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Sample records for double integrator oscillator

  1. BLOCKING OSCILLATOR DOUBLE PULSE GENERATOR CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Haase, J.A.

    1961-01-24

    A double-pulse generator, particuiarly a double-pulse generator comprising a blocking oscillator utilizing a feedback circuit to provide means for producing a second pulse within the recovery time of the blocking oscillator, is described. The invention utilized a passive network which permits adjustment of the spacing between the original pulses derived from the blocking oscillator and further utilizes the original pulses to trigger a circuit from which other pulses are initiated. These other pulses are delayed and then applied to the input of the blocking oscillator, with the result that the output from the oscillator circuit contains twice the number of pulses originally initiated by the blocking oscillator itself.

  2. Wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, Darrell J.; Smith, Arlee V.

    2007-07-24

    A wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator (OPO) comprising a type II nonlinear optical medium for generating a pair of degenerate waves at twice a pump wavelength and a plurality of mirrors for rotating the polarization of one wave by 90 degrees to produce a wavelength-doubled beam with an increased output energy by coupling both of the degenerate waves out of the OPO cavity through the same output coupler following polarization rotation of one of the degenerate waves.

  3. Large Amplitude Oscillations of a Double Pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerres, Jeffrey M.; Jacobs, Robert M.; Kasun, Sara F.; Bacon, Margaret E.; Nagolu, Chakravarthi M.; Owens, Erin L.; Siehl, Kevin F.; Thomsen, Marshall; Troyer, Jon S.

    2008-03-01

    The nature of the normal modes of oscillation in the small angle regime of a double pendulum is well established. However, for large amplitude oscillations, a closed form solution of the differential equations of motion does not exist. Using Lagrange formalism, we explore both the in-phase and out-of-phase normal modes of oscillation of a double pendulum as a function of the mass ratio of the two bobs and their initial angular positions. We conduct the analysis using MatLab, where we initially verify our code in the known small amplitude limit. Among our results we find that certain symmetries between the in-phase and out-of-phase normal modes that exist in the small amplitude limit are no longer present at large amplitudes.

  4. Double integrated laser interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motyka, Zbigniew

    2003-10-01

    The layout of integrated optical system compromising the basis of proposed solution of double laser interferometer composed of two integrated Michelson's interferometers is presented and shortly discussed. Such an integrated system is designed for work with two lasers of different wavelength. It may serve for mapping surfaces and deformations of objects under investigation with the use of simultaneous recording of two mutually orthogonal gratings, each one composed of equidistant, parallel interference fringes projected onto the surface of such an object. The picture resulting two-coloured is recorded with the digital camera and may be used for obtaining these maps and deformations directly or in the indirect way after suitable digital processing applied to each colour component separately.

  5. Modulation of single and double spin torque oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muduli, P. K.; Pogoryelov, Ye.; Consolo, G.; Mancoff, Fred; Åkerman, Johan

    2011-06-01

    We discuss modulation of metallic spin torque oscillators (STOs) based on single and double nano-contacts. The modulation behavior of both types of devices is characterized by equally spaced multiple sidebands, which can be ascribed mostly to a frequency modulation phenomenon. However, quantitative examination reveals that amplitude modulation is also present in both types of devices. We also show the feasibility of modulating the synchronized state of a double nano-contact STO. The synchronized state can be treated as a single oscillator, which is a very promising feature for future applications of STO arrays.z

  6. Generalized double-gradient model of flapping oscillations: Oblique waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    The double-gradient model of flapping oscillations is generalized for oblique plane waves, propagating in the equatorial plane. It is found that longitudinal propagation (ky = 0) is prohibited, while transversal (kx = 0) or nearly transversal waves should possess a maximum frequency, diminishing with the reduction of | k y / k x | ratio. It turns out that the sausage mode may propagate in a narrow range of directions only, | k y / k x | ≫ 1 . A simple analytical expression for the dispersion relation of the kink mode, valid in most part of wave numbers range, | k y / k x | < 9 , is derived.

  7. Axisymmetric oscillation modes of a double droplet system

    SciTech Connect

    Ramalingam, Santhosh K.; Basaran, Osman A.

    2010-11-15

    A double droplet system (DDS) consists of a sessile and a pendant drop that are coupled through a liquid filled cylindrical hole in a plate of thickness d. For a small hole radius R, equilibrium shapes of both drops are sections of spheres. While DDSs have a number of applications in microfluidics, a DDS oscillating about its equilibrium state can be used as a fast focusing liquid lens. Here, a DDS consisting of an isothermal, incompressible Newtonian fluid of constant density p and constant viscosity u that is surrounded by a gas is excited by oscillating in time (a) the pressure in the gas surrounding either drop (pressure excitation), (b) the plate perpendicular to its plane (axial excitation), and (c) the hole radius (radial excitation). In contrast to previous works that assumed transient drop shapes are spherical, they are determined here by simulation and used to identify the natural modes of axisymmetric oscillations from resonances observed during frequency sweeps with DDSs for which the combined volume V of the two drops is less than (4/3)πR3. Pressure and axial excitations are found to have identical responses but axial and radial excitations are shown to excite different modes. These modes are compared to those exhibited by single pendant (sessile) drop systems. Specifically, while a single pendant (sessile) drop has one additional oscillation mode compared to a free drop, a DDS is found to exhibit roughly twice as many oscillation modes as a pendant (sessile) drop. The effects of dimensionless volume V/R3, dimensionless plate thickness d/R, and Ohnesorge number Oh =μ/√ρRσ , where σ is the surface tension of the DDS-gas interface, on the resonance frequencies are also investigated.

  8. Axisymmetric oscillation modes of a double droplet system

    DOE PAGES

    Ramalingam, Santhosh K.; Basaran, Osman A.

    2010-11-15

    A double droplet system (DDS) consists of a sessile and a pendant drop that are coupled through a liquid filled cylindrical hole in a plate of thickness d. For a small hole radius R, equilibrium shapes of both drops are sections of spheres. While DDSs have a number of applications in microfluidics, a DDS oscillating about its equilibrium state can be used as a fast focusing liquid lens. Here, a DDS consisting of an isothermal, incompressible Newtonian fluid of constant density p and constant viscosity u that is surrounded by a gas is excited by oscillating in time (a) themore » pressure in the gas surrounding either drop (pressure excitation), (b) the plate perpendicular to its plane (axial excitation), and (c) the hole radius (radial excitation). In contrast to previous works that assumed transient drop shapes are spherical, they are determined here by simulation and used to identify the natural modes of axisymmetric oscillations from resonances observed during frequency sweeps with DDSs for which the combined volume V of the two drops is less than (4/3)πR3. Pressure and axial excitations are found to have identical responses but axial and radial excitations are shown to excite different modes. These modes are compared to those exhibited by single pendant (sessile) drop systems. Specifically, while a single pendant (sessile) drop has one additional oscillation mode compared to a free drop, a DDS is found to exhibit roughly twice as many oscillation modes as a pendant (sessile) drop. The effects of dimensionless volume V/R3, dimensionless plate thickness d/R, and Ohnesorge number Oh =μ/√ρRσ , where σ is the surface tension of the DDS-gas interface, on the resonance frequencies are also investigated.« less

  9. Synchronization of period-doubling oscillations in vascular coupled nephrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laugesen, J. L.; Mosekilde, E.; Holstein-Rathlou, N.-H.

    2011-09-01

    The mechanisms by which the individual functional unit (nephron) of the kidney regulates the incoming blood flow give rise to a number of nonlinear dynamic phenomena, including period-doubling bifurcations and intra-nephron synchronization between two different oscillatory modes. Interaction between the nephrons produces complicated and time-dependent inter-nephron synchronization patterns. In order to understand the processes by which a pair of vascular coupled nephrons synchronize, the paper presents a detailed analysis of the bifurcations that occur at the threshold of synchronization. We show that, besides infinite cascades of saddle-node bifurcations, these transitions involve mutually connected cascades of torus and homoclinic bifurcations. To illustrate the broader range of occurrence of this bifurcation structure for coupled period-doubling systems, we show that a similar structure arises in a system of two coupled, non-identical Rössler oscillators.

  10. Synchronization of period-doubling oscillations in vascular coupled nephrons.

    PubMed

    Laugesen, J L; Mosekilde, E; Holstein-Rathlou, N-H

    2011-09-01

    The mechanisms by which the individual functional unit (nephron) of the kidney regulates the incoming blood flow give rise to a number of nonlinear dynamic phenomena, including period-doubling bifurcations and intra-nephron synchronization between two different oscillatory modes. Interaction between the nephrons produces complicated and time-dependent inter-nephron synchronization patterns. In order to understand the processes by which a pair of vascular coupled nephrons synchronize, the paper presents a detailed analysis of the bifurcations that occur at the threshold of synchronization. We show that, besides infinite cascades of saddle-node bifurcations, these transitions involve mutually connected cascades of torus and homoclinic bifurcations. To illustrate the broader range of occurrence of this bifurcation structure for coupled period-doubling systems, we show that a similar structure arises in a system of two coupled, non-identical Rössler oscillators.

  11. Neutrino oscillation constraints on neutrinoless double-beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenky, S. M.; Giunti, C.; Kim, C. W.; Monteno, M.

    1998-06-01

    We have studied the constraints imposed by the results of neutrino oscillation experiments on the effective Majorana mass \\|\\| that characterizes the contribution of Majorana neutrino masses to the matrix element of neutrinoless double-beta decay. We have shown that in a general scheme with three Majorana neutrinos and a hierarchy of neutrino masses (which corresponds to the standard seesaw mechanism) the results of neutrino oscillation experiments imply rather strong constraints on the parameter \\|\\|. From the results of the first reactor long-baseline experiment CHOOZ and the Bugey experiment it follows that \\|\\|<~3×10-2 eV if Δm2<~2 eV2 (Δm2 is the largest mass-squared difference). Hence, we conclude that the observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay with a probability that corresponds to \\|\\|>~10-1 eV would be a signal for a nonhierarchical neutrino mass spectrum and/or nonstandard mechanisms of lepton number violation.

  12. Double-sensor method for detection of oscillating electric field.

    PubMed

    Ohkuma, Yasunori; Ikeyama, Taeko; Nogi, Yasuyuki

    2011-04-01

    An electric-field sensor consisting of thin copper plates is designed to measure an oscillating electric field produced by charge separations on a plasma column. The sensor installed in a vacuum region around plasma detects charges induced by the electric field on the copper plates. The value of the induced charges depends not only on the strength of the electric field, but also on the design of the sensor. To obtain the correct strength of the electric field, a correction factor arising from the design of the sensor must be known. The factor is calculated numerically using Laplace's equation and compared with a value measured using a uniform electric field in the frequency range of 10-500 kHz. When an external circuit is connected to the sensor to measure the induced charges, the electric field around the sensor is disturbed. Therefore, a double-sensor method for excluding a disturbed component in the measured electric field is proposed. The reliability of the double-sensor method is confirmed by measuring dipole-like and quadrupole-like electric fields. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  13. Two integrator loop quadrature oscillators: A review

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ahmed M.

    2012-01-01

    A review of the two integrator loop oscillator circuits providing two quadrature sinusoidal output voltages is given. All the circuits considered employ the minimum number of capacitors namely two except one circuit which uses three capacitors. The circuits considered are classified to four different classes. The first class includes floating capacitors and floating resistors and the active building blocks realizing these circuits are the Op Amp or the OTRA. The second class employs grounded capacitors and includes floating resistors and the active building blocks realizing these circuits are the DCVC or the unity gain cells or the CFOA. The third class employs grounded capacitors and grounded resistors and the active building blocks realizing these circuits are the CCII. The fourth class employs grounded capacitors and no resistors and the active building blocks realizing these circuits are the TA. Transformation methods showing the generation of different classes from each other is given in details and this is one of the main objectives of this paper. PMID:25685396

  14. Double relaxation oscillation superconducting quantum interference devices with gradiometric layout

    SciTech Connect

    van Duuren, M.J.; Brons, G.C.; Adelerhof, D.J.; Flokstra, J.; Rogalla, H.

    1997-10-01

    Double relaxation oscillation superconducting quantum interference devices (DROSs) with a gradiometric signal SQUID and either a reference SQUID or a reference junction will be presented in this article. The devices are user friendly, particularly those with a reference junction. Because of the large flux-to-voltage transfer of {partial_derivative}V/{partial_derivative}{Phi}=0.7{endash}1mV/{Phi}{sub 0}, the devices can be operated in a flux locked loop based on direct voltage readout without loss of sensitivity. The typical white flux noise of the DROSs amounts to {radical}S{sub {Phi}}=5{endash}6{mu}{Phi}{sub 0}/{radical}Hz, which corresponds to an energy resolution {epsilon}=S{sub {Phi}}/2L{sub sq}{approx_equal}200h. Coupled to an external planar first-order gradiometer, a white magnetic field sensitivity of {radical}S{sub B}{lt}2fT/{radical}Hz was measured inside a magnetically shielded room. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Double Ramification Cycles and Quantum Integrable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buryak, Alexandr; Rossi, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we define a quantization of the Double Ramification Hierarchies of Buryak (Commun Math Phys 336:1085-1107, 2015) and Buryak and Rossi (Commun Math Phys, 2014), using intersection numbers of the double ramification cycle, the full Chern class of the Hodge bundle and psi-classes with a given cohomological field theory. We provide effective recursion formulae which determine the full quantum hierarchy starting from just one Hamiltonian, the one associated with the first descendant of the unit of the cohomological field theory only. We study various examples which provide, in very explicit form, new (1+1)-dimensional integrable quantum field theories whose classical limits are well-known integrable hierarchies such as KdV, Intermediate Long Wave, extended Toda, etc. Finally, we prove polynomiality in the ramification multiplicities of the integral of any tautological class over the double ramification cycle.

  16. 1 W, coherent, monolithically integrated master oscillator power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waarts, R.; Parke, R.; Welch, D.; Mehuys, D.; Streifer, W.

    1990-11-01

    Monolithically integrated master oscillator power amplifiers (M-MOPA) have been fabricated consisting of a single mode distributed Bragg reflector oscillator coupled to a chain of nine single mode amplifiers and detuned second order grating output couplers. The M-MOPA emits in excess of 1 W in a coherent, single longitudinal mode, beam.

  17. Internal upconversion and doubling of an optical parametric oscillator to extend the tuning range.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campillo, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Efficient extension of the tuning range of a 1.09-1.95-micron parametric oscillator to 0.435-0.975 microns by upconversion and doubling internally to the oscillator cavity is reported. Unlike previously studied external mixing, internal upconversion and doubling yielded uniform powers of 30 and 60 kW, respectively, over the entire extended tuning range with an unfocused 2-mm ruby laser pump beam of 750 kW.-

  18. Double Fourier Harmonic Balance Method for Nonlinear Oscillators by Means of Bessel Series

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-16

    Double Fourier harmonic balance method for nonlinear oscillators by means of Bessel series T.C. Lipscombe∗1 and C.E. Mungan†2 1Catholic University of...expressed in terms of a Bessel series, and the sums of many such series are known or can be developed. The method is illustrated for five different... Bessel series, work-energy theorem, nonlinear oscillator, pendulum. 1 Introduction Nonlinear oscillators are ubiquitous in physical and engineering

  19. Two-parameter double-oscillator model of Mathews-Lakshmanan type: Series solutions and supersymmetric partners

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze-Halberg, Axel E-mail: xbataxel@gmail.com; Wang, Jie

    2015-07-15

    We obtain series solutions, the discrete spectrum, and supersymmetric partners for a quantum double-oscillator system. Its potential features a superposition of the one-parameter Mathews-Lakshmanan interaction and a one-parameter harmonic or inverse harmonic oscillator contribution. Furthermore, our results are transferred to a generalized Pöschl-Teller model that is isospectral to the double-oscillator system.

  20. Integrable oscillator type and Schrödinger type dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Avinash; Saxena, Avadh

    2017-02-01

    A PT-symmetric dimer is a two-site nonlinear oscillator dimer or a two-site nonlinear Schrödinger dimer where one site loses and the other site gains energy at the same rate. We present a wide class of integrable oscillator type dimers whose Hamiltonian is of arbitrary even order. Further, we also present a wide class of integrable nonlinear Schrödinger type dimers where again the Hamiltonian is of arbitrary even order. Finally, we consider a recently discussed complex dimer model and point out a few integrable cases in that model.

  1. Quantum beats in conductance oscillations in graphene-based asymmetric double velocity wells and electrostatic wells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lei; Li, Yu-Xian; Zhang, Ying-Tao; Liu, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-14

    The transport properties in graphene-based asymmetric double velocity well (Fermi velocity inside the well less than that outside the well) and electrostatic well structures are investigated using the transfer matrix method. The results show that quantum beats occur in the oscillations of the conductance for asymmetric double velocity wells. The beating effect can also be found in asymmetric double electrostatic wells, but only if the widths of the two wells are different. The beat frequency for the asymmetric double well is exactly equal to the frequency difference between the oscillation rates in two isolated single wells with the same structures as the individual wells in the double well structure. A qualitative interpretation is proposed based on the fact that the resonant levels depend upon the sizes of the quantum wells. The beating behavior can provide a new way to identify the symmetry of double well structures.

  2. Submillimeter Quasioptical Josephson Junction Oscillator with Integrated Tuning Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-30

    demonstrate a Quasioptical Josephson Oscillator with Integratd Tuning Elements using standard Conductus niobium. technology. T~his device is based on a...Elements Contract #F49620-93-C0037 AE$.R 94 0347 Aleksandar Pance Conductus , Inc. Approved for public release; (408) 524 9820 distribution unlimited...Report Summary The goal of this program was to demonstrate a Quasioptical Josephson Oscillator with Integrated Tuning Elements using standard Conductus

  3. Efficient numerical integration of neutrino oscillations in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, F.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Oteo, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    A special purpose solver, based on the Magnus expansion, well suited for the integration of the linear three neutrino oscillations equations in matter is proposed. The computations are speeded up to two orders of magnitude with respect to a general numerical integrator, a fact that could smooth the way for massive numerical integration concomitant with experimental data analyses. Detailed illustrations about numerical procedure and computer time costs are provided.

  4. Energetics of oscillating lifting surfaces using integral conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmadi, Ali R.; Widnall, Sheila E.

    1987-01-01

    The energetics of oscillating flexible lifting surfaces in two and three dimensions is calculated by the use of integral conservation laws in inviscid incompressible flow for general and harmonic transverse oscillations. Total thrust is calculated from the momentum theorem and energy loss rate due to vortex shedding in the wake from the principle of conservation of mechanical energy. Total power required to maintain the oscillations and hydrodynamic efficiency are also determined. In two dimensions, the results are obtained in closed form. In three dimensions, the distribution of vorticity on the lifting surface is also required as input to the calculations. Thus, unsteady lifting-surface theory must be used as well. The analysis is applicable to oscillating lifting surfaces of arbitrary planform, aspect ratio, and reduced frequency and does not require calculation of the leading-edge thrust.

  5. Energetics of oscillating lifting surfaces using integral conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmadi, Ali R.; Widnall, Sheila E.

    1987-01-01

    The energetics of oscillating flexible lifting surfaces in two and three dimensions is calculated by the use of integral conservation laws in inviscid incompressible flow for general and harmonic transverse oscillations. Total thrust is calculated from the momentum theorem and energy loss rate due to vortex shedding in the wake from the principle of conservation of mechanical energy. Total power required to maintain the oscillations and hydrodynamic efficiency are also determined. In two dimensions, the results are obtained in closed form. In three dimensions, the distribution of vorticity on the lifting surface is also required as input to the calculations. Thus, unsteady lifting-surface theory must be used as well. The analysis is applicable to oscillating lifting surfaces of arbitrary planform, aspect ratio, and reduced frequency and does not require calculation of the leading-edge thrust.

  6. Changing and predicting the frequency of double wall carbon nanotubes oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xing; Xiao, Shao-Rong; Liu, Hong-De; Wang, Tong; Yue, Ju-Qing

    2017-06-01

    Double wall carbon nanotubes have been considered as potential candidate for ultra-high frequency oscillator. However, the exact frequency change versus the nanotubes' shape has not been detailed discussed. In this article, a series of double wall carbon nanotubes oscillators are investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. We find that, by changing the tube length and radius, the oscillation frequency can be easily modified. To better understand the simulation result above, a theoretical model with maximum main force approximation is introduced. Then the tendency for the frequency change can be well interpreted. Moreover, we find the effective force increases linearly with the tube radius. After a careful derivation, a universal formula is given, which can predict the oscillation period with a good accuracy.

  7. Oscillator-interference models of path integration do not require theta oscillations.

    PubMed

    Orchard, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    Navigation and path integration in rodents seems to involve place cells, grid cells, and theta oscillations (4-12 Hz) in the local field potential. Two main theories have been proposed to explain the neurological underpinnings of how these phenomena relate to navigation and to each other. Attractor network (AN) models revolve around the idea that local excitation and long-range inhibition connectivity can spontaneously generate grid-cell-like activity patterns. Oscillator interference (OI) models propose that spatial patterns of activity are caused by the interference patterns between neural oscillators. In rats, these oscillators have a frequency close to the theta frequency. Recent studies have shown that bats do not exhibit a theta cycle when they crawl, and yet they still have grid cells. This has been interpreted as a criticism of OI models. However, OI models do not require theta oscillations. We explain why the absence of theta oscillations does not contradict OI models and discuss how the two families of models might be distinguished experimentally.

  8. Bayesian inference to characterize Josephson oscillations in a double-well trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanainen, Juha; Rajapakse, Renuka

    2015-08-01

    We use quantum trajectories to simulate Josephson oscillations of atomic condensates between the two sides of a double-well potential. In the simulations the atoms in both wells are monitored using off-resonant light scattering, and the ultimate outcome of our thought experiment is a sequence of photon counts probing the numbers of the atoms in each potential well. We show how to reconstruct the Josephson oscillations from the observed photon counts using Bayesian inference, and study the oscillations quantitatively by averaging the inferred time-dependent oscillation amplitude over a large number of realizations. Scaling behaviors that characterize the oscillations are uncovered and related to physics principles such as measurement back-action. It turns out that the scalings hold true for quite small atom numbers, so that in this sense four atoms in a potential well may already make a Bose-Einstein condensate.

  9. Path Integral for Dirac oscillator with generalized uncertainty principle

    SciTech Connect

    Benzair, H.; Boudjedaa, T.; Merad, M.

    2012-12-15

    The propagator for Dirac oscillator in (1+1) dimension, with deformed commutation relation of the Heisenberg principle, is calculated using path integral in quadri-momentum representation. As the mass is related to momentum, we then adapt the space-time transformation method to evaluate quantum corrections and this latter is dependent from the point discretization interval.

  10. Towards an Integrated Optic Phase-Locked Oscillator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    photodetection process. In a recent demonstration [8], a timing stability of 6.8 fs over 10 hours was demonstrated, corresponding to a stability of 1.9×10-19...optic phase-locked oscillator (IO-PLO). While much work remains, a design for an integrated optic balanced optical-microwave phase detector (IO...readily implemented device is an integrated optic balanced optical-microwave phase detector (IO-BOMPD), which is highly useful for distributed timing

  11. Integrated reservoir management doubles Nigerian field reserves

    SciTech Connect

    Akinlawon, Y.; Nwosu, T.; Satter, A.; Jespersen, R.

    1996-10-01

    An integrated alliance across disciplines, companies and countries enabled Texaco to conduct a comprehensive reservoir analysis of the North Apoi/Funiwa field in Nigeria. Recommendations implemented in 3 months doubled the book reserves of this mature field. The paper discusses the objectives, the integration of organizations, reservoir analysis, and conclusions. The conclusions made from the integrated study are: (1) 3-D seismic data dramatically improved reservoir description. (2) OOIP is considerably more than the booked values and reserves additions are substantial. (3) Significant value has been added to TOPCON`s assets as a result of teamwork and a multidisciplinary approach to evaluating the reservoirs and optimizing the scenarios for reservoir management. (4) Teamwork and integration of professionals, data, technology and tools was critical to the projects success. (5) The study set an example for effective and expeditious technology transfer and applications. (6) Partnering of TOPCON, DPR, NAPIMS, EPTD and SSI resulted in a quick cycle time and set an excellent example of integration and alliance.

  12. Self-seeding of a pulsed double-grating Ti:sapphire laser oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Koji

    2008-04-01

    A self-seeded pulsed double-grating Ti:sapphire laser oscillator consisting of a grazing incidence cavity geometry with a pair of gratings and a standing-wave cavity pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser was developed and characterized. With self-seeding, narrow-linewidth single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) operation and SLM scanning were possible with a reduced lasing threshold, which was desirable for the intended applications.

  13. Analysis of monolithic integrated master oscillator power amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehuys, David; Welch, David F.; Waarts, Robert G.; Parke, Ross; Hardy, Amos; Streifer, William

    1991-07-01

    An analysis of a novel, monolithic integrated master oscillator power amplifier (M-MOPA) is presented. The M-MOPA consists of a DBR master oscillator which injects power into a linear chain of amplifiers and detuned second-order grating output couplers. The analysis self-consistently includes amplified spontaneous emission buildup and residual reflections throughout the amplifier stages. It predicts that output powers in excess of 1 W can be expected from a single-lateral-mode waveguide multistage amplifier less than 1 cm in length, injected with less than 15 mW of input power. In addition to the signal gain of more than 25 dB, the signal-to-noise ratio at 1-W output exceeds 15 dB. Because of the small reflections associated with the grating output couplers, and gain saturation by the injected signal, the amplifier self-oscillation threshold is suppressed to current densities above 15 kA/sq cm.

  14. Planar resonator and integrated oscillator using magnetostatic waves.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Y; Kubota, S; Takeda, S; Nakagoshi, A

    1990-01-01

    A simple planar resonator using a magnetostatic wave (MSW) excited by aluminum finger electrodes with two bonding pads was realized on YIG/GGG (yttrium-iron-garnet film on a gadolinium-gallium-garnet crystal) substrate with two reflection edges. The tunable MSW resonator chip (2 mmx5 mm) exhibited a sharp notch filter response, as deep as 20-35 dB, and a high loaded Q up to 2000, which was tunable over the microwave frequency range from 2 to 4 GHz. A small tunable oscillator (8 cm(3)) was experimentally demonstrated using the MSW planar resonator and a silicon bipolar transistor integrated on a ceramic microwave circuit substrate. Microwave oscillation with spectral purity, at the same level as that of YIG sphere technology, was observed at 3 GHz. The experimental results indicate the technical areas where improvement must be made to realize a practical oscillator configuration.

  15. Sub-picosecond double-clad photonic crystal fiber oscillator and amplifier system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pingxue; Zhang, Mengmeng; Liang, Boxing; Chi, Junjie

    2015-08-01

    A ytterbium-doped large mode area PCF sub-picosecond laser oscillator and amplifier system is experimentally studied. The oscillator which combines NPE and SESAM is operating on the all-normal-dispersion regime and the LMA PCF is used as the gain medium. In the CW mode-locking regime, the oscillator directly generates the pulse at the repetition rate of 83.7 MHz while the pulse duration is 960 fs. The double-clad fiber amplifier system directly generates a high average power of 12.53 W with a pulse duration of 4.1 ps corresponding to the pulse energy of 150 nJ and peak power of 36.6 KW after about 3 m ytterbium doped double clad fiber amplification.

  16. Development of a 14-vane, double-strapped, 5.8-GHz magnetron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin Joo; Lee, Han Seoul; Jang, Kwang Ho; Sim, Sung Hun; Choi, Heung Sik

    2016-08-01

    Experiments on a 14-vane, double-strapped magnetron oscillator were performed to demonstrate high-power, high-efficiency coherent radiation at 5.8 GHz. The double-strapped magnetron was designed by using the Buneman-Hatree resonance condition, electromagnetic simulations and non-linear three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Experiments showed an oscillation output power of 5.3 kW at 5.79 GHz, corresponding to a DC-RF conversion efficiency of 57%. The cathode voltage was 9.2 kV, the collected anode current was 1 A, and the external magnetic field is 7.5 kG. Experimental results for the RF power, oscillation frequency, and efficiency were in good agreement with the corresponding values from non-linear three-dimensional PIC simulations.

  17. Millimeter-band oscillations based on resonant tunneling in a double-barrier diode at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. R.; Sollner, T. C. L. G.; Goodhue, W. D.; Parker, C. D.

    1987-01-01

    A double-barrier diode at room temperature has yielded oscillations with fundamental frequencies up to 56 GHz and second harmonics up to 87 GHz. The output powers at these frequencies were about 60 and 18 microW, respectively. These results are attributed to a recent improvement in the material parameters of the device and to the integration of the device into a waveguide resonator. The most successful diode to date has thin (about 1.5 nm) AlAs barriers, a 4.5-nm-wide GaAs quantum well, and 2 x 10 to the 17th/cu cm doping concentration in the n-GaAs outside the barriers. This particular diode is expected to oscillate at frequencies higher than those achieved by any reported p-n tunnel diode.

  18. Yellow light generation by frequency doubling of a fiber oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacher, Christoph; Oliveira, Ricardo; Nogueira, Rogério N.; Romano, Valerio; Ryser, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Laser sources with light-emission in the yellow spectral range around 577nm are very favorable for a variety of applications. These include applications in astronomy, in ophthalmology or in quantum optics. The generation and amplification of 1154 nm light is not straight forward when using Yb-doped optical fibers, since lasing occurs preferentially around the gain-maximum of 1030 nm. We generate the radiation within a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based cavity and focused on reducing the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). After the cavity, the output is frequency doubled to 577nm by using a second harmonic crystal.

  19. Noise-induced transitions in a double-well excitable oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Vladimir V.

    2017-05-01

    The model of a double-well oscillator with nonlinear dissipation is studied. The self-sustained oscillation regime and the excitable one are described. The first regime consists of the coexistence of two stable limit cycles in the phase space, which correspond to self-sustained oscillations of the point mass in either potential well. The self-sustained oscillations do not occur in a noise-free system in the excitable regime, but appropriate conditions for coherence resonance in either potential well can be achieved. The stochastic dynamics in both regimes is researched by using numerical simulation and electronic circuit implementation of the considered system. Multiple qualitative changes of the probability density function caused by noise intensity varying are explained by using the phase-space structure of the deterministic system.

  20. Integrated Ring Oscillators based on high-performance Graphene Inverters.

    PubMed

    Schall, Daniel; Otto, Martin; Neumaier, Daniel; Kurz, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    The road to the realization of complex integrated circuits based on graphene remains an open issue so far. Current graphene based integrated circuits are limited by low integration depth and significant doping variations, representing major road blocks for the success of graphene in future electronic devices. Here we report on the realization of graphene based integrated inverters and ring oscillators. By using an optimized process technology for high-performance graphene transistors with local back-gate electrodes we demonstrate that complex graphene based integrated circuits can be manufactured reproducibly, circumventing problems associated with doping variations. The fabrication process developed here is scalable and fully compatible with conventional silicon technology. Therefore, our results pave the way towards applications based on graphene transistors in future electronic devices.

  1. Integrated Ring Oscillators based on high-performance Graphene Inverters

    PubMed Central

    Schall, Daniel; Otto, Martin; Neumaier, Daniel; Kurz, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    The road to the realization of complex integrated circuits based on graphene remains an open issue so far. Current graphene based integrated circuits are limited by low integration depth and significant doping variations, representing major road blocks for the success of graphene in future electronic devices. Here we report on the realization of graphene based integrated inverters and ring oscillators. By using an optimized process technology for high-performance graphene transistors with local back-gate electrodes we demonstrate that complex graphene based integrated circuits can be manufactured reproducibly, circumventing problems associated with doping variations. The fabrication process developed here is scalable and fully compatible with conventional silicon technology. Therefore, our results pave the way towards applications based on graphene transistors in future electronic devices. PMID:24005257

  2. A non-PRE double-peaked burst with oscillations: burning front propagation and stalling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2006-01-01

    Non-photospheric-radius-expansion (non-PRE) double-peaked bursts may be explained in terms of spreading (and temporary stalling) of thermonuclear flames from a rotational pole on the neutron star surface, as we argued in a previous study. Here we analyze Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA) data of such a burst from the low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) system 4U 1636-536, and show that our model (with ignition at high latitudes) can qualitatively explain the observed burst profile, and spectral evolution. Moreover, the evolution of the source radius inferred from the data shows a strong signature of temporary stalling of the burning front, which is an essential ingredient of our model. This implies that an understanding of thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars can be achieved by a simultaneous study of the evolution of intensity and spectrum of these bursts. We also report the discovery of millisecond period brightness oscillations from this burst, which is the first such observation from a non-PRE double-peaked burst. Our model can explain the corresponding oscillation amplitude during the first (weaker) peak, and the absence of oscillations during the second peak. We discuss how observations of oscillations during non-PRE double-peaked bursts provide an additional t 001 for understanding thermonuclear flame spreading successfully.

  3. Generic mechanisms of decoherence of quantum oscillations in magnetic double-well systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. Chudnovsky, Eugene

    2004-05-01

    Fundamental conservation laws mandate parameter-free generic mechanisms of decoherence of quantum oscillations in double-well systems. We consider two examples: tunneling of the magnetic moment in nanomagnets and tunneling between macroscopic current states in SQUIDs. In both cases the decoherence occurs via emission of phonons and photons at the oscillation frequency. We also show that in a system of identical qubits the decoherence greatly increases due to the superradiance of electromagnetic and sound waves. Our findings have important implications for building elements of quantum computers based upon nanomagnets and SQUIDs.

  4. Pneumatic oscillator circuits for timing and control of integrated microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Philip N; Nguyen, Transon V; Hui, Elliot E

    2013-11-05

    Frequency references are fundamental to most digital systems, providing the basis for process synchronization, timing of outputs, and waveform synthesis. Recently, there has been growing interest in digital logic systems that are constructed out of microfluidics rather than electronics, as a possible means toward fully integrated laboratory-on-a-chip systems that do not require any external control apparatus. However, the full realization of this goal has not been possible due to the lack of on-chip frequency references, thus requiring timing signals to be provided from off-chip. Although microfluidic oscillators have been demonstrated, there have been no reported efforts to characterize, model, or optimize timing accuracy, which is the fundamental metric of a clock. Here, we report pneumatic ring oscillator circuits built from microfluidic valves and channels. Further, we present a compressible-flow analysis that differs fundamentally from conventional circuit theory, and we show the utility of this physically based model for the optimization of oscillator stability. Finally, we leverage microfluidic clocks to demonstrate circuits for the generation of phase-shifted waveforms, self-driving peristaltic pumps, and frequency division. Thus, pneumatic oscillators can serve as on-chip frequency references for microfluidic digital logic circuits. On-chip clocks and pumps both constitute critical building blocks on the path toward achieving autonomous laboratory-on-a-chip devices.

  5. Pneumatic oscillator circuits for timing and control of integrated microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Philip N.; Nguyen, Transon V.; Hui, Elliot E.

    2013-01-01

    Frequency references are fundamental to most digital systems, providing the basis for process synchronization, timing of outputs, and waveform synthesis. Recently, there has been growing interest in digital logic systems that are constructed out of microfluidics rather than electronics, as a possible means toward fully integrated laboratory-on-a-chip systems that do not require any external control apparatus. However, the full realization of this goal has not been possible due to the lack of on-chip frequency references, thus requiring timing signals to be provided from off-chip. Although microfluidic oscillators have been demonstrated, there have been no reported efforts to characterize, model, or optimize timing accuracy, which is the fundamental metric of a clock. Here, we report pneumatic ring oscillator circuits built from microfluidic valves and channels. Further, we present a compressible-flow analysis that differs fundamentally from conventional circuit theory, and we show the utility of this physically based model for the optimization of oscillator stability. Finally, we leverage microfluidic clocks to demonstrate circuits for the generation of phase-shifted waveforms, self-driving peristaltic pumps, and frequency division. Thus, pneumatic oscillators can serve as on-chip frequency references for microfluidic digital logic circuits. On-chip clocks and pumps both constitute critical building blocks on the path toward achieving autonomous laboratory-on-a-chip devices. PMID:24145429

  6. Double-Paddle Oscillators as Probes of Quantum Turbulence in the Zero Temperature Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoranzer, David; Jackson, Martin; Zemma, Elisa; Luzuriaga, Javier

    2017-06-01

    We present a technical report on our tests of a double-paddle oscillator as a detector of quantum turbulence in superfluid 4He at low temperatures ranging from 20 to 1100 mK. The device, known to operate well in the two-fluid regime (Zemma and Luzuriaga in J Low Temp Phys 166:171-181, 2012), is also capable of detecting quantum turbulence in the zero temperature limit. The oscillator demonstrated Lorentzian responses with quality factors of order 10^5 in vacuum, and displayed negative-Duffing resonances in liquid, even at moderate drives. In superfluid He-II at low temperatures, its sensitivity was adversely affected by acoustic damping at higher harmonics. While it successfully created and detected the quantum turbulence, its overall performance does not compare favourably with other oscillators such as tuning forks.

  7. Double-Paddle Oscillators as Probes of Quantum Turbulence in the Zero Temperature Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoranzer, David; Jackson, Martin; Zemma, Elisa; Luzuriaga, Javier

    2016-11-01

    We present a technical report on our tests of a double-paddle oscillator as a detector of quantum turbulence in superfluid 4 He at low temperatures ranging from 20 to 1100 mK. The device, known to operate well in the two-fluid regime (Zemma and Luzuriaga in J Low Temp Phys 166:171-181, 2012), is also capable of detecting quantum turbulence in the zero temperature limit. The oscillator demonstrated Lorentzian responses with quality factors of order 10^5 in vacuum, and displayed negative-Duffing resonances in liquid, even at moderate drives. In superfluid He-II at low temperatures, its sensitivity was adversely affected by acoustic damping at higher harmonics. While it successfully created and detected the quantum turbulence, its overall performance does not compare favourably with other oscillators such as tuning forks.

  8. Analysis of Thickness and Quality factor of a Double Paddle Oscillator at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Hamza; Metcalf, Thomas H; Pomeroy, J M

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the quality (Q) factor and the resonance frequency of a double paddle oscillator (DPO) with different thickness using analytical, computational and experimental methods. The study is carried out for the 2(nd) anti-symmetric resonance mode that provides extremely high experimental Q factors on the order of 10(5). The results show that both the Q factor and the resonance frequency of a DPO increase with the thickness at room temperature.

  9. Coherent oscillations and incoherent tunneling in a one-dimensional asymmetric double-well potential.

    PubMed

    Benderskii, V A; Kats, E I

    2002-03-01

    For a model one-dimensional asymmetric double-well potential we calculated the so-called survival probability (i.e., the probability for a particle initially localized in one well to remain there). We use a semiclassical (WKB) solution of the Schrödinger equation. It is shown that behavior essentially depends on transition probability, and on a dimensionless parameter Lambda that is a ratio of characteristic frequencies for low-energy nonlinear in-well oscillations and interwell tunneling. For the potential describing a finite motion (double-well) one has always a regular behavior. For Lambda<1, there are well defined resonance pairs of levels and the survival probability has coherent oscillations related to resonance splitting. However, for Lambda>1 there are no oscillations at all for the survival probability, and there is almost an exponential decay with the characteristic time determined by Fermi golden rule. In this case, one may not restrict himself to only resonance pair levels. The number of levels perturbed by tunneling grows proportionally to square root of [Lambda] (in other words, instead of isolated pairs there appear the resonance regions containing the sets of strongly coupled levels). In the region of intermediate values of Lambda one has a crossover between both limiting cases, namely, the exponential decay with subsequent long period recurrent behavior.

  10. Force distribution for double-walled carbon nanotubes and gigahertz oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baowan, Duangkamon; Hill, James M.

    2007-09-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have led to the creation of many nano-scale devices and carbon nanotubes are representative materials to construct these devices. Double-walled carbon nanotubes with the inner tube oscillating can be used as gigahertz oscillators and form the basis of possible nano-electronic devices that might be instrumental in the micro-computer industry which are predominantly based on electron transport phenomena. There are many experiments and molecular dynamical simulations which show that a wave is generated on the outer cylinder as a result of the oscillation of the inner carbon nanotube and that the frequency of this wave is also in the gigahertz range. As a preliminary to analyze and model such devices, it is necessary to estimate accurately the resultant force distribution due to the inter-atomic interactions. Here we determine some new analytical expressions for the van der Waals force using the Lennard Jones potential for general lengths of the inner and outer tubes. These expressions are utilized together with Newton’s second law to determine the motion of an oscillating inner tube, assuming that any frictional effects may be neglected. An idealized and much simplified representation of the Lennard Jones force is used to determine a simple formula for the oscillation frequency resulting from an initial extrusion of the inner tube. This simple formula is entirely consistent with the existing known behavior of the frequency and predicts a maximum oscillation frequency occurring when the extrusion length is (L 2 L 1)/2 where L 1 and L 2 are the respective half-lengths of the inner and outer tubes (L 1 < L 2).

  11. KIC 9246715: The Double Red Giant Eclipsing Binary with Odd Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawls, Meredith L.; Gaulme, Patrick; McKeever, Jean; Jackiewicz, Jason; Orosz, Jerome A.; Corsaro, Enrico; Beck, Paul G.; Mosser, Benoît; Latham, David W.; Latham, Christian A.

    2016-02-01

    We combine Kepler photometry with ground-based spectra to present a comprehensive dynamical model of the double red giant eclipsing binary KIC 9246715. While the two stars are very similar in mass ({M}1={2.171}-0.008+0.006 {M}⊙ , {M}2={2.149}-0.008+0.006 {M}⊙ ) and radius ({R}1={8.37}-0.07+0.03 {R}⊙ , {R}2={8.30}-0.03+0.04 {R}⊙ ), an asteroseismic analysis finds one main set of solar-like oscillations with unusually low-amplitude, wide modes. A second set of oscillations from the other star may exist, but this marginal detection is extremely faint. Because the two stars are nearly twins, KIC 9246715 is a difficult target for a precise test of the asteroseismic scaling relations, which yield M = 2.17 ± 0.14 M⊙ and R = 8.26 ± 0.18 R⊙. Both stars are consistent with the inferred asteroseismic properties, but we suspect the main oscillator is Star 2 because it is less active than Star 1. We find evidence for stellar activity and modest tidal forces acting over the 171 day eccentric orbit, which are likely responsible for the essential lack of solar-like oscillations in one star and weak oscillations in the other. Mixed modes indicate the main oscillating star is on the secondary red clump (a core-He-burning star), and stellar evolution modeling supports this with a coeval history for a pair of red clump stars. This system is a useful case study and paves the way for a detailed analysis of more red giants in eclipsing binaries, an important benchmark for asteroseismology.

  12. Resonance spiking by periodic loss in the double-sided liquid cooling disk oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Rongzhi; She, Jiangbo; Li, Dongdong; Li, Fuli; Peng, Bo

    2017-03-01

    A double-sided liquid cooling Nd:YAG disk oscillator working at a pump repetition rate of 20 Hz is demonstrated. The output energy of 376 mJ is realized, corresponding to the optical-optical efficiency of 12.8% and the slope efficiency of 14%. The pump pulse width is 300 µs and the laser pulse width is 260 µs. Instead of being a damped signal, the output of laser comprises undamped spikes. A periodic intra-cavity loss was found by numerical analysis, which has a frequency component near the eigen frequency of the relaxation oscillation. Resonance effect will induce amplified spikes even though the loss fluctuates in a small range. The Shark-Hartmann sensor was used to investigate the wavefront aberration induced by turbulent flow and temperature gradient. According to the wavefront and fluid mechanics analysis, it is considered that the periodic intra-cavity loss can be attributed to turbulent flow and temperature gradient.

  13. Giant magnetoimpedance sensor integrated in an oscillator system

    SciTech Connect

    Giouroudi, I.; Hauser, H.; Musiejovsky, L.; Steurer, J.

    2006-04-15

    This article presents a magnetic field measurement system using giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) sensor as a phase shift element. Investigations were carried out using CoFeB trilayer thin films with 2 kA/m anisotropy field structured as strips and meanders of 300 {mu}m length presented in previous studies. The GMI sensor is integrated into an oscillator circuit. The measurement system detects the phase change caused by the magnetic field to be measured. A 6.85% impedance decrease at an applied field of 1.4 mT was observed. The phase difference in such cases was {delta}{phi}=1.12 deg. . The transmission constant was {mu}{sub a}/{delta}{phi}=1 mV/deg.

  14. Spin-orbit interaction for the double ring-shaped oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chang-Yuan; Lu, Fa-Lin; Sun, Dong-Sheng; You, Yuan; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-08-01

    The spin-orbit interactions (SOI) for the single and double ring-shaped oscillator potentials are studied as an energy correction to the Schrödinger equation. We find that the degeneracy for the energy levels with angular quantum number m = 0 keeps invariant in the case of the SOI. The degeneracy is still 2 for single ring-shaped potential and 4 for double ring-shaped potential. However, for the energy levels with angular quantum number m ≠ 0 the degeneracy is reduced from original 4 for the single ring-shaped potential and 8 for the double ring-shaped potential to 2. That is, their energy levels in the case of the SOI are split to 2 (single) and 4 (double) sublevels. There exists an accidental degeneracy for the cases | m | = 2 , 3 , 4 , …. We note that around the critical value b0, the energy levels are reversed. We also discuss some special cases for η = 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , …, and the b = 0 , c > 0. It should be pointed out that the parameter b0 is relevant for the angular part parameter b in the single and double ring-shaped potentials and it makes the energy levels changed from positive to negative, but the parameter c corresponds to the angular part parameter in double ring-shaped potential and the η is related to it. This model can be useful for investigations of axial symmetric subjects like the ring-shaped molecules or related problems and may also be easily extended to a many-electron theory.

  15. Quantum-coupled radial-breathing oscillations in double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaihui; Hong, Xiaoping; Wu, Muhong; Xiao, Fajun; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; Ager, Joel W; Aloni, Shaul; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Enge; Wang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Van der Waals-coupled materials, ranging from multilayers of graphene and MoS(2) to superlattices of nanoparticles, exhibit rich emerging behaviour owing to quantum coupling between individual nanoscale constituents. Double-walled carbon nanotubes provide a model system for studying such quantum coupling mediated by van der Waals interactions, because each constituent single-walled nanotube can have distinctly different physical structures and electronic properties. Here we systematically investigate quantum-coupled radial-breathing mode oscillations in chirality-defined double-walled nanotubes by combining simultaneous structural, electronic and vibrational characterizations on the same individual nanotubes. We show that these radial-breathing oscillations are collective modes characterized by concerted inner- and outer-wall motions, and determine quantitatively the tube-dependent van der Waals potential governing their vibration frequencies. We also observe strong quantum interference between Raman scattering from the inner- and outer-wall excitation pathways, the relative phase of which reveals chirality-dependent excited-state potential energy surface displacement in different nanotubes.

  16. Oscillations, period doublings, and chaos in CO oxidation and catalytic mufflers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, Miloš; Schejbal, Matyáš; Kočí, Petr; Nevoral, Vladislav; Kubíček, Milan; Hadač, Otto; Schreiber, Igor

    2006-09-01

    Early experimental observations of chaotic behavior arising via the period-doubling route for the CO catalytic oxidation both on Pt (110) and Pt /γ-Al2O3 porous catalyst were reported more than 15 years ago. Recently, a detailed kinetic reaction scheme including over 20 reaction steps was proposed for the catalytic CO oxidation, NOx reduction, and hydrocarbon oxidation taking place in a three-way catalyst (TWC) converter, the most common reactor for detoxification of automobile exhaust gases. This reactor is typically operated with periodic variation of inlet oxygen concentration. For an unforced lumped model, we report results of the stoichiometric network analysis of a CO reaction subnetwork determining feedback loops, which cause the oscillations within certain regions of parameters in bifurcation diagrams constructed by numerical continuation techniques. For a forced system, numerical simulations of the CO oxidation reveal the existence of a period-doubling route to chaos. The dependence of the rotation number on the amplitude and period of forcing shows a typical bifurcation structure of Arnold tongues ordered according to Farey sequences, and positive Lyapunov exponents for sufficiently large forcing amplitudes indicate the presence of chaotic dynamics. Multiple periodic and aperiodic time courses of outlet concentrations were also found in simulations using the lumped model with the full TWC kinetics. Numerical solutions of the distributed model in two geometric coordinates with the CO oxidation subnetwork consisting of several tens of nonlinear partial differential equations show oscillations of the outlet reactor concentrations and, in the presence of forcing, multiple periodic and aperiodic oscillations. Spatiotemporal concentration patterns illustrate the complexity of processes within the reactor.

  17. Speed and Oscillations: Medial Septum Integration of Attention and Navigation.

    PubMed

    Tsanov, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Several cortical and diencephalic limbic brain regions incorporate neurons that fire in correlation with the speed of whole-body motion, also known as linear velocity. Besides the field mapping and head-directional information, the linear velocity is among the major signals that guide animal's spatial navigation. Large neuronal populations in the same limbic regions oscillate with theta rhythm during spatial navigation or attention episodes; and the frequency of theta also correlates with linear velocity. A functional similarity between these brain areas is that their inactivation impairs the ability to form new spatial memories; whereas an anatomical similarity is that they all receive projections from medial septum-diagonal band of Broca complex. We review recent findings supporting the model that septal theta rhythm integrates different sensorimotor signals necessary for spatial navigation. The medial septal is described here as a circuitry that mediates experience-dependent balance of sustained attention and path integration during navigation. We discuss the hypothesis that theta rhythm serves as a key mechanism for the aligning of intrinsic spatial representation to: (1) rapid change of position in the spatial environment; (2) continuous alteration of sensory signals throughout navigation; and (3) adapting levels of attentional behavior. The synchronization of these spatial, somatosensory and neuromodulatory signals is proposed here to be anatomically and physiologically mediated by the medial septum.

  18. Evidence for Electron Antineutrino Oscillations with the Double Chooz Far Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felde, John W.

    Until recently, the neutrino mixing parameter, theta 13, was unknown. A number of experiments were designed to measure this parameter as it will have a significant impact on future neutrino oscillation research. One such experiment, Double Chooz, measures the disappearance of reactor antineutrinos with a single, 8.3 ton, gadolinium loaded liquid scintillator detector at a baseline of about 1km from two 4.25GWth nuclear power reactors located in Chooz, France. Current results from Double Chooz, along with other reactor and accelerator based experiments, have confirmed that theta 13 is nonzero, and all measurements agree that sin2 (2theta 13) ≃ 0.1. In an independent analysis of 234.77 live days, including 6.84 live days when both reactors were off, a new technique was used to evaluate the Double Chooz data. In this analysis, a comparison between the observed and predicted detection rates as well as the energy spectra were used to determine a best fit of sin2 (2theta13) = 0.105 +/- 0.030. This measurement confirms, and improves upon, the results found by previous analyses. Excellent agreement is also found between this measurement and other experiments. ii

  19. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations changed by indirect interdot tunneling via electrodes in parallel-coupled vertical double quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Hatano, T; Kubo, T; Tokura, Y; Amaha, S; Teraoka, S; Tarucha, S

    2011-02-18

    Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations are studied for a parallel-coupled vertical double quantum dot with a common source and drain electrode. We observe AB oscillations of current via a one-electron bonding state as the ground state and an antibonding state as the excited state. As the center gate voltage becomes more negative, the oscillation period is clearly halved for both the bonding and antibonding states, and the phase changes by half a period for the antibonding state. This result can be explained by a calculation that takes account of the indirect interdot coupling via the two electrodes.

  20. Integration of a Self-Coherence Algorithm into DISAT for Forced Oscillation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Follum, James D.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Amidan, Brett G.

    2015-03-03

    With the increasing number of phasor measurement units on the power system, behaviors typically not observable on the power system are becoming more apparent. Oscillatory behavior on the power system, notably forced oscillations, are one such behavior. However, the large amounts of data coming from the PMUs makes manually detecting and locating these oscillations difficult. To automate portions of the process, an oscillation detection routine was coded into the Data Integrity and Situational Awareness Tool (DISAT) framework. Integration into the DISAT framework allows forced oscillations to be detected and information about the event provided to operational engineers. The oscillation detection algorithm integrates with the data handling and atypical data detecting capabilities of DISAT, building off of a standard library of functions. This report details that integration with information on the algorithm, some implementation issues, and some sample results from the western United States’ power grid.

  1. THE EFFECT OF DOUBLE VERSUS SINGLE OSCILLATING EXERCISE DEVICES ON TRUNK AND LIMB MUSCLE ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Shruti; Button, Duane C.; Basset, Fabien A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Proper strengthening of the core and upper extremities is important for muscular health, performance, and rehabilitation. Exercise devices have been developed that attempt to disrupt the center of gravity in order to activate the trunk stabilizing muscles. The objective of this study was to analyze the trunk and shoulder girdle muscle activation with double and single oscillating exercise devices (DOD and SOD respectively) in various planes. Methods: Twelve male subjects performed three interventions using both devices under randomized conditions: single-handed vertical orientation of DOD and SOD to produce 1) medio-lateral oscillation in the frontal plane 2) dorso-ventral oscillation in the sagittal plane and 3) single-handed horizontal orientation for superior and inferior oscillation in the transverse plane. Electromyographic (EMG) activity during the interventions of the anterior deltoid, triceps brachii, biceps brachii, forearm flexors as well as lower abdominal and back stabilizer muscles was collected, and were normalized to maximal voluntary contractions. A two way repeated measures ANOVA (2x3) was conducted to assess the influence of the devices and movement planes on muscle activation. Results: The DOD provided 35.9%, 40.8%, and 52.3% greater anterior deltoid, transverse abdominus (TA)/internal oblique (IO) and lumbo-sacral erector spinae (LSES) activation than did the SOD respectively. Effect size calculations revealed that these differences were of moderate to large magnitude (0.86, 0.48, and 0.61 respectively). There were no significant differences in muscular activation achieved between devices for the triceps brachii, biceps brachii and forearm flexor muscles. Exercise in the transverse plane resulted in 30.5%, 29.5%, and 19.5% greater activation than the sagittal and 21.8%, 17.2%, and 26.3% greater activation than the frontal plane for the anterior deltoid, TA/IO and LSES respectively. Conclusions: A DOD demonstrated greater

  2. Contact process on generalized Fibonacci chains: Infinite-modulation criticality and double-log periodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barghathi, Hatem; Nozadze, David; Vojta, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We study the nonequilibrium phase transition of the contact process with aperiodic transition rates using a real-space renormalization group as well as Monte Carlo simulations. The transition rates are modulated according to the generalized Fibonacci sequences defined by the inflation rules A → ABk and B → A. For k =1 and 2, the aperiodic fluctuations are irrelevant, and the nonequilibrium transition is in the clean directed percolation universality class. For k ≥3, the aperiodic fluctuations are relevant. We develop a complete theory of the resulting unconventional "infinite-modulation" critical point, which is characterized by activated dynamical scaling. Moreover, observables such as the survival probability and the size of the active cloud display pronounced double-log periodic oscillations in time which reflect the discrete scale invariance of the aperiodic chains. We illustrate our theory by extensive numerical results, and we discuss relations to phase transitions in other quasiperiodic systems.

  3. Theoretical and experimental investigation of singly resonant optical parametric oscillator under double-pass pumping.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Li, Yuanji; Feng, Jinxia; Zhang, Kuanshou

    2015-05-10

    The singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO) under double-pass pumping in a two-mirror linear cavity is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Different output couplers are used in the periodically poled lithium niobate based SRO to optimize the extracted signal output. When the 2.5% output coupler is used, a pump threshold as low as 3.7 W is achieved, and 6.2 W of signal at 1.56 μm with the linewidth of 62.5 kHz is obtained at pump power of 14.5 W. The measured signal frequency drift and peak-to-peak power fluctuation are less than ±40 MHz and ±0.9% in a given 1 h, respectively.

  4. Double-pass pumped extracavity optical parametric oscillator with passive optical feedback suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyamani, A.; Algahtani, M.; Rusak, A. A.; Orlovich, V. A.; Dashkevich, V. I.; El-Desouki, M.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a simple way of building a compact eye-safe laser source based on a double-pass pumped extracavity optical parametric oscillator (EOPO) without an optical Faraday isolator. A Nd:KGW pump laser (PL) and the KTP EOPO located close to the PL are designed with stable cavities, while the 100% end system mirrors form an unstable cavity with sufficiently high threshold at 1067 nm. At the 6.6 J pump of the Nd:KGW laser, the EOPO output energy obtained at 1577 nm is 14.7 mJ, corresponding to the conversion efficiency of 33% with respect to the fundamental. The pulse width is 7 ns and the output beam divergence is 3 times diffraction limit.

  5. Contact process on generalized Fibonacci chains: infinite-modulation criticality and double-log periodic oscillations.

    PubMed

    Barghathi, Hatem; Nozadze, David; Vojta, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We study the nonequilibrium phase transition of the contact process with aperiodic transition rates using a real-space renormalization group as well as Monte Carlo simulations. The transition rates are modulated according to the generalized Fibonacci sequences defined by the inflation rules A → ABk and B → A. For k=1 and 2, the aperiodic fluctuations are irrelevant, and the nonequilibrium transition is in the clean directed percolation universality class. For k≥3, the aperiodic fluctuations are relevant. We develop a complete theory of the resulting unconventional "infinite-modulation" critical point, which is characterized by activated dynamical scaling. Moreover, observables such as the survival probability and the size of the active cloud display pronounced double-log periodic oscillations in time which reflect the discrete scale invariance of the aperiodic chains. We illustrate our theory by extensive numerical results, and we discuss relations to phase transitions in other quasiperiodic systems.

  6. Vortex cavitation and oscillation in a double-suction volute pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Nagahara, T.; Tanaka, K.; Fuchiwaki, M.; Shimizu, F.

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes have been utilized actively in the early part of the product development cycle. Numerical analysis models have also been developed rapidly and have added cavitation flow analysis functions peculiar to hydraulic machines, in which the flow analysis has been developed remarkably with high-precision and high-reliability. On the other hand, it is well known that three kinds of cavitation, such as vortex cavitation, reverse flow cavitation and cloud cavitation appear in a double-suction volute pump. We have much interest in a relationship among the cavitating flows, pump oscillation and noise. In this study, full 3D numerical simulations have been performed using a commercial code inside the pump from the inlet of suction duct to the outlet of delivery duct. The numerical model is based on a combination of multiphase flow equations with the truncated version of the Rayleigh-Plesset model predicting the complicated growth and collapse process of cavity bubbles. This study highlights especially the mechanism of vortex cavitation occurrence from the end of the suction duct in the pump and pump oscillation which causes cavitation noise from the pump. The experimental investigations have also been performed on the cavitating flow with flow visualization to evaluate the numerical results.

  7. 241-AZ Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    SciTech Connect

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-09-21

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-A2 double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks.

  8. 241-SY Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    SciTech Connect

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-09-21

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-SY double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks.

  9. 241-AN Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    SciTech Connect

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-09-21

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-AN double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks.

  10. 241-AY Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    SciTech Connect

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-09-21

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-AY double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations. are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks.

  11. 241-AW Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    SciTech Connect

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-09-21

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-AW double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks.

  12. Equilibrium states and chaos in an oscillating double-well potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, H.; Susanto, H.; Benson, T. M.; Cliffe, K. A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically parametrically driven coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations modeling the dynamics of coupled wave fields in a periodically oscillating double-well potential. The equations describe, among other things, two coupled periodically curved optical waveguides with Kerr nonlinearity or Bose-Einstein condensates in a double-well potential that is shaken horizontally and periodically in time. In particular, we study the persistence of equilibrium states of the undriven system due to the presence of the parametric drive. Using numerical continuations of periodic orbits and calculating the corresponding Floquet multipliers, we find that the drive can (de)stabilize a continuation of an equilibrium state indicated by the change in the (in)stability of the orbit, showing that parametric drives can provide a powerful control to nonlinear (optical- or matter-wave-) field tunneling. We also discuss the appearance of chaotic regions reported in previous studies that is due to destabilization of a periodic orbit. Analytical approximations based on an averaging method are presented. Using perturbation theory, the influence of the drive on the symmetry-breaking bifurcation point is analyzed.

  13. The Harmonic Oscillator with a Gaussian Perturbation: Evaluation of the Integrals and Example Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earl, Boyd L.

    2008-01-01

    A general result for the integrals of the Gaussian function over the harmonic oscillator wavefunctions is derived using generating functions. Using this result, an example problem of a harmonic oscillator with various Gaussian perturbations is explored in order to compare the results of precise numerical solution, the variational method, and…

  14. The Harmonic Oscillator with a Gaussian Perturbation: Evaluation of the Integrals and Example Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earl, Boyd L.

    2008-01-01

    A general result for the integrals of the Gaussian function over the harmonic oscillator wavefunctions is derived using generating functions. Using this result, an example problem of a harmonic oscillator with various Gaussian perturbations is explored in order to compare the results of precise numerical solution, the variational method, and…

  15. Parametric frequency transformation in a superconducting waveguide line with an integrated Josephson oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisenko, M. V.; Munyaev, V. O.; Satanin, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    The parametric frequency division in a coplanar waveguide line with an integrated single-contact rf SQUID (Josephson oscillator) is discussed. It is assumed that the oscillator is excited by pump pulses whose carrier frequency can be a multiple of the plasma frequency of the oscillator. It is shown that the Josephson oscillator excited at the pump frequency can induce frequency division by emitting subharmonics that are multiples of the fundamental frequency (fractional resonances). Parameters for which parametric frequency transformation occurs are determined. The possible generalization of this effect to the quantum case in which correlated microwave photons (entangled photon states) can be generated is discussed.

  16. Design of a novel integrated position sensor based on Hall effects for linear oscillating actuator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyi; Yan, Liang; Jiao, Zongxia

    2015-07-01

    Linear oscillating actuator provides linear reciprocate motion directly without other auxiliary components, which is suitable for high integration applications in aerospace industry. Accurate position control is essential for linear oscillating motor and relies on concise measurement of mover position. However, most position measurements are dependent on external complicated sensors, which hinders further integration of linear oscillating actuation system. In this paper, a novel position sensing system for linear oscillating actuator based on Hall effects is proposed to achieve accurate and high integration measurement simultaneously. Axial sensing magnetic field with approximately linear relationship with position is created for direct and convenient measurement. Analytical model of sensing magnetic field is set up for optimization and validated by finite element method and experimental results. Finally, sensing magnets are integrated into motor prototype for experiments. Dynamic position results are tested in experiments and prove to be effective and accurate for position sensing with short-stroke.

  17. Design of a novel integrated position sensor based on Hall effects for linear oscillating actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianyi; Yan, Liang; Jiao, Zongxia

    2015-07-01

    Linear oscillating actuator provides linear reciprocate motion directly without other auxiliary components, which is suitable for high integration applications in aerospace industry. Accurate position control is essential for linear oscillating motor and relies on concise measurement of mover position. However, most position measurements are dependent on external complicated sensors, which hinders further integration of linear oscillating actuation system. In this paper, a novel position sensing system for linear oscillating actuator based on Hall effects is proposed to achieve accurate and high integration measurement simultaneously. Axial sensing magnetic field with approximately linear relationship with position is created for direct and convenient measurement. Analytical model of sensing magnetic field is set up for optimization and validated by finite element method and experimental results. Finally, sensing magnets are integrated into motor prototype for experiments. Dynamic position results are tested in experiments and prove to be effective and accurate for position sensing with short-stroke.

  18. The Quasi-Biennial Oscillation Based on Double Gaussian Distributional Parameterization of Inertial Gravity Waves in WACCM Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C.; Xue, X.; Dou, X.; Wu, J.

    2015-12-01

    The adjustment of gravity wave parameterization associated with model convection has made possible the spontaneous generation of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM 4.0), although there are some mismatching when compared with the observation. The parameterization is based on Lindzen's linear saturation theory which can better describe inertia-gravity waves (IGW) by taking the Coriolis effects into consideration. In this work we improve the parameterization by importing a more realistic double Gaussian distribution IGW spectrum, which is calculated from tropical radiosonde observations. A series of WACCM simulations are performed to determine the relationship between the period and amplitude of equatorial zonal wind oscillations and the feature of parameterized IGW. All of these simulations are capable of generating equatorial wind oscillations in the stratosphere using the standard spatial resolution settings. The period of the oscillation is associate inversely with the strength of the IGW forcing, but the central values of double Gaussian distribution IGW have influence both on the magnitude and period of the oscillation. In fact, the eastward and westward IGWs affect the amplitude of the QBO wind, respectively, and the strength of IGWs forcing determines the accelerating rate of the QBO wind. Furthermore, stronger forcing of IGWs can lead to a deeper propagate of the QBO phase, which can extend the lowest altitude of the constant zonal wind amplitudes to about 100 hPa.

  19. Abnormal functional integration of thalamic low frequency oscillation in the BOLD signal after acute heroin treatment.

    PubMed

    Denier, Niklaus; Schmidt, André; Gerber, Hana; Vogel, Marc; Huber, Christian G; Lang, Undine E; Riecher-Rossler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Walter, Marc; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Heroin addiction is a severe relapsing brain disorder associated with impaired cognitive control, including deficits in attention allocation. The thalamus has a high density of opiate receptors and is critically involved in orchestrating cortical activity during cognitive control. However, there have been no studies on how acute heroin treatment modulates thalamic activity. In a cross-over, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study, 29 heroin-maintained outpatients were studied after heroin and placebo administration, while 20 healthy controls were included for the placebo condition only. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to analyze functional integration of the thalamus by three different resting state analysis techniques. Thalamocortical functional connectivity (FC) was analyzed by seed-based correlation, while intrinsic thalamic oscillation was assessed by analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo) and the fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF). Relative to the placebo treatment and healthy controls, acute heroin administration reduced thalamocortical FC to cortical regions, including the frontal cortex, while the reductions in FC to the mediofrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and frontal pole were positively correlated with the plasma level of morphine, the main psychoactive metabolite of heroin. Furthermore, heroin treatment was associated with increased thalamic ReHo and fALFF values, whereas fALFF following heroin exposure correlated negatively with scores of attentional control. The heroin-associated increase in fALFF was mainly dominated by slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) oscillations. Our findings show that there are acute effects of heroin within the thalamocortical system and may shed new light on the role of the thalamus in cognitive control in heroin addiction. Future research is needed to determine the underlying physiological mechanisms and their role in heroin addiction.

  20. Contact process on generalized Fibonacci chains: infinite-modulation criticality and double-log periodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barghathi, Hatem; Nozadze, David; Vojta, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    We study the nonequilibrium phase transition of the contact process with aperiodic transition rates using a real-space renormalization group as well as Monte-Carlo simulations. The transition rates are modulated according to the generalized Fibonacci sequences defined by the inflation rules A --> ABk and B --> A. For k = 1 and 2, the aperiodic fluctuations are irrelevant, and the nonequilibrium transition is in the clean directed percolation universality class. For k >= 3 , the aperiodic fluctuations are relevant. We develop a complete theory of the resulting unconventional ``infinite-modulation'' critical point which is characterized by activated dynamical scaling. Moreover, observables such as the survival probability and the size of the active cloud display pronounced double-log periodic oscillations in time which reflect the discrete scale invariance of the aperiodic chains. We illustrate our theory by extensive numerical results, and we discuss relations to phase transitions in other quasiperiodic systems. This work has been supported in part by the NSF under grants no. DMR-0906566, DMR-1205803, and PHYS-1066293.

  1. Application of the double paddle oscillator for quantifying environmental, surface mass variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Haoyan; Pomeroy, Joshua

    2016-04-01

    Sub-monolayer sensitivity to controlled gas adsorption and desorption is demonstrated using a double paddle oscillator (DPO) installed within an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environmental chamber equipped with in situ film deposition, (multi)gas admission and temperature control. This effort is intended to establish a robust framework for quantitatively comparing mass changes due to gas loading and unloading on different materials systems selected or considered for use as mass artefacts. Our apparatus is composed of a UHV chamber with gas introduction and temperature control and in situ materials deposition for future materials testing enabling in situ preparation of virgin surfaces that can be monitored during initial exposure to gasses of interest. These tools are designed to allow us to comparatively evaluate how different materials gain or lose mass due to precisely controlled environmental excursions, with a long term goal of measuring changes in absolute mass. Herein, we provide a detailed experimental description of the apparatus, an evaluation of the initial performance, and demonstration measurements using nitrogen adsorption and desorption directly on the DPO.

  2. Tunable optoelectronic oscillator incorporating a carrier phase-shifted double sideband modulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengxin; Chen, Fushen; Zhang, Jiahong

    2016-01-01

    A tunable optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) implemented by using a carrier phase-shifted double sideband modulation (CPS-DSB) system consisting of an optical coupler (OC), a Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) biased at the minimum transmission point, a polarization beam splitter (PBS), and a tunable optical delay line (TODL) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The key device in the system is the CPS-DSB system, which functions in conjunction with a chirped fiber Bragg grating (CFBG) in the loop form a high-Q microwave photonic filter (MPF). Through simply adjusting the TODL, the central frequency of the MPF is shifted and the frequency tunability of the OEO can be realized. A detailed theoretical analysis is provided and the results are confirmed by an experiment. A microwave signal with a frequency-tuning range from 7.24 to 14.05 GHz is generated. The phase noise, the long-term stability and the side-mode suppression performance of the generated microwave signal are also investigated.

  3. Application of the double paddle oscillator for quantifying environmental, surface mass variation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Haoyan; Pomeroy, Joshua

    2016-04-01

    Sub-monolayer sensitivity to controlled gas adsorption and desorption is demonstrated using a double paddle oscillator (DPO) installed within an UHV (ultra-high vacuum) environmental chamber equipped with in situ film deposition, (multi)gas admission and temperature control. This effort is intended to establish a robust framework for quantitatively comparing mass changes due to gas loading and unloading on different materials systems selected or considered for use as mass artifacts. Our apparatus is composed of a UHV chamber with gas introduction and temperature control and in-situ materials deposition for future materials testing enabling in situ preparation of virgin surfaces that can be monitored during initial exposure to gasses of interest. These tools are designed to allow us to comparatively evaluate how different materials gain or lose mass due to precisely controlled environmental excursions, with a long term goal of measuring changes in absolute mass. Herein, we provide a detailed experimental description of the apparatus, an evaluation of the initial performance, and demonstration measurements using nitrogen adsorption and desorption directly on the DPO.

  4. Application of the double paddle oscillator for quantifying environmental, surface mass variation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Haoyan; Pomeroy, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Sub-monolayer sensitivity to controlled gas adsorption and desorption is demonstrated using a double paddle oscillator (DPO) installed within an UHV (ultra-high vacuum) environmental chamber equipped with in situ film deposition, (multi)gas admission and temperature control. This effort is intended to establish a robust framework for quantitatively comparing mass changes due to gas loading and unloading on different materials systems selected or considered for use as mass artifacts. Our apparatus is composed of a UHV chamber with gas introduction and temperature control and in-situ materials deposition for future materials testing enabling in situ preparation of virgin surfaces that can be monitored during initial exposure to gasses of interest. These tools are designed to allow us to comparatively evaluate how different materials gain or lose mass due to precisely controlled environmental excursions, with a long term goal of measuring changes in absolute mass. Herein, we provide a detailed experimental description of the apparatus, an evaluation of the initial performance, and demonstration measurements using nitrogen adsorption and desorption directly on the DPO. PMID:27212736

  5. A fully integrated oven controlled microelectromechanical oscillator -- Part I. Design and fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Wojciechowski, Kenneth E.; Baker, Michael S.; Clews, Peggy J.; Olsson, Roy H.

    2015-06-24

    Our paper reports the design and fabrication of a fully integrated oven controlled microelectromechanical oscillator (OCMO). This paper begins by describing the limits on oscillator frequency stability imposed by the thermal drift and electronic properties (Q, resistance) of both the resonant tank circuit and feedback electronics required to form an electronic oscillator. An OCMO is presented that takes advantage of high thermal isolation and monolithic integration of both micromechanical resonators and electronic circuitry to thermally stabilize or ovenize all the components that comprise an oscillator. This was achieved by developing a processing technique where both silicon-on-insulator complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry and piezoelectric aluminum nitride, AlN, micromechanical resonators are placed on a suspended platform within a standard CMOS integrated circuit. Operation at microscale sizes achieves high thermal resistances (~10 °C/mW), and hence thermal stabilization of the oscillators at very low-power levels when compared with the state-of-the-art ovenized crystal oscillators, OCXO. This constant resistance feedback circuit is presented that incorporates on platform resistive heaters and temperature sensors to both measure and stabilize the platform temperature. Moreover, the limits on temperature stability of the OCMO platform and oscillator frequency imposed by the gain of the constant resistance feedback loop, placement of the heater and temperature sensing resistors, as well as platform radiative and convective heat losses are investigated.

  6. A fully integrated oven controlled microelectromechanical oscillator -- Part I. Design and fabrication

    DOE PAGES

    Wojciechowski, Kenneth E.; Baker, Michael S.; Clews, Peggy J.; ...

    2015-06-24

    Our paper reports the design and fabrication of a fully integrated oven controlled microelectromechanical oscillator (OCMO). This paper begins by describing the limits on oscillator frequency stability imposed by the thermal drift and electronic properties (Q, resistance) of both the resonant tank circuit and feedback electronics required to form an electronic oscillator. An OCMO is presented that takes advantage of high thermal isolation and monolithic integration of both micromechanical resonators and electronic circuitry to thermally stabilize or ovenize all the components that comprise an oscillator. This was achieved by developing a processing technique where both silicon-on-insulator complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuitrymore » and piezoelectric aluminum nitride, AlN, micromechanical resonators are placed on a suspended platform within a standard CMOS integrated circuit. Operation at microscale sizes achieves high thermal resistances (~10 °C/mW), and hence thermal stabilization of the oscillators at very low-power levels when compared with the state-of-the-art ovenized crystal oscillators, OCXO. This constant resistance feedback circuit is presented that incorporates on platform resistive heaters and temperature sensors to both measure and stabilize the platform temperature. Moreover, the limits on temperature stability of the OCMO platform and oscillator frequency imposed by the gain of the constant resistance feedback loop, placement of the heater and temperature sensing resistors, as well as platform radiative and convective heat losses are investigated.« less

  7. Andreev reflection and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations through a parallel-coupled double quantum dot with spin-flip scattering.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Liang; Li, Yu-Xian

    2008-11-19

    Using nonequilibrium Green's function techniques, we investigate Andreev reflection and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations through a parallel-coupled double quantum dot connected with a ferromagnetic lead and a superconductor lead. The possibility of controlling Andreev reflection and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the system is explored by tuning the interdot coupling, the gate voltage, the magnetic flux, and the intradot spin-flip scattering. When the spin-flip scattering increases, Fano resonant peaks resulting from the asymmetrical levels of the two quantum dots begin to split, and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations are suppressed. Due to the interdot coupling, one strongly and one weakly coupled state of the system can be formed. The magnetic flux can exchange the function of the two states, which leads to a swap effect.

  8. A terahertz monolithic integrated resonant tunneling diode oscillator and mixer circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, Sebastian; Tsuruda, Kazuisao; Kim, Jae-Young; Mukai, Toshikazu; Fujita, Masayuki; Nagatsuma, Tadao

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the monolithic integration of two resonant tunneling diodes (RTD) to make a THz mixer circuit. The circuit uses two RTDs, which are integrated in one carrier substrate. The RTDs are biased independently. The fist RTD operates as an oscillator and provides the local oscillator signal for the second RTD operating as a mixer. The measurements demonstrate that a monolithic integration of several RTDs in one substrate is feasible. This offers new possibilities for RTD based wireless communication and sensing systems.

  9. Poles of integrále tritronquée and anharmonic oscillators. A WKB approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoero, Davide

    2010-03-01

    Poles of solutions to the Painlevé-I equations are intimately related to the theory of the cubic anharmonic oscillator. In particular, poles of integrále tritronquée are in bijection with cubic oscillators that admit the simultaneous solutions of two quantization conditions. We analyze this pair of quantization conditions by means of a suitable version of the complex WKB method. Ai miei zii Ivan e Silvia.

  10. Stable integrated hyper-parametric oscillator based on coupled optical microcavities.

    PubMed

    Armaroli, Andrea; Feron, Patrice; Dumeige, Yannick

    2015-12-01

    We propose a flexible scheme based on three coupled optical microcavities that permits us to achieve stable oscillations in the microwave range, the frequency of which depends only on the cavity coupling rates. We find that the different dynamical regimes (soft and hard excitation) affect the oscillation intensity, but not their periods. This configuration may permit us to implement compact hyper-parametric sources on an integrated optical circuit with interesting applications in communications, sensing, and metrology.

  11. On Noether's Theorem and the Various Integrals of the Damped Linear Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Andrew J.; Hurtado, John E.; Bertinato, Chris; Betsch, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Noether's theorem provides deep insight into the connection between analytical mechanics and the integrals of dynamic systems, specifically, showing how symmetries of the action integral are connected to the integrals of motion. To demonstrate Noether's theorem, the harmonic oscillator is often used as a simple example problem. Presentations in the literature, however, often focus on the single absolutely-invariant symmetry for this problem. This paper presents a complete application of Noether's theorem to the damped harmonic oscillator, including general solutions of the divergence-invariant Killing equations and the associated integrals for all underdamped, critically-damped, and overdamped cases. This treatment brings forward several interesting issues. Five different symmetries produce independent solutions to the Killing equations, but of course, only two independent integrals exist for this second-order system. Also, integrals of a particular desired form may not be produced directly from Noether's theorem and are referred to as non-Noether or asymmetric integrals. For the damped oscillator, one such example is the time-independent integrals, referred to as motion constants.

  12. Double asymptotic expansion of three-center electronic repulsion integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Ibarra, A.; Köster, A. M.

    2013-07-01

    A double asymptotic expansion for the evaluation of three-center electron repulsion integrals (ERIs) in the long-range limit is presented. For the definition of this limit, a natural division of space based on the atomic coordinates and basis function exponents in utilized. The resulting analytical expression for the calculation of three-center ERIs in the long-range limit are implemented in the density functional theory program deMon2k. Validation and benchmark calculations of n-alkanes, hydrogen saturated graphene sheets and hydrogen saturated diamond blocks are discussed. It is shown that for a sufficient large number of long-range ERIs, the linear scaling regime is reached.

  13. Concept of Small Sized Integrated PWR with Double Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, I.; Ueda, N.; Nishi, Y.; Matsumura, T.

    2002-07-01

    For early deployment of small sized nuclear reactors, it is better to reduce the BOP cost with new ideas than introducing innovative technologies for core, fuel and materials. In this report, a concept of the integrated, forced convective and small PWR with double pressure vessels has been proposed. The electric output of this reactor is 150 MW. Conventional technologies are adopted for core and fuel. Refueling, maintenance and repairing are made in a special ship with complete facilities and skilled experts. The pressure vessel with the core, control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM), main circulating pumps (MCP), steam generators (SG) and other reactor internals are transferred between the reactor building and the ship. Technical feasibility for safety and maintainability has been discussed qualitatively. The construction cost has been roughly estimated. (authors)

  14. On line and double integrals in the non-Newtonian sense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ćakmak, Ahmet Faruk; Başar, Feyzi

    2014-08-01

    This paper is devoted to line and double integrals in the sense of non-Newtonian calculus (*-calculus). Moreover, in the sense of *-calculus, the fundamental theorem of calculus for line integrals and double integrals are stated and proved, and some applications are presented.

  15. Frequency-dependent study of solid 4He contained in a rigid double-torus torsional oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaewon; Shin, Jaeho; Kim, Eunseong

    2015-10-01

    The rigid double-torus torsional oscillator (TO) is constructed to reduce any elastic effects inherent to complicated TO structures, allowing explicit probing for a genuine supersolid signature. We investigated the frequency- and temperature-dependent response of the rigid double-torus TO containing solid 4He with 0.6-ppb 3He and 300-ppb 3He . We did not find evidence to support the frequency-independent contribution proposed to be a property of supersolid helium. The frequency-dependent contribution which comes from the simple elastic effect of solid helium coupled to the TO is essentially responsible for the entire response. The magnitude of the period drop is linearly proportional to f2, indicating that the responses observed in this TO are mostly caused by the overshoot of "soft" solid helium against the wall of the torus. Dissipation of the rigid TO is vastly suppressed compared to that of nonrigid TOs.

  16. Search for global oscillations on Jupiter with a double-cell sodium magneto-optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciani, A.; Dolci, M.; Moretti, P. F.; D'Alessio, F.; Giuliani, C.; Micolucci, E.; Di Cianno, A.

    2001-06-01

    Doppler observations on Jupiter are presented and discussed. A two-cells Magneto-Optical Filter (MOF), able to obtain two separate signals, Red and Blue, on the opposite wings of the Sodium D-lines, along with a continuum reference signal, has been used. This set of data permits to discriminate between real oscillations and albedo ``modes" by means of the two algorithms D=(B-R)/(B+R) and S=(B+R)/continuum. No unambiguous oscillation modes were detected with amplitudes above the 1-sigma level of ~ 1.2 m s-1 in the range between 0.5 and 0.7 mHz. However, using refined analysis for signal recovery in a noisy background we notice an increase of power also in the region of the solar 5 min oscillations. The albedo variations on the Jupiter's surface and instrumental effects are addressed to be responsible for the spurious signals.

  17. Neuronal oscillations form parietal/frontal networks during contour integration.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Marta; Plöchl, Michael; Vicente, Raul; Pipa, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    The ability to integrate visual features into a global coherent percept that can be further categorized and manipulated are fundamental abilities of the neural system. While the processing of visual information involves activation of early visual cortices, the recruitment of parietal and frontal cortices has been shown to be crucial for perceptual processes. Yet is it not clear how both cortical and long-range oscillatory activity leads to the integration of visual features into a coherent percept. Here, we will investigate perceptual grouping through the analysis of a contour categorization task, where the local elements that form contour must be linked into a coherent structure, which is then further processed and manipulated to perform the categorization task. The contour formation in our visual stimulus is a dynamic process where, for the first time, visual perception of contours is disentangled from the onset of visual stimulation or from motor preparation, cognitive processes that until now have been behaviorally attached to perceptual processes. Our main finding is that, while local and long-range synchronization at several frequencies seem to be an ongoing phenomena, categorization of a contour could only be predicted through local oscillatory activity within parietal/frontal sources, which in turn, would synchronize at gamma (>30 Hz) frequency. Simultaneously, fronto-parietal beta (13-30 Hz) phase locking forms a network spanning across neural sources that are not category specific. Both long range networks, i.e., the gamma network that is category specific, and the beta network that is not category specific, are functionally distinct but spatially overlapping. Altogether, we show that a critical mechanism underlying contour categorization involves oscillatory activity within parietal/frontal cortices, as well as its synchronization across distal cortical sites.

  18. An application of oscillation damped motion for suspended payloads to the advanced integrated maintenance system

    SciTech Connect

    Noakes, M.W. ); Petterson, B.J.; Werner, J.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Transportation of objects using overhead cranes can induce pendulum motion of the object, which usually must be damped or allowed to decay before the next process can take place. Recent work at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has shown that oscillation damped transport and swing-free stops are possible by properly programming the acceleration of the transporting crane. This paper reviews the theory associated with oscillation-damped trajectories for simply suspended objects and describes a specific, full-scale implementation of the damped oscillation methods for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Advanced Integrated Maintenance System (AIMS). Hardware and software requirements and constraints for proper operation are discussed. Finally, test results and lessons learned are presented. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Novel High Temperature Capacitive Pressure Sensor Utilizing SiC Integrated Circuit Twin Ring Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, M.; Neudeck, P.; Spry, D.; Meredith, R.; Jordan, J.; Prokop, N.; Krasowski, M.; Beheim, G.; Hunter, G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes initial development and testing of a novel high temperature capacitive pressure sensor system. The pressure sensor system consists of two 4H-SiC 11-stage ring oscillators and a SiCN capacitive pressure sensor. One oscillator has the capacitive pressure sensor fixed at one node in its feedback loop and varies as a function of pressure and temperature while the other provides a pressure-independent reference frequency which can be used to temperature compensate the output of the first oscillator. A two-day repeatability test was performed up to 500C on the oscillators and the oscillator fundamental frequency changed by only 1. The SiCN capacitive pressure sensor was characterized at room temperature from 0 to 300 psi. The sensor had an initial capacitance of 3.76 pF at 0 psi and 1.75 pF at 300 psi corresponding to a 54 change in capacitance. The integrated pressure sensor system was characterized from 0 to 300 psi in steps of 50 psi over a temperature range of 25 to 500C. The pressure sensor system sensitivity was 0.113 kHzpsi at 25C and 0.026 kHzpsi at 500C.

  20. A fully integrated oven controlled microelectromechanical oscillator – Part II. Characterization and measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wojciechowski, Kenneth E.; Olsson, Roy H.

    2015-06-24

    Our paper reports the measurement and characterization of a fully integrated oven controlled microelectromechanical oscillator (OCMO). The OCMO takes advantage of high thermal isolation and monolithic integration of both aluminum nitride (AlN) micromechanical resonators and electronic circuitry to thermally stabilize or ovenize all the components that comprise an oscillator. Operation at microscale sizes allows implementation of high thermal resistance platform supports that enable thermal stabilization at very low-power levels when compared with the state-of-the-art oven controlled crystal oscillators. A prototype OCMO has been demonstrated with a measured temperature stability of -1.2 ppb/°C, over the commercial temperature range while using tens of milliwatts of supply power and with a volume of 2.3 mm3 (not including the printed circuit board-based thermal control loop). Additionally, due to its small thermal time constant, the thermal compensation loop can maintain stability during fast thermal transients (>10 °C/min). This new technology has resulted in a new paradigm in terms of power, size, and warm up time for high thermal stability oscillators.

  1. A fully integrated oven controlled microelectromechanical oscillator – Part II. Characterization and measurement

    DOE PAGES

    Wojciechowski, Kenneth E.; Olsson, Roy H.

    2015-06-24

    Our paper reports the measurement and characterization of a fully integrated oven controlled microelectromechanical oscillator (OCMO). The OCMO takes advantage of high thermal isolation and monolithic integration of both aluminum nitride (AlN) micromechanical resonators and electronic circuitry to thermally stabilize or ovenize all the components that comprise an oscillator. Operation at microscale sizes allows implementation of high thermal resistance platform supports that enable thermal stabilization at very low-power levels when compared with the state-of-the-art oven controlled crystal oscillators. A prototype OCMO has been demonstrated with a measured temperature stability of -1.2 ppb/°C, over the commercial temperature range while using tensmore » of milliwatts of supply power and with a volume of 2.3 mm3 (not including the printed circuit board-based thermal control loop). Additionally, due to its small thermal time constant, the thermal compensation loop can maintain stability during fast thermal transients (>10 °C/min). This new technology has resulted in a new paradigm in terms of power, size, and warm up time for high thermal stability oscillators.« less

  2. PROGRESS IN HANFORDS DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) INTEGRITY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    BERMAN HS

    2008-01-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection has an extensive integrity assessment program for the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank System. The DOE Orders and environmental protection regulations provide the guidelines for the activities used to inspect and maintain 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs), the waste evaporator, and ancillary equipment that compose this system. This program has been reviewed by oversight and regulatory bodies and found to comply with the established guidelines. The basis for the DOE Order 435.1-1 for tank integrity comes from the Tank Structural Integrity Paneled by Brookhaven National Laboratory during the late 1990s. These guidelines established criteria for performing Non-Destructive Examination (NDE), for acceptance of the NDE results, for waste chemistry control, and for monitoring the tanks. The environmental regulations mirror these requirements and allow for the tank integrity program to provide compliant storage of the tanks. Both sets of requirements provide additional guidance for the protection of ancillary equipment. CH2M HILL uses two methods of NDE: visual inspection and Ultrasonic Testing (UT). The visual inspection program examines the primary tank and secondary liner of the DST. The primary tank is examined both on the interior surface above the waste in the tank and on the exterior surface facing the annulus of the DST. The interior surface of the tank liner is examined at the same time as the outer surface of the primary tank. The UT program examines representative areas of the primary tank and secondary liner by deploying equipment in the annulus of the tank. Both programs have led to the development of new equipment for remote inspection of the tanks. Compact camera and enhanced lighting systems have been designed and deployed through narrow access ports (called risers) into the tanks. The UT program has designed two generations of crawlers and equipment for deployment through risers into the thermally hot and

  3. Progress in Hanford's Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bryson, D.C.; Washenfelder, D.J.; Boomer, K.D.

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection has an extensive integrity assessment program for the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank System. The DOE Orders and environmental protection regulations provide the guidelines for the activities used to inspect and maintain 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs), the waste evaporator, and ancillary equipment that compose this system. This program has been reviewed by oversight and regulatory bodies and found to comply with the established guidelines. The basis for the DOE Order 435.1-1 for tank integrity comes from the Tank Structural Integrity Panel led by Brookhaven National Laboratory during the late 1990's. These guidelines established criteria for performing Non-Destructive Examination (NDE), for acceptance of the NDE results, for waste chemistry control, and for monitoring the tanks. The environmental regulations mirror these requirements and allow for the tank integrity program to provide compliant storage of the tanks. Both sets of requirements provide additional guidance for the protection of ancillary equipment. CH2M HILL uses two methods of NDE: visual inspection and Ultrasonic Testing (UT). The visual inspection program examines the primary tank and secondary liner of the DST. The primary tank is examined both on the interior surface above the waste in the tank and on the exterior surface facing the annulus of the DST. The interior surface of the tank liner is examined at the same time as the outer surface of the primary tank. The UT program examines representative areas of the primary tank and secondary liner by deploying equipment in the annulus of the tank. Both programs have led to the development of new equipment for remote inspection of the tanks. Compact camera and enhanced lighting systems have been designed and deployed through narrow access ports (called risers) into the tanks. The UT program has designed two generations of crawlers and equipment for deployment through risers into the thermally hot

  4. Optimal feedback in efficient ring double-cavity optical parametric oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Petnikova, V M; Shuvalov, Vladimir V

    2010-09-10

    It is shown that the use of two feedback circuits with matched transfer constants and optimal phase incursions in a nondegenerate optical parametric oscillator (OPO) makes it possible to localise the extremes of intensity distributions of interacting waves on the output face of a nonlinear crystal, which provides maximum possible conversion efficiency of pump energy. The optimisation procedure in this case is rather flexible because it is reduced to ambiguous matching of the period and shift of the extremes of exact analytic solutions of the corresponding problem in the form of cnoidal waves with respect to the nonlinear crystal position. Unlike the single-cavity OPO scheme, both these parameters can substantially exceed the nonlinear crystal length and even tend to infinity, which corresponds to solitary soliton-like solutions. (optical parametric oscillators)

  5. An integrated low phase noise radiation-pressure-driven optomechanical oscillator chipset

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Xingsheng; Huang, Yongjun; Li, Ying; McMillan, James F.; Zheng, Jiangjun; Huang, Shu-Wei; Hsieh, Pin-Chun; Gu, Tingyi; Wang, Di; Hati, Archita; Howe, David A.; Wen, Guangjun; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Wong, Chee Wei

    2014-01-01

    High-quality frequency references are the cornerstones in position, navigation and timing applications of both scientific and commercial domains. Optomechanical oscillators, with direct coupling to continuous-wave light and non-material-limited f × Q product, are long regarded as a potential platform for frequency reference in radio-frequency-photonic architectures. However, one major challenge is the compatibility with standard CMOS fabrication processes while maintaining optomechanical high quality performance. Here we demonstrate the monolithic integration of photonic crystal optomechanical oscillators and on-chip high speed Ge detectors based on the silicon CMOS platform. With the generation of both high harmonics (up to 59th order) and subharmonics (down to 1/4), our chipset provides multiple frequency tones for applications in both frequency multipliers and dividers. The phase noise is measured down to −125 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset at ~400 μW dropped-in powers, one of the lowest noise optomechanical oscillators to date and in room-temperature and atmospheric non-vacuum operating conditions. These characteristics enable optomechanical oscillators as a frequency reference platform for radio-frequency-photonic information processing. PMID:25354711

  6. An integrated low phase noise radiation-pressure-driven optomechanical oscillator chipset.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xingsheng; Huang, Yongjun; Li, Ying; McMillan, James F; Zheng, Jiangjun; Huang, Shu-Wei; Hsieh, Pin-Chun; Gu, Tingyi; Wang, Di; Hati, Archita; Howe, David A; Wen, Guangjun; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Wong, Chee Wei

    2014-10-30

    High-quality frequency references are the cornerstones in position, navigation and timing applications of both scientific and commercial domains. Optomechanical oscillators, with direct coupling to continuous-wave light and non-material-limited f × Q product, are long regarded as a potential platform for frequency reference in radio-frequency-photonic architectures. However, one major challenge is the compatibility with standard CMOS fabrication processes while maintaining optomechanical high quality performance. Here we demonstrate the monolithic integration of photonic crystal optomechanical oscillators and on-chip high speed Ge detectors based on the silicon CMOS platform. With the generation of both high harmonics (up to 59 th order) and subharmonics (down to 1/4), our chipset provides multiple frequency tones for applications in both frequency multipliers and dividers. The phase noise is measured down to -125 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset at ~400 μW dropped-in powers, one of the lowest noise optomechanical oscillators to date and in room-temperature and atmospheric non-vacuum operating conditions. These characteristics enable optomechanical oscillators as a frequency reference platform for radio-frequency-photonic information processing.

  7. Demonstration of Double EIT Using Coupled Harmonic Oscillators and RLC Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, Joshua; Joshi, Amitabh; Serna, Juan D.

    2011-01-01

    Single and double electromagnetically induced transparencies (EIT) in a medium, consisting of four-level atoms in the inverted-Y configuration, are discussed using mechanical and electrical analogies. A three-coupled spring-mass system subject to damping and driven by an external force is used to represent the four-level atom mechanically. The…

  8. Demonstration of Double EIT Using Coupled Harmonic Oscillators and RLC Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, Joshua; Joshi, Amitabh; Serna, Juan D.

    2011-01-01

    Single and double electromagnetically induced transparencies (EIT) in a medium, consisting of four-level atoms in the inverted-Y configuration, are discussed using mechanical and electrical analogies. A three-coupled spring-mass system subject to damping and driven by an external force is used to represent the four-level atom mechanically. The…

  9. Linewidth oscillations in a nanometer-size double-slit interference experiment with single electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Barrachina, R. O.; Fremont, F.; Fossez, K.; Gruyer, D.; Helaine, V.; Lepailleur, A.; Leredde, A.; Maclot, S.; Scamps, G.; Chesnel, Jean-Yves

    2010-06-15

    In this article we provide experimental evidence of an interference phenomenon that, to the best of our knowledge, has so far not been observed with either matter or light. In a nanometer-sized version of Feynman's famous two-slit 'thought' experiment with single electrons, we managed to observe that the width of a quasi-monochromatic line oscillates with the detection angle. Furthermore, we find that it occurs in counterphase with the line intensity. We discuss the underlying mechanism that produces this unexpected result.

  10. Optical velocity meter based on Ramsey oscillations in a double-grating setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preclíková, J.; Kozák, M.; Fregenal, D.; Hansen, J. P.

    2014-04-01

    We propose a method for measuring velocities of atoms or molecules in a gas phase based on time-resolved laser experiments. Two intensity gratings of electromagnetic field with variable time delay τ are created by interfering of four laser pulses. Using first-order perturbation theory, we show that such arrangement can be used for measuring particle velocities, which have an optical transition to a long-living excited state. It is shown that the optical Ramsey oscillations obtain a characteristic modulation that reflects the distribution of velocities.

  11. Compact, single-frequency, doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator pumped in an achromatic phase-adapted double-pass geometry.

    PubMed

    Hardy, B; Berrou, A; Guilbaud, S; Raybaut, M; Godard, A; Lefebvre, M

    2011-03-01

    We report on a nested-cavity, doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (NesCOPO) architecture for widely tunable, mid-IR, single-frequency generation. By use of an achromatic phase-adapted double-pass pumping scheme, this new, low-threshold, semimonolithic architecture only requires two free-standing cavity mirrors and a nonlinear crystal with a mirror coating deposited on its input facet while the other facet is antireflection coated. It is thus as simple and compact as any basic linear optical parametric oscillator cavity, is easily tunable, and displays low sensitivity to mechanical vibrations. Using a high-repetition-rate (4.8 kHz) microlaser as the pump source of the NesCOPO, we demonstrate a compact source that provides pulsed, stable single-frequency output over a wide spectral range (3.8-4.3 μm) with a high peak power (up to 50 W), which are properties well suited for practical gas sensing applications.

  12. Abnormal salience signaling in schizophrenia: The role of integrative beta oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Liddle, Elizabeth B.; Price, Darren; Palaniyappan, Lena; Brookes, Matthew J.; Robson, Siân E.; Hall, Emma L.; Morris, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aberrant salience attribution and cerebral dysconnectivity both have strong evidential support as core dysfunctions in schizophrenia. Aberrant salience arising from an excess of dopamine activity has been implicated in delusions and hallucinations, exaggerating the significance of everyday occurrences and thus leading to perceptual distortions and delusional causal inferences. Meanwhile, abnormalities in key nodes of a salience brain network have been implicated in other characteristic symptoms, including the disorganization and impoverishment of mental activity. A substantial body of literature reports disruption to brain network connectivity in schizophrenia. Electrical oscillations likely play a key role in the coordination of brain activity at spatially remote sites, and evidence implicates beta band oscillations in long‐range integrative processes. We used magnetoencephalography and a task designed to disambiguate responses to relevant from irrelevant stimuli to investigate beta oscillations in nodes of a network implicated in salience detection and previously shown to be structurally and functionally abnormal in schizophrenia. Healthy participants, as expected, produced an enhanced beta synchronization to behaviorally relevant, as compared to irrelevant, stimuli, while patients with schizophrenia showed the reverse pattern: a greater beta synchronization in response to irrelevant than to relevant stimuli. These findings not only support both the aberrant salience and disconnectivity hypotheses, but indicate a common mechanism that allows us to integrate them into a single framework for understanding schizophrenia in terms of disrupted recruitment of contextually appropriate brain networks. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1361‐1374, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26853904

  13. Abnormal salience signaling in schizophrenia: The role of integrative beta oscillations.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Elizabeth B; Price, Darren; Palaniyappan, Lena; Brookes, Matthew J; Robson, Siân E; Hall, Emma L; Morris, Peter G; Liddle, Peter F

    2016-04-01

    Aberrant salience attribution and cerebral dysconnectivity both have strong evidential support as core dysfunctions in schizophrenia. Aberrant salience arising from an excess of dopamine activity has been implicated in delusions and hallucinations, exaggerating the significance of everyday occurrences and thus leading to perceptual distortions and delusional causal inferences. Meanwhile, abnormalities in key nodes of a salience brain network have been implicated in other characteristic symptoms, including the disorganization and impoverishment of mental activity. A substantial body of literature reports disruption to brain network connectivity in schizophrenia. Electrical oscillations likely play a key role in the coordination of brain activity at spatially remote sites, and evidence implicates beta band oscillations in long-range integrative processes. We used magnetoencephalography and a task designed to disambiguate responses to relevant from irrelevant stimuli to investigate beta oscillations in nodes of a network implicated in salience detection and previously shown to be structurally and functionally abnormal in schizophrenia. Healthy participants, as expected, produced an enhanced beta synchronization to behaviorally relevant, as compared to irrelevant, stimuli, while patients with schizophrenia showed the reverse pattern: a greater beta synchronization in response to irrelevant than to relevant stimuli. These findings not only support both the aberrant salience and disconnectivity hypotheses, but indicate a common mechanism that allows us to integrate them into a single framework for understanding schizophrenia in terms of disrupted recruitment of contextually appropriate brain networks. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Ultra-light and strong: The massless harmonic oscillator and its singular path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modanese, Giovanni

    2017-09-01

    In classical mechanics, a light particle bound by a strong elastic force just oscillates at high frequency in the region allowed by its initial position and velocity. In quantum mechanics, instead, the ground state of the particle becomes completely de-localized in the limit m → 0. The harmonic oscillator thus ceases to be a useful microscopic physical model in the limit m → 0, but its Feynman path integral has interesting singularities which make it a prototype of other systems exhibiting a “quantum runaway” from the classical configurations near the minimum of the action. The probability density of the coherent runaway modes can be obtained as the solution of a Fokker-Planck equation associated to the condition S = Smin. This technique can be applied also to other systems, notably to a dimensional reduction of the Einstein-Hilbert action.

  15. On the classical and quantum integrability of systems of resonant oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    We study in this paper systems of harmonic oscillators with resonant frequencies. For these systems we present general procedures for the construction of sets of functionally independent constants of motion, which can be used for the definition of generalized actionangle variables, in accordance with the general description of degenerate integrable systems which was presented by Nekhoroshev in a seminal paper in 1972. We then apply to these classical integrable systems the procedure of quantization which has been proposed to the author by Nekhoroshev during his last years of activity at Milan University. This procedure is based on the construction of linear operators by means of the symmetrization of the classical constants of motion mentioned above. For 3 oscillators with resonance 1: 1: 2, by using a computer program we have discovered an exceptional integrable system, which cannot be obtained with the standard methods based on the obvious symmetries of the Hamiltonian function. In this exceptional case, quantum integrability can be realized only by means of a modification of the symmetrization procedure.

  16. Hall magnetohydrodynamic effects for current sheet flapping oscillations related to the magnetic double gradient mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Erkaev, N. V.; Semenov, V. S.; Biernat, H. K.

    2010-06-15

    Hall magnetohydrodynamic model is investigated for current sheet flapping oscillations, which implies a gradient of the normal magnetic field component. For the initial undisturbed current sheet structure, the normal magnetic field component is assumed to have a weak linear variation. The profile of the electric current velocity is described by hyperbolic functions with a maximum at the center of the current sheet. In the framework of this model, eigenfrequencies are calculated as functions of the wave number for the ''kink'' and ''sausage'' flapping wave modes. Because of the Hall effects, the flapping eigenfrequency is larger for the waves propagating along the electric current, and it is smaller for the opposite wave propagation with respect to the current. The asymmetry of the flapping wave propagation, caused by Hall effects, is pronounced stronger for thinner current sheets. This is due to the Doppler effect related to the electric current velocity.

  17. Kinematic Properties of Double-barred Galaxies: Simulations versus Integral-field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Min; Debattista, Victor P.; Shen, Juntai; Cappellari, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we recently reported that a dynamically cool inner disk embedded in a hotter outer disk can naturally generate a steady double-barred (S2B) structure. Here we study the kinematics of these S2B simulations, and compare them to integral-field observations from ATLAS 3D and SAURON. We show that S2B galaxies exhibit several distinct kinematic features, namely: (1) significantly distorted isovelocity contours at the transition region between the two bars, (2) peaks in σ LOS along the minor axis of inner bars, which we term “σ-humps,” that are often accompanied by ring/spiral-like features of increased σ LOS, (3) {h}3{--}\\bar{v} anti-correlations in the region of the inner bar for certain orientations, and (4) rings of positive h 4 when viewed at low inclinations. The most impressive of these features are the σ-humps these evolve with the inner bar, oscillating in strength just as the inner bar does as it rotates relative to the outer bar. We show that, in cylindrical coordinates, the inner bar has similar streaming motions and velocity dispersion properties as normal large-scale bars, except for σ z , which exhibits peaks on the minor axis, i.e., humps. These σ z humps are responsible for producing the σ-humps. For three well-resolved early-type S2Bs (NGC 2859, NGC 2950, and NGC 3941) and a potential S2B candidate (NGC 3384), the S2B model qualitatively matches the integral-field data well, including the “σ-hollows” previously identified. We also discuss the kinematic effect of a nuclear disk in S2Bs.

  18. Suppressing longitudinal double-layer oscillations by using elliptically polarized laser pulses in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Dong; Yan, X. Q.; Zheng, C. Y.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.; Yu, M. Y.

    2013-02-15

    It is shown that well collimated mono-energetic ion beams with a large particle number can be generated in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration regime by using an elliptically polarized laser pulse with appropriate theoretically determined laser polarization ratio. Due to the J Multiplication-Sign B effect, the double-layer charge separation region is imbued with hot electrons that prevent ion pileup, thus suppressing the double-layer oscillations. The proposed mechanism is well confirmed by Particle-in-Cell simulations, and after suppressing the longitudinal double-layer oscillations, the ion beams driven by the elliptically polarized lasers own much better energy spectrum than those by circularly polarized lasers.

  19. Operating characteristics of a high-power monolithically integrated flared amplifier master oscillator power amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, S.; Welch, D.F.; Parke, R.A.; Mehuys, D.; Dzurko, K.; Lang, R.J.; Waarts, R. )

    1993-06-01

    High-power monolithically integrated flared amplifier master oscillator power amplifiers (MFA-MOPA's) have been fabricated that operate up to 2 W continuous wave in a single diffraction-limited lobe. The spectral output of the MFA-MOPA is single longitudinal mode with a side-mode suppression ratio greater than 25 dB. Several operating characteristics of the MFA-MOPA, including the beam astigmatism, amplifier gain saturation, linewidth, far-field extinction ratio, and beam quality metrics, are investigated and discussed.

  20. Hepatic circadian clock oscillators and nuclear receptors integrate microbiome-derived signals

    PubMed Central

    Montagner, Alexandra; Korecka, Agata; Polizzi, Arnaud; Lippi, Yannick; Blum, Yuna; Canlet, Cécile; Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Gautier-Stein, Amandine; Burcelin, Rémy; Yen, Yi-Chun; Je, Hyunsoo Shawn; Maha, Al-Asmakh; Mithieux, Gilles; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Guillou, Hervé; Pettersson, Sven; Wahli, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The liver is a key organ of metabolic homeostasis with functions that oscillate in response to food intake. Although liver and gut microbiome crosstalk has been reported, microbiome-mediated effects on peripheral circadian clocks and their output genes are less well known. Here, we report that germ-free (GF) mice display altered daily oscillation of clock gene expression with a concomitant change in the expression of clock output regulators. Mice exposed to microbes typically exhibit characterized activities of nuclear receptors, some of which (PPARα, LXRβ) regulate specific liver gene expression networks, but these activities are profoundly changed in GF mice. These alterations in microbiome-sensitive gene expression patterns are associated with daily alterations in lipid, glucose, and xenobiotic metabolism, protein turnover, and redox balance, as revealed by hepatic metabolome analyses. Moreover, at the systemic level, daily changes in the abundance of biomarkers such as HDL cholesterol, free fatty acids, FGF21, bilirubin, and lactate depend on the microbiome. Altogether, our results indicate that the microbiome is required for integration of liver clock oscillations that tune output activators and their effectors, thereby regulating metabolic gene expression for optimal liver function. PMID:26879573

  1. Hepatic circadian clock oscillators and nuclear receptors integrate microbiome-derived signals.

    PubMed

    Montagner, Alexandra; Korecka, Agata; Polizzi, Arnaud; Lippi, Yannick; Blum, Yuna; Canlet, Cécile; Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Gautier-Stein, Amandine; Burcelin, Rémy; Yen, Yi-Chun; Je, Hyunsoo Shawn; Al-Asmakh, Maha; Maha, Al-Asmakh; Mithieux, Gilles; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Guillou, Hervé; Pettersson, Sven; Wahli, Walter

    2016-02-16

    The liver is a key organ of metabolic homeostasis with functions that oscillate in response to food intake. Although liver and gut microbiome crosstalk has been reported, microbiome-mediated effects on peripheral circadian clocks and their output genes are less well known. Here, we report that germ-free (GF) mice display altered daily oscillation of clock gene expression with a concomitant change in the expression of clock output regulators. Mice exposed to microbes typically exhibit characterized activities of nuclear receptors, some of which (PPARα, LXRβ) regulate specific liver gene expression networks, but these activities are profoundly changed in GF mice. These alterations in microbiome-sensitive gene expression patterns are associated with daily alterations in lipid, glucose, and xenobiotic metabolism, protein turnover, and redox balance, as revealed by hepatic metabolome analyses. Moreover, at the systemic level, daily changes in the abundance of biomarkers such as HDL cholesterol, free fatty acids, FGF21, bilirubin, and lactate depend on the microbiome. Altogether, our results indicate that the microbiome is required for integration of liver clock oscillations that tune output activators and their effectors, thereby regulating metabolic gene expression for optimal liver function.

  2. An application of oscillation-damped motion for suspended payloads to the advanced integrated maintenance system

    SciTech Connect

    Noakes, M.W. ); Petterson, B.J.; Werner, J.C. )

    1990-06-01

    The transportation of objects using overhead cranes can induce pendular motion of the object, which usually must be damped or allowed to decay before the next process can take place. Recent work at Sandia National Laboratories has shown that oscillation-damped transport and swing-free stops are possible by properly programming the acceleration of the transporting crane. Initial studies have been completed using a CIMCORP XR6100 gantry robot. The Advanced Integrated Maintenance System (AIMS) is an engineering and operations test bed developed for remote maintenance and handling studies within the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goal of CFRP has been to advanced the technology of in-cell systems planned for future nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The AIMS provides the capabilities to examine the needs and constraints necessary for hot-cell remote maintenance and includes a force-reflecting master/slave teleoperator and overhead transporter system. The associated control system provides a flexible programming environment conducive to controls experimentation. This paper reviews the theory associated with oscillation-damped trajectories for simply suspended objects and describes a specific implementation of the oscillation damping methods for the AIMS transporter. Hardware and software requirements and constraints for proper operation are discussed.

  3. Polypyrrole Porous Micro Humidity Sensor Integrated with a Ring Oscillator Circuit on Chip

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Lu, De-Hao

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the design and fabrication of a capacitive micro humidity sensor integrated with a five-stage ring oscillator circuit on chip using the complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The area of the humidity sensor chip is about 1 mm2. The humidity sensor consists of a sensing capacitor and a sensing film. The sensing capacitor is constructed from spiral interdigital electrodes that can enhance the sensitivity of the sensor. The sensing film of the sensor is polypyrrole, which is prepared by the chemical polymerization method, and the film has a porous structure. The sensor needs a post-CMOS process to coat the sensing film. The post-CMOS process uses a wet etching to etch the sacrificial layers, and then the polypyrrole is coated on the sensing capacitor. The sensor generates a change in capacitance when the sensing film absorbs or desorbs vapor. The ring oscillator circuit converts the capacitance variation of the sensor into the oscillation frequency output. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the humidity sensor is about 99 kHz/%RH at 25 °C. PMID:22163459

  4. Altered neural oscillations during multisensory integration in adolescents with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, Alfredo D; Coffman, Brian A; Candelaria-Cook, Felicha T; Kodituwakku, Piyadasa; Stephen, Julia M

    2017-09-25

    Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), who were exposed to alcohol in utero, display a broad range of sensory, cognitive, and behavioral deficits, which are broadly theorized to be rooted in altered brain function and structure. Based on the role of neural oscillations in multisensory integration from past studies, we hypothesized that adolescents with FASD would show a decrease in oscillatory power during event-related gamma oscillatory activity (30-100Hz), when compared to typically-developing healthy controls (HC), and that such decrease in oscillatory power would predict behavioral performance. We measured sensory neurophysiology using magnetoencephalography (MEG) during passive auditory (A), somatosensory (S), and multisensory (synchronous A/S) stimulation in 19 adolescents (12-21yrs) with FASD and 23 age- and gender-matched HC. We employed a cross-hemisphere multisensory paradigm to assess interhemispheric connectivity deficits in children with FASD. Time-frequency analysis of MEG data revealed a significant decrease in gamma oscillatory power for both unisensory and multisensory conditions in the FASD group relative to HC, based on permutation testing of significant group differences. Greater beta oscillatory power (15-30 Hz) was also noted in the FASD group compared to HC in both unisensory and multisensory conditions. Regression analysis revealed greater predictive power of multisensory oscillations from unisensory oscillations in the FASD group compared to the HC group. Furthermore, multisensory oscillatory power, for both groups, predicted performance on the Intra-Extradimensional Set Shift Task and the Cambridge Gambling Task. Altered oscillatory power in the FASD group may reflect a restricted ability to process somatosensory and multisensory stimuli during day-to-day interactions. These alterations in neural oscillations may be associated with the neurobehavioral deficits experienced by adolescents with FASD, and may carry over to

  5. Painlevé analysis, Lie symmetries, and integrability of coupled nonlinear oscillators of polynomial type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, M.; Sahadevan, R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent investigations on nonlinear dynamics, the singularity structure analysis pioneered by Kovalevskaya, Painlevé and contempories, which stresses the meromorphic nature of the solutions of the equations of motion in the complex-time plane, is found to play an increasingly important role. Particularly, soliton equations have been found to be associated with the so-called Painlevé property, which implies that the solutions are free from movable critical points/manifolds. Finite-dimensional integrable dynamical systems have also been found to possess such a property. In this review, after briefly presenting the historical developments and various features of the Painlevé (P) method, we demonstrate how it provides an effective tool in the analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems, starting from simple examples. We apply this method to several important coupled nonlinear oscillators governed by generic Hamiltonians of polynomial type with two, three and arbitrary ( N) degrees of freedom and classify all the P-cases. Sufficient numbers of involutive integrals of motion for each of the P-cases are constructed by employing other direct methods. In particular, we examine the question of integrability from the viewpoint of symmetries, explicitly demonstrate the existence of nontrivial extended Lie symmetries for the P-cases, and obtain the required integrals of motion by direct integration of symmetries. Furthermore, we briefly explain how the singularity structure analysis can be used to understand some of the intrinsic properties of nonintegrability and chaos with special reference to the two-coupled quartic anharmonic oscillators and Henon-Heiles systems.

  6. Equivalence of phase-oscillator and integrate-and-fire models.

    PubMed

    Politi, Antonio; Rosenblum, Michael

    2015-04-01

    A quantitative comparison of various classes of oscillators (integrate-and-fire, Winfree, and Kuramoto-Daido type) is performed in the weak-coupling limit for a fully connected network of identical units. An almost perfect agreement is found, with only tiny differences among the models. We also show that the regime of self-consistent partial synchronization is rather general and can be observed for arbitrarily small coupling strength in any model class. As a byproduct of our study, we are able to show that an integrate-and-fire model with a generic pulse shape can be always transformed into a similar model with δ pulses and a suitable phase response curve.

  7. Self-oscillation of standing spin wave in ring resonator with proportional-integral-derivative control

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, B.; Urazuka, Y.; Chen, H.; Oyabu, S.; Otsuki, H.; Tanaka, T. Matsuyama, K.

    2014-05-07

    We report on numerical analysis on self-oscillation of standing spin wave excited in a nanostructured active ring resonator, consists of a ferromagnetic nanowire with perpendicular anisotropy. The confined resonant modes are along the nanowire length. A positive feedback with proportional-integral-derivative gain control was adopted in the active ring. Stable excitation of the 1st order standing spin wave has been demonstrated with micromagnetic simulations, taking into account the thermal effect with a random field model. The stationary standing spin wave with a pre-determined set variable of precession amplitude was attained within 20 ns by optimizing the proportional-integral-derivative gain control parameters. The result indicates that a monochromatic oscillation frequency f{sub osc} is extracted from the initial thermal fluctuation state and selectively amplified with the positive feedback loop. The obtained f{sub osc} value of 5.22 GHz practically agrees with the theoretical prediction from dispersion relation of the magneto static forward volume wave. It was also confirmed that the f{sub osc} change due to the temperature rise can be compensated with an external perpendicular bias field H{sub b}. The observed quick compensation time with an order of nano second suggests the fast operation speed in the practical device application.

  8. Phase space path integral approach to harmonic oscillator with a time-dependent force constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janakiraman, Deepika; Sebastian, K. L.

    2015-09-01

    The quantum statistical mechanical propagator for a harmonic oscillator with a time-dependent force constant, mω2(t) , has been investigated in the past and was found to have only a formal solution in terms of the solutions of certain ordinary differential equations. Such path integrals are frequently encountered in semiclassical path integral evaluations and having exact analytical expressions for such path integrals is of great interest. In a previous work, we had obtained the exact propagator for motion in an arbitrary time-dependent harmonic potential in the overdamped limit of friction using phase space path integrals in the context of Lévy flights - a result that can be easily extended to Brownian motion. In this paper, we make a connection between the overdamped Brownian motion and the imaginary time propagator of quantum mechanics and thereby get yet another way to evaluate the latter exactly. We find that explicit analytic solution for the quantum statistical mechanical propagator can be written when the time-dependent force constant has the form ω2(t) =λ2(t) - dλ(t)/dt, where λ(t) is any arbitrary function of t and use it to evaluate path integrals which have not been evaluated previously. We also employ this method to arrive at a formal solution of the propagator for both Lévy flights and Brownian subjected to a time-dependent harmonic potential in the underdamped limit of friction.

  9. Frequency-dependent Study of Ultrapure Solid 4He by Using Rigid Double-pendulum Torsional Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaewon; Shin, Jaeho; Kim, Eunseong

    2015-03-01

    The physical origin of the period drop found in the torsional oscillator (TO) containing solid 4He was previously interpreted as the appearance of supersolidity. The current consensus is that the increase in the shear modulus leads to the period anomaly. Further studies show that the stiffening effect in TO can be amplified if a TO is not properly designed to be ``rigid.'' In this study, we designed a rigid double-pendulum TO. High purity solid 4He sample (0.6ppb) was grown by the block capillary method. The resonant period of TO starts to decrease from the empty cell data at 80mK. The ratio of the resonant period changes to the total mass loading are 3 . 8 ×10-5 and 2 . 6 ×10-4 for 1st and 2nd mode, respectively. Unlike recent experiment, we could not found a frequency-independent period drop. The upper bound for the putative supersolid fraction is less than 4 ×10-6 . The dissipation peak accompanied with the period drop was also analyzed with Cole-Cole plot and ωτ plot. We conclude that major contribution for the anomalous TO responses comes from the elastic effect.

  10. Integration of GMR-based spin torque oscillators and CMOS circuitry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tingsu; Eklund, Anders; Sani, Sohrab; Rodriguez, Saul; Malm, B. Gunnar; Åkerman, Johan; Rusu, Ana

    2015-09-01

    This paper demonstrates the integration of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) spin torque oscillators (STO) with dedicated high frequency CMOS circuits. The wire-bonding-based integration approach is employed in this work, since it allows easy implementation, measurement and replacement. A GMR STO is wire-bonded to the dedicated CMOS integrated circuit (IC) mounted on a PCB, forming a (GMR STO + CMOS IC) pair. The GMR STO has a lateral size of 70 nm and more than an octave of tunability in the microwave frequency range. The proposed CMOS IC provides the necessary bias-tee for the GMR STO, as well as electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection and wideband amplification targeting high frequency GMR STO-based applications. It is implemented in a 65 nm CMOS process, offers a measured gain of 12 dB, while consuming only 14.3 mW and taking a total silicon area of 0.329 mm2. The measurement results show that the (GMR STO + CMOS IC) pair has a wide tunability range from 8 GHz to 16.5 GHz and improves the output power of the GMR STO by about 10 dB. This GMR STO-CMOS integration eliminates wave reflections during the signal transmission and therefore exhibits good potential for developing high frequency GMR STO-based applications, which combine the features of CMOS and STO technologies.

  11. Distributed electrode Mach-Zehnder modulator with double-pass phase shifters and integrated inductors.

    PubMed

    Gill, D M; Green, W M J; Xiong, C; Rylyakov, A; Schow, C; Proesel, J; Rosenberg, J C; Barwicz, T; Khater, M; Assefa, S; Shank, S M; Reinholm, C; Kiewra, E; Kamlapurkar, S; Vlasov, Y A

    2015-06-29

    A novel high-speed Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) fully integrated into a 90 nm CMOS process is presented. The MZM features 'double-pass' optical phase shifter segments, and the first use of integrated inductors in a 'velocity-matched' distributed-electrode configuration.

  12. Monolithic MgO:LiNbO sub 3 doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator pumped by a frequency-doubled diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Byer, R.L.; Nabors, C.D.; Kozlovsky, W.J.; Eckardt, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    The authors demonstrated a monolithic MgO:LiNbO3 doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO) using an all solid-state pump. The pump laser was a single-axial-mode monolithic Nd:YAG nonplanar ring oscillator whose diode-laser pump was modulated at 325 kHz to produce relaxation oscillation spikes to higher peak powers at 1.06 micrometers that were frequency doubled in a resonant cavity to 532 nm. Pump depletions for the OPO output was temperature tuned from 1.01 to 1.13 micrometers, producing single-axial-mode output over much of the range. By changing the voltage applied across the OPO, the output wavelength was scanned as much as 11 nm in 310 V.

  13. Optical parametric oscillator based off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy for rapid chemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Arslanov, Denis D; Cristescu, Simona M; Harren, Frans J M

    2010-10-01

    An optical parametric oscillator (OPO), pumped by a fiber-amplified diode laser, is combined with off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS). The cw OPO (power 1.2 W, tunability 3-4 μm, 5 cm(-1) mode-hop-free tuning) has a tuning speed of 100 THz/s, which is ideal for rapid and sensitive trace gas detection. Combined with OA-ICOS, a detection limit of 50 parts per trillion by volume (1×10(12)) of ethane (C(2)H(6)) in nitrogen was obtained in 0.25s at 2997 cm(-1), corresponding to a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 4.8×10(-11) cm(-1) Hz(-1/2). The system demonstrates real-time measurements of methane and water in exhaled human breath.

  14. Millimeter-wave double-dipole antennas for high-gain integrated reflector illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipovic, Daniel F.; Ali-Ahmad, Walid Y.; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.

    1992-05-01

    A double-dipole antenna backed by a ground plane has been fabricated for submillimeter wavelengths. The double-dipole antenna is integrated on a thin dielectric membrane with a planar detector at its center. Measured feed patterns at 246 GHz agree well with theory and demonstrate a rotationally symmetric pattern with high coupling efficiency to Gaussian beams. The input impedance is around 50 ohms, and will match well to a Schottky diode or SIS detector. The double-dipole antenna served as the feed for a small machined parabolic reflector. The integrated reflector had a measured gain of 37 dB at 119 microns. This makes the double-dipole antenna ideally suited as a feed for high resolution tracking or for long focal length Cassegrain antenna systems.

  15. Induction and inhibition of diapause by the same photoperiod: experimental evidence for a "double circadian oscillator clock".

    PubMed

    Spieth, Hubert R; Xue, Fangsen; Strau, Katharina

    2004-12-01

    On the southern Iberian Peninsula, the seasonal life history of the large white butterfly, Pieris brassicae, comprises 2 different photoperiodically induced developmental arrests: a hibernation diapause at photophases < 11 h and an estivation diapause at photophases > 14 h. At intermediate photophases (12 h to 13 h), the butterfly responds with a nondiapause. Combined with the experimental setup to determine photosensitivity in insects, the different photoperiodic responses at long-, intermediate-, and short-night conditions were examined to gain more insight into the time measurement mechanism in P. brassicae. The study reveals evidence for a "double circadian oscillator clock" mechanism that is based on 2 submechanisms, a "short-night determining system" and a separate "long-night determining system." This conclusion was drawn from the facts that an LD 9:15 long-night induces a hibernation diapause but inhibits an estivation diapause and, conversely, that an LD 16:8 short-night inhibits a hibernation diapause but induces an estivation diapause. This opposite effect of the same photoperiod supports the argument for the existence of 2 independent targets for light-dark cycles, interpreted as 2 antagonistic time measurement systems. The existence and independence of 2 systems was further shown by differences in long-night versus short-night responses regarding photosensitivity, temperature dependence, and heritable factors. The long-night measurement system is most effective in the 5th larval stage, is highly affected by temperature, and is easy to manipulate by selective inbreeding. The short-night measurement system is most effective in the 4th larval stage, is largely temperature compensated, and is not affected by experimental manipulation of the longnight measurement system.

  16. Enlarged temporal integration window in schizophrenia indicated by the double-flash illusion.

    PubMed

    Haß, Katharina; Sinke, Christopher; Reese, Tanya; Roy, Mandy; Wiswede, Daniel; Dillo, Wolfgang; Oranje, Bob; Szycik, Gregor R

    2017-03-01

    In the present study we were interested in the processing of audio-visual integration in schizophrenia compared to healthy controls. The amount of sound-induced double-flash illusions served as an indicator of audio-visual integration. We expected an altered integration as well as a different window of temporal integration for patients. Fifteen schizophrenia patients and 15 healthy volunteers matched for age and gender were included in this study. We used stimuli with eight different temporal delays (stimulus onset asynchronys (SOAs) 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 200 and 300 ms) to induce a double-flash illusion. Group differences and the widths of temporal integration windows were calculated on percentages of reported double-flash illusions. Patients showed significantly more illusions (ca. 36-44% vs. 9-16% in control subjects) for SOAs 150-300. The temporal integration window for control participants went from SOAs 25 to 200 whereas for patients integration was found across all included temporal delays. We found no significant relationship between the amount of illusions and either illness severity, chlorpromazine equivalent doses or duration of illness in patients. Our results are interpreted in favour of an enlarged temporal integration window for audio-visual stimuli in schizophrenia patients, which is consistent with previous research.

  17. White Noise Path Integral Treatment of a Two-dimensional Dirac Oscillator in a Uniform Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Bastatas, Lyndon D.; Bornales, Jinky B.

    2008-06-18

    White noise path integral prescription is applied to solve the Dirac equation for a two-dimensional Dirac oscillator in a uniform magnetic field. The energy spectrum obtained agrees with the result obtained by Villalba and Maggiolo using the differential approach.

  18. Constrained time-optimal control of double-integrator system and its application in MPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehér, Marek; Straka, Ondřej; Šmídl, Václav

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with the design of a time-optimal controller for systems subject to both state and control constraints. The focus is laid on a double-integrator system, for which the time-to-go function is calculated. The function is then used as a part of a model predictive control criterion where it represents the long-horizon part. The designed model predictive control algorithm is then used in a constrained control problem of permanent magnet synchronous motor model, which behavior can be approximated by a double integrator model. Accomplishments of the control goals are illustrated in a numerical example.

  19. A Multi-rhythmic Oscillator Model that Can Integrate Motion Stabilization with Motion Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owaki, Dai; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Satoshi; Tero, Atsushi; Ishiguro, Akio

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) have been increasingly attracting roboticists in the hope that they enable robots to realize truly supple and agile locomotion under real world constraints. Thus far, various CPG models have been proposed, particularly in terms of motion stabilization against external perturbations, i.e., limit cycle behavior. On the other hand, biological CPGs have another crucial aspect that cannot be neglected, i.e., motion exploration. Here, note that motion stabilization and motion exploration should be performed in different time-scales. Now the following questions arise: how can different time-scales be embedded into a single CPG effectively?; and what is a good mathematical tool for describing the coexistence of different time-scales? To overcome these problems, this paper introduces a novel oscillator model in which the two functions of motion stabilization and motion exploration can be seamlessly integrated by exploiting the concept of multi-rhythmicity, without relying on any hierarchical structure, which in turn enables that learning is an integral part of the motor control system. We applied this model to the learning of hopping motion as a practical example. Simulation results indicate that the robot can successfully perform online learning without the need for a separation between learning and performance phases.

  20. Development of Local Oscillator Integrated Antenna Array for Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Daisuke; Ito, Naoki; Nagayama, Yoshio; Tsuchiya, Hayato; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Kohagura, Junko; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Kogi, Yuichiro; Mase, Atsushi

    2016-10-01

    Microwave imaging systems include difficulties in terms of multi-channelization and cost. Our group solved these problems by developing a Horn-antenna Mixer Array (HMA), a 50 - 110 GHz 1-D heterodyne-type antenna array, which can be easily stacked as a 2-D receiving array. However, the HMA still evidenced problems owing to the requirement for local oscillation (LO) optics and an expensive high-power LO source. To solve this problem, we have developed an upgraded HMA, named the Local Integrated Antenna array (LIA), in which each channel has an internal LO supply using a frequency multiplier integrated circuit. Therefore, the proposed antenna array eliminates the need for both the LO optics and the high-power LO source. However, the LIA still has problems, that the instabilities of the sensitivity and poor channel isolation. This paper describes the principle of the LIA, and solutions of above-mentioned problems. This work is performed with the support and under the auspices of the NIFS Collaborative Research Program (NIFS15KOAP029 and NIFS16KUGM115).

  1. Development of local oscillator integrated antenna array for microwave imaging diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, D.; Ito, N.; Nagayama, Y.; Tsuchiya, H.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Yoshinaga, T.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kogi, Y.; Mase, A.; Shinohara, S.

    2015-12-01

    Microwave imaging diagnostics are powerful tools that are used to obtain details of complex structures and behaviors of such systems as magnetically confined plasmas. For example, microwave imaging reflectometry and microwave imaging interferometers are suitable for observing phenomena that are involved with electron density fluctuations; moreover, electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostics enable us to accomplish the significant task of observing MHD instabilities in large tokamaks. However, microwave imaging systems include difficulties in terms of multi-channelization and cost. Recently, we solved these problems by developing a Horn-antenna Mixer Array (HMA), a 50 - 110 GHz 1-D heterodyne- type antenna array, which can be easily stacked as a 2-D receiving array, because it uses an end-fire element. However, the HMA still evidenced problems owing to the requirement for local oscillation (LO) optics and an expensive high-power LO source. To solve this problem, we have developed an upgraded HMA, named the Local Integrated Antenna array (LIA), in which each channel has an internal LO supply using a frequency multiplier integrated circuit. Therefore, the proposed antenna array eliminates the need for both the LO optics and the high-power LO source. This paper describes the principle of the LIA, and provides details about an 8 channel prototype LIA.

  2. Micromagnetic model analysis of integrated single-pole-type head with tilted spin-torque oscillator for high-frequency microwave-assisted magnetic recording

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Takuto; Kanai, Yasushi; Yoshida, Kazuetsu; Greaves, Simon; Muraoka, Hiroaki

    2015-05-07

    The spin-torque oscillator (STO) is the most important component in microwave-assisted magnetic recording. Some requirements for the STO are: large amplitude and stable oscillation, small injected current, and oscillation at a frequency that excites resonance in a recording medium. It is also necessary for the STO oscillation to closely follow the head coil current. In this paper, STOs were integrated into write heads and micromagnetic analyses carried out to obtain a write head structure with stable STO oscillation that could follow a high-frequency head coil current.

  3. Some improvements in design of atmospheric ammonia storage tanks of the double integrity type

    SciTech Connect

    Herbertsson, G. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper describes a new atmospheric ammonia storage tank in Iceland. Some modifications have been made to the former common open cup design of double integrity tanks. Another modification is described, dry air is bled under the cladding of the sidewall insulation to protect the insulation from moisture penetration under the vapor barrier which results in frost damages.

  4. Characterizing classical periodic orbits from quantum Green's functions in two-dimensional integrable systems: Harmonic oscillators and quantum billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. F.; Tung, J. C.; Tuan, P. H.; Yu, Y. T.; Liang, H. C.; Huang, K. F.

    2017-01-01

    A general method is developed to characterize the family of classical periodic orbits from the quantum Green's function for the two-dimensional (2D) integrable systems. A decomposing formula related to the beta function is derived to link the quantum Green's function with the individual classical periodic orbits. The practicality of the developed formula is demonstrated by numerically analyzing the 2D commensurate harmonic oscillators and integrable quantum billiards. Numerical analyses reveal that the emergence of the classical features in quantum Green's functions principally comes from the superposition of the degenerate states for 2D harmonic oscillators. On the other hand, the damping factor in quantum Green's functions plays a critical role to display the classical features in mesoscopic regime for integrable quantum billiards, where the physical function of the damping factor is to lead to the coherent superposition of the nearly degenerate eigenstates.

  5. Characterizing classical periodic orbits from quantum Green's functions in two-dimensional integrable systems: Harmonic oscillators and quantum billiards.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y F; Tung, J C; Tuan, P H; Yu, Y T; Liang, H C; Huang, K F

    2017-01-01

    A general method is developed to characterize the family of classical periodic orbits from the quantum Green's function for the two-dimensional (2D) integrable systems. A decomposing formula related to the beta function is derived to link the quantum Green's function with the individual classical periodic orbits. The practicality of the developed formula is demonstrated by numerically analyzing the 2D commensurate harmonic oscillators and integrable quantum billiards. Numerical analyses reveal that the emergence of the classical features in quantum Green's functions principally comes from the superposition of the degenerate states for 2D harmonic oscillators. On the other hand, the damping factor in quantum Green's functions plays a critical role to display the classical features in mesoscopic regime for integrable quantum billiards, where the physical function of the damping factor is to lead to the coherent superposition of the nearly degenerate eigenstates.

  6. Planar dielectric resonator stabilized HEMT oscillator integrated with CPW/aperture coupled patch antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1992-01-01

    A new design of an active antenna with a dielectric resonator stabilized high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) oscillator (DRO) and an aperture-coupled patch antenna is reported. The circuit is fabricated using coplanar waveguide (CPW) with the oscillator and the antenna on opposite sides of the substrate. The active antenna was demonstrated at 7.6 GHz; however, the design can be scaled to higher frequencies. Excellent oscillator characteristics and radiation patterns were obtained.

  7. Planar dielectric resonator stabilized HEMT oscillator integrated with CPW/aperture coupled patch antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1992-01-01

    A design of an active antenna with a dielectric resonator stabilized high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) oscillator (DRO) and an aperture-coupled patch antenna is reported. The circuit is fabricated using coplanar waveguide (CPW) with the oscillator and the antenna on opposite sides of the substrate. The active antenna was demonstrated at 7.6 GHz; however, the design can be scaled to higher frequencies. Excellent oscillator characteristics and radiation patterns were obtained.

  8. Vortex spin-torque oscillator stabilized by phase locked loop using integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreissig, Martin; Lebrun, R.; Protze, F.; Merazzo-Jaimes, K.; Hem, J.; Vila, L.; Ferreira, R.; Cyrille, M.-C.; Ellinger, F.; Cros, V.; Ebels, U.; Bortolotti, P.

    2017-05-01

    Spin-torque nano-oscillators (STO) are candidates for the next technological implementation of spintronic devices in commercial electronic systems. For use in microwave applications, improving the noise figures by efficient control of their phase dynamics is a mandatory requirement. In order to achieve this, we developed a compact phase locked loop (PLL) based on custom integrated circuits (ICs) and demonstrate that it represents an efficient way to reduce the phase noise level of a vortex based STO. The advantage of our approach to phase stabilize STOs is that our compact system is highly reconfigurable e.g. in terms of the frequency divider ratio N, RF gain and loop gain. This makes it robust against device to device variations and at the same time compatible with a large range of STOs. Moreover, by taking advantage of the natural highly non-isochronous nature of the STO, the STO frequency can be easily controlled by e.g. changing the divider ratio N.

  9. Plasma sheet oscillations and their relation to substorm development: Cluster and double star TC1 case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, T.; Nakamura, R.; Asano, Y.; Baumjohann, W.; Runov, A.; Volwerk, M.; Zhang, T. L.; Vörös, Z.; Keika, K.; Klecker, B.; Rème, H.; Lucek, E. A.; Carr, C.; Frey, H. U.

    We examined two consecutive plasma sheet oscillation and dipolarization events observed by Cluster in the magnetotail, which are associated with a pseudo-breakup and a small substorm monitored by the IMAGE spacecraft. Energy input from the solar wind and an associated enhancement of the cross-tail current lead to current sheet thinning and plasma sheet oscillations of 3 5 min periods, while the pseudo-breakups occur during the loading phase within a spatially limited area, accompanied by a localized dipolarization observed by DSP TC1 or GOES 12. That is, the so-called “growth phase” is a preferable condition for both pseudo-breakup and plasma sheet oscillations in the near-Earth magnetotail. One of the plasma sheet oscillation events occurs before the pseudo-breakup, whereas the other takes place after pseudo-breakup. Thus there is no causal relationship between the plasma sheet oscillation events and pseudo-breakup. As for the contribution to the subsequent small substorm, the onset of the small substorm took place where the preceding plasma sheet oscillations can reach the region.

  10. Micromachined piezoresistive inclinometer with oscillator-based integrated interface circuit and temperature readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalola, Simone; Ferrari, Vittorio; Marioli, Daniele

    2012-03-01

    In this paper a dual-chip system for inclination measurement is presented. It consists of a MEMS (microelectromechanical system) piezoresistive accelerometer manufactured in silicon bulk micromachining and a CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) ASIC (application specific integrated circuit) interface designed for resistive-bridge sensors. The sensor is composed of a seismic mass symmetrically suspended by means of four flexure beams that integrate two piezoresistors each to detect the applied static acceleration, which is related to inclination with respect to the gravity vector. The ASIC interface is based on a relaxation oscillator where the frequency and the duty cycle of a rectangular-wave output signal are related to the fractional bridge imbalance and the overall bridge resistance of the sensor, respectively. The latter is a function of temperature; therefore the sensing element itself can be advantageously used to derive information for its own thermal compensation. DC current excitation of the sensor makes the configuration unaffected by wire resistances and parasitic capacitances. Therefore, a modular system results where the sensor can be placed remotely from the electronics without suffering accuracy degradation. The inclination measurement system has been characterized as a function of the applied inclination angle at different temperatures. At room temperature, the experimental sensitivity of the system results in about 148 Hz/g, which corresponds to an angular sensitivity around zero inclination angle of about 2.58 Hz deg-1. This is in agreement with finite element method simulations. The measured output fluctuations at constant temperature determine an equivalent resolution of about 0.1° at midrange. In the temperature range of 25-65 °C the system sensitivity decreases by about 10%, which is less than the variation due to the microsensor alone thanks to thermal compensation provided by the current excitation of the bridge and the positive

  11. Double-Staining Method for Differentiation of Morphological Changes and Membrane Integrity of Campylobacter coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Jose L.; Mascellaro, Salvatore; Moreno, Yolanda; Ferrús, María A.; Hernández, Javier

    2002-01-01

    We developed a double-staining procedure involving NanoOrange dye (Molecular Probes, Eugene, Oreg.) and membrane integrity stains (LIVE/DEAD BacLight kit; Molecular Probes) to show the morphological and membrane integrity changes of Campylobacter coli cells during growth. The conversion from a spiral to a coccoid morphology via intermediary forms and the membrane integrity changes of the C. coli cells can be detected with the double-staining procedure. Our data indicate that young or actively growing cells are mainly spiral shaped (green-stained cells), but older cells undergo a degenerative change to coccoid forms (red-stained cells). Club-shaped transition cell forms were observed with NanoOrange stain. Chlorinated drinking water affected the viability but not the morphology of C. coli cells. PMID:12324366

  12. Energy level promotion in the correlation from the tunnelling-doubled harmonic oscillator to the bi-rotor: application to internal rotation in molecules.

    PubMed

    Ross, Stephen C; Yamada, Koichi M T

    2007-11-21

    A surprisingly rich variety of phenomena are revealed in the energy level correlation between the limits of a tunnelling doubled harmonic oscillator and a bi-rotor. Some levels are found to have their vibrational quantum number "promoted" upon removal of the barrier to rotation, other levels, which we dub "invariant", are found to be completely independent of the barrier, while yet other levels exhibit a smooth transition between these limits. The general nature of these features can be understood in terms of the different degeneracies of the limiting cases. The elucidation of these effects aids the understanding of the rotational-vibrational energy levels of molecules having two internal rotor moieties.

  13. A 60-GHz interferometer with a local oscillator integrated antenna array for divertor simulation experiments on GAMMA 10/PDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohagura, J.; Yoshikawa, M.; Wang, X.; Kuwahara, D.; Ito, N.; Nagayama, Y.; Shima, Y.; Nojiri, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Mase, A.

    2016-11-01

    In conventional multichannel/imaging microwave diagnostics of interferometry, reflectometry, and electron cyclotron emission measurements, a local oscillator (LO) signal is commonly supplied to a receiver array via irradiation using LO optics. In this work, we present a 60-GHz interferometer with a new eight-channel receiver array, called a local oscillator integrated antenna array (LIA). An outstanding feature of LIA is that it incorporates a frequency quadrupler integrated circuit for LO supply to each channel. This enables simple and uniform LO supply to the receiver array using only a 15-GHz LO source and a coaxial cable transmission line instead of using an expensive 60-GHz source, LO optics, and a waveguide transmission line. The new interferometer system is first applied to measure electron line-averaged density inside the divertor simulation experimental module (D-module) on GAMMA 10/PDX tandem mirror device.

  14. Sol-gel zinc oxide humidity sensors integrated with a ring oscillator circuit on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2014-10-28

    The study develops an integrated humidity microsensor fabricated using the commercial 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The integrated humidity sensor consists of a humidity sensor and a ring oscillator circuit on-a-chip. The humidity sensor is composed of a sensitive film and branch interdigitated electrodes. The sensitive film is zinc oxide prepared by sol-gel method. After completion of the CMOS process, the sensor requires a post-process to remove the sacrificial oxide layer and to coat the zinc oxide film on the interdigitated electrodes. The capacitance of the sensor changes when the sensitive film adsorbs water vapor. The circuit is used to convert the capacitance of the humidity sensor into the oscillation frequency output. Experimental results show that the output frequency of the sensor changes from 84.3 to 73.4 MHz at 30 °C as the humidity increases 40 to 90%RH.

  15. Sol-Gel Zinc Oxide Humidity Sensors Integrated with a Ring Oscillator Circuit On-a-Chip

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2014-01-01

    The study develops an integrated humidity microsensor fabricated using the commercial 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The integrated humidity sensor consists of a humidity sensor and a ring oscillator circuit on-a-chip. The humidity sensor is composed of a sensitive film and branch interdigitated electrodes. The sensitive film is zinc oxide prepared by sol-gel method. After completion of the CMOS process, the sensor requires a post-process to remove the sacrificial oxide layer and to coat the zinc oxide film on the interdigitated electrodes. The capacitance of the sensor changes when the sensitive film adsorbs water vapor. The circuit is used to convert the capacitance of the humidity sensor into the oscillation frequency output. Experimental results show that the output frequency of the sensor changes from 84.3 to 73.4 MHz at 30 °C as the humidity increases 40 to 90 %RH. PMID:25353984

  16. A 60-GHz interferometer with a local oscillator integrated antenna array for divertor simulation experiments on GAMMA 10/PDX.

    PubMed

    Kohagura, J; Yoshikawa, M; Wang, X; Kuwahara, D; Ito, N; Nagayama, Y; Shima, Y; Nojiri, K; Sakamoto, M; Nakashima, Y; Mase, A

    2016-11-01

    In conventional multichannel/imaging microwave diagnostics of interferometry, reflectometry, and electron cyclotron emission measurements, a local oscillator (LO) signal is commonly supplied to a receiver array via irradiation using LO optics. In this work, we present a 60-GHz interferometer with a new eight-channel receiver array, called a local oscillator integrated antenna array (LIA). An outstanding feature of LIA is that it incorporates a frequency quadrupler integrated circuit for LO supply to each channel. This enables simple and uniform LO supply to the receiver array using only a 15-GHz LO source and a coaxial cable transmission line instead of using an expensive 60-GHz source, LO optics, and a waveguide transmission line. The new interferometer system is first applied to measure electron line-averaged density inside the divertor simulation experimental module (D-module) on GAMMA 10/PDX tandem mirror device.

  17. A 60-GHz interferometer with a local oscillator integrated antenna array for divertor simulation experiments on GAMMA 10/PDX

    SciTech Connect

    Kohagura, J. Yoshikawa, M.; Shima, Y.; Nojiri, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Wang, X.; Kuwahara, D.; Ito, N.; Nagayama, Y.; Mase, A.

    2016-11-15

    In conventional multichannel/imaging microwave diagnostics of interferometry, reflectometry, and electron cyclotron emission measurements, a local oscillator (LO) signal is commonly supplied to a receiver array via irradiation using LO optics. In this work, we present a 60-GHz interferometer with a new eight-channel receiver array, called a local oscillator integrated antenna array (LIA). An outstanding feature of LIA is that it incorporates a frequency quadrupler integrated circuit for LO supply to each channel. This enables simple and uniform LO supply to the receiver array using only a 15-GHz LO source and a coaxial cable transmission line instead of using an expensive 60-GHz source, LO optics, and a waveguide transmission line. The new interferometer system is first applied to measure electron line-averaged density inside the divertor simulation experimental module (D-module) on GAMMA 10/PDX tandem mirror device.

  18. Optical characterization of tissue mimicking phantoms by a vertical double integrating sphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yilin; Jia, Qiumin; Shen, Shuwei; Liu, Guangli; Guo, Yuwei; Zhou, Ximing; Chu, Jiaru; Zhao, Gang; Dong, Erbao; Allen, David W.; Lemaillet, Paul; Xu, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    Accurate characterization of absorption and scattering properties for biologic tissue and tissue-simulating materials enables 3D printing of traceable tissue-simulating phantoms for medical spectral device calibration and standardized medical optical imaging. Conventional double integrating sphere systems have several limitations and are suboptimal for optical characterization of liquid and soft materials used in 3D printing. We propose a vertical double integrating sphere system and the associated reconstruction algorithms for optical characterization of phantom materials that simulate different human tissue components. The system characterizes absorption and scattering properties of liquid and solid phantom materials in an operating wavelength range from 400 nm to 1100 nm. Absorption and scattering properties of the phantoms are adjusted by adding titanium dioxide powder and India ink, respectively. Different material compositions are added in the phantoms and characterized by the vertical double integrating sphere system in order to simulate the human tissue properties. Our test results suggest that the vertical integrating sphere system is able to characterize optical properties of tissue-simulating phantoms without precipitation effect of the liquid samples or wrinkling effect of the soft phantoms during the optical measurement.

  19. [Method of double feedback from EEG oscillators of the patient for correction of stress-induced functional disorders].

    PubMed

    Fedotchev, A I; Bondar', A T

    2008-01-01

    Method of correction of human stress-induced functional disorders is proposed which is based on two feedback contours from narrow-band EEG oscillators of the patient. The first one is a usual biofeedback contour in which the feedback signals from the narrow-band EEG oscillator are consciously perceived by the patient and serve him as a guide for voluntary reduction/activation of these EEG components. The second one is an additional contour of resonance stimulation which helps a subject to overcome the difficulties of conscious control of feedback signals. In this contour the parameters of audio-visual stimulation are automatically tuned to the frequency of the dominant narrow-band EEG oscillator of the patient (from the same or other EEG frequency range) to reach its resonance activation. Scientific basis of the method is provided, the results of its experimental testing are presented.

  20. Double simple-harmonic-oscillator formulation of the thermal equilibrium of a fluid interacting with a coherent source of phonons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defacio, B.; Vannevel, Alan; Brander, O.

    1993-01-01

    A formulation is given for a collection of phonons (sound) in a fluid at a non-zero temperature which uses the simple harmonic oscillator twice; one to give a stochastic thermal 'noise' process and the other which generates a coherent Glauber state of phonons. Simple thermodynamic observables are calculated and the acoustic two point function, 'contrast' is presented. The role of 'coherence' in an equilibrium system is clarified by these results and the simple harmonic oscillator is a key structure in both the formulation and the calculations.

  1. LNK genes integrate light and clock signaling networks at the core of the Arabidopsis oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Rugnone, Matias L.; Faigón Soverna, Ana; Sanchez, Sabrina E.; Schlaen, Ruben Gustavo; Hernando, Carlos Esteban; Seymour, Danelle K.; Mancini, Estefanía; Chernomoretz, Ariel; Weigel, Detlef; Más, Paloma; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.

    2013-01-01

    Light signaling pathways and the circadian clock interact to help organisms synchronize physiological and developmental processes with periodic environmental cycles. The plant photoreceptors responsible for clock resetting have been characterized, but signaling components that link the photoreceptors to the clock remain to be identified. Here we describe a family of night light–inducible and clock-regulated genes (LNK) that play a key role linking light regulation of gene expression to the control of daily and seasonal rhythms in Arabidopsis thaliana. A genomewide transcriptome analysis revealed that most light-induced genes respond more strongly to light during the subjective day, which is consistent with the diurnal nature of most physiological processes in plants. However, a handful of genes, including the homologous genes LNK1 and LNK2, are more strongly induced by light in the middle of the night, when the clock is most responsive to this signal. Further analysis revealed that the morning phased LNK1 and LNK2 genes control circadian rhythms, photomorphogenic responses, and photoperiodic dependent flowering, most likely by regulating a subset of clock and flowering time genes in the afternoon. LNK1 and LNK2 themselves are directly repressed by members of the TIMING OF CAB1 EXPRESSION/PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR family of core-clock genes in the afternoon and early night. Thus, LNK1 and LNK2 integrate early light signals with temporal information provided by core oscillator components to control the expression of afternoon genes, allowing plants to keep track of seasonal changes in day length. PMID:23818596

  2. Integrated crop management practices for maximizing grain yield of double-season rice crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Depeng; Huang, Jianliang; Nie, Lixiao; Wang, Fei; Ling, Xiaoxia; Cui, Kehui; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing

    2017-01-01

    Information on maximum grain yield and its attributes are limited for double-season rice crop grown under the subtropical environment. This study was conducted to examine key characteristics associated with high yielding double-season rice crop through a comparison between an integrated crop management (ICM) and farmers’ practice (FP). Field experiments were conducted in the early and late seasons in the subtropical environment of Wuxue County, Hubei Province, China in 2013 and 2014. On average, grain yield in ICM was 13.5% higher than that in FP. A maximum grain yield of 9.40 and 10.53 t ha-1 was achieved under ICM in the early- and late-season rice, respectively. Yield improvement of double-season rice with ICM was achieved with the combined effects of increased plant density and optimized nutrient management. Yield gain of ICM resulted from a combination of increases in sink size due to more panicle number per unit area and biomass production, further supported by the increased leaf area index, leaf area duration, radiation use efficiency, crop growth rate, and total nitrogen uptake compared with FP. Further enhancement in the yield potential of double-season rice should focus on increasing crop growth rate and biomass production through improved and integrated crop management practices.

  3. Integrated crop management practices for maximizing grain yield of double-season rice crop

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Depeng; Huang, Jianliang; Nie, Lixiao; Wang, Fei; Ling, Xiaoxia; Cui, Kehui; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing

    2017-01-01

    Information on maximum grain yield and its attributes are limited for double-season rice crop grown under the subtropical environment. This study was conducted to examine key characteristics associated with high yielding double-season rice crop through a comparison between an integrated crop management (ICM) and farmers’ practice (FP). Field experiments were conducted in the early and late seasons in the subtropical environment of Wuxue County, Hubei Province, China in 2013 and 2014. On average, grain yield in ICM was 13.5% higher than that in FP. A maximum grain yield of 9.40 and 10.53 t ha−1 was achieved under ICM in the early- and late-season rice, respectively. Yield improvement of double-season rice with ICM was achieved with the combined effects of increased plant density and optimized nutrient management. Yield gain of ICM resulted from a combination of increases in sink size due to more panicle number per unit area and biomass production, further supported by the increased leaf area index, leaf area duration, radiation use efficiency, crop growth rate, and total nitrogen uptake compared with FP. Further enhancement in the yield potential of double-season rice should focus on increasing crop growth rate and biomass production through improved and integrated crop management practices. PMID:28079051

  4. Integrated crop management practices for maximizing grain yield of double-season rice crop.

    PubMed

    Wang, Depeng; Huang, Jianliang; Nie, Lixiao; Wang, Fei; Ling, Xiaoxia; Cui, Kehui; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing

    2017-01-12

    Information on maximum grain yield and its attributes are limited for double-season rice crop grown under the subtropical environment. This study was conducted to examine key characteristics associated with high yielding double-season rice crop through a comparison between an integrated crop management (ICM) and farmers' practice (FP). Field experiments were conducted in the early and late seasons in the subtropical environment of Wuxue County, Hubei Province, China in 2013 and 2014. On average, grain yield in ICM was 13.5% higher than that in FP. A maximum grain yield of 9.40 and 10.53 t ha(-1) was achieved under ICM in the early- and late-season rice, respectively. Yield improvement of double-season rice with ICM was achieved with the combined effects of increased plant density and optimized nutrient management. Yield gain of ICM resulted from a combination of increases in sink size due to more panicle number per unit area and biomass production, further supported by the increased leaf area index, leaf area duration, radiation use efficiency, crop growth rate, and total nitrogen uptake compared with FP. Further enhancement in the yield potential of double-season rice should focus on increasing crop growth rate and biomass production through improved and integrated crop management practices.

  5. Gamma band oscillations under influence of bromazepam during a sensorimotor integration task: an EEG coherence study.

    PubMed

    Minc, Daniel; Machado, Sergio; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Machado, Dionis; Cunha, Marlo; Cagy, Mauricio; Budde, Henning; Basile, Luis; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2010-01-18

    The goal of the present study was to explore the dynamics of the gamma band using the coherence of the quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) in a sensorimotor integration task and the influence of the neuromodulator bromazepam on the band behavior. Our hypothesis is that the needs of the typewriting task will demand the coupling of different brain areas, and that the gamma band will promote the binding of information. It is also expected that the neuromodulator will modify this coupling. The sample was composed of 39 healthy subjects. We used a randomized double-blind design and divided subjects into three groups: placebo (n=13), bromazepam 3mg (n=13) and bromazepam 6 mg (n=13). The two-way ANOVA analysis demonstrated a main effect for the factors condition (i.e., C4-CZ electrode pair) and moment (i.e., C3-CZ, C3-C4 and C4-CZ pairs of electrodes). We propose that the gamma band plays an important role in the binding among several brain areas in complex motor tasks and that each hemisphere is influenced in a different manner by the neuromodulator. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Microfluidics-integrated cascaded double-microring resonators for label-free biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yangqing; Yu, Fang; Yang, Chang; Li, Mingyu; Tang, Longhua; Song, Jinyan; He, Jian-Jun

    2014-11-01

    A highly-sensitive optical waveguide biosensor integrated with microfluidic channels based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) was investigated in this paper. Experimental results of the label-free detection exhibits this novel biosensor with the superior reliability for quantitative and kinetic measurement of the interaction between biological molecules, dramatically improving the sensitivity due to the Vernier effect induced by cascaded double-microring resonators.

  7. Label-free biosensing using cascaded double-microring resonators integrated with microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yangqing; Yu, Fang; Yang, Chang; Song, Jinyan; Tang, Longhua; Li, Mingyu; He, Jian-Jun

    2015-06-01

    Fast and accurate quantitative measurement of biologically relevant molecules has been demonstrated for medical diagnostics and drug applications in photonic integrated circuits. Herein, we reported a highly-sensitive optical biosensor based on cascaded double-microring resonators. The sensor was integrated with microfluidic channels and investigated with its label-free detection capability. With a wavelength resolution of 0.47 nm, the measured binding capacity of the antibody on the surface exhibits reliable detection limit down to 7.10 μg/mL using human immunoglobulin G (hIgG).

  8. Nonlinear Elastic J-Integral Measurements in Mode I Using a Tapered Double Cantilever Beam Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macon, David J.

    2006-01-01

    An expression for the J-integral of a nonlinear elastic material is derived for an advancing crack in a tapered double cantilever beam fracture specimen. The elastic and plastic fracture energies related to the test geometry and how these energies correlates to the crack position are discussed. The dimensionless shape factors eta(sub el and eta(sub p) are shown to be equivalent and the deformation J-integral is analyzed in terms of the eta(sub el) function. The fracture results from a structural epoxy are interpreted using the discussed approach. The magnitude of the plastic dissipation is found to strongly depend upon the initial crack shape.

  9. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  10. Airborne 2-micron double-pulsed integrated path differential absorption lidar for column CO2 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 mJ and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 µs and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-µm direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-μm IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  11. Integrated double mulching practices optimizes soil temperature and improves soil water utilization in arid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wen; Feng, Fuxue; Zhao, Cai; Yu, Aizhong; Hu, Falong; Chai, Qiang; Gan, Yantai; Guo, Yao

    2016-09-01

    Water shortage threatens agricultural sustainability in many arid and semiarid areas of the world. It is unknown whether improved water conservation practices can be developed to alleviate this issue while increasing crop productivity. In this study, we developed a "double mulching" system, i.e., plastic film coupled with straw mulch, integrated together with intensified strip intercropping. We determined (i) the responses of soil evaporation and moisture conservation to the integrated double mulching system and (ii) the change of soil temperature during key plant growth stages under the integrated systems. Experiments were carried out in northwest China in 2009 to 2011. Results show that wheat-maize strip intercropping in combination with plastic film and straw covering on the soil surface increased soil moisture (mm) by an average of 3.8 % before sowing, 5.3 % during the wheat and maize co-growth period, 4.4 % after wheat harvest, and 4.9 % after maize harvest, compared to conventional practice (control). The double mulching decreased total evapotranspiration of the two intercrops by an average of 4.6 % ( P < 0.05), compared to control. An added feature was that the double mulching system decreased soil temperature in the top 10-cm depth by 1.26 to 1.31 °C in the strips of the cool-season wheat, and by 1.31 to 1.51 °C in the strips of the warm-season maize through the 2 years. Soil temperature of maize strips higher as 1.25 to 1.94 °C than that of wheat strips in the top 10-cm soil depth under intercropping with the double mulching system; especially higher as 1.58 to 2.11 °C under intercropping with the conventional tillage; this allows the two intercrops to grow in a well "collaborative" status under the double mulching system during their co-growth period. The improvement of soil moisture and the optimization of soil temperature for the two intercrops allow us to conclude that wheat-maize intensification with the double mulching system can be used as an

  12. Integrated double mulching practices optimizes soil temperature and improves soil water utilization in arid environments.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wen; Feng, Fuxue; Zhao, Cai; Yu, Aizhong; Hu, Falong; Chai, Qiang; Gan, Yantai; Guo, Yao

    2016-09-01

    Water shortage threatens agricultural sustainability in many arid and semiarid areas of the world. It is unknown whether improved water conservation practices can be developed to alleviate this issue while increasing crop productivity. In this study, we developed a "double mulching" system, i.e., plastic film coupled with straw mulch, integrated together with intensified strip intercropping. We determined (i) the responses of soil evaporation and moisture conservation to the integrated double mulching system and (ii) the change of soil temperature during key plant growth stages under the integrated systems. Experiments were carried out in northwest China in 2009 to 2011. Results show that wheat-maize strip intercropping in combination with plastic film and straw covering on the soil surface increased soil moisture (mm) by an average of 3.8 % before sowing, 5.3 % during the wheat and maize co-growth period, 4.4 % after wheat harvest, and 4.9 % after maize harvest, compared to conventional practice (control). The double mulching decreased total evapotranspiration of the two intercrops by an average of 4.6 % (P < 0.05), compared to control. An added feature was that the double mulching system decreased soil temperature in the top 10-cm depth by 1.26 to 1.31 °C in the strips of the cool-season wheat, and by 1.31 to 1.51 °C in the strips of the warm-season maize through the 2 years. Soil temperature of maize strips higher as 1.25 to 1.94 °C than that of wheat strips in the top 10-cm soil depth under intercropping with the double mulching system; especially higher as 1.58 to 2.11 °C under intercropping with the conventional tillage; this allows the two intercrops to grow in a well "collaborative" status under the double mulching system during their co-growth period. The improvement of soil moisture and the optimization of soil temperature for the two intercrops allow us to conclude that wheat-maize intensification with the double mulching system can be

  13. Low variance energy estimators for systems of quantum Drude oscillators: treating harmonic path integrals with large separations of time scales.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Troy W; Martyna, Glenn J

    2007-02-21

    In the effort to develop atomistic models capable of accurately describing nanoscale systems with complex interfaces, it has become clear that simple treatments with rigid charge distributions and dispersion coefficients selected to generate bulk properties are insufficient to predict important physical properties. The quantum Drude oscillator model, a system of one-electron pseudoatoms whose "pseudoelectrons" are harmonically bound to their respective "pseudonuclei," is capable of treating many-body polarization and dispersion interactions in molecular systems on an equal footing due to the ability of the pseudoatoms to mimic the long-range interactions that characterize real materials. Using imaginary time path integration, the Drude oscillator model can, in principle, be solved in computer operation counts that scale linearly with the number of atoms in the system. In practice, however, standard expressions for the energy and pressure, including the commonly used virial estimator, have extremely large variances that require untenably long simulation times to generate converged averages. In this paper, low-variance estimators for the internal energy are derived, in which the large zero-point energy of the oscillators does not contribute to the variance. The new estimators are applicable to any system of harmonic oscillators coupled to one another (or to the environment) via an arbitrary set of anharmonic interactions. The variance of the new estimators is found to be much smaller than standard estimators in three example problems, a one-dimensional anharmonic oscillator and quantum Drude models of the xenon dimer and solid (fcc) xenon, respectively, yielding 2-3 orders of magnitude improvement in computational efficiency.

  14. Factors affecting the integration of immigrant nurses into the nursing workforce: A double hermeneutic study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Willis, Eileen; Jeffers, Lesley

    2014-04-01

    Variations in nursing practice and communication difficulties pose a challenge for the successful integration into the workforce of immigrant nurses. Evidence for this is found in cultural clashes, interpersonal conflicts, communication problems, prejudiced attitudes and discrimination towards immigrant nurses. While the evidence shows that integrating immigrant nurses into the nursing workforce is shaped by factors that are socially constructed, studies that examine social structures affecting workforce integration are sparse. The aim of this study was to examine interplaying relationships between social structures and nurses' actions that either enabled or inhibited workforce integration in hospital settings. Giddens' Structuration Theory with double hermeneutic methodology was used to interpret 24 immigrant and 20 senior nurses' perceptions of factors affecting workforce integration. Four themes were identified from the data. These were: (1) employer-sponsored visa as a constraint on adaptation, (2) two-way learning and adaptation in multicultural teams, (3) unacknowledged experiences and expertise as barriers to integration, and (4) unquestioned sub-group norms as barriers for group cohesion. The themes presented a critical perspective that unsuitable social structures (policies and resources) constrained nurses' performance in workforce integration in the context of nurse immigration. The direction of structural changes needed to improve workforce integration is illustrated throughout the discussions of policies and resources required for workforce integration at national and organisational levels, conditions for positive group interactions and group cohesion in organisations. Our study reveals inadequate rules and resources used to recruit, classify and utilise immigrant nurses at national and healthcare organisational levels can become structural constraints on their adaptation to professional nursing practice and integration into the workforce in a host

  15. GACD: Integrated Software for Genetic Analysis in Clonal F1 and Double Cross Populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luyan; Meng, Lei; Wu, Wencheng; Wang, Jiankang

    2015-01-01

    Clonal species are common among plants. Clonal F1 progenies are derived from the hybridization between 2 heterozygous clones. In self- and cross-pollinated species, double crosses can be made from 4 inbred lines. A clonal F1 population can be viewed as a double cross population when the linkage phase is determined. The software package GACD (Genetic Analysis of Clonal F1 and Double cross) is freely available public software, capable of building high-density linkage maps and mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) in clonal F1 and double cross populations. Three functionalities are integrated in GACD version 1.0: binning of redundant markers (BIN); linkage map construction (CDM); and QTL mapping (CDQ). Output of BIN can be directly used as input of CDM. After adding the phenotypic data, the output of CDM can be used as input of CDQ. Thus, GACD acts as a pipeline for genetic analysis. GACD and example datasets are freely available from www.isbreeding.net. © The American Genetic Association. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Characteristics of non-irradiated and irradiated double SOI integration type pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, M.; Sekigawa, D.; Hara, K.; Aoyagi, W.; Honda, S.; Tobita, N.; Arai, Y.; Miyoshi, T.; Kurachi, I.; Tsuboyama, T.; Yamada, M.

    2016-09-01

    We are developing monolithic pixel sensors based on a 0.2 μm fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (FD-SOI) technology for high-energy physics experiment applications. With this SOI technology, the wafer resistivities for the electronics and sensor parts can be chosen separately. Therefore, a device with full depletion and fast charge collection is realized. The total ionizing dose (TID) effect is the major challenge for application in hard radiation environments. To compensate for TID damage, we introduced a double SOI structure that implements an additional middle silicon layer (SOI2 layer). Applying a negative voltage to the SOI2 layer should compensate for the effects induced by holes trapped in the buried oxide layers. We studied the recovery from TID damage induced by 60Co γ and other characteristics of the integration-type double SOI sensor INTPIXh2. When the double SOI sensor was irradiated to 100 kGy, it showed a response to the infrared laser similar to that of a non-irradiated sensor when we applied a negative voltage to the SOI2 layer. Thus, we concluded that the double SOI sensor is very effective at sufficiently enhancing the radiation hardness for application in experiments with harsh radiation environments, such as at Belle II or ILC.

  17. Numerical integration of nearly-Hamiltonian systems. [Van der Pol oscillator and perturbed Keplerian motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, V. R.

    1978-01-01

    The reported investigation is concerned with the solution of systems of differential equations which are derived from a Hamiltonian function in the extended phase space. The problem selected involves a one-dimensional perturbed harmonic oscillator. The van der Pol equation considered has an exact asymptotic value for its amplitude. Comparisons are made between a numerical solution and a known analytical solution. In addition to the van der Pol problem, known solutions regarding the restricted problem of three bodies are used as examples for perturbed Keplerian motion. The extended phase space Hamiltonian discussed by Stiefel and Scheifele (1971) is considered. A description is presented of two canonical formulations of the perturbed harmonic oscillator.

  18. High-integrated spectral splitting solar concentrator with double-light guide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongcai; Meng, Qingyu; Xu, Shuyan; Dong, Jihong; Li, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Individual secondary optical components in a spectral splitting solar concentrator utilizing a microlens array require multiple photovoltaic (PV) cells, which leads to the complexity of system alignment and a high cost. In order to improve the integration of the PV cells and thermal management, a spectral splitting concentrator coupled to double-light guide layers has been proposed. Using one-axis tracking, we further investigate the optical performance of the concentrator combined with a cylindrical microlens array with double vertically staggered light guide layers in detail. The results show that this solar concentrator maintains a good acceptance angle of ±2 deg in the east-west direction and an acceptable angle of ±14 deg in the perpendicular direction on both low and high spectrums, achieving a concentration ratio of 10×. Finally, the capability of lateral displacement tracking has been explored for an aperture angle of ±24 deg in this concentrator.

  19. Optical characterization of pancreatic normal and tumor tissues with double integrating sphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiris, Tugba; Akbulut, Saadet; Kiris, Aysenur; Gucin, Zuhal; Karatepe, Oguzhan; Bölükbasi Ates, Gamze; Tabakoǧlu, Haşim Özgür

    2015-03-01

    In order to develop minimally invasive, fast and precise diagnostic and therapeutic methods in medicine by using optical methods, first step is to examine how the light propagates, scatters and transmitted through medium. So as to find out appropriate wavelengths, it is required to correctly determine the optical properties of tissues. The aim of this study is to measure the optical properties of both cancerous and normal ex-vivo pancreatic tissues. Results will be compared to detect how cancerous and normal tissues respond to different wavelengths. Double-integrating-sphere system and computational technique inverse adding doubling method (IAD) were used in the study. Absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of normal and cancerous pancreatic tissues have been measured within the range of 500-650 nm. Statistical significant differences between cancerous and normal tissues have been obtained at 550 nm and 630 nm for absorption coefficients. On the other hand; there were no statistical difference found for scattering coefficients at any wavelength.

  20. A DOUBLE-PEAKED OUTBURST OF A 0535+26 OBSERVED WITH INTEGRAL, RXTE, AND SUZAKU

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, I.; Barragan, L.; Wilms, J.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Ferrigno, C.; Klochkov, D.; Suchy, S.; Santangelo, A.; Staubert, R.; Zurita Heras, J. A.; Kretschmar, P.; Fuerst, F.; Rothschild, R.; Finger, M. H.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Makishima, K.; Enoto, T.; Iwakiri, W.; and others

    2013-02-20

    The Be/X-ray binary A 0535+26 showed a normal (type I) outburst in 2009 August. It is the fourth in a series of normal outbursts associated with the periastron, but is unusual because it presented a double-peaked light curve. The two peaks reached a flux of {approx}450 mCrab in the 15-50 keV range. We present results of the timing and spectral analysis of INTEGRAL, RXTE, and Suzaku observations of the outburst. The energy-dependent pulse profiles and their evolution during the outburst are studied. No significant differences with respect to other normal outbursts are observed. The centroid energy of the fundamental cyclotron line shows no significant variation during the outburst. A spectral hardening with increasing luminosity is observed. We conclude that the source is accreting in the sub-critical regime. We discuss possible explanations for the double-peaked outburst.

  1. Electro-optic spectral tuning in a fan-out double-prism domain periodically poled lithium niobate intracavity optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Chang, W K; Chung, H P; Lin, Y Y; Chen, Y H

    2016-08-15

    We report on the design and experimental demonstration of an electro-optically tunable, pulsed intracavity optical parametric oscillator (IOPO) based on a unique fan-out double-prism domain periodically poled lithium niobate (DPD PPLN) in a diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser. The PPLN device combines the functionalities of fan-out and ramped duty-cycle domain structured nonlinear crystals, working simultaneously as a continuous grating-period quasi-phase-matched optical parametric downconverter and an electro-optic beam deflector/Q switch in the laser system. When driving the fan-out DPD PPLN with a voltage pulse train and varying the DC offset of the pulse train, a pulsed IOPO was realized with its signal and idler being electro-optically tunable over the 1880 and 2453 nm bands at spectral tuning rates of 13.5 (measured) and 25.8 (calculated) nm/(kV/mm), respectively.

  2. Direct estimation of the lateral strain field using a double oscillating point spread function with a scaling factor estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebgott, Herve; Fromageau, Jeremie; Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Vray, Didier; Delachartre, Philippe

    2004-04-01

    This work presents a new approach to lateral strain estimation in the field of tissue elasticity imaging with ultrasound. A particular beamforming is used to produce a point spread function (PSF) with lateral oscillations. Lateral RF signals can then be considered as the juxtaposition of RF samples coming from the same depth. This enables to estimate the lateral strain with a scaling factor estimator applied to the lateral signals. The approach is validated in simulation on a medium stretched only in the lateral direction. The estimation is unbiased for lateral strain values from 0.5 to 7 % with standard deviation less than 0.5 %.

  3. The Comparison between Circadian Oscillators in Mouse Liver and Pituitary Gland Reveals Different Integration of Feeding and Light Schedules

    PubMed Central

    Bur, Isabelle M.; Zouaoui, Sonia; Fontanaud, Pierre; Coutry, Nathalie; Molino, François; Martin, Agnès O.; Mollard, Patrice; Bonnefont, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian circadian system is composed of multiple peripheral clocks that are synchronized by a central pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. This system keeps track of the external world rhythms through entrainment by various time cues, such as the light-dark cycle and the feeding schedule. Alterations of photoperiod and meal time modulate the phase coupling between central and peripheral oscillators. In this study, we used real-time quantitative PCR to assess circadian clock gene expression in the liver and pituitary gland from mice raised under various photoperiods, or under a temporal restricted feeding protocol. Our results revealed unexpected differences between both organs. Whereas the liver oscillator always tracked meal time, the pituitary circadian clockwork showed an intermediate response, in between entrainment by the light regimen and the feeding-fasting rhythm. The same composite response was also observed in the pituitary gland from adrenalectomized mice under daytime restricted feeding, suggesting that circulating glucocorticoids do not inhibit full entrainment of the pituitary clockwork by meal time. Altogether our results reveal further aspects in the complexity of phase entrainment in the circadian system, and suggest that the pituitary may host oscillators able to integrate multiple time cues. PMID:21179516

  4. Macroscopic self-oscillations and aging transition in a network of synaptically coupled quadratic integrate-and-fire neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratas, Irmantas; Pyragas, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a large network of coupled quadratic integrate-and-fire neurons, which represent the canonical model for class I neurons near the spiking threshold. The network is heterogeneous in that it includes both inherently spiking and excitable neurons. The coupling is global via synapses that take into account the finite width of synaptic pulses. Using a recently developed reduction method based on the Lorentzian ansatz, we derive a closed system of equations for the neuron's firing rate and the mean membrane potential, which are exact in the infinite-size limit. The bifurcation analysis of the reduced equations reveals a rich scenario of asymptotic behavior, the most interesting of which is the macroscopic limit-cycle oscillations. It is shown that the finite width of synaptic pulses is a necessary condition for the existence of such oscillations. The robustness of the oscillations against aging damage, which transforms spiking neurons into nonspiking neurons, is analyzed. The validity of the reduced equations is confirmed by comparing their solutions with the solutions of microscopic equations for the finite-size networks.

  5. Macroscopic self-oscillations and aging transition in a network of synaptically coupled quadratic integrate-and-fire neurons.

    PubMed

    Ratas, Irmantas; Pyragas, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a large network of coupled quadratic integrate-and-fire neurons, which represent the canonical model for class I neurons near the spiking threshold. The network is heterogeneous in that it includes both inherently spiking and excitable neurons. The coupling is global via synapses that take into account the finite width of synaptic pulses. Using a recently developed reduction method based on the Lorentzian ansatz, we derive a closed system of equations for the neuron's firing rate and the mean membrane potential, which are exact in the infinite-size limit. The bifurcation analysis of the reduced equations reveals a rich scenario of asymptotic behavior, the most interesting of which is the macroscopic limit-cycle oscillations. It is shown that the finite width of synaptic pulses is a necessary condition for the existence of such oscillations. The robustness of the oscillations against aging damage, which transforms spiking neurons into nonspiking neurons, is analyzed. The validity of the reduced equations is confirmed by comparing their solutions with the solutions of microscopic equations for the finite-size networks.

  6. Engineering Task Plan for the Integrity Assessment Examination of Double Contained Receiver Tanks (DCRT) Catch Tanks and Ancillary facilities

    SciTech Connect

    BECKER, D.L.

    2000-05-23

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) presents the integrity assessment examination of three DCRTs, seven catch tanks, and two ancillary facilities located in the 200 East and West Areas of the Hanford Site. The integrity assessment examinations, as described in this ETP, will provide the necessary information to enable the independently qualified registered professional engineer (IQRPE) to assess the condition and integrity of these facilities. The plan is consistent with the Double-Shell Tank Waste Transfer Facilities Integrity Assessment Plan.

  7. A unified double-loop multi-scale control strategy for NMP integrating-unstable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seer, Qiu Han; Nandong, Jobrun

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a new control strategy which unifies the direct and indirect multi-scale control schemes via a double-loop control structure. This unified control strategy is proposed for controlling a class of highly nonminimum-phase processes having both integrating and unstable modes. This type of systems is often encountered in fed-batch fermentation processes which are very difficult to stabilize via most of the existing well-established control strategies. A systematic design procedure is provided where its applicability is demonstrated via a numerical example.

  8. Detecting Low-Power RF Signals Using a Multimode Optoelectronic Oscillator and Integrated Optical Filter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. 154 IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 22, NO. 3, FEBRUARY 1, 2010 Fig. 4. Measured silicon FPF response...air Bragg mirrors,” Opt. Lett., vol. 32, no. 5, pp. 533–535, 2007. Authorized licensed use limited to: NRL. Downloaded on January 13, 2010 at 07:41 from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. ...152 IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 22, NO. 3, FEBRUARY 1, 2010 Detecting Low-Power RF Signals Using a Multimode Optoelectronic Oscillator

  9. Double Power Laws in the Event-integrated Solar Energetic Particle Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lulu; Zhang, Ming; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2016-04-01

    A double power law or a power law with exponential rollover at a few to tens of MeV nucleon-1 of the event-integrated differential spectra has been reported in many solar energetic particle (SEP) events. The rollover energies per nucleon of different elements correlate with a particle's charge-to-mass ratio (Q/A). The probable causes are suggested as residing in shock finite lifetimes, shock finite sizes, shock geometry, and an adiabatic cooling effect. In this work, we conduct a numerical simulation to investigate a particle's transport process in the inner heliosphere. We solve the focused transport equation using a time-backward Markov stochastic approach. The convection, magnetic focusing, adiabatic cooling effect, and pitch-angle scattering are included. The effects that the interplanetary turbulence imposes on the shape of the resulting SEP spectra are examined. By assuming a pure power-law differential spectrum at the Sun, a perfect double-power-law feature with a break energy ranging from 10 to 120 MeV nucleon-1 is obtained at 1 au. We found that the double power law of the differential energy spectrum is a robust result of SEP interplanetary propagation. It works for many assumptions of interplanetary turbulence spectra that give various forms of momentum dependence of a particle's mean free path. The different spectral shapes in low-energy and high-energy ends are not just a transition from the convection-dominated propagation to diffusion-dominated propagation.

  10. Investigating the Long-term Variability of 4U1705-44; Evidence for an Underlying Nonlinear Double-Welled Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillipson, Rebecca; Boyd, Patricia T.; Smale, Alan P.

    2016-04-01

    The bright low-mass X-ray binary 4U1705-44 exhibits long-term semi-periodic variability with a timescale of several hundred days. The All-Sky Monitor (ASM) aboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Japanese X-ray All-Sky Monitor (MAXI) aboard the International Space Station together have continuously observed the source from December 1995 through the present. The combined ASM-MAXI data provides a continuous time series over fifty times the length of the timescale of interest. The phase space embedding of the flux versus its first derivative shows a strong resemblance to a double-welled nonlinear oscillator. When comparing our time series against well-known nonlinear oscillators, we find that 4U1705-44 exhibits behavior akin to the Duffing oscillator. Topological analysis can help us identify ‘fingerprints’ in the phase space of a system unique to its equations of motion. If such ‘fingerprints’ are the same between two systems, then their equations of motion must be closely related. We therefore found a range of parameters for which the Duffing oscillator closely follows the time evolution of 4U1705-44 and from this range chose 6 different numerical Duffing time series. We can extract low-period, unstable periodic orbits from both the 4U1705-44 and numerical Duffing time series and compare their topological information in phase space, such as their relative rotation rates. We argue that the associated period-1 orbit in 4U1705-44 has a period between 130 and 170 days. The driving periods of our 6 numerical time series correspond to 140 to 175 days. Assigning a logical sequence name to each orbit, the relative rotation rates can be compiled into a unique ‘intertwining’ matrix. The numerical Duffing time series and the 4U1705-44 intertwining matrices are identical, which provides strong evidence that they share the same underlying template. The implications of this equivalence suggests that we can look to the Duffing equation to describe the X

  11. A Quasi-Elliptic Bandpass Filter-Integrated Single-Pole Double-Throw Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yu-Xue; Xu, Jin; Li, Zhao-Zhao; Wang, Huan; Huang, Jin-Jie

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes a quasi-elliptic bandpass filter-integrated single-pole double-throw (SPDT) switch. The series-parallel configuration of p-i-n diodes embedded into the impedance matching circuit is proposed to combine two quasi-elliptic response bandpass filters to constitute the proposed SPDT switch. To validate our design approach, a proposed quasi-elliptic bandpass filter-integrated SPDT switch is designed and fabricated with a central frequency of 1.25 GHz and a 3 dB fractional bandwidth of 16 %. Low insertion loss in the on state and good isolation in the off state are achieved. The switch size including bias circuits but excluding feeding lines is 0.447λg×0.134λg.

  12. An accurate spline polynomial cubature formula for double integration with logarithmic singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichi, Sirajo Lawan; Eshkuvatov, Z. K.; Long, N. M. A. Nik; Bello, M. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The paper studied the integration of logarithmic singularity problem J (y ¯)= ∬ ∇ζ (y ¯)l o g |y ¯-y¯0*|d A , where y ¯=(α ,β ), y¯0=(α0,β0) the domain ∇ is rectangle ∇ = [r1, r2] × [r3, r4], the arbitrary point y ¯∈∇ and the fixed point y¯0∈∇. The given density function ζ(y ¯), is smooth on the rectangular domain ∇ and is in the functions class C2,τ (∇). Cubature formula (CF) for double integration with logarithmic singularities (LS) on a rectangle ∇ is constructed by applying type (0, 2) modified spline function DΓ(P). The results obtained by testing the density functions ζ(y ¯) as linear and absolute value functions shows that the constructed CF is highly accurate.

  13. Double-wedged Wollaston-type polarimeter design and integration to RTT150-TFOSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helhel, Selcuk; Kirbiyik, Halil; Bayar, Cevdet; Khamitov, Irek; Kahya, Gizem; Okuyan, Oguzhan

    2016-07-01

    Photometric and spectroscopic observation capabilities of 1.5-m Russian- Turkish Telescope RTT150 has been broadened with the integration of presented polarimeter. The well-known double-wedged Wollaston-type dual-beam technique was preferred and applied to design and produce it. The designed polarimeter was integrated into the telescope detector TFOSC, and called TFOSC-WP. Its capabil- ities and limitations were attempted to be determined by a number of observation sets. Non-polarized and strongly polarized stars were observed to determine its limi- tations as well as its linearity. An instrumental intrinsic polarization was determined for the 1×5 arcmin field of view in equatorial coordinate system, the systematic error of polarization degree as 0.2% %, and position angle as 1.9°. These limitations and capabilities are denoted as good enough to satisfy telescopes' present and future astrophysical space missions related to GAIA and SRG projects.

  14. Distributed finite-time containment control for double-integrator multiagent systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangyu; Li, Shihua; Shi, Peng

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the distributed finite-time containment control problem for double-integrator multiagent systems with multiple leaders and external disturbances is discussed. In the presence of multiple dynamic leaders, by utilizing the homogeneous control technique, a distributed finite-time observer is developed for the followers to estimate the weighted average of the leaders' velocities at first. Then, based on the estimates and the generalized adding a power integrator approach, distributed finite-time containment control algorithms are designed to guarantee that the states of the followers converge to the dynamic convex hull spanned by those of the leaders in finite time. Moreover, as a special case of multiple dynamic leaders with zero velocities, the proposed containment control algorithms also work for the case of multiple stationary leaders without using the distributed observer. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithms.

  15. Double integrating sphere system for optical parameter determination of industrial suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keränen, Ville T. J.; Mäkynen, Anssi J.

    2008-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to construct a double integrating sphere system and to verify its performance using Intralipid fat emulsion. The final goal was to be able to determine optical properties of various turbid suspensions with the proposed system. Online measurements even would have been possible as backscattering and forward scattering were measured simultaneously. The measured suspension was injected in a cuvette placed between two integrating spheres and illuminated with a laser through the first sphere. The diameter of the spheres was 8" and the diameter of the sample port could have been varied up to 2.5". The cuvette was made of plastic and optical grade glass and its diameter was sufficient to cover the sample port area. The sample thickness in the measurement cuvette was 5 mm. Optical powers were detected using fiber coupled photodiodes. There was one diode for each sphere and one for the unscattered light at the opposite end of the sphere system facing towards the laser. The measured optical powers were converted to absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and if possible to anisotropy using an inverse adding-doubling method. The results measured for the Intralipid using the described system corresponded with those documented in published literature. A number of pulp samples with unknown optical properties were measured with encouraging results. However, the differences between different pulps and fillers are so small that, in the future, the focus will be in error source elimination to achieve reasonable accuracy.

  16. Comparison of the accuracy of the calibration model on the double and single integrating sphere systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Karsten, A.

    2011-06-01

    The accuracy of the calibration model for the single and double integrating sphere systems are compared for a white light system. A calibration model is created from a matrix of samples with known absorption and reduced scattering coefficients. In this instance the samples are made using different concentrations of intralipid and black ink. The total and diffuse transmittance and reflectance is measured on both setups and the accuracy of each model compared by evaluating the prediction errors of the calibration model for the different systems. Current results indicate that the single integrating sphere setup is more accurate than the double system method. This is based on the low prediction errors of the model for the single sphere system for a He-Ne laser as well as a white light source. The model still needs to be refined for more absorption factors. Tests on the prediction accuracies were then determined by extracting the optical properties of solid resin based phantoms for each system. When these properties of the phantoms were used as input to the modeling software excellent agreement between measured and simulated data was found for the single sphere systems.

  17. Asynchronous Periodic Edge-Event Triggered Control for Double-Integrator Networks With Communication Time Delays.

    PubMed

    Duan, Gaopeng; Xiao, Feng; Wang, Long

    2017-01-23

    This paper focuses on the average consensus of double-integrator networked systems based on the asynchronous periodic edge-event triggered control. The asynchronous property lies in the edge event-detecting procedure. For different edges, their event detections are performed at different times and the corresponding events occur independently of each other. When an event is activated, the two adjacent agents connected by the corresponding link sample their relative state information and update their controllers. The application of incidence matrix facilitates the transformation of control objects from the agent-based to the edge-based. Practically, due to the constraints of network bandwidth and communication distance, agents usually cannot receive the instantaneous information of some others, which has an impact on the system performance. Hence, it is necessary to investigate the presence of communication time delays. For double-integrator multiagent systems with and without communication time delays, the average state consensus can be asynchronously achieved by designing appropriate parameters under the proposed event-detecting rules. The presented results specify the relationship among the maximum allowable time delays, interaction topologies, and event-detecting periods. Furthermore, the proposed protocols have the advantages of reduced communication costs and controller-updating costs. Simulation examples are given to illustrate the proposed theoretical results.

  18. The effect of oscillating-energy manual therapy on lateral epicondylitis: a randomized, placebo-control, double-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Mohammad Reza; Fearon, Frank J

    2008-01-01

    Symptoms of lateral epicondylitis (LE) are attributed to degenerative changes and inflammatory reactions in the common extensor tendon induced by microscopic tears in the tissue after repetitive or overload functions of the wrist and hand extensor muscles. Conventional treatments, provided on the premise of inflammatory basis of LE, have shown 39-80% failure rate. An alternative approach suggests that symptoms of LE could be due to active tender points developed in the origin of hand and wrist extensor muscles after overuse or repetitive movements. Oscillating-energy Manual Therapy (OEMT), also known as V-spread, is a craniosacral manual technique that has been clinically used for treating tender points over the suture lines in the skull. Considering symptoms of LE may result from active tender points, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of OEMT on pain, grip strength, and functional abilities of subjects with chronic LE. Twenty-three subjects with chronic LE (>3mo) between ages of 24 and 72 years participated in this study. Before their participation, all subjects were screened to rule out cervical and other pathologies that could possibly contribute to their lateral elbow pain. Subjects who met the inclusion criteria were randomized into treatment and placebo treatment groups by a second (treating) therapist. Subjects were blinded to their group assignment. Subjects in the treatment group received OEMT for six sessions. During each treatment session, first a tender point was located through palpation. After proper hand placement, the therapist focused the direction of the oscillating energy on the localized tender point. Subjects in the placebo group underwent the same procedure, but the direction of the oscillating energy was directed to an area above or below the tender points, not covering the affected area. Jamar Dynamometer, Patient Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), and Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) were used to measure grip strength

  19. Mean-field theory of globally coupled integrate-and-fire neural oscillators with dynamic synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, P. C.

    1999-08-01

    We analyze the effects of synaptic depression or facilitation on the existence and stability of the splay or asynchronous state in a population of all-to-all, pulse-coupled neural oscillators. We use mean-field techniques to derive conditions for the local stability of the splay state and determine how stability depends on the degree of synaptic depression or facilitation. We also consider the effects of noise. Extensions of the mean-field results to finite networks are developed in terms of the nonlinear firing time map.

  20. PDF Signaling Is an Integral Part of the Drosophila Circadian Molecular Oscillator.

    PubMed

    Mezan, Shaul; Feuz, Jean Daniel; Deplancke, Bart; Kadener, Sebastian

    2016-10-11

    Circadian clocks generate 24-hr rhythms in physiology and behavior. Despite numerous studies, it is still uncertain how circadian rhythms emerge from their molecular and neural constituents. Here, we demonstrate a tight connection between the molecular and neuronal circadian networks. Using fluorescent transcriptional reporters in a Drosophila ex vivo brain culture system, we identified a reciprocal negative regulation between the master circadian regulator CLK and expression of pdf, the main circadian neuropeptide. We show that PDF feedback is required for maintaining normal oscillation pattern in CLK-driven transcription. Interestingly, we found that CLK and neuronal firing suppresses pdf transcription, likely through a common pathway involving the transcription factors DHR38 and SR, establishing a direct link between electric activity and the circadian system. In sum, our work provides evidence for the existence of an uncharacterized CLK-PDF feedback loop that tightly wraps together the molecular oscillator with the circadian neuronal network in Drosophila. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Interarea Power System Oscillations Damping via AI-based Referential Integrity Variable-Structure Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahim, M. A.; Ramadan, H. S.

    2016-10-01

    The design of power system stabilizer (PSS) is load-dependent and needs continuous adjustment at each operating condition. This paper aims at introducing a robust non-fragile PSS for interconnected power systems. The proposed controller has the capability of adaptively tuning online its rule-base through a variable-structure direct adaptive control algorithm in order to rigorously attain the desired objectives. The PSS controller acts on damping the electromechanical modes of oscillations not only through a wide range of operating conditions but also in presence of different disturbances. Using MATLABTM-Simulink, simulation results significantly verify that the proposed controller provides favorable performance and efficiently contributes towards enhancing the system dynamic behavior when applied to the four machines two-area power system that mimics the typical system behavior in actual operation. The interaction between the variable-structure adaptive fuzzy-based power system stabilizer (VS-AFPSS) and the existed typical ones inside the interconnected power systems has been explicitly discussed. Compared to other conventional controllers, VS-AFPSS enables better damping characteristics to both local and inter-area oscillation modes considering different operating conditions and sever disturbances.

  2. Reconstructing optical parameters from double-integrating-sphere measurements using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böcklin, Christoph; Baumann, Dirk; Stuker, Florian; Klohs, Jan; Rudin, Markus; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2013-02-01

    For the reconstruction of physiological changes in specific tissue layers detected by optical techniques, the exact knowledge of the optical parameters μa, μs and g of different tissue types is of paramount importance. One approach to accurately determine these parameters for biological tissue or phantom material is to use a double-integrating-sphere measurement system. It offers a flexible way to measure various kinds of tissues, liquids and artificial phantom materials. Accurate measurements can be achieved by technical adjustments and calibration of the spheres using commercially available reflection and transmission standards. The determination For the reconstruction of physiological changes in specific tissue layers detected by optical techniques, the exact knowledge of the optical parameters μa, μs and g of different tissue types is of paramount importance. One approach to accurately determine these parameters for biological tissue or phantom material is to use a double-integrating-sphere measurement system. It offers a flexible way to measure various kinds of tissues, liquids and artificial phantom materials. Accurate measurements can be achieved by technical adjustments and calibration of the spheres using commercially available reflection and transmission standards. The determination of the optical parameters of a material is based on two separate steps. Firstly, the reflectance ρs, the total transmittance TsT and the unscattered transmittance TsC of the sample s are measured with the double-integrating-sphere setup. Secondly, the optical parameters μa, μs and g are reconstructed with an inverse search algorithm combined with an appropriate solver for the forward problem (calculating ρs, TsT and TsC from μa, μs and g) has to be applied. In this study a Genetic Algorithm is applied as search heuristic, since it offers the most flexible and general approach without requiring any foreknowledge of the fitness-landscape. Given the challenging

  3. DOUBLE POWER LAWS IN THE EVENT-INTEGRATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Lulu; Zhang, Ming; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2016-04-10

    A double power law or a power law with exponential rollover at a few to tens of MeV nucleon{sup −1} of the event-integrated differential spectra has been reported in many solar energetic particle (SEP) events. The rollover energies per nucleon of different elements correlate with a particle's charge-to-mass ratio (Q/A). The probable causes are suggested as residing in shock finite lifetimes, shock finite sizes, shock geometry, and an adiabatic cooling effect. In this work, we conduct a numerical simulation to investigate a particle's transport process in the inner heliosphere. We solve the focused transport equation using a time-backward Markov stochastic approach. The convection, magnetic focusing, adiabatic cooling effect, and pitch-angle scattering are included. The effects that the interplanetary turbulence imposes on the shape of the resulting SEP spectra are examined. By assuming a pure power-law differential spectrum at the Sun, a perfect double-power-law feature with a break energy ranging from 10 to 120 MeV nucleon{sup −1} is obtained at 1 au. We found that the double power law of the differential energy spectrum is a robust result of SEP interplanetary propagation. It works for many assumptions of interplanetary turbulence spectra that give various forms of momentum dependence of a particle's mean free path. The different spectral shapes in low-energy and high-energy ends are not just a transition from the convection-dominated propagation to diffusion-dominated propagation.

  4. Electronically and rapidly tunable fiber-integrable optical parametric oscillator for nonlinear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Maximilian; Janfrüchte, Sarah; Hellwig, Tim; Dobner, Sven; Fallnich, Carsten

    2016-05-15

    We present a fiber-based optical parametric oscillator (FOPO) pumped by a fiber-coupled laser diode. The FOPO consisted of a photonic crystal fiber to convert the pump pulses via four-wave mixing and a dispersive resonator formed by a single-mode fiber. Via dispersion filtering, output pulses with a bandwidth of about 3 nm, a temporal duration of about 8 ps and a pulse energy of up to 22 nJ could be generated. By changing the repetition frequency of the pump laser diode by about ±1  kHz, the wavelength of the output pulses could be tuned between 1130 and 1310 nm within 8 μs, without the need to change the length of the resonator. Therewith, the FOPO should especially be suited for hyperspectral imaging, while its all-electronic control constitutes a promising approach to a turnkey and alignment-free light source.

  5. Synchronization, diversity, and topology of networks of integrate and fire oscillators

    PubMed

    Guardiola; Diaz-Guilera; Llas; Perez

    2000-10-01

    We study synchronization dynamics of a population of pulse-coupled oscillators. In particular, we focus our attention on the interplay between topological disorder and synchronization features of networks. First, we analyze synchronization time T in random networks, and find a scaling law which relates T to network connectivity. Then, we compare synchronization time for several other topological configurations, characterized by a different degree of randomness. The analysis shows that regular lattices perform better than a disordered network. This fact can be understood by considering the variability in the number of links between two adjacent neighbors. This phenomenon is equivalent to having a nonrandom topology with a distribution of interactions and it can be removed by an adequate local normalization of the couplings.

  6. Parametrizations and dynamical analysis of angle-integrated cross sections for double photoionization including nondipole effects

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, Andrei Y.; Starace, Anthony F.; Manakov, N. L.; Meremianin, A. V.; Kheifets, A. S.; Bray, Igor

    2005-11-15

    Similarly to differential cross sections for one-electron photoionization, the doubly differential cross section for double photoionization (DPI) may be conveniently described by four parameters: the singly differential (with respect to energy sharing) cross section ({sigma}{sub 0}), the dipole asymmetry parameter ({beta}), and two nondipole asymmetry parameters ({gamma} and {delta}). Here we derive two model-independent representations for these parameters for DPI from a {sup 1}S{sub 0} atomic bound state: (i) in terms of one-dimensional integrals of the polarization-invariant DPI amplitudes and (ii) in terms of the exact two-electron reduced matrix elements. For DPI of He at excess energies, E{sub exc}, of 100 eV, 450 eV, and 1 keV, we present numerical results for the asymmetry parameters within the framework of the convergent close-coupling theory and compare them with results of lowest-order (in the interelectron interaction) perturbation theory (LOPT). The results for E{sub exc}=1 keV exhibit a nondipole asymmetry that is large enough to be easily measured experimentally. We find excellent agreement between our LOPT results and other theoretical predictions and experimental data for total cross sections and ratios of double to single ionization cross sections for K-shell DPI from several multielectron atoms.

  7. In vitro double-integrating-sphere optical properties of tissues between 630 and 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beek, J. F.; Blokland, P.; Posthumus, P.; Aalders, M.; Pickering, J. W.; Sterenborg, H. J. C. M.; van Gemert, M. J. C.

    1997-11-01

    The optical properties (absorption and scattering coefficients and the scattering anisotropy factor) were measured in vitro for cartilage, liver, lung, muscle, myocardium, skin, and tumour (colon adenocarcinoma CC 531) at 630, 632.8, 790, 850 and 1064 nm. Rabbits, rats, piglets, goats, and dogs were used to obtain the tissues. A double-integrating-sphere setup with an intervening sample was used to determine the reflectance, and the diffuse and collimated transmittances of the sample. The inverse adding - doubling algorithm was used to determine the optical properties from the measurements. The overall results were comparable to those available in the literature, although only limited data are available at 790 - 850 nm. The results were reproducible for a specific sample at a specific wavelength. However, when comparing the results of different samples of the same tissue or different lasers with approximately the same wavelength (e.g. argon dye laser at 630 nm and HeNe laser at 632.8 nm) variations are large. We believe these variations in optical properties should be explained by biological variations of the tissues. In conclusion, we report on an extensive set of in vitro absorption and scattering properties of tissues measured with the same equipment and software, and by the same group. Although the accuracy of the method requires further improvement, it is highly likely that the other existing data in the literature have a similar level of accuracy.

  8. Content modification attacks on consensus seeking multi-agent system with double-integrator dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yimeng; Gupta, Nirupam; Chopra, Nikhil

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, vulnerability of a distributed consensus seeking multi-agent system (MAS) with double-integrator dynamics against edge-bound content modification cyber attacks is studied. In particular, we define a specific edge-bound content modification cyber attack called malignant content modification attack (MCoMA), which results in unbounded growth of an appropriately defined group disagreement vector. Properties of MCoMA are utilized to design detection and mitigation algorithms so as to impart resilience in the considered MAS against MCoMA. Additionally, the proposed detection mechanism is extended to detect the general edge-bound content modification attacks (not just MCoMA). Finally, the efficacies of the proposed results are illustrated through numerical simulations.

  9. Content modification attacks on consensus seeking multi-agent system with double-integrator dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yimeng; Gupta, Nirupam; Chopra, Nikhil

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, vulnerability of a distributed consensus seeking multi-agent system (MAS) with double-integrator dynamics against edge-bound content modification cyber attacks is studied. In particular, we define a specific edge-bound content modification cyber attack called malignant content modification attack (MCoMA), which results in unbounded growth of an appropriately defined group disagreement vector. Properties of MCoMA are utilized to design detection and mitigation algorithms so as to impart resilience in the considered MAS against MCoMA. Additionally, the proposed detection mechanism is extended to detect the general edge-bound content modification attacks (not just MCoMA). Finally, the efficacies of the proposed results are illustrated through numerical simulations.

  10. Calculating the reflected radiation error between turbine blades and vanes based on double contour integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chi; Li, Dong; Gao, Shan; Daniel, Ketui

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a CFD (Computation Fluid Dynamic) simulation and experimental results for the reflected radiation error from turbine vanes when measuring turbine blade's temperature using a pyrometer. In the paper, an accurate reflection model based on discrete irregular surfaces is established. Double contour integral method is used to calculate view factor between the irregular surfaces. Calculated reflected radiation error was found to change with relative position between blades and vanes as temperature distribution of vanes and blades was simulated using CFD. Simulation results indicated that when the vanes suction surface temperature ranged from 860 K to 1060 K and the blades pressure surface average temperature is 805 K, pyrometer measurement error can reach up to 6.35%. Experimental results show that the maximum pyrometer absolute error of three different targets on the blade decreases from 6.52%, 4.15% and 1.35% to 0.89%, 0.82% and 0.69% respectively after error correction.

  11. Double-shell tank integrity assessments ultrasonic test equipment performance test

    SciTech Connect

    Pfluger, D.C.

    1996-09-26

    A double-shell tank (DST) inspection (DSTI) system was performance tested over three months until August 1995 at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, completing a contract initiated in February 1993 to design, fabricate, and test an ultrasonic inspection system intended to provide ultrasonic test (UT) and visual data to determine the integrity of 28 DSTs at Hanford. The DSTs are approximately one-million-gallon underground radioactive-waste storage tanks. The test was performed in accordance with a procedure (Jensen 1995) that included requirements described in the contract specification (Pfluger 1995). This report documents the results of tests conducted to evaluate the performance of the DSTI system against the requirements of the contract specification. The test of the DSTI system also reflects the performance of qualified personnel and operating procedures.

  12. On the Kernel function of the integral equation relating lift and downwash distributions of oscillating wings in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Charles E; Berman, Julian H

    1956-01-01

    This report treats the Kernel function of the integral equation that relates a known or prescribed downwash distribution to an unknown lift distribution for harmonically oscillating wings in supersonic flow. The treatment is essentially an extension to supersonic flow of the treatment given in NACA report 1234 for subsonic flow. For the supersonic case the Kernel function is derived by use of a suitable form of acoustic doublet potential which employs a cutoff or Heaviside unit function. The Kernel functions are reduced to forms that can be accurately evaluated by considering the functions in two parts: a part in which the singularities are isolated and analytically expressed, and a nonsingular part which can be tabulated.

  13. Neural alpha oscillations index the balance between self-other integration and segregation in real-time joint action.

    PubMed

    Novembre, Giacomo; Sammler, Daniela; Keller, Peter E

    2016-08-01

    Shared knowledge and interpersonal coordination are prerequisites for most forms of social behavior. Influential approaches to joint action have conceptualized these capacities in relation to the separate constructs of co-representation (knowledge) and self-other entrainment (coordination). Here we investigated how brain mechanisms involved in co-representation and entrainment interact to support joint action. To do so, we used a musical joint action paradigm to show that the neural mechanisms underlying co-representation and self-other entrainment are linked via a process - indexed by EEG alpha oscillations - regulating the balance between self-other integration and segregation in real time. Pairs of pianists performed short musical items while action familiarity and interpersonal (behavioral) synchronization accuracy were manipulated in a factorial design. Action familiarity referred to whether or not pianists had rehearsed the musical material performed by the other beforehand. Interpersonal synchronization was manipulated via congruent or incongruent tempo change instructions that biased performance timing towards the impending, new tempo. It was observed that, when pianists were familiar with each other's parts, millisecond variations in interpersonal synchronized behavior were associated with a modulation of alpha power over right centro-parietal scalp regions. Specifically, high behavioral entrainment was associated with self-other integration, as indexed by alpha suppression. Conversely, low behavioral entrainment encouraged reliance on internal knowledge and thus led to self-other segregation, indexed by alpha enhancement. These findings suggest that alpha oscillations index the processing of information about self and other depending on the compatibility of internal knowledge and external (environmental) events at finely resolved timescales.

  14. Double-prism domain PPLN for simultaneous laser Q-switching and optical parametric oscillation in a Nd:YVO4 laser.

    PubMed

    Huang, J F; Chang, W K; Chung, H P; Huang, S S; Chang, J W; Chen, Y H

    2013-12-16

    We report a design and demonstration of an electro-optically Q-switched intracavity optical parametric oscillator (IOPO) based on a unique ramped duty-cycle periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) in a diode-pumped 1064-nm Nd:YVO(4) laser. The PPLN crystal, having a double-prism domain (DPD) structure with a domain period of 30 μm, can work simultaneously as an electro-optic (EO) beam deflector (and therefore an EO Q-switch in the laser cavity) and an optical parametric down converter. The characterized deflection sensitivity of the DPD PPLN device was 1.15°/kV-cm. At a 180-V Q-switching voltage and a 1-kHz switching rate, we measured a down-converted signal at 1550 nm with pulse energy of >8.1 μJ (or peak power of >2.3 kW) from the constructed IOPO at 7.5-W diode pump power. Continuous wavelength tuning of the IOPO signal was also demonstrated.

  15. The uniform asymptotic swallowtail approximation - Practical methods for oscillating integrals with four coalescing saddle points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, J. N. L.; Curtis, P. R.; Farrelly, D.

    1984-01-01

    Methods that can be used in the numerical implementation of the uniform swallowtail approximation are described. An explicit expression for that approximation is presented to the lowest order, showing that there are three problems which must be overcome in practice before the approximation can be applied to any given problem. It is shown that a recently developed quadrature method can be used for the accurate numerical evaluation of the swallowtail canonical integral and its partial derivatives. Isometric plots of these are presented to illustrate some of their properties. The problem of obtaining the arguments of the swallowtail integral from an analytical function of its argument is considered, describing two methods of solving this problem. The asymptotic evaluation of the butterfly canonical integral is addressed.

  16. Integrated routing and fill for self-aligned double patterning (SADP) using grid-based design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Youngsoo; Lee, Jeemyung; Lee, Seongmin; Shin, Youngsoo

    2016-03-01

    Self-aligned double patterning (SADP) has been proposed as an alternative patterning solution for sub-10nm technology because of delay of advanced lithography beyond 193nm ArF. In conventional SADP, line and space style of dummy metal fills are inserted once main design is complete. A large buffer distance is required around the main design because no further verification of main design (in presence of fills) is performed. This causes irregular pattern density, which becomes a source of process variations. We propose integrated-fill, in which main design and dummy fill insertion are performed together. This requires a change in overall design flow, which we discuss. Integrated-fill is demonstrated in M2 layer of SADP process; M2 density increases by 15.7% with 2.3% reduction in standard deviation of density distribution; metal thickness variation is also reduced by 24%. More dummy fills cause increased coupling capacitance, which however is shown to be insignificant.

  17. The Role of Gamma Band Oscillations and Synchrony on Rubber Hand Illusion and Crossmodal Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanayama, Noriaki; Sato, Atsushi; Ohira, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    The rubber hand illusion represents an illusory experience during the mislocalization of own hand when correlated visuotactile stimuli are presented to the actual and fake hands. The visuotactile integration process appears to cause this illusion; the corresponding brain activity was revealed in many studies. In this study, we investigated the…

  18. The Role of Gamma Band Oscillations and Synchrony on Rubber Hand Illusion and Crossmodal Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanayama, Noriaki; Sato, Atsushi; Ohira, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    The rubber hand illusion represents an illusory experience during the mislocalization of own hand when correlated visuotactile stimuli are presented to the actual and fake hands. The visuotactile integration process appears to cause this illusion; the corresponding brain activity was revealed in many studies. In this study, we investigated the…

  19. Quantum free-energy differences from nonequilibrium path integrals. II. Convergence properties for the harmonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    van Zon, Ramses; Hernández de la Peña, Lisandro; Peslherbe, Gilles H; Schofield, Jeremy

    2008-10-01

    Nonequilibrium path-integral methods for computing quantum free-energy differences are applied to a quantum particle trapped in a harmonic well of uniformly changing strength with the purpose of establishing the convergence properties of the work distribution and free energy as the number of degrees of freedom M in the regularized path integrals goes to infinity. The work distribution is found to converge when M tends to infinity regardless of the switching speed, leading to finite results for the free-energy difference when the Jarzynski nonequilibrium work relation or the Crooks fluctuation relation are used. The nature of the convergence depends on the regularization method. For the Fourier method, the convergence of the free-energy difference and work distribution go as 1/M , while both quantities converge as 1/M(2) when the bead regularization procedure is used. The implications of these results to more general systems are discussed.

  20. Column CO2 Measurement From an Airborne Solid-State Double-Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Fay, J.; Reithmaier, K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micrometers IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  1. Integrated affinity capture, purification, and capillary electrophoresis microdevice for quantitative double-stranded DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Toriello, Nicholas M; Liu, Chung N; Blazej, Robert G; Thaitrong, Numrin; Mathies, Richard A

    2007-11-15

    A novel injection method is developed that utilizes a thermally switchable oligonucleotide affinity capture gel to mediate the concentration, purification, and injection of dsDNA for quantitative microchip capillary electrophoresis analysis. The affinity capture matrix consists of a 20 base acrydite modified oligonucleotide copolymerized into a 6% linear polyacrylamide gel that captures ssDNA or dsDNA analyte including PCR amplicons and synthetic oligonucleotides. Double stranded PCR amplicons with complementarity to the capture probe up to 81 bases from their 5' terminus are reproducibly captured via helix invasion. By integrating the oligo capture matrix directly with the CE separation channel, the electrophoretically mobilized target fragments are quantitatively captured and injected after thermal release for unbiased, efficient, and quantitative analysis. The capture process exhibits optimal efficiency at 44 degrees C and 100 V/cm with a 20 microM affinity capture probe (TM = 57.7 degrees C). A dsDNA titration assay with 20 bp fragments validated that dsDNA is captured at the same efficiency as ssDNA. Dilution studies with a duplex 20mer show that targets can be successfully captured and analyzed with a limit of detection of 1 pM from 250 nL of solution (approximately 150,000 fluorescent molecules). Simultaneous capture and injection of amplicons from E. coli K12 and M13mp18 using a mixture of two different capture probes demonstrates the feasibility of multiplex target capture. Unlike the traditional cross-injector, this method enables efficient capture and injection of dsDNA amplicons which will facilitate the quantitative analysis of products from integrated nanoliter-scale PCR reactors.

  2. Evaluation of Ultrasonic Measurement Variation in the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pardini, Allan F.; Weier, Dennis R.; Crawford, Susan L.; Munley, John T.

    2010-01-12

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) under contract from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for assessing the condition of the double-shell tanks (DST) on the Hanford nuclear site. WRPS has contracted with AREVA Federal Services LLC (AFS) to perform ultrasonic testing (UT) inspections of the 28 DSTs to assess the condition of the tanks, judge the effects of past corrosion control practices, and satisfy a regulatory requirement to periodically assess the integrity of the tanks. Since measurement inception in 1997, nine waste tanks have been examined twice (at the time of this report) providing UT data that can now be compared over specific areas. During initial reviews of these two comparable data sets, average UT wall-thickness measurement reductions were noted in most of the tanks. This variation could be a result of actual wall thinning occurring on the waste-tanks walls, or some other unexplained anomaly resulting from measurement error due to causes such as the then-current measurement procedures, operator setup, or equipment differences. WRPS contracted with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assist in understanding why this variation exists and where it stems from.

  3. On the validity of the double integrator approximation in deep space formation flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, B. H.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Scharf, D. P.

    2002-01-01

    Free-flying models are commonly used f o r path planning and open loop control design (i. e., guidance design) and translational feedback control design (i. e., control design) for deep space precision formation flying. The free flying model, essentially a double integrator, results from discarding small terms in the relative spacecraft equations of motion. While the magnitude of these discarded terms may be small, one must show that their dynamic effects are small as compared to the precision performance requirements. We do so by deriving a theoretical method for bounding the difference between the solution of a nonlinear truth model of the relative translational spacecraft dynamics and a Simplified linear time-invariant model. Presently, the method incorporates feedforward and static output feedback control. The method is applied to a Terrestrial Planet Finder- based example. Using only feedforward control (guidance) the free-flying model and a Hill- Clohessy- Wiltshire Equations-based model are shown to be accurate to 1 c m for up to 4 and 30 hours, respectively. Also shown is that the simplest free-flying model may not be sufficient for low-gain feedback control design-closed-loop tracking errors can be as large as 8 meters.

  4. Double crystal monochromator controlled by integrated computing on BL07A in New SUBARU, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Okui, Masato; Yato, Naoki; Watanabe, Akinobu; Lin, Baiming; Murayama, Norio; Fukushima, Sei; Kanda, Kazuhiro

    2016-07-27

    The BL07A beamline in New SUBARU, University of Hyogo, has been used for many studies of new materials. A new double crystal monochromator controlled by integrated computing was designed and installed in the beamline in 2014. In this report we will discuss the unique features of this new monochromator, MKZ-7NS. This monochromator was not designed exclusively for use in BL07A; on the contrary, it was designed to be installed at low cost in various beamlines to facilitate the industrial applications of medium-scale synchrotron radiation facilities. Thus, the design of the monochromator utilized common packages that can satisfy the wide variety of specifications required at different synchrotron radiation facilities. This monochromator can be easily optimized for any beamline due to the fact that a few control parameters can be suitably customized. The beam offset can be fixed precisely even if one of the two slave axes is omitted. This design reduces the convolution of mechanical errors. Moreover, the monochromator’s control mechanism is very compact, making it possible to reduce the size of the vacuum chamber can be made smaller.

  5. Dynamic modeling and simulation of an integral bipropellant propulsion double-valve combined test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Wang, Huasheng; Xia, Jixia; Cai, Guobiao; Zhang, Zhenpeng

    2017-04-01

    For the pressure reducing regulator and check valve double-valve combined test system in an integral bipropellant propulsion system, a system model is established with modular models of various typical components. The simulation research is conducted on the whole working process of an experiment of 9 MPa working condition from startup to rated working condition and finally to shutdown. Comparison of simulation results with test data shows: five working conditions including standby, startup, rated pressurization, shutdown and halt and nine stages of the combined test system are comprehensively disclosed; valve-spool opening and closing details of the regulator and two check valves are accurately revealed; the simulation also clarifies two phenomena which test data are unable to clarify, one is the critical opening state in which the check valve spools slightly open and close alternately in their own fully closed positions, the other is the obvious effects of flow-field temperature drop and temperature rise in pipeline network with helium gas flowing. Moreover, simulation results with consideration of component wall heat transfer are closer to the test data than those under the adiabatic-wall condition, and more able to reveal the dynamic characteristics of the system in various working stages.

  6. Theoretical study on the mechanism of double proton transfer in porphycene by path-integral molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Takehiro; Sugawara, Shuichi; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Shiga, Motoyuki; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2010-08-01

    Full-dimensional path-integral molecular dynamics simulations were performed to determine whether the double proton transfer tautomerization of porphycene is a concerted or a stepwise process. We employed an on-the-fly direct dynamics technique at the semiempirical PM6 method whose parameters were determined so as that the relative energies of the stationary points approximately reproduce previously reported electronic structure calculations. It was found that double proton transfer occurs dominantly through the concerted pathway via the second-order saddle point structure and that contribution of the stepwise mechanism increases with a temperature increase. Nuclear quantum effects play essential roles in determining the proton transfer mechanism.

  7. Exact path-integral evaluation of the heat distribution function of a trapped Brownian oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Debarati; Cherayil, Binny J.

    2010-11-01

    Using path integrals, we derive an exact expression—valid at all times t —for the distribution P(Q,t) of the heat fluctuations Q of a Brownian particle trapped in a stationary harmonic well. We find that P(Q,t) can be expressed in terms of a modified Bessel function of zeroth order that in the limit t→∞ exactly recovers the heat distribution function obtained recently by Imparato [Phys. Rev. E 76, 050101(R) (2007)]10.1103/PhysRevE.76.050101 from the approximate solution to a Fokker-Planck equation. This long-time result is in very good agreement with experimental measurements carried out by the same group on the heat effects produced by single micron-sized polystyrene beads in a stationary optical trap. An earlier exact calculation of the heat distribution function of a trapped particle moving at a constant speed v was carried out by van Zon and Cohen [Phys. Rev. E 69, 056121 (2004)]10.1103/PhysRevE.69.056121; however, this calculation does not provide an expression for P(Q,t) itself, but only its Fourier transform (which cannot be analytically inverted), nor can it be used to obtain P(Q,t) for the case v=0 .

  8. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2016-03-01

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology.

  9. Reward Dependent Invigoration Relates to Theta Oscillations and Is Predicted by Dopaminergic Midbrain Integrity in Healthy Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Steiger, Tineke K.; Bunzeck, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Motivation can have invigorating effects on behavior via dopaminergic neuromodulation. While this relationship has mainly been established in theoretical models and studies in younger subjects, the impact of structural declines of the dopaminergic system during healthy aging remains unclear. To investigate this issue, we used electroencephalography (EEG) in healthy young and elderly humans in a reward-learning paradigm. Specifically, scene images were initially encoded by combining them with cues predicting monetary reward (high vs. low reward). Subsequently, recognition memory for the scenes was tested. As a main finding, we can show that response times (RTs) during encoding were faster for high reward predicting images in the young but not elderly participants. This pattern was resembled in power changes in the theta-band (4–7 Hz). Importantly, analyses of structural MRI data revealed that individual reward-related differences in the elderlies’ response time could be predicted by the structural integrity of the dopaminergic substantia nigra (SN; as measured by magnetization transfer (MT)). These findings suggest a close relationship between reward-based invigoration, theta oscillations and age-dependent changes of the dopaminergic system. PMID:28174533

  10. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2016-01-01

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology. PMID:26976199

  11. Integrated 1.55 µm photomixer local oscillator sources for heterodyne receivers from 70 GHz to beyond 250 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggard, Peter G.; Azcona, Luis; Laisné, Alexandre; Ellison, Brian N.; Shen, Pengbo; Gomes, Nathan J.; Davies, Phil A.

    2004-10-01

    Photomixing is a flexible and efficient method of providing both local oscillator signals for heterodyne receivers and high frequency phase reference signals. Ultrafast, 70 GHz bandwidth, λ = 1.55 µm, photodiodes from u2t Photonics AG have been incorporated into three designs of mm-wave waveguide mounts. The photomixers utilise a thin freestanding gold foil, or a gold on dielectric, probe to couple power into the waveguide and to deliver the photodiode bias. The frequency coverage of the designs is from 70 GHz to 300 GHz. A method of rapidly characterizing the frequency response of these photomixers using spontaneous-spontaneous beating of light from an EDFA is described. Recent work has been directed at increasing the degree of integration of the photodiode with the waveguide probe and choke filter to reduce the frequency dependence of the output power. A simplified photomixer block manufacturing process has also been introduced. A combined probe and filter structure, impedance matched to both the coplanar output line on the photodiode chip and to 0.4 height milled waveguide, is presented. This matching is achieved over the W-band with a fixed waveguide backshort. We present modelled and experimental results showing the increased efficiency and smoother tuning. The design and frequency response of such a probe is reported. We also present the performance of a simpler mount, operating in the frequency range from 160 GHz to 300 GHz, which generates powers of around 10 µW up to 250 GHz.

  12. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S

    2016-03-15

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology.

  13. Global/Regional Integrated Model System (GRIMs): Double Fourier Series (DFS) Dynamical Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, M.; Hong, S.

    2013-12-01

    A multi-scale atmospheric/oceanic model system with unified physics, the Global/Regional Integrated Model system (GRIMs) has been created for use in numerical weather prediction, seasonal simulations, and climate research projects, from global to regional scales. It includes not only the model code, but also the test cases and scripts. The model system is developed and practiced by taking advantage of both operational and research applications. We outlines the history of GRIMs, its current applications, and plans for future development, providing a summary useful to present and future users. In addition to the traditional spherical harmonics (SPH) dynamical core, a new spectral method with a double Fourier series (DFS) is available in the GRIMs (Table 1). The new DFS dynamical core with full physics is evaluated against the SPH dynamical core in terms of short-range forecast capability for a heavy rainfall event and seasonal simulation framework. Comparison of the two dynamical cores demonstrates that the new DFS dynamical core exhibits performance comparable to the SPH in terms of simulated climatology accuracy and the forecast of a heavy rainfall event. Most importantly, the DFS algorithm guarantees improved computational efficiency in the cluster computer as the model resolution increases, which is consistent with theoretical values computed from the dry primitive equation model framework of Cheong (Fig. 1). The current study shows that, at higher resolutions, the DFS approach can be a competitive dynamical core because the DFS algorithm provides the advantages of both the spectral method for high numerical accuracy and the grid-point method for high performance computing in the aspect of computational cost. GRIMs dynamical cores

  14. Integration of non-communicable diseases in health care: tackling the double burden of disease in African settings

    PubMed Central

    Temu, Florence; Leonhardt, Marcus; Carter, Jane; Thiam, Sylla

    2014-01-01

    Sub-Saharan African countries now face the double burden of Non Communicable and Communicable Diseases. This situation represents a major threat to fragile health systems and emphasises the need for innovative integrative approaches to health care delivery. Health services need to be reorganised to address populations’ needs holistically and effectively leverage resources in already resource-limited settings. Access and delivery of quality health care should be reinforced and implemented at primary health care level within the framework of health system strengthening. Competencies need to be developed around services provided rather than specific diseases. New models of integration within the health sector and other sectors should be explored and further evidence generated to inform policy and practice to combat the double burden. PMID:25419329

  15. On square-integrability of solutions of the stationary Schrödinger equation for the quantum harmonic oscillator in two dimensional constant curvature spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Noguera, Norman; Rózga, Krzysztof

    2015-07-15

    In this work, one provides a justification of the condition that is usually imposed on the parameters of the hypergeometric equation, related to the solutions of the stationary Schrödinger equation for the harmonic oscillator in two-dimensional constant curvature spaces, in order to determine the solutions which are square-integrable. One proves that in case of negative curvature, it is a necessary condition of square integrability and in case of positive curvature, a necessary condition of regularity. The proof is based on the analytic continuation formulas for the hypergeometric function. It is observed also that the same is true in case of a slightly more general potential than the one for harmonic oscillator.

  16. Adaptive Runge-Kutta integration for stiff systems: Comparing Nosé and Nosé-Hoover dynamics for the harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham Hoover, William; Clinton Sprott, Julien; Griswold Hoover, Carol

    2016-10-01

    We describe the application of adaptive (variable time step) integrators to stiff differential equations encountered in many applications. Linear harmonic oscillators subject to nonlinear thermal constraints can exhibit either stiff or smooth dynamics. Two closely related examples, Nosé's dynamics and Nosé-Hoover dynamics, are both based on Hamiltonian mechanics and generate microstates consistent with Gibbs' canonical ensemble. Nosé's dynamics is stiff and can present severe numerical difficulties. Nosé-Hoover dynamics, although it follows exactly the same trajectory, is smooth and relatively trouble-free. We emphasize the power of adaptive integrators to resolve stiff problems such as the Nosé dynamics for the harmonic oscillator. The solutions also illustrate the power of computer graphics to enrich numerical solutions.

  17. GaAs up converter integrated circuit for a double conversion cable TV set-top tuner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheinberg, N.; Michels, R.; Fedoroff, V.; Stoffman, D.; Li, K.; Kent, S.; Waight, M.; Marz, D.

    1994-06-01

    A GaAs up converter integrated circuit used for a double conversion cable TV 'set-top' tuner is described. The up converter IC converts the 50 to 550 MHz band to an IF of 700 MHz. The IC meets the linearity and noise figure requirements for a cable TV tuner. It includes an AGC and image reject filter. The reduced component count achieved by using an integrated circuit and the resulting reduction in the size of the tuner, provides potential cost savings over a discrete implementation.

  18. Cascade of chromosomal rearrangements caused by a heterogeneous T-DNA integration supports the double-strand break repair model for T-DNA integration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yufei; Chen, Zhiyu; Zhuang, Chuxiong; Huang, Jilei

    2017-02-28

    Transferred DNA (T-DNA) from Agrobacterium tumefaciens can be integrated into the plant genome. The double-strand break repair (DSBR) pathway is a major model for T-DNA integration. From this model, we expect that two ends of a T-DNA molecule would invade into a single DNA double-strand break (DSB) or independent DSBs in the plant genome. We call the later phenomenon a heterogeneous T-DNA integration which has never been observed. In this work, we demonstrated it in an Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant seb19. To resolve the chromosomal structural changes caused by T-DNA integration at both the nucleotide and chromosome levels, we performed inverse PCR, genome resequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and linkage analysis. We found, in seb19, a single T-DNA connected two different chromosomal loci and caused complex chromosomal rearrangements. The specific break-junction pattern in seb19 is consistent with the result of heterogeneous T-DNA integration but not of recombination between two T-DNA insertions. We demonstrated that, in seb19, heterogeneous T-DNA integration evoked a cascade of incorrect repair of seven DSBs on chromosome 4 and 5, and then produced translocation, inversion, duplication and deletion. Heterogeneous T-DNA integration supports the DSBR model and suggests that two ends of a T-DNA molecule could be integrated into the plant genome independently. Our results also show a new origin of chromosomal abnormalities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Lagrange-type modeling of continuous dielectric permittivity variation in double-higher-order volume integral equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chobanyan, E.; Ilić, M. M.; Notaroš, B. M.

    2015-05-01

    A novel double-higher-order entire-domain volume integral equation (VIE) technique for efficient analysis of electromagnetic structures with continuously inhomogeneous dielectric materials is presented. The technique takes advantage of large curved hexahedral discretization elements—enabled by double-higher-order modeling (higher-order modeling of both the geometry and the current)—in applications involving highly inhomogeneous dielectric bodies. Lagrange-type modeling of an arbitrary continuous variation of the equivalent complex permittivity of the dielectric throughout each VIE geometrical element is implemented, in place of piecewise homogeneous approximate models of the inhomogeneous structures. The technique combines the features of the previous double-higher-order piecewise homogeneous VIE method and continuously inhomogeneous finite element method (FEM). This appears to be the first implementation and demonstration of a VIE method with double-higher-order discretization elements and conformal modeling of inhomogeneous dielectric materials embedded within elements that are also higher (arbitrary) order (with arbitrary material-representation orders within each curved and large VIE element). The new technique is validated and evaluated by comparisons with a continuously inhomogeneous double-higher-order FEM technique, a piecewise homogeneous version of the double-higher-order VIE technique, and a commercial piecewise homogeneous FEM code. The examples include two real-world applications involving continuously inhomogeneous permittivity profiles: scattering from an egg-shaped melting hailstone and near-field analysis of a Luneburg lens, illuminated by a corrugated horn antenna. The results show that the new technique is more efficient and ensures considerable reductions in the number of unknowns and computational time when compared to the three alternative approaches.

  20. Architecture engineering toward highly active palladium integrated titanium dioxide yolk-double-shell nanoreactor for catalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baocang; Wang, Qin; Yu, Shengli; Jing, Peng; Liu, Lixia; Xu, Guangran; Zhang, Jun

    2014-09-01

    Rational design of the hierarchical architecture of a material with well controlled functionality is crucially important for improving its properties. In this paper, we present the general strategies for rationally designing and constructing three types of hierarchical Pd integrated TiO2 double-shell architectures, i.e. yolk-double-shell TiO2 architecture (Pd@TiO2/Pd@TiO2) with yolk-type Pd nanoparticles residing inside the central cavity of the hollow TiO2 structure; ultrafine Pd nanoparticles homogenously dispersed on both the external and internal surfaces of the inner TiO2 shell; and double-shell TiO2 architecture (@TiO2/Pd@TiO2) with Pd nanoparticles solely loaded on the external surface of the inner TiO2 shell, and double-shell TiO2 architecture (@TiO2@Pd@TiO2) with Pd nanoparticles dispersed in the interlayer space of double TiO2 shells, via newly developed Pd2+ ion-diffusion and Pd sol impregnation methodologies. These architectures are well controlled in structure, size, morphology, and configuration with Pd nanoparticles existing in various locations. Owing to the variable synergistic effects arising from the location discrepancies of Pd nanoparticle in the architectures, they exhibit remarkable variations in catalytic activity. In particular, different from previously reported yolk-shell structures, the obtained yolk-double-shell Pd@TiO2/Pd@TiO2 architecture, which is revealed for the first time, possesses a uniform hierarchical structure, narrow size distribution, and good monodispersibility, and it creates two Pd-TiO2 interfaces on the external and internal surfaces of the inner TiO2 shell, leading to the strongest synergistic effect of Pd nanoparticles with TiO2 shell. Furthermore, the interlayer chamber between the double TiO2 shells connecting with the central cavity of the hollow TiO2 structure through the mesoporous TiO2 wall forms a nanoreactor for enriching the reactants and preventing the deletion of Pd nanoparticles during the reaction, thus

  1. Paradoxes of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedov, E. Kh.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2009-08-15

    Despite the theory of neutrino oscillations being rather old, some of its basic issues are still being debated in the literature. We discuss a number of such issues, including the relevance of the 'same energy' and 'same momentum' assumptions, the role of quantum-mechanical uncertainty relations in neutrino oscillations, the dependence of the coherence and localization conditions that ensure the observability of neutrino oscillations on neutrino energy and momentum uncertainties, the question of (in)dependence of the oscillation probabilities on the neutrino production and detection processes, and the applicability limits of the stationary-source approximation. We also develop a novel approach to calculation of the oscillation probability in the wave-packet approach, based on the summation/integration conventions different from the standard one, which allows a new insight into the 'same energy' vs. 'same momentum' problem. We also discuss a number of apparently paradoxical features of the theory of neutrino oscillations.

  2. A remarkable spectral feature of the Schrödinger Hamiltonian of the harmonic oscillator perturbed by an attractive δ‧-interaction centred at the origin: double degeneracy and level crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albeverio, Sergio; Fassari, Silvestro; Rinaldi, Fabio

    2013-09-01

    We rigorously define the self-adjoint Hamiltonian of the harmonic oscillator perturbed by an attractive δ‧-interaction, of strength β, centred at 0 (the bottom of the confining parabolic potential), by explicitly providing its resolvent. Our approach is based on a ‘coupling constant renormalization’, related to a technique originated in quantum field theory and implemented in the rigorous mathematical construction of the self-adjoint operator representing the negative Laplacian perturbed by the δ-interaction in two and three dimensions. The way the δ‧-interaction enters in our Hamiltonian corresponds to the one originally discussed for the free Hamiltonian (instead of the harmonic oscillator one) by P Sěba. It should not be confused with the δ‧-potential perturbation of the harmonic oscillator discussed, e.g., in a recent paper by Gadella, Glasser and Nieto (also introduced by P Sěba as a perturbation of the one-dimensional free Laplacian and recently investigated in that context by Golovaty, Hryniv and Zolotaryuk). We investigate in detail the spectrum of our perturbed harmonic oscillator. The spectral structure differs from that of the one-dimensional harmonic oscillator perturbed by an attractive δ-interaction centred at the origin: the even eigenvalues are not modified at all by the δ‧-interaction. Moreover, all the odd eigenvalues, regarded as functions of β, exhibit the rather remarkable phenomenon called ‘level crossing’ after first producing the double degeneracy of all the even eigenvalues for the value \\beta = \\beta _0 = \\frac{{2\\sqrt \\pi }}{{B\\left( {\\frac{3}{4},\\frac{1}{2}} \\right)}} \\cong 1.47934(B( ·, ·) being the beta function). Dedicated to Professor Gianfausto Dell'Antonio on the occasion of his 80th birthday.

  3. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Performance Verification Report: METSAT Phase Locked Oscillator Assembly, P/N 1348360-1, S/N's F09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, D.

    1999-01-01

    This is the Performance Verification Report, METSAT (Meteorological Satellites) Phase Locked Oscillator Assembly, P/N 1348360-1, S/N F09 and F10, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  4. Tunable few-electron double quantum dots with integrated charge read-out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzerman, J. M.; Hanson, R.; Greidanus, J. S.; Willems van Beveren, L. H.; De Franceschi, S.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.; Tarucha, S.; Kouwenhoven, L. P.

    2004-11-01

    We report on the realization of few-electron double quantum dots defined in a two-dimensional electron gas by means of surface gates on top of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. Two quantum point contacts (QPCs) are placed in the vicinity of the double quantum dot and serve as charge detectors. These enable determination of the number of conduction electrons on each dot. This number can be reduced to zero, while still allowing transport measurements through the double dot. The coupling between the two dots can be controlled even in the few-electron regime. Microwave radiation is used to pump an electron from one dot to the other by absorption of a single photon. The experiments demonstrate that this quantum dot circuit can serve as a good starting point for a scalable spin-qubit system.

  5. Oscillator detector

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, B.M.

    1980-05-13

    An alien liquid detector employs a monitoring element and an oscillatory electronic circuit for maintaining the temperature of the monitoring element substantially above ambient temperature. The output wave form, eg., frequency of oscillation or wave shape, of the oscillatory circuit depends upon the temperaturedependent electrical characteristic of the monitoring element. A predetermined change in the output waveform allows water to be discriminated from another liquid, eg., oil. Features of the invention employing two thermistors in two oscillatory circuits include positioning one thermistor for contact with water and the other thermistor above the oil-water interface to detect a layer of oil if present. Unique oscillatory circuit arrangements are shown that achieve effective thermistor action with an economy of parts and energizing power. These include an operational amplifier employed in an astable multivibrator circuit, a discrete transistor-powered tank circuit, and use of an integrated circuit chip.

  6. Grid oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zorana B.; Kim, Moonil; Rutledge, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Loading a two-dimensional grid with active devices offers a means of combining the power of solid-state oscillators in the microwave and millimeter-wave range. The grid structure allows a large number of negative resistance devices to be combined. This approach is attractive because the active devices do not require an external locking signal, and the combining is done in free space. In addition, the loaded grid is a planar structure amenable to monolithic integration. Measurements on a 25-MESFET grid at 9.7 GHz show power-combining and frequency-locking without an external locking signal, with an ERP of 37 W. Experimental far-field patterns agree with theoretical results obtained using reciprocity.

  7. Grid oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zorana B.; Kim, Moonil; Rutledge, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Loading a two-dimensional grid with active devices offers a means of combining the power of solid-state oscillators in the microwave and millimeter-wave range. The grid structure allows a large number of negative resistance devices to be combined. This approach is attractive because the active devices do not require an external locking signal, and the combining is done in free space. In addition, the loaded grid is a planar structure amenable to monolithic integration. Measurements on a 25-MESFET grid at 9.7 GHz show power-combining and frequency-locking without an external locking signal, with an ERP of 37 W. Experimental far-field patterns agree with theoretical results obtained using reciprocity.

  8. Femtosecond-laser inscribed double-cladding waveguides in Nd:YAG crystal: a promising prototype for integrated lasers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongliang; Chen, Feng; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Jaque, D

    2013-09-01

    We report on the design and implementation of a prototype of optical waveguides fabricated in Nd:YAG crystals by using femtosecond-laser irradiation. In this prototype, two concentric tubular structures with nearly circular cross sections of different diameters have been inscribed in the Nd:YAG crystals, generating double-cladding waveguides. Under 808 nm optical pumping, waveguide lasers have been realized in the double-cladding structures. Compared with single-cladding waveguides, the concentric tubular structures, benefiting from the large pump area of the outermost cladding, possess both superior laser performance and nearly single-mode beam profile in the inner cladding. Double-cladding waveguides of the same size were fabricated and coated by a thin optical film, and a maximum output power of 384 mW and a slope efficiency of 46.1% were obtained. Since the large diameters of the outer claddings are comparable with those of the optical fibers, this prototype paves a way to construct an integrated single-mode laser system with a direct fiber-waveguide configuration.

  9. Integral equation for spin dependent unintegrated parton distributions incorporating double ln2(1/x) effects at low x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwieciński, Jan; Maul, Martin

    2003-02-01

    In this paper we derive an integral equation for the evolution of unintegrated (longitudinally) polarized quark and gluon parton distributions. The conventional Catani-Ciafaloni-Fiorani-Marchesini (CCFM) framework is modified at small x in order to incorporate the QCD expectations concerning the double ln2(1/x) resummation at low x for the integrated distributions. Complete Altarelli-Parisi splitting functions are included that makes the formalism compatible with the leading order Altarelli-Parisi evolution at large and moderately small values of x. The obtained modified polarized CCFM equation is shown to be partially diagonalized by the Fourier-Bessel transformation. Results of the numerical solution for this modifed polarized CCFM equation for the nonsinglet quark distributions are presented.

  10. Double-wedged Wollaston-type polarimeter design and integration to RTT150-TFOSC; initial tests, calibration, and characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helhel, S.; Khamitov, I.; Kahya, G.; Bayar, C.; Kaynar, S.; Gumerov, R.

    2015-10-01

    Photometric and spectroscopic observation capabilities of 1.5-m Russian-Turkish Telescope RTT150 has been broadened with the integration of presented polarimeter. The well-known double-wedged Wollaston-type dual-beam technique was preferred and applied to design and produce it. The designed polarimeter was integrated into the telescope detector TFOSC, and called TFOSC-WP. Its capabilities and limitations were attempted to be determined by a number of observation sets. Non-polarized and strongly polarized stars were observed to determine its limitations as well as its linearity. An instrumental intrinsic polarization was determined for the 1 × 5 arcmin field of view in equatorial coordinate system, the systematic error of polarization degree as 0.2 %, and position angle as 1.9∘. These limitations and capabilities are denoted as good enough to satisfy telescopes' present and future astrophysical space missions related to GAIA and SRG projects.

  11. Current-induced electrical self-oscillations across out-of-plane threshold switches based on VO2 layers integrated in crossbars geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, A.; Leroy, J.; Orlianges, J.-C.; Crunteanu, A.

    2014-04-01

    Electrically activated metal-insulator transition (MIT) in vanadium dioxide (VO2) is widely studied from both fundamental and practical points of view. It can give valuable insights on the currently controversial phase transition mechanism in this material and, at the same time, allows the development of original MIT-based electronic devices. Electrically triggered insulator-metal transitions are demonstrated in novel out-of-plane, metal-oxide-metal type devices integrating a VO2 thin film, upon applying moderate threshold voltages. It is shown that the current-voltage characteristics of such devices present clear negative differential resistance effects supporting the onset of continuous, current-driven phase oscillations across the vanadium dioxide material. The frequencies of these self-sustained oscillations are ranging from 90 to 300 kHz and they may be tuned by adjusting the injected current. A phenomenological model of the device and its command circuit is developed, and allows to extract the analytical expressions of the oscillation frequencies and to simulate the electrical oscillatory phenomena developed across the VO2 material. Such out-of-plane devices may further contribute to the general understanding of the driving mechanism in metal-insulator transition materials and devices, a prerequisite to promising applications in high speed/high frequency networks of oscillatory or resistive memories circuits.

  12. Current-induced electrical self-oscillations across out-of-plane threshold switches based on VO{sub 2} layers integrated in crossbars geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumont, A.; Leroy, J.; Crunteanu, A.

    2014-04-21

    Electrically activated metal-insulator transition (MIT) in vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) is widely studied from both fundamental and practical points of view. It can give valuable insights on the currently controversial phase transition mechanism in this material and, at the same time, allows the development of original MIT-based electronic devices. Electrically triggered insulator-metal transitions are demonstrated in novel out-of-plane, metal-oxide-metal type devices integrating a VO{sub 2} thin film, upon applying moderate threshold voltages. It is shown that the current-voltage characteristics of such devices present clear negative differential resistance effects supporting the onset of continuous, current-driven phase oscillations across the vanadium dioxide material. The frequencies of these self-sustained oscillations are ranging from 90 to 300 kHz and they may be tuned by adjusting the injected current. A phenomenological model of the device and its command circuit is developed, and allows to extract the analytical expressions of the oscillation frequencies and to simulate the electrical oscillatory phenomena developed across the VO{sub 2} material. Such out-of-plane devices may further contribute to the general understanding of the driving mechanism in metal-insulator transition materials and devices, a prerequisite to promising applications in high speed/high frequency networks of oscillatory or resistive memories circuits.

  13. Error in the determination of the deformed shape of prismatic beams using the double integration of curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurdardottir, Dorotea H.; Stearns, Jett; Glisic, Branko

    2017-07-01

    The deformed shape is a consequence of loading the structure and it is defined by the shape of the centroid line of the beam after deformation. The deformed shape is a universal parameter of beam-like structures. It is correlated with the curvature of the cross-section; therefore, any unusual behavior that affects the curvature is reflected through the deformed shape. Excessive deformations cause user discomfort, damage to adjacent structural members, and may ultimately lead to issues in structural safety. However, direct long-term monitoring of the deformed shape in real-life settings is challenging, and an alternative is indirect determination of the deformed shape based on curvature monitoring. The challenge of the latter is an accurate evaluation of error in the deformed shape determination, which is directly correlated with the number of sensors needed to achieve the desired accuracy. The aim of this paper is to study the deformed shape evaluated by numerical double integration of the monitored curvature distribution along the beam, and create a method to predict the associated errors and suggest the number of sensors needed to achieve the desired accuracy. The error due to the accuracy in the curvature measurement is evaluated within the scope of this work. Additionally, the error due to the numerical integration is evaluated. This error depends on the load case (i.e., the shape of the curvature diagram), the magnitude of curvature, and the density of the sensor network. The method is tested on a laboratory specimen and a real structure. In a laboratory setting, the double integration is in excellent agreement with the beam theory solution which was within the predicted error limits of the numerical integration. Consistent results are also achieved on a real structure—Streicker Bridge on Princeton University campus.

  14. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  15. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators, or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  16. Robust synchronisation tracking control of networked Euler-Lagrange systems using reference trajectory estimation based on virtual double-integrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zi-Jiang; Qin, Pan

    2016-07-01

    This paper considers the problem of distributed synchronisation tracking control of multiple Euler-Lagrange systems on a directed graph which contains a spanning tree with the leader node being the root. To design the high performance distributed controllers, a virtual double-integrator is introduced in each agent and is controlled by a virtual distributed linear high-gain synchronisation tracking controller, so that the position and velocity of each agent track those of the reference trajectory with arbitrarily short transient time and small ultimate tracking error. Then taking the double-integrator's position and velocity as the estimates of those of the reference trajectory, in each generalised coordinate of each Euler-Lagrange agent, a local controller with a disturbance observer and a sliding mode control term is designed, to suppress the mutual interactions among the agents and the modelling uncertainties. The boundedness of the overall signals and the synchronisation tracking control performance are analysed, and the conditions for guaranteed control performance are clarified. Simulation examples are provided to demonstrate the performance of the distributed controllers.

  17. Time-varying formation control for double-integrator multi-agent systems with jointly connected topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiwang; Han, Liang; Li, Qingdong; Ren, Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Time-varying formation analysis and design problems for double-integrator multi-agent systems with jointly connected topologies are investigated. Different from the previous work on formation control, in this paper, the formation is specified by time-varying piecewise continuously differentiable vectors and the topology can be disconnected at any time instant. First, a distributed formation control protocol is constructed using local neighbour-to-neighbour information. In the case where the switching topology is jointly connected, necessary and sufficient conditions for double-integrator multi-agent systems to achieve time-varying formations are proposed, where the formation feasibility constraint is also derived. To describe the macroscopic movement of the whole formation, explicit expressions of the formation reference are presented, the motion modes of which can be partially assigned. Moreover, an approach to design the formation control protocol is given, which is fully distributed and requires no global information about the topology. Finally, the obtained theoretical results are applied to deal with the time-varying formation control problems of multi-vehicle systems.

  18. Current sheet oscillations in the magnetic filament approach

    SciTech Connect

    Erkaev, N. V.; Semenov, V. S.; Biernat, H. K.

    2012-06-15

    Magnetic filament approach is applied for modeling of nonlinear 'kink'-like flapping oscillations of thin magnetic flux tubes in the Earth's magnetotail current sheet. A discrete approximation for the magnetic flux tube was derived on a basis of the Hamiltonian formulation of the problem. The obtained system of ordinary differential equations was integrated by method of Rosenbrock, which is suitable for stiff equations. The two-dimensional exact Kan's solution of the Vlasov equations was used to set the background equilibrium conditions for magnetic field and plasma. Boundary conditions for the magnetic filament were found to be dependent on the ratio of the ionospheric conductivity and the Alfven conductivity of the magnetic tube. It was shown that an enhancement of this ratio leads to the corresponding increase of the frequency of the flapping oscillations. For some special case of boundary conditions, when the magnetic perturbations vanish at the boundaries, the calculated frequency of the 'kink'-like flapping oscillations is rather close to that predicted by the 'double gradient' analytical model. For others cases, the obtained frequency of the flapping oscillations is somewhat larger than that from the 'double gradient' theory. The frequency of the nonlinear flapping oscillations was found to be a decreasing function of the amplitude.

  19. Pitch doubling through dual-patterning lithography challenges in integration and litho budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusa, Mircea; Quaedackers, John; Larsen, Olaf F. A.; Meessen, Jeroen; van der Heijden, Eddy; Dicker, Gerald; Wismans, Onno; de Haas, Paul; van Ingen Schenau, Koen; Finders, Jo; Vleeming, Bert; Storms, Geert; Jaenen, Patrick; Cheng, Shaunee; Maenhoudt, Mireille

    2007-03-01

    We present results from investigating critical challenges of pitch doubling through Double Patterning to meet manufacturing requirements for 32nm 1/ II pitch on 1.2NA lithography system. Simulations of lithography alternatives identified manufacturable Dose-Focus latitudes for a dual-line positive process option which led to an experimental setup based on a single hardmask process. Key challenges of the selected process relate to the presence or absence of the hardmask layer during 1 st or 2 nd patterning step. This has an effect on wafer topography, process setup, etch bias and wafer litho-to-etch CDU offsets, which will create two final CDU populations. Therefore, there are two metrology challenges, separation between the two CD populations and overlay-at-resolution using CDSEM. They were addressed by designing appropriate CD and overlay targets and by implementing an adequate dense sampling allowing modeling of wafer and field CD distributions. We introduced a new CDU model to calculate double patterning budgets based on defining CD from its edges and pooling CD variance from two adjacent patterns within 2*Pitch distance. For a single line and 1.35NA system, the model predicted 3.1nm variance with mask CDU and etch bias being the major contributors. We achieved an experimental resolution of 32-nm 1/ II pitch on 1.2NA system, which equals 0.20k1. Experimental results at 32-nm resolution were confirmed in a pre-manufacturing environment on a full lot of 24 wafers, with raw CDU of 6nm (3s). After modeling and correcting for interfield (wafer) and intrafield spatial distributions, CDU was improved to 2.5nm (3s). Best overlay results equaled scanner SMO capability of ~7nm (mean+3s).

  20. Development of a model to predict flow oscillations in low-flow sodium boiling. [Loss-of-Piping Integrity accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, A.E.; Griffith, P.

    1980-04-01

    Tests performed in a small scale water loop showed that voiding oscillations, similar to those observed in sodium, were present in water, as well. An analytical model, appropriate for either sodium or water, was developed and used to describe the water flow behavior. The experimental results indicate that water can be successfully employed as a sodium simulant, and further, that the condensation heat transfer coefficient varies significantly during the growth and collapse of vapor slugs during oscillations. It is this variation, combined with the temperature profile of the unheated zone above the heat source, which determines the oscillatory behavior of the system. The analytical program has produced a model which qualitatively does a good job in predicting the flow behavior in the wake experiment. The amplitude discrepancies are attributable to experimental uncertainties and model inadequacies. Several parameters (heat transfer coefficient, unheated zone temperature profile, mixing between hot and cold fluids during oscillations) are set by the user. Criteria for the comparison of water and sodium experiments have been developed.

  1. Rate capability improvement of Co-Ni double hydroxides integrated in cathodically partially exfoliated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiang; Song, Yu; Sun, Zhen; Guo, Di; Liu, Xiao-Xia

    2017-10-01

    In-situ growing of energy storage materials on graphene-based substrates/current collectors with low defect is a good way to boost electron transport and so enhance rate capability for the obtained electrode. Herein, high-quality graphene-like nanopetals are partially exfoliated from graphite foil (GF) through a facile and fast cathodic process. Three-dimensional porous structure is established for the afforded cathodically-exfoliated graphite foil (CEG), with many graphene-like nanopetals vertically anchoring on the graphite substrate. A hierarchical structure is constructed by the following electrochemical growth of Co-Ni double hydroxide nanopetals on the graphene atop CEG. The double hydroxide in the obtained electrode with the optimized Co2+/Ni2+ molar ratio, Co0.75Ni0.25(OH)2-CEG, displays much improved rate capability and so can deliver a high specific capacitance of 1460 F g-1 at an ultra-high current density of 100 A g-1. An asymmetric device is assembled by using Co0.75Ni0.25(OH)2-CEG as cathode, which demonstrates a high energy density of 31.6 Wh kg-1 at an ultra-high power density of 21.5 kW kg-1, showing the potential of the hierarchical composite electrode for high power application. The device also displays good stability, it can retain more than 90% of its capacitance after 10000 galvanostatic charge-discharge cycles.

  2. miR-285-Yki/Mask double-negative feedback loop mediates blood-brain barrier integrity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Liu, Yanling; Pei, Chunli; Zhang, Peng; Pan, Linqing; Xiao, Jing; Meng, Songshu; Yuan, Zengqiang; Bi, Xiaolin

    2017-03-21

    The Hippo signaling pathway is highly conserved from Drosophila to mammals and plays a central role in maintaining organ size and tissue homeostasis. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) physiologically isolates the brain from circulating blood or the hemolymph system, and its integrity is strictly maintained to perform sophisticated neuronal functions. Until now, the underlying mechanisms of subperineurial glia (SPG) growth and BBB maintenance during development are not clear. Here, we report an miR-285-Yorkie (Yki)/Multiple Ankyrin repeats Single KH domain (Mask) double-negative feedback loop that regulates SPG growth and BBB integrity. Flies with a loss of miR-285 have a defective BBB with increased SPG ploidy and disruptive septate junctions. Mechanistically, miR-285 directly targets the Yki cofactor Mask to suppress Yki activity and down-regulates the expression of its downstream target cyclin E, a key regulator of cell cycle. Disturbance of cyclin E expression in SPG causes abnormal endoreplication, which leads to aberrant DNA ploidy and defective septate junctions. Moreover, the expression of miR-285 is increased by knockdown of yki or mask and is decreased with yki overexpression, thus forming a double-negative feedback loop. This regulatory loop is crucial for sustaining an appropriate Yki/Mask activity and cyclin E level to maintain SPG ploidy and BBB integrity. Perturbation of this signaling loop, either by dysregulated miR-285 expression or Yki activity, causes irregular SPG ploidy and BBB disruption. Furthermore, ectopic expression of miR-285 promotes canonical Hippo pathway-mediated apoptosis independent of the p53 or JNK pathway. Collectively, these results reveal an exquisite regulatory mechanism for BBB maintenance through an miR-285-Yki/Mask regulatory circuit.

  3. A low-phase-noise Ka-band push-push voltage-controlled oscillator using CMOS/glass-integrated passive device technologies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a Ka-band CMOS push-push voltage- controlled oscillator (VCO) integrated into a glass-integrated passive device (GIPD) process is presented. The transformer, λ/4 transmission line, and inductors of the VCO are realized in the GIPD process, achieving superior performances, and therefore improve the phase noise of the VCO. Moreover, the transformer-based VCO is a differential Hartley topology to further reduce the phase noise and chip area. Operating at 1.8 V supply voltage, the VCO core consumes merely 3.8 mW of dc power. The measured phase noise is -109.18 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset from the 30.84 GHz oscillation frequency. The push-push VCO also demonstrates a 24.5 dB fundamental rejection, and exhibits an 8.4% tuning range. Compared with recently published CMOS-based VCOs, it is observed that the proposed VCO exhibits excellent performance under low power consumption.

  4. Development of silicon microforce sensors integrated with double meander springs for standard hardness test instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Doering, Lutz; Daus, Alwin; Brand, Uwe; Frank, Thomas; Peiner, Erwin

    2015-05-01

    Silicon microforce sensors, to be used as a transferable standard for micro force and depth scale calibrations of hardness testing instruments, are developed using silicon bulk micromachining technologies. Instead of wet chemical etching, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cryogenic deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) is employed in the sensor fabrication process leading to more precise control of 300 μm deep structures with smooth sidewall profiles. Double meander springs are designed flanking to the boss replacing the conventional rectangular springs and thereby improving the system linearity. Two full p-SOI piezoresistive Wheatstone bridges are added on both clamped ends of the active sensors. To realize passive force sensors two spring-mass elements are stacked using glue and photoresist as joining materials. Correspondingly, although plastic deformation seems to occur when the second spring is contacted, the kink effect (i.e., abrupt increase of stiffness) is obviously observed from the first test of the passive stack sensor.

  5. Investigation of Bohr Hamiltonian in the presence of time-dependent Manning-Rosen, harmonic oscillator and double ring shaped potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhani, Hadi; Hassanabadi, Hassan

    2016-08-01

    This paper contains study of Bohr Hamiltonian considering time-dependent form of two important and famous nuclear potentials and harmonic oscillator. Dependence on time in interactions is considered in general form. In order to investigate this system, a powerful mathematical method has been employed, so-called Lewis-Riesenfeld dynamical invariant method. Appropriate dynamical invariant for considered system has been constructed. Then its eigen functions and the wave function are derived. At the end, we discussed about physical meaning of the results.

  6. Cycle-Averaged Phase-Space States for the Harmonic and the Morse Oscillators, and the Corresponding Uncertainty Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.; Constantoudis, Vasilios

    2009-01-01

    In Planck's model of the harmonic oscillator (HO) a century ago, both the energy and the phase space were quantized according to epsilon[subscript n] = nhv, n = 0, 1, 2..., and [double integral]dp[subscript x] dx = h. By referring to just these two relations, we show how the adoption of "cycle-averaged phase-space states" (CAPSSs) leads to the…

  7. Cycle-Averaged Phase-Space States for the Harmonic and the Morse Oscillators, and the Corresponding Uncertainty Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.; Constantoudis, Vasilios

    2009-01-01

    In Planck's model of the harmonic oscillator (HO) a century ago, both the energy and the phase space were quantized according to epsilon[subscript n] = nhv, n = 0, 1, 2..., and [double integral]dp[subscript x] dx = h. By referring to just these two relations, we show how the adoption of "cycle-averaged phase-space states" (CAPSSs) leads to the…

  8. Ex vivo optical characterization of in vivo grown tissues on dummy sensor implants using double integrating spheres measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Goodarzi, Mohammad; Aernouts, Ben; Gellynck, Karolien; Vlaminck, Lieven; Bockstaele, Ronny; Cornelissen, Maria; Ramon, Herman; Saeys, Wouter

    2014-05-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy offers a promising technological platform for continuous glucose monitoring in the human body. NIR measurements can be performed in vivo with an implantable single-chip based optical NIR sensor. However, the application of NIR spectroscopy for accurate estimation of the analyte concentration in highly scattering biological systems still remains a challenge. For instance, a thin tissue layer may grow in the optical path of the sensor. As most biological tissues allow only a small fraction of the collimated light to pass, this might result in a large reduction of the light throughput. To quantify the effect of presence of a thin tissue layer in the optical path, the bulk optical properties of tissue samples grown on sensor dummies which had been implanted for several months in goats were characterized using Double Integrating Spheres and unscattered transmittance measurements. The measured values of diffuse reflectance, diffuse transmittance and collimated transmittance were used as input to Inverse Adding-Doubling algorithm to estimate the bulk optical properties of the samples. The estimates of absorption and scattering coefficients were then used to calculate the light attenuation through a thin tissue layer. Based on the lower reduction in unscattered transmittance and higher absorptivity of glucose molecules, the measurement in the combination band was found to be the better option for the implantable sensor. As the tissues were found to be highly forward scattering with very low unscattered transmittance, the diffuse transmittance measurement based sensor configuration was recommended for the implantable glucose sensor.

  9. Integrative transcriptomics and proteomics analysis of longissimus dorsi muscles of Canadian double-muscled Large White pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuqin; Han, Wenpeng; Jiang, Shunyan; Zhao, Chunjiang; Wu, Changxin

    2016-02-10

    Canadian double-muscled Large White pigs are characterized by notable muscle mass, showing high daily gain and lean rate and good meat quality. In order to identify the major genes or proteins involved in muscle hyperplasia and hypertrophy, three pairs of full-sib pigs with extreme muscle mass difference from Canadian Large White were selected as experimental animals at 3 months age. The phenotypic differences of longissimus dorsi muscles (LD) were investigated with microarray and proteomics (2-DE, MALDI-TOF-MS), and results were verified by real-time PCR and western bolting respectively. The gene expressing profiling identified 57 and 260 and 147 differently expressed genes (DEGs) from the three pairs respectively with Bayesian statistics and significant analysis of microarrays (SAM) (p<0.05, q<0.05, fold>2). From the network of these DEGs, some major genes were displayed, such as EGF, PPARG, FN1, SERPINE1, MYC, JUN, involved in Wnt, MAPK and TGF-β signal pathway respectively, which mainly participated in cell differentiation and proliferation. In parallel, proteomics analyses revealed 50 differently expressed protein (DEP) spots with mass spectrum, and 33 spots of them were found annotated, which took part in energy metabolism and the structure and contraction of muscle fiber. In brief, our integrated study provides a good foundation for the further study on the genetic mechanism of the double muscle traits in pigs.

  10. Neurodynamic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espinosa, Ismael; Gonzalez, Hortensia; Quiza, Jorge; Gonazalez, J. Jesus; Arroyo, Ruben; Lara, Ritaluz

    1995-01-01

    Oscillation of electrical activity has been found in many nervous systems, from invertebrates to vertebrates including man. There exists experimental evidence of very simple circuits with the capability of oscillation. Neurons with intrinsic oscillation have been found and also neural circuits where oscillation is a property of the network. These two types of oscillations coexist in many instances. It is nowadays hypothesized that behind synchronization and oscillation there is a system of coupled oscillators responsible for activities that range from locomotion and feature binding in vision to control of sleep and circadian rhythms. The huge knowledge that has been acquired on oscillators from the times of Lord Rayleigh has made the simulation of neural oscillators a very active endeavor. This has been enhanced with more recent physiological findings about small neural circuits by means of intracellular and extracellular recordings as well as imaging methods. The future of this interdisciplinary field looks very promising; some researchers are going into quantum mechanics with the idea of trying to provide a quantum description of the brain. In this work we describe some simulations using neuron models by means of which we form simple neural networks that have the capability of oscillation. We analyze the oscillatory activity with root locus method, cross-correlation histograms, and phase planes. In the more complicated neural network models there is the possibility of chaotic oscillatory activity and we study that by means of Lyapunov exponents. The companion paper shows an example of that kind.

  11. Modelling of double air-bridged structured inductor implemented by a GaAs integrated passive device manufacturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Yao, Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Wei; Fu, Xiao-Qian; Li, Zhi-Ming; Li, Nian-Qiang; Wang, Cong

    2017-05-01

    In order to provide excellent performance and show the development of a complicated structure in a module and system, this paper presents a double air-bridge-structured symmetrical differential inductor based on integrated passive device technology. Corresponding to the proposed complicated structure, a new manufacturing process fabricated on a high-resistivity GaAs substrate is described in detail. Frequency-independent physical models are presented with lump elements and the results of skin effect-based measurements. Finally, some key features of the inductor are compared; good agreement between the measurements and modeled circuit fully verifies the validity of the proposed modeling approach. Meanwhile, we also present a comparison of different coil turns for inductor performance. The proposed work can provide a good solution for the design, fabrication, modeling, and practical application of radio-frequency modules and systems.

  12. Integrated ternary artificial nacre via synergistic toughening of reduced graphene oxide/double-walled carbon nanotubes/poly(vinyl alcohol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shanshan; Wu, Mengxi; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Qunfeng

    2016-07-01

    The synergistic toughening effect of building blocks and interface interaction exists in natural materials, such as nacre. Herein, inspired by one-dimensional (1D) nanofibrillar chitin and two-dimensional (2D) calcium carbonate platelets of natural nacre, we have fabricated integrated strong and tough ternary bio-inspired nanocomposites (artificial nacre) successfully via the synergistic effect of 2D reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets and 1D double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) and hydrogen bonding cross-linking with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix. Moreover, the crack mechanics model with crack deflection by 2D rGO nanosheets and crack bridging by 1D DWNTs and PVA chains induces resultant artificial nacre exhibiting excellent fatigue-resistance performance. These outstanding characteristics enable the ternary bioinspired nanocomposites have many promising potential applications, for instance, aerospace, flexible electronics devices and so forth. This synergistic toughening strategy also provides an effective way to assemble robust graphene-based nanocomposites.

  13. Study of the optical properties of solid tissue phantoms using single and double integrating sphere systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monem, S.; Singh, A.; Karsten, A. E.; Amin, R.; Harith, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Tissue simulators, the so-called tissue phantoms, have been used to mimic human tissue for spectroscopic applications. Phantoms' design depends on patterning the optical properties, namely absorption and scattering coefficients which characterize light propagation mechanisms inside the tissues. In this work, two calibration models based on measurements adopting integrating sphere systems have been used to determine the optical properties of the studied solid phantoms. Integrating sphere measurement results were fed into the calibration models using the multiple polynomial regression method and Newton-Raphson algorithm. The third-order polynomials have been used for optical properties predictions. Good agreement between the two models has been obtained. Role of solid phantoms' components, namely titanium dioxide as a scatterer and black carbon as an absorber, has been discussed. Both of the two components showed observable effects on the absorption and scattering of light inside the solid tissue phantoms.

  14. DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) INTEGRITY PROJECT HIGH LEVEL WASTE CHEMISTRY OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    WASHENFELDER DJ

    2008-01-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office (DOE) of River Protection (ORP) has a continuing program for chemical optimization to better characterize corrosion behavior of High-Level Waste (HLW). The DOE controls the chemistry in its HLW to minimize the propensity of localized corrosion, such as pitting, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nitrate-containing solutions. By improving the control of localized corrosion and SCC, the ORP can increase the life of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) carbon steel structural components and reduce overall mission costs. The carbon steel tanks at the Hanford Site are critical to the mission of safely managing stored HLW until it can be treated for disposal. The DOE has historically used additions of sodium hydroxide to retard corrosion processes in HLW tanks. This also increases the amount of waste to be treated. The reactions with carbon dioxide from the air and solid chemical species in the tank continually deplete the hydroxide ion concentration, which then requires continued additions. The DOE can reduce overall costs for caustic addition and treatment of waste, and more effectively utilize waste storage capacity by minimizing these chemical additions. Hydroxide addition is a means to control localized and stress corrosion cracking in carbon steel by providing a passive environment. The exact mechanism that causes nitrate to drive the corrosion process is not yet clear. The SCC is less of a concern in the newer stress relieved double shell tanks due to reduced residual stress. The optimization of waste chemistry will further reduce the propensity for SCC. The corrosion testing performed to optimize waste chemistry included cyclic potentiodynamic volarization studies. slow strain rate tests. and stress intensity factor/crack growth rate determinations. Laboratory experimental evidence suggests that nitrite is a highly effective:inhibitor for pitting and SCC in alkaline nitrate environments. Revision of the corrosion control

  15. The double nucleation model for sickle cell haemoglobin polymerization: full integration and comparison with experimental data.

    PubMed

    Medkour, Terkia; Ferrone, Frank; Galactéros, Frédéric; Hannaert, Patrick

    2008-06-01

    Sickle cell haemoglobin (HbS) polymerization reduces erythrocyte deformability, causing deleterous vaso-occlusions. The double-nucleation model states that polymers grow from HbS aggregates, the nuclei, (i) in solution (homogeneous nucleation), (ii) onto existing polymers (heterogeneous nucleation). When linearized at initial HbS concentration, this model predicts early polymerization and its characteristic delay-time (Ferrone et al. J Mol Biol 183(4):591-610, 611-631, 1985). Addressing its relevance for describing complete polymerization, we constructed the full, non-linearized model (Simulink), The MathWorks). Here, we compare the simulated outputs to experimental progress curves (n = 6-8 different [HbS], 3-6 mM range, from Ferrone's group). Within 10% from start, average root mean square (rms) deviation between simulated and experimental curves is 0.04 +/- 0.01 (25 degrees C, n = 8; mean +/- standard error). Conversely, for complete progress curves, averaged rms is 0.48 +/- 0.04. This figure is improved to 0.13 +/- 0.01 by adjusting heterogeneous pathway parameters (p < 0.01): the nucleus stability (sigma(2) micro( cc ): + 40%), and the fraction of polymer surface available for nucleation (phi), from 5e(-7), (3 mM) to 13 (6 mM). Similar results are obtained at 37 degrees C. We conclude that the physico-chemical description of heterogeneous nucleation warrants refinements in order to capture the whole HbS polymerization process.

  16. An implantable seal-less centrifugal pump with integrated double-disk motor.

    PubMed

    Schima, H; Schmallegger, H; Huber, L; Birgmann, I; Reindl, C; Schmidt, C; Roschal, K; Wieselthaler, G; Trubel, W; Losert, U

    1995-07-01

    Thrombus formation and sealing problems at the shaft as well as the compact and efficient design of the driving unit have been major difficulties in the construction of a long-term implantable centrifugal pump. To eliminate the problems of the seal, motor size, and efficiency, two major steps were taken by modifying the Vienna implantable centrifugal pump. First, a special driving unit was developed, in which the permanent magnets of the motor themselves are used for coupling the force into the rotor. Second, the rotor shaft in the pumping chamber was eliminated by adopting a concept recently presented by Ohara. The rotor is supported by 3 pins, which run on a carbon disk, whose concave shape leads to stabilization. The device has the following specifications: size: 65 mm (diameter) by 35 mm (height), 101 cm3; priming volume 30 cm3, 240 g; and a 6-pole brushless double disk DC motor. The required input power of the described prototype is 15 W at 150 mm Hg, 5 L/min (overall eta = 11%), and has an in vitro index of hemolysis (IH) of 0.0046 g/100 L. The test for in vitro thrombus growth exhibited far less thrombus formation in the new design than in designs with axles. In conclusion, the design of a special driving unit and the elimination of the axle led to the construction of a small pump with very low blood traumatization.

  17. Chromosomal Integrity after UV Irradiation Requires FANCD2-Mediated Repair of Double Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Federico, María Belén; Vallerga, María Belén; Radl, Analía; Paviolo, Natalia Soledad; Bocco, José Luis; Di Giorgio, Marina; Soria, Gastón; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to inter-strand crosslinks (ICLs). FANCD2, a central factor of the FA pathway, is essential for the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) generated during fork collapse at ICLs. While lesions different from ICLs can also trigger fork collapse, the contribution of FANCD2 to the resolution of replication-coupled DSBs generated independently from ICLs is unknown. Intriguingly, FANCD2 is readily activated after UV irradiation, a DNA-damaging agent that generates predominantly intra-strand crosslinks but not ICLs. Hence, UV irradiation is an ideal tool to explore the contribution of FANCD2 to the DNA damage response triggered by DNA lesions other than ICL repair. Here we show that, in contrast to ICL-causing agents, UV radiation compromises cell survival independently from FANCD2. In agreement, FANCD2 depletion does not increase the amount of DSBs generated during the replication of UV-damaged DNA and is dispensable for UV-induced checkpoint activation. Remarkably however, FANCD2 protects UV-dependent, replication-coupled DSBs from aberrant processing by non-homologous end joining, preventing the accumulation of micronuclei and chromatid aberrations including non-homologous chromatid exchanges. Hence, while dispensable for cell survival, FANCD2 selectively safeguards chromosomal stability after UV-triggered replication stress.

  18. Chromosomal Integrity after UV Irradiation Requires FANCD2-Mediated Repair of Double Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Federico, María Belén; Vallerga, María Belén; Radl, Analía; Paviolo, Natalia Soledad; Bocco, José Luis; Di Giorgio, Marina; Soria, Gastón; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to inter-strand crosslinks (ICLs). FANCD2, a central factor of the FA pathway, is essential for the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) generated during fork collapse at ICLs. While lesions different from ICLs can also trigger fork collapse, the contribution of FANCD2 to the resolution of replication-coupled DSBs generated independently from ICLs is unknown. Intriguingly, FANCD2 is readily activated after UV irradiation, a DNA-damaging agent that generates predominantly intra-strand crosslinks but not ICLs. Hence, UV irradiation is an ideal tool to explore the contribution of FANCD2 to the DNA damage response triggered by DNA lesions other than ICL repair. Here we show that, in contrast to ICL-causing agents, UV radiation compromises cell survival independently from FANCD2. In agreement, FANCD2 depletion does not increase the amount of DSBs generated during the replication of UV-damaged DNA and is dispensable for UV-induced checkpoint activation. Remarkably however, FANCD2 protects UV-dependent, replication-coupled DSBs from aberrant processing by non-homologous end joining, preventing the accumulation of micronuclei and chromatid aberrations including non-homologous chromatid exchanges. Hence, while dispensable for cell survival, FANCD2 selectively safeguards chromosomal stability after UV-triggered replication stress. PMID:26765540

  19. Characterizing the Long-Term Variability of X-ray Binary 4U1705-44Evidence for an Underlying Double-Welled Nonlinear Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillipson-Nichols, Rebecca A.; Boyd, Patricia T.; Smale, Alan P.

    2015-01-01

    4U 1705-44 is a bright low mass x-ray binary (LMXB) containing a neutron star and a close, low mass companion. The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) All-Sky Monitor obtained approximately 14 years of daily monitoring on 4U 1705-44 in the 2-20 keV energy range. Understanding the x-ray variability of 4U1705-44 is critical to the study of all low mass x-ray binaries because they share many of the same global characteristics in their high-amplitude transitions and non-periodic variability. After comparing the longterm light curve and phase space trajectories of 4U1705-44 to various nonlinear oscillators, the Duffing Oscillator was revealed to be a strong candidate to describe these systems. The parameters of the Duffing equation were optimized and six solutions sharing the same characteristics as 4U1705-44 were found. Striking commonalities were revealed via a phase-space analysis of both 4U1705-44 and the six Duffing solutions: the low-order driving period is no less than 87 days and spans up to 180 days, which is seenand highlighted in the power spectra, zero-crossings and close returns analysis of4U1705-44. Furthermore, the driving frequency of all six Duffing solutions tend toconverge to a range of 3.6 - 4.5, corresponding to driving periods in the range from 130 to 175 days, in agreement with that found in 4U1705-44. Nonlinear analysis methods such as close returns and zero-crossings of the Duffing solutions also show the same trends. This strongly suggests that 4U1705-44 shares the same topological characteristics as the Duffing equation. With further analysis, we hope to develop a model to explain why 4U1705-44 shares the unique topology of the Duffing Oscillator specifically, rather than those of other families of nonlinear differential equations.

  20. Integration of III-V materials and Si-CMOS through double layer transfer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kwang Hong; Bao, Shuyu; Fitzgerald, Eugene; Tan, Chuan Seng

    2015-03-01

    A method to integrate III-V compound semiconductor and SOI-CMOS on a common Si substrate is demonstrated. The SOI-CMOS layer is temporarily bonded on a Si handle wafer. Another III-V/Si substrate is then bonded to the SOI-CMOS containing handle wafer. Finally, the handle wafer is released to realize the SOI-CMOS on III-V/Si hybrid structure on a common substrate. Through this method, high temperature III-V materials growth can be completed without the presence of the temperature sensitive CMOS layer, hence damage to the CMOS layer is avoided.

  1. Integrated Solar Disk Oscillation Measurements Using the Magneto-Optical Filter: Tests with a Two Station Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cacciani, Alessandro; Rosati, P.; Ricci, D.; Marquedant, R.; Smith, E.

    1988-01-01

    The magneto-optical filter (MOF) was used to get high and intermediate l-modes of solar oscillations. For very low l-modes the imaging capability of the MOF is still attractive since it allows a pixel by pixel intensity normalization. However, a crude attempt to get very low l power spectra from Dopplergrams obtained at Mt. Wilson gave noisy results. This means that a careful analysis of all the factors potentially affecting high resolution Dopplergrams should be accomplished. In order to better investigate this problem, a nonimaging channel using the lock-in amplifier technique was considered. Two systems are now operational, one at JPL and the other at University of Rome. Observations in progress are used to discuss the MOF stability, the noise level, and the possible application in asteroseismology.

  2. Integrated Solar Disk Oscillation Measurements Using the Magneto-Optical Filter: Tests with a Two Station Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cacciani, Alessandro; Rosati, P.; Ricci, D.; Marquedant, R.; Smith, E.

    1988-01-01

    The magneto-optical filter (MOF) was used to get high and intermediate l-modes of solar oscillations. For very low l-modes the imaging capability of the MOF is still attractive since it allows a pixel by pixel intensity normalization. However, a crude attempt to get very low l power spectra from Dopplergrams obtained at Mt. Wilson gave noisy results. This means that a careful analysis of all the factors potentially affecting high resolution Dopplergrams should be accomplished. In order to better investigate this problem, a nonimaging channel using the lock-in amplifier technique was considered. Two systems are now operational, one at JPL and the other at University of Rome. Observations in progress are used to discuss the MOF stability, the noise level, and the possible application in asteroseismology.

  3. Relaxation dynamics of ultracold bosons in a double-well potential: Thermalization and prethermalization in a nearly integrable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosme, Jayson G.

    2015-09-01

    We numerically investigate the relaxation dynamics in an isolated quantum system of interacting bosons trapped in a double-well potential after an integrability breaking quench. Using the statistics of the spectrum, we identify the postquench Hamiltonian as nonchaotic and close to integrability over a wide range of interaction parameters. We demonstrate that the system exhibits thermalization in the context of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH). We also explore the possibility of an initial state to delocalize with respect to the eigenstates of the postquench Hamiltonian even for energies away from the middle of the spectrum. We observe distinct regimes of equilibration process depending on the initial energy. For low energies, the system rapidly relaxes in a single step to a thermal state. As the energy increases towards the middle of the spectrum, the relaxation dynamics exhibits prethermalization and the lifetime of the metastable states grows. Time evolution of the occupation numbers and the von Neumann entropy in the mode-partitioned system underpins the analyses of the relaxation dynamics.

  4. Updates in the Global/Regional Integrated Model system (GRIMs)-Double Fourier Series (DFS) Dynamical Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, M. S.; Park, H.; Park, S. H.; Hong, S. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Global/Regional Integrated Model system (GRIMs)-double Fourier series (DFS) spectral dynamical core has been developed to overcome the limitation of traditional spectral model using spherical harmonics in terms of computational cost at very high resolution. Recently, the GRIMs-DFS dynamical core was updated in two respects: (1) better scalability on high-performance computing platform; and (2) reduction of numerical time-stepping error. To improve the parallel efficiency, the archived wave domain was designed not to be sliced in the meridional direction, but to be decomposed in the horizontal and vertical directions. Although the computational cost slightly increased due to the requirement of temporary work array, the revised DFS dynamical core yielded higher scalability in terms of the wall-clock-time than the original one. In addition, its efficiency gain became greater with the increase of horizontal resolution when the number of processors is increased. The Robert-Asselin-Williams (RAW) time filter has been proposed as a simple improvement to the widely used Robert-Asselin filter, in order to reduce time-stepping errors in semi-implicit leapfrog integration. This new approach was implemented into the GRIMs-DFS dynamical core and its impact was quantitatively evaluated on medium-range forecast and seasonal ensemble prediction frameworks. Preliminary results showed that the RAW time-filter properly reduced spurious light rainfalls that might be produced from unphysical computational mode generated by leap-frog time stepping. Further details will be presented in the conference.

  5. Integrated Ternary Bioinspired Nanocomposites via Synergistic Toughening of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shanshan; Cui, Wei; Zhang, Qi; Cao, Anyuan; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Qunfeng

    2015-12-22

    With its synergistic toughening effect and hierarchical micro/nanoscale structure, natural nacre sets a "gold standard" for nacre-inspired materials with integrated high strength and toughness. We demonstrated strong and tough ternary bioinspired nanocomposites through synergistic toughening of reduced graphene oxide and double-walled carbon nanotube (DWNT) and covalent bonding. The tensile strength and toughness of this kind of ternary bioinspired nanocomposites reaches 374.1 ± 22.8 MPa and 9.2 ± 0.8 MJ/m(3), which is 2.6 and 3.3 times that of pure reduced graphene oxide film, respectively. Furthermore, this ternary bioinspired nanocomposite has a high conductivity of 394.0 ± 6.8 S/cm and also shows excellent fatigue-resistant properties, which may enable this material to be used in aerospace, flexible energy devices, and artificial muscle. The synergistic building blocks with covalent bonding for constructing ternary bioinspired nanocomposites can serve as the basis of a strategy for the construction of integrated, high-performance, reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-based nanocomposites in the future.

  6. Voltage-Controlled Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Integrated Component Systems, Inc. incorporated information from a NASA Tech Briefs article into a voltage-controlled oscillator it designed for a customer. The company then applied the technology to its series of phase-locked loop synthesizers, which offer superior phase noise performance.

  7. Double-Stranded Linear Duck Hepatitis B Virus (DHBV) Stably Integrates at a Higher Frequency than Wild-Type DHBV in LMH Chicken Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Shih S.; Jensen, Anne D.; Chang, C. J.; Rogler, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    Integration of hepadnavirus DNAs into host chromosomes can have oncogenic consequences. Analysis of host-viral DNA junctions of DHBV identified the terminally duplicated r region of the viral genome as a hotspot for integration. Since the r region is present on the 5′ and 3′ ends of double-stranded linear (DSL) hepadnavirus DNAs, these molecules have been implicated as integration precursors. We have produced a LMH chicken hepatoma cell line (LMH 66-1 DSL) which replicates exclusively DSL duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) DNA. To test whether linear DHBV DNAs integrate more frequently than the wild type open circular DHBV DNAs, we have characterized the integration frequency in LMH 66-1 DSL cells by using a subcloning approach. This approach revealed that 83% of the LMH 66-1 DSL subclones contained new integrations, compared to only 16% of subclones from LMH-D2 cells replicating wild-type open circular DHBV DNA. Also, a higher percentage of the LMH 66-1 DSL subclones contained two or more new integrations. Mathematical analysis suggests that the DSL DHBV DNAs integrated stably once every three generations during subcloning whereas wild-type DHBV integrated only once every four to five generations. Cloning and sequencing of new integrations confirmed the r region as a preferred integration site for linear DHBV DNA molecules. One DHBV integrant was associated with a small deletion of chromosomal DNA, and another DHBV integrant occurred in a telomeric repeat sequence. PMID:9882355

  8. Retained functional integrity of bull spermatozoa after double freezing and thawing using PureSperm density gradient centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, W M C; Parrilla, I; Caballero, I; Garcia, E; Roca, J; Martinez, E A; Vazquez, J M; Rath, D

    2007-10-01

    The main aim of this study was to compare the motility and functional integrity of bull spermatozoa after single and double freezing and thawing. The viability and morphological integrity of spermatozoa selected by PureSperm density gradient centrifugation after cryopreservation of bovine semen in two commercial extenders (Experiment 1) and the function of bull spermatozoa before and after a second freezing and thawing assisted by PureSperm selection (Experiment 2) were examined. On average, 35.8 +/- 12.1% of sperm loaded onto the PureSperm density gradient were recovered after centrifugation. In Experiment 1, post-thaw motility and acrosome integrity were higher for spermatozoa frozen in Tris-egg yolk extender than in AndroMed, whether the assessments were made immediately after thawing [80.4 +/- 12.7 vs 47.6 +/- 19.0% motile and 78.8 +/- 8.3 vs 50.1 +/- 19.5% normal apical ridge (NAR), p < 0.05] or after preparation on the gradient (83.3 +/- 8.6 vs 69.4 +/- 15.9% motile and 89.5 +/- 7.2 vs 69.1 +/- 11.4% NAR, p < 0.05). For semen frozen in Tris-egg yolk extender, selection on the PureSperm gradient did not influence total motility but significantly improved the proportion of acrosome-intact spermatozoa. After the gradient, both the total motility and percentage of normal acrosomes increased for spermatozoa frozen in AndroMed (Minitüb Tiefenbach, Germany). In Experiment 2, there was no difference in sperm motility after the first and second freeze-thawing (82.9 +/- 12.7 vs 68.8 +/- 18.7%). However, the proportion of acrosome-intact spermatozoa was significantly improved by selection through the PureSperm gradient, whether measured by phase contrast microscopy (78.9 +/- 9.7 vs 90.4 +/- 4.0% NAR, p < 0.05) or flow cytometry (53.4 +/- 11.7 vs 76.3 +/- 6.0% viable acrosome-intact spermatozoa, p < 0.001). The improvement in the percentage of spermatozoa with normal acrosomes was maintained after resuspension in the cooling extender and cooling to 4 degrees C (88

  9. An integral topical gel for cellulite reduction: results from a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled evaluation of efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Eric; Journet, Michel; Oula, Marie-Laure; Gomez, Juan; Léveillé, Claude; Loing, Estelle; Bilodeau, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Background Cellulite is a serious cosmetic concern for most of the 90% of women affected by it. Objective To assess the clinical efficacy of a complex integral anti-cellulite gel. Methods This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study involved 44 healthy women, aged 25–55 years. Subjects had a normal to slightly overweight body mass index and presented slight to moderate cellulite on their thighs, buttocks, and/or hips at baseline. Subjects were randomly assigned to either the treated or placebo group and accordingly applied the active product or placebo on their hips, stomach, buttocks, and thighs, twice daily for 3 months. Skin tonicity, orange-peel aspect, and stubborn cellulite were assessed at day 0, 28, 56, and 84. A self-evaluation questionnaire was completed by all volunteers. Results At the end of the study, an average of 81% of the subjects applying the active product presented improvement in their cellulite condition versus 32% for the placebo group (all descriptors and sites combined). At day 84, skin tonicity, orange-peel appearance, and stubborn cellulite were improved in a significant manner (P<0.05) over placebo, on all studied areas. Skin tonicity improved on average by +41% for buttocks, +35% for hips, and +31% for thighs. Orange peel appearance was reduced on average by −25% for buttocks, −22% for hips, and −22% for thighs. Stubborn cellulite was reduced on average by −19% for buttocks, −24% for hips, and −22% for thighs. Circumference measurements decreased in a significant manner (P<0.05) over placebo, for the abdomen (average value of −1.1 cm) and thighs (average value of −0.8 cm). The product was well tolerated and perceived by the volunteers themselves as better performing than placebo on all criteria. Conclusion All results validate the efficacy of the present integral formulation to significantly reduce signs of cellulite and reshape the silhouette. PMID:24600240

  10. An integral topical gel for cellulite reduction: results from a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled evaluation of efficacy.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Eric; Journet, Michel; Oula, Marie-Laure; Gomez, Juan; Léveillé, Claude; Loing, Estelle; Bilodeau, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Cellulite is a serious cosmetic concern for most of the 90% of women affected by it. To assess the clinical efficacy of a complex integral anti-cellulite gel. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study involved 44 healthy women, aged 25-55 years. Subjects had a normal to slightly overweight body mass index and presented slight to moderate cellulite on their thighs, buttocks, and/or hips at baseline. Subjects were randomly assigned to either the treated or placebo group and accordingly applied the active product or placebo on their hips, stomach, buttocks, and thighs, twice daily for 3 months. Skin tonicity, orange-peel aspect, and stubborn cellulite were assessed at day 0, 28, 56, and 84. A self-evaluation questionnaire was completed by all volunteers. At the end of the study, an average of 81% of the subjects applying the active product presented improvement in their cellulite condition versus 32% for the placebo group (all descriptors and sites combined). At day 84, skin tonicity, orange-peel appearance, and stubborn cellulite were improved in a significant manner (P<0.05) over placebo, on all studied areas. Skin tonicity improved on average by +41% for buttocks, +35% for hips, and +31% for thighs. Orange peel appearance was reduced on average by -25% for buttocks, -22% for hips, and -22% for thighs. Stubborn cellulite was reduced on average by -19% for buttocks, -24% for hips, and -22% for thighs. Circumference measurements decreased in a significant manner (P<0.05) over placebo, for the abdomen (average value of -1.1 cm) and thighs (average value of -0.8 cm). The product was well tolerated and perceived by the volunteers themselves as better performing than placebo on all criteria. All results validate the efficacy of the present integral formulation to significantly reduce signs of cellulite and reshape the silhouette.

  11. No double-dissociation between optic ataxia and visual agnosia: multiple sub-streams for multiple visuo-manual integrations.

    PubMed

    Pisella, L; Binkofski, F; Lasek, K; Toni, I; Rossetti, Y

    2006-01-01

    The current dominant view of the visual system is marked by the functional and anatomical dissociation between a ventral stream specialised for perception and a dorsal stream specialised for action. The "double-dissociation" between visual agnosia (VA), a deficit of visual recognition, and optic ataxia (OA), a deficit of visuo-manual guidance, considered as consecutive to ventral and dorsal damage, respectively, has provided the main argument for this dichotomic view. In the first part of this paper, we show that the currently available empirical data do not suffice to support a double-dissociation between OA and VA. In the second part, we review evidence coming from human neuropsychology and monkey data, which cast further doubts on the validity of a simple double-dissociation between perception and action because they argue for a far more complex organisation with multiple parallel visual-to-motor connections: 1. A dorso-dorsal pathway (involving the most dorsal part of the parietal and pre-motor cortices): for immediate visuo-motor control--with OA as typical disturbance. The latest research about OA is reviewed, showing how these patients exhibit deficits restricted to the most direct and fast visuo-motor transformations. We also propose that mild mirror ataxia, consisting of misreaching errors when the controlesional hand is guided to a visual goal though a mirror, could correspond to OA with an isolated "hand effect". 2. A ventral stream-prefrontal pathway (connections from the ventral visual stream to pre-frontal areas, by-passing the parietal areas): for "mediate" control (involving spatial or temporal transpositions [Rossetti, Y., & Pisella, L. (2003). Mediate responses as direct evidence for intention: Neuropsychology of Not to-, Not now- and Not there-tasks. In S. Johnson (Ed.), Cognitive Neuroscience perspectives on the problem of intentional action (pp. 67-105). MIT Press.])--with VA as typical disturbance. Preserved visuo-manual guidance in patients

  12. [The Research on Measurement System and Method of Tissue Optical Parameters with Wide Spectra Based on Double-Integrating-Spheres].

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Li, Chen-xi; Sun, Cheng-tao; Jiang, Jing-ying; Zhao, Hui-juan; Xu, Ke-xin

    2016-02-01

    The measurement of tissue optical parameters is the focusing research content of Biomedical Photonics. The optical properties of human tissue are closely related to the physiological and pathological state. In recent years, the tissue imaging diagnosis and non-invasive detection of componentsbecome the hot research topics, applying the tissue optical properties especially the absorption and scattering properties. These provide the basis for the study of optical imaging and the spectrum detection of body composition etc. The Double-Integrating-Spheres (DIS) method can measure the absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and so on in vitro tissuesimultaneously. It has the advantages of accurate, rapid, large applicable scope. The method applya standard method for measuring the optical parameters. This paper build the wide spectrum measurement system of optical parameters based on DIS and super continuum lasers. Then we analyze the transfer function, error sources and the best measuring conditions of the system. Finally we establish the correction forward model based on BP-MCML and the inverse algorithm of the optical parameters based on L-M algorithm. The optical parameters of intralipid solution in the wavelength range of 1,100~1,400 nm are measured. The experiment results show that the improved inverse algorithm is accurate. The multiple measurements standard deviation is within 3%. Compared the results of scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient at different wavelengths to the results of other research groups, the deviation is less than 3.4%.

  13. On the Kernel function of the integral equation relating the lift and downwash distributions of oscillating finite wings in subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Charles E; Runyan, Harry L; Woolston, Donald S

    1955-01-01

    This report treats the Kernel function of an integral equation that relates a known prescribed downwash distribution to an unknown lift distribution for a harmonically oscillating finite wing in compressible subsonic flow. The Kernel function is reduced to a form that can be accurately evaluated by separating the Kernel function into two parts: a part in which the singularities are isolated and analytically expressed and a nonsingular part which may be tabulated. The form of the Kernel function for the sonic case (Mach number 1) is treated separately. In addition, results for the special cases of Mach number of 0 (incompressible case) and frequency of 0 (steady case) are given. The derivation of the integral equation which involves this Kernel function is reproduced as an appendix. Another appendix gives the reduction of the form of the Kernel function obtained herein for the three-dimensional case to a known result of Possio for two-dimensional flow. A third appendix contains some remarks on the evaluation of the Kernel function, and a fourth appendix presents an alternate form of expression for the Kernel function.

  14. Squeezed states of damped oscillator chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1993-01-01

    The Caldirola-Kanai model of one-dimensional damped oscillator is extended to the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping. The correlated and squeezed states for the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping are constructed. Based on the concept of the integrals of motion, it is demonstrated how squeezing phenomenon arises due to parametric excitation.

  15. Power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2001-01-01

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  16. Raindrop oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, K. V.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the change in shape of a raindrop is presented. Raindrops measured by two orthogonal cameras were classified by shape and orientation to determine the nature of the oscillation. A physical model based on potential energy was then developed to study the amplitude variation of oscillating drops. The model results show that oscillations occur about the equilibrium axis ratio, but the time average axis ratio if significantly more spherical for large amplitudes because of asymmetry in the surface potential energy. A generalization of the model to oscillations produced by turbulence yields average axis ratios that are consistent with the camera measurements. The model results for average axis ratios were applied to rainfall studies with a dual polarized radar.

  17. Computer-assisted and robot-assisted technologies to improve bone-cutting accuracy when integrated with a freehand process using an oscillating saw.

    PubMed

    Cartiaux, Olivier; Paul, Laurent; Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Raucent, Benoît; Dombre, Etienne; Banse, Xavier

    2010-09-01

    In orthopaedic surgery, many interventions involve freehand bone cutting with an oscillating saw. Such freehand procedures can produce large cutting errors due to the complex hand-controlled positioning of the surgical tool. This study was performed to investigate the potential improvements in cutting accuracy when computer-assisted and robot-assisted technologies are applied to a freehand bone-cutting process when no jigs are available. We designed an experiment based on a geometrical model of the cutting process with use of a simulated bone of rectangular geometry. The target planes were defined by three variables: a cut height (t) and two orientation angles (beta and gamma). A series of 156 cuts were performed by six operators employing three technologically different procedures: freehand, navigated freehand, and robot-assisted cutting. After cutting, we measured the error in the height t, the absolute error in the angles beta and gamma, the flatness, and the location of the cut plane with respect to the target plane. The location of the cut plane averaged 2.8 mm after use of the navigated freehand process compared with 5.2 mm after use of the freehand process (p < 0.0001). Further improvements were obtained with use of the robot-assisted process, which provided an average location of 1.7 mm (p < 0.0001). Significant improvements in cutting accuracy can be achieved when a navigation system or an industrial robot is integrated into a freehand bone-cutting process when no jigs are available. The procedure for navigated hand-controlled positioning of the oscillating saw appears to be easy to learn and use.

  18. Galactic oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, B. F.

    1994-01-01

    A stable galaxy, if excited above its ground state, oscillates about that ground state. If it is resonably robust, it can support oscillations of large amplitude. Normal mode oscillations, with surprisingly large amplitudes, have been seen in numerical experiments. Observational evidence shows that real galaxies also oscillate. Galaxies ring like a bell in the experiments, and ringing continues undamped long after initial transients have died out. Their total kinetic energy oscillates with an amplitude as large as 10% of the mean. A fundamental mode dominates. It is homologous expansion/contraction of the entire galaxy (no nodes). Inward or outward velocities due to this mode are sufficiently large in the outer reaches of a galaxy to account for kinematic warps in observed velocity fields. A second spherically symmetrical mode has one node and is important near the center of the galaxy. It may be the driving force behind bulges in spiral galaxies. Two other normal modes have been identified as well. This appears to be the first experimental demonstration of normal mode oscillations within stable galaxy models.

  19. Monolithic Millimeter Wave Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan-Lei

    There is an increasing interest in the millimeter -wave spectrum for use in communications and for military and scientific applications. The concept of monolithic integration aims to produce very-high-frequency circuits in a more reliable, reproducible way than conventional electronics, and also at lower cost, with smaller size and lighter weight. In this thesis, a negative resistance device is integrated monolithically with a resonator to produce an effective oscillator. This work fills the void resulting from the exclusion of the local oscillator from the monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMMIC) receiver design. For convenience a microwave frequency model was used to design the resonator circuit. A 5 GHz hybrid oscillator was first fabricated to test the design; the necessary GaAs process technology was developed for the fabrication. Negative resistance devices and oscillator theory were studied, and a simple but practical model of the Gunn diode was devised to solve the impedance matching problem. Monolithic oscillators at the Ka band (35 GHz) were built and refined. All devices operated in CW mode. By means of an electric-field probe, the output power was coupled into a metallic waveguide for measurement purposes. The best result was 3.63 mW of power output, the highest efficiency was 0.43% and the frequency stability was better than 10-4. In the future, an IMPATT diode could replace the Gunn device to give much higher power and efficiency. A varactor-tuned circuit also suitable for large-scale integration is under study.

  20. A charge-density-wave oscillator based on an integrated tantalum disulfide-boron nitride-graphene device operating at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanxiong; Debnath, Bishwajit; Pope, Timothy R; Salguero, Tina T; Lake, Roger K; Balandin, Alexander A

    2016-10-01

    The charge-density-wave (CDW) phase is a macroscopic quantum state consisting of a periodic modulation of the electronic charge density accompanied by a periodic distortion of the atomic lattice in quasi-1D or layered 2D metallic crystals. Several layered transition metal dichalcogenides, including 1T-TaSe2, 1T-TaS2 and 1T-TiSe2 exhibit unusually high transition temperatures to different CDW symmetry-reducing phases. These transitions can be affected by the environmental conditions, film thickness and applied electric bias. However, device applications of these intriguing systems at room temperature or their integration with other 2D materials have not been explored. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature current switching driven by a voltage-controlled phase transition between CDW states in films of 1T-TaS2 less than 10 nm thick. We exploit the transition between the nearly commensurate and the incommensurate CDW phases, which has a transition temperature of 350 K and gives an abrupt change in current accompanied by hysteresis. An integrated graphene transistor provides a voltage-tunable, matched, low-resistance load enabling precise voltage control of the circuit. The 1T-TaS2 film is capped with hexagonal boron nitride to provide protection from oxidation. The integration of these three disparate 2D materials in a way that exploits the unique properties of each yields a simple, miniaturized, voltage-controlled oscillator suitable for a variety of practical applications.

  1. A charge-density-wave oscillator based on an integrated tantalum disulfide-boron nitride-graphene device operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guanxiong; Debnath, Bishwajit; Pope, Timothy R.; Salguero, Tina T.; Lake, Roger K.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2016-10-01

    The charge-density-wave (CDW) phase is a macroscopic quantum state consisting of a periodic modulation of the electronic charge density accompanied by a periodic distortion of the atomic lattice in quasi-1D or layered 2D metallic crystals. Several layered transition metal dichalcogenides, including 1T-TaSe2, 1T-TaS2 and 1T-TiSe2 exhibit unusually high transition temperatures to different CDW symmetry-reducing phases. These transitions can be affected by the environmental conditions, film thickness and applied electric bias. However, device applications of these intriguing systems at room temperature or their integration with other 2D materials have not been explored. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature current switching driven by a voltage-controlled phase transition between CDW states in films of 1T-TaS2 less than 10 nm thick. We exploit the transition between the nearly commensurate and the incommensurate CDW phases, which has a transition temperature of 350 K and gives an abrupt change in current accompanied by hysteresis. An integrated graphene transistor provides a voltage-tunable, matched, low-resistance load enabling precise voltage control of the circuit. The 1T-TaS2 film is capped with hexagonal boron nitride to provide protection from oxidation. The integration of these three disparate 2D materials in a way that exploits the unique properties of each yields a simple, miniaturized, voltage-controlled oscillator suitable for a variety of practical applications.

  2. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Double-probe measurements from BOSS galaxy clustering and Planck data – towards an analysis without informative priors

    DOE PAGES

    Pellejero-Ibanez, Marco; Chuang, Chia -Hsun; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; ...

    2016-03-28

    Here, we develop a new methodology called double-probe analysis with the aim of minimizing informative priors in the estimation of cosmological parameters. We extract the dark-energy-model-independent cosmological constraints from the joint data sets of Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) galaxy sample and Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurement. We measure the mean values and covariance matrix of {R, la, Ωbh2, ns, log(As), Ωk, H(z), DA(z), f(z)σ8(z)}, which give an efficient summary of Planck data and 2-point statistics from BOSS galaxy sample, where R = √ΩmH20, and la = πr(z*)/rs(z*), z* is the redshift at the last scattering surface, and r(z*)more » and rs(z*) denote our comoving distance to z* and sound horizon at z* respectively. The advantage of this method is that we do not need to put informative priors on the cosmological parameters that galaxy clustering is not able to constrain well, i.e. Ωbh2 and ns. Using our double-probe results, we obtain Ωm = 0.304 ± 0.009, H0 = 68.2 ± 0.7, and σ8 = 0.806 ± 0.014 assuming ΛCDM; and Ωk = 0.002 ± 0.003 and w = –1.00 ± 0.07 assuming owCDM. The results show no tension with the flat ΛCDM cosmological paradigm. By comparing with the full-likelihood analyses with fixed dark energy models, we demonstrate that the double-probe method provides robust cosmological parameter constraints which can be conveniently used to study dark energy models. We extend our study to measure the sum of neutrino mass and obtain Σmν < 0.10/0.22 (68%/95%) assuming ΛCDM and Σmν < 0.26/0.52 (68%/95%) assuming wCDM. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering dataset from BOSS.« less

  3. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Double-probe measurements from BOSS galaxy clustering and Planck data – towards an analysis without informative priors

    SciTech Connect

    Pellejero-Ibanez, Marco; Chuang, Chia -Hsun; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gongbo; Ashley J. Ross; Rodriquez-Torres, Sergio; Prada, Francisco; Slosar, Anze; Vazquez, Jose A.; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Martin, Hector; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco -Shu; Percival, Will J.; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Sapathy, Siddharth; Seo, Hee -Jong; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Brownstein, Joel R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.

    2016-03-28

    Here, we develop a new methodology called double-probe analysis with the aim of minimizing informative priors in the estimation of cosmological parameters. We extract the dark-energy-model-independent cosmological constraints from the joint data sets of Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) galaxy sample and Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurement. We measure the mean values and covariance matrix of {R, la, Ωbh2, ns, log(As), Ωk, H(z), DA(z), f(z)σ8(z)}, which give an efficient summary of Planck data and 2-point statistics from BOSS galaxy sample, where R = √ΩmH20, and la = πr(z*)/rs(z*), z* is the redshift at the last scattering surface, and r(z*) and rs(z*) denote our comoving distance to z* and sound horizon at z* respectively. The advantage of this method is that we do not need to put informative priors on the cosmological parameters that galaxy clustering is not able to constrain well, i.e. Ωbh2 and ns. Using our double-probe results, we obtain Ωm = 0.304 ± 0.009, H0 = 68.2 ± 0.7, and σ8 = 0.806 ± 0.014 assuming ΛCDM; and Ωk = 0.002 ± 0.003 and w = –1.00 ± 0.07 assuming owCDM. The results show no tension with the flat ΛCDM cosmological paradigm. By comparing with the full-likelihood analyses with fixed dark energy models, we demonstrate that the double-probe method provides robust cosmological parameter constraints which can be conveniently used to study dark energy models. We extend our study to measure the sum of neutrino mass and obtain Σmν < 0.10/0.22 (68%/95%) assuming ΛCDM and Σmν < 0.26/0.52 (68%/95%) assuming wCDM. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy

  4. On the theory of oscillating airfoils of finite span in subsonic compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reissner, Eric

    1950-01-01

    The problem of oscillating lifting surface of finite span in subsonic compressible flow is reduced to an integral equation. The kernel of the integral equation is approximated by a simpler expression, on the basis of the assumption of sufficiently large aspect ratio. With this approximation the double integral occurring in the formulation of the problem is reduced to two single integrals, one of which is taken over the chord and the other over the span of the lifting surface. On the basis of this reduction the three-dimensional problem appears separated into two two-dimensional problems, one of them being effectively the problem of two-dimensional flow and the other being the problem of spanwise circulation distribution. Earlier results concerning the oscillating lifting surface of finite span in incompressible flow are contained in the present more general results.

  5. MMIC Replacement for Gunn Diode Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, Thomas W.; Porterfield, David

    2011-01-01

    An all-solid-state replacement for high-frequency Gunn diode oscillators (GDOs) has been proposed for use in NASA s millimeter- and submillimeter-wave sensing instruments. Highly developed microwave oscillators are used to achieve a low-noise and highly stable reference signal in the 10-40-GHz band. Compact amplifiers and high-power frequency multipliers extend the signal to the 100-500-GHz band with minimal added phase noise and output power sufficient for NASA missions. This technology can achieve improved output power and frequency agility, while maintaining phase noise and stability comparable to other GDOs. Additional developments of the technology include: a frequency quadrupler to 145 GHz with 18 percent efficiency and 15 percent fixed tuned bandwidth; frequency doublers featuring 124, 240, and 480 GHz; an integrated 874-GHz subharmonic mixer with a mixer noise temperature of 3,000 K DSB (double sideband) and mixer conversion loss of 11.8 dB DSB; a high-efficiency frequency tripler design with peak output power of 23 mW and 14 mW, and efficiency of 16 and 13 percent, respectively; millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers to the 30-40 GHz band with high DC power efficiency; and an 874-GHz radiometer suitable for airborne observation with state-of-the-art sensitivity at room temperature and less than 5 W of total power consumption.

  6. Double-pulse 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar airborne validation for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurement.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Ismail, Syed

    2016-05-20

    Field experiments were conducted to test and evaluate the initial atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement capability of airborne, high-energy, double-pulsed, 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. This IPDA was designed, integrated, and operated at the NASA Langley Research Center on-board the NASA B-200 aircraft. The IPDA was tuned to the CO2 strong absorption line at 2050.9670 nm, which is the optimum for lower tropospheric weighted column measurements. Flights were conducted over land and ocean under different conditions. The first validation experiments of the IPDA for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing, focusing on low surface reflectivity oceanic surface returns during full day background conditions, are presented. In these experiments, the IPDA measurements were validated by comparison to airborne flask air-sampling measurements conducted by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. IPDA performance modeling was conducted to evaluate measurement sensitivity and bias errors. The IPDA signals and their variation with altitude compare well with predicted model results. In addition, off-off-line testing was conducted, with fixed instrument settings, to evaluate the IPDA systematic and random errors. Analysis shows an altitude-independent differential optical depth offset of 0.0769. Optical depth measurement uncertainty of 0.0918 compares well with the predicted value of 0.0761. IPDA CO2 column measurement compares well with model-driven, near-simultaneous air-sampling measurements from the NOAA aircraft at different altitudes. With a 10-s shot average, CO2 differential optical depth measurement of 1.0054±0.0103 was retrieved from a 6-km altitude and a 4-GHz on-line operation. As compared to CO2 weighted-average column dry-air volume mixing ratio of 404.08 ppm, derived from air sampling, IPDA measurement resulted in a value of 405.22±4.15  ppm with 1.02% uncertainty and

  7. Transient chaos in two coupled, dissipatively perturbed Hamiltonian Duffing oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabarathinam, S.; Thamilmaran, K.; Borkowski, L.; Perlikowski, P.; Brzeski, P.; Stefanski, A.; Kapitaniak, T.

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of two coupled, dissipatively perturbed, near-integrable Hamiltonian, double-well Duffing oscillators has been studied. We give numerical and experimental (circuit implementation) evidence that in the case of small positive or negative damping there exist two different types of transient chaos. After the decay of the transient chaos in the neighborhood of chaotic saddle we observe the transient chaos in the neighborhood of unstable tori. We argue that our results are robust and they exist in the wide range of system parameters.

  8. Americium-241 integral radiative capture cross section in over-moderated neutron spectrum from pile oscillator measurements in the Minerve reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geslot, Benoit; Gruel, Adrien; Ros, Paul; Blaise, Patrick; Leconte, Pierre; Noguere, Gilles; Mathieu, Ludovic; Villamarin, David; Becares, Vicente; Plompen, Arjan; Kopecky, Stefan; Schillebeeckx, Peter

    2017-09-01

    An experimental program, called AMSTRAMGRAM, was recently conducted in the Minerve low power reactor operated by CEA Cadarache within the frame of the CHANDA initiative (Solving CHAllenges in Nuclear Data). Its aim was to measure the integral capture cross section of 241Am in the thermal domain. Motivation of this work is driven by large differences in this actinide thermal point reported by major nuclear data libraries. The AMSTRAMGRAM experiment, that made use of well characterized EC-JRC americium samples, was based on the oscillation technique commonly implemented in the Minerve reactor. First results are presented and discussed in this article. A preliminary calculation scheme was used to compare measured and calculated results. It is shown that this work confirms a bias previously observed with JEFF-3.1.1 (C/E-1 = -10.5 ± 2%). On the opposite, the experiment is in close agreement with 241Am thermal point reported in JEFF-3.2 (C/E-1 = 0.5 ± 2%).

  9. Oscillators: Old and new perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.; Roy, Jyotirmoy

    2014-02-11

    We consider some of the well known oscillators in literature which are known to exhibit interesting effects of nonlinearity. We review the Lindstedt-Poincare technique for dealing with with the nonlinear effects and then go on to introduce the relevance of the renormalization group for the oscillator following the pioneering work of Chen et al. It is pointed out that the traditional Lindstedt-Poincare and the renormalization group techniques have operational connections. We use this to find an unexpected mode softening in the double pendulum. This mode softening prompted us to look for chaos in the double pendulum at low energies-energies that are just sufficient to allow the outer pendulum to rotate (the double pendulum is known to be chaotic at high energies-energies that are greater than that needed to make both pendulums to rotate). The emergence of the chaos is strongly dependent on initial conditions.

  10. Abnormalities of neuronal oscillations and temporal integration to low- and high-frequency auditory stimulation in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Jordan P; Gilmore, Casey S; Picchetti, Natalie A M; Sponheim, Scott R; Clementz, Brett A

    2011-05-15

    Electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography studies indicate among schizophrenia patients (SZ) abnormal, often reduced, entrained steady-state (aSSR) and transient (N100/M100) neural responses to auditory stimuli. We complement this literature by focusing analyses on auditory cortices, assessing a wide range of stimulation frequencies with long driving periods and evaluating relationships between aSSR and M100 reductions in SZ. Seventeen SZ and 17 healthy subjects (H) participated. Stimuli were 1500 msec binaural broadband noise sequences modulated at 5, 20, 40, 80, or 160 Hz. Magnetoencephalography data were collected and co-registered with structural magnetic resonance images. The aSSRs and M100s projected into brain space were analyzed as a function of hemisphere, stimulus density, and time. For aSSR, SZ displayed weaker entrainment bilaterally at low (5-Hz) and high (80-Hz) modulation frequencies. To 40-Hz stimuli, SZ showed weaker entrainment only in right auditory cortex. For M100, while responses for H increased linearly with stimulus density, this effect was weaker or absent in SZ. A principal components analysis of SZ deficits identified low (5-Hz entrainment and M100) and high (40- to 80-Hz entrainment) frequency components. Discriminant analysis indicated that the low-frequency component uniquely differentiated SZ from H. The high-frequency component correlated with negative symptoms among SZ. The SZ auditory cortices were unable to 1) generate healthy levels of theta and high gamma band (80-Hz) entrainment (aSSR), and 2) augment transient responses (M100s) to rapidly presented auditory information (an index of temporal integration). Only the latter was most apparent in left hemisphere and may reflect a prominent neurophysiological deficit in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Oscillating stagnation point flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.; Salwen, H.

    1982-01-01

    A solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is given for an incompressible stagnation point flow whose magnitude oscillates in time about a constant, non-zero, value (an unsteady Hiemenz flow). Analytic approximations to the solution in the low and high frequency limits are given and compared with the results of numerical integrations. The application of these results to one aspect of the boundary layer receptivity problem is also discussed.

  12. Oscillating stagnation point flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosch, C. E.; Salwen, H.

    1982-11-01

    A solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is given for an incompressible stagnation point flow whose magnitude oscillates in time about a constant, non-zero, value (an unsteady Hiemenz flow). Analytic approximations to the solution in the low and high frequency limits are given and compared with the results of numerical integrations. The application of these results to one aspect of the boundary layer receptivity problem is also discussed.

  13. Mapping of change in cerebral glucose utilization using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose double injection and the constrained weighted-integration method

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, K. |; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Yasuhara, Yoshifumi; Evans, A.C.; Gjedde, A.

    1996-12-01

    The authors developed a method for mapping the change in cerebral glucose utilization at two different physiological states using [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) double injection and the constrained weighted-integration method. They studied young normal subjects without (baseline-baseline group, n = 5) and with (baseline-stimulation group, n = 5) vibrotactile stimulation of the fingertips of the right hand. Dynamic scans were performed using positron emission tomography (PET) following an initial dose (the first session, 0--30 min) and an additional dose (the second session, 30--60 min). The parametric images of the net clearance of FDG from blood to brain (K*), unidirectional blood-to-brain clearance (K*{sub 1}) and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMR{sub glc}) of the two sessions were generated. The averaged subtraction (second minus first session) and t-statistic images were generated, which were rendered into Talairach`s sterotaxic coordinates and merged with the averaged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image. In the baseline-baseline group, regional K*, K*{sub 1}, and CMR{sub glc} in the first and second sessions were strongly correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.953, 0.935, and 0.951, respectively, n = 340). In the baseline-stimulation group, significant increases in these estimates were obtained in the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex (SI) (from 3.43 {+-} 0.78 to 4.02 {+-} 1.01 ml/100 g/min for K*, 7.85 {+-} 1.88 to 9.09 {+-} 1.71 ml/100 g/min for K*{sub 1}, and 28.0 {+-} 5.9 to 32.3 {+-} 5.5 {micro}mol/100 g/min for CMR{sub glc}), while there were no significant changes in the ipsilateral SI (from 3.45 {+-} 0.84 to 3.39 {+-} 0.72 ml/100 g/min for K*, 8.17 {+-} 2.33 to 8.37 {+-} 1.75 ml/100 g/min for K*{sub 1}, and 29.5 {+-} 8.1 to 29.1 {+-} 8.2 {micro}mol/100 g/min for CMR{sub glc}). Significant increases in K* and CMR{sub glc} in the contralateral SI were clearly demonstrated in the t-statistic image.

  14. Transition paths to stochastic oscillations of a self-excited oscillator with a ferrite resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I.S.; Pavlov, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    It is demonstrated experimentally that the transition to stochastic oscillations in a self-excited oscillator with ferrite resonator occurs through the complexification of the structure of self-modulation. All basic types of bifurcations are recorded: doubling, intermittency, hard onset of chaos, and critical behavior of strange attractors. Tripling of the self-modulation period was observed for special values of the parameters.

  15. Double-layer antireflection from silver nanoparticle integrated SiO2 layer on silicon wafer: effect of nanoparticle morphology and SiO2 film thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Piyush K.; Sharma, R. P.; Komarala, Vamsi K.

    2017-01-01

    Optical properties of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on SiO2 thin films of variable thickness, as a plasmonic double layer on a plain silicon wafer, are investigated for broadband antireflection. The light confinement into the silicon is found to be sensitive to the SiO2 film thickness of a few nanometers due to an evanescent character of the Ag NPs’ near-fields. The Ag NPs’ size anisotropy plays a pivotal role in incident light coupling due to the sub-wavelength spatial variation of near-fields at the interface, which leads to reflectance spectrum oscillation behavior in the nanoparticles’ surface plasmon resonance and off-resonance regions. With an optimized SiO2/Ag NP double layer, the average reflectance in the 300-1200 nm spectral range is reduced to 14% in comparison to 42% in bare silicon, with a flat minimum reflectance of 3.5% in the 725-1020 nm spectral region. Finite difference time domain calculations are performed for spatial variation of near-fields and their angular distribution of far-fields at different inhomogeneous interfaces (where near-fields exist). The total reflectance from various configurations is simulated theoretically by considering the experimentally optimized physical parameters of the plasmonic double layer to support the observations. To verify the role of SiO2 surface topology apart from the nanoparticle morphology in plasmon near-field coupling, thermally grown SiO2 films are investigated along with the sputtered SiO2 thin films.

  16. Memcapacitor model and its application in a chaotic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guang-Yi, Wang; Bo-Zhen, Cai; Pei-Pei, Jin; Ti-Ling, Hu

    2016-01-01

    A memcapacitor is a new type of memory capacitor. Before the advent of practical memcapacitor, the prospective studies on its models and potential applications are of importance. For this purpose, we establish a mathematical memcapacitor model and a corresponding circuit model. As a potential application, based on the model, a memcapacitor oscillator is designed, with its basic dynamic characteristics analyzed theoretically and experimentally. Some circuit variables such as charge, flux, and integral of charge, which are difficult to measure, are observed and measured via simulations and experiments. Analysis results show that besides the typical period-doubling bifurcations and period-3 windows, sustained chaos with constant Lyapunov exponents occurs. Moreover, this oscillator also exhibits abrupt chaos and some novel bifurcations. In addition, based on the digital signal processing (DSP) technology, a scheme of digitally realizing this memcapacitor oscillator is provided. Then the statistical properties of the chaotic sequences generated from the oscillator are tested by using the test suit of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The tested randomness definitely reaches the standards of NIST, and is better than that of the well-known Lorenz system. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61271064, 61401134, and 60971046), the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant Nos. LZ12F01001 and LQ14F010008), and the Program for Zhejiang Leading Team of S&T Innovation, China (Grant No. 2010R50010).

  17. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  18. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  19. STABILIZED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, P.L.; Price, H.J.

    1958-03-18

    This patent relates to sine-wave generators and in particular describes a generator with a novel feedback circuit resulting in improved frequency stability. The generator comprises two triodes having a common cathode circuit connected to oscillate at a frequency and amplitude at which the loop galn of the circutt ls unity, and another pair of triodes having a common cathode circuit arranged as a conventional amplifier. A signal is conducted from the osciliator through a frequency selective network to the amplifier and fed back to the osciliator. The unique feature of the feedback circuit is the amplifier operates in the nonlinear portion of its tube characteristics thereby providing a relatively constant feedback voltage to the oscillator irrespective of the amplitude of its input signal.

  20. FEL Oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2003-05-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. More than 30 FEL oscillators are presently operating around the world spanning a wavelength range from the mm region to the ultraviolet using DC and rf linear accelerators and storage rings as electron sources. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high micropulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. Substantial user programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few.

  1. Antiperiodic oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Freire, Joana G.; Cabeza, Cecilia; Marti, Arturo; Pöschel, Thorsten; Gallas, Jason A. C.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation of regular and irregular patterns in nonlinear oscillators is an outstanding problem in physics and in all natural sciences. In general, regularity is understood as tantamount to periodicity. However, there is now a flurry of works proving the existence of “antiperiodicity”, an unfamiliar type of regularity. Here we report the experimental observation and numerical corroboration of antiperiodic oscillations. In contrast to the isolated solutions presently known, we report infinite hierarchies of antiperiodic waveforms that can be tuned continuously and that form wide spiral-shaped stability phases in the control parameter plane. The waveform complexity increases towards the focal point common to all spirals, a key hub interconnecting them all. PMID:23739041

  2. Solar Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Oscillations were first detected in the solar photosphere in 1962 by Leighton and students. In 1970 it was calculated that these oscillations, with a period near five minutes, were the manifestations of acoustic waves trapped in the interior. The subsequent measurements of the frequencies of global oscillation modes from the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the waves made possible the refinement of solar interior models. Over the years, increased understanding of the nuclear reaction rates, the opacity, the equation of state, convection, and gravitational settling have resulted. Mass flows shift the frequencies of modes leading to very accurate measurements of the interior rotation as a function of radius and latitude. In recent years, analogues of terrestrial seismology have led to a tomography of the interior, including measurements of global north-south flows and flow and wave speed measurements below features such as sunspots. The future of helioseismology seems bright with the approval of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, to be launched in 2008.

  3. Review of observations relevant to solar oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.

    1982-01-01

    Recent solar oscillation observations and methods used are described. Integrated or almost integrated sunlight (Sun as a star observation) was observed. The most certain observations are in the 5 minute range. The p-mode and g-mode oscillations are expected from 3 to more than 300 minutes. The possible period ranges are described into the three intervals: (1) the 5 minute range for which the most dramatic and certain results are reported; (2) the 10 to 20 minute range for which solar diameter oscillations are reported; and (3) the 160 minute oscillation found in velocity and several other quantities.

  4. Nanoconstriction spin-Hall oscillator with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divinskiy, B.; Demidov, V. E.; Kozhanov, A.; Rinkevich, A. B.; Demokritov, S. O.; Urazhdin, S.

    2017-07-01

    We experimentally study spin-Hall nano-oscillators based on [Co/Ni] multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We show that these devices exhibit single-frequency auto-oscillations at current densities comparable to those for in-plane magnetized oscillators. The demonstrated oscillators exhibit large magnetization precession amplitudes, and their oscillation frequency is highly tunable by the electric current. These features make them promising for applications in high-speed integrated microwave circuits.

  5. Stable local oscillator module.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-11-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) multi-chip module (MCM). It is a follow-on report to SAND2006-6414, Stable Local Oscillator Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. This report describes the development of an MCM-based version of the complete StaLO, fabricated on an alumina thick film hybrid substrate.

  6. Modeling nonlinearities in MEMS oscillators.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Deepak K; Woodhouse, Jim; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2013-08-01

    We present a mathematical model of a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) oscillator that integrates the nonlinearities of the MEMS resonator and the oscillator circuitry in a single numerical modeling environment. This is achieved by transforming the conventional nonlinear mechanical model into the electrical domain while simultaneously considering the prominent nonlinearities of the resonator. The proposed nonlinear electrical model is validated by comparing the simulated amplitude-frequency response with measurements on an open-loop electrically addressed flexural silicon MEMS resonator driven to large motional amplitudes. Next, the essential nonlinearities in the oscillator circuit are investigated and a mathematical model of a MEMS oscillator is proposed that integrates the nonlinearities of the resonator. The concept is illustrated for MEMS transimpedance-amplifier- based square-wave and sine-wave oscillators. Closed-form expressions of steady-state output power and output frequency are derived for both oscillator models and compared with experimental and simulation results, with a good match in the predicted trends in all three cases.

  7. Tests on Double Layer Metalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    28 page report describes experiments in fabrication of integrated circuits with double-layer metalization. Double-layer metalization requires much less silicon "real estate" and allows more flexibility in placement of circuit elements than does single-layer metalization.

  8. Integrated carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen isotope chemostratigraphy of the Ediacaran Lantian Formation in South China: Spatial gradient, ocean redox oscillation, and fossil distribution.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Guan, C; Zhou, C; Peng, Y; Pratt, L M; Chen, X; Chen, L; Chen, Z; Yuan, X; Xiao, S

    2017-01-06

    The Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation in South China is a prime target for geobiological investigation because it offers opportunities to integrate chemostratigraphic and paleobiological data. Previous studies were mostly focused on successions in shallow-water shelf facies, but data from deep-water successions are needed to fully understand basinal redox structures. Here, we report δ(13) Ccarb , δ(13) Corg , δ(34) Spyr , δ(34) SCAS , and δ(15) Nsed data from a drill core of the fossiliferous Lantian Formation, which is a deep-water equivalent of the Doushantuo Formation. Our data confirm a large (>10‰) spatial gradient in δ(13) Ccarb in the lower Doushantuo/Lantian formations, but this gradient is probably due to the greater sensitivity of carbonate-poor deep-water sediments to isotopic mixing with (13) C-depleted carbonate cements. A pronounced negative δ(13) Ccarb excursion (EN3) in the upper Doushantuo/Lantian formations, however, is spatially consistent and may be an equivalent of the Shuram excursion. δ(34) Spyr is more negative in deeper-water facies than in shallow-water facies, particularly in the lower Doushantuo/Lantian formations, and this spatial pattern is interpreted as evidence for ocean redox stratification: Pyrite precipitated in euxinic deep waters has lower δ(34) Spyr than that formed within shallow-water sediments. The Lantian Formation was probably deposited in oscillating oxic and euxinic conditions. Euxinic black shales have higher TOC and TN contents, but lower δ(34) Spyr and δ(15) Nsed values. In euxinic environments, pyrite was predominantly formed in the water column and organic nitrogen was predominantly derived from nitrogen fixation or NH4(+) assimilation because of quantitative denitrification, resulting in lower δ(34) Spyr and δ(15) Nsed values. Benthic macroalgae and putative animals occur exclusively in euxinic black shales. If preserved in situ, these organisms must have lived in brief oxic episodes punctuating

  9. Outcome and structural integrity of rotator cuff after arthroscopic treatment of large and massive tears with double row technique: a 2-year followup.

    PubMed

    Carbonel, Ignacio; Martínez, Angel A; Aldea, Elisa; Ripalda, Jorge; Herrera, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcome and the tendon healing after arthroscopic double row rotator cuff repair of large and massive rotator cuff tears. Methods. 82 patients with a full-thickness large and massive rotator cuff tear underwent arthroscopic repair with double row technique. Results were evaluated by use of the UCLA, ASES, and Constant questionnaires, the Shoulder Strength Index (SSI), and range of motion. Follow-up time was 2 years. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies were performed on each shoulder preoperatively and 2 years after repair. Results. 100% of the patients were followed up. UCLA, ASES, and Constant questionnaires showed significant improvement compared with preoperatively (P < 0.001). Range of motion and SSI in flexion, abduction, and internal and external rotation also showed significant improvement (P < 0.001). MRI studies showed 24 cases of tear after repair (29%). Only 8 cases were a full-thickness tear. Conclusions. At two years of followup, in large and massive rotator cuff tears, an arthroscopic double row rotator cuff repair technique produces an excellent functional outcome and structural integrity.

  10. Outcome and Structural Integrity of Rotator Cuff after Arthroscopic Treatment of Large and Massive Tears with Double Row Technique: A 2-Year Followup

    PubMed Central

    Carbonel, Ignacio; Martínez, Angel A.; Aldea, Elisa; Ripalda, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcome and the tendon healing after arthroscopic double row rotator cuff repair of large and massive rotator cuff tears. Methods. 82 patients with a full-thickness large and massive rotator cuff tear underwent arthroscopic repair with double row technique. Results were evaluated by use of the UCLA, ASES, and Constant questionnaires, the Shoulder Strength Index (SSI), and range of motion. Follow-up time was 2 years. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies were performed on each shoulder preoperatively and 2 years after repair. Results. 100% of the patients were followed up. UCLA, ASES, and Constant questionnaires showed significant improvement compared with preoperatively (P < 0.001). Range of motion and SSI in flexion, abduction, and internal and external rotation also showed significant improvement (P < 0.001). MRI studies showed 24 cases of tear after repair (29%). Only 8 cases were a full-thickness tear. Conclusions. At two years of followup, in large and massive rotator cuff tears, an arthroscopic double row rotator cuff repair technique produces an excellent functional outcome and structural integrity. PMID:23533788

  11. Self-calibration and laser energy monitor validations for a double-pulsed 2-μm CO2 integrated path differential absorption lidar application.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-08-20

    Double-pulsed 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-μm double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photoelectromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-μm IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  12. Quantum free energy landscapes from ab initio path integral metadynamics: Double proton transfer in the formic acid dimer is concerted but not correlated.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Sergei D; Grant, Ian M; Marx, Dominik

    2015-09-28

    With the goal of computing quantum free energy landscapes of reactive (bio)chemical systems in multi-dimensional space, we combine the metadynamics technique for sampling potential energy surfaces with the ab initio path integral approach to treating nuclear quantum motion. This unified method is applied to the double proton transfer process in the formic acid dimer (FAD), in order to study the nuclear quantum effects at finite temperatures without imposing a one-dimensional reaction coordinate or reducing the dimensionality. Importantly, the ab initio path integral metadynamics technique allows one to treat the hydrogen bonds and concomitant proton transfers in FAD strictly independently and thus provides direct access to the much discussed issue of whether the double proton transfer proceeds via a stepwise or concerted mechanism. The quantum free energy landscape we compute for this H-bonded molecular complex reveals that the two protons move in a concerted fashion from initial to product state, yet world-line analysis of the quantum correlations demonstrates that the protons are as quantum-uncorrelated at the transition state as they are when close to the equilibrium structure.

  13. Quantum free energy landscapes from ab initio path integral metadynamics: Double proton transfer in the formic acid dimer is concerted but not correlated

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Sergei D. Grant, Ian M.; Marx, Dominik

    2015-09-28

    With the goal of computing quantum free energy landscapes of reactive (bio)chemical systems in multi-dimensional space, we combine the metadynamics technique for sampling potential energy surfaces with the ab initio path integral approach to treating nuclear quantum motion. This unified method is applied to the double proton transfer process in the formic acid dimer (FAD), in order to study the nuclear quantum effects at finite temperatures without imposing a one-dimensional reaction coordinate or reducing the dimensionality. Importantly, the ab initio path integral metadynamics technique allows one to treat the hydrogen bonds and concomitant proton transfers in FAD strictly independently and thus provides direct access to the much discussed issue of whether the double proton transfer proceeds via a stepwise or concerted mechanism. The quantum free energy landscape we compute for this H-bonded molecular complex reveals that the two protons move in a concerted fashion from initial to product state, yet world-line analysis of the quantum correlations demonstrates that the protons are as quantum-uncorrelated at the transition state as they are when close to the equilibrium structure.

  14. Small X-Band Oscillator Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Miranda, Felix A.; Clark, Eric B.; Wilt, David M.; Mueller, Carl H.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    A small, segmented microstrip patch antenna integrated with an X-band feedback oscillator on a high-permittivity substrate has been built and tested. This oscillator antenna is a prototype for demonstrating the feasibility of such devices as compact, low-power-consumption building blocks of advanced, lightweight, phased antenna arrays that would generate steerable beams for communication and remotesensing applications.

  15. Arabidopsis DNA polymerase lambda mutant is mildly sensitive to DNA double strand breaks but defective in integration of a transgene

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Tomoyuki; Angelis, Karel J.; Britt, Anne B.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA double-strand break (DSB) is a critical type of damage, and can be induced by both endogenous sources (e.g., errors of oxidative metabolism, transposable elements, programmed meiotic breaks, or perturbation of the DNA replication fork) and exogenous sources (e.g., ionizing radiation or radiomimetic chemicals). Although higher plants, like mammals, are thought to preferentially repair DSBs via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), much remains unclear about plant DSB repair pathways. Our reverse genetic approach suggests that DNA polymerase λ is involved in DSB repair in Arabidopsis. The Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant (atpolλ-1) displayed sensitivity to both gamma-irradiation and treatment with radiomimetic reagents, but not to other DNA damaging treatments. The atpolλ-1 mutant showed a moderate sensitivity to DSBs, while Arabidopsis Ku70 and DNA ligase 4 mutants (atku70-3 and atlig4-2), both of which play critical roles in NHEJ, exhibited a hypersensitivity to these treatments. The atpolλ-1/atlig4-2 double mutant exhibited a higher sensitivity to DSBs than each single mutant, but the atku70/atpolλ-1 showed similar sensitivity to the atku70-3 mutant. We showed that transcription of the DNA ligase 1, DNA ligase 6, and Wee1 genes was quickly induced by BLM in several NHEJ deficient mutants in contrast to wild-type. Finally, the T-DNA transformation efficiency dropped in NHEJ deficient mutants and the lowest transformation efficiency was scored in the atpolλ-1/atlig4-2 double mutant. These results imply that AtPolλ is involved in both DSB repair and DNA damage response pathway. PMID:26074930

  16. Arabidopsis DNA polymerase lambda mutant is mildly sensitive to DNA double strand breaks but defective in integration of a transgene.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Tomoyuki; Angelis, Karel J; Britt, Anne B

    2015-01-01

    The DNA double-strand break (DSB) is a critical type of damage, and can be induced by both endogenous sources (e.g., errors of oxidative metabolism, transposable elements, programmed meiotic breaks, or perturbation of the DNA replication fork) and exogenous sources (e.g., ionizing radiation or radiomimetic chemicals). Although higher plants, like mammals, are thought to preferentially repair DSBs via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), much remains unclear about plant DSB repair pathways. Our reverse genetic approach suggests that DNA polymerase λ is involved in DSB repair in Arabidopsis. The Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant (atpolλ-1) displayed sensitivity to both gamma-irradiation and treatment with radiomimetic reagents, but not to other DNA damaging treatments. The atpolλ-1 mutant showed a moderate sensitivity to DSBs, while Arabidopsis Ku70 and DNA ligase 4 mutants (atku70-3 and atlig4-2), both of which play critical roles in NHEJ, exhibited a hypersensitivity to these treatments. The atpolλ-1/atlig4-2 double mutant exhibited a higher sensitivity to DSBs than each single mutant, but the atku70/atpolλ-1 showed similar sensitivity to the atku70-3 mutant. We showed that transcription of the DNA ligase 1, DNA ligase 6, and Wee1 genes was quickly induced by BLM in several NHEJ deficient mutants in contrast to wild-type. Finally, the T-DNA transformation efficiency dropped in NHEJ deficient mutants and the lowest transformation efficiency was scored in the atpolλ-1/atlig4-2 double mutant. These results imply that AtPolλ is involved in both DSB repair and DNA damage response pathway.

  17. Global study of Rayleigh-Duffing oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hebai; Zou, Lan

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the global dynamics of Rayleigh-Duffing oscillators with global parameters, including equilibria at both finity and infinity, existences and coexistence of limit cycles and homoclinic loops. In fact, this oscillator will occur Hopf bifurcations, homoclinic bifurcations and double limit cycle bifurcations. Moreover, we find that the homoclinic bifurcation of this oscillator is special which is a gluing bifurcation. The global bifurcation diagram and all phase portrait are given, and numerical simulations are shown to verify our analysis finally.

  18. Manipulating motions of targeted single cells in solution by an integrated double-ring magnetic tweezers imaging microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meiling; Yadav, Rajeev; Pal, Nibedita; Lu, H. Peter

    2017-07-01

    Controlling and manipulating living cell motions in solution hold a high promise in developing new biotechnology and biological science. Here, we developed a magnetic tweezers device that employs a combination of two permanent magnets in up-down double-ring configuration axially fitting with a microscopic objective, allowing a picoNewton (pN) bidirectional force and motion control on the sample beyond a single upward pulling direction. The experimental force calibration and magnetic field simulation using finite element method magnetics demonstrate that the designed magnetic tweezers covers a linear-combined pN force with positive-negative polarization changes in a tenability of sub-pN scale, which can be utilized to further achieve motion manipulation by shifting the force balance. We demonstrate an application of the up-down double-ring magnetic tweezers for single cell manipulation, showing that the cells with internalized paramagnetic beads can be selectively picked up and guided in a controlled fine motion.

  19. Oscillating Permanent Magnets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelis, M. M.; Haines, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes several ways to partially levitate permanent magnets. Computes field line geometries and oscillation frequencies. Provides several diagrams illustrating the mechanism of the oscillation. (YP)

  20. Infrared properties of the Double Barrier Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, H. Y.; Sinkkonen, J.

    The infrared admittance of the Double Barrier Structure (DBS) is investigated by using a time-dependent quantum theory. The analysis is carried out under the small signal condition with no dc bias. The calculated results show conductance oscillations in the infrared frequency region. The oscillations are associated with the quantum well transit time resonances.

  1. Double Sided Irradiation for Laser-assisted Shearing of Ultra High Strength Steels with Process Integrated Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Eckert, Markus; Weinbach, Matthias

    Most small or medium sized parts produced in mass production are made by shearing and forming of sheet metal. This technology is cost effective, but the achievable quality and geometrical complexity are limited when working high and highest strength steel. Based on the requirements for widening the process limits of conventional sheet metal working the Fraunhofer IPT has developed the laser-assisted sheet metal working technology. With this enhancement it is possible to produce parts made of high and highest strength steel with outstanding quality, high complexity and low tool wear. Additionally laser hardening has been implemented to adjust the mechanical properties of metal parts within the process. Currently the process is limited to lower sheet thicknesses (<2 mm) to maintain short cycle times. To enable this process for larger geometries and higher sheet thicknesses the Fraunhofer IPT developed a system for double sided laser-assisted sheet metal working within progressive dies.

  2. Auditory Integration Training: A Double-Blind Study of Behavioral and Electrophysiological Effects in People with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelson, Stephen M.; Arin, Deborah; Bauman, Margaret; Lukas, Scott E.; Rudy, Jane H.; Sholar, Michelle; Rimland, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    Nineteen individuals with autism either listened to auditory integration training processed music or unprocessed music for 20 half-hour sessions. A significant decrease in Aberrant Behavior Checklist Scores was observed in the experimental group at the 30-month follow-up assessment. In addition, three experimental subjects but no controls showed a…

  3. Auditory Integration Training: A Double-Blind Study of Behavioral and Electrophysiological Effects in People with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelson, Stephen M.; Arin, Deborah; Bauman, Margaret; Lukas, Scott E.; Rudy, Jane H.; Sholar, Michelle; Rimland, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    Nineteen individuals with autism either listened to auditory integration training processed music or unprocessed music for 20 half-hour sessions. A significant decrease in Aberrant Behavior Checklist Scores was observed in the experimental group at the 30-month follow-up assessment. In addition, three experimental subjects but no controls showed a…

  4. Green function of the double-fractional Fokker-Planck equation: path integral and stochastic differential equations.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, H; Zatloukal, V

    2013-11-01

    The statistics of rare events, the so-called black-swan events, is governed by non-Gaussian distributions with heavy power-like tails. We calculate the Green functions of the associated Fokker-Planck equations and solve the related stochastic differential equations. We also discuss the subject in the framework of path integration.

  5. PPAR-gamma agonist pioglitazone modifies craving intensity and brain white matter integrity in patients with primary cocaine use disorder: a double-blind randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Joy M; Green, Charles E; Hasan, Khader M; Vincent, Jessica; Suchting, Robert; Weaver, Michael F; Moeller, F Gerard; Narayana, Ponnada A; Cunningham, Kathryn A; Dineley, Kelly T; Lane, Scott D

    2017-10-01

    Pioglitazone (PIO), a potent agonist of PPAR-gamma, is a promising candidate treatment for cocaine use disorder (CUD). We tested the effects of PIO on targeted mechanisms relevant to CUD: cocaine craving and brain white matter (WM) integrity. Feasibility, medication compliance and tolerability were evaluated. Two-arm double-blind randomized controlled proof-of-concept pilot trial of PIO or placebo (PLC). Single-site out-patient treatment research clinic in Houston, TX, USA. Thirty treatment-seeking adults, 18 to 60 years old, with CUD. Eighteen participants (8 = PIO; 10 = PLC) completed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of WM integrity at pre-/post-treatment. Study medication was dispensed at thrice weekly visits along with once-weekly cognitive behavioral therapy for 12 weeks. Measures of target engagement mechanisms of interest included cocaine craving assessed by the Brief Substance Craving Scale (BSCS), the Obsessive Compulsive Drug Use Scale (OCDUS), a visual analog scale (VAS) and change in WM integrity. Feasibility measures included number completing treatment, medication compliance (riboflavin detection) and tolerability (side effects, serious adverse events). Target engagement change in mechanisms of interest, defined as a ≥ 0.75 Bayesian posterior probability of an interaction existing favoring PIO over PLC, was demonstrated on measures of craving (BSCS, VAS) and WM integrity indexed by fractional anisotropy (FA) values. Outcomes indicated greater decrease in craving and greater increase in FA values in the PIO group. Feasibility was demonstrated by high completion rates among those starting treatment (21/26 = 80%) and medication compliance (≥ 80%). There were no reported serious adverse events for PIO. Compared with placebo, patients receiving pioglitazone show a higher likelihood of reduced cocaine craving and improved brain white matter integrity as a function of time in treatment. Pioglitazone shows good feasibility as a treatment for cocaine

  6. Multi-functional integration of pore P25@C@MoS2 core-double shell nanostructures as robust ternary anodes with enhanced lithium storage properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Biao; Zhao, Naiqin; Wei, Chaopeng; Zhou, Jingwen; He, Fang; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian; Liu, Enzuo

    2017-04-01

    Ternary anodes have attracted more and more attention due to the characteristic advantages resulting from the effect integration of three different materials on the lithium storage mechanism with functional interfaces interaction. However, clarifying the distribution and interaction of carbon, MoS2 and TiO2 in the MoS2/C/TiO2 composite, which is helpful for the understanding of the formation and lithium storage mechanism of the ternary anodes, is a well-known challenge. Herein, a novel pore core-double shell nanostructure of P25@carbon network supported few-layer MoS2 nanosheet (P25@C@FL-MoS2) is successfully synthesized by a one-pot hydrothermal approach. The distribution and interaction of the carbon, MoS2 and TiO2 in the obtained P25@C@FL-MoS2 hybrid are systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis et al. It is found that the carbon serves as binder, which supports few-layer MoS2 shell and coats the P25 core via Tisbnd Osbnd C bonds at the same time. Such multi-functional integration with smart structure and strong interfacial contact generates favorable structure stability and interfacial pseudocapacity-like storage mechanism. As a consequence, superior cycling and rate capacity of the muti-functional integration ternary P25@C@FL-MoS2 anode are achieved.

  7. A G-band terahertz monolithic integrated amplifier in 0.5-μm InP double heterojunction bipolar transistor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou-Peng, Li; Yong, Zhang; Rui-Min, Xu; Wei, Cheng; Yuan, Wang; Bing, Niu; Hai-Yan, Lu

    2016-05-01

    Design and characterization of a G-band (140-220 GHz) terahertz monolithic integrated circuit (TMIC) amplifier in eight-stage common-emitter topology are performed based on the 0.5-μm InGaAs/InP double heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT). An inverted microstrip line is implemented to avoid a parasitic mode between the ground plane and the InP substrate. The on-wafer measurement results show that peak gains are 20 dB at 140 GHz and more than 15-dB gain at 140-190 GHz respectively. The saturation output powers are -2.688 dBm at 210 GHz and -2.88 dBm at 220 GHz, respectively. It is the first report on an amplifier operating at the G-band based on 0.5-μm InP DHBT technology. Compared with the hybrid integrated circuit of vacuum electronic devices, the monolithic integrated circuit has the advantage of reliability and consistency. This TMIC demonstrates the feasibility of the 0.5-μm InGaAs/InP DHBT amplifier in G-band frequencies applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61501091) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of Ministry of Education of China (Grant Nos. ZYGX2014J003 and ZYGX2013J020).

  8. Maintenance of genomic integrity after DNA double strand breaks in the human prostate and seminal vesicle epithelium: the best and the worst

    PubMed Central

    Jäämaa, Sari; Laiho, Marikki

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most frequent cancer types in men, and its incidence is steadily increasing. On the other hand, primary seminal vesicle carcinomas are extremely rare with less than 60 cases reported worldwide. Therefore the difference in cancer incidence has been estimated to be more than a 100,000-fold. This is astonishing, as both tissues share similar epithelial structure and hormonal cues. Clearly, the two epithelia differ substantially in the maintenance of genomic integrity, possibly due to inherent differences in their DNA damage burden and DNA damage signaling. The DNA damage response evoked by DNA double strand breaks may be relevant, as their faulty repair has been implicated in the formation of common genomic rearrangements such as TMPRSS2-ERG fusions during prostate carcinogenesis. Here, we review DNA damaging processes of both tissues with an emphasis on inflammation and androgen signaling. We discuss how benign prostate and seminal vesicle epithelia respond to acute DNA damage, focusing on the canonical DNA double strand break-induced ATM-pathway, p53 and DNA damage induced checkpoints. We propose that the prostate might be more prone to the accumulation of genetic aberrations during epithelial regeneration than seminal vesicles due to a weaker ability to enforce DNA damage checkpoints. PMID:22762987

  9. Electroabsorption modulators integrated with DFB lasers based on identical active double-stack MQW-layer structure with high-frequency performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmueller, Bernhard; Hanke, Christian

    2003-12-01

    Electro optic modulators are key components for fiber optic transmission at data rates exceeding 10Gbit/s. The monolithic integration of an electroabsorption (EA) modulator applying the quantum confined stark effect with a distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode was demonstrated using a novel approach based on a double-stack multiple quantum well (MQW) structure. This novel approach using an identical MQW layer structure for both devices, the DFB laser diode and the EA modulator, will be described and discussed. Recently, a maximum 3dB-cutoff frequency of 25 GHz was measured. Further experimental results obtained from devices operating at 1.3 μm and 1.55 μm, respectively, exhibit the potential of these devices for high-speed data rate transmission.

  10. Comparative study of double ion implant Ti-salicide and pre-amorphization implant Co-salicide for ultra-large-scale integration applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Hung-Ming; Thei, Kong-Beng; Tsai, Sheng-Fu; Lu, Chun-Tsen; Liao, Xin-Da; Lee, Kuan-Ming; Liu, Wen-Chau

    2002-10-01

    We have investigated the interesting double ion implant (DII) Ti-salicide and pre-amorphization implant (PAI) Co-salicide techniques for ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) applications. The DII technique is combined with germanium (or arsenic) PAI and Si ion-mixing processes. The sheet resistances both of n+ and p+ polysilicons are decreased when the DII Ti-salicide and PAI Co-salicide techniques are used. Moreover, the incomplete phase transformation of Ti-salicide is not observed in 0.2 μm wide polysilicon devices with the Ge DII process. Furthermore, the n+/p-well junction leakage current is reduced when the Si ion-mixing process is used. Experimentally, based on the studied DII Ti-salicide and PAI Co-salicide techniques, high-performance 0.2 μm CMOS devices have been successfully fabricated.

  11. An Integrated Microfabricated Chip with Double Functions as an Ion Source and Air Pump Based on LIGA Technology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Jiang, Linxiu; Guo, Chaoqun; Zhu, Jianmin; Jiang, Yongrong; Chen, Zhencheng

    2017-01-01

    The injection and ionization of volatile organic compounds (VOA) by an integrated chip is experimentally analyzed in this paper. The integrated chip consists of a needle-to-cylinder electrode mounting on the Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) substrate. The needle-to-cylinder electrode is designed and fabricated by Lithographie, Galvanoformung and Abformung (LIGA) technology. In this paper, the needle is connected to a negative power supply of −5 kV and used as the cathode; the cylinder electrodes are composed of two arrays of cylinders and serve as the anode. The ionic wind is produced based on corona and glow discharges of needle-to-cylinder electrodes. The experimental setup is designed to observe the properties of the needle-to-cylinder discharge and prove its functions as an ion source and air pump. In summary, the main results are as follows: (1) the ionic wind velocity produced by the chip is about 0.79 m/s at an applied voltage of −3300 V; (2) acetic acid and ammonia water can be injected through the chip, which is proved by pH test paper; and (3) the current measured by a Faraday cup is about 10 pA for acetic acid and ammonia with an applied voltage of −3185 V. The integrated chip is promising for portable analytical instruments, such as ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), and mass spectrometry (MS). PMID:28054980

  12. An Integrated Microfabricated Chip with Double Functions as an Ion Source and Air Pump Based on LIGA Technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Jiang, Linxiu; Guo, Chaoqun; Zhu, Jianmin; Jiang, Yongrong; Chen, Zhencheng

    2017-01-04

    The injection and ionization of volatile organic compounds (VOA) by an integrated chip is experimentally analyzed in this paper. The integrated chip consists of a needle-to-cylinder electrode mounting on the Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) substrate. The needle-to-cylinder electrode is designed and fabricated by Lithographie, Galvanoformung and Abformung (LIGA) technology. In this paper, the needle is connected to a negative power supply of -5 kV and used as the cathode; the cylinder electrodes are composed of two arrays of cylinders and serve as the anode. The ionic wind is produced based on corona and glow discharges of needle-to-cylinder electrodes. The experimental setup is designed to observe the properties of the needle-to-cylinder discharge and prove its functions as an ion source and air pump. In summary, the main results are as follows: (1) the ionic wind velocity produced by the chip is about 0.79 m/s at an applied voltage of -3300 V; (2) acetic acid and ammonia water can be injected through the chip, which is proved by pH test paper; and (3) the current measured by a Faraday cup is about 10 pA for acetic acid and ammonia with an applied voltage of -3185 V. The integrated chip is promising for portable analytical instruments, such as ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), and mass spectrometry (MS).

  13. Knowledge extraction algorithm for variances handling of CP using integrated hybrid genetic double multi-group cooperative PSO and DPSO.

    PubMed

    Du, Gang; Jiang, Zhibin; Diao, Xiaodi; Yao, Yang

    2012-04-01

    Although the clinical pathway (CP) predefines predictable standardized care process for a particular diagnosis or procedure, many variances may still unavoidably occur. Some key index parameters have strong relationship with variances handling measures of CP. In real world, these problems are highly nonlinear in nature so that it's hard to develop a comprehensive mathematic model. In this paper, a rule extraction approach based on combing hybrid genetic double multi-group cooperative particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO) and discrete PSO algorithm (named HGDMCPSO/DPSO) is developed to discovery the previously unknown and potentially complicated nonlinear relationship between key parameters and variances handling measures of CP. Then these extracted rules can provide abnormal variances handling warning for medical professionals. Three numerical experiments on Iris of UCI data sets, Wisconsin breast cancer data sets and CP variances data sets of osteosarcoma preoperative chemotherapy are used to validate the proposed method. When compared with the previous researches, the proposed rule extraction algorithm can obtain the high prediction accuracy, less computing time, more stability and easily comprehended by users, thus it is an effective knowledge extraction tool for CP variances handling.

  14. Terahertz oscillators using resonant tunneling diodes and their functions for various applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, M.; Suzuki, S.

    2016-04-01

    Compact and coherent source is a key component for various applications of the terahertz wave. We report on our recent results of terahertz oscillators using resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs). The RTD is an InGaAs/AlAs double-barrier structure on InP substrate, and integrated with a planar slot antenna as a resonator and radiator. The output power is obtained from the substrate side through a Si lens. To achieve high-frequency oscillation, a narrow quantum well and an optimized collector spacer thickness were used. The former reduces the electron dwell time in the resonant tunneling region and the latter simultaneously reduces the electron transit time and the capacitance at the collector depletion region. The conduction loss of the slot antenna was also reduced with an optimized antenna length and an improved air bridge structure between the RTD and antenna. By these structures, fundamental oscillation up to 1.92 THz were obtained at room temperature. Oscillation above 2 THz is further expected in theoretical calculation. An oscillator with patch antenna, in which a Si lens is unnecessary, was fabricated. In a preliminary experiment, output power of 55 μW was obtained at 1 THz in a three-element array. Wireless data transmission using direct intensity modulation was demonstrated with the data rate of 30 Gbp/s and the bit error rate below the forward error correction limit. By integrating a varactor into the slot antenna, electrical frequency tuning was achieved with a tuning range of 580-900 GHz in an array device. Application of frequency-tunable RTD oscillators to measurements of absorption spectra was also demonstrated.

  15. Neutrino detectors for oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudenko, Y.

    2017-06-01

    A brief overview of the development of neutrino detectors for long-baseline oscillation experiments at accelerators and reactors is presented. Basic principles and main features of detectors of running accelerator experiments T2K and NOνA sensitive to a first level of CP violation and neutrino mass hierarchy, and reactor experiments Daya Bay, RENO and Double Chooz which measured the mixing angle θ13 are discussed. A variety of different experimental techniques is proposed and developed for the next generation oscillation experiments: a 20 kt scintillator detector for the reactor experiment JUNO, a 0.52 kt water-Cherenkov detector Hyper-Kamiokande, and a massive liquid argon time-projection chamber neutrino detector envisaged for the DUNE experiment. Present status of these detectors, recent progress in R&D and future prospects are summarized in this paper.

  16. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-17

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2{pi} in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step {delta}t. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/{delta}t is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is ''blue shifted'' relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval {delta}t. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  17. An integrated power pack of dye-sensitized solar cell and Li battery based on double-sided TiO2 nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenxi; Xue, Xinyu; Wang, Sihong; Lin, Changjian; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2012-05-09

    We present a new approach to fabricate an integrated power pack by hybridizing energy harvest and storage processes. This power pack incorporates a series-wound dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) and a lithium ion battery (LIB) on the same Ti foil that has double-sided TiO(2) nanotube (NTs) arrays. The solar cell part is made of two different cosensitized tandem solar cells based on TiO(2) nanorod arrays (NRs) and NTs, respectively, which provide an open-circuit voltage of 3.39 V and a short-circuit current density of 1.01 mA/cm(2). The power pack can be charged to about 3 V in about 8 min, and the discharge capacity is about 38.89 μAh under the discharge density of 100 μA. The total energy conversion and storage efficiency for this system is 0.82%. Such an integrated power pack could serve as a power source for mobile electronics.

  18. Band edge tailoring of InGaAs/AlAsSb coupled double quantum wells for a monolithically integrated all-optical switch.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jijun; Akimoto, Ryoichi; Gozu, Shin-ichiro; Mozume, Teruo; Hasama, Toshifumi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate a compact all-optical Michelson interferometer (MI) gating switch with monolithic integration of two different bandgap energies. Based on the ion-induced intermixing in InGaAs/AlAsSb coupled double quantum wells, the blueshift of the band edge can be tailored. Through phosphorus ion implantation with a dose of 5 × 10(14) cm(-2) and subsequent annealing at 720 °C for 60 s, an implanted sample can acquire a high transmittance compared with the as-grown one. Meanwhile, the cross-phase modulation (XPM) efficiency of a non-implanted sample undergoing the same annealing process decreases little. An implanted part for signal propagation and a non-implanted section for XPM are thus monolithically integrated for an MI switch by an area-selective manner. Full switching of a π-rad nonlinear phase shift is achieved with pump pulse energy of 5.6 pJ at a 10-GHz repetition rate.

  19. Chemical oscillator as a generalized Rayleigh oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2013-10-01

    We derive the conditions under which a set of arbitrary two dimensional autonomous kinetic equations can be reduced to the form of a generalized Rayleigh oscillator which admits of limit cycle solution. This is based on a linear transformation of field variables which can be found by inspection of the kinetic equations. We illustrate the scheme with the help of several chemical and bio-chemical oscillator models to show how they can be cast as a generalized Rayleigh oscillator.

  20. Double path integral method for obtaining the mobility of the one-dimensional charge transport in molecular chain.

    PubMed

    Yoo-Kong, Sikarin; Liewrian, Watchara

    2015-12-01

    We report on a theoretical investigation concerning the polaronic effect on the transport properties of a charge carrier in a one-dimensional molecular chain. Our technique is based on the Feynman's path integral approach. Analytical expressions for the frequency-dependent mobility and effective mass of the carrier are obtained as functions of electron-phonon coupling. The result exhibits the crossover from a nearly free particle to a heavily trapped particle. We find that the mobility depends on temperature and decreases exponentially with increasing temperature at low temperature. It exhibits large polaronic-like behaviour in the case of weak electron-phonon coupling. These results agree with the phase transition (A.S. Mishchenko et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 146401 (2015)) of transport phenomena related to polaron motion in the molecular chain.

  1. Multiphoton imaging with a novel compact diode-pumped Ti:sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    König, Karsten; Andersen, Peter; Le, Tuan; Breunig, Hans Georg

    2015-12-01

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy commonly relies on bulky and expensive femtosecond lasers. We integrated a novel minimal-footprint Ti:sapphire oscillator, pumped by a frequency-doubled distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode laser, into a clinical multiphoton tomograph and evaluated its imaging capability using different biological samples, i.e. cell monolayers, corneal tissue, and human skin. With the novel laser, the realization of very compact Ti:sapphire-based systems for high-quality multiphoton imaging at a significantly size and weight compared to current systems will become possible.

  2. Synchronization of genetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianshou; Zhang, Jiajun; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Chen, Luonan

    2008-09-01

    Synchronization of genetic or cellular oscillators is a central topic in understanding the rhythmicity of living organisms at both molecular and cellular levels. Here, we show how a collective rhythm across a population of genetic oscillators through synchronization-induced intercellular communication is achieved, and how an ensemble of independent genetic oscillators is synchronized by a common noisy signaling molecule. Our main purpose is to elucidate various synchronization mechanisms from the viewpoint of dynamics, by investigating the effects of various biologically plausible couplings, several kinds of noise, and external stimuli. To have a comprehensive understanding on the synchronization of genetic oscillators, we consider three classes of genetic oscillators: smooth oscillators (exhibiting sine-like oscillations), relaxation oscillators (displaying jump dynamics), and stochastic oscillators (noise-induced oscillation). For every class, we further study two cases: with intercellular communication (including phase-attractive and repulsive coupling) and without communication between cells. We find that an ensemble of smooth oscillators has different synchronization phenomena from those in the case of relaxation oscillators, where noise plays a different but key role in synchronization. To show differences in synchronization between them, we make comparisons in many aspects. We also show that a population of genetic stochastic oscillators have their own synchronization mechanisms. In addition, we present interesting phenomena, e.g., for relaxation-type stochastic oscillators coupled to a quorum-sensing mechanism, different noise intensities can induce different periodic motions (i.e., inhomogeneous limit cycles).

  3. Stable local oscillator microcircuit.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-10-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. The StaLO uses a comb generator followed by surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters. The comb generator creates a set of harmonic components of the 100MHz input signal. The SAW filters are narrow bandpass filters that are used to select the desired component and reject all others. The resulting circuit has very low sideband power levels and low phase noise (both less than -40dBc) that is limited primarily by the phase noise level of the input signal.

  4. Holographic charge oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Mike; Donos, Aristomenis; Tong, David

    2015-04-01

    The Reissner-Nordström black hole provides the prototypical description of a holographic system at finite density. We study the response of this system to the presence of a local, charged impurity. Below a critical temperature, the induced charge density, which screens the impurity, exhibits oscillations. These oscillations can be traced to the singularities in the density-density correlation function moving in the complex momentum plane. At finite temperature, the oscillations are very similar to the Friedel oscillations seen in Fermi liquids. However, at zero temperature the oscillations in the black hole background remain exponentially damped, while Friedel oscillations relax to a power-law.

  5. Time reversal for modified oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero-Soto, R.; Suslov, S. K.

    2010-03-01

    We consider a new completely integrable case of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in ®n with variable coefficients for a modified oscillator that is dual (with respect to time reversal) to a model of the quantum oscillator. We find a second pair of dual Hamiltonians in the momentum representation. The examples considered show that in mathematical physics and quantum mechanics, a change in the time direction may require a total change of the system dynamics to return the system to its original quantum state. We obtain particular solutions of the corresponding nonlinear Schrödinger equations. We also consider a Hamiltonian structure of the classical integrable problem and its quantization.

  6. Screening effects and Friedel oscillations in quantum-well nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalev, V. M.; Chaplik, A. V.

    2008-11-15

    The screening of the Coulomb interaction is studied with regard to Friedel oscillations in multicomponent electron plasma structure. A double quantum well (QW) and a superlattice are considered. The groundstate energy of a donor (exciton) in a double quantum well is calculated by a variational method as a function of the population of subbands.

  7. Frequency stabilization in nonlinear micromechanical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Dario; Zanette, Damián H.; López, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Mechanical oscillators are present in almost every electronic device. They mainly consist of a resonating element providing an oscillating output with a specific frequency. Their ability to maintain a determined frequency in a specified period of time is the most important parameter limiting their implementation. Historically, quartz crystals have almost exclusively been used as the resonating element, but micromechanical resonators are increasingly being considered to replace them. These resonators are easier to miniaturize and allow for monolithic integration with electronics. However, as their dimensions shrink to the microscale, most mechanical resonators exhibit nonlinearities that considerably degrade the frequency stability of the oscillator. Here we demonstrate that, by coupling two different vibrational modes through an internal resonance, it is possible to stabilize the oscillation frequency of nonlinear self-sustaining micromechanical resonators. Our findings provide a new strategy for engineering low-frequency noise oscillators capitalizing on the intrinsic nonlinear phenomena of micromechanical resonators.

  8. Hydrogen-Maser/Ruby-Maser/Quartz-Crystal Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Dick, G. John

    1994-01-01

    Highly stable oscillator suitable for use as 100-MHz frequency standard consists of 100-MHz hydrogen maser combined with double-phase-locked-loop receiver. Generates 100-MHz signal with reduced noise. Contains 100-MHz voltage-controlled quartz-crystal oscillator (VCO) locked in phase to superconducting-cavity maser oscillator (SCMO). SCMO, locks in phase to hydrogen maser, phase-locking receiver and its SCMO/ VCO combination to hydrogen maser. Aspects of SCMO described in previous reports, including "Performance of Superconducting-Cavity Maser" (NPO-18175), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 15, No. 6. Performances of component oscillators complement each other.

  9. Hydrogen-Maser/Ruby-Maser/Quartz-Crystal Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Dick, G. John

    1994-01-01

    Highly stable oscillator suitable for use as 100-MHz frequency standard consists of 100-MHz hydrogen maser combined with double-phase-locked-loop receiver. Generates 100-MHz signal with reduced noise. Contains 100-MHz voltage-controlled quartz-crystal oscillator (VCO) locked in phase to superconducting-cavity maser oscillator (SCMO). SCMO, locks in phase to hydrogen maser, phase-locking receiver and its SCMO/ VCO combination to hydrogen maser. Aspects of SCMO described in previous reports, including "Performance of Superconducting-Cavity Maser" (NPO-18175), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 15, No. 6. Performances of component oscillators complement each other.

  10. [Integrity].

    PubMed

    Gómez Rodríguez, Rafael Ángel

    2014-01-01

    To say that someone possesses integrity is to claim that that person is almost predictable about responses to specific situations, that he or she can prudentially judge and to act correctly. There is a closed interrelationship between integrity and autonomy, and the autonomy rests on the deeper moral claim of all humans to integrity of the person. Integrity has two senses of significance for medical ethic: one sense refers to the integrity of the person in the bodily, psychosocial and intellectual elements; and in the second sense, the integrity is the virtue. Another facet of integrity of the person is la integrity of values we cherish and espouse. The physician must be a person of integrity if the integrity of the patient is to be safeguarded. The autonomy has reduced the violations in the past, but the character and virtues of the physician are the ultimate safeguard of autonomy of patient. A field very important in medicine is the scientific research. It is the character of the investigator that determines the moral quality of research. The problem arises when legitimate self-interests are replaced by selfish, particularly when human subjects are involved. The final safeguard of moral quality of research is the character and conscience of the investigator. Teaching must be relevant in the scientific field, but the most effective way to teach virtue ethics is through the example of the a respected scientist.

  11. Saturation in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Ahmed; Hanna, James

    2015-03-01

    We consider a weakly nonlinear system consisting of a resonantly forced oscillator coupled to an unforced oscillator. It has long been known that, for quadratic nonlinearities and a 2:1 resonance between the oscillators, a perturbative solution of the dynamics exhibits a phenomenon known as saturation. At low forcing, the forced oscillator responds, while the unforced oscillator is quiescent. Above a critical value of the forcing, the forced oscillator's steady-state amplitude reaches a plateau, while that of the unforced oscillator increases without bound. We show that, contrary to established folklore, saturation is not unique to quadratically nonlinear systems. We present conditions on the form of the nonlinear couplings and resonance that lead to saturation. Our results elucidate a mechanism for localization or diversion of energy in systems of coupled oscillators, and suggest new approaches for the control or suppression of vibrations in engineered systems.

  12. Triple seismic source, double research ship, single ambitious goal: integrated imaging of young oceanic crust in the Panama Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dean; Peirce, Christine; Hobbs, Richard; Gregory, Emma

    2016-04-01

    roughness. Increased basement roughness leads to a non-uniform distribution of sediments, which we hypothesise influences the pattern of hydrothermal circulation and ultimately the secondary alteration of the upper crust. A combination of the complimentary wide-angle and normal incidence datasets and their individual models act as a starting point for joint inversion of seismic, gravity and MT data. The joint inversion produces a fully integrated model, enabling us to better understand how the oceanic crust evolves as a result of hydrothermal fluid circulation and cooling, as it ages from zero-age at the ridge-axis to 6 Ma at borehole 504B. Ultimately, this model can be used to undertake full waveform inversion to produce a high-resolution velocity model of the oceanic crust in the Panama Basin. This research is part of a major, interdisciplinary NERC-funded research collaboration entitled: Oceanographic and Seismic Characterisation of heat dissipation and alteration by hydrothermal fluids at an Axial Ridge (OSCAR).

  13. Alizarin Complexone Functionalized Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles: A Smart System Integrating Glucose-Responsive Double-Drugs Release and Real-Time Monitoring Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhen; He, Dinggeng; Cai, Linli; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Yang, Xue; Li, Liling; Li, Siqi; Su, Xiaoya

    2016-04-06

    The outstanding progress of nanoparticles-based delivery systems capable of releasing hypoglycemic drugs in response to glucose has dramatically changed the outlook of diabetes management. However, the developed glucose-responsive systems have not offered real-time monitoring capabilities for accurate quantifying hypoglycemic drugs released. In this study, we present a multifunctional delivery system that integrates both delivery and monitoring issues using glucose-triggered competitive binding scheme on alizarin complexone (ALC) functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN). In this system, ALC is modified on the surface of MSN as the signal reporter. Gluconated insulin (G-Ins) is then introduced onto MSN-ALC via benzene-1,4-diboronic acid (BA) mediated esterification reaction, where G-Ins not only blocks drugs inside the mesopores but also works as a hypoglycemic drug. In the absence of glucose, the sandwich-type boronate ester structure formed by BA binding to the diols of ALC and G-Ins remains intact, resulting in an fluorescence emission peak at 570 nm and blockage of pores. Following a competitive binding, the presence of glucose cause the dissociation of boronate ester between ALC and BA, which lead to the pores opening and disappearance of fluorescence. As proof of concept, rosiglitazone maleate (RSM), an insulin-sensitizing agent, was doped into the MSN to form a multifunctional MSN (RSM@MSN-ALC-BA-Ins), integrating with double-drugs loading, glucose-responsive performance, and real-time monitoring capability. It has been demonstrated that the glucose-responsive release behaviors of insulin and RSM in buffer or in human serum can be quantified in real-time through evaluating the changes of fluorescence signal. We believe that this developed multifunctional system can shed light on the invention of a new generation of smart nanoformulations for optical diagnosis, individualized treatment, and noninvasive monitoring of diabetes management.

  14. The Accretion Rate Dependence of Burst Oscillation Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootes, Laura S.; Watts, Anna L.; Galloway, Duncan K.; Wijnands, Rudy

    2017-01-01

    Neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries exhibit oscillations during thermonuclear bursts, attributed to asymmetric brightness patterns on the burning surfaces. All models that have been proposed to explain the origin of these asymmetries (spreading hotspots, surface waves, and cooling wakes) depend on the accretion rate. By analysis of archival RXTE data of six oscillation sources, we investigate the accretion rate dependence of the amplitude of burst oscillations. This more than doubles the size of the sample analyzed previously by Muno et al., who found indications for a relationship between accretion rate and oscillation amplitudes. We find that burst oscillation signals can be detected at all observed accretion rates. Moreover, oscillations at low accretion rates are found to have relatively small amplitudes ({A}{{rms}}≤slant 0.10) while oscillations detected in bursts observed at high accretion rates cover a broad spread in amplitudes (0.05≤slant {A}{{rms}}≤slant 0.20). In this paper we present the results of our analysis and discuss these in the light of current burst oscillation models. Additionally, we investigate the bursts of two sources without previously detected oscillations. Despite the fact that these sources have been observed at accretion rates where burst oscillations might be expected, we find their behavior not to be anomalous compared to oscillation sources.

  15. Mapping paddy rice planting area in wheat-rice double-cropped areas through integration of Landsat-8 OLI, MODIS, and PALSAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Xiao, Xiangming; Qin, Yuanwei; Dong, Jinwei; Zhang, Geli; Kou, Weili; Jin, Cui; Zhou, Yuting; Zhang, Yao

    2015-05-01

    As farmland systems vary over space and time (season and year), accurate and updated maps of paddy rice are needed for studies of food security and environmental problems. We selected a wheat-rice double-cropped area from fragmented landscapes along the rural-urban complex (Jiangsu Province, China) and explored the potential utility of integrating time series optical images (Landsat-8, MODIS) and radar images (PALSAR) in mapping paddy rice planting areas. We first identified several main types of non-cropland land cover and then identified paddy rice fields by selecting pixels that were inundated only during paddy rice flooding periods. These key temporal windows were determined based on MODIS Land Surface Temperature and vegetation indices. The resultant paddy rice map was evaluated using regions of interest (ROIs) drawn from multiple high-resolution images, Google Earth, and in-situ cropland photos. The estimated overall accuracy and Kappa coefficient were 89.8% and 0.79, respectively. In comparison with the National Land Cover Data (China) from 2010, the resultant map better detected changes in the paddy rice fields and revealed more details about their distribution. These results demonstrate the efficacy of using images from multiple sources to generate paddy rice maps for two-crop rotation systems.

  16. Mapping paddy rice planting area in wheat-rice double-cropped areas through integration of Landsat-8 OLI, MODIS, and PALSAR images

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Xiao, Xiangming; Qin, Yuanwei; Dong, Jinwei; Zhang, Geli; Kou, Weili; Jin, Cui; Zhou, Yuting; Zhang, Yao

    2015-01-01

    As farmland systems vary over space and time (season and year), accurate and updated maps of paddy rice are needed for studies of food security and environmental problems. We selected a wheat-rice double-cropped area from fragmented landscapes along the rural–urban complex (Jiangsu Province, China) and explored the potential utility of integrating time series optical images (Landsat-8, MODIS) and radar images (PALSAR) in mapping paddy rice planting areas. We first identified several main types of non-cropland land cover and then identified paddy rice fields by selecting pixels that were inundated only during paddy rice flooding periods. These key temporal windows were determined based on MODIS Land Surface Temperature and vegetation indices. The resultant paddy rice map was evaluated using regions of interest (ROIs) drawn from multiple high-resolution images, Google Earth, and in-situ cropland photos. The estimated overall accuracy and Kappa coefficient were 89.8% and 0.79, respectively. In comparison with the National Land Cover Data (China) from 2010, the resultant map better detected changes in the paddy rice fields and revealed more details about their distribution. These results demonstrate the efficacy of using images from multiple sources to generate paddy rice maps for two-crop rotation systems. PMID:25965027

  17. 3-D multilayer monolithic integration of vertical-oriented double-heterojunction GaAs based pHEMT and thermal influence on device parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Mohammad A.; Rezazadeh, Ali A.

    2017-06-01

    This study focuses on 3-D multilayer monolithic integration of vertical-oriented double-heterojunction AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs based pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors. The effects of the presence of 3-D components above the active layer were accomplished by comparing three multilayer fabricated device of different thickness with a virgin device where the thickness of the 3-D components e.g., both metal and polyimide layer were varied. The output current, on-state gate leakage, transconductance are found to be decrease with the increase in thickness of the 3-D components and on the other hand, the on-state resistance, knee voltage and off-state gate leakage is increased. Lastly, the thermal influences on the device behaviour such as off-state and on-state gate leakage, barrier inhomogeneities at Schottky contacts, zero temperature coefficients at the transfer curve, and the threshold voltage as a function of drain bias were measured and analyzed for the both pre and post fabricated multilayer devices. These effective comparisons in terms of thickness and temperature of the both device are useful for future designs and optimizations of multilayer vertical stacked 3-D MMICs.

  18. Supercontinuum laser based double-integrating-sphere system for measuring optical properties of highly dense turbid media in the 1300-2350nm region with high sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Sharma, Sandeep; Aernouts, Ben; Ramon, Herman; Saeys, Wouter

    2012-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of the optical properties of turbid media in the light path is important in NIR absorption spectroscopy of biological tissues where multiple scattering complexes the collected light signals due to the non-uniform tissue architecture. Several approaches such as time resolved spectroscopy and spatially resolved spectroscopy have been proposed to measure the bulk optical properties of turbid media. Among them, double integrating sphere (DIS) measurements are recognized as the "golden standard" for in vitro optical properties measurement of turbid media because of its high accuracy and robustness in different conditions. A DIS system is convenient to measure the in vitro optical properties of turbid media like intralipid solutions and biological tissues, since it measures the diffuse reflectance and transmittance simultaneously. However, DIS measurements have been mostly limited to the optical window region (400-1000 nm) or suffered from low signal levels on the detectors due to the absorption by water in the NIR region. In this study, we developed a DIS system for optical property measurement in the 1300-2350 nm region based on a novel wavelength tunable spectroscopic setup which incorporates a high power broadband supercontinuum laser and a high precision monochromator. With this system, optical properties of intralipid solutions were measured in the wavelength region of 1300-2350nm.

  19. Factors predictive of treatment-emergent adverse events of prucalopride: an integrated analysis of four randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Leelakusolvong, Somchai; Ke, MeiYun; Zou, Duowu; Choi, Suck Chei; Tack, Jan; Quigley, Eamonn M M; Liu, Andy; Kim, Jin Yong

    2015-03-01

    This integrated analysis aimed to identify the factors associated with the most frequently re-ported treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) in Asian and non-Asian patients with chronic constipation (CC) who receive prucalopride or placebo over 12 weeks. Pooled data from four randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, phase III studies (NCT00488137, NCT00483886, NCT00485940, and NCT01116206) on pa-tients treated with prucalopride 2 mg or placebo were ana-lyzed. The associations between predictors and TEAEs were evaluated based on a logistic regression model. Overall, 1,821 patients (Asian, 26.1%; non-Asian, 73.9%) were analyzed. Prucalopride treatment was significantly as-sociated with diarrhea, headache, and nausea (p<0.001), but not with abdominal pain, compared with placebo. Differ-ences in the prevalence of TEAEs between prucalopride and placebo decreased greatly after the first day of treatment. Compared with non-Asians, Asians were more likely to expe-rience diarrhea and less likely to develop abdominal pain, headache, and nausea. Prior laxative use, CC duration, and body weight were not predictive of any of these TEAEs. Con-clusions Prucalopride treatment was positively associated with diarrhea, headache, and nausea. Asian patients tended to have a higher frequency of diarrhea but lower frequencies of headache, abdominal pain, and nausea compared with non-Asians. (Gut Liver, 2015;9208-213).

  20. Optical properties measurement of laser coagulated tissues with double integrating sphere and inverse Monte Carlo technique in the wavelength range from 350 to 2100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Norihiro; Nanjo, Takuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2012-03-01

    In laser medicine, the accurate knowledge about the optical properties (absorption coefficient; μa, scattering coefficient; μs, anisotropy factor; g) of laser irradiated tissues is important for the prediction of light propagation in tissues, since the efficacy of laser treatment depends on the photon propagation within the irradiated tissues. Thus, it is likely that the optical properties of tissues at near-ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared wavelengths will be more important due to more biomedical applications of lasers will be developed. For improvement of the laser induced thermotherapy, the optical property change during laser treatment should be considered in the wide wavelength range. For estimation of the optical properties of the biological tissues, the optical properties measurement system with a double integrating sphere setup and an inverse Monte Carlo technique was developed. The optical properties of chicken muscle tissue were measured in the native state and after laser coagulation using the optical properties measurement system in the wavelength range from 350 to 2100 nm. A CO2 laser was used for laser coagulation. After laser coagulation, the reduced scattering coefficient of the tissue increased. And, the optical penetration depth decreased. For improvement of the treatment depth during laser coagulation, a quantitative procedure using the treated tissue optical properties for determination of the irradiation power density following light penetration decrease might be important in clinic.

  1. Influence of equine conformation on rider oscillation and evaluation of horses for therapeutic riding.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Akihiro; Ohta, Emiko; Ueda, Koichiro; Nakatsuji, Hiroki; Kondo, Seiji

    2008-01-01

    To obtain basic knowledge about selecting horses for therapeutic riding, the influence of equine conformation on rider oscillation and relationships between these factors and the evaluation on horses as the therapeutic riding were studied. Thirty-five riding horses were used. Equine conformation was estimated by 24 indices. Rider oscillation was measured by an accelerometer fixed at the rider's waist. The spatial position of the oscillation was estimated by a double integration of the acceleration. Horses were evaluated for therapeutic riding by a Riding for the Disabled Association instructor as a rider. Evaluations were on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the highest score for 27 items. Horses were classified into 4 groups: the short and narrow (SN), short and wide (SW), tall and narrow (TN), and tall and wide (TW). The frequencies of rider oscillation both at walk and trot were higher (P<0.01), and the vertical (P<0.01) and longitudinal (P<0.05) amplitudes at trot were smaller, on short horses than on tall horses. The vertical amplitude at walk was smaller (P<0.05) and the lateral amplitude at trot was larger (P<0.01) on wide horses than on narrow horses. Short horses could be used for the rider who requires side walkers. Wide horses could be used for relieving muscular tension and for the rider who could not maintain good balance on the horse. Short and wide horses should be suitable for therapeutic riding.

  2. Generation of 6.8 W of CW output power at 1550 nm using small mode field diameter Er:Yb co-doped double clad fiber in laser oscillator configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurram, Srikanth; Kuruvilla, A.; Singh, Rajpal; Bindra, K. S.

    2017-06-01

    We report studies on erbium:ytterbium doped fiber laser, that uses a commercially available off-the-shelf Er:Yb co-doped single mode fiber with small mode field diameter of 7 µm, which is compatible with single mode fibers used in most of the communication systems. In a FBG based laser oscillator configuration pumped at 976 nm, the single transverse mode fiber laser emitted more than 6.87 Watts of output power at 1550 nm with a conversion efficiency of ~32% over a narrow line width. The pump radiation is coupled into active fiber using free-space optics. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest power reported in the 1.55 µm region by using commercially available off-the-shelf active fiber of small mode field diameter (~7 µm) in a simple laser oscillator configuration with 9×× nm pumping. We also observed the effect of weak secondary grating structure in FBGs on the spectral characteristics of EYDFLs and explained its significance for co-doped fiber lasers such as erbium-ytterbium fiber lasers.

  3. Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyn, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Integrated learning is an exciting adventure for both teachers and students. It is not uncommon to observe the integration of academic subjects such as math, science, and language arts. However, educators need to recognize that movement experiences in physical education also can be linked to academic curricula and, may even lead the…

  4. A New Chaotic Electro-Mechanical Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscarino, Arturo; Famoso, Carlo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia

    In this paper, a new electro-mechanical chaotic oscillator is presented. The system is based on the motion of the metal tip of a beam in a double-well potential generated by two magnets, and works thanks to the vibrations generated in the flexible mechanical structure by two rotating coils that produce noise-like signals. As the source of vibration is internal, the system may be considered an autonomous oscillator. Chaotic motion is experimentally observed and verified with a mathematical model of the phenomenon.

  5. Neutrino masses, neutrino oscillations, and cosmological implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical concepts and motivations for considering neutrinos having finite masses are discussed and the experimental situation on searches for neutrino masses and oscillations is summarized. The solar neutrino problem, reactor, deep mine and accelerator data, tri decay experiments and double beta-decay data are considered and cosmological implications and astrophysical data relating to neutrino masses are reviewed. The neutrino oscillation solution to the solar neutrino problem, the missing mass problem in galaxy halos and galaxy cluster galaxy formation and clustering, and radiative neutrino decay and the cosmic ultraviolet background radiation are examined.

  6. Harmonic phase detector for phase locking of cryogenic terahertz oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikov, Konstantin V.; Khudchenko, Andrey V.; Koshelets, Valery P.

    2013-09-01

    We present a simple and effective way to phase lock terahertz cryogenic oscillators. Extreme nonlinearity of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor tunnel junction allows its implementation as a cryogenic high-harmonic phase detector (HPD), which is used both for mixing a terahertz oscillator signal with a microwave reference and for generating a phase error feedback signal that is directly applied to the oscillator for its phase locking. An integration of the HPD with a cryogenic flux-flow oscillator results in synchronization bandwidth as wide as 70 MHz (significantly exceeding conventional room-temperature system bandwidth), providing phase locking of 84% emitted power for 15 MHz oscillator linewidth.

  7. Covariant harmonic oscillators and coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Daesoo; Kim, Young S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators shares the basic symmetry properties with the covariant harmonic oscillator formalism which provides a concise description of the basic features of relativistic hadronic features observed in high-energy laboratories. It is shown also that the coupled oscillator system has the SL(4,r) symmetry in classical mechanics, while the present formulation of quantum mechanics can accommodate only the Sp(4,r) portion of the SL(4,r) symmetry. The possible role of the SL(4,r) symmetry in quantum mechanics is discussed.

  8. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  9. North Atlantic Oscillation signatures in the atmospheric concentrations of persistent organic pollutants: An analysis using Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network-Great Lakes monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianmin; Cao, Zuohao; Hung, Hayley

    2004-06-01

    Spring average air concentrations of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), dieldrin, and two low-molecular-weight polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) measured around the Great Lakes during the 1990s showed strong association with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Decadal air monitoring of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) around the Great Lakes revealed that air concentrations of the aforementioned compounds tend to increase in the positive mode of the NAO. During the same time period, western and northwestern North America experienced warmer-than-normal springs, enhancing volatilization of these compounds from reservoirs accumulated because of past and current use. Atmospheric flows associated with the NAO then transported these compounds from source regions to downwind locations such as the Great Lakes. Roughly reversed situations occurred during the negative mode of the NAO, which was linked to lower POP air concentrations observed around the Great Lakes. Interannual fluctuations of the air concentrations of these POPs significantly correlated with the 1000-500-hPa thickness of the atmospheric layer to the west of the Great Lakes and changes in zonal wind over the western United States. Results indicate that the NAO index may be a useful factor for forecasting interannual fluctuations of POP air concentrations in North America.

  10. Numerical method for hydrodynamic modulation equations describing Bloch oscillations in semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvaro, M.; Carretero, M.; Bonilla, L. L.

    2012-05-01

    We present a finite difference method to solve a new type of nonlocal hydrodynamic equations that arise in the theory of spatially inhomogeneous Bloch oscillations in semiconductor superlattices. The hydrodynamic equations describe the evolution of the electron density, electric field and the complex amplitude of the Bloch oscillations for the electron current density and the mean energy density. These equations contain averages over the Bloch phase which are integrals of the unknown electric field and are derived by singular perturbation methods. Among the solutions of the hydrodynamic equations, at a 70 K lattice temperature, there are spatially inhomogeneous Bloch oscillations coexisting with moving electric field domains and Gunn-type oscillations of the current. At higher temperature (300 K) only Bloch oscillations remain. These novel solutions are found for restitution coefficients in a narrow interval below their critical values and disappear for larger values. We use an efficient numerical method based on an implicit second-order finite difference scheme for both the electric field equation (of drift-diffusion type) and the parabolic equation for the complex amplitude. Double integrals appearing in the nonlocal hydrodynamic equations are calculated by means of expansions in modified Bessel functions. We use numerical simulations to ascertain the convergence of the method. If the complex amplitude equation is solved using a first order scheme for restitution coefficients near their critical values, a spurious convection arises that annihilates the complex amplitude in the part of the superlattice that is closer to the cathode. This numerical artifact disappears if the space step is appropriately reduced or we use the second-order numerical scheme.

  11. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  12. No warmup crystal oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    During warmup, crystal oscillators often show a frequency offset as large as 1 part in 10 to the 5th power. If timing information is transferred to the oscillator and then the oscillator is allowed to warmup, a timing error greater than 1 millisecond will occur. For many applications, it is unsuitable to wait for the oscillator to warmup. For medium accuracy timing requirements where overall accuracies in the order of 1 millisecond are required, a no warmup crystal concept was developed. The concept utilizes two crystal oscillator, used sequentially to avoid using a crystal oscillator for timing much higher frequency accuracy once warmed up. The accuracy achieved with practical TCXOs at initial start over a range of temperatures is discussed. A second design utilizing two oven controlled oscillators is also discussed.

  13. Non-linear oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, P.

    The mathematical pendulum is used to provide a survey of free and forced oscillations in damped and undamped systems. This simple model is employed to present illustrations for and comparisons between the various approximation schemes. A summary of the Liapunov stability theory is provided. The first and the second method of Liapunov are explained for autonomous as well as for nonautonomous systems. Here, a basic familiarity with the theory of linear oscillations is assumed. La Salle's theorem about the stability of invariant domains is explained in terms of illustrative examples. Self-excited oscillations are examined, taking into account such oscillations in mechanical and electrical systems, analytical approximation methods for the computation of self-excited oscillations, analytical criteria for the existence of limit cycles, forced oscillations in self-excited systems, and self-excited oscillations in systems with several degrees of freedom. Attention is given to Hamiltonian systems and an introduction to the theory of optimal control is provided.

  14. Neutrino Oscillations: Eighty Years in Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Rebecca Lyn

    In order to discuss neutrino oscillations, it is necessary to have knowledge of the developments in the field spanning the last eighty years. The existence of the neutrino was posited by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930 to account for the mass defect in beta decay, and to this day physicists are still endeavoring to answer fundamental questions about this enigmatic particle. The scope of this thesis includes a historical background of neutrino physics and a discussion of neutrinos and the Standard Model; subsequent to this is a discussion of the Solar Neutrino Problem, which provided the impetus for the proposal of neutrino oscillations. Bolstering the theory of neutrino oscillations (which is developed in the body of this thesis) are neutrino detector experiments and their results; these include the Homestake experiment, SNO, Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande, MINOS, and Double-Chooz. We also include relevant derivations, most particularly of the quantum mechanics of neutrino oscillations as treated in the wave packet formalism. We have amassed here the principle theories and experimental results -- a mere tip of the iceberg -- that have brought us to our current understanding of neutrino oscillations. We have also studied the quantum mechanics of neutrino oscillations and developed for ourselves the wave packet formalism describing the phenomenon.

  15. The odd-order Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterov, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    We consider a Hamiltonian formulation of the (2 n + 1)-order generalization of the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator with distinct frequencies of oscillation. This system is invariant under time translations. However, the corresponding Noether integral of motion is unbounded from below and can be presented as a direct sum of 2n one-dimensional harmonic oscillators with an alternating sign. If this integral of motion plays a role of a Hamiltonian, a quantum theory of the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator faces a ghost problem. We construct an alternative canonical formulation for the system under study to avoid this nasty feature.

  16. Toughening mystery of natural rubber deciphered by double network incorporating hierarchical structures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiming; Li, Xiangyang; Lu, Jie; Huang, Ningdong; Chen, Liang; Qi, Zeming; Li, Liangbin; Liang, Haiyi

    2014-12-16

    As an indispensible material for modern society, natural rubber possesses peerless mechanical properties such as strength and toughness over its artificial analogues, which remains a mystery. Intensive experimental and theoretical investigations have revealed the self-enhancement of natural rubber due to strain-induced crystallization. However a rigorous model on the self-enhancement, elucidating natural rubber's extraordinary mechanical properties, is obscured by deficient understanding of the local hierarchical structure under strain. With spatially resolved synchrotron radiation micro-beam scanning X-ray diffraction we discover weak oscillation in distributions of strain-induced crystallinity around crack tip for stretched natural rubber film, demonstrating a soft-hard double network structure. The fracture energy enhancement factor obtained by utilizing the double network model indicates an enhancement of toughness by 3 orders. It's proposed that upon stretching spontaneously developed double network structures integrating hierarchy at multi length-scale in natural rubber play an essential role in its remarkable mechanical performance.

  17. Analysis of supplementary controls in damping subsynchronous oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanyam, P.V.; Murty, A.S.R.; Sarkar, B.N.

    1995-12-31

    Analysis and damping of torsional oscillations through thyristor control reactor (TCR) is presented in this paper. The reactive power control is achieved through TCR at the machine terminals. Generator speed deviation signal is used as auxiliary signal and terminal voltage feed back signal as main control signal for TCR. The following control strategies for auxiliary control to TCR have been analyzed. Case 1: Analysis of basic system without damping controls. Case 2: Proportional control (P). Case 3: Proportional control with filter (P+filter). Case 4: Proportional plus derivative control with filter (P+D+filter). Case 5: Proportional plus integral plus derivative control with filter (P+I+D+filter). The main objective of this paper is to discuss the performance of different control strategies for damping torsional oscillations when a generator is connected to an infinite bus via double circuit 400kV transmission line, in which one circuit is series compensated. This configuration is similar to IEEE benchmark two model.

  18. EDFA-based coupled opto-electronic oscillator and its phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, Ertan; Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    EDFA-based coupled opto-electronic oscillator (COEO), an integrated optical and microwave oscillator that can generate picosecond optical pulses, is presented. the phase noise measurements of COEO show better performance than synthesizer-driven mode-locked laser.

  19. Efficacy of a Classroom Integrated Intervention of Phonological Awareness and Word Recognition in "Double-Deficit Children" Learning a Regular Orthography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Andreas; Motsch, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    This study analysed the effects of a classroom intervention focusing on phonological awareness and/or automatized word recognition in children with a deficit in the domains of phonological awareness and rapid automatized naming ("double deficit"). According to the double-deficit hypothesis (Wolf & Bowers, 1999), these children belong…

  20. A Closed-Loop Artificial Pancreas Using a Proportional Integral Derivative with Double Phase Lead Controller Based on a New Nonlinear Model of Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Abbes, Ilham Ben; Richard, Pierre-Yves; Lefebvre, Marie-Anne; Guilhem, Isabelle; Poirier, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Background Most closed-loop insulin delivery systems rely on model-based controllers to control the blood glucose (BG) level. Simple models of glucose metabolism, which allow easy design of the control law, are limited in their parametric identification from raw data. New control models and controllers issued from them are needed. Methods A proportional integral derivative with double phase lead controller was proposed. Its design was based on a linearization of a new nonlinear control model of the glucose–insulin system in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients validated with the University of Virginia/Padova T1DM metabolic simulator. A 36 h scenario, including six unannounced meals, was tested in nine virtual adults. A previous trial database has been used to compare the performance of our controller with their previous results. The scenario was repeated 25 times for each adult in order to take continuous glucose monitoring noise into account. The primary outcome was the time BG levels were in target (70–180 mg/dl). Results Blood glucose values were in the target range for 77% of the time and below 50 mg/dl and above 250 mg/dl for 0.8% and 0.3% of the time, respectively. The low blood glucose index and high blood glucose index were 1.65 and 3.33, respectively. Conclusion The linear controller presented, based on the linearization of a new easily identifiable nonlinear model, achieves good glucose control with low exposure to hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. PMID:23759403

  1. Coupling a Bose condensate to micromechanical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Chandler; Fox, Eli; Flanz, Scott; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2011-05-01

    We describe the construction of a compact apparatus to investigate the interaction of a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate and a micromechanical oscillator. The apparatus uses a double magneto-optical trap, Raman sideband cooling, and evaporative cooling to rapidly produce a 87Rb BEC in close proximity to a high Q membrane. The micromotion of the membrane results in small Zeeman shifts at the location of the BEC due to a magnetic domain attached to the oscillator. Detection of this micromotion by the condensate results in a backaction on the membrane. We investigate prospects of using this backaction to generate nonclassical states of the mechanical oscillator. This work was funded by the DARPA ORCHID program.

  2. Simple driven chaotic oscillators with complex variables.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Delmar; Sprott, J C

    2009-03-01

    Despite a search, no chaotic driven complex-variable oscillators of the form z+f(z)=e(iOmegat) or z+f(z)=e(iOmegat) are found, where f is a polynomial with real coefficients. It is shown that, for analytic functions f(z), driven complex-variable oscillators of the form z+f(z)=e(iOmegat) cannot have chaotic solutions. Seven simple driven chaotic oscillators of the form z+f(z,z)=e(iOmegat) with polynomial f(z,z) are given. Their chaotic attractors are displayed, and Lyapunov spectra are calculated. Attractors for two of the cases have symmetry across the x=-y line. The systems' behavior with Omega as a control parameter in the range of Omega=0.1-2.0 is examined, revealing cases of period doubling, intermittency, chaotic transients, and period adding as routes to chaos. Numerous cases of coexisting attractors are also observed.

  3. Anharmonic oscillators and generalized hypergeometric functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codaccioni, J. P.; Caboz, R.

    1984-08-01

    A large class of anharmonic oscillators represented by the Hamiltonian H(q, p)= 1/2 p2+ 1/2 ω20q2 +λqα (α integer >2) is considered. Owing to an integration technique using the Lagrange-Bürmann theorem, one can give for the period and the action integral of bounded motions closed expressions in terms of energy in the form of very simple generalized hypergeometric functions. Finally an application of the method is given for doubly anharmonic oscillators.

  4. Double beta decay: yesterday, today, tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorini, Ettore

    2011-12-16

    After a brief introduction on the main features of Double Beta Decay (DBD) and on its origin, its importance is stressed in view of the recent results of experiments on neutrino oscillations. The present experimental situation is reported with special reference to direct experiments and to the comparison of their results with theory. The expectations of the future experiments aiming to reach the sensitivity indicated by neutrino oscillations in the inverse hierarchy hypothesis are discussed.

  5. Weathering the Double Whammy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellman, Jane V.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how governing boards can help their institutions weather the "double-whammy" of doing more with less: identify the institution's short-term and long-term challenges; refocus the institution's mission, planning, and programming; assess and integrate the institution's tuition, aid, and outreach strategies; redouble the…

  6. Weathering the Double Whammy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellman, Jane V.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how governing boards can help their institutions weather the "double-whammy" of doing more with less: identify the institution's short-term and long-term challenges; refocus the institution's mission, planning, and programming; assess and integrate the institution's tuition, aid, and outreach strategies; redouble the…

  7. An analytical formulation for phase noise in MEMS oscillators.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Deepak; Seshia, Ashwin

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the design of low-noise MEMS oscillators. This paper presents a new analytical formulation for noise in a MEMS oscillator encompassing essential resonator and amplifier nonlinearities. The analytical expression for oscillator noise is derived by solving a second-order nonlinear stochastic differential equation. This approach is applied to noise modeling of an electrostatically addressed MEMS resonator-based square-wave oscillator in which the resonator and oscillator circuit nonlinearities are integrated into a single modeling framework. By considering the resulting amplitude and phase relations, we derive additional noise terms resulting from resonator nonlinearities. The phase diffusion of an oscillator is studied and the phase diffusion coefficient is proposed as a metric for noise optimization. The proposed nonlinear phase noise model provides analytical insight into the underlying physics and a pathway toward the design optimization for low-noise MEMS oscillators.

  8. Workshop on Harmonic Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D. (Editor); Kim, Y. S. (Editor); Zachary, W. W. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Proceedings of a workshop on Harmonic Oscillators held at the College Park Campus of the University of Maryland on March 25 - 28, 1992 are presented. The harmonic oscillator formalism is playing an important role in many branches of physics. This is the simplest mathematical device which can connect the basic principle of physics with what is observed in the real world. The harmonic oscillator is the bridge between pure and applied physics.

  9. Oscillations in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, A.; Ringuelet, A. E.; Fontenla, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric excitation and propagation of oscillations are analyzed for typical pulsating stars. The linear, plane-parallel approach for the pulsating atmosphere gives a local description of the phenomenon. From the local analysis of oscillations, the minimum frequencies are obtained for radially propagating waves. The comparison of the minimum frequencies obtained for a variety of stellar types is in good agreement with the observed periods of the oscillations. The role of the atmosphere in the globar stellar pulsations is thus emphasized.

  10. Self-oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Alejandro

    2013-04-01

    Physicists are very familiar with forced and parametric resonance, but usually not with self-oscillation, a property of certain dynamical systems that gives rise to a great variety of vibrations, both useful and destructive. In a self-oscillator, the driving force is controlled by the oscillation itself so that it acts in phase with the velocity, causing a negative damping that feeds energy into the vibration: no external rate needs to be adjusted to the resonant frequency. The famous collapse of the Tacoma Narrows bridge in 1940, often attributed by introductory physics texts to forced resonance, was actually a self-oscillation, as was the swaying of the London Millennium Footbridge in 2000. Clocks are self-oscillators, as are bowed and wind musical instruments. The heart is a “relaxation oscillator”, i.e., a non-sinusoidal self-oscillator whose period is determined by sudden, nonlinear switching at thresholds. We review the general criterion that determines whether a linear system can self-oscillate. We then describe the limiting cycles of the simplest nonlinear self-oscillators, as well as the ability of two or more coupled self-oscillators to become spontaneously synchronized (“entrained”). We characterize the operation of motors as self-oscillation and prove a theorem about their limit efficiency, of which Carnot’s theorem for heat engines appears as a special case. We briefly discuss how self-oscillation applies to servomechanisms, Cepheid variable stars, lasers, and the macroeconomic business cycle, among other applications. Our emphasis throughout is on the energetics of self-oscillation, often neglected by the literature on nonlinear dynamical systems.

  11. Oscillations in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, A.; Ringuelet, A. E.; Fontenla, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric excitation and propagation of oscillations are analyzed for typical pulsating stars. The linear, plane-parallel approach for the pulsating atmosphere gives a local description of the phenomenon. From the local analysis of oscillations, the minimum frequencies are obtained for radially propagating waves. The comparison of the minimum frequencies obtained for a variety of stellar types is in good agreement with the observed periods of the oscillations. The role of the atmosphere in the globar stellar pulsations is thus emphasized.

  12. Correlated states of a quantum oscillator acted by short pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1993-01-01

    Correlated squeezed states for a quantum oscillator are constructed based on the method of quantum integrals of motion. The quantum oscillator is acted upon by short duration pulses. Three delta-kickings of frequency are used to model the pulses' dependence upon the time aspects of the frequency of the oscillator. Additionally, the correlation coefficient and quantum variances of operations of coordinates and momenta are written in explicit form.

  13. Quantum wormholes and harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garay, Luis J.

    1993-01-01

    The quantum state of a wormhole can be represented by a path integral over all asymptotically Euclidean four-geometries and all matter fields which have prescribed values, the arguments of the wave function, on a three-surface which divides the space time manifold into two disconnected parts. Minisuperspace models which consist of a homogeneous massless scalar field coupled to a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker space time are considered. Once the path integral over the lapse function is performed, the requirement that the space time be asymptotically Euclidean can be accomplished by fixing the asymptotic gravitational momentum in the remaining path integral. It is argued that there does not exist any wave function which corresponds to asymptotic field configurations such that the effective gravitational constant is negative in the asymptotic region. Then, the wormhole wave functions can be written as linear combinations of harmonic oscillator wave functions.

  14. Membrane Resonance Enables Stable and Robust Gamma Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Moca, Vasile V.; Nikolić, Danko; Singer, Wolf; Mureşan, Raul C.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal mechanisms underlying beta/gamma oscillations (20–80 Hz) are not completely understood. Here, we show that in vivo beta/gamma oscillations in the cat visual cortex sometimes exhibit remarkably stable frequency even when inputs fluctuate dramatically. Enhanced frequency stability is associated with stronger oscillations measured in individual units and larger power in the local field potential. Simulations of neuronal circuitry demonstrate that membrane properties of inhibitory interneurons strongly determine the characteristics of emergent oscillations. Exploration of networks containing either integrator or resonator inhibitory interneurons revealed that: (i) Resonance, as opposed to integration, promotes robust oscillations with large power and stable frequency via a mechanism called RING (Resonance INduced Gamma); resonance favors synchronization by reducing phase delays between interneurons and imposes bounds on oscillation cycle duration; (ii) Stability of frequency and robustness of the oscillation also depend on the relative timing of excitatory and inhibitory volleys within the oscillation cycle; (iii) RING can reproduce characteristics of both Pyramidal INterneuron Gamma (PING) and INterneuron Gamma (ING), transcending such classifications; (iv) In RING, robust gamma oscillations are promoted by slow but are impaired by fast inputs. Results suggest that interneuronal membrane resonance can be an important ingredient for generation of robust gamma oscillations having stable frequency. PMID:23042733

  15. A 1 GHz Oscillator-Type Active Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jennifer L.; Scardelletti, Maximilian; Ponchak, George E.

    2008-01-01

    Wireless sensors are desired for monitoring aircraft engines, automotive engines, industrial machinery, and many other applications. The most important requirement of sensors is that they do not interfere with the environment that they are monitoring. Therefore, wireless sensors must be small, which demands a high level of integration. Sensors that modulate an oscillator active antenna have advantages of small size, high level of integration, and lower packaging cost. Several types of oscillator active antennas have been reported. Ip et al. demonstrated a CPW line fed patch antenna with a feedback loop [1]. No degradation in performance was noticed without a ground plane. A GaAs FET was used in an amplifier/oscillator-based active antenna [2]. An oscillator based on a Cree SiC transistor was designed and characterized in [3]. This paper reports the integration of the SiC Clapp oscillator to a slotline loop antenna.

  16. Double coupled electron shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prada, M.; Platero, G.

    2012-10-01

    A nanoshuttle consisting of two movable islands connected in series and integrated between two contacts is studied. We evaluate the electron transport through the system in the presence of a source-drain voltage with and without an rf excitation. We evaluate the response of the system in terms of the net direct current enhanced by the mechanical motion of the oscillators. An introduction to the charge stability diagram is given in terms of electrochemical potentials and mechanical displacements. The low capacitance of the islands allows the observation of Coulomb blockade even at room temperature. Using radio frequency excitations, the nonlinear dynamics of the system is studied. The oscillators can be tuned to unstable regions where mechanically assisted transfer of electrons can further increase the amplitude of motion, resulting of a net energy being pumped into the system. The resulting amplified response can be exploited to design a mechanical motion detector of nanoscale objects.

  17. Oscillation of Capacitance inside Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Deen; Wu, Jianzhong; Jin, Zhehui

    2011-01-01

    materials for supercapacitors. Although great attention has been given to the anomalous increase of the capacitance as the pore size approaches the ionic dimensions, there remains a lack of full comprehension of the size dependence of the capacitance in nanopores. Here we predict from a classical density functional theory that the capacitance of an ionic-liquid electrolyte inside a nanopore oscillates with a decaying envelope as the pore size increases. The oscillatory behavior can be attributed to the interference of the overlapping electric double layers (EDLs); namely, the maxima in capacitance appear when superposition of the two EDLs is most constructive. The theoretical prediction agreeswell with the experiment when the pore size is less than twice the ionic diameter.Confirmation of the entire oscillatory spectruminvites future experiments with a precise control of the pore size from micro- to mesoscales.

  18. Oscillation of Capacitance inside Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, De-en; Jin, Zhehui; Wu, Jianzhong

    2011-10-26

    Porous carbons of high surface area are promising as cost-effective electrode materials for supercapacitors. Although great attention has been given to the anomalous increase of the capacitance as the pore size approaches the ionic dimensions, there remains a lack of full comprehension of the size dependence of the capacitance in nanopores. Here we predict from a classical density functional theory that the capacitance of an ionic-liquid electrolyte inside a nanopore oscillates with a decaying envelope as the pore size increases. The oscillatory behavior can be attributed to the interference of the overlapping electric double layers (EDLs); namely, the maxima in capacitance appear when superposition of the two EDLs is most constructive. The theoretical prediction agrees well with the experiment when the pore size is less than twice the ionic diameter. Confirmation of the entire oscillatory spectrum invites future experiments with a precise control of the pore size from micro- to mesoscales.

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of coupled oscillator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, David

    1988-03-01

    The phase-locked dynamics of large oscillator arrays is currently of interest because of possible microwave directed energy applications. Straight-forward integration of the coupled dynamical equations for such arrays is computationally costly for the associated multidimensional parameter space, long integration times, various initial conditions and system configurations. Finite difference analogs of the nonlinear differential equations can reproduce their complex dynamical behavior with a 2 to 3 order-of-magnitude improvement in computational time. Here, the applicability of the finite difference technique is demonstrated by solutions of the dynamical equations for 2 coupled oscillators and rings of larger numbers. Parameter studies for these configurations suggest the values of the coupler length and coupling strength required to provide robust phase-locked operation. The finite difference technique can be extended to model large oscillator arrays with other coupling geometries, amplifier arrays, and additional physical phenomena.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of p-channel Si double quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Ko; Kambara, Tomohiro; Oda, Shunri; Kodera, Tetsuo

    2014-09-15

    Lithographically defined p-channel Si single hole transistors (SHTs) and double quantum dot (DQD) devices are fabricated and characterized. Coulomb oscillations are clearly evident at a temperature of 4.2 K. The charging energy and the diameter of the SHT are estimated from the Coulomb diamonds. Honeycomb-like charge stability diagrams are observed from measurements of the DQD devices. Single hole transitions through the DQD are detected using an integrated SHT as a charge sensor, and a few-hole regime of the DQD is observed.

  1. Reinjection laser oscillator and method

    DOEpatents

    McLellan, Edward J.

    1984-01-01

    A uv preionized CO.sub.2 oscillator with integral four-pass amplifier capable of providing 1 to 5 GW laser pulses with pulse widths from 0.1 to 0.5 ns full width at half-maximum (FWHM) is described. The apparatus is operated at any pressure from 1 atm to 10 atm without the necessity of complex high voltage electronics. The reinjection technique employed gives rise to a compact, efficient system that is particularly immune to alignment instabilities with a minimal amount of hardware and complexity.

  2. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Bivens, Hugh M.; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    1994-01-01

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a "telemetered sensor beacon" that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20-100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available.

  3. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Bivens, H.M.; Wessendorf, K.O.

    1994-08-16

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a telemetered sensor beacon'' that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20--100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available. 21 figs.

  4. Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholberg, Kate

    The discovery of neutrino oscillations was recognized by the 2015 Nobel Prize. Tremendous progress has been made in the past two decades on understanding of neutrino mass and mixing properties, yet there are remaining unknowns. This talk presented an overview of neutrino oscillation experiments, with emphasis on recent results from beam and reactor experiments, as well as exciting prospects for the next decades.

  5. Active-bridge oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2001-01-01

    An active bridge oscillator is formed from a differential amplifier where positive feedback is a function of the impedance of one of the gain elements and a relatively low value common emitter resistance. This use of the nonlinear transistor parameter h stabilizes the output and eliminates the need for ALC circuits common to other bridge oscillators.

  6. Investigating Magnetic Oscillations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brueningsen, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    Studies magnetic oscillation using an air track. Ceramic magnets are attached to the cart and also are used as dampeners in place of the springs. The resulting oscillations are fairly sinusoidal and is a good example of simple harmonic motion. (MVL)

  7. Electronically Tuned Microwave Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, Mysore

    1987-01-01

    Features include low phase noise and frequency stability. Bias-tuned, low-phase-noise microwave oscillator circuit based on npn bipolar transistor and dielectric resonator. Operating at frequency of about 8.4 GHz, oscillator adjusted to give low phase noise, relatively flat power output versus frequency, and nearly linear frequency versus bias voltage.

  8. Oscillating Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, M. D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes several oscillating chemical reactions which can be used in undergraduate chemistry laboratories. In one such reaction, ferroin oscillates from red (reducing solution) to blue (oxidizing solution) for about an hour at a frequency which can readily be shown to depend on such factors as the temperature, type of solvent, and concentration…

  9. High power double-scale pulses from a gain-guided double-clad fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haitao; Gao, Gan; Li, Qinghua; Gong, Mali

    2017-03-01

    Generation of high power double-scale pulses from a gain-guided double-clad fiber laser is experimentally demonstrated. By employing the Yb-doped 10/130 double-clad fiber as the gain medium, the laser realizes an output power of 5.1 W and pulse energy of 0.175 µJ at repetition rate of 29.14 MHz. To the best of our knowledge, this average output power is the highest among the reported double-scale pulse oscillators. The autocorrelation trace of pulses contains the short (98 fs) and long (29.5 ps) components, and the spectral bandwidth of the pulse is 27.3 nm. Such double-scale pulses are well suited for seeding the high power MOPA (master oscillator power amplifier) systems, nonlinear frequency conversion and optical coherence tomography.

  10. Investigation of transverse oscillation method.

    PubMed

    Udesen, Jesper; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-05-01

    Conventional ultrasound scanners can display only the axial component of the blood velocity vector, which is a significant limitation when vessels nearly parallel to the skin surface are scanned. The transverse oscillation (TO) method overcomes this limitation by introducing a TO and an axial oscillation in the pulse echo field. The theory behind the creation of the double oscillation pulse echo field is explained as well as the theory behind the estimation of the vector velocity. A parameter study of the method is performed, using the ultrasound simulation program Field II. A virtual linear-array transducer with center frequency 7 MHz and 128 active elements is created, and a virtual blood vessel of radius 6.4 mm is simulated. The performance of the TO method is found around an initial point in the parameter space. The parameters varied are: flow angle, transmit focus depth, receive apodization, pulse length, transverse wave length, number of emissions, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and type of echo-canceling filter used. Using an experimental scanner, the performance of the TO method is evaluated. An experimental flowrig is used to create laminar parabolic flow in a blood mimicking fluid, and the fluid is scanned under different flow-to-beam angles. The relative standard deviation on the transverse velocity estimate is found to be less than 10% for all angles between 50 degrees and 90 degrees. Furthermore, the TO method is evaluated in the flowrig using pulsatile flow, which resembles the flow in the femoral artery. The estimated volume flow as a function of time is compared to the volume flow derived from a conventional axial method at a flow-to-beam angle of 60 degrees. It is found that the method is highly sensitive to the angle between the flow and the beam direction. Also, the choice of echo canceling filter affects the performance significantly.

  11. Damping of thermoacoustic oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Tward, E.; Mason, P.V.

    1982-01-01

    The design criteria for the damping mechanism required to suppress thermoacoustic oscillation is discussed. The theory is presented with formulas stated. Incident acoustic wave generation is illustrated with the pipes and damper positions indicated. Capillary and surge tank functions are described with illustrations and formulas relevant to the thermoacoustic oscillation process. Porous solid dampers were introduced which used glass wool. The problem of damping of the thermoacoustic oscillation appears to be solvable in many applications through the use of an orifice and surge tank. This device can be installed either as a termination in an oscillating pipe or in a branch. It is suggested that such a device be incorporated into cryogenic systems whenever thermoacoustic oscillations could cause a problem.

  12. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  13. Enthalpy of sublimation as measured using a silicon oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Hamza; Pomeroy, J. M.

    In this study, we report the enthalpy of sublimation of common gases (nitrogen, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, neon, krypton, xenon, and water vapor) using a large area silicon oscillator with a sub-ng (~0.027 ng/cm2) mass sensitivity. The double paddle oscillator design enables high frequency stability (17 ppb) at cryogenic temperatures and provides a consistent technique for enthalpy measurements. The enthalpies of sublimation are derived from the rate of mass loss during programmed thermal desorption and are detected as a change in the resonance frequency of the self-tracking oscillator. These measured enthalpy values show excellent agreement with the accepted literature values.

  14. Oscillators and Oscillations in the Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    What is the meaning of an action potential? There must be different answers for neurons that oscillate spontaneously, firing action potentials even in the absence of any synaptic input, and those driven to fire from a resting membrane potential. In spontaneously firing neurons, the occurrence of the next action potential is guaranteed. Only variations in its timing can carry the message. Among cells of this type are all those making up the deeper nuclei of the basal ganglia, including both segments of the globus pallidus, the substantia nigra, and the subthalamic nucleus. These cells receive thousands of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs, but no input is required to maintain the firing of the cells; they fire at approximately the same rate when the synapses are silenced. Instead, synaptic inputs produce brief changes in spike timing and firing rate. The interactions among oscillating cells within and among the basal ganglia nuclei produce a complex resting pattern of activity. Normally, this pattern is highly irregular and decorrelates the network, so that the firing of each cell is statistically independent of the others. This maximizes the potential information that may be transmitted by the basal ganglia to its target structures. In Parkinson’s disease, the resting pattern of activity is dominated by a slow oscillation shared by all the neurons. Treatment with deep brain stimulation may gain its therapeutic value by disrupting this shared pathological oscillation, and restoring independent action by each neuron in the network. PMID:25449134

  15. Quantum harmonic oscillator in a thermal bath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yuhong

    1993-01-01

    The influence functional path-integral treatment of quantum Brownian motion is briefly reviewed. A newly derived exact master equation of a quantum harmonic oscillator coupled to a general environment at arbitrary temperature is discussed. It is applied to the problem of loss of quantum coherence.

  16. Double helicenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachrach, Steven M.

    2016-12-01

    The even double helicenes with 4-12 phenyl groups in each helix were examined at B3LYP-D3/6-311G(d). The double helicenes with 4-10 phenyl rings are less than twice as strained as their component helicenes; the strain results from twisting about the shared naphthyl moiety, with accompanying loss of aromaticity. These compounds should be reasonable synthetic targets, and computed NMR shifts are provided to aid in their characterization.

  17. Ultrastable Cryogenic Microwave Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Anthony G.

    Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are secondary frequency standards in the microwave domain. The best of these oscillators have demonstrated a short term frequency stability in the range 10-14 to a few times 10-16. The main application for these oscillators is as flywheel oscillators for the next generation of passive atomic frequency standards, and as local oscillators in space telemetry ground stations to clean up the transmitter close in phase noise. Fractional frequency stabilities of passive atomic frequency standards are now approaching 3 x10^-14 /τ where τ is the measurement time, limited only by the number of atoms that are being interrogated. This requires an interrogation oscillator whose short-term stability is of the order of 10-14 or better, which cannot be provided by present-day quartz technology. Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are based on resonators which have very high electrical Q-factors. The resolution of the resonator's linewidth is typically limited by electronics noise to about 1ppm and hence Q-factors in excess of 108 are required. As these are only attained in superconducting cavities or sapphire resonators at low temperatures, use of liquid helium cooling is mandatory, which has so far restricted these oscillators to the research or metrology laboratory. Recently, there has been an effort to dispense with the need for liquid helium and make compact flywheel oscillators for the new generation of primary frequency standards. Work is under way to achieve this goal in space-borne and mobile liquid-nitrogen-cooled systems. The best cryogenic oscillators developed to date are the ``whispering gallery'' (WG) mode sapphire resonator-oscillators of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the University of Western Australia (UWA), as well as Stanford University's superconducting cavity stabilized oscillator (SCSO). All of these oscillators have demonstrated frequency

  18. Inhibitory control of intrinsic hippocampal oscillations?

    PubMed

    Fischer, Yacov; Dürr, Roland

    2003-08-22

    An oscillatory mode of activity is a basic operational mode of the hippocampus. Such activity involves the concurrent expression of several rhythmic processes, of which theta (4-15 Hz) and gamma (20-80 Hz) oscillations are prominent and considered to be important for cognitive processing. In an experimental model that preserves the intrinsic network oscillator, exhibiting the dependency on cholinergic inputs and consequent expression of concurrent theta and gamma oscillations, we investigate the intrinsic mechanisms underlying such integrated hippocampal network responses. This experimental framework is used here to examine the currently prevailing dogma, that interneurons control hippocampal oscillations. The spontaneous response of individual pyramidal cells (in areas CA3 and CA1) and interneurons (area CA3), during oscillatory activity, was monitored intracellularly. Particular attention was given to the initiation of interneuron discharge during oscillations, to the impact of the synaptic output of discharging interneurons on the oscillatory activity, and to the time at which interneurons discharge in relation to the oscillatory cycles. Analysis of the spontaneous patterns of activity in individual interneurons and their outcome, during the oscillatory activity, revealed that interneuron activity is incompatible with initiating, pacing or determining the oscillatory frequencies, although contributing to the apparent rhythmic patterns. Moreover, our results show that non-interneuronal members of the network control interneuron activity. We therefore suggest that the activity of the excitatory cells, i.e., principle cells, is critical toward the initiation, pacing and synchronization of intrinsic hippocampal network oscillations.

  19. Experimental investigation of a double-diffused MOS structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H. C.; Halsor, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Self-aligned polysilicon gate technology was applied to double-diffused MOS (DMOS) construction in a manner that retains processing simplicity and effectively eliminates parasitic overlap capacitance because of the self-aligning feature. Depletion mode load devices with the same dimensions as the DMOS transistors were integrated. The ratioless feature results in smaller dimension load devices, allowing for higher density integration with no increase in the processing complexity of standard MOS technology. A number of inverters connected as ring oscillators were used as a vehicle to test the performance and to verify the anticipated benefits. The propagation time-power dissipation product and process related parameters were measured and evaluated. This report includes (1) details of the process; (2) test data and design details for the DMOS transistor, the load device, the inverter, the ring oscillator, and a shift register with a novel tapered geometry for the output stages; and (3) an analytical treatment of the effect of the distributed silicon gate resistance and capacitance on the speed of DMOS transistors.

  20. Quasi-Fibonacci oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilik, A. M.; Kachurik, I. I.; Rebesh, A. P.

    2010-06-01

    We study the properties of the sequences of the energy eigenvalues for some generalizations of q-deformed oscillators including the p, q-oscillator, and the three-, four- and five-parameter deformed oscillators given in the literature. It is shown that most of the considered models belong to the class of so-called Fibonacci oscillators for which any three consecutive energy levels satisfy the relation En + 1 = λEn + ρEn - 1 with real constants λ, ρ. On the other hand, for a certain μ-oscillator known since 1993, we prove its non-Fibonacci nature. Possible generalizations of the three-term Fibonacci relation are discussed, among which for the μ-oscillator we choose, as the most adequate, the so-called quasi-Fibonacci (or local Fibonacci) property of the energy levels. The property is encoded in the three-term quasi-Fibonacci (QF) relation with the non-constant, n-dependent coefficients λ and ρ. Various aspects of the QF relation are elaborated for the μ-oscillator and some of its extensions.

  1. Boxing with neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.J. |; Weiler, T.J.

    1999-06-01

    We develop a characterization of neutrino oscillations based on the coefficients of the oscillating terms. These coefficients are individually observable; although they are quartic in the elements of the unitary mixing matrix, they are independent of the conventions chosen for the angle and phase parametrization of the mixing matrix. We call these reparametrization-invariant observables {open_quotes}boxes{close_quotes} because of their geometric relation to the mixing matrix, and because of their association with the Feynman box diagram that describes oscillations in field theory. The real parts of the boxes are the coefficients for the {ital CP}- or {ital T}-even oscillation modes, while the imaginary parts are the coefficients for the {ital CP}- or {ital T}-odd oscillation modes. Oscillation probabilities are linear in the boxes, so measurements can straightforwardly determine values for the boxes (which can then be manipulated to yield magnitudes of mixing matrix elements). We examine the effects of unitarity on the boxes and discuss the reduction of the number of boxes to a minimum basis set. For the three-generation case, we explicitly construct the basis. Using the box algebra, we show that {ital CP} violation may be inferred from measurements of neutrino flavor mixing even when the oscillatory factors have averaged. The framework presented here will facilitate general analyses of neutrino oscillations among n{ge}3 flavors. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Trigger circuit forces immediate synchronization of free-running oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagano, S.

    1975-01-01

    Device provides positive triggering for inverter synchronization in uninterruptible power supplies. Integrated-circuit oscillator frequency may be higher, lower, or the same as that of the synch pulse and is always synchronized by first clock pulse.

  3. Silicon-Germanium Voltage-Controlled Oscillator at 105 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Alden; Larocca, Tim; Chang, M. Frank; Samoska, Lorene A.

    2011-01-01

    A group at UCLA, in collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has designed a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) created specifically for a compact, integrated, electronically tunable frequency generator useable for submillimeter- wave science instruments operating in extreme cold environments.

  4. Observation of Quasichanneling Oscillations

    DOE PAGES

    Wistisen, T. N.; Mikkelsen, R. E.; Uggerhoj, U. I.; ...

    2017-07-13

    Here, we report on the first experimental observations of quasichanneling oscillations, recently seen in simulations and described theoretically. Although above-barrier particles penetrating a single crystal are generally seen as behaving almost as in an amorphous substance, distinct oscillation peaks nevertheless appear for particles in that category. The quasichanneling oscillations were observed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory by aiming 20.35 GeV positrons and electrons at a thin silicon crystal bent to a radius of R = 0.15 m, exploiting the quasimosaic effect. For electrons, two relatively faint quasichanneling peaks were observed, while for positrons, seven quasichanneling peaks were clearly identified.

  5. Damping of thermoacoustic oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tward, E.; Mason, P. V.

    1982-01-01

    A commonly encountered and troublesome problem in cryogenic systems is related to the occurrence of thermoacoustic oscillations (TAO). The oscillations are accompanied by large heat fluxes which can cause large increases in the boiloff from dewars. Such a boiloff can lead to a serious degradation in performance. It appears, therefore, highly advisable to incorporate mechanisms for damping TAO in those parts of the system where there oscillations might occur. The present investigation is concerned with the criteria for the design of such damping mechanisms. Attention is given to the theory regrading the suppression of TAO, a damper consisting of a capillary with a surge tank, and porous solid dampers.

  6. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, W.C.

    1996-06-01

    In the past several years, a number of experiments have searched for neutrino oscillations, where a neutrino of one type (say {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}) spontaneously transforms into a neutrino of another type (say {bar {nu}}{sub e}). For this phenomenon to occur, neutrinos must be massive and the apparent conservation law of lepton families must be violated. In 1995 the LSND experiment published data showing candidate events that are consistent with {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations. Additional data are reported here which provide stronger evidence for neutrino oscillations.

  7. Undamped fritting oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, V. A.

    2013-01-01

    Fritting oscillations in a glasslike film of methane and chlorine rapidly attenuate. A change in the boundary condition makes them weakly damped, while dosed synchronized injections of vacancies with high-energy particles make it possible to obtain a self-oscillatory system. The mechanism of fritting oscillations is described in detail. An oscillating dissipative structure is formed in the active medium of nonequilibrium glass supersaturated with vacancies and exhibiting a liquid-like behavior. A capillary flow of the medium plays a special role in its evolution.

  8. Observation of Quasichanneling Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wistisen, T. N.; Mikkelsen, R. E.; Uggerhøj, U. I.; Wienands, U.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Gessner, S.; Hogan, M. J.; Noble, R. J.; Holtzapple, R.; Tucker, S.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Sytov, A.; SLAC E-212 Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    We report on the first experimental observations of quasichanneling oscillations, recently seen in simulations and described theoretically. Although above-barrier particles penetrating a single crystal are generally seen as behaving almost as in an amorphous substance, distinct oscillation peaks nevertheless appear for particles in that category. The quasichanneling oscillations were observed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory by aiming 20.35 GeV positrons and electrons at a thin silicon crystal bent to a radius of R =0.15 m , exploiting the quasimosaic effect. For electrons, two relatively faint quasichanneling peaks were observed, while for positrons, seven quasichanneling peaks were clearly identified.

  9. Solar atmosphere neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G.L.; Lisi, E.; Mirizzi, A.; Montanino, D.; Serpico, P.D.; /Fermilab

    2007-02-01

    The Sun is a source of high energy neutrinos (E > 10 GeV) produced by cosmic ray interactions in the solar atmosphere. We study the impact of three-flavor oscillations on the solar atmosphere neutrino fluxes observable at Earth. We find that peculiar matter oscillation effects in the Sun do exist, but are significantly suppressed by averaging over the production region and over the neutrino and antineutrino components. In particular, the relation between the neutrino fluxes at the Sun and at the Earth can be approximately expressed in terms of phase-averaged ''vacuum'' oscillations, dominated by a single mixing parameter (the angle {theta}{sub 23}).

  10. Strong feedback limit of the Goodwin circadian oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woller, Aurore; Gonze, Didier; Erneux, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The three-variable Goodwin model constitutes a prototypical oscillator based on a negative feedback loop. It was used as a minimal model for circadian oscillations. Other core models for circadian clocks are variants of the Goodwin model. The Goodwin oscillator also appears in many studies of coupled oscillator networks because of its relative simplicity compared to other biophysical models involving a large number of variables and parameters. Because the synchronization properties of Goodwin oscillators still remain difficult to explore mathematically, further simplifications of the Goodwin model have been sought. In this paper, we investigate the strong negative feedback limit of Goodwin equations by using asymptotic techniques. We find that Goodwin oscillations approach a sequence of decaying exponentials that can be described in terms of a single-variable leaky integrated-and-fire model.

  11. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Ettore

    2007-06-01

    The recent results showing the presence of neutrino oscillations clearly indicate that the difference between the squared mass of neutrinos of different flavors is different from zero, but are unable to determine the nature and the absolute value of the neutrino mass. Neutrinoless double beta decay (DBD) is at present the most powerful tool to ascertain if the neutrino is a Majorana particle and to determine under this condition the absolute value of its mass. The results already obtained in this lepton violating process will be reported and the two presently running DBD experiments briefly discussed. The future second generation experiments will be reviewed with special emphasis to those already partially approved. In conclusion the peculiar and interdisciplinary nature of these searches will be stressed in their exciting aim to discover if neutrino is Dirac or Majorana particle.

  12. Hydrochloric acid modification process for fabricating Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x THz oscillator stack on-chip coupled to THz detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikata, Tsubasa; Kato, Takahiro; Kotaki, Yukio; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Kawakami, Akira; Yasui, Kanji

    2014-01-01

    We fabricated Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) integrating of an oscillator and a detector by double side photolithography and material modification with a dilutehydrochloric acid solution (pH = 1.65) within a monolithic Bi-2212 crystal. The dilute hydrochloric solution modifies Bi-2212 to insulating BiOCl. Various lateral dimensions of the oscillator IJJ from 45 × 8 to 95 × 30 µm2 were formed; all of the detectors were about 15 × 10 to 15 × 30 µm2 in lateral dimensions. These stacks have 180-416 junctions. Zero voltage current for the detector stack was measured at 77 K while sweeping a bias voltage in the oscillator stack. The zero voltage current of the detector stack was strongly suppressed when a kink structure in the current-voltage curve of the oscillator stacks appeared. This indicates that the oscillator stack emits radiation at this voltage. From the Josephson voltage-frequency relation, it is found that the voltage corresponds to about 0.5-1 THz.

  13. W-band monolithic oscillator using InAlAs/InGaAs HEMT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, Y.; Pavlidis, D.; Tutt, M.; Ng, G. I.; Lai, R.

    1990-01-01

    A W-band monolithic integrated oscillator circuit was designed and fabricated using submicron HEMT technology. The oscillation frequency was around 81 GHz and the power was -7 dBm at the chip level. This is the first report of an InAlAs/InGaAs monolithic oscillator operating at the W-band.

  14. Oscillating fluid power generator

    DOEpatents

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  15. Entraining synthetic genetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemakers, Alexandre; Buldú, Javier M.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.; de Luis, Oscar; Izquierdo, Adriana; Coloma, Antonio

    2009-09-01

    We propose a new approach for synchronizing a population of synthetic genetic oscillators, which consists in the entrainment of a colony of repressilators by external modulation. We present a model where the repressilator dynamics is affected by periodic changes in temperature. We introduce an additional plasmid in the bacteria in order to correlate the temperature variations with the enhancement of the transcription rate of a certain gene. This can be done by introducing a promoter that is related to the heat shock response. This way, the expression of that gene results in a protein that enhances the overall oscillations. Numerical results show coherent oscillations of the population for a certain range of the external frequency, which is in turn related to the natural oscillation frequency of the modified repressilator. Finally we study the transient times related with the loss of synchronization and we discuss possible applications in biotechnology of large-scale production coupled to synchronization events induced by heat shock.

  16. Quasivacuum solar neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Montanino, D.; Palazzo, A.

    2000-12-01

    We discuss in detail solar neutrino oscillations with δm2/E in the range [10-10,10-7] eV2/MeV. In this range, which interpolates smoothly between the so-called ``just-so'' and ``Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein'' oscillation regimes, neutrino flavor transitions are increasingly affected by matter effects as δm2/E increases. As a consequence, the usual vacuum approximation has to be improved through the matter-induced corrections, leading to a ``quasivacuum'' oscillation regime. We perform accurate numerical calculations of such corrections, using both the true solar density profile and its exponential approximation. Matter effects are shown to be somewhat overestimated in the latter case. We also discuss the role of Earth crossing and of energy smearing. Prescriptions are given to implement the leading corrections in the quasivacuum oscillation range. Finally, the results are applied to a global analysis of solar ν data in a three-flavor framework.

  17. Neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kenzo

    2000-12-01

    The present status of neutrino oscillation experiments and prospects of forthcoming experiments are reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the recent results from Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino and solar neutrino observations. .

  18. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing [Houston, TX; Zettl, Alexander K [Kensington, TX

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  19. Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, G.; Giorgini, M.

    2005-04-01

    The latest results from the Soudan 2, MACRO and SuperKamiokande experiments on atmospheric neutrino oscillations are summarised and discussed. In particular a discussion is made on the Monte Carlo simulations used for the atmospheric neutrino flux.

  20. Intracellular Oscillations and Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beta, Carsten; Kruse, Karsten

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic processes in living cells are highly organized in space and time. Unraveling the underlying molecular mechanisms of spatiotemporal pattern formation remains one of the outstanding challenges at the interface between physics and biology. A fundamental recurrent pattern found in many different cell types is that of self-sustained oscillations. They are involved in a wide range of cellular functions, including second messenger signaling, gene expression, and cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, we review recent developments in the field of cellular oscillations and focus on cases where concepts from physics have been instrumental for understanding the underlying mechanisms. We consider biochemical and genetic oscillators as well as oscillations that arise from chemo-mechanical coupling. Finally, we highlight recent studies of intracellular waves that have increasingly moved into the focus of this research field.

  1. A novel photonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a novel oscillator for photonic RF systems. This oscillator is capable of generating high-frequency signals up to 70 GHz in both electrical and optical domains and is a special voltage-controlled oscillator with an optical output port. It can be used to make a phase-locked loop (PLL) and perform all functions that a PLL is capable of for photonic systems. It can be synchronized to a reference source by means of optical injection locking, electrical injection locking, and PLL. It can also be self-phase locked and self-injection locked to generate a high-stability photonic RF reference. Its applications include high-frequency reference regeneration and distribution, high-gain frequency multiplication, comb-frequecy and square-wave generation, carrier recovery, and clock recovery. We anticipate that such photonic voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) will be as important to photonic RF systems as electrical VCOs are to electrical RF systems.

  2. Oscillating Filaments. I. Oscillation and Geometrical Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Heigl, Stefan; Burkert, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    We study the stability of filaments in equilibrium between gravity and internal as well as external pressure using the grid-based AMR code RAMSES. A homogeneous, straight cylinder below a critical line mass is marginally stable. However, if the cylinder is bent, such as with a slight sinusoidal perturbation, an otherwise stable configuration starts to oscillate, is triggered into fragmentation, and collapses. This previously unstudied behavior allows a filament to fragment at any given scale, as long as it has slight bends. We call this process “geometrical fragmentation.” In our realization, the spacing between the cores matches the wavelength of the sinusoidal perturbation, whereas up to now, filaments were thought to be only fragmenting on the characteristic scale set by the mass-to-line ratio. Using first principles, we derive the oscillation period as well as the collapse timescale analytically. To enable a direct comparison with observations, we study the line-of-sight velocity for different inclinations. We show that the overall oscillation pattern can hide the infall signature of cores.

  3. Dysrhythmias of the respiratory oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paydarfar, David; Buerkel, Daniel M.

    1995-03-01

    refractory periods. The same system can be perturbed to a state in which amplitude of oscillation is attenuated or abolished. We have characterized critical perturbations which induce transitions between these two states, giving rise to patterns of dysrhythmic activity that are similar to those seen in the experiments. We illustrate the importance of noise in initiation and termination of rhythm, comparable to normal respiratory rhythm intermixed with spontaneous dysrhythmias. In the BvP system the incidence and duration of dysrhythmia is shown to be strongly influenced by the level of noise. These studies should lead to greater understanding of rhythmicity and integrative responses of the respiratory control system, and provide insight into disturbances in control mechanisms that cause apnea and aspiration in clinical disease states.

  4. [Double responses].

    PubMed

    Motté, G; Dinanian, S; Sebag, C; Drieu, L; Slama, M

    1995-12-01

    Double response is a rare electrocardiographic phenomenon requiring two atrioventricular conduction pathways with very different electrophysiological properties. Double ventricular responses are the usual manifestation: an atrial depolarisation (spontaneous or provoked, anticipated or not) is followed by a first ventricular response dependent on an accessory pathway or a rapid nodal pathway and then a second response resulting from sufficiently delayed transmission through a nodal pathway for the ventricles to have recovered their excitability when the second wave of activation reaches them. A simple curiosity when isolated and occurring under unusual conditions, particularly during electrophysiological investigation of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the double response may initiate symptomatic non-reentrant junctional tachycardia when associated with nodal duality and repeating from atria in sinus rhythm. The functional incapacity and resistance to antiarrhythmic therapy may require referral for ablation of the slow pathway.

  5. Current oscillations in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, Brittany

    We develop a simple phenomenological model to describe current oscillations in single, conically shaped nanopores. The model utilizes aspects of reaction rate theory, electrochemical oscillators, and nonlinear dynamical systems. Time series of experimental data were analyzed and compared to time series simulated using the model equations. There is good qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation, though the model needs to be improved in order to obtain better quantitative agreement.

  6. Ultrastable Multigigahertz Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Novel photonic oscillator developed to serve as ultrastable source of microwave and millimeter-wave signals. In system, oscillations generated photonically, then converted to electronic form. Includes self-mode-locked semiconductor laser producing stream of pulses, detected and fed back to laser as input. System also includes fiber-optic-delay-line discriminator, which detects fluctuations of self-mode-locking frequency and generates error signal used in negative-feedback loop to stabilize pulse-repetition frequency.

  7. Double nonlinear resonance in ferromagnets and other dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakai, A. S.

    2010-08-01

    The phenomenon of double nonlinear resonances in nonlinear oscillators of general type is described. The results are used to describe a double nonlinear ferromagnetic resonance in a uniaxial ferromagnet. The possibility of a similar resonance in the system of brain biocurrents is considered.

  8. On The Chaotic Dynamics Of Multiple Double Layers In Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan, L. M.; Chiriac, S. A.; Aflori, M.; Dimitriu, D. G.

    2007-04-23

    When a multiple double layers structure in plasma is driven far from equilibrium, it passes into a chaotic state, characterized by uncorrelated oscillations of the plasma parameters. Two scenarios of transition to chaos were identified: the Feigenbaum scenario (cascade of period doubling bifurcations) and the intermittency scenario.

  9. Rocket Engine Oscillation Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tom; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Rocket engine oscillating data can reveal many physical phenomena ranging from unsteady flow and acoustics to rotordynamics and structural dynamics. Because of this, engine diagnostics based on oscillation data should employ both signal analysis and physical modeling. This paper describes an approach to rocket engine oscillation diagnostics, types of problems encountered, and example problems solved. Determination of design guidelines and environments (or loads) from oscillating phenomena is required during initial stages of rocket engine design, while the additional tasks of health monitoring, incipient failure detection, and anomaly diagnostics occur during engine development and operation. Oscillations in rocket engines are typically related to flow driven acoustics, flow excited structures, or rotational forces. Additional sources of oscillatory energy are combustion and cavitation. Included in the example problems is a sampling of signal analysis tools employed in diagnostics. The rocket engine hardware includes combustion devices, valves, turbopumps, and ducts. Simple models of an oscillating fluid system or structure can be constructed to estimate pertinent dynamic parameters governing the unsteady behavior of engine systems or components. In the example problems it is shown that simple physical modeling when combined with signal analysis can be successfully employed to diagnose complex rocket engine oscillatory phenomena.

  10. Periodically kicked hard oscillators.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, G. A.; Gonzalez, D. L.; Magnasco, M. O.; Mindlin, G. B.; Piro, O.; Santillan, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    A model of a hard oscillator with analytic solution is presented. Its behavior under periodic kicking, for which a closed form stroboscopic map can be obtained, is studied. It is shown that the general structure of such an oscillator includes four distinct regions; the outer two regions correspond to very small or very large amplitude of the external force and match the corresponding regions in soft oscillators (invertible degree one and degree zero circle maps, respectively). There are two new regions for intermediate amplitude of the forcing. Region 3 corresponds to moderate high forcing, and is intrinsic to hard oscillators; it is characterized by discontinuous circle maps with a flat segment. Region 2 (low moderate forcing) has a certain resemblance to a similar region in soft oscillators (noninvertible degree one circle maps); however, the limit set of the dynamics in this region is not a circle, but a branched manifold, obtained as the tangent union of a circle and an interval; the topological structure of this object is generated by the finite size of the repelling set, and is therefore also intrinsic to hard oscillators.

  11. Oscillating asymmetric dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulin, Sean; Yu, Hai-Bo; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of dark matter (DM) particle-antiparticle oscillations within the context of asymmetric DM. Oscillations arise due to small DM number-violating Majorana-type mass terms, and can lead to recoupling of annihilation after freeze-out and washout of the DM density. Asymmetric DM oscillations "interpolate" between symmetric and asymmetric DM freeze-out scenarios, and allow for a larger DM model-building parameter space. We derive the density matrix equations for DM oscillations and freeze-out from first principles using nonequilibrium field theory, and our results are qualitatively different than in previous studies. DM dynamics exhibits particle-vs-antiparticle "flavor" effects, depending on the interaction type, analogous to neutrino oscillations in a medium. "Flavor-sensitive" DM interactions include scattering or annihilation through a new vector boson, while "flavor-blind" interactions include scattering or s-channel annihilation through a new scalar boson. In particular, we find that flavor-sensitive annihilation does not recouple when coherent oscillations begin, and that flavor-blind scattering does not lead to decoherence.

  12. Oscillations up to 712 GHz in InAs/AlSb resonant-tunneling diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.; Mahoney, L. J.; Molvar, K. M.; Soderstrom, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Oscillations have been obtained at frequencies from 100 to 712 GHz in InAs/AlSb double-barrier resonant-tunneling diodes at room temperature. The measured power density at 360 GHz was 90 W/sq cm, which is 50 times that generated by GaAs/AlAs diodes at essentially the same frequency. The oscillation at 712 GHz represents the highest frequency reported to date from a solid-state electronic oscillator at room temperature.

  13. Differential Resonant Ring YIG Tuned Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Ronald A.

    2010-01-01

    A differential SiGe oscillator circuit uses a resonant ring-oscillator topology in order to electronically tune the oscillator over multi-octave bandwidths. The oscillator s tuning is extremely linear, because the oscillator s frequency depends on the magnetic tuning of a YIG sphere, whose resonant frequency is equal to a fundamental constant times the DC magnetic field. This extremely simple circuit topology uses two coupling loops connecting a differential pair of SiGe bipolar transistors into a feedback configuration using a YIG tuned filter creating a closed-loop ring oscillator. SiGe device technology is used for this oscillator in order to keep the transistor s 1/f noise to an absolute minimum in order to achieve minimum RF phase noise. The single-end resonant ring oscillator currently has an advantage in fewer parts, but when the oscillation frequency is greater than 16 GHz, the package s parasitic behavior couples energy to the sphere and causes holes and poor phase noise performance. This is because the coupling to the YIG is extremely low, so that the oscillator operates at near the unloaded Q. With the differential resonant ring oscillator, the oscillation currents are just in the YIG coupling mechanisms. The phase noise is even better, and the physical size can be reduced to permit monolithic microwave integrated circuit oscillators. This invention is a YIG tuned oscillator circuit making use of a differential topology to simultaneously achieve an extremely broadband electronic tuning range and ultra-low phase noise. As a natural result of its differential circuit topology, all reactive elements, such as tuning stubs, which limit tuning bandwidth by contributing excessive open loop phase shift, have been eliminated. The differential oscillator s open-loop phase shift is associated with completely non-dispersive circuit elements such as the physical angle of the coupling loops, a differential loop crossover, and the high-frequency phase shift of the n

  14. The electronic properties of concentric double quantum ring and possibility designing XOR gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Badry, Lafy. F.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper I have investigated the Aharonov-Bohm oscillation in concentric double quantum ring. The outer ring attached to leads while the inner ring only tunnel-coupled to the outer ring. The effect of inner ring on electron transport properties through outer ring studied and found that the conductance spectrum consists of two types of oscillations. One is the normal Aharonov-Bohm oscillation, and other is a small oscillations superposed above AB oscillation. The AB oscillation utilized to designing nanoscale XOR gate by choosing the magnetic flux and tuning the gate voltages which realization XOR gate action.

  15. GaAs FET microwave oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautereau, J.-F.

    Techniques for establishing the temporal stability of functioning of GaAs FETs are presented, along with a theory of negative resistance oscillators and an analysis of noise in GaAs FETs. Conditions of stable oscillation are discussed, as are techniques for designing solid state devices. An analog microwave circuit is described and is characterized in terms of inherent nonlinearities, which allows precise determination of the period, power, and harmonic distortion for the output signal. A coefficient is defined for expressing low frequency noise in microwave terms and methods for minimizing oscillator noise are presented, based on results from experimentation in X-band and low frequency devices. A computer model is developed which includes allowances for constantly repartitioned circuitry looping impedances. The model is concluded to be useful for the design of integrated monolithic microwave circuits.

  16. Double Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-23

    A double crater, called a crater doublet, is seen in the bottom right part of this image from NASA Dawn spacecraft of asteroid Vesta. This crater doublet was likely formed by the simultaneous impact of two fragments of a split projectile.

  17. Tunneling control using classical non-linear oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Susmita; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    2014-04-24

    A quantum particle is placed in symmetric double well potential which is coupled to a classical non-linear oscillator via a coupling function. With different spatial symmetry of the coupling and under various controlling fashions, the tunneling of the quantum particle can be enhanced or suppressed, or totally destroyed.

  18. Planetary period oscillations in Saturn's magnetosphere: Evolution of magnetic oscillation properties from southern summer to post-equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, D. J.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Dougherty, M. K.; Lamy, L.; Provan, G.; Southwood, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the evolution of the properties of planetary period magnetic field oscillations observed by the Cassini spacecraft in Saturn's magnetosphere over the interval from late 2004 to early 2011, spanning equinox in mid-2009. Oscillations within the inner quasi-dipolar region ( L < 12 ) consist of two components of close but distinct periods, corresponding essentially to the periods of the northern and southern Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) modulations. These give rise to modulations of the combined amplitude and phase at the beat period of the two oscillations, from which the individual oscillation amplitudes and phases (and hence periods) can be determined. Phases are also determined from northern and southern polar oscillation data when available. Results indicate that the southern-period amplitude declines modestly over this interval, while the northern-period amplitude approximately doubles to become comparable with the southern-period oscillations during the equinox interval, producing clear effects in pass-to-pass oscillation properties. It is also shown that the periods of the two oscillations strongly converge over the equinox interval, such that the beat period increases significantly from ~20 to more than 100 days, but that they do not coalesce or cross during the interval investigated, contrary to recent reports of the behavior of the SKR periods. Examination of polar oscillation data for similar beat phase effects yields a null result within a ~10% upper limit on the relative amplitude of northern-period oscillations in the south and vice versa. This result strongly suggests a polar origin for the oscillation periods.

  19. Planetary period oscillations in Saturn's magnetosphere: Evolution of magnetic oscillation properties from southern summer to post-equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, D. J.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Dougherty, M. K.; Lamy, L.; Provan, G.; Southwood, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the evolution of the properties of planetary period magnetic field oscillations observed by the Cassini spacecraft in Saturn's magnetosphere over the interval from late 2004 to early 2011, spanning equinox in mid-2009. Oscillations within the inner quasi-dipolar region (L ≤ 12) consist of two components of close but distinct periods, corresponding essentially to the periods of the northern and southern Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) modulations. These give rise to modulations of the combined amplitude and phase at the beat period of the two oscillations, from which the individual oscillation amplitudes and phases (and hence periods) can be determined. Phases are also determined from northern and southern polar oscillation data when available. Results indicate that the southern-period amplitude declines modestly over this interval, while the northern-period amplitude approximately doubles to become comparable with the southern-period oscillations during the equinox interval, producing clear effects in pass-to-pass oscillation properties. It is also shown that the periods of the two oscillations strongly converge over the equinox interval, such that the beat period increases significantly from ˜20 to more than 100 days, but that they do not coalesce or cross during the interval investigated, contrary to recent reports of the behavior of the SKR periods. Examination of polar oscillation data for similar beat phase effects yields a null result within a ˜10% upper limit on the relative amplitude of northern-period oscillations in the south and vice versa. This result strongly suggests a polar origin for the two oscillation periods.

  20. Calcium oscillations in neurons.

    PubMed

    Friel, D D

    1995-01-01

    Oscillations in the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) have been described in a variety of cells. In some cases, [Ca2+]i oscillations reflect cycles of membrane depolarization and voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry. In others, they are caused by periodic Ca2+ uptake and release by internal stores, with little immediate requirement for external Ca2+. A third type of [Ca2+]i oscillation is typified by caffeine-induced oscillations in sympathetic neurons. Here, the oscillations depend on the interplay between Ca2+ transport across the plasma membrane and transport by a caffeine-sensitive store. These oscillations can occur at a steady membrane potential and are blocked by ryanodine (1 microM), indicating that they do not result from voltage-dependent changes in Ca2+ entry but do require Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release. Entry of Ca2+ from the external medium is important during all phases of the oscillatory cycle except the rapid upstroke, which is dominated by Ca2+ release from an internal store. It is proposed that caffeine-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations are cyclic perturbations of [Ca2+]i caused by exchange of Ca2+ between the cytosol and the caffeine-sensitive store: net Ca2+ loss from the store increases [Ca2+]i transiently above its steady-state value ([Ca2+]ss), whereas net accumulation of Ca2+ by the store transiently depresses [Ca2+]i below [Ca2+]ss. The effects of rapid removal of Ca2+ and caffeine on the rate of change of [Ca2+]i (d[Ca2+]i/dt) provide estimates of the rates of net Ca2+ entry and (caffeine-sensitive) Ca2+ release and information on the way these rates vary during the oscillatory cycle.

  1. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Boris

    2012-06-01

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures. Neutrinos and photons are by far the most abundant elementary particles in the universe. Thus, if we would like to comprehend the universe, we must understand the neutrinos. Of course, studying the neutrinos is challenging, since the only known forces through which these electrically-neutral leptons interact are the weak force and gravity. Consequently, interactions of neutrinos in a detector are very rare events, so that very large detectors and intense neutrino sources are needed to make experiments feasible. Nevertheless, we have confirmed that the weak interactions of neutrinos are correctly described by the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particle physics. Moreover, in the last 14 years, we have discovered that neutrinos have nonzero masses, and that leptons mix. These discoveries have been based on the observation that neutrinos can change from one 'flavor' to another - the phenomenon known as neutrino oscillation. We shall explain the physics of neutrino oscillation, deriving the probability of oscillation in a new way. We shall also provide a very brief guide to references that can be used to study some major neutrino-physics topics other than neutrino oscillation.

  2. Numerical linearized MHD model of flapping oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Ivanov, I. B.; Semenov, V. S.; Erkaev, N. V.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Kink-like magnetotail flapping oscillations in a Harris-like current sheet with earthward growing normal magnetic field component Bz are studied by means of time-dependent 2D linearized MHD numerical simulations. The dispersion relation and two-dimensional eigenfunctions are obtained. The results are compared with analytical estimates of the double-gradient model, which are found to be reliable for configurations with small Bz up to values ˜ 0.05 of the lobe magnetic field. Coupled with previous results, present simulations confirm that the earthward/tailward growth direction of the Bz component acts as a switch between stable/unstable regimes of the flapping mode, while the mode dispersion curve is the same in both cases. It is confirmed that flapping oscillations may be triggered by a simple Gaussian initial perturbation of the Vz velocity.

  3. Supernova neutrino oscillations: A simple analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Montanino, D.; Palazzo, A.

    2002-04-01

    Analyses of observable supernova neutrino oscillation effects require the calculation of the electron (anti)neutrino survival probability Pee along a given supernova matter density profile. We propose a simple analytical prescription for Pee, based on a double-exponential form for the crossing probability and on the concept of maximum violation of adiabaticity. In the case of two-flavor transitions, the prescription is shown to reproduce accurately, in the whole neutrino oscillation parameter space, the results of exact numerical calculations for generic (realistic or power-law) profiles. The analytical approach is then generalized to cover three-flavor transitions with (direct or inverse) mass spectrum hierarchy, and to incorporate Earth matter effects. Compact analytical expressions, explicitly showing the symmetry properties of Pee, are provided for practical calculations.

  4. Photonics-based microwave frequency measurement using a double-sideband suppressed-carrier modulation and an InP integrated ring-assisted Mach-Zehnder interferometer filter.

    PubMed

    Fandiño, Javier S; Muñoz, Pascual

    2013-11-01

    A photonic system capable of estimating the unknown frequency of a CW microwave tone is presented. The core of the system is a complementary optical filter monolithically integrated in InP, consisting of a ring-assisted Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a second-order elliptic response. By simultaneously measuring the different optical powers produced by a double-sideband suppressed-carrier modulation at the outputs of the photonic integrated circuit, an amplitude comparison function that depends on the input tone frequency is obtained. Using this technique, a frequency measurement range of 10 GHz (5-15 GHz) with a root mean square value of frequency error lower than 200 MHz is experimentally demonstrated. Moreover, simulations showing the impact of a residual optical carrier on system performance are also provided.

  5. A New Neutrino Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    Starting in the late 1960s, neutrino detectors began to see signs that neutrinos, now known to come in the flavors electron ({nu}{sub e}), muon ({nu}{sub {mu}}), and tau ({nu}{sub {tau}}), could transform from one flavor to another. The findings implied that neutrinos must have mass, since massless particles travel at the speed of light and their clocks, so to speak, don't tick, thus they cannot change. What has since been discovered is that neutrinos oscillate at two distinct scales, 500 km/GeV and 15,000 km/GeV, which are defined by the baseline (L) of the experiment (the distance the neutrino travels) divided by the neutrino energy (E). Neutrinos of one flavor can oscillate into neutrinos of another flavor at both L/E scales, but the amplitude of these oscillations is different for the two scales and depends on the initial and final flavor of the neutrinos. The neutrino states that propogate unchanged in time, the mass eigenstates {nu}1, {nu}2, {nu}3, are quantum mechanical mixtures of the electron, muon, and tau neutrino flavors, and the fraction of each flavor in a given mass eigenstate is controlled by three mixing angles and a complex phase. Two of these mixing angles are known with reasonable precision. An upper bound exists for the third angle, called {theta}{sub 13}, which controls the size of the muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillation at an L/E of 500 km/GeV. The phase is completely unknown. The existence of this phase has important implications for the asymmetry between matter and antimatter we observe in the universe today. Experiments around the world have steadily assembled this picture of neutrino oscillation, but evidence of muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillation at 500 km/GeV has remained elusive. Now, a paper from the T2K (Tokai to Kamioka) experiment in Japan, reports the first possible observation of muon neutrinos oscillating into electron neutrinos at 500 km/GeV. They see 6 candidate signal events, above an expected background

  6. Superconducting Submm Integrated Receiver for TELIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Ermakov, A. B.; Filippenko, L. V.; Koryukin, O. V.; Khudchenko, A. V.; Sobolev, A. S.; Torgashin, M. Yu; Yagoubov, P. A.; Hoogeveen, R. W. M.; Vreeling, W. J.; Wild, W.; Pylypenko, O. M.

    2006-06-01

    In this report we present design and first experimental results for development of the submm superconducting integrated receiver spectrometer for Terahertz Limb Sounder (TELIS). TELIS is a collaborative European project to build up a three-channel heterodyne balloon-based spectrometer for measuring a variety of atmospheric constituents of the stratosphere. The 550 - 650 GHz channel of TELIS is based on a phase-locked Superconducting Integrated Receiver (SIR). SIR is an on-chip combination of a low-noise Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) mixer with quasioptical antenna, a superconducting Flux Flow Oscillator (FFO) acting as Local Oscillator (LO), and SIS harmonic mixer (HM) for FFO phase locking. A number of new solutions were implemented in the new generation of SIR chips. To achieve the wide-band performance of the spectrometer, a side-feed twin-SIS mixer and balanced SIS mixer with 0.8 µm2 junctions integrated with a double-dipole (or double-slot) antenna is used. An improved design of the FFO for TELIS has been developed and optimized providing a free-running linewidth between 10 and 2 MHz in the frequency range 500 - 700 GHz. It is important to ensure that tuning of a phase-locked (PL) SIR can be performed remotely by telecommand. For this purpose a number of approaches for the PL SIR automatic computer control have been developed. All receiver components (including input optical elements and Martin-Puplett polarization rotating interferometer for single side band operation) will be mounted on a single 4.2 K plate inside a 40 × 180 × 80 mm3 box. First measurements give an uncorrected double side band (DSB) noise temperature below 250 K measured with the phase-locked FFO; more detailed results are presented at the conference.

  7. Oscillations following periodic reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Tiago; Machado, Armando

    2009-06-01

    Three experiments examined behavior in extinction following periodic reinforcement. During the first phase of Experiment 1, four groups of pigeons were exposed to fixed interval (FI 16s or FI 48s) or variable interval (VI 16s or VI 48s) reinforcement schedules. Next, during the second phase, each session started with reinforcement trials and ended with an extinction segment. Experiment 2 was similar except that the extinction segment was considerably longer. Experiment 3 replaced the FI schedules with a peak procedure, with FI trials interspersed with non-food peak interval (PI) trials that were four times longer. One group of pigeons was exposed to FI 20s PI 80s trials, and another to FI 40s PI 160s trials. Results showed that, during the extinction segment, most pigeons trained with FI schedules, but not with VI schedules, displayed pause-peck oscillations with a period close to, but slightly greater than the FI parameter. These oscillations did not start immediately after the onset of extinction. Comparing the oscillations from Experiments 1 and 2 suggested that the alternation of reconditioning and re-extinction increases the reliability and earlier onset of the oscillations. In Experiment 3 the pigeons exhibited well-defined pause-peck cycles since the onset of extinction. These cycles had periods close to twice the value of the FI and lasted for long intervals of time. We discuss some hypotheses concerning the processes underlying behavioral oscillations following periodic reinforcement.

  8. Oscillations of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornek, U.; Müller, F.; Harth, K.; Hahn, A.; Ganesan, S.; Tobiska, L.; Stannarius, R.

    2010-07-01

    Oscillations of droplets or bubbles of a confined fluid in a fluid environment are found in various situations in everyday life, in technological processing and in natural phenomena on different length scales. Air bubbles in liquids or liquid droplets in air are well-known examples. Soap bubbles represent a particularly simple, beautiful and attractive system to study the dynamics of a closed gas volume embedded in the same or a different gas. Their dynamics is governed by the densities and viscosities of the gases and by the film tension. Dynamic equations describing their oscillations under simplifying assumptions have been well known since the beginning of the 20th century. Both analytical description and numerical modeling have made considerable progress since then, but quantitative experiments have been lacking so far. On the other hand, a soap bubble represents an easily manageable paradigm for the study of oscillations of fluid spheres. We use a technique to create axisymmetric initial non-equilibrium states, and we observe damped oscillations into equilibrium by means of a fast video camera. Symmetries of the oscillations, frequencies and damping rates of the eigenmodes as well as the coupling of modes are analyzed. They are compared to analytical models from the literature and to numerical calculations from the literature and this work.

  9. Combustor oscillation pressure stabilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.T.J.; Robey, E.; Cully, S.R.; Addis, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    In accordance with the objective of the present invention, the active control of unsteady combustion induced oscillations in a combustion chamber fired by a suitable fuel and oxidizer mixture, such as a hydrocarbon fuel and air mixture, is provided by restructuring and moving the position of the main flame front and thereby increasing the transport time and displacing the pressure wave further away from the in-phase relationship with the periodic heat release. The restructuring and repositioning of the main flame are achieved by utilizing a pilot flame which is pulsed at a predetermined frequency corresponding to less than about one-half the frequency of the combustion oscillation frequency with the duration of each pulse being sufficient to produce adequate secondary thermal energy to restructure the main flame and thereby decouple the heat release from the acoustic coupling so as to lead to a reduction in the dynamic pressure amplitude. The pulsating pilot flame produces a relatively small and intermittently existing flame front in the combustion zone that is separate from the oscillating main flame front but which provides the thermal energy necessary to effectively reposition the location of the oscillating main flame front out of the region in the combustion zone where the acoustic coupling can occur with the main flame and thereby effectively altering the oscillation-causing phase relationship with the heat of combustion.

  10. Oscillate boiling from microheaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, S. Roberto; Nguyen, Dang Minh; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    We report about an intriguing boiling regime occurring for small heaters embedded on the boundary in subcooled water. The microheater is realized by focusing a continuous wave laser beam to about 10 μ m in diameter onto a 165-nm-thick layer of gold, which is submerged in water. After an initial vaporous explosion a single bubble oscillates continuously and repeatedly at several 100 kHz albeit with constant laser power input. The microbubble's oscillations are accompanied with bubble pinch-off, leading to a stream of gaseous bubbles in the subcooled water. The self-driven bubble oscillation is explained with a thermally kicked oscillator caused by surface attachment and by the nonspherical collapses. Additionally, Marangoni stresses induce a recirculating streaming flow which transports cold liquid towards the microheater, reducing diffusion of heat along the substrate and therefore stabilizing the phenomenon to many million cycles. We speculate that this oscillate boiling regime may overcome the heat transfer thresholds observed during the nucleate boiling crisis and offers a new pathway for heat transfer under microgravity conditions.

  11. Vacuum Rabi oscillations in a macroscopic superconducting qubit oscillator system.

    PubMed

    Johansson, J; Saito, S; Meno, T; Nakano, H; Ueda, M; Semba, K; Takayanagi, H

    2006-03-31

    We have observed the coherent exchange of a single energy quantum between a flux qubit and a superconducting LC circuit acting as a quantum harmonic oscillator. The exchange of an energy quantum is known as the vacuum Rabi oscillation: the qubit is oscillating between the excited state and the ground state and the oscillator between the vacuum state and the first excited state. We also show that we can detect the state of the oscillator with the qubit and thereby obtained evidence of level quantization of the LC circuit. Our results support the idea of using oscillators as couplers of solid-state qubits.

  12. Double Layers in Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Alton C. (Editor); Moorehead, Tauna W. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: laboratory double layers; ion-acoustic double layers; pumping potential wells; ion phase-space vortices; weak double layers; electric fields and double layers in plasmas; auroral double layers; double layer formation in a plasma; beamed emission from gamma-ray burst source; double layers and extragalactic jets; and electric potential between plasma sheet clouds.

  13. Mechanobiological oscillators control lymph flow

    PubMed Central

    Kunert, Christian; Baish, James W.; Liao, Shan; Padera, Timothy P.; Munn, Lance L.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells to sense and respond to physical forces has been recognized for decades, but researchers are only beginning to appreciate the fundamental importance of mechanical signals in biology. At the larger scale, there has been increased interest in the collective organization of cells and their ability to produce complex, “emergent” behaviors. Often, these complex behaviors result in tissue-level control mechanisms that manifest as biological oscillators, such as observed in fireflies, heartbeats, and circadian rhythms. In many cases, these complex, collective behaviors are controlled—at least in part—by physical forces imposed on the tissue or created by the cells. Here, we use mathematical simulations to show that two complementary mechanobiological oscillators are sufficient to control fluid transport in the lymphatic system: Ca2+-mediated contractions can be triggered by vessel stretch, whereas nitric oxide produced in response to the resulting fluid shear stress causes the lymphatic vessel to relax locally. Our model predicts that the Ca2+ and NO levels alternate spatiotemporally, establishing complementary feedback loops, and that the resulting phasic contractions drive lymph flow. We show that this mechanism is self-regulating and robust over a range of fluid pressure environments, allowing the lymphatic vessels to provide pumping when needed but remain open when flow can be driven by tissue pressure or gravity. Our simulations accurately reproduce the responses to pressure challenges and signaling pathway manipulations observed experimentally, providing an integrated conceptual framework for lymphatic function. PMID:26283382

  14. Irreversible energy gain by linear and nonlinear oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, D.; Mulser, P.

    2005-01-01

    A particle can gain appreciable irreversible energy ("absorption") from linear or nonlinear oscillations only by ballistic excitation ("collision") or, if excited by an adiabatic pulse of constant frequency, by undergoing resonance. For the linear oscillator it is shown that the transition from ballistic to adiabatic behavior out of resonance occurs for sin2-pulses 2 4 eigenperiod long. In the case of a linear oscillator with time-varying eigenfrequency it is shown that Cornu's double spiral represents an attractor, either for zero energy gain out of resonance or finite gain by transiting through resonance. One of the remarkable properties of nonlinear oscillators is that resonance depends on the level of excitation. It is this property which opens a new access to understanding the dominant heating process at high laser intensities, the so-called collisionless absorption phase in solids, extended cluster media, dusty plasmas, and sprays, well guaranteed by experiments and computer simulations but hitherto not well understood in physical terms.

  15. Golden quantum oscillator and Binet-Fibonacci calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashaev, Oktay K.; Nalci, Sengul

    2012-01-01

    The Binet formula for Fibonacci numbers is treated as a q-number and a q-operator with Golden ratio bases q = φ and Q = -1/φ, and the corresponding Fibonacci or Golden calculus is developed. A quantum harmonic oscillator for this Golden calculus is derived so that its spectrum is given only by Fibonacci numbers. The ratio of successive energy levels is found to be the Golden sequence, and for asymptotic states in the limit n → ∞ it appears as the Golden ratio. We call this oscillator the Golden oscillator. Using double Golden bosons, the Golden angular momentum and its representation in terms of Fibonacci numbers and the Golden ratio are derived. Relations of Fibonacci calculus with a q-deformed fermion oscillator and entangled N-qubit states are indicated.

  16. Double screening

    SciTech Connect

    Gratia, Pierre; Hu, Wayne; Joyce, Austin; Ribeiro, Raquel H.

    2016-06-15

    Attempts to modify gravity in the infrared typically require a screening mechanism to ensure consistency with local tests of gravity. These screening mechanisms fit into three broad classes; we investigate theories which are capable of exhibiting more than one type of screening. Specifically, we focus on a simple model which exhibits both Vainshtein and kinetic screening. We point out that due to the two characteristic length scales in the problem, the type of screening that dominates depends on the mass of the sourcing object, allowing for different phenomenology at different scales. We consider embedding this double screening phenomenology in a broader cosmological scenario and show that the simplest examples that exhibit double screening are radiatively stable.

  17. Magnetic vortex oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrkac, Gino; Keatley, Paul S.; Bryan, Matthew T.; Butler, Keith

    2015-11-01

    The magnetic vortex has sparked the interest of the academic and industrial communities over the last few decades. From their discovery in the 1970s for bubble memory devices to their modern application as radio frequency oscillators, magnetic vortices have been adopted to modern telecommunication and sensor applications. Basic properties of vortex structures in the static and dynamic regime, from a theoretical and experimental point of view, are presented as well as their application in spin torque driven nano-pillar and magnetic tunnel junction devices. Single vortex excitations and phase locking phenomena of coupled oscillators are discussed with an outlook of vortex oscillators in magnetic hybrid structures with imprinted domain confinement and dynamic encryption devices.

  18. Chalcogenide optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Raja; Rochette, Martin

    2012-04-23

    We demonstrate the first optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on chalcogenide glass. The parametric gain medium is an As(2)Se(3) chalcogenide microwire coated with a layer of polymer. The doubly-resonant OPO oscillates simultaneously at a Stokes and an anti Stokes wavelength shift of >50 nm from the pump wavelength that lies at λ(P) = 1,552 nm. The oscillator has a peak power threshold of 21.6 dBm and a conversion efficiency of >19%. This OPO experiment provides an additional application of the chalcogenide microwire technology; and considering the transparency of As(2)Se(3) glass extending far in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) wavelengths, the device holds promise for realizing mid-IR OPOs utilizing existing optical sources in the telecommunications wavelength region.

  19. Digital numerically controlled oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cellier, A.; Huey, D. C.; Ma, L. N. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The frequency and phase of an output signal from an oscillator circuit are controlled with accuracy by a digital input word. Positive and negative alterations in output frequency are both provided for by translating all values of input words so that they are positive. The oscillator reference frequency is corrected only in one direction, by adding phase to the output frequency of the oscillator. The input control word is translated to a single algebraic sign and the digital 1 is added thereto. The translated input control word is then accumulated. A reference clock signal having a frequency at an integer multiple of the desired frequency of the output signal is generated. The accumulated control word is then compared with a threshold level. The output signal is adjusted in a single direction by dividing the frequency of the reference clock signal by a first integer or by an integer different from the first integer.

  20. Robustness of synthetic oscillators in growing and dividing cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paijmans, Joris; Lubensky, David K.; Rein ten Wolde, Pieter

    2017-05-01

    Synthetic biology sets out to implement new functions in cells, and to develop a deeper understanding of biological design principles. Elowitz and Leibler [Nature (London) 403, 335 (2000), 10.1038/35002125] showed that by rational design of the reaction network, and using existing biological components, they could create a network that exhibits periodic gene expression, dubbed the repressilator. More recently, Stricker et al. [Nature (London) 456, 516 (2008), 10.1038/nature07389] presented another synthetic oscillator, called the dual-feedback oscillator, which is more stable. Detailed studies have been carried out to determine how the stability of these oscillators is affected by the intrinsic noise of the interactions between the components and the stochastic expression of their genes. However, as all biological oscillators reside in growing and dividing cells, an important question is how these oscillators are perturbed by the cell cycle. In previous work we showed that the periodic doubling of the gene copy numbers due to DNA replication can couple not only natural, circadian oscillators to the cell cycle [Paijmans et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. (USA) 113, 4063 (2016), 10.1073/pnas.1507291113], but also these synthetic oscillators. Here we expand this study. We find that the strength of the locking between oscillators depends not only on the positions of the genes on the chromosome, but also on the noise in the timing of gene replication: noise tends to weaken the coupling. Yet, even in the limit of high levels of noise in the replication times of the genes, both synthetic oscillators show clear signatures of locking to the cell cycle. This work enhances our understanding of the design of robust biological oscillators inside growing and diving cells.