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Sample records for double motor mhd-drive

  1. The Design and its Verification of the Double Rotor Double Cage Induction Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sumita; Deb, Nirmal K.; Biswas, Sujit K.

    2017-02-01

    The concept of a double rotor motor presented earlier and its equivalent circuit has been developed, showing a non-linear parameter content. The two rotors (which are recommended to be double cage type for development of high starting torque) can run with equal or unequal speed independently, depending on their individual loading. This paper presents the elaborate design procedure, step-by-step, for the double rotor double cage motor and verifies the designed data with that obtained from three separate tests (compared to two for conventional motor) on a prototype, such that optimum performance can be obtained from the motor.

  2. A novel double-sided flux-switching permanent magnet linear motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Feng; Du, Yi; Sun, Yuxin; Zhu, Huangqiu; Zhao, Wenxiang; Li, Wenlong; Ching, T. W.; Qiu, Chun

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel double-sided flux-switching permanent magnet (PM) linear (DS-FSPML) motor which is suitable for low speed and high thrust force applications. In order to balance the normal force, the motor adopts double-sided arrangement in which the mover is sandwiched between two stators. The mover teeth alternately located on both sides of the mover are composed of laminated iron core segments between which the axially magnetized PMs of alternate polarity are inserted. Similar to conventional flux-switching PM (FSPM) motor, the 3-phase concentrated windings are employed. And the stator is designed as a double-sided simple iron core with salient teeth so that it is very robust to transmit high thrust force. By using the finite element method, the characteristics and performances of the proposed motor are analyzed and compared with the conventional single-sided FSPM linear motor.

  3. Optimization of Magnet Arrangement in Double-Layer Interior Permanent-Magnet Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Katsumi; Kitayuguchi, Kazuya

    The arrangement of permanent magnets in double-layer interior permanent-magnet motors is optimized for variable-speed applications. First, the arrangement of magnets is decided by automatic optimization. Next, the superiority of the optimized motor is discussed by the d- and q-axis equivalent circuits that consider the magnetic saturation of the rotor core. Finally, experimental verification is carried out by using a prototype motor. It is confirmed that the maximum torque of the optimized motor under both low speed and high speed conditions are higher than those of conventional motors because of relatively large q-axis inductance and small d-axis inductance.

  4. A U-shaped linear ultrasonic motor using longitudinal vibration transducers with double feet.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingxiang; Liu, Junkao; Chen, Weishan; Shi, Shengjun

    2012-05-01

    A U-shaped linear ultrasonic motor using longitudinal vibration transducers with double feet was proposed in this paper. The proposed motor contains a horizontal transducer and two vertical transducers. The horizontal transducer includes two exponential shape horns located at the leading ends, and each vertical transducer contains one exponential shape horn. The horns of the horizontal transducer and the vertical transducer intersect at the tip ends where the driving feet are located. Longitudinal vibrations are superimposed in the motor and generate elliptical motions at the driving feet. The two vibration modes of the motor are discussed, and the motion trajectories of driving feet are deduced. By adjusting the structural parameters, the resonance frequencies of two vibration modes were degenerated. A prototype motor was fabricated and measured. Typical output of the prototype is no-load speed of 854 mm/s and maximum thrust force of 40 N at a voltage of 200 V(rms).

  5. Motor cortex fatigue in sports measured by transcranial magnetic double stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tergau, F; Geese, R; Bauer, A; Baur, S; Paulus, W; Reimers, C D

    2000-11-01

    Besides peripheral mechanisms, central fatigue is an important factor limiting the performance of exhausting exercise in sport. The mechanisms responsible are still in discussion. Using noninvasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in a double-pulse technique, we sought to assess fatigue of the motor cortex after exhaustive anaerobic strain. 23 male subjects (22-52 yr) taking part in the study were requested to accomplish as many pull-ups as possible until exhaustion. The amount of physical lifting work was recorded. Before and immediately after the task, intracortical inhibition (ICI) and facilitation (ICF) were measured by a conditioned-test double-pulse TMS method for the right brachioradialis (BR) and abductor pollicis brevis muscle (APB). After exercise, ICF was significantly reduced in the BR but not in the APB. ICI was not altered. Changes tended to normalize within 8 min after the task. The amount of lifting work accomplished showed significant correlation to the values of ICF reduction (r = 0.73). Moreover, the baseline values of ICF before exercise were also significantly correlated to the lifting work (r = 0.63). Because double-pulse TMS gives access to the motor cortex independently of spinal or peripheral mechanisms, reduced ICF reflects decreased excitability of interneuronal circuits within the motor cortex. We suggest that ICF measures motor cortex fatigue after exhausting strain specifically for the muscles performing the task. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic neurotransmission is possibly involved in the mechanisms mediating central fatigue. Double-pulse TMS may be a useful tool in the control of training in sports as well as in the detection of pathological central fatigue in overreaching and in the prevention of overtraining.

  6. A high-temperature double-mode piezoelectric ultrasonic linear motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaotian; Chen, Jianguo; Chen, Zhijiang; Dong, Shuxiang

    2012-08-01

    A miniature piezoelectric ultrasonic linear motor (piezoelectric vibrator sizes: 4.7 × 13.5 × 2 mm3) has been studied for precise actuation at 200 °C high-temperature. This piezoelectric linear motor was made of (1-x)BiScO3-xPbTiO3 piezoelectric ceramic with a high curie temperature (428 °C) and it was operated in first longitudinal and the second bending double-mode. Our experimental results showed that the linear motor moves smoothly at the temperature as high as 200 °C with a driving force of 0.35 N and a speed up to 42 mm/s.

  7. Design and performance analysis of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor with double vibrators.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaopeng; Yang, Ming; Chen, Zhangqi; Xu, Liang; Meng, Fan; Ou, Wenchu

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor, in which a vibrating stator and vibrating rotor are combined in one motor. The stator and rotor are designed as similar structures an elastic body and a piezoelectric ceramic ring. In exciting of the piezoelectric ceramics, the elastic body of the stator and rotor will generate respective traveling waves, which force each other forward in the contact zone. Based on the elliptical rule of particle motion and matching principle of vibration, the design rules of two vibrators are determined. The finite element method is used to design the sizes of vibrators to ensure that they operate in resonance, and the simulation is verified by measuring the vibration with an impedance analyzer. It is found out that to maintain an appropriate contact between the stator and rotor, two vibrators need to be designed with close resonance frequencies, different vibration amplitudes, and be driven by an identical driving frequency. To analyze this innovative contact mechanism, particle velocity synthesis theory and contact force analysis using Hertz contact model are carried out. Finally, a prototype is fabricated and tested to verify the theoretical results. The test results show that the output performance of the motor driven by the two vibrators is significantly improved compared to the motor driven by a sole stator or rotor, which confirms the validity of the double-vibrator motor concept.

  8. Parametric study and performance analysis of hybrid rocket motors with double-tube configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Nanjia; Zhao, Bo; Lorente, Arnau Pons; Wang, Jue

    2017-03-01

    The practical implementation of hybrid rocket motors has historically been hampered by the slow regression rate of the solid fuel. In recent years, the research on advanced injector designs has achieved notable results in the enhancement of the regression rate and combustion efficiency of hybrid rockets. Following this path, this work studies a new configuration called double-tube characterized by injecting the gaseous oxidizer through a head end injector and an inner tube with injector holes distributed along the motor longitudinal axis. This design has demonstrated a significant potential for improving the performance of hybrid rockets by means of a better mixing of the species achieved through a customized injection of the oxidizer. Indeed, the CFD analysis of the double-tube configuration has revealed that this design may increase the regression rate over 50% with respect to the same motor with a conventional axial showerhead injector. However, in order to fully exploit the advantages of the double-tube concept, it is necessary to acquire a deeper understanding of the influence of the different design parameters in the overall performance. In this way, a parametric study is carried out taking into account the variation of the oxidizer mass flux rate, the ratio of oxidizer mass flow rate injected through the inner tube to the total oxidizer mass flow rate, and injection angle. The data for the analysis have been gathered from a large series of three-dimensional numerical simulations that considered the changes in the design parameters. The propellant combination adopted consists of gaseous oxygen as oxidizer and high-density polyethylene as solid fuel. Furthermore, the numerical model comprises Navier-Stokes equations, k-ε turbulence model, eddy-dissipation combustion model and solid-fuel pyrolysis, which is computed through user-defined functions. This numerical model was previously validated by analyzing the computational and experimental results obtained for

  9. An implantable seal-less centrifugal pump with integrated double-disk motor.

    PubMed

    Schima, H; Schmallegger, H; Huber, L; Birgmann, I; Reindl, C; Schmidt, C; Roschal, K; Wieselthaler, G; Trubel, W; Losert, U

    1995-07-01

    Thrombus formation and sealing problems at the shaft as well as the compact and efficient design of the driving unit have been major difficulties in the construction of a long-term implantable centrifugal pump. To eliminate the problems of the seal, motor size, and efficiency, two major steps were taken by modifying the Vienna implantable centrifugal pump. First, a special driving unit was developed, in which the permanent magnets of the motor themselves are used for coupling the force into the rotor. Second, the rotor shaft in the pumping chamber was eliminated by adopting a concept recently presented by Ohara. The rotor is supported by 3 pins, which run on a carbon disk, whose concave shape leads to stabilization. The device has the following specifications: size: 65 mm (diameter) by 35 mm (height), 101 cm3; priming volume 30 cm3, 240 g; and a 6-pole brushless double disk DC motor. The required input power of the described prototype is 15 W at 150 mm Hg, 5 L/min (overall eta = 11%), and has an in vitro index of hemolysis (IH) of 0.0046 g/100 L. The test for in vitro thrombus growth exhibited far less thrombus formation in the new design than in designs with axles. In conclusion, the design of a special driving unit and the elimination of the axle led to the construction of a small pump with very low blood traumatization.

  10. Lead-Free Double-Base Propellant for the 2.75 Inch Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magill, B. T.; Nauflett, G. W.; Furrow, K. W.

    2000-01-01

    The current MK 66 2.75 inch Rocket Motor double-base propellant contains the lead-based ballistic modifier LC-12-15 to achieve the desired plateau and mesa burning rate characteristics. The use of lead compounds poses a concern for the environment and for personal safety due to the metal's toxic nature when introduced into the atmosphere by propellant manufacture, rocket motor firing, and disposal. Copper beta-resorcylate (copper 2,4-di-hydroxy-benzoate) was successfully used in propellant as a simple modifier in the mid 1970's. This and other compounds have also been mixed with lead salts to obtain more beneficial ballistic results. Synthesized complexes of lead and copper compounds soon replaced the mixtures. The complexes incorporate the lead, copper lack of organic liquids, which allows for easier propellant processing. About ten years ago, the Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), initiated an effort to develop a lead-free propellant for use in missile systems. Several lead-free propellant candidate formulations were developed. About five years ago, NSWC, in conjunction with Alliant Techsystems, Radford Army Ammunition Plant, continued ballistic modifier investigations. A four component ballistic modifier system without lead for double-base propellants that provide adequate plateau and mesa burn rate characteristics was developed and patented. The ballistic modifier's system contains bismuth subsalicylate, 1.5 percent; copper salicylate, 1.0 percent, copper stannate, 0.77 percent; and carbon black, 0.1 percent. Action time and impulse data obtained through multiple static firings indicate that the new lead-free double-base propellant, while not a match for NOSIH-AA-2, will be a very suitable replacement in the 2.75 inch Rocket Motor. Accelerated aging of the double-base propellant containing the lead-free ballistic modifier showed that it had a much higher rate of stabilizer depletion than the AA-2. A comprehensive study showed that an

  11. Lead-Free Double-Base Propellant for the 2.75 Inch Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magill, B. T.; Nauflett, G. W.; Furrow, K. W.

    2000-01-01

    The current MK 66 2.75 inch Rocket Motor double-base propellant contains the lead-based ballistic modifier LC-12-15 to achieve the desired plateau and mesa burning rate characteristics. The use of lead compounds poses a concern for the environment and for personal safety due to the metal's toxic nature when introduced into the atmosphere by propellant manufacture, rocket motor firing, and disposal. Copper beta-resorcylate (copper 2,4-di-hydroxy-benzoate) was successfully used in propellant as a simple modifier in the mid 1970's. This and other compounds have also been mixed with lead salts to obtain more beneficial ballistic results. Synthesized complexes of lead and copper compounds soon replaced the mixtures. The complexes incorporate the lead, copper lack of organic liquids, which allows for easier propellant processing. About ten years ago, the Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), initiated an effort to develop a lead-free propellant for use in missile systems. Several lead-free propellant candidate formulations were developed. About five years ago, NSWC, in conjunction with Alliant Techsystems, Radford Army Ammunition Plant, continued ballistic modifier investigations. A four component ballistic modifier system without lead for double-base propellants that provide adequate plateau and mesa burn rate characteristics was developed and patented. The ballistic modifier's system contains bismuth subsalicylate, 1.5 percent; copper salicylate, 1.0 percent, copper stannate, 0.77 percent; and carbon black, 0.1 percent. Action time and impulse data obtained through multiple static firings indicate that the new lead-free double-base propellant, while not a match for NOSIH-AA-2, will be a very suitable replacement in the 2.75 inch Rocket Motor. Accelerated aging of the double-base propellant containing the lead-free ballistic modifier showed that it had a much higher rate of stabilizer depletion than the AA-2. A comprehensive study showed that an

  12. Low cost optical tweezers systems using double coil driving stepping motor to controlling sample stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laowattanatham, N.; Cheamanunkul, N.; Plaipichit, S.; Buranasiri, P.; Nuansri, R.

    2013-06-01

    In this research, the low cost optical tweezers systems using X-Y stage has been developed by using 5-phase stepping motor. By using sequential double coil driving, we can obtain the driving torque larger than using the single coil driving. The moving scale is fine resolution at 0.2 micrometer. The overall systems based on microcontroller PIC18F458 and joystick controller with LabView® graphical user interface (GUI). The mechanical damping has been included in the system for decreasing the vibrational noise. By using this method, our optical tweezers system is cheaper than the other commercial system that has been used the piezoelectric driving, and still has the same efficiency.

  13. Double dissociation between motor and visual imagery in the posterior parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Pelgrims, Barbara; Andres, Michael; Olivier, Etienne

    2009-10-01

    Because motor imagery (MI) and visual imagery (VI) are influenced differently by factors such as biomechanical constraints or stimulus size, it is conceivable that they rely on separate processes, possibly involving distinct cortical networks, a view corroborated by neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies. In the posterior parietal cortex, it has been suggested that the superior parietal lobule (SPL) underlies VI, whereas MI relies on the supramarginalis gyrus (SMG). However, because several brain imaging studies have also shown an overlap of activations in SPL and SMG during VI or MI, the question arises as to which extent these 2 subregions really contribute to distinct imagery processes. To address this issue, we used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to induce virtual lesions of either SMG or SPL in subjects performing a MI (hand drawing rotation) or a VI (letter rotation) task. Whatever hemisphere was stimulated, SMG lesions selectively altered MI, whereas SPL lesions only affected VI, demonstrating a double dissociation between MI and VI. Because these deficits were not influenced by the angular distance of the stimuli, we suggest that SMG and SPL are involved in the reenactment of the motor and visual representations, respectively, and not in mental rotation processes per se.

  14. Rectangular-Plate-Type Piezoelectric Ceramics Ultrasonic Motor Using Double 1st Resonance Modes of Longitudinal and Width-Bending Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suetomo, Atsutoshi; Tomikawa, Yoshiro

    2004-05-01

    This paper deals with a piezoelectric ceramics ultrasonic motor of rectangular plate type using double resonance modes of longitudinal (L1) and width-bending (B1) vibrations. First, the motor construction and its operating principle are described, and second, the measured characteristics of this prototype motor are presented.

  15. Thin Rotary and Linear Ultrasonic Motors Using a Double-Mode Piezoelectric Vibrator of the First Longitudinal and Second Bending Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomikawa, Yoshiro; Takano, Takehiro; Umeda, Hidenobu

    1992-09-01

    This paper deals with thin rotary and linear ultrasonic motors using a double-mode piezoelectric ceramic vibrator; a rectangular plate vibrator of the first longitudinal and second bending modes is utilized. A specific merit of the motors is that their thickness can meet the restriction of 10 mm, which is one of the practical requirements of a light load gearless motor. The rotary motor is intended for application in card forwarding, and the linear motor, in magnetic-head traveling and so on. Construction and characteristics of the motors are described herein.

  16. Insights into the Structure and Assembly of the Bacteriophage ϕ29 Double-Stranded DNA Packaging Motor

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Sheng; Saha, Mitul; Zhao, Wei; Jardine, Paul J.; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The tailed double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophage ϕ29 packages its 19.3-kbp genome into a preassembled procapsid structure by using a transiently assembled phage-encoded molecular motor. This process is remarkable considering that compaction of DNA to near-crystalline densities within the confined space of the capsid requires that the packaging motor work against significant entropic, enthalpic, and DNA-bending energies. The motor consists of three phage-encoded components: the dodecameric connector protein gp10, an oligomeric RNA molecule known as the prohead RNA (pRNA), and the homomeric ring ATPase gp16. Although atomic resolution structures of the connector and different pRNA subdomains have been determined, the mechanism of self-assembly and the resulting stoichiometry of the various motor components on the phage capsid have been the subject of considerable controversy. Here a subnanometer asymmetric cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstruction of a connector-pRNA complex at a unique vertex of the procapsid conclusively demonstrates the pentameric symmetry of the pRNA and illuminates the relative arrangement of the connector and the pRNA. Additionally, a combination of biochemical and cryo-EM analyses of motor assembly intermediates suggests a sequence of molecular events that constitute the pathway by which the motor assembles on the head, thereby reconciling conflicting data regarding pRNA assembly and stoichiometry. Taken together, these data provide new insight into the assembly, structure, and mechanism of a complex molecular machine. IMPORTANCE Viruses consist of a protein shell, or capsid, that protects and surrounds their genetic material. Thus, genome encapsidation is a fundamental and essential step in the life cycle of any virus. In dsDNA viruses, powerful molecular motors essentially pump the viral DNA into a preformed protein shell. This article describes how a viral dsDNA packaging motor self-assembles on the viral capsid and

  17. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-07-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  18. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-01-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients' life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life. PMID:25072053

  19. Optimizing Power Density and Efficiency of a Double-Halbach Array Permanent-Magnet Ironless Axial-Flux Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating hybrid electric and turboelectric propulsion concepts for future aircraft to reduce fuel burn, emissions, and noise. Systems studies show that the weight and efficiency of the electric system components need to be improved for this concept to be feasible. This effort aims to identify design parameters that affect power density and efficiency for a double-Halbach array permanent-magnet ironless axial flux motor configuration. These parameters include both geometrical and higher-order parameters, including pole count, rotor speed, current density, and geometries of the magnets, windings, and air gap.

  20. Optimizing Power Density and Efficiency of a Double-Halbach Array Permanent-Magnet Ironless Axial-Flux Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating hybrid electric and turboelectric propulsion concepts for future aircraft to reduce fuel burn, emissions, and noise. Systems studies show that the weight and efficiency of the electric system components need to be improved for this concept to be feasible. This effort aims to identify design parameters that affect power density and efficiency for a double-Halbach array permanent-magnet ironless axial flux motor configuration. These parameters include both geometrical and higher-order parameters, including pole count, rotor speed, current density, and geometries of the magnets, windings, and air gap.

  1. A double B1-mode 4-layer laminated piezoelectric linear motor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaotian; Chen, Zhijiang; Dong, Shuxiang

    2012-12-01

    We report a miniature piezoelectric ultrasonic linear motor that is made of four Pb(Zr,Ti)O(3) (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic layers for low-voltage work. The 4-layer piezoelectric laminate works in two orthogonal first-bending modes for producing elliptical oscillations, which are then used to drive a contacting slider into continuous linear motion. Experimental results show that the miniature linear motor (size: 4 × 4 × 12 mm, weight: 1.7 g) can generate a large driving force of 0.48 N and a linear motion speed of up to 160 mm/s, using a 40 V(pp)/mm voltage drive at its resonance frequency of 64.5 kHz. The maximum efficiency of the linear motor is 30%.

  2. Double Motor Coordinated Control Based on Hybrid Genetic Algorithm and CMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shaozhong; Tu, Ji

    A novel hybrid cerebellar model articulation controller (CMAC) and online adaptive genetic algorithm (GA) controller is introduced to control two Brushless DC motor (BLDCM) which applied in a biped robot. Genetic Algorithm simulates the random learning among the individuals of a group, and CMAC simulates the self-learning of an individual. To validate the ability and superiority of the novel algorithm, experiments have been done in MATLAB/SIMULINK. Analysis among GA, hybrid GA-CMAC and CMAC feed-forward control is also given. The results prove that the torque ripple of the coordinated control system is eliminated by using the hybrid GA-CMAC algorithm.

  3. Effects of gabapentin on the motor response to levodopa: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study in patients with complicated Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Van Blercom, N; Lasa, A; Verger, K; Masramón, X; Sastre, V M; Linazasoro, G

    2004-01-01

    Motor fluctuations and dyskinesias affect many parkinsonian patients chronically treated with levodopa. Imbalance between gabaergic direct and indirect striatopallidal pathways may originate them. Manipulating GABA neurotransmission may be effective in the treatment of these patients. Gabapentin is an antiepileptic drug that increases the synthesis and release of GABA. Previous studies suggest that gabapentin may be useful in Parkinson disease (PD). To know the effects of gabapentin on the motor response to levodopa in PD patients with motor complications. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial with four weeks of treatment. A tertiary referral center. Twenty subjects with PD and motor fluctuations and dyskinesias on stable antiparkinsonian treatment, took gabapentin up to a maximum dose of 2.400 mg/d in three doses and placebo. Three levodopa challenges were performed: at the beginning of the study and at the end of each period of treatment (4 weeks). Basal (off) and best (on) motor status were assessed by the UPDRS III. Latency to peak effect, magnitude of motor response (difference between "on" and "off" scores in the UPDRS III), duration of motor response and severity and duration of dyskinesias after each levodopa challenge were assessed. Patients' diaries were administered. : Fifteen patients completed the study. A significant improvement in the basal UPDRS III resulting in a significant reduction in the magnitude of the motor response after gabapentin was obtained (P < 0.001). No other changes were observed, either on pharmacological parameters or in levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Number of daily hours spent in "on," "on with dyskinesias" and "off" also remained unchanged. Tolerance was good, dizziness being the most common side effect. Gabapentin improved parkinsonian symptoms (basal UPDRS III and magnitude of the motor response) following levodopa. This improvement was not reflected in the daily motor situation of patients

  4. Modeling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in pure human iPSc-derived motor neurons isolated by a novel FACS double selection technique.

    PubMed

    Toli, Diana; Buttigieg, Dorothée; Blanchard, Stéphane; Lemonnier, Thomas; Lamotte d'Incamps, Boris; Bellouze, Sarah; Baillat, Gilbert; Bohl, Delphine; Haase, Georg

    2015-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe and incurable neurodegenerative disease. Human motor neurons generated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSc) offer new perspectives for disease modeling and drug testing in ALS. In standard iPSc-derived cultures, however, the two major phenotypic alterations of ALS--degeneration of motor neuron cell bodies and axons--are often obscured by cell body clustering, extensive axon criss-crossing and presence of unwanted cell types. Here, we succeeded in isolating 100% pure and standardized human motor neurons by a novel FACS double selection based on a p75(NTR) surface epitope and an HB9::RFP lentivirus reporter. The p75(NTR)/HB9::RFP motor neurons survive and grow well without forming clusters or entangled axons, are electrically excitable, contain ALS-relevant motor neuron subtypes and form functional connections with co-cultured myotubes. Importantly, they undergo rapid and massive cell death and axon degeneration in response to mutant SOD1 astrocytes. These data demonstrate the potential of FACS-isolated human iPSc-derived motor neurons for improved disease modeling and drug testing in ALS and related motor neuron diseases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. A single dose of the serotonin neurotransmission agonist paroxetine enhances motor output: double-blind, placebo-controlled, fMRI study in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Loubinoux, Isabelle; Pariente, Jérémie; Boulanouar, Kader; Carel, Christophe; Manelfe, Claude; Rascol, Olivier; Celsis, Pierre; Chollet, François

    2002-01-01

    Since serotonin (5-HT) stimulates motor function, pharmacological potentiation of 5-HT neurotransmission may improve motor function in healthy subjects and, possibly, recovery in post-stroke patients. Indeed, fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), increased activation in executive motor areas of healthy subjects as fenozolone, a releaser of monoamines (including noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin) from intracellular stores. This study is intended to test the hypothesis that paroxetine can likewise modulate brain motor activity in a dose-dependent manner in healthy subjects. In a double-blind counterbalanced study, six subjects underwent functional MRI examinations on three sessions 1 week apart (E1, E2, and E3) at the time of peak plasma concentrations (5 h after drug intake, i.e., either 20 or 60 mg of paroxetine or placebo) with a complex sequential opposition task. Rest and activation alternated in a block design. During activation, subjects performed, with the right hand, a 1-Hz-paced task that alternated two fist closings with a sequential opposition task. Paroxetine elicited effects similar to those reported for fluoxetine; notable changes were hyperactivation in the contralateral S1/M1, and posterior SMA and widespread hypoactivation of basal ganglia and cerebellum. There was an inverse correlation between dose and effect: significantly greater effects were observed with the 20-mg dose compared with 60 mg. Paroxetine dose-dependently modulates activation of the entire motor pathway in a way that favors motor output. Thus, a single dose of the SSRI paroxetine reorganized motor processing.

  6. Stimulation targeting higher motor areas in stroke rehabilitation: A proof-of-concept, randomized, double-blinded placebo-controlled study of effectiveness and underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, David A.; Varnerin, Nicole; Machado, Andre; Bonnett, Corin; Janini, Daniel; Roelle, Sarah; Potter-Baker, Kelsey; Sankarasubramanian, Vishwanath; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yue, Guang; Plow, Ela B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate, in a proof-of-concept study, whether potentiating ipsilesional higher motor areas (premotor cortex and supplementary motor area) augments and accelerates recovery associated with constraint induced movement. Methods In a randomized, double-blinded pilot clinical study, 12 patients with chronic stroke were assigned to receive anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) (n = 6) or sham (n = 6) to the ipsilesional higher motor areas during constraint-induced movement therapy. We assessed functional and neurophysiologic outcomes before and after 5 weeks of therapy. Results Only patients receiving tDCS demonstrated gains in function and dexterity. Gains were accompanied by an increase in excitability of the contralesional rather than the ipsilesional hemisphere. Conclusions Our proof-of-concept study provides early evidence that stimulating higher motor areas can help recruit the contralesional hemisphere in an adaptive role in cases of greater ipsilesional injury. Whether this early evidence of promise translates to remarkable gains in functional recovery compared to existing approaches of stimulation remains to be confirmed in large-scale clinical studies that can reasonably dissociate stimulation of higher motor areas from that of the traditional primary motor cortices. PMID:26484700

  7. Differential effects of primary motor cortex and cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation on motor learning in healthy individuals: A randomized double-blind sham-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, F; Bakhtiary, A H; Jaberzadeh, S; Talimkhani, A; Hajihasani, A

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of study was to compare the effect of primary motor cortex (M1) and cerebellar anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) on online and offline motor learning in healthy individuals. Fifty-nine healthy volunteers were randomly divided into three groups (n=20 in two experimental groups and n=19 in sham-control group). One experimental group received M1a-tDCSand another received cerebellar a-tDCS. The main outcome measure were response time (RT) and number of errors during serial response time test (SRTT) which were assessed prior, 35min and 48h after the interventions. Reduction of response time (RT) and error numbers at last block of the test compared to the first block was considered online learning. Comparison of assessments during retention tests was considered as short-term and long-term offline learning. Online RT reduction was not different among groups (P>0.05), while online error reduction was significantly greater in cerebellar a-tDCS than sham-control group (P<0.017). Moreover, a-tDCS on both M1 and cerebellar regions produced more long-term offline learning as compared to sham tDCS (P<0.01), while short-term offline RT reduction was significantly greater in M1a-tDCS than sham-control group (P<0.05). The findings indicated that although cerebellar a-tDCS enhances online learning and M1a-tDCS has more effect on short-term offline learning, both M1 and cerebellar a-tDCS can be used as a boosting technique for improvement of offline motor learning in healthy individuals.

  8. An Arginine Finger Regulates the Sequential Action of Asymmetrical Hexameric ATPase in the Double-Stranded DNA Translocation Motor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhengyi; De-Donatis, Gian Marco; Schwartz, Chad; Fang, Huaming; Li, Jingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Biological motors are ubiquitous in living systems. Currently, how the motor components coordinate the unidirectional motion is elusive in most cases. Here, we report that the sequential action of the ATPase ring in the DNA packaging motor of bacteriophage ϕ29 is regulated by an arginine finger that extends from one ATPase subunit to the adjacent unit to promote noncovalent dimer formation. Mutation of the arginine finger resulted in the interruption of ATPase oligomerization, ATP binding/hydrolysis, and DNA translocation. Dimer formation reappeared when arginine mutants were mixed with other ATPase subunits that can offer the arginine to promote their interaction. Ultracentrifugation and virion assembly assays indicated that the ATPase was presenting as monomers and dimer mixtures. The isolated dimer alone was inactive in DNA translocation, but the addition of monomer could restore the activity, suggesting that the hexameric ATPase ring contained both dimer and monomers. Moreover, ATP binding or hydrolysis resulted in conformation and entropy changes of the ATPase with high or low DNA affinity. Taking these observations together, we concluded that the arginine finger regulates sequential action of the motor ATPase subunit by promoting the formation of the dimer inside the hexamer. The finding of asymmetrical hexameric organization is supported by structural evidence of many other ATPase systems showing the presence of one noncovalent dimer and four monomer subunits. All of these provide clues for why the asymmetrical hexameric ATPase gp16 of ϕ29 was previously reported as a pentameric configuration by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) since the contact by the arginine finger renders two adjacent ATPase subunits closer than other subunits. Thus, the asymmetrical hexamer would appear as a pentamer by cryo-EM, a technology that acquires the average of many images. PMID:27457616

  9. Effects of combining robot-assisted therapy with neuromuscular electrical stimulation on motor impairment, motor and daily function, and quality of life in patients with chronic stroke: a double-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ya-yun; Lin, Keh-chung; Cheng, Hsiao-ju; Wu, Ching-yi; Hsieh, Yu-wei; Chen, Chih-kuang

    2015-10-31

    Robot-assisted therapy (RT) is a widely used intervention approach to enhance motor recovery in patients after stroke, but its effects on functional improvement remained uncertain. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is one potential adjuvant intervention approach to RT that could directly activate the stimulated muscles and improve functional use of the paretic hand. This was a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study. Thirty-nine individuals with chronic stroke were randomly assigned to the RT combined with NMES (RT + ES) or to RT with sham stimulation (RT + Sham) groups. The participants completed the intervention 90 to 100 minutes/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. The outcome measures included the upper extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment (UE-FMA), modified Ashworth scale (MAS), Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), Motor Activity Log (MAL), and Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 (SIS). All outcome measures were assessed before and after intervention, and the UE-FMA, MAL, and SIS were reassessed at 3 months of follow-up. Compared with the RT + Sham group, the RT + ES group demonstrated greater improvements in wrist flexor MAS score, WMFT quality of movement, and the hand function domain of the SIS. For other outcome measures, both groups improved significantly after the interventions, but no group differences were found. RT + ES induced significant benefits in reducing wrist flexor spasticity and in hand movement quality in patients with chronic stroke. ClinicalTrials.gov. NCT01655446.

  10. Rotigotine Effects on Early Morning Motor Function and Sleep in Parkinson's Disease: A Double-Blind, Randomized, pLacebo-Controlled Study (RECOVER)

    PubMed Central

    Trenkwalder, Claudia; Kies, Bryan; Rudzinska, Monika; Fine, Jennifer; Nikl, Janos; Honczarenko, Krystyna; Dioszeghy, Peter; Hill, Dennis; Anderson, Tim; Myllyla, Vilho; Kassubek, Jan; Steiger, Malcolm; Zucconi, Marco; Tolosa, Eduardo; Poewe, Werner; Surmann, Erwin; Whitesides, John; Boroojerdi, Babak; Chaudhuri, Kallol Ray

    2011-01-01

    In a multinational, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (NCT00474058), 287 subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD) and unsatisfactory early-morning motor symptom control were randomized 2:1 to receive rotigotine (2–16 mg/24 hr [n = 190]) or placebo (n = 97). Treatment was titrated to optimal dose over 1–8 weeks with subsequent dose maintenance for 4 weeks. Early-morning motor function and nocturnal sleep disturbance were assessed as coprimary efficacy endpoints using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) Part III (Motor Examination) measured in the early morning prior to any medication intake and the modified Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS-2) (mean change from baseline to end of maintenance [EOM], last observation carried forward). At EOM, mean UPDRS Part III score had decreased by −7.0 points with rotigotine (from a baseline of 29.6 [standard deviation (SD) 12.3] and by −3.9 points with placebo (baseline 32.0 [13.3]). Mean PDSS-2 total score had decreased by −5.9 points with rotigotine (from a baseline of 19.3 [SD 9.3]) and by −1.9 points with placebo (baseline 20.5 [10.4]). This represented a significantly greater improvement with rotigotine compared with placebo on both the UPDRS Part III (treatment difference: −3.55 [95% confidence interval (CI) −5.37, −1.73]; P = 0.0002) and PDSS-2 (treatment difference: −4.26 [95% CI −6.08, −2.45]; P < 0.0001). The most frequently reported adverse events were nausea (placebo, 9%; rotigotine, 21%), application site reactions (placebo, 4%; rotigotine, 15%), and dizziness (placebo, 6%; rotigotine 10%). Twenty-four-hour transdermal delivery of rotigotine to PD patients with early-morning motor dysfunction resulted in significant benefits in control of both motor function and nocturnal sleep disturbances. © 2010 Movement Disorder Society PMID:21322021

  11. Hymecromone in the treatment of motor disorders of the bile ducts: a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Abate, A; Dimartino, V; Spina, P; Costa, P L; Lombardo, C; Santini, A; Del Piano, M; Alimonti, P

    2001-01-01

    Biliary dyskinesia is frequently encountered in clinical practice and is characterized by pain during or after meals. The present study was designed to assess the action of hymecromone in patients with motor disorders of the bile ducts. One hundred twenty-three patients (36 men and 87 women) were enrolled in the multicenter double-blind placebo-controlled study. The mean age was 60.3 years +/- 14.2 SD. Diagnosis was dyspepsia in 58 patients, dyskinesia in 59, cholelithiasis in five and hepatopathy in one. The patients were divided into two groups. One group (61 patients) was treated with hymecromone (300 mg tablets at a dosage of 1,200 mg/day, 2 tablets midday and evening) and another group (62 patients) was treated with placebo. Treatment lasted for 14 days. Control of dyspepsia and pain symptoms of biliary origin was more marked and constant with hymecromone than with placebo. By the end of the treatment, patients in the hymecromone group showed a 70.3% reduction in intensity of spontaneous abdominal pain, while the placebo group showed a 43.8% reduction. Hymecromone was well accepted by the patients and judged to be effective by the investigator in 88.5% of patients treated. The possibility of using hymecromone in 300-mg tablets in the treatment of motor disorders of the bile ducts is thus confirmed.

  12. Potential of M-Wave Elicited by Double Pulse for Muscle Fatigue Evaluation in Intermittent Muscle Activation by Functional Electrical Stimulation for Motor Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Miura, Naoto; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to motor rehabilitation have been increasing. However, muscle fatigue appears early in the course of repetitive movement production training by FES. Although M-wave variables were suggested to be reliable indices of muscle fatigue in long lasting constant electrical stimulation under the isometric condition, the ability of M-wave needs more studies under intermittent stimulation condition, because the intervals between electrical stimulations help recovery of muscle activation level. In this paper, M-waves elicited by double pulses were examined in muscle fatigue evaluation during repetitive movements considering rehabilitation training with surface electrical stimulation. M-waves were measured under the two conditions of repetitive stimulation: knee extension force production under the isometric condition and the dynamic movement condition by knee joint angle control. Amplitude of M-wave elicited by the 2nd pulse of a double pulse decreased during muscle fatigue in both measurement conditions, while the change in M-waves elicited by single pulses in a stimulation burst was not relevant to muscle fatigue in repeated activation with stimulation interval of 1 s. Fatigue index obtained from M-waves elicited by 2nd pulses was suggested to provide good estimation of muscle fatigue during repetitive movements with FES.

  13. Potential of M-Wave Elicited by Double Pulse for Muscle Fatigue Evaluation in Intermittent Muscle Activation by Functional Electrical Stimulation for Motor Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Naoto; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to motor rehabilitation have been increasing. However, muscle fatigue appears early in the course of repetitive movement production training by FES. Although M-wave variables were suggested to be reliable indices of muscle fatigue in long lasting constant electrical stimulation under the isometric condition, the ability of M-wave needs more studies under intermittent stimulation condition, because the intervals between electrical stimulations help recovery of muscle activation level. In this paper, M-waves elicited by double pulses were examined in muscle fatigue evaluation during repetitive movements considering rehabilitation training with surface electrical stimulation. M-waves were measured under the two conditions of repetitive stimulation: knee extension force production under the isometric condition and the dynamic movement condition by knee joint angle control. Amplitude of M-wave elicited by the 2nd pulse of a double pulse decreased during muscle fatigue in both measurement conditions, while the change in M-waves elicited by single pulses in a stimulation burst was not relevant to muscle fatigue in repeated activation with stimulation interval of 1 s. Fatigue index obtained from M-waves elicited by 2nd pulses was suggested to provide good estimation of muscle fatigue during repetitive movements with FES. PMID:27110556

  14. Fluoxetine for motor recovery after acute intracerebral hemorrhage (FMRICH): study protocol for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spontaneous, nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a subtype of stroke that causes a great amount of disability and economic and social burden. This is particularly true in developing countries where it accounts for between 20% and 50% of all strokes. Pharmacological and surgical interventions have been attempted to reduce the mortality and disability caused by ICH, with unsuccessful results. Recently, the use of fluoxetine in addition to physical rehabilitation has been proven useful to improve motor recovery following cerebral infarct. The purpose of this study is to test whether a 3-month treatment with fluoxetine enhances motor recovery in nondepressed patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Methods/design Our study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial. We will recruit 86 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage of both sexes, aged >18 years, from four Mexican hospitals. The patients will receive either 20 mg of fluoxetine or a placebo once daily for 90 days. The primary outcome is the mean change in the Fugl-Meyer Motor Scale score between inclusion (day 0) and day 90. The secondary outcomes will be changes in the Barthel Index, the Modified Rankin scale and the National Institutes of Health stroke scale. The outcomes will be measured at day 42 ± 7days and at day 90, for a total of four visits with each subject (at screening and at 0, 42 and 90 days). Discussion Current guidelines recommend early supported hospital discharge and home-based rehabilitation programs as the only cost-effective intervention to aid the recovery of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Nevertheless, such interventions are dependent on available resources and funding, which make them very difficult to implement in developing countries. We believe that the identification of a helpful pharmacological intervention to aid the motor recovery of these patients will constitute a breakthrough that will have a major impact in

  15. Pridopidine for the treatment of motor function in patients with Huntington's disease (MermaiHD): a phase 3, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    de Yebenes, Justo Garcia; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Reilmann, Ralf; Rosser, Anne; Barker, Roger A; Saft, Carsten; Magnet, Markus K; Sword, Alastair; Rembratt, Asa; Tedroff, Joakim

    2011-12-01

    Huntington's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, characterised by motor, cognitive, and behavioural deficits. Pridopidine belongs to a new class of compounds known as dopaminergic stabilisers, and results from a small phase 2 study in patients with Huntington's disease suggested that this drug might improve voluntary motor function. We aimed to assess further the effects of pridopidine in patients with Huntington's disease. We undertook a 6 month, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to assess the efficacy of pridopidine in the treatment of motor deficits in patients with Huntington's disease. Our primary endpoint was change in the modified motor score (mMS; derived from the unified Huntington's disease rating scale) at 26 weeks. We recruited patients with Huntington's disease from 32 European centres; patients were aged 30 years or older and had an mMS of 10 points or greater at baseline. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive placebo, 45 mg per day pridopidine, or 90 mg per day pridopidine by use of centralised computer-generated codes. Patients and investigators were masked to treatment assignment. We also assessed the safety and tolerability profile of pridopidine. For our primary analysis, all patients were eligible for inclusion in our full analysis set, in which we used the last observation carried forward method for missing values. We used an analysis of covariance model and the Bonferroni method to adjust for multiple comparisons. We used a prespecified per-protocol population as our sensitivity analysis. The α level was 0·025 for our primary analysis and 0·05 overall. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00665223. At 26 weeks, in our full analysis set the difference in mean mMS was -0·99 points (97·5% CI -2·08 to 0·10, p=0·042) in patients who received 90 mg per day pridopidine (n=145) versus those who received placebo (n=144), and -0·36 points (-1·44 to 0·72, p=0·456) in those

  16. Combined transcranial direct current stimulation and home-based occupational therapy for upper limb motor impairment following intracerebral hemorrhage: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Jesper; Figlewski, Krystian; Andersen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the combined effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and home-based occupational therapy on activities of daily living (ADL) and grip strength, in patients with upper limb motor impairment following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). A double-blind randomized controlled trial with one-week follow-up. Patients received five consecutive days of occupational therapy at home, combined with either anodal (n = 8) or sham (n = 7) tDCS. The primary outcome was ADL performance, which was assessed with the Jebsen-Taylor test (JTT). Both groups improved JTT over time (p < 0.01). The anodal group improved grip strength compared with the sham group from baseline to post-assessment (p = 0.025). However, this difference was attenuated at one-week follow-up. There was a non-significant tendency for greater improvement in JTT in the anodal group compared with the sham group, from baseline to post-assessment (p = 0.158). Five consecutive days of tDCS combined with occupational therapy provided greater improvements in grip strength compared with occupational therapy alone. tDCS is a promising add-on intervention regarding training of upper limb motor impairment. It is well tolerated by patients and can easily be applied for home-based training. Larger studies with long-term follow-up are needed to further explore possible effects of tDCS in patients with ICH. Five consecutive days of tDCS combined with occupational therapy provided greater improvements in grip strength compared with occupational therapy alone. tDCS is well tolerated by patients and can easily be applied for home-based rehabilitation.

  17. Movement related cortical potentials of cued versus self-initiated movements: double dissociated modulation by dorsal premotor cortex versus supplementary motor area rTMS.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Kuei; Arai, Noritoshi; Tsai, Chon-Haw; Ziemann, Ulf

    2012-04-01

    The dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) is thought to play a significant role in movement preparation cued by sensory information rather than in self-initiated movements. The evidence in humans for this contention is still circumstantial. Here we explored the effects of modulation of PMd by excitability decreasing 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) versus excitability increasing 5 Hz rTMS on two forms of movement related cortical potentials: contingent negative variation (CNV) versus Bereitschaftspotential (BP) reflecting externally cued versus self-triggered movement preparation. Ten healthy right-handed subjects performed visually cued or self-triggered simple sequential finger movements with their right hand. CNV and BP were recorded by 25 EEG electrodes covering the fronto-centro-parietal cortex and divided into an early (1500-500 ms before a go-signal or movement onset) and a late potential (500-0 ms). MRI-navigated 1 Hz rTMS of the left PMd resulted in significant increase of the late CNV over the left central region predominantly contralateral to the prepared right hand movement, while 5 Hz rTMS had no effect on CNV. In contrast, 1 and 5 Hz rTMS did not modify BP. Control experiments of 1 Hz rTMS of the supplementary motor area (SMA) and of low-intensity 1 Hz rTMS of the left primary motor cortex did not change CNV, but 1 Hz SMA-rTMS increased late BP. This double dissociation of effects of PMd-rTMS versus SMA-rTMS on CNV versus BP provides direct evidence that the left PMd in humans is more involved in preparatory processes of externally cued rather than self-initiated movements, contrasting with an opposite role of the SMA. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effects of experimental craniofacial pain on fine jaw motor control: a placebo-controlled double-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Castrillon, Eduardo; Svensson, Krister G; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Trulsson, Mats; Svensson, Peter

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the experiment was to test the hypothesis that experimental pain in the masseter muscle or temporomandibular joint (TMJ) would perturb the oral fine motor control, reflected in bigger variability of bite force values and jaw muscle activity, during repeated splitting of food morsels. Twenty healthy volunteers participated in four sessions. An intervention was made by injection of either 0.2 ml of monosodium glutamate/isotonic saline (MSG/IS) (randomized) in either the masseter or TMJ (randomized). The participants were asked to hold and split a flat-faced placebo tablet with their anterior teeth, thirty times each at baseline, during intervention and post-intervention. Pain was measured using a 0-10 visual analog scale. The force applied by the teeth to "hold" and "split" the tablet along with the corresponding electromyographic (EMG) activity of the jaw muscles and subject-based reports on perception of pain was recorded. The data analysis included a three-way analysis of variance model. The peak pain intensity was significantly higher during the painful MSG injections in the TMJ (6.1 ± 0.4) than the injections in masseter muscle (5.5 ± 0.5) (P = 0.037). Variability of hold force was significantly smaller during the MSG injection than IS injection in the masseter (P = 0.024). However, there was no significant effect of intervention on the variability of split force during the masseter injections (P = 0.769) and variability of hold and split force during the TMJ injections (P = 0.481, P = 0.545). The variability of the EMG activity of the jaw muscles did not show significant effects of intervention. Subject-based reports revealed that pain did not interfere in the ability to hold the tablet in 57.9 and 78.9 %, and the ability to split the tablet in 78.9 and 68.4 %, of the participants, respectively, during painful masseter and TMJ injections. Hence, experimental pain in the masseter muscle or TMJ did not have any robust effect in terms of bigger

  19. Neural control mechanisms of the pheromone-triggered programmed behavior in male silkmoths revealed by double-labeling of descending interneurons and a motor neuron.

    PubMed

    Wada, Satoshi; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2005-04-04

    Male silkmoths, Bombyx mori, exhibit a characteristic zigzagging behavior consisting of straight-line walking, zigzagging turns, and looping. The timing for shifting the turning direction is synchronized to the sideways head movements controlled by neck motor neurons (NMNs) including a cervical ventral NMN (cv1-NMN). It has been suggested that this programmed behavior is instructed by two types of activity patterns descending from the brain and the thoracic ganglion: one is a phasic excitation and the other is a state-dependent activity similar to the flipflop in electric memory circuits. These activities are shown by certain descending interneurons contained in two subsets of DNs, Group-I and -II DNs. However, it is not yet well understood which DNs are directly related to instructing this behavior. In order to understand neural control mechanisms of this programmed behavior, we investigated the morphological relationship between these DNs and the cv1-NMN, which is an index of this programmed behavior. We applied a double-labeling technique combining backfilling of the cv1-NMN and intracellular staining of single DNs. 3D confocal images revealed overlapping regions between the Group-I, -II DNs and the cv1-NMN. Group-IIA and -IID, which showed typical flipflop activities, Group-IIC DNs, which showed phasic excitation, and Group-IB DNs, which showed long-lasting inhibition had many overlapping regions on the cv1-NMNs. Our results indicate that the programmed behavior is instructed by these types of DNs.

  20. Variation in the electrical properties of 100 V/100 a rated mesh and stripe TDMOSFETs (Trench Double-Diffused MOSFETs) for motor drive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Kyoung-Il; Kah, Dong-Ha; Kim, Sang-Gi; Koo, Jin-Gun; Kim, Jongdae; Yang, Yil-Suk; Lee, Jin-Ho

    2012-05-01

    The vertical power metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) with deep trench structures are the most promising candidates to overcome the trade-off relationship between the ON-resistance (R ON ) and the blocking voltage (BV DS ). Especially, 100 V/100 A rated trench power MOSFETs are used in components of many power systems, such as motors and LED lighting drive ICs, DC-DC converters in electric vehicles, and so on. In this work, we studied variations of the electrical characteristics, such as threshold voltage (V TH ), BV DS , and drain current drivability, with p-well doping concentration via the SILVACO simulator. From simulation results, we found the BV DS and the drain current (I D ) as functions of the p-well doping concentration at an ion implantation energy of 80 keV. With increasing of p-well doping concentration in the guard ring region, both V TH and BV DS slowly increased, but I D decreased, because the boron lateral diffusion during the fabrication process below gate trench region affected the doping concentration of the p-body at the active region. Additionally, 100 V/100 A rated trench double-diffused MOSFETs (TDMOSFETs) with meshes and stripes were successfully developed by using a silicon deep etching process. The variations in the electrical properties, such as V TH , BV DS , and drain current drivability, of the two different kinds of fabricated devices, with cell design and density in TDMOSFETs were also studied. The BV DS and the V TH in the stripe-type TDMOSFET were 110 and 3 V, respectively. However, the V TH of mesh-type device was smaller 0.5 V than that of stripe-type because of corner effect. The BV DS improved about 20 V compared to stripe-type TDMOSFET due to edge termination, and the maximum drain current (I D.MAX ) was improved by about 10% due to an increase in the gate width at the same chip size. These effects were reflected in devices with different cell densities. When the cell density was increased, however

  1. Protocol study for a randomised, controlled, double-blind, clinical trial involving virtual reality and anodal transcranial direct current stimulation for the improvement of upper limb motor function in children with Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Jamile Benite Palma; Grecco, Luanda André Collange; de Moura, Renata Calhes Franco; Lazzari, Roberta Delasta; Duarte, Natalia de Almeida Carvalho; Miziara, Isabela; de Melo, Gileno Edu Lameira; Dumont, Arislander Jonathan Lopes; Galli, Manuela; Santos Oliveira, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Down syndrome results in neuromotor impairment that affects selective motor control, compromising the acquisition of motor skills and functional independence. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate and compare the effects of multiple-monopolar anodal transcranial direct current stimulation and sham stimulation over the primary motor cortex during upper limb motor training involving virtual reality on motor control, muscle activity, cerebral activity and functional independence. Methods and analysis A randomised, controlled, double-blind, clinical trial is proposed. The calculation of the sample size will be defined based on the results of a pilot study involving the same methods. The participants will be randomly allocated to two groups. Evaluations will be conducted before and after the intervention as well as 1 month after the end of the intervention process. At each evaluation, three-dimensional analysis of upper limb movement muscle activity will be measured using electromyography, cerebral activity will be measured using an electroencephalogram system and intellectual capacity will be assessed using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children. Virtual reality training will be performed three times a week (one 20 min session per day) for a total of 10 sessions. During the protocol, transcranial stimulation will be administered concomitantly to upper limb motor training. The results will be analysed statistically, with a p value≤0.05 considered indicative of statistical significance. Ethical aspects and publicity The present study received approval from the Institutional Review Board of Universidade Nove de Julho (Sao Paulo,Brazil) under process number 1.540.113 and is registered with the Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (N° RBR3PHPXB). The participating institutions have presented a declaration of participation. The volunteers will be permitted to drop out of the study at any time with no negative repercussions. The results will

  2. Synaptic connections between the hindwing stretch receptor and flight motor neurones in the locust revealed by double cobalt labelling for electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, B.H.; Altman, J.S.; Tyrer, N.M.

    1985-03-08

    Synaptic interactions between sensory and motor neurones in the locust flight system have been investigated by using intracellular labelling with cobalt and nickel for electron microscopy. Simultaneous axonal filling of two neurones with different concentrations of metal ions produces differential labelling, so that contacts between them in the central nervous system can be recognized. We have investigated the connectivity of the hindwing stretch receptor neurone (SR) with a direct hindwing depressor motor neurone (MN 127) known from physiological experiments to receive monosynaptic input from the SR, and an indirect hindwing depressor motor neurone (MN 112/1), for which no monosynaptic connection with the SR has been reported. We have found no direct synapses between the SR and MN 112/1, although some of their branches lie close together in the neuropile. We have, however, found some evidence for polysynaptic connections between them. There are many synapses of conventional dyadic morphology from both the lateral and mediolateral branches of the SR to MN 127; the medial branch was not examined. Those from the lateral branch contact the motor neurone on branches close to the neuropilar segment, while those from the mediolateral branch contact long, thin distal twigs. We estimate that there are about 600 anatomical synapses between these two neurones. Our results suggest that a large number of widely distributed anatomical synapses constitute the physiological synaptic connection between the SR and MN 127. The dyadic arrangement of these synapses provides an anatomical correlate for the physiologically established divergence of SR outputs onto interneurones and motor neurones.

  3. Programmed intermittent epidural bolus versus continuous epidural infusion for labor analgesia: the effects on maternal motor function and labor outcome. A randomized double-blind study in nulliparous women.

    PubMed

    Capogna, Giorgio; Camorcia, Michela; Stirparo, Silvia; Farcomeni, Alessio

    2011-10-01

    Programmed intermittent epidural anesthetic bolus (PIEB) technique may result in reduced total local anesthetic consumption, fewer manual boluses, and greater patient satisfaction compared with continuous epidural infusion (CEI). In this randomized, double-blind study, we compared the incidence of motor block and labor outcome in women who received PIEB or CEI for maintenance of labor analgesia. The primary outcome variable was maternal motor function and the secondary outcome was mode of delivery. Nulliparous, term women with spontaneous labor and cervical dilation <4 cm were eligible to participate in the study. Epidural analgesia was initiated and maintained with a solution of levobupivacaine 0.0625% with sufentanil 0.5 μg/mL. After an initial epidural loading dose of 20 mL, patients were randomly assigned to receive PIEB (10 mL every hour beginning 60 minutes after the initial dose) or CEI (10 mL/h, beginning immediately after the initial dose) for the maintenance of analgesia. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) using a second infusion pump with levobupivacaine 0.125% was used to treat breakthrough pain. The degree of motor block was assessed in both lower extremities using the modified Bromage score at regular intervals throughout labor; the end point was any motor block in either limb. We also evaluated PCEA bolus doses and total analgesic solution consumption. We studied 145 subjects (PIEB = 75; CEI = 70). Motor block was reported in 37% in the CEI group and in 2.7% in the PIEB group (P < 0.001; odds ratio = 21.2; 95% CI: 4.9-129.3); it occurred earlier (P = 0.008) (hazard ratio = 7.8; 95% CI: 1.9-30.8; P = 0.003) and was more frequent at full cervical dilation in the CEI group (P < 0.001). The incidence of instrumental delivery was 20% for the CEI group and 7% for the PIEB group (P = 0.03). Total levobupivacaine consumption, number of patients requiring additional PCEA boluses, and mean number of PCEA boluses per patient were lower in the PIEB

  4. Protocol study for a randomised, controlled, double-blind, clinical trial involving virtual reality and anodal transcranial direct current stimulation for the improvement of upper limb motor function in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Jamile Benite Palma; Grecco, Luanda André Collange; Moura, Renata Calhes Franco de; Lazzari, Roberta Delasta; Duarte, Natalia de Almeida Carvalho; Miziara, Isabela; Melo, Gileno Edu Lameira de; Dumont, Arislander Jonathan Lopes; Galli, Manuela; Santos Oliveira, Claudia

    2017-08-11

    Down syndrome results in neuromotor impairment that affects selective motor control, compromising the acquisition of motor skills and functional independence. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate and compare the effects of multiple-monopolar anodal transcranial direct current stimulation and sham stimulation over the primary motor cortex during upper limb motor training involving virtual reality on motor control, muscle activity, cerebral activity and functional independence. A randomised, controlled, double-blind, clinical trial is proposed. The calculation of the sample size will be defined based on the results of a pilot study involving the same methods. The participants will be randomly allocated to two groups. Evaluations will be conducted before and after the intervention as well as 1 month after the end of the intervention process. At each evaluation, three-dimensional analysis of upper limb movement muscle activity will be measured using electromyography, cerebral activity will be measured using an electroencephalogram system and intellectual capacity will be assessed using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children. Virtual reality training will be performed three times a week (one 20 min session per day) for a total of 10 sessions. During the protocol, transcranial stimulation will be administered concomitantly to upper limb motor training. The results will be analysed statistically, with a p value≤0.05 considered indicative of statistical significance. The present study received approval from the Institutional Review Board of Universidade Nove de Julho (Sao Paulo,Brazil) under process number 1.540.113 and is registered with the Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (N° RBR3PHPXB). The participating institutions have presented a declaration of participation. The volunteers will be permitted to drop out of the study at any time with no negative repercussions. The results will be published and will contribute evidence regarding the use of

  5. Three-color Förster resonance energy transfer within single FOF1-ATP synthases: monitoring elastic deformations of the rotary double motor in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Stefan; Düser, Monika G.; Zarrabi, Nawid; Börsch, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic activities of enzymes are associated with elastic conformational changes of the protein backbone. Förster-type resonance energy transfer, commonly referred to as FRET, is required in order to observe the dynamics of relative movements within the protein. Förster-type resonance energy transfer between two specifically attached fluorophores provides a ruler with subnanometer resolution between 3 and 8 nm, submillisecond time resolution for time trajectories of conformational changes, and single-molecule sensitivity to overcome the need for synchronization of various conformations. FOF1-ATP synthase is a rotary molecular machine which catalyzes the formation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The Escherichia coli enzyme comprises a proton driven 10 stepped rotary FO motor connected to a 3-stepped F1 motor, where ATP is synthesized. This mismatch of step sizes will result in elastic deformations within the rotor parts. We present a new single-molecule FRET approach to observe both rotary motors simultaneously in a single FOF1-ATP synthase at work. We labeled this enzyme with three fluorophores, specifically at the stator part and at the two rotors. Duty cycle-optimized with alternating laser excitation, referred to as DCO-ALEX, allowed to control enzyme activity and to unravel associated transient twisting within the rotors of a single enzyme during ATP hydrolysis and ATP synthesis. Monte Carlo simulations revealed that the rotor twisting is larger than 36 deg.

  6. Effect of DA-9701 on Gastric Motor Function Assessed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Healthy Volunteers: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yang Won; Min, Byung-Hoon; Kim, Seonwoo; Choi, Dongil; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving gastric accommodation and gastric emptying is an attractive physiological treatment target in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD). We evaluated the effect of DA-9701, a new drug for FD, on gastric motor function after a meal in healthy volunteers using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Forty healthy volunteers were randomly allocated to receive either DA-9701 or placebo. After 5 days of treatment, subjects underwent gastric MRI (60 min before and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after a liquid test meal). Gastric volume was measured through 3-dimensional reconstruction from MRI data. We analyzed 4 outcome variables including changes in total gastric volume (TGV), proximal TGV, and proximal to distal TGV ratio after a meal and gastric emptying rates after adjusting values at the pre-test meal. Results Changes in TGV and proximal TGV after a meal did not differ between the DA-9701 and placebo groups (difference between groups -25.9 mL, 95% confidence interval [CI] -54.0 to 2.3 mL, P = 0.070 and -2.9 mL, 95% CI -30.3 to 24.5 mL, P = 0.832, respectively). However, pre-treatment with DA-9701 increased postprandial proximal to distal TGV ratio more than placebo (difference between groups 0.93, 95% CI 0.08 to 1.79, P = 0.034). In addition, pre-treatment with DA-9701 significantly increased gastric emptying as compared with placebo (mean difference between groups 3.41%, 95% CI 0.54% to 6.29%, P = 0.021, by mixed model for repeated measures). Conclusion Our results suggested that DA-9701 enhances gastric emptying and does not significantly affect gastric accommodation in healthy volunteers. Further studies to confirm whether DA-9701 enhances these gastric motor functions in patients with FD are warranted. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02091635 PMID:26402448

  7. Impairments of long-term depression induction and motor coordination precede Aβ accumulation in the cerebellum of APPswe/PS1dE9 double transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Yuki; Ishizeki, Masato; Watamura, Naoto; Toba, Junya; Yoshii, Aya; Inoue, Takafumi; Ohshima, Toshio

    2014-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that represents the most common type of dementia among elderly people. Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides in extracellular Aβ plaques, produced from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via sequential processing by β- and γ-secretases, impair hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and cause cognitive dysfunction in AD patients. Here, we report that Aβ peptides also impair another form of synaptic plasticity; cerebellar long-term depression (LTD). In the cerebellum of commonly used AD mouse model, APPswe/PS1dE9 mice, Aβ plaques were detected from 8 months and profound accumulation of Aβ plaques was observed at 18 onths of age. Biochemical analysis revealed relatively high levels of APP protein and Aβ in the cerebellum of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. At pre-Aβ accumulation stage, LTD induction, and motor coordination are disturbed. These results indicate that soluble Aβ oligomers disturb LTD induction and cerebellar function in AD mouse model. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. ISRO's solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagappa, R.; Kurup, M. R.; Muthunayagam, A. E.

    1989-08-01

    Solid rocket motors have been the mainstay of ISRO's sounding rockets and the first generation satellite launch vehicles. For the new launch vehicle under development also, the solid rocket motors contribute significantly to the vehicle's total propulsive power. The rocket motors in use and under development have been developed for a variety of applications and range in size from 30 mm dia employing 450 g of solid propellant—employed for providing a spin to the apogee motors—to the giant 2.8 m dia motor employing nearly 130 tonnes of solid propellant. The initial development, undertaken in 1967 was of small calibre motor of 75 mm dia using a double base charge. The development was essentially to understand the technological elements. Extruded aluminium tubes were used as a rocket motor casing. The fore and aft closures were machined from aluminium rods. The grain was a seven-pointed star with an enlargement of the port at the aft end and was charged into the chamber using a polyester resin system. The nozzle was a metallic heat sink type with graphite throat insert. The motor was ignited with a black powder charge and fired for 2.0 s. Subsequent to this, further developmental activities were undertaken using PVC plastisol based propellants. A class of sounding rockets ranging from 125 to 560 mm calibre were realized. These rocket motors employed improved designs and had delivered lsp ranging from 2060 to 2256 Ns/kg. Case bonding could not be adopted due to the higher cure temperatures of the plastisol propellants but improvements were made in the grain charging techniques and in the design of the igniters and the nozzle. Ablative nozzles based on asbestos phenolic and silica phenolic with graphite inserts were used. For the larger calibre rocket motors, the lsp could be improved by metallic additives. In the early 1970s designs were evolved for larger and more efficient motors. A series of 4 motors for the country's first satellite launch vehicle SLV-3 were

  9. Motor syndromes.

    PubMed

    Corea, Francesco; Micheli, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Motor disturbances alone or associated with other focal deficits are the most common symptoms suggesting a neurovascular event. An appropriate clinical assessment of these signs and symptoms may help physicians to better diagnose and to both better treat and predict outcome. In this paper the main clinical features of motor deficit are described together with other motor-related events such as ataxia and movement disturbances.

  10. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  11. 49 CFR 380.203 - LCV Doubles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS SPECIAL TRAINING REQUIREMENTS LCV Driver-Training Program § 380.203 LCV Doubles. (a) To qualify for the training necessary...

  12. Stepper motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekramer, Cornelis

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the more commonly used permanent magnet stepper motors for spaceflight. It will discuss the mechanical and electrical aspects of the devices, their torque behavior, those parameters which need to be controlled and measured, and test methods to be employed. It will also discuss torque margins, compare these to the existing margin requirements, and determine the applicability of these requirements. Finally it will attempt to generate a set of requirements which will be used in any stepper motor procurement and will fully characterize the stepper motor behavior in a consistent and repeatable fashion.

  13. Ultrasonic Motors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    Nakamura, M. K. Kurosawa , and S. Ueha, "Characteristics of a Hybrid Transducer-Type Ultrasonic Motor," IEEE Trans. Ultrason.Ferroelec. Freq., vol. 44...pp. 823-828, 1997. [12] M. K. Kurosawa , T. Morita, and T. Higuchi, "A Cylindrical Ultrasonic Micromotor Based on PZT Thin Film," IEEE Ultrasonics...Symposium, vol. 1, pp. 549-552, 1994. [13] T. Morita, M. K. Kurosawa , and T. Higuchi, "A Cylindrical Micro Ultrasonic Motor Using PZT Thin Film

  14. Advanced Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Knoth, Edward A; Chelluri, Bhanumathi; Schumaker, Edward J

    2012-12-14

    vProject Summary Transportation energy usage is predicted to increase substantially by 2020. Hybrid vehicles and fuel cell powered vehicles are destined to become more prominent as fuel prices rise with the demand. Hybrid and fuel cell vehicle platforms are both dependent on high performance electric motors. Electric motors for transportation duty will require sizeable low-speed torque to accelerate the vehicle. As motor speed increases, the torque requirement decreases which results in a nearly constant power motor output. Interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSM) are well suited for this duty. , , These rotor geometries are configured in straight lines and semi circular arc shapes. These designs are of limited configurations because of the lack of availability of permanent magnets of any other shapes at present. We propose to fabricate rotors via a novel processing approach where we start with magnet powders and compact them into a net shape rotor in a single step. Using this approach, widely different rotor designs can be implemented for efficiency. The current limitation on magnet shape and thickness will be eliminated. This is accomplished by co-filling magnet and soft iron powders at specified locations in intricate shapes using specially designed dies and automatic powder filling station. The process fundamentals for accomplishing occurred under a previous Applied Technology Program titled, Motors and Generators for the 21st Century. New efficient motor designs that are not currently possible (or cost prohibitive) can be accomplished by this approach. Such an approach to motor fabrication opens up a new dimension in motor design. Feasibility Results We were able to optimize a IPMSM rotor to take advantage of the powder co-filling and DMC compaction processing methods. The minimum low speed torque requirement of 5 N-m can be met through an optimized design with magnet material having a Br capability of 0.2 T. This level of magnetic performance can

  15. Motor Planning.

    PubMed

    Wong, Aaron L; Haith, Adrian M; Krakauer, John W

    2015-08-01

    Motor planning colloquially refers to any process related to the preparation of a movement that occurs during the reaction time prior to movement onset. However, this broad definition encompasses processes that are not strictly motor-related, such as decision-making about the identity of task-relevant stimuli in the environment. Furthermore, the assumption that all motor-planning processes require processing time, and can therefore be studied behaviorally by measuring changes in the reaction time, needs to be reexamined. In this review, we take a critical look at the processes leading from perception to action and suggest a definition of motor planning that encompasses only those processes necessary for a movement to be executed-that is, processes that are strictly movement related. These processes resolve the ambiguity inherent in an abstract goal by defining a specific movement to achieve it. We propose that the majority of processes that meet this definition can be completed nearly instantaneously, which means that motor planning itself in fact consumes only a small fraction of the reaction time. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Homopolar motor with dual rotors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, J.S.

    1998-12-01

    A homopolar motor has a field rotor mounted on a frame for rotation in a first rotational direction and for producing an electromagnetic field, and an armature rotor mounted for rotation on said frame within said electromagnetic field and in a second rotational direction counter to said first rotational direction of said field rotor. The two rotors are coupled through a 1:1 gearing mechanism, so as to travel at the same speed but in opposite directions. This doubles the output voltage and output power, as compared to a motor in which only the armature is rotated. Several embodiments are disclosed. 7 figs.

  17. Homopolar motor with dual rotors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    1998-01-01

    A homopolar motor (10) has a field rotor (15) mounted on a frame (11) for rotation in a first rotational direction and for producing an electromagnetic field, and an armature rotor (17) mounted for rotation on said frame (11) within said electromagnetic field and in a second rotational direction counter to said first rotational direction of said field rotor (15). The two rotors (15, 17) are coupled through a 1:1 gearing mechanism (19), so as to travel at the same speed but in opposite directions. This doubles the output voltage and output power, as compared to a motor in which only the armature is rotated. Several embodiments are disclosed.

  18. Brownian motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänggi, P.; Marchesoni, F.; Nori, F.

    2005-02-01

    In systems possessing a spatial or dynamical symmetry breaking, thermal Brownian motion combined with unbiased, non-equilibrium noise gives rise to a channelling of chance that can be used to exercise control over systems at the micro- and even on the nano-scale. This theme is known as the Brownian motor concept. The constructive role of (the generally overdamped) Brownian motion is exemplified for a noise-induced transport of particles within various set-ups. We first present the working principles and characteristics with a proof-of-principle device, a diffusive temperature Brownian motor. Next, we consider very recent applications based on the phenomenon of signal mixing. The latter is particularly simple to implement experimentally in order to optimize and selectively control a rich variety of directed transport behaviors. The subtleties and also the potential for Brownian motors operating in the quantum regime are outlined and some state-of-the-art applications, together with future roadways, are presented.

  19. [Motor rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Doménech, J; García-Aymerich, V; Juste, J; Ortiz, A

    2002-02-01

    The child's rehabilitation objectives are the same of the early intervention. The early intervention include motor approaches to facilitate the unique way of the newborn's expression: the movement and with it his holistic development. The motor approach is a classic aspect of early intervention but it is not itself early intervention. When the treatment objective is a term or preterm newborn or neonate the motor approach may be the principal method to facilitate perceptions experiences and basic habits. This intervention is not made with a specific physiotherapeutic technique. It is a sequential stimulation or development, without forget that the child must be taken as a whole. This point of view has special importance the first days of life and must be included in perinatal approach routines. In this paper we expose the work method of a Child Rehabilitation Team liked to a Newborn Unit.

  20. Motor Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Kollmorgen Corporation's Mermaid II two person submersible is propeller-driven by a system of five DC brushless motors with new electronic controllers that originated in work performed in a NASA/DOE project managed by Lewis Research Center. A key feature of the system is electric commutation rather than mechanical commutation for converting AC current to DC.

  1. Therma motor

    DOEpatents

    Kandarian, R.

    The disclosure is directed to a thermal motor utilizing two tapered prestressed parallel adjacent cylinders lengthwise disposed about one third in a coolant. Heat is applied to contacting portions of the cylinders outside the coolant to cause them to deform and turn. Heat sources such as industrial waste heat, geothermal hot water, solar radiation, etc. can be used.

  2. Cooperative behavior of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Karen C; Stienen, Ger J M; Schmid, Christoph F

    2002-01-01

    Both experimental evidence and theoretical models for collective effects in the working mechanism of molecular motors are reviewed at three different levels, namely: (i) interaction between the two heads of double-headed motors, particularly in processive motors like kinesin, myosin V and myosin VI, (ii) cooperative regulation of muscle thin filaments by accessory proteins and the Ca2+ level, and (iii) collective dynamic effects stemming from the mechanical coupling of molecular motors within macroscopic structures such as muscle thick filaments or axonemes. We aim to bridge the gap between structural information at the molecular level and physiological data with accompanying specific models on the one hand, and general stochastic physical models for the action of molecular motors on the other hand. An underlying assumption is that while, ultimately, the function of molecular motors will be explainable by a quantitative description of specific intramolecular dynamics and intermolecular interactions, for some coarse grained larger scale dynamic features it will be sufficient and illuminating to construct physical models that are simplified to the bare essentials.

  3. Double helicenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachrach, Steven M.

    2016-12-01

    The even double helicenes with 4-12 phenyl groups in each helix were examined at B3LYP-D3/6-311G(d). The double helicenes with 4-10 phenyl rings are less than twice as strained as their component helicenes; the strain results from twisting about the shared naphthyl moiety, with accompanying loss of aromaticity. These compounds should be reasonable synthetic targets, and computed NMR shifts are provided to aid in their characterization.

  4. Looking north toward unit 1 pump motor, overhead crane, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking north toward unit 1 pump motor, overhead crane, and double folding doors on the north side of the building - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Pumping Plant No. 2, Bounded by Interstate 8 to south, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  5. [Double responses].

    PubMed

    Motté, G; Dinanian, S; Sebag, C; Drieu, L; Slama, M

    1995-12-01

    Double response is a rare electrocardiographic phenomenon requiring two atrioventricular conduction pathways with very different electrophysiological properties. Double ventricular responses are the usual manifestation: an atrial depolarisation (spontaneous or provoked, anticipated or not) is followed by a first ventricular response dependent on an accessory pathway or a rapid nodal pathway and then a second response resulting from sufficiently delayed transmission through a nodal pathway for the ventricles to have recovered their excitability when the second wave of activation reaches them. A simple curiosity when isolated and occurring under unusual conditions, particularly during electrophysiological investigation of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the double response may initiate symptomatic non-reentrant junctional tachycardia when associated with nodal duality and repeating from atria in sinus rhythm. The functional incapacity and resistance to antiarrhythmic therapy may require referral for ablation of the slow pathway.

  6. Crack Propagation in Double-Base Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    propagation tests were conducted on a composite modified double- base ( CMDB ) propellant with the use of center-cracked strip biaxial specimens...double-base ( CMDB ) propellant. He performed a stress analysis of small, precracked, subscale STV motors formulated in terms of stress intensity factors...assumed for Solithane 113. The present program was aimed at evaluating the Schapery theory when it was applied to a CMDB propellant under similar loading

  7. Training voluntary motor suppression with real-time feedback of motor evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Majid, D S Adnan; Lewis, Christina; Aron, Adam R

    2015-05-01

    Training people to suppress motor representations voluntarily could improve response control. We evaluated a novel training procedure of real-time feedback of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) generated by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over motor cortex. On each trial, a cue instructed participants to use a mental strategy to suppress a particular finger representation without overt movement. A single pulse of TMS was delivered over motor cortex, and an MEP-derived measure of hand motor excitability was delivered visually to the participant within 500 ms. In experiment 1, we showed that participants learned to reduce the excitability of a particular finger beneath baseline (selective motor suppression) within 30 min of practice. In experiment 2, we performed a double-blind study with 2 training groups (1 with veridical feedback and 1 with matched sham feedback) to show that selective motor suppression depends on the veridical feedback itself. Experiment 3 further demonstrated the importance of veridical feedback by showing that selective motor suppression did not arise from mere mental imagery, even when incentivized with reward. Thus participants can use real-time feedback of TMS-induced MEPs to discover an effective mental strategy for selective motor suppression. This high-temporal-resolution, trial-by-trial-feedback training method could be used to help people better control response tendencies and may serve as a potential therapy for motor disorders such as Tourette's and dystonia. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Double Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-23

    A double crater, called a crater doublet, is seen in the bottom right part of this image from NASA Dawn spacecraft of asteroid Vesta. This crater doublet was likely formed by the simultaneous impact of two fragments of a split projectile.

  9. Starting motor

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Hamano, I

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a starting motor having a housing, planetary reduction gears including an internal gear in the housing. The improvement consists of an elastic member having a first annular portion mounted in engagement with a fixed annular member of the housing and a plurality of protruding axially extending elastic portions providing a corrugated surface pressed into engagement with an end portion of the internal gear, the elastic member being sandwiched between the internal gear and the housing member, the protruding axially extending elastic portions providing resilient means which flex and incline circumferentially under turning force from the internal gear and exert reactive thrust on the internal gear elastically so that the frictional force at the abutting surfaces of the protruding portions holds the internal gear in resilient engagement with the elastic member and the resilient means acts as a buffer to absorb rotary impact force developing in the planetary reduction gears.

  10. Gross motor control

    MedlinePlus

    Gross motor control is the ability to make large, general movements (such as waving an arm or lifting a ... Gross motor control is a milestone in the development of an infant. Infants develop gross motor control before they ...

  11. Double Layers in Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Alton C. (Editor); Moorehead, Tauna W. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: laboratory double layers; ion-acoustic double layers; pumping potential wells; ion phase-space vortices; weak double layers; electric fields and double layers in plasmas; auroral double layers; double layer formation in a plasma; beamed emission from gamma-ray burst source; double layers and extragalactic jets; and electric potential between plasma sheet clouds.

  12. Double screening

    SciTech Connect

    Gratia, Pierre; Hu, Wayne; Joyce, Austin; Ribeiro, Raquel H.

    2016-06-15

    Attempts to modify gravity in the infrared typically require a screening mechanism to ensure consistency with local tests of gravity. These screening mechanisms fit into three broad classes; we investigate theories which are capable of exhibiting more than one type of screening. Specifically, we focus on a simple model which exhibits both Vainshtein and kinetic screening. We point out that due to the two characteristic length scales in the problem, the type of screening that dominates depends on the mass of the sourcing object, allowing for different phenomenology at different scales. We consider embedding this double screening phenomenology in a broader cosmological scenario and show that the simplest examples that exhibit double screening are radiatively stable.

  13. Ballistic Missile Propellant Evaluation Test Motor System (Super BATES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-25

    pressure to overcome the high base burning rate limitations of early double base propellants ), no operational or proposed large solid motor operates at a...ressure of 200 psi.-i and would he cavih I iiu1ar tag tIi second stage Polaris to provide a 13 A’ data point for double base propellants . More...it is based on 16% aluminum propellant in motors at 500 to 800 psia. The flow rates of several large solid rocket motors are also shown although their

  14. Motor control for a brushless DC motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, William J. (Inventor); Faulkner, Dennis T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to a motor control system for a brushless DC motor having an inverter responsively coupled to the motor control system and in power transmitting relationship to the motor. The motor control system includes a motor rotor speed detecting unit that provides a pulsed waveform signal proportional to rotor speed. This pulsed waveform signal is delivered to the inverter to thereby cause an inverter fundamental current waveform output to the motor to be switched at a rate proportional to said rotor speed. In addition, the fundamental current waveform is also pulse width modulated at a rate proportional to the rotor speed. A fundamental current waveform phase advance circuit is controllingly coupled to the inverter. The phase advance circuit is coupled to receive the pulsed waveform signal from the motor rotor speed detecting unit and phase advance the pulsed waveform signal as a predetermined function of motor speed to thereby cause the fundamental current waveform to be advanced and thereby compensate for fundamental current waveform lag due to motor winding reactance which allows the motor to operate at higher speeds than the motor is rated while providing optimal torque and therefore increased efficiency.

  15. The dissociable effects of punishment and reward on motor learning.

    PubMed

    Galea, Joseph M; Mallia, Elizabeth; Rothwell, John; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2015-04-01

    A common assumption regarding error-based motor learning (motor adaptation) in humans is that its underlying mechanism is automatic and insensitive to reward- or punishment-based feedback. Contrary to this hypothesis, we show in a double dissociation that the two have independent effects on the learning and retention components of motor adaptation. Negative feedback, whether graded or binary, accelerated learning. While it was not necessary for the negative feedback to be coupled to monetary loss, it had to be clearly related to the actual performance on the preceding movement. Positive feedback did not speed up learning, but it increased retention of the motor memory when performance feedback was withdrawn. These findings reinforce the view that independent mechanisms underpin learning and retention in motor adaptation, reject the assumption that motor adaptation is independent of motivational feedback, and raise new questions regarding the neural basis of negative and positive motivational feedback in motor learning.

  16. Differential effects of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation of prefrontal, motor and somatosensory cortices on cortical excitability and pain perception - a double-blind randomised sham-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Vaseghi, B; Zoghi, M; Jaberzadeh, S

    2015-10-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess the effects of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (c-tDCS) over cortical regions of the pain neuromatrix, including the primary motor (M1), sensory (S1) and dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC) cortices on M1/S1 excitability, sensory (STh), and pain thresholds (PTh) in healthy adults. The secondary aim was to evaluate the placebo effects of c-tDCS on induced cortical and behavioural changes. Before, immediately after and 30 min after c-tDCS the amplitude of N20-P25 components of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) and peak-to-peak amplitudes of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were measured under four different experimental conditions. STh and PTh for peripheral electrical and mechanical stimulation were also evaluated. c-tDCS of 0.3 mA was applied for 20 min. A blinded assessor evaluated all outcome measures. c-tDCS of M1, S1 and DLPFC significantly decreased the corticospinal excitability of M1 (P < 0.05) for at least 30 min. Following the application of c-tDCS over S1, M1 and DLPFC, the amplitude of the N20-P25 component of SEPs decreased for at least 30 min (P < 0.05). Compared with baseline values, significant STh and PTh increases were observed after c-tDCS of these three sites. Decreasing the level of S1 and M1 excitability, following S1, M1 and DLPFC stimulation, confirmed the functional connectivities between these cortical sites involved in pain processing. Furthermore, increasing the level of STh/PTh after c-tDCS of these sites indicated that stimulation of not only M1 but also S1 and DLPFC could be considered a technique to decrease the level of pain in patients.

  17. Motor vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Y.; Sano, S.

    1986-04-15

    An improvement in a motor vehicle is described including: a vehicle body; a front road wheel disposed in the front part of the vehicle body; a rear road wheel disposed in the rear part of the vehicle body; an engine for driving at least either of the front and rear road wheels; and a steering wheel for steering at least either of the front and rear road wheels; comprising: detection means connected to the vehicle for detecting the transverse sliding angle of the vehicle body; and display means connected to the detection means for visually displaying the moving direction of the vehicle body on the basis of an output of the detection means; and the detection means comprises a first sensor for detecting the advancing speed of the vehicle, a second sensor for detecting the transverse acceleration of the vehicle, a third sensor for detecting the yawing velocity of the vehicle, and a processor for calculating the transverse sliding angle on the basis of the advancing speed, the transverse acceleration and the yawing velocity.

  18. Wind motor

    SciTech Connect

    Biscomb, L. I.

    1985-07-09

    A spider-like carrier having at least three generally horizontal arms has a hub mounted to the vertical, rotary-axis input shaft of a load. Each arm has at least one horizontal cross-arm secured to it near its radially outer end, which is supported from the ground by a low-friction support device such as a wheel or set of wheels. Mounted on each arm at the cross-arm or cross-arms is at least one sail, vane, airfoil or similar working member which is erected or spread generally normally to the wind when the respective arm is located for the working member to be blown downwind and is feathered or headed to the wind when the respective arm is located for the working member to be driven upwind. Horizontal axis and vertical axis journalling options for the working members and various sail shapes are shown, including a concave/convex sail and motor-oriented airfoil shape which provides lift when being driven upwind are shown.

  19. Unidirectional rotary motion in achiral molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistemaker, Jos C. M.; Štacko, Peter; Visser, Johan; Feringa, Ben L.

    2015-11-01

    Control of the direction of motion is an essential feature of biological rotary motors and results from the intrinsic chirality of the amino acids from which the motors are made. In synthetic autonomous light-driven rotary motors, point chirality is transferred to helical chirality, and this governs their unidirectional rotation. However, achieving directional rotary motion in an achiral molecular system in an autonomous fashion remains a fundamental challenge. Here, we report an achiral molecular motor in which the presence of a pseudo-asymmetric carbon atom proved to be sufficient for exclusive autonomous disrotary motion of two appended rotor moieties. Isomerization around the two double bonds enables both rotors to move in the same direction with respect to their surroundings—like wheels on an axle—demonstrating that autonomous unidirectional rotary motion can be achieved in a symmetric system.

  20. Unidirectional rotary motion in achiral molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kistemaker, Jos C M; Štacko, Peter; Visser, Johan; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-11-01

    Control of the direction of motion is an essential feature of biological rotary motors and results from the intrinsic chirality of the amino acids from which the motors are made. In synthetic autonomous light-driven rotary motors, point chirality is transferred to helical chirality, and this governs their unidirectional rotation. However, achieving directional rotary motion in an achiral molecular system in an autonomous fashion remains a fundamental challenge. Here, we report an achiral molecular motor in which the presence of a pseudo-asymmetric carbon atom proved to be sufficient for exclusive autonomous disrotary motion of two appended rotor moieties. Isomerization around the two double bonds enables both rotors to move in the same direction with respect to their surroundings--like wheels on an axle--demonstrating that autonomous unidirectional rotary motion can be achieved in a symmetric system.

  1. Motor neuropathies and lower motor neuron syndromes.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, A

    2017-05-01

    Motor or motor-predominant neuropathies may arise from disease processes affecting the motor axon and/or its surrounding myelin. Lower motor neuron syndrome (LMNS) arises from a disease process affecting the spinal motor neuron itself. The term LMNS is more generally used, rather than motor neuronopathy, although both entities are clinically similar. Common features are muscle weakness (distal or proximal) with atrophy and hyporeflexia, but no sensory involvement. They can be acquired or hereditary. Immune-mediated neuropathies (multifocal motor neuropathy, motor-predominant chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy) are important to identify, as effective treatments are available. Other acquired neuropathies, such as infectious, paraneoplastic and radiation-induced neuropathies are also well known. Focal LMNS is an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-mimicking syndrome especially affecting young adults. The main hereditary LMNSs in adulthood are Kennedy's disease, late-onset spinal muscular atrophy and distal hereditary motor neuropathies. Motor neuropathies and LMNS are all clinical entities that should be better known, despite being rare diseases. They can sometimes be difficult to differentially diagnose from other diseases, particularly from the more frequent ALS in its pure LMN form. Nevertheless, correct identification of these syndromes is important because their treatment and prognoses are definitely different. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Unidirectional molecular motor on a gold surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Delden, Richard A.; Ter Wiel, Matthijs K. J.; Pollard, Michael M.; Vicario, Javier; Koumura, Nagatoshi; Feringa, Ben L.

    2005-10-01

    Molecules capable of mimicking the function of a wide range of mechanical devices have been fabricated, with motors that can induce mechanical movement attracting particular attention. Such molecular motors convert light or chemical energy into directional rotary or linear motion, and are usually prepared and operated in solution. But if they are to be used as nanomachines that can do useful work, it seems essential to construct systems that can function on a surface, like a recently reported linear artificial muscle. Surface-mounted rotors have been realized and limited directionality in their motion predicted. Here we demonstrate that a light-driven molecular motor capable of repetitive unidirectional rotation can be mounted on the surface of gold nanoparticles. The motor design uses a chiral helical alkene with an upper half that serves as a propeller and is connected through a carbon-carbon double bond (the rotation axis) to a lower half that serves as a stator. The stator carries two thiol-functionalized `legs', which then bind the entire motor molecule to a gold surface. NMR spectroscopy reveals that two photo-induced cis-trans isomerizations of the central double bond, each followed by a thermal helix inversion to prevent reverse rotation, induce a full and unidirectional 360° rotation of the propeller with respect to the surface-mounted lower half of the system.

  3. Pointing to double-step visual stimuli from a standing position: motor corrections when the speed-accuracy trade-off is unexpectedly modified in-flight. A breakdown of the perception-action coupling.

    PubMed

    Fautrelle, L; Barbieri, G; Ballay, Y; Bonnetblanc, F

    2011-10-27

    The time required to complete a fast and accurate movement is a function of its amplitude and the target size. This phenomenon refers to the well known speed-accuracy trade-off. Some interpretations have suggested that the speed-accuracy trade-off is already integrated into the movement planning phase. More specifically, pointing movements may be planned to minimize the variance of the final hand position. However, goal-directed movements can be altered at any time, if for instance, the target location is changed during execution. Thus, one possible limitation of these interpretations may be that they underestimate feedback processes. To further investigate this hypothesis we designed an experiment in which the speed-accuracy trade-off was unexpectedly varied at the hand movement onset by modifying separately the target distance or size, or by modifying both of them simultaneously. These pointing movements were executed from an upright standing position. Our main results showed that the movement time increased when there was a change to the size or location of the target. In addition, the terminal variability of finger position did not change. In other words, it showed that the movement velocity is modulated according to the target size and distance during motor programming or during the final approach, independently of the final variability of the hand position. It suggests that when the speed-accuracy trade-off is unexpectedly modified, terminal feedbacks based on intermediate representations of the endpoint velocity are used to monitor and control the hand displacement. There is clearly no obvious perception-action coupling in this case but rather intermediate processing that may be involved.

  4. Chaos control by using Motor Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, Paolo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia

    2002-09-01

    In this paper a new method for chaos control is proposed, consisting of an unsupervised neural network, namely a Motor Map. In particular a feedback entrainment scheme is adopted: a chaotic system with a given parameter set generates the reference trajectory for another chaotic system with different parameters to be controlled: the Motor Map is required to provide the appropriate time-varying gain value for the feedback signal. The state of the controlled system is considered as input to the Motor Map. Particular efforts have been paid to the feasibility of the implementation. Indeed, the simulations performed have been oriented to design a Motor Map suitable for an hardware realization, thus some restrictive hypotheses, such as for example a low number of neurons, have been assumed. A huge number of simulations has been carried out by considering as system to be controlled a Double Scroll Chua Attractor as well as other chaotic attractors. Several reference trajectories have also been considered: a limit cycle generated by a Chua's circuit with different parameters values, a double scroll Chua attractor, a chaotic attractor of the family of the Chua's circuit attractors. In all the simulations instead of controlling the whole state space, only two state variables have been fed back. Good results in terms of settling time (namely, the period in which the map learns the control task) and steady state errors have been obtained with a few neurons. The Motor Map based adaptive controller offers high performances, specially in the case when the reference trajectory is switched into another one. In this case, a specialization of the neurons constituting the Motor Map is observed: while a group of neurons learns the appropriate control law for a reference trajectory, another group specializes itself to control the system when the other trajectory is used as a reference. A discrete components electronic realization of the Motor Map is presented and experimental results

  5. Chaos control by using Motor Maps.

    PubMed

    Arena, Paolo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia

    2002-09-01

    In this paper a new method for chaos control is proposed, consisting of an unsupervised neural network, namely a Motor Map. In particular a feedback entrainment scheme is adopted: a chaotic system with a given parameter set generates the reference trajectory for another chaotic system with different parameters to be controlled: the Motor Map is required to provide the appropriate time-varying gain value for the feedback signal. The state of the controlled system is considered as input to the Motor Map. Particular efforts have been paid to the feasibility of the implementation. Indeed, the simulations performed have been oriented to design a Motor Map suitable for an hardware realization, thus some restrictive hypotheses, such as for example a low number of neurons, have been assumed. A huge number of simulations has been carried out by considering as system to be controlled a Double Scroll Chua Attractor as well as other chaotic attractors. Several reference trajectories have also been considered: a limit cycle generated by a Chua's circuit with different parameters values, a double scroll Chua attractor, a chaotic attractor of the family of the Chua's circuit attractors. In all the simulations instead of controlling the whole state space, only two state variables have been fed back. Good results in terms of settling time (namely, the period in which the map learns the control task) and steady state errors have been obtained with a few neurons. The Motor Map based adaptive controller offers high performances, specially in the case when the reference trajectory is switched into another one. In this case, a specialization of the neurons constituting the Motor Map is observed: while a group of neurons learns the appropriate control law for a reference trajectory, another group specializes itself to control the system when the other trajectory is used as a reference. A discrete components electronic realization of the Motor Map is presented and experimental results

  6. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  7. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  8. Teamwork in microtubule motors.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Roop; Rai, Arpan K; Barak, Pradeep; Rai, Ashim; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2013-11-01

    Diverse cellular processes are driven by the collective force from multiple motor proteins. Disease-causing mutations cause aberrant function of motors, but the impact is observed at a cellular level and beyond, therefore necessitating an understanding of cell mechanics at the level of motor molecules. One way to do this is by measuring the force generated by ensembles of motors in vivo at single-motor resolution. This has been possible for microtubule motor teams that transport intracellular organelles, revealing unexpected differences between collective and single-molecule function. Here we review how the biophysical properties of single motors, and differences therein, may translate into collective motor function during organelle transport and perhaps in other processes outside transport. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronic motor tic disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  10. Introduction to ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Sashida, Toshiiku; Kenjo, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    The ultrasonic motor, invented in 1980, utilizes the piezoelectric effect in the ultrasonic frequency range to provide the motive force. (In conventional electric motors the motive force is electromagnetic.) The result is a motor with unusually good low-speed high-torque and power-to-weight characteristics. It has already found applications in camera autofocus mechanisms, medical equipment subject to high magnetic fields, and motorized car accessories. Its applications will increase as designers become more familiar with its unique characteristics. This book is the result of a collaboration between the inventor and an expert in conventional electric motors: the result is an introduction to the general theory presented in a way that links it to conventional motor theory. It will be invaluable both to motor designers and to those who design with and use electric motors as an introduction to this important new invention.

  11. Energy efficient motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-01-01

    This TechData Sheet is intended to help activity personnel identify cost effective energy projects for energy efficient motors. With this guide an energy manager can identify when an energy efficient induction motor should be used.

  12. Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Wallaschek, J.

    1994-12-31

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors are a new type of actuator. They are characterized by high torque at low rotational speed, simple mechanical design and good controllability. They also provide a high holding torque even if no power is applied. Compared to electromagnetic actuators the torque per volume ratio of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors can be higher by an order of magnitude. Recently various types of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors have been developed for industrial applications. This paper describes several types of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors.

  13. Smart motor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D.; Schmitt, D.

    1984-01-01

    Current spacecraft design relies upon microprocessor control; however, motors usually require extensive additional electronic circuitry to interface with these microprocessor controls. An improved control technique that allows a smart brushless motor to connect directly to a microprocessor control system is described. An actuator with smart motors receives a spacecraft command directly and responds in a closed loop control mode. In fact, two or more smart motors can be controlled for synchronous operation.

  14. Influence analysis of structural parameters on electromagnetic properties of HTS linear induction motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Zheng, T. Q.; Zhang, W.; Fang, J.; Liu, Y. M.

    2011-11-01

    A new type high temperature superconductor linear induction motor is designed and analyzed as a prototype to ensure applicability aimed at industrial motors. Made of Bi-2223/Ag, primary windings are distributed with the double-layer concentrated structure. The motor is analyzed by 2D electromagnetic Finite Element Method to get magnetic field distribution, thrust force, vertical force and so on. The critical current of motor and the electromagnetic force are mostly decided by the leakage flux density of primary slot and by the main magnetic flux and eddy current respectively. The structural parameters of motor have a great influence on the distribution of magnetic field. Under constant currents, the properties of motor are analyzed with different slot widths, slot heights and winding turns. The properties of motor, such as the maximum slot leakage flux density, motor thrust and motor vertical force, are analyzed with different structural parameters.

  15. Double inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, J.; Turner, M.S.

    1986-04-01

    The Zel'dovich spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations is a generic prediction of inflation. There is increasing evidence that when the spectrum is normalized by observational data on small scales, there is not enough power on large scales to account for the observed large-scale structure in the Universe. Decoupling the spectrum on large and small scales could solve this problem. As a means of decoupling the large and small scales we propose double inflation (i.e., two episodes of inflation). In this scenario the spectrum on large scales is determined by the first episode of inflation and those on small scales by a second episode of inflation. We present three models for such a scenario. By nearly saturating the large angular-scale cosmic microwave anisotropy bound, we can easily account for the observed large-scale structure. We take the perturbations on small scales to be very large, deltarho/rho approx. = 0.1 to 0.01, which results in the production of primordial black holes (PBHs), early formation of structure, reionization of the Universe, and a rich array of astrophysical events. The ..cap omega..-problem is also addressed by our scenario. Allowing the density perturbations produced by the second episode of inflation to be large also lessens the fine-tuning required in the scalar potential and makes reheating much easier. We briefly speculate on the possibility that the second episode of inflation proceeds through the nucleation of bubbles, which today manifest themselves as empty bubbles whose surfaces are covered with galaxies. 37 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Seeing Double

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesic, Peter

    2003-10-01

    The separateness and connection of individuals is perhaps the central question of human life: What, exactly, is my individuality? To what degree is it unique? To what degree can it be shared, and how? To the many philosophical and literary speculations about these topics over time, modern science has added the curious twist of quantum theory, which requires that the elementary particles of which everything consists have no individuality at all. All aspects of chemistry depend on this lack of individuality, as do many branches of physics. From where, then, does our individuality come? In Seeing Double, Peter Pesic invites readers to explore this intriguing set of questions. He draws on literary and historical examples that open the mind (from Homer to Martin Guerre to Kafka), philosophical analyses that have helped to make our thinking and speech more precise, and scientific work that has enabled us to characterize the phenomena of nature. Though he does not try to be all-inclusive, Pesic presents a broad range of ideas, building toward a specific point of view: that the crux of modern quantum theory is its clash with our ordinary concept of individuality. This represents a departure from the usual understanding of quantum theory. Pesic argues that what is bizarre about quantum theory becomes more intelligible as we reconsider what we mean by individuality and identity in ordinary experience. In turn, quantum identity opens a new perspective on us. Peter Pesic is a Tutor and Musician-in-Residence at St. John's College, Santa Fe, New Mexico. He has a Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University.

  17. Dopaminergic influences on formation of a motor memory.

    PubMed

    Flöel, Agnes; Breitenstein, Caterina; Hummel, Friedhelm; Celnik, Pablo; Gingert, Christian; Sawaki, Lumy; Knecht, Stefan; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2005-07-01

    The ability of the central nervous system to form motor memories, a process contributing to motor learning and skill acquisition, decreases with age. Dopaminergic activity, one of the mechanisms implicated in memory formation, experiences a similar decline with aging. It is possible that restoring dopaminergic function in elderly adults could lead to improved formation of motor memories with training. We studied the influence of a single oral dose of levodopa (100mg) administered preceding training on the ability to encode an elementary motor memory in the primary motor cortex of elderly and young healthy volunteers in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design. Attention to the task and motor training kinematics were comparable across age groups and sessions. In young subjects, encoding a motor memory under placebo was more prominent than in older subjects, and the encoding process was accelerated by intake of levodopa. In the elderly group, diminished motor memory encoding under placebo was enhanced by intake of levodopa to levels present in younger subjects. Therefore, upregulation of dopaminergic activity accelerated memory formation in young subjects and restored the ability to form a motor memory in elderly subjects; possible mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of dopaminergic agents on motor learning in neurorehabilitation.

  18. Double Your Major, Double Your Return?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Rossi, Alison F.; Hersch, Joni

    2008-01-01

    We use the 2003 National Survey of College Graduates to provide the first estimates of the effect on earnings of having a double major. Overall, double majoring increases earnings by 2.3% relative to having a single major among college graduates without graduate degrees. Most of the gains from having a double major come from choosing fields across…

  19. Adiabatic quantum motors.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Marún, Raúl; Refael, Gil; von Oppen, Felix

    2013-08-09

    When parameters are varied periodically, charge can be pumped through a mesoscopic conductor without applied bias. Here, we consider the inverse effect in which a transport current drives a periodic variation of an adiabatic degree of freedom. This provides a general operating principle for adiabatic quantum motors which we discuss here in general terms. We relate the work performed per cycle on the motor degree of freedom to characteristics of the underlying quantum pump and discuss the motors' efficiency. Quantum motors based on chaotic quantum dots operate solely due to quantum interference, and motors based on Thouless pumps have ideal efficiency.

  20. A Reconfigurable Stepping Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Charles; Selvaggi, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Multiphase brushless actuators, commonly known as the stepper motors, are ubiquitous for many precision control applications. Developments in the microelectronics have lead to their use as efficient drive motors for modern electric vehicles. Understanding the physics and the control logic for interfacing these transducers continues to be important for scientists and engineers. An overview of the stepping motor principles and interfacing requirements is presented and a simple working model used to teach the concepts of stepper motors is described and demonstrated. This model was used to design a much larger stepper motor required to precisely rotate a massive optical system in the undergraduate advanced physics laboratory.

  1. Motor/generator

    DOEpatents

    Hickam, Christopher Dale [Glasford, IL

    2008-05-13

    A motor/generator is provided for connecting between a transmission input shaft and an output shaft of a prime mover. The motor/generator may include a motor/generator housing, a stator mounted to the motor/generator housing, a rotor mounted at least partially within the motor/generator housing and rotatable about a rotor rotation axis, and a transmission-shaft coupler drivingly coupled to the rotor. The transmission-shaft coupler may include a clamp, which may include a base attached to the rotor and a plurality of adjustable jaws.

  2. Solid propellant motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, J. I.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A case bonded end burning solid propellant rocket motor is described. A propellant with sufficiently low modulus to avoid chamber buckling on cooling from cure and sufficiently high elongation to sustain the stresses induced without cracking is used. The propellant is zone cured within the motor case at high pressures equal to or approaching the pressure at which the motor will operate during combustion. A solid propellant motor with a burning time long enough that its spacecraft would be limited to a maximum acceleration of less than 1 g is provided by one version of the case bonded end burning solid propellant motor of the invention.

  3. Piezoceramic Ultrasonic Motor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, J.S.

    1999-02-24

    The objective of this project was to team Aerotech and AlliedSignal FM and T (AS) to develop a cost-efficient process for small-batch, high performance PZT motor production. Aerotech would acquire the basic process expertise in motor fabrication, assembly, and testing from AS. Together, Aerotech and AS were to identify appropriate process improvements, focusing on raw material quality, manufacturing processes, and durability assessment. Aerotech would then design and build a motor in consultation with AS. Aerotech engineering observed motor manufacturing in the AS piezo lab and worked side by side with AS personnel to build and test a prototype motor to facilitate learning the technology. Using information from AS and hands-on experience with the AS motor drive system enabled Aerotech to design and build its own laboratory drive system to operate motors. The team compiled information to establish a potential piezo motor users' list, and an intellectual property search was conducted to understand current patent and IP (intellectual property) status of motor design. Work was initiated to identify and develop an American source for piezo motor elements; however, due to manpower restraints created by the resignation of the AS Ph.D. ceramist responsible for these tasks, the project schedule slipped. The project was subsequently terminated before significant activities were accomplished. AS did, however, provide Aerotech with contacts in Japanese industry that are willing and capable of supplying them with special design motor elements.

  4. Motorized support jack

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe

    2003-05-13

    A compact, vacuum compatible motorized jack for supporting heavy loads and adjusting their positions is provided. The motorized jack includes: (a) a housing having a base; (b) a first roller device that provides a first slidable surface and that is secured to the base; (c) a second roller device that provides a second slidable surface and that has an upper surface; (d) a wedge that is slidably positioned between the first roller device and the second roller device so that the wedge is in contact with the first slidable surface and the second slidable surface; (e) a motor; and (d) a drive mechanism that connects the motor and the wedge to cause the motor to controllably move the wedge forwards or backwards. Individual motorized jacks can support and lift of an object at an angle. Two or more motorized jacks can provide tip, tilt and vertical position adjustment capabilities.

  5. Motorized support jack

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, Steven J.; Herron, Donald Joe

    2001-01-01

    A compact, vacuum compatible motorized jack for supporting heavy loads and adjusting their positions is provided. The motorized jack includes: (a) a housing having a base; (b) a first roller device that provides a first slidable surface and that is secured to the base; (c) a second roller device that provides a second slidable surface and that has an upper surface; (d) a wedge that is slidably positioned between the first roller device and the second roller device so that the wedge is in contact with the first slidable surface and the second slidable surface; (e) a motor; and (d) a drive mechanism that connects the motor and the wedge to cause the motor to controllably move the wedge forwards or backwards. Individual motorized jacks can support and lift of an object at an angle. Two or more motorized jacks can provide tip, tilt and vertical position adjustment capabilities.

  6. Motor degradation prediction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor`s duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures.

  7. Dissociating motor cortex from the motor

    PubMed Central

    Schieber, Marc H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract During closed-loop control of a brain–computer interface, neurons in the primary motor cortex can be intensely active even though the subject may be making no detectable movement or muscle contraction. How can neural activity in the primary motor cortex become dissociated from the movements and muscles of the native limb that it normally controls? Here we examine circumstances in which motor cortex activity is known to dissociate from movement – including mental imagery, visuo-motor dissociation and instructed delay. Many such motor cortex neurons may be related to muscle activity only indirectly. Furthermore, the integration of thousands of synaptic inputs by individual α-motoneurons means that under certain circumstances even cortico-motoneuronal cells, which make monosynaptic connections to α-motoneurons, can become dissociated from muscle activity. The natural ability of motor cortex neurons under voluntarily control to become dissociated from bodily movement may underlie the utility of this cortical area for controlling brain–computer interfaces. PMID:22005673

  8. Cerebrolysin combined with rehabilitation promotes motor recovery in patients with severe motor impairment after stroke.

    PubMed

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Park, Chang-hyun; Kim, Deog Young; Shin, Yong-Il; Ko, Myoung-Hwan; Lee, Ahee; Jang, Shin Yi; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2016-03-02

    Cerebrolysin is a neuropeptide preparation with neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects. Combining Cerebrolysin treatment with a standardized rehabilitation program may have a potential synergistic effect in the subacute stage of stroke. This study aims to evaluate whether Cerebrolysin provides additional motor recovery on top of rehabilitation therapy in the subacute stroke patients with moderate to severe motor impairment. This phase IV trial was designed as a prospective, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. A total of 70 patients (Cerebrolysin n = 35, placebo n = 35) with moderate to severe motor function impairment were included within 7 days after stroke onset and were randomized to receive a 21-day treatment course of either Cerebrolysin or placebo, given in addition to standardized rehabilitation therapy. Assessments were performed at baseline, immediately after treatment as well as 2 and 3 months after stroke onset. The plasticity of motor system was assessed by diffusion tensor imaging and with resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Both groups demonstrated significant improvement in motor function (p < 0.05); however, no significant difference was found between the two groups. In the stroke patients with severe motor impairment, the Cerebrolysin group exhibited significantly more improvement in motor function compared with the placebo group (p < 0.05). Effects of Cerebrolysin were demonstrated as restricted increments of corticospinal diffusivity and as recovery of the sensorimotor connectivity. The combination of standard rehabilitation therapy with Cerebrolysin treatment in the subacute stroke has shown additional benefit on motor recovery and plastic changes of the corticospinal tract in patients with severe motor impairment. NCT01996761 (November 5, 2013).

  9. A single session of 1 mA anodal tDCS-supported motor training does not improve motor performance in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Meesen, Raf L J; Thijs, Herbert; Leenus, Daphnie J F; Cuypers, Koen

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effects of atDCS on motor performance in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Previously, anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (atDCS) has been shown to improve motor performance in healthy subjects and neurodegenerative populations. However, the effect of atDCS on motor performance is not examined in MS. In the current study, a sham controlled double-blind crossover design was used to evaluate the effect of 20 minutes of 1 mA atDCS or sham tDCS (stDCS) on a unimanual motor sequence-training task, consisting of sequential finger presses on a computer keyboard with the most impaired hand. Patients received stimulation (atDCS or stDCS) during motor training. tDCS was applied over the primary motor cortex contralateral to the most impaired hand. Motor performance was assessed immediately before, during and 30 minutes after stimulation. Although we need to be careful with the interpretation of the data due to lack of power, our results showed no significant effect of atDCS on motor performance. Our findings indicate that atDCS-supported motor training was not able to improve motor performance more than sham-supported motor training. Possibly, the effects of atDCS are mediated by specific MS-related characteristics. Furthermore, increasing atDCS intensity and offering multiple stimulation sessions might be necessary to optimize motor performance resulting from atDCS-supported motor training.

  10. Motor and Cognitive Developmental Profiles in Children With Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate motor and cognitive developmental profiles and to evaluate the correlation between two developmental areas and assess the influencing factors of the developmental process in children with Down syndrome (DS). Methods Seventy-eight children with DS participated in this study. The medical history was taken and motoric milestone achievements recorded. The Korean Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (K-WPPSI) and Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II (BSID-II) were administered. Subjects were divided into severe motor delay group (severe group) and typical motor delay group (typical group). Results Children with DS follow the same sequence of motor development and generally displayed double times of acquisition of developmental milestones compared with healthy children. Furthermore, having surgery for associated complications showed negative influence to the motor development. Almost of all children with DS showed moderate degree of intellectual disability and motor and cognitive development do not seem to correlate one another. Conclusion Surgery of associated complications can be negatively related to motor development. However, early motor development did not have any significant effects on the achievement of later cognitive functioning. PMID:28289641

  11. Modularity for Motor Control and Motor Learning.

    PubMed

    d'Avella, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    How the central nervous system (CNS) overcomes the complexity of multi-joint and multi-muscle control and how it acquires or adapts motor skills are fundamental and open questions in neuroscience. A modular architecture may simplify control by embedding features of both the dynamic behavior of the musculoskeletal system and of the task into a small number of modules and by directly mapping task goals into module combination parameters. Several studies of the electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from many muscles during the performance of different tasks have shown that motor commands are generated by the combination of a small number of muscle synergies, coordinated recruitment of groups of muscles with specific amplitude balances or activation waveforms, thus supporting a modular organization of motor control. Modularity may also help understanding motor learning. In a modular architecture, acquisition of a new motor skill or adaptation of an existing skill after a perturbation may occur at the level of modules or at the level of module combinations. As learning or adapting an existing skill through recombination of modules is likely faster than learning or adapting a skill by acquiring new modules, compatibility with the modules predicts learning difficulty. A recent study in which human subjects used myoelectric control to move a mass in a virtual environment has tested this prediction. By altering the mapping between recorded muscle activity and simulated force applied on the mass, as in a complex surgical rearrangement of the tendons, it has been possible to show that it is easier to adapt to a perturbation that is compatible with the muscle synergies used to generate hand force than to a similar but incompatible perturbation. This result provides direct support for a modular organization of motor control and motor learning.

  12. Piezoelectric Motors and Transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, K.

    Piezoelectric ceramics forms a new field between electronic and structural ceramics [1-4]. Application fields are classified into three categories: positioners, motors, and vibration suppressors. From the market research result for 80 Japanese component industries in 1992, tiny motors in the range of 5-8 mm are required in large numbers for office and portable equipment; the conventional electromagnetic (EM) motors are rather difficult to produce in this size with sufficient energy efficiency, while Silicon MEMS actuators are too small to be used in practice. Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors whose efficiency is insensitive to size are superior in the millimeter motor area. The manufacturing precision of optical instruments such as lasers and cameras, and the positioning accuracy for fabricating semiconductor chips are of the order of 0.1μm which is much smaller than the backlash of the EM motors. Vibration suppression in space structures and military vehicles also require compact but mighty piezoelectric actuators.

  13. Disrupting the ipsilateral motor cortex interferes with training of a complex motor task in older adults.

    PubMed

    Zimerman, Máximo; Heise, Kirstin-F; Gerloff, Christian; Cohen, Leonardo G; Hummel, Friedhelm C

    2014-04-01

    Performance of unimanual movements is associated with bihemispheric activity in the motor cortex in old adults. However, the causal functional role of the ipsilateral MC (iMC) for motor control is still not completely known. Here, the behavioral consequences of interference of the iMC during training of a complex motor skill were tested. Healthy old (58-85 years) and young volunteers (22-35 years) were tested in a double-blind, cross-over, sham-controlled design. Participants attended 2 different study arms with either cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (ctDCS) or sham concurrent with training. Motor performance was evaluated before, during, 90 min, and 24 h after training. During training, a reduced slope of performance with ctDCS relative to sham was observed in old compared with young (F = 5.8, P = 0.02), with a decrease of correctly rehearsed sequences, an effect that was evident even after 2 consecutive retraining periods without intervention. Furthermore, the older the subject, the more prominent was the disruptive effect of ctDCS (R(2) = 0.50, P = 0.01). These data provide direct evidence for a causal functional link between the iMC and motor skill acquisition in old subjects pointing toward the concept that the recruitment of iMC in old is an adaptive process in response to age-related declines in motor functions.

  14. Sensorless, online motor diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kliman, G.B.; Premerlani, W.J.; Yazici, B.; Koegl, R.A.; Mazereeuw, J.

    1997-04-01

    Electric motors play a very important role in the safe and efficient running of any industrial plant. Early detection of abnormalities in the motors will help avoid expensive failures. Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) implemented in a computer-based motor monitor can contribute to such condition-based maintenance functions. Such a system may also detect an abnormality in the process as well as the motor. Extensive online monitoring of the motors can lead to greater plant availability, extended plant life, higher quality product, and smoother plant operation. With advances in digital technology over the last several years, adequate data processing capability is now available on cost-effective, microprocessor-based, protective-relay platforms to monitor motors for a variety of abnormalities in addition to the normal protection functions. Such multifunction monitors, first introduced by Multilin, are displacing the multiplicity of electromechanical devices commonly applied for many years. Following some background information on motor monitoring, this article features recent developments in providing tools for the diagnosis of faults or incipient faults in electric motor drives: Sensorless torque measurement, direct detection of turn-to-turn short circuits, detection of cracked or broken rotor bars, and detection of bearing deterioration.

  15. Artificial molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Salma; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Lubbe, Anouk S; Wilson, Miriam R; Feringa, Ben L; Leigh, David A

    2017-05-09

    Motor proteins are nature's solution for directing movement at the molecular level. The field of artificial molecular motors takes inspiration from these tiny but powerful machines. Although directional motion on the nanoscale performed by synthetic molecular machines is a relatively new development, significant advances have been made. In this review an overview is given of the principal designs of artificial molecular motors and their modes of operation. Although synthetic molecular motors have also found widespread application as (multistate) switches, we focus on the control of directional movement, both at the molecular scale and at larger magnitudes. We identify some key challenges remaining in the field.

  16. Cryogenic Electric Motor Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.

    2004-01-01

    Technology for pollution-free "electric flight" is being evaluated in a number of NASA Glenn Research Center programs. One approach is to drive propulsive fans or propellers with electric motors powered by fuel cells running on hydrogen. For large transport aircraft, conventional electric motors are far too heavy to be feasible. However, since hydrogen fuel would almost surely be carried as liquid, a propulsive electric motor could be cooled to near liquid hydrogen temperature (-423 F) by using the fuel for cooling before it goes to the fuel cells. Motor windings could be either superconducting or high purity normal copper or aluminum. The electrical resistance of pure metals can drop to 1/100th or less of their room-temperature resistance at liquid hydrogen temperature. In either case, super or normal, much higher current density is possible in motor windings. This leads to more compact motors that are projected to produce 20 hp/lb or more in large sizes, in comparison to on the order of 2 hp/lb for large conventional motors. High power density is the major goal. To support cryogenic motor development, we have designed and built in-house a small motor (7-in. outside diameter) for operation in liquid nitrogen.

  17. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Michael Benjamin

    2001-07-03

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  18. Finding of widespread viral and bacterial revolution dsDNA translocation motors distinct from rotation motors by channel chirality and size

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Double-stranded DNA translocation is ubiquitous in living systems. Cell mitosis, bacterial binary fission, DNA replication or repair, homologous recombination, Holliday junction resolution, viral genome packaging and cell entry all involve biomotor-driven dsDNA translocation. Previously, biomotors have been primarily classified into linear and rotational motors. We recently discovered a third class of dsDNA translocation motors in Phi29 utilizing revolution mechanism without rotation. Analogically, the Earth rotates around its own axis every 24 hours, but revolves around the Sun every 365 days. Results Single-channel DNA translocation conductance assay combined with structure inspections of motor channels on bacteriophages P22, SPP1, HK97, T7, T4, Phi29, and other dsDNA translocation motors such as bacterial FtsK and eukaryotic mimiviruses or vaccinia viruses showed that revolution motor is widespread. The force generation mechanism for revolution motors is elucidated. Revolution motors can be differentiated from rotation motors by their channel size and chirality. Crystal structure inspection revealed that revolution motors commonly exhibit channel diameters larger than 3 nm, while rotation motors that rotate around one of the two separated DNA strands feature a diameter smaller than 2 nm. Phi29 revolution motor translocated double- and tetra-stranded DNA that occupied 32% and 64% of the narrowest channel cross-section, respectively, evidencing that revolution motors exhibit channel diameters significantly wider than the dsDNA. Left-handed oriented channels found in revolution motors drive the right-handed dsDNA via anti-chiral interaction, while right-handed channels observed in rotation motors drive the right-handed dsDNA via parallel threads. Tethering both the motor and the dsDNA distal-end of the revolution motor does not block DNA packaging, indicating that no rotation is required for motors of dsDNA phages, while a small-angle left

  19. Finding of widespread viral and bacterial revolution dsDNA translocation motors distinct from rotation motors by channel chirality and size.

    PubMed

    De-Donatis, Gian Marco; Zhao, Zhengyi; Wang, Shaoying; Huang, Lisa P; Schwartz, Chad; Tsodikov, Oleg V; Zhang, Hui; Haque, Farzin; Guo, Peixuan

    2014-01-01

    Double-stranded DNA translocation is ubiquitous in living systems. Cell mitosis, bacterial binary fission, DNA replication or repair, homologous recombination, Holliday junction resolution, viral genome packaging and cell entry all involve biomotor-driven dsDNA translocation. Previously, biomotors have been primarily classified into linear and rotational motors. We recently discovered a third class of dsDNA translocation motors in Phi29 utilizing revolution mechanism without rotation. Analogically, the Earth rotates around its own axis every 24 hours, but revolves around the Sun every 365 days. Single-channel DNA translocation conductance assay combined with structure inspections of motor channels on bacteriophages P22, SPP1, HK97, T7, T4, Phi29, and other dsDNA translocation motors such as bacterial FtsK and eukaryotic mimiviruses or vaccinia viruses showed that revolution motor is widespread. The force generation mechanism for revolution motors is elucidated. Revolution motors can be differentiated from rotation motors by their channel size and chirality. Crystal structure inspection revealed that revolution motors commonly exhibit channel diameters larger than 3 nm, while rotation motors that rotate around one of the two separated DNA strands feature a diameter smaller than 2 nm. Phi29 revolution motor translocated double- and tetra-stranded DNA that occupied 32% and 64% of the narrowest channel cross-section, respectively, evidencing that revolution motors exhibit channel diameters significantly wider than the dsDNA. Left-handed oriented channels found in revolution motors drive the right-handed dsDNA via anti-chiral interaction, while right-handed channels observed in rotation motors drive the right-handed dsDNA via parallel threads. Tethering both the motor and the dsDNA distal-end of the revolution motor does not block DNA packaging, indicating that no rotation is required for motors of dsDNA phages, while a small-angle left-handed twist of dsDNA that is

  20. Heritability of motor control and motor learning

    PubMed Central

    Missitzi, Julia; Gentner, Reinhard; Misitzi, Angelica; Geladas, Nickos; Politis, Panagiotis; Klissouras, Vassilis; Classen, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to elucidate the relative contribution of genes and environment on individual differences in motor control and acquisition of a force control task, in view of recent association studies showing that several candidate polymorphisms may have an effect on them. Forty‐four healthy female twins performed brisk isometric abductions with their right thumb. Force was recorded by a transducer and fed back to the subject on a computer screen. The task was to place the tracing of the peak force in a force window defined between 30% and 40% of the subject's maximum force, as determined beforehand. The initial level of proficiency was defined as the number of attempts reaching the force window criterion within the first 100 trials. The difference between the number of successful trials within the last and the first 100 trials was taken as a measure of motor learning. For motor control, defined by the initial level of proficiency, the intrapair differences in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins were 6.8 ± 7.8 and 13.8 ± 8.4, and the intrapair correlations 0.77 and 0.39, respectively. Heritability was estimated at 0.68. Likewise for motor learning intrapair differences in the increment of the number of successful trials in MZ and DZ twins were 5.4 ± 5.2 and 12.8 ± 7, and the intrapair correlations 0.58 and 0.19. Heritability reached 0.70. The present findings suggest that heredity accounts for a major part of existing differences in motor control and motor learning, but uncertainty remains which gene polymorphisms may be responsible. PMID:24744865

  1. "Pure" motor hemiplegia.

    PubMed Central

    Chokroverty, S; Rubino, F A

    1975-01-01

    Attenuation of cerebral evoked responses after stimulation of the median nerve in the hemiplegic limbs suggested that an apparently pure motor hemiplegia in some patients may not have pure involvement of the corticospinal system. Frontoparietal metastasis, infarction in basis pontis and medullary pyramid, and occlusion of internal carotid artery in the neck resulted in pure motor hemiplegia in some individuals. Images PMID:1185228

  2. Information on stepping motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fongarland, G.

    1982-04-01

    The principles of the stepping motors which are often used in servomechanisms are reviewed. Variable reluctance as well as permanent magnet stepping motors are considered. Their operation is explained which includes permanent rotation, starting, stopping, and resonance effects. Several application examples, drawn from problems in automation, are outlined.

  3. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, S.C.; Swansen, J.E.

    1982-07-02

    A stepping motor is microprocessor controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  4. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, Steven C.; Swansen, James E.

    1984-01-01

    A stepping motor is microprocessingly controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  5. A double-double/double-single computation package

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.

    2004-12-01

    The DDFUNIDSFUN software permits a new or existing Fortran-90 program to utilize double-double precision (approx. 31 digits) or double-single precision (approx. 14 digits) arithmetic. Double-double precision is required by a rapidly expandirtg body of scientific computations in physics and mathematics, for which the conventional 64-bit IEEE computer arithmetic (about 16 decimal digit accuracy) is not sufficient. Double-single precision permits users of systems that do not have hardware 64-bit IEEE arithmetic (such as some game systems) to perform arithmetic at a precision nearly as high as that of systems that do. Both packages run significantly faster Than using multiple precision or arbitrary precision software for this purpose. The package includes an extensive set of low-level routines to perform high-precision arithmetic, including routines to calculate various algebraic and transcendental functions, such as square roots, sin, ccc, exp, log and others. In addition, the package includes high-level translation facilities, so that Fortran programs can utilize these facilities by making only a few changes to conventional Fortran programs. In most cases, the only changes that are required are to change the type statements of variables that one wishes to be treated as multiple precision, plus a few other minor changes. The DDFUN package is similar in functionality to the double-double part of the GD package, which was previously written at LBNL. However, the DDFUN package is written exclusively in Fortran-90, thus avoidIng difficulties that some users experience when using GD, which includes both Fortran-90 and C++ code.

  6. Production of Nitrous Oxide in a Rocket Motor Exhaust.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    Standard Atmosphere, 1962. NASA , USAF and United States Weather Bureau, 1962. 2 Jensen, D.E. Prediction of Rocket Exhaust Flame Properties. Wilson, A.S...are made of concentrations of N20 produced within the exhaust of a double-base propellant rocet motor. Typical concentrations produced are predicted to

  7. DRIVE TERMINAL WITH VAULT MOTOR ROOM IN BASEMENT. SINGLE CHAIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DRIVE TERMINAL WITH VAULT MOTOR ROOM IN BASEMENT. SINGLE CHAIR SKI LIFT (1947) ON LEFT, DOUBLE CHAIR SKI LIFT (1962) ON RIGHT. LOOKING SOUTHWEST WITH GENERAL STARK MOUNTAIN IN THE BACKGROUND. - Mad River Glen, Single Chair Ski Lift, 62 Mad River Glen Resort Road, Fayston, Washington County, VT

  8. Induction motor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  9. Induction motor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  10. Induction motor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly utilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilizes induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  11. Induction motor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  12. Dualities in the analysis of phage DNA packaging motors.

    PubMed

    Serwer, Philip; Jiang, Wen

    2012-10-01

    The DNA packaging motors of double-stranded DNA phages are models for analysis of all multi-molecular motors and for analysis of several fundamental aspects of biology, including early evolution, relationship of in vivo to in vitro biochemistry and targets for anti-virals. Work on phage DNA packaging motors both has produced and is producing dualities in the interpretation of data obtained by use of both traditional techniques and the more recently developed procedures of single-molecule analysis. The dualities include (1) reductive vs. accretive evolution, (2) rotation vs. stasis of sub-assemblies of the motor, (3) thermal ratcheting vs. power stroking in generating force, (4) complete motor vs. spark plug role for the packaging ATPase, (5) use of previously isolated vs. new intermediates for analysis of the intermediate states of the motor and (6) a motor with one cycle vs. a motor with two cycles. We provide background for these dualities, some of which are under-emphasized in the literature. We suggest directions for future research.

  13. Dualities in the analysis of phage DNA packaging motors

    PubMed Central

    Serwer, Philip; Jiang, Wen

    2012-01-01

    The DNA packaging motors of double-stranded DNA phages are models for analysis of all multi-molecular motors and for analysis of several fundamental aspects of biology, including early evolution, relationship of in vivo to in vitro biochemistry and targets for anti-virals. Work on phage DNA packaging motors both has produced and is producing dualities in the interpretation of data obtained by use of both traditional techniques and the more recently developed procedures of single-molecule analysis. The dualities include (1) reductive vs. accretive evolution, (2) rotation vs. stasis of sub-assemblies of the motor, (3) thermal ratcheting vs. power stroking in generating force, (4) complete motor vs. spark plug role for the packaging ATPase, (5) use of previously isolated vs. new intermediates for analysis of the intermediate states of the motor and (6) a motor with one cycle vs. a motor with two cycles. We provide background for these dualities, some of which are under-emphasized in the literature. We suggest directions for future research. PMID:23532204

  14. [A double gallbladder].

    PubMed

    Mink van der Molen, A B; Salu, M K

    1991-04-06

    A 59-year-old woman is described with symptomatic cholelithiasis. A double gallbladder was incidentally found during abdominal surgery. The literature on a double gallbladder is reviewed with respect to incidence, anatomy, diagnosis and therapy.

  15. Chromosome doubling method

    DOEpatents

    Kato, Akio

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for chromosome doubling in plants. The technique overcomes the low yields of doubled progeny associated with the use of prior techniques for doubling chromosomes in plants such as grasses. The technique can be used in large scale applications and has been demonstrated to be highly effective in maize. Following treatment in accordance with the invention, plants remain amenable to self fertilization, thereby allowing the efficient isolation of doubled progeny plants.

  16. The double identity of linguistic doubling.

    PubMed

    Berent, Iris; Bat-El, Outi; Brentari, Diane; Dupuis, Amanda; Vaknin-Nusbaum, Vered

    2016-11-29

    Does knowledge of language consist of abstract principles, or is it fully embodied in the sensorimotor system? To address this question, we investigate the double identity of doubling (e.g., slaflaf, or generally, XX; where X stands for a phonological constituent). Across languages, doubling is known to elicit conflicting preferences at different levels of linguistic analysis (phonology vs. morphology). Here, we show that these preferences are active in the brains of individual speakers, and they are demonstrably distinct from sensorimotor pressures. We first demonstrate that doubling in novel English words elicits divergent percepts: Viewed as meaningless (phonological) forms, doubling is disliked (e.g., slaflaf < slafmak), but once doubling in form is systematically linked to meaning (e.g., slaf = ball, slaflaf = balls), the doubling aversion shifts into a reliable (morphological) preference. We next show that sign-naive speakers spontaneously project these principles to novel signs in American Sign Language, and their capacity to do so depends on the structure of their spoken language (English vs. Hebrew). These results demonstrate that linguistic preferences doubly dissociate from sensorimotor demands: A single stimulus can elicit diverse percepts, yet these percepts are invariant across stimulus modality--for speech and signs. These conclusions are in line with the possibility that some linguistic principles are abstract, and they apply broadly across language modality.

  17. Dual traveling wave rotary ultrasonic motor with single active vibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Dawei; Yang, Ming; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Yang, Tianyue; Meng, Fan; Dong, Zhaopeng

    2017-04-01

    Traveling wave rotary ultrasonic motor with double vibrators can improve the output performance effectively. However, the rotor has to be energized through a slip ring, which increases the complexity and reduces the reliability. Inheriting the concept of two traveling waves propagating in the stator and rotor, a dual traveling wave rotary ultrasonic motor energized only in the stator is proposed. By analyzing the oscillatory differential equation and the contact particles motion, a traveling wave is found in the rotor and the drive mechanism of dual traveling wave is studied. With the resonant rotor adopted, the consistent eigenfrequencies are calculated by finite element method and verified by an impedance analyzer. The performance experiment presents that the dual traveling wave rotary ultrasonic motor is superior to the motor with single traveling wave. The no-load speed is 60 rpm and the stalling torque is 0.85 Nm. Additionally, compared with a reported motor with double vibrators, the proposed motor presents the better output performance and the simpler design.

  18. Improve Motor System Efficiency for a Broad Range of Motors with MotorMaster+ International

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-01

    Available at no charge, MotorMaster+ International is designed to support motor systems improvement planning at industrial facilities by identifying the most cost-effective choice when deciding to repair or replace older motor models.

  19. Motor Priming in Neurorehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Stoykov, Mary Ellen; Madhavan, Sangeetha

    2014-01-01

    Priming is a type of implicit learning wherein a stimulus prompts a change in behavior. Priming has been long studied in the field of psychology. More recently, rehabilitation researchers have studied motor priming as a possible way to facilitate motor learning. For example, priming of the motor cortex is associated with changes in neuroplasticity that are associated with improvements in motor performance. Of the numerous motor priming paradigms under investigation, only a few are practical for the current clinical environment, and the optimal priming modalities for specific clinical presentations are not known. Accordingly, developing an understanding of the various types of motor priming paradigms and their underlying neural mechanisms is an important step for therapists in neurorehabilitation. Most importantly, an understanding of the methods and their underlying mechanisms is essential for optimizing rehabilitation outcomes. The future of neurorehabilitation is likely to include these priming methods, which are delivered prior to or in conjunction with primary neurorehabilitation therapies. In this Special Interest article we discuss those priming paradigms that are supported by the greatest amount of evidence including: (i) stimulation-based priming, (ii) motor imagery and action observation, (iii) sensory priming, (iv) movement-based priming, and (v) pharmacological priming. PMID:25415551

  20. ATHLETE : Double Auger Anchoring Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The All-Terrain Hex-Legged Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) is a six-limbed robot designed to support surface explorations on Near Earth Objects, the Moon and Mars. ATHLETE can carry large payloads on its top deck and can carry a fully equipped pressurized habitat in low gravity. The robot has wheels on each of its six articulated limbs, allowing it to actively conform to terrain while driving and to walk when driving is impractical. With the use of a tool adapter, ATHLETE limbs can be equipped with end effectors to support various mission objectives. For work on Near Earth Objects and other microgravity environments, an anchoring mechanism is needed to keep the ATHLETE from floating off the surface. My goal for this spring session at JPL was to design and build a counter rotating, double auger, anchoring mechanism. The mechanism mates to the tool adapter and is driven off the wheel motor. The double auger anchoring mechanism will be tested in a regolith simulant that will determine the uplift capacity of the anchoring mechanism.

  1. ATHLETE : Double Auger Anchoring Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The All-Terrain Hex-Legged Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) is a six-limbed robot designed to support surface explorations on Near Earth Objects, the Moon and Mars. ATHLETE can carry large payloads on its top deck and can carry a fully equipped pressurized habitat in low gravity. The robot has wheels on each of its six articulated limbs, allowing it to actively conform to terrain while driving and to walk when driving is impractical. With the use of a tool adapter, ATHLETE limbs can be equipped with end effectors to support various mission objectives. For work on Near Earth Objects and other microgravity environments, an anchoring mechanism is needed to keep the ATHLETE from floating off the surface. My goal for this spring session at JPL was to design and build a counter rotating, double auger, anchoring mechanism. The mechanism mates to the tool adapter and is driven off the wheel motor. The double auger anchoring mechanism will be tested in a regolith simulant that will determine the uplift capacity of the anchoring mechanism.

  2. Advanced motor and motor control development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuertz, Kenneth L.; Beauchamp, Edward D.

    1988-08-01

    The capability of operating a high speed permanent magnet brushless dc motor with electronic controller over a wide load and speed range was demonstrated. A centrifugal pump was used as the loading mechanism and hydraulic fluid was pumped in simulation of an aircraft engine fuel pump requirement. A motor speed of 45,000 rpm was reached and a maximum output of 68.5 hp was demonstrated. The response of the system to step commands for speed change was established. Reduction of size and weight of electronic control was established as a primary future goal. The program system concept with minor rotating machine improvements is viable for high speed drive applications up to 100-hp level.

  3. System and method for motor parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Luhrs, Bin; Yan, Ting

    2014-03-18

    A system and method for determining unknown values of certain motor parameters includes a motor input device connectable to an electric motor having associated therewith values for known motor parameters and an unknown value of at least one motor parameter. The motor input device includes a processing unit that receives a first input from the electric motor comprising values for the known motor parameters for the electric motor and receive a second input comprising motor data on a plurality of reference motors, including values for motor parameters corresponding to the known motor parameters of the electric motor and values for motor parameters corresponding to the at least one unknown motor parameter value of the electric motor. The processor determines the unknown value of the at least one motor parameter from the first input and the second input and determines a motor management strategy for the electric motor based thereon.

  4. Motor Vehicle Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... these crashes is one part of motor vehicle safety. Here are some things you can do to ... speed or drive aggressively Don't drive impaired Safety also involves being aware of others. Share the ...

  5. MotorWeek

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In 2008, PBS's MotorWeek, television's original automotive magazine, visited Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center "to learn what it really takes to make clean power sources a viable reality."

  6. Booster separation motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, testing, evaluation and flight qualification of the space shuttle booster separation motor is discussed. Delivery of flight hardware to support the research and development flights of the space shuttle is discussed.

  7. Fine motor control

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Parkinson disease have trouble speaking, eating, and writing because they have lost fine motor control. The ... Drawing lines or circles Folding clothes Holding and writing with a pencil Stacking blocks Zipping a zipper

  8. General Motors Goes Metric

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Ted

    1976-01-01

    Describes the program to convert to the metric system all of General Motors Corporation products. Steps include establishing policy regarding employee-owned tools, setting up training plans, and making arrangements with suppliers. (MF)

  9. Piezoelectric Rotary Tube Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Charles D.; Badescu, Mircea; Braun, David F.; Culhane, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A custom rotary SQUIGGLE(Registered TradeMark) motor has been developed that sets new benchmarks for small motor size, high position resolution, and high torque without gear reduction. Its capabilities cannot be achieved with conventional electromagnetic motors. It consists of piezoelectric plates mounted on a square flexible tube. The plates are actuated via voltage waveforms 90 out of phase at the resonant frequency of the device to create rotary motion. The motors were incorporated into a two-axis postioner that was designed for fiber-fed spectroscopy for ground-based and space-based projects. The positioner enables large-scale celestial object surveys to take place in a practical amount of time.

  10. Molecular Motors from DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turberfield, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    DNA is a wonderful material for nanoscale construction: its self-assembly can be programmed by making use of its information-carrying capability and its hybridization or hydrolysis can be used as to provide energy for synthetic molecular machinery. With DNA it is possible to design and build three-dimensional scaffolds, to attach molecular components to them with sub-nanometre precision-and then to make them move. I shall describe our work on autonomous, biomimetic molecular motors powered by chemical fuels and the use of synthetic molecular machinery to control covalent chemical synthesis. I shall demonstrate bipedal motors whose operation depends on the coordination of the chemomechanical cycles of two separate catalytic centres and burnt bridges motors that can be programmed to navigate networks of tracks. I shall also discuss the use of kinesin motor proteins to power synthetic devices.

  11. MotorWeek

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, PBS's MotorWeek, television's original automotive magazine, visited Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center "to learn what it really takes to make clean power sources a viable reality."

  12. High Power Density Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing concerns of global warming, the need for pollution-free vehicles is ever increasing. Pollution-free flight is one of NASA's goals for the 21" Century. , One method of approaching that goal is hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbo- generators to develop electric power that can drive electric motors that turn the aircraft's propulsive fans or propellers. Hydrogen fuel would likely be carried as a liquid, stored in tanks at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are far too heavy (for a given horsepower) to use on aircraft. Fortunately the liquid hydrogen fuel can provide essentially free refrigeration that can be used to cool the windings of motors before the hydrogen is used for fuel. Either High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or high purity metals such as copper or aluminum may be used in the motor windings. Superconductors have essentially zero electrical resistance to steady current. The electrical resistance of high purity aluminum or copper near liquid hydrogen temperature can be l/lOO* or less of the room temperature resistance. These conductors could provide higher motor efficiency than normal room-temperature motors achieve. But much more importantly, these conductors can carry ten to a hundred times more current than copper conductors do in normal motors operating at room temperature. This is a consequence of the low electrical resistance and of good heat transfer coefficients in boiling LH2. Thus the conductors can produce higher magnetic field strengths and consequently higher motor torque and power. Designs, analysis and actual cryogenic motor tests show that such cryogenic motors could produce three or more times as much power per unit weight as turbine engines can, whereas conventional motors produce only 1/5 as much power per weight as turbine engines. This summer work has been done with Litz wire to maximize the current density. The current is limited by the amount of heat it

  13. High Power Density Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing concerns of global warming, the need for pollution-free vehicles is ever increasing. Pollution-free flight is one of NASA's goals for the 21" Century. , One method of approaching that goal is hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbo- generators to develop electric power that can drive electric motors that turn the aircraft's propulsive fans or propellers. Hydrogen fuel would likely be carried as a liquid, stored in tanks at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are far too heavy (for a given horsepower) to use on aircraft. Fortunately the liquid hydrogen fuel can provide essentially free refrigeration that can be used to cool the windings of motors before the hydrogen is used for fuel. Either High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or high purity metals such as copper or aluminum may be used in the motor windings. Superconductors have essentially zero electrical resistance to steady current. The electrical resistance of high purity aluminum or copper near liquid hydrogen temperature can be l/lOO* or less of the room temperature resistance. These conductors could provide higher motor efficiency than normal room-temperature motors achieve. But much more importantly, these conductors can carry ten to a hundred times more current than copper conductors do in normal motors operating at room temperature. This is a consequence of the low electrical resistance and of good heat transfer coefficients in boiling LH2. Thus the conductors can produce higher magnetic field strengths and consequently higher motor torque and power. Designs, analysis and actual cryogenic motor tests show that such cryogenic motors could produce three or more times as much power per unit weight as turbine engines can, whereas conventional motors produce only 1/5 as much power per weight as turbine engines. This summer work has been done with Litz wire to maximize the current density. The current is limited by the amount of heat it

  14. Fluoxetine modulates motor performance and cerebral activation of patients recovering from stroke.

    PubMed

    Pariente, J; Loubinoux, I; Carel, C; Albucher, J F; Leger, A; Manelfe, C; Rascol, O; Chollet, F

    2001-12-01

    In order to determine the influence of a single dose of fluoxetine on the cerebral motor activation of lacunar stroke patients in the early phase of recovery, we conducted a prospective, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled study on 8 patients with pure motor hemiparesia. Each patient underwent two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) examinations: one under fluoxetine and one under placebo. The first was performed 2 weeks after stroke onset and the second a week later. During the two fMRI examinations, patients performed an active controlled motor task with the affected hand and a passive one conducted by the examiner with the same hand. Motor performance was evaluated by motor tests under placebo and under fluoxetine immediately before the examinations to investigate the effect of fluoxetine on motor function. Under fluoxetine, during the active motor task, hyperactivation in the ipsilesional primary motor cortex was found. Moreover, fluoxetine significantly improved motor skills of the affected side. We found that a single dose of fluoxetine was enough to modulate cerebral sensory-motor activation in patients. This redistribution of activation toward the motor cortex output activation was associated with an enhancement of motor performance.

  15. Motor Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple motor inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: High Efficiency Motor retrofit and Cogged V-belts retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  16. Rocket Motor Microphone Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, Debbie; Herrera, Eric; Gee, Kent L.; Giraud, Jerom H.; Young, Devin J.

    2010-01-01

    At ATK's facility in Utah, large full-scale solid rocket motors are tested. The largest is a five-segment version of the reusable solid rocket motor, which is for use on the Ares I launch vehicle. As a continuous improvement project, ATK and BYU investigated the use of microphones on these static tests, the vibration and temperature to which the instruments are subjected, and in particular the use of vent tubes and the effects these vents have at low frequencies.

  17. Development Motor-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    One of the key tests in the effort to return the Space Shuttle to flight following the Challenger accident was testing the development Motor-8 (DM-8). The 126-foot long, 1.2-million-pound motor, designated DM-8, underwent a full-duration horizontal test firing for two minutes at the Thiokol test facility in Utah. It was fitted with more than 500 instruments to measure such things as acceleration, pressure, deflection thrust, strain, temperature, and electrical properties.

  18. Maintaining Motor Skill Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-18

    trials eacb--ac--yIecon- ,, :;. - taed p- --d-t-trias,--P-t- rilk --r. expermenter-difie-d- ovementu con- strained by the stop. The distance between...processing in motor control-i ... and -laIg- e-rr--’- cae -clrsj--98 I Y. ag.L., K. A., & D5oWe-l, M. R. Serial-position effects in motor short-! term

  19. Motor maps and synergies.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Peter D; Neilson, Megan D

    2005-01-01

    Consider the process of raising and lowering the arm in the sagittal plane. Different parts of different muscles operate over different sectors of the angular range. How and why does the nervous system implement this differential muscle activation according to joint angle? We contend that such control depends on the adaptive formation of motor maps. These solve the problem of redundancy in the musculoskeletal system by connecting a relatively small number of cortical columns in the motor cortex to a large number of alpha motor neuron pools. We argue that motor maps are formed such that each functional muscle is activated in proportion to its moment arm about the movement. Because of this the required agonist and antagonist turning forces are generated with a minimum demand for metabolic energy. We know from biomechanical principles that, at any given posture, those muscle fibres that change length most in response to a small joint-angle change are those with the greatest moment arm. Likewise those that change least have the smallest. By establishing a model of the polynomial relationships between the lengths of functional muscles l and the corresponding changes in joint angles theta, the nervous system can generate signals partial differentiallj/ partial differentialthetai (where lj is the length of the jth functional muscle and thetai is the magnitude of the ith elemental movement). These signals create motor maps by modulating the gains of descending motor pathways. As a result, functional muscles are activated in proportion to their moment arms. This reduces the demand for metabolic energy to a minimum. Since moment arms change with joint angle, it also accounts for the experimental observations above. Such motor mapping effectively provides a minimum energy "wired-in" synergy. Established in utero, motor maps are the first stage of synergy formation and provide the basis for the development of subsequent task-dependent synergies.

  20. Development Motor-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    One of the key tests in the effort to return the Space Shuttle to flight following the Challenger accident was testing the development Motor-8 (DM-8). The 126-foot long, 1.2-million-pound motor, designated DM-8, underwent a full-duration horizontal test firing for two minutes at the Thiokol test facility in Utah. It was fitted with more than 500 instruments to measure such things as acceleration, pressure, deflection thrust, strain, temperature, and electrical properties.

  1. Electric vehicle motors and controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secunde, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Improved and advanced components being developed include electronically commutated permanent magnet motors of both drum and disk configuration, an unconventional brush commutated motor, and ac induction motors and various controllers. Test results on developmental motors, controllers, and combinations thereof indicate that efficiencies of 90% and higher for individual components, and 80% to 90% for motor/controller combinations can be obtained at rated power. The simplicity of the developmental motors and the potential for ultimately low cost electronics indicate that one or more of these approaches to electric vehicle propulsion may eventually displace presently used controllers and brush commutated dc motors.

  2. Methylphenidate improves motor functions in children diagnosed with Hyperkinetic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Stray, Liv Larsen; Stray, Torstein; Iversen, Synnøve; Ruud, Anne; Ellertsen, Bjørn

    2009-01-01

    Background A previous study showed that a high percentage of children diagnosed with Hyperkinetic Disorder (HKD) displayed a consistent pattern of motor function problems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of methylphenidate (MPH) on such motor performance in children with HKD Methods 25 drug-naïve boys, aged 8–12 yr with a HKD-F90.0 diagnosis, were randomly assigned into two groups within a double blind cross-over design, and tested with a motor assessment instrument, during MPH and placebo conditions. Results The percentage of MFNU scores in the sample indicating 'severe motor problems' ranged from 44–84%, typically over 60%. Highly significant improvements in motor performance were observed with MPH compared to baseline ratings on all the 17 subtests of the MFNU 1–2 hr after administration of MPH. There were no significant placebo effects. The motor improvement was consistent with improvement of clinical symptoms. Conclusion The study confirmed our prior clinical observations showing that children with ADHD typically demonstrate marked improvements of motor functions after a single dose of 10 mg MPH. The most pronounced positive MPH response was seen in subtests measuring either neuromotor inhibition, or heightened muscular tone in the gross movement muscles involved in maintaining the alignment and balance of the body. Introduction of MPH generally led to improved balance and a generally more coordinated and controlled body movement. PMID:19439096

  3. Engineering applications of biomolecular motors.

    PubMed

    Hess, Henry

    2011-08-15

    Biomolecular motors, in particular motor proteins from the kinesin and myosin families, can be used to explore engineering applications of molecular motors in general. Their outstanding performance enables the experimental study of hybrid systems, where bio-inspired functions such as sensing, actuation, and transport rely on the nanoscale generation of mechanical force. Scaling laws and theoretical studies demonstrate the optimality of biomolecular motor designs and inform the development of synthetic molecular motors.

  4. Magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with a self bearing motor.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Onuma, Hiroyuki; Kim, Seung-Jong; Okada, Yohji

    2002-01-01

    A magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with a self bearing motor has been developed for long-term ventricular assistance. A rotor of the self bearing motor is actively suspended and rotated by an electromagnetic field without mechanical bearings. Radial position of the rotor is controlled actively, and axial position of the rotor is passively stable within the thin rotor structure. An open impeller and a semiopened impeller were examined to determine the best impeller structure. The outer diameter and height of the impeller are 63 and 34 mm, respectively. Both the impellers indicated similar pump performance. Single volute and double volute structures were also tested to confirm the performance of the double volute. Power consumption for levitation and radial displacement of the impeller with a rotational speed of 1,500 rpm were 0.7 W and 0.04 mm in the double volute, while those in the single volute were 1.3 W and 0.07 mm, respectively. The stator of the self bearing motor was redesigned to avoid magnetic saturation and improve motor performance. Maximum flow rate and pressure head were 9 L/min and 250 mm Hg, respectively. The developed magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump is a candidate for an implantable left ventricular assist device.

  5. Double-Bounce Switching

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    module. Adjustments provided to investigate double- bounce switching are noted. limitation is at a higher level and occurs in the conventionally...To be presented at the 4th IEEE PUlsed Power Conference, June 6-8, 1983, Albuquerque, NM. DOUBLE- BOUNCE SWITCHING* George B. Frazier and Steven R...Ashby Physics International Company 2700 Merced Street San Leandro, California 94577 Abstract Double- bounce switching is a technique for

  6. A New Type of Motor: Pneumatic Step Motor

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Kavoussi, Louis

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new type of pneumatic motor, a pneumatic step motor (PneuStep). Directional rotary motion of discrete displacement is achieved by sequentially pressurizing the three ports of the motor. Pulsed pressure waves are generated by a remote pneumatic distributor. The motor assembly includes a motor, gearhead, and incremental position encoder in a compact, central bore construction. A special electronic driver is used to control the new motor with electric stepper indexers and standard motion control cards. The motor accepts open-loop step operation as well as closed-loop control with position feedback from the enclosed sensor. A special control feature is implemented to adapt classic control algorithms to the new motor, and is experimentally validated. The speed performance of the motor degrades with the length of the pneumatic hoses between the distributor and motor. Experimental results are presented to reveal this behavior and set the expectation level. Nevertheless, the stepper achieves easily controllable precise motion unlike other pneumatic motors. The motor was designed to be compatible with magnetic resonance medical imaging equipment, for actuating an image-guided intervention robot, for medical applications. For this reason, the motors were entirely made of nonmagnetic and dielectric materials such as plastics, ceramics, and rubbers. Encoding was performed with fiber optics, so that the motors are electricity free, exclusively using pressure and light. PneuStep is readily applicable to other pneumatic or hydraulic precision-motion applications. PMID:21528106

  7. Observing Double Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Russell M.; Fulton, B. J.; Bianco, Federica B.; Martinez, John; Baxter, John; Brewer, Mark; Carro, Joseph; Collins, Sarah; Estrada, Chris; Johnson, Jolyon; Salam, Akash; Wallen, Vera; Warren, Naomi; Smith, Thomas C.; Armstrong, James D.; McGaughey, Steve; Pye, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Church, Rebecca

    2012-05-01

    Double stars have been systematically observed since William Herschel initiated his program in 1779. In 1803 he reported that, to his surprise, many of the systems he had been observing for a quarter century were gravitationally bound binary stars. In 1830 the first binary orbital solution was obtained, leading eventually to the determination of stellar masses. Double star observations have been a prolific field, with observations and discoveries - often made by students and amateurs - routinely published in a number of specialized journals such as the Journal of Double Star Observations. All published double star observations from Herschel's to the present have been incorporated in the Washington Double Star Catalog. In addition to reviewing the history of visual double stars, we discuss four observational technologies and illustrate these with our own observational results from both California and Hawaii on telescopes ranging from small SCTs to the 2-meter Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala. Two of these technologies are visual observations aimed primarily at published "hands-on" student science education, and CCD observations of both bright and very faint doubles. The other two are recent technologies that have launched a double star renaissance. These are lucky imaging and speckle interferometry, both of which can use electron-multiplying CCD cameras to allow short (30 ms or less) exposures that are read out at high speed with very low noise. Analysis of thousands of high speed exposures allows normal seeing limitations to be overcome so very close doubles can be accurately measured.

  8. A versatile stepping motor controller for systems with many motors

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, S.K.; Siddons, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    A versatile system for controlling beamlines or complex experimental setups is described. The system as currently configured can control up to 32 motors, with all motors capable of full speed operation concurrently. There are 2 limit switch inputs for each motor, and a further input to accept a reference position marker. The motors can be controlled via a front panel keyboard with display, or by a host computer over an IEEE-488 interface. Both methods can be used together if required. There is an emergency stop'' key on the front panel keyboard to stop the motion of all motors without losing track of the motors' position. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Magnetostrictive direct drive motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    Highly magnetostrictive materials such as Tb.3Dy.7Fe2, commercially known as TERFENOL-D, have been used to date in a variety of devices such as high power actuators and linear motors. The larger magnetostriction available in twinned single crystal TERFENOL-D, approx. 2000 ppm at moderate magnetic field strengths, makes possible a new generation of magnetomechanical devices. NASA researchers are studying the potential of this material as the basis for a direct microstepping rotary motor with torque densities on the order of industrial hydraulics and five times greater than that of the most efficient, high power electric motors. Such a motor would be a micro-radian stepper, capable of precision movements and self-braking in the power-off state. Innovative mechanical engineering techniques are juxtaposed on proper magnetic circuit design to reduce losses in structural flexures, inertias, thermal expansions, eddy currents, and magneto-mechanical coupling, thus optimizing motor performance and efficiency. Mathematical models are presented, including magnetic, structural, and both linear and nonlinear dynamic calculations and simulations. In addition, test results on prototypes are presented.

  10. Unwinding and rewinding: double faces of helicase?

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuliang

    2012-01-01

    Helicases are enzymes that use ATP-driven motor force to unwind double-stranded DNA or RNA. Recently, increasing evidence demonstrates that some helicases also possess rewinding activity-in other words, they can anneal two complementary single-stranded nucleic acids. All five members of the human RecQ helicase family, helicase PIF1, mitochondrial helicase TWINKLE, and helicase/nuclease Dna2 have been shown to possess strand-annealing activity. Moreover, two recently identified helicases-HARP and AH2 have only ATP-dependent rewinding activity. These findings not only enhance our understanding of helicase enzymes but also establish the presence of a new type of protein: annealing helicases. This paper discusses what is known about these helicases, focusing on their biochemical activity to zip and unzip double-stranded DNA and/or RNA, their possible regulation mechanisms, and biological functions.

  11. Micromachine Wedge Stepping Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Schriner, H.K.

    1998-11-04

    A wedge stepping motor, which will index a mechanism, has been designed and fabricated in the surface rnicromachine SUMMiT process. This device has demonstrated the ability to index one gear tooth at a time with speeds up to 205 teeth/see. The wedge stepper motor has the following features, whi:h will be useful in a number of applications. o The ability to precisely position mechanical components. . Simple pulse signals can be used for operation. o Only 2 drive signals are requixed for operation. o Torque and precision capabilities increase with device size . The device to be indexed is restrained at all times by the wedge shaped tooth that is used for actuation. This paper will discuss the theory of operation and desi=m of the wedge stepping motor. The fabrication and testing of I he device will also be presented.

  12. Magnetostrictive direct drive motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1990-01-01

    Developing magnetostrictive direct drive research motors to power robot joints is discussed. These type motors are expected to produce extraordinary torque density, to be able to perform microradian incremental steps and to be self-braking and safe with the power off. Several types of motor designs have been attempted using magnetostrictive materials. One of the candidate approaches (the magnetostrictive roller drive) is described. The method in which the design will function is described as is the reason why this approach is inherently superior to the other approaches. Following this, the design will be modelled and its expected performance predicted. This particular candidate design is currently undergoing detailed engineering with prototype construction and testing scheduled for mid 1991.

  13. Bent shaft motor

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, Gilbert L.

    1998-01-01

    A nonelectromagnetic motor comprising a base, a bent shaft which is rotable relative to the base wherein the bent shaft comprises a straight portion aligned with a main axis and an offset portion that is offset with respect to the main axis; and a drive means for driving the offset portion of the bent shaft along a generally circular path in a plane perpendicular to the main axis to rotate the bent shaft. The bent shaft and drive means for driving the bent shaft can be selected from piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, rheological and shape memory alloys. The drive means of the nonelectromagnetic motor can additionally comprise a shell which shell surrounds and houses the bent shaft and precesses or gyrates which in turn causes the bent drive shaft to rotate. The nonelectromagnetic motor does not rely on friction for the application of torque upon a rotor.

  14. Bent shaft motor

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, G.L.

    1998-05-05

    A nonelectromagnetic motor comprising a base, a bent shaft which is rotatable relative to the base wherein the bent shaft comprises a straight portion aligned with a main axis and an offset portion that is offset with respect to the main axis; and a drive means for driving the offset portion of the bent shaft along a generally circular path in a plane perpendicular to the main axis to rotate the bent shaft. The bent shaft and drive means for driving the bent shaft can be selected from piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, rheological and shape memory alloys. The drive means of the nonelectromagnetic motor can additionally comprise a shell which shell surrounds and houses the bent shaft and precesses or gyrates which in turn causes the bent drive shaft to rotate. The nonelectromagnetic motor does not rely on friction for the application of torque upon a rotor. 11 figs.

  15. Motor stereotypy disorders.

    PubMed

    Muthugovindan, Deivasumathy; Singer, Harvey

    2009-04-01

    This review highlights recent advances in understanding the clinical features, prevalence, and outcomes of motor stereotypy disorders in typically developing children. Longitudinal data indicate that stereotypies in children with normal intelligence show an early age of onset, chronicity, and high prevalence of comorbid difficulties, including tics, obsessive-compulsive behaviors, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The underlying abnormality remains unknown, but there is increasing evidence for Mendelian inheritance and a neurobiological mechanism. Primary motor stereotypies are relatively common in childhood and can be subdivided into three groups (common, head nodding, and complex motor). Movements are similar to those seen in children with autistic spectrum disorders, mental retardation, and sensory deprivation. The role of pharmacotherapy is not established and behavioral therapy can be beneficial.

  16. The double life of double effect.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alison

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court's majority opinion in Vacco v. Quill assumes that the principle of double effect explains the permissibility of hastening death in the context of ordinary palliative care and in extraordinary cases in which painkilling drugs have failed to relieve especially intractable suffering and terminal sedation has been adopted as a last resort. The traditional doctrine of double effect, understood as providing a prohibition on instrumental harming as opposed to incidental harming or harming as a side effect, must be distinguished from other ways in which the claim that a result is not intended might be offered as part of a justification for it. Although double effect might appropriately be invoked as a constraint on ordinary palliative care, it is not clear that it can be coherently extended to justify such practices as terminal sedation. A better approach would reconsider double effect's traditional prohibition on hastening death as a means to relieve suffering in the context of acute palliative care.

  17. Double metalization for VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trotter, J. D.; Wade, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    Postsintering process increases yield of double-layer metal conductors to almost 100 percent. When wafers containing double-metalized chips are sintered, metal layers react with oxide film remaining in insulation layer holes, breaking it up so that it no longer impedes electric current. Cooling also mechanically disrupts oxide film.

  18. Multidimensional period doubling structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Yup; Flom, Dvir; Ben-Abraham, Shelomo I

    2016-05-01

    This paper develops the formalism necessary to generalize the period doubling sequence to arbitrary dimension by straightforward extension of the substitution and recursion rules. It is shown that the period doubling structures of arbitrary dimension are pure point diffractive. The symmetries of the structures are pointed out.

  19. Peregrine Sustainer Motor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodell, Chuck; Franklin, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The Peregrine sounding rocket is an in-house NASA design that provides approximately 15 percent better performance than the motor it replaces. The design utilizes common materials and well-characterized architecture to reduce flight issues encountered with the current motors. It engages NASA design, analysts, test engineers and technicians, ballisticians, and systems engineers. The in-house work and collaboration within the government provides flexibility to efficiently accommodate design and program changes as the design matures and enhances the ability to meet schedule milestones. It provides a valuable tool to compare industry costs, develop contracts, and it develops foundational knowledge for the next generation of NASA engineers.

  20. ac bidirectional motor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase ac converter that operates from the high-frequency ac bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.

  1. ac bidirectional motor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase ac converter that operates from the high-frequency ac bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.

  2. The functional alterations associated with motor imagery training: a comparison between motor execution and motor imagery of sequential finger tapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hang; Yao, Li; Long, Zhiying

    2011-03-01

    Motor imagery training, as an effective strategy, has been more and more applied to mental disorders rehabilitation and motor skill learning. Studies on the neural mechanism underlying motor imagery have suggested that such effectiveness may be related to the functional congruence between motor execution and motor imagery. However, as compared to the studies on motor imagery, the studies on motor imagery training are much fewer. The functional alterations associated with motor imagery training and the effectiveness of motor imagery training on motor performance improvement still needs further investigation. Using fMRI, we employed a sequential finger tapping paradigm to explore the functional alterations associated with motor imagery training in both motor execution and motor imagery task. We hypothesized through 14 consecutive days motor imagery training, the motor performance could be improved and the functional congruence between motor execution and motor imagery would be sustained form pre-training phase to post-training phase. Our results confirmed the effectiveness of motor imagery training in improving motor performance and demonstrated in both pre and post-training phases, motor imagery and motor execution consistently sustained the congruence in functional neuroanatomy, including SMA (supplementary motor cortex), PMA (premotor area); M1( primary motor cortex) and cerebellum. Moreover, for both execution and imagery tasks, a similar functional alteration was observed in fusiform through motor imagery training. These findings provided an insight into the effectiveness of motor imagery training and suggested its potential therapeutic value in motor rehabilitation.

  3. Sensorimotor organization in double cortex syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jirsch, Jeffrey D; Bernasconi, Neda; Villani, Flavio; Vitali, Paolo; Avanzini, Giuliano; Bernasconi, Andrea

    2006-06-01

    Subcortical band heterotopia is a diffuse malformation of cortical development related to pharmacologically intractable epilepsy. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), patients with "double cortex" syndrome (DCS) present with a band of heterotopic gray matter separated from the overlying cortex by a layer of white matter. The function and connectivity of the subcortical heterotopic band in humans is only partially understood. We studied six DCS patients with bilateral subcortical band heterotopias and six healthy controls using functional MRI (fMRI). In controls, simple motor task elicited contralateral activation of the primary motor cortex (M1) and ipsilateral activation of the cerebellum and left supplementary motor area (SMA). All DCS patients showed task-related contralateral activation of both M1 and the underlying heterotopic band. Ipsilateral motor activation was seen in 4/6 DCS patients. Furthermore, there were additional activations of nonprimary normotopic cortical areas. The sensory stimulus resulted in activation of the contralateral primary sensory cortex (SI) and the thalamus in all healthy subjects. The left sensory task also induced a contralateral activation of the insular cortex. Sensory activation of the contralateral SI was seen in all DCS patients and secondary somatosensory areas in 5/6. The heterotopic band beneath SI became activated in 3/6 DCS patients. Activations were also seen in subcortical structures for both paradigms. In DCS, motor and sensory tasks induce an activation of the subcortical heterotopic band. The recruitment of bilateral primary areas and higher-order association normotopic cortices indicates the need for a widespread network to perform simple tasks.

  4. Tuning Multiple Motor Travel Via Single Motor Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Shu, Zhanyong; King, Stephen J.; Gross, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-based molecular motors often work in small groups to transport cargos in cells. A key question in understanding transport (and its regulation in vivo) is to identify the sensitivity of multiple-motor-based motion to various single molecule properties. Whereas both single-motor travel distance and microtubule binding rate have been demonstrated to contribute to cargo travel, the role of single-motor velocity is yet to be explored. Here, we recast a previous theoretical study, and make explicit a potential contribution of velocity to cargo travel. We test this possibility experimentally, and demonstrate a strong negative correlation between single-motor velocity and cargo travel for transport driven by two motors. Our study thus discovers a previously unappreciated role of single-motor velocity in regulating multiple-motor transport. PMID:22672518

  5. Motor current signature analysis method for diagnosing motor operated devices

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.; Eissenberg, David M.

    1990-01-01

    A motor current noise signature analysis method and apparatus for remotely monitoring the operating characteristics of an electric motor-operated device such as a motor-operated valve. Frequency domain signal analysis techniques are applied to a conditioned motor current signal to distinctly identify various operating parameters of the motor driven device from the motor current signature. The signature may be recorded and compared with subsequent signatures to detect operating abnormalities and degradation of the device. This diagnostic method does not require special equipment to be installed on the motor-operated device, and the current sensing may be performed at remote control locations, e.g., where the motor-operated devices are used in accessible or hostile environments.

  6. Stepwise translocation of nucleic acid motors

    PubMed Central

    Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recent single molecule studies have made a significant contribution to the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in the movement of motor proteins which process DNA and RNA. Measurement of stepsize in two disparate motors, NS3 helicase and ribosome both revealed three basepair steps which consist of three hidden substeps. Combined with previous structural studies, NS3 is likely taking a single nucleotide step of translocation coupled to one ATP binding event and this mode may be conserved in multitude of helicases. Such a stepwise translocation movement appears to occur through main contacts with the phosphate backbone. Double stranded RNA and DNA motor, RIG-I and Φ29 respectively showed translocation on a duplex while tracking exclusively a single stranded RNA/DNA in a directional manner, 5′ to 3′ in both cases. Spontaneous dynamics displayed by ribosome ratcheting and SSB (single stranded DNA binding protein) diffusing on DNA were rectified by interacting cofactors and proteins, EF-G and RecA respectively. PMID:20061135

  7. Stepwise translocation of nucleic acid motors.

    PubMed

    Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip

    2010-02-01

    Recent single molecule studies have made a significant contribution to the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in the movement of motor proteins which process DNA and RNA. Measurement of stepsize in two disparate motors, NS3 helicase and ribosome both revealed 3-bp steps, which consist of three hidden substeps. Combined with previous structural studies, NS3 is likely taking a single nucleotide step of translocation coupled to one ATP binding event and this mode may be conserved in multitude of helicases. Such a stepwise translocation movement appears to occur through main contacts with the phosphate backbone. Double stranded RNA and DNA motor, RIG-I and phi29, respectively, showed translocation on a duplex while tracking exclusively a single strand of RNA or DNA in a directional manner, 5'-3' in both cases. Spontaneous dynamics displayed by ribosome ratcheting and SSB (single stranded DNA binding protein) diffusing on DNA were rectified by interacting cofactors and proteins, EF-G and RecA, respectively. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 46 CFR 169.684 - Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch... motors and motor branch circuits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, each motor... motor that is responsive to motor current or to both motor current and temperature may be used. (b) The...

  9. 46 CFR 169.684 - Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch... motors and motor branch circuits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, each motor... motor that is responsive to motor current or to both motor current and temperature may be used. (b) The...

  10. 46 CFR 169.684 - Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch... motors and motor branch circuits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, each motor... motor that is responsive to motor current or to both motor current and temperature may be used. (b) The...

  11. 46 CFR 169.684 - Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch... motors and motor branch circuits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, each motor... motor that is responsive to motor current or to both motor current and temperature may be used. (b)...

  12. 46 CFR 169.684 - Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch... motors and motor branch circuits. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, each motor... motor that is responsive to motor current or to both motor current and temperature may be used. (b)...

  13. Magnetically Coupled Adjustable Speed Motor Drives - Motor Tip Sheet #13

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Alternating current electric motors rotate at a nearly constant speed that is determined by motor design and line frequency. Energy savings of 50% or more may be available when fixed speed systems are modified to allow the motor speed to match variable load requirements of a centrifugal fan or pump.

  14. Method for assessing motor insulation on operating motors

    DOEpatents

    Kueck, J.D.; Otaduy, P.J.

    1997-03-18

    A method for monitoring the condition of electrical-motor-driven devices is disclosed. The method is achieved by monitoring electrical variables associated with the functioning of an operating motor, applying these electrical variables to a three phase equivalent circuit and determining non-symmetrical faults in the operating motor based upon symmetrical components analysis techniques. 15 figs.

  15. Method for assessing motor insulation on operating motors

    DOEpatents

    Kueck, John D.; Otaduy, Pedro J.

    1997-01-01

    A method for monitoring the condition of electrical-motor-driven devices. The method is achieved by monitoring electrical variables associated with the functioning of an operating motor, applying these electrical variables to a three phase equivalent circuit and determining non-symmetrical faults in the operating motor based upon symmetrical components analysis techniques.

  16. The St. Louis Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The St. Louis Motor, invented in 1909, is unique among physics apparatus for being named for a geographical place rather than a physicist. The sturdy little device (Fig. 1) has never been out of production. Any older school or physics department that has not done a catastrophic housecleaning in the last 20 years will certainly have a small flock…

  17. Perceptual-Motor Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Jean L.

    Discussed are theoretical and treatment aspects of perceptual motor dysfunction and rehabilitation in 4- to 12-year-old academically failing children involved in a 3-year investigation at the University of Kansas. The program is said to stress increasing the amount of stimulation received by sensory receptors of the vestibular, reflex, and haptic…

  18. Solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Ronn L.

    1993-01-01

    Structural requirements, materials and, especially, processing are critical issues that will pace the introduction of new types of solid rocket motors. Designers must recognize and understand the drivers associated with each of the following considerations: (1) cost; (2) energy density; (3) long term storage with use on demand; (4) reliability; (5) safety of processing and handling; (6) operability; and (7) environmental acceptance.

  19. Motorized recreation in Pennsylvania

    Treesearch

    Bruce E. Lord

    2007-01-01

    Pennsylvania's Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) has been developing management plans to deal with the growing popularity of motorized recreation in the Commonwealth. Two important segments of off-highway vehicle use in Pennsylvania involve all-terrain vehicles and snowmobile riding. A pair of needs studies for these recreationists provides a...

  20. Spherically Actuated Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeples, Steven

    2015-01-01

    A three degree of freedom (DOF) spherical actuator is proposed that will replace functions requiring three single DOF actuators in robotic manipulators providing space and weight savings while reducing the overall failure rate. Exploration satellites, Space Station payload manipulators, and rovers requiring pan, tilt, and rotate movements need an actuator for each function. Not only does each actuator introduce additional failure modes and require bulky mechanical gimbals, each contains many moving parts, decreasing mean time to failure. A conventional robotic manipulator is shown in figure 1. Spherical motors perform all three actuation functions, i.e., three DOF, with only one moving part. Given a standard three actuator system whose actuators have a given failure rate compared to a spherical motor with an equal failure rate, the three actuator system is three times as likely to fail over the latter. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory reliability studies of NASA robotic spacecraft have shown that mechanical hardware/mechanism failures are more frequent and more likely to significantly affect mission success than are electronic failures. Unfortunately, previously designed spherical motors have been unable to provide the performance needed by space missions. This inadequacy is also why they are unavailable commercially. An improved patentable spherically actuated motor (SAM) is proposed to provide the performance and versatility required by NASA missions.

  1. Motor Learning and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, Hartmut

    Two recent conferences on the science of sport have focused on the topic of sports for older people. Investigations have been made on the special demand in motor learning, in table-tennis, family-tennis, gymnastics, and dancing. This paper summarizes some experiences and conclusions drawn from these studies, including special notes on isolated…

  2. The St. Louis Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The St. Louis Motor, invented in 1909, is unique among physics apparatus for being named for a geographical place rather than a physicist. The sturdy little device (Fig. 1) has never been out of production. Any older school or physics department that has not done a catastrophic housecleaning in the last 20 years will certainly have a small flock…

  3. Thiokol Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on thiokol solid rocket motors. The topics include: 1) Communications; 2) Military and government intelligence; 3) Positioning satellites; 4) Remote sensing; 5) Space burial; 6) Science; 7) Space manufacturing; 8) Advertising; 9) Space rescue space debris management; 10) Space tourism; 11) Space settlements; 12) Hazardous waste disposal; 13) Extraterrestrial resources; 14) Fast package delivery; and 15) Space utilities.

  4. Reciprocating Linear Electric Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldowsky, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Features include structural simplicity and good force/displacement characteristics. Reciprocating motor has simple, rugged construction, relatively low reciprocating weight, improved power delivery, and improved force control. Wear reduced by use of magnetic bearings. Intended to provide drivers for long-lived Stirling-cycle cryogenic refrigerators, concept has less exotic applications, such as fuel pumps.

  5. Thiokol Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on thiokol solid rocket motors. The topics include: 1) Communications; 2) Military and government intelligence; 3) Positioning satellites; 4) Remote sensing; 5) Space burial; 6) Science; 7) Space manufacturing; 8) Advertising; 9) Space rescue space debris management; 10) Space tourism; 11) Space settlements; 12) Hazardous waste disposal; 13) Extraterrestrial resources; 14) Fast package delivery; and 15) Space utilities.

  6. Reciprocating Linear Electric Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldowsky, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Features include structural simplicity and good force/displacement characteristics. Reciprocating motor has simple, rugged construction, relatively low reciprocating weight, improved power delivery, and improved force control. Wear reduced by use of magnetic bearings. Intended to provide drivers for long-lived Stirling-cycle cryogenic refrigerators, concept has less exotic applications, such as fuel pumps.

  7. Electric motor model repair specifications

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    These model repair specifications list the minimum requirements for repair and overhaul of polyphase AC squireel cage induction motors. All power ranges, voltages, and speeds of squirrel cage motors are covered.

  8. Emerging double helical nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Gui-Li; Wei, Fei

    2014-07-01

    As one of the most important and land-mark structures found in nature, a double helix consists of two congruent single helices with the same axis or a translation along the axis. This double helical structure renders the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) the crucial biomolecule in evolution and metabolism. DNA-like double helical nanostructures are probably the most fantastic yet ubiquitous geometry at the nanoscale level, which are expected to exhibit exceptional and even rather different properties due to the unique organization of the two single helices and their synergistic effect. The organization of nanomaterials into double helical structures is an emerging hot topic for nanomaterials science due to their promising exceptional unique properties and applications. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art research progress for the fabrication of double-helical nanostructures based on `bottom-up' and `top-down' strategies. The relevant nanoscale, mesoscale, and macroscopic scale fabrication methods, as well as the properties of the double helical nanostructures are included. Critical perspectives are devoted to the synthesis principles and potential applications in this emerging research area. A multidisciplinary approach from the scope of nanoscience, physics, chemistry, materials, engineering, and other application areas is still required to the well-controlled and large-scale synthesis, mechanism, property, and application exploration of double helical nanostructures.

  9. Emerging double helical nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Gui-Li; Wei, Fei

    2014-08-21

    As one of the most important and land-mark structures found in nature, a double helix consists of two congruent single helices with the same axis or a translation along the axis. This double helical structure renders the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) the crucial biomolecule in evolution and metabolism. DNA-like double helical nanostructures are probably the most fantastic yet ubiquitous geometry at the nanoscale level, which are expected to exhibit exceptional and even rather different properties due to the unique organization of the two single helices and their synergistic effect. The organization of nanomaterials into double helical structures is an emerging hot topic for nanomaterials science due to their promising exceptional unique properties and applications. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art research progress for the fabrication of double-helical nanostructures based on 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' strategies. The relevant nanoscale, mesoscale, and macroscopic scale fabrication methods, as well as the properties of the double helical nanostructures are included. Critical perspectives are devoted to the synthesis principles and potential applications in this emerging research area. A multidisciplinary approach from the scope of nanoscience, physics, chemistry, materials, engineering, and other application areas is still required to the well-controlled and large-scale synthesis, mechanism, property, and application exploration of double helical nanostructures.

  10. Topological Quantum Double

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneau, Philippe

    Following a preceding paper showing how the introduction of a t.v.s. topology on quantum groups led to a remarkable unification and rigidification of the different definitions, we adapt here, in the same way, the definition of quantum double. This topological double is dualizable and reflexive (even for infinite dimensional algebras). In a simple case we show, considering the double as the "zero class" of an extension theory, the uniqueness of the double structure as a quasi-Hopf algebra. A la suite d'un précédent article montrant comment l'introduction d'une topologie d'e.v.t. sur les groupes quantiques permet une unification et une rigidification remarquables des différentes définitions, on adapte ici de la même manière la définition du double quantique. Ce double topologique est alors dualisable et reflexif (même pour des algèbres de dimension infinie). Dans un cas simple on montre, en considérant le double comme la "classe zéro" d'une théorie d'extensions, l'unicité de cette structure comme algèbre quasi-Hopf.

  11. Tandem motors reduce well costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, M.; Daigle, C.; Crowe, R.

    1995-10-01

    The new generation of tandem mud motors that recently appeared on the drilling scene is significantly affecting drilling efficiency worldwide. These motors provide drillers with increased horsepower at the bit, higher torque, and faster rates of penetration (ROP). With advanced engineering and more durable materials, motor life is being extended, thereby increasing the time between bit trips and reducing drilling costs. This article reviews the performance, design, and operation of these motors.

  12. Load-Responsive Motor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edge, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    New circuit controls voltage applied to a three-phase induction motor in response to magnitude of current, so as to reduce power consumption when the motor is idling or operating at less than full load. Control circuit decreases rms applied voltage to match decreases in motor load over entire torque range. This considerably decreases power consumption in motors operating at a fraction of their rated torques.

  13. Mechanochemistry of Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Zev

    2008-03-01

    Molecular motors lie at the heart of biological processes from DNA replication to vesicle transport. We seek to understand the physical mechanisms by which these nanoscale machines convert chemical energy into mechanical work. I will overview our ongoing use of single molecule tracking and manipulation techniques to observe and perturb substeps in the mechanochemical cycles of individual motors, before concentrating on our recent efforts to dissect the structural basis of a ``reverse gear'' in myosin VI. The basic actomyosin motor has been embellished, altered, and re-used many times through the evolution of diverse members of the myosin superfamily. Class VI myosins are highly specialized (-) end directed motors involved in a growing list of functions in animal cells, including endocytosis, cell migration, and maintenance of stereociliar membrane tension. How does myosin VI achieve reverse directionality, despite sharing extensive sequence and structural conservation with (+) end directed myosins? We generated a series of truncated myosin VI constructs and characterized the size and direction of the power stroke for each construct using dual-labeled gliding filament assays and optical trapping. Motors truncated near the end of the converter domain generate (+) end directed motion, whereas longer constructs move toward the (-) end, confirming the importance of a class-specific insert that redirects the lever arm. Our quantitative results suggest a surprising model in which the lever arm rotates ˜180^o during the power stroke. We are currently studying the behavior of engineered myosin VI constructs with artificial lever arms, in order to further challenge and refine our power stroke model.

  14. Motor Vehicle Theft. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Caroline Wolf

    Thirteen years of data from the National Crime Survey were analyzed to examine the characteristics of motor vehicle theft, to identify trends during the past 13 years, and to determine who are most likely to be victims of motor vehicle theft. All motor vehicle thefts reported to the National Crime Survey from 1973 through 1985 were examined.…

  15. Speed control for synchronous motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, H.; Schott, J.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback circuit controls fluctuations in speed of synchronous ac motor. Voltage proportional to phase angle is developed by phase detector, rectified, amplified, compared to threshold, and reapplied positively or negatively to motor excitation circuit. Speed control reduces wow and flutter of audio turntables and tape recorders, and enhances hunting in gyroscope motors.

  16. Rehabilitation following motor nerve transfers.

    PubMed

    Novak, Christine B

    2008-11-01

    Cortical mapping and relearning are key factors in optimizing patient outcome following motor nerve transfers. To maximize function following nerve transfers, the rehabilitation program must include motor reeducation to initiate recruitment of the weak reinnervated muscles and to establish new motor patterns and cortical mapping. Patient education and a home program are essential to obtain the optimal functional result.

  17. Speed control for synchronous motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, H.; Schott, J.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback circuit controls fluctuations in speed of synchronous ac motor. Voltage proportional to phase angle is developed by phase detector, rectified, amplified, compared to threshold, and reapplied positively or negatively to motor excitation circuit. Speed control reduces wow and flutter of audio turntables and tape recorders, and enhances hunting in gyroscope motors.

  18. Motor Education: Educational Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansley, A. E.

    This booklet presents educational programs and activities focusing on motor skills for 5- to 9-year-old children and older children with learning problems. The premise of the activities is that the acquisition of motor skills is essential to basic learning. The role of language as a mediator and controller of motor development is emphasized. The…

  19. Brushless direct-current motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahm, E. J.

    1970-01-01

    Survey results are presented on the use of unconventional motor windings and switching sequences to optimize performance of brushless dc motors. A motor was built, each coil terminal having a separate, accessible lead. With the shaft and all electronics excluded, length and outside diameter measured 1.25 and 0.75 in., respectively.

  20. Motor Education: Educational Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansley, A. E.

    This booklet presents educational programs and activities focusing on motor skills for 5- to 9-year-old children and older children with learning problems. The premise of the activities is that the acquisition of motor skills is essential to basic learning. The role of language as a mediator and controller of motor development is emphasized. The…

  1. Experiments with a DC Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with an electric motor provide good opportunity to demonstrate some basic laws of electricity and magnetism. The aim of the experiments with a low-power dc motor is to show how the motor approaches its steady rotation and how its torque, mechanical power and efficiency depend on the rotation velocity. The tight relationship between the…

  2. Experiments with a DC Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with an electric motor provide good opportunity to demonstrate some basic laws of electricity and magnetism. The aim of the experiments with a low-power dc motor is to show how the motor approaches its steady rotation and how its torque, mechanical power and efficiency depend on the rotation velocity. The tight relationship between the…

  3. Multiple stage miniature stepping motor

    DOEpatents

    Niven, William A.; Shikany, S. David; Shira, Michael L.

    1981-01-01

    A stepping motor comprising a plurality of stages which may be selectively activated to effect stepping movement of the motor, and which are mounted along a common rotor shaft to achieve considerable reduction in motor size and minimum diameter, whereby sequential activation of the stages results in successive rotor steps with direction being determined by the particular activating sequence followed.

  4. Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in primary cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Katschnig-Winter, Petra; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Davare, Marco; Sadnicka, Anna; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rothwell, John C; Bhatia, Kailash P; Edwards, Mark J

    2014-06-01

    Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation rely on overlapping circuits predominantly involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Given the importance of these brain regions to the pathophysiology of primary dystonia, and the previous finding of abnormal motor sequence learning in DYT1 gene carriers, we explored motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in patients with primary cervical dystonia. We recruited 12 patients with cervical dystonia and 11 healthy controls matched for age. Subjects used a joystick to move a cursor from a central starting point to radial targets as fast and accurately as possible. Using this device, we recorded baseline motor performance, motor sequence learning and a visuomotor adaptation task. Patients with cervical dystonia had a significantly higher peak velocity than controls. Baseline performance with random target presentation was otherwise normal. Patients and controls had similar levels of motor sequence learning and motor adaptation. Our patients had significantly higher peak velocity compared to controls, with similar movement times, implying a different performance strategy. The preservation of motor sequence learning in cervical dystonia patients contrasts with the previously observed deficit seen in patients with DYT1 gene mutations, supporting the hypothesis of differing pathophysiology in different forms of primary dystonia. Normal motor adaptation is an interesting finding. With our paradigm we did not find evidence that the previously documented cerebellar abnormalities in cervical dystonia have a behavioral correlate, and thus could be compensatory or reflect "contamination" rather than being directly pathological. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Coordinated switching of bacterial flagellar motors: evidence for direct motor-motor coupling?

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Tu, Yuhai

    2013-04-12

    The swimming of Escherichia coli is powered by its multiple flagellar motors. Each motor spins either clockwise or counterclockwise, under the control of an intracellular regulator, CheY-P. There can be two mechanisms (extrinsic and intrinsic) to coordinate the switching of bacterial motors. The extrinsic one arises from the fact that different motors in the same cell sense a common input (CheY-P) which fluctuates near the motors' response threshold. An alternative, intrinsic mechanism is direct motor-motor coupling which makes synchronized switching energetically favorable. Here, we develop simple models for both mechanisms and uncover their different hallmarks. A quantitative comparison to the recent experiments suggests that the direct coupling mechanism may be accountable for the observed sharp correlation between motors in a single Escherichia coli. Possible origins of this coupling (e.g., hydrodynamic interaction) are discussed.

  6. Inhibition of the contralesional dorsal premotor cortex improves motor function of the affected hand following stroke.

    PubMed

    Lüdemann-Podubecká, J; Bösl, K; Nowak, D A

    2016-04-01

    Numerous studies have shown that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) may improve motor function of the affected hand after stroke. The effects of 1 Hz rTMS applied over the contralesional dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) on hand function and cortical neurophysiology in subacute stroke were examined. Ten subacute stroke patients with mild hand motor impairment were enrolled in a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study with two intervention sessions. 1 Hz rTMS was applied over the contralesional PMd (real rTMS, 900 pulses at 110% of the motor threshold; sham rTMS, 900 pulses at 0% of the motor threshold). Tests of hand function (Jebsen-Taylor hand function test, box and block test) and neurophysiological evaluations (resting motor threshold, motor evoked potentials, cortical silent period, ipsilateral silent period) were obtained from both hands and hemispheres prior to (baseline) and after each treatment. Hand function tests revealed significant improvement of motor function of the affected but not of the unaffected hand after real rTMS only. Neither intervention changed the neurophysiological measures in comparison to baseline. One hertz rTMS over the contralesional PMd improves motor function of the affected hand in subacute stroke. The PMd may be a novel rTMS target to treat motor impairment after stroke. © 2016 EAN.

  7. A standing wave linear ultrasonic motor operating in face-diagonal-bending mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ci, Penghong; Liu, Guoxi; Chen, Zhijiang; Dong, Shuxiang

    2013-09-01

    We report a piezoelectric standing wave linear ultrasonic motor with double driving tips for generating precision motion. The motor's piezoelectric actuator was made of a simple Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 square-plate (15 × 15 × 2 mm3) operating in a single face-diagonal-bending standing wave mode to produce symmetric, bi-directional linear motion. The motor generated a driving force of 3.0 N and a moving speed of up to 165 mm/s under a relatively low applied electric field of 75 Vpp/mm at a resonance frequency of 141.5 kHz. This motor is superior to those previously reported because of the double friction-tip standing wave driving mechanism and the operating mode.

  8. Double Outlet Right Ventricle

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/007328.htm Double outlet right ventricle Texas Adult Congenital Heart Center (TACH) www.bcm.edu/ ... comments. Terms of Use and Privacy Policy © Copyright Texas Heart Institute All rights reserved.

  9. Double Degenerate Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yakut, K.

    2011-09-21

    In this study, angular momentum loss via gravitational radiation in double degenerate binary (DDB)systems (NS + NS, NS + WD, WD + WD, and AM CVn) is studied. Energy loss by gravitational waves has been estimated for each type of systems.

  10. Variation in motor output and motor performance in a centrally generated motor pattern.

    PubMed

    Wenning, Angela; Norris, Brian J; Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2014-07-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) produce motor patterns that ultimately drive motor outputs. We studied how functional motor performance is achieved, specifically, whether the variation seen in motor patterns is reflected in motor performance and whether fictive motor patterns differ from those in vivo. We used the leech heartbeat system in which a bilaterally symmetrical CPG coordinates segmental heart motor neurons and two segmented heart tubes into two mutually exclusive coordination modes: rear-to-front peristaltic on one side and nearly synchronous on the other, with regular side-to-side switches. We assessed individual variability of the motor pattern and the beat pattern in vivo. To quantify the beat pattern we imaged intact adults. To quantify the phase relations between motor neurons and heart constrictions we recorded extracellularly from two heart motor neurons and movement from the corresponding heart segments in minimally dissected leeches. Variation in the motor pattern was reflected in motor performance only in the peristaltic mode, where larger intersegmental phase differences in the motor neurons resulted in larger phase differences between heart constrictions. Fictive motor patterns differed from those in vivo only in the synchronous mode, where intersegmental phase differences in vivo had a larger front-to-rear bias and were more constrained. Additionally, load-influenced constriction timing might explain the amplification of the phase differences between heart segments in the peristaltic mode and the higher variability in motor output due to body shape assumed in this soft-bodied animal. The motor pattern determines the beat pattern, peristaltic or synchronous, but heart mechanics influence the phase relations achieved.

  11. Variation in motor output and motor performance in a centrally generated motor pattern

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Brian J.; Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) produce motor patterns that ultimately drive motor outputs. We studied how functional motor performance is achieved, specifically, whether the variation seen in motor patterns is reflected in motor performance and whether fictive motor patterns differ from those in vivo. We used the leech heartbeat system in which a bilaterally symmetrical CPG coordinates segmental heart motor neurons and two segmented heart tubes into two mutually exclusive coordination modes: rear-to-front peristaltic on one side and nearly synchronous on the other, with regular side-to-side switches. We assessed individual variability of the motor pattern and the beat pattern in vivo. To quantify the beat pattern we imaged intact adults. To quantify the phase relations between motor neurons and heart constrictions we recorded extracellularly from two heart motor neurons and movement from the corresponding heart segments in minimally dissected leeches. Variation in the motor pattern was reflected in motor performance only in the peristaltic mode, where larger intersegmental phase differences in the motor neurons resulted in larger phase differences between heart constrictions. Fictive motor patterns differed from those in vivo only in the synchronous mode, where intersegmental phase differences in vivo had a larger front-to-rear bias and were more constrained. Additionally, load-influenced constriction timing might explain the amplification of the phase differences between heart segments in the peristaltic mode and the higher variability in motor output due to body shape assumed in this soft-bodied animal. The motor pattern determines the beat pattern, peristaltic or synchronous, but heart mechanics influence the phase relations achieved. PMID:24717348

  12. [Double scleral covering evisceration].

    PubMed

    Sanz López, A; Sales Sanz, M

    2003-05-01

    To describe a surgical technique for evisceration that allows the use of large size implants, reducing risk of exposure. We analize the results of 22 eviscerations with Medpor implants with double scleral covering. We managed to use implants of 20 and 22 mm, sometimes in very small anophthalmic cavities, without complications. Double scleral covering evisceration is a surgical technique that allows the use of large size implants, reducing the risk of exposure.

  13. Motor technology for mining applications advances

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-08-15

    AC motors are steadily replacing DC motors in mining and mineral processing equipment, requiring less maintenance. The permanent magnet rotor, or the synchronous motor, has enabled Blador to introduce a line of cooling tower motors. Synchronous motors are soon likely to take over from the induction motor. 1 photo.

  14. Molecular Motors and Stochastic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowsky, Reinhard

    The behavior of single molecular motors such as kinesin or myosin V, which move on linear filaments, involves a nontrivial coupling between the biochemical motor cycle and the stochastic movement. This coupling can be studied in the framework of nonuniform ratchet models which are characterized by spatially localized transition rates between the different internal states of the motor. These models can be classified according to their functional relationships between the motor velocity and the concentration of the fuel molecules. The simplest such relationship applies to two subclasses of models for dimeric kinesin and agrees with experimental observations on this molecular motor.

  15. Big Savings from Smart Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Chesebrough-Pond's operates 32 plants across the nation and in those plants are more than 10,000 electric motors. In an effort to cut down on waste of electrical power used by these motors, Chesebrough organized a Corporate Advanced Technology Group to devise ways of improving productivity and cut manufacturing costs. Chesebrough used NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Power Factor Controller technology as a departure point for development of their own computerized motor controller that enables motors to operate at maximum efficiency regardless of the motor's applications or operating condition.

  16. Advanced Motor Drives Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehsani, M.; Tchamdjou, A.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of advanced motor drive systems as a replacement for the hydrazine fueled APU units. The replacement technology must meet several requirements which are particular to the space applications and the Orbiter in general. Some of these requirements are high efficiency, small size, high power density. In the first part of the study several motors are compared, based on their characteristics and in light of the Orbiter requirements. The best candidate, the brushless DC is chosen because of its particularly good performance with regards to efficiency. Several power electronics drive technologies including the conventional three-phase hard switched and several soft-switched inverters are then presented. In the last part of the study, a soft-switched inverter is analyzed and compared to its conventional hard-switched counterpart. Optimal efficiency is a basic requirement for space applications and the soft-switched technology represents an unavoidable trend for the future.

  17. Ironless armature torque motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Four iron-less armature torque motors, four Hall device position sensor assemblies, and two test fixtures were fabricated. The design approach utilized samarium cobalt permanent magnets, a large airgap, and a three-phase winding in a stationary ironless armature. Hall devices were employed to sense rotor position. An ironless armature torque motor having an outer diameter of 4.25 inches was developed to produce a torque constant of 65 ounce-inches per ampere with a resistance of 20.5 ohms. The total weight, including structural elements, was 1.58 pounds. Test results indicated that all specifications were met except for generated voltage waveform. It is recommended that investigations be made concerning the generated voltage waveform to determine if it may be improved.

  18. Magnetostrictive direct drive motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    A new rare earth alloy, Terfenol-D, combines low frequency operation and extremely high energy density with high magnetostriction. Its material properties make it suitable as a drive element for actuators requiring high output torque. The high strains, the high forces and the high controllability of Terfenol alloys provide a powerful and challenging basis for new ways to generate motion in actuators. Two prototypes of motors using Terfenol-D rods were developed at NASA Goddard. The basic principles of operation are provided of the motor along with other relevant details. A conceptual design of a torque limiting safety clutch/brake under development is illustrated. Also, preliminary design drawings of a linear actuator using Terfenol-D is shown.

  19. Dynamically Timed Electric Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Ann M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A brushless DC motor including a housing having an end cap secured thereto. The housing encloses a rotor. a stator and a rotationally displaceable commutation board having sensors secured thereon and spaced around the periphery of the rotor. An external rotational force is applied to the commutation board for displacement of the sensors to various positions whereby varying feedback signals are generated by the positioning of the sensors relative to the rotating rotor. The commutation board is secured in a fixed position in response to feedback signals indicative of optimum sensor position being determined. The rotation of the commutation board and the securing of the sensors in the desired fixed position is accomplished without requiring the removal of the end cap and with the DC motor operating.

  20. Dynamically timed electric motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Ann M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention disclosed in this document is a brushless DC motor including a housing having an end cap secured thereto. The housing encloses a rotor, a stator and a rotationally displaceable commutation board having 5 sensors secured thereon and spaced around the periphery of the rotor. An external rotational force is applied to the commutation board for displacement of the sensors to various positions whereby varying feedback signals are generated by the positioning of the sensors relative to the rotating rotor. The commutation board is secured in a fixed position in response to feedback signals indicative of optimum sensor position being determined. The rotation of the commutation board and the securing of the sensors in the desired fixed position is accomplished without requiring the removal of the 5 end cap and with the DC motor operating.

  1. Prospective errors determine motor learning

    PubMed Central

    Takiyama, Ken; Hirashima, Masaya; Nozaki, Daichi

    2015-01-01

    Diverse features of motor learning have been reported by numerous studies, but no single theoretical framework concurrently accounts for these features. Here, we propose a model for motor learning to explain these features in a unified way by extending a motor primitive framework. The model assumes that the recruitment pattern of motor primitives is determined by the predicted movement error of an upcoming movement (prospective error). To validate this idea, we perform a behavioural experiment to examine the model’s novel prediction: after experiencing an environment in which the movement error is more easily predictable, subsequent motor learning should become faster. The experimental results support our prediction, suggesting that the prospective error might be encoded in the motor primitives. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this model has a strong explanatory power to reproduce a wide variety of motor-learning-related phenomena that have been separately explained by different computational models. PMID:25635628

  2. Energy efficient motors reference guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadanandan, N. D.; Eltom, A. H.

    1992-03-01

    The motor reference guide is the result of data and information collected and organized by the Industrial and Large Commercial staff of the Tennessee Valley Authority. The information was collected over several months from motor manufacturers, technical papers, textbooks, and files of former TVA engineers. Additionally, computer simulations were performed to develop data not currently available in literature. The guide is not intended to be a textbook on motors, but a quick and ready reference for the TVA field staff to assist in the technical and economic evaluation of energy-efficient motors versus standard motors. However, chapters on motor related topics such as rotating fields, power factor correction, and impact of power quality on motor performances have also been included to complement the text.

  3. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components, and, with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives, functionally required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g., powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf-life characteristics.

  4. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components and with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives functionally-required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g. powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf life characteristics.

  5. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components, and, with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives, functionally required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g., powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf-life characteristics.

  6. Motor neurone disease.

    PubMed

    2016-03-23

    Essential facts Motor neurone disease describes a group of related diseases, affecting the neurones in the brain and spinal cord. Progressive, incurable and life-limiting, MND is rare, with about 1,100 people developing it each year in the UK and up to 5,000 people affected at any one time. One third of people will die within a year of diagnosis and more than half within two years. About 5% to 10% are alive at ten years.

  7. Libert-E Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieloff, Susan F.; Kinnunen, Raymond; Chevarley, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Kei Yun Wong has big dreams. She has been entrusted with the United States launch of Libert-E Motor, a new line of Chinese-manufactured electric scooters. With only $750,000 of her original budget of $3 million left, she needs to make sure that the launch succeeds, as it represents the initial step in her desire to create the first Chinese global…

  8. Libert-E Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieloff, Susan F.; Kinnunen, Raymond; Chevarley, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Kei Yun Wong has big dreams. She has been entrusted with the United States launch of Libert-E Motor, a new line of Chinese-manufactured electric scooters. With only $750,000 of her original budget of $3 million left, she needs to make sure that the launch succeeds, as it represents the initial step in her desire to create the first Chinese global…

  9. The St. Louis Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2011-10-01

    The St. Louis Motor, invented in 1909, is unique among physics apparatus for being named for a geographical place rather than a physicist. The sturdy little device (Fig. 1) has never been out of production. Any older school or physics department that has not done a catastrophic housecleaning in the last 20 years will certainly have a small flock of them in the back room.

  10. Motor Fuel Excise Taxes

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    A new report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) explores the role of alternative fuels and energy efficient vehicles in motor fuel taxes. Throughout the United States, it is common practice for federal, state, and local governments to tax motor fuels on a per gallon basis to fund construction and maintenance of our transportation infrastructure. In recent years, however, expenses have outpaced revenues creating substantial funding shortfalls that have required supplemental funding sources. While rising infrastructure costs and the decreasing purchasing power of the gas tax are significant factors contributing to the shortfall, the increased use of alternative fuels and more stringent fuel economy standards are also exacerbating revenue shortfalls. The current dynamic places vehicle efficiency and petroleum use reduction polices at direct odds with policies promoting robust transportation infrastructure. Understanding the energy, transportation, and environmental tradeoffs of motor fuel tax policies can be complicated, but recent experiences at the state level are helping policymakers align their energy and environmental priorities with highway funding requirements.

  11. Motor actuated vacuum door

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanagud, A. V.

    1986-10-01

    Doors that allow scientific instruments to record and retrieve the observed data are often required to be designed and installed as a part of sounding rocket hardware. The motor-actuated vacuum door was designed to maintain a medium vacuum of the order of 0.0001 torr or better while closed, and to provide an opening 15 inches long x 8.5 inches wide while open for cameras to image Halley's comet. When the electric motor receives the instruction to open the door through the payload battery, timer, and relay circuit, the first operation is to unlock the door. After unlatching, the torque transmitted by the motor to the main shaft through the links opens the door. A microswitch actuator, which rides on the linear motion conversion mechanism, is adjusted to trip the limit switch at the end of the travel. The process is repeated in the reverse order to close the door. 'O' rings are designed to maintain the seal. Door mechanisms similar to the one described have flown on Aerobee 17.018 and Black Brant 27.047 payloads.

  12. Dyspraxia, motor function and visual-motor integration in autism.

    PubMed

    Miller, M; Chukoskie, L; Zinni, M; Townsend, J; Trauner, D

    2014-08-01

    This project assessed dyspraxia in high-functioning school aged children with autism with a focus on Ideational Praxis. We examined the association of specific underlying motor function including eye movement with ideational dyspraxia (sequences of skilled movements) as well as the possible role of visual-motor integration in dyspraxia. We found that compared to IQ-, sex- and age-matched typically developing children, the children with autism performed significantly worse on: Ideational and Buccofacial praxis; a broad range of motor tests, including measures of simple motor skill, timing and accuracy of saccadic eye movements and motor coordination; and tests of visual-motor integration. Impairments in individual children with autism were heterogeneous in nature, although when we examined the praxis data as a function of a qualitative measure representing motor timing, we found that children with poor motor timing performed worse on all praxis categories and had slower and less accurate eye movements while those with regular timing performed as well as typical children on those same tasks. Our data provide evidence that both motor function and visual-motor integration contribute to dyspraxia. We suggest that dyspraxia in autism involves cerebellar mechanisms of movement control and the integration of these mechanisms with cortical networks implicated in praxis.

  13. Dyspraxia, Motor Function and Visual-Motor Integration in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M.; Chukoskie, L.; Zinni, M.; Townsend, J.; Trauner, D.

    2014-01-01

    This project assessed dyspraxia in high-functioning school aged children with autism with a focus on Ideational Praxis. We examined the association of specific underlying motor function including eye movement with ideational dyspraxia (sequences of skilled movements) as well as the possible role of visual-motor integration in dyspraxia. We found that compared to IQ-, sex- and age-matched typically developing children, the children with autism performed significantly worse on: Ideational and Buccofacial praxis; a broad range of motor tests, including measures of simple motor skill, timing and accuracy of saccadic eye movements and motor coordination; and tests of visual-motor integration. Impairments in individual children with autism were heterogeneous in nature, although when we examined the praxis data as a function of a qualitative measure representing motor timing, we found that children with poor motor timing performed worse on all praxis categories and had slower and less accurate eye movements while those with regular timing performed as well as typical children on those same tasks. Our data provide evidence that both motor function and visual-motor integration contribute to dyspraxia. We suggest that dyspraxia in autism involves cerebellar mechanisms of movement control and the integration of these mechanisms with cortical networks implicated in praxis. PMID:24742861

  14. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers. 111.70-3... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motor Circuits, Controllers, and Protection § 111.70-3 Motor controllers and motor-control centers. (a) General. The enclosure for each motor controller or motor-control...

  15. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers. 111.70-3... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motor Circuits, Controllers, and Protection § 111.70-3 Motor controllers and motor-control centers. (a) General. The enclosure for each motor controller or motor-control...

  16. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers. 111.70-3... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motor Circuits, Controllers, and Protection § 111.70-3 Motor controllers and motor-control centers. (a) General. The enclosure for each motor controller or motor-control...

  17. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers. 111.70-3... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motor Circuits, Controllers, and Protection § 111.70-3 Motor controllers and motor-control centers. (a) General. The enclosure for each motor controller or motor-control...

  18. Coordinated Switching of Bacterial Flagellar Motors: Evidence for Direct Motor-Motor Coupling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Tu, Yuhai

    2013-04-01

    The swimming of Escherichia coli is powered by its multiple flagellar motors. Each motor spins either clockwise or counterclockwise, under the control of an intracellular regulator, CheY-P. There can be two mechanisms (extrinsic and intrinsic) to coordinate the switching of bacterial motors. The extrinsic one arises from the fact that different motors in the same cell sense a common input (CheY-P) which fluctuates near the motors’ response threshold. An alternative, intrinsic mechanism is direct motor-motor coupling which makes synchronized switching energetically favorable. Here, we develop simple models for both mechanisms and uncover their different hallmarks. A quantitative comparison to the recent experiments suggests that the direct coupling mechanism may be accountable for the observed sharp correlation between motors in a single Escherichia coli. Possible origins of this coupling (e.g., hydrodynamic interaction) are discussed.

  19. Causal Role of Motor Simulation in Turn-Taking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Novembre, Giacomo; Keller, Peter E.; Pickering, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Overlap between sensory and motor representations has been documented for a range of human actions, from grasping (Rizzolatti et al., 1996b) to playing a musical instrument (Novembre and Keller, 2014). Such overlap suggests that individuals use motor simulation to predict the outcome of observed actions (Wolpert, 1997). Here we investigate motor simulation as a basis of human communication. Using a musical turn-taking task, we show that pianists call on motor representations of their partner's part to predict when to come in for their own turn. Pianists played alternating solos with a videoed partner, and double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied around the turn-switch to temporarily disrupt processing in two cortical regions implicated previously in different forms of motor simulation: (1) the dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC), associated with automatic motor resonance during passive observation of hand actions, especially when the actions are familiar (Lahav et al., 2007); and (2) the supplementary motor area (SMA), involved in active motor imagery, especially when the actions are familiar (Baumann et al., 2007). Stimulation of the right dPMC decreased the temporal accuracy of pianists' (right-hand) entries relative to sham when the partner's (left-hand) part had been rehearsed previously. This effect did not occur for dPMC stimulation without rehearsal or for SMA stimulation. These findings support the role of the dPMC in predicting the time course of observed actions via resonance-based motor simulation during turn-taking. Because turn-taking spans multiple modes of human interaction, we suggest that simulation is a foundational mechanism underlying the temporal dynamics of joint action. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Even during passive observation, seeing or hearing somebody execute an action from within our repertoire activates motor cortices of our brain. But what is the functional relevance of such “motor simulation”? By combining a musical duet

  20. Gli function is essential for motor neuron induction in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Vanderlaan, Gary; Tyurina, Oksana V; Karlstrom, Rolf O; Chandrasekhar, Anand

    2005-06-15

    The Gli family of zinc-finger transcription factors mediates Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in all vertebrates. However, their roles in ventral neural tube patterning, in particular motor neuron induction, appear to have diverged across species. For instance, cranial motor neurons are essentially lost in zebrafish detour (gli1(-)) mutants, whereas motor neuron development is unaffected in mouse single gli and some double gli knockouts. Interestingly, the expression of some Hh-regulated genes (ptc1, net1a, gli1) is mostly unaffected in the detour mutant hindbrain, suggesting that other Gli transcriptional activators may be involved. To better define the roles of the zebrafish gli genes in motor neuron induction and in Hh-regulated gene expression, we examined these processes in you-too (yot) mutants, which encode dominant repressor forms of Gli2 (Gli2(DR)), and following morpholino-mediated knockdown of gli1, gli2, and gli3 function. Motor neuron induction at all axial levels was reduced in yot (gli2(DR)) mutant embryos. In addition, Hh target gene expression at all axial levels except in rhombomere 4 was also reduced, suggesting an interference with the function of other Glis. Indeed, morpholino-mediated knockdown of Gli2(DR) protein in yot mutants led to a suppression of the defective motor neuron phenotype. However, gli2 knockdown in wild-type embryos generated no discernable motor neuron phenotype, while gli3 knockdown reduced motor neuron induction in the hindbrain and spinal cord. Significantly, gli2 or gli3 knockdown in detour (gli1(-)) mutants revealed roles for Gli2 and Gli3 activator functions in ptc1 expression and spinal motor neuron induction. Similarly, gli1 or gli3 knockdown in yot (gli2(DR)) mutants resulted in severe or complete loss of motor neurons, and of ptc1 and net1a expression, in the hindbrain and spinal cord. In addition, gli1 expression was greatly reduced in yot mutants following gli3, but not gli1, knockdown, suggesting that Gli3 activator

  1. Wind motor applications for transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Lysenko, G.P.; Grigoriev, B.V.; Karpin, K.B.

    1996-12-31

    Motion equation for a vehicle equipped with a wind motor allows, taking into account the drag coefficients, to determine the optimal wind drag velocity in the wind motor`s plane, and hence, obtain all the necessary data for the wind wheel blades geometrical parameters definition. This optimal drag velocity significantly differs from the flow drag velocity which determines the maximum wind motor power. Solution of the motion equation with low drag coefficients indicates that the vehicle speed against the wind may be twice as the wind speed. One of possible transportation wind motor applications is its use on various ships. A ship with such a wind motor may be substantially easier to steer, and if certain devices are available, may proceed in autonomous control mode. Besides, it is capable of moving within narrow fairways. The cruise speed of a sailing boat and wind-motored ship were compared provided that the wind velocity direction changes along a harmonic law with regard to the motion direction. Mean dimensionless speed of the wind-motored ship appears to be by 20--25% higher than that of a sailing boat. There was analyzed a possibility of using the wind motors on planet rovers in Mars or Venus atmospheric conditions. A Mars rover power and motor system has been assessed for the power level of 3 kW.

  2. Design of permanent magnet synchronous motor speed control system based on SVPWM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haibo

    2017-04-01

    The control system is designed to realize TMS320F28335 based on the permanent magnet synchronous motor speed control system, and put it to quoting all electric of injection molding machine. The system of the control method used SVPWM, through the sampling motor current and rotating transformer position information, realize speed, current double closed loop control. Through the TMS320F28335 hardware floating-point processing core, realize the application for permanent magnet synchronous motor in the floating point arithmetic, to replace the past fixed-point algorithm, and improve the efficiency of the code.

  3. Comparison of capabilities of reluctance synchronous motor and induction motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štumberger, Gorazd; Hadžiselimović, Miralem; Štumberger, Bojan; Miljavec, Damijan; Dolinar, Drago; Zagradišnik, Ivan

    2006-09-01

    This paper compares the capabilities of a reluctance synchronous motor (RSM) with those of an induction motor (IM). An RSM and IM were designed and made, with the same rated power and speed. They differ only in the rotor portion while their stators, housings and cooling systems are identical. The capabilities of both motors in a variable speed drive are evaluated by comparison of the results obtained by magnetically nonlinear models and by measurements.

  4. Neurons other than motor neurons in motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Ruffoli, Riccardo; Biagioni, Francesca; Busceti, Carla L; Gaglione, Anderson; Ryskalin, Larisa; Gambardella, Stefano; Frati, Alessandro; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is typically defined by a loss of motor neurons in the central nervous system. Accordingly, morphological analysis for decades considered motor neurons (in the cortex, brainstem and spinal cord) as the neuronal population selectively involved in ALS. Similarly, this was considered the pathological marker to score disease severity ex vivo both in patients and experimental models. However, the concept of non-autonomous motor neuron death was used recently to indicate the need for additional cell types to produce motor neuron death in ALS. This means that motor neuron loss occurs only when they are connected with other cell types. This concept originally emphasized the need for resident glia as well as non-resident inflammatory cells. Nowadays, the additional role of neurons other than motor neurons emerged in the scenario to induce non-autonomous motor neuron death. In fact, in ALS neurons diverse from motor neurons are involved. These cells play multiple roles in ALS: (i) they participate in the chain of events to produce motor neuron loss; (ii) they may even degenerate more than and before motor neurons. In the present manuscript evidence about multi-neuronal involvement in ALS patients and experimental models is discussed. Specific sub-classes of neurons in the whole spinal cord are reported either to degenerate or to trigger neuronal degeneration, thus portraying ALS as a whole spinal cord disorder rather than a disease affecting motor neurons solely. This is associated with a novel concept in motor neuron disease which recruits abnormal mechanisms of cell to cell communication.

  5. Motor and cognitive aspects of motor retardation in depression.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, M P; Ellwanger, J

    2000-01-01

    Motor retardation is a common feature of major depressive disorder having potential prognostic and etiopathological significance. According to DSM-IV, depressed patients who meet criteria for psychomotor retardation, must exhibit motor slowing of sufficient severity to be observed by others. However, overt presentations of motor slowing cannot distinguish slowness due to cognitive factors from slowness due to neuromotor disturbances. We examined cognitive and neuromotor aspects of motor slowing in 36 depressed patients to test the hypothesis that a significant proportion of patients exhibit motor programming disturbances in addition to psychomotor impairment. A novel instrumental technique was used to assess motor programming in terms of the subject's ability to program movement velocity as a function of movement distance. A traditional psychomotor battery was combined with an instrumental measure of reaction time to assess the cognitive aspects of motor retardation. The depressed patients exhibited significant impairment on the velocity scaling measure and longer reaction times compared with nondepressed controls. Approximately 40% of the patients demonstrated abnormal psychomotor function as measured by the traditional battery; whereas over 60% exhibited some form of motor slowing as measured by the instruments. Approximately 40% of the patients exhibited parkinsonian-like motor programming deficits. A five-factor model consisting of motor measures predicted diagnosis among bipolar and unipolar depressed patients with 100% accuracy. The ability of motor measures to discriminate bipolar from unipolar patients must be viewed with caution considering the relatively small sample size of bipolar patients. These findings suggest that a subgroup of depressed patients exhibit motor retardation that is behaviorally similar to parkinsonian bradykinesia and may stem from a similar disruption within the basal ganglia.

  6. The Chromodomains of the Chd1 Chromatin Remodeler Regulate DNA Access to the ATPase Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Hauk, G.; McKnight, J; Nodelman, I; Bowman, G

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin remodelers are ATP-driven machines that assemble, slide, and remove nucleosomes from DNA, but how the ATPase motors of remodelers are regulated is poorly understood. Here we show that the double chromodomain unit of the Chd1 remodeler blocks DNA binding and activation of the ATPase motor in the absence of nucleosome substrates. The Chd1 crystal structure reveals that an acidic helix joining the chromodomains can pack against a DNA-binding surface of the ATPase motor. Disruption of the chromodomain-ATPase interface prevents discrimination between nucleosomes and naked DNA and reduces the reliance on the histone H4 tail for nucleosome sliding. We propose that the chromodomains allow Chd1 to distinguish between nucleosomes and naked DNA by physically gating access to the ATPase motor, and we hypothesize that related ATPase motors may employ a similar strategy to discriminate among DNA-containing substrates.

  7. The role of the motor system in discriminating normal and degraded speech sounds.

    PubMed

    D'Ausilio, Alessandro; Bufalari, Ilaria; Salmas, Paola; Fadiga, Luciano

    2012-07-01

    Listening to speech recruits a network of fronto-temporo-parietal cortical areas. Classical models consider anterior, motor, sites involved in speech production whereas posterior sites involved in comprehension. This functional segregation is more and more challenged by action-perception theories suggesting that brain circuits for speech articulation and speech perception are functionally interdependent. Recent studies report that speech listening elicits motor activities analogous to production. However, the motor system could be crucially recruited only under certain conditions that make speech discrimination hard. Here, by using event-related double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on lips and tongue motor areas, we show data suggesting that the motor system may play a role in noisy, but crucially not in noise-free environments, for the discrimination of speech signals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  8. Continuous growth of the motor system in the axolotl

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, N.; Clarke, J.D.; Stephens, N.; Wilson, S.W.; Orsi, C.; Bloomer, T.; Tonge, D.A. )

    1991-01-22

    During growth of the axolotl, motor neurons, and muscle fibres are added to the motor system. By double labelling neurons with tritiated thymidine and retrogradely transported HRP, we show that some motor neurons are born at postembryonic stages. Further analysis of motor neurons with the aid of HRP reveals this population of newly born cells relatively frequently in small (5-7 cm long) axolotls, but only rarely in large (7-13 cm long) axolotls. Evidence is presented that suggests that these immature cells are in the process of migrating from close to the ependyma out to the ventral horn. HRP transport also reveals growth cones of advancing axons within spinal nerves in animals up to 6 cm in length. Cell counts by light and electron microscopic methods show that muscle fibres are generated throughout larval life in the iliotibialis, a typical limb muscle. This analysis provides data consistent with the notion that new muscle fibres are added from a localised growth zone situated at the superficial edge of the muscle. These results are discussed in terms of the correlation between continuous growth of the motor system and the ability of the axolotl to functionally repair lesions to the peripheral nervous system.

  9. Continuous growth of the motor system in the axolotl.

    PubMed

    Holder, N; Clarke, J D; Stephens, N; Wilson, S W; Orsi, C; Bloomer, T; Tonge, D A

    1991-01-22

    During growth of the axolotl, motor neurons, and muscle fibres are added to the motor system. By double labelling neurons with tritiated thymidine and retrogradely transported HRP, we show that some motor neurons are born at postembryonic stages. Further analysis of motor neurons with the aid of HRP reveals this population of newly born cells relatively frequently in small (5-7 cm long) axolotls, but only rarely in large (7-13 cm long) axolotls. Evidence is presented that suggests that these immature cells are in the process of migrating from close to the ependyma out to the ventral horn. HRP transport also reveals growth cones of advancing axons within spinal nerves in animals up to 6 cm in length. Cell counts by light and electron microscopic methods show that muscle fibres are generated throughout larval life in the iliotibialis, a typical limb muscle. This analysis provides data consistent with the notion that new muscle fibres are added from a localised growth zone situated at the superficial edge of the muscle. These results are discussed in terms of the correlation between continuous growth of the motor system and the ability of the axolotl to functionally repair lesions to the peripheral nervous system.

  10. Revisting the Double Helix

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Taekjip

    2010-12-08

    Properties of DNA double helix have been studied for over 60 years. Yet as more sensitive tools become available, fundamental assumptions in our understanding of these properties are being challenged. One such question is over the flexibility of DNA. Looping or bending of DNA on short length scales is essential for many cellular processes but it is highly controversial exactly how flexible the DNA is. Using a new, single-molecule based method, we found that DNA of lengths as short as 50 base pairs can form a circle more than 108 times faster than theoretical predictions. Another question concerns the physical principles governing the reversible, helix-coil transitions of DNA between the double helix and single strands. Using porous nanocontainers, we found that the rate of double helix formation shows an abrupt 100 fold change depending on whether there are 7 or more contiguous base pairs or not.

  11. Double checking: a second look.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Tanya; Chreim, Samia; Forster, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Double checking is a standard practice in many areas of health care, notwithstanding the lack of evidence supporting its efficacy. We ask in this study: 'How do front line practitioners conceptualize double checking? What are the weaknesses of double checking? What alternate views of double checking could render it a more robust process?' This is part of a larger qualitative study based on 85 semi-structured interviews of health care practitioners in general internal medicine and obstetrics and neonatology; thematic analysis of the transcribed interviews was undertaken. Inductive and deductive themes are reported. Weaknesses in the double checking process include inconsistent conceptualization of double checking, double (or more) checking as a costly and time-consuming procedure, double checking trusted as an accepted and stand-alone process, and double checking as preventing reporting of near misses. Alternate views of double checking that would render it a more robust process include recognizing that double checking requires training and a dedicated environment, Introducing automated double checking, and expanding double checking beyond error detection. These results are linked with the concepts of collective efficiency thoroughness trade off (ETTO), an in-family approach, and resilience. Double checking deserves more questioning, as there are limitations to the process. Practitioners could view double checking through alternate lenses, and thus help strengthen this ubiquitous practice that is rarely challenged. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Double checking: a second look

    PubMed Central

    Chreim, Samia; Forster, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rationale, aims and objectives Double checking is a standard practice in many areas of health care, notwithstanding the lack of evidence supporting its efficacy. We ask in this study: ‘How do front line practitioners conceptualize double checking? What are the weaknesses of double checking? What alternate views of double checking could render it a more robust process?’ Method This is part of a larger qualitative study based on 85 semi‐structured interviews of health care practitioners in general internal medicine and obstetrics and neonatology; thematic analysis of the transcribed interviews was undertaken. Inductive and deductive themes are reported. Results Weaknesses in the double checking process include inconsistent conceptualization of double checking, double (or more) checking as a costly and time‐consuming procedure, double checking trusted as an accepted and stand‐alone process, and double checking as preventing reporting of near misses. Alternate views of double checking that would render it a more robust process include recognizing that double checking requires training and a dedicated environment, Introducing automated double checking, and expanding double checking beyond error detection. These results are linked with the concepts of collective efficiency thoroughness trade off (ETTO), an in‐family approach, and resilience. Conclusion(s) Double checking deserves more questioning, as there are limitations to the process. Practitioners could view double checking through alternate lenses, and thus help strengthen this ubiquitous practice that is rarely challenged. PMID:26568537

  13. Double-helix stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-09-01

    A new stellarator configuration, the Double-Helix Stellarator (DHS), is introduced. This novel configuration features a double-helix center post as the only helical element of the stellarator coil system. The DHS configuration has many unique characteristics. One of them is the extreme low plasma aspect ratio, A {approx} 1--1.2. Other advantages include a high enclosed volume, appreciable rotational transform, and a possibility of extreme-high-{beta} MHD equilibria. Moreover, the DHS features improved transport characteristics caused by the absence of the magnetic field ripple on the outboard of the torus. Compactness, simplicity and modularity of the coil system add to the DHS advantages for fusion applications.

  14. Double arch mirror study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a method of mounting light weight glass mirrors for astronomical telescopes compatible with the goals of the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was investigated. A 20 in. diameter double arch lightweight mirror previously fabricated was modified to use a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed and fabricated. The mounting concept of the double mounting mirror is outlined. The modifications made to the mirror, fabrication of the mirror mount, and room temperature testing of the mirror and mount and the extension of the mirror and mount concept to a full size (40 in. diameter) primary mirror for SIRTF are discussed.

  15. Double Photoionization Near Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehlitz, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The threshold region of the double-photoionization cross section is of particular interest because both ejected electrons move slowly in the Coulomb field of the residual ion. Near threshold both electrons have time to interact with each other and with the residual ion. Also, different theoretical models compete to describe the double-photoionization cross section in the threshold region. We have investigated that cross section for lithium and beryllium and have analyzed our data with respect to the latest results in the Coulomb-dipole theory. We find that our data support the idea of a Coulomb-dipole interaction.

  16. Motor Maps for Nonlinear Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, Paolo; Bucolo, Maide; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia

    2002-07-01

    In this paper the design of a motor map to control a chaotic system is presented. A feedback entrainment scheme is adopted: a system with different parameters is used to generate the reference trajectory for the chaotic system to be controlled, while the motor map provides the appropriate gain value of the feedback signal. As input of the motor map the state of the system to be controlled is considered. The motor map based adaptive controller offers high performances, specially in the case when the reference trajectory is switched into another one. In this case, a specialization of the neurons constituting the motor map is observed: while a group of neurons learns the appropriate control law for a reference trajectory, another group specializes itself to control the system when the other trajectory is used as reference. Moreover, a discrete components hardware implementation of the motor map has been realized.

  17. Dissociation of motor maturation.

    PubMed

    DiMario, Francis J

    2003-06-01

    We prospectively acquired clinical data regarding the presentation, evaluation, and developmental progress of all patients identified with dissociated motor maturation to define their clinical outcomes. Children (N = 8) referred for evaluation of suspected cerebral palsy because of delayed sitting or walking and identified to have dissociated motor maturation were followed with serial clinical examination. All displayed the characteristic "sitting on air" posture while held in vertical suspension and had otherwise normal developmental assessments. This posture is composed of the hips held in flexion and abduction with the knees extended and feet plantar or dorsiflexed. Three children were initially evaluated at 10 months of age owing to absence of sitting and five other children were evaluated at a mean of 14 months (range 12-19 months) owing to inability to stand. Follow-up evaluations were conducted over a mean of 10.5 months (range 5-34 months). Five children were born prematurely at 34 to 36 weeks gestation. Denver Developmental Screening Test and general and neurologic examinations were normal except to note hypotonia in six children and the "sitting on air" posture in all of the children. Four children have older siblings or parents who "walked late" (after 15 months). On average, the children attained sitting by 8 months (range 7-10 months). One child did not crawl prior to independent walking, two children scooted rather than crawled, and five children crawled at an average of 13.5 months (range 10-16 months). All children cruised by a mean of 18 months (range 16-21.5 months) and attained independent walking by 20.1 months (range 18-25 months). Neuroimaging and serum creatine kinase enzyme testing were normal in two children who were tested. These eight children conform to the syndrome of dissociated motor maturation. The "sitting on air" posture serves as a diagnostic sign and anticipated excellent prognosis, but follow-up is required to ensure a normal

  18. Transcranial static magnetic field stimulation of the human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, Antonio; Mordillo-Mateos, Laura; Arias, Pablo; Panyavin, Ivan; Foffani, Guglielmo; Aguilar, Juan

    2011-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate in healthy humans the possibility of a non-invasive modulation of motor cortex excitability by the application of static magnetic fields through the scalp. Static magnetic fields were obtained by using cylindrical NdFeB magnets. We performed four sets of experiments. In Experiment 1, we recorded motor potentials evoked by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex before and after 10 min of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) in conscious subjects. We observed an average reduction of motor cortex excitability of up to 25%, as revealed by TMS, which lasted for several minutes after the end of tSMS, and was dose dependent (intensity of the magnetic field) but not polarity dependent. In Experiment 2, we confirmed the reduction of motor cortex excitability induced by tSMS using a double-blind sham-controlled design. In Experiment 3, we investigated the duration of tSMS that was necessary to modulate motor cortex excitability. We found that 10 min of tSMS (compared to 1 min and 5 min) were necessary to induce significant effects. In Experiment 4, we used transcranial electric stimulation (TES) to establish that the tSMS-induced reduction of motor cortex excitability was not due to corticospinal axon and/or spinal excitability, but specifically involved intracortical networks. These results suggest that tSMS using small static magnets may be a promising tool to modulate cerebral excitability in a non-invasive, painless, and reversible way.

  19. Sport expert's motor imagery: functional imaging of professional motor skills and simple motor skills.

    PubMed

    Wei, Gaoxia; Luo, Jing

    2010-06-23

    Numerous studies provide evidence that motor skill acquisition is associated with dynamic changes in cortical and subcortical regions. Athletes are a professional population who are engaged in extensive motor training for long periods. However, the neural substrates of extreme level motor performance have not been clarified. We used kinesthetic imagery task to induce the mental representation of sport expert's extraordinary performance in view of the shared substrates of executing movement and motor imagery. For the first time, we compared, through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the pattern of cerebral activations in 12 professional divers and 12 normal people without extensive training, during imagery of professional skills and imagery of simple motor skills. The sport experts showed significant activation in the parahippocampus during imagery of professional skills relative to the novices, which might reflect the representation adapted to experience-related motor tasks. No significant difference was found between experts and novices when they imagined simple motor skills. These results indicated the experts might utilize their kinesthetic imagery more efficiently than novices, but only for the activity in which they had expertise. The sport experts also demonstrated more focused activation patterns in prefrontal areas in both of imagery tasks, which may be relevant to higher order of motor control during motor imagery. Moreover, this study suggested that the brains of sport experts could be regarded as the ideal subjects to explore the relationship between cerebral plasticity and learning of complex motor skills.

  20. Multimotor Driven Cargos: From Single Motor under Load to the Role of Motor-Motor Coupling.

    PubMed

    Peker, Itay; Granek, Rony

    2016-07-07

    Motor proteins constitute an essential part of the cellular machinery. They have been the subject of intensive studies in the past two decades. Yet, when several motors simultaneously carry a single cargo, the effect of motor-motor coupling, such as mutual stalling and jamming, remains unclear. We commence by constructing a general model for single motor motion, which is a product of a derived load-dependent expression and a phenomenological motor specific function. Forming the latter according to recent single molecule measurements for a given load, the model correctly predicts the motor full step-size distribution for all other measured loads. We then use our proposed model to predict transport properties of multimotor complexes, with particular attention to 1-dimensional constructs with variable flexibility, motor density, and number of motors: (i) a chain of motors connected by springs, a recently studied construction of a pair, and (ii) an array of motors all connected by identical springs to a stiff rod, which is essentially a mirror image of standard gliding motility assays. In both systems, and for any number of carrying motors, we find that, while low flexibility results in a strongly damped velocity, increased flexibility renders an almost single motor velocity. Comparing our model based simulations to recent gliding assays we find remarkable qualitative agreement. We also demonstrate consistency with other multimotor motility assays. In all cases, the characteristic spring constant, that controls the crossover behavior between high and low velocity regimes, is found to be the stalling force divided by the mean step size. We conjecture that this characteristic spring constant can serve as a tool for engineering multimotor complexes.

  1. Motor timing under microgravity.

    PubMed

    Semjen, A; Leone, G; Lipshits, M

    1998-01-01

    Five participants were tested on their ability to produce accurate and regular inter-response intervals in the 350 to 530 ms time range. Three of them were members of the French-Russian CASSIOPEE 96 spaceflight mission, and the other two were control subjects tested on the ground. During spaceflight, the target inter-response intervals were increasingly undershot and the timing became more variable (less regular). The increase in the timing variability was mostly attributable to the internal timekeeping processes rather than those involved in motor execution. The results are discussed with reference to the physiological mechanisms possibly underlying the timing of fast serial movements.

  2. Electric motor analysis at Dofasco

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.; Morgan, V.A.; Nicholas, J.R. Jr.

    1997-03-01

    Initiatives adopted by Dofasco to enhance electric motor reliability and availability include: Enhancement of the electrical repair shop testing and repair capabilities; More stringent standards for motor repair service vendors; Application of predictive technologies to motors in service within manufacturing units; Training of personnel in electrical predictive condition monitoring and analysis methods; and Periodic audit and comparison of central support and operating unit predictive technology application and integration. The basis for the initiative is discussed together with illustrative case histories.

  3. Torque-Summing Brushless Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidya, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Torque channels function cooperatively but electrically independent for reliability. Brushless, electronically-commutated dc motor sums electromagnetic torques on four channels and applies them to single shaft. Motor operates with any combination of channels and continues if one or more of channels fail electrically. Motor employs single stator and rotor and mechanically simple; however, each of channels electrically isolated from other so that failure of one does not adversely affect others.

  4. Double Marking Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Val

    2004-01-01

    In 2002, the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) published the report of an independent panel of experts into maintaining standards at Advanced Level (A-Level). One of its recommendations was for: limited experimental double marking of scripts in subjects such as English to determine whether the strategy would significantly reduce errors…

  5. Double Helix Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glickstein, Neil M.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of James Watson's book, "The Double Helix," as a multidisciplinary way of introducing students to actual science; the scientific method; dilemmas encountered in the world of research; and the rich setting of personalities, politics, and history in post-World War II Europe. (MKR)

  6. Weathering the Double Whammy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellman, Jane V.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how governing boards can help their institutions weather the "double-whammy" of doing more with less: identify the institution's short-term and long-term challenges; refocus the institution's mission, planning, and programming; assess and integrate the institution's tuition, aid, and outreach strategies; redouble the…

  7. Weathering the Double Whammy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellman, Jane V.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how governing boards can help their institutions weather the "double-whammy" of doing more with less: identify the institution's short-term and long-term challenges; refocus the institution's mission, planning, and programming; assess and integrate the institution's tuition, aid, and outreach strategies; redouble the…

  8. Double Helix Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glickstein, Neil M.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of James Watson's book, "The Double Helix," as a multidisciplinary way of introducing students to actual science; the scientific method; dilemmas encountered in the world of research; and the rich setting of personalities, politics, and history in post-World War II Europe. (MKR)

  9. Teaching the Double Layer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockris, J. O'M.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various methods for teaching the double layer in electrochemistry courses. Topics addressed include measuring change in absolute potential difference (PD) at interphase, conventional electrode potential scale, analyzing absolute PD, metal-metal and overlap electron PDs, accumulation of material at interphase, thermodynamics of electrified…

  10. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.

    1982-09-23

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  11. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1984-01-01

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  12. Design for Double Rainbow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2011-01-01

    Rare is the inspirational, spontaneous, transformative moment shared among 20 million people. In the summer of 2010, people around the world were moved by the sighting of a double rainbow--almost a triple rainbow--"all the way across the sky" in Yosemite National Park. Caught on video and posted to by YouTube by Paul Vasquez in January 2010, the…

  13. Double-Glazing Interferometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toal, Vincent; Mihaylova, Emilia M.

    2009-01-01

    This note describes how white light interference fringes can be seen by observing the Moon through a double-glazed window. White light interferometric fringes are normally observed only in a well-aligned interferometer whose optical path difference is less than the coherence length of the light source, which is approximately one micrometer for…

  14. Rosette (Double Blossom)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rosette, or double blossom, is a serious disease of erect blackberries that is limited to the genus Rubus. Rosette may occur on trailing blackberries and dewberries, but rarely on red and black raspberries. In the United States, rosette occurs from New Jersey to Illinois and southwest to Texas and i...

  15. Sun Packs Double Punch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    On August 3, the sun packed a double punch, emitting a M6.0-class flare at 9:43 am EDT. This video is of the second, slightly stronger M9.3-class flare at 11:41 pm EDT. Both flares had significant ...

  16. Design for Double Rainbow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2011-01-01

    Rare is the inspirational, spontaneous, transformative moment shared among 20 million people. In the summer of 2010, people around the world were moved by the sighting of a double rainbow--almost a triple rainbow--"all the way across the sky" in Yosemite National Park. Caught on video and posted to by YouTube by Paul Vasquez in January 2010, the…

  17. Double-Glazing Interferometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toal, Vincent; Mihaylova, Emilia M.

    2009-01-01

    This note describes how white light interference fringes can be seen by observing the Moon through a double-glazed window. White light interferometric fringes are normally observed only in a well-aligned interferometer whose optical path difference is less than the coherence length of the light source, which is approximately one micrometer for…

  18. Continuous Allosteric Regulation of a Viral Packaging Motor by a Sensor that Detects the Density and Conformation of Packaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Berndsen, Zachary T.; Keller, Nicholas; Smith, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    We report evidence for an unconventional type of allosteric regulation of a biomotor. We show that the genome-packaging motor of phage ϕ29 is regulated by a sensor that detects the density and conformation of the DNA packaged inside the viral capsid, and slows the motor by a mechanism distinct from the effect of a direct load force on the motor. Specifically, we show that motor-ATP interactions are regulated by a signal that is propagated allosterically from inside the viral shell to the motor mounted on the outside. This signal continuously regulates the motor speed and pausing in response to changes in either density or conformation of the packaged DNA, and slows the motor before the buildup of large forces resisting DNA confinement. Analysis of motor slipping reveals that the force resisting packaging remains low (<1 pN) until ∼70% and then rises sharply to ∼23 pN at high filling, which is a several-fold lower value than was previously estimated under the assumption that force alone slows the motor. These findings are consistent with recent studies of the stepping kinetics of the motor. The allosteric regulatory mechanism we report allows double-stranded DNA viruses to achieve rapid, high-density packing of their genomes by limiting the buildup of nonequilibrium load forces on the motor. PMID:25606680

  19. Motor-operated valve (MOV) actuator motor and gearbox testing

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.; Watkins, J.C.; Bramwell, D.

    1997-07-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory tested the performance of electric motors and actuator gearboxes typical of the equipment installed on motor-operated valves used in nuclear power plants. Using a test stand that simulates valve closure loads against flow and pressure, the authors tested five electric motors (four ac and one dc) and three gearboxes at conditions a motor might experience in a power plant, including such off-normal conditions as operation at high temperature and reduced voltage. They also monitored the efficiency of the actuator gearbox. All five motors operated at or above their rated starting torque during tests at normal voltages and temperatures. For all five motors, actual torque losses due to voltage degradation were greater than the losses calculated by methods typically used for predicting motor torque at degraded voltage conditions. For the dc motor the actual torque losses due to elevated operating temperatures were greater than the losses calculated by the typical predictive method. The actual efficiencies of the actuator gearboxes were generally lower than the running efficiencies published by the manufacturer and were generally nearer the published pull-out efficiencies. Operation of the gearbox at elevated temperature did not affect the operating efficiency.

  20. Motor power control circuit for ac induction motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A motor power control of the type which functions by controlling the power factor wherein one of the parameters of power factor current on time is determined by the on time of a triac through which current is supplied to the motor. By means of a positive feedback circuit, a wider range of control is effected.

  1. 27. View, looking north, of motor house; the electric motor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. View, looking north, of motor house; the electric motor and electric-powered winch are housed in section of building to the left. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  2. Motor vehicle drivers' injuries in train-motor vehicle crashes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shanshan; Khattak, Aemal

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to: (1) identify a more suitable model for modeling injury severity of motor vehicle drivers involved in train-motor vehicle crashes at highway-rail grade crossings from among three commonly used injury severity models and (2) to investigate factors associated with injury severity levels of motor vehicle drivers involved in train-motor vehicle crashes at such crossings. The 2009-2013 highway-rail grade crossing crash data and the national highway-rail crossing inventory data were combined to produce the analysis dataset. Four-year (2009-2012) data were used for model estimation while 2013 data were used for model validation. The three injury severity levels-fatal, injury and no injury-were based on the reported intensity of motor-vehicle drivers' injuries at highway-rail grade crossings. The three injury severity models evaluated were: ordered probit, multinomial logit and random parameter logit. A comparison of the three models based on different criteria showed that the random parameter logit model and multinomial logit model were more suitable for injury severity analysis of motor vehicle drivers involved in crashes at highway-rail grade crossings. Some of the factors that increased the likelihood of more severe crashes included higher train and vehicle speeds, freight trains, older drivers, and female drivers. Where feasible, reducing train and motor vehicle speeds and nighttime lighting may help reduce injury severities of motor vehicle drivers.

  3. 76 FR 12792 - Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor Theft Prevention Standard; General...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor Theft Prevention Standard; General Motors Corporation AGENCY: National Highway Traffic.... SUMMARY: This document grants in full the petition of General Motors Corporation's (GM) petition for...

  4. Long stroke, double acting pump having tension guide member

    SciTech Connect

    Walling, J. B.

    1985-09-17

    A downhole, electro-hydraulic pump assembly, having a hydraulic power piston connected to a double-acting production piston is disclosed. Hydraulic power for operating the power piston is developed downhole by a mechanical pump which is driven by an electrical motor carried within the pump housing. The electrical motor is energized by high-cycle electrical power conducted from a surface facility for increased pumping capability in very deep wells. Long stroke capability is provided by an annular piston and a tubular connecting ram which ride on a tensioned guide tube. The effective production piston area is maximized for efficient production in both up-stroke and down-stroke by conducting the flow of formation fluid produced in the down-stroke through the bore of the tensioned guide tube. The electric drive motor and hydraulic drive pump are operated safely at high power levels because of the improved heat dissipation arrangement in which the electrical motor and pump are cooled by circulation of the power fluid within the pump housing, with the power fluid being continuously circulated to the surface through a filter and heat exchanger. In a preferred embodiment, the downhole electrical drive motor is energized from the surface by a cyclo-converter having a continuously variable frequency output, whereby the stroke speed is also continuously variable over a wide range to accomodate changes in the producing formation.

  5. To What Extent Can Motor Imagery Replace Motor Execution While Learning a Fine Motor Skill?

    PubMed Central

    Sobierajewicz, Jagna; Szarkiewicz, Sylwia; Przekoracka-Krawczyk, Anna; Jaśkowski, Wojciech; van der Lubbe, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Motor imagery is generally thought to share common mechanisms with motor execution. In the present study, we examined to what extent learning a fine motor skill by motor imagery may substitute physical practice. Learning effects were assessed by manipulating the proportion of motor execution and motor imagery trials. Additionally, learning effects were compared between participants with an explicit motor imagery instruction and a control group. A Go/NoGo discrete sequence production (DSP) task was employed, wherein a five-stimulus sequence presented on each trial indicated the required sequence of finger movements after a Go signal. In the case of a NoGo signal, participants either had to imagine carrying out the response sequence (the motor imagery group), or the response sequence had to be withheld (the control group). Two practice days were followed by a final test day on which all sequences had to be executed. Learning effects were assessed by computing response times (RTs) and the percentages of correct responses (PCs). The electroencephalogram (EEG ) was additionally measured on this test day to examine whether motor preparation and the involvement of visual short term memory (VST M) depended on the amount of physical/mental practice. Accuracy data indicated strong learning effects. However, a substantial amount of physical practice was required to reach an optimal speed. EEG results suggest the involvement of VST M for sequences that had less or no physical practice in both groups. The absence of differences between the motor imagery and the control group underlines the possibility that motor preparation may actually resemble motor imagery. PMID:28154614

  6. To What Extent Can Motor Imagery Replace Motor Execution While Learning a Fine Motor Skill?

    PubMed

    Sobierajewicz, Jagna; Szarkiewicz, Sylwia; Przekoracka-Krawczyk, Anna; Jaśkowski, Wojciech; van der Lubbe, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Motor imagery is generally thought to share common mechanisms with motor execution. In the present study, we examined to what extent learning a fine motor skill by motor imagery may substitute physical practice. Learning effects were assessed by manipulating the proportion of motor execution and motor imagery trials. Additionally, learning effects were compared between participants with an explicit motor imagery instruction and a control group. A Go/NoGo discrete sequence production (DSP) task was employed, wherein a five-stimulus sequence presented on each trial indicated the required sequence of finger movements after a Go signal. In the case of a NoGo signal, participants either had to imagine carrying out the response sequence (the motor imagery group), or the response sequence had to be withheld (the control group). Two practice days were followed by a final test day on which all sequences had to be executed. Learning effects were assessed by computing response times (RTs) and the percentages of correct responses (PCs). The electroencephalogram (EEG ) was additionally measured on this test day to examine whether motor preparation and the involvement of visual short term memory (VST M) depended on the amount of physical/mental practice. Accuracy data indicated strong learning effects. However, a substantial amount of physical practice was required to reach an optimal speed. EEG results suggest the involvement of VST M for sequences that had less or no physical practice in both groups. The absence of differences between the motor imagery and the control group underlines the possibility that motor preparation may actually resemble motor imagery.

  7. Motor field sensitivity for preoperative localization of motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter T.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2014-01-01

    Object In this study the role of magnetic source imaging for preoperative motor mapping was evaluated by using a single-dipole localization method to analyze motor field data in 41 patients. Methods Data from affected and unaffected hemispheres were collected in patients performing voluntary finger flexion movements. Somatosensory evoked field (SSEF) data were also obtained using tactile stimulation. Dipole localization using motor field (MF) data was successful in only 49% of patients, whereas localization with movement evoked field (MEF) data was successful in 66% of patients. When the spatial distribution of MF and MEF dipoles in relation to SSEF dipoles was analyzed, the motor dipoles were not spatially distinct from somatosensory dipoles. Conclusions The findings in this study suggest that single-dipole localization for the analysis of motor data is not sufficiently sensitive and is nonspecific, and thus not clinically useful. PMID:17044563

  8. Memory, double, shadow, and evil.

    PubMed

    McNamara, P

    1994-04-01

    In order to examine shadow dynamics the author explores the phenomenology and mythological associations of the 'double' or Doppelgänger. Current Jungian-inspired theories concerning relations of shadow and double are found to be limited because they do not explain (1) the process of personification of the psychic complex which gives rise to the double, (2) the immediate conditions under which doubling occurs, (3) the conditions which lead to the assignment of evil qualities to the double as shadow. The paper seeks to remedy each of the above limitations by redescribing shadow/double phenomena in terms of autonomous memory phenomena, both personal and trans-personal.

  9. Aberrant supplementary motor complex and limbic activity during motor preparation in motor conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Brezing, Christina; Gallea, Cecile; Hallett, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Conversion disorder (CD) is characterized by unexplained neurological symptoms presumed related to psychological issues. The main hypotheses to explain conversion paralysis, characterized by a lack of movement, include impairments in either motor intention or disruption of motor execution, and further, that hyperactive self-monitoring, limbic processing or top-down regulation from higher order frontal regions may interfere with motor execution. We have recently shown that CD with positive abnormal or excessive motor symptoms was associated with greater amygdala activity to arousing stimuli along with greater functional connectivity between the amygdala and supplementary motor area. Here we studied patients with such symptoms focusing on motor initiation. Subjects performed either an internally or externally generated 2-button action selection task in a functional MRI study. Eleven CD patients without major depression and 11 age- and gender-matched normal volunteers were assessed. During both internally and externally generated movement, conversion disorder patients relative to normal volunteers had lower left supplementary motor area (SMA) (implicated in motor initiation) and higher right amygdala, left anterior insula, and bilateral posterior cingulate activity (implicated in assigning emotional salience). These findings were confirmed in a subgroup analysis of patients with tremor symptoms. During internally versus externally generated action in CD patients, the left SMA had lower functional connectivity with bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortices. We propose a theory in which previously mapped conversion motor representations may in an arousing context hijack the voluntary action selection system, which is both hypoactive and functionally disconnected from prefrontal top-down regulation.

  10. Development of a Double Crystal Monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Kupp, Tom; Blank, Basil; Deyhim, Alex; Benson, Curtis; Robinson, Ian; Fuoss, Paul

    2004-05-12

    A high-precision water-cooled, small offset, double crystal monochromator has been developed for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) UNICAT Sector 34 beamline. The design incorporates the supports and gravity feed water cooling of two diamond or silicon crystals correctly positioned about a common rotation axis so that the incident and diffracted beam do not walk off the edges of the crystals within the energy range 6-15KeV (30 deg. motorized tilt motion around an axis parallel to its face and around the beam direction. In this paper preliminary measurement data obtained from Advanced Photon Source and the detail of the instrument design are presented.

  11. Development of a Double Crystal Monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Kupp, T.; Blank, B.; Deyhim, A.; Fuoss, P.H.; Benson, C.A.; Robinson, I.K.

    2010-11-16

    A high-precision water-cooled, small offset, double crystal monochromator has been developed for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) UNICAT Sector 34 beamline. The design incorporates the supports and gravity feed water cooling of two diamond or silicon crystals correctly positioned about a common rotation axis so that the incident and diffracted beam do not walk off the edges of the crystals within the energy range 6-15KeV (30{sup o} < q < 11.6{sup o}). In the 34ID implementation, the first crystal sees unfocussed pink beam from an undulator. The second crystal has a {+-}5{sup o} motorized tilt motion around an axis parallel to its face and around the beam direction. In this paper preliminary measurement data obtained from Advanced Photon Source and the detail of the instrument design are presented.

  12. Circuit changes in motor cortex during motor skill learning.

    PubMed

    Papale, Andrew E; Hooks, Bryan M

    2017-09-14

    Motor cortex is important for motor skill learning, particularly the dexterous skills necessary for our favorite sports and careers. We are especially interested in understanding how plasticity in motor cortex contributes to skill learning. Although human studies have been helpful in understanding the importance of motor cortex in learning skilled tasks, animal models are necessary for achieving a detailed understanding of the circuitry underlying these behaviors and the changes that occur during training. We review data from these models to try to identify sites of plasticity in motor cortex, focusing on rodents asa model system. Rodent neocortex contains well-differentiated motor and sensory regions, as well as neurons expressing similar genetic markers to many of the same circuit components in human cortex. Furthermore, rodents have circuit mapping tools for labeling, targeting, and manipulating these cell types as circuit nodes. Crucially, the projection from rodent primary somatosensory cortex to primary motor cortex is a well-studied corticocortical projection and a model of sensorimotor integration. We first summarize some of the descending pathways involved in making dexterous movements, including reaching. We then describe local and long-range circuitry in mouse motor cortex, summarizing structural and functional changes associated with motor skill acquisition. We then address which specific connections might be responsible for plasticity. For insight into the range of plasticity mechanisms employed by cortex, we review plasticity in sensory systems. The similarities and differences between motor cortex plasticity and critical periods of plasticity in sensory systems are discussed. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pain in motor neuron disease.

    PubMed Central

    Newrick, P G; Langton-Hewer, R

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-seven of 42 patients with motor neuron disease had significant pain. The nature and duration of the pain are described along with an illustrative case-report. The aetiology and most effective treatment of this common complication of motor neuron disease remain unclear. PMID:4031936

  14. High efficiency motor rewind study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. K.; Spee, R.

    1991-02-01

    The objective of performing this work was to evaluate a new technology used for rewinding electric motors. Motor performance evaluation was conducted at the motor test facility at Oregon State University. The test program consisted of comparing new high efficiency motor technology and standard rewind technology with the Unity-Plus system. The Unity-Plus configuration exhibited reduced efficiency over the complete load range compared to the other motors. Appropriately sized capacitors connected to the terminals of the conventional induction motor produced the same power factor improvement as the Unity-Plus system. Torque production and torque pulsation were very similar for all systems. The Unity-Plus configuration drew lower starting currents but the duration of the starting transient was increased. Motor temperature rise was about the same for all systems. Noise levels were about the same in all systems. Although determination of time to failure was not undertaken, the expected lifetime of the Unit-Plus system is probably less due to higher capacitor stress and higher insulation stress. The investigation concludes that a conventional induction motor with terminal capacitors is the most acceptable way of obtaining good efficiency and power factor and the Unity-Plus system cannot be recommended on the basis of any of the evaluation criteria used in this study.

  15. Conical Bearingless Motor/Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, P.; Jansen, R.; Dever, T.

    2008-01-01

    Motor/generators based on conical magnetic bearings have been invented as an improved alternative to prior such machines based, variously, on radial and/or axial magnetic bearings. Both the present and prior machines are members of the class of so-called bearingless or self bearing (in the sense of not containing mechanical bearings) rotary machines. Each motor/generator provides both a torque and force allowing it to either function as a motor and magnetic bearing or a generator and magnetic bearing concurrently. Because they are not subject to mechanical bearing wear, these machines have potentially long operational lives and can function without lubrication and over wide ranges of speed and temperature that include conditions under which lubricants would become depleted, degraded, or ineffective and mechanical bearings would fail. The figure shows three typical configurations of conical bearingless motor/generators. The main elements of each motor/generator are concentric rotor and stator portions having conically tapered surfaces facing each other across a gap. Because a conical motor/generator imposes both radial and axial magnetic forces, it acts, in effect, as a combination of an axial and a radial magnetic bearing. Therefore, only two conical motor/generators - one at each end of a rotor - are needed to effect complete magnetic leviation of the rotor, whereas previously, it was necessary to use a combination of an axial and a radial magnetic bearing at each end of the rotor to achieve complete magnetic levitation and a separate motor to provide torque.

  16. Motor Coordination and Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Since Piaget, the view that motor and cognitive development are interrelated has gained wide acceptance. However, empirical research on this issue is still rare. Few studies show a correlation of performance in cognitive and motor tasks in typically developing children. More specifically, Diamond A. (2000) hypothesizes an involvement of executive…

  17. Motor Coordination and Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Since Piaget, the view that motor and cognitive development are interrelated has gained wide acceptance. However, empirical research on this issue is still rare. Few studies show a correlation of performance in cognitive and motor tasks in typically developing children. More specifically, Diamond A. (2000) hypothesizes an involvement of executive…

  18. Perceptual Aspects of Motor Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallahue, David L.

    Perceptual-motor functioning is a cyclic process involving: (1) organizing incoming sensory stimuli with past or stored perceptual information; (2) making motor (internal) decisions based on the combination of sensory (present) and perceptual (past) information; (3) executing the actual movement (observable act) itself; and (4) evaluating the act…

  19. Retention of Motor Skills: Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schendel, J. D.; And Others

    A summary of an extensive literature survey deals with the variables known or suspected to affect the retention of learned motor behaviors over lengthy no-practice intervals. Emphasis was given to research conducted by or for the military. The variables that may affect the retention of motor skills were dichotomized into task variables and…

  20. Open-Ended Electric Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Mauri

    1975-01-01

    Presents complete instructions for assembling an electric motor which does not require large amounts of power to operate and which is inexpensive as well as reliable. Several open-ended experiments with the motor are included as well as information for obtaining a kit of parts and instructions. (BR)

  1. Advanced solid propellant motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.; Russ, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced lightweight insulation system suitable for use in long duration, low pressure planetary orbiter-type motor applications was developed. Experiments included the screening of various filler and binder materials with optimization studies combining the best of each. Small scale test motor data were used to judge the degree of success.

  2. Individualized Motor-Perceptual Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Public Schools, OR.

    This guide is being used in the Individualized Motor-Perceptual Study to determine whether working directly with kindergarten children to improve performance on motor-perceptual tasks will affect reading ability at the end of grades one, two, and three. The 5-year project involves six schools. In this guide, there are tips for teaching, suggested…

  3. Computational approaches to motor control.

    PubMed

    Flash, T; Sejnowski, T J

    2001-12-01

    New concepts and computational models that integrate behavioral and neurophysiological observations have addressed several of the most fundamental long-standing problems in motor control. These problems include the selection of particular trajectories among the large number of possibilities, the solution of inverse kinematics and dynamics problems, motor adaptation and the learning of sequential behaviors.

  4. Power control for ac motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, R. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A motor controller employing a triac through which power is supplied to a motor is described. The open circuit voltage appearing across the triac controls the operation of a timing circuit. This timing circuit triggers on the triac at a time following turn off which varies inversely as a function of the amplitude of the open circuit voltage of the triac.

  5. Motor Development: Core Curricular Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrich, Beverly

    2007-01-01

    Motor developmentalists study the processes that underlie change in behavior. There are at least two fundamental ways in which theory and data emanating from motor development are critical components of what undergraduate kinesiology majors should know. First is an emphasis on the lifespan. We are very different organisms as we progress through…

  6. Motors and Bulbs in Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    One of Paul Hewitt's "Figuring Physics" that appeared in this journal dealt with the heating of a motor. This phenomenon can be demonstrated with a miniature motor and a bulb as part of a series of activities with "batteries and bulbs." Students examine the effect on the brightness of a single bulb when a second, identical bulb is placed in series…

  7. Genetic heterogeneity of motor neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Bansagi, Boglarka; Griffin, Helen; Whittaker, Roger G.; Antoniadi, Thalia; Evangelista, Teresinha; Miller, James; Greenslade, Mark; Forester, Natalie; Duff, Jennifer; Bradshaw, Anna; Kleinle, Stephanie; Boczonadi, Veronika; Steele, Hannah; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Franko, Edit; Pyle, Angela; Lochmüller, Hanns; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the prevalence, molecular cause, and clinical presentation of hereditary motor neuropathies in a large cohort of patients from the North of England. Methods: Detailed neurologic and electrophysiologic assessments and next-generation panel testing or whole exome sequencing were performed in 105 patients with clinical symptoms of distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN, 64 patients), axonal motor neuropathy (motor Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease [CMT2], 16 patients), or complex neurologic disease predominantly affecting the motor nerves (hereditary motor neuropathy plus, 25 patients). Results: The prevalence of dHMN is 2.14 affected individuals per 100,000 inhabitants (95% confidence interval 1.62–2.66) in the North of England. Causative mutations were identified in 26 out of 73 index patients (35.6%). The diagnostic rate in the dHMN subgroup was 32.5%, which is higher than previously reported (20%). We detected a significant defect of neuromuscular transmission in 7 cases and identified potentially causative mutations in 4 patients with multifocal demyelinating motor neuropathy. Conclusions: Many of the genes were shared between dHMN and motor CMT2, indicating identical disease mechanisms; therefore, we suggest changing the classification and including dHMN also as a subcategory of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Abnormal neuromuscular transmission in some genetic forms provides a treatable target to develop therapies. PMID:28251916

  8. Torque control for electric motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Method for adjusting electric-motor torque output to accomodate various loads utilizes phase-lock loop to control relay connected to starting circuit. As load is imposed, motor slows down, and phase lock is lost. Phase-lock signal triggers relay to power starting coil and generate additional torque. Once phase lock is recoverd, relay restores starting circuit to its normal operating mode.

  9. Open-Ended Electric Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Mauri

    1975-01-01

    Presents complete instructions for assembling an electric motor which does not require large amounts of power to operate and which is inexpensive as well as reliable. Several open-ended experiments with the motor are included as well as information for obtaining a kit of parts and instructions. (BR)

  10. Motors and Bulbs in Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    One of Paul Hewitt's "Figuring Physics" that appeared in this journal dealt with the heating of a motor. This phenomenon can be demonstrated with a miniature motor and a bulb as part of a series of activities with "batteries and bulbs." Students examine the effect on the brightness of a single bulb when a second, identical bulb is placed in series…

  11. Computational approaches to motor control

    PubMed Central

    Flash, Tamar; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2010-01-01

    New concepts and computational models that integrate behavioral and neurophysiological observations have addressed several of the most fundamental long-standing problems in motor control. These problems include the selection of particular trajectories among the large number of possibilities, the solution of inverse kinematics and dynamics problems, motor adaptation and the learning of sequential behaviors. PMID:11741014

  12. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers. 111.70-3... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motor Circuits, Controllers, and Protection § 111.70-3 Motor controllers and motor-control centers. (a) General. The enclosure for each motor controller or...

  13. Double Degrees: Double the Trouble or Twice the Return?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, A. Wendy; Dolnicar, Sara; Ayoub, Marina

    2008-01-01

    Double degrees (also called joint or combined degrees)--programs of study combining two bachelor degrees--are increasingly popular in Australian universities, particularly among women. A case study using qualitative and quantitative surveys of current and past double degree students is presented. The study indicates that double degrees benefit…

  14. Double Degrees: Double the Trouble or Twice the Return?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, A. Wendy; Dolnicar, Sara; Ayoub, Marina

    2008-01-01

    Double degrees (also called joint or combined degrees)--programs of study combining two bachelor degrees--are increasingly popular in Australian universities, particularly among women. A case study using qualitative and quantitative surveys of current and past double degree students is presented. The study indicates that double degrees benefit…

  15. Unique characteristics of motor adaptation during walking in young children

    PubMed Central

    Musselman, Kristin E.; Patrick, Susan K.; Vasudevan, Erin V. L.; Bastian, Amy J.

    2011-01-01

    Children show precocious ability in the learning of languages; is this the case with motor learning? We used split-belt walking to probe motor adaptation (a form of motor learning) in children. Data from 27 children (ages 8–36 mo) were compared with those from 10 adults. Children walked with the treadmill belts at the same speed (tied belt), followed by walking with the belts moving at different speeds (split belt) for 8–10 min, followed again by tied-belt walking (postsplit). Initial asymmetries in temporal coordination (i.e., double support time) induced by split-belt walking were slowly reduced, with most children showing an aftereffect (i.e., asymmetry in the opposite direction to the initial) in the early postsplit period, indicative of learning. In contrast, asymmetries in spatial coordination (i.e., center of oscillation) persisted during split-belt walking and no aftereffect was seen. Step length, a measure of both spatial and temporal coordination, showed intermediate effects. The time course of learning in double support and step length was slower in children than in adults. Moreover, there was a significant negative correlation between the size of the initial asymmetry during early split-belt walking (called error) and the aftereffect for step length. Hence, children may have more difficulty learning when the errors are large. The findings further suggest that the mechanisms controlling temporal and spatial adaptation are different and mature at different times. PMID:21368001

  16. Intelligent motion control for linear piezoelectric ceramic motor drive.

    PubMed

    Wai, Rong-Jong; Lee, Jeng-Dao

    2004-10-01

    Since the dynamic characteristics of a linear piezoelectric ceramic motor (LPCM) are highly nonlinear and time varying, it is difficult to design a suitable motor drive and position controller that realizes accurate position control at all time. This study investigates a double-inductance double-capacitance (LLCC) resonant driving circuit and a sliding-mode fuzzy-neural-network control (SMFNNC) system for the motion control of an LPCM. First, the motor structure and LLCC driving circuit of an LPCM are introduced. The LLCC resonant inverter is designed to operate at an optimal switching frequency such that the output voltage will not be influenced by the variation of quality factor. Moreover, a SMFNNC system is designed to achieve favorable tracking performance without precise dynamic models being controlled. All adaptive learning algorithms in the SMFNNC system are derived in the sense of Lyapunov stability analysis, so that system-tracking stability can be guaranteed in the closed-loop system. The effectiveness of the proposed driving circuit and control system is verified by experimental results.

  17. Motor-operator gearbox efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-06-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory recently conducted tests investigating the operating efficiency of the power train (gearbox) in motor-operators typically used in nuclear power plants to power motor-operated valves. Actual efficiency ratios were determined from in-line measurements of electric motor torque (input to the operator gearbox) and valve stem torque (output from the gearbox) while the operators were subjected to gradually increasing loads until the electric motor stalled. The testing included parametric studies under reduced voltage and elevated temperature conditions. As part of the analysis of the results, we compared efficiency values determined from testing to the values published by the operator manufacturer and typically used by the industry in calculations for estimating motor-operator capabilities. The operators we tested under load ran at efficiencies lower than the running efficiency (typically 50%) published by the operator manufacturer.

  18. Motor-operated gearbox efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; Bramwell, D.; Weidenhamer, G.H.

    1996-12-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory recently conducted tests investigating the operating efficiency of the power train (gearbox) in motor-operators typically used in nuclear power plants to power motor-operated valves. Actual efficiency ratios were determined from in-line measurements of electric motor torque (input to the operator gearbox) and valve stem torque (output from the gearbox) while the operators were subjected to gradually increasing loads until the electric motor stalled. The testing included parametric studies under reduced voltage and elevated temperature conditions. As part of the analysis of the results, the authors compared efficiency values determined from testing to the values published by the operator manufacturer and typically used by the industry in calculations for estimating motor-operator capabilities. The operators they tested under load ran at efficiencies lower than the running efficiency (typically 50%) published by the operator manufacturer.

  19. Molecular Motors: A Theorist's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Fisher, Michael E.

    Individual molecular motors, or motor proteins, are enzymatic molecules that convert chemical energy, typically obtained from the hydrolysis of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), into mechanical work and motion. Processive motor proteins, such as kinesin, dynein, and certain myosins, step unidirectionally along linear tracks, specifically microtubules and actin filaments, and play a crucial role in cellular transport processes, organization, and function. In this review some theoretical aspects of motor-protein dynamics are presented in the light of current experimental methods that enable the measurement of the biochemical and biomechanical properties on a single-molecule basis. After a brief discussion of continuum ratchet concepts, we focus on discrete kinetic and stochastic models that yield predictions for the mean velocity, V(F, [ATP],…), and other observables as a function of an imposed load force F, the ATP concentration, and other variables. The combination of appropriate theory with single-molecule observations should help uncover the mechanisms underlying motor-protein function.

  20. An interacting adiabatic quantum motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola Kusminskiy, Silvia; Bruch, Anton; von Oppen, Felix

    We consider the effect of electron-electron interactions on the performance of an adiabatic quantum motor based on a Thouless pump operating in reverse. We model such a device by electrons in a 1d wire coupled to a slowly moving periodic potential associated with the classical mechanical degree of freedom of the motor. This periodic degree of freedom is set into motion by a bias voltage applied to the 1d electron channel. We investigate the Thouless motor with interacting leads modeled as Luttinger liquids. We show that interactions enhance the energy gap opened by the periodic potential and thus the robustness of the Thouless motor against variations in the chemical potential. We show that the motor degree of freedom can be described as a mobile impurity in a Luttinger liquid obeying Langevin dynamics with renormalized coefficients due to interactions, for which we give explicit expressions.

  1. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing assembly (10) has an intermediate rotatable section (33) having an outer cylindrical member (30) coaxially suspended by a torsion wire (72) around an axially polarized cylindrical magnet (32). Axial alignment between the pole faces (40-43) of the intermediate section (33) and end surfaces (50-53) of opposed end bells (20, 22) provides a path of least reluctance across intervening air gaps (60-63) for the magnetic flux emanating from magnet (32). Radial dislocation increases the reluctance and creates a radial restoring force. Substitution of radially polarized magnets 107 fixed to a magnetically permeable cylinder (32') and insertion of pairs of armature coil windings (109-112) between the cylinder pair (33') provides an integral magnetic bearing and torsion motor (100) able to provide arcuately limited rotational drive.

  2. DNA based molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Jens; Muschielok, Adam; Andrecka, Joanna; Kügel, Wolfgang; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.

    2009-12-01

    Most of the essential cellular processes such as polymerisation reactions, gene expression and regulation are governed by mechanical processes. Controlled mechanical investigations of these processes are therefore required in order to take our understanding of molecular biology to the next level. Single-molecule manipulation and force spectroscopy have over the last 15 years been developed into extremely powerful techniques. Applying these techniques to the investigation of proteins and DNA molecules has led to a mechanistic understanding of protein function on the level of single molecules. As examples for DNA based molecular machines we will describe single-molecule experiments on RNA polymerases as well as on the packaging of DNA into a viral capsid-a process that is driven by one of the most powerful molecular motors.

  3. Reciprocating linear motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldowsky, Michael P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A reciprocating linear motor is formed with a pair of ring-shaped permanent magnets having opposite radial polarizations, held axially apart by a nonmagnetic yoke, which serves as an axially displaceable armature assembly. A pair of annularly wound coils having axial lengths which differ from the axial lengths of the permanent magnets are serially coupled together in mutual opposition and positioned with an outer cylindrical core in axial symmetry about the armature assembly. One embodiment includes a second pair of annularly wound coils serially coupled together in mutual opposition and an inner cylindrical core positioned in axial symmetry inside the armature radially opposite to the first pair of coils. Application of a potential difference across a serial connection of the two pairs of coils creates a current flow perpendicular to the magnetic field created by the armature magnets, thereby causing limited linear displacement of the magnets relative to the coils.

  4. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOEpatents

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2003-02-11

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  5. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOEpatents

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2001-07-17

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  6. Industrial motor repair in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Schueler, V.; Leistner, P.; Douglass, J.

    1994-09-01

    This report characterizes the motor repair industry in the United States; summarizes current motor repair and testing practice; and identifies barriers to energy motor repair practice and recommends strategies for overcoming those barriers.

  7. Activities for a Perceptual Motor Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinning, Dorothy; And Others

    Perceptual motor activities for physically handicapped children are presented in the areas of fine and gross motor skills. Also detailed are activities to develop body image, visual motor skills, and tactile and auditory perception. (JD)

  8. Tests on Double Layer Metalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    28 page report describes experiments in fabrication of integrated circuits with double-layer metalization. Double-layer metalization requires much less silicon "real estate" and allows more flexibility in placement of circuit elements than does single-layer metalization.

  9. Measuring the Double Helix

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew-Fenn, R.S.; Das, R.; Harbury, P.A.B.

    2009-05-26

    DNA is thought to behave as a stiff elastic rod with respect to the ubiquitous mechanical deformations inherent to its biology. To test this model at short DNA lengths, we measured the mean and variance of end-to-end length for a series of DNA double helices in solution, using small-angle x-ray scattering interference between gold nanocrystal labels. In the absence of applied tension, DNA is at least one order of magnitude softer than measured by single-molecule stretching experiments. Further, the data rule out the conventional elastic rod model. The variance in end-to-end length follows a quadratic dependence on the number of base pairs rather than the expected linear dependence, indicating that DNA stretching is cooperative over more than two turns of the DNA double helix. Our observations support the idea of long-range allosteric communication through DNA structure.

  10. Remeasuring the double helix

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew-Fenn, Rebecca S.; Das, Rhiju; Harbury, Pehr A.B.

    2008-10-20

    DNA is thought to behave as a stiff elastic rod with respect to the ubiquitous mechanical deformations inherent to its biology. To test this model at short DNA lengths, we measured the mean and variance of end-to-end length for a series of DNA double helices in solution, using small-angle x-ray scattering interference between gold nanocrystal labels. In the absence of applied tension, DNA is at least one order of magnitude softer than measured by single-molecule stretching experiments. Further, the data rule out the conventional elastic rod model. The variance in end-to-end length follows a quadratic dependence on the number of base pairs rather than the expected linear dependence, indicating that DNA stretching is cooperative over more than two turns of the DNA double helix. Our observations support the idea of long-range allosteric communication through DNA structure.

  11. Enhancement of magnetic flux distribution in a DC superconducting electric motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, N. A.; Ewe, L. S.; Chin, K. M.

    2013-06-01

    Most motor designs require an air gap between the rotor and stator to enable the armature to rotate freely. The interaction of magnetic flux from rotor and stator within the air gap will provide the thrust for rotational motion. Thus, the understanding of magnetic flux in the vicinity of the air gap is very important to mathematically calculate the magnetic flux generated in the area. In this work, a finite element analysis was employed to study the behavior of the magnetic flux in view of designing a synchronous DC superconducting electric motor. The analysis provides an ideal magnetic flux distribution within the components of the motor. From the flux plot analysis, it indicates that flux losses are mainly in the forms of leakage and fringe effect. The analysis also shows that the flux density is high at the area around the air gap and the rotor. The high flux density will provide a high force area that enables the rotor to rotate. In contrast, the other parts of the motor body do not show high flux density indicating low distribution of flux. Consequently, a bench top model of a DC superconducting motor was developed where by motor with a 2-pole type winding was chosen. Each field coil was designed with a racetrack-shaped double pancake wound using DI-BSCCO Bi-2223 superconducting tapes. The performance and energy efficiency of the superconducting motor was superior when compared to the conventional motor with similar capacity.

  12. Algebra of Majorana doubling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehoon; Wilczek, Frank

    2013-11-27

    Motivated by the problem of identifying Majorana mode operators at junctions, we analyze a basic algebraic structure leading to a doubled spectrum. For general (nonlinear) interactions the emergent mode creation operator is highly nonlinear in the original effective mode operators, and therefore also in the underlying electron creation and destruction operators. This phenomenon could open up new possibilities for controlled dynamical manipulation of the modes. We briefly compare and contrast related issues in the Pfaffian quantum Hall state.

  13. Double shell liner implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, S. A.; Chaikovsky, S. A.

    1997-05-05

    Experiments on the double shell liner (DSL) implosions with and without an initial axial magnetic were performed on the SNOP-3 pulse generator (1.1 MA, 100 ns). In implosions of a DSL without an initial axial magnetic field, high radial compressions of the inner shell were observed, as in previous experiments with an initial axial magnetic field. Possible mechanisms for the formation of the initial azimuthal magnetic field are discussed.

  14. Closed-Loop Motor-Speed Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew A.; Delcher, Ray C.; Huston, Steven W.

    1989-01-01

    Electronic motor-speed control circuit designed to operate in electrically noisy environment. Includes optoelectronic pick-up device, placed inside motor housing to provide speed feedback signal. Automatically maintains speed motor at commanded value. Measures speed of motor in terms of frequency of pulses of infrared light chopped by fan blades of motor. Difference between measured and commanded speeds serves as control signal for external amplifier driving motor. Major advantage of circuit is low cost.

  15. Atypical motor neuron disease and related motor syndromes.

    PubMed

    Verma, A; Bradley, W G

    2001-06-01

    There is an imperative need for the early diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND) in the current era of emerging treatments. When evaluating the patient with ALS/MND, the neurologist must consider a number of other motor neuron disorders and related motor syndromes that may have clinical features resembling ALS/MND. The revised Airlie House-El Escorial diagnostic criteria have been established through the consensus of experts meeting at workshops. However, by definition, using these criteria a patient is likely to have fairly advanced disease at the time of a definitive ALS/MND diagnosis. The reasons for the difficulty in making an early ALS/MND diagnosis are several. No surrogate diagnostic marker currently exists for ALS/MND. ALS/MND at its onset is heterogeneous in clinical presentation, its clinical course is variable, and several clinical variants are recognized. In addition, certain motor syndromes, such as monomelic amyotrophy, postpolio muscular atrophy, and multifocal motor neuropathy, can clinically mimic ALS/MND. Therefore, not only may the diagnosis of ALS/MND be clinically missed in the early stages, but worse, the patient may be wrongly labeled as having ALS/MND. The diagnosis of ALS/MND requires a combination of upper motor neuron (UMN) and lower motor neuron (LMN) involvement. Motor syndromes in which the deficit is restricted to the UMN or LMN through the entire course of the disease are described as atypical MND in this review. Approximately 5% of patients with ALS/MND have overt dementia with a characteristic frontal affect. ALS/MND with parkinsonism and dementia is rare outside the western Pacific region. The clinical course of motor disorder in these overlap syndromes does not differ from that in typical ALS/MND.

  16. Double face sealing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A double face sealing device is disclosed for mounting between two surfaces to provide an air-tight and fluid-tight seal between a closure member bearing one of the surfaces and a structure or housing bearing the other surface which extends around the opening or hatchway to be closed. The double face sealing device includes a plurality of sections or segments mounted to one of the surfaces, each having a main body portion, a pair of outwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, and a pair of inwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, an elastomeric cover on the distal, free ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free, ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free ends of the inwardly extending and diverging spring arms. The double face sealing device has application or use in all environments requiring a seal, but is particularly useful to seal openings or hatchways between compartments of spacecraft or aircraft.

  17. Motor imagery in physical therapist practice.

    PubMed

    Dickstein, Ruth; Deutsch, Judith E

    2007-07-01

    Motor imagery is the mental representation of movement without any body movement. Abundant evidence on the positive effects of motor imagery practice on motor performance and learning in athletes, people who are healthy, and people with neurological conditions (eg, stroke, spinal cord injury, Parkinson disease) has been published. The purpose of this update is to synthesize the relevant literature about motor imagery in order to facilitate its integration into physical therapist practice. This update also will discuss visual and kinesthetic motor imagery, factors that modify motor imagery practice, the design of motor imagery protocols, and potential applications of motor imagery.

  18. RetroDISCO: Clearing technique to improve quantification of retrograde labeled motor neurons of intact mouse spinal cords.

    PubMed

    Žygelytė, Emilija; Bernard, Megan E; Tomlinson, Joy E; Martin, Matthew J; Terhorst, Allegra; Bradford, Harriet E; Lundquist, Sarah A; Sledziona, Michael; Cheetham, Jonathan

    2016-09-15

    Quantification of the number of axons reinnervating a target organ is often used to assess regeneration after peripheral nerve repair, but because of axonal branching, this method can overestimate the number of motor neurons regenerating across an injury. Current methods to count the number of regenerated motor neurons include retrograde labeling followed by cryosectioning and counting labeled motor neuron cell bodies, however, the process of sectioning introduces error from potential double counting of cells in adjacent sections. We describe a method, retroDISCO, that optically clears whole mouse spinal cord without loss of fluorescent signal to allow imaging of retrograde labeled motor neurons using confocal microscopy. Complete optical clearing of spinal cords takes four hours and confocal microscopy can obtain z-stacks of labeled motor neuron pools within 3-5min. The technique is able to detect anticipated differences in motor neuron number after cross-suture and conduit repair compared to intact mice and is highly repeatable. RetroDISCO is inexpensive, simple, robust and uses commonly available microscopy techniques to determine the number of motor neurons extending axons across an injury site, avoiding the need for labor-intensive cryosectioning and potential double counting of motor neuron cell bodies in adjacent sections. RetroDISCO allows rapid quantification of the degree of reinnervation without the confounding produced by axonal sprouting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole–dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single

  20. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Teitelboim, Ayelet; Meir, Noga; Kazes, Miri; Oron, Dan

    2016-05-17

    Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole-dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single photon

  1. Motor axons are guided to exit points in the spinal cord by Slit and Netrin signals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minkyung; Fontelonga, Tatiana M; Lee, Clare H; Barnum, Sarah J; Mastick, Grant S

    2017-10-03

    In the spinal cord, motor axons project out the neural tube at specific exit points, then bundle together to project toward target muscles. The molecular signals that guide motor axons to and out of their exit points remain undefined. Since motor axons and their exit points are located near the floor plate, guidance signals produced by the floor plate and adjacent ventral tissues could influence motor axons as they project toward and out of exit points. The secreted Slit proteins are major floor plate repellents, and motor neurons express two Slit receptors, Robo1 and Robo2. Using mutant mouse embryos at early stages of motor axon exit, we found that motor exit points shifted ventrally in Robo1/2 or Slit1/2 double mutants. Along with the ventral shift, mutant axons had abnormal trajectories both within the neural tube toward the exit point, and after exit into the periphery. In contrast, the absence of the major ventral attractant, Netrin-1, or its receptor, DCC caused motor exit points to shift dorsally. Netrin-1 attraction on spinal motor axons was demonstrated by in vitro explant assays, showing that Netrin-1 increased outgrowth and attracted cultured spinal motor axons. The opposing effects of Slit/Robo and Netrin-1/DCC signals were tested genetically by combining Netrin-1 and Robo1/2 mutations. The location of exit points in the combined mutants was significantly recovered to their normal position compared to Netrin-1 or Robo1/2 mutants. Together, these results suggest that the proper position of motor exit points is determined by a "push-pull" mechanism, pulled ventrally by Netrin-1/DCC attraction and pushed dorsally by Slit/Robo repulsion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Torque linearizing hardware for the electric joint motors of a direct-drive robot

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, P.F.; Bryan, J.R.

    1991-12-31

    Many emerging high-performance robot control algorithms require the command of the joint torques; yet no known commercial robots provide such a capability. In this paper, we describe the design, development, testing and application of a VMEbus-based torque linearizing joint interface board (JIB). One JIB resides between the robot control processor and each joint motor amplifier. The JIB provides the control processor with the capability to read the motor position and apply accurate motor torques. The torque command capability derives from the application of a 128k {times} 8 EPROM lookup table for each motor phase. Because joint motor torque is dependent upon the torque command and the motor position, the hardware is designed to utilize the torque command and the current motor position as the address to retrieve the proper pulse-width for the PWM motor amplifier. The table look-up cycle operates independently of the robot controller at a 40KHz rate to provide constant joint torque as the motor rotates. We identify the proper table entries by an automated in situ data collection procedure. Static torque generation results show that the torque deviations are reduced from as much as 76% to below 5% for each of the three direct-drive motors (two are variable reluctance motors and one is brushless DC) on an AdeptTwo robot. These torque deviations are reduced below 2.5% if only the upper 90% of the torque range is considered. The torque deviations of the non-direct-drive joint are reduced by 50%. Dynamic robot edge following experiments show that the robot speed of operation can be more than doubled for a given applied force accuracy by utilizing the joint torque linearizing boards. 8 refs.

  3. Torque linearizing hardware for the electric joint motors of a direct-drive robot

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, P.F.; Bryan, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Many emerging high-performance robot control algorithms require the command of the joint torques; yet no known commercial robots provide such a capability. In this paper, we describe the design, development, testing and application of a VMEbus-based torque linearizing joint interface board (JIB). One JIB resides between the robot control processor and each joint motor amplifier. The JIB provides the control processor with the capability to read the motor position and apply accurate motor torques. The torque command capability derives from the application of a 128k {times} 8 EPROM lookup table for each motor phase. Because joint motor torque is dependent upon the torque command and the motor position, the hardware is designed to utilize the torque command and the current motor position as the address to retrieve the proper pulse-width for the PWM motor amplifier. The table look-up cycle operates independently of the robot controller at a 40KHz rate to provide constant joint torque as the motor rotates. We identify the proper table entries by an automated in situ data collection procedure. Static torque generation results show that the torque deviations are reduced from as much as 76% to below 5% for each of the three direct-drive motors (two are variable reluctance motors and one is brushless DC) on an AdeptTwo robot. These torque deviations are reduced below 2.5% if only the upper 90% of the torque range is considered. The torque deviations of the non-direct-drive joint are reduced by 50%. Dynamic robot edge following experiments show that the robot speed of operation can be more than doubled for a given applied force accuracy by utilizing the joint torque linearizing boards. 8 refs.

  4. Torque linearizing hardware for the electric joint motors of a direct-drive robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, P. F.; Bryan, J. R.

    Many emerging high-performance robot control algorithms require the command of the joint torques, yet no known commercial robots provide such a capability. We describe the design, development, testing, and application of a VMEbus-based torque linearizing joint interface board (JIB). One JIB resides between the robot control processor and each joint motor amplifier. The JIB provides the control processor with the capability to read the motor position and apply accurate motor torques. The torque command capability derives from the application of a 128k x 8 EPROM lookup table for each motor phase. Because joint motor torque is dependent upon the torque command and the motor position, the hardware is designed to utilize the torque command and the current motor position as the address to retrieve the proper pulse-width for the PWM motor amplifier. The table look-up cycle operates independently of the robot controller at a 40KHz rate to provide constant joint torque as the motor rotates. We identify the proper table entries by an automated in situ data collection procedure. Static torque generation results show that the torque deviations are reduced from as much as 76 percent to below 5 percent for each of the three direct-drive motors (two are variable reluctance motors and one is brushless DC) on an AdeptTwo robot. These torque deviations are reduced below 2.5 percent if only the upper 90 percent of the torque range is considered. The torque deviations of the non-direct-drive joint are reduced by 50 percent. Dynamic robot edge following experiments show that the robot speed of operation can be more than doubled for a given applied force accuracy by utilizing the joint torque linearizing boards.

  5. Dissociated functional connectivity profiles for motor and attention deficits in acute right-hemisphere stroke.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Antonello; Ramsey, Lenny; Rengachary, Jennifer; Zinn, Kristi; Siegel, Joshua S; Metcalf, Nicholas V; Strube, Michael J; Snyder, Abraham Z; Corbetta, Maurizio; Shulman, Gordon L

    2016-07-01

    Strokes often cause multiple behavioural deficits that are correlated at the population level. Here, we show that motor and attention deficits are selectively associated with abnormal patterns of resting state functional connectivity in the dorsal attention and motor networks. We measured attention and motor deficits in 44 right hemisphere-damaged patients with a first-time stroke at 1-2 weeks post-onset. The motor battery included tests that evaluated deficits in both upper and lower extremities. The attention battery assessed both spatial and non-spatial attention deficits. Summary measures for motor and attention deficits were identified through principal component analyses on the raw behavioural scores. Functional connectivity in structurally normal cortex was estimated based on the temporal correlation of blood oxygenation level-dependent signals measured at rest with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Any correlation between motor and attention deficits and between functional connectivity in the dorsal attention network and motor networks that might spuriously affect the relationship between each deficit and functional connectivity was statistically removed. We report a double dissociation between abnormal functional connectivity patterns and attention and motor deficits, respectively. Attention deficits were significantly more correlated with abnormal interhemispheric functional connectivity within the dorsal attention network than motor networks, while motor deficits were significantly more correlated with abnormal interhemispheric functional connectivity patterns within the motor networks than dorsal attention network. These findings indicate that functional connectivity patterns in structurally normal cortex following a stroke link abnormal physiology in brain networks to the corresponding behavioural deficits. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  6. General Theory of the Double Fed Synchronous Machine. Ph.D. Thesis - Swiss Technological Univ., 1950

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Magrabi, M. G.

    1982-01-01

    Motor and generator operation of a double-fed synchronous machine were studied and physically and mathematically treated. Experiments with different connections, voltages, etc. were carried out. It was concluded that a certain degree of asymmetry is necessary for the best utilization of the machine.

  7. Motor neuron cell bodies are actively positioned by Slit/Robo repulsion and Netrin/DCC attraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minkyung; Fontelonga, Tatiana; Roesener, Andrew P; Lee, Haeram; Gurung, Suman; Mendonca, Philipe R F; Mastick, Grant S

    2015-03-01

    Motor neurons differentiate from a ventral column of progenitors and settle in static clusters, the motor nuclei, next to the floor plate. Within these cell clusters, motor neurons receive afferent input and project their axons out to muscle targets. The molecular mechanisms that position motor neurons in the neural tube remain poorly understood. The floor plate produces several types of guidance cues with well-known roles in attracting and repelling axons, including the Slit family of chemorepellents via their Robo receptors, and Netrin1 via its DCC attractive receptor. In the present study we found that Islet1(+) motor neuron cell bodies invaded the floor plate of Robo1/2 double mutant mouse embryos or Slit1/2/3 triple mutants. Misplaced neurons were born in their normal progenitor column, but then migrated tangentially into the ventral midline. Robo1 and 2 receptor expression in motor neurons was confirmed by reporter gene staining and anti-Robo antibody labeling. Mis-positioned motor neurons projected their axons longitudinally within the floor plate, and failed to reach their normal exit points. To test for potential counteracting ventral attractive signals, we examined Netrin-1 and DCC mutants, and found that motor neurons shifted dorsally in the hindbrain and spinal cord, suggesting that Netrin-1/DCC signaling normally attracts motor neurons closer to the floor plate. Our results show that motor neurons are actively migrating cells, and are normally trapped in a static position by Slit/Robo repulsion and Netrin-1/DCC attraction.

  8. The mechanochemistry of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Keller, D; Bustamante, C

    2000-02-01

    A theory of molecular motors is presented that explains how the energy released in single chemical reactions can generate mechanical motion and force. In the simplest case the fluctuating movements of a motor enzyme are well described by a diffusion process on a two-dimensional potential energy surface, where one dimension is a chemical reaction coordinate and the other is the spatial displacement of the motor. The coupling between chemistry and motion results from the shape of the surface, and motor velocities and forces result from diffusion currents on this surface. This microscopic description is shown to possess an equivalent kinetic mechanism in which the rate constants depend on externally applied forces. By using this equivalence we explore the characteristic properties of several broad classes of motor mechanisms and give general expressions for motor velocity versus load force for any member of each class. We show that in some cases simple plots of 1/velocity vs. 1/concentration can distinguish between classes of motor mechanisms and may be used to determine the step at which movement occurs.

  9. New moves in motor control.

    PubMed

    Büschges, Ansgar; Scholz, Henrike; El Manira, Abdeljabbar

    2011-07-12

    Motor behaviour results from information processing across multiple neural networks acting at all levels from initial selection of the behaviour to its final generation. Understanding how motor behaviour is produced requires identifying the constituent neurons of these networks, their cellular properties, and their pattern of synaptic connectivity. Neural networks have been traditionally studied with neurophysiological and neuroanatomical approaches. These approaches have been highly successful in particularly suitable 'model' preparations, typically ones in which the numbers of neurons in the networks were relatively small, neural network composition was unvarying across individual animals, and the preparations continued to produce fictive motor patterns in vitro. However, analysing networks without these characteristics, and analysing the complete ensemble of networks that cooperatively generate behaviours, is difficult with these approaches. Recently developed molecular and neurogenetic tools provide additional avenues for analysing motor networks by allowing individual or groups of neurons within networks to be manipulated in novel ways and allowing experiments to be performed not only in vitro but also in vivo. We review here some of the new insights into motor network function that these advances have provided and indicate how these advances might bridge gaps in our understanding of motor control. To these ends, we first review motor neural network organisation highlighting cross-phylum principles. We then use prominent examples from the field to show how neurogenetic approaches can complement classical physiological studies, and identify additional areas where these approaches could be advantageously applied. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Solid rocket motor witness test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Christopher S.

    1991-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motor Witness Test was undertaken to examine the potential for using thermal infrared imagery as a tool for monitoring static tests of solid rocket motors. The project consisted of several parts: data acquisition, data analysis, and interpretation. For data acquisition, thermal infrared data were obtained of the DM-9 test of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor on December 23, 1987, at Thiokol, Inc. test facility near Brigham City, Utah. The data analysis portion consisted of processing the video tapes of the test to produce values of temperature at representative test points on the rocket motor surface as the motor cooled down following the test. Interpretation included formulation of a numerical model and evaluation of some of the conditions of the motor which could be extracted from the data. These parameters included estimates of the insulation remaining following the tests and the thickness of the charred layer of insulation at the end of the test. Also visible was a temperature signature of the star grain pattern in the forward motor segment.

  11. The mechanochemistry of molecular motors.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, D; Bustamante, C

    2000-01-01

    A theory of molecular motors is presented that explains how the energy released in single chemical reactions can generate mechanical motion and force. In the simplest case the fluctuating movements of a motor enzyme are well described by a diffusion process on a two-dimensional potential energy surface, where one dimension is a chemical reaction coordinate and the other is the spatial displacement of the motor. The coupling between chemistry and motion results from the shape of the surface, and motor velocities and forces result from diffusion currents on this surface. This microscopic description is shown to possess an equivalent kinetic mechanism in which the rate constants depend on externally applied forces. By using this equivalence we explore the characteristic properties of several broad classes of motor mechanisms and give general expressions for motor velocity versus load force for any member of each class. We show that in some cases simple plots of 1/velocity vs. 1/concentration can distinguish between classes of motor mechanisms and may be used to determine the step at which movement occurs. PMID:10653770

  12. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, Richard F.; Pollick, Richard D.; Nyilas, Charles P.; Denmeade, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    A transfer pump used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank.

  13. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.

    1997-10-07

    A mixer pump is described used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump. 10 figs.

  14. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, Richard F.; Pollick, Richard D.

    1997-01-01

    A mixer pump used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump.

  15. Nano-Magnets and Additive Manufacturing for Electric Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    2014-01-01

    High power density is required for application of electric motors in hybrid electric propulsion. Potential path to achieve high power density in electric motors include advanced materials, lightweight thermal management, lightweight structural concepts, high power density power electronics, and advanced manufacturing. This presentation will focus on two key technologies for achieving high power density, advanced magnets and additive manufacturing. The maximum energy product in current magnets is reaching their theoretical limits as a result of material and process improvements. Future improvements in the maximum energy product for magnets can be achieved through development of nanocomposite magnets combining the hard magnetic phase and soft magnetic phase at the nanoscale level. The presentation will provide an overview of the current state of development for nanocomposite magnets and the future path for doubling the maximum energy product. The other part of the presentation will focus on the role of additive manufacturing in fabrication of high power density electric motors. The presentation will highlight the potential opportunities for applying additive manufacturing to fabricate electric motors.

  16. Toll road crashes of commercial and passenger motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Braver, Elisa R; Solomon, Mark G; Preusser, David F

    2002-05-01

    Revenue-collection data from toll roads allow for accurate estimates of miles driven by vehicle type and, when combined with crash data, valid estimates of crash involvements per mile driven. Data on vehicle-miles traveled and collisions were obtained from toll road authorities in Florida. Kansas, and New York. In addition, state crash files and published vehicle-miles of travel were obtained for toll roads in Illinois. Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Large commercial motor vehicles were significantly underinvolved in single-vehicle crashes on all state toll roads. In five states, commercial motor vehicles were significantly overinvolved in multiple-vehicle crashes relative to passenger vehicles; the exceptions were Kansas, where they had significantly lower multiple-vehicle involvement rates, and Indiana. where there were no significant differences in multiple-vehicle involvements by vehicle type. The risk of commercial motor vehicle involvement in multiple-vehicle crashes resulting in deaths or serious injuries was double that of passenger vehicles in the two states (Ohio and Pennsylvania) that identified serious injuries. Whether crash rates, on toll roads of commercial motor vehicles are higher or lower than those of passenger vehicles appears to depend on the type of crash, specific toll road. and traffic density.

  17. [Procedural learning and anxiolytic effects: electroencephalographic, motor and attentional measures].

    PubMed

    Portella, Claudio Elidio; Silva, Julio Guilherme; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Machado, Dionis; Cunha, Marlo; Cagy, Maurício; Basile, Luis; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2006-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate attentional, motor and electroencephalographic (EEG) parameters during a procedural task when subjects have ingested 6 mg of bromazepam. The sample consisted of 26 healthy subjects, male or female, between 19 and 36 years of age. The control (placebo) and experimental (bromazepam 6 mg) groups were submitted to a typewriting task in a randomized, double-blind design. The findings did not show significant differences in attentional and motor measures between groups. Coherence measures (qEEG) were evaluated between scalp regions, in theta, alpha and beta bands. A first analysis revealed a main effect for condition (Anova 2-way--condition versus blocks). A second Anova 2-way (condition versus scalp regions) showed a main effect for both factors. The coherence measure was not a sensitive tool at demonstrating differences between cortical areas as a function of procedural learning.

  18. [Electroencephalography measures in motor skill learning and effects of bromazepam].

    PubMed

    Bastos, Victor Hugo; Machado, Dionis; Cunha, Marlo; Portella, Claudio Elidio; Cagy, Maurício; Furtado, Vernon; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2005-06-01

    Neuromodulators change brain's neural circuitry. Bromazepam is often been used in the pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders. Few papers links this anxiolytic to motor tasks. The purpose of this study was to examine motor and electrophysiological changes produced by administration of bromazepam in differents doses (3 and 6 mg). The sample consisted of 39 healthy individuals, of both sexes, between 20 and 30 years of age. The control (placebo) and experimental (bromazepam 3mg and bromazepam 6 mg) groups were submitted to a typewriting task, in a randomized, double-blind design. The results did not reveal differences on score and time of the attention test. In the comportamental analysis was noticed blocks as main effect to behavioral variables (time and mistakes in the task). Electrophysiological data showed significants interactions to: laterally/condition/moment; laterally/condition; laterally/moment; condition/moment; condition/site.

  19. Ultra-Compact Motor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, William T.; Cromwell, Adam; Hauptman, Traveler; Pratt, Gill Andrews

    2012-01-01

    This invention is an electronically commutated brushless motor contro ller that incorporates Hall-array sensing in a small, 42-gram packag e that provides 4096 absolute counts per motor revolution position s ensing. The unit is the size of a miniature hockey puck, and is a 44 -pin male connector that provides many I/O channels, including CANbus , RS-232 communications, general-purpose analog and digital I/O (GPI O), analog and digital Hall inputs, DC power input (18-90 VDC, 0-l0 A), three-phase motor outputs, and a strain gauge amplifier.

  20. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) that is being developed to replace, in 1997, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor which currently boosts the Space Shuttle. The ASRM will contain features to improve motor safety (fewer potential leak paths, improved seal materials, stronger case material, and fewer nozzle and case joints), an improved ignition system using through-bulkhead initiators, and highly reproducible manufacturing and inspection techniques with a large number of automated procedures. The ASRM will be able to deliver 12,000 lbs greater payloads to any given orbit of the Shuttle. There are also environmental improvements, realized by waste propellant recovery.

  1. State observer for synchronous motors

    DOEpatents

    Lang, Jeffrey H.

    1994-03-22

    A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

  2. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) that is being developed to replace, in 1997, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor which currently boosts the Space Shuttle. The ASRM will contain features to improve motor safety (fewer potential leak paths, improved seal materials, stronger case material, and fewer nozzle and case joints), an improved ignition system using through-bulkhead initiators, and highly reproducible manufacturing and inspection techniques with a large number of automated procedures. The ASRM will be able to deliver 12,000 lbs greater payloads to any given orbit of the Shuttle. There are also environmental improvements, realized by waste propellant recovery.

  3. 26. View, looking east, of motor house; the electric motor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. View, looking east, of motor house; the electric motor and electric-powered winch are housed in section of building to the left. The U-bolt and concrete deadman which anchors the cable of the tramway is to the right. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  4. Anodal tDCS over the primary motor cortex improves motor imagery benefits on postural control: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Saruco, Elodie; Rienzo, Franck Di; Nunez-Nagy, Susana; Rubio-Gonzalez, Miguel A; Jackson, Philip L; Collet, Christian; Saimpont, Arnaud; Guillot, Aymeric

    2017-03-28

    Performing everyday actions requires fine postural control, which is a major focus of functional rehabilitation programs. Among the various range of training methods likely to improve balance and postural stability, motor imagery practice (MIP) yielded promising results. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied over the primary motor cortex was also found to potentiate the benefits of MIP on upper-limb motor tasks. Yet, combining both techniques has not been tested for tasks requiring fine postural control. To determine the impact of MIP and the additional effects of tDCS, 14 participants performed a postural control task before and after two experimental (MIP + anodal or sham tDCS over the primary motor cortex) and one control (control task + sham tDCS) conditions, in a double blind randomized study. Data revealed a significant decrease of the time required to perform the postural task. Greater performance gains were recorded when MIP was paired with anodal tDCS and when the task involved the most complex postural adjustments. Altogether, findings highlight short-term effects of MIP on postural control and suggest that combining MIP with tDCS might also be effective in rehabilitation programs for regaining postural skills in easily fatigable persons and neurologic populations.

  5. Primary motor cortex disinhibition during motor skill learning.

    PubMed

    Coxon, James P; Peat, Nicola M; Byblow, Winston D

    2014-07-01

    Motor learning requires practice over a period of time and depends on brain plasticity, yet even for relatively simple movements, there are multiple practice strategies that can be used for skill acquisition. We investigated the role of intracortical inhibition in the primary motor cortex (M1) during motor skill learning. Event-related transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess corticomotor excitability and inhibition thought to involve synaptic and extrasynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Short intracortical inhibition (SICI) was assessed using 1- and 2.5-ms interstimulus intervals (ISIs). Participants learned a novel, sequential pinch-grip task on a computer in either a repetitive or interleaved practice structure. Both practice structures showed equivalent levels of motor performance at the end of acquisition and at retention 1 wk later. There was a novel task-related modulation of 1-ms SICI. Repetitive practice elicited a greater reduction of 1- and 2.5-ms SICI, i.e., disinhibition, between rest and task acquisition, compared with interleaved practice. These novel findings support the use of a repetitive practice structure for motor learning because the associated effects within M1 have relevance for motor rehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Turn Motors Off When Not in Use - Motor Tip Sheet #10

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Motors use no energy when turned off. Reducing motor operating time by just 10% usually saves more energy than replacing a standard efficiency motor with a NEMA Premium® efficiency motor. In fact, given that 97% of the life cycle cost of purchasing and operating a motor is energy-related, turning a motor off 10% of the time could reduce energy costs enough to purchase three new motors.

  7. Plasma motor generator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hite, Gerald E.

    1987-01-01

    The significant potential advantages of a plasma motor generator system over conventional systems for the generation of electrical power and propulsion for spacecraft in low Earth orbits warrants its further investigation. The two main components of such a system are a long insulated wire and the plasma generating hollow cathodes needed to maintain electrical contact with the ionosphere. Results of preliminary theoretical and experimental investigations of this system are presented. The theoretical work involved the equilibrium configurations of the wire and the nature of small oscillation about these equilibrium positions. A particularly interesting result was that two different configurations are allowed when the current is above a critical value. Experimental investigations were made of the optimal starting and running conditions for the proposed, low current hollow cathodes. Although optimal ranges of temperature, argon pressure and discharge voltage were identified, start up became progressively more difficult. This supposed depletion or contamination of the emissive surface could be countered by the addition of new emissive material.

  8. Synthetic Motors and Nanomachines.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, Amar

    2006-03-01

    A bistable and palindromically-constituted [3]rotaxane incorporating two mechanically-mobile rings interlocked around a linear dumbbell component, has been designed to operate like the sarcomeres of skeletal muscle. Contraction and extension occurs when the inter-ring distance of the two rings switch, ideally, between 4.2 and 1.4 nm upon redox stimulation either chemically or electrochemically in the solution phase. When the mobile rings of these artificial molecular muscles are bound onto the tops of gold-coated, micron-scale cantilever beams, their controllable nanometer motions have a chance to be amplified along the long axis of each cantilever. It turns out that ˜6 billion of the self-assembled [3]rotaxanes can bend the cantilevers in a bistable manner concomitant with the cycled addition of redox agents. The extent of bending is commensurate with 10's of pN of force per [3]rotaxane. Recent studies on a set of ``single-shot'' control [2]rotaxanes have provided additional evidence for the origins of the force generation as it arises from a molecule-based electrostatic repulsion energy of about 10 kcal/mol at 300 K. These findings will be presented in terms of the underlying thermodynamics and kinetics that have been utilized extensively to direct the design and synthesis of artificial molecular machines and which may also serve as a guide for the rational design of unidirectional molecular motors.

  9. Controlled wind motor

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, F.A.

    1983-12-27

    A mechanical sail including a rotatable mast, the mast including a top vane mount and a bottom vane mount, the mounts being spaced from each other on the mast and rotatable therewith, a series of rotatable vanes spaced from and surrounding the mast and supported by and between the mounts, cam operaters extending between the mounts and connected to the vanes for controlling the rotation of the vanes, a first controller associated with the mast below the bottom vane mount for controlling the cam operators, the first controller being movable vertically with respect to the mast, a second controller for moving the first controller vertically with respect to the mast, the vanes being flexible and bowed outwardly, the bottom vane mount being movable with respect to the mast and connected to the second controller whereby when the second controller is operated, the bottom vane mount will move toward the top vane mount causing the vanes to bow outwardly at a desired arc and whereby when the first controller is moved, the vanes are caused to rotate to the desired angle of attack with respect to wind velocity and direction. When the sail is connected to a motor drive, the vessel may be driven forward or rearward depending on the angle of attack of the vanes through 180/sup 0/.

  10. Motor proteins 1: kinesins.

    PubMed

    Bloom, G S; Endow, S A

    1995-01-01

    Progress regarding the kinesins is now being made at a rapid and accelerating rate. The in vivo-functions, and biophysical and enzymatic properties of kinesin itself are being explored at ever increasing levels of detail. The kinesin-related proteins now number several dozen, and although more is known about primary structure than function for most of the proteins, this trend is already reversing. For example, knowledge about the kinesin-related protein, ncd, is expanding rapidly, and more is already known about its three-dimensional structure than is known for kinesin heavy chain. This volume presents a comprehensive review of the major published works on kinesin and kinesin-related proteins. Hopefully, this manuscript will complement other recent review articles [17, 20, 25, 37, 60-62, 67, 69, 75, 85-88, 231, 233, 238, 244, 269-271, 281, 282, 292] or books [49, 227, 293] that have focused on more selective aspects of the kinesin family, or have been aimed more generally at MT motor proteins. In line with the stated purpose of the Protein Profile series, annual updates of the review on the kinesins are planned for at least the next few years.

  11. Mechanical thermal motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, L. A.; Myers, W. N. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus is described for converting thermal energy such as solar energy into mechanical motion for driving fluid pumps and similar equipment. The thermal motor comprises an inner concentric cylinder carried by a stationary core member. The core member has a cylindrical disc plate fixed adjacent to a lower portion and extending radially from it. An outer concentric cylinder rotatably carried on the disc plate defining a space between the inner and outer concentric cylinders. A spiral tubular member encircles the inner concentric cylinder and is contained within the space between the inner and outer cylinders. One portion is connected to the inner concentric cylinder and a second portion connected to the outer concentric cylinder. A heated fluid is conveyed through the tubular member and is periodically cooled causing the tubular member to expand and contract. This causes the outer concentric cylinder to reciprocally rotate on the base plate accordingly. The reciprocating motion of the outer concentric cylinder is then utilized to drive a pump member in a pump chamber.

  12. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing for passively suspending a rotatable element subjected to axial and radial thrust forces is disclosed. The magnetic bearing employs a taut wire stretched along the longitudinal axis of the bearing between opposed end pieces and an intermediate magnetic section. The intermediate section is segmented to provide oppositely directed magnetic flux paths between the end pieces and may include either an axially polarized magnets interposed between the segments. The end pieces, separated from the intermediate section by air gaps, control distribution of magnetic flux between the intermediate section segments. Coaxial alignment of the end pieces with the intermediate section minimizes magnetic reluctance in the flux paths endowing the bearing with self-centering characteristics when subjected to radial loads. In an alternative embodiment, pairs of oppositely wound armature coils are concentrically interposed between segments of the intermediate section in concentric arcs adjacent to radially polarized magnets to equip a magnetic bearing as a torsion drive motor. The magnetic suspension bearing disclosed provides long term reliability without maintenance with application to long term space missions such as the VISSR/VAS scanning mirror instrument in the GOES program.

  13. A Biochemical Double Slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominis, Iannis

    2011-03-01

    Radical-ion-pair reactions, fundamental in photosynthesis and at the basis of the avian magnetic compass mechanism, have been recently shown to offer a rich playground for applying methods and concepts from quantum measurement/quantum information science. We will demonstrate that radical-ion-pair reactions are almost the exact analog of the optical double slit experiment, i.e. Nature has already engineered biochemical reactions performing the act of quantum interference. We will further elaborate on the non-trivial quantum effects pertaining in these reactions and the recent debate on their fundamental theoretical description that these effects have sparked.

  14. Aberrant supplementary motor complex and limbic activity during motor preparation in motor conversion disorder

    PubMed Central

    Voon, V; Brezing, C; Gallea, C; Hallett, M

    2014-01-01

    Background Conversion disorder is characterized by unexplained neurological symptoms presumed related to psychological issues. The main hypotheses to explain conversion paralysis, characterized by a lack of movement, include impairments in either motor intention or disruption of motor execution, and further, that hyperactive self-monitoring, limbic processing or top-down regulation from higher order frontal regions may interfere with motor execution. We have recently shown that conversion disorder with positive abnormal or excessive motor symptoms was associated with greater amygdala activity to arousing stimuli along with greater functional connectivity between the amgydala and supplementary motor area. Here we studied patients with such symptoms focusing on motor initiation. Methods Subjects performed either an internally or externally generated two-button action selection task in a functional MRI study. Results Eleven conversion disorder patients without major depression and 11 age- and gender-matched normal volunteers were assessed. During both internally and externally generated movement, conversion disorder patients relative to normal volunteers had lower left supplementary motor area (SMA) (implicated in motor initiation) and higher right amygdala, left anterior insula and bilateral posterior cingulate activity (implicated in assigning emotional salience). These findings were confirmed in a subgroup analysis of patients with tremor symptoms. During internally versus externally generated action in CD patients, the left SMA had lower functional connectivity with bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortices. Conclusion We propose a theory in which previously mapped conversion motor representations may in an arousing context hijack the voluntary action selection system which is both hypoactive and functionally disconnected from prefrontal top-down regulation. PMID:21935985

  15. 75 FR 72863 - Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice of Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces that the Agency's Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee...

  16. 76 FR 12214 - Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice: Announcement of Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee meeting; request for comment. SUMMARY: The Federal Motor Carrier Safety...

  17. 75 FR 50797 - Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces that its Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee (MCSAC)...

  18. 75 FR 29384 - Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Public Meeting AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee meeting. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces that its Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee (MCSAC)...

  19. Drill-motor holding fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartier, E. N.; Culp, L. N.

    1980-01-01

    Guide improves accuracy and reduces likelihood of bit breakage in drilling large work pieces. Drill motor is mounted on pipe that slides on furniture clamp. Drill is driven into work piece by turning furniture-clamp handle.

  20. Gearless speed-reduction motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madey, J.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed rolling electric motor has output shaft speed reductions of 1000 to 1 or better. Light compact unit uses no gears or pulleys to reduce speed presenting less bulk and frictional loss, and more efficiency.

  1. Battery powererd electric motor vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlbacker, K.

    1984-02-28

    A battery powered vehicle is provided with a vehicle frame and an electric motor whose main shaft is connected to a differential gear by means of a gear train with a variable transmission ratio, the motor shaft and all gear shafts being parallel to the axle of the driving wheels. In order to achieve a compact design and to avoid power-consuming drive elements the electric motor and the variable transmission gear as well as a potential reducing gear mounted between the latter and the differential gear, are positioned on a subframe which is connected to the housing of the driving wheel axle on the one side whereas the other side carrying the electric motor is attached to the vehicle frame by means of a cardanic suspension.

  2. Small Solid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    It was three-two-one to brilliant fire as NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center tested a small solid rocket motor designed to mimic NASA's Space Launch System booster. The Mar. 14 test provides a qui...

  3. Drill-motor holding fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartier, E. N.; Culp, L. N.

    1980-01-01

    Guide improves accuracy and reduces likelihood of bit breakage in drilling large work pieces. Drill motor is mounted on pipe that slides on furniture clamp. Drill is driven into work piece by turning furniture-clamp handle.

  4. Advanced Motor-Controller Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-22

    which document the three stages of develop- _ - fment. "U Volume Summary A. Phase I Report Flux Synthesis and PWM Synthesis Techniques Theory and...Three Phase Power Bridge and Evaluation of Motor Controller Volume Summary The three reports assembled in this votume represent work performed...1963-A * I ADVANCED MOTOR-CONTROLLER * DEVELOPMENT Final Report for Period October 1979 - June 1983 June 22, 1983 Report DTNSRDC-PASD-CR-1-83

  5. Solid rocket motor internal insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twichell, S. E. (Editor); Keller, R. B., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Internal insulation in a solid rocket motor is defined as a layer of heat barrier material placed between the internal surface of the case propellant. The primary purpose is to prevent the case from reaching temperatures that endanger its structural integrity. Secondary functions of the insulation are listed and guidelines for avoiding critical problems in the development of internal insulation for rocket motors are presented.

  6. A soft and dexterous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Iain A.; Tse, Tony Chun Hin; Inamura, Tokushu; O'Brien, Benjamin M.; McKay, Thomas; Gisby, Todd

    2011-03-01

    We present a soft, bearing-free artificial muscle motor that cannot only turn a shaft but also grip and reposition it through a flexible gear. The bearing-free operation provides a foundation for low complexity soft machines, with multiple degree-of-freedom actuation, that can act simultaneously as motors and manipulators. The mechanism also enables an artificial muscle controlled gear change. Future work will include self-sensing feedback for precision, multidegree-of-freedom operation.

  7. Motor Activity Improves Temporal Expectancy

    PubMed Central

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1) pointing with a whole-body movement, (2) pointing only with the arm, (3) imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4) simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5) pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6) reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments. PMID:25806813

  8. Meissner-Effect Stepping Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed stepping motor derives torque from diamagnetic repulsion produced by Meissner effect - exclusion of magnetic field from interior of superconductor. Design of motor takes advantage of silver-doped YB2Cu3O and other compounds superconductive at temperatures as high as that of liquid nitrogen. Skin of rotor cooled below its superconducting-transition temperature by liquid nitrogen. O-rings prevent leaks of liquid nitrogen from rotor. Weight, cost, and maintenance reduced.

  9. Electrical stimulation and motor recovery.

    PubMed

    Young, Wise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several investigators have successfully regenerated axons in animal spinal cords without locomotor recovery. One explanation is that the animals were not trained to use the regenerated connections. Intensive locomotor training improves walking recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in people, and >90% of people with incomplete SCI recover walking with training. Although the optimal timing, duration, intensity, and type of locomotor training are still controversial, many investigators have reported beneficial effects of training on locomotor function. The mechanisms by which training improves recovery are not clear, but an attractive theory is available. In 1949, Donald Hebb proposed a famous rule that has been paraphrased as "neurons that fire together, wire together." This rule provided a theoretical basis for a widely accepted theory that homosynaptic and heterosynaptic activity facilitate synaptic formation and consolidation. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord has a locomotor center, called the central pattern generator (CPG), which can be activated nonspecifically with electrical stimulation or neurotransmitters to produce walking. The CPG is an obvious target to reconnect after SCI. Stimulating motor cortex, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves can modulate lumbar spinal cord excitability. Motor cortex stimulation causes long-term changes in spinal reflexes and synapses, increases sprouting of the corticospinal tract, and restores skilled forelimb function in rats. Long used to treat chronic pain, motor cortex stimuli modify lumbar spinal network excitability and improve lower extremity motor scores in humans. Similarly, epidural spinal cord stimulation has long been used to treat pain and spasticity. Subthreshold epidural stimulation reduces the threshold for locomotor activity. In 2011, Harkema et al. reported lumbosacral epidural stimulation restores motor control in chronic motor complete patients. Peripheral nerve or functional electrical

  10. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  11. Medical management of motor fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Richard B

    2008-08-01

    Given the magnitude of the problem of motor fluctuations in patients who have Parkinson's disease treated with levodopa, a significant effort has been expended by physicians, researchers, and pharmaceutical manufacturers over the years to find effective treatments. This article briefly reviews the medical options for managing motor fluctuations that are in common use in the United States or that are expected to be available soon.

  12. Paliperidone-associated motor tics.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Han; Chiu, Nan-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Paliperidone-associated motor tics. Case report. We report a 30-year-old man with schizophrenia who developed motor tics (eye blinking) after treatment of paliperidone up to 15 mg daily. Tic-like symptoms, from simple eye blinking to complex Tourette-like syndrome, may occur during paliperidone treatment, especially with high dose. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Direct drive field actuator motors

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  14. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Jr., Maynard; Marder, Barry M.

    1996-01-01

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces.

  15. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-09-03

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces. 6 figs.

  16. Double Eclipsing Binary Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagas, P.; Pejcha, O.

    2012-06-01

    The parameters of the mutual orbit of eclipsing binaries that are physically connected can be obtained by precision timing of minima over time through light travel time effect, apsidal motion or orbital precession. This, however, requires joint analysis of data from different sources obtained through various techniques and with insufficiently quantified uncertainties. In particular, photometric uncertainties are often underestimated, which yields too small uncertainties in minima timings if determined through analysis of a χ2 surface. The task is even more difficult for double eclipsing binaries, especially those with periods close to a resonance such as CzeV344, where minima get often blended with each other. This code solves the double binary parameters simultaneously and then uses these parameters to determine minima timings (or more specifically O-C values) for individual datasets. In both cases, the uncertainties (or more precisely confidence intervals) are determined through bootstrap resampling of the original data. This procedure to a large extent alleviates the common problem with underestimated photometric uncertainties and provides a check on possible degeneracies in the parameters and the stability of the results. While there are shortcomings to this method as well when compared to Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, the ease of the implementation of bootstrapping is a significant advantage.

  17. Doubling an investment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2004-01-01

    We study the issue of optimal long-term portfolio management in continuous time multi-asset financial markets. Rather than following the abstract notion of ‘utility’ and its implied paradigm of ‘maximization of expected utility’ we suggest a different approach: The investor sets a goal-such as reaching a desired fortune level, or doubling the initial investment-and then operates to minimize the expected time-to-goal, i.e., achieving the goal as quick as possible. We assume the ‘standard model’ of multi-asset financial markets where assets are governed by correlated Geometric Brownian motion dynamics, and study optimality under the criteria of ‘minimization of the expected time-to-goal’. We explicitly compute: (i) the optimal holding strategies; (ii) the dynamics and behavior of the optimal investment portfolios; and, (iii) the statistics-mean, variance, and Laplace transform-of the time-to-goal (under the optimal investment strategy). Also, an investment paradox arising in this context-in which some portfolios have exponential mean growth but have a positive probability of never doubling their initial value-is discussed and explained.

  18. Firewalls from double purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael

    2013-10-01

    The firewall paradox is often presented as arising from double entanglement, but I argue that more generally the paradox is double purity. Near-horizon modes are purified by the interior, in the infalling vacuum. Hence, they cannot also be pure alone, or in combination with any third system, as demanded by unitarity. This conflict arises independently of the Page time, for entangled and for pure states. It implies that identifications of Hilbert spaces cannot resolve the paradox. Traditional complementarity requires the unitary identification of infalling matter with a scrambled subsystem of the Hawking radiation. Extending this map to the infalling vacuum overdetermines the out-state. More general complementarity maps (“A=RB,” “ER=EPR”) necessarily fail when the near-horizon zone is pure. I argue that pure-zone states span the microcanonical ensemble, and that this suffices to make the horizon a special place. I advocate that the ability to detect the horizon locally, rather than the degree or probability of violence, is what makes firewalls problematic. Conversely, if the production of matter at the horizon can be dynamically understood and shown to be consistent, then firewalls do not constitute a violation of the equivalence principle.

  19. 29 CFR 1926.601 - Motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motor vehicles. 1926.601 Section 1926.601 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and Marine Operations § 1926.601 Motor vehicles. (a) Coverage. Motor vehicles as covered by this part are those vehicles...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.601 - Motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motor vehicles. 1926.601 Section 1926.601 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and Marine Operations § 1926.601 Motor vehicles. (a) Coverage. Motor vehicles as covered by this part are those vehicles...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.601 - Motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motor vehicles. 1926.601 Section 1926.601 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and Marine Operations § 1926.601 Motor vehicles. (a) Coverage. Motor vehicles as covered by this part are those vehicles...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.601 - Motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Motor vehicles. 1926.601 Section 1926.601 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and Marine Operations § 1926.601 Motor vehicles. (a) Coverage. Motor vehicles as covered by this part are those vehicles...

  3. 30 CFR 18.34 - Motors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motors. 18.34 Section 18.34 Mineral Resources... PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.34 Motors. Explosion-proof electric motor assemblies intended for use in approved equipment in underground...

  4. 30 CFR 18.34 - Motors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motors. 18.34 Section 18.34 Mineral Resources... PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.34 Motors. Explosion-proof electric motor assemblies intended for use in approved equipment in underground...

  5. 30 CFR 18.34 - Motors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motors. 18.34 Section 18.34 Mineral Resources... PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.34 Motors. Explosion-proof electric motor assemblies intended for use in approved equipment in underground...

  6. 30 CFR 18.34 - Motors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Motors. 18.34 Section 18.34 Mineral Resources... PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.34 Motors. Explosion-proof electric motor assemblies intended for use in approved equipment in underground...

  7. Electric motor for laser-mechanical drilling

    DOEpatents

    Grubb, Daryl L.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2017-10-10

    A high power laser drilling system utilizing an electric motor laser bottom hole assembly. A high power laser beam travels within the electric motor for performing a laser operation. A system includes a down hole electrical motor having a hollow rotor for conveying a high power laser beam having a wavelength less than 1060 nm through the electrical motor.

  8. 29 CFR 1926.601 - Motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motor vehicles. 1926.601 Section 1926.601 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and Marine Operations § 1926.601 Motor vehicles. (a) Coverage. Motor vehicles as covered by this part are those...

  9. Electric motor for laser-mechanical drilling

    DOEpatents

    Grubb, Daryl L.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2015-07-07

    A high power laser drilling system utilizing an electric motor laser bottom hole assembly. A high power laser beam travels within the electric motor for advancing a borehole. High power laser drilling system includes a down hole electrical motor having a hollow rotor for conveying a high power laser beam through the electrical motor.

  10. Precision stop control for motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor); Montenegro, Justino (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved stop control system and method are provided for a motor having a drive mechanism in which the motor is coupled to a motor controller that controls the speed and position of the drive mechanism using a first signal indicative of a commanded position of the drive mechanism, a second signal indicative of the actual speed of the drive mechanism and a third signal indicative of the actual position of the drive mechanism. The improved system/method uses a first circuit that receives the first and third signal and generates an error signal indicative of a difference therebetween. A second circuit receives the error signal and compares same with a threshold position error. The result of this comparison is used to selectively supply the second signal (i.e., speed) to the motor controller at least whenever the error signal is less than the threshold position error so that the motor controller can use the second signal in conjunction with the third signal to stop the motor.

  11. Unconventional functions of microtubule motors.

    PubMed

    Muresan, Virgil; Muresan, Zoia

    2012-04-01

    With the functional characterization of proteins advancing at fast pace, the notion that one protein performs different functions - often with no relation to each other - emerges as a novel principle of how cells work. Molecular motors are no exception to this new development. Here, we provide an account on recent findings revealing that microtubule motors are multifunctional proteins that regulate many cellular processes, in addition to their main function in transport. Some of these functions rely on their motor activity, but others are independent of it. Of the first category, we focus on the role of microtubule motors in organelle biogenesis, and in the remodeling of the cytoskeleton, especially through the regulation of microtubule dynamics. Of the second category, we discuss the function of microtubule motors as static anchors of the cargo at the destination, and their participation in regulating signaling cascades by modulating interactions between signaling proteins, including transcription factors. We also review atypical forms of transport, such as the cytoplasmic streaming in the oocyte, and the movement of cargo by microtubule fluctuations. Our goal is to provide an overview of these unexpected functions of microtubule motors, and to incite future research in this expanding field.

  12. Sensory change following motor learning.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Andrew A G; Nasir, Sazzad M; Darainy, Mohammad; Ostry, David J

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe two studies linking perceptual change with motor learning. In the first, we document persistent changes in somatosensory perception that occur following force field learning. Subjects learned to control a robotic device that applied forces to the hand during arm movements. This led to a change in the sensed position of the limb that lasted at least 24 h. Control experiments revealed that the sensory change depended on motor learning. In the second study, we describe changes in the perception of speech sounds that occur following speech motor learning. Subjects adapted control of speech movements to compensate for loads applied to the jaw by a robot. Perception of speech sounds was measured before and after motor learning. Adapted subjects showed a consistent shift in perception. In contrast, no consistent shift was seen in control subjects and subjects that did not adapt to the load. These studies suggest that motor learning changes both sensory and motor function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. LTD, RP, and Motor Learning.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Tomoo; Yamazaki, Yoshito; Nakamura, Yoji

    2016-02-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) at excitatory synapses between parallel fibers and a Purkinje cell has been regarded as a critical cellular mechanism for motor learning. However, it was demonstrated that normal motor learning occurs under LTD suppression, suggesting that cerebellar plasticity mechanisms other than LTD also contribute to motor learning. One candidate for such plasticity is rebound potentiation (RP), which is long-term potentiation at inhibitory synapses between a stellate cell and a Purkinje cell. Both LTD and RP are induced by the increase in postsynaptic Ca(2+) concentration, and work to suppress the activity of a Purkinje cell. Thus, LTD and RP might work synergistically, and one might compensate defects of the other. RP induction is dependent on the interaction between GABAA receptor and GABAA receptor binding protein (GABARAP). Transgenic mice expressing a peptide which inhibits binding of GABARAP and GABAA receptor only in Purkinje cells show defects in both RP and adaptation of vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), a motor learning paradigm. However, another example of motor learning, adaptation of optokinetic response (OKR), is normal in the transgenic mice. Both VOR and OKR are reflex eye movements suppressing the slip of visual image on the retina during head movement. Previously, we reported that delphilin knockout mice show facilitated LTD induction and enhanced OKR adaptation, but we recently found that VOR adaptation was not enhanced in the knockout mice. These results together suggest that animals might use LTD and RP differently depending on motor learning tasks.

  14. Sensory Plasticity in Human Motor Learning.

    PubMed

    Ostry, David J; Gribble, Paul L

    2016-02-01

    There is accumulating evidence from behavioral, neurophysiological, and neuroimaging studies that the acquisition of motor skills involves both perceptual and motor learning. Perceptual learning alters movements, motor learning, and motor networks of the brain. Motor learning changes perceptual function and the sensory circuits of the brain. Here, we review studies of both human limb movement and speech that indicate that plasticity in sensory and motor systems is reciprocally linked. Taken together, this points to an approach to motor learning in which perceptual learning and sensory plasticity have a fundamental role.

  15. Sensory plasticity in human motor learning

    PubMed Central

    Ostry, David J; Gribble, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    Summary There is accumulating evidence from behavioural, neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies that the acquisition of motor skills involves both perceptual and motor learning. Perceptual learning alters movements, motor learning and motor networks of the brain. Motor learning changes perceptual function and the brain’s sensory circuits. Here we review studies of both human limb movement and speech which indicate that plasticity in sensory and motor systems is reciprocally linked. Taken together, this points to an approach to motor learning in which perceptual learning and sensory plasticity play a fundamental role. PMID:26774345

  16. Contained rocket motor burn demonstrations in X-tunnel: Final report for the DoD/DOE Joint Demilitarization Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    S. W. Allendorf; B. W. Bellow; R. f. Boehm

    2000-05-01

    Three low-pressure rocket motor propellant burn tests were performed in a large, sealed test chamber located at the X-tunnel complex on the Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site in the period May--June 1997. NIKE rocket motors containing double base propellant were used in two tests (two and four motors, respectively), and the third test used two improved HAWK rocket motors containing composite propellant. The preliminary containment safety calculations, the crack and burn procedures used in each test, and the results of various measurements made during and after each test are all summarized and collected in this document.

  17. The Infant Motor Profile: A Standardized and Qualitative Method to Assess Motor Behaviour in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineman, Kirsten R.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2008-01-01

    A reliable and valid instrument to assess neuromotor condition in infancy is a prerequisite for early detection of developmental motor disorders. We developed a video-based assessment of motor behaviour, the Infant Motor Profile (IMP), to evaluate motor abilities, movement variability, ability to select motor strategies, movement symmetry, and…

  18. 75 FR 67770 - General Motors Company, Formerly Known as General Motors Corporation, Orion Assembly Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Employment and Training Administration General Motors Company, Formerly Known as General Motors Corporation... Assistance on March 17, 2010, applicable to workers of General Motors Company, formerly known as General... the Lake Orion, Michigan location of General Motors Company, formerly known as General Motors...

  19. The Infant Motor Profile: A Standardized and Qualitative Method to Assess Motor Behaviour in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineman, Kirsten R.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2008-01-01

    A reliable and valid instrument to assess neuromotor condition in infancy is a prerequisite for early detection of developmental motor disorders. We developed a video-based assessment of motor behaviour, the Infant Motor Profile (IMP), to evaluate motor abilities, movement variability, ability to select motor strategies, movement symmetry, and…

  20. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  1. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  2. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  3. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  4. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle...

  5. Supplementary motor area (SMA) volume is associated with psychotic aberrant motor behaviour of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Stegmayer, Katharina; Horn, Helge; Federspiel, Andrea; Razavi, Nadja; Bracht, Tobias; Laimböck, Karin; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas; Wiest, Roland; Müller, Thomas J; Walther, Sebastian

    2014-07-30

    We aimed to investigate whether aberrant motor behavior in schizophrenia was associated with structural alterations in the motor system. Whole brain voxel based morphometry of patients with different severity of motor symptoms identified altered gray matter volume in the supplementary motor area (SMA), a key region of the motor system.

  6. Formation of cortical plasticity in older adults following tDCS and motor training.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Alicia M; Reynolds, John; Daly, Robin M; Kidgell, Dawson J

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegeneration accompanies the process of natural aging, reducing the ability to perform functional daily activities. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) alters neuronal excitability and motor performance; however its beneficial effect on the induction of primary motor cortex (M1) plasticity in older adults is unclear. Moreover, little is known as to whether the tDCS electrode arrangement differentially affects M1 plasticity and motor performance in this population. In a double-blinded, cross-over trial, we compared unilateral, bilateral and sham tDCS combined with visuomotor tracking, on M1 plasticity and motor performance of the non-dominant upper limb, immediately post and 30 min following stimulation. We found (a) unilateral and bilateral tDCS decreased tracking error by 12-22% at both time points; with sham decreasing tracking error by 10% at 30 min only, (b) at both time points, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were facilitated (38-54%) and short-interval intracortical inhibition was released (21-36%) for unilateral and bilateral conditions relative to sham, (c) there were no differences between unilateral and bilateral conditions for any measure. These findings suggest that tDCS modulated elements of M1 plasticity, which improved motor performance irrespective of the electrode arrangement. The results provide preliminary evidence indicating that tDCS is a safe non-invasive tool to preserve or improve neurological function and motor control in older adults.

  7. Motor cortical control of cardiovascular bulbar neurones projecting to spinal autonomic areas.

    PubMed

    Viltart, Odile; Mullier, Olivia; Bernet, François; Poulain, Pierre; Ba-M'Hamed, Saadia; Sequeira, Henrique

    2003-07-01

    There is evidence that the motor cortex is involved in cardiovascular adjustments associated with somatic motor activity, as it has functional connections with the ventrolateral medulla, a brainstem region critically involved in the control of blood pressure and the regulation of plasma catecholamine levels. The ventrolateral medulla sends projections to the spinal intermediolateral nucleus, where preganglionic neurones controlling heart and blood vessels (T2 segment) and adrenal medulla (T8 segment) are found. The aim of the present study was to determine whether electrical stimulation of the rat motor cortex induces cardiovascular responses and Fos expression in ventrolateral medulla neurones projecting to the T2 and T8 segments. After a set of experiments designed to record cardiovascular parameters (blood pressure and plasma catecholamine levels), injections of retrograde tracer (Fluorogold) were performed in the intermediolateral nucleus of two groups of rats, at the T2 or at the T8 segmental levels. Five days later, the motor cortex was stimulated in order to induce Fos expression in the ventrolateral medulla. Stimulation of the motor cortex induced: (1). hypotension and a significant decrease in plasma noradrenaline levels, and (2). a significant increase in the number of the double-labelled neurones in the rostral ventrolateral medulla projecting to T2. These data demonstrate that cardiovascular adjustments, preparatory to, or concomitant with, motor activity may be initiated in the motor cortex and transmitted to cardiac and vasomotor spinal preganglionic neurones, via the ventrolateral medulla. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Dynamic modeling and characteristics analysis of a modal-independent linear ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Yao, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Shengli; Lv, Qibao; Liu, Zhen

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, an integrated model is developed to analyze the fundamental characteristics of a modal-independent linear ultrasonic motor with double piezoelectric vibrators. The energy method is used to model the dynamics of the two piezoelectric vibrators. The interface forces are coupled into the dynamic equations of the two vibrators and the moving platform, forming a whole machine model of the motor. The behavior of the force transmission of the motor is analyzed via the resulting model to understand the drive mechanism. In particular, the relative contact length is proposed to describe the intermittent contact characteristic between the stator and the mover, and its role in evaluating motor performance is discussed. The relations between the output speed and various inputs to the motor and the start-stop transients of the motor are analyzed by numerical simulations, which are validated by experiments. Furthermore, the dead-zone behavior is predicted and clarified analytically using the proposed model, which is also observed in experiments. These results are useful for designing servo control scheme for the motor.

  9. Investigation of a rotary ultrasonic motor using a longitudinal vibrator and spiral fin rotor.

    PubMed

    Peng, Taijiang; Wu, Xiaoyu; Liang, Xiong; Shi, Hongyan; Luo, Feng

    2015-08-01

    A Langevin transducer can provide longitudinal vibration with larger amplitude while also possessing a greater fatigue life than other types of piezoelectric vibrators. A novel rotary Ultrasonic Motor (USM) was proposed based on the use of a longitudinal transducer (acting as the stator) and a spiral fin rotor: the front cover of the Langevin transducer was designed as a double-layer cup-shaped structure, with the rotor sustained by the inner-layer, and the bearing cover fixed to the outer-layer; the rotor consisted of a shaft and spiral fins which acted as the elastic coupler. It is different from a traditional traveling USM, because the stator provides longitudinal vibration and the rotor generates the elliptical motion. This paper analyzed the motion locus equation of the fin contact points. Additionally, a theoretical analysis was performed in regards to the mechanism and the motor's rotor motion characteristics, which demonstrates the relationships among the motor's driving force, the torque, the revolution speed, and the motor structure parameters. A motor prototype has been manufactured and surveyed to demonstrate the motor performance. The relationships between the amplitude and the preload on the rotor, the free revolution speed, and the torque of the motor have also been studied.

  10. Age-related motor neuron degeneration in DNA repair-deficient Ercc1 mice

    PubMed Central

    de Waard, Monique C.; Zuiderveen Borgesius, Nils; Comley, Laura H.; Haasdijk, Elize D.; Rijksen, Yvonne; Ridwan, Yanto; Zondag, Gerben; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Elgersma, Ype; Gillingwater, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Degeneration of motor neurons contributes to senescence-associated loss of muscle function and underlies human neurodegenerative conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy. The identification of genetic factors contributing to motor neuron vulnerability and degenerative phenotypes in vivo are therefore important for our understanding of the neuromuscular system in health and disease. Here, we analyzed neurodegenerative abnormalities in the spinal cord of progeroid Ercc1Δ/− mice that are impaired in several DNA repair systems, i.e. nucleotide excision repair, interstrand crosslink repair, and double strand break repair. Ercc1Δ/− mice develop age-dependent motor abnormalities, and have a shortened life span of 6–7 months. Pathologically, Ercc1Δ/− mice develop widespread astrocytosis and microgliosis, and motor neuron loss and denervation of skeletal muscle fibers. Degenerating motor neurons in many occasions expressed genotoxic-responsive transcription factors p53 or ATF3, and in addition, displayed a range of Golgi apparatus abnormalities. Furthermore, Ercc1Δ/− motor neurons developed perikaryal and axonal intermediate filament abnormalities reminiscent of cytoskeletal pathology observed in aging spinal cord. Our findings support the notion that accumulation of DNA damage and genotoxic stress may contribute to neuronal aging and motor neuron vulnerability in human neuromuscular disorders. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00401-010-0715-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20602234

  11. Lower Motor Neuron Findings after Upper Motor Neuron Injury: Insights from Postoperative Supplementary Motor Area Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Florman, Jeffrey E.; Duffau, Hugues; Rughani, Anand I.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertonia and hyperreflexia are classically described responses to upper motor neuron injury. However, acute hypotonia and areflexia with motor deficit are hallmark findings after many central nervous system insults such as acute stroke and spinal shock. Historic theories to explain these contradictory findings have implicated a number of potential mechanisms mostly relying on the loss of descending corticospinal input as the underlying etiology. Unfortunately, these simple descriptions consistently fail to adequately explain the pathophysiology and connectivity leading to acute hyporeflexia and delayed hyperreflexia that result from such insult. This article highlights the common observation of acute hyporeflexia after central nervous system insults and explores the underlying anatomy and physiology. Further, evidence for the underlying connectivity is presented and implicates the dominant role of supraspinal inhibitory influence originating in the supplementary motor area descending through the corticospinal tracts. Unlike traditional explanations, this theory more adequately explains the findings of postoperative supplementary motor area syndrome in which hyporeflexia motor deficit is observed acutely in the face of intact primary motor cortex connections to the spinal cord. Further, the proposed connectivity can be generalized to help explain other insults including stroke, atonic seizures, and spinal shock. PMID:23508473

  12. Neuromodulatory effect of bromazepam on motor learning: an electroencephalographic approach.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Marlo; Machado, Dionis; Bastos, Victor H; Ferreira, Camila; Cagy, Maurício; Basile, Luis; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2006-10-23

    To investigate the effects of bromazepam on motor performance and electroencephalographic activity (qEEG) in healthy subjects, during the process of learning a typewriting task, with a focused attention demand. A randomized double-blind model was used to allocate subjects in one of the following conditions: placebo (n=13), bromazepam 3 mg (n=13) or bromazepam 6 mg (n=13). Forty minutes after treatment administration, subjects were submitted to the motor task. EEG activity was recorded simultaneously. The analyzed variables were: number of errors and execution time, which were extracted from each block of the typewriting task, and mean relative power values in the beta band (13-35 Hz), extracted from the qEEG. A significantly lower number of typing errors was observed in both bromazepam conditions (Br 3 mg and Br 6 mg) when compared to the placebo. There was no difference between the two bromazepam conditions. For the execution time variable, a better performance was observed in the Br 3 mg condition, but with no statistical significance. The highest degree of cortical activation during the task was observed in Br 3 mg and Br 6 mg when compared to placebo. The medication's anxiolytic effect intensifies the attentional focus over predictable events occurring in reduced perceptual fields. The qEEG's accentuated response in pre-motor and primary motor areas suggests a greater effort directed to the most relevant aspects of the task. In short, the doses employed (3 and 6 mg) seem to enhance the learning of motor tasks that involve focused attention, such as typewriting.

  13. The influence of Oxytocin on automatic motor simulation.

    PubMed

    De Coster, Lize; Mueller, Sven C; T'Sjoen, Guy; De Saedeleer, Lien; Brass, Marcel

    2014-12-01

    Motor simulation is important for imitation, action understanding, and a wide range of social cognitive skills. Furthermore, the neuropeptide hormone Oxytocin (OT) has also been related to social information processing in humans, improving perception of social stimuli and increasing altruism and trust. Surprisingly, however, a direct link between OT and motor simulation has never been systematically investigated. The current study examined this question using the imitation-inhibition task, a paradigm used to investigate automatic imitation behaviour and motor simulation. In this task, participants carry out simple finger movements while observing irrelevant movements that either match (congruent condition) or do not match (incongruent condition) the instructed movements. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled design, male participants were administered either OT (N=24) or placebo (N=24), and subsequently performed the imitation-inhibition task. To ensure specificity of OT effects to imitative behaviour, participants additionally performed a Stroop colour-word interference task (adapted to optimize similarities with the imitation inhibition task) to rule out general effects on cognitive control. As predicted, OT selectively influenced the congruency effect in the imitation-inhibition task but not the congruency effect in the Stroop task. This effect showed that OT led to a larger congruency effect by slowing down reaction times on incongruent trials when observed and own actions did not match. The findings suggest that OT leads to a decrease of control over automatic imitative behaviour mediated by increased self-other merging. Thus, for the first time, a link between OT and motor simulation is demonstrated, providing a window into the role of OT in motoric aspects of social cognition.

  14. Manufacture and static firing of X259-E6 rocket motor serial number XJ04/0001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    A single motor was cast and static fired to demonstrate the performance of high energy crosslinked double base (XLDB) propellant in standard X259 rocket motor hardware. Prior to motor fabrication, the motor was analyzed to predict the results of static firing the X259 motor loaded with XLDB propellant. As a result of the analyses, a forward dome shrinkage liner was added to the design. With this design change it was determined that adequate margins of safety existed. The motor, designated the X259-E6 model with serial number XJ04/0001, was fabricated using a slurry-casting technique and was assembled with a standard X259-B4 nozzle which had the nozzle throat machined to a smaller inside diameter than the B4 model and the exit cone cut short for Bacchus Works altitude expansion. The motor was static fired on 20 February 1974 with the nozzle failing during motor operation. Nozzle failure was attributed to spalling of the throat material leading to complete nozzle break-up. However, the propellant functioned as predicted in the motor chamber, ignition was normal, and char and erosion of the internal insulator were as expected.

  15. Children with Autism and Attention Difficulties: A Pilot Study of the Association between Sensory, Motor, and Adaptive Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Mattard-Labrecque, Carolanne; Ben Amor, Leila; Couture, Mélanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This pilot study aimed to compare sensory processing, motor skills and adaptive behaviors in children with a double diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (ASD+ADHD) with children with ADHD alone and to examine the association of sensory processing and motor skills with adaptive behaviors (self-care). Method: Thirty children aged 5–14 years diagnosed with ASD+ADHD (n = 13) or ADHD (n = 17) were evaluated on their sensory processing and motor skills and adaptive behaviors. Analysis of covariance compared the groups on these dimensions. Correlation analyses examined the association between sensory processing and motor skills and adaptive behaviors. Results: Compared to children with ADHD alone, children with ASD+ADHD had poorer skills in sensory processing (p < 0.001), motor (p = 0.001) and adaptive behaviors (p < 0.001). For all children, increased autonomy in self-care was correlated with better sensory processing (p < 0.001) and motor skills (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Children with ASD+ADHD have poorer sensory processing, motor and adaptive skills than those with ADHD alone. Sensory processing and motor deficits were negatively associated with autonomy in self-care. Interventions aiming to improve sensory processing and motor skills and autonomy in self-care should become important targets for these children. PMID:23667360

  16. Colored Flag by Double Refraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Bill

    1994-01-01

    Describes various demonstrations that illustrate double refraction and rotation of the plane of polarization in stressed, transparent plastics, with the consequent production of colored designs. (ZWH)

  17. Colored Flag by Double Refraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Bill

    1994-01-01

    Describes various demonstrations that illustrate double refraction and rotation of the plane of polarization in stressed, transparent plastics, with the consequent production of colored designs. (ZWH)

  18. Apple Valley Double Star Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The High Desert Astronomical Society hosts an annual double star workshop, where participants measure the position angles and separations of double stars. Following the New Generation Science Standards (NGSS), adopted by the California State Board of Education, participants are assigned to teams where they learn the process of telescope set-up and operation, the gathering of data, and the reduction of the data. Team results are compared to the latest epoch listed in the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) and papers are written for publication in the Journal of Double Star Observations (JDSO). Each team presents a PowerPoint presentation to their peers about actual hands-on astronomical research.

  19. Double integrated laser interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motyka, Zbigniew

    2003-10-01

    The layout of integrated optical system compromising the basis of proposed solution of double laser interferometer composed of two integrated Michelson's interferometers is presented and shortly discussed. Such an integrated system is designed for work with two lasers of different wavelength. It may serve for mapping surfaces and deformations of objects under investigation with the use of simultaneous recording of two mutually orthogonal gratings, each one composed of equidistant, parallel interference fringes projected onto the surface of such an object. The picture resulting two-coloured is recorded with the digital camera and may be used for obtaining these maps and deformations directly or in the indirect way after suitable digital processing applied to each colour component separately.

  20. Double beta decay: Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brofferio, Chiara

    2008-11-01

    Calorimeters or, with a more specific definition, low temperature detectors, have been used by now for more than 15 years in Double Beta Decay (DBD) searches, with excellent results: they compete with Ge diodes for the rank of detectors with the highest sensitivity to the effective neutrino mass, which is defined as a linear combination of the neutrino mass eigenvalues. After a brief introduction to the argument, with some notes on DBD and on bolometers, an update on the now closed experiment CUORICINO and on its successor, CUORE, is given. The fundamental role of background is then revealed and commented, introducing in this way the importance of the specific experiment now under construction, CUORE-0, that will precede CUORE to help optimizing the struggle against surface background. The possible future of this technique is then commented, quoting important R&D studies that are going on, for active shielding bolometers and for scintillating bolometers coupled with light detecting bolometers.

  1. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Ettore

    2007-06-01

    The recent results showing the presence of neutrino oscillations clearly indicate that the difference between the squared mass of neutrinos of different flavors is different from zero, but are unable to determine the nature and the absolute value of the neutrino mass. Neutrinoless double beta decay (DBD) is at present the most powerful tool to ascertain if the neutrino is a Majorana particle and to determine under this condition the absolute value of its mass. The results already obtained in this lepton violating process will be reported and the two presently running DBD experiments briefly discussed. The future second generation experiments will be reviewed with special emphasis to those already partially approved. In conclusion the peculiar and interdisciplinary nature of these searches will be stressed in their exciting aim to discover if neutrino is Dirac or Majorana particle.

  2. Emergence of Motor Circuit Activity

    PubMed Central

    Law, Chris; Paquet, Michel; Kania, Artur

    2014-01-01

    In the developing nervous system, ordered neuronal activity patterns can occur even in the absence of sensory input and to investigate how these arise, we have used the model system of the embryonic chicken spinal motor circuit, focusing on motor neurons of the lateral motor column (LMC). At the earliest stages of their molecular differentiation, we can detect differences between medial and lateral LMC neurons in terms of expression of neurotransmitter receptor subunits, including CHRNA5, CHRNA7, GRIN2A, GRIK1, HTR1A and HTR1B, as well as the KCC2 transporter. Using patch-clamp recordings we also demonstrate that medial and lateral LMC motor neurons have subtly different activity patterns that reflect the differential expression of neurotransmitter receptor subunits. Using a combination of patch-clamp recordings in single neurons and calcium-imaging of motor neuron populations, we demonstrate that inhibition of nicotinic, muscarinic or GABA-ergic activity, has profound effects of motor circuit activity during the initial stages of neuromuscular junction formation. Finally, by analysing the activity of large populations of motor neurons at different developmental stages, we show that the asynchronous, disordered neuronal activity that occurs at early stages of circuit formation develops into organised, synchronous activity evident at the stage of LMC neuron muscle innervation. In light of the considerable diversity of neurotransmitter receptor expression, activity patterns in the LMC are surprisingly similar between neuronal types, however the emergence of patterned activity, in conjunction with the differential expression of transmitter systems likely leads to the development of near-mature patterns of locomotor activity by perinatal ages. PMID:24722186

  3. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.; Nyilas, C.P.; Denmeade, T.J.

    1997-08-19

    A transfer pump is described which is used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank. 17 figs.

  4. Adenosine triphosphatases of thermophilic archaeal double-stranded DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) of double-stranded (ds) DNA archaeal viruses are structurally related to the AAA+ hexameric helicases and translocases. These ATPases have been implicated in viral life cycle functions such as DNA entry into the host, and viral genome packaging into preformed procapsids. We summarize bioinformatical analyses of a wide range of archaeal ATPases, and review the biochemical and structural properties of those archaeal ATPases that have measurable ATPase activity. We discuss their potential roles in genome delivery into the host, virus assembly and genome packaging in comparison to hexameric helicases and packaging motors from bacteriophages. PMID:25105011

  5. Neural substrates underlying stimulation-enhanced motor skill learning after stroke.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Stéphanie; Dricot, Laurence; Laloux, Patrice; Gradkowski, Wojciech; Desfontaines, Philippe; Evrard, Frédéric; Peeters, André; Jamart, Jacques; Vandermeeren, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Motor skill learning is one of the key components of motor function recovery after stroke, especially recovery driven by neurorehabilitation. Transcranial direct current stimulation can enhance neurorehabilitation and motor skill learning in stroke patients. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the retention of stimulation-enhanced motor skill learning involving a paretic upper limb have not been resolved. These neural substrates were explored by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging. Nineteen chronic hemiparetic stroke patients participated in a double-blind, cross-over randomized, sham-controlled experiment with two series. Each series consisted of two sessions: (i) an intervention session during which dual transcranial direct current stimulation or sham was applied during motor skill learning with the paretic upper limb; and (ii) an imaging session 1 week later, during which the patients performed the learned motor skill. The motor skill learning task, called the 'circuit game', involves a speed/accuracy trade-off and consists of moving a pointer controlled by a computer mouse along a complex circuit as quickly and accurately as possible. Relative to the sham series, dual transcranial direct current stimulation applied bilaterally over the primary motor cortex during motor skill learning with the paretic upper limb resulted in (i) enhanced online motor skill learning; (ii) enhanced 1-week retention; and (iii) superior transfer of performance improvement to an untrained task. The 1-week retention's enhancement driven by the intervention was associated with a trend towards normalization of the brain activation pattern during performance of the learned motor skill relative to the sham series. A similar trend towards normalization relative to sham was observed during performance of a simple, untrained task without a speed/accuracy constraint, despite a lack of behavioural difference between the dual transcranial direct current stimulation and sham

  6. Neural substrates underlying stimulation-enhanced motor skill learning after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Stéphanie; Dricot, Laurence; Laloux, Patrice; Gradkowski, Wojciech; Desfontaines, Philippe; Evrard, Frédéric; Peeters, André; Jamart, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Motor skill learning is one of the key components of motor function recovery after stroke, especially recovery driven by neurorehabilitation. Transcranial direct current stimulation can enhance neurorehabilitation and motor skill learning in stroke patients. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the retention of stimulation-enhanced motor skill learning involving a paretic upper limb have not been resolved. These neural substrates were explored by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging. Nineteen chronic hemiparetic stroke patients participated in a double-blind, cross-over randomized, sham-controlled experiment with two series. Each series consisted of two sessions: (i) an intervention session during which dual transcranial direct current stimulation or sham was applied during motor skill learning with the paretic upper limb; and (ii) an imaging session 1 week later, during which the patients performed the learned motor skill. The motor skill learning task, called the ‘circuit game’, involves a speed/accuracy trade-off and consists of moving a pointer controlled by a computer mouse along a complex circuit as quickly and accurately as possible. Relative to the sham series, dual transcranial direct current stimulation applied bilaterally over the primary motor cortex during motor skill learning with the paretic upper limb resulted in (i) enhanced online motor skill learning; (ii) enhanced 1-week retention; and (iii) superior transfer of performance improvement to an untrained task. The 1-week retention’s enhancement driven by the intervention was associated with a trend towards normalization of the brain activation pattern during performance of the learned motor skill relative to the sham series. A similar trend towards normalization relative to sham was observed during performance of a simple, untrained task without a speed/accuracy constraint, despite a lack of behavioural difference between the dual transcranial direct current stimulation and

  7. Nkx2.2 and Nkx2.9 are the key regulators to determine cell fate of branchial and visceral motor neurons in caudal hindbrain.

    PubMed

    Jarrar, Wassan; Dias, Jose M; Ericson, Johan; Arnold, Hans-Henning; Holz, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cranial motor nerves in vertebrates are comprised of the three principal subtypes of branchial, visceral, and somatic motor neurons, which develop in typical patterns along the anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes of hindbrain. Here we demonstrate that the formation of branchial and visceral motor neurons critically depends on the transcription factors Nkx2.2 and Nkx2.9, which together determine the cell fate of neuronal progenitor cells. Disruption of both genes in mouse embryos results in complete loss of the vagal and spinal accessory motor nerves, and partial loss of the facial and glossopharyngeal motor nerves, while the purely somatic hypoglossal and abducens motor nerves are not diminished. Cell lineage analysis in a genetically marked mouse line reveals that alterations of cranial nerves in Nkx2.2; Nkx2.9 double-deficient mouse embryos result from changes of cell fate in neuronal progenitor cells. As a consequence progenitors of branchiovisceral motor neurons in the ventral p3 domain of hindbrain are transformed to somatic motor neurons, which use ventral exit points to send axon trajectories to their targets. Cell fate transformation is limited to the caudal hindbrain, as the trigeminal nerve is not affected in double-mutant embryos suggesting that Nkx2.2 and Nkx2.9 proteins play no role in the development of branchiovisceral motor neurons in hindbrain rostral to rhombomere 4.

  8. A nano universal joint made from curved double-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Kun; Cai, Haifang; Shi, Jiao; Qin, Qing H.

    2015-06-15

    A nano universal joint is constructed from curved double-wall carbon nanotubes with a short outer tube as stator and a long inner tube as a rotor. When one end of the rotor is driven (by a rotary motor) to rotate, the same rotational speed but with different rotational direction will be induced at the other end of the rotor. This mechanism makes the joint useful for designing a flexible nanodevice with an adjustable output rotational signal. The motion transmission effect of the universal joint is analyzed using a molecular dynamics simulation approach. In particular, the effects of three factors are investigated. The first factor is the curvature of the stator, which produces a different rotational direction of the rotor at the output end. The second is the bonding conditions of carbon atoms on the adjacent tube ends of the motor and the rotor, sp{sup 1} or sp{sup 2} atoms, which create different attraction between the motor and the rotor. The third is the rotational speed of the motor, which can be considered as the input signal of the universal joint. It is noted that the rotor's rotational speed is usually the same as that of the motor when the carbon atoms on the adjacent ends of the motor and the rotor are sp{sup 1} carbon atoms. When they become the new sp{sup 2} atoms, the rotor experiences a jump in rotational speed from a lower value to that of the motor. The mechanism of drops in potential of the motor is revealed. If the carbon atoms on the adjacent ends are sp{sup 2} atoms, the rotor rotates more slowly than the motor, whereas the rotational speed is stable when driven by a higher speed motor.

  9. Improve Motor Operation at Off-Design Voltages - Motor Tip Sheet #9

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Motors are designed to operate within +/- 10% of their nameplate rated voltages. When motors operate at conditions of over- or under-voltage, motor efficiency and other performance parameters are degraded.

  10. 75 FR 76692 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Small Business Impacts of Motor Vehicle Safety

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ..., and 571 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Small Business Impacts of Motor Vehicle Safety AGENCY... passenger vehicles, trucks, buses, trailers, incomplete vehicles, motorcycles, and motor vehicle equipment... impacts. 523 Vehicle classification. 525 Exemptions from average fuel economy standards. 526 Petitions...

  11. Motor cortical plasticity induced by motor learning through mental practice

    PubMed Central

    Avanzino, Laura; Gueugneau, Nicolas; Bisio, Ambra; Ruggeri, Piero; Papaxanthis, Charalambos; Bove, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Several investigations suggest that actual and mental actions trigger similar neural substrates. Motor learning via physical practice results in long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity processes, namely potentiation of M1 and a temporary occlusion of additional LTP-like plasticity. However, whether this neuroplasticity process contributes to improve motor performance through mental practice remains to be determined. Here, we tested skill learning-dependent changes in primary motor cortex (M1) excitability and plasticity by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in subjects trained to physically execute or mentally perform a sequence of finger opposition movements. Before and after physical practice and motor-imagery practice, M1 excitability was evaluated by measuring the input-output (IO) curve of motor evoked potentials. M1 LTP and long-term depression (LTD)-like plasticity was assessed with paired-associative stimulation (PAS) of the median nerve and motor cortex using an interstimulus interval of 25 ms (PAS25) or 10 ms (PAS10), respectively. We found that even if after both practice sessions subjects significantly improved their movement speed, M1 excitability and plasticity were differentially influenced by the two practice sessions. First, we observed an increase in the slope of IO curve after physical but not after MI practice. Second, there was a reversal of the PAS25 effect from LTP-like plasticity to LTD-like plasticity following physical and MI practice. Third, LTD-like plasticity (PAS10 protocol) increased after physical practice, whilst it was occluded after MI practice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that MI practice lead to the development of neuroplasticity, as it affected the PAS25- and PAS10- induced plasticity in M1. These results, expanding the current knowledge on how MI training shapes M1 plasticity, might have a potential impact in rehabilitation. PMID:25972791

  12. Motor cortical plasticity induced by motor learning through mental practice.

    PubMed

    Avanzino, Laura; Gueugneau, Nicolas; Bisio, Ambra; Ruggeri, Piero; Papaxanthis, Charalambos; Bove, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Several investigations suggest that actual and mental actions trigger similar neural substrates. Motor learning via physical practice results in long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity processes, namely potentiation of M1 and a temporary occlusion of additional LTP-like plasticity. However, whether this neuroplasticity process contributes to improve motor performance through mental practice remains to be determined. Here, we tested skill learning-dependent changes in primary motor cortex (M1) excitability and plasticity by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in subjects trained to physically execute or mentally perform a sequence of finger opposition movements. Before and after physical practice and motor-imagery practice, M1 excitability was evaluated by measuring the input-output (IO) curve of motor evoked potentials. M1 LTP and long-term depression (LTD)-like plasticity was assessed with paired-associative stimulation (PAS) of the median nerve and motor cortex using an interstimulus interval of 25 ms (PAS25) or 10 ms (PAS10), respectively. We found that even if after both practice sessions subjects significantly improved their movement speed, M1 excitability and plasticity were differentially influenced by the two practice sessions. First, we observed an increase in the slope of IO curve after physical but not after MI practice. Second, there was a reversal of the PAS25 effect from LTP-like plasticity to LTD-like plasticity following physical and MI practice. Third, LTD-like plasticity (PAS10 protocol) increased after physical practice, whilst it was occluded after MI practice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that MI practice lead to the development of neuroplasticity, as it affected the PAS25- and PAS10- induced plasticity in M1. These results, expanding the current knowledge on how MI training shapes M1 plasticity, might have a potential impact in rehabilitation.

  13. Modulation of motor cortex inhibition during motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Chong, Benjamin W X; Stinear, Cathy M

    2017-04-01

    Motor imagery (MI) is similar to overt movement, engaging common neural substrates and facilitating the corticomotor pathway; however, it does not result in excitatory descending motor output. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be used to assess inhibitory networks in the primary motor cortex via measures of 1-ms short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI), and late cortical disinhibition (LCD). These measures are thought to reflect extrasynaptic GABAA tonic inhibition, postsynaptic GABAB inhibition, and presynaptic GABAB disinhibition, respectively. The behavior of 1-ms SICI, LICI, and LCD during MI has not yet been explored. This study aimed to investigate how 1-ms SICI, LICI, and LCD are modulated during MI and voluntary relaxation (VR) of a target muscle. Twenty-five healthy young adults participated. TMS was used to assess nonconditioned motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, 1-ms SICI, 100- (LICI100) and 150-ms LICI, and LCD in the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and right abductor digiti minimi during rest, MI, and VR of the hand. Compared with rest, MEP amplitudes were facilitated in APB during MI. SICI was not affected by task or muscle. LICI100 decreased in both muscles during VR but not MI, whereas LCD was recruited in both muscles during both tasks. This indicates that VR modulates postsynaptic GABAB inhibition, whereas both tasks modulate presynaptic GABAB inhibition in a non-muscle-specific way. This study highlights further neurophysiological parallels between actual and imagined movement, which may extend to voluntary relaxation.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first study to investigate how 1-ms short-interval intracortical inhibition, long-interval intracortical inhibition, and late cortical disinhibition are modulated during motor imagery and voluntary muscle relaxation. We present novel findings of decreased 100-ms long-interval intracortical inhibition during voluntary muscle

  14. Early identification of motor delay

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the Harris Infant Neuromotor Test (HINT), an infant neuromotor test using Canadian norms published in 2010 that could be used to screen for motor delay during the first year of life. Quality of evidence Extensive research has been published on the intrarater, interrater, and test-retest reliability and the content, concurrent, predictive, and known-groups validity of the HINT, as well as on the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of parental concerns, as assessed by the HINT. Most evidence is level II. Main message Diagnosing motor delays during the first year of life is important because these often indicate more generalized developmental delays or specific disabilities, such as cerebral palsy. Parental concerns about their children’s motor development are strongly predictive of subsequent diagnoses involving motor delay. Conclusion Only through early identification of developmental motor delays, initially with screening tools such as the HINT, is it possible to provide referrals for early intervention that could benefit both the infant and the family. PMID:27521388

  15. Low-power superconducting motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, X.; López, J.; Bosch, R.; Bartolomé, E.; Lloberas, J.; Maynou, R.; Puig, T.; Obradors, X.

    2008-03-01

    Since the discovery and development of adequate superconducting materials, the development of motors has been a challenge for applications. The basis of design, however, has been the substitution of copper wires by superconducting tapes in coils in order to obtain a higher working field, thus improving power density and efficiency. In the case of high-power motors, the benefit is clear. The cost of the materials, cryogenics and building procedures could be assumed by the clear benefit in size, weight, efficiency, and, in some cases, reliability. Otherwise, low-power motors require a different treatment. Superconducting wires are insufficiently developed to produce small coils for a high field with the adequate shape. Air gaps are more critical than in large motors and cost has a major impact. Only very specific applications, in which standard technology cannot give a reliable and satisfactory solution, could benefit from superconductivity. This paper summarizes our work realized by applying superconducting pellets in low-power motors, thus improving their power density, reliability, dynamics and regularity. Applications to cryogenics, control and high speed have been our focus.

  16. Filament overwrapped motor case technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Joel P.

    1993-11-01

    Atlantic Research Corporation (ARC) joined with the French Societe Europeenne de Propulsion (SEP) to develop and deliver to the U.S. Navy a small quantity of composite filament wound rocket motors to demonstrate a manufacturing technique that was being applied at the two companies. It was perceived that the manufacturing technique could produce motors that would be light in weight, inexpensive to produce, and that had a good chance of meeting insensitive munitions (IM) requirements that were being formulated by the Navy in the early 1980s. Under subcontract to ARC, SEP designed, tested, and delivered 2.75-inch rocket motors to the U.S. Navy for IM tests that were conducted in 1989 at China Lake, California. The program was one of the first to be founded by Nunn Amendment money. The Government-to-Government program was sponsored by the Naval Air Systems Command and was monitored by the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head (NSWC-IH), Maryland. The motor propellant that was employed was a new, extruded composite formulation that was under development at the Naval Surface Warfare Center. The following paper describes the highlights of the program and gives the results of structural and ballistic static tests and insensitive munitions tests that were conducted on demonstration motors.

  17. Differentiating lower motor neuron syndromes.

    PubMed

    Garg, Nidhi; Park, Susanna B; Vucic, Steve; Yiannikas, Con; Spies, Judy; Howells, James; Huynh, William; Matamala, José M; Krishnan, Arun V; Pollard, John D; Cornblath, David R; Reilly, Mary M; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2017-06-01

    Lower motor neuron (LMN) syndromes typically present with muscle wasting and weakness and may arise from pathology affecting the distal motor nerve up to the level of the anterior horn cell. A variety of hereditary causes are recognised, including spinal muscular atrophy, distal hereditary motor neuropathy and LMN variants of familial motor neuron disease. Recent genetic advances have resulted in the identification of a variety of disease-causing mutations. Immune-mediated disorders, including multifocal motor neuropathy and variants of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, account for a proportion of LMN presentations and are important to recognise, as effective treatments are available. The present review will outline the spectrum of LMN syndromes that may develop in adulthood and provide a framework for the clinician assessing a patient presenting with predominantly LMN features. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Three phase AC motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Vuckovich, Michael; Wright, Maynard K.; Burkett, John P.

    1984-03-20

    A motor controller for a three phase AC motor (10) which is adapted to operate bidirectionally from signals received either from a computer (30) or a manual control (32). The controller is comprised of digital logic circuit means which implement a forward and reverse command signal channel (27, 29) for the application of power through the forward and reverse power switching relays (16, 18, 20, 22). The digital logic elements are cross coupled to prevent activation of both channels simultaneously and each includes a plugging circuit (65, 67) for stopping the motor upon the removal of control signal applied to one of the two channels (27, 29) for a direction of rotation desired. Each plugging circuit (65, 67) includes a one-shot pulse signal generator (88, 102) which outputs a single pulse signal of predetermined pulsewidth which is adapted to inhibit further operation of the application of power in the channel which is being activated and to apply a reversal command signal to the other channel which provides a reversed phase application of power to the motor for a period defined by the pulse-width output of the one-shot signal generator to plug the motor (10) which will then be inoperative until another rotational command signal is applied to either of the two channels.

  19. An ultrasonic motor model for bacterial flagellar motors.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, T

    2001-11-07

    A model for the transduction of energy occurring in bacterial flagellar motors is presented. In this model, the influx of ions across the channel causes the cyclic conformational change of the channel itself, which in turn produces travelling waves in one of the subcomponents of the motor, the C ring. This wave stabilizes the cyclical movement of the channel which generates the rotating force. The estimated frequency of cyclic conformational change is between 36 kHz and 6.3 MHz, i.e. in the ultrasonic range. This phenomenon is therefore referred to as the ultrasonic micromotor of microorganisms. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  20. [Improvements in motor and non-motor symptoms in parkinson patients under ropinirole therapy].

    PubMed

    Buchwald, B; Angersbach, D; Jost, W H

    2007-04-01

    Ropinirole is a non-ergoline selective D2 dopamine agonist. Its efficacy and safety has been established in several controlled double-blind studies in patients with early and advanced Parkinson's disease. It is assumed that the improvement in the activities of daily living under ropinirole is not only due to the improved motor symptoms but also due to the improvement of non-motor symptoms like symptoms of mood and anxiety. The objective of this post marketing surveillance study was to show that under the conditions of the daily routine in the neurologic practice ropinirole may not only improve motor symptoms, the activity of daily living and complications of the treatment (dystonia, dyskinesia) but also alleviate symptoms of depression and anxiety. A total of 110 neurological practices enrolled 327 patients in early and advanced stages of the disease (139 females, 188-males; mean age: 67 years). They were treated with ropinirole as monotherapy and as adjunctive therapy with l-dopa over a period of 12 - 14 weeks. Selected symptoms of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II-IV and symptoms of depression and anxiety were rated by the clinicians. Mood and functional impairment in job, family and social life were rated by the patients using selected items of the Beck Depression Inventory and the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS). The different subtypes, i. e. the akinetic-rigid, tremor-dominant and the mixed subtype, are described separately. The total UPDRS score at baseline was similar for all three subtypes and there was also a similar improvement in the three groups under ropinirole. Both according to self-rating and to clinician rating the symptoms of depression and anxiety at baseline were more severe in the akinetic-rigid and the mixed subtype compared to the tremor-dominant subtype. The symptoms considerably improved and were reduced by 48 % under therapy with ropinirole. Adverse events were reported by 7.7 % of the patients. The surveillance

  1. A miniscale ballistic test motor for propellant burning rate characterization from one motor firing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rast, Robert H.; Boyles, Sharon M.; Obney, Phyllis

    1992-07-01

    A mini ballistic test motor for burn rate characterization from one motor firing has been developed. The small charge weight required for this motor allows ballistic characterization of small scale lot set evaluation and R&D propellant mixes in a rocket motor environment. This paper presents results comparing the mini-motor to the standard Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head (IHDIVNAVSURFWARCEN) ballistic test motor, (BTM). Burn rate data from the standard BTM and mini BTM show excellent agreement.

  2. Learning in the Rodent Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Peters, Andrew J; Liu, Haixin; Komiyama, Takaki

    2017-03-31

    The motor cortex is far from a stable conduit for motor commands and instead undergoes significant changes during learning. An understanding of motor cortex plasticity has been advanced greatly using rodents as experimental animals. Two major focuses of this research have been on the connectivity and activity of the motor cortex. The motor cortex exhibits structural changes in response to learning, and substantial evidence has implicated the local formation and maintenance of new synapses as crucial substrates of motor learning. This synaptic reorganization translates into changes in spiking activity, which appear to result in a modification and refinement of the relationship between motor cortical activity and movement. This review presents the progress that has been made using rodents to establish the motor cortex as an adaptive structure that supports motor learning. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Neuroscience Volume 40 is July 8, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  3. Control Circuit For Two Stepping Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratliff, Roger; Rehmann, Kenneth; Backus, Charles

    1990-01-01

    Control circuit operates two independent stepping motors, one at a time. Provides following operating features: After selected motor stepped to chosen position, power turned off to reduce dissipation; Includes two up/down counters that remember at which one of eight steps each motor set. For selected motor, step indicated by illumination of one of eight light-emitting diodes (LED's) in ring; Selected motor advanced one step at time or repeatedly at rate controlled; Motor current - 30 mA at 90 degree positions, 60 mA at 45 degree positions - indicated by high or low intensity of LED that serves as motor-current monitor; Power-on reset feature provides trouble-free starts; To maintain synchronism between control circuit and motors, stepping of counters inhibited when motor power turned off.

  4. Electric motors: Markets, trends, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Electric motors play an important role in nearly all sectors of the US economy. Typical motor applications range from air conditioning and appliances in the residential sector, to cooling and space heating in the commercial sector, to materials handling and processing in the industrial sectors. Motors in the residential sector consumed nearly 352 billion kilowatthours (BkWh) in 1985, in the commercial sector 279 BkWh, and the industrial sector 552 BkWh. Approximately 87% of electric motor electricity use in the industrial sector was consumed in manufacturing processes, while the process industries consumed more than half of the manufacturing sector's electric motor electricity use. The total motor population in all sectors in 1987 stood just shy of 1.02 billion, 90% of which are less than one horsepower (HP) in size. An increasing percentage of the motor population is comprised of high efficiency motors, as classified by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA). High efficiency motors offer end-users greater energy and cost savings than do their standard efficiency counterparts. This report provides an overview of the history of the electric motor, a brief description of the electromechanical theory behind motor operations, and offers a statistical review of the size and distribution of the electric motor market. The report also presents data on sector motor electricity use, describes current and potential motor application opportunities, and details areas in which further research and development may be needed.

  5. Bromazepam impairs motor response: an ERSP study.

    PubMed

    Silva, Julio G; Arias-Carrion, Oscar; Paes, Flavia; Velasques, Bruna; Teixeira, Silmar; Basile, Luis F H; Cagy, Mauricio; Piedade, Roberto; Nardi, Antonio E; Machado, Sergio; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the acute modulatory effect of bromazepam, a benzodiazepine derivative drug, on alpha and beta bands (8-35Hz) in primary motor areas (M1) through event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP). Ten healthy subjects were submitted to a cross-over double-blind design. Subjects performed a visuomotor task where they had to identify rapidly the ball launched horizontally and catch it quickly, while electroencephalographic activity was acquired. We found a statistically significant difference on the time windows of 2920 ms for 13Hz in the electrodes C3 and Cz, and on the time window of 2000 ms for 18Hz in the electrodes C3, when compared the bromazepam and placebo conditions. We concluded that the acute effects of bromazepam provoked changes in information process in the left M1 represented by electrode C3 in both 13 Hz and 18 Hz. Our paradigm is relevant for a better understanding of the brain dynamics due to the information related to bromazepam effects on sensorimotor processes. We consider this report an invitation to conduct more studies in order to associate electro-cortical activity and psychometric tests.

  6. Rad54, the Motor of Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Mazin, Alexander V.; Mazina, Olga M.; Bugreev, Dmitry V.; Rossi, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) performs crucial functions including DNA repair, segregation of homologous chromosomes, propagation of genetic diversity, and maintenance of telomeres. HR is responsible for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA interstrand cross-links. The process of HR is initiated at the site of DNA breaks and gaps and involves a search for homologous sequences promoted by Rad51 and auxiliary proteins followed by the subsequent invasion of broken DNA ends into the homologous duplex DNA that then serves as a template for repair. The invasion produces a cross-stranded structure, known as the Holliday junction. Here, we describe the properties of Rad54, an important and versatile HR protein that is evolutionarily conserved in eukaryotes. Rad54 is a motor protein that translocates along dsDNA and performs several important functions in HR. The current review focuses on the recently identified Rad54 activities which contribute to the late phase of HR, especially the branch migration of Holliday junctions. PMID:20089461

  7. Syncope and Motor Vehicle Crash Risk: A Danish Nationwide Study.

    PubMed

    Numé, Anna-Karin; Gislason, Gunnar; Christiansen, Christine B; Zahir, Deewa; Hlatky, Mark A; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Ruwald, Martin H

    2016-04-01

    Syncope may have serious consequences for traffic safety. Current clinical guideline recommendations on driving following syncope are primarily based on expert consensus. To identify whether there is excess risk of motor vehicle crashes among patients with syncope compared with the general population. Danish nationwide cohort study from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2012. Through individual-level linkage of nationwide administrative registers, all Danish residents 18 years or older were identified. Of 4 265 301 eligible Danish residents, we identified 41 039 individuals with a first-time diagnosis of syncope from emergency department or hospital. Rate of motor vehicle crashes (including nonfatal and fatal crashes), based on multivariate Poisson regression models, using the total Danish population as reference. The 41 039 patients with syncope had a median age of 66 years (interquartile range [IQR], 47-78 years); 51.0% were women; and 34.8% had cardiovascular disease. Through a median follow-up of 2.0 years (IQR, 0.8-3.3 years), 1791 patients with syncope (4.4%) had a motor vehicle crash, 78.1% of which led to injury (n = 1398) and 0.3% to death (n = 6). The crude incidence rate of motor vehicle crashes was almost doubled among patients with syncope (20.6 per 1000 person-years; 95% CI, 19.7-21.6) compared with the general population (12.1; 95% CI, 12.0-12.1), with a rate ratio (RR) of 1.83 (95% CI, 1.74-1.91) after adjustment for age, sex, socioeconomic position, and relevant comorbidities and pharmacotherapy. Men had a relatively higher rate of motor vehicle crashes (RR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.79-2.03) than women (RR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.63-1.87). The excess risk of motor vehicle crashes persisted throughout the follow-up period. The 5-year crash risk following syncope was 8.2% (95% CI, 7.5%-8.8%) among the population aged 18 to 69 years compared with 5.1% (95% CI, 4.7%-5.4%) in the general population. Prior hospitalization for syncope was associated with

  8. New Galactic Double Periodic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennickent, R. E.; Rosales, J.

    2014-10-01

    We discovered two new Double Periodic Variables in the ASAS catalogue of variable stars, viz., V495 Cen and V4142 Sgr. Other 3 candidates for Double Periodic Variables were found. All systems have relatively long orbital periods. We present improved ephemerides and disentangled light curves.

  9. Empirically Unbinding the Double Bind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, David H.

    The theoretical concept of the double bind and the possibilities for researching it are discussed. The author has observed that theory and research, which should be reciprocal and mutually beneficial, have been working, as concerns the double bind, at odds with one another. Two approaches to empirically investigating the concept are considered via…

  10. Remote control for motor vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale R. (Inventor); Ciciora, John A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A remote controller is disclosed for controlling the throttle, brake and steering mechanism of a conventional motor vehicle, with the remote controller being particularly advantageous for use by severely handicapped individuals. The controller includes a remote manipulator which controls a plurality of actuators through interfacing electronics. The remote manipulator is a two-axis joystick which controls a pair of linear actuators and a rotary actuator, with the actuators being powered by electric motors to effect throttle, brake and steering control of a motor vehicle adapted to include the controller. The controller enables the driver to control the adapted vehicle from anywhere in the vehicle with one hand with minimal control force and range of motion. In addition, even though a conventional vehicle is adapted for use with the remote controller, the vehicle may still be operated in the normal manner.

  11. Neuroplasticity subserving motor skill learning

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Eran; Cohen, Leonardo G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Recent years have seen significant progress in our understanding of the neural substrates of motor skill learning. Advances in neuroimaging provide new insight into functional reorganization associated with the acquisition, consolidation and retention of motor skills. Plastic changes involving structural reorganization in gray and white matter architecture that occurs over shorter time periods than previously thought have been documented as well. Data from experimental animals provided crucial information on plausible cellular and molecular substrates contributing to large-scale reorganization underlying skill acquisition in humans. Here, we review findings demonstrating functional and structural plasticity across different spatial and temporal scales that mediate motor skill learning, while identifying converging areas of interest, and possible avenues for future research. PMID:22078504

  12. Linear Synchronous Motor Repeatability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.R.

    2002-10-18

    A cart system using linear synchronous motors was being considered for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). One of the applications in the PIP was the movement of a stack of furnace trays, filled with the waste form (pucks) from a stacking/unstacking station to several bottom loaded furnaces. A system was ordered to perform this function in the PIP Ceramic Prototype Test Facility (CPTF). This system was installed and started up in SRTC prior to being installed in the CPTF. The PIP was suspended and then canceled after the linear synchronous motor system was started up. This system was used to determine repeatability of a linear synchronous motor cart system for the Modern Pit Facility.

  13. Double valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Stassano, Paolo; Mannacio, Vito; Musumeci, Antonino; Golino, Alessandro; Maida, Piero; Ferrigno, Vincenzo; Buonocore, Gaetano; Spampinato, Nicola

    1991-01-01

    From January 1976 through December 1987, 194 patients with a mean age of 43.3 ± 13.7 years (range, 11 to 74 years) underwent double (mitral and aortic) replacement of native valves with 8 types of bioprostheses: Carpentier-Edwards, 127 valves; Hancock, 76 valves; Liotta-Bioimplant, 57 valves; Ionescu-Shiley, 53 valves; Vascor, 27 valves; Carpentier-Edwards Pericardial, 22 valves; Angell-Shiley, 20 valves; and Implamedic, 6 valves. Concomitant cardiac procedures were performed in 25 patients (12.8%). There were 18 operative deaths (9.27%). Our retrospective analysis was restricted to 352 bioprostheses implanted in the 176 patients who survived surgery and were considered at risk for valve tissue failure. The overall cumulative duration of follow-up was 1,174.1 patient-years (range, 1 to 13 years). The durations of follow-up for specific valves were: Carpentier-Edwards, 920.2 valve-years; Hancock, 383.8 valve-years; Liotta-Bioimplant, 310.2 valve-years; Ionescu-Shiley, 357.7 valve-years; Vascor, 131.2 valve-years; Carpentier-Edwards Pericardial, 52.0 valve-years; Angell-Shiley, 167.0 valve-years; and Implamedic, 31.0 valve-years. Thirty patients had thromboembolic accidents, for a linearized incidence of 2.5% per patient-year. At 13 years, the actuarial freedom from thromboembolic accidents was 85.8% ± 10.7%. Nine patients had endocarditis, for a linearized incidence of 0.7% per patient-year. At 13 years, the actuarial freedom from endocarditis was 92.0% ± 1.5%. Twenty-four patients had valve tissue failure, for a cumulative linearized incidence of 1.87% per valve-year. The cumulative actuarial probability of freedom from valve tissue failure was 78.6% ± 3.7% at 10 years and 51.2% ± 10.7% at 13 years. The 24 patients with valve tissue failure all underwent reoperation: 20 of these had double valve replacement, 3 had aortic valve replacement alone, and 1 had mitral valve replacement alone. The mean interval between initial valve implantation and reoperation was

  14. The Visual Double Star Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian D.

    2015-08-01

    In visual double star work, production of the first comprehensive attempt to list all discovered pairs in his accessible sky was prepared by S.W. Burnham in 1906. A double star catalog for the southern hemisphere was prepared by R.T.A. Innes et al. in 1927 and the northern hemisphere catalog was updated by R.G. Aitken and E. Doolittle in 1932. Eventually, this led to Lick Observatory maintaining what became known as the Index Catalogue, an all-sky visual double star database.In 1964, under the aegis of Commission 26, the Lick double star database was transferred to the U.S. Naval Observatory where it was redesignated the Washington Double Star Catalog where it and it's ancillary catalogs, have been maintained for over half a century. The current statistics of the catalog and it's supplements are presented as are the enhancements currently under consideration.

  15. Theory of nonmonotonic double layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.Y.

    1987-12-01

    A simple graphic method of solving the Vlasov--Poisson system associated with nonlinear eigenvalue conditions for arbitrary potential structures is presented. A general analytic formulation for nonmonotonic double layers is presented and illustrated with some particular closed form solutions. This class of double layers satisfies the time stationary Vlasov--Poisson system while requiring a Sagdeev potential, which is a double-valued function of the physical potential. It follows that any distribution function having a density representation as any integer or noninteger power series of potential can never satisfy the nonmonotonic double-layer boundary conditions. A Korteweg--de Vries-like equation is found showing a relationship among the speed of the nonmonotonic double layer, its scale length, and its degree of asymmetry.

  16. Miniaturization of planar horn motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Ostlund, Patrick N.; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Widholm, Scott E.; Badescu, Mircea

    2012-04-01

    There is a great need for compact, efficient motors for driving various mechanisms including robots or mobility platforms. A study is currently underway to develop a new type of piezoelectric actuators with significantly more strength, low mass, small footprint, and efficiency. The actuators/motors utilize piezoelectric actuated horns which have a very high power density and high electromechanical conversion efficiency. The horns are fabricated using our recently developed novel pre-stress flexures that make them thermally stable and increases their coupling efficiency. The monolithic design and integrated flexures that pre-stresses the piezoelectric stack eliminates the use of a stress bolt. This design allows embedding solid-state motors and actuators in any structure so that the only macroscopically moving parts are the rotor or the linear translator. The developed actuator uses a stack/horn actuation and has a Barth motor configuration, which potentially generates very large torque and speeds that do not require gearing. Finite element modeling and design tools were investigated to determine the requirements and operation parameters and the results were used to design and fabricate a motor. This new design offers a highly promising actuation mechanism that can potentially be miniaturized and integrated into systems and structures. It can be configured in many shapes to operate as multi-degrees of freedom and multi-dimensional motors/actuators including unidirectional, bidirectional, 2D and 3D. In this manuscript, we are reporting the experimental measurements from a bench top design and the results from the efforts to miniaturize the design using 2×2×2 mm piezoelectric stacks integrated into thin plates that are of the order of 3 × 3 × 0.2 cm.

  17. Motor Imagery Shapes Abstract Concepts.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Juanma; Casasanto, Daniel; Martínez-Cascales, Jose Isidro; Santiago, Julio

    2017-07-01

    The concepts of "good" and "bad" are associated with right and left space. Individuals tend to associate good things with the side of their dominant hand, where they experience greater motor fluency, and bad things with their nondominant side. This mapping has been shown to be flexible: Changing the relative fluency of the hands, or even observing a change in someone else's motor fluency, results in a reversal of the conceptual mapping, such that good things become associated with the side of the nondominant hand. Yet, based on prior studies, it is unclear whether space-valence associations were determined by the experience of fluent versus disfluent actions, or by the mere expectation of fluency. Here, we tested the role of expected fluency by removing motor execution and perceptual feedback altogether. Participants were asked to imagine themselves performing a psychomotor task with one of their hands impaired, after which their implicit space-valence mapping was measured. After imagining that their right hand was impaired, right-handed participants showed the "good is left" association typical of left-handers. Motor imagery can change people's implicit associations between space and emotional valence. Although asymmetric motor experience may be necessary to establish body-specific associations between space and valence initially, neither motoric nor perceptual experience is needed to change these associations subsequently. The mere expectation of fluent versus disfluenct actions can drive fluency-based effects on people's implicit spatialization of "good" and "bad." These results suggest a reconsideration of the mechanisms and boundary conditions of fluency effects. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  18. Miniaturization of Planar Horn Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Ostlund, Patrick N.; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Widholm, Scott E.; Badescu, Mircea

    2012-01-01

    There is a great need for compact, efficient motors for driving various mechanisms including robots or mobility platforms. A study is currently underway to develop a new type of piezoelectric actuators with significantly more strength, low mass, small footprint, and efficiency. The actuators/motors utilize piezoelectric actuated horns which have a very high power density and high electromechanical conversion efficiency. The horns are fabricated using our recently developed novel pre-stress flexures that make them thermally stable and increases their coupling efficiency. The monolithic design and integrated flexures that pre-stresses the piezoelectric stack eliminates the use of stress bolt. This design allows embedding solid-state motors and actuators in any structure so that the only macroscopically moving parts are the rotor or the linear translator. The developed actuator uses a stack/horn actuation and has a Barth motor configuration, which potentially generates very large torque and speeds that do not require gearing. Finite element modeling and design tools were investigated to determine the requirements and operation parameters and the results were used to design and fabricate a motor. This new design offers a highly promising actuation mechanism that can potentially be miniaturized and integrated into systems and structures. It can be configured in many shapes to operate as multi-degrees of freedom and multi-dimensional motors/actuators including unidirectional, bidirectional, 2D and 3D. In this manuscript, we are reporting the experimental measurements from a bench top design and the results from the efforts to miniaturize the design using 2x2x2 mm piezoelectric stacks integrated into thin plates that are of the order of3 x 3x 0.2 cm.

  19. Miniaturization of Planar Horn Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Ostlund, Patrick N.; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Widholm, Scott E.; Badescu, Mircea

    2012-01-01

    There is a great need for compact, efficient motors for driving various mechanisms including robots or mobility platforms. A study is currently underway to develop a new type of piezoelectric actuators with significantly more strength, low mass, small footprint, and efficiency. The actuators/motors utilize piezoelectric actuated horns which have a very high power density and high electromechanical conversion efficiency. The horns are fabricated using our recently developed novel pre-stress flexures that make them thermally stable and increases their coupling efficiency. The monolithic design and integrated flexures that pre-stresses the piezoelectric stack eliminates the use of stress bolt. This design allows embedding solid-state motors and actuators in any structure so that the only macroscopically moving parts are the rotor or the linear translator. The developed actuator uses a stack/horn actuation and has a Barth motor configuration, which potentially generates very large torque and speeds that do not require gearing. Finite element modeling and design tools were investigated to determine the requirements and operation parameters and the results were used to design and fabricate a motor. This new design offers a highly promising actuation mechanism that can potentially be miniaturized and integrated into systems and structures. It can be configured in many shapes to operate as multi-degrees of freedom and multi-dimensional motors/actuators including unidirectional, bidirectional, 2D and 3D. In this manuscript, we are reporting the experimental measurements from a bench top design and the results from the efforts to miniaturize the design using 2x2x2 mm piezoelectric stacks integrated into thin plates that are of the order of3 x 3x 0.2 cm.

  20. Direct and crossed effects of somatosensory electrical stimulation on motor learning and neuronal plasticity in humans.

    PubMed

    Veldman, M P; Zijdewind, I; Solnik, S; Maffiuletti, N A; Berghuis, K M M; Javet, M; Négyesi, J; Hortobágyi, T

    2015-12-01

    Sensory input can modify voluntary motor function. We examined whether somatosensory electrical stimulation (SES) added to motor practice (MP) could augment motor learning, interlimb transfer, and whether physiological changes in neuronal excitability underlie these changes. Participants (18-30 years, n = 31) received MP, SES, MP + SES, or a control intervention. Visuomotor practice included 300 trials for 25 min with the right-dominant wrist and SES consisted of weak electrical stimulation of the radial and median nerves above the elbow. Single- and double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) metrics were measured in the intervention and non-intervention extensor carpi radialis. There was 27 % motor learning and 9 % (both p < 0.001) interlimb transfer in all groups but SES added to MP did not augment learning and transfer. Corticospinal excitability increased after MP and SES when measured at rest but it increased after MP and decreased after SES when measured during contraction. No changes occurred in intracortical inhibition and facilitation. MP did not affect the TMS metrics in the transfer hand. In contrast, corticospinal excitability strongly increased after SES with MP + SES showing sharply opposite of these effects. Motor practice and SES each can produce motor learning and interlimb transfer and are likely to be mediated by different mechanisms. The results provide insight into the physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of MP and SES on motor learning and cortical plasticity and show that these mechanisms are likely to be different for the trained and stimulated motor cortex and the non-trained and non-stimulated motor cortex.