R; Catanescu, V; Cavicchioli, C; Ceballos Sanchez, C; Cepila, J; Cerello, P; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Chawla, I; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Chibante Barroso, V; Chinellato, D D; Chochula, P; Chojnacki, M; Choudhury, S; Christakoglou, P; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, S U; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cleymans, J; Coccetti, F; Colamaria, F; Colella, D; Conesa Balbastre, G; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Constantin, P; Contin, G; Contreras, J G; Cormier, T M; Corrales Morales, Y; Cortese, P; Cortés Maldonado, I; Cosentino, M R; Costa, F; Cotallo, M E; Crescio, E; Crochet, P; Cruz Alaniz, E; Cuautle, E; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; Dalsgaard, H H; Danu, A; Das, D; Das, K; Das, I; Dash, S; Dash, A; De, S; de Barros, G O V; De Caro, A; de Cataldo, G; de Cuveland, J; De Falco, A; De Gruttola, D; Delagrange, H; Deloff, A; Demanov, V; De Marco, N; Dénes, E; De Pasquale, S; Deppman, A; D Erasmo, G; de Rooij, R; Diaz Corchero, M A; Di Bari, D; Dietel, T; Di Giglio, C; Di Liberto, S; Di Mauro, A; Di Nezza, P; Divià, R; Djuvsland, Ø; Dobrin, A; Dobrowolski, T; Domínguez, I; Dönigus, B; Dordic, O; Driga, O; Dubey, A K; Dubla, A; Ducroux, L; Dupieux, P; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Dutta Majumdar, A K; Elia, D; Emschermann, D; Engel, H; Erazmus, B; Erdal, H A; Espagnon, B; Estienne, M; Esumi, S; Evans, D; Eyyubova, G; Fabris, D; Faivre, J; Falchieri, D; Fantoni, A; Fasel, M; Fearick, R; Fedunov, A; Fehlker, D; Feldkamp, L; Felea, D; Fenton-Olsen, B; Feofilov, G; Fernández Téllez, A; Ferretti, A; Ferretti, R; Festanti, A; Figiel, J; Figueredo, M A S; Filchagin, S; Finogeev, D; Fionda, F M; Fiore, E M; Floris, M; Foertsch, S; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Fragiacomo, E; Francescon, A; Frankenfeld, U; Fuchs, U; Furget, C; Fusco Girard, M; Gaardhøje, J J; Gagliardi, M; Gago, A; Gallio, M; Gangadharan, D R; Ganoti, P; Garabatos, C; Garcia-Solis, E; Garishvili, I; Gerhard, J; Germain, M; Geuna, C; Gheata, M; Gheata, A; Ghidini, B; Ghosh, P; Gianotti, P; Girard, M R; Giubellino, P; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Glässel, P; Gomez, R; Ferreiro, E G; González-Trueba, L H; González-Zamora, P; Gorbunov, S; Goswami, A; Gotovac, S; Grabski, V; Graczykowski, L K; Grajcarek, R; Grelli, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoras, A; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, S; Grigoryan, A; Grinyov, B; Grion, N; Gros, P; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grossiord, J-Y; Grosso, R; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerra Gutierrez, C; Guerzoni, B; Guilbaud, M; Gulbrandsen, K; Gunji, T; Gupta, A; Gupta, R; Gutbrod, H; Haaland, Ø; Hadjidakis, C; Haiduc, M; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Han, B H; Hanratty, L D; Hansen, A; Harmanová-Tóthová, Z; Harris, J W; Hartig, M; Hasegan, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayrapetyan, A; Heckel, S T; Heide, M; Helstrup, H; Herghelegiu, A; Herrera Corral, G; Herrmann, N; Hess, B A; Hetland, K F; Hicks, B; Hille, P T; Hippolyte, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hristov, P; Hřivnáčová, I; Huang, M; Humanic, T J; Hwang, D S; Ichou, R; Ilkaev, R; Ilkiv, I; Inaba, M; Incani, E; Innocenti, P G; Innocenti, G M; Ippolitov, M; Irfan, M; Ivan, C; Ivanov, A; Ivanov, M; Ivanov, V; Ivanytskyi, O; Jachołkowski, A; Jacobs, P M; Jang, H J; Janik, R; Janik, M A; Jayarathna, P H S Y; Jena, S; Jha, D M; Jimenez Bustamante, R T; Jirden, L; Jones, P G; Jung, H; Jusko, A; Kaidalov, A B; Kakoyan, V; Kalcher, S; Kaliňák, P; Kalliokoski, T; Kalweit, A; Kang, J H; Kaplin, V; Karasu Uysal, A; Karavichev, O; Karavicheva, T; Karpechev, E; Kazantsev, A; Kebschull, U; Keidel, R; Khan, P; Khan, S A; Khan, M M; Khanzadeev, A; Kharlov, Y; Kileng, B; Kim, S; Kim, B; Kim, T; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, J H; Kim, J S; Kim, M; Kim, M; Kirsch, S; Kisel, I; Kiselev, S; Kisiel, A; Klay, J L; Klein, J; Klein-Bösing, C; Kliemant, M; Kluge, A; Knichel, M L; Knospe, A G; Koch, K; Köhler, M K; Kollegger, T; Kolojvari, A; Kondratiev, V; Kondratyeva, N; Konevskikh, A; Korneev, A; Kour, R; Kowalski, M; Kox, S; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G; Kral, J; Králik, I; Kramer, F; Kraus, I; Krawutschke, T; Krelina, M; Kretz, M; Krivda, M; Krizek, F; Krus, M; Kryshen, E; Krzewicki, M; Kucheriaev, Y; Kugathasan, T; Kuhn, C; Kuijer, P G; Kulakov, I; Kumar, J; Kurashvili, P; Kurepin, A B; Kurepin, A; Kuryakin, A; Kushpil, V; Kushpil, S; Kvaerno, H; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Lakomov, I; Langoy, R; La Pointe, S L; Lara, C; Lardeux, A; La Rocca, P; Lea, R; Le Bornec, Y; Lechman, M; Lee, S C; Lee, G R; Lee, K S; Lefèvre, F; Lehnert, J; Lenhardt, M; Lenti, V; León, H; Leoncino, M; León Monzón, I; León Vargas, H; Lévai, P; Lien, J; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Liu, L; Loggins, V R; Loginov, V; Lohn, S; Lohner, D; Loizides, C; Loo, K K; Lopez, X; López Torres, E; Løvhøiden, G; Lu, X-G; Luettig, P; Lunardon, M; Luo, J; Luparello, G; Luquin, L; Luzzi, C; Ma, K; Ma, R; Madagodahettige-Don, D M; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahapatra, D P; Maire, A; Malaev, M; Maldonado Cervantes, I; Malinina, L; Mal'Kevich, M V D; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Mangotra, L; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Mao, Y; Marchisone, M; Mareš, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Marín, A; Marin Tobon, C A; Markert, C; Marquard, M; Martashvili, I; Martinengo, P; Martínez, M I; Martínez Davalos, A; Martínez García, G; Martynov, Y; Mas, A; Masciocchi, S; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Massacrier, L; Mastroserio, A; Matthews, Z L; Matyja, A; Mayer, C; Mazer, J; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Mercado Pérez, J; Meres, M; Miake, Y; Milano, L; Milosevic, J; Mischke, A; Mishra, A N; Miśkowiec, D; Mitu, C; Mlynarz, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Montaño Zetina, L; Monteno, M; Montes, E; Moon, T; Morando, M; Moreira De Godoy, D A; Moretto, S; Morsch, A; Muccifora, V; Mudnic, E; Muhuri, S; Mukherjee, M; Müller, H; Munhoz, M G; Musa, L; Musso, A; Nandi, B K; Nania, R; Nappi, E; Nattrass, C; Naumov, N P; Navin, S; Nayak, T K; Nazarenko, S; Nazarov, G; Nedosekin, A; Nicassio, M; Niculescu, M; Nielsen, B S; Niida, T; Nikolaev, S; Nikolic, V; Nikulin, S; Nikulin, V; Nilsen, B S; Nilsson, M S; Noferini, F; Nomokonov, P; Nooren, G; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A; Nyatha, A; Nygaard, C; Nystrand, J; Ochirov, A; Oeschler, H; Oh, S; Oh, S K; Oleniacz, J; Oppedisano, C; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Ortona, G; Oskarsson, A; Ostrowski, P; Otwinowski, J; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pachmayer, Y; Pachr, M; Padilla, F; Pagano, P; Paić, G; Painke, F; Pajares, C; Pal, S K; Palaha, A; Palmeri, A; Papikyan, V; Pappalardo, G S; Park, W J; Passfeld, A; Pastirčák, B; Patalakha, D I; Paticchio, V; Pavlinov, A; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Pereira Da Costa, H; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E; Peresunko, D; Pérez Lara, C E; Perez Lezama, E; Perini, D; Perrino, D; Peryt, W; Pesci, A; Peskov, V; Pestov, Y; Petráček, V; Petran, M; Petris, M; Petrov, P; Petrovici, M; Petta, C; Piano, S; Piccotti, A; Pikna, M; Pillot, P; Pinazza, O; Pinsky, L; Pitz, N; Piyarathna, D B; Planinic, M; Płoskoń, M; Pluta, J; Pocheptsov, T; Pochybova, S; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Poghosyan, M G; Polák, K; Polichtchouk, B; Pop, A; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S; Pospíšil, V; Potukuchi, B; Prasad, S K; Preghenella, R; Prino, F; Pruneau, C A; Pshenichnov, I; Puchagin, S; Puddu, G; Pulvirenti, A; Punin, V; Putiš, M; Putschke, J; Quercigh, E; Qvigstad, H; Rachevski, A; Rademakers, A; Räihä, T S; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramello, L; Ramírez Reyes, A; Raniwala, S; Raniwala, R; Räsänen, S S; Rascanu, B T; Rathee, D; Read, K F; Real, J S; Redlich, K; Reichelt, P; Reicher, M; Renfordt, R; Reolon, A R; Reshetin, A; Rettig, F; Revol, J-P; Reygers, K; Riccati, L; Ricci, R A; Richert, T; Richter, M; Riedler, P; Riegler, W; Riggi, F; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, B; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M; Rodriguez Manso, A; Røed, K; Rohr, D; Röhrich, D; Romita, R; Ronchetti, F; Rosnet, P; Rossegger, S; Rossi, A; Roy, P; Roy, C; Rubio Montero, A J; Rui, R; Russo, R; Ryabinkin, E; Rybicki, A; Sadovsky, S; Šafařík, K; Sahoo, R; Sahu, P K; Saini, J; Sakaguchi, H; Sakai, S; Sakata, D; Salgado, C A; Salzwedel, J; Sambyal, S; Samsonov, V; Sanchez Castro, X; Šándor, L; Sandoval, A; Sano, M; Sano, S; Santo, R; Santoro, R; Sarkamo, J; Scapparone, E; Scarlassara, F; Scharenberg, R P; Schiaua, C; Schicker, R; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, H R; Schreiner, S; Schuchmann, S; Schukraft, J; Schutz, Y; Schwarz, K; Schweda, K; Scioli, G; Scomparin, E; Scott, R; Segato, G; Selyuzhenkov, I; Senyukov, S; Seo, J; Serci, S; Serradilla, E; Sevcenco, A; Shabetai, A; Shabratova, G; Shahoyan, R; Sharma, N; Sharma, S; Rohni, S; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shtejer, K; Sibiriak, Y; Siciliano, M; Sicking, E; Siddhanta, S; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Simatovic, G; Simonetti, G; Singaraju, R; Singh, R; Singha, S; Singhal, V; Sinha, B C; Sinha, T; Sitar, B; Sitta, M; Skaali, T B; Skjerdal, K; Smakal, R; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R J M; Søgaard, C; Soltz, R; Son, H; Song, M; Song, J; Soos, C; Soramel, F; Sputowska, I; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M; Srivastava, B K; Stachel, J; Stan, I; Stan, I; Stefanek, G; Steinpreis, M; Stenlund, E; Steyn, G; Stiller, J H; Stocco, D; Stolpovskiy, M; Strabykin, K; Strmen, P; Suaide, A A P; Subieta Vásquez, M A; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhorukov, M; Sultanov, R; Šumbera, M; Susa, T; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarka, I; Szczepankiewicz, A; Szostak, A; Szymański, M; Takahashi, J; Tapia Takaki, J D; Tauro, A; Tejeda Muñoz, G; Telesca, A; Terrevoli, C; Thäder, J; Thomas, D; Tieulent, R; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Toia, A; Torii, H; Toscano, L; Trubnikov, V; Truesdale, D; Trzaska, W H; Tsuji, T; Tumkin, A; Turrisi, R; Tveter, T S; Ulery, J; Ullaland, K; Ulrich, J; Uras, A; Urbán, J; Urciuoli, G M; Usai, G L; Vajzer, M; Vala, M; Valencia Palomo, L; Vallero, S; Vande Vyvre, P; van Leeuwen, M; Vannucci, L; Vargas, A; Varma, R; Vasileiou, M; Vasiliev, A; Vechernin, V; Veldhoen, M; Venaruzzo, M; Vercellin, E; Vergara, S; Vernet, R; Verweij, M; Vickovic, L; Viesti, G; Vikhlyantsev, O; Vilakazi, Z; Villalobos Baillie, O; Vinogradov, Y; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, L; Virgili, T; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopyanov, A; Voloshin, S; Voloshin, K; Volpe, G; von Haller, B; Vranic, D; Øvrebekk, G; Vrláková, J; Vulpescu, B; Vyushin, A; Wagner, V; Wagner, B; Wan, R; Wang, M; Wang, D; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Watanabe, K; Weber, M; Wessels, J P; Westerhoff, U; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilde, M; Wilk, A; Wilk, G; Williams, M C S; Windelband, B; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L; Yaldo, C G; Yamaguchi, Y; Yang, H; Yang, S; Yasnopolskiy, S; Yi, J; Yin, Z; Yoo, I-K; Yoon, J; Yu, W; Yuan, X; Yushmanov, I; Zaccolo, V; Zach, C; Zampolli, C; Zaporozhets, S; Zarochentsev, A; Závada, P; Zaviyalov, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zelnicek, P; Zgura, I S; Zhalov, M; Zhang, X; Zhang, H; Zhou, D; Zhou, Y; Zhou, F; Zhu, J; Zhu, J; Zhu, X; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, A; Zinovjev, G; Zoccarato, Y; Zynovyev, M; Zyzak, M

    Measurements of cross sections of inelastic and diffractive processes in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies were carried out with the ALICE detector. The fractions of diffractive processes in inelastic collisions were determined from a study of gaps in charged particle pseudorapidity distributions: for single diffraction (diffractive mass MX <200 GeV/c(2)) [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text], respectively at centre-of-mass energies [Formula: see text]; for double diffraction (for a pseudorapidity gap Δη>3) σDD/σINEL=0.11±0.03,0.12±0.05, and [Formula: see text], respectively at [Formula: see text]. To measure the inelastic cross section, beam properties were determined with van der Meer scans, and, using a simulation of diffraction adjusted to data, the following values were obtained: [Formula: see text] mb at [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text]. The single- and double-diffractive cross sections were calculated combining relative rates of diffraction with inelastic cross sections. The results are compared to previous measurements at proton-antiproton and proton-proton colliders at lower energies, to measurements by other experiments at the LHC, and to theoretical models.

  17. Interference structures in the differential cross-sections for inelastic scattering of NO by Ar.

    PubMed

    Eyles, C J; Brouard, M; Yang, C-H; Kłos, J; Aoiz, F J; Gijsbertsen, A; Wiskerke, A E; Stolte, S

    2011-06-12

    Inelastic scattering is a fundamental collisional process that plays an important role in many areas of chemistry, and its detailed study can provide valuable insight into more complex chemical systems. Here, we report the measurement of differential cross-sections for the rotationally inelastic scattering of NO(X2Π1/2, v=0, j=0.5, f) by Ar at a collision energy of 530 cm(-1) in unprecedented detail, with full Λ-doublet (hence total NO parity) resolution in both the initial and final rotational quantum states. The observed differential cross-sections depend sensitively on the change in total NO parity on collision. Differential cross-sections for total parity-conserving and changing collisions have distinct, novel quantum-mechanical interference structures, reflecting different sensitivities to specific homonuclear and heteronuclear terms in the interaction potential. The experimental data agree remarkably well with rigorous quantum-mechanical scattering calculations, and reveal the role played by total parity in acting as a potential energy landscape filter.

  18. Rotational echo double resonance detection of cross-links formed in mussel byssus under high-flow stress.

    PubMed

    McDowell, L M; Burzio, L A; Waite, J H; Schaefer, J

    1999-07-16

    13C2H rotational echo double resonance NMR has been used to provide the first evidence for the formation of quinone-derived cross-links in mussel byssal plaques. Labeling of byssus was achieved by allowing mussels to filter feed from seawater containing L-[phenol-4-13C]tyrosine and L-[ring-d4]tyrosine for 2 days. Plaques and threads were harvested from two groups of mussels over a period of 28 days. One group was maintained in stationary water while the other was exposed to turbulent flow at 20 cm/s. The flow-stressed byssal plaques exhibited significantly enhanced levels of 5, 5'-di-dihydroxyphenylalanine cross-links. The average concentration of di-dihydroxyphenylalanine cross-links in byssal plaques is 1 per 1800 total protein amino acid residues.

  19. Hartree-Fock calculation of the differential photoionization cross sections of small Li clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Galitskiy, S. A.; Artemyev, A. N.; Jänkälä, K.; Lagutin, B. M.; Demekhin, Ph. V.

    2015-01-21

    Cross sections and angular distribution parameters for the single-photon ionization of all electron orbitals of Li{sub 2−8} are systematically computed in a broad interval of the photoelectron kinetic energies for the energetically most stable geometry of each cluster. Calculations of the partial photoelectron continuum waves in clusters are carried out by the single center method within the Hartree-Fock approximation. We study photoionization cross sections per one electron and analyze in some details general trends in the photoionization of inner and outer shells with respect to the size and geometry of a cluster. The present differential cross sections computed for Li{sub 2} are in a good agreement with the available theoretical data, whereas those computed for Li{sub 3−8} clusters can be considered as theoretical predictions.

  20. Differential (p,p') and (p,d) Cross Sections of 89Y and 92Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeling, Molly; Burke, Jason; Koglin, Johnathon; McClory, John

    2016-03-01

    Differential cross sections for the (p,p') and (p,d) reactions on 89Y and 92Zr were measured using a 28.5-MeV proton beam at the 88-inch cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Angular distributions were obtained for the ground state and several excited states of each isotope using silicon detector telescopes over angles 10° to 140° in the reaction plane. Angular distributions for unresolved higher-energy states up to 22 MeV were also obtained. These data were obtained by fitting a Gaussian function to each peak in the energy spectra using the ROOT toolkit and integrating the number of counts under each peak. The cross sections will be included in nuclear structure models so that neutron and other particle reaction cross sections can be predicted for other isotopes, including eventually those farther from stability and those whose half-lives are too short to measure experimentally.

  1. Absolute differential cross sections for elastic scattering of electrons from pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Maljkovic, J. B.; Milosavljevic, A. R.; Sevic, D.; Marinkovic, B. P.; Blanco, F.

    2009-05-15

    Differential cross sections (DCSs) for elastic scattering of electrons from pyrimidine (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}) are presented for incident energies from 50 to 300 eV. The measurements were performed using a cross beam technique, for scattering angles from 20 deg. to 110 deg. The relative DCSs were measured as a function of both the angle and incident energy and the absolute DCSs were determined using the relative flow method. The calculations of electron interaction cross sections are based on a corrected form of the independent-atom method, known as the screen corrected additivity rule procedure and using an improved quasifree absorption model. Calculated results agree very well with the experiment.

  2. Relay Selection Based Double-Differential Transmission for Cooperative Networks with Multiple Carrier Frequency Offsets: Model, Analysis, and Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Bangning; Pan, Kegang; Liu, Aijun; Guo, Daoxing

    2014-07-01

    Due to the distributed nature, cooperative networks are generally subject to multiple carrier frequency offsets (MCFOs), which make the channels time-varying and drastically degrade the system performance. In this paper, to address the MCFOs problem in detect-andforward (DetF) multi-relay cooperative networks, a robust relay selection (RS) based double-differential (DD) transmission scheme, termed RSDDT, is proposed, where the best relay is selected to forward the source's double-differentially modulated signals to the destination with the DetF protocol. The proposed RSDDT scheme can achieve excellent performance over fading channels in the presence of unknown MCFOs. Considering double-differential multiple phase-shift keying (DDMPSK) is applied, we first derive exact expressions for the outage probability and average bit error rate (BER) of the RSDDT scheme. Then, we look into the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regime and present simple and informative asymptotic outage probability and average BER expressions, which reveal that the proposed scheme can achieve full diversity. Moreover, to further improve the BER performance of the RSDDT scheme, we investigate the optimum power allocation strategy among the source and the relay nodes, and simple analytical solutions are obtained. Numerical results are provided to corroborate the derived analytical expressions and it is demonstrated that the proposed optimum power allocation strategy offers substantial BER performance improvement over the equal power allocation strategy.

  3. Experiment to measure total cross sections, differential cross sections and polarization effects in pp elastic scattering at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Guryn, W.

    1998-02-01

    The authors are describing an experiment to study proton-proton (pp) elastic scattering experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Using both polarized and unpolarized beams, the experiment will study pp elastic scattering from {radical}s = 50 GeV to {radical}s = 500 GeV in two kinematical regions. In the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region, 0.0005 < {vert_bar}t{vert_bar} < 0.12 (GeV/c){sup 2}, they will measure and study the s dependence of the total and elastic cross sections, {sigma}{sub tot} and {sigma}{sub el}; the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, {rho}; and the nuclear slope parameter of the pp elastic scattering, b. In the medium {vert_bar}t{vert_bar}-region, {vert_bar}t{vert_bar} < 1.5 (GeV/c){sup 2}, they plan to study the evolution of the dip structure with s, as observed at ISR in the differential elastic cross section, d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, and the s and {vert_bar}t{vert_bar} dependence of b. With the polarized beams the following can be measured: the difference in the total cross sections as function of initial transverse spin states {Delta}{sigma}{sub T}, the analyzing power, A{sub N}, and the transverse spin correlation parameter A{sub NN}. The behavior of the analyzing power A{sub N} at RHIC energies in the dip region of d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, where a pronounced structure was found at fixed-target experiments will be studied. The relation of pp elastic scattering to the beam polarization measurement at RHIC is also discussed.

  4. Differential and angle-integrated cross sections for the 40Ca(n, α)37Ar reaction from 4.0 to 6.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinhua; Liu, Jiaming; Liu, Xiang; Fan, Xiao; Wang, Zhimin; Chen, Jinxiang; Zhang, Guohui; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Sedysheva, M. V.; Krupa, L.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.; Szalanski, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Differential cross sections for the 40 Ca( n,) , and reactions are measured at neutron energies of 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0 and 6.5MeV using a double-section gridded ionization chamber and two CaF2 samples. Monoenergetic neutrons were produced through the 2 H( d, n)3 He reaction with a deuterium gas target. A BF3 neutron counter was utilized to normalize the neutron flux among different measurements. The absolute value of neutron flux was calibrated using a 238U sample. Angle-integrated cross sections for the 40 Ca( n,) , and reactions are obtained from the integration of the differential data. Model calculations are performed using the TALYS-1.6 code and general agreement is achieved between measurements and calculations. Then the total 40Ca( n,)37Ar cross sections are derived from the angle-integrated cross sections combined with the code calculations. Present results are compared with existing measurements and evaluations.

  5. Differential use of autophagy by primary dendritic cells specialized in cross-presentation.

    PubMed

    Mintern, Justine D; Macri, Christophe; Chin, Wei Jin; Panozza, Scott E; Segura, Elodie; Patterson, Natalie L; Zeller, Peter; Bourges, Dorothee; Bedoui, Sammy; McMillan, Paul J; Idris, Adi; Nowell, Cameron J; Brown, Andrew; Radford, Kristen J; Johnston, Angus Pr; Villadangos, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells survey their environment and present captured antigens bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Formation of MHC-antigen complexes occurs in specialized compartments where multiple protein trafficking routes, still incompletely understood, converge. Autophagy is a route that enables the presentation of cytosolic antigen by MHC class II molecules. Some reports also implicate autophagy in the presentation of extracellular, endocytosed antigen by MHC class I molecules, a pathway termed "cross-presentation." The role of autophagy in cross-presentation is controversial. This may be due to studies using different types of antigen presenting cells for which the use of autophagy is not well defined. Here we report that active use of autophagy is evident only in DC subtypes specialized in cross-presentation. However, the contribution of autophagy to cross-presentation varied depending on the form of antigen: it was negligible in the case of cell-associated antigen or antigen delivered via receptor-mediated endocytosis, but more prominent when the antigen was a soluble protein. These findings highlight the differential use of autophagy and its machinery by primary cells equipped with specific immune function, and prompt careful reassessment of the participation of this endocytic pathway in antigen cross-presentation.

  6. Inelastic scattering of He atoms and NO(X2Pi) molecules: the role of parity on the differential cross section.

    PubMed

    Aoiz, F J; Verdasco, J E; Brouard, M; Kłos, J; Marinakis, S; Stolte, S

    2009-12-31

    Quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) and quantum mechanical (QM) close-coupling calculations have been used to study the state-resolved rotationally inelastic scattering of NO(X(2)Pi(1/2),v = 0,j = 1/2,e/f) by He on the most recent ab initio potential energy surface of J. Kłos et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 112, 2195.]. Opacity functions, and integral and differential cross sections are reported at collision energies of 63 and 147 meV and compared with previous theoretical calculations and experimental measurements on this and other systems. The existence of double peaks in the QCT and QM differential cross sections is examined in detail. While at a collision energy of 147 meV two rotational peaks appear in both the QCT and open-shell QM results, only a single peak is found in the QM calculations at the lower collision energy. The double peaks in the quantum-state-resolved differential cross sections (DCS) are found to be closely related to structure found in the corresponding state-resolved opacity functions. The structure in the QCT and QM DCSs is attributed to a flattening of the potential energy surface for sideways approach of He to the near-symmetric NO(X) molecule, and in both sets of calculations, it is shown to arise from a specific odd term in the expansion of the intermolecular potential. Although significant differences are found between the QCT and QM data in the forward scattered direction, and for higher final rotational levels, reflecting differences in the nature of the rotational rainbows observed in these two methods, in general, the QCT calculations are shown to give similar results to quantum theory. Furthermore, they provide valuable clues as to the mechanism of rotational energy transfer in this system.

  7. Studies of combustion reactions at the state-resolved differential cross section level

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, P.L.; Suits, A.G.; Bontuyan, L.S.; Whitaker, B.J.

    1993-12-01

    State-resolved differential reaction cross sections provide perhaps the most detailed information about the mechanism of a chemical reaction, but heretofore they have been extremely difficult to measure. This program explores a new technique for obtaining differential cross sections with product state resolution. The three-dimensional velocity distribution of state-selected reaction products is determined by ionizing the appropriate product, waiting for a delay while it recoils along the trajectory imparted by the reaction, and finally projecting the spatial distribution of ions onto a two dimensional screen using a pulsed electric field. Knowledge of the arrival time allows the ion position to be converted to a velocity, and the density of velocity projections can be inverted mathematically to provide the three-dimensional velocity distribution for the selected product. The main apparatus has been constructed and tested using photodissociations. The authors report here the first test results using crossed beams to investigate collisions between Ar and NO. Future research will both develop further the new technique and employ it to investigate methyl radical, formyl radical, and hydrogen atom reactions which are important in combustion processes. The authors intend specifically to characterize the reactions of CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO; of HCO with O{sub 2}; and of H with CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}.

  8. Differential cross sections for electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of pyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunger, Michael; Jones, Darryl; Bellm, Susan

    2012-06-01

    Pyrimidine (C4N2H4) is an important molecule, as it forms the basis of larger biomolecules, such as the DNA bases thymine, cytosine and uracil. There is a pressing demand for low-energy electron scattering data from such biological analogs in order to model radiation induced damage [1]. We therefore present the first measurements for absolute differential cross section data for low-energy electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of pyrimidine. The present measurements were performed using a crossed-beam apparatus [2] for incident electron energies ranging between 15 to 50eV while covering a 10 to 90^o angular range. Here the absolute scale has been determined through a normalisation to the recently measured elastic scattering differential cross section data for pyrimidine [3]. [1] F. Ferreira da Silva, D. Almeida, G. Martins, A. R. Milosavljevic, B. P. Marinkovic, S. V. Hoffmann, N. J. Mason, Y. Nunes, G. Garcia and P. Limao-Vieira, Phys Chem Chem Phys 12, 6717 (2010). [2] M. J. Brunger and P. J. O. Teubner, Phys Rev A 41, 1413 (1990). [3] P. Palihawadana, J. Sullivan, M. Brunger, C. Winstead, V. McKoy, G. Garcia, F. Blanco and S. Buckman, Phys Rev A 84, 062702 (2011).

  9. Measurement of differential cross sections for single neutral pion produced by charged-current interactions in MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung; Minerva Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    MINERvA is a neutrino scattering experiment which uses the intense neutrino beam from the NuMI beam line at FNAL. The detector employs high spatial resolution, is fully active, and designed to study interactions of neutrinos using different nuclei. We present the differential cross sections for single neutral pion produced by charged-current interactions of anti-neutrinos in plastic scintillator. We also compare the differential cross sections to predictions by the GENIE event generator.

  10. Double-helical nucleic acids with cross-linked strands: synthesis and applications in molecular biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antsypovitch, Sergei I.; Oretskaya, Tat'yana S.

    1998-03-01

    Data on the methods employed for cross-linking of DNA strands and for the synthesis of oligonucleotide duplexes with cross-links between strands are summarised. Existing methods are systematised; their advantages and drawbacks are discussed. The examples of applications of DNA duplexes with covalently cross-linked chains for the study of protein-nucleic acid recognition and mechanisms of action of nucleic acid-binding proteins for gaining information about the spatial structure of nucleic acids, and for the solution of other problems of molecular biology are given. The bibliography includes 131 references.

  11. Inelastic neutron scattering cross section measurements for Xe,136134 of relevance to neutrinoless double-β decay searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, E. E.; Ross, T. J.; Liu, S. H.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Yates, S. W.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrinoless double-β decay (0 ν β β ) searches typically involve large-scale experiments for which backgrounds can be complex. One possible source of background near the 0 ν β β signature in the observed spectra is γ rays arising from inelastic neutron scattering from the materials composing or surrounding the detector. In relation to searches for the 0 ν β β of 136Xe to 136Ba, such as the EXO-200 and KamLAND-Zen projects, inelastic neutron scattering γ -ray production cross sections for 136Xe and 134Xe are of importance for characterizing such γ rays that may inhibit the unambiguous identification of this yet-to-be-observed process. These cross sections have been measured at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory at neutron energies from 2.5 to 4.5 MeV.

  12. Differential diagnosis of human bladder mucosa pathologies in vivo with cross-polarization optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kiseleva, Elena; Kirillin, Mikhail; Feldchtein, Felix; Vitkin, Alex; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Zagaynova, Elena; Streltzova, Olga; Shakhov, Boris; Gubarkova, Ekaterina; Gladkova, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative image analysis and parameter extraction using a specific implementation of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides differential diagnosis of mucosal pathologies in in-vivo human bladders. We introduce a cross-polarization (CP) OCT image metric called Integral Depolarization Factor (IDF) to enable automatic diagnosis of bladder conditions (assessment the functional state of collagen fibers). IDF-based diagnostic accuracy of identification of the severe fibrosis of normal bladder mucosa is 79%; recurrence of carcinoma on the post-operative scar is 97%; and differentiation between neoplasia and acute inflammation is 75%. The promising potential of CP OCT combined with image analysis in human urology is thus demonstrated in vivo. PMID:25909028

  13. Differential cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran at intermediate impact energies

    SciTech Connect

    Do, T. P. T.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au; Jones, D. B. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au

    2015-03-28

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran, at intermediate incident electron energies (15-50 eV) and over the 10°-90° scattered electron angular range. These measurements extend the available DCS data for vibrational excitation for this species, which have previously been obtained at lower incident electron energies (≤20 eV). Where possible, our data are compared to the earlier measurements in the overlapping energy ranges. Here, quite good agreement was generally observed where the measurements overlapped.

  14. Low-energy triple differential cross sections for electron-impact ionization of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhangjin; Zhang, Suimeng; Shi, Qicun; Chen, Ji; Xu, Kezun

    1997-11-01

    The BBK model is modified by the introduction of effective Sommerfeld parameters for both symmetric and asymmetric geometries on an empirical basis, while still maintaining the philosophy that all three Coulomb interactions are included on an equal footing. The triple differential cross sections for electron-impact ionization of atomic helium at an incident energy of 40 eV in an asymmetric geometry are calculated. Results of this approach are compared with the absolute measurements and the only existing theoretical results of the convergent close-coupling method.

  15. Absolute differential cross sections for elastic electron scattering from small biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maljković, Jelena

    2014-12-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of electrons colliding with a set of biomolecules that are assumed to be analogues of the building blocks of DNA (furan, 3- hydroxytetrahydrofuran and pyrimidine) and proteins (formamide, N-methylformamide) are presented. Absolute differential cross sections at medium incident electron energies 40 eV- 300 eV are presented and compared for these different targets. The experimental results are also compared with available calculations, based on the corrected form of independent atom model and show good agreement over the energy range studied.

  16. Coincidence measurement of the fully differential cross section for atomic-field bremsstrahlung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulk, J. D.; Quarles, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    A coincidence measurement was made of the absolute cross section for electron-atomic-field bremsstrahlung, differential in photon energy, photon-emission angle, and electron scattering angle. The incident electron energy was 140 keV and the scattering materials were thin films of aluminum and gold. The data are compared to the theoretical calculations of Elwert and Haug and of Bethe and Heitler. Both theories give generally satisfactory agreement for aluminum. The Elwert-Haug theory is somewhat more accurate for gold.

  17. Measurement of inelastic, single- and double-diffraction cross sections in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahn, S. A.; Ahn, S. U.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, N.; Böttger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bose, S.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Boyer, B.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caballero Orduna, D.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chawla, I.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Coccetti, F.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Constantin, P.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, K.; Das, I.; Dash, S.; Dash, A.; De, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; De Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; D Erasmo, G.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, M. R.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fedunov, A.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Ferretti, R.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, M.; Gheata, A.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Girard, M. R.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, S.; Grigoryan, A.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra Gutierrez, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Han, B. H.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harmanová-Tóthová, Z.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hille, P. T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, P. G.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, R.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jha, D. M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jirden, L.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A. B.; Kakoyan, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khan, M. M.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, S.; Kim, B.; Kim, T.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Koch, K.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Korneev, A.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Krawutschke, T.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kurepin, A.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, V.; Kushpil, S.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; La Pointe, S. L.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lechman, M.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, K. S.; Lefèvre, F.; Lehnert, J.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León, H.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, L.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K. K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, K.; Ma, R.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, M. V. D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Naumov, N. P.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Niida, T.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Oleniacz, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Ortona, G.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Pastirčák, B.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Planinic, M.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puchagin, S.; Puddu, G.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, B.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, P.; Roy, C.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Rohni, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Son, H.; Song, M.; Song, J.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strabykin, K.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhorukov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szostak, A.; Szymański, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Trubnikov, V.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, Y.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voloshin, S.; Voloshin, K.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vranic, D.; Øvrebekk, G.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, V.; Wagner, B.; Wan, R.; Wang, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J.; Yu, W.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, F.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.

    2013-06-01

    Measurements of cross sections of inelastic and diffractive processes in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies were carried out with the ALICE detector. The fractions of diffractive processes in inelastic collisions were determined from a study of gaps in charged particle pseudorapidity distributions: for single diffraction (diffractive mass M X <200 GeV/ c 2) σ_{SD}/σ_{INEL} = 0.21 ± 0.03, 0.20^{+0.07}_{-0.08}, and 0.20^{+0.04}_{-0.07}, respectively at centre-of-mass energies √{s} = 0.9, 2.76{, and }7 {TeV}; for double diffraction (for a pseudorapidity gap Δ η>3) σ DD/ σ INEL=0.11±0.03,0.12±0.05, and 0.12^{+0.05}_{-0.04}, respectively at √{s} = 0.9, 2.76{, and }7 {TeV}. To measure the inelastic cross section, beam properties were determined with van der Meer scans, and, using a simulation of diffraction adjusted to data, the following values were obtained: σ_{INEL} = 62.8^{+2.4}_{-4.0} (model) ±1.2 (lumi) mb at √{s} = 2.76 {TeV} and 73.2^{+2.0}_{-4.6} (model) ±2.6 (lumi) {mb} at √{s} = 7 {TeV}. The single- and double-diffractive cross sections were calculated combining relative rates of diffraction with inelastic cross sections. The results are compared to previous measurements at proton-antiproton and proton-proton colliders at lower energies, to measurements by other experiments at the LHC, and to theoretical models.

  18. Analyzing Powers and Differential Cross Sections for Polarized Proton Neutron Going to Negative Pion Proton Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Fraser Andrew

    There is considerable interest in the pn to pi^-pp reaction which can proceed by a nonresonant channel from the isospin 0 pn initial state (an NDelta intermediate state cannot be formed). This thesis describes a measurement of analyzing powers and triple differential cross sections for a subset of this reaction, pn to pi^-pp(^1S_0) by isolating the quasifree process in pd to pi^-ppp_{s}. The experimental arrangement selects the relative S-wave component of the outgoing "diproton". The experiment was done on TRIUMF beam line 1B using a LD_2 target; the pion was detected in a magnetic spectrometer, the two outgoing protons in a scintillator bar array. The spectator proton was undetected. Data were taken in August 1989 at 353, 403 and 440 MeV beam energies. Of these the 403 and 440 MeV data are analysed in this thesis and analyzing powers and triple differential cross sections as a function of pion scattering angle extracted at centre of mass kinetic energies, T_{CM}, of 55 and 70 MeV (corresponding to the 403 and 440 MeV beam energies respectively). Partial wave analysis of the data shows that, while the isospin 0 channel dominates the reaction, contributing approximately 75% of the cross section at the energies studied here, there are significant contributions from the s and d-wave pion, isospin 1 channels. Of particular importance is the contribution from the s-wave pion, isospin 1, channel whose interference with the isospin 0 channels produces the characteristic shapes of the cross sections and analyzing powers observed in the data. The d-wave pion, isospin 1 channels, are also required to fully explain the observed analyzing power distributions, and are essential for the T_{CM} = 70MeV data. Comparisons of the pion production data measured in this experiment with pion absorption measurements on ^3He, where the absorption process is pi^-pp(^1S_0) to pn, show a shift in the shape of the differential cross section which can be interpreted as due to differences in

  19. Converged cross-section results for double photoionization of helium atoms in hyperspherical partial wave theory at 6 eV above threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Das, J.N.; Paul, S.; Chakrabarti, K.

    2004-04-01

    Here we report a set of converged cross-section results for double photoionization of helium atoms obtained in the hyperspherical partial wave theory for equal energy sharing kinematics at 6 eV energy above threshold. The calculated cross section results are generally in excellent agreement with the absolute measured results of Doerner et al. [Phys. Rev. 57, 1074 (1998)].

  20. Bioinspired fully physically cross-linked double network hydrogels with a robust, tough and self-healing structure.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Mohammad; Samadi, Navid; Abbasi, Farhang; Mahdavinia, Gholam Reza; Babaahmadi, Masoud

    2017-05-01

    The conventional covalently cross-linked double network (DN) hydrogels with high stiffness often show low toughness and self-healing property due to the irreversible bond breakages in their networks. Therefore, scarcity of hydrogels that possess simultaneous features of stiffness, toughness, and autonomous self-healing properties at the same time remains a great challenge and seriously limits their biomedical applications. While, many natural materials acquire these features from their dynamic sacrificial bonds. Inspired by biomaterials, herein we propose a novel strategy to design stiff, tough and self-healing DN gels by substitution of both covalently cross-linked networks with strong, dynamic hydrogen bond cross-linked networks. The prepared fully physically cross-linked DN gels composed of strong agar biopolymer gel as the first network and tough polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) biopolymer gel as the second network. The DN gels demonstrated multiple-energy dissipating mechanisms with a high modulus up to 2200kPa, toughness up to 2111kJm(-3), and ability to self-heal quickly and autonomously with regaining 67% of original strength only after 10min. The developed DN gels will open a new avenue to hydrogel research and holds high potential for diverse biomedical applications, such as scaffold, cartilage, tendon and muscle.

  1. Absolute angle-differential vibrational excitation cross sections for electron collisions with diacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.; May, O.; Fedor, J.; Ibanescu, B. C.; Andric, L.

    2011-05-15

    Absolute vibrational excitation cross sections were measured for diacetylene (1,3-butadiyne). The selectivity of vibrational excitation reveals detailed information about the shape resonances. Excitation of the C{identical_to}C stretch and of double quanta of the C-H bend vibrations reveals a {sup 2}{Pi}{sub u} resonance at 1 eV (autodetachment width {approx}30 meV) and a {sup 2}{Pi}{sub g} resonance at 6.2 eV (autodetachment width 1-2 eV). There is a strong preference for excitation of even quanta of the bending vibration. Excitation of the C-H stretch vibration reveals {sigma}* resonances at 4.3, 6.8, and 9.8 eV, with autodetachment widths of {approx}2 eV. Detailed information about resonances permits conclusions about the mechanism of the dissociative electron attachment.

  2. Diagnostic utility of epithelial and melanocitic markers with double sequential immunohistochemical staining in differentiating melanoma in situ from invasive melanoma.

    PubMed

    Parra-Medina, Rafael; Morales, Samuel David

    2017-02-01

    Identification of melanoma in situ and its distinction from invasive melanoma is important because of its significant impact on morbidity and mortality. However, this interpretation can cause pitfalls in the diagnosis even with the use of immunohistochemistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic utility of epithelial makers (AE1/AE3, CK5/6, and p63) combined with melanocytic markers (HMB-45, S-100, or Melan-A) using dual-color immunohistochemical staining, performed on a single slide by sequentially applying the antibodies. In this study, we show 4 cases in which examination of routine hematoxylin and eosin slides did not allow for clear-cut distinction between in situ and invasive melanoma and highlight the utility of the double-staining method. Therefore, we recommend this double-staining method with melanocytic and epithelial markers as a helpful adjunct to the diagnosis of cases with a differential diagnosis between in situ and invasive melanoma.

  3. Differentiation between human coronaviruses NL63 and 229E using a novel double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Patricia; Dijkman, Ronald; Camuñas, Ana; Ruiz, Tamara; Jebbink, Maarten F; van der Hoek, Lia; Vela, Carmen; Rueda, Paloma

    2011-01-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are responsible for respiratory tract infections ranging from common colds to severe acute respiratory syndrome. HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E are two of the four HCoVs that circulate worldwide and are close phylogenetic relatives. HCoV infections can lead to hospitalization of children, elderly individuals, and immunocompromised patients. Globally, approximately 5% of all upper and lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized children are caused by HCoV-229E and HCoV-NL63. The latter virus has recently been associated with the childhood disease croup. Thus, differentiation between the two viruses is relevant for epidemiology studies. The aim of this study was to develop a double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) as a potential tool for identification and differentiation between HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E. The nucleocapsid (N) proteins of HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E were expressed in an Escherichia coli system and used to immunize mice in order to obtain monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for each virus. Three specific MAbs to HCoV-NL63, one MAb specific to HCoV-229E, and four MAbs that recognized both viruses were obtained. After their characterization, three MAbs were selected in order to develop a differential DAS-ELISA. The described assay could detect up to 3 ng/ml of N protein and 50 50% tissue culture infective doses/ml of virus stock. No cross-reactivity with other human coronaviruses or closely related animal coronaviruses was found. The newly developed DAS-ELISA was species specific, and therefore, it could be considered a potential tool for detection and differentiation of HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E infections.

  4. Determining Temperature Differential to Prevent Hardware Cross-Contamination in a Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, David

    2013-01-01

    When contamination-sensitive hardware must be tested in a thermal vacuum chamber, cross-contamination from other hardware present in the chamber, or residue from previous tests, becomes a concern. Typical mitigation strategies involve maintaining the temperature of the critical item above that of other hardware elements at the end of the test. A formula for relating the pumping speed of a chamber, the surface area of contamination sources, and the temperatures of the chamber, source, and contamination-sensitive items has been developed. The formula allows the determination of a temperature threshold about which contamination will not condense on the sensitive items. It defines a parameter alpha that is the fraction given by (contaminant source area)/[chamber pumping speed (time under vacuum) 0.5]. If this parameter is less than 10(exp -6), cross-contamination from common spacecraft material will not occur when the sensitive hardware is at the same temperature as the source of contamination (The chamber is isothermal within 5 C.). Knowing when it becomes safe to have the hardware isothermal permits faster and easier thermal transitions when compared with maintaining an arbitrary temperature differential between parts. Furthermore, the standard temperature differential may not be adequate under some conditions (alpha>10(exp -4)).

  5. Differential cross-sections for elastic and inelastic electron scattering from fundamental polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakoo, Murtadha A.

    2011-10-01

    The near-threshold scattering of electrons from polyatomic molecules of fundamental interest, e.g. water, primary alcohols and ring molecules e.g. furan, benzene are important in plasma fuel processes, plasmas used in biological processes e.g. in the treatment of skin diseases, astrophysical plasmas, etc. The determination of cross-sections for such molecules has gathered impetus because of the increasing number of applications industrial plasma and biomedical processes and the need to understand and model these complex processes. It is now possible to determine accurate differential cross-sections for electron scattering from these polyatomic molecules. We will present recent normalized, absolute low energy electron scattering differential cross-sections for near-threshold elastic and inelastic scattering from water, primary alcohols, furan and benzene using a well-tested electron spectrometer apparatus. We will also compare our results with those of other experiments and available theoretical models, which show an encouragingly overall improved picture in terms of agreement between the different research groups. Funded by the National Science Foundation Research in an Undergraduate Institution Grant #s 0653452 and 1135203. This work was done collaboratively with Drs. V. Mckoy and C. Winstead, Caltech, USA (National Science Foundation Grant # 0653396 and Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US DOE Grant) and Dr. M. C. A. Lopes, U. Fed. de Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil; Dr. M. H. F. Bettega, U. Fed. do Parana, Curitiba, Brazil Drs. R. F. da Costa and M. A. P. Lima, Universidade Estadual de Campinas UNICAMP and CTBE, Campinas, Brazil (CNPq, FAPESP, FAPEMG, Finep, CENAPAD-SP and CAPES grants). Funded by US-NSF Grant #s 0653452 and 1135203.

  6. Vibrational state-resolved differential cross sections for the D + H sub 2 yields DH + H reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Continetti, R.E.

    1989-11-01

    In this thesis, crossed-molecular-beams studies of the reaction D + H{sub 2} {yields} DH + H at collision energies of 0.53 and 1.01 eV are reported. Chapter 1 provides a survey of important experimental and theoretical studies on the dynamics of the hydrogen exchange reaction. Chapter 2 discusses the development of the excimer-laser photolysis D atom beam source that was used in these studies and preliminary experiments on the D + H{sub 2} reaction. In Chapter 3, the differential cross section measurements are presented and compared to recent theoretical predictions. The measured differential cross sections for rotationally excited DH products showed significant deviations from recent quantum scattering calculations, in the first detailed comparison of experimental and theoretical differential cross sections. These results indicate that further work on the H{sub 3} potential energy surface, particularly the bending potential, is in order.

  7. Differential and integral cross sections in OH(X) + Xe collisions.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Gautam; Saha, Ashim Kumar; ter Meulen, J J; Parker, David H; Marinakis, Sarantos

    2015-01-21

    Differential cross sections (DCSs) for inelastic collisions of OH(X) with Xe have been measured at a collision energy of 483 cm(-1). The hydroxyl (OH) radicals were initially prepared in the X(2)Π3/2 (v = 0, j = 1.5, f) level using the hexapole electric field selection method. Products were detected state-selectively by [2 + 1] resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of OH, combined with velocity-map imaging. Integral cross sections in OH(X) + Xe at a collision energy of 490 cm(-1) were also measured by laser-induced fluorescence. The results are compared with exact close-coupling quantum mechanical scattering calculations on the only available ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The agreement between experimental and theoretical results is generally very satisfactory. This highlights the ability of such measurements to test the available PES for such a benchmark open-shell system. The agreement between experiment and theory for DCSs is less satisfactory at low scattering angles, and possible reasons for this disagreement are discussed. Finally, theoretical calculations of OH(X) + He DCSs have been obtained at various collision energies and are compared with those of OH(X) + Xe. The role of the reduced mass in the DCSs and partial cross sections is also examined.

  8. Towards rotationally state-resolved differential cross sections for the hydrogen exchange reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vrakking, M.J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The hydrogen exchange reaction H + H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2} + H (and its isotopic variants) plays a pivotal role in chemical reaction dynamics. It is the only chemical reaction for which fully converged quantum scattering calculations have been carried out using a potential energy surface which is considered to be chemically accurate. To improve our ability to test the theory, a `perfect experiment`, measuring differential cross sections with complete specification of the reactant and product states, is called for. In this thesis, the design of an experiment is described that aims at achieving this goal for the D + H{sub 2} reaction. A crossed molecular beam arrangement is used, in which a photolytic D atom beam is crossed by a pulsed beam of H{sub 2} molecules. DH molecules formed in the D + H{sub 2} reaction are state-specifically ionized using Doppler-free (2+1) Resonance-Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI) and detected using a Position-sensitive microchannel plate detector. This detection technique has an unprecedented single shot detection sensitivity of 6.8 10{sup 3} molecules/cc. This thesis does not contain experimental results for the D + H{sub 2} reaction yet, but progress that has been made towards achieving this goal is reported. In addition, results are reported for a study of the Rydberg spectroscopy of the water molecule.

  9. Towards rotationally state-resolved differential cross sections for the hydrogen exchange reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vrakking, M.J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The hydrogen exchange reaction H + H[sub 2] [yields] H[sub 2] + H (and its isotopic variants) plays a pivotal role in chemical reaction dynamics. It is the only chemical reaction for which fully converged quantum scattering calculations have been carried out using a potential energy surface which is considered to be chemically accurate. To improve our ability to test the theory, a 'perfect experiment', measuring differential cross sections with complete specification of the reactant and product states, is called for. In this thesis, the design of an experiment is described that aims at achieving this goal for the D + H[sub 2] reaction. A crossed molecular beam arrangement is used, in which a photolytic D atom beam is crossed by a pulsed beam of H[sub 2] molecules. DH molecules formed in the D + H[sub 2] reaction are state-specifically ionized using Doppler-free (2+1) Resonance-Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI) and detected using a Position-sensitive microchannel plate detector. This detection technique has an unprecedented single shot detection sensitivity of 6.8 10[sup 3] molecules/cc. This thesis does not contain experimental results for the D + H[sub 2] reaction yet, but progress that has been made towards achieving this goal is reported. In addition, results are reported for a study of the Rydberg spectroscopy of the water molecule.

  10. Differential and integral cross sections in OH(X) + Xe collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Gautam; Saha, Ashim Kumar; Meulen, J. J. ter; Parker, David H.; Marinakis, Sarantos

    2015-01-21

    Differential cross sections (DCSs) for inelastic collisions of OH(X) with Xe have been measured at a collision energy of 483 cm{sup −1}. The hydroxyl (OH) radicals were initially prepared in the X{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} (v = 0, j = 1.5, f) level using the hexapole electric field selection method. Products were detected state-selectively by [2 + 1] resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of OH, combined with velocity-map imaging. Integral cross sections in OH(X) + Xe at a collision energy of 490 cm{sup −1} were also measured by laser-induced fluorescence. The results are compared with exact close-coupling quantum mechanical scattering calculations on the only available ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The agreement between experimental and theoretical results is generally very satisfactory. This highlights the ability of such measurements to test the available PES for such a benchmark open-shell system. The agreement between experiment and theory for DCSs is less satisfactory at low scattering angles, and possible reasons for this disagreement are discussed. Finally, theoretical calculations of OH(X) + He DCSs have been obtained at various collision energies and are compared with those of OH(X) + Xe. The role of the reduced mass in the DCSs and partial cross sections is also examined.

  11. Differential electron scattering cross sections for the first optically forbidden and resonance transitions in Mg II, Zn II and Cd II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, I. D.; Chutjian, A.; Mawhorter, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Differential electron scattering cross sections have been measured for dipole-forbidden and resonance transitions in Mg II, Zn II and Cd II in the angular range theta = 4-17 deg at 50 eV. These provide the first recorded angular distributions for an optically forbidden transition. It is found that while the cross section for excitation of the 4s (2)S-3d(9)4s(2) (2)D transition in Zn II is small, those for the 3s (2)S-3d (2)D, 4s (2)S (unresolved lines) in Mg II, and the 5s (2)S-4d(9)5s(2) D in Cd II are comparable in magnitude with the cross sections for resonance excitation. In addition, for Cd II it is found that the allowed and forbidden transitions have very similar angular distributions, and it is proposed that excitation to the 2D state may be dominated by a virtual 'double-dipole' transition via the 2P state. Also, the total excitation cross section of the resonance 2P state in Cd II is a factor of four higher than that predicted by the Gaunt factor approximation, suggesting that the accepted value for the oscillator strength may be too low.

  12. Differential effects of single and double parental death on child emotional functioning and daily life in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sherr, Lorraine; Croome, Natasha; Clucas, Claudine; Brown, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    There is a high level of orphaning in Africa due to war, violence, and more recently HIV and AIDS. This study examines parental death in South African children and examines the differential impact on child functioning of double, single and non-orphanhoods. Bereavement, depression, behavior problems, and violence were examined in a consecutive sample of 381 children/adolescents (51.2% girls) between 8 and 19 years of age (M = 12.8). Parental death experience was high; 70 (17.5%) reported the death of one parent, and a further 24 (6%) reported the death of both. Group comparisons showed double orphans had elevated depression, worse psychosocial functioning, were more likely to be kept home from school for household chores, and were more likely to be slapped. Single orphans were more similar to the non-orphans than the double orphans on most scores. Our study reveals that parental loss should be studied with more fine-grained definitions and that emotional sequelae should be addressed.

  13. Interference in acetylene intersystem crossing acts as the molecular analog of Young's double-slit experiment.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Mattijs; Field, Robert W; Buma, Wybren J

    2009-02-24

    We report on an experimental approach that reveals crucial details of the composition of singlet-triplet mixed eigenstates in acetylene. Intersystem crossing in this prototypical polyatomic molecule embodies the mixing of the lowest excited singlet state (S(1)) with 3 triplet states (T(1), T(2), and T(3)). Using high-energy (157-nm) photons from an F(2) laser to record excited-state photoelectron spectra, we have decomposed the mixed eigenstates into their S(1), T(3), T(2), and T(1) constituent parts. One example of the interpretive power that ensues from the selective sensitivity of the experiment to the individual electronic state characters is the discovery and examination of destructive interference between two doorway-mediated intersystem crossing pathways. This observation of an interference effect in nonradiative decay opens up possibilities for rational coherent control over molecular excited state dynamics.

  14. Differential expression of human lysyl hydroxylase genes, lysine hydroxylation, and cross-linking of type I collagen during osteoblastic differentiation in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzawa, K.; Grzesik, W. J.; Nishiura, T.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Robey, P. G.; Brenner, D. A.; Yamauchi, M.

    1999-01-01

    The pattern of lysyl hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of collagen is critical in determining the cross-linking pathways that are tissue specific. We hypothesized that the tissue specificity of type I collagen cross-linking is, in part, due to the differential expression of lysyl hydroxylase genes (Procollagen-lysine,2-oxyglutarate,5-dioxygenase 1, 2, and 3 [PLOD1, PLOD2, and PLOD3]). In this study, we have examined the expression patterns of these three genes during the course of in vitro differentiation of human osteoprogenitor cells (bone marrow stromal cells [BMSCs]) and normal skin fibroblasts (NSFs). In addition, using the medium and cell layer/matrix fractions in these cultures, lysine hydroxylation of type I collagen alpha chains and collagen cross-linking chemistries have been characterized. High levels of PLOD1 and PLOD3 genes were expressed in both BMSCs and NSFs, and the expression levels did not change in the course of differentiation. In contrast to the PLOD1 and PLOD3 genes, both cell types showed low PLOD2 gene expression in undifferentiated and early differentiated conditions. However, fully differentiated BMSCs, but not NSFs, exhibited a significantly elevated level (6-fold increase) of PLOD2 mRNA. This increase coincided with the onset of matrix mineralization and with the increase in lysyl hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of alpha chains of type I collagen molecule. Furthermore, the collagen cross-links that are derived from the nontriple helical hydroxylysine-aldehyde were found only in fully differentiated BMSC cultures. The data suggests that PLOD2 expression is associated with lysine hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of collagen and, thus, could be partially responsible for the tissue-specific collagen cross-linking pattern.

  15. Double-Staining Method for Differentiation of Morphological Changes and Membrane Integrity of Campylobacter coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Jose L.; Mascellaro, Salvatore; Moreno, Yolanda; Ferrús, María A.; Hernández, Javier

    2002-01-01

    We developed a double-staining procedure involving NanoOrange dye (Molecular Probes, Eugene, Oreg.) and membrane integrity stains (LIVE/DEAD BacLight kit; Molecular Probes) to show the morphological and membrane integrity changes of Campylobacter coli cells during growth. The conversion from a spiral to a coccoid morphology via intermediary forms and the membrane integrity changes of the C. coli cells can be detected with the double-staining procedure. Our data indicate that young or actively growing cells are mainly spiral shaped (green-stained cells), but older cells undergo a degenerative change to coccoid forms (red-stained cells). Club-shaped transition cell forms were observed with NanoOrange stain. Chlorinated drinking water affected the viability but not the morphology of C. coli cells. PMID:12324366

  16. Differential requirement for SUB1 in chromosomal and plasmid double-strand DNA break repair.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lijian; Volkert, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Non homologous end joining (NHEJ) is an important process that repairs double strand DNA breaks (DSBs) in eukaryotic cells. Cells defective in NHEJ are unable to join chromosomal breaks. Two different NHEJ assays are typically used to determine the efficiency of NHEJ. One requires NHEJ of linearized plasmid DNA transformed into the test organism; the other requires NHEJ of a single chromosomal break induced either by HO endonuclease or the I-SceI restriction enzyme. These two assays are generally considered equivalent and rely on the same set of NHEJ genes. PC4 is an abundant DNA binding protein that has been suggested to stimulate NHEJ. Here we tested the role of PC4's yeast homolog SUB1 in repair of DNA double strand breaks using different assays. We found SUB1 is required for NHEJ repair of DSBs in plasmid DNA, but not in chromosomal DNA. Our results suggest that these two assays, while similar are not equivalent and that repair of plasmid DNA requires additional factor(s) that are not required for NHEJ repair of chromosomal double-strand DNA breaks. Possible roles for Sub1 proteins in NHEJ of plasmid DNA are discussed.

  17. Common-mode differential-mode (CMDM) method for double-nuclear MR signal excitation and reception at ultrahigh fields.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yong; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Xie, Zhentian; Wang, Chunsheng; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2011-11-01

    Double-tuned radio-frequency (RF) coils for heteronuclear mangentic resonance (MR) require sufficient electromagnetic isolation between the two resonators operating at two Larmor frequencies and independent tuning in order to attain highly efficient signal acquisition at each frequency. In this work, a novel method for double-tuned coil design at 7T based on the concept of common-mode differential-mode (CMDM) was developed and tested. Common mode (CM) and differential mode (DM) currents exist within two coupled parallel transmission lines, e.g., microstrip lines, yielding two different current distributions. The electromagnetic (EM) fields of the CM and DM are orthogonal to each other, and thus, the two modes are intrinsically EM decoupled. The modes can be tuned independently to desired frequencies, thus satisfying the requirement of dual-frequency MR applications. To demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed CMDM technique, CMDM surface coils and volume coils using microstrip transmission line for (1)H and (13)C MRI/MRSI were designed, constructed, and tested at 7T. Bench test results showed that the isolations between the two frequency channels of the CMDM surface coil and volume coil were better than -30 and -25 dB, respectively. High quality MR phantom images were also obtained using the CMDM coils. The performance of the CMDM technique was validated through a comparison with the conventional two-pole design method at 7T. The proposed CMDM technique can be also implemented by using other coil techniques such as lumped element method, and can be applied to designing double-tuned parallel imaging coil arrays. Furthermore, if the two resonant modes of a CMDM coil were tuned to the same frequency, the CMDM coil becomes a quadrature coil due to the intrinsic orthogonal field distribution of CM and DM.

  18. Antibacterial carboxymethyl cellulose/Ag nanocomposite hydrogels cross-linked with layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Yadollahi, Mehdi; Namazi, Hassan; Aghazadeh, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    This paper deals with the preparation of antibacterial nanocomposite hydrogels through the combination of carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC), layered double hydroxides (LDH), and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). CMC-LDH hydrogels were prepared by intercalating CMC into different LDHs. Then, Ag/CMC-LDH nanocomposite hydrogels were prepared through in situ formation of AgNPs within the CMC-LDHs. XRD analysis confirmed the intercalating CMC into the LDH sheets and formation of intercalated structures, as well as formation of AgNPs within the CMC-LDHs. SEM and TEM micrographs indicated well distribution of AgNPs within the Ag/CMC-LDHs. The prepared hydrogels showed a pH sensitive swelling behavior. The Ag/CMC-LDH nanocomposite hydrogels have rather higher swelling in different aqueous solutions in comparison with CMC-LDHs. The antibacterial activity of CMC-LDHs increased considerably after formation of AgNPs and was stable for more than one month.

  19. Cross-Linguistic Differences in Processing Double-Embedded Relative Clauses: Working-Memory Constraints or Language Statistics?

    PubMed

    Frank, Stefan L; Trompenaars, Thijs; Vasishth, Shravan

    2016-04-01

    An English double-embedded relative clause from which the middle verb is omitted can often be processed more easily than its grammatical counterpart, a phenomenon known as the grammaticality illusion. This effect has been found to be reversed in German, suggesting that the illusion is language specific rather than a consequence of universal working memory constraints. We present results from three self-paced reading experiments which show that Dutch native speakers also do not show the grammaticality illusion in Dutch, whereas both German and Dutch native speakers do show the illusion when reading English sentences. These findings provide evidence against working memory constraints as an explanation for the observed effect in English. We propose an alternative account based on the statistical patterns of the languages involved. In support of this alternative, a single recurrent neural network model that is trained on both Dutch and English sentences is shown to predict the cross-linguistic difference in the grammaticality effect.

  20. [Treatment of essential headache in developmental age with L-5-HTP (cross over double-blind study versus placebo)].

    PubMed

    Longo, G; Rudoi, I; Iannuccelli, M; Strinati, R; Panizon, F

    1984-01-01

    Thirty patients (mean age: 10.38 years) affected by primary headache were selected for a double-blind cross-over clinical trial. The patients were randomized into 2 homogeneous groups of 15 and treated for 12 weeks with L-5-HTP (100 mg/day) and placebo as per the following design: placebo - L-5-HTP (group A) and L-5-HTP - placebo (group B). Evaluation was carried out every 3 weeks by the Migraine Index supplying a general assessment of the attacks, i.e. severity, duration and frequency. The decrease in mean score values was directly proportional to L-5-HTP treatment, and statistical significance (Wilcoxon's test) was observed only for L-5-HTP in both groups, from 0.05 to 0.01. Improvement, as evaluated by CGI on percentage distribution of the patients, was homogeneous in both groups.

  1. COMMENT: Comment on `Asymptotic behaviour of the total cross section for double ionization of helium-like ions by electrons'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, B. G.; Rejoub, R.; Stebbings, R. F.

    2002-04-01

    Defrance et al (Defrance P, Kereselidze T M, Noselidze I L and Tzulukidze M F 2001b J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 34 4957-68; Defrance P, Kereselidze T, Noselidze I and Tzulukidze M 2001a 22nd Int. Conf. on Photonic, Electronic, and Atomic Collisions (Santa Fe, CA) (abstracts of contributed papers) p 315) have reported calculations of the electron-impact double-ionization cross section for helium that display a markedly different high-energy behaviour than do most of the published experimental data and they contend that new precise measurements are needed. The results presented here confirm the correctness of the more recent experimental data and indicate that revision of the theory is required.

  2. Intermediate-energy differential and integral cross sections for vibrational excitation in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Duque, H. V.; Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Pettifer, Z.; Silva, G. B. da; Limão-Vieira, P.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; White, R. D.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Brunger, M. J.

    2014-06-07

    Differential and integral cross section measurements, for incident electron energies in the 20–50 eV range, are reported for excitation of several composite vibrational modes in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). Optimisation and frequency calculations, using GAUSSIAN 09 at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level, were also undertaken for the two most abundant conformers of THFA, with results being reported for their respective mode classifications and excitation energies. Those calculations assisted us in the experimental assignments of the composite features observed in our measured energy loss spectra. There are, to the best of our knowledge, no other experimental or theoretical data currently available in the literature against which we can compare the present results.

  3. Triple Differential Cross Sections for Ionization of Laser-Aligned Mg Atoms by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amami, Sadek; Madison, Don; Nixon, Kate; Murray, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    3DW (3-body distorted wave) triple differential cross sections have been calculated for electron impact ionization of magnesium atoms aligned by lasers. Calculations have been performed for the kinematics of the experiment performed by Kate Nixon and Andrew Murray at Manchester, England [K. L. Nixon and A. J. Murray 2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 123201]. An incident projectile was produced with energy of 41.91eV, scattered and ejected electrons were detected with equal energies (E1 =E2 =20eV), the scattered projectile was detected at a fixed angle of 30deg, and the ejected electrons were detected at angles ranging between 0circ; - 180circ; . The theoretical 3DW results will be compared with the experimental data. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation under Grant.No.PHY-1068237.

  4. Measurements of Differential Z/gamma*+jet+X Cross Sections with the D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lammers, Sabine

    2009-11-01

    We present measurements of differential cross sections in inclusive Z/{gamma}* plus jet production in a data sample of 1 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector in proton antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measured variables include the Z/{gamma}* transverse momentum (p{sub T}{sup Z}) and rapidity (y{sup Z}), the leading jet transverse momentum (p{sub T}{sup jet}) and rapidity (y{sup jet}), as well as various angles of the Z+jet system. We compare the results to different Monte Carlo event generators and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD (NLO pQCD) predictions, with non-perturbative corrections applied.

  5. First measurements of inclusive muon neutrino charged current differential cross sections on argon.

    PubMed

    Anderson, C; Antonello, M; Baller, B; Bolton, T; Bromberg, C; Cavanna, F; Church, E; Edmunds, D; Ereditato, A; Farooq, S; Fleming, B; Greenlee, H; Guenette, R; Haug, S; Horton-Smith, G; James, C; Klein, E; Lang, K; Laurens, P; Linden, S; McKee, D; Mehdiyev, R; Page, B; Palamara, O; Partyka, K; Patch, A; Rameika, G; Rebel, B; Rossi, B; Soderberg, M; Spitz, J; Szelc, A M; Weber, M; Yang, T; Zeller, G

    2012-04-20

    The ArgoNeuT Collaboration presents the first measurements of inclusive muon neutrino charged current differential cross sections on argon. Obtained in the NuMI neutrino beam line at Fermilab, the flux-integrated results are reported in terms of outgoing muon angle and momentum. The data are consistent with the Monte Carlo expectation across the full range of kinematics sampled, 0°<θ(μ)<36° and 0

  6. Single ionization of CH{sub 4} by bare ions: Fully differential cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Menchero, L.; Otranto, S.

    2010-08-15

    A theoretical study of fully differential cross sections for the single ionization of CH{sub 4} by collisions with H{sup +}, He{sup 2+}, and C{sup 6+} ions at energies in the order of MeV/amu is presented. We work in terms of the Born-3DW model, which considers a non-Coulomb central potential for the interaction of the active electron with the molecular core. Results obtained with the Born-3DW model are compared to those obtained with the Born-C3 model, which assumes this potential as purely Coulombic. The anisotropic potential of the CH{sub 4} molecule is smoothed through an angular integration, and results are averaged over all the possible orientations of the target molecule. Results for the lesser bound molecular orbitals (1T and 2A{sub 1}) are presented and discussed for different projectile momentum transfers for the coplanar geometry.

  7. Differential cross sections and recoil polarizations for the reaction γp→K+Σ0

    DOE PAGES

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; ...

    2010-08-06

    Here, high-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and recoil polarizations for the reactionmore » $$\\gamma p \\rightarrow K^+ \\Sigma^0$$ have been obtained using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies ($$\\sqrt{s}$$) from 1.69 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the $K^+$ production angle. Independent measurements were made using the $$K^{+}p\\pi^{-}$$($$\\gamma$$) and $$K^{+}p$$($$\\pi^-,\\gamma$$) final-state topologies, and were found to exhibit good agreement. Our differential cross sections show good agreement with earlier CLAS, SAPHIR and LEPS results, while offering better statistical precision and a 300-MeV increase in $$\\sqrt{s}$$ coverage. Above $$\\sqrt{s} \\approx 2.5$$ GeV, $t$- and $u$-channel Regge scaling behavior can be seen at forward- and backward-angles, respectively. Our recoil polarization ($$P_\\Sigma$$) measurements represent a substantial increase in kinematic coverage and enhanced precision over previous world data. At forward angles we find that $$P_\\Sigma$$ is of the same magnitude but opposite sign as $$P_\\Lambda$$, in agreement with the static SU(6) quark model prediction of $$P_\\Sigma \\approx -P_\\Lambda$$. This expectation is violated in some mid- and backward-angle kinematic regimes, where $$P_\\Sigma$$ and $$P_\\Lambda$$ are of similar magnitudes but also have the same signs. In conjunction with several other meson photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, the present data will help constrain the partial wave analyses being performed to search for missing baryon resonances.« less

  8. Analysis of double stub tuner control stability in a many element phased array antenna with strong cross-coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, G. M.; Fitzgerald, E.; Johnson, D. K.; Kanojia, A. D.; Koert, P.; Lin, Y.; Murray, R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D. R.; Wukitch, S. J.; Hillairet, J.

    2014-02-12

    Active stub tuning with a fast ferrite tuner (FFT) allows for the system to respond dynamically to changes in the plasma impedance such as during the L-H transition or edge localized modes (ELMs), and has greatly increased the effectiveness of fusion ion cyclotron range of frequency systems. A high power waveguide double-stub tuner is under development for use with the Alcator C-Mod lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system. Exact impedance matching with a double-stub is possible for a single radiating element under most load conditions, with the reflection coefficient reduced from Γ to Γ{sup 2} in the “forbidden region.” The relative phase shift between adjacent columns of a LHCD antenna is critical for control of the launched n{sub ∥} spectrum. Adding a double-stub tuning network will perturb the phase of the forward wave particularly if the unmatched reflection coefficient is high. This effect can be compensated by adjusting the phase of the low power microwave drive for each klystron amplifier. Cross-coupling of the reflected power between columns of the launcher must also be considered. The problem is simulated by cascading a scattering matrix for the plasma provided by a linear coupling model with the measured launcher scattering matrix and that of the FFTs. The solution is advanced in an iterative manner similar to the time-dependent behavior of the real system. System performance is presented under a range of edge density conditions from under-dense to over-dense and a range of launched n{sub ∥}.

  9. Analysis of double stub tuner control stability in a many element phased array antenna with strong cross-coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, G. M.; Fitzgerald, E.; Hillairet, J.; Johnson, D. K.; Kanojia, A. D.; Koert, P.; Lin, Y.; Murray, R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D. R.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2014-02-01

    Active stub tuning with a fast ferrite tuner (FFT) allows for the system to respond dynamically to changes in the plasma impedance such as during the L-H transition or edge localized modes (ELMs), and has greatly increased the effectiveness of fusion ion cyclotron range of frequency systems. A high power waveguide double-stub tuner is under development for use with the Alcator C-Mod lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system. Exact impedance matching with a double-stub is possible for a single radiating element under most load conditions, with the reflection coefficient reduced from Γ to Γ2 in the "forbidden region." The relative phase shift between adjacent columns of a LHCD antenna is critical for control of the launched n∥ spectrum. Adding a double-stub tuning network will perturb the phase of the forward wave particularly if the unmatched reflection coefficient is high. This effect can be compensated by adjusting the phase of the low power microwave drive for each klystron amplifier. Cross-coupling of the reflected power between columns of the launcher must also be considered. The problem is simulated by cascading a scattering matrix for the plasma provided by a linear coupling model with the measured launcher scattering matrix and that of the FFTs. The solution is advanced in an iterative manner similar to the time-dependent behavior of the real system. System performance is presented under a range of edge density conditions from under-dense to over-dense and a range of launched n∥.

  10. Inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for Ge76 relevant to background in neutrinoless double- β decay experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Crider, B. P.; Peters, E. E.; Allmond, J. M.; ...

    2015-09-11

    The experimental signature in searches for the neutrinoless double- decay of 76Ge is a peak near 2039 keV in the spectrum. Given the low probability of the process, it is important that the background in this region be well understood. Moreover, inelastic scattering reactions with neutrons from muon-induced interactions and ( ,n) reactions in the surrounding materials or in the detector can provide contributions to the background. We also measured the production cross sections for rays from the 76Ge(n,n ) reaction in the 2039-keV region at incident neutron energies up to 4.9 MeV. In addition to determining that the crossmore » sections of a previously known 2040.7-keV ray from the 3952-keV level in 76 Ge are rather small, we find that a larger contribution arises from a 2037.5-keV ray which is attributed to a newly identified level at 3147 keV in 76Ge. Finally, a third contribution is also possible from another new level at 3577 keV. These results indicate that the 2039-keV region in 76Ge neutrinoless double- decay searches is more complex than was previously thought.« less

  11. The development of frost tolerance and DHN5 protein accumulation in barley (Hordeum vulgare) doubled haploid lines derived from Atlas 68 x Igri cross during cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Kosová, Klára; Tom Prásil, Ilja; Prásilová, Pavla; Vítámvás, Pavel; Chrpová, Jana

    2010-03-15

    The dynamics of a long-term cold acclimation (CA) was studied in spring barley cultivar Atlas 68, winter barley cultivar Igri and a set of doubled haploid (DH) lines derived from an Atlas 68xIgri cross. The aim was to evaluate the effect of plant development on the ability to induce frost tolerance (FT) and to accumulate dehydrin 5 (DHN5) during CA. The plant developmental stage was evaluated by phenological development of the shoot apex and by determination of days to heading after a certain period of CA. FT was determined by direct frost tests. Plant winter survival was also determined. DHN5 was evaluated by densitometric analysis of protein gel blots. Cold led to the induction of increased FT and to the accumulation of DHN5 in both spring and winter lines. However, with the progression of CA, differences between the growth habits occurred as the winter lines were able to maintain increased FT and DHN5 levels for a significantly longer period of time than the spring lines. After vegetative/reproductive transition, a significant decrease in DHN5 accumulation was found in all lines; however, a discrepancy between the acquired FT level and DHN5 accumulation in vernalized winter barley plants was found. A correlation between DHN5 accumulation and plant winter survival was found when the studied lines were differentiated according to their developmental stage and DHN5 level. Possible explanations for these phenomena are provided.

  12. Differential tandem mass spectrometry-based cross-linker: a new approach for high confidence in identifying protein cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Jayanta K.; Naik, Aishwarya G.; Fessler, Michael B.; Munske, Gerhard R.; Chowdhury, Saiful M.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry are now widely used to analyze large-scale protein-protein interactions. The major challenge in cross-linking approaches is the complexity of the mass spectrometric data. New approaches are required that can identify cross-linked peptides with high-confidence and establish a user-friendly analysis protocol for the biomedical scientific community. Here, we introduce a novel cross-linker that can be selectively cleaved in the gas phase using two differential tandem mass-spectrometric fragmentation methods, such as collision-induced or electron transfer dissociation (CID and ETD). This technique produces two signature mass spectra of the same cross-linked peptide, thereby producing high confidence in identifying the sites of interaction. Further tandem mass spectrometry can also give additional confidence on the peptide sequences. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept for this method using standard peptides and proteins. Peptides and proteins were cross-linked and their fragmentation characteristics were analyzed using CID and ETD tandem mass spectrometry. Two sequential cleavages unambiguously identified cross-linked peptides. In addition, the labeling efficiency of the new cross-linker was evaluated in macrophage immune cells after stimulation with the microbial ligand lipopolysaccharide and subsequent pulldown experiments with biotin-avidin affinity chromatography. We believe this strategy will help advance insights into the structural biology and systems biology of cell signaling. PMID:27649375

  13. Differential Cross Sections of K0 Λ Photoproduction off the Deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Nicholas; Taylor, Charles; Hicks, Kenneth; Cole, Phil; CLAS Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of nucleon resonances, N*, continues to be of great interest in order to understand non-perturbative solutions of QCD. Currently there are many poorly described or postulated spectroscopic states that need to be explored. Solving these problems entail the use of partial wave analyses (PWA) on photoproduction observables from both the proton and neutron. Photoproduction of strange mesons from the neutron are difficult to measure, and there are only a few measurements of this kind. These reactions supply essential complementary data to those on the proton. The differential cross section of γd ->K0 ΛX was measured, where the missing mass is constrained to be the spectator proton mass. This was done using data from the CLAS Collaboration at Jefferson Laboratory. Comparisons between the K+ Λ and K0 Λ cross sections demonstrate that the contribution typically associated with N(1900)3/2+ is less pronounced in the latter. This is possibly due to interference between the N* states and t-channel terms present in each reaction. A PWA fit from the BonnGa group, which incorporates known spectroscopic states in the complex energy plane, was used to study the contributions of various N* resonances.

  14. Experimental and theoretical differential cross sections for the N(2D) + H2 reaction.

    PubMed

    Balucani, Nadia; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio; Bañares, Luis; Aoiz, F Javier; Gonzalez-Lezana, Tomás; Honvault, Pascal; Launay, Jean-Michel

    2006-01-19

    In this paper, we report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the dynamics of the N(2D) + H2 insertion reaction at a collision energy of 15.9 kJ mol(-1). Product angular and velocity distributions have been obtained in crossed beam experiments and simulated by using the results of quantum mechanical (QM) scattering calculations on the accurate ab initio potential energy surface (PES) of Pederson et al. (J. Chem. Phys. 1999, 110, 9091). Since the QM calculations indicate that there is a significant coupling between the product angular and translational energy distributions, such a coupling has been explicitly included in the simulation of the experimental results. The very good agreement between experiment and QM calculations sustains the accuracy of the NH2 ab initio ground state PES. We also take the opportunity to compare the accurate QM differential cross sections with those obtained by two approximate methods, namely, the widely used quasiclassical trajectory calculations and a rigorous statistical method based on the coupled-channel theory.

  15. Double resonance with Landesman-Lazer conditions for planar systems of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonda, Alessandro; Garrione, Maurizio

    We prove the existence of periodic solutions for first order planar systems at resonance. The nonlinearity is indeed allowed to interact with two positively homogeneous Hamiltonians, both at resonance, and some kind of Landesman-Lazer conditions are assumed at both sides. We are thus able to obtain, as particular cases, the existence results proposed in the pioneering papers by Lazer and Leach (1969) [27], and by Frederickson and Lazer (1969) [18]. Our theorem also applies in the case of asymptotically piecewise linear systems, and in particular generalizes Fabry's results in Fabry (1995) [10], for scalar equations with double resonance with respect to the Dancer-Fučik spectrum.

  16. Isolation of human monocytes by double gradient centrifugation and their differentiation to macrophages in teflon-coated cell culture bags.

    PubMed

    Menck, Kerstin; Behme, Daniel; Pantke, Mathias; Reiling, Norbert; Binder, Claudia; Pukrop, Tobias; Klemm, Florian

    2014-09-09

    Human macrophages are involved in a plethora of pathologic processes ranging from infectious diseases to cancer. Thus they pose a valuable tool to understand the underlying mechanisms of these diseases. We therefore present a straightforward protocol for the isolation of human monocytes from buffy coats, followed by a differentiation procedure which results in high macrophage yields. The technique relies mostly on commonly available lab equipment and thus provides a cost and time effective way to obtain large quantities of human macrophages. Briefly, buffy coats from healthy blood donors are subjected to a double density gradient centrifugation to harvest monocytes from the peripheral blood. These monocytes are then cultured in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon-coated cell culture bags in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The differentiated macrophages can be easily harvested and used for subsequent studies and functional assays. Important methods for quality control and validation of the isolation and differentiation steps will be highlighted within the protocol. In summary, the protocol described here enables scientists to routinely and reproducibly isolate human macrophages without the need for cost intensive tools. Furthermore, disease models can be studied in a syngeneic human system circumventing the use of murine macrophages.

  17. Absolute elastic differential electron scattering cross sections for He - A proposed calibration standard from 5 to 200 eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Register, D. F.; Trajmar, S.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1980-01-01

    Absolute differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for electrons elastically scattered from helium are reported for the impact energy range of 5 to 200 eV. Angular distributions for elastically scattered electrons are measured in a crossed-beam geometry using a collimated, differentially pumped atomic-beam source which requires no effective-path-length correction. Below the first inelastic threshold the angular distributions were placed on an absolute scale by use of a phase-shift analysis. Above this threshold, the angular distributions from 10 to 140 deg were fitted using the phase-shift technique, and the resulting integral cross sections were normalized to a semiempirically derived integral elastic cross section. Depending on the impact energy, the data are estimated to be accurate to within 5 to 9%.

  18. Single differential electron impact ionization cross sections in the binary-encounter-Bethe approximation for the low binding energy regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, M.; Amaro, P.; Machado, J.; Santos, J. P.

    2015-09-01

    An analytical expression based on the binary-encounter-Bethe model for energy differential cross sections in the low binding energy regime is presented. Both the binary-encounter-Bethe model and its modified counterpart are extended to shells with very low binding energy by removing the constraints in the interference term of the Mott cross section, originally introduced by Kim et al. The influence of the ionic factor is also studied for such targets. All the binary-encounter-Bethe based models presented here are checked against experimental results of low binding energy targets, such as the total ionization cross sections of alkali metals. The energy differential cross sections for H and He, at several incident energies, are also compared to available experimental and theoretical values.

  19. Total and differential cross sections of C3H8 and C3F8 by electron and positron impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueoka, Osamu; Kitajima, Masashi; Sakamoto, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Samukawa, S.; Sueoka, Osamu; Hamada, Akira; Kimura, Mineo

    1998-10-01

    Total and differential elastic cross sections in e-/e+ + C3H8 and C3F8 scattering have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The differential cross section measurement by electron impact has been carried out from 2 eV to 100 eV, while the total cross section measurement by electron and positron has been for 0.7 eV to 600 eV. The theoretical study has been performed by using the continuum multiple-scattering method. The present total cross sections are found to agree reasonably well with those by Wayne State Univ. group, and theoretical rationale for origins of shape resonances are provided.

  20. Dual-band selective double cross polarization for heteronuclear polarization transfer between dilute spins in solid-state MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Miao, Yimin; Liu, Xiaoli; Yang, Jun; Li, Conggang; Deng, Feng; Fu, Riqiang

    2012-04-01

    A sinusoidal modulation scheme is described for selective heteronuclear polarization transfer between two dilute spins in double cross polarization magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. During the second N → C cross polarization, the 13C RF amplitude is modulated sinusoidally while the 15N RF amplitude is tangent. This modulation induces an effective spin-lock field in two selective frequency bands in either side of the 13C RF carrier frequency, allowing for simultaneous polarization transfers from 15N to 13C in those two selective frequency bands. It is shown by experiments and simulations that this sinusoidal modulation allows one to selectively polarize from 15N to its covalently bonded 13Cα and 13C' carbons in neighboring peptide planes simultaneously, which is useful for establishing the backbone connectivity between two sequential residues in protein structural elucidation. The selectivity and efficiency were experimentally demonstrated on a uniformly 13C,15N-labeled β1 immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G (GB1).

  1. Double-magic nature of 132Sn and 208Pb through lifetime and cross-section measurements.

    PubMed

    Allmond, J M; Stuchbery, A E; Beene, J R; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Liang, J F; Padilla-Rodal, E; Radford, D C; Varner, R L; Ayres, A; Batchelder, J C; Bey, A; Bingham, C R; Howard, M E; Jones, K L; Manning, B; Mueller, P E; Nesaraja, C D; Pain, S D; Peters, W A; Ratkiewicz, A; Schmitt, K T; Shapira, D; Smith, M S; Stone, N J; Stracener, D W; Yu, C-H

    2014-05-02

    Single-neutron states in (133)Sn and (209)Pb, which are analogous to single-electron states outside of closed atomic shells in alkali metals, were populated by the ((9)Be, (8)Be) one-neutron transfer reaction in inverse kinematics using particle-γ coincidence spectroscopy. In addition, the s(1/2) single-neutron hole-state candidate in (131)Sn was populated by ((9)Be, (10)Be). Doubly closed-shell (132)Sn (radioactive) and (208)Pb (stable) beams were used at sub-Coulomb barrier energies of 3 MeV per nucleon. Level energies, γ-ray transitions, absolute cross sections, spectroscopic factors, asymptotic normalization coefficients, and excited-state lifetimes are reported and compared with shell-model expectations. The results include a new transition and precise level energy for the 3p(1/2) candidate in (133)Sn, new absolute cross sections for the 1h(9/2) candidate in (133)Sn and 3s(1/2) candidate in (131)Sn, and new lifetimes for excited states in (133)Sn and (209)Pb. This is the first report on excited-state lifetimes of (133)Sn, which allow for a unique test of the nuclear shell model and (132)Sn double-shell closure.

  2. [Essential arterial hypertension and quality of life. Comparative crossed double-blind study of labetalol and captopril].

    PubMed

    Carre, A; Petetin, N; Jouvent, R; Baruch, P; d'Allens, H; Pappo, M

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this multicenter randomised, double-blind and cross-over study was to compare the antihypertensive effects of labetalol (L) and captopril (C) in 42 moderate hypertensive patients (mean age: 52 years). The drugs were given during two 4-weeks periods at the end of which the systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP) were measured at rest in supine and standing positions. The assessment of the quality of life was realized with 4 scales completed by the practitioner [anxiety, depression, well-being, visual analog scale (VAS)] and 4 scales of auto-assessment completed by the patient [2 VAS, well-being, sub-scale of pleasure]. At the end of the first treatment's period (D28), both drugs had decreased significantly supine SBP and DBP (p less than 0.001), standing DBP (L = p less than 0.01; C = p less than 0.05), while only L lowered supine SBP (p less than 0.01). The cross-over analysis was unable to conclude, due to the number of patients and a significant interaction which reduced its power. Thus the effect of the first treatment's period seemed to influence the efficacy of the second one. The percentages of patients with a controlled BP were respectively: after 4 weeks of treatment, L = 61 p. 100 vs C = 42 p. 100 and at the end of study (D56), L = 67 p. 100 vs C = 64 p. 100.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Cross-linking protein glutathionylation mediated by O2-arylated bis-diazeniumdiolate "Double JS-K".

    PubMed

    Holland, Ryan J; Maciag, Anna E; Kumar, Varun; Shi, Lei; Saavedra, Joseph E; Prud'homme, Robert K; Chakrapani, Harinath; Keefer, Larry K

    2012-12-17

    Attachment of glutathione (GSH) to cysteine residues in proteins (S-glutathionylation) is a reversible post-translational modification that can profoundly alter protein structure and function. Often serving in a protective role, for example, by temporarily saving protein thiols from irreversible oxidation and inactivation, glutathionylation can be identified and semiquantitatively assessed using anti-GSH antibodies, thought to be specific for recognition of the S-glutathionylation modification. Here, we describe an alternate mechanism of protein glutathionylation in which the sulfur atoms of the GSH and the protein's thiol group are covalently bound via a cross-linking agent, rather than through a disulfide bond. This form of thiol cross-linking has been shown to occur and has been confirmed by mass spectrometry at the solution chemistry level, as well as in experiments documenting the potent antiproliferative activity of the bis-diazeniumdiolate Double JS-K in H1703 cells in vitro and in vivo. The modification is recognized by the anti-GSH antibody as if it were authentic S-glutathionylation, requiring mass spectrometry to distinguish between them.

  4. Double-magic nature of 132Sn and 208Pb through lifetime and cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, James M; Stuchbery, Andrew E; Beene, James R; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Liang, J Felix; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth; Radford, David C; Varner Jr, Robert L; Ayres, A.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C. R.; Howard, Meredith E; Jones, K. L.; Manning, Brett M; Mueller, Paul Edward; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; Peters, William A; Ratkiewicz, Andrew J; Schmitt, Kyle; Shapira, Dan; Smith, Michael Scott; Stone, N. J.; Stracener, Daniel W; Yu, Chang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Single-neutron states in 133Sn and 209Pb, which are analogous to single electrons outside of closed atomic shells in alkali metals, were populated by the (9Be,8Be) one-neutron transfer reaction in inverse kinematics using particle-gamma coincidence spectroscopy. In addition, the s1/2 single-neutron hole-state candidate in 131Sn was populated by (9Be,10Be). Doubly closed-shell 132Sn (radioactive) and 208Pb (stable) beams were used at sub-Coulomb barrier energies of 3 MeV per nucleon. Level energies, gamma-ray transitions, absolute cross sections, spectroscopic factors, asymptotic normalization coefficients, and excited-state lifetimes are reported and compared to shell-model expectations. The results include a new transition and precise level energy for the 3p1/2 candidate in 133Sn, new absolute cross sections for the 1h9/2 candidate in 133Sn and 3s1/2 candidate in 131Sn, and new lifetimes for excited states in 133Sn and 209Pb. This is the first report on excited-state lifetimes of 133Sn, which provide a unique signature of the single-neutron states and 132Sn double-shell closure.

  5. Crossed thalamocortical connections in the Madagascan hedgehog tenrec: dissimilarities to erinaceous hedgehog, similarities to mammals with more differentiated brains.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H

    1995-04-14

    The adult erinaceous hedgehog, unlike other mammals, has recently been shown to have prominent crossed projections from the thalamus to the motor cortex. There are suggestions relating this unique pattern of connectivity to the overall degree of brain differentiation and/or the poorly developed corpus callosum. The present tracing study demonstrates that the Madagascan lesser hedgehog tenrec, with its tiny corpus callosum and one of the lowest neocorticalization indices among insectivores, has extensive crossed cortico-thalamic projections, but essentially the same sparse thalamic projections to the contralateral cortex as have placental mammals with more differentiated brains. The implications of the findings and the relevance of extracallosal pathways are discussed.

  6. Supplementary absolute differential cross sections for the excitation of atomic hydrogen's n=3 and 4 levels by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Christopher J.; Shyn, Tong W.; Grafe, Alan

    2004-05-01

    We have conducted measurements of absolute differential cross sections for the excitation of hydrogen atoms to their n=3(3S+3P+3D) and 4(4S+4P+4D+4F) levels. A modulated, crossed-beam method was employed, and the impact energies were 40 and 60 eV. Comparison of our results with those of others is quite favorable.

  7. Low energy positron interactions with uracil—Total scattering, positronium formation, and differential elastic scattering cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E. K.; Boadle, R. A.; Machacek, J. R.; Makochekanwa, C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Chiari, L.; Buckman, S. J.; Brunger, M. J.; Garcia, G.; Blanco, F.; Ingolfsson, O.

    2014-07-21

    Measurements of the grand total and total positronium formation cross sections for positron scattering from uracil have been performed for energies between 1 and 180 eV, using a trap-based beam apparatus. Angular, quasi-elastic differential cross section measurements at 1, 3, 5, 10, and 20 eV are also presented and discussed. These measurements are compared to existing experimental results and theoretical calculations, including our own calculations using a variant of the independent atom approach.

  8. Contribution of Upper-Body Strength, Body Composition, and Maximal Oxygen Uptake to Predict Double Poling Power and Overall Performance in Female Cross-Country Skiers.

    PubMed

    Østerås, Sindre; Welde, Boye; Danielsen, Jørgen; van den Tillaar, Roland; Ettema, Gertjan; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2016-09-01

    Østerås, S, Welde, B, Danielsen, J, van den Tillaar, R, Ettema, G, and Sandbakk, Ø. Contribution of upper-body strength, body composition, and maximal oxygen uptake to predict double poling power and overall performance in female cross-country skiers. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2557-2564, 2016-Maximal oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max) is regarded as the most performance-differentiating physiological measure in cross-country (XC) skiing. In addition, upper-body strength and lean mass have been associated with double poling (DP) power in XC skiers. In this study, we tested upper-body maximal strength, lean mass, and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max's contributions to predict DP power production of different durations and the overall XC skiing performance level of elite female XC skiers. Thirteen skiers (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max: 64.9 ± 4.2 ml·kg·min) performed one 30-second and one 3-minute DP performance test using a ski ergometer. The International Ski Federation's (FIS) ranking points determined their overall XC skiing performance. The skiers performed three 1-repetition maximal strength tests in poling-specific exercises that isolated the elbow extension, shoulder extension, and trunk flexion movements. Body composition was determined by a DXA scan, and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max was tested in an incremental running test. Multiple regressions were used to predict power production in the 30-second and 3-minute tests and FIS points. The 2 best predictions of 30-second DP power were lean upper-body mass and maximal upper-body strength (with the 3 strength tests normalized and pooled together as one variable) (R = 0.84 and 0.81, p < 0.001). Along with V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, the same 2 variables were the best predictions of both 3-minute DP power (R = 0.60 and 0.44, p ≤ 0.05) and overall XC skiing performance (R = 0.43 and 0.40, p ≤ 0.05). Although the importance of upper-body strength and lean mass to predict DP power production and the

  9. Shielding data for 100 250 MeV proton accelerators: Double differential neutron distributions and attenuation in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Magistris, M.; Mereghetti, A.; Silari, M.; Zajacova, Z.

    2007-12-01

    Double differential distributions of neutrons produced by 100, 150, 200 and 250 MeV protons stopped in a thick iron target were simulated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code at four emission angles: forward, 45°, transverse and 135° backwards. The attenuation in ordinary concrete of the dose equivalent due to secondary neutrons, protons, photons and electrons was calculated. Some of the resulting attenuation curves are best fitted by a double-exponential function rather than a single-exponential. The effect of various approximations introduced in the simulations is thoroughly discussed. The contribution to the total ambient dose equivalent from photons and protons is usually limited to a few percent, except in the backward direction where photons contribute more than 10% and up to 35% to the total dose for a shield thickness of 1-2 m. Source terms and attenuation lengths are given as a function of energy and emission angle, along with fit to the Monte Carlo data. An extensive comparison is made of values obtained in the present work with published experimental and computational data.

  10. Differentiation between work and nonwork self-aspects as a predictor of presenteeism and engagement: cross-cultural differences.

    PubMed

    Garczynski, Amy M; Waldrop, Jessica S; Rupprecht, Elizabeth A; Grawitch, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Research on the work-life interface does not specifically account for how individuals cognitively conceptualize their work and nonwork lives in terms of the differentiation between work and nonwork self-aspects. In addition, no cross-cultural research examines self-concept differentiation in conjunction with employee outcomes of presenteeism and engagement, pointing to a need to study these relationships cross-culturally. Results of the current study revealed cultural differences in self-concept differentiation, engagement, mental presenteeism, and physical presenteeism. Indian participants reported lower levels of differentiation and higher levels of engagement, mental presenteeism, and physical presenteeism than American participants. Nationality interacted with self-concept differentiation to predict mental presenteeism, physical presenteeism, and engagement. Among Indian participants, self-concept differentiation did not impact scores on the other variables. However, among American participants, those lower in differentiation reported greater engagement, lower mental presenteeism, and lower physical presenteeism. These results have important implications for the study of the work-life interface, and they provide evidence that engagement and presenteeism may be culturally contingent.

  11. Intermolecular cross-double-michael addition between nitro and carbonyl activated olefins as a new approach in C-C bond formation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaohua; Sengupta, Sujata; Petersen, Jeffrey L; Wang, Hong; Lewis, James P; Shi, Xiaodong

    2007-10-25

    A novel intermolecular cross-double-Michael addition between nitro and carbonyl activated olefins has been developed through Lewis base catalysis. The reaction took place with a large group of beta-alkyl nitroalkenes and alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone/esters, producing an allylic nitro compound in good to excellent yields.

  12. Quantum state-resolved differential cross sections for complex-forming chemical reactions: Asymmetry is the rule, symmetry the exception

    SciTech Connect

    Larrégaray, Pascal Bonnet, Laurent

    2015-10-14

    We argue that statistical theories are generally unable to accurately predict state-resolved differential cross sections for triatomic bimolecular reactions studied in beam experiments, even in the idealized limit where the dynamics are fully chaotic. The basic reason is that quenching of interferences between partial waves is less efficient than intuitively expected, especially around the poles.

  13. Theoretical and experimental quantification of doubly and singly differential cross sections for electron-induced ionization of isolated tetrahydrofuran molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele A.; Bug, Marion U.; ...

    2014-07-29

    Electron-induced ionization of the commonly used surrogate of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone, namely, the tetrahydrofuran molecule, is here theoretically described within the 1st Born approximation by means of quantum-mechanical approach. Comparisons between theory and recent experiments are reported in terms of doubly and singly differential cross sections.

  14. Measurement of the analysing power and the differential cross section of the overlinepp charge-exchange reaction at LEAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Torre-Colautti, S. Dalla; Giorgi, M.; Lamanna, M.; Martin, A.; Penzo, A.; Schiavon, P.; Tessarotto, F.; Macciotta, M. P.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.; Niinikoski, T.; Rijllart, A.; Ahmidouch, A.; Heer, E.; Hess, R.; Kunne, R. A.; Luc, C. Lechanoine-Le; Mascarini, C.; Rapin, D.; Arvieux, J.; Bertini, R.; Catz, H.; Faivre, J. C.; Perrot-Kunne, F.; Agnello, M.; Iazzi, F.; Minetti, B.; Bressani, T.; Chiavassa, E.; De Marco, N.; Musso, A.; Piccotti, A.

    1990-08-01

    As part of a programme to study the spin structure of the overlinepp→ overlinenn channel, we have measured the analysing power A0 n and the differential cross section at an incident antiproton beam momentum of 704 MeV/ c. The analysing power exhibits a remarkable angular dependence, which is poorly reproduced by the existing potential models.

  15. Theoretical and experimental quantification of doubly and singly differential cross sections for electron-induced ionization of isolated tetrahydrofuran molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele A.; Bug, Marion U.; Baek, Woon Y.; Weck, Philippe F.

    2014-07-29

    Electron-induced ionization of the commonly used surrogate of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone, namely, the tetrahydrofuran molecule, is here theoretically described within the 1st Born approximation by means of quantum-mechanical approach. Comparisons between theory and recent experiments are reported in terms of doubly and singly differential cross sections.

  16. Deletion-bias in DNA double-strand break repair differentially contributes to plant genome shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Vu, Giang T H; Cao, Hieu X; Reiss, Bernd; Schubert, Ingo

    2017-02-28

    In order to prevent genome instability, cells need to be protected by a number of repair mechanisms, including DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. The extent to which DSB repair, biased towards deletions or insertions, contributes to evolutionary diversification of genome size is still under debate. We analyzed mutation spectra in Arabidopsis thaliana and in barley (Hordeum vulgare) by PacBio sequencing of three DSB-targeted loci each, uncovering repair via gene conversion, single strand annealing (SSA) or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Furthermore, phylogenomic comparisons between A. thaliana and two related species were used to detect naturally occurring deletions during Arabidopsis evolution. Arabidopsis thaliana revealed significantly more and larger deletions after DSB repair than barley, and barley displayed more and larger insertions. Arabidopsis displayed a clear net loss of DNA after DSB repair, mainly via SSA and NHEJ. Barley revealed a very weak net loss of DNA, apparently due to less active break-end resection and easier copying of template sequences into breaks. Comparative phylogenomics revealed several footprints of SSA in the A. thaliana genome. Quantitative assessment of DNA gain and loss through DSB repair processes suggests deletion-biased DSB repair causing ongoing genome shrinking in A. thaliana, whereas genome size in barley remains nearly constant.

  17. Optical CDMA with Embedded Spectral-Polarization Coding over Double Balanced Differential-Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jen-Fa; Yen, Chih-Ta; Chen, Bo-Hau

    A spectral-polarization coding (SPC) optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) configuration structured over arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) router is proposed. The polarization-division double balanced detector is adopted to execute difference detection and enhances system performance. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is derived by taking the effect of PIIN into account. The result indicates that there would be up to 9-dB SNR improvement than the conventional spectral-amplitude coding (SAC) structures with Walsh-Hadamard codes. Mathematical deriving results of the SNR demonstrate the system embedded with the orthogonal state of polarization (SOP) will suppress effectively phase-induced intensity noise (PIIN). In addition, we will analyze the relations about bit error rate (BER) vs. the number of active users under the different encoding schemes and compare them with our proposed scheme. The BER vs. the effective power under the different encoding scheme with the same number of simultaneous active user conditions are also revealed. Finally, the polarization-matched factor and the difference between simulated and experimental values are discussed.

  18. Differential cross sections measurement of 31P(p,pγ1)31P reaction for PIGE applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokar, A.; Kakuee, O.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.

    2016-09-01

    Differential cross sections of proton induced gamma-ray emission from the 31P(p,pγ1)31P (Eγ = 1266 keV) nuclear reaction were measured in the proton energy range of 1886-3007 keV at the laboratory angle of 90°. For these measurements a thin Zn3P2 target evaporated onto a self-supporting C film was used. The gamma-rays and backscattered protons were detected simultaneously. An HPGe detector placed at an angle of 90° with respect to the beam direction was employed to collect gamma-rays while an ion implanted Si detector placed at a scattering angle of 165° was used to detect backscattered protons. Simultaneous collection of gamma-rays and RBS spectra is a great advantage of this approach which makes differential cross-section measurements independent on the collected beam charge. The obtained cross-sections were compared with the previously only measured data in the literature. The validity of the measured differential cross sections was verified through a thick target benchmarking experiment. The overall systematic uncertainty of cross section values was estimated to be better than ±9%.

  19. A novel vitamin D analog with two double bonds in its side chain. A potent inducer of osteoblastic cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mahonen, A; Jääskeläinen, T; Mäenpää, P H

    1996-04-12

    EB 1089 (1 alpha,25-dihydroxy-22,24-diene-24,26,27-trihomovitamin D3) is a novel, synthetic analog of calcitriol, characterized by two extra double bonds in its side chain. It is less potent than calcitriol in its calcemic action, but is an order of magnitude more potent in its antiproliferative action. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of EB 1089 to induce the well-known biological effects of calcitriol in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells (i.e. by inhibiting cell proliferation and by induction of differentiation). Both calcitriol and EB 1089 significantly decreased cell growth after 2 days in culture. At 5 days, however, Eb 1089 was more potent than the natural hormone in inhibiting the proliferation of MG-63 cells. Potent effects of EB 1089 on cell differentiation were also seen in the stimulation of alkaline phosphatase activity, cellular vitamin D receptor mRNA levels, and medium osteocalcin synthesis. EB 1089 was clearly more effective than calcitriol in stimulating alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin synthesis. In gel shift assays, the binding of vitamin D receptor to the composite AP-1 plus vitamin-D responsive promoter region of the human osteocalcin gene after EB 1089 treatment was stronger and longer-lasting than after calcitriol treatment.

  20. Control of neo-classical double tearing modes by differential poloidal rotation in reversed magnetic shear tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jialei; Wang, Zheng-Xiong; Wei, Lai; Liu, Yue

    2017-04-01

    The control of neo-classical tearing modes (NTMs) by the differential rotation in the reversed magnetic shear (RMS) configuration with different separations Δ {{r}\\text{s}} between two rational surfaces is numerically studied by means of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. It is found that the differential rotation with a strong shear at the outer resonant surface can effectively suppress the explosive burst of double tearing modes (DTMs)/NTMs. Critical values of the strength of rotation to suppress the burst are also presented for different bootstrap current fractions {{f}\\text{b}} . Furthermore, a couple of measurable parameters ≤ft(δ, κ \\right) , corresponding respectively to the triangularity and elongation of the magnetic islands at the outer resonant surface, are introduced to characterize the deformation of islands in the nonlinear phase. It is found that the triangularity δ is more likely to precisely predict the onset of burst than the island width w and elongation κ . For a given Δ {{r}\\text{s}} , the critical value of triangularity {δ\\text{crit}} is obtained by scanning different plasma parameters. Establishing such a database of ≤ft(δ,κ \\right) is helpful to effectively control the development of NTMs in the RMS experimental discharges.

  1. SCATTER-DOMINATED INTERPLANETARY TRANSPORT OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES IN LARGE GRADUAL EVENTS AND THE FORMATION OF DOUBLE POWER-LAW DIFFERENTIAL FLUENCE SPECTRA OF GROUND-LEVEL EVENTS DURING SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Gen; Lee, Martin A.

    2015-09-01

    The effects of scatter-dominated interplanetary transport on the spectral properties of the differential fluence of large gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are investigated analytically. The model assumes for simplicity radial constant solar wind and radial magnetic field. The radial diffusion coefficient is calculated with quasilinear theory by assuming a spectrum of Alfvén waves propagating parallel to the magnetic field. Cross-field transport is neglected. The model takes into consideration several essential features of gradual event transport: nearly isotropic ion distributions, adiabatic deceleration in a divergent solar wind, and particle radial scattering mean free paths increasing with energy. Assuming an impulsive and spherically symmetric injection of SEPs with a power-law spectrum near the Sun, the predicted differential fluence spectrum exhibits at 1 AU three distinctive power laws for different energy domains. The model naturally reproduces the spectral features of the double power-law proton differential fluence spectra that tend to be observed in extremely large SEP events. We select nine western ground-level events (GLEs) out of the 16 GLEs during Solar Cycle 23 and fit the observed double power-law spectra to the analytical predictions. The compression ratio of the accelerating shock wave, the power-law index of the ambient wave intensity, and the proton radial scattering mean free path are determined for the nine GLEs. The derived parameters are generally in agreement with the characteristic values expected for large gradual SEP events.

  2. Near-threshold electron-impact doubly differential cross sections for the ionization of argon and krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, Brent R.; Khakoo, Murtadha A.

    2011-04-15

    We present normalized doubly differential cross sections (DDCS's) for the near-threshold, electron-impact single ionization of argon and krypton, similar to those taken earlier for Ne and Xe [Yates et al., J. Phys. B 42, 095206 (2009)]. The Ar measurements were taken at incident energies of 17, 18, 20, and 30 eV while the Kr measurements were taken at 15, 16, 17.5, and 20 eV. The DDCS scattering angles range from 15 deg. to 120 deg. The differential data are initially normalized to available experimental cross sections for excitation of the ground np{sup 6} to the np{sup 5}(n+1)s excited states of the noble gas and, after integration, to well-established experimental total ionization cross sections of Rapp and Englander-Golden [J. Chem. Phys. 43, 1464 (1965)].

  3. Differential collision cross-sections for atomic oxygen: Analysis of space flight instruments for solar terrestrial physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the status of the Cross-section Facility at MSFC is presented. A facility was designed, fabricated, assembled, tested, and operated for measurement of differential scattering cross sections important to understand the induced environment for a vehicle (e.g., Space Station) in low earth orbit. A user's manual for the facility is also presented. The performance of the facility was evaluated and found to be satisfactory in all the essential areas. Differential scattering cross sections were measured and results for the scattering measurements are included. Input to the development of the Ultraviolet Imager Optical System is also discussed. Design, fabrication, and evaluation of UV filters using a four-layer aluminum base are reported.

  4. Hybrid maize breeding with doubled haploids: V. Selection strategies for testcross performance with variable sizes of crosses and S(1) families.

    PubMed

    Wegenast, Thilo; Utz, H Friedrich; Longin, C Friedrich H; Maurer, Hans Peter; Dhillon, Baldev S; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2010-02-01

    In hybrid maize (Zea mays L.) breeding, doubled haploids (DH) are increasingly replacing inbreds developed by recurrent selfing. Doubled haploids may be developed directly from S(0) plants in the parental cross or via S(1) families. In both these breeding schemes, we examined 2 two-stage selecting strategies, i.e., considering or ignoring cross and family structure while selection among and within parental crosses and S(1) families. We examined the optimum allocation of resources to maximize the selection gain DeltaG and the probability P(q) of identifying the q% best genotypes. Our specific objectives were to (1) determine the optimum number and size of crosses and S(1) families, as well as the optimum number of test environments and (2) identify the superior selection strategy. Selection was based on the evaluation of testcross progenies of (1) DH lines in both stages (DHTC) and (2) S(1) families in the first stage and of DH lines within S(1) families in the second stage (S(1)TC-DHTC) with uniform and variable sizes of crosses and S(1) families. We developed and employed simulation programs for selection with variable sizes of crosses and S(1) families within crosses. The breeding schemes and selection strategies showed similar relative efficiency for both optimization criteria DeltaG and P (0.1%). As compared with DHTC, S(1)TC-DHTC had larger DeltaG and P (0.1%), but a higher standard deviation of DeltaG. The superiority of S(1)TC-DHTC was increased when the selection was done among all DH lines ignoring their cross and family structure and using variable sizes of crosses and S(1) families. In DHTC, the best selection strategy was to ignore cross structures and use uniform size of crosses.

  5. Formaldehyde Crosses the Human Placenta and Affects Human Trophoblast Differentiation and Hormonal Functions.

    PubMed

    Pidoux, Guillaume; Gerbaud, Pascale; Guibourdenche, Jean; Thérond, Patrice; Ferreira, Fatima; Simasotchi, Christelle; Evain-Brion, Danièle; Gil, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The chorionic villus of the human placenta is the source of specific endocrine functions and nutrient exchanges. These activities are ensured by the syncytiotrophobast (ST), which bathes in maternal blood. The ST arises and regenerates throughout pregnancy by fusion of underlying cytotrophoblasts (CT). Any anomaly of ST formation or regeneration can affect pregnancy outcome and fetal growth. Because of its direct interaction with maternal blood, the ST is sensitive to drugs, pollutants and xenohormones. Ex vivo assays of perfused cotyledon show that formaldehyde, a common pollutant present in furniture, paint and plastics, can accumulate in the human placenta and cross to the fetal compartment. By means of RT-qPCR, immunoblot and immunocytochemistry experiments, we demonstrate in vitro that formaldehyde exerts endocrine toxicity on human trophoblasts, including a decrease in the production of protein hormones of pregnancy. In addition, formaldehyde exposure triggered human trophoblast fusion by upregulating syncitin-1 receptor expression (ASC-type amino-acid transporter 2: ASCT2). Moreover, we show that formaldehyde-exposed trophoblasts present an altered redox status associated with oxidative stress, and an increase in ASCT2 expression intended to compensate for this stress. Finally, we demonstrate that the adverse effects of formaldehyde on trophoblast differentiation and fusion are reversed by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (Nac), an antioxidant.

  6. Laser-assisted coplanar symmetric (e, 2e) triple differential cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, D.; Tlidi, M.; Makhoute, A.; Ajana, I.

    2017-04-01

    The modification due to an external linearly polarized monochromatic laser field on the dynamics of the ionization process of an atomic hydrogen by electron-impact is studied theoretically for a coplanar symmetric geometry. The interaction of the laser field with the unbound electrons is treated in a non-perturbative way. The wave functions of the ingoing and outgoing electrons in the laser field are treated as non-relativistic Volkov waves, while the interaction of the bound electron with the laser field is treated by using first-order perturbation theory, assuming that the electric field strength associated with the external laser field is much less than the atomic unit e/{a}2=5× {10}9 {{V}} {{{cm}}}-1. The influence of the laser parameters on the angular distribution is analyzed and several illustrative examples are discussed. Significant changes are noted both in the shape and magnitude of the triple differential cross sections (TDCS) by the application of the laser field. Numerical results show that the TDCS are strongly dependent on the dressing of the projectile by the laser field at low frequency in (e, 2e) spectroscopy region.

  7. Experimental and Theoretical Fully differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of furfuryl molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Esam; Jones, Darryl; Nixon, Kate; Ning, Chuangang; Brunger, Michael; Murray, Andrew; Madison, Don

    2015-09-01

    Experimental and theoretical Fully Differential Cross Sections (FDCS) are presented for 250 eV electron impact ionization of the highest and next highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMO and NHOMO). Theoretical results are compared with experiment for in plane scattering with projectile scattering angles of 5°, 10°, and 15°. Different theoretical models are examined - the molecular 3 body distorted wave (M3DW), and the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA), with the effects of the post collision interaction (PCI) treated either exactly or with the Ward-Macek approximations. These approximations show good agreement with experimental data for binary peaks. However, for the recoil peak region, experiment finds a noticeable peak while theory predicts no peak. No recoil peak suggests no (or very weak) nuclear scattering, so we have investigated the importance of nuclear scattering by moving the nuclei closer to the center of mass. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1068237 and XSEDE resources provided by the Texas Advanced Computing Center (Grant No. TG-MCA07S029).

  8. Formaldehyde Crosses the Human Placenta and Affects Human Trophoblast Differentiation and Hormonal Functions

    PubMed Central

    Pidoux, Guillaume; Gerbaud, Pascale; Guibourdenche, Jean; Thérond, Patrice; Ferreira, Fatima; Simasotchi, Christelle; Evain-Brion, Danièle; Gil, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The chorionic villus of the human placenta is the source of specific endocrine functions and nutrient exchanges. These activities are ensured by the syncytiotrophobast (ST), which bathes in maternal blood. The ST arises and regenerates throughout pregnancy by fusion of underlying cytotrophoblasts (CT). Any anomaly of ST formation or regeneration can affect pregnancy outcome and fetal growth. Because of its direct interaction with maternal blood, the ST is sensitive to drugs, pollutants and xenohormones. Ex vivo assays of perfused cotyledon show that formaldehyde, a common pollutant present in furniture, paint and plastics, can accumulate in the human placenta and cross to the fetal compartment. By means of RT-qPCR, immunoblot and immunocytochemistry experiments, we demonstrate in vitro that formaldehyde exerts endocrine toxicity on human trophoblasts, including a decrease in the production of protein hormones of pregnancy. In addition, formaldehyde exposure triggered human trophoblast fusion by upregulating syncitin-1 receptor expression (ASC-type amino-acid transporter 2: ASCT2). Moreover, we show that formaldehyde-exposed trophoblasts present an altered redox status associated with oxidative stress, and an increase in ASCT2 expression intended to compensate for this stress. Finally, we demonstrate that the adverse effects of formaldehyde on trophoblast differentiation and fusion are reversed by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (Nac), an antioxidant. PMID:26186596

  9. Fully differential ionization cross sections for proton collisions with multielectronic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.; Otranto, S.; Garibotti, C. R.

    2008-02-15

    In this work we present a theoretical study of the single ionization process involved in collisions of protons on He, Li, and Be targets at 2 MeV/amu projectile impact energy. Fully differential cross sections (FDCSs) are calculated within a continuum distorted wave method. Three different potentials are used to represent the interaction between the low energy outgoing electron and the residual ion target. Two of them are based on Coulomb potentials with proper effective charges for the target, while the other relies in a Garvey-type potential. These procedures provide remarkable differences in the binary and recoil peak regions, for the Li and Be cases. On the other hand, He target calculations lead to qualitative agreement for the three FDCSs at the momentum transfers and emission energies here considered. These results manifest the complexity of the ionization process for multielectronic targets and emphasize the importance of choosing an adequate model potential to describe the emitted electron dynamics in ionizing collisions.

  10. Differential cross sections for p+d-->γ+3He at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briscoe, W. J.; Silverman, B. H.; Fitzgerald, D. H.; Nefkens, B. M. K.; Boudard, A.; Bruge, G.; Farvacque, L.; Glashausser, C.

    1985-12-01

    Differential cross sections have been measured for p+d-->γ+3He at Tp(lab)=300, 350, 400, 425, 450, 470, and 500 MeV for thetaγ(c.m.) near 60° and 90°. Measurements were also made for d+p-->γ+3He at Td=376 MeV for thetaγ(c.m.)=84°, 98°, and 113°, and at Td=600 MeV for thetaγ=96° and 105°. Our results are in agreement with those of the inverse reaction, γ+3He-->p+d of Sober et al., as is expected from time-reversal invariance. Our data agree with the latest results of Cameron et al. The older radiative capture measurements of Heusch et al. and the photodisintegration measurements made at other laboratories differ significantly from our results. Our data are compared with three theoretical models; the one proposed by Maximon and Prats comes closest to describing the data.

  11. Deep minimum in the triple differential cross sections for the electron-impact ionization of He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, James; Feagin, James; Pindzola, Michael

    2012-06-01

    We further explore the unusual deep minimum found in the triple differential cross sections for the electron-impact ionization of helium. This feature has been observed experimentally more than 15 years ago [1] and confirmed via close-coupling calculations [2]. A recent study [3] identified the minimum with a vortex in the two-electron continuum, and an analytic expansion of the electron pair about the vortex has recently been derived [4]. The imaging theorem [3] is invoked to compute the TDCS from the radial wavefunctions propagated in time via solution of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation for the electron helium system. This allows us to more easily visualize the portion of the wavefunction that contributes to the TDCS at the specific ejected electron angles where the deep minimum is observed. Interesting features in the radial wavefunction as a function of time are found, which appear to be consistent with the prediction [3] that a vortex in the two-electron wavefunction is responsible for the observed deep minimum. [1] A. J. Murray and F. H. Read, J. Phys. B 26, L359 (1993). [2] J. Colgan et al, J. Phys. B. 42, 171001 2009. [3] J. H. Macek, et al, Phys. Rev. Letts. 104, 033201 (2010). [4] J. M. F Feagin, J. Phys. B 44, 011001 (2011).

  12. Differential trends in mercury concentrations in double-crested cormorant populations of the Canadian Prairies.

    PubMed

    Hall, Britt D; Doucette, Jennifer L; Bates, Lara M; Bugajski, Aleksandra; Niyogi, Som; Somers, Christopher M

    2014-04-01

    Mercury and selenium concentrations were measured in double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), piscivorous fish, and common prey items in five lakes in two ecoregions in Saskatchewan, Canada. Hg and Se concentrations in cormorants were within the natural ranges of birds living in un-impacted sites. Site explained a significant proportion of the variation in total Hg (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in both cormorant breast muscle and livers. Birds nesting on more northern lakes in the Boreal Plain ecoregion (THg range 0.11-1.06 and 0.26-9.27 μg g(-1) wet weight, for breast and liver respectively) had lower THg concentrations compared to those from lakes in the Prairie ecoregion (THg range 0.60-4.26 μg g(-1) ww and 1.59-25.11 μg g(-1), for breast and liver respectively). Concentrations of MeHg in livers was also lower in birds from northern sites (0.06-1.15 μg g(-1) ww) compared to those from prairie sites (0.22-4.06 μg g(-1) ww). We documented a wide range of %MeHg in livers (4.5-52 %), indicative of detoxifying MeHg via demethylation to inorganic Hg. Our data suggest that the threshold value where demethylation rates increase substantially appears to be ~10 μg g(-1) ww MeHg, similar to thresholds in other wildlife. Molar ratios of Hg:Se suggests that some birds from highly saline Reed Lake in the prairie region had insufficient Se available to bind to Hg, thereby removing Se binding as a mitigative strategy for high Hg levels for these birds.

  13. A randomised, double- blind, cross-over study investigating the prebiotic effect of agave fructans in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Ramnani, P; Costabile, A; Bustillo, A G R; Gibson, G R

    2015-01-01

    This placebo-controlled, randomised, double-blind, cross-over human feeding study aimed to determine the prebiotic effect of agave fructans. A total of thirty-eight volunteers completed this trial. The treatment consisted of 3 weeks' supplementation with 5 g/d of prebiotic agave fructan (Predilife) or equivalent placebo (maltodextrin), followed by a 2-week washout period following which subjects were crossed over to alternate the treatment arm for 3 weeks followed by a 2-week washout. Faecal samples were collected at baseline, on the last day of treatment (days 22 and 58) and washout (days 36 and 72), respectively. Changes in faecal bacterial populations, SCFA and secretory IgA were assessed using fluorescent in situ hybridisation, GC and ELISA, respectively. Bowel movements, stool consistencies, abdominal comfort and mood changes were evaluated by a recorded daily questionnaire. In parallel, the effect of agave fructans on different regions of the colon using a three-stage continuous culture simulator was studied. Predilife significantly increased faecal bifidobacteria (log10 9·6 (sd 0·4)) and lactobacilli (log10 7·7 (sd 0·8)) compared with placebo (log10 9·2 (sd 0·4); P = 0·00) (log10 7·4 (sd 0·7); P = 0·000), respectively. No change was observed for other bacterial groups tested, SCFA, secretory IgA, and PGE2 concentrations between the treatment and placebo. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that bacterial communities were randomly dispersed and no significant differences were observed between Predilife and placebo treatments. The in vitro models showed similar increases in bifidobacterial and lactobacilli populations to that observed with the in vivo trial. To conclude, agave fructans are well tolerated in healthy human subjects and increased bifidobacteria and lactobacilli numbers in vitro and in vivo but did not influence other products of fermentation.

  14. Double stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase is involved in osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Teramachi, Junpei; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Baba, Ryoko; Doi, Yoshiaki; Hirashima, Kanji; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2010-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) plays a critical role in antiviral defence of the host cells. PKR is also involved in cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. We previously reported that PKR is required for differentiation and calcification of osteoblasts. However, it is unknown about the role of PKR in osteoclast differentiation. A dominant-negative PKR mutant cDNA, in which the amino acid lysine at 296 was replaced with arginine, was transfected into RAW264.7 cells. We have established the cell line that stably expresses the PKR mutant gene (PKR-K/R). Phosphorylation of PKR and {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 was not stimulated by polyinosic-polycytidylic acid in the PKR-K/R cells. RANKL stimulated the formation of TRAP-positive multinuclear cells in RAW264.7 cells. However, TRAP-positive multinuclear cells were not formed in the PKR-K/R cells even when the cells were stimulated with higher doses of RANKL. A specific inhibitor of PKR, 2-aminopurine, also suppressed the RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells. The expression of macrophage fusion receptor and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein significantly decreased in the PKR-K/R cells by real time PCR analysis. The results of RT-PCR revealed that the mRNA expression of osteoclast markers (cathepsin K and calcitonin receptor) was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and RAW264.7 cells treated with 2-aminopurine. Expression of NF-{kappa}B protein was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and 2-aminopurine-treated RAW264.7 cells. The level of STAT1 protein expression was elevated in the PKR-K/R cells compared with that of the wild-type cells. Immunohistochemical study showed that PKR was localized in osteoclasts of metatarsal bone of newborn mouse. The finding that the PKR-positive multinuclear cells should be osteoclasts was confirmed by TRAP-staining. Our present study indicates that PKR plays important

  15. All-optical production of a large Bose-Einstein condensate in a double compressible crossed dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Kazuya; Hanasaki, Kouhei; Ando, Akihiro; Takahama, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Toshiya

    2017-01-01

    We report on an all-optical production of a 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of 106 atoms. We construct a double compressible crossed dipole trap (DCDT) formed by a high-power multimode fiber laser (MCDT) and a single-mode fiber amplifier (SCDT), which are both operated at 1.06 μ m . A very cold dense gas is first cooled by polarization gradient cooling in a three-dimensional optical lattice. More than 2 ×107 atoms are loaded into the enlarged DCDT. Both CDTs are then simultaneously compressed to significantly different sizes followed by evaporation, which is performed by lowering only the MCDT power. The tighter SCDT produces an extremely high collision rate and maintains the trap stiffness, which leads to rapid and efficient evaporation. After 0.4 s, a gas of 5 ×106 atoms with a phase-space density of 0.2 is confined within the SCDT alone. Further evaporation in 2.8 s yields a nearly pure BEC of 1.2 ×106 atoms in the |F mF>=|11 > state. This number is the largest generated among all-optical methods. Our approach significantly improves the atom number of a condensate and circumvents the severe atom loss previously reported for multimode fiber lasers.

  16. Salivary Oxytocin Concentrations in Males following Intranasal Administration of Oxytocin: A Double-Blind, Cross-Over Study

    PubMed Central

    Daughters, Katie; Manstead, Antony S. R.; Hubble, Kelly; Rees, Aled; Thapar, Anita; van Goozen, Stephanie H. M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of intranasal oxytocin (OT) in research has become increasingly important over the past decade. Although researchers have acknowledged a need for further investigation of the physiological effects of intranasal administration, few studies have actually done so. In the present double-blind cross-over study we investigated the longevity of a single 24 IU dose of intranasal OT measured in saliva in 40 healthy adult males. Salivary OT concentrations were significantly higher in the OT condition, compared to placebo. This significant difference lasted until the end of testing, approximately 108 minutes after administration, and peaked at 30 minutes. Results showed significant individual differences in response to intranasal OT administration. To our knowledge this is the largest and first all-male within-subjects design study to demonstrate the impact of intranasal OT on salivary OT concentrations. The results are consistent with previous research in suggesting that salivary OT is a valid matrix for OT measurement. The results also suggest that the post-administration ‘wait-time’ prior to starting experimental tasks could be reduced to 30 minutes, from the 45 minutes typically used, thereby enabling testing during peak OT concentrations. Further research is needed to ascertain whether OT concentrations after intranasal administration follow similar patterns in females, and different age groups. PMID:26669935

  17. The feasibility of using a double blind experimental cross-over design to study interventions for sick building syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tamblyn, R M; Menzies, R I; Tamblyn, R T; Farant, J P; Hanley, J

    1992-06-01

    Methodological problems have limited scientific investigation of the causes of and solutions for sick building syndrome. The feasibility of using an experimental double blind cross-over study to resolve many of these methodological problems was assessed in a pilot study. The experimental intervention was to vary the amount of outdoor air from 10 cubic feet per minute per person (cfmpp) to 20 cfmpp or 50 cfmpp by central manipulation of the building heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system. Over 6 consecutive study weeks, 2 trials of rates were administered in random order. Study subjects and investigators of the study were blinded to intervention sequence. Unblinding, office environment rating and symptom occurrence were measured weekly. Of 305 eligible workers, 254 participated. Problems were encountered in delivering the lowest dose of ventilation due to building leakage. The prevalence of symptoms diminished steadily over the 6 study weeks, time trends which could be controlled by recommended design modifications. Blinding to the intervention was successfully maintained. Weekly non-response did not introduce a response bias but reduced the number of subjects available for analysis by one-third for each trial. We conclude that this design, with certain modifications, is feasible to evaluate many proposed interventions for sick building syndrome.

  18. Comprehensive Waveform Cross-correlation of Southern California Seismograms: Part 1. Refined Hypocenters Obtained Using the Double-difference Method and Tectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, E.; Chi, W.; Shearer, P.

    2003-12-01

    We present preliminary results applying waveform cross-correlation to southern California seismograms for over 380,000 events between 1984 and 2002. Waveforms recorded by the SCSN are first extracted from the SCEDC data center in 50 s windows that include both P and S waves. The resulting online waveform archive uses about 0.5 TB on a RAID system. The traces are then re-sampled to a uniform 100 Hz sample rate and band-pass filtered to between 1 and 10 Hz. Next, we apply time domain waveform cross-correlation for P and S waves between each event and 100 neighboring events (identified from the catalog based on a 3-D velocity model of Hauksson (2000). We identify and save differential times from the peaks in the cross-correlation functions and use a spline interpolation method to achieve a nominal timing precision of 0.001 s. These differential times, together with existing P and S phase picks, are input to the double-difference program of Waldhauser and Ellsworth (2000). We define a grid across southern California and locate hypocenters near each grid node. Because some events may be located many times as hypocenters are calculated near successive grid-points, we assign a weight to each hypocenter and calculate a weighted average hypo-center for each earthquake. The new HypoDD hypocenters show improved clustering both horizontally and vertically, creating a more focused picture of the previously identified, spatially complex distributions of seismicity. In many cases, the late Quaternary faults, such as the Elsinore and Hollywood-Santa Monica faults appear to bracket the seismicity distributions; in other cases, the faults trace the median within a symmetric distribution of hypocenters. The depth distribution of the seismicity shows sudden changes across some of the major strike-slip faults, while regions of dip-slip faulting are often bound by dipping surfaces that are clearly defined by the deepest hypocenters. The seismicity around the southern San Andreas fault

  19. Galectins: Double-edged Swords in the Cross-roads of Pregnancy Complications and Female Reproductive Tract Inflammation and Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Than, Nandor Gabor; Romero, Roberto; Balogh, Andrea; Karpati, Eva; Mastrolia, Salvatore Andrea; Staretz-Chacham, Orna; Hahn, Sinuhe; Erez, Offer; Papp, Zoltan; Kim, Chong Jai

    2015-01-01

    Galectins are an evolutionarily ancient and widely expressed family of lectins that have unique glycan-binding characteristics. They are pleiotropic regulators of key biological processes, such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, signal transduction, and pre-mRNA splicing, as well as homo- and heterotypic cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Galectins are also pivotal in immune responses since they regulate host-pathogen interactions, innate and adaptive immune responses, acute and chronic inflammation, and immune tolerance. Some galectins are also central to the regulation of angiogenesis, cell migration and invasion. Expression and functional data provide convincing evidence that, due to these functions, galectins play key roles in shared and unique pathways of normal embryonic and placental development as well as oncodevelopmental processes in tumorigenesis. Therefore, galectins may sometimes act as double-edged swords since they have beneficial but also harmful effects for the organism. Recent advances facilitate the use of galectins as biomarkers in obstetrical syndromes and in various malignancies, and their therapeutic applications are also under investigation. This review provides a general overview of galectins and a focused review of this lectin subfamily in the context of inflammation, infection and tumors of the female reproductive tract as well as in normal pregnancies and those complicated by the great obstetrical syndromes. PMID:26018511

  20. Elastic positron scattering by C{sub 2}H{sub 2}: Differential cross sections and virtual state formation

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, Claudia R.C. de; Varella, Marcio T. do N; Lima, Marco A.P.; Silva, Euclimar P. da

    2003-12-01

    We present calculated elastic differential cross sections for positron-acetylene scattering, obtained by using the Schwinger multichannel method. Our results are in very good agreement with quasielastic experimental data of Kauppila et al. [Nucl. Instrum. Meth. Phys. Res. B 192, 162 (2002)]. We also discuss the existence of a virtual state (zero-energy resonance) in e{sup +}-C{sub 2}H{sub 2} collisions, based on the behavior of the integral cross section and of the s-wave phase shift. As expected the fixed-nuclei cross section and annihilation parameter (Z{sub eff}) present the same energy dependence at very low impact energies. As the virtual state energy approaches zero, the magnitude of both cross section and Z{sub eff} are extremely enhanced (at zero impact energy). The possibility of shifting from a low-lying virtual state to a shallow bound state is not expected to significantly affect room-temperature annihilation rates.

  1. 315mJ, 2-micrometers Double-Pulsed Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar Transmitter for Atmospheric CO2 Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Koch, Grady; Chen, Songsheng; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The design of a double pulsed, injection seeded, 2-micrometer compact coherent Differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) transmitter for CO2 sensing is presented. This system is hardened for ground and airborne applications. The design architecture includes three continuous wave lasers which provide controlled on and off line seeding, injection seeded power oscillator and a single amplifier operating in double pass configuration. As the derivative a coherent Doppler wind lidar, this instrument has the added benefit of providing wind information. The active laser material used for this application is a Ho: Tm:YLF crystal operates at the eye-safe wavelength. The 3-meter long folded ring resonator produces energy of 130-mJ (90/40) with a temporal pulse length around 220 nanoseconds and 530 nanosecond pulses for on and off lines respectively. The separation between the two pulses is on the order of 200 microseconds. The line width is in the order of 2.5MHz and the beam quality has an M(sup 2) of 1.1 times diffraction limited beam. A final output energy for a pair of both on and off pulses as high as 315 mJ (190/125) at a repetition rate of 10 Hz is achieved. The operating temperature is set around 20 C for the pump diode lasers and 10 C for the rod. Since the laser design has to meet high-energy as well as high beam quality requirements, close attention is paid to the laser head design to avoid thermal distortion in the rod. A side-pumped configuration is used and heat is removed uniformly by passing coolant through a tube slightly larger than the rod to reduce thermal gradient. This paper also discusses the advantage of using a long upper laser level life time laser crystal for DIAL application. In addition issues related to injection seeding with two different frequencies to achieve a transform limited line width will be presented.

  2. Influence of differential elastic nucleon-nucleon cross section on stopping and collective flow in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongjia; Guo, Chenchen; Li, Qingfeng; Li, Zhuxia; Su, Jun; Zhang, Hongfei

    2016-08-01

    We considered three different nucleon-nucleon (NN) elastic differential cross sections: the Cugnon et al. parameterized differential cross section [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. B 111, 215 (1996), 10.1016/0168-583X(95)01384-9], the differential cross section derived from the collision term of the self-consistent relativistic Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation proposed by Mao et al. [Z. Phys. A 347, 173 (1994), 10.1007/BF01292373], and the isotropic differential cross section within the newly updated version of the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) model. By doing so, we investigated the influence of the differential elastic NN cross section on various observables (e.g., nuclear stopping, both the rapidity and transverse-velocity dependence of the directed and elliptic flows) in Au+Au collisions at beam energies 150, 250, 400, and 800 MeV /nucleon . By comparing calculations with those three differential cross sections, we found that the nuclear stopping power and the directed and elliptic flows are affected to some extent by the differential cross sections, and the impact of differential cross section on those observables becomes more visible as the beam energy increases. The effect on the elliptic flow difference v2n-v2H and ratio v2n/v2H of neutrons versus hydrogen isotopes (Z =1 ), which have been used as sensitive observables for probing nuclear symmetry energy at high densities, is weak.

  3. Rheological Behavior, Granule Size Distribution and Differential Scanning Calorimetry of Cross-Linked Banana (Musa paradisiaca) Starch.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez-Santiago, María C.; Maristany-Cáceres, Amira J.; Suárez, Francisco J. García; Bello-Pérez, Arturo

    2008-07-01

    Rheological behavior at 60 °C, granule size distribution and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) tests were employed to study the effect of diverse reaction conditions: adipic acid concentration, pH and temperature during cross-linking of banana (Musa paradisiaca) starch. These properties were determined in native banana starch pastes for the purpose of comparison. Rheological behavior from pastes of cross-linked starch at 60 °C did not show hysteresis, probably due the cross-linkage of starch that avoided disruption of granules, elsewhere, native starch showed hysteresis in a thixotropic loop. All pastes exhibited non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior. In all cases, size distribution showed a decrease in the median diameter in cross-linked starches. This condition produces a decrease in swelling capacity of cross-linked starch. The median diameter decreased with an increase of acid adipic concentration; however, an increase of pH and Temperature produced an increase in this variable. Finally, an increase in gelatinization temperature and entalphy (ΔH) were observed as an effect of cross-linkage. An increase in acid adipic concentration produced an increase in Tonset and a decrease in ΔH. pH and temperature. The cross-linked of banana starch produced granules more resistant during the pasting procedure.

  4. Absolute measurement of the differential cross section for deuteron photodisintegration from 63 to 71 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Debevec, P.T.; Harty, P.D.; Knott, J.E. ); Jenkins, D.A.; Jones, R.T. )

    1992-03-01

    The absolute differential cross section for the {sup 2}H({gamma},{ital p}){ital n} reaction has been measured using a large solid angle detector, with a tagged photon beam of mean energy 67 MeV. The data have been compared with nine different theoretical calculations of the cross section, which account for the data to varying degrees. Best agreement is obtained for models utilizing the nonrelativistic impulse approximation with a realistic nuclear potential, meson-exchange currents, and relativistic corrections.

  5. The pharmacodynamic equivalence of levothyroxine and liothyronine. A randomized, double blind, cross-over study in thyroidectomized patients

    PubMed Central

    Celi, Francesco S.; Zemskova, Marina; Linderman, Joyce D.; Babar, Nabeel I.; Skarulis, Monica C.; Csako, Gyorgy; Wesley, Robert; Costello, Rene; Penzak, Scott R.; Pucino, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Summary Context The substitution of liothyronine (l-T3) for levothyroxine (l-T4) is commonly employed during thyroid hormone (TH) withdrawal in preparation for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on thyroid cancer patients. Presently, only limited data are available on the l-T3 for l-T4 therapeutic substitution. Objective To characterize the pharmcodynamic equivalence of l-T3 and l-T4. Design Randomized, double-blind, cross-over intervention study. Setting NIH Clinical Center. Patients 10 thyroidectomized patients. Interventions Study participants were treated with l-T3 or l-T4 with a target TSH ≥0.5≤1.5 mU/l for at least 30 days before undergoing inpatient testing. Following testing, subjects crossed-over according to the same scheme. Main outcome measures Area under the serum concentration-time curve of TSH from 0 to 60 minutes (AUC 0-60) and peak TSH serum concentration (Cmax) following thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulation test, total l-T4 and l-T3 dose (mcg/kg), and l-T4/l-T3 ratio. Results No difference was observed for time 0 TSH values between l-T3 and l-T4 replacement phases (1.48± 0.77 vs. 1.21± 0.62 mU/l, p=0.293) at average daily doses of 40.3±11.3 mcg lT-3 and 115.2±38.5 mcg lT-4, l-T3: l-T4 ratio 0.36±0.06. TRH stimulation test resulted in similar l-T3 vs.l-T4 TSH responses with AUC 0-60 of 326.1 (95% CI 232.6-457.1) and 247.1 (95% CI 153.8-397.1) mU*min /l (p=0.285); and Cmax of 6.83 (95% CI 4.88-9.55) and 5.23 (95% CI 3.31-8.3) mU/l (p=0.383). Conclusions This is the first study addressing the equivalency between l-T3 and l-T4 therapy measured by baseline and TRH-stimulated TSH. The therapeutic substitution of l-T3 for l-T4 was achieved at approximately 1:3 ratio. PMID:20447070

  6. Double-diffusive convection and baroclinic instability in a differentially heated and initially stratified rotating system: the barostrat instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincze, Miklos; Borcia, Ion; Harlander, Uwe; Le Gal, Patrice

    2016-12-01

    A water-filled differentially heated rotating annulus with initially prepared stable vertical salinity profiles is studied in the laboratory. Based on two-dimensional horizontal particle image velocimetry data and infrared camera visualizations, we describe the appearance and the characteristics of the baroclinic instability in this original configuration. First, we show that when the salinity profile is linear and confined between two non-stratified layers at top and bottom, only two separate shallow fluid layers can be destabilized. These unstable layers appear nearby the top and the bottom of the tank with a stratified motionless zone between them. This laboratory arrangement is thus particularly interesting to model geophysical or astrophysical situations where stratified regions are often juxtaposed to convective ones. Then, for more general but stable initial density profiles, statistical measures are introduced to quantify the extent of the baroclinic instability at given depths and to analyze the connections between this depth-dependence and the vertical salinity profiles. We find that, although the presence of stable stratification generally hinders full-depth overturning, double-diffusive convection can lead to development of multicellular sideways convection in shallow layers and subsequently to a multilayered baroclinic instability. Therefore we conclude that by decreasing the characteristic vertical scale of the flow, stratification may even enhance the formation of cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies (and thus, mixing) in a local sense.

  7. Differential vimentin expression in ovarian and uterine corpus endometrioid adenocarcinomas: diagnostic utility in distinguishing double primaries from metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Desouki, Mohamed M; Kallas, Sarah J; Khabele, Dineo; Crispens, Marta A; Hameed, Omar; Fadare, Oluwole

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the diagnostic value of vimentin expression in differentiating endometrioid adenocarcinoma of primary uterine corpus and ovarian origin. Immunohistochemical analyses for the expression of vimentin in tumoral epithelial cells were performed on 149 endometrioid adenocarcinomas wherein the primary sites were not in question, including whole tissue sections of 27 carcinomas of uterine corpus origin (and no synchronous ovarian tumor), 7 carcinomas of ovarian origin (and no synchronous uterine corpus tumor) and a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 91 primary uterine corpus and 24 primary ovarian carcinomas. We also assessed 15 cases that synchronously involved the uterine corpus and ovary, 15 cases of metastasis to organs/tissues other than uterine corpus or ovary as well as 7 lymph node metastases. Vimentin was negative in 97% (30/31) of primary ovarian carcinomas. In contrast, 82% (97/118) of primary uterine corpus carcinomas were vimentin-positive. Vimentin expression was discordant in 53% of synchronous tumors. The sensitivity and specificity of negative vimentin staining in predicting an ovarian primary were 97% and 82%, respectively, whereas parallel values for positive vimentin staining in predicting a primary uterine tumor were 82% and 97%, respectively. The pattern of vimentin expression in all cases was maintained in their respective regional lymph nodes and distant metastases. In conclusion, ovarian and uterine corpus endometrioid adenocarcinomas have different patterns of vimentin expression. If validated in larger and/or different data sets, these findings may have diagnostic value in distinguishing metastatic lesions from double primary tumors involving both sites.

  8. A high speed CMOS image sensor with a novel digital correlated double sampling and a differential difference amplifier.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehyeok; Bae, Jaeyoung; Song, Minkyu

    2015-03-02

    In order to increase the operating speed of a CMOS image sensor (CIS), a new technique of digital correlated double sampling (CDS) is described. In general, the fixed pattern noise (FPN) of a CIS has been reduced with the subtraction algorithm between the reset signal and pixel signal. This is because a single-slope analog-to-digital converter (ADC) has been normally adopted in the conventional digital CDS with the reset ramp and signal ramp. Thus, the operating speed of a digital CDS is much slower than that of an analog CDS. In order to improve the operating speed, we propose a novel digital CDS based on a differential difference amplifier (DDA) that compares the reset signal and the pixel signal using only one ramp. The prototype CIS has been fabricated with 0.13 µm CIS technology and it has the VGA resolution of 640 × 480. The measured conversion time is 16 µs, and a high frame rate of 131 fps is achieved at the VGA resolution.

  9. Measurement of double-differential muon neutrino charged-current interactions on C8 H8 without pions in the final state using the T2K off-axis beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Andreopoulos, C.; Antonova, M.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bartet-Friburg, P.; Batkiewicz, M.; Berardi, V.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blondel, A.; Bolognesi, S.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Calland, R. G.; Cao, S.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Chikuma, N.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Collazuol, G.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Denner, P. F.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dolan, S.; Drapier, O.; Duffy, K. E.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, D.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Garcia, A.; Giffin, S. G.; Giganti, C.; Gizzarelli, F.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Hogan, M.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Hosomi, F.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Intonti, R. A.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kim, H.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Knight, A.; Knox, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Konaka, A.; Kondo, K.; Kopylov, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Lasorak, P.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Liptak, Z. J.; Litchfield, R. P.; Li, X.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Ludovici, L.; Lu, X.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Ma, W. Y.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, K. D.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Patel, N. D.; Pavin, M.; Payne, D.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pickering, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Rychter, A.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaikhiev, A.; Shaker, F.; Shaw, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Shirahige, T.; Short, S.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Stewart, T.; Suda, Y.; Suvorov, S.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thakore, T.; Thompson, L. F.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vallari, Z.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Wakamatsu, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Warzycha, W.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshida, K.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We report the measurement of muon neutrino charged-current interactions on carbon without pions in the final state at the T2K beam energy using 5.734 ×1020 protons on target. For the first time the measurement is reported as a flux-integrated, double-differential cross section in muon kinematic variables (cos θμ, pμ), without correcting for events where a pion is produced and then absorbed by final state interactions. Two analyses are performed with different selections, background evaluations and cross-section extraction methods to demonstrate the robustness of the results against biases due to model-dependent assumptions. The measurements compare favorably with recent models which include nucleon-nucleon correlations but, given the present precision, the measurement does not distinguish among the available models. The data also agree with Monte Carlo simulations which use effective parameters that are tuned to external data to describe the nuclear effects. The total cross section in the full phase space is σ =(0.417 ±0.047 (syst ) ±0.005 (stat ) )×10-38 cm2 nucleon-1 and the cross section integrated in the region of phase space with largest efficiency and best signal-over-background ratio (cos θμ>0.6 and pμ>200 MeV ) is σ =(0.202 ±0.036 (syst ) ±0.003 (stat ) )×10-38 cm2 nucleon-1 .

  10. Charged-pion cross sections and double-helicity asymmetries in polarized p + p collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Ta’ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Appelt, E.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belmont, R.; Ben-Benjamin, J.; Bennett, R.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Broxmeyer, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; D’Orazio, L.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En’yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, I.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harper, C.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; John, D.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Král, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O’Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rubin, J. G.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, T.; Savastio, M.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shim, H. H.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Sodre, T.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Togawa, M.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Utsunomiya, K.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.

    2015-02-02

    We present midrapidity charged-pion invariant cross sections, the ratio of the π⁻ to π⁺ cross sections and the charge-separated double-spin asymmetries in polarized p+p collisions at √s = 200 GeV. While the cross section measurements are consistent within the errors of next-to-leadingorder (NLO) perturbative quantum chromodynamics predictions (pQCD), the same calculations over estimate the ratio of the charged-pion cross sections. This discrepancy arises from the cancellation of the substantial systematic errors associated with the NLO-pQCD predictions in the ratio and highlights the constraints these data will place on flavor dependent pion fragmentation functions. Thus, the charge-separated pion asymmetries presented here sample an x range of ~0.03–0.16 and provide unique information on the sign of the gluon-helicity distribution.

  11. Charged-pion cross sections and double-helicity asymmetries in polarized p + p collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; ...

    2015-02-02

    We present midrapidity charged-pion invariant cross sections, the ratio of the π⁻ to π⁺ cross sections and the charge-separated double-spin asymmetries in polarized p+p collisions at √s = 200 GeV. While the cross section measurements are consistent within the errors of next-to-leadingorder (NLO) perturbative quantum chromodynamics predictions (pQCD), the same calculations over estimate the ratio of the charged-pion cross sections. This discrepancy arises from the cancellation of the substantial systematic errors associated with the NLO-pQCD predictions in the ratio and highlights the constraints these data will place on flavor dependent pion fragmentation functions. Thus, the charge-separated pion asymmetries presented heremore » sample an x range of ~0.03–0.16 and provide unique information on the sign of the gluon-helicity distribution.« less

  12. Oxytocin to modulate emotional processing in schizophrenia: A randomized, double-blind, cross-over clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Michela; Cotelli, Maria; Manenti, Rosa; Dagani, Jessica; Sisti, Davide; Rocchi, Marco; Balestrieri, Matteo; Pini, Stefano; Raimondi, Sara; Saviotti, Francesco Maria; Scocco, Paolo; de Girolamo, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    Deficits in social cognition, including emotional processing, are hallmarks of schizophrenia and antipsychotic agents seem to be ineffectual to improve these symptoms. However, oxytocin does seem to have beneficial effects on social cognition. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of four months of treatment with intranasal oxytocin, in 31 patients with schizophrenia, on distinct aspects of social cognition. This was assessed using standardized and experimental tests in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial. All patients underwent clinical and experimental assessment before treatment, four months after treatment and at the end of treatment. Social cognition abilities were assessed with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes task (RMET). Furthermore, an Emotional Priming Paradigm (EPP) was developed to examine the effects of oxytocin on implicit perceptual sensitivity to affective information and explicit facial affect recognition. We found that oxytocin improved performance on MSCEIT compared to placebo in Branch 3-Understanding Emotion (p-value=0.004; Cohen׳s d=1.12). In the EPP task, we observed a significant reduction of reaction times for facial affect recognition (p-value=0.021; Cohen׳s d=0.88). No effects were found for implicit priming or for theory of mind abilities. Further study is required in order to highlight the potential for possible integration of oxytocin with antipsychotic agents as well as to evaluate psycho-social treatment as a multi-dimensional approach to increase explicit emotional processing abilities and compensate social cognition deficits related to schizophrenia.

  13. Fully quantum state-resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) + Kr: differential cross sections and product rotational alignment.

    PubMed

    Brouard, M; Chadwick, H; Gordon, S D S; Hornung, B; Nichols, B; Kłos, J; Aoiz, F J; Stolte, S

    2014-10-28

    Fully quantum state selected and resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) by krypton has been investigated. Initial Λ-doublet state selection is achieved using an inhomogeneous hexapole electric field. Differential cross sections and even-moment polarization dependent differential cross sections have been obtained at a collision energy of 514 cm(-1) for both spin-orbit and parity conserving and changing collisions. Experimental results are compared with those obtained from quantum scattering calculations and are shown to be in very good agreement. Hard shell quantum scattering calculations are also performed to determine the effects of the different parts of the potential on the scattering dynamics. Comparisons are also made with the NO(X) + Ar system.

  14. Fully quantum state-resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) + Kr: Differential cross sections and product rotational alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Brouard, M. Chadwick, H.; Gordon, S. D. S.; Hornung, B.; Nichols, B.; Kłos, J.; Aoiz, F. J.; Stolte, S.

    2014-10-28

    Fully quantum state selected and resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) by krypton has been investigated. Initial Λ-doublet state selection is achieved using an inhomogeneous hexapole electric field. Differential cross sections and even-moment polarization dependent differential cross sections have been obtained at a collision energy of 514 cm{sup −1} for both spin-orbit and parity conserving and changing collisions. Experimental results are compared with those obtained from quantum scattering calculations and are shown to be in very good agreement. Hard shell quantum scattering calculations are also performed to determine the effects of the different parts of the potential on the scattering dynamics. Comparisons are also made with the NO(X) + Ar system.

  15. Double-pulse 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar airborne validation for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurement.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Ismail, Syed

    2016-05-20

    Field experiments were conducted to test and evaluate the initial atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement capability of airborne, high-energy, double-pulsed, 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. This IPDA was designed, integrated, and operated at the NASA Langley Research Center on-board the NASA B-200 aircraft. The IPDA was tuned to the CO2 strong absorption line at 2050.9670 nm, which is the optimum for lower tropospheric weighted column measurements. Flights were conducted over land and ocean under different conditions. The first validation experiments of the IPDA for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing, focusing on low surface reflectivity oceanic surface returns during full day background conditions, are presented. In these experiments, the IPDA measurements were validated by comparison to airborne flask air-sampling measurements conducted by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. IPDA performance modeling was conducted to evaluate measurement sensitivity and bias errors. The IPDA signals and their variation with altitude compare well with predicted model results. In addition, off-off-line testing was conducted, with fixed instrument settings, to evaluate the IPDA systematic and random errors. Analysis shows an altitude-independent differential optical depth offset of 0.0769. Optical depth measurement uncertainty of 0.0918 compares well with the predicted value of 0.0761. IPDA CO2 column measurement compares well with model-driven, near-simultaneous air-sampling measurements from the NOAA aircraft at different altitudes. With a 10-s shot average, CO2 differential optical depth measurement of 1.0054±0.0103 was retrieved from a 6-km altitude and a 4-GHz on-line operation. As compared to CO2 weighted-average column dry-air volume mixing ratio of 404.08 ppm, derived from air sampling, IPDA measurement resulted in a value of 405.22±4.15  ppm with 1.02% uncertainty and

  16. Evaluation of the γn→π⁻p differential cross section in the Δ-isobar region

    DOE PAGES

    Briscoe, W. J.; Kudryavtsev, A. E.; Pedroni, P.; ...

    2012-12-20

    Differential cross sections for the process γn→π⁻p have been extracted from MAMI-B measurements of γd→π⁻pp, accounting for final-state interaction effects, using a diagrammatic technique taking into account the NN and πN final-state interaction amplitudes. Results are compared to previous measurements of the inverse process, π⁻p→nγ, and recent multipole analyses.

  17. Migration and differentiation of gonadal germ cells under cross-sex germline chimeras condition in domestic chickens.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuki; Hattori, Tetsuya; Asano, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Naoto; Tajima, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to investigate migration, proliferation and differentiation of gonadal germ cells (GGCs) collected from the gonads of 7-day-old chick embryos under cross-sex germline chimera conditions. The migratory and proliferative abilities of exogenous GGCs were examined by transferring 50 fluorescently labeled GGCs collected from White Leghorn (WL) embryos into the blood of 2-day-old Rhode Island Red (RIR) embryos. No significant difference was observed in the number of fluorescently labeled GGCs in the gonads of recipient embryos among any of the four possible donor and recipient sex combinations. Cross-sex germline chimeras were produced to examine the differentiation of GGCs by transferring 100 GGCs from WL embryos into 2-day-old RIR embryos. Exogenous-GGC-derived progeny were obtained from both male and female recipients, except when female GGCs were transferred into male recipients. The migratory ability of GGCs recovered from the 7-day-old embryonic gonad was not influenced by cross-sex germ cell transfer conditions, whereas the differentiation of the GGCs was affected by the sex combinations of GGCs donors and recipients.

  18. Notch induces human T-cell receptor γδ+ thymocytes to differentiate along a parallel, highly proliferative and bipotent CD4 CD8 double-positive pathway.

    PubMed

    Van Coppernolle, S; Vanhee, S; Verstichel, G; Snauwaert, S; van der Spek, A; Velghe, I; Sinnesael, M; Heemskerk, M H; Taghon, T; Leclercq, G; Plum, J; Langerak, A W; Kerre, T; Vandekerckhove, B

    2012-01-01

    In wild-type mice, T-cell receptor (TCR) γδ(+) cells differentiate along a CD4 CD8 double-negative (DN) pathway whereas TCRαβ(+) cells differentiate along the double-positive (DP) pathway. In the human postnatal thymus (PNT), DN, DP and single-positive (SP) TCRγδ(+) populations are present. Here, the precursor-progeny relationship of the various PNT TCRγδ(+) populations was studied and the role of the DP TCRγδ(+) population during T-cell differentiation was elucidated. We demonstrate that human TCRγδ(+) cells differentiate along two pathways downstream from an immature CD1(+) DN TCRγδ(+) precursor: a Notch-independent DN pathway generating mature DN and CD8αα SP TCRγδ(+) cells, and a Notch-dependent, highly proliferative DP pathway generating immature CD4 SP and subsequently DP TCRγδ(+) populations. DP TCRγδ(+) cells are actively rearranging the TCRα locus, and differentiate to TCR(-) DP cells, to CD8αβ SP TCRγδ(+) cells and to TCRαβ(+) cells. Finally, we show that the γδ subset of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALL) consists mainly of CD4 SP or DP phenotypes carrying significantly more activating Notch mutations than DN T-ALL. The latter suggests that activating Notch mutations in TCRγδ(+) thymocytes induce proliferation and differentiation along the DP pathway in vivo.

  19. Cross-sections and maps showing double-difference relocated earthquakes from 1984-2000 along the Hayward and Calaveras faults, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Robert W.; Graymer, Russell W.; Jachens, Robert C.; Ponce, David A.; Wentworth, Carl M.

    2004-01-01

    We present cross-section and map views of earthquakes that occurred from 1984 to 2000 in the vicinity of the Hayward and Calaveras faults in the San Francisco Bay region, California. These earthquakes came from a catalog of events relocated using the double-difference technique, which provides superior relative locations of nearby events. As a result, structures such as fault surfaces and alignments of events along these surfaces are more sharply defined than in previous catalogs.

  20. The differential production cross section of the (1020) meson in = 7 TeV collisions measured with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, C. W.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colas, J.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; de Mora, L.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dinut, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Dressnandt, N.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Duguid, L.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edson, W.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fisher, M. J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fowler, A. J.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Frank, T.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, Y. S.; Gaponenko, A.; Garberson, F.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerlach, P.; Gershon, A.; Geweniger, C.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giunta, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K. W.; Glonti, G. L.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Göpfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gössling, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guest, D.; Guicheney, C.; Guido, E.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Guo, J.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hadley, D. R.; Haefner, P.; Hahn, F.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hall, D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Harenberg, T.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Haruyama, T.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Helary, L.; Heller, C.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henke, M.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Henß, T.; Hernandez, C. M.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirsch, F.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holder, M.; Holmgren, S. O.; Holy, T.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Horner, S.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huettmann, A.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hurwitz, M.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibbotson, M.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ivashin, A. V.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J. N.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Jantsch, A.; Janus, M.; Jared, R. C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jeanty, L.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Jež, P.; Jézéquel, S.; Jha, M. K.; Ji, H.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Joffe, D.; Johansen, M.; Johansson, K. E.; Johansson, P.; Johnert, S.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Joram, C.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Jovin, T.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jungst, R. M.; Juranek, V.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kabana, S.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kadlecik, P.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinin, S.; Kalinovskaya, L. V.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kanno, T.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kaplon, J.; Kar, D.; Karagounis, M.; Karakostas, K.; Karnevskiy, M.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, M.; Kataoka, Y.; Katsoufis, E.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kayl, M. S.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. A.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P. T.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Keller, J. S.; Kenyon, M.; Kepka, O.; Kerschen, N.; Kerševan, B. 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A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, DJ.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, H. S.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. S.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2014-07-01

    A measurement is presented of the production cross section at = 7 TeV using collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 383 , collected with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Selection of (1020) mesons is based on the identification of charged kaons by their energy loss in the pixel detector. The differential cross section is measured as a function of the transverse momentum, , and rapidity, , of the (1020) meson in the fiducial region 500 1200 MeV, 0.8, kaon 230 MeV and kaon momentum 800 MeV. The integrated -meson production cross section in this fiducial range is measured to be = 570 8 (stat) 66 (syst) 20 (lumi).

  1. Measurement of the Differential Cross Section for Isolated Prompt Photon Production in pp Collisions at 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2011-09-01

    A measurement of the differential cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement covers the pseudorapidity range |eta|<2.5 and the transverse energy range 25 < ET < 400 GeV, corresponding to the kinematic region 0.007 < xT < 0.114. Photon candidates are identified with two complementary methods, one based on photon conversions in the silicon tracker and the other on isolated energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter. The measured cross section is presented as a function of ET in four pseudorapidity regions. The next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations are consistent with the measured cross section.

  2. Are cross-cultural comparisons of personality profiles meaningful? Differential item and facet functioning in the Revised NEO Personality Inventory.

    PubMed

    Church, A Timothy; Alvarez, Juan M; Mai, Nhu T Q; French, Brian F; Katigbak, Marcia S; Ortiz, Fernando A

    2011-11-01

    Measurement invariance is a prerequisite for confident cross-cultural comparisons of personality profiles. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis was used to detect differential item functioning (DIF) in factor loadings and intercepts for the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (P. T. Costa, Jr., & R. R. McCrae, 1992) in comparisons of college students in the United States (N = 261), Philippines (N = 268), and Mexico (N = 775). About 40%-50% of the items exhibited some form of DIF and item-level noninvariance often carried forward to the facet level at which scores are compared. After excluding DIF items, some facet scales were too short or unreliable for cross-cultural comparisons, and for some other facets, cultural mean differences were reduced or eliminated. The results indicate that considerable caution is warranted in cross-cultural comparisons of personality profiles.

  3. Absolute elastic differential electron scattering cross sections in the intermediate energy region. III - SF6 and UF6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Trajmar, S.; Chutjian, A.; Williams, W.

    1976-01-01

    A recently developed technique has been used to measure the ratios of elastic differential electron scattering cross sections (DCS) for SF6 and UF6 to those of He at electron impact energies of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 75 eV and at scattering angles of 20 to 135 deg. In order to obtain the absolute values of DCS from these ratios, He DCS of McConkey and Preston have been employed in the 20 to 90 deg range. At angles in the 90 to 135 deg range the recently determined cross sections of Srivastava and Trajmar have been utilized. From these DCS, elastic integral and momentum transfer cross sections have been obtained.

  4. Differential cross section measurement of the 12C(e,e'pp)10Beg.s. reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makek, M.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Barbieri, C.; Bernauer, J. C.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Denig, A.; Distler, M. O.; Friščić, I.; Giusti, C.; Merkel, H.; Müller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanches Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Schwamb, M.; Walcher, Th.

    2016-09-01

    The differential cross section was measured for the 12C(e,e'pp)10Be g.s. reaction at energy and momentum transfers of 163MeV and 198MeV/ c, respectively. The measurement was performed at the Mainz Microtron by using two high-resolution magnetic spectrometers of the A1 Collaboration and a newly developed silicon detector telescope. The overall resolution of the detector system was sufficient to distinguish the ground state from the first excited state in 10 Be. We chose a super-parallel geometry that minimizes the effect of two-body currents and emphasizes the effect of nucleon-nucleon correlations. The obtained differential cross section is compared to the theoretical results of the Pavia reaction code in which different processes leading to two-nucleon knockout are accounted for microscopically. The comparison shows a strong sensitivity to nuclear-structure input and the measured cross section is seen to be dominated by the interplay between long- and short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations. Microscopic calculations based on the ab initio self-consistent Green's function method give a reasonable description of the experimental cross section.

  5. Functional Cross-Talking between Differentially Expressed and Alternatively Spliced Genes in Human Liver Cancer Cells Treated with Berberine.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zhen; Sun, Yi; Zhu, Ruixin; Jiao, Na; Tang, Kailin; Cao, Zhiwei; Ma, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Berberine has been identified with anti-proliferative effects on various cancer cells. Many researchers have been trying to elucidate the anti-cancer mechanisms of berberine based on differentially expressed genes. However, differentially alternative splicing genes induced by berberine might also contribute to its pharmacological actions and have not been reported yet. Moreover, the potential functional cross-talking between the two sets of genes deserves further exploration. In this study, RNA-seq technology was used to detect the differentially expressed genes and differentially alternative spliced genes in BEL-7402 cancer cells induced by berberine. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly enriched in the p53 and cell cycle signalling pathway. In addition, it was statistically proven that the two sets of genes were locally co-enriched along chromosomes, closely connected to each other based on protein-protein interaction and functionally similar on Gene Ontology tree. These results suggested that the two sets of genes regulated by berberine might be functionally cross-talked and jointly contribute to its cell cycle arresting effect. It has provided new clues for further researches on the pharmacological mechanisms of berberine as well as the other botanical drugs.

  6. Double-photoionization of helium including quadrupole radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, James; Ludlow, J A; Lee, Teck - Ghee; Pindzola, M S; Robicheaux, F

    2009-01-01

    Non-perturbative time-dependent close-coupling calculations are carried out for the double photoionization of helium including both dipole and quadrupole radiation effects. At a photon energy of 800 eV, accessible at CUlTent synchrotron light sources, the quadrupole interaction contributes around 6% to the total integral double photoionization cross section. The pure quadrupole single energy differential cross section shows a local maxima at equal energy sharing, as opposed to the minimum found in the pure dipole single energy differential cross section. The sum of the pure dipole and pure quadrupole single energy differentials is insensitive to non-dipole effects at 800 eV. However, the triple differential cross section at equal energy sharing of the two ejected electrons shows strong non-dipole effects due to the quadrupole interaction that may be experimentally observable.

  7. Differential uptake and cross-presentation of soluble and necrotic cell antigen by human DC subsets.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Meng-Chieh; Tullett, Kirsteen M; Lee, Yoke Seng; Idris, Adi; Ding, Yitian; McDonald, Kylie J; Kassianos, Andrew; Leal Rojas, Ingrid M; Jeet, Varinder; Lahoud, Mireille H; Radford, Kristen J

    2016-02-01

    Cross-presentation is the mechanism by which exogenous Ag is processed for recognition by CD8(+) T cells. Murine CD8α(+) DCs are specialized at cross-presenting soluble and cellular Ag, but in humans this process is poorly characterized. In this study, we examined uptake and cross-presentation of soluble and cellular Ag by human blood CD141(+) DCs, the human equivalent of mouse CD8α(+) DCs, and compared them with human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) and blood CD1c(+) DC subsets. MoDCs were superior in their capacity to internalize and cross-present soluble protein whereas CD141(+) DCs were more efficient at ingesting and cross-presenting cellular Ag. Whilst cross-presentation by CD1c(+) DCs and CD141(+) DCs was dependent on the proteasome, and hence cytosolic translocation, cross-presentation by MoDCs was not. Inhibition of endosomal acidification enhanced cross-presentation by CD1c(+) DCs and MoDCs but not by CD141(+) DCs. These data demonstrate that CD1c(+) DCs, CD141(+) DCs, and MoDCs are capable of cross-presentation; however, they do so via different mechanisms. Moreover, they demonstrate that human CD141(+) DCs, like their murine CD8α(+) DC counterparts, are specialized at cross-presenting cellular Ag, most likely mediated by an enhanced capacity to ingest cellular Ag combined with subtle changes in lysosomal pH during Ag processing and use of the cytosolic pathway.

  8. Rotationally inelastic scattering of NO(A(2)Σ(+)) + Ar: Differential cross sections and rotational angular momentum polarization.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Thomas R; Luxford, Thomas F M; Townsend, Dave; McKendrick, Kenneth G; Costen, Matthew L

    2015-11-28

    We present the implementation of a new crossed-molecular beam, velocity-map ion-imaging apparatus, optimized for collisions of electronically excited molecules. We have applied this apparatus to rotational energy transfer in NO(A(2)Σ(+), v = 0, N = 0, j = 0.5) + Ar collisions, at an average energy of 525 cm(-1). We report differential cross sections for scattering into NO(A(2)Σ(+), v = 0, N' = 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9), together with quantum scattering calculations of the differential cross sections and angle dependent rotational alignment. The differential cross sections show dramatic forward scattered peaks, together with oscillatory behavior at larger scattering angles, while the rotational alignment moments are also found to oscillate as a function of scattering angle. In general, the quantum scattering calculations are found to agree well with experiment, reproducing the forward scattering and oscillatory behavior at larger scattering angles. Analysis of the quantum scattering calculations as a function of total rotational angular momentum indicates that the forward scattering peak originates from the attractive minimum in the potential energy surface at the N-end of the NO. Deviations in the quantum scattering predictions from the experimental results, for scattering at angles greater than 10°, are observed to be more significant for scattering to odd final N'. We suggest that this represents inaccuracies in the potential energy surface, and in particular in its representation of the difference between the N- and O-ends of the molecule, as given by the odd-order Legendre moments of the surface.

  9. Gene stacking strategies with doubled haploids derived from biparental crosses: theory and simulations assuming a finite number of loci.

    PubMed

    Melchinger, Albrecht E; Technow, Frank; Dhillon, Baldev S

    2011-12-01

    Recent progress in genotyping and doubled haploid (DH) techniques has created new opportunities for development of improved selection methods in numerous crops. Assuming a finite number of unlinked loci (ℓ) and a given total number (n) of individuals to be genotyped, we compared, by theory and simulations, three methods of marker-assisted selection (MAS) for gene stacking in DH lines derived from biparental crosses: (1) MAS for high values of the marker score (T, corresponding to the total number of target alleles) in the F(2) generation and subsequently among DH lines derived from the selected F(2) individual (Method 1), (2) MAS for augmented F(2) enrichment and subsequently for T among DH lines from the best carrier F(2) individual (Method 2), and (3) MAS for T among DH lines derived from the F(1) generation (Method 3). Our objectives were to (a) determine the optimum allocation of resources to the F(2) ([Formula: see text]) and DH generations [Formula: see text] for Methods 1 and 2 by simulations, (b) compare the efficiency of all three methods for gene stacking by simulations, and (c) develop theory to explain the general effect of selection on the segregation variance and interpret our simulation results. By theory, we proved that for smaller values of ℓ, the segregation variance of T among DH lines derived from F(2) individuals, selected for high values of T, can be much smaller than expected in the absence of selection. This explained our simulation results, showing that for Method 1, it is best to genotype more F(2) individuals than DH lines ([Formula: see text]), whereas under Method 2, the optimal ratio [Formula: see text] was close to 0.5. However, for ratios deviating moderately from the optimum, the mean [Formula: see text] of T in the finally selected DH line ([Formula: see text]) was hardly reduced. Method 3 had always the lowest mean [Formula: see text] of [Formula: see text] except for small numbers of loci (ℓ = 4) and is favorable only if

  10. Measurement of the antineutrino neutral-current elastic differential cross section

    DOE PAGES

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.  A.; Brown, B.  C.; Bugel, L.; ...

    2015-01-08

    We report the measurement of the flux-averaged antineutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross section (dσν-barN→ν-barN/dQ2) on CH2 by the MiniBooNE experiment using the largest sample of antineutrino neutral current elastic candidate events ever collected. The ratio of the antineutrino to neutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross sections and a ratio of the antineutrino neutral current elastic to antineutrino charged current quasi elastic cross sections are also presented.

  11. Measurement of the antineutrino neutral-current elastic differential cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.  A.; Brown, B.  C.; Bugel, L.; Cheng, G.; Church, E.  D.; Conrad, J.  M.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Finley, D.  A.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F.  G.; Garvey, G.  T.; Grange, J.; Huelsnitz, W.; Ignarra, C.; Imlay, R.; Johnson, R.  A.; Karagiorgi, G.; Katori, T.; Kobilarcik, T.; Louis, W.  C.; Mariani, C.; Marsh, W.; Mills, G.  B.; Mirabal, J.; Moore, C.  D.; Mousseau, J.; Nienaber, P.; Osmanov, B.; Pavlovic, Z.; Perevalov, D.; Polly, C.  C.; Ray, H.; Roe, B.  P.; Russell, A.  D.; Shaevitz, M.  H.; Spitz, J.; Stancu, I.; Tayloe, R.; Van de Water, R.  G.; Wascko, M.  O.; White, D.  H.; Wickremasinghe, D.  A.; Zeller, G.  P.; Zimmerman, E.  D.

    2015-01-08

    We report the measurement of the flux-averaged antineutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross section (dσν-barN→ν-barN/dQ2) on CH2 by the MiniBooNE experiment using the largest sample of antineutrino neutral current elastic candidate events ever collected. The ratio of the antineutrino to neutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross sections and a ratio of the antineutrino neutral current elastic to antineutrino charged current quasi elastic cross sections are also presented.

  12. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  13. Double minute chromatin bodies and other chromosome alterations in human myeloid HL-60 leukemia cells susceptible or resistant to induction of differentiation by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Au, W.W.; Callaham, M.F.; Workman, M.L.; Huberman, E.

    1983-12-01

    An analysis of the chromosomal karyotype of the human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemia cell line and of a number of its sublines that exhibit varying degrees of resistance to induction of differentiation by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate was conducted. The HL-60 cell line and the derived sublines contained two consistent marker chromosomes (9p- and t(10;13)), which suggested that they have a common and possibly clonal origin. HL-60 cells that are susceptible to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced cell differentiation contained double minute chromatine bodies. The sublines with different degrees of resistance showed a corresponding sequential reduction of double minute chromatin bodies in metaphase cells. This loss of double minute chromatin bodies was not associated with an appearance of homogeneously staining chromosomal regions. Resistant and susceptible HL-60 cell differed also in a number of other chromosomal alteration, including gains or losses involving chromosomes 5, 8, 11, 13, 16, and 17. Thus, it is suggested that acquisition of resistance to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced cell differentiation in the HL-60 cells may involve one or more of the above chromosomal changes.

  14. Differential and total cross sections of mutual neutralization in low-energy collisions of isotopes of H++H-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkambule, Sifiso M.; Elander, Nils; Larson, Åsa; Lecointre, Julien; Urbain, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Mutual neutralization in the collisions of H+ and H- is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The quantum-mechanical ab initio model includes covalent states associated with the H (1 )+H (n ≤3 ) limits and the collision energy ranges from 1 meV to 100 eV. The reaction is theoretically studied for collisions between different isotopes of the hydrogen ions. From the partial wave scattering amplitude, the differential and total cross sections are computed. The differential cross section is analyzed in terms of forward- and backward-scattering events, showing a dominance of backward scattering which can be understood by examining the phase of the scattering amplitudes for the gerade and ungerade set of states. The isotope dependence of the total cross section is compared with the one obtained using a semiclassical multistate Landau-Zener model. The final state distribution analysis emphasizes the dominance of the n =3 channel for collisions below 10 eV, while at higher collision energies, the n =2 channel starts to become important. For collisions of ions forming a molecular system with a larger reduced mass, the n =2 channel starts to dominate at lower energies. Using a merged ion-beam apparatus, the branching ratios for mutual neutralization in H+ and H- collisions in the energy range from 11 to 185 eV are measured with position- and time-sensitive particle detectors. The measured and calculated branching ratios satisfactorily agree with respect to state contributions.

  15. Measurement of the differential cross section for top quark pair production in pp collisions at [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

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    The normalized differential cross section for top quark pair ([Formula: see text]) production is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8[Formula: see text] at the CERN LHC using the CMS detector in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7[Formula: see text]. The measurements are performed in the lepton[Formula: see text]jets ([Formula: see text][Formula: see text]jets) and in the dilepton ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]) decay channels. The [Formula: see text] cross section is measured as a function of the kinematic properties of the charged leptons, the jets associated to b quarks, the top quarks, and the [Formula: see text] system. The data are compared with several predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamic up to approximate next-to-next-to-leading-order precision. No significant deviations are observed relative to the standard model predictions.

  16. Measurement of inclusive differential cross sections for pp collisions at (square root)s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

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Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pope, B G; Silva, W L Prado da; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Thomas, E; Thooris, B; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu, Anh T; Wahl, H D; Walker, R; Wang, L; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; Wermes, N; White, A; White, V; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2005-06-17

    We present measurements of the inclusive production cross sections of the Gamma(1S) bottomonium state in pp collisions at (square root)s = 1.96 TeV. Using the Gamma(1S) --> mu(+)mu(-) decay mode for a data sample of 159 +/- 10 pb(-1) collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, we determine the differential cross sections as a function of the Gamma(1S) transverse momentum for three ranges of the Gamma(1S) rapidity: 0 < y(Gamma) < or = 0.6, 0.6 < y(Gamma) < or = 1.2, and 1.2 < y(Gamma) < or = 1.8.

  17. Differential cross section measurements of the 19F(d,d0) elastic scattering for Ion Beam Analysis purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foteinou, V.; Provatas, G.; Aslanoglou, X.; Axiotis, M.; Harissopulos, S.; Kokkoris, M.; Lagoyannis, A.; Misaelides, P.; Ntemou, E.; Patronis, N.; Preketes-Sigalas, K.

    2017-04-01

    The differential cross sections of the 19F(d,d0) elastic scattering were determined at five backward angles from 125° to 170°. Two independent experiments were performed, one for the determination of the cross sections and one for the validation of the obtained results. In the first experiment, a thin natLiF target was bombarded with deuterons in the energy region from 0.94 to 2.0 MeV. In the benchmarking experiment, a thick ZnF2 pellet was irradiated with deuterons at Ed,lab = 1.11, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8and 2.0MeV .

  18. Differential cross sections for the reactions γp→pη and γp→pη'

    DOE PAGES

    Williams, M.; Krahn, Z.; Applegate, D.; ...

    2009-10-29

    In high-statistics differential cross sections for the reactions γ p -> p η and γ p -> p η' the CLAS at Jefferson Lab was used to measure the center-of-mass energies from near threshold up to 2.84 GeV. The eta-prime results are the most precise to date and provide the largest energy and angular coverage. The eta measurements extend the energy range of the world's large-angle results by approximately 300 MeV. These new data, in particular the η' measurements, are likely to help constrain the analyses being performed to search for new baryon resonance states.

  19. Ion--dipole scattering: The differential cross section for the K/sup +/--CsCl system

    SciTech Connect

    Budenholzer, F.E.; Gislason, E.A.; Polak-Dingels, P.

    1982-05-15

    The total differential cross section has been measured for K/sup +/ scattered by CsCl over the range 10< or =Etheta< or =2000 eV deg. Classical perturbation scattering theory calculations for a realistic intermolecular potential have also been carried out and agree well with the experiments. The results show that the scattering is dominated at small angles by the ion--dipole potential and at large angles by the spherically symmetric part of the repulsive potential. No rainbow scattering is observed.

  20. PIGE related differential cross-section measurements of the 25Mg(p,p‧γ)25Mg reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preketes-Sigalas, K.; Lagoyannis, A.; Axiotis, M.; Becker, H. W.; Foteinou, V.; Harissopulos, S.; Kokkoris, M.; Provatas, G.

    2016-11-01

    The differential cross sections of the 25Mg(p,p‧γ)25Mg reaction, critical for the quantitative determination of magnesium in complex matrices using the PIGE technique, were measured at two (2) angles, 55° and 90°, and at proton energies from 2420 to 4550 keV, by detecting the 390, 585 and 975 keV γ-rays emitted. The experimental setup consisted of two 100% relative efficiency HPGe detectors. The results are compared to those already present in literature and an attempt is made to explain the existing discrepancies. The obtained results from the present work are validated via thick-target measurements.

  1. Cross-talk between EGF and BMP9 signalling pathways regulates the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Qin, Jiaqiang; Luo, Qing; Bi, Yang; Zhu, Gaohui; Jiang, Wei; Kim, Stephanie H; Li, Mi; Su, Yuxi; Nan, Guoxin; Cui, Jing; Zhang, Wenwen; Li, Ruidong; Chen, Xiang; Kong, Yuhan; Zhang, Jiye; Wang, Jinhua; Rogers, Mary Rose; Zhang, Hongyu; Shui, Wei; Zhao, Chen; Wang, Ning; Liang, Xi; Wu, Ningning; He, Yunfeng; Luu, Hue H; Haydon, Rex C; Shi, Lewis L; Li, Tingyu; He, Tong-Chuan; Li, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitors, which give rise to several lineages, including bone, cartilage and fat. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates cell growth, proliferation and differentiation. EGF acts by binding with high affinity to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on the cell surface and stimulating the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase activity of its receptor, which initiates a signal transduction cascade causing a variety of biochemical changes within the cell and regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. We have identified BMP9 as one of the most osteogenic BMPs in MSCs. In this study, we investigate if EGF signalling cross-talks with BMP9 and regulates BMP9-induced osteogenic differentiation. We find that EGF potentiates BMP9-induced early and late osteogenic markers of MSCs in vitro, which can be effectively blunted by EGFR inhibitors Gefitinib and Erlotinib or receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors AG-1478 and AG-494 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, EGF significantly augments BMP9-induced bone formation in the cultured mouse foetal limb explants. In vivo stem cell implantation experiment reveals that exogenous expression of EGF in MSCs can effectively potentiate BMP9-induced ectopic bone formation, yielding larger and more mature bone masses. Interestingly, we find that, while EGF can induce BMP9 expression in MSCs, EGFR expression is directly up-regulated by BMP9 through Smad1/5/8 signalling pathway. Thus, the cross-talk between EGF and BMP9 signalling pathways in MSCs may underline their important roles in regulating osteogenic differentiation. Harnessing the synergy between BMP9 and EGF should be beneficial for enhancing osteogenesis in regenerative medicine. PMID:23844832

  2. Theoretical treatment of double photoionization of helium using a B-spline implementation of exterior complex scaling

    SciTech Connect

    McCurdy, C. William; Horner, Daniel A.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; Martin, Fernando

    2004-02-19

    Calculations of absolute triple differential and single differential cross sections for helium double photoionization are performed using an implementation of exterior complex scaling in B-splines. Results for cross sections, well-converged in partial waves, are presented and compared with both experiment and earlier theoretical calculations. These calculations establish the practicality and effectiveness of the complex B-spline approach to calculations of double ionization of atomic and molecular systems.

  3. Buckling analysis of defective cross-linked functionalized single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes with polyethylene chains using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ajori, S; Ansari, R; Parsapour, H

    2016-12-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be used for improving the mechanical properties and load transfer in nanocomposites. In this research, the buckling behavior of perfect and defective cross-linked functionalized CNTs with polyethylene (PE) chains is studied employing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Two different configurations with the consideration of vacancy defects, namely mapped and wrapped, are selected. According to the results, critical buckling force of cross-linked functionalized CNTs with PE chains increases as compared to pure CNTs, especially in the case of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs). By contrast, it is demonstrated that critical strain of cross-linked functionalized CNTs decreases as compared to that of pristine CNTs. Also, it is observed that increasing the weight percentage leads to the higher increase and the decrease in critical buckling force and strain of cross-linked functionalized CNTs, respectively. Moreover, the presence of defect considerably reduces both critical buckling force and strain of cross-linked functionalized CNTs. Finally, it is shown that the critical buckling strain is more sensitive to the presence of defects as compared to critical buckling force.

  4. Measurement of differential cross sections and Cx and Cz for γp→ K+Λ and γp →K+Σ° using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford Jr., Robert K.

    2005-05-11

    This work presents several observables for the reactions γ pK+Λ and γ pK+Σ°. In addition to measuring differential cross sections, we have made first measurements of the double polarization observables Cx and Cz. Cx and C z characterize the transfer of polarization from the incident photon to the produced hyperons. Data were obtained at Jefferson Lab using a circularly polarized photon beam at endpoint energies of 2.4, 2.9, and 3.1 GeV. Events were detected with the CLAS spectrometer. In the Λ channel, the cross sections support the recent observation of new resonant structure at W = 1900 MeV. Studies of the invariant cross section, $dσ/\\atop{dt}$ show scaling behavior suggesting that the production mechanism becomes t-channel dominated near threshold at forward kaon angles. The double polarization observables show that the recoiling Λ is almost maximally polarized along the direction of the incident photon from mid to forward kaon angles. While Σo differential cross sections are of the same magnitude as the Λ differential cross sections, there is evidence of different physics dominating the production mechanism. The Σ° invariant cross sections do not show the same t-scaling behavior present in the Λ results. The double polarization observables indicate that the Σ° is not polarized as strongly as the Λ. They also fail to identify one preferred polarization axis. Complete interpretation of these results will rely on model calculations. Currently available isobar models obtain varying degrees of success while attempting to predict the double polarization observables. While the models are in better agreement with the differential cross sections, discrepancies with our

  5. Doubly differential cross sections and longitudinal momentum distributions in the single ionization of Ne by fast ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSherry, D. M.; O'Rourke, S. F. C.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2000-10-01

    There are very few experimental data sets for doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) for targets heavier than helium due to the difficulties in collecting data with conventional spectrometers. However with the recent developments in efficient spectrometers combined with recoil momentum spectroscopy, experimental results for the single ionization of Ne by 3.6MeV/u Au^53+ impact were obtained[1]. At the conference we consider these results in the context of our theoretical results achieved using continuum-distorted-wave quantum mechanical models, in particular the CDW-EIS approximation, which has had much success in the non-perturbative regime[2]. Doubly differential cross sections for helium shall also be considered in comparision to Ne and longitudinal electron and recoil ion momentum distributions will be examined. [1]. R. Moshammer, P.D. Fainstein, M.Schulz, W.Schmitt, H.Kollmus, R.Mann, S.Hagmann and J.Ullrich, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 4721. [2]. S.F.C. O'Rourke, I.Shimamura and D.S.F. Crothers, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 452 (1996) 175.

  6. Measuring Muon-Neutrino Charged-Current Differential Cross Sections with a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Spitz, Joshua B.

    2011-01-01

    More than 80 years after its proposed existence, the neutrino remains largely mysterious and elusive. Precision measurements of the neutrino's properties are just now beginning to take place. Such measurements are required in order to determine the mass of the neutrino, how many neutrinos there are, if neutrinos are different than anti-neutrinos, and more. Muon-neutrino charged-current differential cross sections on an argon target in terms of the outgoing muon momentum and angle are presented. The measurements have been taken with the ArgoNeuT Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) experiment. ArgoNeuT is the first LArTPC to ever take data in a low energy neutrino beam, having collected thousands of neutrino and anti-neutrino events in the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. The results are relevant for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments searching for non-zero $\\theta_{13}$, CP-violation in the lepton sector, and the sign of the neutrino mass hierarchy, among other things. Furthermore, the differential cross sections are important for understanding the nature of the neutrino-nucleus interaction in general. These measurements represent a significant step forward for LArTPC technology as they are among the first neutrino physics results with such a device.

  7. Differential cross section for the π+d-->pp reaction from 80 to 417 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, J.; Altemus, R.; Minehart, R.; Orphanos, L.; Ziock, H. J.; Wadlinger, E. A.

    1982-05-01

    Differential cross sections were measured for the reaction, π+d-->pp, at seven energies, 80, 100, 140, 182, 230, 323, and 417 MeV. Sufficient data were taken for a 1% statistical uncertainty at eleven different angles for most of these energies. The elastic π+p reaction was used to normalize the π+d-->pp data. Legendre polynomial fits of the data are presented. The increased accuracy and energy of these data require an addition of a 6θ* term in the traditional low energy form of the differential cross section: C(A+2θ*+B4θ*). The coefficients, A and B, are used to compare the present data with a survey of previous experiments and the theoretical work of Niskanen. Agreement is usually within uncertainties, but some diagreement remains even among recent experiments. NUCLEAR REACTIONS d (π,pp), E=80-417 MeV; measured σ(θ) calculated Legendre polynomial fits; compared to earlier work.

  8. Cross-linguistic Differences in Processing Double-Embedded Relative Clauses: Working-Memory Constraints or Language Statistics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Stefan L.; Trompenaars, Thijs; Vasishth, Shravan

    2016-01-01

    An English double-embedded relative clause from which the middle verb is omitted can often be processed more easily than its grammatical counterpart, a phenomenon known as the grammaticality illusion. This effect has been found to be reversed in German, suggesting that the illusion is language specific rather than a consequence of universal…

  9. Cross-Fostering Differentially Affects ADHD-Related Behaviors in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Angela C.; DeAngeli, Nicole E.; Bucci, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Although both genetic and non-genetic factors are known to contribute to the occurrence of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity/Disorder (ADHD), little is known about how they impact specific symptoms. We used a cross-fostering approach with an established animal model of ADHD, the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat strain (SHR), to test the influence of genotype and maternal behavior on ADHD-related behaviors. SHRs and their normo-active genetic relative, Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY), were cross-fostered to an unfamiliar dam of either the same or different strain. Behavioral testing took place when the rats reached adulthood. Locomotor hyperactivity was completely dependent on the strain of the offspring. In contrast, social behavior was primarily determined by the strain of the mother, while attentional orienting behavior was influenced by both the strain of the offspring and the strain of the dam. Anxiety-related behavior was influenced by an interaction between offspring and dam strain. PMID:25647439

  10. Differential reaction cross section of the C2H5X (X=Br, I) K → systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, V. J.; Tabares, F. L.; Saez Rabanos, V.; Aoiz, F. J.; González Ureña, A.

    Using the crossed molecular beam method complete laboratory differential reaction cross sections for the exoergic reaction C2H5Br → BrK + C2H5 have been measured as a function of relative translational energy from 0·11 to 0·41 eV. An analysis has been carried out of both the present KBr laboratory angular distributions and that of KI from the K + C2H5I molecular beam reaction obtained by Aoiz et al., over the range of reactive translational energy, Ēt, from 0·17 eV to 0·55 eV. By using the uncoupled approximation for the centre of mass (c.m.) angular and recoil energy distributions to recover the laboratory angular distributions it was found the c.m. differential (solid angle) reaction cross sections to be backward-peaked, characteristic of a direct, rebound mechanism, with a large fraction of the available energy going into product translation. The average translational energy of the products, Ē't, increases approximately linearly with increasing collision energy E't = 0·57 Ēt + 0·59 and Ē't = 0·65 Et + 0·72 (in eV) for the K + C2H5Br and C2H5I reactions respectively. The present data for the K + C2H5X (X = I, Br) systems are compared with previous results for the analogous CH3X reaction from where the role played by the halogen and alkyl group is discussed and qualitative effects are noted as, for example, the fact that the heavier the alkyl group the broader the backward cone of the MX angular distribution. Comparison with several theoretical impulsive models, e.g. the photodissociation model of Herschbach and the information-theoretic form of Levine and coworkers is made. A modified hard sphere collision is also found to account satisfactorily for the main features of the present differential reaction cross sections.

  11. Cross Talk with Hematopoietic Cells Regulates the Endothelial Progenitor Cell Differentiation of CD34 Positive Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Jung, Seok-Yun; Kim, Da-Yeon; Kang, Song-Hwa; Yoo, So-Young; Hong, Jong-Kyu; Park, Ji-Hye; Kim, Jung-Hee; Kim, Sung-Wook; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Sun-Jin; Kim, Hwi-Gon; Asahara, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Despite the crucial role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in vascular regeneration, the specific interactions between EPCs and hematopoietic cells remain unclear. Methods In EPC colony forming assays, we first demonstrated that the formation of EPC colonies was drastically increased in the coculture of CD34+ and CD34− cells, and determined the optimal concentrations of CD34+ cells and CD34− cells for spindle-shaped EPC differentiation. Results Functionally, the coculture of CD34+ and CD34− cells resulted in a significant enhancement of adhesion, tube formation, and migration capacity compared with culture of CD34+ cells alone. Furthermore, blood flow recovery and capillary formation were remarkably increased by the coculture of CD34+ and CD34− cells in a murine hind-limb ischemia model. To elucidate further the role of hematopoietic cells in EPC differentiation, we isolated different populations of hematopoietic cells. T lymphocytes (CD3+) markedly accelerated the early EPC status of CD34+ cells, while macrophages (CD11b+) or megakaryocytes (CD41+) specifically promoted large EPC colonies. Conclusion Our results suggest that specific populations of hematopoietic cells play a role in the EPC differentiation of CD34+ cells, a finding that may aid in the development of a novel cell therapy strategy to overcome the quantitative and qualitative limitations of EPC therapy. PMID:25166961

  12. Differential cross sections for intermediate-energy electron scattering from α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol: Excitation of electronic-states

    SciTech Connect

    Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Thorn, P. A.; Pettifer, Z.; Duque, H. V.; Silva, G. B. da; Limão-Vieira, P.; Duflot, D.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; and others

    2014-07-14

    We report on measurements of differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of Rydberg electronic-states in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). The energy range of these experiments was 20–50 eV, while the scattered electron was detected in the 10°–90° angular range. There are currently no other experimental data or theoretical computations against which we can directly compare the present measured results. Nonetheless, we are able to compare our THFA DCSs with earlier cross section measurements for Rydberg-state electronic excitation for tetrahydrofuran, a similar cyclic ether, from Do et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144302 (2011)]. In addition, “rotationally averaged” elastic DCSs, calculated using our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction approach are also reported. Those latter results give integral cross sections consistent with the optical theorem, and supercede those from the only previous study of Milosavljević et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 40, 107 (2006)].

  13. Effect of fuel composition and differential diffusion on flame stabilization in reacting syngas jets in turbulent cross-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Minamoto, Yuki; Kolla, Hemanth; Grout, Ray W.; Gruber, Andrea; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-07-24

    Here, three-dimensional direct numerical simulation results of a transverse syngas fuel jet in turbulent cross-flow of air are analyzed to study the influence of varying volume fractions of CO relative to H2 in the fuel composition on the near field flame stabilization. The mean flame stabilizes at a similar location for CO-lean and CO-rich cases despite the trend suggested by their laminar flame speed, which is higher for the CO-lean condition. To identify local mixtures having favorable mixture conditions for flame stabilization, explosive zones are defined using a chemical explosive mode timescale. The explosive zones related to flame stabilization are located in relatively low velocity regions. The explosive zones are characterized by excess hydrogen transported solely by differential diffusion, in the absence of intense turbulent mixing or scalar dissipation rate. The conditional averages show that differential diffusion is negatively correlated with turbulent mixing. Moreover, the local turbulent Reynolds number is insufficient to estimate the magnitude of the differential diffusion effect. Alternatively, the Karlovitz number provides a better indicator of the importance of differential diffusion. A comparison of the variations of differential diffusion, turbulent mixing, heat release rate and probability of encountering explosive zones demonstrates that differential diffusion predominantly plays an important role for mixture preparation and initiation of chemical reactions, closely followed by intense chemical reactions sustained by sufficient downstream turbulent mixing. The mechanism by which differential diffusion contributes to mixture preparation is investigated using the Takeno Flame Index. The mean Flame Index, based on the combined fuel species, shows that the overall extent of premixing is not intense in the upstream regions. However, the Flame Index computed based on individual contribution of H2 or CO species reveals that

  14. Effect of fuel composition and differential diffusion on flame stabilization in reacting syngas jets in turbulent cross-flow

    DOE PAGES

    Minamoto, Yuki; Kolla, Hemanth; Grout, Ray W.; ...

    2015-07-24

    Here, three-dimensional direct numerical simulation results of a transverse syngas fuel jet in turbulent cross-flow of air are analyzed to study the influence of varying volume fractions of CO relative to H2 in the fuel composition on the near field flame stabilization. The mean flame stabilizes at a similar location for CO-lean and CO-rich cases despite the trend suggested by their laminar flame speed, which is higher for the CO-lean condition. To identify local mixtures having favorable mixture conditions for flame stabilization, explosive zones are defined using a chemical explosive mode timescale. The explosive zones related to flame stabilization aremore » located in relatively low velocity regions. The explosive zones are characterized by excess hydrogen transported solely by differential diffusion, in the absence of intense turbulent mixing or scalar dissipation rate. The conditional averages show that differential diffusion is negatively correlated with turbulent mixing. Moreover, the local turbulent Reynolds number is insufficient to estimate the magnitude of the differential diffusion effect. Alternatively, the Karlovitz number provides a better indicator of the importance of differential diffusion. A comparison of the variations of differential diffusion, turbulent mixing, heat release rate and probability of encountering explosive zones demonstrates that differential diffusion predominantly plays an important role for mixture preparation and initiation of chemical reactions, closely followed by intense chemical reactions sustained by sufficient downstream turbulent mixing. The mechanism by which differential diffusion contributes to mixture preparation is investigated using the Takeno Flame Index. The mean Flame Index, based on the combined fuel species, shows that the overall extent of premixing is not intense in the upstream regions. However, the Flame Index computed based on individual contribution of H2 or CO species reveals that hydrogen

  15. Self-calibration and laser energy monitor validations for a double-pulsed 2-μm CO2 integrated path differential absorption lidar application.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-08-20

    Double-pulsed 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-μm double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photoelectromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-μm IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  16. Cross-Species Transmission and Differential Fate of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Three Mammal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Xiaoyu; Feschotte, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) arise from retroviruses chromosomally integrated in the host germline. ERVs are common in vertebrate genomes and provide a valuable fossil record of past retroviral infections to investigate the biology and evolution of retroviruses over a deep time scale, including cross-species transmission events. Here we took advantage of a catalog of ERVs we recently produced for the bat Myotis lucifugus to seek evidence for infiltration of these retroviruses in other mammalian species (>100) currently represented in the genome sequence database. We provide multiple lines of evidence for the cross-ordinal transmission of a gammaretrovirus endogenized independently in the lineages of vespertilionid bats, felid cats and pangolin ~13–25 million years ago. Following its initial introduction, the ERV amplified extensively in parallel in both bat and cat lineages, generating hundreds of species-specific insertions throughout evolution. However, despite being derived from the same viral species, phylogenetic and selection analyses suggest that the ERV experienced different amplification dynamics in the two mammalian lineages. In the cat lineage, the ERV appears to have expanded primarily by retrotransposition of a single proviral progenitor that lost infectious capacity shortly after endogenization. In the bat lineage, the ERV followed a more complex path of germline invasion characterized by both retrotransposition and multiple infection events. The results also suggest that some of the bat ERVs have maintained infectious capacity for extended period of time and may be still infectious today. This study provides one of the most rigorously documented cases of cross-ordinal transmission of a mammalian retrovirus. It also illustrates how the same retrovirus species has transitioned multiple times from an infectious pathogen to a genomic parasite (i.e. retrotransposon), yet experiencing different invasion dynamics in different mammalian hosts. PMID

  17. Cross-Species Transmission and Differential Fate of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Three Mammal Lineages.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Xiaoyu; Feschotte, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) arise from retroviruses chromosomally integrated in the host germline. ERVs are common in vertebrate genomes and provide a valuable fossil record of past retroviral infections to investigate the biology and evolution of retroviruses over a deep time scale, including cross-species transmission events. Here we took advantage of a catalog of ERVs we recently produced for the bat Myotis lucifugus to seek evidence for infiltration of these retroviruses in other mammalian species (>100) currently represented in the genome sequence database. We provide multiple lines of evidence for the cross-ordinal transmission of a gammaretrovirus endogenized independently in the lineages of vespertilionid bats, felid cats and pangolin ~13-25 million years ago. Following its initial introduction, the ERV amplified extensively in parallel in both bat and cat lineages, generating hundreds of species-specific insertions throughout evolution. However, despite being derived from the same viral species, phylogenetic and selection analyses suggest that the ERV experienced different amplification dynamics in the two mammalian lineages. In the cat lineage, the ERV appears to have expanded primarily by retrotransposition of a single proviral progenitor that lost infectious capacity shortly after endogenization. In the bat lineage, the ERV followed a more complex path of germline invasion characterized by both retrotransposition and multiple infection events. The results also suggest that some of the bat ERVs have maintained infectious capacity for extended period of time and may be still infectious today. This study provides one of the most rigorously documented cases of cross-ordinal transmission of a mammalian retrovirus. It also illustrates how the same retrovirus species has transitioned multiple times from an infectious pathogen to a genomic parasite (i.e. retrotransposon), yet experiencing different invasion dynamics in different mammalian hosts.

  18. STORAGE RING CROSS-SECTION MEASUREMENTS FOR ELECTRON IMPACT SINGLE AND DOUBLE IONIZATION OF Fe{sup 9+} AND SINGLE IONIZATION OF Fe{sup 10+}

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Novotny, O.; Savin, D. W.; Becker, A.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Wolf, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Repnow, R.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.

    2012-11-20

    We have measured electron impact ionization from the ground state of Fe{sup 9+} and Fe{sup 10+} over the relative electron-ion collision energy ranges 200-1900 eV and 250-1800 eV, respectively. The ions were confined in an ion storage ring long enough for essentially all metastable levels to radiatively relax to the ground state. For single ionization, we find a number of discrepancies between the existing theoretical cross sections and our results. The calculations appear to neglect some excitation-autoionization (EA) channels, particularly from n = 3 to n' excitations, which are important near threshold, and those from n = 2 {yields} 3 excitations, which contribute at about 650 eV. Conversely, at higher energies the calculations appear to overestimate the importance of EA channels due to excitation into levels where n {>=} 4. The resulting experimental rate coefficients agree with the most recent theory for Fe{sup 9+} to within 16% and for Fe{sup 10+} to within 19% at temperatures where these ions are predicted to form in collisional ionization equilibrium. We have also measured double ionization of Fe{sup 9+} forming Fe{sup 11+} in the energy range 450-3000 eV and found that although there is an appreciable cross section for direct double ionization, the dominant mechanism appears to be through direct ionization of an inner shell electron producing an excited state that subsequently stabilizes through autoionization.

  19. Differentiating cross-reacting allergens in the immunological analysis of celery (Apium graveolens) by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Faeste, Christiane K; Jonscher, Karen R; Sit, Louis; Klawitter, Jelena; Løvberg, Kjersti E; Moen, Lena H

    2010-01-01

    Celery is acknowledged as a major food allergen in Europe, and mandatory labeling for preprocessed foods has been implemented. However, no methods for the specific detection of celery protein in foods have been published. In the present study, a sandwich celery ELISA using polyclonal anticelery antibodies for capture and detection was developed and validated. The method has an LOD of 0.5 mg/kg in buffer; however, it is applicable only for the screening of food products because of extensive cross-reactivity with potato and carrot proteins. Using nanoLC-ion-trap MS/MS, a number of proteins in the three vegetable species were identified as candidates for causing cross-reactions due to amino acid sequence homologies. Among others, a novel patatin (Sola t 1)-like protein was detected in celery and a flavin adenine dinucleotide binding domain-containing protein (Api g 5)-like protein was identified in carrot. The utility of triple-quadrupole MS/MS for specific and quantitative analysis of celery, potato, and carrot allergens was evaluated using whole protein extracts. Several unique precursor ion-to-product ion transitions were determined for each species, suggesting the feasibility of developing an MS-based screening method to specifically detect celery allergens in foods.

  20. Impact of Metabolism on T-Cell Differentiation and Function and Cross Talk with Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kouidhi, Soumaya; Elgaaied, Amel Benammar; Chouaib, Salem

    2017-01-01

    The immune system and metabolism are highly integrated and multilevel interactions between metabolic system and T lymphocyte signaling and fate exist. Accumulating evidence indicates that the regulation of nutrient uptake and utilization in T cells is critically important for the control of their differentiation and manipulating metabolic pathways in these cells can shape their function and survival. This review will discuss some potential cell metabolism pathways involved in shaping T lymphocyte function and differentiation. It will also describe show subsets of T cells have specific metabolic requirements and signaling pathways that contribute to their respective function. Examples showing the apparent similarity between cancer cell metabolism and T cells during activation are illustrated and finally some mechanisms being used by tumor microenvironment to orchestrate T-cell metabolic dysregulation and the subsequent emergence of immune suppression are discussed. We believe that targeting T-cell metabolism may provide an additional opportunity to manipulate T-cell function in the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:28348562

  1. Ionic liquids in a poly ethylene oxide cross-linked gel polymer as an electrolyte for electrical double layer capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudoy, V.; Tran Van, F.; Deschamps, M.; Ghamouss, F.

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, we developed a gel polymer electrolyte via the incorporation of a room temperature ionic liquid into a cross-linked polymer matrix. The cross-linked gel electrolyte was prepared using a free radical polymerization of methacrylate and dimethacrylate oligomers dissolved in 1-propyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide. Combining the advantages of the ionic liquids and of conventional polymers, the cross-linked gel polymer electrolyte was used both as a separator and as an electrolyte for a leakage-free and non-flammable EDLC supercapacitor. The quasi-all solid-state supercapacitors showed rather good capacitance, power and energy densities by comparison to a liquid electrolyte-based EDLC.

  2. Absolute Differential Scattering Cross-Sections of Electrons from Neon, Nitrogen and Methyl Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xueying

    The relative flow technique is used to obtain absolute DCS in a crossed-beam experiment. A novel gas handling system was designed to facilitate these measurements. The absolute DCS of electrons scattered from neon have been measured from 7 eV down to 0.25 eV. At energies of 2 eV and lower, our results are in excellent agreement with MERT and recent ab initio calculation. At energies higher than 2 eV, our results are in excellent agreement with those of Williams. Thus we propose that neon can be used as a benchmark to test the overall performance of the electron spectrometer at low energies. The angular dependence of absolute vibrationally -elastic DCS of electrons scattered from N_2 have been measured at 0.55 eV, 1.50 eV, and ~2.22 eV, the second elastic peak of the ^2Pi_{rm g} resonance. Our results at these two lower energies are much larger than the previous experimental results, but in close agreement with theoretical calculations by Morrison. By extrapolating our curves to 0^ circ and 180^circ using Morrison's curves as a guide, integration gave the total vibrationally-elastic cross sections at these two energies. Our results are within 2-4% of the experimentally measured total cross sections. Methyl Chloride is the simplest saturated hydrocarbon with a single chlorine atom substitution. Two resonances have been assigned in CH_3Cl, the a_1(C-Cl,sigma^*) resonance at 3.45 eV and the e(C-H,sigma ^*) resonance at 5.5 eV. In the elastic channel, the measurements show that dipole scattering dominates at low energies and in the forward direction. In inelastic channels, the C-Cl stretch mode nu_3(a _1) is strongly excited by the sigma ^*(C-Cl) shape resonance, and the C-H stretch mode nu_4(e) is the strongest one excited by the e resonance. The angular dependences for excitation of these two modes are relatively flat. The shapes cannot be explained solely by a few leading terms in the angular momentum expansion arising from the resonance. This suggests that non

  3. Column CO2 Measurement From an Airborne Solid-State Double-Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Fay, J.; Reithmaier, K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micrometers IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  4. The effect of the mus309 mutation, defective in DNA double-strand break repair, on crossing over in Drosophila melanogaster suggests a mechanism for the centromere effect of crossing over.

    PubMed

    Portin, Petter

    2010-03-01

    The mus309 gene in Drosophila melanogaster encodes a RecQ helicase which is involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. In a brood pattern analysis, it was observed that in mus309 mutant females, the frequency of single crossovers in the central cv-v interval of the X chromosome was reduced in young females but returned to the level of the wild type control as the females aged. In the proximal v-f interval, the frequency of single crossovers was increased during the entire experimental period. In particular, it was observed that the frequency of double crossovers, as well as the coefficient of coincidence first increased but then gradually decreased, finally reaching the level of the control flies, as the females aged. Map distances increased due to the mus309 mutation in both gene interval studies, but they did not change as the females aged, a result suggesting that the mus309 gene controls the distribution of DSBs to be repaired as crossovers instead of non-crossovers. The results suggest a mechanism for the centromere effect of crossing over in Drosophila, viz the fact the frequency of meiotic crossing over reduces with the age of the female, and that the reduction is more pronounced the closer the interval is to the proximal heterochromatin of the chromosome arm. According to the model suggested, the centromere effect is simply a matter of the balance between different pathways of the repair of the DSBs of DNA.

  5. Hybrid maize breeding with doubled haploids. IV. Number versus size of crosses and importance of parental selection in two-stage selection for testcross performance.

    PubMed

    Wegenast, Thilo; Longin, C Friedrich H; Utz, H Friedrich; Melchinger, Albrecht E; Maurer, Hans Peter; Reif, Jochen C

    2008-07-01

    Parental selection influences the gain from selection and the optimum allocation of test resources in breeding programs. We compared two hybrid maize (Zea mays L.) breeding schemes with evaluation of testcross progenies: (a) doubled haploid (DH) lines in both stages (DHTC) and (b) S(1) families in the first stage and DH lines within S(1) families in the second stage (S(1)TC-DHTC). Our objectives were to (1) determine the optimum allocation regarding the number of crosses, S(1) families, DH lines, and test locations, (2) investigate the impact of parental selection on the optimum allocation and selection gain (DeltaG), and (3) compare the maximum DeltaG achievable with each breeding scheme. Selection gain was calculated by numerical integration. Different assumptions were made regarding the budget, variance components, correlation between the mean phenotypic performance of the parents and the mean genotypic value of the testcross performance of their progenies (rho( P )), and the composition of the finally selected test candidates. In comparison with randomly chosen crosses, maximum DeltaG was largely increased with parental selection in both breeding schemes. With an increasing correlation rho( P ), this superiority increased strongly, while the optimum number of crosses decreased in favor of an increased number of test candidates within crosses. Thus, concentration on few crosses among the best parental lines might be a promising approach for short-term success in advanced cycle breeding. Breeding scheme S(1)TC-DHTC led to a larger DeltaG but had a longer cycle length than DHTC. However, with further improvements in the DH technique and the realization of more than two generations per year, early testing of S(1) families prior to production of DH lines would become very attractive in hybrid maize breeding.

  6. Measurements of the Differential Cross Sections for the Inclusive Production of a Photon and Heavy Flavor Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    This thesis presents the first measurement of the differential production cross section of a heavy flavor (bottom or charm) jet and direct photon at the Fermilab Tevatron. These measurements were performed using data recorded with the D0 detector from proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. These results probe a kinematic range for the photon transverse momentum of 30 < pTγ < 150 GeV and rapidity of |yγ| < 1.0 and for jet transverse momentum pTjet > 15 GeV and rapidity of |yjet| < 0.8. These results are compared to next-to-leading-order theoretical calculations.

  7. How to measure a complete set of polarization-dependent differential cross sections in a scattering experiment with aligned reagents?

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengyan; Lin, Jui-San; Liu, Kopin

    2014-02-28

    Polarization-dependent differential cross section (PDDCS) is one of the three-vector correlations (k, k('), j) in molecular collisions, which provides the most detailed insights into the steric requirements of chemical reactions, i.e., how the reactivity depends on the polarization of reagents. Only quite recently has such quantity been fully realized experimentally in the study of the reaction of the aligned CHD3(v1 = 1, |jK⟩ = |10⟩) molecules with Cl((2)P3/2) atoms. Theoretically, PDDCS is a relatively new concept; experimental realization of the theoretical construct requires some careful considerations that are not readily available in the literature. Here, we present the "know-how" behind the full PDDCS measurements to fill the gaps and to provide a clear roadmap for future applications. To make the connection apparent between the methodology presented here and the stereodynamics revealed in previous reports, the same Cl + aligned CHD3 reaction is used for illustration.

  8. Fully differential cross section for single ionization of helium by 1 KeV electrons in the eikonal approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, R.; Roy, A. C.

    2009-07-01

    We report new results for fully differential cross sections for the single ionization of helium by 1 KeV electron impact at the ejection energy of 10 eV. Investigations have been made for both the scattering and perpendicular planes. The present calculation is based on the eikonal approximation due to Glauber. Here we have also incorporated the effect of classical post collision interaction (PCI) in the Glauber approximation (GA). A comparison is made of the present calculation with the results of other theoretical methods and the recent experiment [M. Dürr, C. Dimopoulou, B. Najjari, A. Dorn, K. Bartschat, I. Bray, D.V. Fursa, Z. Chen, D.H. Madison, J. Ullrich, Phys. Rev. A 77 (2008) 032717]. The Glauber results are in good agreement with the experiment in the scattering plane, but strong discrepancies are observed in the plane perpendicular to it. The effect of PCI is not substantial in the present kinematics.

  9. Absolute differential cross sections for the elastic scattering of electrons from atomic hydrogen at low incident energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Kenneth; Leonard, Linda; Proctor, Stephanie; Childers, J. G.; Khakoo, Murtadha A.

    2003-05-01

    Absolute differential cross sections for electrons elastically scattered from atomic hydrogen have been measured at low incident energies. The measurements were facilitated by the moveable nozzle source recently developed in our lab. Data taken at the incident energies of 20 eV, 40 eV, and 100 eV, and spanning the angular range of 10^rc to 120^rc will be presented. The results will be compared to the earlier measurements of Williams(Joseph Callaway and J. F. Williams, Phys. Rev. A) 12, 2312 (1975), J. F. Williams, J. Phys. B 8, 2191 (1975) and Shyn(T. W. Shyn and S. Y. Cho, Phys. Rev. A) 40, 1315 (1989), T. W. Shyn and Alan Grafe, Phys. Rev. A 46, 2949 (1992), and the theoretical calculations of Bray(Igor Bray, Phys. Rev. A) 46, 6995 (1992). Funded by the National Science Foundation under Grant # NSF-RUI-PHY-0096808.

  10. Human Cell Assays for Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing and Crossing over During Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zapotoczny, Grzegorz; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most deleterious types of lesions to the genome. Synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) is thought to be a major pathway of DSB repair, but direct tests of this model have only been conducted in budding yeast and Drosophila. To better understand this pathway, we developed an SDSA assay for use in human cells. Our results support the hypothesis that SDSA is an important DSB repair mechanism in human cells. We used siRNA knockdown to assess the roles of a number of helicases suggested to promote SDSA. None of the helicase knockdowns reduced SDSA, but knocking down BLM or RTEL1 increased SDSA. Molecular analysis of repair products suggests that these helicases may prevent long-tract repair synthesis. Since the major alternative to SDSA (repair involving a double-Holliday junction intermediate) can lead to crossovers, we also developed a fluorescent assay that detects crossovers generated during DSB repair. Together, these assays will be useful in investigating features and mechanisms of SDSA and crossover pathways in human cells. PMID:28179392

  11. Differential cross sections for gamma + p --> K^+ + Y for Lambda and Sigma^0 hyperons

    SciTech Connect

    R. Bradford; R.A. Schumacher; J.W.C. McNabb; L. Todor; et. Al.

    2005-09-29

    High-statistics cross sections for the reactions {gamma} + p {yields} K{sup +} + {Lambda} and {gamma} + p {yields} K{sup +} + {Sigma}{sup 0} have been measured using CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies W between 1.6 and 2.53 GeV, and for -0.85 < cos {theta}{sub K{sup +}}{sup c.m.} < +0.95. In the K{sup +}{Lambda} channel we confirm a resonance-like structure near W=1.9 GeV at backward kaon angles. The position and width of this structure change with angle, indicating that more than one resonance is likely playing a role. The K{sup +} {Lambda} channel at forward angles and all energies is well described by a t-channel scaling characteristic of Regge exchange, while the same scaling applied to the K{sup +} {Sigma}{sup 0} channel is less successful. Several existing theoretical models are compared to the data, but none provide a good representation of the results.

  12. Microbe-specific unconventional T-cells induce human neutrophil differentiation into antigen cross-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Anna Rita; Tyler, Christopher J.; Khan, Mohd Wajid A.; Szakmany, Tamas; Hall, Judith E.; Moser, Bernhard; Eberl, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The early immune response to microbes is dominated by the recruitment of neutrophils whose primary function is to clear invading pathogens. However, there is emerging evidence that neutrophils play additional effector and regulatory roles. The present study demonstrates that human neutrophils assume antigen cross-presenting functions, and suggests a plausible scenario for the local generation of APC-like neutrophils through the mobilization of unconventional T-cells in response to microbial metabolites. Vγ9/Vδ2 T-cells and MAIT cells are abundant in blood, inflamed tissues and mucosal barriers. Here, both human cell types responded rapidly to neutrophils after phagocytosis of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria producing the corresponding ligands, and in turn mediated the differentiation of neutrophils into APCs for both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells through secretion of GM-CSF, IFN-γ and TNF-α. In patients with acute sepsis, circulating neutrophils displayed a similar APC-like phenotype and readily processed soluble proteins for cross-presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8+ T-cells, at a time when peripheral Vγ9/Vδ2 T-cells were highly activated. Our findings indicate that unconventional T-cells represent key controllers of neutrophil-driven innate and adaptive responses to a broad range of pathogens. PMID:25165152

  13. Modified Differential Renal Function Measurement Revised by Renal Cross Sectional Area in Children with Ureteropelvic Junction Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jong Kil; Chung, Moon Kee

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Diuretic 99mTc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Tc-DTPA) renal scans may show false-negative or false-positive results in children with ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). We evaluated whether modified differential renal function (DRF) revised by the renal cross-sectional area on imaging study may be a more valuable predictor than conventional DRF on a renal scan for deciding on a proper interventional time. Materials and Methods Between September 2001 and January 2008, we reviewed the diuretic renal scan results of 29 pediatric patients who underwent pyeloplasty due to unilateral UPJO. Diuretic renal scans using the standard 99mTc-DTPA protocol and imaging studies for renal unit measurement area were done. Conventional DRF measurement and modified calculation of DRF per unit area were done. Conventional DRF was classified into group I (below 40%) and group II (above 40%). Results The mean age of all patients was 42.6±52.6 months (range, 3-198 months). The mean cross-sectional areas of the UPJO kidney and of the normal contralateral kidney were 62.1±29.2 cm2 and 41.3±22.5 cm2, respectively (p<0.01). The conventional and modified DRF of the UPJO kidney were 45.2±9.2% and 35.2±9.5%, respectively (p<0.01). Thirteen children (62%) in group II (n=21) were classified in group I by the modified DRF measurement. Conclusions The modified DRF measurement calculated according to cross-sectional area showed fewer false-negative results and may be a valuable method for deciding on pyeloplasty under equivocal circumstances. PMID:20428431

  14. Testing for Ancient Selection Using Cross-population Allele Frequency Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Racimo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    A powerful way to detect selection in a population is by modeling local allele frequency changes in a particular region of the genome under scenarios of selection and neutrality and finding which model is most compatible with the data. A previous method based on a cross-population composite likelihood ratio (XP-CLR) uses an outgroup population to detect departures from neutrality that could be compatible with hard or soft sweeps, at linked sites near a beneficial allele. However, this method is most sensitive to recent selection and may miss selective events that happened a long time ago. To overcome this, we developed an extension of XP-CLR that jointly models the behavior of a selected allele in a three-population tree. Our method - called “3-population composite likelihood ratio” (3P-CLR) - outperforms XP-CLR when testing for selection that occurred before two populations split from each other and can distinguish between those events and events that occurred specifically in each of the populations after the split. We applied our new test to population genomic data from the 1000 Genomes Project, to search for selective sweeps that occurred before the split of Yoruba and Eurasians, but after their split from Neanderthals, and that could have led to the spread of modern-human-specific phenotypes. We also searched for sweep events that occurred in East Asians, Europeans, and the ancestors of both populations, after their split from Yoruba. In both cases, we are able to confirm a number of regions identified by previous methods and find several new candidates for selection in recent and ancient times. For some of these, we also find suggestive functional mutations that may have driven the selective events. PMID:26596347

  15. Testing for Ancient Selection Using Cross-population Allele Frequency Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Racimo, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    A powerful way to detect selection in a population is by modeling local allele frequency changes in a particular region of the genome under scenarios of selection and neutrality and finding which model is most compatible with the data. A previous method based on a cross-population composite likelihood ratio (XP-CLR) uses an outgroup population to detect departures from neutrality that could be compatible with hard or soft sweeps, at linked sites near a beneficial allele. However, this method is most sensitive to recent selection and may miss selective events that happened a long time ago. To overcome this, we developed an extension of XP-CLR that jointly models the behavior of a selected allele in a three-population tree. Our method - called "3-population composite likelihood ratio" (3P-CLR) - outperforms XP-CLR when testing for selection that occurred before two populations split from each other and can distinguish between those events and events that occurred specifically in each of the populations after the split. We applied our new test to population genomic data from the 1000 Genomes Project, to search for selective sweeps that occurred before the split of Yoruba and Eurasians, but after their split from Neanderthals, and that could have led to the spread of modern-human-specific phenotypes. We also searched for sweep events that occurred in East Asians, Europeans, and the ancestors of both populations, after their split from Yoruba. In both cases, we are able to confirm a number of regions identified by previous methods and find several new candidates for selection in recent and ancient times. For some of these, we also find suggestive functional mutations that may have driven the selective events.

  16. Synthesis of a double helicene by a palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction: structure and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Kashihara, Hitoshi; Asada, Toshio; Kamikawa, Ken

    2015-04-20

    For this study, twisted π-extended helicene 1 and double helicene 2 with a helicene framework were synthesized through palladium-catalyzed C-H arylation or Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction. X-ray crystallography revealed grossly twisted structures that were soluble in various conventional organic solvents. Optical properties based on UV/Vis and fluorescence spectra were measured. Electrochemical properties were also studied by measurements of cyclic voltammetry in 1 and 2, which revealed their HOMO and the LUMO energies. Theoretical calculation supports their HOMO and LUMO energies and molecular orbitals. Furthermore, a racemization process of 2 predicted that the activation free energy at 300 K would be 31.8 kcal mol(-1) by DFT calculation, which indicated the static helicity at 300 K.

  17. Ultrafast all-optical switch with cross-phase modulation by area-selective ion implantation in InGaAs/AlAsSb coupled double quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jijun; Akimoto, Ryoichi; Gozu, Shin-ichiro; Mozume, Teruo; Hasama, Toshifumi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2012-12-10

    We have developed a compact gate switch with monolithic integration of all-optical cross-phase modulation (XPM) in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI). XPM is caused by intersubband transition (ISBT) in InGaAs/AlAsSb coupled double quantum wells (CDQWs) by area-selective silicon ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing (RTA). While injecting pump light through a transverse electric/transverse magnetic (TE/TM) beam combiner, XPM is induced in one MZI arm and gating operation can be realized. The RTA condition is optimized, and the sample is annealed at 780 °C for 8 s with an implantation dose of 5 × 10(13) cm(-2). Dependence of XPM efficiency on the length of the implanted mesa is also analyzed, and there exists an optimum implantation length to fulfill both high efficiency of ISBT modulation and low loss of the probe and pump signals.

  18. Pancreatic enzyme supplementation as acid-resistant microspheres versus enteric-coated granules in cystic fibrosis. A double placebo-controlled cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, W; Heilmann, C; Garne, S

    1987-01-01

    In order to compare the efficacy of pancreatic enzyme supplementation as pH-sensitive enteric-coated microspheres Pancrease to that of conventional supplementation with enteric-coated Pancreatin in cystic fibrosis, a double blind cross-over study was conducted. Eleven patients under 12 years of age received each of the enzyme preparations for four weeks. Treatment efficacy was evaluated by means of a symptom score card recording stool frequency, consistency, colour, odour, abdominal cramps and appetite as well as a 3 days fat absorption test. Weight increments were recorded 3 months before the study when patients were on Pancreatin, and 3 months after the study when patients were on Pancrease. In eight of the patients fat absorption was improved on Pancrease, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. However, the patients experienced significantly less dyspeptic symptoms, decreased stool frequency, better appetite and increments in weight were significantly higher on Pancrease compared to Pancreatin.

  19. Theoretical analysis for temporal phase-shifting of volume moiré tomography via double cross gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Nan; Yan, Keding; Xue, Liang; Wang, Shouyu

    2014-11-01

    Volume Moiré Tomography (VMT) is an important technique to diagnose the flow field. In this Letter, the characteristic of temporal phase-shifting is analyzed for VMT. When the distance between two cross gratings is not on the Talbot distance, the phase-shifting factors are existed between moiré patterns of different orders. Especially, when the distance conforms to the sub-Talbot distance, the phase-shifting factors are maximum. This characteristic of temporal phaseshifting could be used for real 3-D flow fields reconstruction in the future.

  20. Isotopic production cross sections in proton-nucleus collisions at 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Machner, H.; Aschman, D.G.; Steyn, D.; Baruth-Ram, K.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Cowley, A.A.; Goldenbaum, F.; Nangu, B.M.; Spoelstra, B.; Pilcher, J.V.; Smit, F.D.

    2006-04-15

    Intermediate-mass fragments from the interaction of {sup 27}Al, {sup 59}Co, and {sup 197}Au with 200-MeV protons were measured in an angular range from 20 deg. to 120 deg. in the laboratory system. The fragments, ranging from isotopes of helium up to isotopes of carbon, were isotopically resolved. Double-differential cross sections, energy-differential cross sections, and total cross sections were extracted.

  1. Green function of the double-fractional Fokker-Planck equation: path integral and stochastic differential equations.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, H; Zatloukal, V

    2013-11-01

    The statistics of rare events, the so-called black-swan events, is governed by non-Gaussian distributions with heavy power-like tails. We calculate the Green functions of the associated Fokker-Planck equations and solve the related stochastic differential equations. We also discuss the subject in the framework of path integration.

  2. Multiple double cross-section transmission electron microscope sample preparation of specific sub-10 nm diameter Si nanowire devices.

    PubMed

    Gignac, Lynne M; Mittal, Surbhi; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Cohen, Guy M; Sleight, Jeffrey W

    2011-12-01

    The ability to prepare multiple cross-section transmission electron microscope (XTEM) samples from one XTEM sample of specific sub-10 nm features was demonstrated. Sub-10 nm diameter Si nanowire (NW) devices were initially cross-sectioned using a dual-beam focused ion beam system in a direction running parallel to the device channel. From this XTEM sample, both low- and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) images were obtained from six separate, specific site Si NW devices. The XTEM sample was then re-sectioned in four separate locations in a direction perpendicular to the device channel: 90° from the original XTEM sample direction. Three of the four XTEM samples were successfully sectioned in the gate region of the device. From these three samples, low- and high-resolution TEM images of the Si NW were taken and measurements of the NW diameters were obtained. This technique demonstrated the ability to obtain high-resolution TEM images in directions 90° from one another of multiple, specific sub-10 nm features that were spaced 1.1 μm apart.

  3. Effect of Chromatin Structure on the Extent and Distribution of DNA Double Strand Breaks Produced by Ionizing Radiation; Comparative Study of hESC and Differentiated Cells Lines.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Priyanka; Panyutin, Irina V; Remeeva, Evgenia; Neumann, Ronald D; Panyutin, Igor G

    2016-01-02

    Chromatin structure affects the extent of DNA damage and repair. Thus, it has been shown that heterochromatin is more protective against DNA double strand breaks (DSB) formation by ionizing radiation (IR); and that DNA DSB repair may proceed differently in hetero- and euchromatin regions. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have a more open chromatin structure than differentiated cells. Here, we study the effect of chromatin structure in hESC on initial DSB formation and subsequent DSB repair. DSB were scored by comet assay; and DSB repair was assessed by repair foci formation via 53BP1 antibody staining. We found that in hESC, heterochromatin is confined to distinct regions, while in differentiated cells it is distributed more evenly within the nuclei. The same dose of ionizing radiation produced considerably more DSB in hESC than in differentiated derivatives, normal human fibroblasts; and one cancer cell line. At the same time, the number of DNA repair foci were not statistically different among these cells. We showed that in hESC, DNA repair foci localized almost exclusively outside the heterochromatin regions. We also noticed that exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in an increase in heterochromatin marker H3K9me3 in cancer HT1080 cells, and to a lesser extent in IMR90 normal fibroblasts, but not in hESCs. These results demonstrate the importance of chromatin conformation for DNA protection and DNA damage repair; and indicate the difference of these processes in hESC.

  4. Nonperturbative theory of double photoionization of the hydrogen molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Vanroose, W.; Martin, F.; Rescigno, T.N.; McCurdy, C.W.

    2004-10-01

    We present completely ab initio nonperturbative calculations of the integral and single differential cross sections for double photoionization of H2 for photon energies from 53.9 to 75.7 eV. The method of exterior complex scaling, implemented with B-splines, is used to solve the Schrodinger equation for a correlated continuum wave function corresponding to a single photon having been absorbed by a correlated initial state. The results are in good agreement with experimental integral cross sections.

  5. Electron-impact double ionization of magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, M.J.; El-Marji, B.; Doering, J.P.; Moore, J.H.; Coplan, M.A.; Cooper, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Electron-impact double-ionization cross sections differential in the angles of the two ejected electrons have been measured at impact energies of 422 and 1052 eV. The energies of the ejected electrons were fixed at 100 eV each. The cross sections are very different at the two incident energies. At 1052 eV the ejected electrons are preferentially found in the forward direction with respect to the incident beam. At 422 eV they are found in the forward and backward directions with approximately equal probability. The 422-eV cross sections are largest when the incident-electron and ejected-electron momentum vectors lie in a common plane. The observations are discussed in the context of several models for double ionization. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Experimental Studies of Electron Impact Phenomena: (i) Absolute Elastic Differential Cross Section Measurements of Carbon-Monoxide Nitrogen Molecule, and Carbon-Dioxide Using a Refined Relative Flow Technique, (ii) Differential Cross Section Measurements for Excitation of Electronic Levels of Carbon-Monoxide by Electron Impact, (iii) Absolute Total Scattering Cross Section Measurements for Electron Impact on Krypton, Oxygen Molecule, and Carbon-Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanik, Isik

    1988-12-01

    Absolute elastic differential scattering cross sections (DCS) for electron impact on CO, N_2 , and CO_2 in the energy range 20-100 eV and angular range 20^circ -120^circ were measured. A crossed beam scattering geometry was employed and the results were obtained using a relative flow technique in which the DCS of CO and CO_2 were compared directly to the DCS of helium at each angle and energy and the DCS of N_2 was compared directly to the DCS of CO. The results of the elastic DCS of neon are also presented as a check on the experimental procedure. Differential cross section measurements for excitation of the electronic features (a^3Pi , a^'^3Sigma ^+, d^3Delta, and A^1Pi) of CO by electron impact have been carried out by JPL group (Peter Zetner and Sandor Trajmar). These data have been analyzed and differential cross sections were obtained for the impact energies 12.5 eV and 15.0 eV by using a computer unfolding program that employes flux corrected Franck-Condon factors and calibration scheme developed jointly with the JPL group. Details of the routine for extracting the DCS are presented. Absolute total scattering cross section measurements were carried out for electron impact on Kr, O_2 , and CO. The results were obtained using a linear attenuation technique in the 5-300 eV incident energy range. The present results have an assigned error of 3% and generally found to be in good agreement with other experimental data.

  7. Enriched Air Nitrox Breathing Reduces Venous Gas Bubbles after Simulated SCUBA Diving: A Double-Blind Cross-Over Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Souday, Vincent; Koning, Nick J.; Perez, Bruno; Grelon, Fabien; Mercat, Alain; Boer, Christa; Seegers, Valérie; Radermacher, Peter; Asfar, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis whether enriched air nitrox (EAN) breathing during simulated diving reduces decompression stress when compared to compressed air breathing as assessed by intravascular bubble formation after decompression. Methods Human volunteers underwent a first simulated dive breathing compressed air to include subjects prone to post-decompression venous gas bubbling. Twelve subjects prone to bubbling underwent a double-blind, randomized, cross-over trial including one simulated dive breathing compressed air, and one dive breathing EAN (36% O2) in a hyperbaric chamber, with identical diving profiles (28 msw for 55 minutes). Intravascular bubble formation was assessed after decompression using pulmonary artery pulsed Doppler. Results Twelve subjects showing high bubble production were included for the cross-over trial, and all completed the experimental protocol. In the randomized protocol, EAN significantly reduced the bubble score at all time points (cumulative bubble scores: 1 [0–3.5] vs. 8 [4.5–10]; P < 0.001). Three decompression incidents, all presenting as cutaneous itching, occurred in the air versus zero in the EAN group (P = 0.217). Weak correlations were observed between bubble scores and age or body mass index, respectively. Conclusion EAN breathing markedly reduces venous gas bubble emboli after decompression in volunteers selected for susceptibility for intravascular bubble formation. When using similar diving profiles and avoiding oxygen toxicity limits, EAN increases safety of diving as compared to compressed air breathing. Trial Registration ISRCTN 31681480 PMID:27163253

  8. Inclusive cross section and double-helicity asymmetry for $\\pi^{0}$ production at midrapidity in $p$$+$$p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=510$ GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.

    2016-01-07

    PHENIX measurements are presented for the cross section and double-helicity asymmetry (ALL) in inclusive π⁰ production at midrapidity from p+p collisions at √s = 510 GeV from data taken in 2012 and 2013 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The next-to-leading-order perturbativequantum- chromodynamics theory calculation is in excellent agreement with the presented cross section results. The calculation utilized parton-to-pion fragmentation functions from the recent DSS14 global analysis, which prefer a smaller gluon-to-pion fragmentation function. The π⁰ALL results follow an increasingly positive asymmetry trend with pT and √s with respect to the predictions and are in excellent agreement with the latest global analysis results. This analysis incorporated earlier results on π0 and jet ALL, and suggested a positive contribution of gluon polarization to the spin of the proton ΔG for the gluon momentum fraction range x > 0.05. The data presented here extend to a currently unexplored region, down to x 0.01, and thus provide additional constraints on the value of ΔG.

  9. Inclusive cross section and double-helicity asymmetry for $$\\pi^{0}$$ production at midrapidity in $p$$+$$p$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=510$$ GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2016-01-07

    PHENIX measurements are presented for the cross section and double-helicity asymmetry (ALL) in inclusive π⁰ production at midrapidity from p+p collisions at √s = 510 GeV from data taken in 2012 and 2013 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The next-to-leading-order perturbativequantum- chromodynamics theory calculation is in excellent agreement with the presented cross section results. The calculation utilized parton-to-pion fragmentation functions from the recent DSS14 global analysis, which prefer a smaller gluon-to-pion fragmentation function. The π⁰ALL results follow an increasingly positive asymmetry trend with pT and √s with respect to the predictions and are in excellent agreement with the latestmore » global analysis results. This analysis incorporated earlier results on π0 and jet ALL, and suggested a positive contribution of gluon polarization to the spin of the proton ΔG for the gluon momentum fraction range x > 0.05. The data presented here extend to a currently unexplored region, down to x 0.01, and thus provide additional constraints on the value of ΔG.« less

  10. Inclusive cross section and double-helicity asymmetry for π0 production at midrapidity in p +p collisions at √{s }=510 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.

    2016-01-01

    PHENIX measurements are presented for the cross section and double-helicity asymmetry (AL L ) in inclusive π0 production at midrapidity from p +p collisions at √{s }=510 GeV from data taken in 2012 and 2013 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The next-to-leading-order perturbative-quantum-chromodynamics theory calculation is in excellent agreement with the presented cross section results. The calculation utilized parton-to-pion fragmentation functions from the recent DSS14 global analysis, which prefer a smaller gluon-to-pion fragmentation function. The π0AL L results follow an increasingly positive asymmetry trend with pT and √{s } with respect to the predictions and are in excellent agreement with the latest global analysis results. This analysis incorporated earlier results on π0 and jet AL L and suggested a positive contribution of gluon polarization to the spin of the proton Δ G for the gluon momentum fraction range x >0.05 . The data presented here extend to a currently unexplored region, down to x ˜0.01 , and thus provide additional constraints on the value of Δ G .

  11. Optimization of complex slater-type functions with analytic derivative methods for describing photoionization differential cross sections.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Rei; Yabushita, Satoshi

    2017-05-05

    The complex basis function (CBF) method applied to various atomic and molecular photoionization problems can be interpreted as an L2 method to solve the driven-type (inhomogeneous) Schrödinger equation, whose driven term being dipole operator times the initial state wave function. However, efficient basis functions for representing the solution have not fully been studied. Moreover, the relation between their solution and that of the ordinary Schrödinger equation has been unclear. For these reasons, most previous applications have been limited to total cross sections. To examine the applicability of the CBF method to differential cross sections and asymmetry parameters, we show that the complex valued solution to the driven-type Schrödinger equation can be variationally obtained by optimizing the complex trial functions for the frequency dependent polarizability. In the test calculations made for the hydrogen photoionization problem with five or six complex Slater-type orbitals (cSTOs), their complex valued expansion coefficients and the orbital exponents have been optimized with the analytic derivative method. Both the real and imaginary parts of the solution have been obtained accurately in a wide region covering typical molecular regions. Their phase shifts and asymmetry parameters are successfully obtained by extrapolating the CBF solution from the inner matching region to the asymptotic region using WKB method. The distribution of the optimized orbital exponents in the complex plane is explained based on the close connection between the CBF method and the driven-type equation method. The obtained information is essential to constructing the appropriate basis sets in future molecular applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The effectiveness of stretch-shortening cycling in upper-limb extensor muscles during elite cross-country skiing with the double-poling technique.

    PubMed

    Zoppirolli, Chiara; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Pellegrini, Barbara; Quaglia, Diego; Bortolan, Lorenzo; Schena, Federico

    2013-12-01

    This investigation was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of stretch-shortening cycling (SSC(EFF)) in upper-limb extensor muscles while cross-country skiing using the double-poling technique (DP). To this end, SSC(EFF) was analyzed in relation to DP velocity and performance. Eleven elite cross-country skiers performed an incremental test to determine maximal DP velocity (V(max)). Thereafter, cycle characteristics, elbow joint kinematics and poling forces were monitored on a treadmill while skiing at two sub-maximal and racing velocity (85% of V(max)). The average EMG activities of the triceps brachii and latissimus dorsi muscles were determined during the flexion and extension sub-phases of the poling cycle (EMG(FLEX), EMG(EXT)), as well as prior to pole plant (EMG(PRE)). SSC(EFF) was defined as the ratio of aEMG(FLEX) to aEMG(EXT). EMG(PRE) and EMG(FLEX) increased with velocity for both muscles (P < 0.01), as did SSC(EFF) (from 0.9 ± 0.3 to 1.3 ± 0.5 for the triceps brachii and from 0.9 ± 0.4 to 1.5 ± 0.5 for the latissimus dorsi) and poling force (from 253 ± 33 to 290 ± 36N; P < 0.05). Furthermore, SSC(EFF) was positively correlated to Vmax, to EMG(PRE) and EMG(FLEX) (P < 0.05). The neuromuscular adaptations made at higher velocities, when more poling force must be applied to the ground, exert a major influence on the DP performance of elite cross-country skiers.

  13. Study of the 15N(p,n)15O reaction as a monoenergetic neutron source for the measurement of differential scattering cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenitz, E.; Nolte, R.; Schmidt, D.; Chen, G.

    2017-03-01

    The 15N(p,n) reaction is a promising candidate for the production of monoenergetic neutrons with energies of up to 5.7 MeV at the facilities where the T(p,n)3He reaction cannot be used. The characteristic properties of this reaction were studied focusing on its suitability as a source of monoenergetic neutrons for the measurement of differential scattering cross sections in the neutron energy range of 2 MeV to 5 MeV . For this purpose differential and integral cross sections were measured and the choice of optimum target conditions was investigated. The reaction has already been used successfully to measure of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for natPb in the energy range from 2 MeV to 4 MeV and for 209Bi and 181Ta at 4 MeV .

  14. Double K-shell photoionization of atomic beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, F. L.; Martin, F.; McCurdy, C. W.; Rescigno, T. N.

    2011-11-15

    Double photoionization of the core 1s electrons in atomic beryllium is theoretically studied using a hybrid approach that combines orbital and grid-based representations of the Hamiltonian. The {sup 1} S ground state and {sup 1} P final state contain a double occupancy of the 2s valence shell in all configurations used to represent the correlated wave function. Triply differential cross sections are evaluated, with particular attention focused on a comparison of the effects of scattering the ejected electrons through the spherically symmetric valence shell with similar cross sections for helium, representing a purely two-electron target with an analogous initial-state configuration.

  15. ATP binding and hydrolysis by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Msh2-Msh3 are differentially modulated by mismatch and double-strand break repair DNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Charanya; Eichmiller, Robin; Wang, Bangchen; Williams, Gregory M; Bianco, Piero R; Surtees, Jennifer A

    2014-06-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Msh2-Msh3-mediated mismatch repair (MMR) recognizes and targets insertion/deletion loops for repair. Msh2-Msh3 is also required for 3' non-homologous tail removal (3'NHTR) in double-strand break repair. In both pathways, Msh2-Msh3 binds double-strand/single-strand junctions and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. However, we recently demonstrated that the two pathways have distinct requirements with respect to Msh2-Msh3 activities. We identified a set of aromatic residues in the nucleotide binding pocket (FLY motif) of Msh3 that, when mutated, disrupted MMR, but left 3'NHTR largely intact. One of these mutations, msh3Y942A, was predicted to disrupt the nucleotide sandwich and allow altered positioning of ATP within the pocket. To develop a mechanistic understanding of the differential requirements for ATP binding and/or hydrolysis in the two pathways, we characterized Msh2-Msh3 and Msh2-msh3Y942A ATP binding and hydrolysis activities in the presence of MMR and 3'NHTR DNA substrates. We observed distinct, substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover by Msh2-Msh3, indicating that the MMR and 3'NHTR DNA substrates differentially modify the ATP binding/hydrolysis activities of Msh2-Msh3. Msh2-msh3Y942A retained the ability to bind DNA and ATP but exhibited altered ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover. We propose that both ATP and structure-specific repair substrates cooperate to direct Msh2-Msh3-mediated repair and suggest an explanation for the msh3Y942A separation-of-function phenotype.

  16. Modafinil for attentional and psychomotor dysfunction in advanced cancer: a double-blind, randomised, cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Lundorff, L E; Jønsson, B H; Sjøgren, P

    2009-12-01

    Cognitive impairment seems to be highly prevalent in patients with advanced cancer. Modafinil, a novel vigilance and wake-promoting agent, may be an alternative treatment. We wanted to investigate this treatment on attentional and psychomotor dysfunction in cancer patients. 28 cancer patients with a tiredness score of 50 mm or more on a scale of 0 to 10 (0=no tiredness, 10=worst possible tiredness) and Karnofsky Performance Status 40-70 were included. All medications were kept stable during the trial despite short acting opioids for breakthrough pain. On day 1 the patients were randomly assigned to receive 200 mg Modafinil orally or placebo and on day 4 they crossed-over to the alternative treatment. Finger Tapping Test (FTT), Trail Making Test (TMT) and Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) were evaluated before tablet intake and again 4, 5 hours after. FTT for the dominant hand as well as TMT were statistically significantly improved on modafinil (p-values=0.006 and 0.042, respectively). On ESAS, depression and drowsiness also improved statistically significantly (p-values=<0.001 and 0.038, respectively). Modafinil in a single dose regimen was significantly superior to placebo regarding two cognitive tests of psychomotor speed and attention. Furthermore subjective scores of depression and drowsiness were significantly improved by modafinil.

  17. How to measure a complete set of polarization-dependent differential cross sections in a scattering experiment with aligned reagents?

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Fengyan E-mail: kliu@po.iams.sinica.edu.tw; Lin, Jui-San; Liu, Kopin E-mail: kliu@po.iams.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-02-28

    Polarization-dependent differential cross section (PDDCS) is one of the three-vector correlations (k, k{sup ′}, j) in molecular collisions, which provides the most detailed insights into the steric requirements of chemical reactions, i.e., how the reactivity depends on the polarization of reagents. Only quite recently has such quantity been fully realized experimentally in the study of the reaction of the aligned CHD{sub 3}(v{sub 1} = 1, |jK〉 = |10〉) molecules with Cl({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) atoms. Theoretically, PDDCS is a relatively new concept; experimental realization of the theoretical construct requires some careful considerations that are not readily available in the literature. Here, we present the “know-how” behind the full PDDCS measurements to fill the gaps and to provide a clear roadmap for future applications. To make the connection apparent between the methodology presented here and the stereodynamics revealed in previous reports, the same Cl + aligned CHD{sub 3} reaction is used for illustration.

  18. High genetic differentiation and cross-shelf patterns of genetic diversity among Great Barrier Reef populations of Symbiodinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, E. J.; van Oppen, M. J. H.; Willis, B. L.

    2009-03-01

    The resilience of Symbiodinium harboured by corals is dependent on the genetic diversity and extent of connectivity among reef populations. This study presents genetic analyses of Great Barrier Reef (GBR) populations of clade C Symbiodinium hosted by the alcyonacean coral, Sinularia flexibilis. Allelic variation at four newly developed microsatellite loci demonstrated that Symbiodinium populations are genetically differentiated at all spatial scales from 16 to 1,360 km (pairwise ΦST = 0.01-0.47, mean = 0.22); the only exception being two neighbouring populations in the Cairns region separated by 17 km. This indicates that gene flow is restricted for Symbiodinium C hosted by S. flexibilis on the GBR. Patterns of population structure reflect longshore circulation patterns and limited cross-shelf mixing, suggesting that passive transport by currents is the primary mechanism of dispersal in Symbiodinium types that are acquired horizontally. There was no correlation between the genetic structure of Symbiodinium populations and their host S. flexibilis, most likely because different factors affect the dispersal and recruitment of each partner in the symbiosis. The genetic diversity of these Symbiodinium reef populations is on average 1.5 times lower on inshore reefs than on offshore reefs. Lower inshore diversity may reflect the impact of recent bleaching events on Sinularia assemblages, which have been more widespread and severe on inshore reefs, but may also have been shaped by historical sea level fluctuations or recent migration patterns.

  19. Measurement of the π0 differential cross-section with CLAS and outlook into 12 GeV Hall C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, Michael C.

    2016-05-01

    Photoproduction of the π0 meson was studied using the CLAS detector at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility using tagged incident beam energies spanning the range Eγ = 1.1 GeV - 5.45 GeV. The measurement is performed on a liquid hydrogen target in the reaction γp → pe+e-(γ). The final state of the reaction is the sum of two subprocesses for π0 decay, the Dalitz decay mode of π0 → e+e-γ and conversion mode where one photon from π0 → γγ decay is converted into a e+e- pair. This specific final state reaction avoided limitations caused by single prompt track triggering and allowed a kinematic range extension to the world data on π0 photoproduction to a domain never systematically measured before. We report the measurement of the π0 differential cross-sections d/σ d Ω and d/σ d t . The angular distributions agree well with the SAID parametrization for incident beam energies below 3 GeV, while an interpretation of the data for incident beam energies greater than 3 GeV is currently being developed. Included in the report will be a discussion of the future wide angle, exclusive photoproduction of π0 experiment that will be performed in Hall C.

  20. Optimization of A 2-Micron Laser Frequency Stabilization System for a Double-Pulse CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingsin; Koch, Grady; Petros, Mulugeta; Trieu, Bo; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO2) Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for accurate CO2 concentration measurement requires a frequency locking system to achieve high frequency locking precision and stability. We describe the frequency locking system utilizing Frequency Modulation (FM), Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD), and Proportional Integration Derivative (PID) feedback servo loop, and report the optimization of the sensitivity of the system for the feed back loop based on the characteristics of a variable path-length CO2 gas cell. The CO2 gas cell is characterized with HITRAN database (2004). The method can be applied for any other frequency locking systems referring to gas absorption line.

  1. Electron collisions with phenol: Total, integral, differential, and momentum transfer cross sections and the role of multichannel coupling effects on the elastic channel.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Romarly F; de Oliveira, Eliane M; Bettega, Márcio H F; Varella, Márcio T do N; Jones, Darryl B; Brunger, Michael J; Blanco, Francisco; Colmenares, Rafael; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; García, Gustavo; Lima, Marco A P

    2015-03-14

    We report theoretical and experimental total cross sections for electron scattering by phenol (C6H5OH). The experimental data were obtained with an apparatus based in Madrid and the calculated cross sections with two different methodologies, the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR), and the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP). The SMCPP method in the Nopen-channel coupling scheme, at the static-exchange-plus-polarization approximation, is employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies ranging from 5.0 eV to 50 eV. We discuss the multichannel coupling effects in the calculated cross sections, in particular how the number of excited states included in the open-channel space impacts upon the convergence of the elastic cross sections at higher collision energies. The IAM-SCAR approach was also used to obtain the elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) and for correcting the experimental total cross sections for the so-called forward angle scattering effect. We found a very good agreement between our SMCPP theoretical differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections and experimental data for benzene (a molecule differing from phenol by replacing a hydrogen atom in benzene with a hydroxyl group). Although some discrepancies were found for lower energies, the agreement between the SMCPP data and the DCSs obtained with the IAM-SCAR method improves, as expected, as the impact energy increases. We also have a good agreement among the present SMCPP calculated total cross section (which includes elastic, 32 inelastic electronic excitation processes and ionization contributions, the latter estimated with the binary-encounter-Bethe model), the IAM-SCAR total cross section, and the experimental data when the latter is corrected for the forward angle scattering effect [Fuss et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 042702 (2013)].

  2. Chemical cross-linking with thiol-cleavable reagents combined with differential mass spectrometric peptide mapping--a novel approach to assess intermolecular protein contacts.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, K. L.; Kussmann, M.; Björk, P.; Godzwon, M.; Mikkelsen, M.; Sørensen, P.; Roepstorff, P.

    2000-01-01

    The intermolecular contact regions between monomers of the homodimeric DNA binding protein ParR and the interaction between the glycoproteins CD28 and CD80 were investigated using a strategy that combined chemical cross-linking with differential MALDI-MS analyses. ParR dimers were modified in vitro with the thiol-cleavable cross-linker 3,3'-dithio-bis(succinimidylproprionate) (DTSSP), proteolytically digested with trypsin and analyzed by MALDI-MS peptide mapping. Comparison of the peptide maps obtained from digested cross-linked ParR dimers in the presence and absence of a thiol reagent strongly supported a "head-to-tail" arrangement of the monomers in the dimeric complex. Glycoprotein fusion constructs CD28-IgG and CD80-Fab were cross-linked in vitro by DTSSP, characterized by nonreducing SDS-PAGE, digested in situ with trypsin and analyzed by MALDI-MS peptide mapping (+/- thiol reagent). The data revealed the presence of an intermolecular cross-link between the receptor regions of the glycoprotein constructs, as well as a number of unexpected but nonetheless specific interactions between the fusion domains of CD28-IgG and the receptor domain of CD80-Fab. The strategy of chemical cross-linking combined with differential MALDI-MS peptide mapping (+ thiol reagent) enabled localization of the interface region(s) of the complexes studied and clearly demonstrates the utility of such an approach to obtain structural information on interacting noncovalent complexes. PMID:10975572

  3. The Effect of Rosa Damascena Extract on Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Double-blind Cross-over Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bani, Soheila; Hasanpour, Shirin; Mousavi, Zeinabalsadat; Mostafa Garehbaghi, Parvin; Gojazadeh, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dysmenorrhea is one of the most common types of cyclic pain that affects 50% of women and girls in their menstrual ages. Because of the side-effects and contraindications of chemical medicines, using herbs has been investigated in treating dysmenorrhea. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Rosa damascena extract on primary dysmenorrhea among the students of Kowsar dormitory in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This study was performed in Iran on 92 single 18-24 year old students with BMI :19-25 and obtaining pain intensity score of 5-8 in Visual Analogue Scale that were randomly classified and included in two groups of 46 persons. The participants received two capsules of Mefenamic Acid and Rosa damascena with the similar physical properties in two consecutive cycles per 6 hours for 3 days in a cross-over form. The data were collected through the questionnaire of demographic characteristics and check-list of visual analogue scale. Descriptive statistics and repeated measurement test and independent samples t test by using SPSS (13/win) were used in order to determine and compare the effects of two drugs on dysmenorrheal pain intensity of the groups. Results: There was a significant difference between the average of pain intensity at different hours of measurement in each group after the end of first cycle and second cycle (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the average of pain intensity in two groups in the first cycle (P = 0.35) and second cycle (P = 0.22). Conclusions: In this study¸ Rosa damascena and Mefenamic acid had similar effects on pain intensity of primary dysmenorrhea . With further studies, Rosa damascena which has no chemical side effects¸ can be suggested for treating primary dysmenorrhea. PMID:24719710

  4. Elastic Differential Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werneth, Charles M.; Maung, Khin M.; Ford, William P.; Norbury, John W.; Vera, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The eikonal, partial wave (PW) Lippmann-Schwinger, and three-dimensional Lippmann-Schwinger (LS3D) methods are compared for nuclear reactions that are relevant for space radiation applications. Numerical convergence of the eikonal method is readily achieved when exact formulas of the optical potential are used for light nuclei (A less than or equal to 16) and the momentum-space optical potential is used for heavier nuclei. The PW solution method is known to be numerically unstable for systems that require a large number of partial waves, and, as a result, the LS3D method is employed. The effect of relativistic kinematics is studied with the PW and LS3D methods and is compared to eikonal results. It is recommended that the LS3D method be used for high energy nucleon- nucleus reactions and nucleus-nucleus reactions at all energies because of its rapid numerical convergence and stability.

  5. Differential responses of double petal and multi petal jasmine to shading: I. Photosynthetic characteristics and chloroplast ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yanming; Li, Congcong; Shao, Qingsong; Ye, Xiaoqing; She, Jianming

    2012-06-01

    A double petal (DP) and a multi petal (MP) type jasmine (Jasminum sambac Ait.) growth and flowering was known largely affected by different levels of irradiance. Here, our objective was to determine the effects of shade on photosynthesis related characteristics and chloroplast ultrastructure of these two types. In both types, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (g(s)) and transpiration rate increased with decreasing irradiance from 100% to 20%, while both maximum and variable fluorescence showed a steady increase, and photochemical and nonphotochemical quenching indexes declined. At each conducted time, chlorophyll a, b and carotenoids contents in DP type shaded leaves increased whereas those in MP type decreased at 5% irradiance (considered as extreme shade). The maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II of DP plants showed subtle changes but that of MP plants declined by shading thereafter 21 days of treatment. Observation of chloroplast ultrastructure showed its best development in the leaves of DP and MP types mostly from 50% to 20% irradiance (considered as weak and moderate shade, respectively). At each shade treatment, Pn, g(s) and water use efficiency of DP-jasmine were always higher than those of MP-jasmine, thus the shade tolerance ability of the former was higher than that of the latter. The results showed that full sunlight and 5% natural irradiance caused photoinhibition and light deficiency of jasmine plants respectively, and modulating chloroplast development by the more numbers of thylakoids and grana to contain more photosynthetic pigments is an important shade tolerance mechanism of DP type.

  6. Cross talk between germ cells and gonadal somatic cells is critical for sex differentiation of the gonads in the teleost fish, medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Minoru; Saito, Daisuke; Morinaga, Chikako; Kurokawa, Hiromi

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate the possible role of germ cells on sex differentiation of the gonads in vertebrates, the teleost fish, medaka (Oryzias latipes), was used to generate a gonad without germ cells. The germ cell-deficient medaka reveals multiple effects of germ cells on the process of sex differentiation. The previously isolated mutant medaka, hotei, with the excessive number of germ cells may support the contention that the proliferation of germ cells is related to feminization of the gonad. Futhermore, we show that two modes of proliferation for either maintenance of germ cells or commitment to gametogenesis are important components of the sex differentiation of medaka developing gonads. An intimate cross talk between germ cells and gonadal somatic cells during the sex differentiation will be discussed.

  7. Differential mercury transfer in the aquatic food web of a double basined lake associated with selenium and habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arcagni, Marina; Campbell, Linda; Arribére, María A.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; Rizzo, Andrea; Guevara, Sergio Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Food web trophodynamics of total mercury (THg) and selenium (Se) were assessed for the double-basined ultraoligotrophic system of Lake Moreno, Patagonia. Each basin has differing proportions of littoral and pelagic habitats, thereby providing an opportunity to assess the importance of habitat (e.g. food web structure or benthic MeHg production) in the transfer of Hg and Se to top trophic fish species. Pelagic plankton, analyzed in three size classes (10–53, 53–200, and > 200 μm), had very high [THg], exceeding 200 μg g− 1 dry weight (DW) in the smallest, and a low ratio of MeHg to THg (0.1 to 3%). In contrast, [THg] in littoral macroinvertebrates showed lower values (0.3 to 1.8 μg g− 1 DW). Juvenile and small fish species feeding upon plankton had higher [THg] (0.2 to 8 μg g− 1 muscle DW) compared to large piscivore fish species (0.1 to 1.6 μg g− 1 muscle DW). Selenium concentrations exhibited a much narrower variation range than THg in the food web, varying from 0.5 to 2.7 μg g− 1 DW. Molar Se:Hg ratios exceeded 1 for the majority of organisms in both basins, with most ratios exceeding 10. Using stable nitrogen isotopes as indicator of trophic level, no significant correlations were found with [THg], [Se] or Se:Hg. The apparent lack of biomagnification trends was attributed to elevated [THg] in plankton in the inorganic form mostly, as well as the possibility of consistent Se supply reducing the biomagnification in the food web of the organic portion of THg.

  8. Evidence for non-exponential elastic proton-proton differential cross-section at low |t| and $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV by TOTEM

    DOE PAGES

    Antchev, G.

    2015-08-15

    The TOTEM experiment has made a precise measurement of the elastic proton–proton differential cross-section at the centre-of-mass energy √s = 8 TeV based on a high-statistics data sample obtained with the β* = 90 m optics. Both the statistical and systematic uncertainties remain below 1%, except for the t -independent contribution from the overall normalisation. This unprecedented precision allows to exclude a purely exponential differential cross-section in the range of four-momentum transfer squared 0.027 < |t| < 0.2 GeV2 with a significance greater than 7 σ. Two extended parametrisations, with quadratic and cubic polynomials in the exponent, are shown tomore » be well compatible with the data. As a result, using them for the differential cross-section extrapolation to t=0, and further applying the optical theorem, yields total cross-section estimates of (101.5 ± 2.1) mb and (101.9 ± 2.1) mb, respectively, in agreement with previous TOTEM measurements.« less

  9. Evidence for non-exponential elastic proton-proton differential cross-section at low |t| and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV by TOTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Antchev, G.

    2015-08-15

    The TOTEM experiment has made a precise measurement of the elastic proton–proton differential cross-section at the centre-of-mass energy √s = 8 TeV based on a high-statistics data sample obtained with the β* = 90 m optics. Both the statistical and systematic uncertainties remain below 1%, except for the t -independent contribution from the overall normalisation. This unprecedented precision allows to exclude a purely exponential differential cross-section in the range of four-momentum transfer squared 0.027 < |t| < 0.2 GeV2 with a significance greater than 7 σ. Two extended parametrisations, with quadratic and cubic polynomials in the exponent, are shown to be well compatible with the data. As a result, using them for the differential cross-section extrapolation to t=0, and further applying the optical theorem, yields total cross-section estimates of (101.5 ± 2.1) mb and (101.9 ± 2.1) mb, respectively, in agreement with previous TOTEM measurements.

  10. Diet restriction in migraine, based on IgG against foods: A clinical double-blind, randomised, cross-over trial

    PubMed Central

    Alpay, Kadriye; Ertaş, Mustafa; Orhan, Elif Kocasoy; Üstay, Didem Kanca; Lieners, Camille; Baykan, Betül

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: It is well-known that specific foods trigger migraine attacks in some patients. We aimed to investigate the effect of diet restriction, based on IgG antibodies against food antigens on the course of migraine attacks in this randomised, double blind, cross-over, headache-diary based trial on 30 patients diagnosed with migraine without aura. Methods: Following a 6-week baseline, IgG antibodies against 266 food antigens were detected by ELISA. Then, the patients were randomised to a 6-week diet either excluding or including specific foods with raised IgG antibodies, individually. Following a 2-week diet-free interval after the first diet period, the same patients were given the opposite 6-week diet (provocation diet following elimination diet or vice versa). Patients and their physicians were blinded to IgG test results and the type of diet (provocation or elimination). Primary parameters were number of headache days and migraine attack count. Of 30 patients, 28 were female and 2 were male, aged 19–52 years (mean, 35 ± 10 years). Results: The average count of reactions with abnormally high titre was 24 ± 11 against 266 foods. Compared to baseline, there was a statistically significant reduction in the number of headache days (from 10.5 ± 4.4 to 7.5 ± 3.7; P < 0.001) and number of migraine attacks (from 9.0 ± 4.4 to 6.2 ± 3.8; P < 0.001) in the elimination diet period. Conclusion: This is the first randomised, cross-over study in migraineurs, showing that diet restriction based on IgG antibodies is an effective strategy in reducing the frequency of migraine attacks. PMID:20647174

  11. A randomized, double-blind, cross-over, phase IV trial of oros-methylphenidate (CONCERTA®) and generic novo-methylphenidate ER-C (NOVO-generic)

    PubMed Central

    Fallu, Angelo; Dabouz, Farida; Furtado, Melissa; Anand, Leena; Katzman, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurobehavioral disorder with onset during childhood. Multiple aspects of a child’s development are hindered, in both home and school settings, with negative impacts on social, emotional, and cognitive functioning. If left untreated, ADHD is commonly associated with poor academic achievement and low occupational status, as well as increased risk of substance abuse and delinquency. The objective of this study was to evaluate adult ADHD subject reported outcomes when switched from a stable dose of CONCERTA® to the same dose of generic Novo-methylphenidate ER-C®. Methods: Randomized, double-blind, cross-over, phase IV trial consisted of two phases in which participants with a primary diagnosis of ADHD were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to 3 weeks of treatment with CONCERTA or generic Novo-Methylphenidate ER-C. Following 3 weeks of treatment, participants were crossed-over to receive the other treatment for an additional 3 weeks. Primary efficacy was assessed through the use of the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication, Version II (TSQM-II). Results: Participants with ADHD treated with CONCERTA were more satisfied in terms of efficacy and side effects compared to those receiving an equivalent dose of generic Novo-Methylphenidate ER-C. All participants chose to continue with CONCERTA treatment at the conclusion of the study. Conclusion: Although CONCERTA and generic Novo-Methylphenidate ER-C have been deemed bioequivalent, however the present findings demonstrate clinically and statistically significant differences between generic and branded CONCERTA. Further investigation of these differences is warranted. PMID:27536342

  12. Total cross sections of electron and positron collisions with C3F8 and C3H8 molecules and differential elastic and vibrational excitation cross sections by electron impact on these molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tachibana, Yoshio; Kitajima, Masashi; Sueoka, Osamu; Takaki, Hideki; Hamada, Akira; Kimura, Mineo

    1999-03-01

    Total cross sections for electron (e-) and positron (e+) scattering from C3H8 and C3F8 have been measured from 0.8 to 600 eV and 0.7 to 600 eV, respectively. We have also investigated differential elastic cross sections by electron impact from 2.0 to 200 eV, and compared them with the present theoretical results. For e- scattering from C3H8, the cross sections are found to be larger by a factor of 2 than those of e+ scattering below 20-30 eV. They show a large peak at 8 eV due to a shape resonance and a shoulderlike structure in the region of 20-40 eV. For e- scattering from C3F8, the cross sections are again larger by at least a factor of 2 than those of e+ scattering below 50 eV, and they have two peaks at 4 and 8 eV, followed by a broad peak in the region of 20-40 eV. Some small structures overlie the broad hump. Both e- and e+ impact cross sections for C3H8 and C3F8 quickly approach each other beyond 200 eV. From the differential cross section study, we have been able to provide more detailed information on shape resonances, and also we have carried out some analysis of resonances in vibrational excitation results. In general, the total and integrated elastic cross sections are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement.

  13. The collision cross sections of iodide salt cluster ions in air via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Hui; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Oberreit, Derek R; Hogan, Christopher J

    2013-12-01

    To date, most collision cross section (CCS) predictions have invoked gas molecule impingement-reemission rules in which specular and elastic scattering of spherical gas molecules from rigid polyatomic surfaces are assumed. Although such predictions have been shown to agree well with CCSs measured in helium bath gas, a number of studies reveal that these predictions do not agree with CCSs for ions in diatomic gases, namely, air and molecular nitrogen. To further examine the validity of specular-elastic versus diffuse-inelastic scattering models, we measured the CCSs of positively charged metal iodide cluster ions of the form [MI]n[M(+)]z, where M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs, n = 1 - 25, and z = 1 - 2. Measurements were made in air via differential mobility analysis mass spectrometry (DMA-MS). The CCSs measured are compared with specular-elastic as well as diffuse-inelastic scattering model predictions with candidate ion structures determined from density functional theory. It is found that predictions from diffuse-inelastic collision models agree well (within 5%) with measurements from sodium iodide cluster ions, while specular-elastic collision model predictions are in better agreement with cesium iodide cluster ion measurements. The agreement with diffuse-inelastic and specular-elastic predictions decreases and increases, respectively, with increasing cation mass. However, even when diffuse-inelastic cluster ion predictions disagree wi