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Sample records for double-stranded rna-activated protein

  1. Ethanol Promotes Thiamine Deficiency-Induced Neuronal Death: Involvement of Double-Stranded RNA-activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Zun-Ji; Wang, Xin; Fan, Zhiqin; Luo, Jia

    2011-01-01

    Background Heavy alcohol consumption causes cerebellar degeneration, and the underlying mechanism is unclear. Chronic alcoholism is usually associated with thiamine deficiency (TD) which is known to induce selective neurodegeneration in the brain. However, the role of TD in alcohol-induced cerebellar degeneration remains to be elucidated. The double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) is a potent antiviral protein. Viral infection or binding to dsRNA causes PKR autophosphorylation and subsequent phosphorylation of the α-subunit of eukaryotic translation factor-2α, leading to inhibition of translation or apoptosis. PKR can also be activated by cellular stresses. Methods In this study, we used an in vitro model, cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), to investigate the interaction between TD and ethanol and evaluate the contribution of their interaction to neuronal loss. TD was induced by treatment with amprolium in association with ethanol. Cell viability was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. PKR expression/phosphorylation and subcellular distribution was analyzed with immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Results Thiamine deficiency caused death of CGNs but ethanol did not. However, TD plus ethanol induced a much greater cell loss than TD alone. TD-induced PKR phosphorylation and ethanol exposure significantly promoted TD-induced PKR phosphorylation as well as its nuclear translocation. A selective PKR inhibitor not only protected CGNs against TD toxicity, but also abolished ethanol potentiation of TD-induced loss of CGNs. Conclusions Ethanol promoted TD-induced PKR activation and neuronal death. PKR may be a convergent protein that mediates the interaction between TD and ethanol. PMID:19382901

  2. Ethanol promotes thiamine deficiency-induced neuronal death: involvement of double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Ke, Zun-Ji; Wang, Xin; Fan, Zhiqin; Luo, Jia

    2009-06-01

    Heavy alcohol consumption causes cerebellar degeneration, and the underlying mechanism is unclear. Chronic alcoholism is usually associated with thiamine deficiency (TD) which is known to induce selective neurodegeneration in the brain. However, the role of TD in alcohol-induced cerebellar degeneration remains to be elucidated. The double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) is a potent antiviral protein. Viral infection or binding to dsRNA causes PKR autophosphorylation and subsequent phosphorylation of the alpha-subunit of eukaryotic translation factor-2alpha, leading to inhibition of translation or apoptosis. PKR can also be activated by cellular stresses. In this study, we used an in vitro model, cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), to investigate the interaction between TD and ethanol and evaluate the contribution of their interaction to neuronal loss. TD was induced by treatment with amprolium in association with ethanol. Cell viability was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. PKR expression/phosphorylation and subcellular distribution was analyzed with immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Thiamine deficiency caused death of CGNs but ethanol did not. However, TD plus ethanol induced a much greater cell loss than TD alone. TD-induced PKR phosphorylation and ethanol exposure significantly promoted TD-induced PKR phosphorylation as well as its nuclear translocation. A selective PKR inhibitor not only protected CGNs against TD toxicity, but also abolished ethanol potentiation of TD-induced loss of CGNs. Ethanol promoted TD-induced PKR activation and neuronal death. PKR may be a convergent protein that mediates the interaction between TD and ethanol.

  3. Double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase PKR of fishes and amphibians: Varying the number of double-stranded RNA binding domains and lineage-specific duplications

    PubMed Central

    Rothenburg, Stefan; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Dey, Madhusudan; Dever, Thomas E; Tazi, Loubna

    2008-01-01

    Background Double-stranded (ds) RNA, generated during viral infection, binds and activates the mammalian anti-viral protein kinase PKR, which phosphorylates the translation initiation factor eIF2α leading to the general inhibition of protein synthesis. Although PKR-like activity has been described in fish cells, the responsible enzymes eluded molecular characterization until the recent discovery of goldfish and zebrafish PKZ, which contain Z-DNA-binding domains instead of dsRNA-binding domains (dsRBDs). Fish and amphibian PKR genes have not been described so far. Results Here we report the cloning and identification of 13 PKR genes from 8 teleost fish and amphibian species, including zebrafish, demonstrating the coexistence of PKR and PKZ in this latter species. Analyses of their genomic organization revealed up to three tandemly arrayed PKR genes, which are arranged in head-to-tail orientation. At least five duplications occurred independently in fish and amphibian lineages. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the kinase domains of fish PKR genes are more closely related to those of fish PKZ than to the PKR kinase domains of other vertebrate species. The duplication leading to fish PKR and PKZ genes occurred early during teleost fish evolution after the divergence of the tetrapod lineage. While two dsRBDs are found in mammalian and amphibian PKR, one, two or three dsRBDs are present in fish PKR. In zebrafish, both PKR and PKZ were strongly upregulated after immunostimulation with some tissue-specific expression differences. Using genetic and biochemical assays we demonstrate that both zebrafish PKR and PKZ can phosphorylate eIF2α in yeast. Conclusion Considering the important role for PKR in host defense against viruses, the independent duplication and fixation of PKR genes in different lineages probably provided selective advantages by leading to the recognition of an extended spectrum of viral nucleic acid structures, including both dsRNA and Z-DNA/RNA, and

  4. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara can activate NF-kappaB transcription factors through a double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR)-dependent pathway during the early phase of virus replication.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Heather E; Ray, Caroline A; Oie, Katrina L; Pollara, Justin J; Petty, Ian T D; Sadler, Anthony J; Williams, Bryan R G; Pickup, David J

    2009-09-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA), which is a promising replication-defective vaccine vector, is unusual among the orthopoxviruses in activating NF-kappaB transcription factors in cells of several types. In human embryonic kidney (HEK 293T) cells, the MVA-induced depletion of IkappaBalpha required to activate NF-kappaB is inhibited by UV-inactivation of the virus, and begins before viral DNA replication. In HEK 293T, CHO, or RK13 cells, expression of the cowpox virus CP77 early gene, or the vaccinia virus K1L early gene suppresses MVA-induced IkappaBalpha depletion. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), MVA induction of IkappaBalpha depletion is dependent on the expression of mouse or human double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR). These results demonstrate that events during the early phase of MVA replication can induce PKR-mediated processes contributing both to the activation of NF-kappaB signaling, and to processes that may restrict viral replication. This property may contribute to the efficacy of this vaccine virus.

  5. A Kinome-Wide Small Interfering RNA Screen Identifies Proviral and Antiviral Host Factors in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Replication, Including Double-Stranded RNA-Activated Protein Kinase and Early Secretory Pathway Proteins

    PubMed Central

    de Wilde, Adriaan H.; Wannee, Kazimier F.; Scholte, Florine E. M.; Goeman, Jelle J.; ten Dijke, Peter; Snijder, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To identify host factors relevant for severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) replication, we performed a small interfering RNA (siRNA) library screen targeting the human kinome. Protein kinases are key regulators of many cellular functions, and the systematic knockdown of their expression should provide a broad perspective on factors and pathways promoting or antagonizing coronavirus replication. In addition to 40 proteins that promote SARS-CoV replication, our study identified 90 factors exhibiting an antiviral effect. Pathway analysis grouped subsets of these factors in specific cellular processes, including the innate immune response and the metabolism of complex lipids, which appear to play a role in SARS-CoV infection. Several factors were selected for in-depth validation in follow-up experiments. In cells depleted for the β2 subunit of the coatomer protein complex (COPB2), the strongest proviral hit, we observed reduced SARS-CoV protein expression and a >2-log reduction in virus yield. Knockdown of the COPB2-related proteins COPB1 and Golgi-specific brefeldin A-resistant guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GBF1) also suggested that COPI-coated vesicles and/or the early secretory pathway are important for SARS-CoV replication. Depletion of the antiviral double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) enhanced virus replication in the primary screen, and validation experiments confirmed increased SARS-CoV protein expression and virus production upon PKR depletion. In addition, cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) was identified as a novel antiviral host factor in SARS-CoV replication. The inventory of pro- and antiviral host factors and pathways described here substantiates and expands our understanding of SARS-CoV replication and may contribute to the identification of novel targets for antiviral therapy. IMPORTANCE Replication of all viruses, including SARS-CoV, depends on and is influenced by cellular pathways. Although

  6. Dynamic profiling of double-stranded RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinlei; Vukovic, Lela; Koh, Hye Ran; Schulten, Klaus; Myong, Sua

    2015-01-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA is a key player in numerous biological activities in cells, including RNA interference, anti-viral immunity and mRNA transport. The class of proteins responsible for recognizing dsRNA is termed double-stranded RNA binding proteins (dsRBP). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between dsRBPs and dsRNA. Here we examined four human dsRBPs, ADAD2, TRBP, Staufen 1 and ADAR1 on six dsRNA substrates that vary in length and secondary structure. We combined single molecule pull-down (SiMPull), single molecule protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (smPIFE) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the dsRNA-dsRBP interactions. Our results demonstrate that despite the highly conserved dsRNA binding domains, the dsRBPs exhibit diverse substrate specificities and dynamic properties when in contact with different RNA substrates. While TRBP and ADAR1 have a preference for binding simple duplex RNA, ADAD2 and Staufen1 display higher affinity to highly structured RNA substrates. Upon interaction with RNA substrates, TRBP and Staufen1 exhibit dynamic sliding whereas two deaminases ADAR1 and ADAD2 mostly remain immobile when bound. MD simulations provide a detailed atomic interaction map that is largely consistent with the affinity differences observed experimentally. Collectively, our study highlights the diverse nature of substrate specificity and mobility exhibited by dsRBPs that may be critical for their cellular function. PMID:26184879

  7. Interactions between double-stranded RNA regulators and the protein kinase DAI.

    PubMed Central

    Manche, L; Green, S R; Schmedt, C; Mathews, M B

    1992-01-01

    The interferon-induced protein kinase DAI, the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated inhibitor of translation, plays a key role in regulating protein synthesis in higher cells. Once activated, in a process that involves autophosphorylation, it phosphorylates the initiation factor eIF-2, leading to inhibition of polypeptide chain initiation. The activity of DAI is controlled by RNA regulators, including dsRNA activators and highly structured single-stranded RNAs which block activation by dsRNA. To elucidate the mechanism of activation, we studied the interaction of DAI with RNA duplexes of discrete sizes. Molecules shorter than 30 bp fail to bind stably and do not activate the enzyme, but at high concentrations they prevent activation by long dsRNA. Molecules longer than 30 bp bind and activate the enzyme, with an efficiency that increases with increasing chain length, reaching a maximum at about 85 bp. These dsRNAs fail to activate at high concentrations and also prevent activation by long dsRNA. Analysis of complexes between dsRNA and DAI suggests that at maximal packing the enzyme interacts with as little as a single helical turn of dsRNA (11 bp) but under conditions that allow activation the binding site protects about 80 bp of duplex. When the RNA-binding site is fully occupied with an RNA activator, the complex appears to undergo a conformational change. Images PMID:1357546

  8. Viral Proteins That Bind Double-Stranded RNA: Countermeasures Against Host Antiviral Responses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Several animal viruses encode proteins that bind double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to counteract host dsRNA-dependent antiviral responses. This article discusses the structure and function of the dsRNA-binding proteins of influenza A virus and Ebola viruses (EBOVs). PMID:24905203

  9. Double strand-breaks and DNA-to-protein cross-links induced by fast neutrons in bacteriophage DNA.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, R B

    1979-01-01

    Coliphage T7 was suspended in tryptone broth and exposed to a mixture of fast neutrons and gamma radiation. Plaque survival, double strand-breaks and DNA-to-protein cross-linkage were examined and the results compared with those found in phage exposed to gamma radiation alone. Neutral sucrose density sedimentation patterns indicate that neutron-induced double strand-breaks sometimes occur in clusters of more than 100 in the same phage and that the effeciency with which double strand-breaks form is about 50 times that of gamma-induced double strand-breaks. Neutron-induced protein-to-DNA cross-links probably also occur in clusters with enhanced efficiency relative to low LET radiation.

  10. ADAR proteins: double-stranded RNA and Z-DNA binding domains.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Pierre; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) catalyze adenosine to inosine editing within double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. Inosine is read as a guanine by most cellular processes and therefore these changes create codons for a different amino acid, stop codons or even a new splice-site allowing protein diversity generated from a single gene. We review here the current structural and molecular knowledge on RNA editing by the ADAR family of protein. We focus especially on two types of nucleic acid binding domains present in ADARs, namely the dsRNA and Z-DNA binding domains.

  11. Double strand break (DSB) repair in heterochromatin and heterochromatin proteins in DSB repair.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Charlène; Soutoglou, Evi

    2014-07-01

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of cancer cells and they represent a major cause of tumorigenesis. To avoid chromosomal translocations, faithful repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) has to be ensured in the context of high ordered chromatin structure. However, chromatin compaction is proposed to represent a barrier for DSB repair. Here we review the different mechanisms cells use to alleviate the heterochromatic barrier for DNA repair. At the same time, we discuss the activating role of heterochromatin-associated proteins in this process, therefore proposing that chromatin structure, more than being a simple barrier, is a key modulator of DNA repair.

  12. RNA Activation of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Gene (VEGF) Promoter by Double-Stranded RNA and Hypoxia: Role of Noncoding VEGF Promoter Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Hofman, Paul; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    RNA activation (RNAa) is a gene regulation process in which promoter-targeted short double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) or microRNAs (miRs) induce target gene expression at the transcriptional level. Here, we investigate the presence of cryptic promoter transcripts within the VEGF promoter. Single-strand sense and antisense noncoding vascular endothelial growth factor (NcVEGF) promoter transcripts are identified, and their respective expression is studied in cells transfected with a VEGF promoter targeted dsRNA, namely, dsVEGF706, in hypoxic cells and in human malignant lung tissues. Interestingly, in dsVEGF706-transfected, as well as in hypoxic cells, NcVEGF expression levels increase coordinately with coding VEGF expression. Ago2 interaction with both sense and antisense NcVEGFs is increased in hypoxic cells, whereas in dsVEGF706-transfected cells, Ago2 and the antisense strand of the dsRNA interact specifically with the sense NcVEGF transcript. Furthermore, both dsVEGF706 and ectopic NcVEGF transcripts are able to activate the VEGF promoter endogenously present or in a reporter construct. Finally, using small interfering RNA targeting Ago2, we show that RNAa plays a role in the maintenance of increased VEGF and NcVEGF expression after hypoxia. Given the central role of VEGF in major human diseases, including cancer, this novel molecular mechanism is poised to reveal promising possibilities for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26976645

  13. Human Ku70 protein binds hairpin RNA and double stranded DNA through two different sites.

    PubMed

    Anisenko, Andrey N; Knyazhanskaya, Ekaterina S; Zatsepin, Timofey S; Gottikh, Marina B

    2017-01-01

    Human protein Ku usually functions in the cell as a complex of two subunits, Ku70 and Ku80. The Ku heterodimer plays a key role in the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway by specifically recognizing the DNA ends at the site of the lesion. The binding of the Ku heterodimer to DNA has been well-studied, and its interactions with RNA have been also described. However, Ku70 subunit is known to have independent DNA binding capability, which is less characterized. RNA binding properties of Ku70 have not been yet specially studied. We have prepared recombinant full-length Ku70 and a set of its truncated mutants in E. coli, and studied their interactions with nucleic acids of various structures: linear single- and double-stranded DNA and RNA, as well as closed circular DNA and hairpin RNA. Ku70 has demonstrated a high affinity binding to double stranded DNA and hairpin RNA with a certain structure only. Interestingly, in contrast to the Ku heterodimer, Ku70 is found to interact with closed circular DNA. We also show for the first time that Ku70 employs two different sites for DNA and RNA binding. The double-stranded DNA is recognized by the C-terminal part of Ku70 including SAP domain as it has been earlier demonstrated, whereas hairpin RNA binding is provided by amino acids 251-438. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  14. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: A multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis.

    PubMed

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2015-03-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes.

  15. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes. PMID:25550082

  16. Endonucleolytic processing of covalent protein-linked DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Neale, Matthew J; Pan, Jing; Keeney, Scott

    2005-08-18

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with protein covalently attached to 5' strand termini are formed by Spo11 to initiate meiotic recombination. The Spo11 protein must be removed for the DSB to be repaired, but the mechanism for removal is unclear. Here we show that meiotic DSBs in budding yeast are processed by endonucleolytic cleavage that releases Spo11 attached to an oligonucleotide with a free 3'-OH. Two discrete Spo11-oligonucleotide complexes were found in equal amounts, differing with respect to the length of the bound DNA. We propose that these forms arise from different spacings of strand cleavages flanking the DSB, with every DSB processed asymmetrically. Thus, the ends of a single DSB may be biochemically distinct at or before the initial processing step-much earlier than previously thought. SPO11-oligonucleotide complexes were identified in extracts of mouse testis, indicating that this mechanism is evolutionarily conserved. Oligonucleotide-topoisomerase II complexes were also present in extracts of vegetative yeast, although not subject to the same genetic control as for generating Spo11-oligonucleotide complexes. Our findings suggest a general mechanism for repair of protein-linked DSBs.

  17. Cockayne syndrome group B protein regulates DNA double-strand break repair and checkpoint activation

    PubMed Central

    Batenburg, Nicole L; Thompson, Elizabeth L; Hendrickson, Eric A; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of CSB account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome (CS), a devastating hereditary disorder characterized by physical impairment, neurological degeneration and segmental premature aging. Here we report the generation of a human CSB-knockout cell line. We find that CSB facilitates HR and represses NHEJ. Loss of CSB or a CS-associated CSB mutation abrogating its ATPase activity impairs the recruitment of BRCA1, RPA and Rad51 proteins to damaged chromatin but promotes the formation of 53BP1-Rif1 damage foci in S and G2 cells. Depletion of 53BP1 rescues the formation of BRCA1 damage foci in CSB-knockout cells. In addition, knockout of CSB impairs the ATM- and Chk2-mediated DNA damage responses, promoting a premature entry into mitosis. Furthermore, we show that CSB accumulates at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a transcription-dependent manner. The kinetics of DSB-induced chromatin association of CSB is distinct from that of its UV-induced chromatin association. These results reveal novel, important functions of CSB in regulating the DNA DSB repair pathway choice as well as G2/M checkpoint activation. PMID:25820262

  18. Cockayne syndrome group B protein regulates DNA double-strand break repair and checkpoint activation.

    PubMed

    Batenburg, Nicole L; Thompson, Elizabeth L; Hendrickson, Eric A; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2015-05-12

    Mutations of CSB account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome (CS), a devastating hereditary disorder characterized by physical impairment, neurological degeneration and segmental premature aging. Here we report the generation of a human CSB-knockout cell line. We find that CSB facilitates HR and represses NHEJ. Loss of CSB or a CS-associated CSB mutation abrogating its ATPase activity impairs the recruitment of BRCA1, RPA and Rad51 proteins to damaged chromatin but promotes the formation of 53BP1-Rif1 damage foci in S and G2 cells. Depletion of 53BP1 rescues the formation of BRCA1 damage foci in CSB-knockout cells. In addition, knockout of CSB impairs the ATM- and Chk2-mediated DNA damage responses, promoting a premature entry into mitosis. Furthermore, we show that CSB accumulates at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a transcription-dependent manner. The kinetics of DSB-induced chromatin association of CSB is distinct from that of its UV-induced chromatin association. These results reveal novel, important functions of CSB in regulating the DNA DSB repair pathway choice as well as G2/M checkpoint activation.

  19. Crystallization of the avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA

    PubMed Central

    Hermo-Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Fox, Gavin C.; Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    The avian reovirus protein σA plays a dual role: it is a structural protein forming part of the transcriptionally active core, but it has also been implicated in the resistance of the virus to interferon by strongly binding double-stranded RNA and thus inhibiting the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase. The σA protein has been crystallized from solutions containing ammonium sulfate at pH values around 6. Crystals belonging to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2° were grown and a complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution. The self-rotation function suggests that σA may form symmetric arrangements in the crystals. PMID:17565188

  20. Direct Activation of Ribosome-Associated Double-Stranded RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase (PKR) by Deoxynivalenol, Anisomycin and Ricin: A New Model for Ribotoxic Stress Response Induction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui-Ren; He, Kaiyu; Landgraf, Jeff; Pan, Xiao; Pestka, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) is a critical upstream mediator of the ribotoxic stress response (RSR) to the trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) and other translational inhibitors. Here, we employed HeLa cell lysates to: (1) characterize PKR’s interactions with the ribosome and ribosomal RNA (rRNA); (2) demonstrate cell-free activation of ribosomal-associated PKR and (3) integrate these findings in a unified model for RSR. Robust PKR-dependent RSR was initially confirmed in intact cells. PKR basally associated with 40S, 60S, 80S and polysome fractions at molar ratios of 7, 2, 23 and 3, respectively. Treatment of ATP-containing HeLa lysates with DON or the ribotoxins anisomycin and ricin concentration-dependently elicited phosphorylation of PKR and its substrate eIF2α. These phosphorylations could be blocked by PKR inhibitors. rRNA immunoprecipitation (RNA-IP) of HeLa lysates with PKR-specific antibody and sequencing revealed that in the presence of DON or not, the kinase associated with numerous discrete sites on both the 18S and 28S rRNA molecules, a number of which contained double-stranded hairpins. These findings are consistent with a sentinel model whereby multiple PKR molecules basally associate with the ribosome positioning them to respond to ribotoxin-induced alterations in rRNA structure by dimerizing, autoactivating and, ultimately, evoking RSR. PMID:25521494

  1. Direct activation of ribosome-associated double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) by deoxynivalenol, anisomycin and ricin: a new model for ribotoxic stress response induction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui-Ren; He, Kaiyu; Landgraf, Jeff; Pan, Xiao; Pestka, James J

    2014-12-16

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) is a critical upstream mediator of the ribotoxic stress response (RSR) to the trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) and other translational inhibitors. Here, we employed HeLa cell lysates to: (1) characterize PKR's interactions with the ribosome and ribosomal RNA (rRNA); (2) demonstrate cell-free activation of ribosomal-associated PKR and (3) integrate these findings in a unified model for RSR. Robust PKR-dependent RSR was initially confirmed in intact cells. PKR basally associated with 40S, 60S, 80S and polysome fractions at molar ratios of 7, 2, 23 and 3, respectively. Treatment of ATP-containing HeLa lysates with DON or the ribotoxins anisomycin and ricin concentration-dependently elicited phosphorylation of PKR and its substrate eIF2α. These phosphorylations could be blocked by PKR inhibitors. rRNA immunoprecipitation (RNA-IP) of HeLa lysates with PKR-specific antibody and sequencing revealed that in the presence of DON or not, the kinase associated with numerous discrete sites on both the 18S and 28S rRNA molecules, a number of which contained double-stranded hairpins. These findings are consistent with a sentinel model whereby multiple PKR molecules basally associate with the ribosome positioning them to respond to ribotoxin-induced alterations in rRNA structure by dimerizing, autoactivating and, ultimately, evoking RSR.

  2. Crystallization of the avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA

    SciTech Connect

    Hermo-Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Fox, Gavin C.; Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier; Raaij, Mark J. van

    2007-05-01

    The avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA has been crystallized in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2°. A complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution and analyzed. The avian reovirus protein σA plays a dual role: it is a structural protein forming part of the transcriptionally active core, but it has also been implicated in the resistance of the virus to interferon by strongly binding double-stranded RNA and thus inhibiting the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase. The σA protein has been crystallized from solutions containing ammonium sulfate at pH values around 6. Crystals belonging to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2° were grown and a complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution. The self-rotation function suggests that σA may form symmetric arrangements in the crystals.

  3. Role of double-stranded RNA-binding proteins in RNA silencing and antiviral defense

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In plants as well as in animals, the intracellular presence of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) triggers a signal transduction pathway that uses the sequence information of dsRNA to direct silencing of homologous genes. This process, designated RNA silencing or RNA interference (RNAi), relies on a family...

  4. Structure of the Rad50 DNA double-strand break repair protein in complex with DNA.

    PubMed

    Rojowska, Anna; Lammens, Katja; Seifert, Florian U; Direnberger, Carolin; Feldmann, Heidi; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2014-12-01

    The Mre11-Rad50 nuclease-ATPase is an evolutionarily conserved multifunctional DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor. Mre11-Rad50's mechanism in the processing, tethering, and signaling of DSBs is unclear, in part because we lack a structural framework for its interaction with DNA in different functional states. We determined the crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima Rad50(NBD) (nucleotide-binding domain) in complex with Mre11(HLH) (helix-loop-helix domain), AMPPNP, and double-stranded DNA. DNA binds between both coiled-coil domains of the Rad50 dimer with main interactions to a strand-loop-helix motif on the NBD. Our analysis suggests that this motif on Rad50 does not directly recognize DNA ends and binds internal sites on DNA. Functional studies reveal that DNA binding to Rad50 is not critical for DNA double-strand break repair but is important for telomere maintenance. In summary, we provide a structural framework for DNA binding to Rad50 in the ATP-bound state.

  5. Double stranded nucleic acid biochips

    DOEpatents

    Chernov, Boris; Golova, Julia

    2006-05-23

    This invention describes a new method of constructing double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) microarrays based on the use of pre-synthesized or natural DNA duplexes without a stem-loop structure. The complementary oligonucleotide chains are bonded together by a novel connector that includes a linker for immobilization on a matrix. A non-enzymatic method for synthesizing double-stranded nucleic acids with this novel connector enables the construction of inexpensive and robust dsDNA/dsRNA microarrays. DNA-DNA and DNA-protein interactions are investigated using the microarrays.

  6. The TopoVIB-Like protein family is required for meiotic DNA double-strand break formation.

    PubMed

    Robert, T; Nore, A; Brun, C; Maffre, C; Crimi, B; Bourbon, H-M; de Massy, B

    2016-02-26

    Meiotic recombination is induced by the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by SPO11, the ortholog of subunit A of TopoVI DNA topoisomerase (TopoVIA). TopoVI activity requires the interaction between A and B subunits. We identified a conserved family of plant and animal proteins [the TOPOVIB-Like (TOPOVIBL) family] that share strong structural similarity to the TopoVIB subunit of TopoVI DNA topoisomerase. We further characterize the meiotic recombination proteins Rec102 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), Rec6 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), and MEI-P22 (Drosophila melanogaster) as homologs to the transducer domain of TopoVIB. We demonstrate that the mouse TOPOVIBL protein interacts and forms a complex with SPO11 and is required for meiotic DSB formation. We conclude that meiotic DSBs are catalyzed by a complex involving SPO11 and TOPOVIBL.

  7. Accumulation of Ku80 proteins at DNA double-strand breaks in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Manabu Koike, Aki

    2008-03-10

    Ku plays a key role in multiple nuclear processes, e.g., DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. The regulation mechanism of the localizations of Ku70 and Ku80 plays a key role in regulating the multiple functions of Ku. Although numerous biochemical studies in vitro have elucidated the DNA binding mechanism of Ku, no accumulation mechanisms of Ku70 and Ku80 at DSBs have been clarified in detail in vivo. In this study, we examined the accumulation mechanism of Ku80 at DSBs in living cells. EGFP-Ku80 accumulation at DSBs began immediately after irradiation. On the other hand, our data show that Ku70 alone, which has DNA binding activity independent of Ku80, cannot accumulate at the DSBs, whereas Ku70 bound to Ku80 can. The deletion of the C-terminal DNA-PKcs-binding domain and the mutation at the SUMOylation site of Ku80 had no effect on Ku80 accumulation. Unexpectedly, N-terminal deletion mutants of Ku80 fully lost their accumulation activity, although the mutants retained their Ku70 binding activity. Altogether, these data demonstrate that Ku80 is essential for Ku70 accumulation at DSBs. Furthermore, three domains of Ku80, i.e., the N-terminal {alpha}/{beta}, the DNA-binding, and Ku70-binding domains, seem to necessary for the accumulation at or recognition of DSBs in the early stage after irradiation.

  8. Surface shapes and surrounding environment analysis of single- and double-stranded DNA-binding proteins in protein-DNA interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Juan; Sun, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Protein-DNA bindings are critical to many biological processes. However, the structural mechanisms underlying these interactions are not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the residues shape (peak, flat, or valley) and the surrounding environment of double-stranded DNA-binding proteins (DSBs) and single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) in protein-DNA interfaces. In the results, we found that the interface shapes, hydrogen bonds, and the surrounding environment present significant differences between the two kinds of proteins. Built on the investigation results, we constructed a random forest (RF) classifier to distinguish DSBs and SSBs with satisfying performance. In conclusion, we present a novel methodology to characterize protein interfaces, which will deepen our understanding of the specificity of proteins binding to ssDNA (single-stranded DNA) or dsDNA (double-stranded DNA). Proteins 2016; 84:979-989. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Spo11-accessory proteins link double-strand break sites to the chromosome axis in early meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Panizza, Silvia; Mendoza, Marco A; Berlinger, Marc; Huang, Lingzhi; Nicolas, Alain; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Klein, Franz

    2011-08-05

    Meiotic recombination between homologous chromosomes initiates via programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), generated by complexes comprising Spo11 transesterase plus accessory proteins. DSBs arise concomitantly with the development of axial chromosome structures, where the coalescence of axis sites produces linear arrays of chromatin loops. Recombining DNA sequences map to loops, but are ultimately tethered to the underlying axis. How and when such tethering occurs is currently unclear. Using ChIPchip in yeast, we show that Spo11-accessory proteins Rec114, Mer2, and Mei4 stably interact with chromosome axis sequences, upon phosphorylation of Mer2 by S phase Cdk. This axis tethering requires meiotic axis components (Red1/Hop1) and is modulated in a domain-specific fashion by cohesin. Loss of Rec114, Mer2, and Mei4 binding correlates with loss of DSBs. Our results strongly suggest that hotspot sequences become tethered to axis sites by the DSB machinery prior to DSB formation.

  10. Melatonin sensitizes human breast cancer cells to ionizing radiation by downregulating proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair.

    PubMed

    Alonso-González, Carolina; González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Gómez-Arozamena, José; Cos, Samuel

    2015-03-01

    Radiation and adjuvant endocrine therapy are nowadays considered a standard treatment option after surgery in breast cancer. Melatonin exerts oncostatic actions on human breast cancer cells. In the current study, we investigated the effects of a combination of radiotherapy and melatonin on human breast cancer cells. Melatonin (1 mm, 10 μm and 1 nm) significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. Radiation alone inhibited the MCF-7 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of breast cancer cells with melatonin 1 wk before radiation led to a significantly greater decrease of MCF-7 cell proliferation compared with radiation alone. Melatonin pretreatment before radiation also decreased G2 -M phase arrest compared with irradiation alone, with a higher percentage of cells in the G0 -G1 phase and a lower percentage of cells in S phase. Radiation alone diminished RAD51 and DNA-protein kinase (PKcs) mRNA expression, two main proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair. Treatment with melatonin for 7 days before radiation led to a significantly greater decrease in RAD51 and DNA-PKcs mRNA expression compared with radiation alone. Our findings suggest that melatonin pretreatment before radiation sensitizes breast cancer cells to the ionizing effects of radiation by decreasing cell proliferation, inducing cell cycle arrest and downregulating proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair. These findings may have implications for designing clinical trials using melatonin and radiotherapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A census of α-helical membrane proteins in double-stranded DNA viruses infecting bacteria and archaea.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, David M; Saeed, Usman; Frishman, Dmitrij; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-11-10

    Viruses are the most abundant and genetically diverse biological entities on earth, yet the repertoire of viral proteins remains poorly explored. As the number of sequenced virus genomes grows into the thousands, and the number of viral proteins into the hundreds of thousands, we report a systematic computational analysis of the point of first-contact between viruses and their hosts, namely viral transmembrane (TM) proteins. The complement of α-helical TM proteins in double-stranded DNA viruses infecting bacteria and archaea reveals large-scale trends that differ from those of their hosts. Viruses typically encode a substantially lower fraction of TM proteins than archaea or bacteria, with the notable exception of viruses with virions containing a lipid component such as a lipid envelope, internal lipid core, or inner membrane vesicle. Compared to bacteriophages, archaeal viruses are substantially enriched in membrane proteins. However, this feature is not always stable throughout the evolution of a viral lineage; for example, TM proteins are not part of the common heritage shared between Lipothrixviridae and Rudiviridae. In contrast to bacteria and archaea, viruses almost completely lack proteins with complicated membrane topologies composed of more than 4 TM segments, with the few detected exceptions being obvious cases of relatively recent horizontal transfer from the host. The dramatic differences between the membrane proteomes of cells and viruses stem from the fact that viruses do not depend on essential membranes for energy transformation, ion homeostasis, nutrient transport and signaling.

  12. PARP activation regulates the RNA-binding protein NONO in the DNA damage response to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Krietsch, Jana; Caron, Marie-Christine; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Ethier, Chantal; Vignard, Julien; Vincent, Michel; Rouleau, Michèle; Hendzel, Michael J; Poirier, Guy G; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2012-11-01

    After the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is one of the first proteins to be recruited and activated through its binding to the free DNA ends. Upon activation, PARP-1 uses NAD+ to generate large amounts of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which facilitates the recruitment of DNA repair factors. Here, we identify the RNA-binding protein NONO, a partner protein of SFPQ, as a novel PAR-binding protein. The protein motif being primarily responsible for PAR-binding is the RNA recognition motif 1 (RRM1), which is also crucial for RNA-binding, highlighting a competition between RNA and PAR as they share the same binding site. Strikingly, the in vivo recruitment of NONO to DNA damage sites completely depends on PAR, generated by activated PARP-1. Furthermore, we show that upon PAR-dependent recruitment, NONO stimulates nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and represses homologous recombination (HR) in vivo. Our results therefore place NONO after PARP activation in the context of DNA DSB repair pathway decision. Understanding the mechanism of action of proteins that act in the same pathway as PARP-1 is crucial to shed more light onto the effect of interference on PAR-mediated pathways with PARP inhibitors, which have already reached phase III clinical trials but are until date poorly understood.

  13. PARP activation regulates the RNA-binding protein NONO in the DNA damage response to DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Krietsch, Jana; Caron, Marie-Christine; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Ethier, Chantal; Vignard, Julien; Vincent, Michel; Rouleau, Michèle; Hendzel, Michael J.; Poirier, Guy G.; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2012-01-01

    After the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is one of the first proteins to be recruited and activated through its binding to the free DNA ends. Upon activation, PARP-1 uses NAD+ to generate large amounts of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which facilitates the recruitment of DNA repair factors. Here, we identify the RNA-binding protein NONO, a partner protein of SFPQ, as a novel PAR-binding protein. The protein motif being primarily responsible for PAR-binding is the RNA recognition motif 1 (RRM1), which is also crucial for RNA-binding, highlighting a competition between RNA and PAR as they share the same binding site. Strikingly, the in vivo recruitment of NONO to DNA damage sites completely depends on PAR, generated by activated PARP-1. Furthermore, we show that upon PAR-dependent recruitment, NONO stimulates nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and represses homologous recombination (HR) in vivo. Our results therefore place NONO after PARP activation in the context of DNA DSB repair pathway decision. Understanding the mechanism of action of proteins that act in the same pathway as PARP-1 is crucial to shed more light onto the effect of interference on PAR-mediated pathways with PARP inhibitors, which have already reached phase III clinical trials but are until date poorly understood. PMID:22941645

  14. Non-histone chromosomal proteins HMG1 and 2 enhance ligation reaction of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Nagaki, S; Yamamoto, M; Yumoto, Y; Shirakawa, H; Yoshida, M; Teraoka, H

    1998-05-08

    DNA ligase IV in a complex with XRCC4 is responsible for DNA end-joining in repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and V(D)J recombination. We found that non-histone chromosomal high mobility group (HMG) proteins 1 and 2 enhanced the ligation of linearized pUC119 DNA with DNA ligase IV from rat liver nuclear extract. Intra-molecular and inter-molecular ligations of cohesive-ended and blunt-ended DNA were markedly stimulated by HMG1 and 2. Recombinant HMG2-domain A, B, and (A + B) polypeptides were similarly, but non-identically, effective for the stimulation of DSB ligation reaction. Ligation of single-strand breaks (nicks) was only slightly activated by the HMG proteins. The DNA end-binding Ku protein singly or in combination with the catalytic component of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) as the DNA-PK holoenzyme was ineffective for the ligation of linearized pUC119 DNA. Although the stimulatory effect of HMG1 and 2 on ligation of DSB in vitro was not specific to DNA ligase IV, these results suggest that HMG1 and 2 are involved in the final ligation step in DNA end-joining processes of DSB repair and V(D)J recombination.

  15. The coat protein of the yeast double-stranded RNA virus L-A attaches covalently to the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, A; Goyer, C; Sonenberg, N

    1992-01-01

    The eukaryotic mRNA 5' cap structure m7GpppX (where X is any nucleotide) interacts with a number of cellular proteins. Several of these proteins were studied in mammalian, yeast, and drosophila cells and found to be involved in translation initiation. Here we describe a novel cap-binding protein, the coat protein of L-A, a double-stranded RNA virus that is persistently maintained in many Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The results also suggest that the coat protein of a related double-stranded RNA virus (L-BC) is likewise a cap-binding protein. Strikingly, in contrast to the cellular cap-binding proteins, the interaction between the L-A virus coat protein and the cap structure is through a covalent bond. Images PMID:1630453

  16. Double-stranded Endonuclease Activity in Bacillus halodurans Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated Cas2 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Ding, Fran; Haitjema, Charles; Huang, Qingqiu; DeLisa, Matthew P.; Ke, Ailong

    2012-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) system is a prokaryotic RNA-based adaptive immune system against extrachromosomal genetic elements. Cas2 is a universally conserved core CRISPR-associated protein required for the acquisition of new spacers for CRISPR adaptation. It was previously characterized as an endoribonuclease with preference for single-stranded (ss)RNA. Here, we show using crystallography, mutagenesis, and isothermal titration calorimetry that the Bacillus halodurans Cas2 (Bha_Cas2) from the subtype I-C/Dvulg CRISPR instead possesses metal-dependent endonuclease activity against double-stranded (ds)DNA. This activity is consistent with its putative function in producing new spacers for insertion into the 5′-end of the CRISPR locus. Mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry studies revealed that a single divalent metal ion (Mg2+ or Mn2+), coordinated by a symmetric Asp pair in the Bha_Cas2 dimer, is involved in the catalysis. We envision that a pH-dependent conformational change switches Cas2 into a metal-binding competent conformation for catalysis. We further propose that the distinct substrate preferences among Cas2 proteins may be determined by the sequence and structure in the β1–α1 loop. PMID:22942283

  17. Crystal Structure of E. coli RecE Protein Reveals a Toroidal Tetramer for Processing Double-Stranded DNA Breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinjin; Xing, Xu; Herr, Andrew B.; Bell, Charles E.

    2009-07-21

    Escherichia coli RecE protein is part of the classical RecET recombination system that has recently been used in powerful new methods for genetic engineering. RecE binds to free double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) ends and processively digests the 5{prime}-ended strand to form 5{prime}-mononucleotides and a 3{prime}-overhang that is a substrate for single strand annealing promoted by RecT. Here, we report the crystal structure of the C-terminal nuclease domain of RecE at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. RecE forms a toroidal tetramer with a central tapered channel that is wide enough to bind dsDNA at one end, but is partially plugged at the other end by the C-terminal segment of the protein. Four narrow tunnels, one within each subunit of the tetramer, lead from the central channel to the four active sites, which lie about 15 {angstrom} from the channel. The structure, combined with mutational studies, suggests a mechanism in which dsDNA enters through the open end of the central channel, the 5{prime}-ended strand passes through a tunnel to access one of the four active sites, and the 3{prime}-ended strand passes through the plugged end of the channel at the back of the tetramer.

  18. Double-stranded endonuclease activity in Bacillus halodurans clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Cas2 protein.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Ding, Fran; Haitjema, Charles; Huang, Qingqiu; DeLisa, Matthew P; Ke, Ailong

    2012-10-19

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) system is a prokaryotic RNA-based adaptive immune system against extrachromosomal genetic elements. Cas2 is a universally conserved core CRISPR-associated protein required for the acquisition of new spacers for CRISPR adaptation. It was previously characterized as an endoribonuclease with preference for single-stranded (ss)RNA. Here, we show using crystallography, mutagenesis, and isothermal titration calorimetry that the Bacillus halodurans Cas2 (Bha_Cas2) from the subtype I-C/Dvulg CRISPR instead possesses metal-dependent endonuclease activity against double-stranded (ds)DNA. This activity is consistent with its putative function in producing new spacers for insertion into the 5'-end of the CRISPR locus. Mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry studies revealed that a single divalent metal ion (Mg(2+) or Mn(2+)), coordinated by a symmetric Asp pair in the Bha_Cas2 dimer, is involved in the catalysis. We envision that a pH-dependent conformational change switches Cas2 into a metal-binding competent conformation for catalysis. We further propose that the distinct substrate preferences among Cas2 proteins may be determined by the sequence and structure in the β1-α1 loop.

  19. siRNA targeting vaccinia virus double-stranded RNA binding protein [E3L] exerts potent antiviral effects.

    PubMed

    Dave, Rajnish S; McGettigan, James P; Qureshi, Tazeen; Schnell, Matthias J; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Pomerantz, Roger J

    2006-05-10

    The Vaccinia virus gene, E3L, encodes a double-stranded RNA [dsRNA]-binding protein. We hypothesized that, owing to the critical nature of dsRNA in triggering host innate antiviral responses, E3L-specific small-interfering RNAs [siRNAs] should be effective antiviral agents against pox viruses, for which Vaccinia virus is an appropriate surrogate. In this study, we have utilized two human cell types, namely, HeLa and 293T, one which responds to interferon [IFN]-beta and the other produces and responds to IFN-beta, respectively. The antiviral effects were equally robust in HeLa and 293T cells. However, in the case of 293T cells, several distinct features were observed, when IFN-beta is activated in these cells. Vaccinia virus replication was inhibited by 97% and 98% as compared to control infection in HeLa and 293T cells transfected with E3L-specific siRNAs, respectively. These studies demonstrate the utility of E3L-specific siRNAs as potent antiviral agents for small pox and related pox viruses.

  20. SIRT6 stabilizes DNA-dependent Protein Kinase at chromatin for DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Ronald A.; Michishita, Eriko; Hong, Tao; Berber, Elisabeth; Boxer, Lisa D.; Kusumoto, Rika; Guan, Shenheng; Shi, Xiaobing; Gozani, Or; Burlingame, Alma L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Chua, Katrin F.

    2009-01-01

    The Sir2 chromatin regulatory factor links maintenance of genomic stability to life span extension in yeast. The mammalian Sir2 family member SIRT6 has been proposed to have analogous functions, because SIRT6-deficiency leads to shortened life span and an aging-like degenerative phenotype in mice, and SIRT6 knockout cells exhibit genomic instability and DNA damage hypersensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not fully understood. Here, we show that SIRT6 forms a macromolecular complex with the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase) and promotes DNA DSB repair. In response to DSBs, SIRT6 associates dynamically with chromatin and is necessary for an acute decrease in global cellular acetylation levels on histone H3 Lysine 9. Moreover, SIRT6 is required for mobilization of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to chromatin in response to DNA damage and stabilizes DNA-PKcs at chromatin adjacent to an induced site-specific DSB. Abrogation of these SIRT6 activities leads to impaired resolution of DSBs. Together, these findings elucidate a mechanism whereby regulation of dynamic interaction of a DNA repair factor with chromatin impacts on the efficiency of repair, and establish a link between chromatin regulation, DNA repair, and a mammalian Sir2 factor. PMID:20157594

  1. The scaffold protein WRAP53β orchestrates the ubiquitin response critical for DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Sofia; Rassoolzadeh, Hanif; Hedström, Elisabeth; Coucoravas, Christos; Julner, Alexander; Goldstein, Michael; Imreh, Gabriela; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Kastan, Michael B.; Helleday, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The WD40 domain-containing protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA antisense to p53; also referred to as WDR79/TCAB1) controls trafficking of splicing factors and the telomerase enzyme to Cajal bodies, and its functional loss has been linked to carcinogenesis, premature aging, and neurodegeneration. Here, we identify WRAP53β as an essential regulator of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. WRAP53β rapidly localizes to DSBs in an ATM-, H2AX-, and MDC1-dependent manner. We show that WRAP53β targets the E3 ligase RNF8 to DNA lesions by facilitating the interaction between RNF8 and its upstream partner, MDC1, in response to DNA damage. Simultaneous binding of MDC1 and RNF8 to the highly conserved WD40 scaffold domain of WRAP53β facilitates their interaction and accumulation of RNF8 at DSBs. In this manner, WRAP53β controls proper ubiquitylation at DNA damage sites and the downstream assembly of 53BP1, BRCA1, and RAD51. Furthermore, we reveal that knockdown of WRAP53β impairs DSB repair by both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), causes accumulation of spontaneous DNA breaks, and delays recovery from radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Our findings establish WRAP53β as a novel regulator of DSB repair by providing a scaffold for DNA repair factors. PMID:25512560

  2. p53 binding protein 1 foci as a biomarker of DNA double strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. K. M.; Wong, M. Y. P.; Lam, R. K. K.; Ho, J. P. Y.; Chiu, S. K.; Yu, K. N.

    2011-12-01

    Foci of p53 binding protein 1 (53 BP1) have been used as a biomarker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in cells induced by ionizing radiations. 53 BP1 was shown to relocalize into foci shortly after irradiation, with the number of foci closely paralleling the number of DNA DSBs. However, consensus on criteria in terms of the numbers of 53 BP1 foci to define cells damaged by direct irradiation or by bystander signals has not been reached, which is partly due to the presence of 53 BP1 also in normal cells. The objective of the present work was to study the changes in the distribution of cells with different numbers of 53 BP1 foci in a cell population after low-dose ionizing irradiation (<0.1 Gy) provided by alpha particles, with a view to propose feasible criteria for defining cells damaged by direct irradiation or by bystander signals. It was proposed that the change in the percentage of cells with 1-3 foci should be used for such purposes. The underlying reasons were discussed.

  3. Adenovirus DNA-binding protein forms a multimeric protein complex with double-stranded DNA and enhances binding of nuclear factor I.

    PubMed Central

    Stuiver, M H; van der Vliet, P C

    1990-01-01

    The 72-kilodalton adenovirus DNA-binding protein (DBP) binds to single-stranded DNA as well as to RNA and double-stranded DNA and is essential for the replication of viral DNA. We investigated the binding of DBP to double-stranded DNA by gel retardation analysis. By using a 114-base-pair DNA fragment, five or six different complexes were observed by gel retardation. The mobility of these complexes is dependent on the DBP concentration, suggesting that the complexes arise by sequential binding of DBP molecules to the DNA. In contrast to binding to single-stranded DNA, the binding of DBP to double-stranded DNA appears to be noncooperative. DBP binds to linear DNA as well as to circular DNA, while linear DNA containing the adenovirus terminal protein was also recognized. No specificity for adenovirus origin sequences was observed. To study whether the binding of DBP could influence initiation of DNA replication, we analyzed the effect of DBP on the binding of nuclear factor I (NFI) and NFIII, two sequence-specific origin-recognizing proteins that enhance initiation. At subsaturating levels of NFI, DBP increases the rate of binding of NFI considerably, while no effect was seen on NFIII. This stimulation of NFI binding is specific for DBP and was not observed with another protein (NFIV), which forms a similar DNA-multimeric protein complex. In agreement with enhanced NFI binding, DBP stimulates initiation of adenovirus DNA replication in vitro especially strongly at subsaturating NFI concentrations. We explain our results by assuming that DBP forms a complex with origin DNA that promotes formation of an alternative DNA structure, thereby facilitating the binding of NFI as well as the initiation of DNA replication via NFI. Images PMID:2293667

  4. Ribosomal protein S1 unwinds double-stranded RNA in multiple steps

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xiaohui; Lancaster, Laura; Noller, Harry F.; Bustamante, Carlos; Tinoco, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    The sequence and secondary structure of the 5′-end of mRNAs regulate translation by controlling ribosome initiation on the mRNA. Ribosomal protein S1 is crucial for ribosome initiation on many natural mRNAs, particularly for those with structured 5′-ends, or with no or weak Shine-Dalgarno sequences. Besides a critical role in translation, S1 has been implicated in several other cellular processes, such as transcription recycling, and the rescuing of stalled ribosomes by tmRNA. The mechanisms of S1 functions are still elusive but have been widely considered to be linked to the affinity of S1 for single-stranded RNA and its corresponding destabilization of mRNA secondary structures. Here, using optical tweezers techniques, we demonstrate that S1 promotes RNA unwinding by binding to the single-stranded RNA formed transiently during the thermal breathing of the RNA base pairs and that S1 dissociation results in RNA rezipping. We measured the dependence of the RNA unwinding and rezipping rates on S1 concentration, and the force applied to the ends of the RNA. We found that each S1 binds 10 nucleotides of RNA in a multistep fashion implying that S1 can facilitate ribosome initiation on structured mRNA by first binding to the single strand next to an RNA duplex structure (“stand-by site”) before subsequent binding leads to RNA unwinding. Unwinding by multiple small substeps is much less rate limited by thermal breathing than unwinding in a single step. Thus, a multistep scheme greatly expedites S1 unwinding of an RNA structure compared to a single-step mode. PMID:22908248

  5. Non-homologous end-joining protein expression screen from radiosensitive cancer patients yields a novel DNA double strand break repair phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Su Kak; McKay, Jeremy N.; Chao, Michael; McKay, Timothy M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinical radiosensitivity is a significant impediment to tumour control and cure, in that it restricts the total doses which can safely be delivered to the whole radiotherapy population, within the tissue tolerance of potentially radiosensitive (RS) individuals. Understanding its causes could lead to personalization of radiotherapy. Methods We screened tissues from a unique bank of RS cancer patients for expression defects in major DNA double-strand break repair proteins, using Western blot analysis and subsequently reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Results We hypothesized that abnormalities in expression of these proteins may explain the radiosensitivity of some of our cancer patients. The cells from one patient showed a reproducibly consistent expression reduction in two complex-forming DNA double-strand break repair protein components (DNA Ligase IV and XRCC4). We also showed a corresponding reduction in both gene products at the mRNA level. Additionally, the mRNA inducibility by ionizing radiation was increased for one of the proteins in the patient’s cells. We confirmed the likely functional significance of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) expression abnormalities with a DNA double strand break (DNA DSB) repair assay. Conclusions We have identified a novel biological phenotype linked to clinical radiosensitivity. This is important in that very few molecular defects are known in human radiotherapy subjects. Such knowledge may contribute to the understanding of radiation response mechanisms in cancer patients and to personalization of radiotherapy. PMID:28361061

  6. Non-homologous end-joining protein expression screen from radiosensitive cancer patients yields a novel DNA double strand break repair phenotype.

    PubMed

    McKay, Michael J; Goh, Su Kak; McKay, Jeremy N; Chao, Michael; McKay, Timothy M

    2017-03-01

    Clinical radiosensitivity is a significant impediment to tumour control and cure, in that it restricts the total doses which can safely be delivered to the whole radiotherapy population, within the tissue tolerance of potentially radiosensitive (RS) individuals. Understanding its causes could lead to personalization of radiotherapy. We screened tissues from a unique bank of RS cancer patients for expression defects in major DNA double-strand break repair proteins, using Western blot analysis and subsequently reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. We hypothesized that abnormalities in expression of these proteins may explain the radiosensitivity of some of our cancer patients. The cells from one patient showed a reproducibly consistent expression reduction in two complex-forming DNA double-strand break repair protein components (DNA Ligase IV and XRCC4). We also showed a corresponding reduction in both gene products at the mRNA level. Additionally, the mRNA inducibility by ionizing radiation was increased for one of the proteins in the patient's cells. We confirmed the likely functional significance of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) expression abnormalities with a DNA double strand break (DNA DSB) repair assay. We have identified a novel biological phenotype linked to clinical radiosensitivity. This is important in that very few molecular defects are known in human radiotherapy subjects. Such knowledge may contribute to the understanding of radiation response mechanisms in cancer patients and to personalization of radiotherapy.

  7. Activation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits proliferation of pancreatic β-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Teng; Wang, Yi; Gu, Li-Ze; Wu, Hui-Wen; Tan, Lan; Guo, Jun

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in β-cells. •Activated PKR inhibited β-cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. •Activated PKR fully abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I on β-cells. -- Abstract: Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is revealed to participate in the development of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Meanwhile, PKR is also characterized as a critical regulator of cell proliferation. To date, no study has focused on the impact of PKR on the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. Here, we adopted insulinoma cell lines and mice islet β-cells to investigate: (1) the effects of glucolipotoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines on PKR activation; (2) the effects of PKR on proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and its underlying mechanisms; (3) the actions of PKR on pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I and its underlying pathway. Our results provided the first evidence that PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in pancreatic β-cells, and activated PKR significantly inhibited cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. Reductions in cyclin D1 and D2 as well as increases in p27 and p53 were associated with the anti-proliferative effects of PKR, and proteasome-dependent degradation took part in the reduction of cyclin D1 and D2. Besides, PKR activation abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I by activating JNK and disrupting IRS1/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. These findings indicate that the anti-proliferative actions of PKR on pancreatic β-cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of T2DM.

  8. CtIP Protein Dimerization Is Critical for Its Recruitment to Chromosomal DNA Double-stranded Breaks*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hailong; Shao, Zhengping; Shi, Linda Z.; Hwang, Patty Yi-Hwa; Truong, Lan N.; Berns, Michael W.; Chen, David J.; Wu, Xiaohua

    2012-01-01

    CtIP (CtBP-interacting protein) associates with BRCA1 and the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex and plays an essential role in homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA double-stranded break (DSB) repair. It has been described that CtIP forms dimers in mammalian cells, but the biological significance is not clear. In this study, we identified a conserved motif in the N terminus of CtIP, which is required for dimer formation. We further showed that CtIP mutants impaired in forming dimers are strongly defective in HR, end resection, and activation of the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related pathway, without notable change of CtIP interactions with BRCA1 or Nbs1. In addition to HR, CtIP dimerization is also required for microhomology-mediated end joining. Live cell imaging of enhanced GFP-tagged CtIP demonstrates that the CtIP dimerization mutant fails to be localized to DSBs, whereas placing a heterologous dimerization motif to the dimerization mutant restores CtIP recruitment to DSBs. These studies suggest that CtIP dimer formation is essential for its recruitment to DSBs on chromatin upon DNA damage. Furthermore, DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of CtIP is significantly reduced in the CtIP dimerization mutants. Therefore, in addition to the C-terminal conserved domains critical for CtIP function, the dimerization motif on the N terminus of CtIP is also conserved and essential for its function in DNA damage responses. The severe repair defects of CtIP dimerization mutants are likely due to the failure in localization to chromosomal DSBs upon DNA damage. PMID:22544744

  9. ATM protein is indispensable to repair complex-type DNA double strand breaks induced by high LET heavy ion irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Fujimori, Akira; Anzai, Kazunori; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated) protein responsible for a rare genetic disease with hyperradiosensitivity, is the one of the earliest repair proteins sensing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). ATM is known to phosphorylate DNA repair proteins such as MRN complex (Mre11, Rad50 and NBS1), 53BP1, Artemis, Brca1, gamma-H2AX, and MDC. We studied the interactions between ATM and DNA-PKcs, a crucial NHEJ repair protein, after cells exposure to high and low LET irradiation. Normal human (HFL III, MRC5VA) and AT homozygote (AT2KY, AT5BIVA, AT3BIVA) cells were irradiated with X-rays and high LET radiation (carbon ions: 290MeV/n initial energy at 70 keV/um, and iron ions: 500MeV/n initial energy at 200KeV/um), and several critical end points were examined. AT cells with high LET irradiation showed a significantly higher radiosensitivity when compared with normal cells. The behavior of DNA DSB repair was monitored by immuno-fluorescence techniques using DNA-PKcs (pThr2609, pSer2056) and ATM (pSer1981) antibodies. In normal cells, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs was clearly detected after high LET irradiation, though the peak of phosphorylation was delayed when compared to X-irradiation. In contrast, almost no DNA-PKcs phosphorylation foci were detected in AT cells irradiated with high LET radiation. A similar result was also observed in normal cells treated with 10 uM ATM kinase specific inhibitor (KU55933) one hour before irradiation. These data suggest that the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with low LET X-rays is mostly ATM-independent, and the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with high LET radiation seems to require ATM probably due to its complex nature of DSB induced. Our study indicates that high LET heavy ion irradiation which we can observe in the space environment would provide a useful tool to study the fundamental mechanism associated with DNA DSB repair.

  10. Double stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase is involved in osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Teramachi, Junpei; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Baba, Ryoko; Doi, Yoshiaki; Hirashima, Kanji; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2010-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) plays a critical role in antiviral defence of the host cells. PKR is also involved in cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. We previously reported that PKR is required for differentiation and calcification of osteoblasts. However, it is unknown about the role of PKR in osteoclast differentiation. A dominant-negative PKR mutant cDNA, in which the amino acid lysine at 296 was replaced with arginine, was transfected into RAW264.7 cells. We have established the cell line that stably expresses the PKR mutant gene (PKR-K/R). Phosphorylation of PKR and {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 was not stimulated by polyinosic-polycytidylic acid in the PKR-K/R cells. RANKL stimulated the formation of TRAP-positive multinuclear cells in RAW264.7 cells. However, TRAP-positive multinuclear cells were not formed in the PKR-K/R cells even when the cells were stimulated with higher doses of RANKL. A specific inhibitor of PKR, 2-aminopurine, also suppressed the RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells. The expression of macrophage fusion receptor and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein significantly decreased in the PKR-K/R cells by real time PCR analysis. The results of RT-PCR revealed that the mRNA expression of osteoclast markers (cathepsin K and calcitonin receptor) was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and RAW264.7 cells treated with 2-aminopurine. Expression of NF-{kappa}B protein was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and 2-aminopurine-treated RAW264.7 cells. The level of STAT1 protein expression was elevated in the PKR-K/R cells compared with that of the wild-type cells. Immunohistochemical study showed that PKR was localized in osteoclasts of metatarsal bone of newborn mouse. The finding that the PKR-positive multinuclear cells should be osteoclasts was confirmed by TRAP-staining. Our present study indicates that PKR plays important

  11. Induction of potent cellular immune response in mice by hepatitis C virus NS3 protein with double-stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Bo; Wang, Richard Y; Qiu, Qi; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Grandinetti, Teresa; Alter, Harvey J; Shih, J Wai-Kuo

    2007-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA is produced during virus replication and, together with the viral antigen, is responsible for inducing host antivirus immunity. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) non-structural protein-3 (NS3) has been implicated in the immune evasion of HCV, and is one of the prime targets for inducing immunity against HCV infection. Mice were immunized with recombinant NS3 protein (rNS3) and poly (I:C) emulsified in Montanide ISA 720 (M720). Cytokine production was assayed by enzyme-linked immunospot assay, and CD4+ IFN-γ+ T helper (Th) cells or CD8+ IFN-γ+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes were detected by flow cytometry. Anti-NS3 titre and immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) and IgG1 levels were monitored by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Administration of rNS3 formulated in poly (I:C) and M720 induced anti-NS3 titres with a predominantly IgG2a isotype comparable to those induced by rNS3 in CpG-ODN and M720. The cytokine profiles showed that this formulation induced a Th1-biased immune response with several-fold more interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-producing cells than interleukin-4-producing cells. In contrast, rNS3 in M720 induced a Th2-biased immune response. The frequency of IFN-γ-producing CD4+ and CD8+ cells induced by rNS3 in poly (I:C) and M720 was significantly higher than that induced by rNS3, rNS3 in M720, or rNS3 in poly (I:C), and was comparable to that induced by rNS3 in CpG-ODN with M720. The antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell immune response persisted for up to 7 months after immunization. In conclusion, poly (I:C) with rNS3 in M720 can elicit a strong and persistent Th1-biased immune response and a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response through cross-priming in mice. This study highlighted a promising formulation for inducing an efficient cellular immune response against HCV that has potential for HCV vaccine development. PMID:17451465

  12. Structures of the first and second double-stranded RNA-binding domains of human TAR RNA-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Seisuke; Nagata, Takashi; Kawazoe, Masahito; Takemoto, Chie; Kigawa, Takanori; Güntert, Peter; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Muto, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2011-01-01

    The TAR RNA-binding Protein (TRBP) is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding protein, which binds to Dicer and is required for the RNA interference pathway. TRBP consists of three dsRNA-binding domains (dsRBDs). The first and second dsRBDs (dsRBD1 and dsRBD2, respectively) have affinities for dsRNA, whereas the third dsRBD (dsRBD3) binds to Dicer. In this study, we prepared the single domain fragments of human TRBP corresponding to dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 and solved the crystal structure of dsRBD1 and the solution structure of dsRBD2. The two structures contain an α−β−β−β−α fold, which is common to the dsRBDs. The overall structures of dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 are similar to each other, except for a slight shift of the first α helix. The residues involved in dsRNA binding are conserved. We examined the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-binding properties of these dsRBDs by isothermal titration colorimetry measurements. The dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 fragments both bound to siRNA, with dissociation constants of 220 and 113 nM, respectively. In contrast, the full-length TRBP and its fragment with dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 exhibited much smaller dissociation constants (0.24 and 0.25 nM, respectively), indicating that the tandem dsRBDs bind simultaneously to one siRNA molecule. On the other hand, the loop between the first α helix and the first β strand of dsRBD2, but not dsRBD1, has a Trp residue, which forms hydrophobic and cation-π interactions with the surrounding residues. A circular dichroism analysis revealed that the thermal stability of dsRBD2 is higher than that of dsRBD1 and depends on the Trp residue. PMID:21080422

  13. Overexpression of the scaffold WD40 protein WRAP53β enhances the repair of and cell survival from DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Rassoolzadeh, H; Böhm, S; Hedström, E; Gad, H; Helleday, T; Henriksson, S; Farnebo, M

    2016-01-01

    Altered expression of the multifunctional protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA Antisense to p53), which targets repair factors to DNA double-strand breaks and factors involved in telomere elongation to Cajal bodies, is linked to carcinogenesis. While loss of WRAP53β function has been shown to disrupt processes regulated by this protein, the consequences of its overexpression remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of WRAP53β disrupts the formation of and impairs the localization of coilin to Cajal bodies. At the same time, the function of this protein in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks is enhanced. Following irradiation, cells overexpressing WRAP53β exhibit more rapid clearance of phospho-histone H2AX (γH2AX), and more efficient homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining, in association with fewer DNA breaks. Moreover, in these cells the ubiquitylation of damaged chromatin, which is known to facilitate the recruitment of repair factors and subsequent repair, is elevated. Knockdown of the ubiquitin ligase involved, ring-finger protein 8 (RNF8), which is recruited to DNA breaks by WRAP53β, attenuated this effect, suggesting that overexpression of WRAP53β leads to more rapid repair, as well as improved cell survival, by enhancing RNF8-mediated ubiquitylation at DNA breaks. Our present findings indicate that WRAP53β and RNF8 are rate-limiting factors in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and raise the possibility that upregulation of WRAP53β may contribute to genomic stability in and survival of cancer cells. PMID:27310875

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Red1 protein exhibits nonhomologous DNA end-joining activity and potentiates Hop1-promoted pairing of double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, Rucha; Ghodke, Indrajeet; Muniyappa, K

    2017-08-18

    Elucidation of the function of synaptonemal complex (SC) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has mainly focused on in vivo analysis of recombination-defective meiotic mutants. Consequently, significant gaps remain in the mechanistic understanding of the activities of various SC proteins and the functional relationships among them. S. cerevisiae Hop1 and Red1 are essential structural components of the SC axial/lateral elements. Previous studies have demonstrated that Hop1 is a structure-selective DNA-binding protein exhibiting high affinity for the Holliday junction and promoting DNA bridging, condensation, and pairing between double-stranded DNA molecules. However, the exact mode of action of Red1 remains unclear, although it is known to interact with Hop1 and to suppress the spore viability defects of hop1 mutant alleles. Here, we report the purification and functional characterization of the full-length Red1 protein. Our results revealed that Red1 forms a stable complex with Hop1 in vitro and provided quantitative insights into their physical interactions. Mechanistically, Red1 preferentially associated with the Holliday junction and 3-way junction rather than with single- or double-stranded DNA with overhangs. Although Hop1 and Red1 exhibited similar binding affinities toward several DNA substrates, the two proteins displayed some significant differences. Notably, Red1, by itself, lacked DNA-pairing ability; however, it potentiated Hop1-promoted intermolecular pairing between double-stranded DNA molecules. Moreover, Red1 exhibited nonhomologous DNA end-joining activity, thus revealing an unexpected role for Red1 in recombination-based DNA repair. Collectively, this study presents the first direct insights into Red1's mode of action and into the mechanism underlying its role in chromosome synapsis and recombination. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Amblyomma americanum salivary glands: double-stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing of synaptobrevin homologue and inhibition of PGE2 stimulated protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Karim, Shahid; Ramakrishnan, Vijay G; Tucker, James S; Essenberg, Richard C; Sauer, John R

    2004-04-01

    Protein secretion into the saliva from the tick salivary glands is due to exocytosis of vesicular membrane bound granular material regulated by SNARE complex proteins after salivary gland stimulation by PGE2 [Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 32 (2002) 1711]. Proteins associated with vesicles (v-SNAREs) are essential components of the exocytotic process. Synaptobrevin is a key v-SNARE in all secreting cells studied to date. A vesicle-associated synaptobrevin cDNA fragment homologue from the salivary glands of partially fed lone star tick females was cloned and sequenced. Double-stranded (ds) RNA interference (RNAi) is an effective method to silence specific gene expression. The functional role of synaptobrevin in protein secretion in partially fed tick salivary glands was studied with an in vitro RNAi method. Incubation of isolated salivary glands with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) transcribed from a tick salivary gland synaptobrevin cDNA fragment resulted in decreased expression of the transcript, a reduction in the level of synaptobrevin protein and inhibition of PGE2 stimulated anticoagulant protein secretion by isolated salivary glands. We demonstrate the applicability of RNAi for studying individual steps in the mechanism of PGE2 stimulated exocytosis in the salivary glands of ixodid ticks.

  16. Massive parallel analysis of the binding specificity of histone-like protein HU to single- and double-stranded DNA with generic oligodeoxyribonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, A. S.; Zasedateleva, O. A.; Prokopenko, D. V.; Rouviere-Yaniv, J.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Inst. de Biologie Physico-Chimique

    2001-06-15

    A generic hexadeoxyribonucleotide microchip has been applied to test the DNA-binding properties of HU histone-like bacterial protein, which is known to have a low sequence specificity. All 4096 hexamers flanked within 8mers by degenerate bases at both the 3'- and 5'-ends were immobilized within the 100 x 100 x 20 mm polyacrylamide gel pads of the microchip. Single-stranded immobilized oligonucleotides were converted in some experiments to the double-stranded form by hybridization with a specified mixture of 8mers. The DNA interaction with HU was characterized by three type of measurements: (i) binding of FITC-labeled HU to microchip oligonucleotides; (ii) melting curves of complexes of labeled HU with single-stranded microchip oligonucleotides; (iii) the effect of HU binding on melting curves of microchip double-stranded DNA labeled with another fluorescent dye, Texas Red. Large numbers of measurements of these parameters were carried out in parallel for all or many generic microchip elements in real time with a multi-wavelength fluorescence microscope. Statistical analysis of these data suggests some preference for HU binding to G/C-rich single-stranded oligonucleotides. HU complexes with double-stranded microchip 8mers can be divided into two groups in which HU binding either increased the melting temperature (T{sub m}) of duplexes or decreased it. The stabilized duplexes showed some preference for presence of the sequence motifs AAG, AGA and AAGA. In the second type of complex, enriched with A/T base pairs, the destabilization effect was higher for longer stretches of A/T duplexes. Binding of HU to labeled duplexes in the second type of complex caused some decrease in fluorescence. This decrease also correlates with the higher A/T content and lower T{sub m}. The results demonstrate that generic microchips could be an efficient approach in analysis of sequence specificity of proteins.

  17. Creating Directed Double-strand Breaks with the Ref Protein: A Novel Rec A-Dependent Nuclease from Bacteriophage P1

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenig, Marielle C.; Lu, Duo; Won, Sang Joon; Dulberger, Charles L.; Manlick, Angela J.; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M.

    2012-03-16

    The bacteriophage P1-encoded Ref protein enhances RecA-dependent recombination in vivo by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that Ref is a new type of enzyme; that is, a RecA-dependent nuclease. Ref binds to ss- and dsDNA but does not cleave any DNA substrate until RecA protein and ATP are added to form RecA nucleoprotein filaments. Ref cleaves only where RecA protein is bound. RecA functions as a co-nuclease in the Ref/RecA system. Ref nuclease activity can be limited to the targeted strands of short RecA-containing D-loops. The result is a uniquely programmable endonuclease activity, producing targeted double-strand breaks at any chosen DNA sequence in an oligonucleotide-directed fashion. We present evidence indicating that cleavage occurs in the RecA filament groove. The structure of the Ref protein has been determined to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. The core structure, consisting of residues 77-186, consists of a central 2-stranded {beta}-hairpin that is sandwiched between several {alpha}-helical and extended loop elements. The N-terminal 76 amino acid residues are disordered; this flexible region is required for optimal activity. The overall structure of Ref, including several putative active site histidine residues, defines a new subclass of HNH-family nucleases. We propose that enhancement of recombination by Ref reflects the introduction of directed, recombinogenic double-strand breaks.

  18. Meiosis-specific DNA double-strand breaks are catalyzed by Spo11, a member of a widely conserved protein family.

    PubMed

    Keeney, S; Giroux, C N; Kleckner, N

    1997-02-07

    Meiotic recombination in S. cerevisiae is initiated by double-strand breaks (DSBs). In certain mutants, breaks accumulate with a covalently attached protein, suggesting that cleavage is catalyzed by the DSB-associated protein via a topoisomerase-like transesterase mechanism. We have purified these protein-DNA complexes and identified the protein as Spo11, one of several proteins required for DSB formation. These findings strongly implicate Spo11 as the catalytic subunit of the meiotic DNA cleavage activity. This is the first identification of a biochemical function for any of the gene products involved in DSB formation. Spo11 defines a protein family with other members in fission yeast, nematodes, and archaebacteria. The S. pombe homolog, rec12p, is also known to be required for meiotic recombination. Thus, these findings provide direct evidence that the mechanism of meiotic recombination initiation is evolutionarily conserved.

  19. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells.

  20. Evolutionary history of double-stranded RNA binding proteins in plants: identification of new cofactors involved in easiRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marion; Pélissier, Thierry; Montavon, Thomas; Tschopp, Marie-Aude; Pouch-Pélissier, Marie-Noëlle; Descombin, Julie; Jean, Viviane; Dunoyer, Patrice; Bousquet-Antonelli, Cécile; Deragon, Jean-Marc

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we retrace the evolutionary history of plant double-stranded RNA binding proteins (DRBs), a group of non-catalytic factors containing one or more double-stranded RNA binding motif (dsRBM) that play important roles in small RNA biogenesis and functions. Using a phylogenetic approach, we show that multiple dsRBM DRBs are systematically composed of two different types of dsRBMs evolving under different constraints and likely fulfilling complementary functions. In vascular plants, four distinct clades of multiple dsRBM DRBs are always present with the exception of Brassicaceae species, that do not possess member of the newly identified clade we named DRB6. We also identified a second new and highly conserved DRB family (we named DRB7) whose members possess a single dsRBM that shows concerted evolution with the most C-terminal dsRBM domain of the Dicer-like 4 (DCL4) proteins. Using a BiFC approach, we observed that Arabidopsis thaliana DRB7.2 (AtDRB7.2) can directly interact with AtDRB4 but not with AtDCL4 and we provide evidence that both AtDRB7.2 and AtDRB4 participate in the epigenetically activated siRNAs pathway.

  1. Complex formation in yeast double-strand break repair: participation of Rad51, Rad52, Rad55, and Rad57 proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hays, S L; Firmenich, A A; Berg, P

    1995-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires genes of the RAD52 epistasis group, of which RAD55 and RAD57 are members. Here, we show that the x-ray sensitivity of rad55 and rad57 mutant strains is suppressible by overexpression of RAD51 or RAD52. Virtually complete suppression is provided by the simultaneous overexpression of RAD51 and RAD52. This suppression occurs at 23 degrees C, where these mutants are more sensitive to x-rays, as well as at 30 degrees C and 36 degrees C. In addition, a recombination defect of rad55 and rad57 mutants is similarly suppressed. Direct in vivo interactions between the Rad51 and Rad55 proteins, and between Rad55 and Rad57, have also been identified by using the two-hybrid system. These results indicate that these four proteins constitute part of a complex, a "recombinosome," to effect the recombinational repair of double-strand breaks. PMID:7624345

  2. In Planta Recognition of a Double-Stranded RNA Synthesis Protein Complex by a Potexviral RNA Silencing Suppressor[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Yukari; Senshu, Hiroko; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Neriya, Yutaro; Netsu, Osamu; Minato, Nami; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Maejima, Kensaku; Oshima, Kenro; Komatsu, Ken; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2014-01-01

    RNA silencing plays an important antiviral role in plants and invertebrates. To counteract antiviral RNA silencing, most plant viruses have evolved viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs). TRIPLE GENE BLOCK PROTEIN1 (TGBp1) of potexviruses is a well-characterized VSR, but the detailed mechanism by which it suppresses RNA silencing remains unclear. We demonstrate that transgenic expression of TGBp1 of plantago asiatica mosaic virus (PlAMV) induced developmental abnormalities in Arabidopsis thaliana similar to those observed in mutants of SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING3 (SGS3) and RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE6 (RDR6) required for the trans-acting small interfering RNA synthesis pathway. PlAMV-TGBp1 inhibits SGS3/RDR6-dependent double-stranded RNA synthesis in the trans-acting small interfering RNA pathway. TGBp1 interacts with SGS3 and RDR6 and coaggregates with SGS3/RDR6 bodies, which are normally dispersed in the cytoplasm. In addition, TGBp1 forms homooligomers, whose formation coincides with TGBp1 aggregation with SGS3/RDR6 bodies. These results reveal the detailed molecular function of TGBp1 as a VSR and shed new light on the SGS3/RDR6-dependent double-stranded RNA synthesis pathway as another general target of VSRs. PMID:24879427

  3. Coordinate 5' and 3' endonucleolytic trimming of terminally blocked blunt DNA double-strand break ends by Artemis nuclease and DNA-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Yannone, Steven M; Khan, Imran S; Zhou, Rui-Zhe; Zhou, Tong; Valerie, Kristoffer; Povirk, Lawrence F

    2008-06-01

    Previous work showed that, in the presence of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), Artemis slowly trims 3'-phosphoglycolate-terminated blunt ends. To examine the trimming reaction in more detail, long internally labeled DNA substrates were treated with Artemis. In the absence of DNA-PK, Artemis catalyzed extensive 5'-->3' exonucleolytic resection of double-stranded DNA. This resection required a 5'-phosphate, but did not require ATP, and was accompanied by endonucleolytic cleavage of the resulting 3' overhang. In the presence of DNA-PK, Artemis-mediated trimming was more limited, was ATP-dependent and did not require a 5'-phosphate. For a blunt end with either a 3'-phosphoglycolate or 3'-hydroxyl terminus, endonucleolytic trimming of 2-4 nucleotides from the 3'-terminal strand was accompanied by trimming of 6 nt from the 5'-terminal strand. The results suggest that autophosphorylated DNA-PK suppresses the exonuclease activity of Artemis toward blunt-ended DNA, and promotes slow and limited endonucleolytic trimming of the 5'-terminal strand, resulting in short 3' overhangs that are trimmed endonucleolytically. Thus, Artemis and DNA-PK can convert terminally blocked DNA ends of diverse geometry and chemical structure to a form suitable for polymerase-mediated patching and ligation, with minimal loss of terminal sequence. Such processing could account for the very small deletions often found at DNA double-strand break repair sites.

  4. A role for the malignant brain tumour (MBT) domain protein LIN-61 in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicholas M; Lemmens, Bennie B L G; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Malignant brain tumour (MBT) domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR) for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT-deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair.

  5. Promyelocytic leukemia protein interacts with werner syndrome helicase and regulates double-strand break repair in γ-irradiation-induced DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jilai; Song, Yi; Qian, Junjie; Liu, Bin; Dong, Yan; Tian, Baolei; Sun, Zhixian

    2011-05-01

    We show here that γ-irradiation leads to the translocation of endogenous Werner syndrome helicase (WRN) from nucleoli to nucleoplasmic DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), and WRN plays a role in damage repair. The relocation of WRN after irradiation was perturbed by promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) knockdown and enhanced by PML IV overexpression. PML IV physically interacted with WRN after irradiation. Amino acids (a.a.) 394 to 433 of PML were necessary for this interaction and the nucleoplasmic translocation of WRN and were involved in DSB repair and cellular sensitivity to γ-irradiation. Taken together, our results provide molecular support for a model in which PML IV physically interacts with and regulates the translocation of WRN for DNA damage repair through its 394-433 a.a. domain.

  6. Molecular characterization of double-stranded RNA segments encoding the major capsid proteins of a Palyam serogroup orbivirus that caused an epizootic of congenital abnormalities in cattle.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, M; Furuuchi, S; Minobe, Y

    1999-01-01

    cDNA cloning of the double-stranded RNA genome of Chuzan virus, a member of the Palyam serogroup orbiviruses, was carried out and the complete nucleotide sequences of RNA segments 2, 3, 6 and 7, encoding the major capsid proteins VP2, VP3, VP5 and VP7, respectively, were determined. The individual segments had single open reading frames and short inverted repeats adjacent to the conserved terminal sequences. Comparative sequence analysis with other serogroups of the genus Orbivirus suggested that VP2 is the principal determinant of serotype specificity and the neutralizing antigen of the Palyam serogroup. VP5 is also considered to be associated with antigenic variability. Both VP3 and VP7 probably contain serogroup-specific epitopes. Phylogenetic profiles demonstrated that the Palyam serogroup virus is more closely related to African horsesickness virus than to bluetongue virus and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus.

  7. Alignment of Homologous Chromosomes and Effective Repair of Programmed DNA Double-Strand Breaks during Mouse Meiosis Require the Minichromosome Maintenance Domain Containing 2 (MCMDC2) Protein.

    PubMed

    Finsterbusch, Friederike; Ravindranathan, Ramya; Dereli, Ihsan; Stanzione, Marcello; Tränkner, Daniel; Tóth, Attila

    2016-10-01

    Orderly chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division requires meiotic recombination to form crossovers between homologous chromosomes (homologues). Members of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase family have been implicated in meiotic recombination. In addition, they have roles in initiation of DNA replication, DNA mismatch repair and mitotic DNA double-strand break repair. Here, we addressed the function of MCMDC2, an atypical yet conserved MCM protein, whose function in vertebrates has not been reported. While we did not find an important role for MCMDC2 in mitotically dividing cells, our work revealed that MCMDC2 is essential for fertility in both sexes due to a crucial function in meiotic recombination. Meiotic recombination begins with the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks into the genome. DNA ends at break sites are resected. The resultant 3-prime single-stranded DNA overhangs recruit RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases that promote the invasion of homologous duplex DNAs by the resected DNA ends. Multiple strand invasions on each chromosome promote the alignment of homologous chromosomes, which is a prerequisite for inter-homologue crossover formation during meiosis. We found that although DNA ends at break sites were evidently resected, and they recruited RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases, these recombinases were ineffective in promoting alignment of homologous chromosomes in the absence of MCMDC2. Consequently, RAD51 and DMC1 foci, which are thought to mark early recombination intermediates, were abnormally persistent in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Importantly, the strand invasion stabilizing MSH4 protein, which marks more advanced recombination intermediates, did not efficiently form foci in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Thus, our work suggests that MCMDC2 plays an important role in either the formation, or the stabilization, of DNA strand invasion events that promote homologue alignment and provide the basis for inter-homologue crossover formation during

  8. Alignment of Homologous Chromosomes and Effective Repair of Programmed DNA Double-Strand Breaks during Mouse Meiosis Require the Minichromosome Maintenance Domain Containing 2 (MCMDC2) Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranathan, Ramya; Dereli, Ihsan; Stanzione, Marcello; Tóth, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Orderly chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division requires meiotic recombination to form crossovers between homologous chromosomes (homologues). Members of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase family have been implicated in meiotic recombination. In addition, they have roles in initiation of DNA replication, DNA mismatch repair and mitotic DNA double-strand break repair. Here, we addressed the function of MCMDC2, an atypical yet conserved MCM protein, whose function in vertebrates has not been reported. While we did not find an important role for MCMDC2 in mitotically dividing cells, our work revealed that MCMDC2 is essential for fertility in both sexes due to a crucial function in meiotic recombination. Meiotic recombination begins with the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks into the genome. DNA ends at break sites are resected. The resultant 3-prime single-stranded DNA overhangs recruit RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases that promote the invasion of homologous duplex DNAs by the resected DNA ends. Multiple strand invasions on each chromosome promote the alignment of homologous chromosomes, which is a prerequisite for inter-homologue crossover formation during meiosis. We found that although DNA ends at break sites were evidently resected, and they recruited RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases, these recombinases were ineffective in promoting alignment of homologous chromosomes in the absence of MCMDC2. Consequently, RAD51 and DMC1 foci, which are thought to mark early recombination intermediates, were abnormally persistent in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Importantly, the strand invasion stabilizing MSH4 protein, which marks more advanced recombination intermediates, did not efficiently form foci in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Thus, our work suggests that MCMDC2 plays an important role in either the formation, or the stabilization, of DNA strand invasion events that promote homologue alignment and provide the basis for inter-homologue crossover formation during

  9. Heme protein assisted dispersion of gold nanoparticle multilayers on chips: from stabilization to high-density double-stranded DNAs fabricated in situ for protein/DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ting; Li, Chun-Wei; Sung, Wang-Chou; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2009-05-15

    Heme proteins in general are shown to be an effective linking agent in stabilizing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and thus facilitate the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) AuNP multilayers on a chip, resulting in a higher coating density than that on polymer linker anchored surfaces for analytical applications. With the use of electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) measurements, a lower oxidation state of Au(0) and dramatic changes among multiple chemical states of N1s are detected upon coating AuNPs with heme proteins but not detected upon coating AuNPs with non-heme proteins. Thus, we propose that the stabilization power arises from pi-conjugation between AuNPs and the heme group. We also propose that such conjugation must be facilitated by the exposure of the heme group through a conformational change of the protein as well as interactions of other functional groups with AuNPs to bring the heme moiety to a close face-to-face distance with the AuNPs. A high-density double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) composed of a sequence of estrogen response element (ERE) is then fabricated on heme protein anchored chips. An in situ hybridization and tracking method is developed based on hybridization-induced fluorescence restoration associated with AuNPs and assists in the subsequent detection of DNA/protein binding on the same chip. The AuNP ERE chips are shown to have high sensitivity and specificity for quantitative detection of ERE binding with its two transcription factor isoforms, estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERalpha and ERbeta), in cell lysates with reduced reagents and reaction time.

  10. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress independent of DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengxia; Lin, Yu-Fen; Palchik, Guillermo A; Matsunaga, Shinji; Wang, Dong; Chen, Benjamin P C

    2014-11-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) are the two major kinases involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and are required for cellular resistance to ionizing radiation. Whereas ATM is the key upstream kinase for DSB signaling, DNA-PKcs is primarily involved in DSB repair through the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) mechanism. In addition to DSB repair, ATM has been shown to be involved in the oxidative stress response and could be activated directly in vitro on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment. However, the role of DNA-PKcs in cellular response to oxidative stress is not clear. We hypothesize that DNA-PKcs may participate in the regulation of ATM activation in response to oxidative stress, and that this regulatory role is independent of its role in DNA double-strand break repair. Our findings reveal that H2O2 induces hyperactivation of ATM signaling in DNA-PKcs-deficient, but not Ligase 4-deficient cells, suggesting an NHEJ-independent role for DNA-PKcs. Furthermore, DNA-PKcs deficiency leads to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and to a decrease in cellular survival against H2O2. For the first time, our results reveal that DNA-PKcs plays a noncanonical role in the cellular response to oxidative stress, which is independent from its role in NHEJ. In addition, DNA-PKcs is a critical regulator of the oxidative stress response and contributes to the maintenance of redox homeostasis. Our findings reveal that DNA-PKcs is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress and suppression of ROS buildup independently of its function in DSB repair.

  11. Recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara generating excess early double-stranded RNA transiently activates protein kinase R and triggers enhanced innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Wolferstätter, Michael; Schweneker, Marc; Späth, Michaela; Lukassen, Susanne; Klingenberg, Marieken; Brinkmann, Kay; Wielert, Ursula; Lauterbach, Henning; Hochrein, Hubertus; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; Hausmann, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important molecular pattern associated with viral infection and is detected by various extra- and intracellular recognition molecules. Poxviruses have evolved to avoid producing dsRNA early in infection but generate significant amounts of dsRNA late in infection due to convergent transcription of late genes. Protein kinase R (PKR) is activated by dsRNA and triggers major cellular defenses against viral infection, including protein synthesis shutdown, apoptosis, and type I interferon (IFN-I) production. The poxviral E3 protein binds and sequesters viral dsRNA and is a major antagonist of the PKR pathway. We found that the highly replication-restricted modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) engineered to produce excess amounts of dsRNA early in infection showed enhanced induction of IFN-β in murine and human cells in the presence of an intact E3L gene. IFN-β induction required a minimum overlap length of 300 bp between early complementary transcripts and was strongly PKR dependent. Excess early dsRNA produced by MVA activated PKR early but transiently in murine cells and induced enhanced systemic levels of IFN-α, IFN-γ, and other cytokines and chemokines in mice in a largely PKR-dependent manner. Replication-competent chorioallantois vaccinia virus Ankara (CVA) generating excess early dsRNA also enhanced IFN-I production and was apathogenic in mice even at very high doses but showed no in vitro host range defect. Thus, genetically adjuvanting MVA and CVA to generate excess early dsRNA is an effective method to enhance innate immune stimulation by orthopoxvirus vectors and to attenuate replicating vaccinia virus in vivo. Efficient cellular sensing of pathogen-specific components, including double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), is an important prerequisite of an effective antiviral immune response. The prototype poxvirus vaccinia virus (VACV) and its derivative modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) produce dsRNA as a by-product of viral

  12. Giardiavirus double-stranded RNA genome encodes a capsid polypeptide and a gag-pol-like fusion protein by a translation frameshift.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, A L; Yang, H M; Shen, K A; Wang, C C

    1993-01-01

    Giardiavirus is a small, nonenveloped virus comprising a monopartite double-stranded RNA genome, a major protein of 100 kDa, and a less abundant polypeptide of 190 kDa. It can be isolated from the culture supernatant of Giardia lamblia, a parasitic flagellate in human and other mammals, and efficiently infects other virus-free G. lamblia. A single-stranded copy of the viral RNA can be electroporated into uninfected G. lamblia cells to complete the viral replication cycle. Giardiavirus genomic cDNA of 6100 nt was constructed and its sequence revealed the presence of two large open reading frames that are separated by a -1 frameshift and share an overlap of 220 nt. The 3' open reading frame contains all consensus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase sequence motifs. A heptamer-pseudoknot structure similar to those found at ribosomal slippage sites in retroviruses and yeast killer virus was identified within this overlap. Immunostudies using antisera against synthesized peptides from four regions in the two open reading frames indicated that the 100- and 190-kDa viral proteins share a common domain in the amino-terminal region. But the 190-kDa protein makes a -1 switch of its reading frame beyond the presumed slippage heptamer and is therefore a -1 frameshift fusion protein similar to the gag-pol fusion protein found in retroviruses. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8378334

  13. Crystal Structure of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 Protein Revealed Ca[superscript 2+]-dependent Double-stranded DNA Binding Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong

    2012-05-22

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 {angstrom} tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is {approx}26 {angstrom} wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an {alpha}/{beta} domain and an {alpha}-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca{sup 2+} was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca{sup 2+} ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca{sup 2+} ions.

  14. Crystal structure of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 protein revealed Ca2+-dependent double-stranded DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong

    2011-09-02

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 Å tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is ∼26 Å wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an α/β domain and an α-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca(2+) was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca(2+) ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca(2+) ions.

  15. Possible Involvement of the Double-Stranded RNA-Binding Core Protein ςA in the Resistance of Avian Reovirus to Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Costas, José; González-López, Claudia; Vakharia, Vikram N.; Benavente, Javier

    2000-01-01

    Treatment of primary cultures of chicken embryo fibroblasts with a recombinant chicken alpha/beta interferon (rcIFN) induces an antiviral state that causes a strong inhibition of vaccinia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus replication but has no effect on avian reovirus S1133 replication. The fact that avian reovirus polypeptides are synthesized normally in rcIFN-treated cells prompted us to investigate whether this virus expresses factors that interfere with the activation and/or the activity of the IFN-induced, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent enzymes. Our results demonstrate that extracts of avian-reovirus-infected cells, but not those of uninfected cells, are able to relieve the translation-inhibitory activity of dsRNA in reticulocyte lysates, by blocking the activation of the dsRNA-dependent enzymes. In addition, our results show that protein ςA, an S1133 core polypeptide, binds to dsRNA in an irreversible manner and that clearing this protein from extracts of infected cells abolishes their protranslational capacity. Taken together, our results raise the interesting possibility that protein ςA antagonizes the IFN-induced cellular response against avian reovirus by blocking the intracellular activation of enzyme pathways dependent on dsRNA, as has been suggested for several other viral dsRNA-binding proteins. PMID:10627522

  16. The RSF1 histone-remodelling factor facilitates DNA double-strand break repair by recruiting centromeric and Fanconi Anaemia proteins.

    PubMed

    Pessina, Fabio; Lowndes, Noel F

    2014-05-01

    ATM is a central regulator of the cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here we identify a biochemical interaction between ATM and RSF1 and we characterise the role of RSF1 in this response. The ATM-RSF1 interaction is dependent upon both DSBs and ATM kinase activity. Together with SNF2H/SMARCA5, RSF1 forms the RSF chromatin-remodelling complex. Although RSF1 is specific to the RSF complex, SNF2H/SMARCA5 is a catalytic subunit of several other chromatin-remodelling complexes. Although not required for checkpoint signalling, RSF1 is required for efficient repair of DSBs via both end-joining and homology-directed repair. Specifically, the ATM-dependent recruitment to sites of DSBs of the histone fold proteins CENPS/MHF1 and CENPX/MHF2, previously identified at centromeres, is RSF1-dependent. In turn these proteins recruit and regulate the mono-ubiquitination of the Fanconi Anaemia proteins FANCD2 and FANCI. We propose that by depositing CENPS/MHF1 and CENPX/MHF2, the RSF complex either directly or indirectly contributes to the reorganisation of chromatin around DSBs that is required for efficient DNA repair.

  17. XRCC4 and XLF form long helical protein filaments suitable for DNA end protection and alignment to facilitate DNA double strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Mahaney, Brandi L.; Hammel, Michal; Meek, Katheryn; Tainer, John A.; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2013-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and endogenous stress including replication failure, are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage. In human cells, most IR-induced DSBs are repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. One of the most critical steps in NHEJ is ligation of DNA ends by DNA ligase IV (LIG4), which interacts with, and is stabilized by, the scaffolding protein X-ray cross-complementing gene 4 (XRCC4). XRCC4 also interacts with XRCC4-like factor (XLF, also called Cernunnos); yet, XLF has been one of the least mechanistically understood proteins and precisely how XLF functions in NHEJ has been enigmatic. Here, we examine current combined structural and mutational findings that uncover integrated functions of XRCC4 and XLF and reveal their interactions to form long, helical protein filaments suitable to protect and align DSB ends. XLF-XRCC4 provides a global structural scaffold for ligating DSBs without requiring long complementary DNA ends, thus ensuring accurate and efficient ligation and repair. The assembly of these XRCC4-XLF filaments, providing both DNA end protection and alignment, may commit cells to NHEJ with general biological implications for NHEJ and DSB repair processes and their links to cancer predispositions and interventions. PMID:23442139

  18. Loss of the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase in DNA double-strand-break-repair mutant mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Peterson, S R; Kurimasa, A; Oshimura, M; Dynan, W S; Bradbury, E M; Chen, D J

    1995-04-11

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) consists of three polypeptide components: Ku-70, Ku-80, and an approximately 350-kDa catalytic subunit (p350). The gene encoding the Ku-80 subunit is identical to the x-ray-sensitive group 5 complementing gene XRCC5. Expression of the Ku-80 cDNA rescues both DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and V(D)J recombination in group 5 mutant cells. The involvement of Ku-80 in these processes suggests that the underlying defect in these mutant cells may be disruption of the DNA-PK holoenzyme. In this report we show that the p350 kinase subunit is deleted in cells derived from the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse and in the Chinese hamster ovary cell line V-3, both of which are defective in DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. A centromeric fragment of human chromosome 8 that complements the scid defect also restores p350 protein expression and rescues in vitro DNA-PK activity. These data suggest the scid gene may encode the p350 protein or regulate its expression and are consistent with a model whereby DNA-PK is a critical component of the DSB-repair pathway.

  19. Protein phosphatases pph3, ptc2, and ptc3 play redundant roles in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Ae; Hicks, Wade M; Li, Jin; Tay, Sue Yen; Haber, James E

    2011-02-01

    In response to a DNA double-strand break (DSB), cells undergo a transient cell cycle arrest prior to mitosis until the break is repaired. In budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), the DNA damage checkpoint is regulated by a signaling cascade of protein kinases, including Mec1 and Rad53. When DSB repair is complete, cells resume cell cycle progression (a process called "recovery") by turning off the checkpoint. Recovery involves two members of the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family, Ptc2 and Ptc3, as well as the protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) enzyme, Pph3. Here, we demonstrate a new function of these three phosphatases in DSB repair. Cells lacking all three phosphatases Pph3, Ptc2, and Ptc3 exhibit synergistic sensitivities to the DNA-damaging agents camptothecin and methyl methanesulfonate, as well as hydroxyurea but not to UV light. Moreover, the simultaneous absence of Pph3, Ptc2, and Ptc3 results in defects in completing DSB repair, whereas neither single nor double deletion of the phosphatases causes a repair defect. Specifically, cells lacking all three phosphatases are defective in the repair-mediated DNA synthesis. Interestingly, the repair defect caused by the triple deletion of Pph3, Ptc2, and Ptc3 is most prominent when a DSB is slowly repaired and the DNA damage checkpoint is fully activated.

  20. Interaction of a DNA-binding protein, the gene product of D5 of bacteriophage T5, with double-stranded DNA. Analysis by metrizamide gradient centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, R K; Roop, B C

    1982-12-25

    Interactions of DNA and the gene product D5 (gpD5) of bacteriophage T5, a DNA-binding protein that binds preferentially and cooperatively to double-stranded DNA, were analyzed by metrizamide gradient centrifugation. Conditions were set so that DNA and DNA protein complex sedimented to apparent equilibrium positions. DNA has a buoyant density of 1.12 g/cm3, and DNA saturated with gpD5 has a buoyant density of 1.17 g/cm3. These values are independent of DNA size and base composition in the range studied. At gpD5 concentration below the saturation value in a low ionic strength buffer, DNA distribution is bimodal, indicating cooperative binding of gpD5 to DNA. However, in the presence of 10 mM MgCl2, the binding process becomes distributive, with the buoyant density increasing linearly with the amount of gpD5 added until the saturation. From these data, one molecule of gpD5 is calculated to cover 40 base pairs at saturation. The technique as described has general applicability to the study of any interaction between DNA and dNA-binding proteins that bind in sufficient amount to cause detectable changes in buoyant density.

  1. Normal microRNA Maturation and Germ-Line Stem Cell Maintenance Requires Loquacious, a Double-Stranded RNA-Binding Domain Protein

    PubMed Central

    Förstemann, Klaus; Tomari, Yukihide; Du, Tingting; Vagin, Vasily V; Denli, Ahmet M; Bratu, Diana P; Klattenhoff, Carla; Theurkauf, William E

    2005-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded, 21- to 23-nucleotide cellular RNAs that control the expression of cognate target genes. Primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts are transformed to mature miRNA by the successive actions of two RNase III endonucleases. Drosha converts pri-miRNA transcripts to precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA); Dicer, in turn, converts pre-miRNA to mature miRNA. Here, we show that normal processing of Drosophila pre-miRNAs by Dicer-1 requires the double-stranded RNA-binding domain (dsRBD) protein Loquacious (Loqs), a homolog of human TRBP, a protein first identified as binding the HIV trans-activator RNA (TAR). Efficient miRNA-directed silencing of a reporter transgene, complete repression of white by a dsRNA trigger, and silencing of the endogenous Stellate locus by Suppressor of Stellate, all require Loqs. In loqs f00791 mutant ovaries, germ-line stem cells are not appropriately maintained. Loqs associates with Dcr-1, the Drosophila RNase III enzyme that processes pre-miRNA into mature miRNA. Thus, every known Drosophila RNase-III endonuclease is paired with a dsRBD protein that facilitates its function in small RNA biogenesis. PMID:15918770

  2. Epitope mapping and direct visualization of the parallel, in-register arrangement of the double-stranded coiled-coil in the NuMA protein.

    PubMed Central

    Harborth, J; Weber, K; Osborn, M

    1995-01-01

    NuMA, a 238 kDa protein present in the nucleus during interphase, translocates to the spindle poles in mitosis. NuMA plays an essential role in mitosis, since microinjection of the NuMA SPN-3 monoclonal antibody causes mitotic arrest and micronuclei formation. We have mapped the approximate position of the epitopes of six monoclonal NuMA antibodies using recombinant NuMA fragments. The SPN-3 epitope has been located to residues 255-267 at the C-terminus of the first helical subdomain of the central rod domain and several residues crucial for antibody binding have been identified. To gain insight into the ultrastructure of NuMA, several defined fragments, as well as the full-length recombinant protein, were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. They were then characterized by chemical cross-linking, circular dichroism spectra and electron microscopy. The results directly reveal the tripartate structure of NuMA. A long central rod domain is flanked by globular end domains. The rod is 207 nm long and is at least 90% alpha-helical. It reflects a double-stranded coiled-coil with the alpha-helices arranged parallel and in register. The NuMA protein thus forms the longest coiled-coil currently known. Our analyses reveal no indication that recombinant NuMA assembles into filaments or other higher order structures. Images PMID:7781599

  3. The dominant-negative inhibition of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase PKR increases the efficacy of Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lihoradova, Olga; Kalveram, Birte; Indran, Sabarish V; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Juelich, Terry L; Hill, Terence E; Tseng, Chien-Te K; Gong, Bin; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Morikawa, Shigeru; Freiberg, Alexander N; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2012-07-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), belonging to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae, is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa and causes a high rate of abortion in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. MP-12 is the only RVFV strain excluded from the select-agent rule and handled at a biosafety level 2 (BSL2) laboratory. MP-12 encodes a functional major virulence factor, the NSs protein, which contributes to its residual virulence in pregnant ewes. We found that 100% of mice subcutaneously vaccinated with recombinant MP-12 (rMP12)-murine PKRN167 (mPKRN167), which encodes a dominant-negative form of mouse double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase (PKR) in place of NSs, were protected from wild-type (wt) RVFV challenge, while 72% of mice vaccinated with MP-12 were protected after challenge. rMP12-mPKRN167 induced alpha interferon (IFN-α) in sera, accumulated RVFV antigens in dendritic cells at the local draining lymph nodes, and developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies, while parental MP-12 induced neither IFN-α nor viral-antigen accumulation at the draining lymph node yet induced a high level of neutralizing antibodies. The present study suggests that the expression of a dominant-negative PKR increases the immunogenicity and efficacy of live-attenuated RVFV vaccine, which will lead to rational design of safe and highly immunogenic RVFV vaccines for livestock and humans.

  4. The Dominant-Negative Inhibition of Double-Stranded RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase PKR Increases the Efficacy of Rift Valley Fever Virus MP-12 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lihoradova, Olga; Kalveram, Birte; Indran, Sabarish V.; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Juelich, Terry L.; Hill, Terence E.; Tseng, Chien-Te K.; Gong, Bin; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Morikawa, Shigeru; Freiberg, Alexander N.

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), belonging to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae, is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa and causes a high rate of abortion in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. MP-12 is the only RVFV strain excluded from the select-agent rule and handled at a biosafety level 2 (BSL2) laboratory. MP-12 encodes a functional major virulence factor, the NSs protein, which contributes to its residual virulence in pregnant ewes. We found that 100% of mice subcutaneously vaccinated with recombinant MP-12 (rMP12)-murine PKRN167 (mPKRN167), which encodes a dominant-negative form of mouse double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase (PKR) in place of NSs, were protected from wild-type (wt) RVFV challenge, while 72% of mice vaccinated with MP-12 were protected after challenge. rMP12-mPKRN167 induced alpha interferon (IFN-α) in sera, accumulated RVFV antigens in dendritic cells at the local draining lymph nodes, and developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies, while parental MP-12 induced neither IFN-α nor viral-antigen accumulation at the draining lymph node yet induced a high level of neutralizing antibodies. The present study suggests that the expression of a dominant-negative PKR increases the immunogenicity and efficacy of live-attenuated RVFV vaccine, which will lead to rational design of safe and highly immunogenic RVFV vaccines for livestock and humans. PMID:22573861

  5. Regulation of DNA-end resection by hnRNPU-like proteins promotes DNA double-strand break signaling and repair

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Sophie E.; Blackford, Andrew N.; Chapman, J. Ross; Baskcomb, Linda; Gravel, Serge; Rusch, Andre; Thomas, Anoushka; Blundred, Rachel; Smith, Philippa; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Dobner, Thomas; Taylor, A. Malcolm R.; Turnell, Andrew S.; Stewart, Grant S.; Grand, Roger J.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary DNA double-strand break (DSB) signaling and repair are critical for cell viability, and rely on highly coordinated pathways whose molecular organization is still incompletely understood. Here, we show that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like (hnRNPUL) proteins 1 and 2 play key roles in cellular responses to DSBs. We identify human hnRNPUL1 and 2 as binding partners for the DSB sensor complex MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) and demonstrate that hnRNPUL1 and 2 are recruited to DNA damage in an interdependent manner that requires MRN. Moreover, we show that hnRNPUL1 and 2 stimulate DNA-end resection and promote ATR-dependent signaling and DSB repair by homologous recombination, thereby contributing to cell survival upon exposure to DSB-inducing agents. Finally, we establish that hnRNPUL1 and 2 function downstream of MRN and CtBP-interacting protein (CtIP) to promote recruitment of the BLM helicase to DNA breaks. Collectively, these results provide insights into how mammalian cells respond to DSBs. PMID:22365830

  6. A novel protein, Rsf1/Pxd1, is critical for the single-strand annealing pathway of double-strand break repair in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanqian; Zhang, Zhanlu; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Qiuxue; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Yangmin; Wang, Weibu; Fan, Yunliu; Wang, Lei

    2015-06-01

    The process of single-strand annealing (SSA) repairs DNA double-strand breaks that are flanked by direct repeat sequences through the coordinated actions of a series of proteins implicated in recombination, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair (NER). Many of the molecular and mechanistic insights gained in SSA repair have principally come from studies in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, there is little molecular understanding of the SSA pathway in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. To further our understanding of this important process, we established a new chromosome-based SSA assay in fission yeast. Our genetic analyses showed that, although many homologous components participate in SSA repair in these species indicating that some evolutionary conservation, Saw1 and Slx4 are not principal agents in the SSA repair pathway in fission yeast. This is in marked contrast to the function of Saw1 and Slx4 in budding yeast. Additionally, a novel genus-specific protein, Rsf1/Pxd1, physically interacts with Rad16, Swi10 and Saw1 in vitro and in vivo. We find that Rsf1/Pxd1 is not required for NER and demonstrate that, in fission yeast, Rsf1/Pxd1, but not Saw1, plays a critical role in SSA recombination.

  7. Regulation of DNA-end resection by hnRNPU-like proteins promotes DNA double-strand break signaling and repair.

    PubMed

    Polo, Sophie E; Blackford, Andrew N; Chapman, J Ross; Baskcomb, Linda; Gravel, Serge; Rusch, Andre; Thomas, Anoushka; Blundred, Rachel; Smith, Philippa; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Dobner, Thomas; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Turnell, Andrew S; Stewart, Grant S; Grand, Roger J; Jackson, Stephen P

    2012-02-24

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) signaling and repair are critical for cell viability, and rely on highly coordinated pathways whose molecular organization is still incompletely understood. Here, we show that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like (hnRNPUL) proteins 1 and 2 play key roles in cellular responses to DSBs. We identify human hnRNPUL1 and -2 as binding partners for the DSB sensor complex MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) and demonstrate that hnRNPUL1 and -2 are recruited to DNA damage in an interdependent manner that requires MRN. Moreover, we show that hnRNPUL1 and -2 stimulate DNA-end resection and promote ATR-dependent signaling and DSB repair by homologous recombination, thereby contributing to cell survival upon exposure to DSB-inducing agents. Finally, we establish that hnRNPUL1 and -2 function downstream of MRN and CtBP-interacting protein (CtIP) to promote recruitment of the BLM helicase to DNA breaks. Collectively, these results provide insights into how mammalian cells respond to DSBs.

  8. Ebola Virus VP35 Protein Binds Double-Stranded RNA and Inhibits Alpha/Beta Interferon Production Induced by RIG-I Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Washington B.; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Gale, Michael; Hartman, Amy L.; Kimberlin, Christopher R.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Basler, Christopher F.

    2006-01-01

    The Ebola virus (EBOV) VP35 protein blocks the virus-induced phosphorylation and activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), a transcription factor critical for the induction of alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) expression. However, the mechanism(s) by which this blockage occurs remains incompletely defined. We now provide evidence that VP35 possesses double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding activity. Specifically, VP35 bound to poly(rI) · poly(rC)-coated Sepharose beads but not control beads. In contrast, two VP35 point mutants, R312A and K309A, were found to be greatly impaired in their dsRNA-binding activity. Competition assays showed that VP35 interacted specifically with poly(rI) · poly(rC), poly(rA) · poly(rU), or in vitro-transcribed dsRNAs derived from EBOV sequences, and not with single-stranded RNAs (ssRNAs) or double-stranded DNA. We then screened wild-type and mutant VP35s for their ability to target different components of the signaling pathways that activate IRF-3. These experiments indicate that VP35 blocks activation of IRF-3 induced by overexpression of RIG-I, a cellular helicase recently implicated in the activation of IRF-3 by either virus or dsRNA. Interestingly, the VP35 mutants impaired for dsRNA binding have a decreased but measurable IFN antagonist activity in these assays. Additionally, wild-type and dsRNA-binding-mutant VP35s were found to have equivalent abilities to inhibit activation of the IFN-β promoter induced by overexpression of IPS-1, a recently identified signaling molecule downstream of RIG-I, or by overexpression of the IRF-3 kinases IKKɛ and TBK-1. These data support the hypothesis that dsRNA binding may contribute to VP35 IFN antagonist function. However, additional mechanisms of inhibition, at a point proximal to the IRF-3 kinases, most likely also exist. PMID:16698997

  9. Asymmetric Segregation of the Double-Stranded RNA Binding Protein Staufen2 during Mammalian Neural Stem Cell Divisions Promotes Lineage Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kusek, Gretchen; Campbell, Melissa; Doyle, Frank; Tenenbaum, Scott A.; Kiebler, Michael; Temple, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Summary Asymmetric cell divisions are a fundamental feature of neural development, and misregulation can lead to brain abnormalities or tumor formation. During an asymmetric cell division, molecular determinants are segregated preferentially into one daughter cell to specify its fate. An important goal is to identify the asymmetric determinants in neural progenitor cells, which could be tumor suppressors or inducers of specific neural fates. Here we show that the double-stranded RNA-binding protein Stau2 is distributed asymmetrically during progenitor divisions in the developing mouse cortex, preferentially segregating into the Tbr2+ neuroblast daughter, taking with it a sub-set of RNAs. Knockdown of Stau2 stimulates differentiation and over-expression produces periventricular neuronal masses, demonstrating its functional importance for normal cortical development. We immunoprecipitated Stau2 to examine its cargo mRNAs, and found enrichment for known asymmetric and basal cell determinants, such as Trim32, and identified novel candidates, including a subset involved in primary cilium function. PMID:22902295

  10. Regulation of 53BP1 Protein Stability by RNF8 and RNF168 Is Important for Efficient DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yiheng; Wang, Chao; Huang, Kun; Xia, Fen; Parvin, Jeffrey D.; Mondal, Neelima

    2014-01-01

    53BP1 regulates DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. In functional assays for specific DSB repair pathways, we found that 53BP1 was important in the conservative non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) pathway, and this activity was dependent upon RNF8 and RNF168. We observed that 53BP1 protein was diffusely abundant in nuclei, and upon ionizing radiation, 53BP1 was everywhere degraded except at DNA damage sites. Depletion of RNF8 or RNF168 blocked the degradation of the diffusely localized nuclear 53BP1, and ionizing radiation induced foci (IRIF) did not form. Furthermore, when 53BP1 degradation was inhibited, a subset of 53BP1 was bound to DNA damage sites but bulk, unbound 53BP1 remained in the nucleoplasm, and localization of its downstream effector RIF1 at DSBs was abolished. Our data suggest a novel mechanism for responding to DSB that upon ionizing radiation, 53BP1 was divided into two populations, ensuring functional DSB repair: damage site-bound 53BP1 whose binding signal is known to be generated by RNF8 and RNF168; and unbound bulk 53BP1 whose ensuing degradation is regulated by RNF8 and RNF168. PMID:25337968

  11. Significance of p53-binding protein 1 nuclear foci in uterine cervical lesions: endogenous DNA double strand breaks and genomic instability during carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Katsuya; Miura, Shiro; Kurashige, Tomomi; Suzuki, Keiji; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Ihara, Makoto; Nakajima, Hisayoshi; Masuzaki, Hideaki; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Aims A defective DNA damage response can result in genomic instability (GIN) and lead to transformation to cancer. As p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) localizes at the sites of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and rapidly forms nuclear foci (NF), the presence of 53BP1 NF can be considered to be an indicator of endogenous DSBs reflecting GIN. Our aim was to analyse the presence of DSBs by immunofluorescence for 53BP1 expression in a series of cervical lesions, to evaluate the significance of GIN during carcinogenesis. Methods and results A total of 80 archival cervical tissue samples, including 11 normal, 16 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)1, 15 CIN2, 24 CIN3 and 14 squamous cell carcinoma samples, were analysed for 53BP1 NF, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and p16INK4a overexpression. The number of 53BP1 NF in cervical cells appeared to increase with progression during carcinogenesis. The distribution of 53BP1 NF was similar to that of the punctate HPV signals as determined by in-situ hybridization and also to p16INK4a overexpression in CIN, suggesting an association with viral infection and replication stress. Conclusions Immunofluorescence analysis of 53BP1 expression can be a useful tool with which to estimate the level of GIN. During cervical carcinogenesis, GIN may allow further accumulation of genomic alterations, causing progression to invasive cancer. PMID:22034884

  12. Role of the yeast DNA repair protein Nej1 in end processing during the repair of DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Trujillo, Kelly M; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Osley, Mary Ann; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2015-07-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB)s often require end processing prior to joining during their repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Although the yeast proteins, Pol4, a Pol X family DNA polymerase, and Rad27, a nuclease, participate in the end processing reactions of NHEJ, the mechanisms underlying the recruitment of these factors to DSBs are not known. Here we demonstrate that Nej1, a NHEJ factor that interacts with and modulates the activity of the NHEJ DNA ligase complex (Dnl4/Lif1), physically and functionally interacts with both Pol4 and Rad27. Notably, Nej1 and Dnl4/Lif1, which also interacts with both Pol4 and Rad27, independently recruit the end processing factors to in vivo DSBs via mechanisms that are additive rather than redundant. As was observed with Dnl4/Lif1, the activities of both Pol4 and Rad27 were enhanced by the interaction with Nej1. Furthermore, Nej1 increased the joining of incompatible DNA ends in reconstituted reactions containing Pol4, Rad27 and Dnl4/Lif1, indicating that the stimulatory activities of Nej1 and Dnl4/Lif1 are also additive. Together our results reveal novel roles for Nej1 in the recruitment of Pol4 and Rad27 to in vivo DSBs and the coordination of the end processing and ligation reactions of NHEJ. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Serines 440 and 467 in the Werner syndrome protein are phosphorylated by DNA-PK and affects its dynamics in response to DNA double strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Kusumoto-Matsuo, Rika; Ghosh, Deblina; Karmakar, Parimal; May, Alfred; Ramsden, Dale; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2014-01-01

    WRN protein, defective in Werner syndrome (WS), a human segmental progeria, is a target of serine/threonine kinases involved in sensing DNA damage. DNA-PK phosphorylates WRN in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). However, the main phosphorylation sites and functional importance of the phosphorylation of WRN has remained unclear. Here, we identify Ser-440 and −467 in WRN as major phosphorylation sites mediated by DNA-PK. In vitro, DNA-PK fails to phosphorylate a GST-WRN fragment with S440A and/or S467A substitution. In addition, full length WRN with the mutation expressed in 293T cells was not phosphorylated in response to DSBs produced by bleomycin. Accumulation of the mutant WRN at the site of laser-induced DSBs occurred with the same kinetics as wild type WRN in live HeLa cells. While the wild type WRN relocalized to the nucleoli after 24 hours recovery from etoposide-induced DSBs, the mutant WRN remained mostly in the nucleoplasm. Consistent with this, WS cells expressing the mutants exhibited less DNA repair efficiency and more sensitivity to etoposide, compared to those expressing wild type. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation of Ser-440 and −467 in WRN are important for relocalization of WRN to nucleoli, and that it is required for efficient DSB repair. PMID:24429382

  14. Acetyltransferase p300 collaborates with chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4) to facilitate DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenjing; Chen, Hongyu; Xiao, Ting; Wang, Ruoxi; Li, Ting; Han, Liping; Zeng, Xianlu

    2016-03-01

    Chromatin remodelling is critical for repairing DNA damage and maintaining genomic integrity. Previous studies have reported that histone acetyltransferase p300 and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4) functions, respectively, in DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair. But the physiological significance of their interaction remains elusive. Here, we showed that p300 and CHD4 were both recruited to the sites of DSBs. Their ablation led to impaired DSBs repair and sensitised cells to laser and the anti-cancer drug, etoposide. Using DR-GFP and EJ5-GFP reporter systems, we found that knockdown of p300 or CHD4 impaired the homologous recombination (HR) repair but no the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair. Furthermore, p300 or CHD4 knockdown respectively suppressed the recruitment of replication protein A (RPA), a key protein for HR, to the DSB sites. In addition, immunofluorescence results showed that knockdown of p300 reduced the recruitment of CHD4 at DSB sites. In turn, CHD4 knockdown also decreased p300 assembly. Moreover, immunoprecipitation and purified protein pull down assay revealed that p300 physically interacted with CHD4 at DNA damage sites, and this interaction was dependent on the chromodomain and ATPase/helicase domain of CHD4 and the CH2, Bd and HAT domains of p300. These results indicate that p300 and CHD4 could function cooperatively at DSB sites and provide a new insight into the detailed crosstalk among the chromatin remodelling proteins.

  15. Use of double-stranded RNA-mediated interference to determine the substrates of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Muda, Marco; Worby, Carolyn A; Simonson-Leff, Nancy; Clemens, James C; Dixon, Jack E

    2002-08-15

    Despite the wealth of information generated by genome-sequencing projects, the identification of in vivo substrates of specific protein kinases and phosphatases is hampered by the large number of candidate enzymes, overlapping enzyme specificity and sequence similarity. In the present study, we demonstrate the power of RNA interference (RNAi) to dissect signal transduction cascades involving specific kinases and phosphatases. RNAi is used to identify the cellular tyrosine kinases upstream of the phosphorylation of Down-Syndrome cell-adhesion molecule (Dscam), a novel cell-surface molecule of the immunoglobulin-fibronectin super family, which has been shown to be important for axonal path-finding in Drosophila. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Dscam recruits the Src homology 2 domain of the adaptor protein Dock to the receptor. Dock, the ortho- logue of mammalian Nck, is also essential for correct axonal path-finding in Drosophila. We further determined that Dock is tyrosine-phosphorylated in vivo and identified DPTP61F as the protein tyrosine phosphatase responsible for maintaining Dock in its non-phosphorylated state. The present study illustrates the versatility of RNAi in the identification of the physiological substrates for protein kinases and phosphatases.

  16. Use of double-stranded RNA-mediated interference to determine the substrates of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    Muda, Marco; Worby, Carolyn A; Simonson-Leff, Nancy; Clemens, James C; Dixon, Jack E

    2002-01-01

    Despite the wealth of information generated by genome-sequencing projects, the identification of in vivo substrates of specific protein kinases and phosphatases is hampered by the large number of candidate enzymes, overlapping enzyme specificity and sequence similarity. In the present study, we demonstrate the power of RNA interference (RNAi) to dissect signal transduction cascades involving specific kinases and phosphatases. RNAi is used to identify the cellular tyrosine kinases upstream of the phosphorylation of Down-Syndrome cell-adhesion molecule (Dscam), a novel cell-surface molecule of the immunoglobulin-fibronectin super family, which has been shown to be important for axonal path-finding in Drosophila. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Dscam recruits the Src homology 2 domain of the adaptor protein Dock to the receptor. Dock, the ortho- logue of mammalian Nck, is also essential for correct axonal path-finding in Drosophila. We further determined that Dock is tyrosine-phosphorylated in vivo and identified DPTP61F as the protein tyrosine phosphatase responsible for maintaining Dock in its non-phosphorylated state. The present study illustrates the versatility of RNAi in the identification of the physiological substrates for protein kinases and phosphatases. PMID:12014990

  17. Cell-type specific role of the RNA-binding protein, NONO, in the DNA double-strand break response in the mouse testes.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuyi; Shu, Feng-Jue; Li, Zhentian; Jaafar, Lahcen; Zhao, Shourong; Dynan, William S

    2017-03-01

    The tandem RNA recognition motif protein, NONO, was previously identified as a candidate DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor in a biochemical screen for proteins with end-joining stimulatory activity. Subsequent work showed that NONO and its binding partner, SFPQ, have many of the properties expected for bona fide repair factors in cell-based assays. Their contribution to the DNA damage response in intact tissue in vivo has not, however, been demonstrated. Here we compare DNA damage sensitivity in the testes of wild-type mice versus mice bearing a null allele of the NONO homologue (Nono (gt)). In wild-type mice, NONO protein was present in Sertoli, peritubular myoid, and interstitial cells, with an increase in expression following induction of DNA damage. As expected for the product of an X-linked gene, NONO was not detected in germ cells. The Nono (gt/0) mice had at most a mild testis developmental phenotype in the absence of genotoxic stress. However, following irradiation at sublethal, 2-4 Gy doses, Nono (gt/0) mice displayed a number of indicators of radiosensitivity as compared to their wild-type counterparts. These included higher levels of persistent DSB repair foci, increased numbers of apoptotic cells in the seminiferous tubules, and partial degeneration of the blood-testis barrier. There was also an almost complete loss of germ cells at later times following irradiation, evidently arising as an indirect effect reflecting loss of stromal support. Results demonstrate a role for NONO protein in protection against direct and indirect biological effects of ionizing radiation in the whole animal.

  18. Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase is required for bone calcification in MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kaya; Okamura, Hirohiko; Amorim, Bruna Rabelo; Ozaki, Akiko; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2005-11-15

    In this study, we demonstrated that double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is required for the calcification of osteoblasts via the signal transducers and activators of transcription 1alpha (STAT1alpha) signaling in vitro. A dominant-negative mutant PKR cDNA, in which the amino acid lysine at 296 was replaced with arginine and which does not have catalytic activity, was transfected into mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells; thereby, we established cells that stably expressed the PKR mutant gene (PKR-K/R). Phosphorylation of PKR was not stimulated by polyinosic-polycytidylic acid in the mutant cells. The PKR-K/R mutant cells exhibited up-regulated cell growth and had low alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. The PKR-K/R mutant cells were not able to form bone nodules in vitro. In the PKR-K/R mutant cells, runt-related gene 2 (Runx2)-mediated transcription decreased compared with the levels in the control cells. The expression of STAT1alpha protein increased and the protein was translocated to the nucleus in the PKR-K/R mutant cells. When the expression of STAT1alpha protein in PKR mutant cells was suppressed using RNAi, the activity of Runx2-mediated transcription recovered to the control level. Our results indicate that PKR is a stimulator of Runx2 transcription and is a negative modulator of STAT1alpha expression. Our findings also suggest that PKR plays important roles in the differentiation and calcification of osteoblasts by modulating STAT1alpha and/or Runx2 expression.

  19. Mutational analysis of vaccinia virus E3 protein: the biological functions do not correlate with its biochemical capacity to bind double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Dueck, Kevin J; Hu, YuanShen Sandy; Chen, Peter; Deschambault, Yvon; Lee, Jocelyn; Varga, Jessie; Cao, Jingxin

    2015-05-01

    Vaccinia E3 protein has the biochemical capacity of binding to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The best characterized biological functions of the E3 protein include its host range function, suppression of cytokine expression, and inhibition of interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral activity. Currently, the role of the dsRNA binding capacity in the biological functions of the E3 protein is not clear. To further understand the mechanism of the E3 protein biological functions, we performed alanine scanning of the entire dsRNA binding domain of the E3 protein to examine the link between its biochemical capacity of dsRNA binding and biological functions. Of the 115 mutants examined, 20 were defective in dsRNA binding. Although the majority of the mutants defective in dsRNA binding also showed defective replication in HeLa cells, nine mutants (I105A, Y125A, E138A, F148A, F159A, K171A, L182A, L183A, and I187/188A) retained the host range function to various degrees. Further examination of a set of representative E3L mutants showed that residues essential for dsRNA binding are not essential for the biological functions of E3 protein, such as inhibition of protein kinase R (PKR) activation, suppression of cytokine expression, and apoptosis. Thus, data described in this communication strongly indicate the E3 protein performs its biological functions via a novel mechanism which does not correlate with its dsRNA binding activity. dsRNAs produced during virus replication are important pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) for inducing antiviral immune responses. One of the strategies used by many viruses to counteract such antiviral immune responses is achieved by producing dsRNA binding proteins, such as poxvirus E3 family proteins, influenza virus NS1, and Ebola virus V35 proteins. The most widely accepted model for the biological functions of this class of viral dsRNA binding proteins is that they bind to and sequester viral dsRNA PAMPs; thus, they suppress the related

  20. Opposing Roles of Double-Stranded RNA Effector Pathways and Viral Defense Proteins Revealed with CRISPR-Cas9 Knockout Cell Lines and Vaccinia Virus Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruikang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccinia virus (VACV) decapping enzymes and cellular exoribonuclease Xrn1 catalyze successive steps in mRNA degradation and prevent double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) accumulation, whereas the viral E3 protein can bind dsRNA. We showed that dsRNA and E3 colocalized within cytoplasmic viral factories in cells infected with a decapping enzyme mutant as well as with wild-type VACV and that they coprecipitated with antibody. An E3 deletion mutant induced protein kinase R (PKR) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor alpha (eIF2α) phosphorylation earlier and more strongly than a decapping enzyme mutant even though less dsRNA was made, leading to more profound effects on viral gene expression. Human HAP1 and A549 cells were genetically modified by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-Cas9 (CRISPR-Cas9) to determine whether the same pathways restrict E3 and decapping mutants. The E3 mutant replicated in PKR knockout (KO) HAP1 cells in which RNase L is intrinsically inactive but only with a double knockout (DKO) of PKR and RNase L in A549 cells, indicating that both pathways decreased replication equivalently and that no additional dsRNA pathway was crucial. In contrast, replication of the decapping enzyme mutant increased significantly (though less than that of wild-type virus) in DKO A549 cells but not in DKO HAP1 cells where a smaller increase in viral protein synthesis occurred. Xrn1 KO A549 cells were viable but nonpermissive for VACV; however, wild-type and mutant viruses replicated in triple-KO cells in which RNase L and PKR were also inactivated. Since KO of PKR and RNase L was sufficient to enable VACV replication in the absence of E3 or Xrn1, the poor replication of the decapping mutant, particularly in HAP1 DKO, cells indicated additional translational defects. IMPORTANCE Viruses have evolved ways of preventing or counteracting the cascade of antiviral responses that double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) triggers in host cells. We showed that

  1. Opposing Roles of Double-Stranded RNA Effector Pathways and Viral Defense Proteins Revealed with CRISPR-Cas9 Knockout Cell Lines and Vaccinia Virus Mutants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruikang; Moss, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) decapping enzymes and cellular exoribonuclease Xrn1 catalyze successive steps in mRNA degradation and prevent double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) accumulation, whereas the viral E3 protein can bind dsRNA. We showed that dsRNA and E3 colocalized within cytoplasmic viral factories in cells infected with a decapping enzyme mutant as well as with wild-type VACV and that they coprecipitated with antibody. An E3 deletion mutant induced protein kinase R (PKR) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor alpha (eIF2α) phosphorylation earlier and more strongly than a decapping enzyme mutant even though less dsRNA was made, leading to more profound effects on viral gene expression. Human HAP1 and A549 cells were genetically modified by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-Cas9 (CRISPR-Cas9) to determine whether the same pathways restrict E3 and decapping mutants. The E3 mutant replicated in PKR knockout (KO) HAP1 cells in which RNase L is intrinsically inactive but only with a double knockout (DKO) of PKR and RNase L in A549 cells, indicating that both pathways decreased replication equivalently and that no additional dsRNA pathway was crucial. In contrast, replication of the decapping enzyme mutant increased significantly (though less than that of wild-type virus) in DKO A549 cells but not in DKO HAP1 cells where a smaller increase in viral protein synthesis occurred. Xrn1 KO A549 cells were viable but nonpermissive for VACV; however, wild-type and mutant viruses replicated in triple-KO cells in which RNase L and PKR were also inactivated. Since KO of PKR and RNase L was sufficient to enable VACV replication in the absence of E3 or Xrn1, the poor replication of the decapping mutant, particularly in HAP1 DKO, cells indicated additional translational defects. Viruses have evolved ways of preventing or counteracting the cascade of antiviral responses that double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) triggers in host cells. We showed that the dsRNA produced in

  2. The Cellular TAR RNA Binding Protein, TRBP, Promotes HIV-1 Replication Primarily by Inhibiting the Activation of Double-Stranded RNA-Dependent Kinase PKR▿

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Viraj R.; Steel, Laura F.

    2011-01-01

    The TAR RNA binding protein, TRBP, is a cellular double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding protein that can promote the replication of HIV-1 through interactions with the viral TAR element as well as with cellular proteins that affect the efficiency of translation of viral transcripts. The structured TAR element, present on all viral transcripts, can impede efficient translation either by sterically blocking access of translation initiation factors to the 5′-cap or by activating the dsRNA-dependent kinase, PKR. Several mechanisms by which TRBP can facilitate translation of viral transcripts have been proposed, including the binding and unwinding of TAR and the suppression of PKR activation. Further, TRBP has been identified as a cofactor of Dicer in the processing of microRNAs (miRNAs), and sequestration of TRBP by TAR in infected cells has been proposed as a viral countermeasure to potential host cell RNA interference-based antiviral activities. Here, we have addressed the relative importance of these various roles for TRBP in HIV-1 replication. Using Jurkat T cells, primary human CD4+ T cells, and additional cultured cell lines, we show that depletion of TRBP has no effect on viral replication when PKR activation is otherwise blocked. Moreover, the presence of TAR-containing mRNAs does not affect the efficacy of cellular miRNA silencing pathways. These results establish that TRBP, when expressed at physiological levels, promotes HIV-1 replication mainly by suppressing the PKR-mediated antiviral response, while its contribution to HIV-1 replication through PKR-independent pathways is minimal. PMID:21937648

  3. Conserved Surface Features Form the Double-stranded RNA Binding Site of Non-structural Protein 1 (NS1) from Influenza A and B Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Yin,C.; Khan, J.; Swapna, G.; Ertekin, A.; Krug, R.; Tong, L.; Montelione, G.

    2007-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause a highly contagious respiratory disease in humans and are responsible for periodic widespread epidemics with high mortality rates. The influenza A virus NS1 protein (NS1A) plays a key role in countering host antiviral defense and in virulence. The 73-residue N-terminal domain of NS1A (NS1A-(1-73)) forms a symmetric homodimer with a unique six-helical chain fold. It binds canonical A-form double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Mutational inactivation of this dsRNA binding activity of NS1A highly attenuates virus replication. Here, we have characterized the unique structural features of the dsRNA binding surface of NS1A-(1-73) using NMR methods and describe the 2.1-{angstrom} x-ray crystal structure of the corresponding dsRNA binding domain from human influenza B virus NS1B-(15-93). These results identify conserved dsRNA binding surfaces on both NS1A-(1-73) and NS1B-(15-93) that are very different from those indicated in earlier 'working models' of the complex between dsRNA and NS1A-(1-73). The combined NMR and crystallographic data reveal highly conserved surface tracks of basic and hydrophilic residues that interact with dsRNA. These tracks are structurally complementary to the polyphosphate backbone conformation of A-form dsRNA and run at an {approx}45{sup o} angle relative to the axes of helices {alpha}2/{alpha}2'. At the center of this dsRNA binding epitope, and common to NS1 proteins from influenza A and B viruses, is a deep pocket that includes both hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acids. This pocket provides a target on the surface of the NS1 protein that is potentially suitable for the development of antiviral drugs targeting both influenza A and B viruses.

  4. Conserved surface features form the double-stranded RNA binding site of non-structural protein 1 (NS1) from influenza A and B viruses.

    PubMed

    Yin, Cuifeng; Khan, Javed A; Swapna, G V T; Ertekin, Asli; Krug, Robert M; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2007-07-13

    Influenza A viruses cause a highly contagious respiratory disease in humans and are responsible for periodic widespread epidemics with high mortality rates. The influenza A virus NS1 protein (NS1A) plays a key role in countering host antiviral defense and in virulence. The 73-residue N-terminal domain of NS1A (NS1A-(1-73)) forms a symmetric homodimer with a unique six-helical chain fold. It binds canonical A-form double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Mutational inactivation of this dsRNA binding activity of NS1A highly attenuates virus replication. Here, we have characterized the unique structural features of the dsRNA binding surface of NS1A-(1-73) using NMR methods and describe the 2.1-A x-ray crystal structure of the corresponding dsRNA binding domain from human influenza B virus NS1B-(15-93). These results identify conserved dsRNA binding surfaces on both NS1A-(1-73) and NS1B-(15-93) that are very different from those indicated in earlier "working models" of the complex between dsRNA and NS1A-(1-73). The combined NMR and crystallographic data reveal highly conserved surface tracks of basic and hydrophilic residues that interact with dsRNA. These tracks are structurally complementary to the polyphosphate backbone conformation of A-form dsRNA and run at an approximately 45 degrees angle relative to the axes of helices alpha2/alpha2'. At the center of this dsRNA binding epitope, and common to NS1 proteins from influenza A and B viruses, is a deep pocket that includes both hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acids. This pocket provides a target on the surface of the NS1 protein that is potentially suitable for the development of antiviral drugs targeting both influenza A and B viruses.

  5. Label-Free and Separation-Free Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry-Based Bioassay: Sensitive Determination of Single-Strand DNA, Protein, and Double-Strand DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Piaopiao; Wu, Peng; Chen, Junbo; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Xinfeng; Zheng, Chengbin; Hou, Xiandeng

    2016-02-16

    Based on selective and sensitive determination of Hg(2+) released from mercury complex by cold vapor generation (CVG) atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) using SnCl2 as a reductant, a novel label-free and separation-free strategy was proposed for DNA and protein bioassay. To construct the DNA bioassay platform, an Hg(2+)-mediated molecular beacon (hairpin) without labeling but possessing several thymine (T) bases at both ends was employed as the probe. It is well-known that Hg(2+) could trigger the formation of the hairpin structure through T-Hg(2+)-T connection. In the presence of a specific target, the hairpin structure could be broken and the captured Hg(2+) was released. Interestingly, it was found that SnCl2 could selectively reduce only free Hg(2+) to Hg(0) vapor in the presence of T-Hg(2+)-T complex, which could be separated from sample matrices for sensitive AFS detection. Three different types of analyte, namely, single-strand DNA (ssDNA), protein, and double-strand DNA (dsDNA), were investigated as the target analytes. Under the optimized conditions, this bioassay provided high sensitivity for ssDNA, protein, and dsDNA determination with the limits of detection as low as 0.2, 0.08, and 0.3 nM and the linear dynamic ranges of 10-150, 5-175, and 1-250 nM, respectively. The analytical performance for these analytes compares favorably with those by previously reported methods, demonstrating the potential usefulness and versatility of this new AFS-based bioassay. Moreover, the bioassay retains advantages of simplicity, cost-effectiveness, and sensitivity compared to most of the conventional methods.

  6. Yellow fever virus capsid protein is a potent suppressor of RNA silencing that binds double-stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Glady Hazitha; Wiley, Michael R.; Badawi, Atif; Adelman, Zach N.; Myles, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including yellow fever virus (YFV), Zika virus (ZIKV), and West Nile virus (WNV), profoundly affect human health. The successful transmission of these viruses to a human host depends on the pathogen’s ability to overcome a potentially sterilizing immune response in the vector mosquito. Similar to other invertebrate animals and plants, the mosquito’s RNA silencing pathway comprises its primary antiviral defense. Although a diverse range of plant and insect viruses has been found to encode suppressors of RNA silencing, the mechanisms by which flaviviruses antagonize antiviral small RNA pathways in disease vectors are unknown. Here we describe a viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) encoded by the prototype flavivirus, YFV. We show that the YFV capsid (YFC) protein inhibits RNA silencing in the mosquito Aedes aegypti by interfering with Dicer. This VSR activity appears to be broadly conserved in the C proteins of other medically important flaviviruses, including that of ZIKV. These results suggest that a molecular “arms race” between vector and pathogen underlies the continued existence of flaviviruses in nature. PMID:27849599

  7. Double-strand DNA end-binding and sliding of the toroidal CRISPR-associated protein Csn2

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Zihni; Wurm, Reinhild; Brener, Oleksandr; Ellinger, Philipp; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Oesterhelt, Filipp; Schmitt, Lutz; Willbold, Dieter; Wagner, Rolf; Gohlke, Holger; Smits, Sander H. J.; Pul, Ümit

    2013-01-01

    The adaptive immunity of bacteria against foreign nucleic acids, mediated by CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats), relies on the specific incorporation of short pieces of the invading foreign DNA into a special genomic locus, termed CRISPR array. The stored sequences (spacers) are subsequently used in the form of small RNAs (crRNAs) to interfere with the target nucleic acid. We explored the DNA-binding mechanism of the immunization protein Csn2 from the human pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae using different biochemical techniques, atomic force microscopic imaging and molecular dynamics simulations. The results demonstrate that the ring-shaped Csn2 tetramer binds DNA ends through its central hole and slides inward, likely by a screw motion along the helical path of the enclosed DNA. The presented data indicate an accessory function of Csn2 during integration of exogenous DNA by end-joining. PMID:23625968

  8. Structural basis of nucleic-acid recognition and double-strand unwinding by the essential neuronal protein Pur-alpha.

    PubMed

    Weber, Janine; Bao, Han; Hartlmüller, Christoph; Wang, Zhiqin; Windhager, Almut; Janowski, Robert; Madl, Tobias; Jin, Peng; Niessing, Dierk

    2016-01-08

    The neuronal DNA-/RNA-binding protein Pur-alpha is a transcription regulator and core factor for mRNA localization. Pur-alpha-deficient mice die after birth with pleiotropic neuronal defects. Here, we report the crystal structure of the DNA-/RNA-binding domain of Pur-alpha in complex with ssDNA. It reveals base-specific recognition and offers a molecular explanation for the effect of point mutations in the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome. Consistent with the crystal structure, biochemical and NMR data indicate that Pur-alpha binds DNA and RNA in the same way, suggesting binding modes for tri- and hexanucleotide-repeat RNAs in two neurodegenerative RNAopathies. Additionally, structure-based in vitro experiments resolved the molecular mechanism of Pur-alpha's unwindase activity. Complementing in vivo analyses in Drosophila demonstrated the importance of a highly conserved phenylalanine for Pur-alpha's unwinding and neuroprotective function. By uncovering the molecular mechanisms of nucleic-acid binding, this study contributes to understanding the cellular role of Pur-alpha and its implications in neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Structural basis of nucleic-acid recognition and double-strand unwinding by the essential neuronal protein Pur-alpha

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Janine; Bao, Han; Hartlmüller, Christoph; Wang, Zhiqin; Windhager, Almut; Janowski, Robert; Madl, Tobias; Jin, Peng; Niessing, Dierk

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal DNA-/RNA-binding protein Pur-alpha is a transcription regulator and core factor for mRNA localization. Pur-alpha-deficient mice die after birth with pleiotropic neuronal defects. Here, we report the crystal structure of the DNA-/RNA-binding domain of Pur-alpha in complex with ssDNA. It reveals base-specific recognition and offers a molecular explanation for the effect of point mutations in the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome. Consistent with the crystal structure, biochemical and NMR data indicate that Pur-alpha binds DNA and RNA in the same way, suggesting binding modes for tri- and hexanucleotide-repeat RNAs in two neurodegenerative RNAopathies. Additionally, structure-based in vitro experiments resolved the molecular mechanism of Pur-alpha's unwindase activity. Complementing in vivo analyses in Drosophila demonstrated the importance of a highly conserved phenylalanine for Pur-alpha's unwinding and neuroprotective function. By uncovering the molecular mechanisms of nucleic-acid binding, this study contributes to understanding the cellular role of Pur-alpha and its implications in neurodegenerative diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11297.001 PMID:26744780

  10. Induction of Apoptosis by Double-Stranded-RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase (PKR) Involves the α Subunit of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 2 and NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Jesús; Alcamí, José; Esteban, Mariano

    1999-01-01

    The double-stranded (ds) RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is a key mediator of antiviral effects of interferon (IFN) and an active player in apoptosis induced by different stimuli. The translation initiation factor eIF-2α (α subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2) and IκBα, the inhibitor of the transcription factor NF-κB, have been proposed as downstream mediators of PKR effects. To evaluate the involvement of NF-κB and eIF-2α in the induction of apoptosis by PKR, we have used vaccinia virus (VV) recombinants that inducibly express PKR concomitantly with a dominant negative mutant of eIF-2α or a repressor form of IκBα. We found that while expression of PKR by a VV vector resulted in extensive inhibition of protein synthesis and induction of apoptosis, coexpression of PKR with a dominant negative mutant of eIF-2α (Ser-51→Ala) reversed both the PKR-mediated translational block and PKR-induced apoptosis. Coexpression of PKR with a repressor form of IκBα (Ser-32,36-Ala) also leads to the inhibition of apoptosis by abolishing NF-κB induction, while translation remains blocked. Treating cells with two different proteasome inhibitors which block IκBα degradation, prevented PKR-induced apoptosis, supporting results from coexpression studies. Biochemical analysis and transient assays revealed that PKR expression by a VV vector induced NF-κB binding and transactivation. In addition, upregulation of Fas mRNA transcription occurred during PKR activation. Our findings provide direct evidence for the involvement of eIF-2α and NF-κB in the induction of apoptosis by PKR. PMID:10373514

  11. Modeling of the catalytic core of Arabidopsis thaliana Dicer-like 4 protein and its complex with double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Mickiewicz, Agnieszka; Sarzyńska, Joanna; Miłostan, Maciej; Kurzyńska-Kokorniak, Anna; Rybarczyk, Agnieszka; Łukasiak, Piotr; Kuliński, Tadeusz; Figlerowicz, Marek; Błażewicz, Jacek

    2017-02-01

    Plant Dicer-like proteins (DCLs) belong to the Ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzyme family. They are involved in the regulation of gene expression and antiviral defense through RNA interference pathways. A model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana encodes four DCL proteins (AtDCL1-4) that produce different classes of small regulatory RNAs. Our studies focus on AtDCL4 that processes double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) into 21 nucleotide trans-acting small interfering RNAs. So far, little is known about the structures of plant DCLs and the complexes they form with dsRNA. In this work, we present models of the catalytic core of AtDCL4 and AtDCL4-dsRNA complex constructed by computational methods. We built a homology model of the catalytic core of AtDCL4 comprising Platform, PAZ, Connector helix and two RNase III domains. To assemble the AtDCL4-dsRNA complex two modeling approaches were used. In the first method, to establish conformations that allow building a consistent model of the complex, we used Normal Mode Analysis for both dsRNA and AtDCL4. The second strategy involved template-based approach for positioning of the PAZ domain and manual arrangement of the Connector helix. Our results suggest that the spatial orientation of the Connector helix, Platform and PAZ relative to the RNase III domains is crucial for measuring dsRNA of defined length. The modeled complexes provide information about interactions that may contribute to the relative orientations of these domains and to dsRNA binding. All these information can be helpful for understanding the mechanism of AtDCL4-mediated dsRNA recognition and binding, to produce small RNA of specific size.

  12. Novel double-stranded RNA viruses of plant-feeding insects encode a serine-alanine-proline rich protein and a polymerase distantly related to fungal viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Novel double stranded RNAs (~8 kbp) were isolated from the three cornered alfalfa hopper (Spissistilus festinus) and beet leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus), two plant-feeding hemipteran insect pests. Genome organization of the two new viruses, designated as Spissistilus festinus virus 1 (SpFV1) and ...

  13. Plant-feeding insects harbor double-stranded RNA viruses encoding a novel proline-alanine rich protein and a polymerase distantly related to that of fungal viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Novel double-stranded RNAs (~8 kbp) were isolated from three cornered alfalfa hopper (Spissistilus festinus) and beet leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus), two plant-feeding hemipteran insect pests. Genomes of the two new viruses, designated as Spissistilus festinus virus 1 (SpFV1) and Circulifer tenell...

  14. Double-stranded RNA-binding protein DRB3 negatively regulates anthocyanin biosynthesis by modulating PAP1 expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sawano, Hikaru; Matsuzaki, Takuma; Usui, Tomoyuki; Tabara, Midori; Fukudome, Akihito; Kanaya, Akihiro; Tanoue, Daichi; Hiraguri, Akihiro; Horiguchi, Gorou; Ohtani, Misato; Demura, Taku; Kozaki, Toshinori; Ishii, Kazuo; Moriyama, Hiromitsu; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has five double-stranded RNA-binding proteins (DRB1-DRB5), two of which, DRB1 and DRB4, are well characterized. In contrast, the functions of DRB2, DRB3 and DRB5 have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we tried to uncover their functions using drb mutants and DRB-over-expressed lines. In over-expressed lines of all five DRB genes, the over-expression of DRB2 or DRB3 (DRB2ox or DRB3ox) conferred a downward-curled leaf phenotype, but the expression profiles of ten small RNAs were similar to that of the wild-type (WT) plant. Phenotypes were examined in response to abiotic stresses. Both DRB2ox and DRB3ox plants exhibited salt-tolerance. When these plants were exposed to cold stress, drb2 and drb3 over-accumulated anthocyanin but DRB2ox and DRB3ox did not. Therefore, the over-expression of DRB2 or DRB3 had pleiotropic effects on host plants. Microarray and deep-sequencing analyses indicated that several genes encoding key enzymes for anthocyanin biosynthesis, including chalcone synthase (CHS), dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR) and anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), were down-regulated in DRB3ox plants. When DRB3ox was crossed with the pap1-D line, which is an activation-tagged transgenic line that over-expresses the key transcription factor PAP1 (Production of anthocyanin pigmentation1) for anthocyanin biosynthesis, over-expression of DRB3 suppressed the expression of PAP1, CHS, DFR and ANS genes. DRB3 negatively regulates anthocyanin biosynthesis by modulating the level of PAP1 transcript. Since two different small RNAs regulate PAP1 gene expression, a possible function of DRB3 for small RNA biogenesis is discussed.

  15. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 and DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Have Equivalent Roles in Double Strand Break Repair Following Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jody; Smith, Graeme; Curtin, Nicola J.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are predominantly repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), involving DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), well characterized for its role in single strand break repair, may also facilitate DSB repair. We investigated the activation of these enzymes by differing DNA ends and their interaction in the cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR). Methods and Materials: The effect of PARP and DNA-PK inhibitors (KU-0058684 and NU7441) on repair of IR-induced DSBs was investigated in DNA-PK and PARP-1 proficient and deficient cells by measuring gammaH2AX foci and neutral comets. Complementary in vitro enzyme kinetics assays demonstrated the affinities of DNA-PK and PARP-1 for DSBs with varying DNA termini. Results: DNA-PK and PARP-1 both promoted the fast phase of resolution of IR-induced DSBs in cells. Inactivation of both enzymes was not additive, suggesting that PARP-1 and DNA-PK cooperate within the same pathway to promote DSB repair. The affinities of the two enzymes for oligonucleotides with blunt, 3' GGG or 5' GGG overhanging termini were similar and overlapping (K{sub dapp} = 2.6-6.4nM for DNA-PK; 1.7-4.5nM for PARP-1). DNA-PK showed a slightly greater affinity for overhanging DNA and was significantly more efficient when activated by a 5' GGG overhang. PARP-1 had a preference for blunt-ended DNA and required a separate factor for efficient stimulation by a 5' GGG overhang. Conclusion: DNA-PK and PARP-1 are both required in a pathway facilitating the fast phase of DNA DSB repair.

  16. Non-Target Effects of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-Derived Double-Stranded RNA (dsRNA-GFP) Used in Honey Bee RNA Interference (RNAi) Assays.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Francis M F; Aleixo, Aline C; Barchuk, Angel R; Bomtorin, Ana D; Grozinger, Christina M; Simões, Zilá L P

    2013-01-04

    RNA interference has been frequently applied to modulate gene function in organisms where the production and maintenance of mutants is challenging, as in our model of study, the honey bee, Apis mellifera. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-derived double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-GFP) is currently commonly used as control in honey bee RNAi experiments, since its gene does not exist in the A. mellifera genome. Although dsRNA-GFP is not expected to trigger RNAi responses in treated bees, undesirable effects on gene expression, pigmentation or developmental timing are often observed. Here, we performed three independent experiments using microarrays to examine the effect of dsRNA-GFP treatment (introduced by feeding) on global gene expression patterns in developing worker bees. Our data revealed that the expression of nearly 1,400 genes was altered in response to dsRNA-GFP, representing around 10% of known honey bee genes. Expression changes appear to be the result of both direct off-target effects and indirect downstream secondary effects; indeed, there were several instances of sequence similarity between putative siRNAs generated from the dsRNA-GFP construct and genes whose expression levels were altered. In general, the affected genes are involved in important developmental and metabolic processes associated with RNA processing and transport, hormone metabolism, immunity, response to external stimulus and to stress. These results suggest that multiple dsRNA controls should be employed in RNAi studies in honey bees. Furthermore, any RNAi studies involving these genes affected by dsRNA-GFP in our studies should use a different dsRNA control.

  17. DNA and protein binding, double-strand DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity of mixed ligand copper(II) complexes of the antibacterial drug nalidixic acid.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Rangasamy; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Muruganantham, Amsaveni; Ghosh, Swapan K; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2017-09-01

    The water soluble mixed ligand complexes [Cu(nal)(diimine)(H2O)](ClO4) 1-4, where H(nal) is nalidixic acid and diimine is 2,2'-bipyridine (1), 1,10-phenanthroline (2), 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (3), and 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (4), have been isolated. The coordination geometry around Cu(II) in 1 and that in the Density Functional Theory optimized structures of 1-4 has been assessed as square pyramidal. The trend in DNA binding constants (Kb) determined using absorption spectral titration (Kb: 1, 0.79±0.1<2, 1.06±0.1<3, 1.79±0.2<4, 1.84±0.2×10(5)M(-1)) is in line with that (Kapp) determined by competitive ethidium bromide binding studies. The large red-shift (10nm) observed for 2 suggests that the phen co-ligand is stacked with a frayed DNA base pair. In contrast, 3 and 4 are involved in intimate hydrophobic interaction with DNA through the methyl substituents on phen ring, which is supported by viscosity and protein binding studies. DNA docking studies imply that 4 is involved preferentially in DNA major groove binding while 1-3 in minor groove binding and that all the complexes, upon removing the axially coordinated water molecule, bind in the major groove. Interestingly, 3 and 4 display prominent double-strand DNA cleavage while 1 and 2 effect only single-strand DNA cleavage in the absence of an activator. The complexes 3 and 4 show cytotoxicity higher than 1 and 2 against human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7). The complex 4 induces apoptotic mode of cell death in cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Double strand break unwinding and resection by the mycobacterial helicase-nuclease AdnAB in the presence of single strand DNA-binding protein (SSB).

    PubMed

    Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Shuman, Stewart

    2010-11-05

    Mycobacterial AdnAB is a heterodimeric DNA helicase-nuclease and 3' to 5' DNA translocase implicated in the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs). The AdnA and AdnB subunits are each composed of an N-terminal motor domain and a C-terminal nuclease domain. Inclusion of mycobacterial single strand DNA-binding protein (SSB) in reactions containing linear plasmid dsDNA allowed us to study the AdnAB helicase under conditions in which the unwound single strands are coated by SSB and thereby prevented from reannealing or promoting ongoing ATP hydrolysis. We found that the AdnAB motor catalyzed processive unwinding of 2.7-11.2-kbp linear duplex DNAs at a rate of ∼250 bp s(-1), while hydrolyzing ∼5 ATPs per bp unwound. Crippling the AdnA phosphohydrolase active site did not affect the rate of unwinding but lowered energy consumption slightly, to ∼4.2 ATPs bp(-1). Mutation of the AdnB phosphohydrolase abolished duplex unwinding, consistent with a model in which the "leading" AdnB motor propagates a Y-fork by translocation along the 3' DNA strand, ahead of the "lagging" AdnA motor domain. By tracking the resection of the 5' and 3' strands at the DSB ends, we illuminated a division of labor among the AdnA and AdnB nuclease modules during dsDNA unwinding, whereby the AdnA nuclease processes the unwound 5' strand to liberate a short oligonucleotide product, and the AdnB nuclease incises the 3' strand on which the motor translocates. These results extend our understanding of presynaptic DSB processing by AdnAB and engender instructive comparisons with the RecBCD and AddAB clades of bacterial helicase-nuclease machines.

  19. Adenovirus infection targets the cellular protein kinase CK2 and RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) into viral inclusions of the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Souquere-Besse, Sylvie; Pichard, Evelyne; Filhol, Odile; Legrand, Valerie; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Hovanessian, Ara G; Cochet, Claude; Puvion-Dutilleul, Francine

    2002-03-15

    The effects of the adenovirus infection on the distribution of the cellular protein kinase CK2 and double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) were examined at the ultrastructural level. Immunogold labeling revealed the redistribution of CK2 subunits and PKR to morphologically distinct structures of the cell nucleus. The electron-clear amorphous structures, designated pIX nuclear bodies in our previous work (Rosa-Calatrava et al., 2001), contained CK2 alpha and PKR. The protein crystals, which result from the regular assembly of hexon, penton base, and fiber proteins [Boulanger et al. (1970) J Gen Virol 6:329-332], contained CK2 beta and PKR. Both viral structures were devoid of viral RNA, including the PKR-inhibitor VA1 RNA generated by the RNA polymerase III. Instead, VA1 RNA accumulated in PKR-free viral compact rings in which the viral RNA generated by the RNA polymerase II was excluded.

  20. Hepatitis B virus pre-S2 mutant large surface protein inhibits DNA double-strand break repair and leads to genome instability in hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Chang, Yu-Ying; Su, Ih-Jen; Yen, Chia-Jui; Liu, Yi-Ru; Liu, Ren-Jei; Hsieh, Wen-Chuan; Tsai, Hung-Wen; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching; Huang, Wenya

    2015-07-01

    Although hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been established to cause hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the exact mechanism remains to be clarified. Type II ground glass hepatocytes (GGHs) harbouring the HBV pre-S2 mutant large surface protein (LHBS) have been recognized as a morphologically distinct hallmark of HCC in the advanced stages of chronic HBV infection. Considering its preneoplastic nature, we hypothesized that type II GGH may exhibit high genomic instability, which is important for the carcinogenic process in chronic HBV carriers. In this study we found that pre-S2 mutant LHBS directly interacted with importin α1, the key factor that recognizes cargos undergoing nuclear transportation mediated by the importin α/β-associated nuclear pore complex (NPC). By interacting with importin α1, which inhibits its function as an NPC factor, pre-S2 mutant LHBS blocked nuclear transport of an essential DNA repair and recombination factor, Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 (NBS1), upon DNA damage, thereby delaying the formation of nuclear foci at the sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Pre-S2 mutant LHBS was also found to block NBS1-mediated homologous recombination repair and induce multi-nucleation of cells. In addition, pre-S2 mutant LHBS transgenic mice showed genomic instability, indicated by increased global gene copy number variations (CNVs), which were significantly higher than those in hepatitis B virus X mice, indicating that pre-S2 mutant LHBS is the major viral oncoprotein inducing genomic instability in HBV-infected hepatocytes. Consistently, the human type II GGHs in HCC patients exhibited increased DNA DSBs representing significant genomic instability. In conclusion, type II GGHs harbouring HBV pre-S2 mutant oncoprotein represent a high-risk marker for the loss of genome integrity in chronic HBV carriers and explain the complex chromosome changes in HCCs. Mouse array CGH raw data: GEO Accession No. GSE61378 (http://www.ncbi

  1. Bluetongue virus VP6 protein binds ATP and exhibits an RNA-dependent ATPase function and a helicase activity that catalyze the unwinding of double-stranded RNA substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Stäuber, N; Martinez-Costas, J; Sutton, G; Monastyrskaya, K; Roy, P

    1997-01-01

    RNA-dependent ATPase and helicase activities have been identified associated with the purified VP6 protein of bluetongue virus, a member of the Orbivirus genus of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA; Reoviridae family) viruses. In addition, the protein has an ATP binding activity. RNA unwinding of duplexes occurred with both 3' and 5' overhang templates, as well as with blunt-ended dsRNA, an activity not previously identified in other viral helicases. Although little sequence similarity to other helicases was detected, certain similarities to motifs commonly attributed to such proteins were identified. PMID:9311795

  2. Dissipation of double-stranded RNA in aquatic microcosms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    RNA interference (RNAi) represents the next wave of pest management technologies. RNAi is initiated by double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) that are ingested by the target pest and cleaved into small-interfering RNAs that silence a molecular target in the pest. Similar to Cry proteins, dsRNAs are being deve...

  3. Coordinateendonucleolytic 5' and 3' trimming of terminally blocked blunt DNA double-strand break ends by Artemis nuclease and DNA-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Povirk, Lawrence; Yannone, Steven M.; Khan, Imran S.; Zhou, Rui-Zhe; Zhou, Tong; Valerie, Kristoffer; F., Lawrence

    2008-02-18

    Previous work showed that, in the presence of DNA-PK, Artemis slowly trims 3'-phosphoglycolate-terminated blunt ends. To examine the trimming reaction in more detail, long internally labeled DNA substrates were treated with Artemis. In the absence of DNA-PK, Artemis catalyzed extensive 5' {yields} 3' exonucleolytic resection of double-stranded DNA. This resection required a 5'-phosphate but did not require ATP, and was accompanied by endonucleolytic cleavage of the resulting 3' overhang. In the presence of DNA-PK, Artemis-mediated trimming was more limited, was ATP-dependent, and did not require a 5'-phosphate. For a blunt end with either a 3'-phosphoglycolate or 3'-hydroxyl terminus, endonucleolytic trimming of 2-4 nucleotides from the 3'-terminal strand was accompanied by trimming of 6 nucleotides from the 5'-terminal strand. The results suggest that autophosphorylated DNA-PK suppresses the exonuclease activity of Artemis toward blunt-ended DNA, and promotes slow and limited endonucleolytic trimming of the 5'-terminal strand, resulting in short 3' overhangs that are trimmed endonucleolytically. Thus, Artemis and DNA-PK can convert terminally blocked DNA ends of diverse geometry and chemical structure to a form suitable for polymerase mediated patching and ligation, with minimal loss of terminal sequence. Such processing could account for the very small deletions often found at DNA double-strand break repair sites.

  4. hnRNP-U is a specific DNA-dependent protein kinase substrate phosphorylated in response to DNA double-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, Fredrik M.; Clarke, Paul R.

    2009-03-27

    Cellular responses to DNA damage are orchestrated by the large phosphoinositol-3-kinase related kinases ATM, ATR and DNA-PK. We have developed a cell-free system to dissect the biochemical mechanisms of these kinases. Using this system, we identify heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP-U), also termed scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), as a specific substrate for DNA-PK. We show that hnRNP-U is phosphorylated at Ser59 by DNA-PK in vitro and in cells in response to DNA double-strand breaks. Phosphorylation of hnRNP-U suggests novel functions for DNA-PK in the response to DNA damage.

  5. BRCA1-Ku80 Protein Interaction Enhances End-joining Fidelity of Chromosomal Double-strand Breaks in the G1 Phase of the Cell Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guochun; Plo, Isabelle; Wang, Tong; Rahman, Mohammad; Cho, Ju Hwan; Yang, Eddy; Lopez, Bernard S.; Xia, Fen

    2013-01-01

    Quality control of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is vital in preventing mutagenesis. Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), a repair process predominant in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, rejoins DSBs either accurately or with errors, but the mechanisms controlling its fidelity are poorly understood. Here we show that BRCA1, a tumor suppressor, enhances the fidelity of NHEJ-mediated DSB repair and prevents mutagenic deletional end-joining through interaction with canonical NHEJ machinery during G1. BRCA1 binds and stabilizes Ku80 at DSBs through its N-terminal region, promotes precise DSB rejoining, and increases cellular resistance to radiation-induced DNA damage in a G1 phase-specific manner. These results suggest that BRCA1, as a central player in genome integrity maintenance, ensures high fidelity repair of DSBs by not only promoting homologous recombination repair in G2/M phase but also facilitating fidelity of Ku80-dependent NHEJ repair, thus preventing deletional end-joining of chromosomal DSBs during G1. PMID:23344954

  6. Single-stranded DNA oligomers stimulate error-prone alternative repair of DNA double-strand breaks through hijacking Ku protein

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ying; Britton, Sébastien; Delteil, Christine; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P.; Barboule, Nadia; Frit, Philippe; Calsou, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In humans, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by two mutually-exclusive mechanisms, homologous recombination or end-joining. Among end-joining mechanisms, the main process is classical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) which relies on Ku binding to DNA ends and DNA Ligase IV (Lig4)-mediated ligation. Mostly under Ku- or Lig4-defective conditions, an alternative end-joining process (A-EJ) can operate and exhibits a trend toward microhomology usage at the break junction. Homologous recombination relies on an initial MRN-dependent nucleolytic degradation of one strand at DNA ends. This process, named DNA resection generates 3′ single-stranded tails necessary for homologous pairing with the sister chromatid. While it is believed from the current literature that the balance between joining and recombination processes at DSBs ends is mainly dependent on the initiation of resection, it has also been shown that MRN activity can generate short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssO) that may also be implicated in repair regulation. Here, we evaluate the effect of ssO on end-joining at DSB sites both in vitro and in cells. We report that under both conditions, ssO inhibit C-NHEJ through binding to Ku and favor repair by the Lig4-independent microhomology-mediated A-EJ process. PMID:26350212

  7. Ctp1 is a cell-cycle-regulated protein that functions with Mre11 complex to control double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Limbo, Oliver; Chahwan, Charly; Yamada, Yoshiki; de Bruin, Robertus A M; Wittenberg, Curt; Russell, Paul

    2007-10-12

    The Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex is a primary sensor of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Upon recruitment to DSBs, it plays a critical role in catalyzing 5' --> 3' single-strand resection that is required for repair by homologous recombination (HR). Unknown mechanisms repress HR in G1 phase of the cell cycle during which nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the favored mode of DSB repair. Here we describe fission yeast Ctp1, so-named because it shares conserved domains with the mammalian tumor suppressor CtIP. Ctp1 is recruited to DSBs where it is essential for repair by HR. Ctp1 is required for efficient formation of RPA-coated single-strand DNA adjacent to DSBs, indicating that it functions with the MRN complex in 5' --> 3' resection. Transcription of ctp1(+) is periodic during the cell cycle, with the onset of its expression coinciding with the start of DNA replication. These data suggest that regulation of Ctp1 underlies cell-cycle control of HR.

  8. A Luciferase Reporter Gene Assay to Measure Ebola Virus Viral Protein 35-Associated Inhibition of Double-Stranded RNA-Stimulated, Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene 1-Mediated Induction of Interferon β.

    PubMed

    Cannas, Valeria; Daino, Gian Luca; Corona, Angela; Esposito, Francesca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-10-01

    During Ebola virus (EBOV) infection, the type I interferon α/β (IFN-α/β) innate immune response is suppressed by EBOV viral protein 35 (VP35), a validated drug target. Identification of EBOV VP35 inhibitors requires a cellular system able to assess the VP35-based inhibitory functions of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) IFN-β induction. We established a miniaturized luciferase gene reporter assay in A549 cells that measures IFN-β induction by viral dsRNA and is dose-dependently inhibited by VP35 expression. When compared to influenza A virus NS1 protein, EBOV VP35 showed improved inhibition of viral dsRNA-based IFN-β induction. This assay can be used to screen for EBOV VP35 inhibitors.

  9. Phenolic promiscuity in the cell nucleus--epigallocatechingallate (EGCG) and theaflavin-3,3'-digallate from green and black tea bind to model cell nuclear structures including histone proteins, double stranded DNA and telomeric quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Mikutis, Gediminas; Karaköse, Hande; Jaiswal, Rakesh; LeGresley, Adam; Islam, Tuhidul; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2013-02-01

    Flavanols from tea have been reported to accumulate in the cell nucleus in considerable concentrations. The nature of this phenomenon, which could provide novel approaches in understanding the well-known beneficial health effects of tea phenols, is investigated in this contribution. The interaction between epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) from green tea and a selection of theaflavins from black tea with selected cell nuclear structures such as model histone proteins, double stranded DNA and quadruplex DNA was investigated using mass spectrometry, Circular Dichroism spectroscopy and fluorescent assays. The selected polyphenols were shown to display affinity to all of the selected cell nuclear structures, thereby demonstrating a degree of unexpected molecular promiscuity. Most interestingly theaflavin-digallate was shown to display the highest affinity to quadruplex DNA reported for any naturally occurring molecule reported so far. This finding has immediate implications in rationalising the chemopreventive effect of the tea beverage against cancer and possibly the role of tea phenolics as "life span essentials".

  10. MTE1 Functions with MPH1 in Double-Strand Break Repair.

    PubMed

    Yimit, Askar; Kim, TaeHyung; Anand, Ranjith P; Meister, Sarah; Ou, Jiongwen; Haber, James E; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2016-05-01

    Double-strand DNA breaks occur upon exposure of cells to ionizing radiation and certain chemical agents or indirectly through replication fork collapse at DNA damage sites. If left unrepaired, double-strand breaks can cause genome instability and cell death, and their repair can result in loss of heterozygosity. In response to DNA damage, proteins involved in double-strand break repair by homologous recombination relocalize into discrete nuclear foci. We identified 29 proteins that colocalize with recombination repair protein Rad52 in response to DNA damage. Of particular interest, Ygr042w/Mte1, a protein of unknown function, showed robust colocalization with Rad52. Mte1 foci fail to form when the DNA helicase gene MPH1 is absent. Mte1 and Mph1 form a complex and are recruited to double-strand breaks in vivo in a mutually dependent manner. MTE1 is important for resolution of Rad52 foci during double-strand break repair and for suppressing break-induced replication. Together our data indicate that Mte1 functions with Mph1 in double-strand break repair.

  11. In vitro binding kinetics of DNA double strand break repair proteins Ku70/80 and DNA-PKcs quantified by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisalaam, Salim; Chen, David J.; Alexandrakis, George

    2012-02-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most lethal types of DNA damage that occurs in eukaryotic cells. There are two distinct pathways of repairing DSBs, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). In the NHEJ repairing pathway, DSB recognition and repair initiation is directed by the interaction of DNAbinding subunit Ku70/80 heterodimer with the DNA-PK protein catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). Mutations in these proteins result in repair stalling and eventual DNA misrepair that may lead to genomic instability. Studying the binding kinetics of these repair proteins is therefore important for understanding the conditions under which DSB repair stalls. Currently open questions are, what is the minimum DNA length that this complex needs to get a foothold onto a DSB and how tightly does DNA-PKcs bind onto the DNA-Ku70/80 complex. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) and Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS) techniques have the potential to give information about the binding kinetics of DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions at the single-molecule level. In this work, FCS/FCCS measurements were performed to explore the minimum DNA base-pair (bp) length that Ku70/80 needed as a foothold to bind effectively onto the tips of different lengths of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) fragments that mimic DSBs. 25 bp, 33 bp and 50 bp of dsDNA were used for these experiments and binding was studied as a function of salt concentration in solution. It was found that the 25 bp binding was weak even at physiological salt concentrations while the dissociation constant (Kd) remained constant for 33 and 50 bp dsDNA strand lengths. These studies indicated that the minimum binding length for the Ku70/8 is in the vicinity of 25 bp. The specificity of binding of Ku70/80 was proven by competitive binding FCCS experiments between Cy5-labeled DNA, GFP-Ku70/80 and titrations of unlabeled Ku70/80. Finally, using FCCS it was possible to estimate

  12. Induction of dsRNA-activated protein kinase links mitochondrial unfolded protein response to the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Messlik, Anja; Nunes, Tiago; Liu, Bo; Kim, Sandy C; Hoogenraad, Nick; Sans, Miquel; Sartor, R Balfour; Haller, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Objective Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) feature multiple cellular stress responses, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein responses (UPRs). UPRs represent autoregulatory pathways that adjust organelle capacity to cellular demand. A similar mechanism, mitochondrial UPR (mtUPR), has been described for mitochondria. ER UPR in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) contributes to the development of intestinal inflammation, and since mitochondrial alterations and dysfunction are implicated in the pathogenesis of IBDs, the authors characterised mtUPR in the context of intestinal inflammation. Methods Truncated ornithine transcarbamylase was used to selectively induce mtUPR in a murine IEC line. Dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) was administered to PKR (double-stranded-RNA-activated protein kinase) knockout mice to induce IEC stress in vivo and to test for their susceptibility to DSS-induced colitis. Expression levels of the mitochondrial chaperone chaperonin 60 (CPN60) and PKR were quantified in IECs from patients with IBDs and from murine models of colitis using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Results Selective mtUPR induction by truncated ornithine transcarbamylase transfection triggered the phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 2α and cJun through the recruitment of PKR. Using pharmacological inhibitors and small inhibitory RNA, the authors identified mtUPR-induced eIF2α phosphorylation and transcription factor activation (cJun/AP1) as being dependent on the activities of the mitochondrial protease ClpP and the cytoplasmic kinase PKR. Pkr−/− mice failed to induce CPN60 in IECs upon DSS treatment at early time points and subsequently showed an almost complete resistance to DSS-induced colitis. Under inflammatory conditions, primary IECs from patients with IBDs and two murine models of colitis exhibited a strong induction of the mtUPR marker protein CPN60 associated with enhanced expression of PKR

  13. 'Black sheep' that don't leave the double-stranded RNA-binding domain fold.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, Michael L; Maquat, Lynne E

    2014-07-01

    The canonical double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (dsRBD) is composed of an α1-β1-β2-β3-α2 secondary structure that folds in three dimensions to recognize dsRNA. Recently, structural and functional studies of divergent dsRBDs revealed adaptations that include intra- and/or intermolecular protein interactions, sometimes in the absence of detectable dsRNA-binding ability. We describe here how discrete dsRBD components can accommodate pronounced amino-acid sequence changes while maintaining the core fold. We exemplify the growing importance of divergent dsRBDs in mRNA decay by discussing Dicer, Staufen (STAU)1 and 2, trans-activation responsive RNA-binding protein (TARBP)2, protein activator of protein kinase RNA-activated (PKR) (PACT), DiGeorge syndrome critical region (DGCR)8, DEAH box helicase proteins (DHX) 9 and 30, and dsRBD-like fold-containing proteins that have ribosome-related functions. We also elaborate on the computational limitations to discovering yet-to-be-identified divergent dsRBDs.

  14. A requirement for polymerized actin in DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Andrin, Christi; McDonald, Darin; Attwood, Kathleen M; Rodrigue, Amélie; Ghosh, Sunita; Mirzayans, Razmik; Masson, Jean-Yves; Dellaire, Graham; Hendzel, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear actin is involved in several nuclear processes from chromatin remodeling to transcription. Here we examined the requirement for actin polymerization in DNA double-strand break repair. Double-strand breaks are considered the most dangerous type of DNA lesion. Double-strand break repair consists of a complex set of events that are tightly regulated. Failure at any step can have catastrophic consequences such as genomic instability, oncogenesis or cell death. Many proteins involved in this repair process have been identified and their roles characterized. We discovered that some DNA double-strand break repair factors are capable of associating with polymeric actin in vitro and specifically, that purified Ku70/80 interacts with polymerized actin under these conditions. We find that the disruption of polymeric actin inhibits DNA double strand break repair both in vitro and in vivo. Introduction of nuclear targeted mutant actin that cannot polymerize, or the depolymerization of endogenous actin filaments by the addition of cytochalasin D, alters the retention of Ku80 at sites of DNA damage in live cells. Our results suggest that polymeric actin is required for proper DNA double-strand break repair and may function through the stabilization of the Ku heterodimer at the DNA damage site.

  15. OsSpo11-4, a rice homologue of the archaeal TopVIA protein, mediates double-strand DNA cleavage and interacts with OsTopVIB.

    PubMed

    An, Xiao Jing; Deng, Zhu Yun; Wang, Tai

    2011-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase VI from Archaea, a heterotetrameric complex composed of two TopVIA and two TopVIB subunits, is involved in altering DNA topology during replication, transcription and chromosome segregation by catalyzing DNA strand transfer through transient double-strand breaks. The sequenced yeast and animal genomes encode only one homologue of the archaeal TopVIA subunit, namely Spo11, and no homologue of the archaeal TopVIB subunit. In yeast, Spo11 is essential for initiating meiotic recombination and this function appears conserved among other eukaryotes. In contrast to yeast and animals, studies in Arabidopsis and rice have identified three Spo11/TopVIA homologues and one TopVIB homologue in plants. Here, we further identified two novel Spo11/TopVIA homologues (named OsSpo11-4 and OsSpo11-5, respectively) that exist just in the monocot model plant Oryza sativa, indicating that at least five Spo11/TopVIA homologues are present in the rice genome. To reveal the biochemical function of the two novel Spo11/TopVIA homologues, we first examined the interactions among OsSpo11-1, OsSpo11-4, OsSpo11-5, and OsTopVIB by yeast two-hybrid assay. The results showed that OsSpo11-4 and OsTopVIB can self-interact strongly and among the 3 examined OsSpo11 proteins, only OsSpo11-4 interacted with OsTopVIB. Pull-down assay confirmed the interaction between OsSpo11-4 and OsTopVIB, which indicates that OsSpo11-4 may interact with OsTopVIB in vivo. Further in vitro enzymatic analysis revealed that among the above 4 proteins, only OsSpo11-4 exhibited double-strand DNA cleavage activity and its enzymatic activity appears dependent on Mg(2+) and independent of OsTopVIB, despite its interaction with OsTopVIB. We further analyzed the biological function of OsSpo11-4 by RNA interference and found that down-regulated expression of OsSpo11-4 led to defects in male meiosis, indicating OsSpo11-4 is required for meiosis.

  16. ATM has a major role in the double-strand break repair pathway dysregulation in sporadic breast carcinomas and is an independent prognostic marker at both mRNA and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, S; Vacher, S; De Koning, L; Briaux, A; Schnitzler, A; Chemlali, W; Callens, C; Lidereau, R; Bièche, I

    2015-03-17

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a kinase that has a central role in the maintenance of genomic integrity by activating cell cycle checkpoints and promoting repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). In breast cancer, a low level of ATM was correlated with poor outcome; however, the molecular mechanism of this downregulation is still unclear. We used qRT-PCR assay to quantify mRNA levels of ATM gene in 454 breast tumours from patients with known clinical/pathological status and outcome; reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) were used to assess the levels of ATM and 14 proteins in 233 breast tumours. ATM mRNA was associated with poor metastasis-free survival (MFS) (P=0.00012) on univariate analysis. ATM mRNA and protein levels were positively correlated (P=0.00040). A low level of ATM protein was correlated with poorer MFS (P=0.000025). ATM expression at mRNA or protein levels are independent prognostic factors on multivariate analysis (P=0.00046 and P=0.00037, respectively). The ATM protein level was positively correlated with the levels of six proteins of the DSB repair pathway: H2AX (P<0.0000001), XRCC5 (P<0.0000001), NBN (P<0.0000001), Mre11 (P=0.0000029), Rad50 (P=0.0064), and TP53BP1 (P=0.026), but not with proteins involved in other pathways that are altered in cancer. Low expression of ATM protein was significantly associated with high miR-203 expression (P=0.011). We confirmed that ATM expression is an independent prognostic marker at both RNA and protein levels. We showed that alteration of ATM is involved in dysregulation of the DSB repair pathway. Finally, miR-203 may be responsible for downregulation of ATM in breast cancers.

  17. ATM has a major role in the double-strand break repair pathway dysregulation in sporadic breast carcinomas and is an independent prognostic marker at both mRNA and protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Rondeau, S; Vacher, S; De Koning, L; Briaux, A; Schnitzler, A; Chemlali, W; Callens, C; Lidereau, R; Bièche, I

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a kinase that has a central role in the maintenance of genomic integrity by activating cell cycle checkpoints and promoting repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). In breast cancer, a low level of ATM was correlated with poor outcome; however, the molecular mechanism of this downregulation is still unclear. Methods: We used qRT–PCR assay to quantify mRNA levels of ATM gene in 454 breast tumours from patients with known clinical/pathological status and outcome; reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) were used to assess the levels of ATM and 14 proteins in 233 breast tumours. Results: ATM mRNA was associated with poor metastasis-free survival (MFS) (P=0.00012) on univariate analysis. ATM mRNA and protein levels were positively correlated (P=0.00040). A low level of ATM protein was correlated with poorer MFS (P=0.000025). ATM expression at mRNA or protein levels are independent prognostic factors on multivariate analysis (P=0.00046 and P=0.00037, respectively). The ATM protein level was positively correlated with the levels of six proteins of the DSB repair pathway: H2AX (P<0.0000001), XRCC5 (P<0.0000001), NBN (P<0.0000001), Mre11 (P=0.0000029), Rad50 (P=0.0064), and TP53BP1 (P=0.026), but not with proteins involved in other pathways that are altered in cancer. Low expression of ATM protein was significantly associated with high miR-203 expression (P=0.011). Conclusion: We confirmed that ATM expression is an independent prognostic marker at both RNA and protein levels. We showed that alteration of ATM is involved in dysregulation of the DSB repair pathway. Finally, miR-203 may be responsible for downregulation of ATM in breast cancers. PMID:25742469

  18. DNA in motion during double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Miné-Hattab, Judith; Rothstein, Rodney

    2013-11-01

    DNA organization and dynamics profoundly affect many biological processes such as gene regulation and DNA repair. In this review, we present the latest studies on DNA mobility in the context of DNA damage. Recent studies demonstrate that DNA mobility is dramatically increased in the presence of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As a consequence, chromosomes explore a larger nuclear volume, facilitating homologous pairing but also increasing the rate of ectopic recombination. Increased DNA dynamics is dependent on several homologous recombination (HR) proteins and we are just beginning to understand how chromosome dynamics is regulated after DNA damage.

  19. Viral double-stranded RNAs from vaccinia virus early or intermediate gene transcripts possess PKR activating function, resulting in NF-kappaB activation, when the K1 protein is absent or mutated.

    PubMed

    Willis, Kristen L; Langland, Jeffrey O; Shisler, Joanna L

    2011-03-11

    PKR is a potent antiviral molecule that can terminate infection by inhibiting protein synthesis and stimulating NF-κB activation and apoptosis. Originally, it was thought that only intermediate and late gene transcription produced double-stranded (ds) RNA to activate PKR during vaccinia virus (VACV) infection. The VACV E3 or K3 proteins squelch this effect by binding to either dsRNA or PKR. However, in the absence of the K1 protein, VACV infection activates PKR at very early times post-infection and despite the presence of E3 and K3. These data suggest that VACV infection induces PKR activation by a currently unknown mechanism. To determine this mechanism, cells were infected with K1L-containing or -deficient VACVs. By using conditions that limited the progression of the poxvirus replication cycle, we observed that early gene transcripts activated PKR in RK13 cells, identifying a new PKR-activating mechanism of poxvirus infection. Using a similar approach for HeLa cells, intermediate gene transcription was sufficient to activate PKR. RNA isolated from infected RK13 or HeLa cells maintained PKR-activating properties only when dsRNA was present. Moreover, viral dsRNA was directly detected in infected cells either by RT-PCR or immunofluorescent microscopy. Interestingly, dsRNA levels were higher in infected cells in which the K1 protein was nonfunctional. Only K1 proteins with PKR inhibitory function prevented downstream NF-κB activation. These results reveal a new PKR activation pathway during VACV infection, in which the K1 protein reduces dsRNA levels early in VACV infection to directly inhibit PKR and several of its downstream antiviral effects, thereby enhancing virus survival.

  20. Synthesis of Biotinylated Inositol Hexakisphosphate To Study DNA Double-Strand Break Repair and Affinity Capture of IP6-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Chensong; Summerlin, Matthew; Bruzik, Karol S; Hanakahi, Leslyn

    2015-10-20

    Inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) is a soluble inositol polyphosphate, which is abundant in mammalian cells. Despite the participation of IP6 in critical cellular functions, few IP6-binding proteins have been characterized. We report on the synthesis, characterization, and application of biotin-labeled IP6 (IP6-biotin), which has biotin attached at position 2 of the myo-inositol ring via an aminohexyl linker. Like natural IP6, IP6-biotin stimulated DNA ligation by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) in vitro. The Ku protein is a required NHEJ factor that has been shown to bind IP6. We found that IP6-biotin could affinity capture Ku and other required NHEJ factors from human cell extracts, including the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), XRCC4, and XLF. Direct binding studies with recombinant proteins show that Ku is the only NHEJ factor with affinity for IP6-biotin. DNA-PKcs, XLF, and the XRCC4:ligase IV complex interact with Ku in cell extracts and likely interact indirectly with IP6-biotin. IP6-biotin was used to tether streptavidin to Ku, which inhibited NHEJ in vitro. These proof-of-concept experiments suggest that molecules like IP6-biotin might be used to molecularly target biologically important proteins that bind IP6. IP6-biotin affinity capture experiments show that numerous proteins specifically bind IP6-biotin, including casein kinase 2, which is known to bind IP6, and nucleolin. Protein binding to IP6-biotin is selective, as IP3, IP4, and IP5 did not compete for binding of proteins to IP6-biotin. Our results document IP6-biotin as a useful tool for investigating the role of IP6 in biological systems.

  1. The deinococcal DdrB protein is involved in an early step of DNA double strand break repair and in plasmid transformation through its single-strand annealing activity

    PubMed Central

    de la Tour, Claire Bouthier; Boisnard, Stéphanie; Norais, Cédric; Toueille, Magali; Bentchikou, Esma; Vannier, Françoise; Cox, Michael M.; Sommer, Suzanne; Servant, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans bacterium exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. Here, we investigated the in vivo role of DdrB, a radiation-induced Deinococcus specific protein that was previously shown to exhibit some in vitro properties akin to those of SSB protein from E. coli but also to promote annealing of single stranded DNA. First we report that the deletion of the C-terminal motif of the DdrB protein, which is similar to the SSB C-terminal motif involved in recruitment to DNA of repair proteins, did neither affect cell radioresistance nor DNA binding properties of purified DdrB protein. We show that, in spite of their different quaternary structure, DdrB and SSB occlude the same amount of ssDNA in vitro. We also showed that DdrB is recruited early and transiently after irradiation into the nucleoid to form discrete foci. Absence of DdrB increased the lag phase of the extended synthesis-dependent strand annealing (ESDSA) process, affecting neither the rate of DNA synthesis nor the efficiency of fragment reassembly, as indicated by monitoring DNA synthesis and genome reconstitution in cells exposed to a sub-lethal ionizing radiation dose. Moreover, cells devoid of DdrB were affected in the establishment of plasmid DNA during natural transformation, a process that requires pairing of internalized plasmid single stranded DNA fragments, whereas they were proficient in transformation by a chromosomal DNA marker that integrates into the host chromosome through homologous recombination. Our data are consistent with a model in which DdrB participates in an early step of DNA double strand break repair in cells exposed to very high radiation doses. DdrB might facilitate the accurate assembly of the myriad of small fragments generated by extreme radiation exposure through a single strand annealing (SSA) process to generate suitable substrates for subsequent ESDSA-promoted genome reconstitution. PMID:21968057

  2. Entropy in DNA Double-Strand Break, Detection and Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Schindler, Christina; Heermann, Dieter

    2014-03-01

    In biology, the term entropy is often understood as a measure of disorder - a restrictive interpretation that can even be misleading. Recently it has become clearer and clearer that entropy, contrary to conventional wisdom, can help to order and guide biological processes in living cells. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most dangerous lesions and efficient damage detection and repair is essential for organism viability. However, what remains unknown is the precise mechanism of targeting the site of damage within billions of intact nucleotides and a crowded nuclear environment, a process which is often referred to as recruitment or signaling. Here we show that the change in entropy associated with inflicting a DSB facilitates the recruitment of damage sensor proteins. By means of computational modeling we found that higher mobility and local chromatin structure accelerate protein association at DSB ends. We compared the effect of different chromatin architectures on protein dynamics and concentrations in the vicinity of DSBs, and related these results to experiments on repair in heterochromatin. Our results demonstrate how entropy contributes to a more efficient damage detection. We identify entropy as the physical basis for DNA double-strand break signaling.

  3. Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenrong; Li, Fang; Huang, Qian; Shen, Jingping; Wolf, Frank; He, Yujun; Liu, Xinjian; Hu, Y. Angela; Bedford, Joel. S.; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks is a major form of DNA damage and a key mechanism through which radiotherapy and some chemotherapeutic agents kill cancer cells. Despite its importance, measuring DNA double strand breaks is still a tedious task that is normally carried out by gel electrophoresis or immunofluorescence staining. Here we report a novel approach to image and quantify DNA double strand breaks in live mammalian cells through bi-fragment luciferase reconstitution. N- and C- terminal fragments of firefly luciferase gene were fused with H2AX and MDC1 genes, respectively. Our strategy was based on the established fact that at the sites of DNA double strand breaks, H2AX protein is phosphoryated and physically associates with the MDC1 protein, thus bringing together N- and C- luciferase fragments and reconstituting luciferase activity. Our strategy allowed serial, non-invasive quantification of DNA double strand breaks in cells irradiated with x-rays and 56Fe ions. Furthermore, it allowed for the evaluation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) non-invasively in vivo in irradiated tumors over two weeks. Surprisingly, we detected a second wave of DSB induction in irradiated tumor cells days after radiation exposure in addition to the initial rapid induction of DSBs. We conclude that our new split-luciferase based method for imaging γ-H2AX-MDC1 interaction is a powerful new tool to study DNA double strand break repair kinetics in vivo with considerable advantage for experiments requiring observations over an extended period of time. PMID:21527553

  4. DNA Ligase I is an In Vivo Substrate of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase and is Activated by Phosphorylation in Response to DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    anlysis. to the procedure described by Malanga and Althaus (8). Gel Electrophoresis and A utoradiography. Immunopre- DNA Ligase and Protein Assays. DNA...by casein kinase 11, EMBO J. 11, 2925-2933. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that DNA ligase I 8. Malanga , M., and Althaus, F. R. (1994) Poly (ADP

  5. Why double-stranded RNA resists condensation

    PubMed Central

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Katz, Andrea M.; Chen, Yujie; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of multivalent cations to solutions containing double-stranded DNA leads to inter-DNA attraction and eventual condensation. Surprisingly, the condensation is suppressed in double-stranded RNA, which carries the same negative charge as DNA, but assumes a different double helical form. Here, we combine experiment and atomistic simulations to propose a mechanism that explains the variations in condensation of short (25 base-pairs) nucleic acid (NA) duplexes, from B-like form of homopolymeric DNA, to mixed sequence DNA, to DNA:RNA hybrid, to A-like RNA. Circular dichroism measurements suggest that duplex helical geometry is not the fundamental property that ultimately determines the observed differences in condensation. Instead, these differences are governed by the spatial variation of cobalt hexammine (CoHex) binding to NA. There are two major NA-CoHex binding modes—internal and external—distinguished by the proximity of bound CoHex to the helical axis. We find a significant difference, up to 5-fold, in the fraction of ions bound to the external surfaces of the different NA constructs studied. NA condensation propensity is determined by the fraction of CoHex ions in the external binding mode. PMID:25123663

  6. Why double-stranded RNA resists condensation.

    PubMed

    Tolokh, Igor S; Pabit, Suzette A; Katz, Andrea M; Chen, Yujie; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2014-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of multivalent cations to solutions containing double-stranded DNA leads to inter-DNA attraction and eventual condensation. Surprisingly, the condensation is suppressed in double-stranded RNA, which carries the same negative charge as DNA, but assumes a different double helical form. Here, we combine experiment and atomistic simulations to propose a mechanism that explains the variations in condensation of short (25 base-pairs) nucleic acid (NA) duplexes, from B-like form of homopolymeric DNA, to mixed sequence DNA, to DNA:RNA hybrid, to A-like RNA. Circular dichroism measurements suggest that duplex helical geometry is not the fundamental property that ultimately determines the observed differences in condensation. Instead, these differences are governed by the spatial variation of cobalt hexammine (CoHex) binding to NA. There are two major NA-CoHex binding modes--internal and external--distinguished by the proximity of bound CoHex to the helical axis. We find a significant difference, up to 5-fold, in the fraction of ions bound to the external surfaces of the different NA constructs studied. NA condensation propensity is determined by the fraction of CoHex ions in the external binding mode.

  7. The role of co-opted ESCRT proteins and lipid factors in protection of tombusviral double-stranded RNA replication intermediate against reconstituted RNAi in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Peter D.

    2017-01-01

    Reconstituted antiviral defense pathway in surrogate host yeast is used as an intracellular probe to further our understanding of virus-host interactions and the role of co-opted host factors in formation of membrane-bound viral replicase complexes in protection of the viral RNA against ribonucleases. The inhibitory effect of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery of S. castellii, which only consists of the two-component DCR1 and AGO1 genes, was measured against tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in wild type and mutant yeasts. We show that deletion of the co-opted ESCRT-I (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport I) or ESCRT-III factors makes TBSV replication more sensitive to the RNAi machinery in yeast. Moreover, the lack of these pro-viral cellular factors in cell-free extracts (CFEs) used for in vitro assembly of the TBSV replicase results in destruction of dsRNA replication intermediate by a ribonuclease at the 60 min time point when the CFE from wt yeast has provided protection for dsRNA. In addition, we demonstrate that co-opted oxysterol-binding proteins and membrane contact sites, which are involved in enrichment of sterols within the tombusvirus replication compartment, are required for protection of viral dsRNA. We also show that phosphatidylethanolamine level influences the formation of RNAi-resistant replication compartment. In the absence of peroxisomes in pex3Δ yeast, TBSV subverts the ER membranes, which provide as good protection for TBSV dsRNA against RNAi or ribonucleases as the peroxisomal membranes in wt yeast. Altogether, these results demonstrate that co-opted protein factors and usurped lipids are exploited by tombusviruses to build protective subcellular environment against the RNAi machinery and possibly other cellular ribonucleases. PMID:28759634

  8. Aberrant DNA Double-strand Break Repair Threads in Breast Carcinoma: Orchestrating Genomic Insult Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Azad; Purohit, Shruti; Sharma, Nilesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is a heterogeneous disease that has exhibited rapid resistance to treatment in the last decade. Depending genotype and phenotype of breast cancer, there are discernible differences in DNA repair protein responses including DNA double strand break repair. It is a fact that different molecular sub-types of breast carcinoma activate these dedicated protein pathways in a distinct manner. The DNA double-strand damage repair machinery is manipulated by breast carcinoma to selectively repair the damage or insults inflicted by the genotoxic effects of chemotherapy or radiation therapy. The two DNA double-strand break repair pathways employed by breast carcinoma are homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. In recent decades, therapeutic interventions targeting one or more factors involved in repairing DNA double-strand breaks inflicted by chemo/radiation therapy have been widely studied. Herein, this review paper summarizes the recent evidence and ongoing clinical trials citing potential therapeutic combinatorial interventions targeting DNA double-strand break repair pathways in breast carcinoma. PMID:28053956

  9. Aberrant DNA Double-strand Break Repair Threads in Breast Carcinoma: Orchestrating Genomic Insult Survival.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Azad; Purohit, Shruti; Sharma, Nilesh Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Breast carcinoma is a heterogeneous disease that has exhibited rapid resistance to treatment in the last decade. Depending genotype and phenotype of breast cancer, there are discernible differences in DNA repair protein responses including DNA double strand break repair. It is a fact that different molecular sub-types of breast carcinoma activate these dedicated protein pathways in a distinct manner. The DNA double-strand damage repair machinery is manipulated by breast carcinoma to selectively repair the damage or insults inflicted by the genotoxic effects of chemotherapy or radiation therapy. The two DNA double-strand break repair pathways employed by breast carcinoma are homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. In recent decades, therapeutic interventions targeting one or more factors involved in repairing DNA double-strand breaks inflicted by chemo/radiation therapy have been widely studied. Herein, this review paper summarizes the recent evidence and ongoing clinical trials citing potential therapeutic combinatorial interventions targeting DNA double-strand break repair pathways in breast carcinoma.

  10. Translocation of double strand DNA into a biological nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatkaew, Sunita; Mlayeh, Lamia; Leonetti, Marc; Homble, Fabrice

    2009-03-01

    Translocation of double strand DNA across a unique mitochondrial biological nanopore (VDAC) is observed by an electrophysiological method. Characteristics of opened and sub-conductance states of VDAC are studied. When the applied electric potential is beyond ± 20 mV, VDAC transits to a sub-conductance state. Plasmids (circular double strand DNA) with a diameter greater than that of the channel shows the current reduction into the channel during the interaction but the state with zero-current is not observed. On the contrary, the interaction of linear double strand DNA with the channel shows the current reduction along with the zero-current state. These show the passages of linear double strand DNA across the channel and the electrostatic effect due to the surface charges of double strand DNA and channel for circular and linear double strand DNA.

  11. Double-stranded RNA delivery through soaking mediates silencing of the muscle protein 20 and increases mortality to the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiudao; Gowda, Siddarame; Killiny, Nabil

    2017-09-01

    Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is the most important economic pest of citrus because it transmits Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB). Silencing genes by RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising approach for controlling D. citri. RNAi-based insect management strategies depend on the selection of suitable target genes. The muscle protein 20 gene DcMP20 was characterized from D. citri in an effort to impair proper muscle development through RNAi. Phylogenetic analysis showed that DcMP20 was more closely related to MP20 from Drosophila compared with its counterpart from other insect species. Developmental expression analysis revealed that transcription of DcMP20 was development dependent and reached a maximum level in the last instar (fourth-fifth) of the nymphal stage. The extent of RNAi in D. citri was dose dependent, with dsRNA-DcMP20 at 75 ng µL(-1) being sufficient to knock down endogenous DcMP20 expression, which resulted in significant mortality and reduced body weight that positively correlated with the silencing of DcMP20. No effect was found when dsRNA-GFP or water was used, indicating the specific effect of dsRNA-DcMP20. Our results suggest that dsRNA can be delivered to D. citri through soaking, and DcMP20 is an effective RNAi target to be used in the management of D. citri. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Double-stranded RNA under force and torque: Similarities to and striking differences from double-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lipfert, Jan; Skinner, Gary M.; Keegstra, Johannes M.; Hensgens, Toivo; Jager, Tessa; Dulin, David; Köber, Mariana; Yu, Zhongbo; Donkers, Serge P.; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Das, Rhiju; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2014-01-01

    RNA plays myriad roles in the transmission and regulation of genetic information that are fundamentally constrained by its mechanical properties, including the elasticity and conformational transitions of the double-stranded (dsRNA) form. Although double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) mechanics have been dissected with exquisite precision, much less is known about dsRNA. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of dsRNA under external forces and torques using magnetic tweezers. We find that dsRNA has a force–torque phase diagram similar to that of dsDNA, including plectoneme formation, melting of the double helix induced by torque, a highly overwound state termed “P-RNA,” and a highly underwound, left-handed state denoted “L-RNA.” Beyond these similarities, our experiments reveal two unexpected behaviors of dsRNA: Unlike dsDNA, dsRNA shortens upon overwinding, and its characteristic transition rate at the plectonemic buckling transition is two orders of magnitude slower than for dsDNA. Our results challenge current models of nucleic acid mechanics, provide a baseline for modeling RNAs in biological contexts, and pave the way for new classes of magnetic tweezers experiments to dissect the role of twist and torque for RNA–protein interactions at the single-molecule level. PMID:25313077

  13. Double-stranded RNA under force and torque: similarities to and striking differences from double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Lipfert, Jan; Skinner, Gary M; Keegstra, Johannes M; Hensgens, Toivo; Jager, Tessa; Dulin, David; Köber, Mariana; Yu, Zhongbo; Donkers, Serge P; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Das, Rhiju; Dekker, Nynke H

    2014-10-28

    RNA plays myriad roles in the transmission and regulation of genetic information that are fundamentally constrained by its mechanical properties, including the elasticity and conformational transitions of the double-stranded (dsRNA) form. Although double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) mechanics have been dissected with exquisite precision, much less is known about dsRNA. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of dsRNA under external forces and torques using magnetic tweezers. We find that dsRNA has a force-torque phase diagram similar to that of dsDNA, including plectoneme formation, melting of the double helix induced by torque, a highly overwound state termed "P-RNA," and a highly underwound, left-handed state denoted "L-RNA." Beyond these similarities, our experiments reveal two unexpected behaviors of dsRNA: Unlike dsDNA, dsRNA shortens upon overwinding, and its characteristic transition rate at the plectonemic buckling transition is two orders of magnitude slower than for dsDNA. Our results challenge current models of nucleic acid mechanics, provide a baseline for modeling RNAs in biological contexts, and pave the way for new classes of magnetic tweezers experiments to dissect the role of twist and torque for RNA-protein interactions at the single-molecule level.

  14. Why double-stranded RNA resists condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Pabit, Suzette; Katz, Andrea M.; Chen, Yujie; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan A.; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey

    2014-09-15

    The addition of small amounts of multivalent cations to solutions containing double-stranded DNA leads to attraction between the negatively charged helices and eventually to condensation. Surprisingly, this effect is suppressed in double-stranded RNA, which carries the same charge as the DNA, but assumes a different double helical form. However, additional characterization of short (25 base-pairs) nucleic acid (NA) duplex structures by circular dichroism shows that measured differences in condensation are not solely determined by duplex helical geometry. Here we combine experiment, theory, and atomistic simulations to propose a mechanism that connects the observed variations in condensation of short NA duplexes with the spatial variation of cobalt hexammine (CoHex) binding at the NA duplex surface. The atomistic picture that emerged showed that CoHex distributions around the NA reveals two major NA-CoHex binding modes -- internal and external -- distinguished by the proximity of bound CoHex to the helical axis. Decreasing trends in experimentally observed condensation propensity of the four studied NA duplexes (from B-like form of homopolymeric DNA, to mixed sequence DNA, to DNA:RNA hybrid, to A-like RNA) are explained by the progressive decrease of a single quantity: the fraction of CoHex ions in the external binding mode. Thus, while NA condensation depends on a complex interplay between various structural and sequence features, our coupled experimental and theoretical results suggest a new model in which a single parameter connects the NA condensation propensity with geometry and sequence dependence of CoHex binding.

  15. Saliva of Lygus lineolaris digests double stranded ribonucleic acids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The prospects for development of highly specific pesticides based on double stranded ribonucleic acid have been a recent focus of scientific research. Creative applications have been proposed and demonstrated. However, not all insects are sensitive to double stranded RNA (dsRNA) gene knockdown effec...

  16. Repair of Double-Strand Breaks by End Joining

    PubMed Central

    Chiruvella, Kishore K.; Liang, Zhuobin; Wilson, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) refers to a set of genome maintenance pathways in which two DNA double-strand break (DSB) ends are (re)joined by apposition, processing, and ligation without the use of extended homology to guide repair. Canonical NHEJ (c-NHEJ) is a well-defined pathway with clear roles in protecting the integrity of chromosomes when DSBs arise. Recent advances have revealed much about the identity, structure, and function of c-NHEJ proteins, but many questions exist regarding their concerted action in the context of chromatin. Alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ) refers to more recently described mechanism(s) that repair DSBs in less-efficient backup reactions. There is great interest in defining alt-NHEJ more precisely, including its regulation relative to c-NHEJ, in light of evidence that alt-NHEJ can execute chromosome rearrangements. Progress toward these goals is reviewed. PMID:23637284

  17. Repair of double-strand breaks by end joining.

    PubMed

    Chiruvella, Kishore K; Liang, Zhuobin; Wilson, Thomas E

    2013-05-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) refers to a set of genome maintenance pathways in which two DNA double-strand break (DSB) ends are (re)joined by apposition, processing, and ligation without the use of extended homology to guide repair. Canonical NHEJ (c-NHEJ) is a well-defined pathway with clear roles in protecting the integrity of chromosomes when DSBs arise. Recent advances have revealed much about the identity, structure, and function of c-NHEJ proteins, but many questions exist regarding their concerted action in the context of chromatin. Alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ) refers to more recently described mechanism(s) that repair DSBs in less-efficient backup reactions. There is great interest in defining alt-NHEJ more precisely, including its regulation relative to c-NHEJ, in light of evidence that alt-NHEJ can execute chromosome rearrangements. Progress toward these goals is reviewed.

  18. Assembly of large icosahedral double-stranded RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Poranen, Minna M; Bamford, Dennis H

    2012-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses are a diverse group of viruses infecting hosts from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. Among the hosts are humans, domestic animals, and economically important plant species. Fine details of high-resolution virion structures have revealed common structural characteristics unique to these viruses including an internal icosahedral capsid built from 60 asymmetric dimers (120 monomers!) of the major coat protein. Here we focus mainly on the structures and assembly principles of large icosahedral dsRNA viruses belonging to the families of Cystoviridae and Reoviridae. It is obvious that there are a variety of assembly pathways utilized by different viruses starting from similar building blocks and reaching in all cases a similar capsid architecture. This is true even with closely related viruses indicating that the assembly pathway per se is not an indicator of relatedness and is achieved with minor changes in the interacting components.

  19. Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Martin; Lukasova, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    The genetic information of cells continuously undergoes damage induced by intracellular processes including energy metabolism, DNA replication and transcription, and by environmental factors such as mutagenic chemicals and UV and ionizing radiation. This causes numerous DNA lesions, including double strand breaks (DSBs). Since cells cannot escape this damage or normally function with a damaged genome, several DNA repair mechanisms have evolved. Although most "single-stranded" DNA lesions are rapidly removed from DNA without permanent damage, DSBs completely break the DNA molecule, presenting a real challenge for repair mechanisms, with the highest risk among DNA lesions of incorrect repair. Hence, DSBs can have serious consequences for human health. Therefore, in this chapter, we will refer only to this type of DNA damage. In addition to the biochemical aspects of DSB repair, which have been extensively studied over a long period of time, the spatio-temporal organization of DSB induction and repair, the importance of which was recognized only recently, will be considered in terms of current knowledge and remaining questions.

  20. A double-stranded DNA rotaxane.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Damian; Schmidt, Thorsten L; Hannam, Jeffrey S; Purohit, Chandra S; Heckel, Alexander; Famulok, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Mechanically interlocked molecules such as rotaxanes and catenanes have potential as components of molecular machinery. Rotaxanes consist of a dumb-bell-shaped molecule encircled by a macrocycle that can move unhindered along the axle, trapped by bulky stoppers. Previously, rotaxanes have been made from a variety of molecules, but not from DNA. Here, we report the design, assembly and characterization of rotaxanes in which both the dumb-bell-shaped molecule and the macrocycle are made of double-stranded DNA, and in which the axle of the dumb-bell is threaded through the macrocycle by base pairing. The assembly involves the formation of pseudorotaxanes, in which the macrocycle and the axle are locked together by hybridization. Ligation of stopper modules to the axle leads to the characteristic dumb-bell topology. When an oligonucleotide is added to release the macrocycle from the axle, the pseudorotaxanes are either converted to mechanically stable rotaxanes, or they disassemble by means of a slippage mechanism to yield a dumb-bell and a free macrocycle. Our DNA rotaxanes allow the fields of mechanically interlocked molecules and DNA nanotechnology to be combined, thus opening new possibilities for research into molecular machines and synthetic biology.

  1. A double-stranded DNA rotaxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Damian; Schmidt, Thorsten L.; Hannam, Jeffrey S.; Purohit, Chandra S.; Heckel, Alexander; Famulok, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Mechanically interlocked molecules such as rotaxanes and catenanes have potential as components of molecular machinery. Rotaxanes consist of a dumb-bell-shaped molecule encircled by a macrocycle that can move unhindered along the axle, trapped by bulky stoppers. Previously, rotaxanes have been made from a variety of molecules, but not from DNA. Here, we report the design, assembly and characterization of rotaxanes in which both the dumb-bell-shaped molecule and the macrocycle are made of double-stranded DNA, and in which the axle of the dumb-bell is threaded through the macrocycle by base pairing. The assembly involves the formation of pseudorotaxanes, in which the macrocycle and the axle are locked together by hybridization. Ligation of stopper modules to the axle leads to the characteristic dumb-bell topology. When an oligonucleotide is added to release the macrocycle from the axle, the pseudorotaxanes are either converted to mechanically stable rotaxanes, or they disassemble by means of a slippage mechanism to yield a dumb-bell and a free macrocycle. Our DNA rotaxanes allow the fields of mechanically interlocked molecules and DNA nanotechnology to be combined, thus opening new possibilities for research into molecular machines and synthetic biology.

  2. Prevention of the β-amyloid peptide-induced inflammatory process by inhibition of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase in primary murine mixed co-cultures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There has been little success with anti-inflammatory drugs in AD, while the promise of anti-inflammatory treatment is more evident in experimental models. A new anti-inflammatory strategy requires a better understanding of molecular mechanisms. Among the plethora of signaling pathways activated by β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway could be an interesting target. In virus-infected cells, double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) controls the NF-κB signaling pathway. It is well-known that PKR is activated in AD. This led us to study the effect of a specific inhibitor of PKR on the Aβ42-induced inflammatory response in primary mixed murine co-cultures, allowing interactions between neurons, astrocytes and microglia. Methods Primary mixed murine co-cultures were prepared in three steps: a primary culture of astrocytes and microglia for 14 days, then a primary culture of neurons and astrocytes which were cultured with microglia purified from the first culture. Before exposure to Aβ neurotoxicity (72 h), co-cultures were treated with compound C16, a specific inhibitor of PKR. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 were assessed by ELISA. Levels of PT451-PKR and activation of IκB, NF-κB and caspase-3 were assessed by western blotting. Apoptosis was also followed using annexin V-FITC immunostaining kit. Subcellular distribution of PT451-PKR was assessed by confocal immunofluorescence and morphological structure of cells by scanning electron microscopy. Data were analysed using one-way ANOVA followed by a Newman-Keuls' post hoc test Results In these co-cultures, PKR inhibition prevented Aβ42-induced activation of IκB and NF-κB, strongly decreased production and release of tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) and interleukin (IL)-1β, and limited apoptosis. Conclusion In spite of the complexity of the

  3. Heavy Metal Exposure Influences Double Strand Break DNA Repair Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Morales, Maria E; Derbes, Rebecca S; Ade, Catherine M; Ortego, Jonathan C; Stark, Jeremy; Deininger, Prescott L; Roy-Engel, Astrid M

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel are classified as carcinogens. Although the precise mechanism of carcinogenesis is undefined, heavy metal exposure can contribute to genetic damage by inducing double strand breaks (DSBs) as well as inhibiting critical proteins from different DNA repair pathways. Here we take advantage of two previously published culture assay systems developed to address mechanistic aspects of DNA repair to evaluate the effects of heavy metal exposures on competing DNA repair outcomes. Our results demonstrate that exposure to heavy metals significantly alters how cells repair double strand breaks. The effects observed are both specific to the particular metal and dose dependent. Low doses of NiCl2 favored resolution of DSBs through homologous recombination (HR) and single strand annealing (SSA), which were inhibited by higher NiCl2 doses. In contrast, cells exposed to arsenic trioxide preferentially repaired using the "error prone" non-homologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) while inhibiting repair by HR. In addition, we determined that low doses of nickel and cadmium contributed to an increase in mutagenic recombination-mediated by Alu elements, the most numerous family of repetitive elements in humans. Sequence verification confirmed that the majority of the genetic deletions were the result of Alu-mediated non-allelic recombination events that predominantly arose from repair by SSA. All heavy metals showed a shift in the outcomes of alt-NHEJ repair with a significant increase of non-templated sequence insertions at the DSB repair site. Our data suggest that exposure to heavy metals will alter the choice of DNA repair pathway changing the genetic outcome of DSBs repair.

  4. Ebolavirus VP35 Coats the Backbone of Double-Stranded RNA for Interferon Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Shridhar; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Krois, Alexander S.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) activates interferon production and immune signaling in host cells. Crystal structures of ebolavirus VP35 show that it caps dsRNA ends to prevent sensing by pattern recognition receptors such as RIG-I. In contrast, structures of marburgvirus VP35 show that it primarily coats the dsRNA backbone. Here, we demonstrate that ebolavirus VP35 also coats the dsRNA backbone in solution, although binding to the dsRNA ends probably constitutes the initial binding event. PMID:23824825

  5. 53BP1-mediated DNA double strand break repair: insert bad pun here.

    PubMed

    Noon, Angela T; Goodarzi, Aaron A

    2011-10-10

    53BP1 is an established player in the cellular response to DNA damage and is a canonical component of ionizing-radiation induced foci--that cadre of proteins which assemble at DNA double strand breaks following radiation exposure and which are readily visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy. While its roles in p53 regulation and cell cycle checkpoint activation have been studied for some time, the impact of 53BP1 on DNA double strand break rejoining has only come to light in the past few years. Convincing evidence now exists for 53BP1 significantly affecting the outcome of DNA double strand break repair in several contexts, many of which hint to an important role in modulating chromatin structure surrounding the break site. Here, we highlight the known and emerging roles of 53BP1 in DNA double strand break repair, including the repair of lesions induced within heterochromatin, following telomere uncapping, in long-range V(D)J recombination, during immunoglobulin class switch recombination and its much debated role in regulating resection during homologous recombination.

  6. Genetics of x-ray induced double strand break repair in saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Budd, M.E.

    1982-07-01

    The possible fates of x-ray-induced double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined. One possible pathway which breaks can follow, the repair pathway, was studied by assaying strains with mutations in the RAD51, RAD54, and RAD57 loci for double-strand break repair. In order of increasing radiation sensitivity one finds: rad57-1(23/sup 0/)> rad51-1(30/sup 0/)> rad54-3(36/sup 0/). At 36/sup 0/, rad54-3 cells cannot repair double-strand breaks, while 23/sup 0/, they can. Strains with the rad57-1 mutation can rejoin broken chromosomes at both temperatures. However, the low survival at 36/sup 0/ shows that the assay is not distinguishing large DNA fragments which allow cell survival from those which cause cell death. A rad51-1 strain could also rejoin broken chromosomes, and was thus capable of incomplete repair. The data can be explained with the hypothesis that rad54-3 cells are blocked in an early step of repair, while rad51-1 and rad57-1 strains are blocked in a later step of repair. The fate of double-strand breaks when they are left unrepaired was investigated with the rad54-3 mutation. If breaks are prevented from entering the RAD54 repair pathway they become uncommitted lesions. These lesions are repaired slower than the original breaks. One possible fate for an uncommitted lesion is conversion into a fixed lesion, which is likely to be an unrepairable or misrepaired double-strand break. The presence of protein synthesis after irradiation increases the probability that a break will enter the repair pathway. Evidence shows that increased probability of repair results from enhanced synthesis of repair proteins shortly after radiation. (ERB)

  7. Regulation of Gene Expression with Double-Stranded Phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielinska, Anna; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.; Zhang, Liquan; Nabel, Gary J.

    1990-11-01

    Alteration of gene transcription by inhibition of specific transcriptional regulatory proteins is necessary for determining how these factors participate in cellular differentiation. The functions of these proteins can be antagonized by several methods, each with specific limitations. Inhibition of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins was achieved with double-stranded (ds) phosphorothioate oligonucleotides that contained octamer or kappaB consensus sequences. The phosphorothioate oligonucleotides specifically bound either octamer transcription factor or nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB. The modified oligonucleotides accumulated in cells more effectively than standard ds oligonucleotides and modulated gene expression in a specific manner. Octamer-dependent activation of a reporter plasmid or NF-kappaB-dependent activation of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enhancer was inhibited when the appropriate phosphorothioate oligonucleotide was added to a transiently transfected B cell line. Addition of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides that contained the octamer consensus to Jurkat T leukemia cells inhibited interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion to a degree similar to that observed with a mutated octamer site in the IL-2 enhancer. The ds phosphorothioate oligonucleotides probably compete for binding of specific transcription factors and may provide anti-viral, immunosuppressive, or other therapeutic effects.

  8. Correct end use during end joining of multiple chromosomal double strand breaks is influenced by repair protein RAD50, DNA-dependent protein kinase DNA-PKcs, and transcription context.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Amanda; Bennardo, Nicole; Cheng, Anita; Stark, Jeremy M

    2011-12-09

    During repair of multiple chromosomal double strand breaks (DSBs), matching the correct DSB ends is essential to limit rearrangements. To investigate the maintenance of correct end use, we examined repair of two tandem noncohesive DSBs generated by endonuclease I-SceI and the 3' nonprocessive exonuclease Trex2, which can be expressed as an I-SceI-Trex2 fusion. We examined end joining (EJ) repair that maintains correct ends (proximal-EJ) versus using incorrect ends (distal-EJ), which provides a relative measure of incorrect end use (distal end use). Previous studies showed that ATM is important to limit distal end use. Here we show that DNA-PKcs kinase activity and RAD50 are also important to limit distal end use, but that H2AX is dispensable. In contrast, we find that ATM, DNA-PKcs, and RAD50 have distinct effects on repair events requiring end processing. Furthermore, we developed reporters to examine the effects of the transcription context on DSB repair, using an inducible promoter. We find that a DSB downstream from an active promoter shows a higher frequency of distal end use, and a greater reliance on ATM for limiting incorrect end use. Conversely, DSB transcription context does not affect end processing during EJ, the frequency of homology-directed repair, or the role of RAD50 and DNA-PKcs in limiting distal end use. We suggest that RAD50, DNA-PKcs kinase activity, and transcription context are each important to limit incorrect end use during EJ repair of multiple DSBs, but that these factors and conditions have distinct roles during repair events requiring end processing.

  9. Correct End Use during End Joining of Multiple Chromosomal Double Strand Breaks Is Influenced by Repair Protein RAD50, DNA-dependent Protein Kinase DNA-PKcs, and Transcription Context*

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Amanda; Bennardo, Nicole; Cheng, Anita; Stark, Jeremy M.

    2011-01-01

    During repair of multiple chromosomal double strand breaks (DSBs), matching the correct DSB ends is essential to limit rearrangements. To investigate the maintenance of correct end use, we examined repair of two tandem noncohesive DSBs generated by endonuclease I-SceI and the 3′ nonprocessive exonuclease Trex2, which can be expressed as an I-SceI-Trex2 fusion. We examined end joining (EJ) repair that maintains correct ends (proximal-EJ) versus using incorrect ends (distal-EJ), which provides a relative measure of incorrect end use (distal end use). Previous studies showed that ATM is important to limit distal end use. Here we show that DNA-PKcs kinase activity and RAD50 are also important to limit distal end use, but that H2AX is dispensable. In contrast, we find that ATM, DNA-PKcs, and RAD50 have distinct effects on repair events requiring end processing. Furthermore, we developed reporters to examine the effects of the transcription context on DSB repair, using an inducible promoter. We find that a DSB downstream from an active promoter shows a higher frequency of distal end use, and a greater reliance on ATM for limiting incorrect end use. Conversely, DSB transcription context does not affect end processing during EJ, the frequency of homology-directed repair, or the role of RAD50 and DNA-PKcs in limiting distal end use. We suggest that RAD50, DNA-PKcs kinase activity, and transcription context are each important to limit incorrect end use during EJ repair of multiple DSBs, but that these factors and conditions have distinct roles during repair events requiring end processing. PMID:22027841

  10. Spo11 and the Formation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Keeney, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is carried out through a specialized pathway for the formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks made by the Spo11 protein, a relative of archaeal topoisomerase VI. This review summarizes recent studies that provide insight to the mechanism of DNA cleavage by Spo11, functional interactions of Spo11 with other proteins required for break formation, mechanisms that control the timing of recombination initiation, and evolutionary conservation and divergence of these processes.

  11. Euler buckling and nonlinear kinking of double-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Alexander; Axelrod, Kevin; Cohen, Adam

    2012-02-01

    Bare double-stranded DNA is a stiff biopolymer with a persistence length of roughly 53 nm under physiological conditions. Cells and viruses employ extensive protein machinery to overcome this stiffness and bend, twist, and loop DNA to accomplish tasks such as packaging, recombination, gene regulation, and repair. The mechanical properties of DNA are of fundamental importance to the mechanism and thermodynamics of these processes, but physiologically relevant curvature has been difficult to access experimentally. We designed and synthesized a DNA hairpin construct in which base-pairing interactions generated a compressive force on a short segment of duplex DNA, inducing Euler buckling followed by bending to thermally inaccessible radii of curvature. The efficiency of F"orster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two fluorophores covalently linked to the hairpin indicated the degree of buckling. Bulk and single-molecule measurements yielded distinctly different force-compression curves for intact DNA and for strands with single nicks, base pair mismatches, and damage sites. These results suggest that changes in local mechanical properties may play a significant role in the recognition of these features by DNA-binding proteins.

  12. ATM controls meiotic double-strand-break formation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Julian; Pan, Jing; Cole, Francesca; Thelen, Michael P; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott

    2011-10-16

    In many organisms, developmentally programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs) formed by the SPO11 transesterase initiate meiotic recombination, which promotes pairing and segregation of homologous chromosomes. Because every chromosome must receive a minimum number of DSBs, attention has focused on factors that support DSB formation. However, improperly repaired DSBs can cause meiotic arrest or mutation; thus, having too many DSBs is probably as deleterious as having too few. Only a small fraction of SPO11 protein ever makes a DSB in yeast or mouse and SPO11 and its accessory factors remain abundant long after most DSB formation ceases, implying the existence of mechanisms that restrain SPO11 activity to limit DSB numbers. Here we report that the number of meiotic DSBs in mouse is controlled by ATM, a kinase activated by DNA damage to trigger checkpoint signalling and promote DSB repair. Levels of SPO11-oligonucleotide complexes, by-products of meiotic DSB formation, are elevated at least tenfold in spermatocytes lacking ATM. Moreover, Atm mutation renders SPO11-oligonucleotide levels sensitive to genetic manipulations that modulate SPO11 protein levels. We propose that ATM restrains SPO11 via a negative feedback loop in which kinase activation by DSBs suppresses further DSB formation. Our findings explain previously puzzling phenotypes of Atm-null mice and provide a molecular basis for the gonadal dysgenesis observed in ataxia telangiectasia, the human syndrome caused by ATM deficiency.

  13. Template Role of Double-Stranded RNA in Tombusvirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; Pogany, Judit

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Replication of plus-strand RNA [(+)RNA] viruses of plants is a relatively simple process that involves complementary minus-strand RNA [(−)RNA] synthesis and subsequent (+)RNA synthesis. However, the actual replicative form of the (−)RNA template in the case of plant (+)RNA viruses is not yet established unambiguously. In this paper, using a cell-free replication assay supporting a full cycle of viral replication, we show that replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) leads to the formation of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Using RNase digestion, DNAzyme, and RNA mobility shift assays, we demonstrate the absence of naked (−)RNA templates during replication. Time course experiments showed the rapid appearance of dsRNA earlier than the bulk production of new (+)RNAs, suggesting an active role for dsRNA in replication. Radioactive nucleotide chase experiments showed that the mechanism of TBSV replication involves the use of dsRNA templates in strand displacement reactions, where the newly synthesized plus strand replaces the original (+)RNA in the dsRNA. We propose that the use of dsRNA as a template for (+)RNA synthesis by the viral replicase is facilitated by recruited host DEAD box helicases and the viral p33 RNA chaperone protein. Altogether, this replication strategy allows TBSV to separate minus- and plus-strand syntheses in time and regulate asymmetrical RNA replication that leads to abundant (+)RNA progeny. IMPORTANCE Positive-stranded RNA viruses of plants use their RNAs as the templates for replication. First, the minus strand is synthesized by the viral replicase complex (VRC), which then serves as a template for new plus-strand synthesis. To characterize the nature of the (−)RNA in the membrane-bound viral replicase, we performed complete RNA replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in yeast cell-free extracts and in plant extracts. The experiments demonstrated that the TBSV (−)RNA is present as a double-stranded RNA that serves

  14. Selective mitochondrial DNA degradation following double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Moretton, Amandine; Morel, Frédéric; Macao, Bertil; Lachaume, Philippe; Ishak, Layal; Lefebvre, Mathilde; Garreau-Balandier, Isabelle; Vernet, Patrick; Falkenberg, Maria; Farge, Géraldine

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can undergo double-strand breaks (DSBs), caused by defective replication, or by various endogenous or exogenous sources, such as reactive oxygen species, chemotherapeutic agents or ionizing radiations. MtDNA encodes for proteins involved in ATP production, and maintenance of genome integrity following DSBs is thus of crucial importance. However, the mechanisms involved in mtDNA maintenance after DSBs remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the consequences of the production of mtDNA DSBs using a human inducible cell system expressing the restriction enzyme PstI targeted to mitochondria. Using this system, we could not find any support for DSB repair of mtDNA. Instead we observed a loss of the damaged mtDNA molecules and a severe decrease in mtDNA content. We demonstrate that none of the known mitochondrial nucleases are involved in the mtDNA degradation and that the DNA loss is not due to autophagy, mitophagy or apoptosis. Our study suggests that a still uncharacterized pathway for the targeted degradation of damaged mtDNA in a mitophagy/autophagy-independent manner is present in mitochondria, and might provide the main mechanism used by the cells to deal with DSBs.

  15. DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Duen-Wei; Kiely, Rhian; Couto, C Anne-Marie; Wang, Hong-Yu; Hudson, Jessica J R; Borer, Christine; Pears, Catherine J; Lakin, Nicholas D

    2011-05-15

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The mechanisms that govern whether a DSB is repaired by NHEJ or HR remain unclear. Here, we characterise DSB repair in the amoeba Dictyostelium. HR is the principal pathway responsible for resistance to DSBs during vegetative cell growth, a stage of the life cycle when cells are predominantly in G2. However, we illustrate that restriction-enzyme-mediated integration of DNA into the Dictyostelium genome is possible during this stage of the life cycle and that this is mediated by an active NHEJ pathway. We illustrate that Dclre1, a protein with similarity to the vertebrate NHEJ factor Artemis, is required for NHEJ independently of DNA termini complexity. Although vegetative dclre1(-) cells are not radiosensitive, they exhibit delayed DSB repair, further supporting a role for NHEJ during this stage of the life cycle. By contrast, cells lacking the Ku80 component of the Ku heterodimer that binds DNA ends to facilitate NHEJ exhibit no such defect and deletion of ku80 suppresses the DSB repair defect of dclre1(-) cells through increasing HR efficiency. These data illustrate a functional NHEJ pathway in vegetative Dictyostelium and the importance of Ku in regulating DSB repair choice during this phase of the life cycle.

  16. Unzipping of Double-stranded DNA in Engineered α-Hemolysin Pores.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aihua; Zhao, Qitao; Krishantha, D M Milan; Guan, Xiyun

    2011-06-12

    Biological protein α-hemolysin nanopore is under intense investigation as a potential platform for rapid and low-cost DNA sequencing. However, due to its narrow constriction, analysis of DNA in the α-hemolysin pore has long time been restricted to single strands. In this paper, we report that by introducing new surface functional groups into the α-hemolysin pore, facilitated unzipping of double-stranded DNA through the channel could be achieved. Since the mean residence time of the DNA events is dependent on the length of the duplex, and also varies with the nucleotide base composition, the modified protein pore approach offers the potential for rapid double-stranded DNA analysis, including sequencing.

  17. Unzipping of Double-stranded DNA in Engineered α-Hemolysin Pores

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Aihua; Zhao, Qitao; Krishantha, D.M. Milan; Guan, Xiyun

    2011-01-01

    Biological protein α-hemolysin nanopore is under intense investigation as a potential platform for rapid and low-cost DNA sequencing. However, due to its narrow constriction, analysis of DNA in the α-hemolysin pore has long time been restricted to single strands. In this paper, we report that by introducing new surface functional groups into the α-hemolysin pore, facilitated unzipping of double-stranded DNA through the channel could be achieved. Since the mean residence time of the DNA events is dependent on the length of the duplex, and also varies with the nucleotide base composition, the modified protein pore approach offers the potential for rapid double-stranded DNA analysis, including sequencing. PMID:21709813

  18. PROPERTIES OF DOUBLE-STRANDED DNA AS A POLYELECTROLYTE.

    PubMed

    OHNISHI, T

    1963-11-01

    The stability of the structure of double-stranded DNA in the salt-free solution is discussed on the basis of the polyelectrolyte theory. Assuming that DNA is an infinitely long rod, and the formation of double strands is divided into combining process and folding process, the free energy changes required in these processes are calculated by the use of the exact solutions of two-dimensional Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the one rod and the two rod systems.By strong depression of electrostatic interaction due to counter-ion condensation phenomena, the free energy change is remarkably decreased so that the double-stranded structure of DNA can be stabilized by energy of hydrogen bonds between base pairs. The increase of the activity coefficient of a counterion upon heat denaturation of DNA is also explained.

  19. Atomic force microscopy of single- and double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hansma, H G; Sinsheimer, R L; Li, M Q; Hansma, P K

    1992-01-01

    A method has been developed for imaging single-stranded DNA with the atomic force microscope (AFM). phi X174 single-stranded DNA in formaldehyde on mica can be imaged in the AFM under propanol or butanol or in air. Measured lengths of most molecules are on the order of 1 mu, although occasionally more extended molecules with lengths of 1.7 to 1.9 mu are seen. Single-stranded DNA in the AFM generally appears lumpier than double-stranded DNA, even when extended. Images of double-stranded lambda DNA in the AFM show more sharp kinks and bends than are typically observed in the electron microscope. Dense, aggregated fields of double-stranded plasmids can be converted by gentle rinsing with hot water to well spread fields. Images PMID:1386422

  20. Partners and pathwaysrepairing a double-strand break.

    PubMed

    Haber, J E

    2000-06-01

    Double-strand chromosome breaks can arise in a number of ways, by ionizing radiation, by spontaneous chromosome breaks during DNA replication, or by the programmed action of endonucleases, such as in meiosis. Broken chromosomes can be repaired either by one of several homologous recombination mechanisms, or by a number of nonhomologous repair processes. Many of these pathways compete actively for the repair of a double-strand break. Which of these repair pathways is used appears to be regulated developmentally, genetically and during the cell cycle.

  1. Interaction of DAPI with double-stranded ribonucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Manzini, G; Xodo, L; Barcellona, M L; Quadrifoglio, F

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of DAPI with natural and synthetic double-stranded polyribonucleotides was studied with different optical and calorimetric methods. The results were similar to those obtained previously with double-stranded polydeoxynucleotides, i.e. two interaction modes, the first of which shows high affinity for AU clusters and consequent strong fluorescence enhancement. The results suggest caution in the use of DAPI as selective fluorescent staining agent for DNA in the presence of RNA. A narrow groove binding model with hydrogen bonds between DAPI and AU pairs is proposed. An intercalation mechanism can be excluded because of the non planarity of DAPI molecule. PMID:4080554

  2. DNA double-strand break repair in a cellular context.

    PubMed

    Shibata, A; Jeggo, P A

    2014-05-01

    Substantial insight into the mechanisms responding to DNA double-strand breaks has been gained from molecular, biochemical and structural approaches. Attention is now focusing on understanding the interplay between the pathways, how they interface through the cell cycle and the communication with other DNA transactions, such as replication and transcription. Understanding these aspects will facilitate an assessment of how cancer cells have modified these processes to achieve unlimited proliferative capacity and adaptability, and pave the way to identify targets suitable for therapy. Here, we briefly overview the processes responding to double-strand breaks and discuss our current understanding of their interplay in a cellular context.

  3. Double-stranded RNA virus in the human pathogenic fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis.

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, S; Fujimura, T; Rulong, S; Kwon-Chung, K J

    1994-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA viruses were detected in a strain of Blastomyces dermatitidis isolated from a patient in Uganda. The viral particles are spherical (mostly 44 to 50 nm in diameter) and consist of about 25% double-stranded RNA (5 kb) and 75% protein (90 kDa). The virus contains transcriptional RNA polymerase activity; it synthesized single-stranded RNA in vitro in a conservative manner. The newly synthesized single-stranded RNA was a full-length strand, and the rate of chain elongation was approximately 170 nucleotides per min. The virus-containing strain shows no morphological difference from virus-free strains in the mycelial phase. Although the association with the presence of the virus is unclear, the virus-infected strain converts to the yeast form at 37 degrees C, but the yeast cells fail to multiply at that temperature. Images PMID:7933142

  4. Repair of DNA double strand breaks: in vivo biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Neal; Haber, James E

    2006-01-01

    Double strand breaks (DSBs) can cause damage to the genomic integrity of a cell as well as initiate genetic recombination processes. The HO and I-SceI endonucleases from budding yeast have provided a way to study these events by inducing a unique DSB in vivo under the control of a galactose-inducible promoter. The GAL::HO construct has been used extensively to study processes such as nonhomologous end joining, intra- and interchromosomal gene conversion, single strand annealing and break-induced recombination. Synchronously induced DSBs have also been important in the study of the DNA damage checkpoint, adaptation, and recovery pathways of yeast. This chapter describes methods of using GAL::HO to physically monitor the progression of events following a DSB, specifically the events leading to the switching of mating type by gene conversion of MAT using the silent donors at HML and HMR. Southern blot analysis can be used to follow the overall events in this process such as the formation of the DSB and product. Denaturing alkaline gels and slot blot techniques can be employed to follow the 5' to 3' resection of DNA starting at the DSB. After resection, the 3' tail initiates a homology search and then strand invades its homologous sequence at the donor cassette. Polymerase chain reaction is an important means to assay strand invasion and the priming of new DNA synthesis as well as the completion of gene conversion. Methods such as chromatin immunoprecipitation have provided a means to study many proteins that associate with a DSB, including not only recombination proteins, but also proteins involved in nonhomologous end joining, cell cycle arrest, chromatin remodeling, cohesin function, and mismatch repair.

  5. Differential requirement for SUB1 in chromosomal and plasmid double-strand DNA break repair.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lijian; Volkert, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Non homologous end joining (NHEJ) is an important process that repairs double strand DNA breaks (DSBs) in eukaryotic cells. Cells defective in NHEJ are unable to join chromosomal breaks. Two different NHEJ assays are typically used to determine the efficiency of NHEJ. One requires NHEJ of linearized plasmid DNA transformed into the test organism; the other requires NHEJ of a single chromosomal break induced either by HO endonuclease or the I-SceI restriction enzyme. These two assays are generally considered equivalent and rely on the same set of NHEJ genes. PC4 is an abundant DNA binding protein that has been suggested to stimulate NHEJ. Here we tested the role of PC4's yeast homolog SUB1 in repair of DNA double strand breaks using different assays. We found SUB1 is required for NHEJ repair of DSBs in plasmid DNA, but not in chromosomal DNA. Our results suggest that these two assays, while similar are not equivalent and that repair of plasmid DNA requires additional factor(s) that are not required for NHEJ repair of chromosomal double-strand DNA breaks. Possible roles for Sub1 proteins in NHEJ of plasmid DNA are discussed.

  6. Targeting DNA double-strand breaks with TAL effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Christian, Michelle; Cermak, Tomas; Doyle, Erin L; Schmidt, Clarice; Zhang, Feng; Hummel, Aaron; Bogdanove, Adam J; Voytas, Daniel F

    2010-10-01

    Engineered nucleases that cleave specific DNA sequences in vivo are valuable reagents for targeted mutagenesis. Here we report a new class of sequence-specific nucleases created by fusing transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) to the catalytic domain of the FokI endonuclease. Both native and custom TALE-nuclease fusions direct DNA double-strand breaks to specific, targeted sites.

  7. Heavy ion induced double strand breaks in bacteria and bacteriophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micke, U.; Schäfer, M.; Anton, A.; Horneck, G.; Bücker, H.

    DNA damage induced by heavy ions in bacterial cells and bacteriophages such as Bacillus subtilis, E. coli and Bacteriophage Tl were investigated by analyzing the double strand breaks in the chromosomal DNA. This kind of lesion is considered as one of the main reasons for lethal events. To analyze double strand breaks in long molecules of DNA - up to some Mbp in length - the technique of pulse field agarose gel electrophoresis has been used. This allows the detection of one double strand break per genome. Cell lysis and DNA isolation were performed in small agarose blocks directly. This procedure secured minimum DNA destruction by shearing forces. After running a gel, the DNA was stained with ethidium bromide. The light intensity of ethidium bromide fluorescence for both the outcoming (running) DNA and the remaining intact DNA were measured by scanning. The mean number of double strand breaks was calculated by determining the quotient of these intensities. Strand break induction after heavy ion and X-ray irradiation was compared.

  8. Processing of 3'-phosphoglycolate-terminated DNA double strand breaks by Artemis nuclease.

    PubMed

    Povirk, Lawrence F; Zhou, Tong; Zhou, Ruizhe; Cowan, Morton J; Yannone, Steven M

    2007-02-09

    The Artemis nuclease is required for V(D)J recombination and for repair of an as yet undefined subset of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. To assess the possibility that Artemis acts on oxidatively modified double strand break termini, its activity toward model DNA substrates, bearing either 3'-hydroxyl or 3'-phosphoglycolate moieties, was examined. A 3'-phosphoglycolate had little effect on Artemis-mediated trimming of long 3' overhangs (> or =9 nucleotides), which were efficiently trimmed to 4-5 nucleotides. However, 3'-phosphoglycolates on overhangs of 4-5 bases promoted Artemis-mediated removal of a single 3'-terminal nucleotide, while at least 2 nucleotides were trimmed from identical hydroxyl-terminated substrates. Artemis also efficiently removed a single nucleotide from a phosphoglycolate-terminated 3-base 3' overhang, while leaving an analogous hydroxyl-terminated overhang largely intact. Such removal was completely dependent on DNA-dependent protein kinase and ATP and was largely dependent on Ku, which markedly stimulated Artemis activity toward all 3' overhangs. Together, these data suggest that efficient Artemis-mediated cleavage of 3' overhangs requires a minimum of 2 nucleotides, or a nucleotide plus a phosphoglycolate, 3' to the cleavage site, as well as 2 unpaired nucleotides 5' to the cleavage site. Shorter 3'-phosphoglycolate-terminated overhangs and blunt ends were also processed by Artemis but much more slowly. Consistent with a role for Artemis in repair of terminally blocked double strand breaks in vivo, human cells lacking Artemis exhibited hypersensitivity to x-rays, bleomycin, and neocarzinostatin, which all induce 3'-phosphoglycolate-terminated double strand breaks.

  9. A general solution for opening double-stranded DNA for isothermal amplification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gangyi; Dong, Juan; Yuan, Yi; Li, Na; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification is the core technology of molecular biology and genetic engineering. Various isothermal amplification techniques have been developed as alternatives to polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, most of these methods can only detect single stranded nucleic acid. Herein, we put forward a simple solution for opening double-stranded DNA for isothermal detection methods. The strategy employs recombination protein from E. coli (RecA) to form nucleoprotein complex with single-stranded DNA, which could scan double-stranded template for homologous sites. Then, the nucleoprotein can invade the double-stranded template to form heteroduplex in the presence of ATP, resulting in the strand exchange. The ATP regeneration system could be eliminated by using high concentration of ATP, and the 3′-OH terminal of the invasion strand can be recognized by other DNA modifying enzymes such as DNA polymerase or DNA ligase. Moreover, dATP was found to be a better cofactor for RecA, which make the system more compatible to DNA polymerase. The method described here is a general solution to open dsDNA, serving as a platform to develop more isothermal nucleic acids detection methods for real DNA samples based on it. PMID:27687498

  10. Theory for the force-stretched double-stranded chain molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Dai, Luru; Ou-Yang, Zhong-can

    2003-10-01

    We modify and extend the recently developed statistical mechanical theory of chain molecules having noncovalent double-stranded conformations, as in RNA or single-stranded DNA, and β sheets in protein, to the force-stretched case as in a typical single-molecule experiment. The conformations of double-stranded regions of the molecules are calculated based on polymer graph-theoretic approach [S.-J. Chen and K. A. Dill, J. Chem. Phys. 109, 4602 (1998)], while the unpaired single-stranded regions are treated as self-avoiding walks. Two classes of conformations—the hairpin conformations and RNA secondary structures—are explored. For the hairpin conformations, all possible end-to-end distances corresponding to the different types of double-stranded regions are enumerated exactly. For the RNA secondary structures, a recursive formula incorporating the secondary structure and end-to-end distribution has been derived. The sequence dependence and excluded volume interaction are taken into account explicitly. Using the extended theory, we investigate the extension-force and force-extension curves, distribution of the extensions at fixed forces, and reentering phenomenon, respectively. We find that the mechanical behaviors of homogeneous chains of hairpin conformations and secondary structures are quite different: the unfolding of the hairpin case is two state, while the unfolding of the latter is one state. In addition, a reentering transition is observed in hairpin conformations.

  11. Ribonuclease III mechanisms of double-stranded RNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Allen W

    2014-01-01

    Double-stranded(ds) RNA has diverse roles in gene expression and regulation, host defense, and genome surveillance in bacterial and eukaryotic cells. A central aspect of dsRNA function is its selective recognition and cleavage by members of the ribonuclease III (RNase III) family of divalent-metal-ion-dependent phosphodiesterases. The processing of dsRNA by RNase III family members is an essential step in the maturation and decay of coding and noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs and siRNAs. RNase III, as first purified from Escherichia coli, has served as a biochemically well-characterized prototype, and other bacterial orthologs provided the first structural information. RNase III family members share a unique fold (RNase III domain) that can dimerize to form a structure that binds dsRNA and cleaves phosphodiesters on each strand, providing the characteristic 2 nt, 3'-overhang product ends. Ongoing studies are uncovering the functions of additional domains, including, inter alia, the dsRNA-binding and PAZ domains that cooperate with the RNase III domain to select target sites, regulate activity, confer processivity, and support the recognition of structurally diverse substrates. RNase III enzymes function in multicomponent assemblies that are regulated by diverse inputs, and at least one RNase III-related polypeptide can function as a noncatalytic, dsRNA-binding protein. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the mechanisms of catalysis and target site selection of RNase III family members, and also addresses less well understood aspects of these enzymes and their interactions with dsRNA. © 2013 The Authors. WIREs RNA published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Chromatin remodeling in DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yunhe; Shen, Xuetong

    2007-04-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes use ATP hydrolysis to remodel nucleosomes and have well-established functions in transcription. However, emerging lines of evidence suggest that chromatin remodeling complexes are important players in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair as well. The INO80 and SWI2 subfamilies of chromatin remodeling complexes have been found to be recruited to the double-strand lesions and to function directly in both homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining, the two major conserved DSB repair pathways. Improperly repaired DSBs are implicated in cancer development in higher organisms. Understanding how chromatin remodeling complexes contribute to DSB repair should provide new insights into the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and might suggest new targets for cancer treatment.

  13. Double-Stranded Water on Stepped Platinum Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Manuel J.; Farber, Rachael G.; Derouin, Jonathan; Badan, Cansin; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Juurlink, Ludo B. F.; Killelea, Daniel R.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-04-01

    The interaction of platinum with water plays a key role in (electro)catalysis. Herein, we describe a combined theoretical and experimental study that resolves the preferred adsorption structure of water wetting the Pt(111)-step type with adjacent (111) terraces. Double stranded lines wet the step edge forming water tetragons with dissimilar hydrogen bonds within and between the lines. Our results qualitatively explain experimental observations of water desorption and impact our thinking of solvation at the Pt electrochemical interface.

  14. Radiation Induced DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Kuefner, M A; Brand, M; Engert, C; Schwab, S A; Uder, M

    2015-10-01

    Shortly after the discovery of X-rays, their damaging effect on biological tissues was observed. The determination of radiation exposure in diagnostic and interventional radiology is usually based on physical measurements or mathematical algorithms with standardized dose simulations. γ-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy is a reliable and sensitive method for the quantification of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in blood lymphocytes. The detectable amount of these DNA damages correlates well with the dose received. However, the biological radiation damage depends not only on dose but also on other individual factors like radiation sensitivity and DNA repair capacity. Iodinated contrast agents can enhance the x-ray induced DNA damage level. After their induction DSB are quickly repaired. A protective effect of antioxidants has been postulated in experimental studies. This review explains the prinicple of the γ-H2AX technique and provides an overview on studies evaluating DSB in radiologic examinations. Radiologic examinations including CT and angiography induce DNA double-strand breaks. Even after mammography a slight but significant increase is detectable in peripheral blood lymphocytes. The number of radiation induced double-strand breaks correlates well with the radiation dose. Individual factors including radiation sensitivity, DNA repair capacity and the application of iodinated contrast media has an influence on the DNA damage level. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Multistrain Probiotic Modulation of Intestinal Epithelial Cells' Immune Response to a Double-Stranded RNA Ligand, Poly(I·C)

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, Chad; Audy, Julie; Mathieu, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    A commercially available product containing three probiotic bacterial strains (Lactobacillus helveticus R0052, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis R0033, and Bifidobacterium bifidum R0071) was previously shown in animal trials to modulate both TH1 and TH2 immune responses. Clinical studies on this combination of bacteria have also shown positive health effects against seasonal winter diseases and rotavirus infection. The goal of this study was to use a well-established in vitro intestinal epithelial (HT-29) cell model that has been shown to constitutively express double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) sensors (Toll-like receptor 3 [TLR3], retinoic acid-inducible gene I, melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5, and dsRNA-activated protein kinase). By using the HT-29 cell model, we wanted to evaluate whether or not this combination of three bacteria had the capacity to immune modulate the host cell response to a dsRNA ligand, poly(I·C). Using a custom-designed, two-color expression microarray targeting genes of the human immune system, we investigated the response of HT-29 cells challenged with poly(I·C) both in the presence and in the absence of the three probiotic bacteria. We observed that the combination of the three bacteria had a major impact on attenuating the expression of genes connected to proinflammatory TH1 and antiviral innate immune responses compared to that obtained by the poly(I·C)-only challenge. Major pathways through which the multistrain combination may be eliciting its immune-modulatory effect include the TLR3 domain-containing adapter-inducing beta interferon (TRIF), mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-κB signaling pathways. Such a model may be useful for selecting potential biomarkers for the design of future clinical trials. PMID:24375132

  16. Mammalian Ino80 mediates double-strand break repair through its role in DNA end strand resection.

    PubMed

    Gospodinov, Anastas; Vaissiere, Thomas; Krastev, Dragomir B; Legube, Gaëlle; Anachkova, Boyka; Herceg, Zdenko

    2011-12-01

    Chromatin modifications/remodeling are important mechanisms by which cells regulate various functions through providing accessibility to chromatin DNA. Recent studies implicated INO80, a conserved chromatin-remodeling complex, in the process of DNA repair. However, the precise underlying mechanism by which this complex mediates repair in mammalian cells remains enigmatic. Here, we studied the effect of silencing of the Ino80 subunit of the complex on double-strand break repair in mammalian cells. Comet assay and homologous recombination repair reporter system analyses indicated that Ino80 is required for efficient double-strand break repair. Ino80 association with chromatin surrounding double-strand breaks suggested the direct involvement of INO80 in the repair process. Ino80 depletion impaired focal recruitment of 53BP1 but did not impede Rad51 focus formation, suggesting that Ino80 is required for the early steps of repair. Further analysis by using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled single-stranded DNA and replication protein A (RPA) immunofluorescent staining showed that INO80 mediates 5'-3' resection of double-strand break ends.

  17. Staufen Negatively Modulates MicroRNA Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhiji; Veksler-Lublinsky, Isana; Morrissey, David; Ambros, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA-binding protein Staufen has been implicated in various posttranscriptional gene regulatory processes. Here, we demonstrate that the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Staufen, STAU-1, functionally interacts with microRNAs. Loss-of-function mutations of stau-1 significantly suppress phenotypes of let-7 family microRNA mutants, a hypomorphic allele of dicer, and a lsy-6 microRNA partial loss-of-function mutant. Furthermore, STAU-1 modulates the activity of lin-14, a target of lin-4 and let-7 family microRNAs, and this modulation is abolished when the 3′ untranslated region of lin-14 is removed. Deep sequencing of small RNA cDNA libraries reveals no dramatic change in the levels of microRNAs or other small RNA populations between wild-type and stau-1 mutants, with the exception of certain endogenous siRNAs in the WAGO pathway. The modulation of microRNA activity by STAU-1 does not seem to be associated with the previously reported enhanced exogenous RNAi (Eri) phenotype of stau-1 mutants, since eri-1 exhibits the opposite effect on microRNA activity. Altogether, our results suggest that STAU-1 negatively modulates microRNA activity downstream of microRNA biogenesis, possibly by competing with microRNAs for binding on the 3′ untranslated region of target mRNAs. PMID:26921297

  18. A critical role for topoisomerase IIb and DNA double strand breaks in transcription

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Stuart K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies have indicated a novel role for topoisomerase IIb in transcription. Transcription of heat shock genes, serum-induced immediate early genes and nuclear receptor-activated genes, each required DNA double strands generated by topoisomerase IIb. Such strand breaks seemed both necessary and sufficient for transcriptional activation. In addition, such transcription was associated with initiation of the DNA damage response pathways, including the activation of the enzymes: ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), DNA-dependent protein kinase and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase 1. DNA damage response signaling was involved both in transcription and in repair of DNA breaks generated by topoisomerase IIb. PMID:27100743

  19. Bleomycin-induced double-strand breaks in mitochondrial DNA of Drosophila cells are repaired.

    PubMed

    Morel, Frederic; Renoux, Monique; Lachaume, Philippe; Alziari, Serge

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA lesions cause numerous human diseases, and it is therefore important to identify the mechanisms whereby the mitochondrion repairs the damage. We have studied in cultured Drosophila cells the repair of bleomycin-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mitochondrial DNA. Our results show that DSBs are repaired as rapidly and effectively in the mitochondria as in the nucleus. DNA repair is complete within 2h following bleomycin treatment, showing that Drosophila mitochondria have an effective system of DSB repair. The mechanism and mitochondrial proteins involved remain to be identified.

  20. RecG Directs DNA Synthesis during Double-Strand Break Repair.

    PubMed

    Azeroglu, Benura; Mawer, Julia S P; Cockram, Charlotte A; White, Martin A; Hasan, A M Mahedi; Filatenkova, Milana; Leach, David R F

    2016-02-01

    Homologous recombination provides a mechanism of DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) that requires an intact, homologous template for DNA synthesis. When DNA synthesis associated with DSBR is convergent, the broken DNA strands are replaced and repair is accurate. However, if divergent DNA synthesis is established, over-replication of flanking DNA may occur with deleterious consequences. The RecG protein of Escherichia coli is a helicase and translocase that can re-model 3-way and 4-way DNA structures such as replication forks and Holliday junctions. However, the primary role of RecG in live cells has remained elusive. Here we show that, in the absence of RecG, attempted DSBR is accompanied by divergent DNA replication at the site of an induced chromosomal DNA double-strand break. Furthermore, DNA double-stand ends are generated in a recG mutant at sites known to block replication forks. These double-strand ends, also trigger DSBR and the divergent DNA replication characteristic of this mutant, which can explain over-replication of the terminus region of the chromosome. The loss of DNA associated with unwinding joint molecules previously observed in the absence of RuvAB and RecG, is suppressed by a helicase deficient PriA mutation (priA300), arguing that the action of RecG ensures that PriA is bound correctly on D-loops to direct DNA replication rather than to unwind joint molecules. This has led us to put forward a revised model of homologous recombination in which the re-modelling of branched intermediates by RecG plays a fundamental role in directing DNA synthesis and thus maintaining genomic stability.

  1. Smoking during pregnancy causes double-strand DNA break damage to the placenta.

    PubMed

    Slatter, Tania L; Park, Lydia; Anderson, Karyn; Lailai-Tasmania, Viwa; Herbison, Peter; Clow, William; Royds, Janice A; Devenish, Celia; Hung, Noelyn A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the adverse effects of smoking, many pregnancies are exposed to tobacco smoke. Recent studies have investigated whether smoking damages placental DNA by measuring DNA adducts. This study investigated whether a more severe lesion, double-strand DNA breaks, was also present in the tobacco smoking-exposed placenta. Term placentae from women who smoked during their entire pregnancies (n = 52), from those who had ceased smoking for at least 4 weeks before delivery (previous smokers, n = 34), and from nonsmoking women (n = 150) were examined using the DNA double-strand break marker phosphorylated γ H2AX. The extent of DNA damage was assessed according to cell type and additional markers were applied for cell fate (apoptosis and DNA repair), and function (human chorionic gonadotropin, human placental lactogen, and glucose transporter 1), to characterize the effect of the DNA damage on placental integrity. Marked phosphorylated γ H2AX-positive cells occurred in the villous syncytiotrophoblast and syncytial knot nuclei in placentae from smokers (P < .001). Phosphorylated γ H2AX foci did not colocalize with the DNA repair protein 53BP1, and damaged nuclei had a marked reduction in expression of human chorionic gonadotropin, human placental lactogen, and glucose transporter 1. Minimal DNA damage, similar to nonsmokers, was present in previous smokers including those that had ceased smoking for just over 4 weeks before delivery. In summary, smoking during pregnancy was associated with marked double-strand DNA break damage to the syncytiotrophoblast. We suggest that smoking cessation is important to prevent additional DNA damage and to facilitate DNA repair.

  2. Processing of 3'-Phosphoglycolate-Terminated DNA Double-StrandBreaks by Artemis Nuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Povrik, Lawrence F.; Zhou, Tong; Zhou, Ruizhe; Cowan, Morton J.; Yannone, Steven M.

    2005-10-01

    The Artemis nuclease is required for V(D)J recombination and for repair of an as yet undefined subset of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. To assess the possibility that Artemis functions on oxidatively modified double-strand break termini, its activity toward model DNA substrates, bearing either 3{prime}-hydroxyl or 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate moieties, was examined. A 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate had little effect on Artemis-mediated trimming of long 3{prime} overhangs (>9 nucleotides), which were efficiently trimmed to 4-5 nucleotides. However, 3{prime}-phosphoglycolates on overhangs of 4-5 bases promoted selective Artemis-mediated trimming of a single 3{prime}-terminal nucleotide, while at least 2 nucleotides were trimmed from identical hydroxyl-terminated substrates. Artemis also efficiently removed a single nucleotide from a phosphoglycolate-terminated 3-base 3{prime} overhang, while leaving an analogous hydroxyl-terminated overhang largely intact. Such removal was dependent upon Ku, DNA-dependent protein kinase, and ATP. Together, these data suggest that Artemis-mediated cleavage of 3{prime} overhangs requires a minimum of 2 nucleotides, or a nucleotide plus a phosphoglycolate, 3{prime} to the cleavage site. Shorter 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate-terminated overhangs and blunt ends were also processed by Artemis, but much less efficiently. Consistent with the in vitro substrate specificity of Artemis, human cells lacking Artemis exhibited hypersensitivity to X-rays, bleomycin and neocarzinostatin, which all induce 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate-terminated double-strand breaks. Collectively, these results suggest that 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate termini and/or specific classes of DNA ends that arise from such blocked termini are relevant Artemis substrates in vivo.

  3. Electrodeless dielectrophoresis of single- and double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Fu; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O; Bakajin, Olgica; Chan, Shirley S; Cox, Edward C; Darnton, Nicholas; Duke, Thomas; Austin, Robert H

    2002-01-01

    Dielectrophoretic trapping of molecules is typically carried out using metal electrodes to provide high field gradients. In this paper we demonstrate dielectrophoretic trapping using insulating constrictions at far lower frequencies than are feasible with metallic trapping structures because of water electrolysis. We demonstrate that electrodeless dielectrophoresis (EDEP) can be used for concentration and patterning of both single-strand and double-strand DNA. A possible mechanism for DNA polarization in ionic solution is discussed based on the frequency, viscosity, and field dependence of the observed trapping force. PMID:12324434

  4. Herpetic keratoconjunctivitis: Therapy with synthetic double-stranded RNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Evans, C.; Meighan, C.W.; Foote, L.J.; Aiello, P.V.; Park, J.H.; Baron, S.

    1968-01-01

    A study was undertaken in rabbits to determine how late in the course of keratoconjunctivitis caused by herpes simplex recovery could be effected by an inducer of interferon. Interferon was induced by means of synthetic double-stranded RNA copolymer formed with polynosinic acid : polycytidilic acid RNA. Therapy promotes recovery from severe and fully established keratoconjunctivitis for which treatment was begun as late as 3 days after virus inoculation. No drug toxicity was observed in the therapeutic dose range. These findings further support the proposed role of the interferon mechanism in the natural recovery of already established viral infection. They also suggest the usefulness of interferon inducers in viral infections of man.

  5. Chromatin organization and dynamics in double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Seeber, Andrew; Gasser, Susan M

    2016-10-31

    Chromatin is organized and segmented into a landscape of domains that serve multiple purposes. In contrast to transcription, which is controlled by defined sequences at distinct sites, DNA damage can occur anywhere. Repair accordingly must occur everywhere, yet it is inevitably affected by its chromatin environment. In this review, we summarize recent work investigating how changes in chromatin organization facilitate and/or guide DNA double-strand break repair. In addition, we examine new live cell studies on the dynamics of chromatin and the mechanisms that regulate its movement.

  6. Nucleosome remodelers in double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Seeber, Andrew; Hauer, Michael; Gasser, Susan M

    2013-04-01

    ATP-dependent nucleosome remodelers use ATP hydrolysis to shift, evict and exchange histone dimers or octamers and have well-established roles in transcription. Earlier work has suggested a role for nucleosome remodelers such as INO80 in double-strand break (DSB) repair. This review will begin with an update on recent studies that explore how remodelers are recruited to DSBs. We then examine their impact on various steps of repair, focusing on resection and the formation of the Rad51-ssDNA nucleofilament. Finally, we will explore new studies that implicate remodelers in the physical movement of chromatin in response to damage.

  7. Adenosine triphosphatases of thermophilic archaeal double-stranded DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) of double-stranded (ds) DNA archaeal viruses are structurally related to the AAA+ hexameric helicases and translocases. These ATPases have been implicated in viral life cycle functions such as DNA entry into the host, and viral genome packaging into preformed procapsids. We summarize bioinformatical analyses of a wide range of archaeal ATPases, and review the biochemical and structural properties of those archaeal ATPases that have measurable ATPase activity. We discuss their potential roles in genome delivery into the host, virus assembly and genome packaging in comparison to hexameric helicases and packaging motors from bacteriophages. PMID:25105011

  8. Ultrastructural evidence for intramolecular double stranding in iota-carrageenan.

    PubMed

    Abeysekera, R M; Bergström, E T; Goodall, D M; Norton, I T; Robards, A W

    1993-10-04

    Kinetic studies of primary processes of conformational ordering in gel-forming biopolymers have suggested that a change in mechanism from intermolecular to intramolecular multistrand formation occurs on lowering the concentration of biopolymer. We report here ultrastructural observations consistent with intramolecular double stranding in a carbohydrate polymer, iota-carrageenan, by arresting this process of primary conformational ordering by an ultra-rapid freeze fixation technique. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed isolated iota-carrageenan chains showing a range of morphologies (linear, circular, and hairpin) consistent with intramolecular stranding. Control experiments in which iota-carrageenan was frozen in the disordered form revealed longer and thinner strands.

  9. RecBCD Enzyme and the Repair of Double-Stranded DNA Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Dillingham, Mark S.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The RecBCD enzyme of Escherichia coli is a helicase-nuclease that initiates the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks by homologous recombination. It also degrades linear double-stranded DNA, protecting the bacteria from phages and extraneous chromosomal DNA. The RecBCD enzyme is, however, regulated by a cis-acting DNA sequence known as Chi (crossover hotspot instigator) that activates its recombination-promoting functions. Interaction with Chi causes an attenuation of the RecBCD enzyme's vigorous nuclease activity, switches the polarity of the attenuated nuclease activity to the 5′ strand, changes the operation of its motor subunits, and instructs the enzyme to begin loading the RecA protein onto the resultant Chi-containing single-stranded DNA. This enzyme is a prototypical example of a molecular machine: the protein architecture incorporates several autonomous functional domains that interact with each other to produce a complex, sequence-regulated, DNA-processing machine. In this review, we discuss the biochemical mechanism of the RecBCD enzyme with particular emphasis on new developments relating to the enzyme's structure and DNA translocation mechanism. PMID:19052323

  10. Evidence that the Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein, an early sensor of double-strand DNA breaks (DSB), is involved in HIV-1 post-integration repair by recruiting the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated kinase in a process similar to, but distinct from, cellular DSB repair.

    PubMed

    Smith, Johanna A; Wang, Feng-Xiang; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Kou-Juey; Williams, Kevin Jon; Daniel, René

    2008-01-22

    Retroviral transduction involves integrase-dependent linkage of viral and host DNA that leaves an intermediate that requires post-integration repair (PIR). We and others proposed that PIR hijacks the host cell double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair pathways. Nevertheless, the geometry of retroviral DNA integration differs considerably from that of DSB repair and so the precise role of host-cell mechanisms in PIR remains unclear. In the current study, we found that the Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 protein (NBS1), an early sensor of DSBs, associates with HIV-1 DNA, recruits the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, promotes stable retroviral transduction, mediates efficient integration of viral DNA and blocks integrase-dependent apoptosis that can arise from unrepaired viral-host DNA linkages. Moreover, we demonstrate that the ATM kinase, recruited by NBS1, is itself required for efficient retroviral transduction. Surprisingly, recruitment of the ATR kinase, which in the context of DSB requires both NBS1 and ATM, proceeds independently of these two proteins. A model is proposed emphasizing similarities and differences between PIR and DSB repair. Differences between the pathways may eventually allow strategies to block PIR while still allowing DSB repair.

  11. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  12. Conformations of double stranded DNA: the effect of breathing bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Aiqun; Bhattacharya, Aniket

    2015-03-01

    A double stranded DNA (dsDNA) is a natural semi-flexible biopolymer with persistence length ~ 50 nm, while a single stranded (ss) DNA is very flexible whose persistence length is one order of magnitude smaller (3-5 nm). Depending on the temperature and sequence, the two strands in a dsDNA can locally denature into two single strands and form bubbles along the polymer chain, i.e. dsDNA exists in the form of a combination of double strands and single strands, exhibiting a heterogeneity of bending rigidity. In our study, we adopt a coarse grained model of dsDNA developed by Kim et al. [J. Y. Kim, J. H. Jeon, and W. Sung, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 055101 2008] and further improve it by incorporating excluded volume effect and sequence heterogeneity. In this model, a dsDNA is described as two semi-flexible chains paired with each other by hydrogen bonding, the stacking interaction is designed such that the persistence length of the paired chains interpolates 3 nm and 50 nm depending on the fraction of the melted base pairs. By performing Langevin dynamics simulation we study the bubble statistics as a function of temperature and sequence and how the bubbles affect local bending rigidity and the chain conformations. We compare our results with those from WLC model.

  13. Identification and Characterization of a Human DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.; Cary, R.B.

    1999-07-12

    The authors have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize the assembly and structure of the macromolecular assemblies involved in DNA repair. They have demonstrated using AFM that the DNA-dependent protein kinase can play a structural role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by physically holding DNA ends together. They have extended these studies to include other DNA damage response proteins, these efforts have resulted in important and novel findings regarding the ATM protein. Specifically, the work has demonstrated, for the first time, that the ATM protein binds with specificity to a DNA end. This finding is the first to implicate the ATM protein in the detection of DNA damage by direct physical interaction with DSBs.

  14. Long noncoding RNA LINP1 regulates double strand DNA break repair in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youyou; He, Qun; Hu, Zhongyi; Feng, Yi; Fan, Lingling; Tang, Zhaoqing; Yuan, Jiao; Shan, Weiwei; Li, Chunsheng; Hu, Xiaowen; Tanyi, Janos L; Fan, Yi; Huang, Qihong; Montone, Kathleen; Dang, Chi V; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are transcripts that are larger than 200 nucleotides but do not appear to have protein-coding potential, play critical roles during tumorigenesis by functioning as scaffolds to regulate protein-protein, protein-DNA or protein-RNA interactions. Using a clinically guided genetic screening approach, we identified (lncRNA in Non-homologous end joining [NHEJ] pathway 1) as a lncRNA that is overexpressed in human triple-negative breast cancer. We found that LINP1 enhances double-strand DNA break repair by serving as a scaffold that links Ku80 and DNA-PKcs, thereby coordinating the NHEJ pathway. Importantly, blocking LINP1, which is regulated by the p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, increases sensitivity of tumor cell response to radiotherapy in breast cancer. PMID:27111890

  15. Nucleotide sequence of the large double-stranded RNA segment of bacteriophage phi 6: genes specifying the viral replicase and transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Mindich, L; Nemhauser, I; Gottlieb, P; Romantschuk, M; Carton, J; Frucht, S; Strassman, J; Bamford, D H; Kalkkinen, N

    1988-01-01

    The genome of the lipid-containing bacteriophage phi 6 contains three segments of double-stranded RNA. We determined the nucleotide sequence of cDNA derived from the largest RNA segment (L). This segment specifies the procapsid proteins necessary for transcription and replication of the phi 6 genome. The coding sequences of the four proteins on this segment were identified on the basis of size and the correlation of predicted N-terminal amino acid sequences with those found through analysis of isolated proteins. This report completes the sequence analysis of phi 6. This constitutes the first complete sequence of a double-stranded RNA genome virus. PMID:3346944

  16. Origin of the catalytic activity of bovine seminal ribonuclease against double-stranded RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opitz, J. G.; Ciglic, M. I.; Haugg, M.; Trautwein-Fritz, K.; Raillard, S. A.; Jermann, T. M.; Benner, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    Bovine seminal ribonuclease (RNase) binds, melts, and (in the case of RNA) catalyzes the hydrolysis of double-stranded nucleic acid 30-fold better under physiological conditions than its pancreatic homologue, the well-known RNase A. Reported here are site-directed mutagenesis experiments that identify the sequence determinants of this enhanced catalytic activity. These experiments have been guided in part by experimental reconstructions of ancestral RNases from extinct organisms that were intermediates in the evolution of the RNase superfamily. It is shown that the enhanced interactions between bovine seminal RNase and double-stranded nucleic acid do not arise from the increased number of basic residues carried by the seminal enzyme. Rather, a combination of a dimeric structure and the introduction of two glycine residues at positions 38 and 111 on the periphery of the active site confers the full catalytic activity of bovine seminal RNase against duplex RNA. A structural model is presented to explain these data, the use of evolutionary reconstructions to guide protein engineering experiments is discussed, and a new variant of RNase A, A(Q28L K31C S32C D38G E111G), which contains all of the elements identified in these experiments as being important for duplex activity, is prepared. This is the most powerful catalyst within this subfamily yet observed, some 46-fold more active against duplex RNA than RNase A.

  17. Splicing controls the ubiquitin response during DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Pederiva, C; Böhm, S; Julner, A; Farnebo, M

    2016-01-01

    Although evidence that splicing regulates DNA repair is accumulating, the underlying mechanism(s) remain unclear. Here, we report that short-term inhibition of pre-mRNA splicing by spliceosomal inhibitors impairs cellular repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Indeed, interference with splicing as little as 1 h prior to irradiation reduced ubiquitylation of damaged chromatin and impaired recruitment of the repair factors WRAP53β, RNF168, 53BP1, BRCA1 and RAD51 to sites of DNA damage. Consequently, splicing-deficient cells exhibited significant numbers of residual γH2AX foci, as would be expected if DNA repair is defective. Furthermore, we show that this is due to downregulation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF8 and that re-introduction of this protein into splicing-deficient cells restores ubiquitylation at sites of DNA damage, accumulation of downstream factors and subsequent repair. Moreover, downregulation of RNF8 explains the defective repair associated with knockdown of various splicing factors in recent genome-wide siRNA screens and, significantly, overexpression of RNF8 counteracts this defect. These discoveries reveal a mechanism that may not only explain how splicing regulates repair of double-strand breaks, but also may underlie various diseases caused by deregulation of splicing factors, including cancer. PMID:27315300

  18. Origin of the catalytic activity of bovine seminal ribonuclease against double-stranded RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opitz, J. G.; Ciglic, M. I.; Haugg, M.; Trautwein-Fritz, K.; Raillard, S. A.; Jermann, T. M.; Benner, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    Bovine seminal ribonuclease (RNase) binds, melts, and (in the case of RNA) catalyzes the hydrolysis of double-stranded nucleic acid 30-fold better under physiological conditions than its pancreatic homologue, the well-known RNase A. Reported here are site-directed mutagenesis experiments that identify the sequence determinants of this enhanced catalytic activity. These experiments have been guided in part by experimental reconstructions of ancestral RNases from extinct organisms that were intermediates in the evolution of the RNase superfamily. It is shown that the enhanced interactions between bovine seminal RNase and double-stranded nucleic acid do not arise from the increased number of basic residues carried by the seminal enzyme. Rather, a combination of a dimeric structure and the introduction of two glycine residues at positions 38 and 111 on the periphery of the active site confers the full catalytic activity of bovine seminal RNase against duplex RNA. A structural model is presented to explain these data, the use of evolutionary reconstructions to guide protein engineering experiments is discussed, and a new variant of RNase A, A(Q28L K31C S32C D38G E111G), which contains all of the elements identified in these experiments as being important for duplex activity, is prepared. This is the most powerful catalyst within this subfamily yet observed, some 46-fold more active against duplex RNA than RNase A.

  19. The effects of metal ion contaminants on the double stranded DNA helix and diseases.

    PubMed

    Theophanides, T; Anastassopoulou, J

    2017-08-24

    Mineral metal ions are essential for the maintenance of the reactions that regulate homeostasis and the functions of our body. It is known that the regulation of the neurodegenerative system depends directly on life metal ions, such as Na, K, Mg, Ca, Fe, Mo, Cu, Co, Zn, Cr, Mn, while the toxic metals Cd, Pb, Hg, etc disturb homeostasis, leading to diseases. Particularly significant is the effect of toxic metals on the double stranded forms of DNA and conformations. It was found that the toxic metal ions by reacting specifically with the nucleic bases and electrostatically with the negatively phosphate groups of the DNA backbone cause changes in the structure of the DNA double helix, leading to breaks of single or double strands. Accumulation of these defects affects the protecting systems of the body and induces mutations, eventually leading to serious diseases. There are many metal ions, such as Cr, Al, Cd, Cu, Ni, which by binding directly to DNA molecule or by developing oxidative stress increase the instability of DNA, promoting epigenetic changes that lead to DNA damage. Toxic metal ions induce indirect DNA damage and influence the gene stability by inactivating encoding proteins or by changing the redox potential and the signaling of metalloenzymes.

  20. Contribution of double strand break repair gene XRCC3 genotypes to nasopharyngeal carcinoma risk in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Hsu, Chin-Mu; Chang, Wen-Shin; Li, Chi-Yuan; Liu, Shih-Ping; Shen, Wu-Chung; Bau, Da-Tian

    2015-02-28

    The DNA double strand break repair protein XRCC3 plays a central role in removing double strand breaks from the genome and defects in cellular repair capacity is closely related to human cancer initiation. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the contribution of XRCC3 genotypes to individual nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) susceptibility. In this hospital-based population research, the genotyping and analyzing of XRCC3 rs1799794, rs45603942, rs861530, rs3212057, rs1799796, rs861539, rs28903081 in a large Taiwanese population was performed. Totally, 176 NPC patients and 880 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were genotyped and analyzed by PCR-RFLP method. The results showed that there was a differential distribution among NPC and control subjects in the genotypic (P = 0.000488) and allelic (P = 0.0002) frequencies of XRCC3 rs861539. As for the gene-environment interaction, we have firstly provided evidence showing that there is an obvious joint effect of XRCC3 rs861539 CT and TT genotypes with individual smoking habits on increased NPC risk. In conclusion, the T allele of XRCC3 rs861539, interacts with smoking habit in increasing NPC risk, may be an early detection marker for NPC.

  1. Base specific binding of deoxyguanylate and deoxycytidylate antibodies to double stranded DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, A; Jacob, T M

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies raised in rabbits against deoxyguanylate and deoxycytidylate bind to 3H-lambda double stranded DNA and the binding is base specific. The concentrations of antibody populations that bind to double stranded DNA are much less than those binding to denatured DNA. Due to their low concentrations, these antibodies were not detected in earlier studies. These antibodies are expected to be useful to probe the conformational flexibilities of double stranded DNAs. PMID:6217448

  2. Neddylation inhibits CtIP-mediated resection and regulates DNA double strand break repair pathway choice.

    PubMed

    Jimeno, Sonia; Fernández-Ávila, María Jesús; Cruz-García, Andrés; Cepeda-García, Cristina; Gómez-Cabello, Daniel; Huertas, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks are the most cytotoxic lesions that can occur on the DNA. They can be repaired by different mechanisms and optimal survival requires a tight control between them. Here we uncover protein deneddylation as a major controller of repair pathway choice. Neddylation inhibition changes the normal repair profile toward an increase on homologous recombination. Indeed, RNF111/UBE2M-mediated neddylation acts as an inhibitor of BRCA1 and CtIP-mediated DNA end resection, a key process in repair pathway choice. By controlling the length of ssDNA produced during DNA resection, protein neddylation not only affects the choice between NHEJ and homologous recombination but also controls the balance between different recombination subpathways. Thus, protein neddylation status has a great impact in the way cells respond to DNA breaks.

  3. BMI1-mediated histone ubiquitylation promotes DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Ismail Hassan; Andrin, Christi; McDonald, Darin

    2010-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are major determinants of cell identity, stem cell pluripotency, and epigenetic gene silencing during development. The polycomb repressive complex 1, which contains BMI1, RING1, and RING2, functions as an E3-ubuiquitin ligase. We found that BMI1 and RING2 are recruited to sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) where they contribute to the ubiquitylation of γ-H2AX. In the absence of BMI1, several proteins dependent on ubiquitin signaling, including 53BP1, BRCA1, and RAP80, are impaired in recruitment to DSBs. Loss of BMI1 sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation to the same extent as loss of RNF8. The simultaneous depletion of both proteins revealed an additive increase in radiation sensitivity. These data uncover an unexpected link between the polycomb and the DNA damage response pathways, and suggest a novel function for BMI1 in maintaining genomic stability. PMID:20921134

  4. Neddylation inhibits CtIP-mediated resection and regulates DNA double strand break repair pathway choice

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno, Sonia; Fernández-Ávila, María Jesús; Cruz-García, Andrés; Cepeda-García, Cristina; Gómez-Cabello, Daniel; Huertas, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks are the most cytotoxic lesions that can occur on the DNA. They can be repaired by different mechanisms and optimal survival requires a tight control between them. Here we uncover protein deneddylation as a major controller of repair pathway choice. Neddylation inhibition changes the normal repair profile toward an increase on homologous recombination. Indeed, RNF111/UBE2M-mediated neddylation acts as an inhibitor of BRCA1 and CtIP-mediated DNA end resection, a key process in repair pathway choice. By controlling the length of ssDNA produced during DNA resection, protein neddylation not only affects the choice between NHEJ and homologous recombination but also controls the balance between different recombination subpathways. Thus, protein neddylation status has a great impact in the way cells respond to DNA breaks. PMID:25567988

  5. Roles of chromatin remodellers in DNA double strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Jeggo, Penny A; Downs, Jessica A

    2014-11-15

    Now that we have a good understanding of the DNA double strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms and DSB-induced damage signalling, attention is focusing on the changes to the chromatin environment needed for efficient DSB repair. Mutations in chromatin remodelling complexes have been identified in cancers, making it important to evaluate how they impact upon genomic stability. Our current understanding of the DSB repair pathways suggests that each one has distinct requirements for chromatin remodelling. Moreover, restricting the extent of chromatin modifications could be a significant factor regulating the decision of pathway usage. In this review, we evaluate the distinct DSB repair pathways for their potential need for chromatin remodelling and review the roles of ATP-driven chromatin remodellers in the pathways.

  6. DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice and cancer.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Tomas; Baer, Richard; Gautier, Jean

    2014-07-01

    Since DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) contribute to the genomic instability that drives cancer development, DSB repair pathways serve as important mechanisms for tumor suppression. Thus, genetic lesions, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, that disrupt DSB repair are often associated with cancer susceptibility. In addition, recent evidence suggests that DSB "mis-repair", in which DSBs are resolved by an inappropriate repair pathway, can also promote genomic instability and presumably tumorigenesis. This notion has gained currency from recent cancer genome sequencing studies which have uncovered numerous chromosomal rearrangements harboring pathological DNA repair signatures. In this perspective, we discuss the factors that regulate DSB repair pathway choice and their consequences for genome stability and cancer.

  7. Melting of DNA double strand after binding to geroprotective tetrapeptide.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Solovyov, A Yu; Shataeva, L K

    2008-11-01

    Experimental relationship between the hyperchromic effect of DNA [poly(dA-dT):poly(dA-dT)] interacting with Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly peptide is presented by a saturation isotherm. The free DNA double strand is melting (the strands separate) at 69.5 degrees C and at higher energy expenditures (enthalpy increase by 976.4 kJ/mol b.p.) in comparison with melting of the DNA-peptide complex (28 degrees C and 444.6 kJ/mol b.p.). The detected regularities of melting of duplex DNA and the thermodynamic parameters of this process indicate the natural mechanism of interaction between DNA and regulatory peptides underlying functioning of the living matter.

  8. Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Felicity Z.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most damaging lesions in DNA, since, if not identified and repaired, they can lead to insertions, deletions or chromosomal rearrangements. DSBs can be in the form of simple or complex breaks, and may be repaired by one of a number of processes, the nature of which depends on the complexity of the break or the position of the break within the chromatin. In eukaryotic cells, nuclear DNA is maintained as either euchromatin (EC) which is loosely packed, or in a denser form, much of which is heterochromatin (HC). Due to the less accessible nature of the DNA in HC as compared to that in EC, repair of damage in HC is not as straightforward as repair in EC. Here we review the literature on how cells deal with DSBs in HC. PMID:27999260

  9. Current-voltage characteristics of double-strand DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerril, L. M.; Moreira, D. A.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; de Oliveira, E. L.; de Sousa, J. S.

    2009-09-01

    We use a tight-binding formulation to investigate the transmissivity and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of sequences of double-strand DNA molecules. In order to reveal the relevance of the underlying correlations in the nucleotides distribution, we compare the results for the genomic DNA sequence with those of artificial sequences (the long-range correlated Fibonacci and Rudin-Shapiro one) and a random sequence, which is a kind of prototype of a short-range correlated system. The random sequence is presented here with the same first neighbors pair correlations of the human DNA sequence. We found that the long-range character of the correlations is important to the transmissivity spectra, although the I-V curves seem to be mostly influenced by the short-range correlations.

  10. Electronic transport in double-strand DNA segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; Mauriz, P. W.; Moreira, D. A.

    2008-03-01

    We report in this work a numerical study of the electronic density of states in π-stacked arrays of DNA double-strand segments made up from the nucleotides guanine G, adenine A, cytosine C and thymine T. In order to reveal the relevance of the underlying correlations in the nucleotides distribution, we compare the results for a genomic DNA sequence, considering a segment of the first sequenced human chromosome 22 (Ch 22), with those of two artificial sequences forming a Rudin-Shapiro (RS) as well as a Fibonacci (FB) polyGC quasiperiodic sequences. Our theoretical method uses an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian suitable to describe the DNA segments modeled by the quasiperiodic chains.

  11. Evidence for a novel signal transduction pathway activated by platelet-derived growth factor and by double-stranded RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.J.; Jones, S.D.; Rollins, B.J.; Stiles, C.D. ); Stiles, C.D. ); Kaplan, D.R.; Whitman, M. )

    1989-04-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and the synthetic double-stranded RNA poly(I) x poly(C) (poly(I x C)) stimulate transcription of the JE gene in BALB/c-3T3 fibroblasts. The response of JE to poly(I x C) does not appear to be channeled through any known component of the PDGF receptor signal transduction apparatus. In addition, JE sequences upstream of the transcription start site are devoid of previously identified poly(I x C)-responsive elements, such as those found in the beta-interferon gene. These data suggest that a novel signal transduction pathway regulates the JE response to PDGF and double-stranded RNA. The c-myc and c-fos proto-oncogenes also respond to this pathway but with poor efficiency. However, this pathway operates very efficiently on other PDGF-inducible genes that encode the secretory proteins KC and M-CSF.

  12. Coordination and processing of DNA ends during double-strand break repair: the role of the bacteriophage T4 Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex.

    PubMed

    Almond, Joshua R; Stohr, Bradley A; Panigrahi, Anil K; Albrecht, Dustin W; Nelson, Scott W; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2013-11-01

    The in vivo functions of the bacteriophage T4 Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex (gp46/47) in double-strand-end processing, double-strand break repair, and recombination-dependent replication were investigated. The complex is essential for T4 growth, but we wanted to investigate the in vivo function during productive infections. We therefore generated a suppressed triple amber mutant in the Rad50 subunit to substantially reduce the level of complex and thereby reduce phage growth. Growth-limiting amounts of the complex caused a concordant decrease in phage genomic recombination-dependent replication. However, the efficiencies of double-strand break repair and of plasmid-based recombination-dependent replication remained relatively normal. Genetic analyses of linked markers indicated that double-strand ends were less protected from nuclease erosion in the depleted infection and also that end coordination during repair was compromised. We discuss models for why phage genomic recombination-dependent replication is more dependent on Mre11/Rad50 levels when compared to plasmid recombination-dependent replication. We also tested the importance of the conserved histidine residue in nuclease motif I of the T4 Mre11 protein. Substitution with multiple different amino acids (including serine) failed to support phage growth, completely blocked plasmid recombination-dependent replication, and led to the stabilization of double-strand ends. We also constructed and expressed an Mre11 mutant protein with the conserved histidine changed to serine. The mutant protein was found to be completely defective for nuclease activities, but retained the ability to bind the Rad50 subunit and double-stranded DNA. These results indicate that the nuclease activity of Mre11 is critical for phage growth and recombination-dependent replication during T4 infections.

  13. Visualization of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair at the Single-Molecule Level

    SciTech Connect

    Dynan, William S.; Li, Shuyi; Mernaugh, Raymond; Wragg, Stephanie; Takeda, Yoshihiko

    2003-03-27

    Exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation is universal. The signature injury from ionizing radiation exposure is induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The first line of defense against DSBs is direct ligation of broken DNA ends via the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Because even a relatively high environmental exposure induces only a few DSBs per cell, our current understanding of the response to this exposure is limited by the ability to measure DSB repair events reliably in situ at a single-molecule level. To address this need, we have taken advantage of biological amplification, measuring relocalization of proteins and detection of protein phosphorylation as a surrogate for detection of broken ends themselves. We describe the use of specific antibodies to investigate the kinetics and mechanism of repair of very small numbers of DSBs in human cells by the nonhomologous end-joining pathway.

  14. Significant correlation of species longevity with DNA double strand break recognition but not with telomere length.

    PubMed

    Lorenzini, Antonello; Johnson, F Brad; Oliver, Anthony; Tresini, Maria; Smith, Jasmine S; Hdeib, Mona; Sell, Christian; Cristofalo, Vincent J; Stamato, Thomas D

    2009-01-01

    The identification of the cellular mechanisms responsible for the wide differences in species lifespan remains one of the major unsolved problems of the biology of aging. We measured the capacity of nuclear protein to recognize DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and telomere length of skin fibroblasts derived from mammalian species that exhibit wide differences in longevity. Our results indicate DNA DSB recognition increases exponentially with longevity. Further, an analysis of the level of Ku80 protein in human, cow, and mouse suggests that Ku levels vary dramatically between species and these levels are strongly correlated with longevity. In contrast mean telomere length appears to decrease with increasing longevity of the species, although not significantly. These findings suggest that an enhanced ability to bind to DNA ends may be important for longevity. A number of possible roles for increased levels of Ku and DNA-PKcs are discussed.

  15. Processing of meiotic DNA double strand breaks requires cyclin-dependent kinase and multiple nucleases.

    PubMed

    Manfrini, Nicola; Guerini, Ilaria; Citterio, Andrea; Lucchini, Giovanna; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2010-04-09

    Meiotic recombination requires the formation of programmed Spo11-dependent DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Sae2 protein and the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex are necessary to remove the covalently attached Spo11 protein from the DNA ends, which are then resected by so far unknown nucleases. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of Sae2 Ser-267 by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) is required to initiate meiotic DSB resection by allowing Spo11 removal from DSB ends. This finding suggests that Cdk1 activity is required for the processing of Spo11-induced DSBs, thus providing a mechanism for coordinating DSB resection with progression through meiotic prophase. Furthermore, the helicase Sgs1 and the nucleases Exo1 and Dna2 participate in lengthening the 5'-3' resection tracts during meiosis by controlling a step subsequent to Spo11 removal.

  16. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa activates the DNA double-strand break signaling and repair pathway in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Elsen, Sylvie; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Gidrol, Xavier; Lemercier, Claudie

    2013-11-01

    Highly hazardous DNA double-strand breaks can be induced in eukaryotic cells by a number of agents including pathogenic bacterial strains. We have investigated the genotoxic potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen causing devastating nosocomial infections in cystic fibrosis or immunocompromised patients. Our data revealed that infection of immune or epithelial cells by P. aeruginosa triggered DNA strand breaks and phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double-strand breaks. Moreover, it induced formation of discrete nuclear repair foci similar to gamma-irradiation-induced foci, and containing γH2AX and 53BP1, an adaptor protein mediating the DNA-damage response pathway. Gene deletion, mutagenesis, and complementation in P. aeruginosa identified ExoS bacterial toxin as the major factor involved in γH2AX induction. Chemical inhibition of several kinases known to phosphorylate H2AX demonstrated that Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) was the principal kinase in P. aeruginosa-induced H2AX phosphorylation. Finally, infection led to ATM kinase activation by an auto-phosphorylation mechanism. Together, these data show for the first time that infection by P. aeruginosa activates the DNA double-strand break repair machinery of the host cells. This novel information sheds new light on the consequences of P. aeruginosa infection in mammalian cells. As pathogenic Escherichia coli or carcinogenic Helicobacter pylori can alter genome integrity through DNA double-strand breaks, leading to chromosomal instability and eventually cancer, our findings highlight possible new routes for further investigations of P. aeruginosa in cancer biology and they identify ATM as a potential target molecule for drug design.

  17. Tracking Cryptosporidium parvum by sequence analysis of small double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, L.; Limor, J.; Bern, C.; Lal, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    We sequenced a 173-nucleotide fragment of the small double-stranded viruslike RNA of Cryptosporidium parvum isolates from 23 calves and 38 humans. Sequence diversity was detected at 17 sites. Isolates from the same outbreak had identical double-stranded RNA sequences, suggesting that this technique may be useful for tracking Cryptosporidium infection sources. PMID:11266306

  18. Probing Enhanced Double-Strand Break Formation at Abasic Sites within Clustered Lesions in Nucleosome Core Particles.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samya; Chakraborty, Supratim; Jacinto, Marco Paolo; Paul, Michael D; Balster, Morgan V; Greenberg, Marc M

    2017-01-10

    DNA is rapidly cleaved under mild alkaline conditions at apyrimidinic/apurinic sites, but the half-life is several weeks in phosphate buffer (pH 7.5). However, abasic sites are ∼100-fold more reactive within nucleosome core particles (NCPs). Histone proteins catalyze the strand scission, and at superhelical location 1.5, the histone H4 tail is largely responsible for the accelerated cleavage. The rate constant for strand scission at an abasic site is enhanced further in a nucleosome core particle when it is part of a bistranded lesion containing a proximal strand break. Cleavage of this form results in a highly deleterious double-strand break. This acceleration is dependent upon the position of the abasic lesion in the NCP and its structure. The enhancement in cleavage rate at an apurinic/apyrimidinic site rapidly drops off as the distance between the strand break and abasic site increases and is negligible once the two forms of damage are separated by 7 bp. However, the enhancement of the rate of double-strand break formation increases when the size of the gap is increased from one to two nucleotides. In contrast, the cleavage rate enhancement at 2-deoxyribonolactone within bistranded lesions is more modest, and it is similar in free DNA and nucleosome core particles. We postulate that the enhanced rate of double-strand break formation at bistranded lesions containing apurinic/apyrimidinic sites within nucleosome core particles is a general phenomenon and is due to increased DNA flexibility.

  19. Restriction Endonucleases from Invasive Neisseria gonorrhoeae Cause Double-Strand Breaks and Distort Mitosis in Epithelial Cells during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Weyler, Linda; Engelbrecht, Mattias; Mata Forsberg, Manuel; Brehwens, Karl; Vare, Daniel; Vielfort, Katarina; Wojcik, Andrzej; Aro, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The host epithelium is both a barrier against, and the target for microbial infections. Maintaining regulated cell growth ensures an intact protective layer towards microbial-induced cellular damage. Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections disrupt host cell cycle regulation machinery and the infection causes DNA double strand breaks that delay progression through the G2/M phase. We show that intracellular gonococci upregulate and release restriction endonucleases that enter the nucleus and damage human chromosomal DNA. Bacterial lysates containing restriction endonucleases were able to fragment genomic DNA as detected by PFGE. Lysates were also microinjected into the cytoplasm of cells in interphase and after 20 h, DNA double strand breaks were identified by 53BP1 staining. In addition, by using live-cell microscopy and NHS-ester stained live gonococci we visualized the subcellular location of the bacteria upon mitosis. Infected cells show dysregulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint proteins MAD1 and MAD2, impaired and prolonged M-phase, nuclear swelling, micronuclei formation and chromosomal instability. These data highlight basic molecular functions of how gonococcal infections affect host cell cycle regulation, cause DNA double strand breaks and predispose cellular malignancies. PMID:25460012

  20. A link between double-strand break-related repair and V(D)J recombination: the scid mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, E.A.; Qin, X.Q.; Bump, E.A.; Schatz, D.G.; Oettinger, M.; Weaver, D.T. )

    1991-05-15

    We show here that mammalian site-specific recombination and DNA-repair pathways share a common factor. The effects of DNA-damaging agents on cell lines derived from mice homozygous for the scid (severe combined immune deficiency) mutation were studied. Surprisingly, all scid cell lines exhibited a profound hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents that caused double-strand breaks (x-irradiation and bleomycin) but not to other chemicals that caused single-strand breaks or cross-links. Neutral filter elution assays demonstrated that the x-irradiation hypersensitivity could be correlated with a deficiency in repairing double-strand breaks. These data suggest that the scid gene product is involved in two pathways: DNA repair of random double-strand breaks and the site-specific and lymphoid-restricted variable-(diversity)-joining (V(D)J) DNA rearrangement process. We propose that the scid gene product performs a similar function in both pathways and may be a ubiquitous protein.

  1. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M.; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex.Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to

  2. Coupling end resection with the checkpoint response at DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Villa, Matteo; Cassani, Corinne; Gobbini, Elisa; Bonetti, Diego; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2016-10-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are a nasty form of damage that needs to be repaired to ensure genome stability. The DSB ends can undergo a strand-biased nucleolytic processing (resection) to generate 3'-ended single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that channels DSB repair into homologous recombination. Generation of ssDNA also triggers the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint, which couples cell cycle progression with DSB repair. The checkpoint response is intimately linked to DSB resection, as some checkpoint proteins regulate the resection process. The present review will highlight recent works on the mechanism and regulation of DSB resection and its interplays with checkpoint activation/inactivation in budding yeast.

  3. Multiple Pathways of Recombination Induced by Double-Strand Breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pâques, Frédéric; Haber, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been the principal organism used in experiments to examine genetic recombination in eukaryotes. Studies over the past decade have shown that meiotic recombination and probably most mitotic recombination arise from the repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs). There are multiple pathways by which such DSBs can be repaired, including several homologous recombination pathways and still other nonhomologous mechanisms. Our understanding has also been greatly enriched by the characterization of many proteins involved in recombination and by insights that link aspects of DNA repair to chromosome replication. New molecular models of DSB-induced gene conversion are presented. This review encompasses these different aspects of DSB-induced recombination in Saccharomyces and attempts to relate genetic, molecular biological, and biochemical studies of the processes of DNA repair and recombination. PMID:10357855

  4. Subdiffusion Supports Joining Of Correct Ends During Repair Of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girst, S.; Hable, V.; Drexler, G. A.; Greubel, C.; Siebenwirth, C.; Haum, M.; Friedl, A. A.; Dollinger, G.

    2013-08-01

    The mobility of damaged chromatin regions in the nucleus may affect the probability of mis-repair. In this work, live-cell observation and distance tracking of GFP-tagged DNA damage response protein MDC1 was used to study the random-walk behaviour of chromatin domains containing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Our measurements indicate a subdiffusion-type random walk process with similar time dependence for isolated and clustered DSBs that were induced by 20 MeV proton or 43 MeV carbon ion micro-irradiation. As compared to normal diffusion, subdiffusion enhances the probability that both ends of a DSB meet, thus promoting high efficiency DNA repair. It also limits their probability of long-range movements and thus lowers the probability of mis-rejoining and chromosome aberrations.

  5. Control of Meiotic Crossovers: From Double-Strand Break Formation to Designation

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Meiosis, the mechanism of creating haploid gametes, is a complex cellular process observed across sexually reproducing organisms. Fundamental to meiosis is the process of homologous recombination, whereby DNA double-strand breaks are introduced into the genome and are subsequently repaired to generate either noncrossovers or crossovers. Although homologous recombination is essential for chromosome pairing during prophase I, the resulting crossovers are critical for maintaining homolog interactions and enabling accurate segregation at the first meiotic division. Thus, the placement, timing, and frequency of crossover formation must be exquisitely controlled. In this review, we discuss the proteins involved in crossover formation, the process of their formation and designation, and the rules governing crossovers, all within the context of the important landmarks of prophase I. We draw together crossover designation data across organisms, analyze their evolutionary divergence, and propose a universal model for crossover regulation. PMID:27648641

  6. Double-stranded DNA viruses: 20 families and only five different architectural principles for virion assembly.

    PubMed

    Krupovic, Mart; Bamford, Dennis H

    2011-08-01

    The number of viral particles in the biosphere is enormous. Virus classification helps to comprehend the virosphere and to understand the relationship between different virus groups. However, the evolutionary reach of the currently employed sequence-based approaches in virus taxonomy is rather limited, producing a fragmented view of the virosphere. As a result, viruses are currently classified into 87 different families. However, studies on virion architectures have unexpectedly revealed that their structural diversity is far more limited. Here we describe structures of the major capsid proteins of double-stranded DNA viruses infecting hosts residing in different domains of life. We note that viruses belonging to 20 different families fall into only five distinct structural groups, suggesting that optimal virus classification approach should equally rely on both sequence and structural information.

  7. Physiological Brain Activity Causes DNA Double Strand Breaks in Neurons — Exacerbation by Amyloid-β

    PubMed Central

    Suberbielle, Elsa; Sanchez, Pascal E.; Kravitz, Alexxai V.; Wang, Xin; Ho, Kaitlyn; Eilertson, Kirsten; Devidze, Nino; Kreitzer, Anatol C.; Mucke, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    We show that a natural behavior, exploration of a novel environment, causes DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in neurons of young adult wildtype mice. DSBs occurred in multiple brain regions, were most abundant in the dentate gyrus, which is involved in spatial learning and memory, and were repaired within 24 hours. Increasing neuronal activity by sensory or optogenetic stimulation increased neuronal DSBs in relevant but not irrelevant networks. Human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) transgenic mice, which simulate key aspects of Alzheimer's disease, had increased neuronal DSBs at baseline and more severe and prolonged DSBs after exploration. Interventions that suppress aberrant neuronal activity and improve memory in hAPP mice normalized their levels of DSBs. Blocking extrasynaptic NMDA-type glutamate receptors prevented amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced DSBs in neuronal cultures. Thus, transient increases in neuronal DSBs occur as a result of physiological brain activity and Aβ exacerbates DNA damage, most likely by eliciting synaptic dysfunction. PMID:23525040

  8. Monitoring homology search during DNA double-strand break repair in vivo.

    PubMed

    Renkawitz, Jörg; Lademann, Claudio A; Kalocsay, Marian; Jentsch, Stefan

    2013-04-25

    Homologous recombination (HR) is crucial for genetic exchange and accurate repair of DNA double-strand breaks and is pivotal for genome integrity. HR uses homologous sequences for repair, but how homology search, the exploration of the genome for homologous DNA sequences, is conducted in the nucleus remains poorly understood. Here, we use time-resolved chromatin immunoprecipitations of repair proteins to monitor homology search in vivo. We found that homology search proceeds by a probing mechanism, which commences around the break and samples preferentially on the broken chromosome. However, elements thought to instruct chromosome loops mediate homology search shortcuts, and centromeres, which cluster within the nucleus, may facilitate homology search on other chromosomes. Our study thus reveals crucial parameters for homology search in vivo and emphasizes the importance of linear distance, chromosome architecture, and proximity for recombination efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Have a break: determinants of meiotic DNA double strand break (DSB) formation and processing in plants.

    PubMed

    Edlinger, Bernd; Schlögelhofer, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Meiosis is an essential process for sexually reproducing organisms, leading to the formation of specialized generative cells. This review intends to highlight current knowledge of early events during meiosis derived from various model organisms, including plants. It will particularly focus on cis- and trans-requirements of meiotic DNA double strand break (DSB) formation, a hallmark event during meiosis and a prerequisite for recombination of genetic traits. Proteins involved in DSB formation in different organisms, emphasizing the known factors from plants, will be introduced and their functions outlined. Recent technical advances in DSB detection and meiotic recombination analysis will be reviewed, as these new tools now allow analysis of early meiotic recombination in plants with incredible accuracy. To anticipate future directions in plant meiosis research, unpublished results will be included wherever possible.

  10. Transcriptionally active chromatin recruits homologous recombination at DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Aymard, François; Bugler, Beatrix; Schmidt, Christine K; Guillou, Emmanuelle; Caron, Pierre; Briois, Sébastien; Iacovoni, Jason S; Daburon, Virginie; Miller, Kyle M; Jackson, Stephen P; Legube, Gaëlle

    2014-04-01

    Although both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining can repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), the mechanisms by which one of these pathways is chosen over the other remain unclear. Here we show that transcriptionally active chromatin is preferentially repaired by HR. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) to analyze repair of multiple DSBs induced throughout the human genome, we identify an HR-prone subset of DSBs that recruit the HR protein RAD51, undergo resection and rely on RAD51 for efficient repair. These DSBs are located in actively transcribed genes and are targeted to HR repair via the transcription elongation-associated mark trimethylated histone H3 K36. Concordantly, depletion of SETD2, the main H3 K36 trimethyltransferase, severely impedes HR at such DSBs. Our study thereby demonstrates a primary role in DSB repair of the chromatin context in which a break occurs.

  11. γ-H2AX as a biomarker for DNA double-strand breaks in ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Gerić, Marko; Gajski, Goran; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2014-07-01

    The visualisation of DNA damage response proteins enables the indirect measurement of DNA damage. Soon after the occurrence of a DNA double-strand break (DSB), the formation of γ-H2AX histone variants is to be expected. This review is focused on the potential use of the γ-H2AX foci assay in assessing the genotoxicity of environmental contaminants including cytostatic pharmaceuticals, since standard methods may not be sensitive enough to detect the damaging effect of low environmental concentrations of such drugs. These compounds are constantly released into the environment, potentially representing a threat to water quality, aquatic organisms, and, ultimately, human health. Our review of the literature revealed that this method could be used in the biomonitoring and risk assessment of aquatic systems affected by wastewater from the production, usage, and disposal of cytostatic pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Double-strand break repair on sex chromosomes: challenges during male meiotic prophase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lin-Yu; Yu, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    During meiotic prophase, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair-mediated homologous recombination (HR) occurs for exchange of genetic information between homologous chromosomes. Unlike autosomes or female sex chromosomes, human male sex chromosomes X and Y share little homology. Although DSBs are generated throughout male sex chromosomes, homologous recombination does not occur for most regions and DSB repair process is significantly prolonged. As a result, male sex chromosomes are coated with many DNA damage response proteins and form a unique chromatin structure known as the XY body. Interestingly, associated with the prolonged DSB repair, transcription is repressed in the XY body but not in autosomes, a phenomenon known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which is critical for male meiosis. Here using mice as model organisms, we briefly summarize recent progress on DSB repair in meiotic prophase and focus on the mechanism and function of DNA damage response in the XY body. PMID:25565522

  13. DNA-PKcs structure suggests an allosteric mechanism modulating DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Sibanda, Bancinyane L; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Ascher, David B; Blundell, Tom L

    2017-02-03

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is a central component of nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), repairing DNA double-strand breaks that would otherwise lead to apoptosis or cancer. We have solved its structure in complex with the C-terminal peptide of Ku80 at 4.3 angstrom resolution using x-ray crystallography. We show that the 4128-amino acid structure comprises three large structural units: the N-terminal unit, the Circular Cradle, and the Head. Conformational differences between the two molecules in the asymmetric unit are correlated with changes in accessibility of the kinase active site, which are consistent with an allosteric mechanism to bring about kinase activation. The location of KU80ct194 in the vicinity of the breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) binding site suggests competition with BRCA1, leading to pathway selection between NHEJ and homologous recombination.

  14. Double-strand break repair on sex chromosomes: challenges during male meiotic prophase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lin-Yu; Yu, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    During meiotic prophase, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair-mediated homologous recombination (HR) occurs for exchange of genetic information between homologous chromosomes. Unlike autosomes or female sex chromosomes, human male sex chromosomes X and Y share little homology. Although DSBs are generated throughout male sex chromosomes, homologous recombination does not occur for most regions and DSB repair process is significantly prolonged. As a result, male sex chromosomes are coated with many DNA damage response proteins and form a unique chromatin structure known as the XY body. Interestingly, associated with the prolonged DSB repair, transcription is repressed in the XY body but not in autosomes, a phenomenon known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which is critical for male meiosis. Here using mice as model organisms, we briefly summarize recent progress on DSB repair in meiotic prophase and focus on the mechanism and function of DNA damage response in the XY body.

  15. A paper-based device for double-stranded DNA detection with Zif268

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daohong

    2017-05-01

    Here, a small analytical device was fabricated on both nitrocellulose membrane and filter paper, for the detection of biotinylated double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from 1 nM. Zif268 was utilized for capturing the target DNA, which was a zinc finger protein that recognized only a dsDNA with specific sequence. Therefore, this detection platform could be utilized for PCR result detection, with the well-designed primers (interpolate both biotin and Zif268 binding sequence). The result of the assay could be recorded by a camera-phone, and analyzed with software. The whole assay finished within 1 hour. Due to the easy fabrication, operation and disposal of this device, this method can be employed in point-of-care detection or on-site monitoring.

  16. Artemis-dependent DNA double-strand break formation at stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Unno, Junya; Takagi, Masatoshi; Piao, Jinhua; Sugimoto, Masataka; Honda, Fumiko; Maeda, Daisuke; Masutani, Mitsuko; Kiyono, Tohru; Watanabe, Fumiaki; Morio, Tomohiro; Teraoka, Hirobumi; Mizutani, Shuki

    2013-06-01

    Stalled replication forks undergo DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) under certain conditions. However, the precise mechanism underlying DSB induction and the cellular response to persistent replication fork stalling are not fully understood. Here we show that, in response to hydroxyurea exposure, DSBs are generated in an Artemis nuclease-dependent manner following prolonged stalling with subsequent activation of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) signaling pathway. The kinase activity of the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase, a prerequisite for stimulation of the endonuclease activity of Artemis, is also required for DSB generation and subsequent ATM activation. Our findings indicate a novel function of Artemis as a molecular switch that converts stalled replication forks harboring single-stranded gap DNA lesions into DSBs, thereby activating the ATM signaling pathway following prolonged replication fork stalling. © 2013 Japanese Cancer Association.

  17. DNA double strand break repair, aging and the chromatin connection.

    PubMed

    Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2016-06-01

    Are DNA damage and mutations possible causes or consequences of aging? This question has been hotly debated by biogerontologists for decades. The importance of DNA damage as a possible driver of the aging process went from being widely recognized to then forgotten, and is now slowly making a comeback. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are particularly relevant to aging because of their toxicity, increased frequency with age and the association of defects in their repair with premature aging. Recent studies expand the potential impact of DNA damage and mutations on aging by linking DNA DSB repair and age-related chromatin changes. There is overwhelming evidence that increased DNA damage and mutations accelerate aging. However, an ultimate proof of causality would be to show that enhanced genome and epigenome stability delays aging. This is not an easy task, as improving such complex biological processes is infinitely more difficult than disabling it. We will discuss the possibility that animal models with enhanced DNA repair and epigenome maintenance will be generated in the near future.

  18. How a short double-stranded DNA bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaeoh; Lee, O.-Chul; Sung, Wokyung

    2015-04-01

    A recent experiment using fluorescence microscopy showed that double-stranded DNA fragments shorter than 100 base pairs loop with the probabilities higher by the factor of 102-106 than predicted by the worm-like chain (WLC) model [R. Vafabakhsh and T. Ha, Science 337, 1101(2012)]. Furthermore, the looping probabilities were found to be nearly independent of the loop size. The results signify a breakdown of the WLC model for DNA mechanics which works well on long length scales and calls for fundamental understanding for stressed DNA on shorter length scales. We develop an analytical, statistical mechanical model to investigate what emerges to the short DNA under a tight bending. A bending above a critical level initiates nucleation of a thermally induced bubble, which could be trapped for a long time, in contrast to the bubbles in both free and uniformly bent DNAs, which are either transient or unstable. The trapped bubble is none other than the previously hypothesized kink, which releases the bending energy more easily as the contour length decreases. It leads to tremendous enhancement of the cyclization probabilities, in a reasonable agreement with experiment.

  19. Euler buckling and nonlinear kinking of double-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Alexander P.; Meyer, Elisabeth A.; Cohen, Adam E.

    2013-01-01

    The bending stiffness of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) at high curvatures is fundamental to its biological activity, yet this regime has been difficult to probe experimentally, and literature results have not been consistent. We created a ‘molecular vise’ in which base-pairing interactions generated a compressive force on sub-persistence length segments of dsDNA. Short dsDNA strands (<41 base pairs) resisted this force and remained straight; longer strands became bent, a phenomenon called ‘Euler buckling’. We monitored the buckling transition via Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between appended fluorophores. For low-to-moderate concentrations of monovalent salt (up to ∼150 mM), our results are in quantitative agreement with the worm-like chain (WLC) model of DNA elasticity, without the need to invoke any ‘kinked’ states. Greater concentrations of monovalent salts or 1 mM Mg2+ induced an apparent softening of the dsDNA, which was best accounted for by a kink in the region of highest curvature. We tested the effects of all single-nucleotide mismatches on the DNA bending. Remarkably, the propensity to kink correlated with the thermodynamic destabilization of the mismatched DNA relative the perfectly complementary strand, suggesting that the kinked state is locally melted. The molecular vise is exquisitely sensitive to the sequence-dependent linear and nonlinear elastic properties of dsDNA. PMID:23956222

  20. Giant Stark effect in double-stranded porphyrin ladder polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Anup; Kang, Hong Seok

    2011-03-01

    Using the first-principles calculations, we have investigated the stability and the electronic structure of two types of recently synthesized one-dimensional nanoribbons, i.e., double-stranded zinc(II) porphyrin ladder polymer (LADDER) arrays. First, electronic structure calculations were used to show that the LADDER is a semiconductor. Most importantly, the application of a transverse electric field significantly reduces the band gap of the LADDER, ultimately converting the LADDER to a metal at a field strength of 0.1 V/Å. The giant Stark effect in this case is almost as strong as that in boron nitride nanotubes and nanoribbons. In the presence of an electric field, hole conduction and electronic conduction will occur entirely through spatially separated strands, rendering these materials useful for nanoelectronic devices. Second, the substitution of hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin units or that of zinc ions with other kinds of chemical species is found to increase the binding strength of the LADDER and reduce the band gap.

  1. Dissipation of double-stranded RNA in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Albright, Vurtice C; Wong, Colin R; Hellmich, Richard L; Coats, Joel R

    2017-05-01

    Silencing genes of a pest with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is a promising new pest management technology. As part of the environmental risk assessment for dsRNA-based products, the environmental fate and the potential for adverse effects to on-target organisms should be characterized. In the present study, a nonbioactive dsRNA was spiked into the water column of a water and sediment microcosm to mimic drift from a spray application run off of unbound dsRNA or transport of plant tissues. Dissipation of dsRNA in the water column and partitioning into sediment was determined. The dsRNA rapidly dissipated in the water column and was below the limit of detection after 96 h. The levels detected in the sediment were not significant and may indicate rapid degradation in the water column prior to partitioning to sediment. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1249-1253. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  2. A double-strand break can trigger immunoglobulin gene conversion

    PubMed Central

    Bastianello, Giulia; Arakawa, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    All three B cell-specific activities of the immunoglobulin (Ig) gene re-modeling system—gene conversion, somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination—require activation-induced deaminase (AID). AID-induced DNA lesions must be further processed and dissected into different DNA recombination pathways. In order to characterize potential intermediates for Ig gene conversion, we inserted an I-SceI recognition site into the complementarity determining region 1 (CDR1) of the Ig light chain locus of the AID knockout DT40 cell line, and conditionally expressed I-SceI endonuclease. Here, we show that a double-strand break (DSB) in CDR1 is sufficient to trigger Ig gene conversion in the absence of AID. The pattern and pseudogene usage of DSB-induced gene conversion were comparable to those of AID-induced gene conversion; surprisingly, sometimes a single DSB induced multiple gene conversion events. These constitute direct evidence that a DSB in the V region can be an intermediate for gene conversion. The fate of the DNA lesion downstream of a DSB had more flexibility than that of AID, suggesting two alternative models: (i) DSBs during the physiological gene conversion are in the minority compared to single-strand breaks (SSBs), which are frequently generated following DNA deamination, or (ii) the physiological gene conversion is mediated by a tightly regulated DSB that is locally protected from non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or other non-homologous DNA recombination machineries. PMID:27701075

  3. DNA Double Strand Breaks: A Common Theme in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Daniela; Mollinari, Cristiana; Racaniello, Mauro; Garaci, Enrico; Cardinale, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of DNA damage and impairment of DNA repair systems are involved in the pathogenesis of different neurodegenerative diseases. Whenever DNA damage is too extensive, the DNA damage response pathway provides for triggering cellular senescence and/or apoptosis. However, whether the increased level of DNA damage in neurodegenerative disorders is a cause rather than the consequence of neurodegenerative events remains to be established. Among possible DNA lesions, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are rare events, nevertheless they are the most lethal form of DNA damage. In neurons, DSBs are particularly deleterious because of their reduced DNA repair capability as compared to proliferating cells. Here, we provide a description of DSB repair systems and describe human studies showing the presence of several types of DNA lesions in three major neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). Then, we analyze the role of DSB accumulation and deficiency of DSB repair systems in neurodegeneration by examining studies on animal models of neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Chromatin modifications and DNA repair: beyond double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    House, Nealia C. M.; Koch, Melissa R.; Freudenreich, Catherine H.

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair must take place in the context of chromatin, and chromatin modifications and DNA repair are intimately linked. The study of double-strand break repair has revealed numerous histone modifications that occur after induction of a DSB, and modification of the repair factors themselves can also occur. In some cases the function of the modification is at least partially understood, but in many cases it is not yet clear. Although DSB repair is a crucial activity for cell survival, DSBs account for only a small percentage of the DNA lesions that occur over the lifetime of a cell. Repair of single-strand gaps, nicks, stalled forks, alternative DNA structures, and base lesions must also occur in a chromatin context. There is increasing evidence that these repair pathways are also regulated by histone modifications and chromatin remodeling. In this review, we will summarize the current state of knowledge of chromatin modifications that occur during non-DSB repair, highlighting similarities and differences to DSB repair as well as remaining questions. PMID:25250043

  5. Signaling of double strand breaks and deprotected telomeres in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Amiard, Simon; Gallego, Maria E.; White, Charles I.

    2013-01-01

    Failure to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB) can lead to chromosomal rearrangements and eventually to cancer or cell death. Radiation and environmental pollutants induce DSB and this is of particular relevance to plants due to their sessile life style. DSB also occur naturally in cells during DNA replication and programmed induction of DSB initiates the meiotic recombination essential for gametogenesis in most eukaryotes. The linear nature of most eukaryotic chromosomes means that each chromosome has two “broken” ends. Chromosome ends, or telomeres, are protected by nucleoprotein caps which avoid their recognition as DSB by the cellular DNA repair machinery. Deprotected telomeres are recognized as DSB and become substrates for recombination leading to chromosome fusions, the “bridge-breakage-fusion” cycle, genome rearrangements and cell death. The importance of repair of DSB and the severity of the consequences of their misrepair have led to the presence of multiple, robust mechanisms for their detection and repair. After a brief overview of DSB repair pathways to set the context, we present here an update of current understanding of the detection and signaling of DSB in the plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:24137170

  6. Fluid mechanics of DNA double-strand filter elution.

    PubMed

    Rudinger, George; Blazek, Ed Robert

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of infrequent DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in mammalian cells is essential for the understanding of cell damage by ionizing radiation and many DNA-reactive drugs. One of the most important assays for measuring DSB in cellular DNA is filter elution. This study is an attempt to determine whether standard concepts of fluid mechanics can yield a self-consistent model of this process. Major assumptions of the analysis are reptation through a channel formed by surrounding strands, with only strand ends captured by filter pores. Both viscosity and entanglement with surrounding strands are considered to determine the resistance to this motion. One important result is that the average elution time of a strand depends not only on its length, but also on the size distribution of the surrounding strands. This model is consistent with experimental observations, such as the dependence of elution kinetics upon radiation dose, but independence from the size of the DNA sample up to a critical filter loading, and possible overlap of elution times for strands of different length. It indicates how the dependence of elution time on the flow rate could reveal the relative importance of viscous and entanglement resistance, and also predicts the consequences of using different filters.

  7. DNA double-strand breaks caused by replication arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Michel, B; Ehrlich, S D; Uzest, M

    1997-01-01

    We report here that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) form in Escherichia coli upon arrest of replication forks due to a defect in, or the inhibition of, replicative DNA helicases. The formation of DSBs was assessed by the appearance of linear DNA detected by pulse-field gel electrophoresis. Processing of DSBs by recombination repair or linear DNA degradation was abolished by mutations in recBCD genes. Two E. coli replicative helicases were tested, Rep, which is essential in recBC mutants, and DnaB. The proportion of linear DNA increased up to 50% upon shift of rep recBTS recCTS cells to restrictive temperature. No increase in linear DNA was observed in the absence of replicating chromosomes, indicating that the formation of DSBs in rep strains requires replication. Inhibition of the DnaB helicase either by a strong replication terminator or by a dnaBTS mutation led to the formation of linear DNA, showing that blocked replication forks are prone to DSB formation. In wild-type E. coli, linear DNA was detected in the absence of RecBC or of both RecA and RecD. This reveals the existence of a significant amount of spontaneous DSBs. We propose that some of them may also result from the impairment of replication fork progression. PMID:9029161

  8. Pilus-dependent, double-stranded DNA bacteriophage for Caulobacter.

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, D R; Jollick, J D

    1980-01-01

    Caulobacter phage phi 6, previously reported to adsorb specifically to bacterial flagella, was shown here to attach to pili more frequently than to flagella. Phage phi 6 was shown to contain double-stranded DNA by circular dichroism spectroscopy and thermal denaturation accompanied by a hyperchromic shift at 260 nm. Morphologically, phage phi 6 fits group B2 (H.-W. Ackermann, in A. I. Laskin and H. A. Lechevalier, ed., Handbook of Microbiology, vol. 1, p. 638-643, 1973) with a long, noncontractile tail and an elongate head. Pilus-less mutants of the host Caulobacter vibrioides CV6 are phage phi 6 resistant, whereas flagellum-less mutants, which produce pili, are phage susceptible. Treatments of susceptible cells which remove or immobilize pili and flagella, e.g., blending or cyanide, inhibited phage phi 6 infection. Our evidence suggests that phage of phi 6 initiates infection in a manner similar to the pilus-specific phages for Pseudomonas described previously (D. E. Bradley, Virology 51:489-492, 1973; D. E. Bradley and T. L. Pitt, J. Gen. Virol. 24:1-15, 1974). Images PMID:6106721

  9. Euler buckling and nonlinear kinking of double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Fields, Alexander P; Meyer, Elisabeth A; Cohen, Adam E

    2013-11-01

    The bending stiffness of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) at high curvatures is fundamental to its biological activity, yet this regime has been difficult to probe experimentally, and literature results have not been consistent. We created a 'molecular vise' in which base-pairing interactions generated a compressive force on sub-persistence length segments of dsDNA. Short dsDNA strands (<41 base pairs) resisted this force and remained straight; longer strands became bent, a phenomenon called 'Euler buckling'. We monitored the buckling transition via Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between appended fluorophores. For low-to-moderate concentrations of monovalent salt (up to ∼150 mM), our results are in quantitative agreement with the worm-like chain (WLC) model of DNA elasticity, without the need to invoke any 'kinked' states. Greater concentrations of monovalent salts or 1 mM Mg(2+) induced an apparent softening of the dsDNA, which was best accounted for by a kink in the region of highest curvature. We tested the effects of all single-nucleotide mismatches on the DNA bending. Remarkably, the propensity to kink correlated with the thermodynamic destabilization of the mismatched DNA relative the perfectly complementary strand, suggesting that the kinked state is locally melted. The molecular vise is exquisitely sensitive to the sequence-dependent linear and nonlinear elastic properties of dsDNA.

  10. Looping of anisotropic, short double-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Harold; Le, Tung

    2013-03-01

    Bending of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is associated with fundamental biological processes such as genome packaging and gene regulation, and therefore studying sequence-dependent dsDNA bending is a key to understanding biological impact of DNA sequence beyond the genetic code. Average mechanical behavior of long dsDNA is well described by the wormlike chain model, but sequence-dependent anisotropic bendability and bendedness of dsDNA can in principle lead to abnormally high looping probability at short length scales. Here, we measured the looping probability density (J factor) and kinetics of dsDNA as a function of length and curvature using single-molecule FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer). For theoretical comparison, we calculated the J-factor using a discrete dinucleotide chain model, and also simulated it by Monte Carlo methods. We provide evidences that even when the intrinsic shape of dsDNA is accounted for, the wormlike chain model fails to describe looping dynamics of dsDNA below 200-bp length scale. Georgia Tech FIRE program

  11. Fluid mechanics of DNA double-strand filter elution.

    PubMed Central

    Rudinger, George; Blazek, Ed Robert

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of infrequent DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in mammalian cells is essential for the understanding of cell damage by ionizing radiation and many DNA-reactive drugs. One of the most important assays for measuring DSB in cellular DNA is filter elution. This study is an attempt to determine whether standard concepts of fluid mechanics can yield a self-consistent model of this process. Major assumptions of the analysis are reptation through a channel formed by surrounding strands, with only strand ends captured by filter pores. Both viscosity and entanglement with surrounding strands are considered to determine the resistance to this motion. One important result is that the average elution time of a strand depends not only on its length, but also on the size distribution of the surrounding strands. This model is consistent with experimental observations, such as the dependence of elution kinetics upon radiation dose, but independence from the size of the DNA sample up to a critical filter loading, and possible overlap of elution times for strands of different length. It indicates how the dependence of elution time on the flow rate could reveal the relative importance of viscous and entanglement resistance, and also predicts the consequences of using different filters. PMID:11751292

  12. An effective mesoscopic model of double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Sung, Wokyung

    2014-01-01

    Watson and Crick's epochal presentation of the double helix structure in 1953 has paved the way to intense exploration of DNA's vital functions in cells. Also, recent advances of single molecule techniques have made it possible to probe structures and mechanics of constrained DNA at length scales ranging from nanometers to microns. There have been a number of atomistic scale quantum chemical calculations or molecular level simulations, but they are too computationally demanding or analytically unfeasible to describe the DNA conformation and mechanics at mesoscopic levels. At micron scales, on the other hand, the wormlike chain model has been very instrumental in describing analytically the DNA mechanics but lacks certain molecular details that are essential in describing the hybridization, nano-scale confinement, and local denaturation. To fill this fundamental gap, we present a workable and predictive mesoscopic model of double-stranded DNA where the nucleotides beads constitute the basic degrees of freedom. With the inter-strand stacking given by an interaction between diagonally opposed monomers, the model explains with analytical simplicity the helix formation and produces a generalized wormlike chain model with the concomitant large bending modulus given in terms of the helical structure and stiffness. It also explains how the helical conformation undergoes overstretch transition to the ladder-like conformation at a force plateau, in agreement with the experiment.

  13. Double-Stranded RNA Interacts With Toll-Like Receptor 3 in Driving the Acute Inflammatory Response Following Lung Contusion.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Madathilparambil V; Thomas, Bivin; Machado-Aranda, David; Dolgachev, Vladislov A; Kumar Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh; Talarico, Nicholas; Cavassani, Karen; Sherman, Matthew A; Hemmila, Mark R; Kunkel, Steven L; Walter, Nils G; Hogaboam, Cory M; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2016-11-01

    Lung contusion is a major risk factor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome. We set to determine the role of toll-like receptor 3 and the binding of double-stranded RNA in the pathogenesis of sterile injury following lung contusion. Toll-like receptor 3 expression was analyzed in postmortem lung samples from patients with lung contusion. Unilateral lung contusion was induced in toll-like receptor 3 (-/-), TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (-/-), and wild-type mice. Subsequently, lung injury and inflammation were evaluated. Apoptotic indices, phagocytic activity, and phenotypic characterization of the macrophages were determined. Double-stranded RNA in bronchoalveolar lavage and serum samples following lung contusion was measured. A toll-like receptor 3/double-stranded RNA ligand inhibitor was injected into wild-type mice prior to lung contusion. Toll-like receptor 3 expression was higher in patients and wild-type mice with lung contusion. The degree of lung injury, inflammation, and macrophage apoptosis was reduced in toll-like receptor 3 (-/-), TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (-/-), and wild-type mice with toll-like receptor 3 antibody neutralization. Alveolar macrophages from toll-like receptor 3 (-/-) mice had a lower early apoptotic index, a predominant M2 phenotype and increased surface translocation of toll-like receptor 3 from the endosome to the surface. When compared with viral activation pathways, lung injury in lung contusion demonstrated increased p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation with inflammasome activation without a corresponding increase in nuclear factor-κB or type-1 interferon production. Additionally, pretreatment with toll-like receptor 3/double-stranded RNA ligand inhibitor led to a reduction in injury, inflammation, and macrophage apoptosis. We conclude that the interaction of double-stranded RNA from injured cells with

  14. Double-strand break repair-adox: Restoration of suppressed double-strand break repair during mitosis induces genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Terasawa, Masahiro; Shinohara, Akira; Shinohara, Miki

    2014-12-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the severest types of DNA damage. Unrepaired DSBs easily induce cell death and chromosome aberrations. To maintain genomic stability, cells have checkpoint and DSB repair systems to respond to DNA damage throughout most of the cell cycle. The failure of this process often results in apoptosis or genomic instability, such as aneuploidy, deletion, or translocation. Therefore, DSB repair is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. During mitosis, however, cells seem to suppress the DNA damage response and proceed to the next G1 phase, even if there are unrepaired DSBs. The biological significance of this suppression is not known. In this review, we summarize recent studies of mitotic DSB repair and discuss the mechanisms of suppression of DSB repair during mitosis. DSB repair, which maintains genomic integrity in other phases of the cell cycle, is rather toxic to cells during mitosis, often resulting in chromosome missegregation and aberration. Cells have multiple safeguards to prevent genomic instability during mitosis: inhibition of 53BP1 or BRCA1 localization to DSB sites, which is important to promote non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination, respectively, and also modulation of the non-homologous end joining core complex to inhibit DSB repair. We discuss how DSBs during mitosis are toxic and the multiple safeguard systems that suppress genomic instability.

  15. Double-strand break repair-adox: Restoration of suppressed double-strand break repair during mitosis induces genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Terasawa, Masahiro; Shinohara, Akira; Shinohara, Miki

    2014-01-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the severest types of DNA damage. Unrepaired DSBs easily induce cell death and chromosome aberrations. To maintain genomic stability, cells have checkpoint and DSB repair systems to respond to DNA damage throughout most of the cell cycle. The failure of this process often results in apoptosis or genomic instability, such as aneuploidy, deletion, or translocation. Therefore, DSB repair is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. During mitosis, however, cells seem to suppress the DNA damage response and proceed to the next G1 phase, even if there are unrepaired DSBs. The biological significance of this suppression is not known. In this review, we summarize recent studies of mitotic DSB repair and discuss the mechanisms of suppression of DSB repair during mitosis. DSB repair, which maintains genomic integrity in other phases of the cell cycle, is rather toxic to cells during mitosis, often resulting in chromosome missegregation and aberration. Cells have multiple safeguards to prevent genomic instability during mitosis: inhibition of 53BP1 or BRCA1 localization to DSB sites, which is important to promote non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination, respectively, and also modulation of the non-homologous end joining core complex to inhibit DSB repair. We discuss how DSBs during mitosis are toxic and the multiple safeguard systems that suppress genomic instability. PMID:25287622

  16. Rad50 Is Not Essential for the Mre11-Dependent Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Halobacterium sp. Strain NRC-1▿

    PubMed Central

    Kish, A.; DiRuggiero, J.

    2008-01-01

    The genome of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 encodes homologs of the eukaryotic Mre11 and Rad50 proteins, which are involved in the recognition and end processing of DNA double-strand breaks in the homologous recombination repair pathway. We have analyzed the phenotype of Halobacterium deletion mutants lacking mre11 and/or rad50 after exposure to UV-C radiation, an alkylating agent (N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine), and γ radiation, none of which resulted in a decrease in survival of the mutant strains compared to that of the background strain. However, a decreased rate of repair of DNA double-strand breaks in strains lacking the mre11 gene was observed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. These observations led to the hypothesis that Mre11 is essential for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in Halobacterium, whereas Rad50 is dispensable. This is the first identification of a Rad50-independent function for the Mre11 protein, and it represents a shift in the Archaea away from the eukaryotic model of homologous recombination repair of DNA double-strand breaks. PMID:18502851

  17. Rad50 is not essential for the Mre11-dependent repair of DNA double-strand breaks in Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1.

    PubMed

    Kish, A; DiRuggiero, J

    2008-08-01

    The genome of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 encodes homologs of the eukaryotic Mre11 and Rad50 proteins, which are involved in the recognition and end processing of DNA double-strand breaks in the homologous recombination repair pathway. We have analyzed the phenotype of Halobacterium deletion mutants lacking mre11 and/or rad50 after exposure to UV-C radiation, an alkylating agent (N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine), and gamma radiation, none of which resulted in a decrease in survival of the mutant strains compared to that of the background strain. However, a decreased rate of repair of DNA double-strand breaks in strains lacking the mre11 gene was observed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. These observations led to the hypothesis that Mre11 is essential for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in Halobacterium, whereas Rad50 is dispensable. This is the first identification of a Rad50-independent function for the Mre11 protein, and it represents a shift in the Archaea away from the eukaryotic model of homologous recombination repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

  18. DNA Double-Strand Break Rejoining in Complex Normal Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Kuehne, Martin; Fricke, Andreas

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: The clinical radiation responses of different organs vary widely and likely depend on the intrinsic radiosensitivities of their different cell populations. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious form of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, and the cells' capacity to rejoin radiation-induced DSBs is known to affect their intrinsic radiosensitivity. To date, only little is known about the induction and processing of radiation-induced DSBs in complex normal tissues. Using an in vivo model with repair-proficient mice, the highly sensitive {gamma}H2AX immunofluorescence was established to investigate whether differences in DSB rejoining could account for the substantial differences in clinical radiosensitivity observed among normal tissues. Methods and Materials: After whole body irradiation of C57BL/6 mice (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy), the formation and rejoining of DSBs was analyzed by enumerating {gamma}H2AX foci in various organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding (lung, brain, heart, kidney) tissues. Results: The linear dose correlation observed in all analyzed tissues indicated that {gamma}H2AX immunofluorescence allows for the accurate quantification of DSBs in complex organs. Strikingly, the various normal tissues exhibited identical kinetics for {gamma}H2AX foci loss, despite their clearly different clinical radiation responses. Conclusion: The identical kinetics of DSB rejoining measured in different organs suggest that tissue-specific differences in radiation responses are independent of DSB rejoining. This finding emphasizes the fundamental role of DSB repair in maintaining genomic integrity, thereby contributing to cellular viability and functionality and, thus, tissue homeostasis.

  19. DNA Mismatch Repair-Induced Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Nowosielska, Anetta; Marinus, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli dam mutants are sensitized to the cytotoxic action of base analogs, cisplatin and N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), while their mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient derivatives are tolerant to these agents. We showed previously, using pulse field gel electrophoresis, that MMR-mediated double-strand breaks (DSBs) are produced by cisplatin in dam recB (Ts) cells at the non-permissive temperature. We demonstrate here that the majority of these DSBs require DNA replication for their formation, consistent with a model in which replication forks collapse at nicks or gaps formed during MMR. DSBs were also detected in dam recB(Ts) ada ogt cells exposed to MNNG in a dose- and MMR-dependent manner. In contrast to cisplatin, the formation of these DSBs was not affected by DNA replication and it is proposed that two separate mechanisms result in DSB formation. Replication-independent DSBs arise from overlapping base excision and MMR repair tracts on complementary strands and constitute the majority of detectable DSBs in dam recB(Ts) ada ogt cells exposed to MNNG. Replication-dependent DSBs result from replication fork collapse at O6-meG base pairs undergoing MMR futile cycling and are more likely to contribute to cytotoxicity. This model is consistent with the observation that fast-growing dam recB (Ts) ada ogt cells, which have more chromosome replication origins, are more sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of MNNG than the same cells growing slowly. PMID:17827074

  20. RNF4 is required for DNA double-strand break repair in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vyas, R; Kumar, R; Clermont, F; Helfricht, A; Kalev, P; Sotiropoulou, P; Hendriks, I A; Radaelli, E; Hochepied, T; Blanpain, C; Sablina, A; van Attikum, H; Olsen, J V; Jochemsen, A G; Vertegaal, A C O; Marine, J-C

    2013-03-01

    Unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) cause genetic instability that leads to malignant transformation or cell death. Cells respond to DSBs with the ordered recruitment of signaling and repair proteins to the sites of DNA lesions. Coordinated protein SUMOylation and ubiquitylation have crucial roles in regulating the dynamic assembly of protein complexes at these sites. However, how SUMOylation influences protein ubiquitylation at DSBs is poorly understood. We show herein that Rnf4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets SUMO-modified proteins, accumulates in DSB repair foci and is required for both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining repair. To establish a link between Rnf4 and the DNA damage response (DDR) in vivo, we generated an Rnf4 allelic series in mice. We show that Rnf4-deficiency causes persistent ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and signaling, and that Rnf4-deficient cells and mice exhibit increased sensitivity to genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, we show that Rnf4 targets SUMOylated MDC1 and SUMOylated BRCA1, and is required for the loading of Rad51, an enzyme required for HR repair, onto sites of DNA damage. Similarly to inactivating mutations in other key regulators of HR repair, Rnf4 deficiency leads to age-dependent impairment in spermatogenesis. These findings identify Rnf4 as a critical component of the DDR in vivo and support the possibility that Rnf4 controls protein localization at DNA damage sites by integrating SUMOylation and ubiquitylation events.

  1. Multistrain probiotic modulation of intestinal epithelial cells' immune response to a double-stranded RNA ligand, poly(i·c).

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Chad; Audy, Julie; Mathieu, Olivier; Tompkins, Thomas A

    2014-03-01

    A commercially available product containing three probiotic bacterial strains (Lactobacillus helveticus R0052, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis R0033, and Bifidobacterium bifidum R0071) was previously shown in animal trials to modulate both TH1 and TH2 immune responses. Clinical studies on this combination of bacteria have also shown positive health effects against seasonal winter diseases and rotavirus infection. The goal of this study was to use a well-established in vitro intestinal epithelial (HT-29) cell model that has been shown to constitutively express double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) sensors (Toll-like receptor 3 [TLR3], retinoic acid-inducible gene I, melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5, and dsRNA-activated protein kinase). By using the HT-29 cell model, we wanted to evaluate whether or not this combination of three bacteria had the capacity to immune modulate the host cell response to a dsRNA ligand, poly(I·C). Using a custom-designed, two-color expression microarray targeting genes of the human immune system, we investigated the response of HT-29 cells challenged with poly(I·C) both in the presence and in the absence of the three probiotic bacteria. We observed that the combination of the three bacteria had a major impact on attenuating the expression of genes connected to proinflammatory TH1 and antiviral innate immune responses compared to that obtained by the poly(I·C)-only challenge. Major pathways through which the multistrain combination may be eliciting its immune-modulatory effect include the TLR3 domain-containing adapter-inducing beta interferon (TRIF), mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-κB signaling pathways. Such a model may be useful for selecting potential biomarkers for the design of future clinical trials.

  2. Single- and double-stranded viral RNAs in plants infected with the potexviruses papaya mosaic virus and foxtail mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Mackie, G A; Johnston, R; Bancroft, J B

    1988-01-01

    Three classes of viral RNA were recovered from polyribosomes purified from papaya leaves infected with papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) and from barley leaves infected with foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV): full-length viral RNAs [6.8 and 6.2 kilobases (kb), respectively]; less abundant intermediate subgenomic RNAs (2.2 and 1.9 kb), and abundant, small subgenomic RNAs (1 and 0.9 kb). Small amounts of the PapMV-specified 1.0-kb subgenomic RNA were encapsidated, whereas no encapsidated subgenomic RNAs could be found in preparations of FoMV. Immunoprecipitation of the products of in vitro translation of the small subgenomic RNA of both viruses showed that it codes for the corresponding viral coat protein. FoMV genomic RNA isolated from polyribosomes also directed the efficient synthesis of a 37- to 38-kilodalton protein which was immunoprecipitated by an antiserum raised against the coat protein. We presume this product to be a readthrough protein initiated to the 5' side of and in the same reading frame as the coat protein-coding sequences in FoMV RNA. The predominant double-stranded viral-specified RNAs in tissues infected with PapMV, FoMV, and clover yellow mosaic virus were genome sized (6.8, 6.2, and 7.0 kb pairs, respectively). If double-stranded RNAs corresponding to coat protein subgenomic RNAs exist, they must be present in much lower relative abundances.

  3. DNA Double-Strand Breaks, Chromosomal Rearrangements, and GenomicInstability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, W.F.; Corcoran, J.; Hartmann, A.; Kaplan, M.I.; Limoli,C.L.; Ponnaiya, B.

    1998-03-09

    DNA double-strand breaks can lead to chromosomalrearrangements at the first mitosis after exposure to the DNAstrand-breaking agent. The evidence suggests a number of differentpathways for DNA double-strand break rejoining in mammalian cells, but itis unclear what factors determine the fate of the induced break andwhether or not it will lead to chromosomal rearrangement. If a cell doessurvive and proliferate after DNA cleavage, delayed chromosomalinstability can be observedin the clonal descendants of the exposedcell. Most, but not all DNA double-strand breaking agents are effectiveat inducing this delayed chromosomal instability. In this paper, wereview the evidence for the role of the DNA double-strand break indirectly induced and delayed chromosomal rearrangements. Copyright 1998Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. DNA double strand breaks and Hsp70 expression in proton irradiated living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Anja; Reinert, Tilo; Tanner, Judith; Butz, Tilman

    2007-07-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells can be directly provoked by ionising radiation. DSBs can be visualized by immunostaining the phosphorylated histone γH2AX. Our concern was to test the feasibility of γH2AX staining for a direct visualization of single proton hits. If single protons produce detectable foci, DNA DSBs could be used as "biological track detectors" for protons. Ionising radiation can also damage proteins indirectly by inducing free radicals. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) help to refold or even degrade the damaged proteins. The level of the most famous heat shock protein Hsp70 is increased by ionising radiation. We investigated the expression of γH2AX and Hsp70 after cross and line patterned irradiation with counted numbers of 2.25 MeV protons on primary human skin fibroblasts. The proton induced DSBs appear more delocalised than it was expected by the ion hit accuracy. Cooling the cells before the irradiation reduces the delocalisation of DNA DSBs, which is probably caused by the reduced diffusion of DNA damaging agents. Proton irradiation seems to provoke protein damages mainly in the cytoplasm indicated by cytoplasmic Hsp70 aggregates. On the contrary, in control heat shocked cells the Hsp70 was predominantly localized in the cell nucleus. However, the irradiated area could not be recognized, all cells on the Si 3N 4 window showed a homogenous Hsp70 expression pattern.

  5. BRCA1-CtIP interaction in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Tomas; Gautier, Jean

    2016-07-01

    DNA termini at double-strand breaks are often chemically heterogeneous and require processing before initiation of repair. In a recent report, we demonstrated that CtIP and the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) nuclease complex cooperate with BRCA1 to specifically repair topoisomerase II-DNA adducted breaks. In contrast, BRCA1 is dispensable for repair of restriction endonuclease-generated double-strand breaks.

  6. Synthesis and properties of double-stranded antisense oligonucleotides connected with a pentaerythritol linker.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Aya; Ueno, Yoshihito; Matsuda, Akira; Kitade, Yukio

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and properties of double-stranded antisense oligonucleotides connected with a pentaerythritol linker. We found that double-stranded antisense oligonucleotides with aminomethyl residues have high affinity for single-stranded DNA or RNA in buffer solutions both with and without MgCl(2). Thus, these oligonucleotides would be useful as antisense oligonucleotides for targeting single-stranded RNA through triplex formation.

  7. Detection and repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks: new developments in nonhomologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2013-07-01

    DNA damage can occur as a result of endogenous metabolic reactions and replication stress or from exogenous sources such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. DNA double strand breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage, and defects in their repair can result in genome instability, a hallmark of cancer. The major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DSBs in human cells is nonhomologous end joining. Here we review recent advances on the mechanism of nonhomologous end joining, as well as new findings on its component proteins and regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection and Repair of Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks: New Developments in Nonhomologous End Joining

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chen; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2013-07-01

    DNA damage can occur as a result of endogenous metabolic reactions and replication stress or from exogenous sources such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. DNA double strand breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage, and defects in their repair can result in genome instability, a hallmark of cancer. The major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DSBs in human cells is nonhomologous end joining. Here we review recent advances on the mechanism of nonhomologous end joining, as well as new findings on its component proteins and regulation.

  9. The Caenorhabditis elegans Homolog of Gen1/Yen1 Resolvases Links DNA Damage Signaling to DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, Aymeric P.; Alpi, Arno; Lilley, David M. J.; Ahmed, Shawn; Gartner, Anton

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR), which can involve Holliday junction (HJ) intermediates that are ultimately resolved by nucleolytic enzymes. An N-terminal fragment of human GEN1 has recently been shown to act as a Holliday junction resolvase, but little is known about the role of GEN-1 in vivo. Holliday junction resolution signifies the completion of DNA repair, a step that may be coupled to signaling proteins that regulate cell cycle progression in response to DNA damage. Using forward genetic approaches, we identified a Caenorhabditis elegans dual function DNA double-strand break repair and DNA damage signaling protein orthologous to the human GEN1 Holliday junction resolving enzyme. GEN-1 has biochemical activities related to the human enzyme and facilitates repair of DNA double-strand breaks, but is not essential for DNA double-strand break repair during meiotic recombination. Mutational analysis reveals that the DNA damage-signaling function of GEN-1 is separable from its role in DNA repair. GEN-1 promotes germ cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via a pathway that acts in parallel to the canonical DNA damage response pathway mediated by RPA loading, CHK1 activation, and CEP-1/p53–mediated apoptosis induction. Furthermore, GEN-1 acts redundantly with the 9-1-1 complex to ensure genome stability. Our study suggests that GEN-1 might act as a dual function Holliday junction resolvase that may coordinate DNA damage signaling with a late step in DNA double-strand break repair. PMID:20661466

  10. DNA double-strand breaks after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Geisel, Dominik; Heverhagen, Johannes T; Kalinowski, Marc; Wagner, Hans-Joachim

    2008-09-01

    To determine exemplarily the amount of DNA damage and the repair kinetics after interventional radiologic procedures by using visualization of foci of the phosphorylated form of the H2AX histone variant (gammaH2AX) to quantify DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of the lower limb arteries. After local ethics committee approval and written informed consent were obtained, five patients (two women, three men; mean age, 64.4 years; age range, 45-76 years) scheduled for computed tomography (CT) and 20 patients (six women, 14 men; mean age, 68.5 years; age range, 53-85 years) scheduled for PTA of lower limb arteries were prospectively entered into the study. Blood samples were taken before the first exposure to ionizing radiation and 5 minutes, 1 hour, 6 hours, and 24 hours after the last exposure. Additional samples were taken from the irradiated limb (femoral vein) of three patients who underwent PTA--before the first radiation exposure, 5 and 10 minutes after the first exposure, and 5 minutes after the last exposure. Lymphocytes were isolated, fixed, and stained with anti-gammaH2AX antibody, and gammaH2AX focus yields were determined with fluorescence microscopy. Data were analyzed with linear regression and two-sample F tests. Mean increase in number of gammaH2AX foci after CT (7.78 per 1 Gy x cm) depended linearly on dose-length product (r = 0.997). Number of foci reached background levels within 24 hours. Mean numbers of gammaH2AX foci per cell increased by factors of 4.08-20.67 in blood samples taken 5 minutes after PTA compared with mean numbers of foci before PTA. Mean radiation dose increase, 6.56/(10 Gy x cm(2)), depended linearly on dose-area product (r = 0.993). Maximal focus yield in cells taken directly from the irradiated limb was higher than that in cells from the systemic circulation (by mean factor of 1.46). Data showed compromised DSB repair capacity after PTA (P < .05). Mean number of foci at 24 hours (0

  11. Trimming of damaged 3' overhangs of DNA double-strand breaks by the Metnase and Artemis endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Susovan; Yannone, Steven M; Lee, Suk-Hee; Hromas, Robert A; Akopiants, Konstantin; Menon, Vijay; Ramsden, Dale A; Povirk, Lawrence F

    2013-06-01

    Both Metnase and Artemis possess endonuclease activities that trim 3' overhangs of duplex DNA. To assess the potential of these enzymes for facilitating resolution of damaged ends during double-strand break rejoining, substrates bearing a variety of normal and structurally modified 3' overhangs were constructed, and treated either with Metnase or with Artemis plus DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Unlike Artemis, which trims long overhangs to 4-5 bases, cleavage by Metnase was more evenly distributed over the length of the overhang, but with significant sequence dependence. In many substrates, Metnase also induced marked cleavage in the double-stranded region within a few bases of the overhang. Like Artemis, Metnase efficiently trimmed overhangs terminated in 3'-phosphoglycolates (PGs), and in some cases the presence of 3'-PG stimulated cleavage and altered its specificity. The nonplanar base thymine glycol in a 3' overhang severely inhibited cleavage by Metnase in the vicinity of the modified base, while Artemis was less affected. Nevertheless, thymine glycol moieties could be removed by Metnase- or Artemis-mediated cleavage at sites farther from the terminus than the lesion itself. In in vitro end-joining systems based on human cell extracts, addition of Artemis, but not Metnase, effected robust trimming of an unligatable 3'-PG overhang, resulting in a dramatic stimulation of ligase IV- and XLF-dependent end joining. Thus, while both Metnase and Artemis are biochemically capable of resolving a variety of damaged DNA ends for the repair of complex double-strand breaks, Artemis appears to act more efficiently in the context of other nonhomologous end joining proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Trimming of damaged 3′ overhangs of DNA double-strand breaks by the Metnase and Artemis endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Susovan; Yannone, Steven M.; Lee, Suk-Hee; Hromas, Robert A.; Akopiants, Konstantin; Menon, Vijay; Ramsden, Dale A.; Povirk, Lawrence F.

    2013-01-01

    Both Metnase and Artemis possess endonuclease activities that trim 3′ overhangs of duplex DNA. To assess the potential of these enzymes for facilitating resolution of damaged ends during double-strand break rejoining, substrates bearing a variety of normal and structurally modified 3′ overhangs were constructed, and treated either with Metnase or with Artemis plus DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Unlike Artemis, which trims long overhangs to 4–5 bases, cleavage by Metnase was more evenly distributed over the length of the overhang, but with significant sequence dependence. In many substrates, Metnase also induced marked cleavage in the double-stranded region within a few bases of the overhang. Like Artemis, Metnase efficiently trimmed overhangs terminated in 3′-phosphoglycolates (PGs), and in some cases the presence of 3′-PG stimulated cleavage and altered its specificity. The nonplanar base thymine glycol in a 3′ overhang severely inhibited cleavage by Metnase in the vicinity of the modified base, while Artemis was less affected. Nevertheless, thymine glycol moieties could be removed by Metnase- or Artemis-mediated cleavage at sites farther from the terminus than the lesion itself. In in vitro end-joining systems based on human cell extracts, addition of Artemis, but not Metnase, effected robust trimming of an unligatable 3′-PG overhang, resulting in a dramatic stimulation of ligase IV- and XLF-dependent end joining. Thus, while both Metnase and Artemis are biochemically capable of resolving a variety of damaged DNA ends for the repair of complex double-strand breaks, Artemis appears to act more efficiently in the context of other nonhomologous end joining proteins. PMID:23602515

  13. Dynamic monitoring of oxidative DNA double-strand break and repair in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Bo; Hou, Ning; Xiao, Lu; Xu, Yifan; Xu, Haodong; Li, Faqian

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are most dangerous lesions. To determine whether oxidative stress can induce DSBs and how they are repaired in cardiomyocytes (CMs), cultured neonatal rat CMs were treated with different doses of H2O2 and followed for up to 72 h for monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of DNA repair protein assembly/disassembly at DSB foci. The protein levels and foci numbers of histone H2AX phosphorylated at serine 139 (γ-H2AX) increased proportionally to 50, 100, and 200 μmol/L H2O2 after 30 min treatment. When H2O2 was at or above 400 μmol/L, γ-H2AX became predominantly pannuclear. After 30 min, 200 μmol/L of H2O2 treatment, γ-H2AX levels were highest within the first hour and then gradually declined during the recovery and returned to basal levels at 48 h. Among DNA damage transducer kinases, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) was significantly activated by H2O2 in contrast to mild activation of ATR (ATM and Rad3-related). A DSB binding protein, p53 binding protein 1, formed distinct nuclear foci that colocalized with γ-H2AX foci and phosphorylated ATM. Our findings indicate that DSBs can be induced by H2O2 and ATM is the main kinase to mediate DSB repair in CMs. Therefore, monitoring DSB repair can assess oxidative injury and response in CMs.

  14. Immunofluorescent Detection of DNA Double Strand Breaks induced by High-LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu; Desai, Nirav

    2004-01-01

    Within cell nuclei, traversing charged heavy ion particles lead to the accumulation of proteins related to DNA lesions and repair along the ion trajectories. Irradiation using a standard geometric setup with the beam path perpendicular to the cell monolayer generates discrete foci of several proteins known to localize at sites of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). One such molecule is the histone protein H2AX (gamma-H2AX), which gets rapidly phosphorylated in response to ionizing radiation. Here we present data obtained with a modified irradiation geometry characterized by a beam path parallel to a monolayer of human fibroblast cells. This new irradiation geometry leads to the formation of gamma-H2AX aggregates in the shape of streaks stretching over several micrometers in the x/y plane, thus enabling the analysis of the fluorescence distributions along the particle trajectories. Qualitative analysis of these distributions presented insights into the DNA repair kinetics along the primary track structure and visualization of possible chromatin movement. We also present evidence of colocalization of gamma-H2AX with several other proteins in responses to ionizing radiation exposure. Analysis of gamma-H2AX has the potential to provide useful information on human cell responses to high LET radiation after exposure to space-like radiation.

  15. Immunofluorescent Detection of DNA Double Strand Breaks induced by High-LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu; Desai, Nirav

    2004-01-01

    Within cell nuclei, traversing charged heavy ion particles lead to the accumulation of proteins related to DNA lesions and repair along the ion trajectories. Irradiation using a standard geometric setup with the beam path perpendicular to the cell monolayer generates discrete foci of several proteins known to localize at sites of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). One such molecule is the histone protein H2AX (gamma-H2AX), which gets rapidly phosphorylated in response to ionizing radiation. Here we present data obtained with a modified irradiation geometry characterized by a beam path parallel to a monolayer of human fibroblast cells. This new irradiation geometry leads to the formation of gamma-H2AX aggregates in the shape of streaks stretching over several micrometers in the x/y plane, thus enabling the analysis of the fluorescence distributions along the particle trajectories. Qualitative analysis of these distributions presented insights into the DNA repair kinetics along the primary track structure and visualization of possible chromatin movement. We also present evidence of colocalization of gamma-H2AX with several other proteins in responses to ionizing radiation exposure. Analysis of gamma-H2AX has the potential to provide useful information on human cell responses to high LET radiation after exposure to space-like radiation.

  16. TrmBL2 from Pyrococcus furiosus Interacts Both with Double-Stranded and Single-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wierer, Sebastian; Daldrop, Peter; Ud Din Ahmad, Misbha; Boos, Winfried; Drescher, Malte; Welte, Wolfram; Seidel, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    In many hyperthermophilic archaea the DNA binding protein TrmBL2 or one of its homologues is abundantly expressed. TrmBL2 is thought to play a significant role in modulating the chromatin architecture in combination with the archaeal histone proteins and Alba. However, its precise physiological role is poorly understood. It has been previously shown that upon binding TrmBL2 covers double-stranded DNA, which leads to the formation of a thick and fibrous filament. Here we investigated the filament formation process as well as the stabilization of DNA by TrmBL2 from Pyroccocus furiosus in detail. We used magnetic tweezers that allow to monitor changes of the DNA mechanical properties upon TrmBL2 binding on the single-molecule level. Extended filaments formed in a cooperative manner and were considerably stiffer than bare double-stranded DNA. Unlike Alba, TrmBL2 did not form DNA cross-bridges. The protein was found to bind double- and single-stranded DNA with similar affinities. In mechanical disruption experiments of DNA hairpins this led to stabilization of both, the double- (before disruption) and the single-stranded (after disruption) DNA forms. Combined, these findings suggest that the biological function of TrmBL2 is not limited to modulating genome architecture and acting as a global repressor but that the protein acts additionally as a stabilizer of DNA secondary structure. PMID:27214207

  17. Writers, Readers, and Erasers of Histone Ubiquitylation in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair.

    PubMed

    Smeenk, Godelieve; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions, whose faulty repair may alter the content and organization of cellular genomes. To counteract this threat, numerous signaling and repair proteins are recruited hierarchically to the chromatin areas surrounding DSBs to facilitate accurate lesion repair and restoration of genome integrity. In vertebrate cells, ubiquitin-dependent modifications of histones adjacent to DSBs by RNF8, RNF168, and other ubiquitin ligases have a key role in promoting the assembly of repair protein complexes, serving as direct recruitment platforms for a range of genome caretaker proteins and their associated factors. These DNA damage-induced chromatin ubiquitylation marks provide an essential component of a histone code for DSB repair that is controlled by multifaceted regulatory circuits, underscoring its importance for genome stability maintenance. In this review, we provide a comprehensive account of how DSB-induced histone ubiquitylation is sensed, decoded and modulated by an elaborate array of repair factors and regulators. We discuss how these mechanisms impact DSB repair pathway choice and functionality for optimal protection of genome integrity, as well as cell and organismal fitness.

  18. Writers, Readers, and Erasers of Histone Ubiquitylation in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Smeenk, Godelieve; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions, whose faulty repair may alter the content and organization of cellular genomes. To counteract this threat, numerous signaling and repair proteins are recruited hierarchically to the chromatin areas surrounding DSBs to facilitate accurate lesion repair and restoration of genome integrity. In vertebrate cells, ubiquitin-dependent modifications of histones adjacent to DSBs by RNF8, RNF168, and other ubiquitin ligases have a key role in promoting the assembly of repair protein complexes, serving as direct recruitment platforms for a range of genome caretaker proteins and their associated factors. These DNA damage-induced chromatin ubiquitylation marks provide an essential component of a histone code for DSB repair that is controlled by multifaceted regulatory circuits, underscoring its importance for genome stability maintenance. In this review, we provide a comprehensive account of how DSB-induced histone ubiquitylation is sensed, decoded and modulated by an elaborate array of repair factors and regulators. We discuss how these mechanisms impact DSB repair pathway choice and functionality for optimal protection of genome integrity, as well as cell and organismal fitness. PMID:27446204

  19. Nucleolar Reorganization Upon Site-Specific Double-Strand Break Induction.

    PubMed

    Franek, Michal; Kovaříková, Alena; Bártová, Eva; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2016-11-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) in ribosomal genes and mechanisms of DNA repair in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are less explored nuclear events. DDR in ESCs should be unique due to their high proliferation rate, expression of pluripotency factors, and specific chromatin signature. Given short population doubling time and fast progress through G1 phase, ESCs require a sustained production of rRNA, which leads to the formation of large and prominent nucleoli. Although transcription of rRNA in the nucleolus is relatively well understood, little is known about DDR in this nuclear compartment. Here, we directed formation of double-strand breaks in rRNA genes with I- PpoI endonuclease, and we studied nucleolar morphology, DDR, and chromatin modifications. We observed a pronounced formation of I- PpoI-induced nucleolar caps, positive on BRCA1, NBS1, MDC1, γH2AX, and UBF1 proteins. We showed interaction of nucleolar protein TCOF1 with HDAC1 and TCOF1 with CARM1 after DNA injury. Moreover, H3R17me2a modification mediated by CARM1 was found in I- PpoI-induced nucleolar caps. Finally, we report that heterochromatin protein 1 is not involved in DNA repair of nucleolar caps.

  20. The Fun30 nucleosome remodeller promotes resection of DNA double-strand break ends.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuefeng; Cui, Dandan; Papusha, Alma; Zhang, Xiaotian; Chu, Chia-Dwo; Tang, Jiangwu; Chen, Kaifu; Pan, Xuewen; Ira, Grzegorz

    2012-09-27

    Chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) are resected by 5' nucleases to form 3' single-stranded DNA substrates for binding by homologous recombination and DNA damage checkpoint proteins. Two redundant pathways of extensive resection have been described both in cells and in vitro, one relying on Exo1 exonuclease and the other on Sgs1 helicase and Dna2 nuclease. However, it remains unknown how resection proceeds within the context of chromatin, where histones and histone-bound proteins represent barriers for resection enzymes. Here we identify the yeast nucleosome-remodelling enzyme Fun30 as a factor promoting DSB end resection. Fun30 is the major nucleosome remodeller promoting extensive Exo1- and Sgs1-dependent resection of DSBs. The RSC and INO80 chromatin-remodelling complexes and Fun30 have redundant roles in resection adjacent to DSB ends. ATPase and helicase domains of Fun30, which are needed for nucleosome remodelling, are also required for resection. Fun30 is robustly recruited to DNA breaks and spreads along the DSB coincident with resection. Fun30 becomes less important for resection in the absence of the histone-bound Rad9 checkpoint adaptor protein known to block 5' strand processing and in the absence of either histone H3 K79 methylation or γ-H2A, which mediate recruitment of Rad9 (refs 9, 10). Together these data suggest that Fun30 helps to overcome the inhibitory effect of Rad9 on DNA resection.

  1. Transcription-induced DNA double strand breaks: both oncogenic force and potential therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Haffner, Michael C; De Marzo, Angelo M; Meeker, Alan K; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2011-06-15

    An emerging model of transcriptional activation suggests that induction of transcriptional programs, for instance by stimulating prostate or breast cells with androgens or estrogens, respectively, involves the formation of DNA damage, including DNA double strand breaks (DSB), recruitment of DSB repair proteins, and movement of newly activated genes to transcription hubs. The DSB can be mediated by the class II topoisomerase TOP2B, which is recruited with the androgen receptor and estrogen receptor to regulatory sites on target genes and is apparently required for efficient transcriptional activation of these genes. These DSBs are recognized by the DNA repair machinery triggering the recruitment of repair proteins such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), ATM, and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). If illegitimately repaired, such DSBs can seed the formation of genomic rearrangements like the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion oncogene in prostate cancer. Here, we hypothesize that these transcription-induced, TOP2B-mediated DSBs can also be exploited therapeutically and propose that, in hormone-dependent tumors like breast and prostate cancers, a hormone-cycling therapy, in combination with topoisomerase II poisons or inhibitors of the DNA repair components PARP1 and DNA-PK, could overwhelm cancer cells with transcription-associated DSBs. Such strategies may find particular utility in cancers, like prostate cancer, which show low proliferation rates, in which other chemotherapeutic strategies that target rapidly proliferating cells have had limited success.

  2. The COP9 signalosome is vital for timely repair of DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Michal; Galanty, Yaron; Kashani, Lior; Blank, Michael; Khosravi, Rami; Fernández-Ávila, María Jesús; Cruz-García, Andrés; Star, Ayelet; Shochot, Lea; Thomas, Yann; Garrett, Lisa J.; Chamovitz, Daniel A.; Bodine, David M.; Kurz, Thimo; Huertas, Pablo; Ziv, Yael; Shiloh, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response is vigorously activated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The chief mobilizer of the DSB response is the ATM protein kinase. We discovered that the COP9 signalosome (CSN) is a crucial player in the DSB response and an ATM target. CSN is a protein complex that regulates the activity of cullin ring ubiquitin ligase (CRL) complexes by removing the ubiquitin-like protein, NEDD8, from their cullin scaffold. We find that the CSN is physically recruited to DSB sites in a neddylation-dependent manner, and is required for timely repair of DSBs, affecting the balance between the two major DSB repair pathways—nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination repair (HRR). The CSN is essential for the processivity of deep end-resection—the initial step in HRR. Cullin 4a (CUL4A) is recruited to DSB sites in a CSN- and neddylation-dependent manner, suggesting that CSN partners with CRL4 in this pathway. Furthermore, we found that ATM-mediated phosphorylation of CSN subunit 3 on S410 is critical for proper DSB repair, and that loss of this phosphorylation site alone is sufficient to cause a DDR deficiency phenotype in the mouse. This novel branch of the DSB response thus significantly affects genome stability. PMID:25855810

  3. Triplex structures induce DNA double strand breaks via replication fork collapse in NER deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik Tiwari, Meetu; Adaku, Nneoma; Peart, Natoya; Rogers, Faye A.

    2016-01-01

    Structural alterations in DNA can serve as natural impediments to replication fork stability and progression, resulting in DNA damage and genomic instability. Naturally occurring polypurine mirror repeat sequences in the human genome can create endogenous triplex structures evoking a robust DNA damage response. Failures to recognize or adequately process these genomic lesions can result in loss of genomic integrity. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) proteins have been found to play a prominent role in the recognition and repair of triplex structures. We demonstrate using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that chromosomal triplexes perturb DNA replication fork progression, eventually resulting in fork collapse and the induction of double strand breaks (DSBs). We find that cells deficient in the NER damage recognition proteins, XPA and XPC, accumulate more DSBs in response to chromosomal triplex formation than NER-proficient cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that XPC-deficient cells are particularly prone to replication-associated DSBs in the presence of triplexes. In the absence of XPA or XPC, deleterious consequences of triplex-induced genomic instability may be averted by activating apoptosis via dual phosphorylation of the H2AX protein. Our results reveal that damage recognition by XPC and XPA is critical to maintaining replication fork integrity and preventing replication fork collapse in the presence of triplex structures. PMID:27298253

  4. Torsional regulation of hRPA-induced unwinding of double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Vidic, Iztok; van Loenhout, Marijn T J; Kanaar, Roland; Lebbink, Joyce H G; Dekker, Cees

    2010-07-01

    All cellular single-stranded (ss) DNA is rapidly bound and stabilized by single stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs). Replication protein A, the main eukaryotic SSB, is able to unwind double-stranded (ds) DNA by binding and stabilizing transiently forming bubbles of ssDNA. Here, we study the dynamics of human RPA (hRPA) activity on topologically constrained dsDNA with single-molecule magnetic tweezers. We find that the hRPA unwinding rate is exponentially dependent on torsion present in the DNA. The unwinding reaction is self-limiting, ultimately removing the driving torsional stress. The process can easily be reverted: release of tension or the application of a rewinding torque leads to protein dissociation and helix rewinding. Based on the force and salt dependence of the in vitro kinetics we anticipate that the unwinding reaction occurs frequently in vivo. We propose that the hRPA unwinding reaction serves to protect and stabilize the dsDNA when it is structurally destabilized by mechanical stresses.

  5. Cohesin promotes the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in replicated chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Bauerschmidt, Christina; Arrichiello, Cecilia; Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne; Woodcock, Michael; Hill, Mark A.; Stevens, David L.; Rothkamm, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The cohesin protein complex holds sister chromatids together after synthesis until mitosis. It also contributes to post-replicative DNA repair in yeast and higher eukaryotes and accumulates at sites of laser-induced damage in human cells. Our goal was to determine whether the cohesin subunits SMC1 and Rad21 contribute to DNA double-strand break repair in X-irradiated human cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. RNA interference-mediated depletion of SMC1 sensitized HeLa cells to X-rays. Repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, measured by γH2AX/53BP1 foci analysis, was slower in SMC1- or Rad21-depleted cells than in controls in G2 but not in G1. Inhibition of the DNA damage kinase DNA-PK, but not ATM, further inhibited foci loss in cohesin-depleted cells in G2. SMC1 depletion had no effect on DNA single-strand break repair in either G1 or late S/G2. Rad21 and SMC1 were recruited to sites of X-ray-induced DNA damage in G2-phase cells, but not in G1, and only when DNA damage was concentrated in subnuclear stripes, generated by partially shielded ultrasoft X-rays. Our results suggest that the cohesin complex contributes to cell survival by promoting the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in G2-phase cells in an ATM-dependent pathway. PMID:19906707

  6. A new method to efficiently induce a site-specific double-strand break in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Sunder, Sham; Greeson-Lott, Nikole T; Runge, Kurt W; Sanders, Steven L

    2012-07-01

    Double-strand DNA breaks are a serious threat to cellular viability and yeast systems have proved invaluable in helping to understand how these potentially toxic lesions are sensed and repaired. An important method to study the processing of DNA breaks in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is to introduce a unique double-strand break into the genome by regulating the expression of the site-specific HO endonuclease with a galactose inducible promoter. Variations of the HO site-specific DSB assay have been adapted to many organisms, but the methodology has seen only limited use in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe because of the lack of a promoter capable of inducing endonuclease expression on a relatively short time scale (~1 h). We have overcome this limitation by developing a new assay in which expression of the homing endonuclease I-PpoI is tightly regulated with a tetracycline-inducible promoter. We show that induction of the I-PpoI endonuclease produces rapid cutting of a defined cleavage site (> 80% after 1 h), efficient cell cycle arrest and significant accumulation of the checkpoint protein Crb2 at break-adjacent regions in a manner that is analogous to published findings with DSBs produced by an acute exposure to ionizing irradiation. This assay provides an important new tool for the fission yeast community and, because many aspects of mammalian chromatin organization have been well-conserved in Sz. pombe but not in S. cerevisiae, also offers an attractive system to decipher the role of chromatin structure in modulating the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. SAW1 is required for SDSA double-strand break repair in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Diamante, Graciel; Phan, Claire; Celis, Angie S; Krueger, Jonas; Kelson, Eric P; Fischhaber, Paula L

    2014-03-14

    SAW1, coding for Saw1, is required for single-strand annealing (SSA) DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in Saccharomycescerevisiae. Saw1 physically associates with Rad1 and Rad52 and recruits the Rad1-Rad10 endonuclease. Herein we show by fluorescence microscopy that SAW1 is similarly required for recruitment of Rad10 to sites of Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing (SDSA) and associates with sites of SDSA repair in a manner temporally overlapped with Rad10. The magnitude of induction of colocalized Saw1-CFP/Rad10-YFP/DSB-RFP foci in SDSA is more dramatic in S and G2 phase cells than in M phase, consistent with the known mechanism of SDSA. We observed a substantial fraction of foci in which Rad10 was localized to the repair site without Saw1, but few DSB sites that contained Saw1 without Rad10. Together these data are consistent with a model in which Saw1 recruits Rad1-Rad10 to SDSA sites, possibly even binding as a protein-protein complex, but departs the repair site in advance of Rad1-Rad10.

  8. Ex vivo regulation of specific gene expression by nanomolar concentration of double-stranded dumbbell oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Clusel, C; Ugarte, E; Enjolras, N; Vasseur, M; Blumenfeld, M

    1993-01-01

    Inhibition of specific transcriptional regulatory proteins is a new approach to control gene expression. Transcriptional activity of DNA-binding proteins can be inhibited by the use of double-stranded (ds) oligodeoxynucleotides that compete for the binding to their specific target sequences in promoters and enhancers. As a model, we used phosphodiester dumbbell oligonucleotides containing a binding site for the liver-enriched transcription factor HNF-1 (Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1). Binding affinity of HNF-1 to dumbbell oligonucleotides was the same as that to ds oligonucleotides, as determined by gel retardation assays. HNF-1 dumbbells specifically inhibited in vitro transcription driven by the albumin promoter by more than 90%. HNF-1-dependent activation of a CAT reporter plasmid was specifically inhibited when the HNF-1 dumbbell oligonucleotide was added at nM concentration to transiently transfected C33 cells. On the contrary, HNF-1 ds oligonucleotides, which displayed the same activity as the dumbbell oligonucleotides in the in vitro assays, were no more effective in the ex vivo experiments. These results might reflect the increased stability of the circular dumbbell oligonucleotides towards cellular nuclease degradation, as shown in vitro with nucleolytic enzymes. Dumbbell oligonucleotides containing unmodified phosphodiester bonds may efficiently compete for binding of specific transcription factors within cells, then providing a potential therapeutic tool to control disease-causing genes. Images PMID:7688452

  9. Homologous Pairing Preceding SPO11 Mediated Double Strand Breaks in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boateng, Kingsley A.; Bellani, Marina A.; Gregoretti, Ivan V.; Pratto, Florencia; Camerini-Otero, R. Daniel

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY How homologous chromosomes (homologs) find their partner, pair and recombine during meiosis constitutes the central phenomenon in eukaryotic genetics. It is widely believed that in most organisms SPO11-mediated DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) introduced during prophase I precede and are required for efficient homolog pairing. We now show that in the mouse, a significant level of homolog pairing precedes programmed DNA cleavage. Strikingly, this early chromosome pairing still requires SPO11, but is neither dependent on its ability to make DSBs nor homologous recombination proteins. Intriguingly, SUN1, a protein required for telomere attachment to the nuclear envelope and for post-DSB synapsis, is also required for early pre-DSB homolog pairing. Furthermore, pre-DSB pairing at telomeres persists upon entry into prophase I, and is most likely important for initiation of synapsis. Our findings suggest that the DSB-triggered homology search may mainly serve to proofread and stabilize the pre-DSB pairing of homologous chromosomes. PMID:23318132

  10. Intermediate States of Ribonuclease III in Complex with Double-Stranded RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Jianhua; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Court, Donald L.; Waugh, David S.; Ji, Xinhua

    2010-07-19

    Bacterial ribonuclease III (RNase III) can affect RNA structure and gene expression in either of two ways: as a processing enzyme that cleaves double-stranded (ds) RNA, or as a binding protein that binds but does not cleave dsRNA. We previously proposed a model of the catalytic complex of RNase III with dsRNA based on three crystal structures, including the endonuclease domain of RNase III with and without bound metal ions and a dsRNA binding protein complexed with dsRNA. We also reported a noncatalytic assembly observed in the crystal structure of an RNase III mutant, which binds but does not cleave dsRNA, complexed with dsRNA. We hypothesize that the RNase III {center_dot} dsRNA complex can exist in two functional forms, a catalytic complex and a noncatalytic assembly, and that in between the two forms there may be intermediate states. Here, we present four crystal structures of RNase III complexed with dsRNA, representing possible intermediates.

  11. DEAD Box 1 Facilitates Removal of RNA and Homologous Recombination at DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Germain, Devon R.; Poon, Ho-Yin; Hildebrandt, Matthew R.; Monckton, Elizabeth A.; McDonald, Darin; Hendzel, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Although RNA and RNA-binding proteins have been linked to double-strand breaks (DSBs), little is known regarding their roles in the cellular response to DSBs and, if any, in the repair process. Here, we provide direct evidence for the presence of RNA-DNA hybrids at DSBs and suggest that binding of RNA to DNA at DSBs may impact repair efficiency. Our data indicate that the RNA-unwinding protein DEAD box 1 (DDX1) is required for efficient DSB repair and cell survival after ionizing radiation (IR), with depletion of DDX1 resulting in reduced DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR). While DDX1 is not essential for end resection, a key step in homology-directed DSB repair, DDX1 is required for maintenance of the single-stranded DNA once generated by end resection. We show that transcription deregulation has a significant effect on DSB repair by HR in DDX1-depleted cells and that RNA-DNA duplexes are elevated at DSBs in DDX1-depleted cells. Based on our combined data, we propose a role for DDX1 in resolving RNA-DNA structures that accumulate at DSBs located at sites of active transcription. Our findings point to a previously uncharacterized requirement for clearing RNA at DSBs for efficient repair by HR. PMID:27550810

  12. DNA damage signaling in response to double-strand breaks during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Giunta, Simona

    2010-01-01

    The signaling cascade initiated in response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) has been extensively investigated in interphase cells. Here, we show that mitotic cells treated with DSB-inducing agents activate a “primary” DNA damage response (DDR) comprised of early signaling events, including activation of the protein kinases ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), histone H2AX phosphorylation together with recruitment of mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), and the Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 (MRN) complex to damage sites. However, mitotic cells display no detectable recruitment of the E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168, or accumulation of 53BP1 and BRCA1, at DSB sites. Accordingly, we found that DNA-damage signaling is attenuated in mitotic cells, with full DDR activation only ensuing when a DSB-containing mitotic cell enters G1. Finally, we present data suggesting that induction of a primary DDR in mitosis is important because transient inactivation of ATM and DNA-PK renders mitotic cells hypersensitive to DSB-inducing agents. PMID:20660628

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor and DNA double strand break repair: the cell's self-defence.

    PubMed

    Szumiel, Irena

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the relation between the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB)--the main lethal lesion inflicted by ionising radiation-and the function of receptors of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) and similar ligands (other members of the ERBB family). The reviewed experimental data support the assumption that in mammalian cells, one consequence of EGFR/ERBB activation by X-rays is its internalisation and nuclear translocation together with DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) subunits present in lipid rafts or cytoplasm. The effect of EGFR/ERBB stimulation on DSB rejoining would be due to an increase in the nuclear content of DNA-PK subunits and hence, in activity increase of the DNA-PK dependent non-homologous end-joining (D-NHEJ) system. Such mechanism explains the radiosensitising action of "membrane-active drugs", hypertonic media, and other agents that affect nuclear translocation of proteins. Also, one radiosensitising effect of the recently introduced into clinical practice EGFR/ERBB inhibitors would consist on counteracting the nuclear translocation of DNA-PK subunits. In result, D-NHEJ may be less active in inhibitor-treated cells and this will contribute to an enhanced lethal effect of irradiation. The reviewed observations point to a heretofore not understood mechanism of the cell's self-defence against X-rays which can be exploited in combined radio- and chemotherapy.

  14. Marking of specific sequences in double-stranded DNA molecules—SNP detection and direct observation

    PubMed Central

    Shigemori, Yasushi; Haruta, Hirotaka; Okada, Takao; Oishi, Michio

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we describe a simple method to mark specific sequences in double-stranded DNA molecules. For the marking, we used two specifically designed oligonucleotides, one of which is complementary to the sequence to be marked and the other, serving as a splint, to make the marking stable and detectable by subsequent various analytical means. In the presence of the two deoxyoligonucleotides, whereas RecA protein-mediated reaction converts the sequence to be marked to a regional triple-stranded structure with the complementary (probing) oligonucleotide, DNA ligase transforms it to a stable multi- (possibly quintuple) stranded structure with the splint oligonucleotide. The whole marking process is simple and completed in a single reaction mixture. Because RecA protein makes the marking to proceed with high fidelity, we were able to mark (detect) SNPs in complex genomes like human's. Furthermore, the structure of the marked sequence is stable and quite distinct enough to be readily detectable by biochemical means or direct observation by scanning probe microscopy. PMID:15574826

  15. Plasmid-Based Reverse Genetics for Animal Double-Stranded RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Antar, Annukka A. R.; Boehme, Karl W.; Danthi, Pranav; Eby, Elizabeth A.; Guglielmi, Kristen M.; Holm, Geoffrey H.; Johnson, Elizabeth M.; Maginnis, Melissa S.; Naik, Sam; Skelton, Wesley B.; Wetzel, J. Denise; Wilson, Gregory J.; Chappell, James D.; Dermody, Terence S.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Mammalian orthoreoviruses (reoviruses) are highly tractable experimental models for studies of double-stranded (ds) RNA virus replication and pathogenesis. Reoviruses infect respiratory and intestinal epithelium and disseminate systemically in newborn animals. Until now, a strategy to rescue infectious virus from cloned cDNA has not been available for any member of the Reoviridae family of dsRNA viruses. We report the generation of viable reovirus following plasmid transfection of murine L929 (L) cells using a strategy free of helper virus and independent of selection. Point mutations introduced into viral capsid proteins σ1 and σ3 were used to define sequences that govern susceptibility to cleavage by intestinal proteases. We recovered a recombinant virus that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) by replacement of the σ3 open-reading frame with GFP. The plasmid-based reverse genetics approach described here can be exploited for studies of reovirus replication and pathogenesis and used to develop reovirus as a vaccine vector. PMID:18005692

  16. Rad51-mediated double-strand break repair and mismatch correction of divergent substrates.

    PubMed

    Anand, Ranjith; Beach, Annette; Li, Kevin; Haber, James

    2017-04-20

    The Rad51 (also known as RecA) family of recombinases executes the critical step in homologous recombination: the search for homologous DNA to serve as a template during the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although budding yeast Rad51 has been extensively characterized in vitro, the stringency of its search and sensitivity to mismatched sequences in vivo remain poorly defined. Here, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we analysed Rad51-dependent break-induced replication in which the invading DSB end and its donor template share a 108-base-pair homology region and the donor carries different densities of single-base-pair mismatches. With every eighth base pair mismatched, repair was about 14% of that of completely homologous sequences. With every sixth base pair mismatched, repair was still more than 5%. Thus, completing break-induced replication in vivo overcomes the apparent requirement for at least 6-8 consecutive paired bases that has been inferred from in vitro studies. When recombination occurs without a protruding nonhomologous 3' tail, the mismatch repair protein Msh2 does not discourage homeologous recombination. However, when the DSB end contains a 3' protruding nonhomologous tail, Msh2 promotes the rejection of mismatched substrates. Mismatch correction of strand invasion heteroduplex DNA is strongly polar, favouring correction close to the DSB end. Nearly all mismatch correction depends on the proofreading activity of DNA polymerase-δ, although the repair proteins Msh2, Mlh1 and Exo1 influence the extent of correction.

  17. Genome-wide redistribution of meiotic double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Robine, Nicolas; Uematsu, Norio; Amiot, Franck; Gidrol, Xavier; Barillot, Emmanuel; Nicolas, Alain; Borde, Valérie

    2007-03-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by the formation of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the Spo11 protein. DSBs are not randomly distributed along chromosomes. To better understand factors that control the distribution of DSBs in budding yeast, we have examined the genome-wide binding and cleavage properties of the Gal4 DNA binding domain (Gal4BD)-Spo11 fusion protein. We found that Gal4BD-Spo11 cleaves only a subset of its binding sites, indicating that the association of Spo11 with chromatin is not sufficient for DSB formation. In centromere-associated regions, the centromere itself prevents DSB cleavage by tethered Gal4BD-Spo11 since its displacement restores targeted DSB formation. In addition, we observed that new DSBs introduced by Gal4BD-Spo11 inhibit surrounding DSB formation over long distances (up to 60 kb), keeping constant the number of DSBs per chromosomal region. Together, these results demonstrate that the targeting of Spo11 to new chromosomal locations leads to both local stimulation and genome-wide redistribution of recombination initiation and that some chromosomal regions are inherently cold regardless of the presence of Spo11.

  18. Homologous pairing preceding SPO11-mediated double-strand breaks in mice.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Kingsley A; Bellani, Marina A; Gregoretti, Ivan V; Pratto, Florencia; Camerini-Otero, R Daniel

    2013-01-28

    How homologous chromosomes (homologs) find their partner, pair, and recombine during meiosis constitutes the central phenomenon in eukaryotic genetics. It is widely believed that, in most organisms, SPO11-mediated DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) introduced during prophase I precede and are required for efficient homolog pairing. We now show that, in the mouse, a significant level of homolog pairing precedes programmed DNA cleavage. Strikingly, this early chromosome pairing still requires SPO11 but is not dependent on its ability to make DSBs or homologous recombination proteins. Intriguingly, SUN1, a protein required for telomere attachment to the nuclear envelope and for post-DSB synapsis, is also required for early pre-DSB homolog pairing. Furthermore, pre-DSB pairing at telomeres persists upon entry into prophase I and is most likely important for initiation of synapsis. Our findings suggest that the DSB-triggered homology search may mainly serve to proofread and stabilize the pre-DSB pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  19. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-06-24

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo.

  20. Using triplex-forming oligonucleotide probes for the reagentless, electrochemical detection of double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Adriana; Caprio, Felice; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis; Moscone, Danila; Plaxco, Kevin W; Palleschi, Giuseppe; Ricci, Francesco

    2010-11-01

    We report a reagentless, electrochemical sensor for the detection of double-stranded DNA targets that employs triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as its recognition element. These sensors are based on redox-tagged TFO probes strongly chemisorbed onto an interrogating gold electrode. Upon the addition of the relevant double-stranded DNA target, the probe forms a rigid triplex structure via reverse Hoogsteen base pairing in the major groove. The formation of the triplex impedes contact between the probe's redox moiety and the interrogating electrode, thus signaling the presence of the target. We first demonstrated the proof of principle of this approach by using a well-characterized 22-base polypurine TFO sequence that readily detects a synthetic, double-stranded DNA target. We then confirmed the generalizability of our platform with a second probe, a 19-base polypyrimidine TFO sequence that targets a polypurine tract (PPT) sequence conserved in all HIV-1 strains. Both sensors rapidly and specifically detect their double-stranded DNA targets at concentrations as low as ~10 nM and are selective enough to be employed directly in complex sample matrices such as blood serum. Moreover, to demonstrate real-world applicability of this new sensor platform, we have successfully detected unpurified, double-stranded PCR amplicons containing the relevant conserved HIV-1 sequence.

  1. Using Triplex-Forming Oligonucleotide Probes for the Reagentless, Electrochemical Detection of Double-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Adriana; Caprio, Felice; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis; Moscone, Danila; Plaxco, Kevin W.; Palleschi, Giuseppe; Ricci, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We report a reagentless, electrochemical sensor for the detection of double-stranded DNA targets that employs triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as its recognition element. These sensors are based on redox-tagged TFO probes strongly chemisorbed onto an interrogating gold electrode. Upon the addition of the relevant double-stranded DNA target, the probe forms a rigid triplex structure via reverse Hoogsteen base pairing in the major groove. The formation of the triplex impedes contact between the probe’s redox moiety and the interrogating electrode, thus signaling the presence of the target. We first demonstrated the proof of principle of this approach by using a well-characterized 22-base polypurine TFO sequence that readily detects a synthetic, double-stranded DNA target. We then confirmed the generalizability of our platform with a second probe, a 19-base polypyrimidine TFO sequence that targets a polypurine tract (PPT) sequence conserved in all HIV-1 strains. Both sensors rapidly and specifically detect their double-stranded DNA targets at concentrations as low as ~10 nM and are selective enough to be employed directly in complex sample matrices such as blood serum. Moreover, to demonstrate real-world applicability of this new sensor platform, we have successfully detected unpurified, double-stranded PCR amplicons containing the relevant conserved HIV-1 sequence. PMID:20936782

  2. Sulforaphane induces DNA double strand breaks predominantly repaired by homologous recombination pathway in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine-Suzuki, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Kubota, Nobuo; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2008-12-12

    Cytotoxicity and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were studied in HeLa cells treated with sulforaphane (SFN), a well-known chemo-preventive agent. Cell survival was impaired by SFN in a concentration and treatment time-dependent manner. Both constant field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) and {gamma}-H2AX assay unambiguously indicated formation of DSBs by SFN, reflecting the cell survival data. These DSBs were predominantly processed by homologous recombination repair (HRR), judging from the SFN concentration-dependent manner of Rad51 foci formation. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, a key non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) protein, was not observed by SFN treatment, suggesting that NHEJ may not be involved in DSBs induced by this chemical. G2/M arrest by SFN, a typical response for cells exposed to ionizing radiation was also observed. Our new data indicate the clear induction of DSBs by SFN and a useful anti-tumor aspect of SFN through the induction of DNA DSBs.

  3. Fine-tuning the ubiquitin code at DNA double-strand breaks: deubiquitinating enzymes at work

    PubMed Central

    Citterio, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a reversible protein modification broadly implicated in cellular functions. Signaling processes mediated by ubiquitin (ub) are crucial for the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), one of the most dangerous types of DNA lesions. In particular, the DSB response critically relies on active ubiquitination by the RNF8 and RNF168 ub ligases at the chromatin, which is essential for proper DSB signaling and repair. How this pathway is fine-tuned and what the functional consequences are of its deregulation for genome integrity and tissue homeostasis are subject of intense investigation. One important regulatory mechanism is by reversal of substrate ubiquitination through the activity of specific deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), as supported by the implication of a growing number of DUBs in DNA damage response processes. Here, we discuss the current knowledge of how ub-mediated signaling at DSBs is controlled by DUBs, with main focus on DUBs targeting histone H2A and on their recent implication in stem cell biology and cancer. PMID:26442100

  4. Tumor suppressor and deubiquitinase BAP1 promotes DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Helen; Pak, Helen; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Ghram, Mehdi; Rodrigue, Amélie; Daou, Salima; Barbour, Haithem; Corbeil, Luc; Hébert, Josée; Drobetsky, Elliot; Masson, Jean Yves; Di Noia, Javier M.; Affar, El Bachir

    2014-01-01

    The cellular response to highly genotoxic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) involves the exquisite coordination of multiple signaling and repair factors. Here, we conducted a functional RNAi screen and identified BAP1 as a deubiquitinase required for efficient assembly of the homologous recombination (HR) factors BRCA1 and RAD51 at ionizing radiation (IR) -induced foci. BAP1 is a chromatin-associated protein frequently inactivated in cancers of various tissues. To further investigate the role of BAP1 in DSB repair, we used a gene targeting approach to knockout (KO) this deubiquitinase in chicken DT40 cells. We show that BAP1-deficient cells are (i) sensitive to IR and other agents that induce DSBs, (ii) defective in HR-mediated immunoglobulin gene conversion, and (iii) exhibit an increased frequency of chromosomal breaks after IR treatment. We also show that BAP1 is recruited to chromatin in the proximity of a single site-specific I-SceI–induced DSB. Finally, we identified six IR-induced phosphorylation sites in BAP1 and showed that mutation of these residues inhibits BAP1 recruitment to DSB sites. We also found that both BAP1 catalytic activity and its phosphorylation are critical for promoting DNA repair and cellular recovery from DNA damage. Our data reveal an important role for BAP1 in DSB repair by HR, thereby providing a possible molecular basis for its tumor suppressor function. PMID:24347639

  5. Analysis of DNA double-strand break response and chromatin structure in mitosis using laser microirradiation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Wu, Tao; Sherman, Adria J.; Lee, Christopher S.; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Zhongsheng, You; Yokomori, Kyoko; Berns, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    In this study the femtosecond near-IR and nanosecond green lasers are used to induce alterations in mitotic chromosomes. The subsequent double-strand break responses are studied. We show that both lasers are capable of creating comparable chromosomal alterations and that a phase paling observed within 1–2 s of laser exposure is associated with an alteration of chromatin as confirmed by serial section electron microscopy, DAPI, γH2AX and phospho-H3 staining. Additionally, the accumulation of dark material observed using phase contrast light microscopy (indicative of a change in refractive index of the chromatin) ∼34 s post-laser exposure corresponds spatially to the accumulation of Nbs1, Ku and ubiquitin. This study demonstrates that chromosomes selectively altered in mitosis initiate the DNA damage response within 30 s and that the accumulation of proteins are visually represented by phase-dark material at the irradiation site, allowing us to determine the fate of the damage as cells enter G1. These results occur with two widely different laser systems, making this approach to study DNA damage responses in the mitotic phase generally available to many different labs. Additionally, we present a summary of most of the published laser studies on chromosomes in order to provide a general guide of the lasers and operating parameters used by other laboratories. PMID:20923785

  6. PML nuclear body disruption impairs DNA double-strand break sensing and repair in APL.

    PubMed

    di Masi, A; Cilli, D; Berardinelli, F; Talarico, A; Pallavicini, I; Pennisi, R; Leone, S; Antoccia, A; Noguera, N I; Lo-Coco, F; Ascenzi, P; Minucci, S; Nervi, C

    2016-07-28

    Proteins involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair localize within the promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), whose disruption is at the root of the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) pathogenesis. All-trans-retinoic acid (RA) treatment induces PML-RARα degradation, restores PML-NB functions, and causes terminal cell differentiation of APL blasts. However, the precise role of the APL-associated PML-RARα oncoprotein and PML-NB integrity in the DSB response in APL leukemogenesis and tumor suppression is still lacking. Primary leukemia blasts isolated from APL patients showed high phosphorylation levels of H2AX (γ-H2AX), an initial DSBs sensor. By addressing the consequences of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSB response in primary APL blasts and RA-responsive and -resistant myeloid cell lines carrying endogenous or ectopically expressed PML-RARα, before and after treatment with RA, we found that the disruption of PML-NBs is associated with delayed DSB response, as revealed by the impaired kinetic of disappearance of γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci and activation of ATM and of its substrates H2AX, NBN, and CHK2. The disruption of PML-NB integrity by PML-RARα also affects the IR-induced DSB response in a preleukemic mouse model of APL in vivo. We propose the oncoprotein-dependent PML-NB disruption and DDR impairment as relevant early events in APL tumorigenesis.

  7. Castration radiosensitizes prostate cancer tissue by impairing DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Tarish, Firas L; Schultz, Niklas; Tanoglidi, Anna; Hamberg, Hans; Letocha, Henry; Karaszi, Katalin; Hamdy, Freddie C; Granfors, Torvald; Helleday, Thomas

    2015-11-04

    Chemical castration improves responses to radiotherapy in prostate cancer, but the mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that this radiosensitization is caused by castration-mediated down-regulation of nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). To test this, we enrolled 48 patients with localized prostate cancer in two arms of the study: either radiotherapy first or radiotherapy after neoadjuvant castration treatment. We biopsied patients at diagnosis and before and after castration and radiotherapy treatments to monitor androgen receptor, NHEJ, and DSB repair in verified cancer tissue. We show that patients receiving neoadjuvant castration treatment before radiotherapy had reduced amounts of the NHEJ protein Ku70, impaired radiotherapy-induced NHEJ activity, and higher amounts of unrepaired DSBs, measured by γ-H2AX foci in cancer tissues. This study demonstrates that chemical castration impairs NHEJ activity in prostate cancer tissue, explaining the improved response of patients with prostate cancer to radiotherapy after chemical castration. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Identification of a pKa-regulating motif stabilizing imidazole-modified double-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Buyst, Dieter; Gheerardijn, Vicky; Fehér, Krisztina; Van Gasse, Bjorn; Van Den Begin, Jos; Martins, José C.; Madder, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    The predictable 3D structure of double-stranded DNA renders it ideally suited as a template for the bottom-up design of functionalized nucleic acid-based active sites. We here explore the use of a 14mer DNA duplex as a scaffold for the precise and predictable positioning of catalytic functionalities. Given the ubiquitous participation of the histidine-based imidazole group in protein recognition and catalysis events, single histidine-like modified duplexes were investigated. Tethering histamine to the C5 of the thymine base via an amide bond, allows the flexible positioning of the imidazole function in the major groove. The mutual interactions between the imidazole and the duplex and its influence on the imidazolium pKaH are investigated by placing a single modified thymine at four different positions in the center of the 14mer double helix. Using NMR and unrestrained molecular dynamics, a structural motif involving the formation of a hydrogen bond between the imidazole and the Hoogsteen side of the guanine bases of two neighboring GC base pairs is established. The motif contributes to a stabilization against thermal melting of 6°C and is key in modulating the pKaH of the imidazolium group. The general features, prerequisites and generic character of the new pKaH-regulating motif are described. PMID:25520197

  9. MOF phosphorylation by ATM regulates 53BP1-mediated double-strand break repair pathway choice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arun; Hunt, Clayton R; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Singh, Mayank; Ramnarain, Deepti B; Hittelman, Walter N; Namjoshi, Sarita; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Hazra, Tapas K; Ludwig, Thomas; Pandita, Raj K; Tyler, Jessica K; Pandita, Tej K

    2014-07-10

    Cell-cycle phase is a critical determinant of the choice between DNA damage repair by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). Here, we report that double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce ATM-dependent MOF (a histone H4 acetyl-transferase) phosphorylation (p-T392-MOF) and that phosphorylated MOF colocalizes with γ-H2AX, ATM, and 53BP1 foci. Mutation of the phosphorylation site (MOF-T392A) impedes DNA repair in S and G2 phase but not G1 phase cells. Expression of MOF-T392A also blocks the reduction in DSB-associated 53BP1 seen in wild-type S/G2 phase cells, resulting in enhanced 53BP1 and reduced BRCA1 association. Decreased BRCA1 levels at DSB sites correlates with defective repairosome formation, reduced HR repair, and decreased cell survival following irradiation. These data support a model whereby ATM-mediated MOF-T392 phosphorylation modulates 53BP1 function to facilitate the subsequent recruitment of HR repair proteins, uncovering a regulatory role for MOF in DSB repair pathway choice during S/G2 phase. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. DNA double-strand breaks induced along the trajectory of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, I. C.; Niu, H.; Chen, C. H.; Yu, Y. C.; Hsu, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    It is well-known that the DNA damage caused by charged particles considerably differs from damage due to electromagnetic radiation. In the case of irradiation by charged particles the DNA lesions are more complex and clustered. Such clustered damage is presumed difficult to be repaired, and is potentially lethal. In this study, we utilize a 90°-scattering system and related imaging techniques to investigate the accumulation of γ-H2AX along the trajectory of charged particles. By immunostaining the γ-H2AX protein, optical images of corresponding double strand breaks were observed using a high resolution confocal microscope. We demonstrate the difference in the accumulation of γ-H2AX from irradiation by 1 MeV protons and that of 150 keV X-rays. The acquired images were arranged and reconstructed into a 3D image using ImageJ software. We discovered that the γ-H2AX foci, following irradiation by protons, have a tendency to extend in the beam direction, while those from X-ray irradiation tend to be smaller and more randomly distributed. These results can be explained by the physical model of energy deposition.

  11. Meiotic double-strand breaks at the interface of chromosome movement, chromosome remodeling, and reductional division.

    PubMed

    Storlazzi, Aurora; Tessé, Sophie; Gargano, Silvana; James, Françoise; Kleckner, Nancy; Zickler, Denise

    2003-11-01

    Chromosomal processes related to formation and function of meiotic chiasmata have been analyzed in Sordaria macrospora. Double-strand breaks (DSBs), programmed or gamma-rays-induced, are found to promote four major events beyond recombination and accompanying synaptonemal complex formation: (1) juxtaposition of homologs from long-distance interactions to close presynaptic coalignment at midleptotene; (2) structural destabilization of chromosomes at leptotene/zygotene, including sister axis separation and fracturing, as revealed in a mutant altered in the conserved, axis-associated cohesin-related protein Spo76/Pds5p; (3) exit from the bouquet stage, with accompanying global chromosome movements, at zygotene/pachytene (bouquet stage exit is further found to be a cell-wide regulatory transition and DSB transesterase Spo11p is suggested to have a new noncatalytic role in this transition); (4) normal occurrence of both meiotic divisions, including normal sister separation. Functional interactions between DSBs and the spo76-1 mutation suggest that Spo76/Pds5p opposes local destabilization of axes at developing chiasma sites and raise the possibility of a regulatory mechanism that directly monitors the presence of chiasmata at metaphase I. Local chromosome remodeling at DSB sites appears to trigger an entire cascade of chromosome movements, morphogenetic changes, and regulatory effects that are superimposed upon a foundation of DSB-independent processes.

  12. Meiotic double-strand breaks at the interface of chromosome movement, chromosome remodeling, and reductional division

    PubMed Central

    Storlazzi, Aurora; Tessé, Sophie; Gargano, Silvana; James, Françoise; Kleckner, Nancy; Zickler, Denise

    2003-01-01

    Chromosomal processes related to formation and function of meiotic chiasmata have been analyzed in Sordaria macrospora. Double-strand breaks (DSBs), programmed or γ-rays-induced, are found to promote four major events beyond recombination and accompanying synaptonemal complex formation: (1) juxtaposition of homologs from long-distance interactions to close presynaptic coalignment at midleptotene; (2) structural destabilization of chromosomes at leptotene/zygotene, including sister axis separation and fracturing, as revealed in a mutant altered in the conserved, axis-associated cohesin-related protein Spo76/Pds5p; (3) exit from the bouquet stage, with accompanying global chromosome movements, at zygotene/pachytene (bouquet stage exit is further found to be a cell-wide regulatory transition and DSB transesterase Spo11p is suggested to have a new noncatalytic role in this transition); (4) normal occurrence of both meiotic divisions, including normal sister separation. Functional interactions between DSBs and the spo76-1 mutation suggest that Spo76/Pds5p opposes local destabilization of axes at developing chiasma sites and raise the possibility of a regulatory mechanism that directly monitors the presence of chiasmata at metaphase I. Local chromosome remodeling at DSB sites appears to trigger an entire cascade of chromosome movements, morphogenetic changes, and regulatory effects that are superimposed upon a foundation of DSB-independent processes. PMID:14563680

  13. Multiple mechanisms contribute to double-strand break repair at rereplication forks in Drosophila follicle cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jessica L.; Beagan, Kelly; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.; McVey, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    Rereplication generates double-strand breaks (DSBs) at sites of fork collisions and causes genomic damage, including repeat instability and chromosomal aberrations. However, the primary mechanism used to repair rereplication DSBs varies across different experimental systems. In Drosophila follicle cells, developmentally regulated rereplication is used to amplify six genomic regions, two of which contain genes encoding eggshell proteins. We have exploited this system to test the roles of several DSB repair pathways during rereplication, using fork progression as a readout for DSB repair efficiency. Here we show that a null mutation in the microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ) component, polymerase θ/mutagen-sensitive 308 (mus308), exhibits a sporadic thin eggshell phenotype and reduced chorion gene expression. Unlike other thin eggshell mutants, mus308 displays normal origin firing but reduced fork progression at two regions of rereplication. We also find that MMEJ compensates for loss of nonhomologous end joining to repair rereplication DSBs in a site-specific manner. Conversely, we show that fork progression is enhanced in the absence of both Drosophila Rad51 homologs, spindle-A and spindle-B, revealing homologous recombination is active and actually impairs fork movement during follicle cell rereplication. These results demonstrate that several DSB repair pathways are used during rereplication in the follicle cells and their contribution to productive fork progression is influenced by genomic position and repair pathway competition. Furthermore, our findings illustrate that specific rereplication DSB repair pathways can have major effects on cellular physiology, dependent upon genomic context. PMID:27849606

  14. DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Telomeres Play Important Roles in Trypanosoma brucei Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human-infecting microbial pathogens all face a serious problem of elimination by the host immune response. Antigenic variation is an effective immune evasion mechanism where the pathogen regularly switches its major surface antigen. In many cases, the major surface antigen is encoded by genes from the same gene family, and its expression is strictly monoallelic. Among pathogens that undergo antigenic variation, Trypanosoma brucei (a kinetoplastid), which causes human African trypanosomiasis, Plasmodium falciparum (an apicomplexan), which causes malaria, Pneumocystis jirovecii (a fungus), which causes pneumonia, and Borrelia burgdorferi (a bacterium), which causes Lyme disease, also express their major surface antigens from loci next to the telomere. Except for Plasmodium, DNA recombination-mediated gene conversion is a major pathway for surface antigen switching in these pathogens. In the last decade, more sophisticated molecular and genetic tools have been developed in T. brucei, and our knowledge of functions of DNA recombination in antigenic variation has been greatly advanced. VSG is the major surface antigen in T. brucei. In subtelomeric VSG expression sites (ESs), VSG genes invariably are flanked by a long stretch of upstream 70-bp repeats. Recent studies have shown that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), particularly those in 70-bp repeats in the active ES, are a natural potent trigger for antigenic variation in T. brucei. In addition, telomere proteins can influence VSG switching by reducing the DSB amount at subtelomeric regions. These findings will be summarized and their implications will be discussed in this review. PMID:25576484

  15. Mechanisms of DNA Packaging by Large Double-Stranded DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Venigalla B.; Feiss, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Translocation of viral double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) into the icosahedral prohead shell is catalyzed by TerL, a motor protein that has ATPase, endonuclease, and translocase activities. TerL, following endonucleolytic cleavage of immature viral DNA concatemer recognized by TerS, assembles into a pentameric ring motor on the prohead’s portal vertex and uses ATP hydrolysis energy for DNA translocation. TerL’s N-terminal ATPase is connected by a hinge to the C-terminal endonuclease. Inchworm models propose that modest domain motions accompanying ATP hydrolysis are amplified, through changes in electrostatic interactions, into larger movements of the C-terminal domain bound to DNA. In phage φ29, four of the five TerL subunits sequentially hydrolyze ATP, each powering translocation of 2.5 bp. After one viral genome is encapsidated, the internal pressure signals termination of packaging and ejection of the motor. Current focus is on the structures of packaging complexes and the dynamics of TerL during DNA packaging, endonuclease regulation, and motor mechanics. PMID:26958920

  16. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated activation by transcription- and topoisomerase I-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Sordet, Olivier; Redon, Christophe E; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Smith, Susan; Solier, Stéphanie; Douarre, Céline; Conti, Chiara; Nakamura, Asako J; Das, Benu B; Nicolas, Estelle; Kohn, Kurt W; Bonner, William M; Pommier, Yves

    2009-08-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), the deficiency of which causes a severe neurodegenerative disease, is a crucial mediator for the DNA damage response (DDR). As neurons have high rates of transcription that require topoisomerase I (TOP1), we investigated whether TOP1 cleavage complexes (TOP1cc)-which are potent transcription-blocking lesions-also produce transcription-dependent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with ATM activation. We show the induction of DSBs and DDR activation in post-mitotic primary neurons and lymphocytes treated with camptothecin, with the induction of nuclear DDR foci containing activated ATM, gamma-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX), activated CHK2 (checkpoint kinase 2), MDC1 (mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1) and 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1). The DSB-ATM-DDR pathway was suppressed by inhibiting transcription and gamma-H2AX signals were reduced by RNase H1 transfection, which removes transcription-mediated R-loops. Thus, we propose that Top1cc produce transcription arrests with R-loop formation and generate DSBs that activate ATM in post-mitotic cells.

  17. Sulforaphane induces DNA double strand breaks predominantly repaired by homologous recombination pathway in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sekine-Suzuki, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Kubota, Nobuo; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2008-12-12

    Cytotoxicity and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were studied in HeLa cells treated with sulforaphane (SFN), a well-known chemo-preventive agent. Cell survival was impaired by SFN in a concentration and treatment time-dependent manner. Both constant field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) and gamma-H2AX assay unambiguously indicated formation of DSBs by SFN, reflecting the cell survival data. These DSBs were predominantly processed by homologous recombination repair (HRR), judging from the SFN concentration-dependent manner of Rad51 foci formation. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, a key non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) protein, was not observed by SFN treatment, suggesting that NHEJ may not be involved in DSBs induced by this chemical. G2/M arrest by SFN, a typical response for cells exposed to ionizing radiation was also observed. Our new data indicate the clear induction of DSBs by SFN and a useful anti-tumor aspect of SFN through the induction of DNA DSBs.

  18. Live cell microscopy analysis of radiation-induced DNA double-strand break motion

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, B.; Splinter, J.; Durante, M.; Taucher-Scholz, G.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the spatiotemporal organization of DNA damage processing by live cell microscopy analysis in human cells. In unirradiated U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cancer cells, a fast confined and Brownian-like motion of DNA repair protein foci was observed, which was not altered by radiation. By analyzing the motional activity of GFP-53BP1 foci in live cells up to 12-h after irradiation, we detected an additional slower mobility of damaged chromatin sites showing a mean square displacement of ≈0.6 μm2/h after exposure to densely- or sparsely-ionizing radiation, most likely driven by normal diffusion of chromatin. Only occasionally, larger translational motion connected to morphological changes of the whole nucleus could be observed. In addition, there was no general tendency to form repair clusters in the irradiated cells. We conclude that long-range displacements of damaged chromatin domains do not generally occur during DNA double-strand break repair after introduction of multiple damaged sites by charged particles. The occasional and in part transient appearance of cluster formation of radiation-induced foci may represent a higher mobility of chromatin along the ion trajectory. These observations support the hypothesis that spatial proximity of DNA breaks is required for the formation of radiation-induced chromosomal exchanges. PMID:19221031

  19. Homozygous mutation of MTPAP causes cellular radiosensitivity and persistent DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Martin, N T; Nakamura, K; Paila, U; Woo, J; Brown, C; Wright, J A; Teraoka, S N; Haghayegh, S; McCurdy, D; Schneider, M; Hu, H; Quinlan, A R; Gatti, R A; Concannon, P

    2014-01-01

    The study of rare human syndromes characterized by radiosensitivity has been instrumental in identifying novel proteins and pathways involved in DNA damage responses to ionizing radiation. In the present study, a mutation in mitochondrial poly-A-polymerase (MTPAP), not previously recognized for its role in the DNA damage response, was identified by exome sequencing and subsequently associated with cellular radiosensitivity. Cell lines derived from two patients with the homozygous MTPAP missense mutation were radiosensitive, and this radiosensitivity could be abrogated by transfection of wild-type mtPAP cDNA into mtPAP-deficient cell lines. Further analysis of the cellular phenotype revealed delayed DNA repair, increased levels of DNA double-strand breaks, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), and increased cell death after irradiation (IR). Pre-IR treatment of cells with the potent anti-oxidants, α-lipoic acid and n-acetylcysteine, was sufficient to abrogate the DNA repair and clonogenic survival defects. Our results firmly establish that mutation of the MTPAP gene results in a cellular phenotype of increased DNA damage, reduced repair kinetics, increased cell death by apoptosis, and reduced clonogenic survival after exposure to ionizing radiation, suggesting a pathogenesis that involves the disruption of ROS homeostasis. PMID:24651433

  20. A three-dimensional statistical mechanical model of folding double-stranded chain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbing; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2001-05-01

    Based on a graphical representation of intrachain contacts, we have developed a new three-dimensional model for the statistical mechanics of double-stranded chain molecules. The theory has been tested and validated for the cubic lattice chain conformations. The statistical mechanical model can be applied to the equilibrium folding thermodynamics of a large class of chain molecules, including protein β-hairpin conformations and RNA secondary structures. The application of a previously developed two-dimensional model to RNA secondary structure folding thermodynamics generally overestimates the breadth of the melting curves [S-J. Chen and K. A. Dill, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 646 (2000)], suggesting an underestimation for the sharpness of the conformational transitions. In this work, we show that the new three-dimensional model gives much sharper melting curves than the two-dimensional model. We believe that the new three-dimensional model may give much improved predictions for the thermodynamic properties of RNA conformational changes than the previous two-dimensional model.

  1. PML nuclear body disruption impairs DNA double-strand break sensing and repair in APL

    PubMed Central

    di Masi, A; Cilli, D; Berardinelli, F; Talarico, A; Pallavicini, I; Pennisi, R; Leone, S; Antoccia, A; Noguera, N I; Lo-Coco, F; Ascenzi, P; Minucci, S; Nervi, C

    2016-01-01

    Proteins involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair localize within the promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), whose disruption is at the root of the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) pathogenesis. All-trans-retinoic acid (RA) treatment induces PML-RARα degradation, restores PML-NB functions, and causes terminal cell differentiation of APL blasts. However, the precise role of the APL-associated PML-RARα oncoprotein and PML-NB integrity in the DSB response in APL leukemogenesis and tumor suppression is still lacking. Primary leukemia blasts isolated from APL patients showed high phosphorylation levels of H2AX (γ-H2AX), an initial DSBs sensor. By addressing the consequences of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSB response in primary APL blasts and RA-responsive and -resistant myeloid cell lines carrying endogenous or ectopically expressed PML-RARα, before and after treatment with RA, we found that the disruption of PML-NBs is associated with delayed DSB response, as revealed by the impaired kinetic of disappearance of γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci and activation of ATM and of its substrates H2AX, NBN, and CHK2. The disruption of PML-NB integrity by PML-RARα also affects the IR-induced DSB response in a preleukemic mouse model of APL in vivo. We propose the oncoprotein-dependent PML-NB disruption and DDR impairment as relevant early events in APL tumorigenesis. PMID:27468685

  2. Real-time analysis of double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Wade M; Yamaguchi, Miyuki; Haber, James E

    2011-02-22

    The ability to induce synchronously a single site-specific double-strand break (DSB) in a budding yeast chromosome has made it possible to monitor the kinetics and genetic requirements of many molecular steps during DSB repair. Special attention has been paid to the switching of mating-type genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a process initiated by the HO endonuclease by cleaving the MAT locus. A DSB in MATa is repaired by homologous recombination--specifically, by gene conversion--using a heterochromatic donor, HMLα. Repair results in the replacement of the a-specific sequences (Ya) by Yα and switching from MATa to MATα. We report that MAT switching requires the DNA replication factor Dpb11, although it does not require the Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase or the Mcm and Cdc45 helicase components. Using Southern blot, PCR, and ChIP analysis of samples collected every 10 min, we extend previous studies of this process to identify the times for the loading of Rad51 recombinase protein onto the DSB ends at MAT, the subsequent strand invasion by the Rad51 nucleoprotein filament into the donor sequences, the initiation of new DNA synthesis, and the removal of the nonhomologous Y sequences. In addition we report evidence for the transient displacement of well-positioned nucleosomes in the HML donor locus during strand invasion.

  3. The MRE11 GAR motif regulates DNA double-strand break processing and ATR activation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhenbao; Vogel, Gillian; Coulombe, Yan; Dubeau, Danielle; Spehalski, Elizabeth; Hébert, Josée; Ferguson, David O; Masson, Jean Yves; Richard, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    The MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex is the primary sensor rapidly recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). MRE11 is known to be arginine methylated by PRMT1 within its glycine-arginine-rich (GAR) motif. In this study, we report a mouse knock-in allele of Mre11 that substitutes the arginines with lysines in the GAR motif and generates the MRE11RK protein devoid of methylated arginines. The Mre11RK/RK mice were hypersensitive to γ-irradiation (IR) and the cells from these mice displayed cell cycle checkpoint defects and chromosome instability. Moreover, the Mre11RK/RK MEFs exhibited ATR/CHK1 signaling defects and impairment in the recruitment of RPA and RAD51 to the damaged sites. The MRKRN complex formed and localized to the sites of DNA damage and normally activated the ATM pathway in response to IR. The MRKRN complex exhibited exonuclease and DNA-binding defects in vitro responsible for the impaired DNA end resection and ATR activation observed in vivo in response to IR. Our findings provide genetic evidence for the critical role of the MRE11 GAR motif in DSB repair, and demonstrate a mechanistic link between post-translational modifications at the MRE11 GAR motif and DSB processing, as well as the ATR/CHK1 checkpoint signaling. PMID:21826105

  4. Rad51-mediated double-strand break repair and mismatch correction of divergent substrates

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ranjith; Beach, Annette; Li, Kevin; Haber, James

    2017-01-01

    The RecA/Rad51 family of recombinases execute the critical step in homologous recombination (HR): the search for homologous DNA to serve as the template during DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair1–7. Although budding yeast Rad51 has been extensively characterized in vitro3,4,6–9, the stringency of its search and sensitivity to mismatched sequences in vivo remain poorly defined. We analyzed Rad51-dependent break-induced replication (BIR) where the invading DSB end and its donor template share 108 bp homology and the donor carries different densities of single-bp mismatches (Fig. 1a). With every 8th bp mismatched, repair was ~14% compared to completely homologous sequences. With every 6th bp mismatched, repair was >5%. Thus completing BIR in vivo overcomes the apparent requirement for at least 6–8 consecutive paired bases inferred from in vitro studies6,8. When recombination occurs without a protruding nonhomologous 3′ tail, mismatch repair protein Msh2 does not discourage homeologous recombination. However, when the DSB end contains a 3′ protruding nonhomologous tail, Msh2 promotes rejection of mismatched substrates. Mismatch correction of strand invasion heteroduplex DNA is strongly polar, favoring correction close to the DSB end. Nearly all mismatch correction depends on the proofreading activity of DNA polymerase δ, although Msh2-Mlh1 and Exo1 influence the extent of correction. PMID:28405019

  5. Chromosome position determines the success of double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Sheng; Wang, Ruoxi W; Chang, Hsiao-Han; Capurso, Daniel; Segal, Mark R; Haber, James E

    2016-01-12

    Repair of a chromosomal double-strand break (DSB) by gene conversion depends on the ability of the broken ends to encounter a donor sequence. To understand how chromosomal location of a target sequence affects DSB repair, we took advantage of genome-wide Hi-C analysis of yeast chromosomes to create a series of strains in which an induced site-specific DSB in budding yeast is repaired by a 2-kb donor sequence inserted at different locations. The efficiency of repair, measured by cell viability or competition between each donor and a reference site, showed a strong correlation (r = 0.85 and 0.79) with the contact frequencies of each donor with the DSB repair site. Repair efficiency depends on the distance between donor and recipient rather than any intrinsic limitation of a particular donor site. These results further demonstrate that the search for homology is the rate-limiting step in DSB repair and suggest that cells often fail to repair a DSB because they cannot locate a donor before other, apparently lethal, processes arise. The repair efficiency of a donor locus can be improved by four factors: slower 5' to 3' resection of the DSB ends, increased abundance of replication protein factor A (RPA), longer shared homology, or presence of a recombination enhancer element adjacent to a donor.

  6. Telmisartan Induces Growth Inhibition, DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Apoptosis in Human Endometrial Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Naoko; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishii, Terukazu; Yoshida, Toshie; Furukawa, Yuichi; Narahara, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Telmisartan, an angiotensin II receptor type 1 blocker, is often used as an antihypertension drug, and it has also been characterized as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) ligand. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the antitumor effects of telmisartan on endometrial cancer cells. We treated three endometrial cancer cell lines with various concentrations of telmisartan, and we investigated the effects of the telmisartan on the cell proliferation, apoptosis, and their related measurements in vitro. We also administered telmisartan to nude mice with experimental tumors to determine its in vivo effects and toxicity. All three endometrial cancer cell lines were sensitive to the growth-inhibitory effect of telmisartan. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed in concert with the altered expression of genes and proteins related to the apoptosis. We also observed that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were induced in HHUA (human endometrial cancer) cells by telmisartan treatment. In addition, experiments in nude mice showed that telmisartan significantly inhibited human endometrial tumor growth, without toxic side effects. Our results suggest that telmisartan might be a new therapeutic option for the treatment of endometrial cancers. PMID:24667764

  7. Double-strand break repair in tandem repeats during bacteriophage T4 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Tomso, D J; Kreuzer, K N

    2000-01-01

    Recombinational repair of double-strand breaks in tandemly repeated sequences often results in the loss of one or more copies of the repeat. The single-strand annealing (SSA) model for repair has been proposed to account for this nonconservative recombination. In this study we present a plasmid-based physical assay that measures SSA during bacteriophage T4 infection and apply this assay to the genetic analysis of break repair. SSA occurs readily in broken plasmid DNA and is independent of the strand exchange protein UvsX and its accessory factor UvsY. We use the unique features of T4 DNA metabolism to examine the link between SSA repair and DNA replication and demonstrate directly that the DNA polymerase and the major replicative helicase of the phage are not required for SSA repair. We also show that the Escherichia coli RecBCD enzyme can mediate the degradation of broken DNA during early, but not late, times of infection. Finally, we consider the status of broken ends during the course of the infection and propose a model for SSA during T4 infections. PMID:10924452

  8. Cotton plants expressing CYP6AE14 double-stranded RNA show enhanced resistance to bollworms.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ying-Bo; Tao, Xiao-Yuan; Xue, Xue-Yi; Wang, Ling-Jian; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2011-06-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) plays an important role in regulating gene expression in eukaryotes. Previously, we generated Arabidopsis and tobacco plants expressing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting a cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera) P450 gene, CYP6AE14. Bollworms fed on transgenic dsCYP6AE14 plants showed suppressed CYP6AE14 expression and reduced growth on gossypol-containing diet (Mao et al., in Nat Biotechnol 25: 1307-1313, 2007). Here we report generation and analysis of dsRNA-expressing cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) plants. Bollworm larvae reared on T2 plants of the ds6-3 line exhibited drastically retarded growth, and the transgenic plants were less damaged by bollworms than the control. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that the CYP6AE14 expression level was reduced in the larvae as early as 4 h after feeding on the transgenic plants; accordingly, the CYP6AE14 protein level dropped. These results demonstrated that transgenic cotton plants expressing dsCYP6AE14 acquired enhanced resistance to cotton bollworms, and that RNAi technology can be used for engineering insect-proof cotton cultivar.

  9. Real-time analysis of double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Wade M.; Yamaguchi, Miyuki; Haber, James E.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to induce synchronously a single site-specific double-strand break (DSB) in a budding yeast chromosome has made it possible to monitor the kinetics and genetic requirements of many molecular steps during DSB repair. Special attention has been paid to the switching of mating-type genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a process initiated by the HO endonuclease by cleaving the MAT locus. A DSB in MATa is repaired by homologous recombination—specifically, by gene conversion—using a heterochromatic donor, HMLα. Repair results in the replacement of the a-specific sequences (Ya) by Yα and switching from MATa to MATα. We report that MAT switching requires the DNA replication factor Dpb11, although it does not require the Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase or the Mcm and Cdc45 helicase components. Using Southern blot, PCR, and ChIP analysis of samples collected every 10 min, we extend previous studies of this process to identify the times for the loading of Rad51 recombinase protein onto the DSB ends at MAT, the subsequent strand invasion by the Rad51 nucleoprotein filament into the donor sequences, the initiation of new DNA synthesis, and the removal of the nonhomologous Y sequences. In addition we report evidence for the transient displacement of well-positioned nucleosomes in the HML donor locus during strand invasion. PMID:21292986

  10. RecQ helicases in DNA double strand break repair and telomere maintenance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Ghosh, Avik K; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-08-01

    Organisms are constantly exposed to various environmental insults which could adversely affect the stability of their genome. To protect their genomes against the harmful effect of these environmental insults, organisms have evolved highly diverse and efficient repair mechanisms. Defective DNA repair processes can lead to various kinds of chromosomal and developmental abnormalities. RecQ helicases are a family of evolutionarily conserved, DNA unwinding proteins which are actively engaged in various DNA metabolic processes, telomere maintenance and genome stability. Bacteria and lower eukaryotes, like yeast, have only one RecQ homolog, whereas higher eukaryotes including humans possess multiple RecQ helicases. These multiple RecQ helicases have redundant and/or non-redundant functions depending on the types of DNA damage and DNA repair pathways. Humans have five different RecQ helicases and defects in three of them cause autosomal recessive diseases leading to various kinds of cancer predisposition and/or aging phenotypes. Emerging evidence also suggests that the RecQ helicases have important roles in telomere maintenance. This review mainly focuses on recent knowledge about the roles of RecQ helicases in DNA double strand break repair and telomere maintenance which are important in preserving genome integrity.

  11. MDA5 cooperatively forms dimers and ATP-sensitive filaments upon binding double-stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Berke, Ian C; Modis, Yorgo

    2012-01-01

    Melanoma differentiation-associated gene-5 (MDA5) detects viral double-stranded RNA in the cytoplasm. RNA binding induces MDA5 to activate the signalling adaptor MAVS through interactions between the caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) of the two proteins. The molecular mechanism of MDA5 signalling is not well understood. Here, we show that MDA5 cooperatively binds short RNA ligands as a dimer with a 16–18-basepair footprint. A crystal structure of the MDA5 helicase-insert domain demonstrates an evolutionary relationship with the archaeal Hef helicases. In X-ray solution structures, the CARDs in unliganded MDA5 are flexible, and RNA binds on one side of an asymmetric MDA5 dimer, bridging the two subunits. On longer RNA, full-length and CARD-deleted MDA5 constructs assemble into ATP-sensitive filaments. We propose a signalling model in which the CARDs on MDA5–RNA filaments nucleate the assembly of MAVS filaments with the same polymeric geometry. PMID:22314235

  12. Radiation dose determines the method for quantification of DNA double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Bulat, Tanja; Keta, Otilija; Korićanac, Lela; Žakula, Jelena; Petrović, Ivan; Ristić-Fira, Aleksandra; Todorović, Danijela

    2016-03-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that trigger phosphorylation of the histone protein H2AX (γH2AX). Immunofluorescent staining visualizes formation of γH2AX foci, allowing their quantification. This method, as opposed to Western blot assay and Flow cytometry, provides more accurate analysis, by showing exact position and intensity of fluorescent signal in each single cell. In practice there are problems in quantification of γH2AX. This paper is based on two issues: the determination of which technique should be applied concerning the radiation dose, and how to analyze fluorescent microscopy images obtained by different microscopes. HTB140 melanoma cells were exposed to γ-rays, in the dose range from 1 to 16 Gy. Radiation effects on the DNA level were analyzed at different time intervals after irradiation by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunochemically stained cells were visualized with two types of microscopes: AxioVision (Zeiss, Germany) microscope, comprising an ApoTome software, and AxioImagerA1 microscope (Zeiss, Germany). Obtained results show that the level of γH2AX is time and dose dependent. Immunofluorescence microscopy provided better detection of DSBs for lower irradiation doses, while Western blot analysis was more reliable for higher irradiation doses. AxioVision microscope containing ApoTome software was more suitable for the detection of γH2AX foci.

  13. Sequencing Spo11 Oligonucleotides for Mapping Meiotic DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Lam, Isabel; Mohibullah, Neeman; Keeney, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized form of cell division resulting in reproductive cells with a reduced, usually haploid, genome complement. A key step after premeiotic DNA replication is the occurrence of homologous recombination at multiple places throughout the genome, initiated with the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the topoisomerase-like protein Spo11. DSBs are distributed non-randomly in genomes, and understanding the mechanisms that shape this distribution is important for understanding how meiotic recombination influences heredity and genome evolution. Several methods exist for mapping where Spo11 acts. Of these, sequencing of Spo11-associated oligonucleotides (Spo11 oligos) is the most precise, specifying the locations of DNA breaks to the base pair. In this chapter we detail the steps involved in Spo11-oligo mapping in the SK1 strain of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, from harvesting cells of highly synchronous meiotic cultures, through preparation of sequencing libraries, to the mapping pipeline used for processing the data.

  14. Coordinated nuclease activities counteract Ku at single-ended DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Chanut, Pauline; Britton, Sébastien; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P.; Calsou, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Repair of single-ended DNA double-strand breaks (seDSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) requires the generation of a 3′ single-strand DNA overhang by exonuclease activities in a process called DNA resection. However, it is anticipated that the highly abundant DNA end-binding protein Ku sequesters seDSBs and shields them from exonuclease activities. Despite pioneering works in yeast, it is unclear how mammalian cells counteract Ku at seDSBs to allow HR to proceed. Here we show that in human cells, ATM-dependent phosphorylation of CtIP and the epistatic and coordinated actions of MRE11 and CtIP nuclease activities are required to limit the stable loading of Ku on seDSBs. We also provide evidence for a hitherto unsuspected additional mechanism that contributes to prevent Ku accumulation at seDSBs, acting downstream of MRE11 endonuclease activity and in parallel with MRE11 exonuclease activity. Finally, we show that Ku persistence at seDSBs compromises Rad51 focus assembly but not DNA resection. PMID:27641979

  15. RecQ helicases in DNA double strand break repair and telomere maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Ghosh, Avik K.; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms are constantly exposed to various environmental insults which could adversely affect the stability of their genome. To protect their genomes against the harmful effect of these environmental insults, organisms have evolved highly diverse and efficient repair mechanisms. Defective DNA repair processes can lead to various kinds of chromosomal and developmental abnormalities. RecQ helicases are a family of evolutionarily conserved, DNA unwinding proteins which are actively engaged in various DNA metabolic processes, telomere maintenance and genome stability. Bacteria and lower eukaryotes, like yeast, have only one RecQ homolog, whereas higher eukaryotes including humans possess multiple RecQ helicases. These multiple RecQ helicases have redundant and/or non-redundant functions depending on the types of DNA damage and DNA repair pathways. Humans have five different RecQ helicases and defects in three of them cause autosomal recessive diseases leading to various kinds of cancer predisposition and/or aging phenotypes. Emerging evidence also suggests that the RecQ helicases have important roles in telomere maintenance. This review mainly focuses on recent knowledge about the roles of RecQ helicases in DNA double strand break repair and telomere maintenance which are important in preserving genome integrity. PMID:21689668

  16. Interactions of human O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) with short double-stranded DNAs.

    PubMed

    Melikishvili, Manana; Rasimas, Joseph J; Pegg, Anthony E; Fried, Michael G

    2008-12-30

    O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) is a ubiquitous enzyme with an amino acid sequence that is conserved in Eubacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. It repairs O(6)-alkylguanine and O(4)-alkylthymine adducts in single-stranded and duplex DNAs. In performing these functions, AGT must partition between adduct-containing sites and the large excess of adduct-free DNA distributed throughout the genome. Here, we characterize the binding of human AGT to linear double-stranded, adduct-free DNAs ranging in length from 11 bp to 2686 bp. Moderately cooperative binding (22.6 +/- 3.7 < or = omega < or = 145.0 +/- 37.0) results in an all-or-nothing association pattern on short templates. The apparent binding site size S(app) (mean = 4.39 +/- 0.02 bp) oscillates with increasing template length. Oscillations in cooperativity factor omega have the same frequency but are of opposite phase to S(app), with the result that the most stable protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions occur at the highest packing densities. The oscillation period (4.05 +/- 0.02 bp/protein) is nearly identical to the occluded binding site size obtained at the highest measured binding density (4 bp/protein) and is significantly smaller than the contour length ( approximately 8 bp) occupied in crystalline complexes. A model in which protein molecules overlap along the DNA contour is proposed to account for these features. High AGT densities resulting from cooperative binding may allow efficient search for lesions in the context of chromatin remodeling and DNA replication.

  17. INTERACTIONS OF HUMAN O6-ALKYLGUANINE-DNA ALKYLTRANSFERASE (AGT) WITH SHORT DOUBLE-STRANDED DNAS†

    PubMed Central

    Melikishvili, Manana; Rasimas, Joseph J.; Pegg, Anthony E.; Fried, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) is a ubiquitous enzyme with an amino acid sequence that is conserved in Eubacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. It repairs O6-alkylguanine and O4-alkylthymine adducts in single-stranded and duplex DNAs. In performing these functions, AGT must partition between adduct-containing sites and the large excess of adduct-free DNA distributed throughout the genome. Here we characterize the binding of human AGT to linear double-stranded, adduct-free DNAs ranging in length from 11 bp to 2686 bp. Moderately-cooperative binding (22.6 ± 3.7 ≤ ω ≤ 145.0 ± 37.0) results in an all-or-nothing association pattern on short templates. The apparent binding site size Sapp (mean = 4.39 ± 0.02 bp) oscillates with increasing template length. Oscillations in cooperativity factor ω have the same frequency but are of opposite phase to Sapp, with the result that the most stable protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions occur at the highest packing densities. The oscillation period (4.05 ± 0.02 bp/protein) is nearly identical to the occluded binding site size obtained at the highest measured binding density (4 bp/protein) and is significantly smaller than the contour length (~8 bp) occupied in crystalline complexes. A model in which protein molecules overlap along the DNA contour is proposed to account for these features. High AGT densities resulting from cooperative binding may allow efficient search for lesions in the context of chromatin remodeling and DNA replication. PMID:19061338

  18. Characterization of Steroid Receptor RNA Activator Protein Function in Modulating the Estrogen Signaling Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    reporter vector (Promega, Madison, WI) using the lipo - fectamine reagent (Invitrogen). Cells were then treated with either ethanol (vehicle), estradiol...and concurrent functions and regulations of SRA RNA and SRAP, are essential to establish the clinical potential of these bifaceted mole - cules in the...by SRA1 RNA and SRAP. SRA1 appears to be the first example of a mole - cule active both at the RNA and at the protein level. No data are currently

  19. Structure and Function of Steroid Receptor RNA Activator Protein, the Proposed Partner of SRA Non-coding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Barthel, Kristen K. B.; Cech, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    In a widely accepted model, the steroid receptor RNA activator protein (SRA protein; SRAP) modulates the transcriptional regulatory activity of SRA RNA by binding a specific stem-loop of SRA. We first confirmed that SRAP is present in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, where it is expressed at the level of about 105 molecules/cell. However, our SRAP-RNA binding experiments, both in vitro with recombinant protein and in cultured cells with plasmid-expressed protein and RNA, did not reveal a specific interaction between SRAP and SRA. We determined the crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal domain of human SRAP and found that it does not have the postulated RRM (RNA recognition motif). The structure is a five-helix bundle that is distinct from known RNA-binding motifs and instead is similar to the carboxy-terminal domain of the yeast spliceosome protein PRP18, which stabilizes specific protein-protein interactions within a multisubunit mRNA splicing complex. SRA binding experiments with this domain gave negative results. Transcriptional regulation by SRA/SRAP was examined with siRNA knockdown. Effects on both specific estrogen-responsive genes and genes identified by RNA-seq as candidates for regulation were examined in MCF-7 cells. Only a small effect (~20% change) on one gene resulting from depletion of SRA/SRAP could be confirmed. We conclude that the current model for SRAP function must be re-evaluated; we suggest SRAP may function in a different context to stabilize specific intermolecular interactions in the nucleus. PMID:24486609

  20. TDP-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of TDP-43, limits the accumulation of double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Saldi, Tassa K; Ash, Peter Ea; Wilson, Gavin; Gonzales, Patrick; Garrido-Lecca, Alfonso; Roberts, Christine M; Dostal, Vishantie; Gendron, Tania F; Stein, Lincoln D; Blumenthal, Thomas; Petrucelli, Leonard; Link, Christopher D

    2014-12-17

    Caenorhabditis elegans mutants deleted for TDP-1, an ortholog of the neurodegeneration-associated RNA-binding protein TDP-43, display only mild phenotypes. Nevertheless, transcriptome sequencing revealed that many RNAs were altered in accumulation and/or processing in the mutant. Analysis of these transcriptional abnormalities demonstrates that a primary function of TDP-1 is to limit formation or stability of double-stranded RNA. Specifically, we found that deletion of tdp-1: (1) preferentially alters the accumulation of RNAs with inherent double-stranded structure (dsRNA); (2) increases the accumulation of nuclear dsRNA foci; (3) enhances the frequency of adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing; and (4) dramatically increases the amount of transcripts immunoprecipitable with a dsRNA-specific antibody, including intronic sequences, RNAs with antisense overlap to another transcript, and transposons. We also show that TDP-43 knockdown in human cells results in accumulation of dsRNA, indicating that suppression of dsRNA is a conserved function of TDP-43 in mammals. Altered accumulation of structured RNA may account for some of the previously described molecular phenotypes (e.g., altered splicing) resulting from reduction of TDP-43 function.

  1. Molecular cloning of cDNA for double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase, a candidate enzyme for nuclear RNA editing.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, U; Wang, Y; Sanford, T; Zeng, Y; Nishikura, K

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned human cDNA encoding double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase (DRADA). DRADA is a ubiquitous nuclear enzyme that converts multiple adenosines to inosines in double-helical RNA substrates without apparent sequence specificity. The A --> I conversion activity of the protein encoded by the cloned cDNA was confirmed by recombinant expression in insect cells. Use of the cloned DNA as a molecular probe documented sequence conservation across mammals and detected a single transcript of 7 kb in RNA of all human tissues analyzed. The deduced primary structure of human DRADA revealed a bipartite nuclear localization signal, three repeats of a double-stranded RNA binding motif, and the presence of sequences conserved in the catalytic center of other deaminases, including a cytidine deaminase involved in the RNA editing of apolipoprotein B. These structural properties are consistent with the enzymatic signature of DRADA, and strengthen the hypothesis that DRADA carries out the RNA editing of transcripts encoding glutamate-gated ion channels in brain. Images PMID:7972084

  2. Selective contribution of IFN-/ signaling to the maturation of dendritic cells induced by double-stranded RNA or viral infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Kenya; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Nakajima, Chigusa; Watanabe, Ai; Yanai, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Misako; Ohteki, Toshiaki; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Takaoka, Akinori; Akira, Shizuo; Seya, Tsukasa; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2003-09-01

    A complex mechanism may be operational for dendritic cell (DC) maturation, wherein Toll-like receptor and other signaling pathways may be coordinated differently depending on the nature of the pathogens, in order for DC maturation to be most effective to a given threat. Here, we show that IFN-/ signaling is selectively required for the maturation of DCs induced by double-stranded RNA or viral infection in vitro. Interestingly, the maturation is still observed in the absence of either of the two target genes of IFN-/, TLR3 and PKR (double-stranded-RNA-dependent protein kinase R), indicating the complexity of the IFN-/-induced transcriptional program in DCs. We also show that the DCs stimulated in vivo by these agents can migrate into the T cell zone of the spleen but fail to mature without the IFN signal. The immune system may have acquired the selective utilization of this cytokine system, which is essential for innate antiviral immunity, to effectively couple with the induction of adaptive immunity.

  3. The ancestral role of ATP hydrolysis in type II topoisomerases: prevention of DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Andrew D.; Berger, James M.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Type II DNA topoisomerases (topos) catalyse changes in DNA topology by passing one double-stranded DNA segment through another. This reaction is essential to processes such as replication and transcription, but carries with it the inherent danger of permanent double-strand break (DSB) formation. All type II topos hydrolyse ATP during their reactions; however, only DNA gyrase is able to harness the free energy of hydrolysis to drive DNA supercoiling, an energetically unfavourable process. A long-standing puzzle has been to understand why the majority of type II enzymes consume ATP to support reactions that do not require a net energy input. While certain type II topos are known to ‘simplify’ distributions of DNA topoisomers below thermodynamic equilibrium levels, the energy required for this process is very low, suggesting that this behaviour is not the principal reason for ATP hydrolysis. Instead, we propose that the energy of ATP hydrolysis is needed to control the separation of protein–protein interfaces and prevent the accidental formation of potentially mutagenic or cytotoxic DSBs. This interpretation has parallels with the actions of a variety of molecular machines that catalyse the conformational rearrangement of biological macromolecules. PMID:21525132

  4. Contribution of DNA double-strand break repair gene XRCC3 genotypes to oral cancer susceptibility in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Wen-Shin; Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Bau, Da-Tian

    2014-06-01

    The DNA repair gene X-ray repair cross complementing protein 3 (XRCC3) is thought to play a major role in double-strand break repair and in maintaining genomic stability. Very possibly, defective double-strand break repair of cells can lead to carcinogenesis. Therefore, a case-control study was performed to reveal the contribution of XRCC3 genotypes to individual oral cancer susceptibility. In this hospital-based research, the association of XRCC3 rs1799794, rs45603942, rs861530, rs3212057, rs1799796, rs861539, rs28903081 genotypes with oral cancer risk in a Taiwanese population was investigated. In total, 788 patients with oral cancer and 956 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were genotyped. The results showed that there was significant differential distribution among oral cancer and controls in the genotypic (p=0.001428) and allelic (p=0.0013) frequencies of XRCC3 rs861539. As for the other polymorphisms, there was no difference between case and control groups. In gene-lifestyle interaction analysis, we have provided the first evidence showing that there is an obvious joint effect of XRCC3 rs861539 genotype with individual areca chewing habits on oral cancer risk. In conclusion, the T allele of XRCC3 rs861539, which has an interaction with areca chewing habit in oral carcinogenesis, may be an early marker for oral cancer in Taiwanese.

  5. Long noncoding RNA LINP1 regulates repair of DNA double-strand breaks in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youyou; He, Qun; Hu, Zhongyi; Feng, Yi; Fan, Lingling; Tang, Zhaoqing; Yuan, Jiao; Shan, Weiwei; Li, Chunsheng; Hu, Xiaowen; Tanyi, Janos L; Fan, Yi; Huang, Qihong; Montone, Kathleen; Dang, Chi V; Zhang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play critical roles during tumorigenesis by functioning as scaffolds that regulate protein-protein, protein-DNA or protein-RNA interactions. Using a clinically guided genetic screening approach, we identified lncRNA in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway 1 (LINP1), which is overexpressed in human triple-negative breast cancer. We found that LINP1 enhances repair of DNA double-strand breaks by serving as a scaffold linking Ku80 and DNA-PKcs, thereby coordinating the NHEJ pathway. Importantly, blocking LINP1, which is regulated by p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, increases the sensitivity of the tumor-cell response to radiotherapy in breast cancer.

  6. Rotavirus Replication: Plus-Sense Templates for Double-Stranded RNA Synthesis Are Made in Viroplasms

    PubMed Central

    Silvestri, Lynn S.; Taraporewala, Zenobia F.; Patton, John T.

    2004-01-01

    Rotavirus plus-strand RNAs not only direct protein synthesis but also serve as templates for the synthesis of the segmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genome. In this study, we identified short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for viral genes 5, 8, and 9 that suppressed the expression of NSP1, a nonessential protein; NSP2, a component of viral replication factories (viroplasms); and VP7, an outer capsid protein, respectively. The loss of NSP2 expression inhibited viroplasm formation, genome replication, virion assembly, and synthesis of the other viral proteins. In contrast, the loss of VP7 expression had no effect on genome replication; instead, it inhibited only outer-capsid morphogenesis. Similarly, neither genome replication nor any other event of the viral life cycle was affected by the loss of NSP1. The data indicate that plus-strand RNAs templating dsRNA synthesis within viroplasms are not susceptible to siRNA-induced RNase degradation. In contrast, plus-strand RNAs templating protein synthesis in the cytosol are susceptible to degradation and thus are not the likely source of plus-strand RNAs for dsRNA synthesis in viroplasms. Indeed, immunofluorescence analysis of bromouridine (BrU)-labeled RNA made in infected cells provided evidence that plus-strand RNAs are synthesized within viroplasms. Furthermore, transfection of BrU-labeled viral plus-strand RNA into infected cells suggested that plus-strand RNAs introduced into the cytosol do not localize to viroplasms. From these results, we propose that plus-strand RNAs synthesized within viroplasms are the primary source of templates for genome replication and that trafficking pathways do not exist within the cytosol that transport plus-strand RNAs to viroplasms. The lack of such pathways confounds the development of reverse genetics systems for rotavirus. PMID:15220450

  7. Double strand breaks may be a missing link between entropy and aging.

    PubMed

    Lenart, Peter; Bienertová-Vašků, Julie

    2016-07-01

    It has been previously suggested that an increase in entropy production leads to aging. However, the mechanisms linking increased entropy production in living mass to aging are currently unclear. Even though entropy cannot be easily associated with any specific molecular damage, the increase of entropy in structural mass may be connected with heat stress, which is known to generate double strand breaks. Double strand breaks, which are in turn known to play an important role in process of aging, are thus connected to both aging and an increase of entropy. In view of these associations, we propose a new model where the increase of entropy leads to the formation of double strand breaks, resulting in an aging phenotype. This not only offers a new perspective on aging research and facilitates experimental validation, but could also serve as a useful explanatory tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Tightly Stretched Ultralong Supramolecular Multiporphyrin Array Propagated by Double-Strand Formation.

    PubMed

    Morisue, Mitsuhiko; Hoshino, Yuki; Shimizu, Masaki; Uemura, Shinobu; Sakurai, Shinichi

    2016-09-05

    A shape-programmed linearity through supramolecular polymerization is demonstrated by a step-growth double-strand formation of a telechelic oligomeric porphyrin array in which two alternating pyridyl-porphyrin sequenced units are held together by self-complementary ligand-to-metal coordination. The stiff rod-like structure and sufficiently large binding constant of the double-strand unit considerably extended a supramolecular array in the one dimension, which produced a tightly stretched string with a length that exceeded several micrometers. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Tbf1 and Vid22 promote resection and non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand break ends.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Diego; Anbalagan, Savani; Lucchini, Giovanna; Clerici, Michela; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2013-01-23

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is crucial for maintaining genome stability. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Tbf1, which is characterized by a Myb domain and is related to mammalian TRF1 and TRF2, has been proposed to act as a transcriptional activator. Here, we show that Tbf1 and its interacting protein Vid22 are new players in the response to DSBs. Inactivation of either TBF1 or VID22 causes hypersensitivity to DSB-inducing agents and shows strong negative interactions with mutations affecting homologous recombination. Furthermore, Tbf1 and Vid22 are recruited to an HO-induced DSB, where they promote both resection of DNA ends and repair by non-homologous end joining. Finally, inactivation of either Tbf1 or Vid22 impairs nucleosome eviction around the DSB, suggesting that these proteins promote efficient repair of the break by influencing chromatin identity in its surroundings.

  10. Vilya, a component of the recombination nodule, is required for meiotic double-strand break formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lake, Cathleen M; Nielsen, Rachel J; Guo, Fengli; Unruh, Jay R; Slaughter, Brian D; Hawley, R Scott

    2015-10-09

    Meiotic recombination begins with the induction of programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs). In most organisms only a fraction of DSBs become crossovers. Here we report a novel meiotic gene, vilya, which encodes a protein with homology to Zip3-like proteins shown to determine DSB fate in other organisms. Vilya is required for meiotic DSB formation, perhaps as a consequence of its interaction with the DSB accessory protein Mei-P22, and localizes to those DSB sites that will mature into crossovers. In early pachytene Vilya localizes along the central region of the synaptonemal complex and to discrete foci. The accumulation of Vilya at foci is dependent on DSB formation. Immuno-electron microscopy demonstrates that Vilya is a component of recombination nodules, which mark the sites of crossover formation. Thus Vilya links the mechanism of DSB formation to either the selection of those DSBs that will become crossovers or to the actual process of crossing over.

  11. The interferon-stimulated genes: targets of direct signaling by interferons, double-stranded RNA, and viruses.

    PubMed

    Sen, G C; Sarkar, S N

    2007-01-01

    The interferon system plays a profound role in determining the outcome of viral infection in mammals. Viruses induce the synthesis of interferon, which, in turn, blocks virus replication by inducing the expression of antiviral proteins encoded by interferon-stimulated genes. It is not widely appreciated that without the participation of interferon, many of the same genes can also be induced by a variety of virus-related agents, such as double-stranded RNA and viral proteins. In this chapter, we discuss different signaling pathways, activated by these agents, that lead to the induction of partially overlapping sets of genes, including the interferon-stimulated genes. We also review the biochemical and cellular properties of the protein products of a selected number of these genes including ISG56, ISG54, and ISG15.

  12. Interactions of Ku70/80 with Double-Strand DNA: Energetic, Dynamics, and Functional Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    Space radiation is a proficient inducer of DNA damage leading to mutation, aberrant cell signaling, and cancer formation. Ku is among the first responding proteins in nucleus to recognize and bind the DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) whenever they are introduced. Once loaded Ku works as a scaffold to recruit other repair factors of non-homologous end joining and facilitates the following repair processes. The crystallographic study of the Ku70/80 heterodimer indicate the core structure of this protein shows virtually no conformational change after binding with DNA. To investigate the dynamical features as well as the energetic characteristics of Ku-DNA binding, we conduct multi-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations of a modeled Ku70/80 structure and several complexes with two 24-bp DNA duplexes. Free energy calculations show significant energy differences between the complexes with Ku bound at DSBs and those with Ku associated at an internal site of a chromosome. The results also reveal detailed interactions between different nucleotides and the amino acids along the DNA-binding cradle of Ku, indicating subtle binding preference of Ku at specific DNA sequences. The covariance matrix analyses along the trajectories demonstrate the protein is stimulated to undergo correlated motions of different domains once bound to DNA ends. Additionally, principle component analyses identify these low frequency collective motions suitable for binding with and translocation along duplex DNA. It is proposed that the modification of dynamical properties of Ku upon binding with DSBs may provide a signal for the further recruitment of other repair factors such as DNA-PKcs, XLF, and XRCC4.

  13. DNA double-strand breaks activate ATM independent of mitochondrial dysfunction in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Kalifa, Lidza; Gewandter, Jennifer S; Staversky, Rhonda J; Sia, Elaine A; Brookes, Paul S; O'Reilly, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    Excessive nuclear or mitochondrial DNA damage can lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased energy production, and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although numerous cell signaling pathways are activated when cells are injured, the ataxia telangiectasia mutant (ATM) protein has emerged as a major regulator of the response to both mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Because mitochondrial dysfunction is often a response to excessive DNA damage, it has been difficult to determine whether nuclear and/or mitochondrial DNA DSBs activate ATM independent of mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, mitochondrial and nuclear DNA DSBs were generated in the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line by infecting with retroviruses expressing the restriction endonuclease PstI fused to a mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) or nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and a hemagglutinin antigen epitope tag (HA). Expression of MTS-PstI-HA or NLS-PstI-HA activated the DNA damage response defined by phosphorylation of ATM, the tumor suppressor protein p53 (TP53), KRAB-associated protein (KAP)-1, and structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC)-1. Phosphorylated ATM and SMC1 were detected in nuclear fractions, whereas phosphorylated TP53 and KAP1 were detected in both mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. PstI also enhanced expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and inhibited cell growth. This response to DNA damage occurred in the absence of detectable mitochondrial dysfunction and excess production of ROS. These findings reveal that DNA DSBs are sufficient to activate ATM independent of mitochondrial dysfunction and suggest that the activated form of ATM and some of its substrates are restricted to the nuclear compartment, regardless of the site of DNA damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Transcriptional Response to DNA-Double-Strand Breaks in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Kamisugi, Yasuko; Whitaker, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens is unique among plants in supporting the generation of mutant alleles by facile homologous recombination-mediated gene targeting (GT). Reasoning that targeted transgene integration occurs through the capture of transforming DNA by the homology-dependent pathway for DNA double-strand break (DNA-DSB) repair, we analysed the genome-wide transcriptomic response to bleomycin-induced DNA damage and generated mutants in candidate DNA repair genes. Massively parallel (Illumina) cDNA sequencing identified potential participants in gene targeting. Transcripts encoding DNA repair proteins active in multiple repair pathways were significantly up-regulated. These included Rad51, CtIP, DNA ligase 1, Replication protein A and ATR in homology-dependent repair, Xrcc4, DNA ligase 4, Ku70 and Ku80 in non-homologous end-joining and Rad1, Tebichi/polymerase theta, PARP in microhomology-mediated end-joining. Differentially regulated cell-cycle components included up-regulated Rad9 and Hus1 DNA-damage-related checkpoint proteins and down-regulated D-type cyclins and B-type CDKs, commensurate with the imposition of a checkpoint at G2 of the cell cycle characteristic of homology-dependent DNA-DSB repair. Candidate genes, including ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling helicases associated with repair and recombination, were knocked out and analysed for growth defects, hypersensitivity to DNA damage and reduced GT efficiency. Targeted knockout of PpCtIP, a cell-cycle activated mediator of homology-dependent DSB resection, resulted in bleomycin-hypersensitivity and greatly reduced GT efficiency. PMID:27537368

  15. The Double-Stranded DNA Virosphere as a Modular Hierarchical Network of Gene Sharing

    PubMed Central

    Iranzo, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Virus genomes are prone to extensive gene loss, gain, and exchange and share no universal genes. Therefore, in a broad-scale study of virus evolution, gene and genome network analyses can complement traditional phylogenetics. We performed an exhaustive comparative analysis of the genomes of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses by using the bipartite network approach and found a robust hierarchical modularity in the dsDNA virosphere. Bipartite networks consist of two classes of nodes, with nodes in one class, in this case genomes, being connected via nodes of the second class, in this case genes. Such a network can be partitioned into modules that combine nodes from both classes. The bipartite network of dsDNA viruses includes 19 modules that form 5 major and 3 minor supermodules. Of these modules, 11 include tailed bacteriophages, reflecting the diversity of this largest group of viruses. The module analysis quantitatively validates and refines previously proposed nontrivial evolutionary relationships. An expansive supermodule combines the large and giant viruses of the putative order “Megavirales” with diverse moderate-sized viruses and related mobile elements. All viruses in this supermodule share a distinct morphogenetic tool kit with a double jelly roll major capsid protein. Herpesviruses and tailed bacteriophages comprise another supermodule, held together by a distinct set of morphogenetic proteins centered on the HK97-like major capsid protein. Together, these two supermodules cover the great majority of currently known dsDNA viruses. We formally identify a set of 14 viral hallmark genes that comprise the hubs of the network and account for most of the intermodule connections. PMID:27486193

  16. Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies support a late step in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Percy Luk; Denissova, Natalia G; Nasello, Cara; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Chen, J Don; Brenneman, Mark A

    2012-05-01

    The PML protein and PML nuclear bodies (PML-NB) are implicated in multiple cellular functions relevant to tumor suppression, including DNA damage response. In most cases of acute promyelocytic leukemia, the PML and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) genes are translocated, resulting in expression of oncogenic PML-RARα fusion proteins. PML-NB fail to form normally, and promyelocytes remain in an undifferentiated, abnormally proliferative state. We examined the involvement of PML protein and PML-NB in homologous recombinational repair (HRR) of chromosomal DNA double-strand breaks. Transient overexpression of wild-type PML protein isoforms produced hugely enlarged or aggregated PML-NB and reduced HRR by ~2-fold, suggesting that HRR depends to some extent upon normal PML-NB structure. Knockdown of PML by RNA interference sharply attenuated formation of PML-NB and reduced HRR by up to 20-fold. However, PML-knockdown cells showed apparently normal induction of H2AX phosphorylation and RAD51 foci after DNA damage by ionizing radiation. These findings indicate that early steps in HRR, including recognition of DNA double-strand breaks, initial processing of ends, and assembly of single-stranded DNA/RAD51 nucleoprotein filaments, do not depend upon PML-NB. The HRR deficit in PML-depleted cells thus reflects inhibition of later steps in the repair pathway. Expression of PML-RARα fusion proteins disrupted PML-NB structure and reduced HRR by up to 10-fold, raising the possibility that defective HRR and resulting genomic instability may figure in the pathogenesis, progression and relapse of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

  17. PAXX, a paralog of XRCC4 and XLF, interacts with Ku to promote DNA double-strand break repair**

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Julia; Jhujh, Satpal; Mehmood, Shahid; Tamura, Naoka; Travers, Jon; Wu, Qian; Draviam, Viji M.; Robinson, Carol V.; Blundell, Tom L.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    XRCC4 and XLF are two structurally-related proteins that function in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here, we identify human PAXX (PAralog of XRCC4 and XLF; also called C9orf142) as a new XRCC4-superfamily member, and show that its crystal structure resembles that of XRCC4. PAXX interacts directly with the DSB-repair protein Ku and is recruited to DNA-damage sites in cells. Using RNA interference and CRISPR-Cas9 to generate PAXX−/− cells, we demonstrate that PAXX functions with XRCC4 and XLF to mediate DSB repair and cell survival in response to DSB-inducing agents. Finally, we reveal that PAXX promotes Ku-dependent DNA ligation in vitro, and assembly of core non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) factors on damaged chromatin in cells. These findings identify PAXX as a new component of the NHEJ machinery. PMID:25574025

  18. Subtelomeric I-SceI-Mediated Double-Strand Breaks Are Repaired by Homologous Recombination in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Chiurillo, Miguel A; Moraes Barros, Roberto R; Souza, Renata T; Marini, Marjorie M; Antonio, Cristiane R; Cortez, Danielle R; Curto, María Á; Lorenzi, Hernán A; Schijman, Alejandro G; Ramirez, José L; da Silveira, José F

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi chromosome ends are enriched in surface protein genes and pseudogenes (e.g., trans-sialidases) surrounded by repetitive sequences. It has been proposed that the extensive sequence variability among members of these protein families could play a role in parasite infectivity and evasion of host immune response. In previous reports we showed evidence suggesting that sequences located in these regions are subjected to recombination. To support this hypothesis we introduced a double-strand break (DSB) at a specific target site in a T. cruzi subtelomeric region cloned into an artificial chromosome (pTAC). This construct was used to transfect T. cruzi epimastigotes expressing the I-SceI meganuclease. Examination of the repaired sequences showed that DNA repair occurred only through homologous recombination (HR) with endogenous subtelomeric sequences. Our findings suggest that DSBs in subtelomeric repetitive sequences followed by HR between them may contribute to increased variability in T. cruzi multigene families.

  19. Subtelomeric I-SceI-Mediated Double-Strand Breaks Are Repaired by Homologous Recombination in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Chiurillo, Miguel A.; Moraes Barros, Roberto R.; Souza, Renata T.; Marini, Marjorie M.; Antonio, Cristiane R.; Cortez, Danielle R.; Curto, María Á.; Lorenzi, Hernán A.; Schijman, Alejandro G.; Ramirez, José L.; da Silveira, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi chromosome ends are enriched in surface protein genes and pseudogenes (e.g., trans-sialidases) surrounded by repetitive sequences. It has been proposed that the extensive sequence variability among members of these protein families could play a role in parasite infectivity and evasion of host immune response. In previous reports we showed evidence suggesting that sequences located in these regions are subjected to recombination. To support this hypothesis we introduced a double-strand break (DSB) at a specific target site in a T. cruzi subtelomeric region cloned into an artificial chromosome (pTAC). This construct was used to transfect T. cruzi epimastigotes expressing the I-SceI meganuclease. Examination of the repaired sequences showed that DNA repair occurred only through homologous recombination (HR) with endogenous subtelomeric sequences. Our findings suggest that DSBs in subtelomeric repetitive sequences followed by HR between them may contribute to increased variability in T. cruzi multigene families. PMID:28066363

  20. Essential role for DNA-PKcs in DNA double strand break repair and apoptosis in ATM deficient lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Callén, Elsa; Jankovic, Mila; Wong, Nancy; Zha, Shan; Chen, Hua-Tang; Difilippantonio, Simone; Di Virgilio, Michela; Heidkamp, Gordon; Alt, Frederick W.; Nussenzweig, André; Nussenzweig, Michel

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The DNA double strand break (DSB) repair protein DNA-PKcs and the signal transducer ATM are both activated by DNA breaks and phosphorylate similar substrates in vitro, yet appear to have distinct functions in vivo. Here we show that ATM and DNA-PKcs have overlapping functions in lymphocytes. Ablation of both kinase activities in cells undergoing immunoglobulin class switch recombination leads to a compound defect in switching, and a synergistic increase in chromosomal fragmentation, DNA insertions and translocations due to aberrant processing of DSBs. These abnormalities are attributed to a compound deficiency in phosphorylation of key proteins required for DNA repair, class switching and cell death. Notably, both kinases are required for normal levels of p53 phosphorylation in B and T cells and p53 dependent apoptosis. Our experiments reveal a DNA-PKcs-dependent pathway that regulates DNA repair and activation of p53 in the absence of ATM. PMID:19450527

  1. DNA polymerase θ (POLQ), double-strand break repair, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Richard D; Doublié, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    DNA polymerase theta (pol θ) is encoded in the genomes of many eukaryotes, though not in fungi. Pol θ is encoded by the POLQ gene in mammalian cells. The C-terminal third of the protein is a family A DNA polymerase with additional insertion elements relative to prokaryotic homologs. The N-terminal third is a helicase-like domain with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Pol θ is important in the repair of genomic double-strand breaks (DSBs) from many sources. These include breaks formed by ionizing radiation and topoisomerase inhibitors, breaks arising at stalled DNA replication forks, breaks introduced during diversification steps of the mammalian immune system, and DSB induced by CRISPR-Cas9. Pol θ participates in a route of DSB repair termed "alternative end-joining" (altEJ). AltEJ is independent of the DNA binding Ku protein complex and requires DNA end resection. Pol θ is able to mediate joining of two resected 3' ends harboring DNA sequence microhomology. "Signatures" of Pol θ action during altEJ are the frequent utilization of longer microhomologies, and the insertion of additional sequences at joining sites. The mechanism of end-joining employs the ability of Pol θ to tightly grasp a 3' terminus through unique contacts in the active site, allowing extension from minimally paired primers. Pol θ is involved in controlling the frequency of chromosome translocations and preserves genome integrity by limiting large deletions. It may also play a backup role in DNA base excision repair. POLQ is a member of a cluster of similarly upregulated genes that are strongly correlated with poor clinical outcome for breast cancer, ovarian cancer and other cancer types. Inhibition of pol θ is a compelling approach for combination therapy of radiosensitization.

  2. Deficiency in the response to DNA double-strand breaks in mouse early preimplantation embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Yukawa, Masashi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi; Nagata, Masao; Aoki, Fugaku . E-mail: aokif@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-06-29

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are caused by various environmental stresses, such as ionizing radiation and DNA-damaging agents. When DSBs occur, cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms function to stop the cell cycle until all DSBs are repaired; the phosphorylation of H2AX plays an important role in this process. Mouse preimplantation-stage embryos are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation, and X-irradiated mouse zygotes are arrested at the G2 phase of the first cell cycle. To investigate the mechanisms responding to DNA damage at G2 in mouse preimplantation embryos, we examined G2/M checkpoint and DNA repair mechanisms in these embryos. Most of the one- and two-cell embryos in which DSBs had been induced by {gamma}-irradiation underwent a delay in cleavage and ceased development before the blastocyst stage. In these embryos, phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) was not detected in the one- or two-cell stages by immunocytochemistry, although it was detected after the two-cell stage during preimplantation development. These results suggest that the G2/M checkpoint and DNA repair mechanisms have insufficient function in one- and two-cell embryos, causing hypersensitivity to {gamma}-irradiation. In addition, phosphorylated ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein and DNA protein kinase catalytic subunits, which phosphorylate H2AX, were detected in the embryos at one- and two-cell stages, as well as at other preimplantation stages, suggesting that the absence of {gamma}-H2AX in one- and two-cell embryos depends on some factor(s) other than these kinases.

  3. Binding of undamaged double stranded DNA to vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase

    DOE PAGES

    Schormann, Norbert; Banerjee, Surajit; Ricciardi, Robert; ...

    2015-06-02

    Background: Uracil-DNA glycosylases are evolutionarily conserved DNA repair enzymes. However, vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase (known as D4), also serves as an intrinsic and essential component of the processive DNA polymerase complex during DNA replication. In this complex D4 binds to a unique poxvirus specific protein A20 which tethers it to the DNA polymerase. At the replication fork the DNA scanning and repair function of D4 is coupled with DNA replication. So far, DNA-binding to D4 has not been structurally characterized. Results: This manuscript describes the first structure of a DNA-complex of a uracil-DNA glycosylase from the poxvirus family. This alsomore » represents the first structure of a uracil DNA glycosylase in complex with an undamaged DNA. In the asymmetric unit two D4 subunits bind simultaneously to complementary strands of the DNA double helix. Each D4 subunit interacts mainly with the central region of one strand. DNA binds to the opposite side of the A20-binding surface on D4. In comparison of the present structure with the structure of uracil-containing DNA-bound human uracil-DNA glycosylase suggests that for DNA binding and uracil removal D4 employs a unique set of residues and motifs that are highly conserved within the poxvirus family but different in other organisms. Conclusion: The first structure of D4 bound to a truly non-specific undamaged double-stranded DNA suggests that initial binding of DNA may involve multiple non-specific interactions between the protein and the phosphate backbone.« less

  4. Binding of undamaged double stranded DNA to vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Schormann, Norbert; Banerjee, Surajit; Ricciardi, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-06-02

    Background: Uracil-DNA glycosylases are evolutionarily conserved DNA repair enzymes. However, vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase (known as D4), also serves as an intrinsic and essential component of the processive DNA polymerase complex during DNA replication. In this complex D4 binds to a unique poxvirus specific protein A20 which tethers it to the DNA polymerase. At the replication fork the DNA scanning and repair function of D4 is coupled with DNA replication. So far, DNA-binding to D4 has not been structurally characterized. Results: This manuscript describes the first structure of a DNA-complex of a uracil-DNA glycosylase from the poxvirus family. This also represents the first structure of a uracil DNA glycosylase in complex with an undamaged DNA. In the asymmetric unit two D4 subunits bind simultaneously to complementary strands of the DNA double helix. Each D4 subunit interacts mainly with the central region of one strand. DNA binds to the opposite side of the A20-binding surface on D4. In comparison of the present structure with the structure of uracil-containing DNA-bound human uracil-DNA glycosylase suggests that for DNA binding and uracil removal D4 employs a unique set of residues and motifs that are highly conserved within the poxvirus family but different in other organisms. Conclusion: The first structure of D4 bound to a truly non-specific undamaged double-stranded DNA suggests that initial binding of DNA may involve multiple non-specific interactions between the protein and the phosphate backbone.

  5. DNA-PKcs and ATM Co-Regulate DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastav, Meena; Miller, Cheryl A.; De Haro, Leyma P.; Durant, Stephen T.; Chen, Benjamin P.C.; Chen, David J.; Nickoloff, Jac A.

    2009-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). The NHEJ/HR decision is under complex regulation and involves DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). HR is elevated in DNA-PKcs null cells, but suppressed by DNA-PKcs kinase inhibitors, suggesting that kinase-inactive DNA-PKcs (DNA-PKcs-KR) would suppress HR. Here we use a direct repeat assay to monitor HR repair of DSBs induced by I-SceI nuclease. Surprisingly, DSB-induced HR in DNA-PKcs-KR cells was 2- to 3-fold above the elevated HR level of DNA-PKcs null cells, and ∼4- to 7-fold above cells expressing wild-type DNA-PKcs. The hyperrecombination in DNA-PKcs-KR cells compared to DNA-PKcs null cells was also apparent as increased resistance to DNA crosslinks induced by mitomycin C. ATM phosphorylates many HR proteins, and ATM is expressed at a low level in cells lacking DNA-PKcs, but restored to wild-type level in cells expressing DNA-PKcs-KR. Several clusters of phosphorylation sites in DNA-PKcs, including the T2609 cluster, which is phosphorylated by DNA-PKcs and ATM, regulate access of repair factors to broken ends. Our results indicate that ATM-dependent phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs-KR contributes to the hyperrecombination phenotype. Interestingly, DNA-PKcs null cells showed more persistent ionizing radiation-induced RAD51 foci (but lower HR levels) compared to DNA-PKcs-KR cells, consistent with HR completion requiring RAD51 turnover. ATM may promote RAD51 turnover, suggesting a second (not mutually exclusive) mechanism by which restored ATM contributes to hyperrecombination in DNA-PKcs-KR cells. We propose a model in which DNA-PKcs and ATM coordinately regulate DSB repair by NHEJ and HR. PMID:19535303

  6. Chromatin modification and NBS1: their relationship in DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yuichiro; Zhou, Hui; Kobayashi, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The importance of chromatin modification, including histone modification and chromatin remodeling, for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, as well as transcription and replication, has been elucidated. Phosphorylation of H2AX to γ-H2AX is one of the first responses following DSB detection, and this histone modification is important for the DSB damage response by triggering several events, including the accumulation of DNA damage response-related proteins and subsequent homologous recombination (HR) repair. The roles of other histone modifications such as acetylation, methylation and ubiquitination have also been recently clarified, particularly in the context of HR repair. NBS1 is a multifunctional protein that is involved in various DNA damage responses. Its recently identified binding partner RNF20 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that facilitates the monoubiquitination of histone H2B, a process that is crucial for recruitment of the chromatin remodeler SNF2h to DSB damage sites. Evidence suggests that SNF2h functions in HR repair, probably through regulation of end-resection. Moreover, several recent reports have indicated that SNF2h can function in HR repair pathways as a histone remodeler and that other known histone remodelers can also participate in DSB damage responses. On the other hand, information about the roles of such chromatin modifications and NBS1 in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair of DSBs and stalled fork-related damage responses is very limited; therefore, these aspects and processes need to be further studied to advance our understanding of the mechanisms and molecular players involved.

  7. DNA polymerase θ (POLQ), double-strand break repair, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Richard D.; Doublié, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase theta (pol θ) is encoded in the genomes of many eukaryotes, though not in fungi. Pol θ is encoded by the POLQ gene in mammalian cells. The C-terminal third of the protein is a family A DNA polymerase with additional insertion elements relative to prokaryotic homologs. The N-terminal third is a helicase-like domain with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Pol θ is important in the repair of genomic double-strand breaks (DSBs) from many sources. These include breaks formed by ionizing radiation and topoisomerase inhibitors, breaks arising at stalled DNA replication forks, breaks introduced during diversification steps of the mammalian immune system, and DSB induced by CRISPR-Cas9. Pol θ participates in a route of DSB repair termed “alternative end-joining” (altEJ). AltEJ is independent of the DNA binding Ku protein complex and requires DNA end resection. Pol θ is able to mediate joining of two resected 3’ ends harboring DNA sequence microhomology. “Signatures” of Pol θ action during altEJ are the frequent utilization of longer microhomologies, and the insertion of additional sequences at joining sites. The mechanism of end-joining employs the ability of Pol θ to tightly grasp a 3’ terminus through unique contacts in the active site, allowing extension from minimally paired primers. Pol θ is involved in controlling the frequency of chromosome translocations and preserves genome integrity by limiting large deletions. It may also play a backup role in DNA base excision repair. POLQ is a member of a cluster of similarly upregulated genes that are strongly correlated with poor clinical outcome for breast cancer, ovarian cancer and other cancer types. Inhibition of pol θ is a compelling approach for combination therapy of radiosensitization. PMID:27264557

  8. c-Myc Suppression of DNA Double-strand Break Repair12

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaozhong; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Sun, Shi-Yong; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Doetsch, Paul W; Xiao, Zhi-Qiang; Khuri, Fadlo R; Curran, Walter J; Deng, Xingming

    2012-01-01

    c-Myc is a transcriptional factor that functions as a central regulator of cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. Overexpression of c-Myc also enhances DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), genetic instability, and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism(s) involved remains elusive. Here, we discovered that γ-ray ionizing radiation-induced DSBs promote c-Myc to form foci and to co-localize with γ-H2AX. Conditional expression of c-Myc in HO15.19 c-Myc null cells using the Tet-Off/Tet-On inducible system results in down-regulation of Ku DNA binding and suppressed activities of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and DNA end-joining, leading to inhibition of DSB repair and enhanced chromosomal and chromatid breaks. Expression of c-Myc reduces both signal and coding joins with decreased fidelity during V(D)J recombination. Mechanistically, c-Myc directly interacts with Ku70 protein through its Myc box II (MBII) domain. Removal of the MBII domain from c-Myc abrogates its inhibitory effects on Ku DNA binding, DNA-PKcs, and DNA end-joining activities, which results in loss of c-Myc's ability to block DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. Interestingly, c-Myc directly disrupts the Ku/DNA-PKcs complex in vitro and in vivo. Thus, c-Myc suppression of DSB repair and V(D)J recombination may occur through inhibition of the nonhomologous end-joining pathway, which provides insight into the mechanism of c-Myc in the development of tumors through promotion of genomic instability. PMID:23308051

  9. Zinc chromate induces chromosome instability and DNA double strand breaks in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Hong; Holmes, Amie L.; Young, Jamie L.; Qin Qin; Joyce, Kellie; Pelsue, Stephen C.; Peng Cheng; Wise, Sandra S.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Wallace, William T.; Hammond, Dianne; Wise, John Pierce E-mail: John.Wise@usm.maine.edu

    2009-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is a respiratory toxicant and carcinogen, with solubility playing an important role in its carcinogenic potential. Zinc chromate, a water insoluble or 'particulate' Cr(VI) compound, has been shown to be carcinogenic in epidemiology studies and to induce tumors in experimental animals, but its genotoxicity is poorly understood. Our study shows that zinc chromate induced concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity, chromosome damage and DNA double strand breaks in human lung cells. In response to zinc chromate-induced breaks, MRE11 expression was increased and ATM and ATR were phosphorylated, indicating that the DNA double strand break repair system was initiated in the cells. In addition, our data show that zinc chromate-induced double strand breaks were only observed in the G2/M phase population, with no significant amount of double strand breaks observed in G1 and S phase cells. These data will aid in understanding the mechanisms of zinc chromate toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  10. Understanding the similarity in thermophoresis between single- and double-stranded DNA or RNA.

    PubMed

    Reichl, Maren; Herzog, Mario; Greiss, Ferdinand; Wolff, Manuel; Braun, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Thermophoresis is the movement of molecules in a temperature gradient. For aqueous solutions its microscopic basis is debated. Understanding thermophoresis for this case is, however, important since it proved very useful to detect the binding affinity of biomolecules and since thermophoresis could have played an important role in early molecular evolution. Here we discuss why the thermophoresis of single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides - DNA and RNA - is surprisingly similar. This finding is understood by comparing the spherical capacitor model for single-stranded species with the case of a rod-shaped model for double-stranded oligonucleotides. The approach describes thermophoresis of DNA and RNA with fitted effective charges consistent with electrophoresis measurements and explains the similarity between single- and double-stranded species. We could not confirm the sign change for the thermophoresis of single- versus double-stranded DNA in crowded solutions containing polyethylene glycol [Y. T. Maeda, T. Tlusty, and A. Libchaber, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 17972 (2012)], but find a salt-independent offset while the Debye length dependence still satisfies the capacitor model. Overall, the analysis documents the continuous progress in the microscopic understanding of thermophoresis.

  11. Double-Stranded RNAs and their Use for Characterization of Recalcitrant Viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The presence of high molecular weight, virus-specific, double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) in virus-infected plants are probably formed during virus replication and consists of full-length and subgenomic RNAs of single-stranded RNA viruses or genomes of dsRNA viruses. The sizes and patterns of these viru...

  12. Folding DNA origami from a double-stranded source of scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Högberg, Björn; Liedl, Tim; Shih, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Combined heat and chemical denaturation of double-stranded DNA scaffold strands in the presence of staple strands, followed by a sudden temperature drop and then stepwise dialysis to remove the chemical denaturant, leads to self-assembly of two distinct DNA-origami structures. PMID:19566089

  13. Branch migration prevents DNA loss during double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Mawer, Julia S P; Leach, David R F

    2014-08-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks must be accurate to avoid genomic rearrangements that can lead to cell death and disease. This can be accomplished by promoting homologous recombination between correctly aligned sister chromosomes. Here, using a unique system for generating a site-specific DNA double-strand break in one copy of two replicating Escherichia coli sister chromosomes, we analyse the intermediates of sister-sister double-strand break repair. Using two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, we show that when double-strand breaks are formed in the absence of RuvAB, 4-way DNA (Holliday) junctions are accumulated in a RecG-dependent manner, arguing against the long-standing view that the redundancy of RuvAB and RecG is in the resolution of Holliday junctions. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we explain the redundancy by showing that branch migration catalysed by RuvAB and RecG is required for stabilising the intermediates of repair as, when branch migration cannot take place, repair is aborted and DNA is lost at the break locus. We demonstrate that in the repair of correctly aligned sister chromosomes, an unstable early intermediate is stabilised by branch migration. This reliance on branch migration may have evolved to help promote recombination between correctly aligned sister chromosomes to prevent genomic rearrangements.

  14. Understanding the similarity in thermophoresis between single- and double-stranded DNA or RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichl, Maren; Herzog, Mario; Greiss, Ferdinand; Wolff, Manuel; Braun, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Thermophoresis is the movement of molecules in a temperature gradient. For aqueous solutions its microscopic basis is debated. Understanding thermophoresis for this case is, however, important since it proved very useful to detect the binding affinity of biomolecules and since thermophoresis could have played an important role in early molecular evolution. Here we discuss why the thermophoresis of single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides - DNA and RNA - is surprisingly similar. This finding is understood by comparing the spherical capacitor model for single-stranded species with the case of a rod-shaped model for double-stranded oligonucleotides. The approach describes thermophoresis of DNA and RNA with fitted effective charges consistent with electrophoresis measurements and explains the similarity between single- and double-stranded species. We could not confirm the sign change for the thermophoresis of single- versus double-stranded DNA in crowded solutions containing polyethylene glycol [Y. T. Maeda, T. Tlusty, and A. Libchaber, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 17972 (2012), 10.1073/pnas.1215764109], but find a salt-independent offset while the Debye length dependence still satisfies the capacitor model. Overall, the analysis documents the continuous progress in the microscopic understanding of thermophoresis.

  15. Nanoconstructions on the base of double-stranded DNA molecules and their optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuridin, S. G.; Yevdokimov, Yu. M.; Chulkov, D. P.; Gusev, V. M.; Kompanets, O. N.; Vereschagin, F. V.

    2016-12-01

    Experimental results have been presented on studying optical properties of nanoconstructions formed of orientationally ordered neighbouring double-stranded DNA molecules in the structure of their liquid-crystalline phases and dispersion particles of these phases including ones cured with intercalators.

  16. Single primer-triggered isothermal amplification for double-stranded DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cuiping; Han, Dianang; Deng, Meilian; Wang, Jingfei; Shi, Chao

    2015-01-11

    Here we have devised a new generation of isothermal double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) detection method, termed single primer-triggered isothermal amplification (SAMP). It is very simple only requiring one primer and a few copies of dsDNA in less than an hour are detectable with multiple signal amplification steps.

  17. [Superparamagnetic Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles "Blow up" Spatial Ordering of Double-stranded DNA Molecules].

    PubMed

    Yevdokimov, Yu M; Pershina, A G; Salyanov, V I; Magaeva, A A; Popenko, V I; Shtykova, E V; Dadinova, L A; Skuridin, S G

    2015-01-01

    The formation of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions formed by double-stranded DNA molecules, handled by positively charged superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, as well as action of these nanoparticles on DNA dispersion, are considered. The binding of magnetic nanoparticles to the linear double-stranded DNA in solution of high ionic strength (0.3 M NaCl) and subsequent phase exclusion of these complexes from polyethylene glycol-containing solutions lead to their inability to form dispersions, whose particles do possess the spatially twisted arrangement of neighboring double-stranded DNA molecules. The action of magnetic nanoparticles on DNA dispersion (one magnetic nanoparticle per one double-stranded DNA molecule) results in such "perturbation" of DNA structure at sites of magnetic nanoparticles binding that the regular spatial structure of DNA dispersion particles "blows up"; this process is accompanied by disappearance of both abnormal optical activity and characteristic Bragg maximum on the small-angle X-ray scattering curve. Allowing with the fact that the physicochemical properties of the DNA liquid-crystalline dispersion particles reflect features of spatial organization of these molecules in chromosomes of primitive organisms, it is possible, that the found effect can have the relevant biological consequences.

  18. Double strand RNA delivery system for plant-sap-feeding insects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mediated gene silencing also known as RNA interference (RNAi) is a breakthrough technology for functional genomic studies providing a potential tool for management of insect pests. Since the inception of RNAi numerous studies have documented successful introduction of syn...

  19. DNA double-strand break repair: Genetic determinants of flanking crossing-over

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, Kohji; Sunohara, Yukari; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Takahashi, Noriko; Yoshikura, Hiroshi )

    1994-02-01

    Whether or not homologous interaction of two DNA molecules results in crossing-over of the flanking sequences is an important decision in view of genome organization. Several homologous recombination models, including the double-strand break repair models, explain this decision as choice between two alternative modes of resolution of Holliday-type intermediates. The authors have demonstrated that a double-strand gap can be repaired through gene conversion copying a homologous duplex, as predicted by the double-strand break repair models, in the RecE pathway of Escherichia coli. This gap repair is often accompanied by crossing-over of the flanking sequences. Mutations in ruvC and recG, whose products interact with Holliday structures in vitro, do not block double-strand gap repair or its association with flanking crossing-over. However, two mutations in the recJ gene, which encodes a single-strand 5[prime][yields]3[prime] exonuclease, severely decrease association of flanking crossing-over. Two mutations in the recQ gene, which encodes a helicase, moderately decrease association of flanking crossing-over by themselves and suppress the severe effect of a recJ mutation. Similar relationships of recJ and recQ mutations are observed in cell survival after ultraviolet light irradiation, [gamma]-ray irradiation, and H[sub 2]O[sub 2] treatment. The authors discuss how cooperation of the recQ gene product and the recJ gene product brings about double-strand break repair accompanied by flanking crossing-over. They also discuss how this reaction is related to repair of chromosome damages.

  20. Targeting abnormal DNA double strand break repair in tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant chronic myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Lisa A.; Robert, Carine; Rapoport, Aaron P.; Gojo, Ivana; Baer, Maria R.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Rassool, Feyruz V.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to imatinib (IM) and other BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI)s is an increasing problem in leukemias caused by expression of BCR-ABL1. Since chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell lines expressing BCR-ABL1 utilize an alternative non-homologous end-joining pathway (ALT NHEJ) to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB)s, we asked whether this repair pathway is a novel therapeutic target in TKI-resistant disease. Notably, the steady state levels of two ALT NHEJ proteins, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and DNA ligase IIIα were increased in the BCR-ABL1-positive CML cell line K562 and, to a greater extent, in its imatinib resistant (IMR) derivative. Incubation of these cell lines with a combination of DNA ligase and PARP inhibitors inhibited ALT NHEJ and selectively decreased survival with the effect being greater in the IMR derivative. Similar results were obtained with TKI-resistant derivatives of two hematopoietic cell lines that had been engineered to stably express BCR-ABL1. Together our results show that the sensitivity of cell lines expressing BCR-ABL1 to the combination of DNA ligase and PARP inhibitors correlates with the steady state levels of PARP1 and DNA ligase IIIα, and ALT NHEJ activity. Importantly, analysis of clinical samples from CML patients confirmed that the expression levels of PARP1 and DNA ligase IIIα correlated with sensitivity to the DNA repair inhibitor combination. Thus, the expression levels of PARP1 and DNA ligase IIIα serve as biomarkers to identify a subgroup of CML patients who may be candidates for therapies that target the ALT NHEJ pathway when treatment with TKIs has failed. PMID:22641215

  1. Evolution of double-stranded DNA viruses of eukaryotes: from bacteriophages to transposons to giant viruses

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V; Krupovic, Mart; Yutin, Natalya

    2015-01-01

    Diverse eukaryotes including animals and protists are hosts to a broad variety of viruses with double-stranded (ds) DNA genomes, from the largest known viruses, such as pandoraviruses and mimiviruses, to tiny polyomaviruses. Recent comparative genomic analyses have revealed many evolutionary connections between dsDNA viruses of eukaryotes, bacteriophages, transposable elements, and linear DNA plasmids. These findings provide an evolutionary scenario that derives several major groups of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses, including the proposed order “Megavirales,” adenoviruses, and virophages from a group of large virus-like transposons known as Polintons (Mavericks). The Polintons have been recently shown to encode two capsid proteins, suggesting that these elements lead a dual lifestyle with both a transposon and a viral phase and should perhaps more appropriately be named polintoviruses. Here, we describe the recently identified evolutionary relationships between bacteriophages of the family Tectiviridae, polintoviruses, adenoviruses, virophages, large and giant DNA viruses of eukaryotes of the proposed order “Megavirales,” and linear mitochondrial and cytoplasmic plasmids. We outline an evolutionary scenario under which the polintoviruses were the first group of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses that evolved from bacteriophages and became the ancestors of most large DNA viruses of eukaryotes and a variety of other selfish elements. Distinct lines of origin are detectable only for herpesviruses (from a different bacteriophage root) and polyoma/papillomaviruses (from single-stranded DNA viruses and ultimately from plasmids). Phylogenomic analysis of giant viruses provides compelling evidence of their independent origins from smaller members of the putative order “Megavirales,” refuting the speculations on the evolution of these viruses from an extinct fourth domain of cellular life. PMID:25727355

  2. Double-stranded RNAs induce a pattern-triggered immune signaling pathway in plants.

    PubMed

    Niehl, Annette; Wyrsch, Ines; Boller, Thomas; Heinlein, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) is a plant defense response that relies on the perception of conserved microbe- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs or PAMPs, respectively). Recently, it has been recognized that PTI restricts virus infection in plants; however, the nature of the viral or infection-induced PTI elicitors and the underlying signaling pathways are still unknown. As double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) are conserved molecular patterns associated with virus replication, we applied dsRNAs or synthetic dsRNA analogs to Arabidopsis thaliana and investigated PTI responses. We show that in vitro-generated dsRNAs, dsRNAs purified from virus-infected plants and the dsRNA analog polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) induce typical PTI responses dependent on the co-receptor SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE 1 (SERK1), but independent of dicer-like (DCL) proteins in Arabidopsis. Moreover, dsRNA treatment of Arabidopsis induces SERK1-dependent antiviral resistance. Screening of Arabidopsis wild accessions demonstrates natural variability in dsRNA sensitivity. Our findings suggest that dsRNAs represent genuine PAMPs in plants, which induce a signaling cascade involving SERK1 and a specific dsRNA receptor. The dependence of dsRNA-mediated PTI on SERK1, but not on DCLs, implies that dsRNA-mediated PTI involves membrane-associated processes and operates independently of RNA silencing. dsRNA sensitivity may represent a useful trait to increase antiviral resistance in cultivated plants. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Effects of interferons and double-stranded RNA on human prostate cancer cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Haiyan; Zeng, Chun; Xie, Junbo; Alghamdi, Norah J.; Song, Ya; Zhang, Hongbing; Zhou, Aimin; Jin, Di

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among men in the United States. Prostate cancer therapy is severely hampered by lack of response and development of resistance to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs in patients. Therefore, the development and discovery of new drugs have become an urgent clinical need. Interferons (IFNs), a family of pleiotropic cytokines, exert antitumor activities due to their anti-proliferative, immunomodulatory and proapoptotic functions. Here, we report that pretreatment of prostate cancer PC-3 cells with IFNs sensitized these cells to double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs)-induced apoptosis. The enhancement effect of IFN treatment was dependent on IFN subtypes, in particular, IFN γ. In comparison with IFN α or β, IFN γ treatment remarkably augmented apoptosis in PC-3 cells induced with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a synthesized form of dsRNA. We demonstrated that IFN-signaling was necessary for these effects by using mutant cell lines. Transfection of 2–5A, the activator of RNase L, or silencing of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase R (PKR) by siRNA did not have any significant impact on this event, suggesting that neither RNase L nor PKR was involved in poly I:C/IFN γ-induced apoptosis in the cells. Further investigation of the apoptotic pathway revealed that Bak, a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2family, was synergistically up-regulated by IFN γ and poly I:C, whereas other members of the family were not affected. Knocking down of Bak demonstrated its contribution to poly I:C/IFN γ-induced apoptosis in the cells. We believeour findings will precipitate the design of novel therapeutic strategies for prostate cancer. PMID:26452032

  4. Two Novel Relative Double-Stranded RNA Mycoviruses Infecting Fusarium poae Strain SX63

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luan; Zhang, Jingze; Zhang, Hailong; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Two novel double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycoviruses, termed Fusarium poae dsRNA virus 2 (FpV2) and Fusarium poae dsRNA virus 3 (FpV3), were isolated from the plant pathogenic fungus, Fusarium poae strain SX63, and molecularly characterized. FpV2 and FpV3, with respective genome sequences of 9518 and 9419 base pairs (bps), are both predicted to contain two discontinuous open reading frames (ORFs), ORF1 and ORF2. A hypothetical polypeptide (P1) and a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) are encoded by ORF1 and ORF2, respectively. Phytoreo_S7 domain (pfam07236) homologs were detected downstream of the RdRp domain (RdRp_4; pfam02123) of the ORF2-coded proteins of both FpV2 and FpV3. The same shifty heptamers (GGAAAAC) were both found immediately before the stop codon UAG of ORF1 in FpV2 and FpV3, which could mediate programmed –1 ribosomal frameshifting (–1 PRF). Phylogenetic analysis based on RdRp sequences clearly place FpV2 and FpV3 in a taxonomically unassigned dsRNA mycovirus group. Together, with a comparison of genome organization, a new taxonomic family termed Fusagraviridae is proposed to be created to include FpV2- and FpV3-related dsRNA mycoviruses, within which FpV2 and FpV3 would represent two distinct virus species. PMID:27144564

  5. BRUCE regulates DNA double-strand break response by promoting USP8 deubiquitination of BRIT1.

    PubMed

    Ge, Chunmin; Che, Lixiao; Ren, Jinyu; Pandita, Raj K; Lu, Jing; Li, Kaiyi; Pandita, Tej K; Du, Chunying

    2015-03-17

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is crucial for genomic integrity. BRIT1 (breast cancer susceptibility gene C terminus-repeat inhibitor of human telomerase repeat transcriptase expression), a tumor suppressor and early DDR factor, is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by phosphorylated H2A histone family, member X (γ-H2AX), where it promotes chromatin relaxation by recruiting the switch/sucrose nonfermentable (SWI-SNF) chromatin remodeler to facilitate DDR. However, regulation of BRIT1 recruitment is not fully understood. The baculovirus IAP repeat (BIR)-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (BRUCE) is an inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP). Here, we report a non-IAP function of BRUCE in the regulation of the BRIT1-SWI-SNF DSB-response pathway and genomic stability. We demonstrate that BRIT1 is K63 ubiquitinated in unstimulated cells and that deubiquitination of BRIT1 is a prerequisite for its recruitment to DSB sites by γ-H2AX. We show mechanistically that BRUCE acts as a scaffold, bridging the ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8) and BRIT1 in a complex to coordinate USP8-catalyzed deubiquitination of BRIT1. Loss of BRUCE or USP8 impairs BRIT1 deubiquitination, BRIT1 binding with γ-H2AX, the formation of BRIT1 DNA damage foci, and chromatin relaxation. Moreover, BRUCE-depleted cells display reduced homologous recombination repair, and BRUCE-mutant mice exhibit repair defects and genomic instability. These findings identify BRUCE and USP8 as two hitherto uncharacterized critical DDR regulators and uncover a deubiquitination regulation of BRIT1 assembly at damaged chromatin for efficient DDR and genomic stability.

  6. BRUCE regulates DNA double-strand break response by promoting USP8 deubiquitination of BRIT1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Chunmin; Che, Lixiao; Ren, Jinyu; Pandita, Raj K.; Lu, Jing; Li, Kaiyi; Pandita, Tej K.; Du, Chunying

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is crucial for genomic integrity. BRIT1 (breast cancer susceptibility gene C terminus-repeat inhibitor of human telomerase repeat transcriptase expression), a tumor suppressor and early DDR factor, is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by phosphorylated H2A histone family, member X (γ-H2AX), where it promotes chromatin relaxation by recruiting the switch/sucrose nonfermentable (SWI–SNF) chromatin remodeler to facilitate DDR. However, regulation of BRIT1 recruitment is not fully understood. The baculovirus IAP repeat (BIR)-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (BRUCE) is an inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP). Here, we report a non-IAP function of BRUCE in the regulation of the BRIT1–SWI–SNF DSB-response pathway and genomic stability. We demonstrate that BRIT1 is K63 ubiquitinated in unstimulated cells and that deubiquitination of BRIT1 is a prerequisite for its recruitment to DSB sites by γ-H2AX. We show mechanistically that BRUCE acts as a scaffold, bridging the ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8) and BRIT1 in a complex to coordinate USP8-catalyzed deubiquitination of BRIT1. Loss of BRUCE or USP8 impairs BRIT1 deubiquitination, BRIT1 binding with γ-H2AX, the formation of BRIT1 DNA damage foci, and chromatin relaxation. Moreover, BRUCE-depleted cells display reduced homologous recombination repair, and BRUCE-mutant mice exhibit repair defects and genomic instability. These findings identify BRUCE and USP8 as two hitherto uncharacterized critical DDR regulators and uncover a deubiquitination regulation of BRIT1 assembly at damaged chromatin for efficient DDR and genomic stability. PMID:25733871

  7. Cap Snatching in Yeast L-BC Double-stranded RNA Totivirus*

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Tsutomu; Esteban, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Yeast L-A double-stranded RNA virus furnishes its transcript with a 5′ cap structure by a novel cap-snatching mechanism in which m7Gp from a host mRNA cap structure is transferred to the 5′-diphosphate terminus of the viral transcript. His-154 of the coat protein Gag forms an m7Gp adduct, and the H154R mutation abolishes both m7Gp adduct formation and cap snatching. Here we show that L-BC, another totivirus closely related to L-A, also synthesizes 5′-diphosphorylated transcripts and transfers m7Gp from mRNA to the 5′ termini of the transcripts. L-BC Gag also covalently binds to the cap structure and the mutation H156R, which corresponds to H154R of L-A Gag, abolishes cap adduct formation. Cap snatching of the L-BC virus is very similar to that of L-A; N7 methylation of the mRNA cap is essential for cap donor activity, and only 5′-diphosphorylated RNA is used as cap acceptor. L-BC cap snatching is also activated by viral transcription. Furthermore, both viruses require Mg2+ and Mn2+ for cap snatching. These cations are not only required for transcription activation but also directly involved in the cap transfer process. These findings support our previous proposal that the cap-snatching mechanism of the L-A virus is shared by fungal totiviruses closely related to L-A. Interestingly, L-A and L-BC viruses accept either viral transcript as cap acceptor in vitro. Because L-A and L-BC viruses cohabit in many yeast strains, it raises the possibility that their cohabitation in the same host may be beneficial for their mutual cap acquisition. PMID:23824187

  8. Unique Thermal Stability of Unnatural Hydrophobic Ds Bases in Double-Stranded DNAs.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Michiko; Hirao, Ichiro

    2017-07-26

    Genetic alphabet expansion technology, the introduction of unnatural bases or base pairs into replicable DNA, has rapidly advanced as a new synthetic biology area. A hydrophobic unnatural base pair between 7-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds) and 2-nitro-4-propynylpyrrole (Px) exhibited high fidelity as a third base pair in PCR. SELEX methods using the Ds-Px pair enabled high-affinity DNA aptamer generation, and introducing a few Ds bases into DNA aptamers extremely augmented their affinities and selectivities to target proteins. Here, to further scrutinize the functions of this highly hydrophobic Ds base, the thermal stabilities of double-stranded DNAs (dsDNA) containing a noncognate Ds-Ds or G-Ds pair were examined. The thermal stability of the Ds-Ds self-pair was as high as that of the natural G-C pair, and apart from the generally higher stability of the G-C pair than that of the A-T pair, most of the 5'-pyrimidine-Ds-purine-3' sequences, such as CDsA and TDsA, exhibited higher stability than the 5'-purine-Ds-pyrimidine-3' sequences, such as GDsC and ADsC, in dsDNAs. This trait enabled the GC-content-independent control of the thermal stability of the designed dsDNA fragments. The melting temperatures of dsDNA fragments containing the Ds-Ds pair can be predicted from the nearest-neighbor parameters including the Ds base. In addition, the noncognate G-Ds pair can efficiently distinguish its neighboring cognate natural base pairs from noncognate pairs. We demonstrated that real-time PCR using primers containing Ds accurately detected a single-nucleotide mismatch in target DNAs. These unique properties of the Ds base that affect the stabilities of the neighboring base pairs could impart new functions to DNA molecules and technologies.

  9. NR4A2 Promotes DNA Double-strand Break Repair Upon Exposure to UVR.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kelvin; Chhabra, Yash; Tropée, Romain; Lim, Yi Chieh; Fane, Mitchell; Dray, Eloise; Sturm, Richard A; Smith, Aaron G

    2017-09-01

    Exposure of melanocytes to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induces the formation of UV lesions that can produce deleterious effects in genomic DNA. Encounters of replication forks with unrepaired UV lesions can lead to several complex phenomena, such as the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The NR4A family of nuclear receptors are transcription factors that have been associated with mediating DNA repair functions downstream of the MC1R signaling pathway in melanocytes. In particular, emerging evidence shows that upon DNA damage, the NR4A2 receptor can translocate to sites of UV lesion by mechanisms requiring post-translational modifications within the N-terminal domain and at a serine residue in the DNA-binding domain at position 337. Following this, NR4A2 aids in DNA repair by facilitating chromatin relaxation, allowing accessibility for DNA repair machinery. Using A2058 and HT144 melanoma cells engineered to stably express wild-type or mutant forms of the NR4A2 proteins, we reveal that the expression of functional NR4A2 is associated with elevated cytoprotection against UVR. Conversely, knockdown of NR4A2 expression by siRNA results in a significant loss of cell viability after UV insult. By analyzing the kinetics of the ensuing 53BP1 and RAD51 foci following UV irradiation, we also reveal that the expression of mutant NR4A2 isoforms, lacking the ability to translocate, transactivate, or undergo phosphorylation, display compromised repair capacity.Implications: These data expand the understanding of the mechanism by which the NR4A2 nuclear receptor can facilitate DNA DSB repair. Mol Cancer Res; 15(9); 1184-96. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Exonuclease TREX1 degrades double-stranded DNA to prevent spontaneous lupus-like inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Grieves, Jessica L; Fye, Jason M; Harvey, Scott; Grayson, Jason M; Hollis, Thomas; Perrino, Fred W

    2015-04-21

    The TREX1 gene encodes a potent DNA exonuclease, and mutations in TREX1 cause a spectrum of lupus-like autoimmune diseases. Most lupus patients develop autoantibodies to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), but the source of DNA antigen is unknown. The TREX1 D18N mutation causes a monogenic, cutaneous form of lupus called familial chilblain lupus, and the TREX1 D18N enzyme exhibits dysfunctional dsDNA-degrading activity, providing a link between dsDNA degradation and nucleic acid-mediated autoimmune disease. We determined the structure of the TREX1 D18N protein in complex with dsDNA, revealing how this exonuclease uses a novel DNA-unwinding mechanism to separate the polynucleotide strands for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) loading into the active site. The TREX1 D18N dsDNA interactions coupled with catalytic deficiency explain how this mutant nuclease prevents dsDNA degradation. We tested the effects of TREX1 D18N in vivo by replacing the TREX1 WT gene in mice with the TREX1 D18N allele. The TREX1 D18N mice exhibit systemic inflammation, lymphoid hyperplasia, vasculitis, and kidney disease. The observed lupus-like inflammatory disease is associated with immune activation, production of autoantibodies to dsDNA, and deposition of immune complexes in the kidney. Thus, dysfunctional dsDNA degradation by TREX1 D18N induces disease in mice that recapitulates many characteristics of human lupus. Failure to clear DNA has long been linked to lupus in humans, and these data point to dsDNA as a key substrate for TREX1 and a major antigen source in mice with dysfunctional TREX1 enzyme.

  11. Evolution of double-stranded DNA viruses of eukaryotes: from bacteriophages to transposons to giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V; Krupovic, Mart; Yutin, Natalya

    2015-04-01

    Diverse eukaryotes including animals and protists are hosts to a broad variety of viruses with double-stranded (ds) DNA genomes, from the largest known viruses, such as pandoraviruses and mimiviruses, to tiny polyomaviruses. Recent comparative genomic analyses have revealed many evolutionary connections between dsDNA viruses of eukaryotes, bacteriophages, transposable elements, and linear DNA plasmids. These findings provide an evolutionary scenario that derives several major groups of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses, including the proposed order "Megavirales," adenoviruses, and virophages from a group of large virus-like transposons known as Polintons (Mavericks). The Polintons have been recently shown to encode two capsid proteins, suggesting that these elements lead a dual lifestyle with both a transposon and a viral phase and should perhaps more appropriately be named polintoviruses. Here, we describe the recently identified evolutionary relationships between bacteriophages of the family Tectiviridae, polintoviruses, adenoviruses, virophages, large and giant DNA viruses of eukaryotes of the proposed order "Megavirales," and linear mitochondrial and cytoplasmic plasmids. We outline an evolutionary scenario under which the polintoviruses were the first group of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses that evolved from bacteriophages and became the ancestors of most large DNA viruses of eukaryotes and a variety of other selfish elements. Distinct lines of origin are detectable only for herpesviruses (from a different bacteriophage root) and polyoma/papillomaviruses (from single-stranded DNA viruses and ultimately from plasmids). Phylogenomic analysis of giant viruses provides compelling evidence of their independent origins from smaller members of the putative order "Megavirales," refuting the speculations on the evolution of these viruses from an extinct fourth domain of cellular life.

  12. Evolution of Susceptibility to Ingested Double-Stranded RNAs in Caenorhabditis Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Nuez, Isabelle; Félix, Marie-Anne

    2012-01-01

    Background The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is able to take up external double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) and mount an RNA interference response, leading to the inactivation of specific gene expression. The uptake of ingested dsRNAs into intestinal cells has been shown to require the SID-2 transmembrane protein in C. elegans. By contrast, C. briggsae was shown to be naturally insensitive to ingested dsRNAs, yet could be rendered sensitive by transgenesis with the C. elegans sid-2 gene. Here we aimed to elucidate the evolution of the susceptibility to external RNAi in the Caenorhabditis genus. Principal Findings We study the sensitivity of many new species of Caenorhabditis to ingested dsRNAs matching a conserved actin gene sequence from the nematode Oscheius tipulae. We find ample variation in the Caenorhabditis genus in the ability to mount an RNAi response. We map this sensitivity onto a phylogenetic tree, and show that sensitivity or insensitivity have evolved convergently several times. We uncover several evolutionary losses in sensitivity, which may have occurred through distinct mechanisms. We could render C. remanei and C. briggsae sensitive to ingested dsRNAs by transgenesis of the Cel-sid-2 gene. We thus provide tools for RNA interference studies in these species. We also show that transgenesis by injection is possible in many Caenorhabditis species. Conclusions The ability of animals to take up dsRNAs or to respond to them by gene inactivation is under rapid evolution in the Caenorhabditis genus. This study provides a framework and tools to use RNA interference and transgenesis in various Caenorhabditis species for further comparative and evolutionary studies. PMID:22253787

  13. Rapid, simple method of preparing rotaviral double-stranded ribonucleic acid for analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Theil, K W; McCloskey, C M; Saif, L J; Redman, D R; Bohl, E H; Hancock, D D; Kohler, E M; Moorhead, P D

    1981-01-01

    A procedure for extracting rotaviral double-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA) directly from fecal and intestinal specimens collected from calves and pigs is described. This procedure provides a rapid, simple, reproducible method of obtaining rotaviral double-stranded RNA preparations suitable for electrophoretic analysis in polyacrylamide-agarose composite gels. The rotaviral genome electrophoretic migration pattern produced by double-stranded RNA extracted directly from a specimen by this procedure was qualitatively identical to the electrophoretic migration pattern obtained with double-stranded RNA extracted from purified rotavirus derived from the same specimen. Direct extraction of specimens containing porcine rotavirus-like virus by this procedure gave preparations that had electrophoretic migration patterns similar, but not identical, to the characteristic electrophoretic migration pattern of the rotaviral genome. Sufficient rotaviral double-stranded RNA could be extracted from 6 ml of fecal or intestinal specimen by this procedure to permit 15 or more electrophoretic assays. Images PMID:6270190

  14. An in vitro DNA double-strand break repair assay based on end-joining of defined duplex oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kamal; Purkayastha, Shubhadeep; Neumann, Ronald D; Winters, Thomas A

    2012-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are caused by endogenous cellular processes such as oxidative metabolism, or by exogenous events like exposure to ionizing radiation or other genotoxic agents. Repair of these DSBs is essential for the maintenance of cellular genomic integrity. In human cells, and cells of other higher eukaryotes, DSBs are primarily repaired by the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) DSB repair pathway. Most in vitro assays that have been designed to measure NHEJ activity employ linear plasmid DNA as end-joining substrates, and such assays have made significant contributions to our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of NHEJ. Here we describe an in vitro end-joining assay employing linear oligonucleotides that has distinct advantages over plasmid-based assays for the study of structure-function relationships between the proteins of the NHEJ pathway and synthetic DNA end-joining substrates possessing predetermined DSB configurations and chemistries.

  15. SWR1 and INO80 chromatin remodelers contribute to DNA double-strand break perinuclear anchorage site choice.

    PubMed

    Horigome, Chihiro; Oma, Yukako; Konishi, Tatsunori; Schmid, Roger; Marcomini, Isabella; Hauer, Michael H; Dion, Vincent; Harata, Masahiko; Gasser, Susan M

    2014-08-21

    Persistent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are recruited to the nuclear periphery in budding yeast. Both the Nup84 pore subcomplex and Mps3, an inner nuclear membrane (INM) SUN domain protein, have been implicated in DSB binding. It was unclear what, if anything, distinguishes the two potential sites of repair. Here, we characterize and distinguish the two binding sites. First, DSB-pore interaction occurs independently of cell-cycle phase and requires neither the chromatin remodeler INO80 nor recombinase Rad51 activity. In contrast, Mps3 binding is S and G2 phase specific and requires both factors. SWR1-dependent incorporation of Htz1 (H2A.Z) is necessary for break relocation to either site in both G1- and S-phase cells. Importantly, functional assays indicate that mutations in the two sites have additive repair defects, arguing that the two perinuclear anchorage sites define distinct survival pathways.

  16. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-01-01

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo. PMID:26114388

  17. Uptake of extracellular double-stranded RNA by SID-2

    PubMed Central

    McEwan, Deborah L; Weisman, Alexandra S; Hunter, Craig P

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ingested dsRNAs trigger RNA interference (RNAi) in many invertebrates including the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we show that the C. elegans apical intestinal membrane protein SID-2 is required in C. elegans for the import of ingested dsRNA and, when expressed in Drosophila S2 cells, SID-2 enables the uptake of dsRNAs. SID-2-dependent dsRNA transport requires an acidic extracellular environment and is selective for dsRNAs with at least 50 base pairs. Through structure-function analysis, we identify several SID-2 regions required for this activity including three extracellular, positively-charged, histidines. Finally, we find that SID-2-dependent transport is inhibited by drugs that interfere with vesicle transport. Therefore, we propose that environmental dsRNAs are imported from the acidic intestinal lumen by SID-2 via endocytosis and are released from internalized vesicles in a secondary step mediated by the dsRNA-channel SID-1. Similar multistep mechanisms may underlie the widespread observations of environmental RNAi. PMID:22902558

  18. Deficiency of double-strand DNA break repair does not impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence in multiple animal models of infection.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Brook E; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage and must be repaired for chromosome replication to proceed. M. tuberculosis elaborates three genetically distinct DSB repair systems: homologous recombination (HR), nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). NHEJ, which repairs DSBs in quiescent cells, may be particularly relevant to M. tuberculosis latency. However, very little information is available about the phenotype of DSB repair-deficient M. tuberculosis in animal models of infection. Here we tested M. tuberculosis strains lacking NHEJ (a Δku ΔligD strain), HR (a ΔrecA strain), or both (a ΔrecA Δku strain) in C57BL/6J mice, C3HeB/FeJ mice, guinea pigs, and a mouse hollow-fiber model of infection. We found no difference in bacterial load, histopathology, or host mortality between wild-type and DSB repair mutant strains in any model of infection. These results suggest that the animal models tested do not inflict DSBs on the mycobacterial chromosome, that other repair pathways can compensate for the loss of NHEJ and HR, or that DSB repair is not required for M. tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  19. Repair on the go: E. coli maintains a high proliferation rate while repairing a chronic DNA double-strand break.

    PubMed

    Darmon, Elise; Eykelenboom, John K; Lopez-Vernaza, Manuel A; White, Martin A; Leach, David R F

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage checkpoints exist to promote cell survival and the faithful inheritance of genetic information. It is thought that one function of such checkpoints is to ensure that cell division does not occur before DNA damage is repaired. However, in unicellular organisms, rapid cell multiplication confers a powerful selective advantage, leading to a dilemma. Is the activation of a DNA damage checkpoint compatible with rapid cell multiplication? By uncoupling the initiation of DNA replication from cell division, the Escherichia coli cell cycle offers a solution to this dilemma. Here, we show that a DNA double-strand break, which occurs once per replication cycle, induces the SOS response. This SOS induction is needed for cell survival due to a requirement for an elevated level of expression of the RecA protein. Cell division is delayed, leading to an increase in average cell length but with no detectable consequence on mutagenesis and little effect on growth rate and viability. The increase in cell length caused by chronic DNA double-strand break repair comprises three components: two types of increase in the unit cell size, one independent of SfiA and SlmA, the other dependent of the presence of SfiA and the absence of SlmA, and a filamentation component that is dependent on the presence of either SfiA or SlmA. These results imply that chronic checkpoint induction in E. coli is compatible with rapid cell multiplication. Therefore, under conditions of chronic low-level DNA damage, the SOS checkpoint operates seamlessly in a cell cycle where the initiation of DNA replication is uncoupled from cell division.

  20. Using double-stranded RNA to prevent in vitro and in vivo viral infections by recombinant baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Victor Julian; Sampieri, Alicia; Sepulveda, Jorge; Vaca, Luis

    2003-05-23

    Introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into a wide variety of cells and organisms results in post-transcriptional depletion of the homologue endogenous mRNA. This well-preserved phenomenon known as RNA interference (RNAi) is present in evolutionarily diverse organisms such as plants, fungi, insects, metazoans, and mammals. Because the identification of the targeted mRNA by the RNAi machinery depends upon Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions, RNAi can be exquisitely specific. We took advantage of this powerful and flexible technique to demonstrate that selective silencing of genes essential for viral propagation prevents in vitro and in vivo viral infection. Using the baculovirus Autographa californica, a rapidly replicating and highly cytolytic double-stranded DNA virus that infects many different insect species, we show for the first time that introduction of dsRNA from gp64 and ie1, two genes essential for baculovirus propagation, results in prevention of viral infection in vitro and in vivo. This is the first report demonstrating the use of RNAi to inhibit a viral infection in animals. This inhibition was specific, because dsRNA from the polyhedrin promoter (used as control) or unrelated dsRNAs did not affect the time course of viral infection. The most relevant consequences from the present study are: 1) RNAi offers a rapid and efficient way to interfere with viral genes to assess the role of specific proteins in viral function and 2) using RNAi to interfere with viral genes essential for cell infection may provide a powerful therapeutic tool for the treatment of viral infections.

  1. Maintenance of Double-Stranded Telomeric Repeats as the Critical Determinant for Cell Viability in Yeast Cells Lacking Ku

    PubMed Central

    Gravel, Serge; Wellinger, Raymund J.

    2002-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ku complex, while important for nonhomologous DNA end joining, is also necessary for maintaining wild-type telomere length and a normal chromosomal DNA end structure. Yeast cells lacking Ku can grow at 23°C but are unable to do so at elevated temperatures due to an activation of DNA damage checkpoints. To gain insights into the mechanisms affected by temperature in such strains, we isolated and characterized a new allele of the YKU70 gene, yku70-30ts. By several criteria, the Yku70-30p protein is functional at 23°C and nonfunctional at 37°C. The analyses of telomeric repeat maintenance as well as the terminal DNA end structure in strains harboring this allele alone or in strains with a combination of other mutations affecting telomere maintenance show that the altered DNA end structure in yeast cells lacking Ku is not generated in a telomerase-dependent fashion. Moreover, the single-stranded G-rich DNA on such telomeres is not detected by DNA damage checkpoints to arrest cell growth, provided that there are sufficient double-stranded telomeric repeats present. The results also demonstrate that mutations in genes negatively affecting G-strand synthesis (e.g., RIF1) or C-strand synthesis (e.g., the DNA polymerase α gene) allow for the maintenance of longer telomeric repeat tracts in cells lacking Ku. Finally, extending telomeric repeat tracts in such cells at least temporarily suppresses checkpoint activation and growth defects at higher temperatures. Thus, we hypothesize that an aspect of the coordinated synthesis of double-stranded telomeric repeats is sensitive to elevated temperatures. PMID:11884605

  2. Double-stranded regions are essential design components of potent inhibitors of RISC function.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Annaleen; Robertson, Barbara; Dalby, Andrew B; Marshall, William S; Karpilow, Jon; Leake, Devin; Khvorova, Anastasia; Baskerville, Scott

    2007-05-01

    While microRNAs (miRNAs) are recognized as playing a critical role in regulating eukaryotic gene expression, both the mechanism by which these small, noncoding RNAs function and the genes they target remain elusive. Previous studies have shown that short, single-stranded 2'-O-methyl-modified oligonucleotides that are complementary to mature microRNA sequences can interact with the miRNA-RISC nucleoprotein complex and weakly inhibit miRNA function. Here we report the identification of secondary structural elements that enhance the potency of these molecules. Incorporation of highly structured, double-stranded flanking regions around the reverse complement core significantly increases inhibitor function and allows for multi-miRNA inhibition at subnanomolar concentrations. The improved functionality of these double-stranded miRNA inhibitors may provide insights into the miRNA mechanism by suggesting the possible importance of such structures in or near endogenous miRNA target sites.

  3. Cell transcriptional state alters genomic patterns of DNA double-strand break repair in human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yong, Raymund L; Yang, Chunzhang; Lu, Jie; Wang, Huaien; Schlaff, Cody D; Tandle, Anita; Graves, Christian A; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zhuang, Zhengping; Lonser, Russell R

    2014-12-17

    The misrepair of DNA double-strand breaks in close spatial proximity within the nucleus can result in chromosomal rearrangements that are important in the pathogenesis of haematopoietic and solid malignancies. It is unknown why certain epigenetic states, such as those found in stem or progenitor cells, appear to facilitate neoplastic transformation. Here we show that altering the transcriptional state of human astrocytes alters patterns of DNA damage repair from ionizing radiation at a gene locus-specific and genome-wide level. Astrocytes induced into a reactive state exhibit increased DNA repair, compared with non-reactive cells, in actively transcribed chromatin after irradiation. In mapping these repair sites, we identify misrepair events and repair hotspots that are unique to each state. The precise characterization of genomic regions susceptible to mutation in specific transcriptional states provides new opportunities for addressing clonal evolution in solid cancers, in particular those where double-strand break induction is a cornerstone of clinical intervention.

  4. Spin transport and spin polarization properties in double-stranded DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Simchi, Hamidreza; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi Mazidabadi, Hossein

    2013-11-21

    We study the spin-dependent electron transport through a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations and non-equilibrium Green's function method. We calculate the spin-dependent electron conductance and spin-polarization for different lengths, helix angles, twist angles of dsDNA, the environment-induced dephasing factors, and hopping integral. It is shown that the conductance decreases by increasing the length and dephasing factor. Also, we show that the spin-polarization depends on the helical symmetry and the length of DNA. It is shown that the double-stranded DNA can act as a perfect spin filter. Finally, we show that the sign of spin polarization can be inverted from +1 (−1) to −1 (+1) for some values of hopping integral.

  5. Millisecond analysis of double stranded DNA with fluorescent intercalator by micro-thermocontrol-device.

    PubMed

    Arata, Hideyuki F; Gillot, Frederic; Collard, Dominique; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2009-08-15

    Study of interaction between DNA and intercalator at molecular level is important to understand the mechanisms of DNA replication and repair. A micro-fabricated local heating thermodevice was adapted to perform denaturation experiments of DNA with fluorescent intercalator on millisecond time scale. Response time of complete unzipping of double stranded DNA, 16 microm in length, was measured to be around 5 min by commercial thermocycler. Response time of quenching of double stranded DNA with fluorescent intercalator SYBR Green was measured to be 10 ms. Thus, quenching properties owing to strand unzipping and denaturation at base pair level were distinguished. This method has provided easy access to measure this parameter and may be a powerful methodology in analyzing biomolecules on millisecond time scale.

  6. Mechanistic Modelling and Bayesian Inference Elucidates the Variable Dynamics of Double-Strand Break Repair.

    PubMed

    Woods, Mae L; Barnes, Chris P

    2016-10-01

    DNA double-strand breaks are lesions that form during metabolism, DNA replication and exposure to mutagens. When a double-strand break occurs one of a number of repair mechanisms is recruited, all of which have differing propensities for mutational events. Despite DNA repair being of crucial importance, the relative contribution of these mechanisms and their regulatory interactions remain to be fully elucidated. Understanding these mutational processes will have a profound impact on our knowledge of genomic instability, with implications across health, disease and evolution. Here we present a new method to model the combined activation of non-homologous end joining, single strand annealing and alternative end joining, following exposure to ionising radiation. We use Bayesian statistics to integrate eight biological data sets of double-strand break repair curves under varying genetic knockouts and confirm that our model is predictive by re-simulating and comparing to additional data. Analysis of the model suggests that there are at least three disjoint modes of repair, which we assign as fast, slow and intermediate. Our results show that when multiple data sets are combined, the rate for intermediate repair is variable amongst genetic knockouts. Further analysis suggests that the ratio between slow and intermediate repair depends on the presence or absence of DNA-PKcs and Ku70, which implies that non-homologous end joining and alternative end joining are not independent. Finally, we consider the proportion of double-strand breaks within each mechanism as a time series and predict activity as a function of repair rate. We outline how our insights can be directly tested using imaging and sequencing techniques and conclude that there is evidence of variable dynamics in alternative repair pathways. Our approach is an important step towards providing a unifying theoretical framework for the dynamics of DNA repair processes.

  7. Topically Applied AaeIAP1 Double-Stranded RNA Kills Female Adults of Aedes aegypti

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    VECTOR CONTROL, PEST MANAGEMENT , RESISTANCE, REPELLENTS Topically Applied AaeIAP1 Double-Stranded RNA Kills Female Adults of Aedes aegypti JULIA W...Armed Forces Pest Management Board. References Cited Aitken, T. H., W. G. Downs, and R. E. Shope. 1977. Aedes aegypti strain Þtness for yellow fever...virus transmission. Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 26: 985Ð989. Ambrosini, G., C. Adida , and D. C. Altieri. 1997. A novel anti-apoptosis gene, survivin

  8. Effects of heavy ions on inactivation and DNA double strand breaks in Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, H; Schafer, M; Schmitz, C; Bucker, H

    1994-10-01

    Inactivation and double strand break (dsb) induction after heavy ion irradiation were studied in stationary phase cells of the highly radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1. There is evidence that the radiation sensitivity of this bacterium is nearly independent on energy in the range of up to 15 MeV/u for lighter ions (Ar). The responses to dsb induction for charged particles show direct relationship between increasing radiation dose and residual intact DNA.

  9. Mechanistic Modelling and Bayesian Inference Elucidates the Variable Dynamics of Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks are lesions that form during metabolism, DNA replication and exposure to mutagens. When a double-strand break occurs one of a number of repair mechanisms is recruited, all of which have differing propensities for mutational events. Despite DNA repair being of crucial importance, the relative contribution of these mechanisms and their regulatory interactions remain to be fully elucidated. Understanding these mutational processes will have a profound impact on our knowledge of genomic instability, with implications across health, disease and evolution. Here we present a new method to model the combined activation of non-homologous end joining, single strand annealing and alternative end joining, following exposure to ionising radiation. We use Bayesian statistics to integrate eight biological data sets of double-strand break repair curves under varying genetic knockouts and confirm that our model is predictive by re-simulating and comparing to additional data. Analysis of the model suggests that there are at least three disjoint modes of repair, which we assign as fast, slow and intermediate. Our results show that when multiple data sets are combined, the rate for intermediate repair is variable amongst genetic knockouts. Further analysis suggests that the ratio between slow and intermediate repair depends on the presence or absence of DNA-PKcs and Ku70, which implies that non-homologous end joining and alternative end joining are not independent. Finally, we consider the proportion of double-strand breaks within each mechanism as a time series and predict activity as a function of repair rate. We outline how our insights can be directly tested using imaging and sequencing techniques and conclude that there is evidence of variable dynamics in alternative repair pathways. Our approach is an important step towards providing a unifying theoretical framework for the dynamics of DNA repair processes. PMID:27741226

  10. Choreographing the Double Strand Break Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Control of Nuclear Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Shane M.; Greenberg, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    The cellular response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) is a multifaceted signaling program that centers on post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitylation and SUMOylation. In this review we discuss how ubiquitin and SUMO orchestrate the recognition of DSBs and explore how this influences chromatin organization. We discuss functional outcomes of this response including transcriptional silencing and how pre-existing chromatin states may control the DSB response and the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:27375678

  11. DNA double-strand breaks induced by high NaCl occur predominantly in gene deserts

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieva, Natalia I.; Cui, Kairong; Kitchaev, Daniil A.; Zhao, Keji; Burg, Maurice B.

    2011-01-01

    High concentration of NaCl increases DNA breaks both in cell culture and in vivo. The breaks remain elevated as long as NaCl concentration remains high and are rapidly repaired when the concentration is lowered. The exact nature of the breaks, and their location, has not been entirely clear, and it has not been evident how cells survive, replicate, and maintain genome integrity in environments like the renal inner medulla in which cells are constantly exposed to high NaCl concentration. Repair of the breaks after NaCl is reduced is accompanied by formation of foci containing phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), which occurs around DNA double-strand breaks and contributes to their repair. Here, we confirm by specific comet assay and pulsed-field electrophoresis that cells adapted to high NaCl have increased levels of double-strand breaks. Importantly, γH2AX foci that occur during repair of the breaks are nonrandomly distributed in the mouse genome. By chromatin immunoprecipitation using anti-γH2AX antibody, followed by massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq), we find that during repair of double-strand breaks induced by high NaCl, γH2AX is predominantly localized to regions of the genome devoid of genes (“gene deserts”), indicating that the high NaCl-induced double-strand breaks are located there. Localization to gene deserts helps explain why the DNA breaks are less harmful than are the random breaks induced by genotoxic agents such as UV radiation, ionizing radiation, and oxidants. We propose that the universal presence of NaCl around animal cells has directly influenced the evolution of the structure of their genomes. PMID:22106305

  12. Sequence Selective Recognition of Double-Stranded RNA at Physiologically Relevant Conditions Using PNA-Peptide Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Muse, Oluwatoyosi; Zengeya, Thomas; Mwaura, Juddy; Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W.; Grewer, Christof T.; Rozners, Eriks

    2013-01-01

    Conjugation of short peptide nucleic acids (PNA) with tetralysine peptides strongly enhanced triple helical binding to RNA at physiologically relevant conditions. The PNA hexamers and heptamers carrying cationic nucleobase and tetralysine modifications displayed high binding affinity for complementary double-stranded RNA without compromising sequence selectivity. The PNA-peptide conjugates had unique preference for binding double-stranded RNA, while having little, if any, affinity for double-stranded DNA. The cationic PNAs were efficiently taken up by HEK293 cells, while little uptake was observed for unmodified PNA. PMID:23721369

  13. Sequence selective recognition of double-stranded RNA at physiologically relevant conditions using PNA-peptide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Muse, Oluwatoyosi; Zengeya, Thomas; Mwaura, Juddy; Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W; Grewer, Christof T; Rozners, Eriks

    2013-08-16

    Conjugation of short peptide nucleic acids (PNA) with tetralysine peptides strongly enhanced triple helical binding to RNA at physiologically relevant conditions. The PNA hexamers and heptamers carrying cationic nucleobase and tetralysine modifications displayed high binding affinity for complementary double-stranded RNA without compromising sequence selectivity. The PNA-peptide conjugates had unique preference for binding double-stranded RNA, while having little, if any, affinity for double-stranded DNA. The cationic PNAs were efficiently taken up by HEK293 cells, whereas little uptake was observed for unmodified PNA.

  14. Chiral symmetry breaking of a double-stranded helical chain through bend-writhe coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanao, Tomohiro; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2014-06-01

    This paper explores asymmetric elasticity of a double-stranded helical chain, which serves as a minimal model of biopolymers. The model consists of two elastic chains that mutually intertwine in a right-handed manner, forming a double-stranded helix. A simple numerical experiment for structural relaxation, which reduces the total elastic energy of the model monotonically without thermal fluctuations, reveals possible asymmetric elasticity inherent in the helical chain. It is first shown that a short segment of the double-stranded helical chain has a tendency to unwind when it is bent. It is also shown that a short segment of the helical chain has a tendency to writhe in the left direction upon bending. This tendency gives rise to a propensity for a longer segment of the chain to form a left-handed superhelix spontaneously upon bending. Finally, this propensity of the helical chain to form a left-handed superhelix is proposed to be a possible origin of the uniform left-handed wrapping of DNA around nucleosome core particles in nature. The results presented here could provide deeper insights into the roles and significance of helical chirality of biopolymers.

  15. Myonuclear breakdown in sporadic inclusion body myositis is accompanied by DNA double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Makoto; Nakano, Satoshi; Nakamura, Seika; Wate, Reika; Shinde, Akiyo; Kaneko, Satoshi; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2011-05-01

    Rimmed vacuoles in sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM) contain nuclear remnants. We sought to determine if the nuclear degeneration seen in s-IBM is associated with DNA damage. In muscle biopsy specimens from ten patients with s-IBM and 50 controls, we immunolocalized 1) phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX), which is a sensitive immunocytochemical marker of DNA double-strand breaks and 2) DNA-PK, which is an enzyme involved in double-strand break repair. In s-IBM, vacuolar peripheries often showed strong immunoreactivity to γ-H2AX and the three components of DNA-PK (DNA-PKcs, Ku70, and Ku80). A triple fluorescence study of Ku70, emerin, and DNA displayed nuclear breakdown and it suggested impaired nuclear incorporation of Ku70. The percentage of positive nuclei for γ-H2AX was significantly higher in vacuolated fibers than non-vacuolated fibers in s-IBM, or fibers in polymyosits. We hypothesize that a dysfunction of nuclear envelope may cause nuclear fragility, double-strand breaks and impaired nuclear transport in s-IBM. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Illegitimate recombination induced by DNA double-strand breaks in a mammalian chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J W; Morgan, W F

    1994-01-01

    We examined DNA double-strand-break-induced mutations in the endogenous adenine phosphoribosyl-transferase (APRT) gene in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells after exposure to restriction endonucleases. PvuII, EcoRV, and StuI, all of which produce blunt-end DNA double-strand breaks, were electroporated into CHO-AT3-2 cells hemizygous at the APRT locus. Colonies of viable cells containing mutations at APRT were expanded, and the mutations that occurred during break repair were analyzed at the DNA sequence level. Restriction enzyme-induced mutations consisted of small deletions of 1 to 36 bp, insertions, and combinations of insertions and deletions at the cleavage sites. Most of the small deletions involved overlaps of one to four complementary bases at the recombination junctions. Southern blot analysis revealed more complex mutations, suggesting translocation, inversion, or insertion of larger chromosomal fragments. These results indicate that blunt-end DNA double-strand breaks can induce illegitimate (nonhomologous) recombination in mammalian chromosomes and that they play an important role in mutagenesis. Images PMID:8065314

  17. Simulation of the Formation of DNA Double Strand Breaks and Chromosome Aberrations in Irradiated Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Wu, Honglu; Blattnig, Steve; George, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    The formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosome aberrations is an important consequence of ionizing radiation. To simulate DNA double-strand breaks and the formation of chromosome aberrations, we have recently merged the codes RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) and NASARTI (NASA Radiation Track Image). The program RITRACKS is a stochastic code developed to simulate detailed event-by-event radiation track structure: [1] This code is used to calculate the dose in voxels of 20 nm, in a volume containing simulated chromosomes, [2] The number of tracks in the volume is calculated for each simulation by sampling a Poisson distribution, with the distribution parameter obtained from the irradiation dose, ion type and energy. The program NASARTI generates the chromosomes present in a cell nucleus by random walks of 20 nm, corresponding to the size of the dose voxels, [3] The generated chromosomes are located within domains which may intertwine, and [4] Each segment of the random walks corresponds to approx. 2,000 DNA base pairs. NASARTI uses pre-calculated dose at each voxel to calculate the probability of DNA damage at each random walk segment. Using the location of double-strand breaks, possible rejoining between damaged segments is evaluated. This yields various types of chromosomes aberrations, including deletions, inversions, exchanges, etc. By performing the calculations using various types of radiations, it will be possible to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for several types of chromosome aberrations.

  18. Inhibition of APOBEC3G activity impedes double-stranded DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Ponnandy; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Nagler, Adi; Schiffer, Celia A; Kotler, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G (A3G) was first described as an anti-HIV-1 restriction factor, acting by directly deaminating reverse transcripts of the viral genome. HIV-1 Vif neutralizes the activity of A3G, primarily by mediating degradation of A3G to establish effective infection in host target cells. Lymphoma cells, which express high amounts of A3G, can restrict Vif-deficient HIV-1. Interestingly, these cells are more stable in the face of treatments that result in double-stranded DNA damage, such as ionizing radiation and chemotherapies. Previously, we showed that the Vif-derived peptide (Vif25-39) efficiently inhibits A3G deamination, and increases the sensitivity of lymphoma cells to ionizing radiation. In the current study, we show that additional peptides derived from Vif, A3G, and APOBEC3F, which contain the LYYF motif, inhibit deamination activity. Each residue in the Vif25-39 sequence moderately contributes to the inhibitory effect, whereas replacing a single residue in the LYYF motif completely abrogates inhibition of deamination. Treatment of A3G-expressing lymphoma cells exposed to ionizing radiation with the new inhibitory peptides reduces double-strand break repair after irradiation. Incubation of cultured irradiated lymphoma cells with peptides that inhibit double-strand break repair halts their propagation. These results suggest that A3G may be a potential therapeutic target that is amenable to peptide and peptidomimetic inhibition. © 2015 FEBS.

  19. The ability of sperm selection techniques to remove single- or double-strand DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Enciso, María; Iglesias, Miriam; Galán, Isabel; Sarasa, Jonás; Gosálvez, Antonio; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of techniques for the preparation of sperm are currently available, of which the most commonly employed are density–gradient centrifugation (DGC) and swim-up (SUP). To date, these methods appear to be effective in selecting functional sperm for assisted reproduction techniques (ART), but they may have negative effects on sperm DNA. In this study, the ability of these semen processing techniques to eliminate spermatozoa containing single- and double-strand DNA damage was assessed by the two-tailed comet assay and the sperm chromatin dispersion test in 157 semen samples from patients seeking assisted reproduction treatment. Our results indicated that SUP and DGC are equally efficient in eliminating spermatozoa containing double-strand DNA damage and sperm with highly damaged (degraded) DNA, as characterized by the presence of both single- and double-strand DNA breaks. However, DGC is more efficient than SUP in selecting spermatozoa that are free from single-strand DNA damage. Future studies should characterise the importance of the various types of DNA damage and examine the sperm processing protocols used in each laboratory to determine their ability to eliminate DNA damage and hence, prevent the potential transmission of genetic mutations via ART. PMID:21725332

  20. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-06-02

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-01-01

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. PMID:27112572

  2. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2015-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  3. Viral Phosphodiesterases That Antagonize Double-Stranded RNA Signaling to RNase L by Degrading 2-5A

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The host interferon (IFN) antiviral response involves a myriad of diverse biochemical pathways that disrupt virus replication cycles at many different levels. As a result, viruses have acquired and evolved genes that antagonize the host antiviral proteins. IFNs inhibit viral infections in part through the 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase (OAS)/RNase L pathway. OAS proteins are pathogen recognition receptors that exist at different basal levels in different cell types and that are IFN inducible. Upon activation by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern viral double-stranded RNA, certain OAS proteins synthesize 2-5A from ATP. 2-5A binds to the antiviral enzyme RNase L causing its dimerization and activation. Recently, disparate RNA viruses, group 2a betacoronaviruses, and group A rotaviruses, have been shown to produce proteins with 2′,5′-phosphodiesterase (PDE) activities that eliminate 2-5A thereby evading the antiviral activity of the OAS/RNase L pathway. These viral proteins are members of the eukaryotic-viral LigT-like group of 2H phosphoesterases, so named for the presence of 2 conserved catalytic histidine residues. Here, we will review the biochemistry, biology, and implications of viral and cellular 2′,5′-PDEs that degrade 2-5A. In addition, we discuss alternative viral and cellular strategies for limiting the activity of OAS/RNase L. PMID:24905202

  4. The effect of a magnetic field on the spin-selective transport in double-stranded DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Simchi, Hamidreza; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi Mazidabadi, Hossein

    2014-05-28

    Spin-polarization in double-stranded DNA is studied in the presence of a magnetic field applied along its helix axis using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The spin-polarization could be tuned by changing the magnetic field. In some special cases, the double-stranded DNA behaved as a perfect spin-filter. Furthermore, the dependency of the spin-polarization on the spin-orbit strength and dephasing strength is studied.

  5. Separation of Short Single- and Double-Stranded DNA Based on Their Adsorption Kinetics Difference on Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Jung Jimmy; Liu, Juewen

    2013-01-01

    Separation of short single- and double-stranded DNA typically requires gel electrophoresis followed by DNA extraction, which is a time consuming process. Graphene oxide adsorbs single-stranded DNA more quickly than double-stranded ones, allowing for selective removal of the former with a simple mixing and centrifugation operation. The effect of DNA length and salt on adsorption selectivity has been characterized and its application in DNA melting curve measurement has been demonstrated.

  6. Transcription-associated recombination is independent of XRCC2 and mechanistically separate from homology-directed DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, Linda; Helleday, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    It has previously been shown that transcription greatly enhances recombination in mammalian cells. However, the proteins involved in catalysing this process and the recombination pathways involved in transcription-associated recombination (TAR) are still unknown. It is well established that both the BRCA2 protein and the RAD51 paralog protein XRCC2 are required for homologous recombination. Here, we show that the BRCA2 protein is also required for TAR, while the XRCC2 protein is not involved. Expression of the XRCC2 gene in XRCC2 mutated irs1 cells restores the defect in homologous recombination repair of an I-SceI-induced DNA double-strand break, while TAR is unaffected. Interestingly, the XRCC2-deficient irs1 cells are also proficient in recombination induced at slowed replication forks, suggesting that TAR is mechanistically linked with this recombination pathway. In conclusion, we show that TAR depends on BRCA2 but is independent of XRCC2, and that this recombination pathway is separate from that used to repair a two-ended DNA double-strand break.

  7. Age-dependent change of HMGB1 and DNA double-strand break accumulation in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Enokido, Yasushi; Yoshitake, Ayaka; Ito, Hikaru; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2008-11-07

    HMGB1 is an evolutionarily conserved non-histone chromatin-associated protein with key roles in maintenance of nuclear homeostasis; however, the function of HMGB1 in the brain remains largely unknown. Recently, we found that the reduction of nuclear HMGB1 protein level in the nucleus associates with DNA double-strand break (DDSB)-mediated neuronal damage in Huntington's disease [M.L. Qi, K. Tagawa, Y. Enokido, N. Yoshimura, Y. Wada, K. Watase, S. Ishiura, I. Kanazawa, J. Botas, M. Saitoe, E.E. Wanker, H. Okazawa, Proteome analysis of soluble nuclear proteins reveals that HMGB1/2 suppress genotoxic stress in polyglutamine diseases, Nat. Cell Biol. 9 (2007) 402-414]. In this study, we analyze the region- and cell type-specific changes of HMGB1 and DDSB accumulation during the aging of mouse brain. HMGB1 is localized in the nuclei of neurons and astrocytes, and the protein level changes in various brain regions age-dependently. HMGB1 reduces in neurons, whereas it increases in astrocytes during aging. In contrast, DDSB remarkably accumulates in neurons, but it does not change significantly in astrocytes during aging. These results indicate that HMGB1 expression during aging is differentially regulated between neurons and astrocytes, and suggest that the reduction of nuclear HMGB1 might be causative for DDSB in neurons of the aged brain.

  8. RecA Binding to a Single Double-Stranded DNA Molecule: A Possible Role of DNA Conformational Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, J. F.; Robert, J.; Bourdieu, L.; Chatenay, D.; Marko, J. F.

    1998-10-01

    Most genetic regulatory mechanisms involve protein-DNA interactions. In these processes, the classical Watson-Crick DNA structure sometimes is distorted severely, which in turn enables the precise recognition of the specific sites by the protein. Despite its key importance, very little is known about such deformation processes. To address this general question, we have studied a model system, namely, RecA binding to double-stranded DNA. Results from micromanipulation experiments indicate that RecA binds strongly to stretched DNA; based on this observation, we propose that spontaneous thermal stretching fluctuations may play a role in the binding of RecA to DNA. This has fundamental implications for the protein-DNA binding mechanism, which must therefore rely in part on a combination of flexibility and thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure. We also show that this mechanism is sequence sensitive. Theoretical simulations support this interpretation of our experimental results, and it is argued that this is of broad relevance to DNA-protein interactions.

  9. RecA binding to a single double-stranded DNA molecule: a possible role of DNA conformational fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Leger, J F; Robert, J; Bourdieu, L; Chatenay, D; Marko, J F

    1998-10-13

    Most genetic regulatory mechanisms involve protein-DNA interactions. In these processes, the classical Watson-Crick DNA structure sometimes is distorted severely, which in turn enables the precise recognition of the specific sites by the protein. Despite its key importance, very little is known about such deformation processes. To address this general question, we have studied a model system, namely, RecA binding to double-stranded DNA. Results from micromanipulation experiments indicate that RecA binds strongly to stretched DNA; based on this observation, we propose that spontaneous thermal stretching fluctuations may play a role in the binding of RecA to DNA. This has fundamental implications for the protein-DNA binding mechanism, which must therefore rely in part on a combination of flexibility and thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure. We also show that this mechanism is sequence sensitive. Theoretical simulations support this interpretation of our experimental results, and it is argued that this is of broad relevance to DNA-protein interactions.

  10. The Arabidopsis thaliana DSB formation (AtDFO) gene is required for meiotic double-strand break formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Song, Yao; Cheng, Zhi-hao; Wang, Ying-xiang; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Hong; Xu, Ling; Yang, Zhong-Nan

    2012-10-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation is the initial event for meiotic recombination catalyzed by the conserved Spo11 protein. In Arabidopsis, several proteins have been reported to be involved in DSB formation. Here, we report an Arabidopsis DSB forming (DFO) gene in Arabidopsis that is involved in DSB formation. The dfo mutant exhibits reduced fertility, producing polyads with an abnormal number of microspores, unlike the tetrads in the wild type. The dfo meiocytes were defective in homologous chromosome synapsis and segregation. Genetic analysis revealed that the homologous recombination of Atdfo-1 is severely affected in meiotic prophase I. DFO encodes a protein without any known conserved domain. There was no homologue identified outside the plant kingdom, indicating that AtDFO is a plant-specific protein. AtMRE11 has been reported to be responsible for processing SPO11-generated DSBs. The Atmre11 mutant displays chromosome fragmentation during meiosis. However, the Atdfo Atmre11 double mutant had no such chromosome fragmentation, indicating that AtDFO is required for DSB formation.

  11. XLS (c9orf142) is a new component of mammalian DNA double-stranded break repair

    PubMed Central

    Craxton, A; Somers, J; Munnur, D; Jukes-Jones, R; Cain, K; Malewicz, M

    2015-01-01

    Repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells primarily occurs by the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway, which requires seven core proteins (Ku70/Ku86, DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit), Artemis, XRCC4-like factor (XLF), XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV). Here we show using combined affinity purification and mass spectrometry that DNA-PKcs co-purifies with all known core NHEJ factors. Furthermore, we have identified a novel evolutionary conserved protein associated with DNA-PKcs—c9orf142. Computer-based modelling of c9orf142 predicted a structure very similar to XRCC4, hence we have named c9orf142—XLS (XRCC4-like small protein). Depletion of c9orf142/XLS in cells impaired DSB repair consistent with a defect in NHEJ. Furthermore, c9orf142/XLS interacted with other core NHEJ factors. These results demonstrate the existence of a new component of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway in mammalian cells. PMID:25941166

  12. Myricetin induces apoptosis via endoplasmic reticulum stress and DNA double-strand breaks in human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    XU, YE; XIE, QI; WU, SHAOHUA; YI, DAN; YU, YANG; LIU, SHIBING; LI, SONGYAN; LI, ZHIXIN

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying myricetin-induced cancer cell apoptosis remain to be elucidated. Certain previous studies have shown that myricetin induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway. Apoptosis, however, can also be induced by other classical pathways, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The aim of the present study was to assess whether these two apoptotic pathways are involved in myricetin-induced cell death in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. The results revealed that treatment with myricetin inhibited viability of SKOV3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Myricetin induced nuclear chromatin condensation and fragmentation, and also upregulated the protein levels of active caspase 3 in a time-dependent manner. In addition, myricetin upregulated ER stress-associated proteins, glucose-regulated protein-78 and C/EBP homologous protein in SKOV3 cells. Phosphorylation of H2AX, a marker of DNA DSBs, was revealed to be upregulated in myricetin-treated cells. The data indicated that myricetin induces DNA DSBs and ER stress, which leads to apoptosis in SKOV3 cells. PMID:26782830

  13. Age-dependent change of HMGB1 and DNA double-strand break accumulation in mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Enokido, Yasushi; Yoshitake, Ayaka; Ito, Hikaru; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2008-11-07

    HMGB1 is an evolutionarily conserved non-histone chromatin-associated protein with key roles in maintenance of nuclear homeostasis; however, the function of HMGB1 in the brain remains largely unknown. Recently, we found that the reduction of nuclear HMGB1 protein level in the nucleus associates with DNA double-strand break (DDSB)-mediated neuronal damage in Huntington's disease [M.L. Qi, K. Tagawa, Y. Enokido, N. Yoshimura, Y. Wada, K. Watase, S. Ishiura, I. Kanazawa, J. Botas, M. Saitoe, E.E. Wanker, H. Okazawa, Proteome analysis of soluble nuclear proteins reveals that HMGB1/2 suppress genotoxic stress in polyglutamine diseases, Nat. Cell Biol. 9 (2007) 402-414]. In this study, we analyze the region- and cell type-specific changes of HMGB1 and DDSB accumulation during the aging of mouse brain. HMGB1 is localized in the nuclei of neurons and astrocytes, and the protein level changes in various brain regions age-dependently. HMGB1 reduces in neurons, whereas it increases in astrocytes during aging. In contrast, DDSB remarkably accumulates in neurons, but it does not change significantly in astrocytes during aging. These results indicate that HMGB1 expression during aging is differentially regulated between neurons and astrocytes, and suggest that the reduction of nuclear HMGB1 might be causative for DDSB in neurons of the aged brain.

  14. MEIOTIC F-BOX Is Essential for Male Meiotic DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Rice[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Yu, Junping; Zong, Jie; Lu, Pingli

    2016-01-01

    F-box proteins constitute a large superfamily in plants and play important roles in controlling many biological processes, but the roles of F-box proteins in male meiosis in plants remain unclear. Here, we identify the rice (Oryza sativa) F-box gene MEIOTIC F-BOX (MOF), which is essential for male meiotic progression. MOF belongs to the FBX subfamily and is predominantly active during leptotene to pachytene of prophase I. mof meiocytes display disrupted telomere bouquet formation, impaired pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes, and arrested meiocytes at late prophase I, followed by apoptosis. Although normal, programmed double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) form in mof mutants, foci of the phosphorylated histone variant γH2AX, a marker for DSBs, persist in the mutant, indicating that many of the DSBs remained unrepaired. The recruitment of Completion of meiosis I (COM1) and Radiation sensitive51C (RAD51C) to DSBs is severely compromised in mutant meiocytes, indicating that MOF is crucial for DSB end-processing and repair. Further analyses showed that MOF could physically interact with the rice SKP1-like Protein1 (OSK1), indicating that MOF functions as a component of the SCF E3 ligase to regulate meiotic progression in rice. Thus, this study reveals the essential role of an F-box protein in plant meiosis and provides helpful information for elucidating the roles of the ubiquitin proteasome system in plant meiotic progression. PMID:27436711

  15. Members of the RAD52 Epistasis Group Contribute to Mitochondrial Homologous Recombination and Double-Strand Break Repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Alexis; Kalifa, Lidza; Sia, Elaine A.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria contain an independently maintained genome that encodes several proteins required for cellular respiration. Deletions in the mitochondrial genome have been identified that cause several maternally inherited diseases and are associated with certain cancers and neurological disorders. The majority of these deletions in human cells are flanked by short, repetitive sequences, suggesting that these deletions may result from recombination events. Our current understanding of the maintenance and repair of mtDNA is quite limited compared to our understanding of similar events in the nucleus. Many nuclear DNA repair proteins are now known to also localize to mitochondria, but their function and the mechanism of their action remain largely unknown. This study investigated the contribution of the nuclear double-strand break repair (DSBR) proteins Rad51p, Rad52p and Rad59p in mtDNA repair. We have determined that both Rad51p and Rad59p are localized to the matrix of the mitochondria and that Rad51p binds directly to mitochondrial DNA. In addition, a mitochondrially-targeted restriction endonuclease (mtLS-KpnI) was used to produce a unique double-strand break (DSB) in the mitochondrial genome, which allowed direct analysis of DSB repair in vivo in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that loss of these three proteins significantly decreases the rate of spontaneous deletion events and the loss of Rad51p and Rad59p impairs the repair of induced mtDNA DSBs. PMID:26540255

  16. MOF and histone H4 acetylation at lysine 16 are critical for DNA damage response and double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Girdhar G; So, Sairei; Gupta, Arun; Kumar, Rakesh; Cayrou, Christelle; Avvakumov, Nikita; Bhadra, Utpal; Pandita, Raj K; Porteus, Matthew H; Chen, David J; Cote, Jacques; Pandita, Tej K

    2010-07-01

    The human MOF gene encodes a protein that specifically acetylates histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16ac). Here we show that reduced levels of H4K16ac correlate with a defective DNA damage response (DDR) and double-strand break (DSB) repair to ionizing radiation (IR). The defect, however, is not due to altered expression of proteins involved in DDR. Abrogation of IR-induced DDR by MOF depletion is inhibited by blocking H4K16ac deacetylation. MOF was found to be associated with the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), a protein involved in nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair. ATM-dependent IR-induced phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs was also abrogated in MOF-depleted cells. Our data indicate that MOF depletion greatly decreased DNA double-strand break repair by both NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR). In addition, MOF activity was associated with general chromatin upon DNA damage and colocalized with the synaptonemal complex in male meiocytes. We propose that MOF, through H4K16ac (histone code), has a critical role at multiple stages in the cellular DNA damage response and DSB repair.

  17. Vilya, a component of the recombination nodule, is required for meiotic double-strand break formation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Cathleen M; Nielsen, Rachel J; Guo, Fengli; Unruh, Jay R; Slaughter, Brian D; Hawley, R Scott

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic recombination begins with the induction of programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs). In most organisms only a fraction of DSBs become crossovers. Here we report a novel meiotic gene, vilya, which encodes a protein with homology to Zip3-like proteins shown to determine DSB fate in other organisms. Vilya is required for meiotic DSB formation, perhaps as a consequence of its interaction with the DSB accessory protein Mei-P22, and localizes to those DSB sites that will mature into crossovers. In early pachytene Vilya localizes along the central region of the synaptonemal complex and to discrete foci. The accumulation of Vilya at foci is dependent on DSB formation. Immuno-electron microscopy demonstrates that Vilya is a component of recombination nodules, which mark the sites of crossover formation. Thus Vilya links the mechanism of DSB formation to either the selection of those DSBs that will become crossovers or to the actual process of crossing over. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08287.001 PMID:26452093

  18. Mdt1 Facilitates Efficient Repair of Blocked DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Recombinational Maintenance of Telomeres▿

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Brietta L.; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    DNA recombination plays critical roles in DNA repair and alternative telomere maintenance. Here we show that absence of the SQ/TQ cluster domain-containing protein Mdt1 (Ybl051c) renders Saccharomyces cerevisiae particularly hypersensitive to bleomycin, a drug that causes 3′-phospho-glycolate-blocked DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). mdt1Δ also hypersensitizes partially recombination-defective cells to camptothecin-induced 3′-phospho-tyrosyl protein-blocked DSBs. Remarkably, whereas mdt1Δ cells are unable to restore broken chromosomes after bleomycin treatment, they efficiently repair “clean” endonuclease-generated DSBs. Epistasis analyses indicate that MDT1 acts in the repair of bleomycin-induced DSBs by regulating the efficiency of the homologous recombination pathway as well as telomere-related functions of the KU complex. Moreover, mdt1Δ leads to severe synthetic growth defects with a deletion of the recombination facilitator and telomere-positioning factor gene CTF18 already in the absence of exogenous DNA damage. Importantly, mdt1Δ causes a dramatic shift from the usually prevalent type II to the less-efficient type I pathway of recombinational telomere maintenance in the absence of telomerase in liquid senescence assays. As telomeres resemble protein-blocked DSBs, the results indicate that Mdt1 acts in a novel blocked-end-specific recombination pathway that is required for the efficiency of both drug-induced DSB repair and telomerase-independent telomere maintenance. PMID:17636027

  19. Repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end-joining

    PubMed Central

    Mahaney, Brandi L.; Meek, Katheryn; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2010-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are considered the most cytotoxic type of DNA lesion. They can be introduced by external sources such as ionizing radiation (IR), by chemotherapeutic drugs such as topoisomerase poisons and by normal biological processes such as V(D)J recombination. If left unrepaired, DSBs can cause cell death. If misrepaired, DSBs may lead to chromosomal translocations and genomic instability. One of the major pathways for the repair of IR-induced DSBs in mammalian cells is non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The main proteins required for NHEJ in mammalian cells are the Ku heterodimer, the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Artemis, XRCC4, DNA ligase IV and XLF (XRCC4-like factor, also called Cernunnos). Additional proteins including DNA polymerases μ and λ, polynucleotide kinase (PNK) and the Werner’s Syndrome helicase (WRN) may also play a role. Here, we will review our current understanding of the mechanism of NHEJ in mammalian cells and discuss the roles of DNA-PKcs and DNA-PK-mediated phosphorylation in NHEJ. PMID:19133841

  20. Low level phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine 139 (γH2AX) is not associated with DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, Paulina; Hoang, Agnieszka; Bujnowicz, Lukasz; Bernas, Tytus; Berniak, Krzysztof; Zarębski, Mirosław; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Dobrucki, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine 139 (γH2AX) is an early step in cellular response to a DNA double-strand break (DSB). γH2AX foci are generally regarded as markers of DSBs. A growing body of evidence demonstrates, however, that while induction of DSBs always brings about phosphorylation of histone H2AX, the reverse is not true - the presence of γH2AX foci should not be considered an unequivocal marker of DNA double-strand breaks. We studied DNA damage induced in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells by topoisomerase type I and II inhibitors (0.2 μM camptothecin, 10 μM etoposide or 0.2 μM mitoxantrone for 1 h), and using 3D high resolution quantitative confocal microscopy, assessed the number, size and the integrated intensity of immunofluorescence signals of individual γH2AX foci induced by these drugs. Also, investigated was spatial association between γH2AX foci and foci of 53BP1, the protein involved in DSB repair, both in relation to DNA replication sites (factories) as revealed by labeling nascent DNA with EdU. Extensive 3D and correlation data analysis demonstrated that γH2AX foci exhibit a wide range of sizes and levels of H2AX phosphorylation, and correlate differently with 53BP1 and DNA replication. This is the first report showing lack of a link between low level phosphorylation γH2AX sites and double-strand DNA breaks in cells exposed to topoisomerase I or II inhibitors. The data are discussed in terms of mechanisms that may be involved in formation of γH2AX sites of different sizes and intensities. PMID:27391338

  1. Viromes, Not Gene Markers, for Studying Double-Stranded DNA Virus Communities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have recently been recognized as dominant forces in nature, with studies benefiting from gene markers that can be quickly, informatively, and universally surveyed. Viruses, where explored, have proven to be powerful modulators of locally and globally important microbes through mortality, horizontal gene transfer, and metabolic reprogramming. However, community-wide virus studies have been challenged by the lack of a universal marker. Here, I propose that viral metagenomics has advanced to largely take over study of double-stranded DNA viruses. PMID:25540374

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of a Double-Stranded RNA Virus from Avocado

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Francisco; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Valverde, Rodrigo A.

    2012-01-01

    A number of avocado (Persea americana) cultivars are known to contain high-molecular-weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules for which a viral nature has been suggested, although sequence data are not available. Here we report the cloning and complete sequencing of a 13.5-kbp dsRNA virus isolated from avocado and show that it corresponds to the genome of a new species of the genus Endornavirus (family Endornaviridae), tentatively named Persea americana endornavirus (PaEV). PMID:22205720

  3. Translocation frequency of double-stranded DNA through a solid-state nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Nicholas A. W.; Muthukumar, Murugappan; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state nanopores are single-molecule sensors that measure changes in ionic current as charged polymers such as DNA pass through. Here, we present comprehensive experiments on the length, voltage, and salt dependence of the frequency of double-stranded DNA translocations through conical quartz nanopores with mean opening diameter 15 nm. We observe an entropic barrier-limited, length-dependent translocation frequency at 4M LiCl salt concentration and a drift-dominated, length-independent translocation frequency at 1M KCl salt concentration. These observations are described by a unifying convection-diffusion equation, which includes the contribution of an entropic barrier for polymer entry.

  4. LRV1 viral particles in Leishmania guyanensis contain double-stranded or single-stranded RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, R; Aline, R F; Myler, P J; Stuart, K

    1992-01-01

    The 32-nm-diameter spherical viral particles found in the cytoplasm of Leishmania guyanensis CUMC1-1A sediment at 130S and have a buoyant density of approximately 1.4 g/ml in cesium chloride gradients. These particles contain a 5.3-kb double-stranded RNA, while single-stranded RNA that corresponds to the viral positive strand is associated with less-dense particles. These results suggest a conservative and sequential mode of LRV1 viral RNA replication that is exemplified by the ScV L-A virus of yeast. Images PMID:1738198

  5. DNA double strand break repair, chromosome synapsis and transcriptional silencing in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Akiko; Schoenmakers, Sam; Baarends, Willy M

    2010-05-16

    Chromosome pairing and synapsis during meiotic prophase requires the formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the topoisomerase-like enzyme SPO11. Chromosomes, or chromosomal regions, that lack a pairing partner, such as the largely heterologous X and Y chromosomes, show delayed meiotic DSB repair and are transcriptionally silenced. Herein, we review meiosis-specific aspects of DSB repair in relation to homology recognition and meiotic silencing of heterologous regions. We propose a dynamic interplay between progression of synapsis and persistent meiotic DSBs. Signaling from these persistent breaks could inhibit heterologous synapsis and stimulate meiotic silencing of the X and Y chromosomes.

  6. Single- and double-strand photocleavage of DNA by YO, YOYO and TOTO.

    PubMed Central

    Akerman, B; Tuite, E

    1996-01-01

    Photocleavage of dsDNA by the fluorescent DNA stains oxazole yellow (YO), its dimer YOYO) and the dimer TOTO of thiazole orange (TO) has been investigated as a function of binding ratio. On visible illumination, both YO and YOYO cause single-strand cleavage, with an efficiency that varies with the dye/DNA binding ratio in a manner which can be rationalized in terms of free dye being an inefficient photocleavage reagent and externally bound dye being more efficient than intercalated dye. Moreover, the photocleavage mechanism changes with binding mode. Photocleavage by externally bound dye is, at least partly, oxygen dependent with scavenger studies implicating singlet oxygen as the activated oxygen intermediate. Photocleavage by intercalated dye is essentially oxygen-independent but can be inhibited by moderate concentrations of beta- mercaptoethanol--direct attack on the phosphoribose backbone is a possible mechanism. TOTO causes single-strand cleavage approximately five times less efficiently than YOYO. No direct double-strand breaks (dsb) are detected with YO or YOYO, but in both cases single-strand breaks (ssb) are observed to accumulate to eventually produce double-strand cleavage. With intercalated YO the accumulation occurs in a manner consistent with random generation of strand lesions, while with bisintercalated YOYO the yield of double-strand cleavage (per ssb) is 5-fold higher. A contributing factor is the slow dissociation of the bis-intercalated dimer, which allows for repeated strand-attack at the same binding site, but the observation that the dsb/ssb yield is considerably lower for externally bound than for bis-intercalated YOYO at low dye/DNA ratios indicates that the binding geometry and/or the cleavage mechanism are also important for the high dsb-efficiency. In fact, double-strand cleavage yields with bis-intercalated YOYO are higher than those predicted by simple models, implying a greater than statistical probability for a second cleavage event

  7. Single and double stranded DNA detection using locked nucleic acid (LNA) functionalized nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Fiona; Stokes, Robert; Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan

    2008-08-01

    Gold and silver nanoparticles functionalized with oligonucleotides can be used for the detection of specific sequences of DNA. We show that gold nanoparticles modified with locked nucleic acid (LNA) form stronger duplexes with a single stranded DNA target and offer better discrimination against single base pair mismatches than analogous DNA probes. Our LNA nanoparticle probes have also been used to detect double stranded DNA through triplex formation, whilst still maintaining selectivity for only complementary targets. Nanoparticle conjugates embedded with suitable surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) labels have been synthesized enabling simultaneous detection and identification of multiple DNA targets.

  8. Conditional knockdown of target gene expression by tetracycline regulated transcription of double strand RNA.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xubin; Omi, Minoru; Harada, Hidekiyo; Ishii, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Nakamura, Harukazu

    2011-01-01

    In vivo electroporation has served as an effective tool for the study of developmental biology. Here we report tetracycline inducible gene knockdown by electroporation. Our system consists of genome integration of a cassette encoding long double strand RNA (dsRNA) of a gene of interest by electroporation, transcription of which is assured by RNA polymerase II, and induction of transcription of dsRNA by tetracyclin. Long dsRNA decapped by ribozyme in the cassette and without poly A tail is processed into siRNA within nuclei. We could successfully induce knockdown of En2 and Coactosin by Dox administration.

  9. Deficiency of XLF and PAXX prevents DNA double-strand break repair by non-homologous end joining in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hung, Putzer J; Chen, Bo-Ruei; George, Rosmy; Liberman, Caleb; Morales, Abigail J; Colon-Ortiz, Pedro; Tyler, Jessica K; Sleckman, Barry P; Bredemeyer, Andrea L

    2017-02-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that functions in all phases of the cell cycle. NHEJ repairs genotoxic and physiological DSBs, such as those generated by ionizing radiation and during V(D)J recombination at antigen receptor loci, respectively. DNA end joining by NHEJ relies on the core factors Ku70, Ku80, XRCC4, and DNA Ligase IV. Additional proteins also play important roles in NHEJ. The XRCC4-like factor (XLF) participates in NHEJ through its interaction with XRCC4, and XLF deficiency in humans leads to immunodeficiency and increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. However, XLF is dispensable for NHEJ-mediated DSB repair during V(D)J recombination in murine lymphocytes, where it may have redundant functions with other DSB repair factors. Paralog of XRCC4 and XLF (PAXX) is a recently identified NHEJ factor that has structural similarity to XRCC4 and XLF. Here we show that PAXX is also dispensable for NHEJ during V(D)J recombination and during the repair of genotoxic DSBs in lymphocytes. However, a combined deficiency of PAXX and XLF blocks NHEJ with a severity comparable to that observed in DNA Ligase IV-deficient cells. Similar to XLF, PAXX interacts with Ku through its C-terminal region, and mutations that disrupt Ku binding prevent PAXX from promoting NHEJ in XLF-deficient lymphocytes. Our findings suggest that the PAXX and XLF proteins may have redundant functions during NHEJ.

  10. Involvement of the nuclear proteasome activator PA28γ in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Levy-Barda, Adva; Lerenthal, Yaniv; Davis, Anthony J; Chung, Young Min; Essers, Jeroen; Shao, Zhengping; van Vliet, Nicole; Chen, David J; Hu, Mickey C-T; Kanaar, Roland; Ziv, Yael; Shiloh, Yosef

    2011-12-15

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex signaling network that leads to damage repair while modulating numerous cellular processes. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), a highly cytotoxic DNA lesion, activate this system most vigorously. The DSB response network is orchestrated by the ATM protein kinase, which phosphorylates key players in its various branches. Proteasome-mediated protein degradation plays an important role in the proteome dynamics following DNA damage induction. Here, we identify the nuclear proteasome activator PA28γ (REGγ; PSME3) as a novel DDR player. PA28γ depletion leads to cellular radiomimetic sensitivity and a marked delay in DSB repair. Specifically, PA28γ deficiency abrogates the balance between the two major DSB repair pathways--nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination repair. Furthermore, PA28γ is found to be an ATM target, being recruited to the DNA damage sites and required for rapid accumulation of proteasomes at these sites. Our data reveal a novel ATM-PA28γ-proteasome axis of the DDR that is required for timely coordination of DSB repair.

  11. Involvement of the nuclear proteasome activator PA28γ in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Levy-Barda, Adva; Lerenthal, Yaniv; Davis, Anthony J; Chung, Young Min; Essers, Jeroen; Shao, Zhengping; van Vliet, Nicole; Chen, David J; Hu, Mickey C-T; Kanaar, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex signaling network that leads to damage repair while modulating numerous cellular processes. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), a highly cytotoxic DNA lesion, activate this system most vigorously. The DSB response network is orchestrated by the ATM protein kinase, which phosphorylates key players in its various branches. Proteasome-mediated protein degradation plays an important role in the proteome dynamics following DNA damage induction. Here, we identify the nuclear proteasome activator PA28γ (REGγ; PSME3) as a novel DDR player. PA28γ depletion leads to cellular radiomimetic sensitivity and a marked delay in DSB repair. Specifically, PA28γ deficiency abrogates the balance between the two major DSB repair pathways—nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination repair. Furthermore, PA28γ is found to be an ATM target, being recruited to the DNA damage sites and required for rapid accumulation of proteasomes at these sites. Our data reveal a novel ATM-PA28γ-proteasome axis of the DDR that is required for timely coordination of DSB repair. PMID:22134242

  12. Organization and dynamics of the nonhomologous end-joining machinery during DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Reid, Dylan A; Keegan, Sarah; Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Watanabe, Go; Strande, Natasha T; Chang, Howard H; Oksuz, Betul Akgol; Fenyo, David; Lieber, Michael R; Ramsden, Dale A; Rothenberg, Eli

    2015-05-19

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a major repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), involving synapsis and ligation of the broken strands. We describe the use of in vivo and in vitro single-molecule methods to define the organization and interaction of NHEJ repair proteins at DSB ends. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allowed the precise visualization of XRCC4, XLF, and DNA ligase IV filaments adjacent to DSBs, which bridge the broken chromosome and direct rejoining. We show, by single-molecule FRET analysis of the Ku/XRCC4/XLF/DNA ligase IV NHEJ ligation complex, that end-to-end synapsis involves a dynamic positioning of the two ends relative to one another. Our observations form the basis of a new model for NHEJ that describes the mechanism whereby filament-forming proteins bridge DNA DSBs in vivo. In this scheme, the filaments at either end of the DSB interact dynamically to achieve optimal configuration and end-to-end positioning and ligation.

  13. Organization and dynamics of the nonhomologous end-joining machinery during DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Dylan A.; Keegan, Sarah; Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Watanabe, Go; Strande, Natasha T.; Chang, Howard H.; Oksuz, Betul Akgol; Fenyo, David; Lieber, Michael R.; Ramsden, Dale A.; Rothenberg, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a major repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), involving synapsis and ligation of the broken strands. We describe the use of in vivo and in vitro single-molecule methods to define the organization and interaction of NHEJ repair proteins at DSB ends. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allowed the precise visualization of XRCC4, XLF, and DNA ligase IV filaments adjacent to DSBs, which bridge the broken chromosome and direct rejoining. We show, by single-molecule FRET analysis of the Ku/XRCC4/XLF/DNA ligase IV NHEJ ligation complex, that end-to-end synapsis involves a dynamic positioning of the two ends relative to one another. Our observations form the basis of a new model for NHEJ that describes the mechanism whereby filament-forming proteins bridge DNA DSBs in vivo. In this scheme, the filaments at either end of the DSB interact dynamically to achieve optimal configuration and end-to-end positioning and ligation. PMID:25941401

  14. Pleolipoviridae, a newly proposed family comprising archaeal pleomorphic viruses with single-stranded or double-stranded DNA genomes.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Maija K; Roine, Elina; Sencilo, Ana; Bamford, Dennis H; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2016-01-01

    Viruses infecting archaea show a variety of virion morphotypes, and they are currently classified into more than ten viral families or corresponding groups. A pleomorphic virus morphotype is very common among haloarchaeal viruses, and to date, several such viruses have been isolated. Here, we propose the classification of eight such viruses and formation of a new family, Pleolipoviridae (from the Greek pleo for more or many and lipos for lipid), containing three genera, Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammapleolipovirus. The proposal is currently under review by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). The members of the proposed family Pleolipoviridae infect halophilic archaea and are nonlytic. They share structural and genomic features and differ from any other classified virus. The virion of pleolipoviruses is composed of a pleomorphic membrane vesicle enclosing the genome. All pleolipoviruses have two major structural protein species, internal membrane and spike proteins. Although the genomes of the pleolipoviruses are single- or double-stranded, linear or circular DNA molecules, they share the same genome organization and gene synteny and show significant similarity at the amino acid level. The canonical features common to all members of the proposed family Pleolipoviridae show that they are closely related and thus form a new viral family.

  15. Real Estate in the DNA Damage Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Ligases Home in on DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Dantuma, Nico P; Pfeiffer, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO are intimately connected with the cellular response to various types of DNA damage. A striking feature is the local accumulation of these proteinaceous post-translational modifications in the direct vicinity to DNA double-strand breaks, which plays a critical role in the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci. The functional significance of these modifications is the coordinated recruitment and removal of proteins involved in DNA damage signaling and repair in a timely manner. The central orchestrators of these processes are the ubiquitin and SUMO ligases that are responsible for accurately tagging a broad array of chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins thereby changing their behavior or destination. Despite many differences in the mode of action of these enzymes, they share some striking features that are of direct relevance for their function in the DNA damage response. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the recruitment of ubiquitin and SUMO ligases and discuss the importance of chromatin proximity in this process.

  16. RecA binding to a single double-stranded DNA molecule: A possible role of DNA conformational fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Leger, J. F.; Robert, J.; Bourdieu, L.; Chatenay, D.; Marko, J. F.

    1998-01-01

    Most genetic regulatory mechanisms involve protein–DNA interactions. In these processes, the classical Watson–Crick DNA structure sometimes is distorted severely, which in turn enables the precise recognition of the specific sites by the protein. Despite its key importance, very little is known about such deformation processes. To address this general question, we have studied a model system, namely, RecA binding to double-stranded DNA. Results from micromanipulation experiments indicate that RecA binds strongly to stretched DNA; based on this observation, we propose that spontaneous thermal stretching fluctuations may play a role in the binding of RecA to DNA. This has fundamental implications for the protein–DNA binding mechanism, which must therefore rely in part on a combination of flexibility and thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure. We also show that this mechanism is sequence sensitive. Theoretical simulations support this interpretation of our experimental results, and it is argued that this is of broad relevance to DNA–protein interactions. PMID:9770480

  17. Double stranded-RNA-mediated activation of P21 gene induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Whitson, Jared M; Noonan, Emily J; Pookot, Deepa; Place, Robert F; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2014-01-01

    Small double stranded RNAs (dsRNA) are a new class of molecules which regulate gene expression. Accumulating data suggest that some dsRNA can function as tumor suppressors. Here we report further evidence on the potential of dsRNA mediated p21 induction. Using the human renal cell carcinoma cell line A498, we found that dsRNA targeting the p21 promoter significantly induced the expression of p21 mRNA and protein levels. As a result, dsP21 transfected cells had a significant decrease in cell viability with a concomitant G1 arrest. We also observed a significant increase in apoptosis. These findings were associated with a significant decrease in survivin mRNA and protein levels. This is the first report that demonstrates dsRNA mediated gene activation in renal cell carcinoma and suggests that forced over-expression of p21 may lead to an increase in apoptosis through a survivin dependent mechanism. PMID:19384944

  18. Double stranded-RNA-mediated activation of P21 gene induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Whitson, Jared M; Noonan, Emily J; Pookot, Deepa; Place, Robert F; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2009-07-15

    Small double stranded RNAs (dsRNA) are a new class of molecules which regulate gene expression. Accumulating data suggest that some dsRNA can function as tumor suppressors. Here, we report further evidence on the potential of dsRNA mediated p21 induction. Using the human renal cell carcinoma cell line A498, we found that dsRNA targeting the p21 promoter significantly induced the expression of p21 mRNA and protein levels. As a result, dsP21 transfected cells had a significant decrease in cell viability with a concomitant G1 arrest. We also observed a significant increase in apoptosis. These findings were associated with a significant decrease in survivin mRNA and protein levels. This is the first report that demonstrates dsRNA mediated gene activation in renal cell carcinoma and suggests that forced over-expression of p21 may lead to an increase in apoptosis through a survivin dependent mechanism.

  19. RSC facilitates Rad59-dependent homologous recombination between sister chromatids by promoting cohesin loading at DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Oum, Ji-Hyun; Seong, Changhyun; Kwon, Youngho; Ji, Jae-Hoon; Sid, Amy; Ramakrishnan, Sreejith; Ira, Grzegorz; Malkova, Anna; Sung, Patrick; Lee, Sang Eun; Shim, Eun Yong

    2011-10-01

    Homologous recombination repairs DNA double-strand breaks by searching for, invading, and copying information from a homologous template, typically the homologous chromosome or sister chromatid. Tight wrapping of DNA around histone octamers, however, impedes access of repair proteins to DNA damage. To facilitate DNA repair, modifications of histones and energy-dependent remodeling of chromatin are required, but the precise mechanisms by which chromatin modification and remodeling enzymes contribute to homologous DNA repair are unknown. Here we have systematically assessed the role of budding yeast RSC (remodel structure of chromatin), an abundant, ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, in the cellular response to spontaneous and induced DNA damage. RSC physically interacts with the recombination protein Rad59 and functions in homologous recombination. Multiple recombination assays revealed that RSC is uniquely required for recombination between sister chromatids by virtue of its ability to recruit cohesin at DNA breaks and thereby promoting sister chromatid cohesion. This study provides molecular insights into how chromatin remodeling contributes to DNA repair and maintenance of chromatin fidelity in the face of DNA damage.

  20. Real Estate in the DNA Damage Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Ligases Home in on DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Dantuma, Nico P.; Pfeiffer, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO are intimately connected with the cellular response to various types of DNA damage. A striking feature is the local accumulation of these proteinaceous post-translational modifications in the direct vicinity to DNA double-strand breaks, which plays a critical role in the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci. The functional significance of these modifications is the coordinated recruitment and removal of proteins involved in DNA damage signaling and repair in a timely manner. The central orchestrators of these processes are the ubiquitin and SUMO ligases that are responsible for accurately tagging a broad array of chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins thereby changing their behavior or destination. Despite many differences in the mode of action of these enzymes, they share some striking features that are of direct relevance for their function in the DNA damage response. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the recruitment of ubiquitin and SUMO ligases and discuss the importance of chromatin proximity in this process. PMID:27148355

  1. Inhibition of DNA double-strand break repair by the Ku heterodimer in mrx mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wasko, Brian M.; Holland, Cory L.; Resnick, Michael A.; Lewis, L. Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Yeast rad50 and mre11 nuclease mutants are hypersensitive to physical and chemical agents that induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). This sensitivity was suppressed by elevating intracellular levels of TLC1, the RNA subunit of telomerase. Suppression required proteins linked to homologous recombination, including Rad51, Rad52, Rad59 and Exo1, but not genes of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair pathway. Deletion mutagenesis experiments demonstrated that the 5′ end of TLC1 RNA was essential and a segment containing a binding site for the Yku70/Yku80 complex was sufficient for suppression. A mutant TLC1 RNA unable to associate with Yku80 protein did not increase resistance. These and other genetic studies indicated that association of the Ku heterodimer with broken DNA ends inhibits recombination in mrx mutants, but not in repair-proficient cells or in other DNA repair single mutants. In support of this model, DNA damage resistance of mrx cells was enhanced when YKU70 was co-inactivated. Defective recombinational repair of DSBs in mrx cells thus arises from at least two separate processes: loss of Mrx nuclease-associated DNA end-processing and inhibition of the Exo1-mediated secondary recombination pathway by Ku. PMID:18992851

  2. Site-specific ADP-ribosylation of histone H2B in response to DNA double strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Rakhimova, Alina; Ura, Seiji; Hsu, Duen-Wei; Wang, Hong-Yu; Pears, Catherine J.; Lakin, Nicholas D.

    2017-01-01

    ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) modify proteins with single units or polymers of ADP-ribose to regulate DNA repair. However, the substrates for these enzymes are ill-defined. For example, although histones are modified by ARTs, the sites on these proteins ADP-ribosylated following DNA damage and the ARTs that catalyse these events are unknown. This, in part, is due to the lack of a eukaryotic model that contains ARTs, in addition to histone genes that can be manipulated to assess ADP-ribosylation events in vivo. Here we exploit the model Dictyostelium to identify site-specific histone ADP-ribosylation events in vivo and define the ARTs that mediate these modifications. Dictyostelium histones are modified in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in vivo by the ARTs Adprt1a and Adprt2. Adprt1a is a mono-ART that modifies H2BE18 in vitro, although disruption of this site allows ADP-ribosylation at H2BE19. Although redundancy between H2BE18 and H2BE19 ADP-ribosylation is also apparent following DSBs in vivo, by generating a strain with mutations at E18/E19 in the h2b locus we demonstrate these are the principal sites modified by Adprt1a/Adprt2. This identifies DNA damage induced histone mono-ADP-ribosylation sites by specific ARTs in vivo, providing a unique platform to assess how histone ADP-ribosylation regulates DNA repair. PMID:28252050

  3. RhoB Promotes γH2AX Dephosphorylation and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mamouni, Kenza; Cristini, Agnese; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Monferran, Sylvie; Lemarié, Anthony; Faye, Jean-Charles; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike other Rho GTPases, RhoB is rapidly induced by DNA damage, and its expression level decreases during cancer progression. Because inefficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can lead to cancer, we investigated whether camptothecin, an anticancer drug that produces DSBs, induces RhoB expression and examined its role in the camptothecin-induced DNA damage response. We show that in camptothecin-treated cells, DSBs induce RhoB expression by a mechanism that depends notably on Chk2 and its substrate HuR, which binds to RhoB mRNA and protects it against degradation. RhoB-deficient cells fail to dephosphorylate γH2AX following camptothecin removal and show reduced efficiency of DSB repair by homologous recombination. These cells also show decreased activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a phosphatase for γH2AX and other DNA damage and repair proteins. Thus, we propose that DSBs activate a Chk2-HuR-RhoB pathway that promotes PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation of γH2AX and DSB repair. Finally, we show that RhoB-deficient cells accumulate endogenous γH2AX and chromosomal abnormalities, suggesting that RhoB loss increases DSB-mediated genomic instability and tumor progression. PMID:24912678

  4. Innate Immune Recognition of Double-stranded RNA Triggers Increased Expression of NKG2D Ligands After Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Esteso, Gloria; Guerra, Susana; Valés-Gómez, Mar; Reyburn, Hugh T

    2017-10-06

    Self/non-self discrimination by the innate immune system relies on germline-encoded, non-rearranging receptors expressed by innate immune cells recognizing conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns. The natural killer group 2D (NKG2D) receptor is a potent immune-activating receptor that binds human genome-encoded ligands, whose expression is negligible in normal tissues, but increased in stress and disease conditions for reasons that are incompletely understood. Here it is not clear how the immune system reconciles receptor binding of self-proteins with self/non-self discrimination to avoid autoreactivity. We now report that increased expression of NKG2D ligands after virus infection depends on interferon response factors (IRFs) activated by the detection of viral double-stranded RNA by pattern-recognition receptors (RIG-I/MDA-5) and that NKG2D ligand upregulation can be blocked by the expression of viral dsRNA-binding proteins. Thus, innate immunity-mediated recognition of viral nucleic acids triggers the infected cell to release interferon for NK cell recruitment and to express NKG2D-ligands to become more visible to the immune system. Finally, the observation that NKG2D-ligand induction is a consequence of signalling by pattern-recognition receptors that have been selected over evolutionary time to be highly pathogen specific explains how the risks of autoreactivity in this system are minimized. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  5. Cumulus Cells Block Oocyte Meiotic Resumption via Gap Junctions in Cumulus Oocyte Complexes Subjected to DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Hong; Zheng, Jie; Xie, Feng-Yun; Shen, Wei; Yin, Shen; Ma, Jun-Yu

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian oocyte growth, genomic DNA may accumulate DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by factors such as reactive oxygen species. Recent evidence demonstrated that slight DSBs do not activate DNA damage checkpoint proteins in denuded oocytes. These oocytes, even with DNA DSBs, can resume meiosis and progress to metaphase of meiosis II. Meiotic resumption in oocytes is also controlled by the surrounding cumulus cells; accordingly, we analyzed whether cumulus-cell enclosed oocytes (CEOs) with DNA damage are able to resume meiosis. Compared with DNA-damaged denuded oocytes, we found that meiotic resumption rates of CEOs significantly decreased. To assess the mechanism by which cumulus cells block meiotic resumption in CEOs with DNA DSBs, we treated the cumulus oocyte complex with the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone and found that carbenoxolone can rescue the block in CEO meiosis induced by DNA DSBs. Since cumulus cell-synthesized cAMPs can pass through the gap junctions between oocyte and cumulus cell to block oocyte meiosis, we measured the expression levels of adenylate cyclase 1 (Adcy1) in cumulus cells, and G-protein coupled receptor 3 (Gpr3) and phosphodiesterase 3A (Pde3a) in oocytes, and found that the mRNA expression level of Adcy1 increased significantly in DNA-damaged cumulus cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that DNA DSBs promote cAMP synthesis in cumulus cells, and cumulus cAMPs can inhibit meiotic resumption of CEOs through gap junctions.

  6. A unique HMG-box domain of mouse Maelstrom binds structured RNA but not double stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Genzor, Pavol; Bortvin, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Piwi-interacting piRNAs are a major and essential class of small RNAs in the animal germ cells with a prominent role in transposon control. Efficient piRNA biogenesis and function require a cohort of proteins conserved throughout the animal kingdom. Here we studied Maelstrom (MAEL), which is essential for piRNA biogenesis and germ cell differentiation in flies and mice. MAEL contains a high mobility group (HMG)-box domain and a Maelstrom-specific domain with a presumptive RNase H-fold. We employed a combination of sequence analyses, structural and biochemical approaches to evaluate and compare n