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Sample records for douglass coulter phd

  1. Ian Douglass Coulter, PhD

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Douglas M

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on Dr. Ian Coulter’s accomplishments from the time he became Executive Vice-President of CMCC in 1981, until he ended his presidency with a year’s administrative leave in 1990. Annual planning initiatives, pedagogy, scholarship, conflicts, and the quest for university affiliation are discussed as well as his legacy to the College and the chiropractic profession. The term “adventurous” was first attributed to Coulter by Oswald Hall, PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto who had worked closely with Coulter in a major investigation of the chiropractic profession from 1976 to 1979. Throughout this article the author tries to capture the spirit of daring, innovation and intellect that permeated Coulter’s presidency, enthralling his advocates and confounding his detractors. PMID:17549218

  2. Maniac Talk - Dr. Anne Douglass

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-03-27

    Anne Douglass Maniac Lecture, 27 March, 2013 NASA climate scientist Dr. Anne Douglass presented a Maniac Talk entitled "Satellite Observations - the Touchstone of Atmospheric Modeling." Anne shared some of her scientific career that is filled with unexpected twists and turns and even a few blind alleys, but most important her passion in satellite measurements of ozone and other trace gases, which have been her touchstone.

  3. Frederick Douglass & the Value of My Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adisa, Opal Palmer

    1996-01-01

    Describes how Frederick Douglass's "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave" can be used to explore differences between biography and autobiography, and how a personal account can be used to change attitudes of others. Presents poems written by 10th- and 11th-grade students composed after reading Douglass's…

  4. Attention-Shifting in Frederick Douglass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leroux, Neil R.

    A study explored rhetorical strategies and dynamics within a single speech delivered by Frederick Douglass on July 5, l852 in Rochester, New York, which was considered by speaker and audience to be an Independence Day speech. An examination of the text suggests that Douglass embarked on a strategy of attention-shifting--turning the attention of…

  5. Frederick Douglass Changed My Mind about the Constitution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakes, James

    2008-01-01

    Frederick Douglass dramatically and publicly changed his own mind about the Constitution. Like Frederick Douglass, the author had originally viewed the Constitution as pro-slavery. Yet a close look at Douglass's writings revealed a Constitution that empowered the federal government to abolish slavery.

  6. Frederick Douglass Changed My Mind about the Constitution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakes, James

    2008-01-01

    Frederick Douglass dramatically and publicly changed his own mind about the Constitution. Like Frederick Douglass, the author had originally viewed the Constitution as pro-slavery. Yet a close look at Douglass's writings revealed a Constitution that empowered the federal government to abolish slavery.

  7. Frederick Douglass: An American Adult Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Jerry Paul

    2010-01-01

    Throughout his life, Frederick Douglass struggled to be something extraordinary. He rose from a life in slavery to become the most prominent African-American of his day and a leading figure in the abolitionist movement. Lost in the discussion of his life are the adult education roles that he played throughout his life and career. Beginning while…

  8. Frederick Douglass: An American Adult Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Jerry Paul

    2010-01-01

    Throughout his life, Frederick Douglass struggled to be something extraordinary. He rose from a life in slavery to become the most prominent African-American of his day and a leading figure in the abolitionist movement. Lost in the discussion of his life are the adult education roles that he played throughout his life and career. Beginning while…

  9. "The Joyous Circle": The Vernacular Presence in Frederick Douglass's Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babb, Valerie

    2005-01-01

    Frederick Douglass, as a nineteenth-century writer, experimented with all manner of discourses including sentimentality, romance and, more significantly, the vernacular tradition. In his works like "My Bondage" and "Life and Times of Frederick Douglass", the confidence of a writer willing to experiment with contrasting forms and willing to make a…

  10. "The Joyous Circle": The Vernacular Presence in Frederick Douglass's Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babb, Valerie

    2005-01-01

    Frederick Douglass, as a nineteenth-century writer, experimented with all manner of discourses including sentimentality, romance and, more significantly, the vernacular tradition. In his works like "My Bondage" and "Life and Times of Frederick Douglass", the confidence of a writer willing to experiment with contrasting forms and willing to make a…

  11. The Teachers & Writers Guide to Frederick Douglass. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Wesley, Ed.

    The 12 essays in this book provide a variety of ways to get students engaged and inspired by the "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave" (1845). Most of the essays emphasize writing as a means for students to learn about Douglass, his times, and his legacy, as well as implications for the students themselves.…

  12. The Teachers & Writers Guide to Frederick Douglass. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Wesley, Ed.

    The 12 essays in this book provide a variety of ways to get students engaged and inspired by the "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave" (1845). Most of the essays emphasize writing as a means for students to learn about Douglass, his times, and his legacy, as well as implications for the students themselves.…

  13. Was the Constitution Pro-Slavery? The Changing View of Frederick Douglass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Robert

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on Frederick Douglass's different interpretations of the Constitution. One explanation of the shift in Douglass's thinking on the Constitution had to do with his growing intellectual independence. Douglass had the intellectual space to reflect on the fact that there was more than one way to think about…

  14. Was the Constitution Pro-Slavery? The Changing View of Frederick Douglass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Robert

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on Frederick Douglass's different interpretations of the Constitution. One explanation of the shift in Douglass's thinking on the Constitution had to do with his growing intellectual independence. Douglass had the intellectual space to reflect on the fact that there was more than one way to think about…

  15. Obituary: Geoffrey Gardner Douglass, 1942-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William; Corbin, Thomas

    2005-12-01

    Geoffrey Gardner Douglass passed away on 15 February 2005, following a long illness. Geoff was born 11 June 1942 in Rocky River, Ohio, and grew up there with a passion for science, theatre, and pets. He attended the nearby Case Institute of Technology (Cleveland, Ohio) before coming to the U.S. Naval Observatory on 28 April 1967. He worked at the USNO for over 30 years, until his retirement in January 1999. He was involved in the observing and measurement of parallax and double star plates on the SAMM and MANN measuring engines, and was stationed at Blenheim, New Zealand from 1985-1988 working at the Black Birch site on the Twin Astrograph Telescope. While there he and his wife Doris travelled extensively throughout New Zealand and Australia, He later worked with an early iteration of the USNO StarScan measuring machine. However, most of his work involved observations of visual double stars with the USNO 26-inch Clark Refractor, collaborating with F.J. ("Jerry") Josties on the photographic program in the late 1960s to the development of the USNO's speckle interferometry program throughout the 1990s. Geoff collaborated closely with Charles Worley from 1968 until Charles's death in December 1997, writing much of the double star software and assisting in the production of the USNO's double star catalogs. This was a period of transition, when some 200,000 punch cards of the Lick IDS (Index Catalog of Double Stars) were transferred from Lick Observatory to the USNO, then converted to magnetic tape. This ultimately resulted in the 1984 WDS catalog (currently maintained online). It was often joked that the "W" and "D" in the WDS (officially the "Washington Double Star" catalog) really stood for "Worley" and "Douglass." The "Curmudgeon" and the "Dour Scot" were a team for nearly thirty years. Geoff's first observation, of BU 442, was made 2 June 1967 with the USNO double star (photographic) camera, and his last, STF 342, was made on 28 November 1998 with the USNO speckle

  16. Differential Counting in Mixed Cultures with Coulter Counters

    PubMed Central

    Drake, J. F.; Tsuchiya, H. M.

    1973-01-01

    A critical comparison of Coulter, viable, and microscope counts for several mixed cultures of microorganisms has been made. This investigation shows that Coulter counting can provide reliable estimates of microbial numbers in mixed cultures. Precautions and limitations of Coulter counting in mixed cultures are discussed. PMID:4199341

  17. Differentiating neutrophils using the optical coulter counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonbrun, E.; Di Caprio, G.

    2015-03-01

    We present an opto-fluidic measurement system that quantifies cell volume, dry mass and nuclear morphology of neutrophils in high-throughput. While current clinical hematology analyzers can differentiate neutrophils from a blood sample, they do not give other quantitative information beyond their count. In order to better understand the distribution of neutrophil phenotypes in a blood sample, we perform two distinct multivariate measurements. In both measurements, white blood cells are driven through a microfluidic channel and imaged while in flow onto a color camera using a single exposure. In the first measurement, we quantify cell volume, scattering strength, and cell dry mass by combining quantitative phase imaging with dye exclusion cell volumetric imaging. In the second measurement, we quantify cell volume and nuclear morphology using a nucleic acid fluorescent stain. In this way, we can correlate cell volume to other cellular characteristics, which would not be possible using an electrical coulter counter. Unlike phase imaging or cell scattering analysis, the optical coulter counter is capable of quantifying cell volume virtually independent of the cell's refractive index and unlike optical tomography, measurements are possible on quickly flowing cells, enabling high-throughput.

  18. Differentiating neutrophils using the optical coulter counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Di Caprio, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    We present an optofluidic measurement system that quantifies cell volume, dry mass, and nuclear morphology of neutrophils in high-throughput. While current clinical hematology analyzers can differentiate neutrophils from a blood sample, they do not give other quantitative information beyond their count. In order to better understand the distribution of neutrophil phenotypes in a blood sample, we perform two distinct multivariate measurements. In both measurements, white blood cells are driven through a microfluidic channel and imaged while in flow onto a color camera using a single exposure. In the first measurement, we quantify cell volume, scattering strength, and cell dry mass by combining quantitative phase imaging with dye exclusion cell volumetric imaging. In the second measurement, we quantify cell volume and nuclear morphology using a nucleic acid fluorescent stain. In this way, we can correlate cell volume to other cellular characteristics, which would not be possible using an electrical coulter counter. Unlike phase imaging or cell scattering analysis, the optical coulter counter is capable of quantifying cell volume virtually independent of the cell's refractive index and unlike optical tomography, measurements are possible on quickly flowing cells, enabling high-throughput.

  19. Literacy, Orality, and Silence: "Reading" the Exigencies of Oppression in Fredrick Douglass' 1845 "Narrative."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Donald C.

    By focusing on Frederick Douglass' reconsideration of literacy in the 1845 "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass," this slave narrative becomes very relevant to students today. This important historical document becomes a powerful tool with which educators can encourage students to confront contemporary, postmodern questions about…

  20. Heritability in syntactic development: a critique of Munsinger and Douglass.

    PubMed

    Fahey, V K; Kamitomo, G A; Cornell, E H

    1978-03-01

    Munsinger and Douglass (Child Development, 1976, 47, 40-50) used the Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension and the Northwestern Syntax Screening Test as measures of syntactic ability to investigate the heritability factor in language acquisition. By comparing the concordance of scores of twins and siblings, they concluded that heritability was the important variable in test performance (h2 = .79) and that environmental influences were not much over, 10. In the present critique, weaknesses regarding test measures are pointed out, and the validity of these measures for the ages of the children used in the study is questioned. It is also emphasized that the question of environmental effects in normal circumstances remains unquantified, and research indicates that language intervention programs with deficient populations can be beneficial.

  1. Douglass Houghton and the Precambrian of Lake Superior

    SciTech Connect

    Merk, G.

    1985-01-01

    The first chronological subdivision of Precambrian rocks in the Lake Superior area was made in 1841 by Douglass Houghton for the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. In spite of the fact that the then prevailing philosophy of geologic history was quite different from that of today, Houghton's chronological subdivision became the commonly accepted framework for Precambrian studies on the south shore of Lake Superior. Using only megascopic rock analyses and the physical stratigraphic criteria of relative age, Houghton and his assistants recognized these division, in ascending order: the Primary (granite-gneiss-greenstone); the Metamorphic (slates, iron ore, quartz rock); and on the Keweenaw Peninsula, the Trap (with copper ore); the Trap Conglomerate; and the Red Sandrock. This Pioneer study demanded heroic effort and imagination because the swampy, forested terrain was barely penetrable, the outcrops are discontinuous, the rocks are often deformed, and the lithology changes locally within the formations. Houghton was aided in these accomplishments by William A. Burt, a US Linear Surveyor and the inventor of the solar compass, a sextant-like device used to supplement the surveyors compass. Together, Houghton and Burt formed the first combined geological-linear survey in the US. The combined survey was completed by the assistants Houghton had trained so well, William Burt and Bela Hubbard. Their reports (1846, 1847) supplemented Houghton's report of 1841 by showing the areal distribution of the exposed Precambrian rocks in the region thus facilitating future research, prospecting, and development.

  2. Automatic platelet counting with the Coulter particle counter

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R. E.; Green, R. E.

    1967-01-01

    A method for accurately counting platelets is described using the Coulter counter model B fitted with a standard 100μ aperture tube. This enables the counter to be used for red and white cell as well as platelet counts using the same aperture tube. The method uses standard equipment except for a small inexpensive electronic speed controller. PMID:5602990

  3. Founder effects and the genetic structure of coulter pine

    Treesearch

    F. Thomas Ledig

    2000-01-01

    Mean expected heterozygosity at 33 isozyme loci decreased with latitude from 0.193 near the southern extreme of Coulter pine's range to 0.107 at its northern extreme. This decrease was paralleled by a loss of alleles north of the Peninsular Ranges of southern California. Fiftenn alleles dropped out along the roughly linear range, at points coincident with large...

  4. Wallace H. Coulter: decades of invention and discovery.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J Paul

    2013-05-01

    Only a few inventors can be said to have made as great an impact on mankind as Wallace Coulter. His inquisitive mind and ability to see well beyond what existed served him well for 40 years of inventing. So many of the fundamental tools that exist today in the area of hematology were derived from or driven by Coulter's inventions that he could be called the most technological innovator in the field of modern hematology. In achieving these discoveries Wallace Coulter was clearly capable of visualizing future opportunities that few others recognized. His vision was combined with an uncanny ability to translate his ideas into products. He developed a large number of tools that shaped the fields of cytometry, image analysis, and industrial materials. His understanding of the future power of computation drove him to link these technologies in a unique way. In the end, Coulter shaped the technologies that ultimately drove hematology in a new direction, one that remains on a critical pathway linking technology innovation all the way to true translational impact. It was said of Henry Ford that "[h]e has no notion that wealth has made him great, and any one who is imprest merely by his wealth bores him. In his personal contacts he likes to dodge the subject. He would prefer to talk with a machinist about machinery, or with somebody who likes birds about birds. In these contacts, he asks no deference; and if he gets it, he suspects it is mere deference to wealth, and that ends his interest."(1) The same could be said of Wallace Coulter, who, like Ford, understood the concepts of mass production and customer service. Coulter had the ability to recognize the opportunity and fulfill the need for development of a blood-cell counter that could be placed in every pathology laboratory, and in so doing transformed a field from a qualitative to a quantitative environment. Every person who has ever entered a medical lab, hospital, or doctor's office has felt the impact of Coulter

  5. Investigation of hydrodynamic focusing in a microfluidic coulter counter device.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Muheng; Lian, Yongsheng; Harnett, Cindy; Brehob, Ellen

    2012-08-01

    The Coulter technique enables rapid analysis of particles or cells suspended in a fluid stream. In this technique, the cells are suspended in an electrically conductive solution, which is hydrodynamically focused by nonconducting sheath flows. The cells produce a characteristic voltage signal when they interrupt an electrical path. The population and size of the cells can be obtained through analyzing the voltage signal. In a microfluidic Coulter counter device, the hydrodynamic focusing technique is used to position the conducting sample stream and the cells and also to separate close cells to generate distinct signals for each cell and avoid signal jam. The performance of hydrodynamic focusing depends on the relative flow ratio between the sample stream and sheath stream. We use a numerical approach to study the hydrodynamic focusing in a microfluidic Coulter counter device. In this approach, the flow field is described by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The sample stream concentration is modeled by an advection-diffusion equation. The motion of the cells is governed by the Newton-Euler equations of motion. Particle motion through the flow field is handled using an overlapping grid technique. A numerical model for studying a microfluidic Coulter counter has been validated. Using the model, the impact of relative flow rate on the performance of hydrodynamic focusing was studied. Our numerical results show that the position of the sample stream can be controlled by adjusting the relative flow rate. Our simulations also show that particles can be focused into the stream and initially close particles can be separated by the hydrodynamic focusing. From our study, we conclude that hydrodynamic focusing provides an effective way to control the position of the sample stream and cells and it also can be used to separate cells to avoid signal jam.

  6. High-Speed Multipass Coulter Counter with Ultrahigh Resolution.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Martin A; German, Sean R; Dick, Jeffrey E; Bard, Allen J; White, Henry S

    2015-12-22

    Coulter counters measure the size of particles in solution by passing them through an orifice and measuring a resistive pulse, i.e., a drop in the ionic current flowing between two electrodes placed on either side of the orifice. The magnitude of the pulse gives information on the size of the particle; however, resolution is limited by variability in the path of the translocation, due to the Brownian motion of the particle. We present a simple yet powerful modified Coulter counter that uses programmable data acquisition hardware to switch the voltage after sensing the resistive pulse of a nanoparticle passing through the orifice of a nanopipet. Switching the voltage reverses the direction of the driving force on the particle and, when this detect-switch cycle is repeated, allows us to pass an individual nanoparticle through the orifice thousands of times. By measuring individual particles more than 100 times per second we rapidly determine the distribution of the resistive pulses for each particle, which allows us to accurately determine the mean pulse amplitude and deliver considerably improved size resolution over a conventional Coulter counter. We show that single polystyrene nanoparticles can be shuttled back and forth and monitored for minutes, leading to a precisely determined mean blocking current equating to sub-angstrom size resolution.

  7. Irony, Silence, and Time: Frederick Douglass on the Fifth of July

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrill, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Frederick Douglass's oration, "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" is a rhetorical masterwork of irony. It illustrates a strategy for enlisting the liberatory potential inherent in the detached and multiple perspective of irony without allowing that detachment to culminate in political impotence. The speech accomplishes this through opening…

  8. Irony, Silence, and Time: Frederick Douglass on the Fifth of July

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrill, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Frederick Douglass's oration, "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" is a rhetorical masterwork of irony. It illustrates a strategy for enlisting the liberatory potential inherent in the detached and multiple perspective of irony without allowing that detachment to culminate in political impotence. The speech accomplishes this through opening…

  9. The Impact of Triple Room Assignment on Students at Rutgers and Douglass Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semaj, Leahcim

    The effects of overassignment (three students living in a room usually assigned to two) on students at Rutgers and Douglass Colleges are examined in a study of differences between students housed in two- and three-person rooms for the semester. The dependent measures were perception of the university environment, academic performance, physical…

  10. Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center: An ABA Program for Children and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handleman, Jan S.; Harris, Sandra L.

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is an effective, and often superior, method to teach children with Autism Spectrum Disorders ASD), than other methods. The Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center of Rutgers University (DDDC) has been using ABA for more than thirty years to teach toddlers, young children,…

  11. [Leukocyte differential of the Coulter VCS. Evaluation and modalities of use in comparison with the Coulter STKR and manual count].

    PubMed

    Jouault, H; Imbert, M; Mary, J Y; Ade, P; Herpin, J; Sultan, C

    1990-01-01

    The Coulter VCS is a flow cytometer which performs, from a 100 microliter blood sample, a full five-part differential by assessing the volume (V), high frequency conductivity (C) and laser light scatter (S) on each white cell counted. The authors evaluated the Coulter VCS and compared its results with those of the Coulter STKR (three-part differential) and of the manual count. Reproducibility (ten replicate analyses on six different normal samples) was studied by the three methods and showed coefficients of variation closed to the manufacturer's specifications except for monocytes. The correlation coefficients obtained from 345 normal samples were the following: VCS/manual count: 0.97 for neutrophils, 0.70 for eosinophils, 0.97 for lymphocytes and 0.57 for monocytes; VCS/STKR: 0.99 for granulocytes, 0.99 for lymphocytes and 0.70 for monocytes. Comparisons of means displayed statistical differences for some cell categories but without clinical consequences. The flag analysis of 313 abnormal samples showed a false positive rate of 3.1 p. cent for the VCS and 1.8 p. cent for the STKR, the false negative rate was 2.1 p. cent for the VCS and 3.6 p. cent for the STKR. Starting from total blood count parameters, the authors propose guidelines for appropriate use of the different leucocyte differential methods.

  12. An evaluation of leucocyte analysis on the Coulter STKS.

    PubMed

    Robertson, E P; Lai, H W; Wei, D C

    1992-01-01

    The performance of leucocyte analysis on the Coulter STKS (Coulter, Hialeah, FL, USA) was evaluated for accuracy, precision and reliability. The results were compared with those obtained from visual examination of a Romanowsky stained blood film together with the automated WBC-diff. from the Technicon H*1 (Technicon, Tarrytown, NY, USA). The relationship between the number of cells counted per WBC-diff. and the WBC count of the sample was established. Precision of the STKS WBC-diff. was acceptable on blood samples with normal and low WBC counts. Correlation with an 800 cell manual WBC-diff. (n = 104) was excellent (r = 0.97, 0.97, 0.83, 0.98 and 0.53 for neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils and basophils respectively). Blood specimens, collected into dipotassium EDTA, could be stored at 20-25 degrees C for at least 8 h with no significant effect on the STKS WBC-diff. In a study of 513 patient samples, the BLASTS suspect flag gave 5.4% false positives and zero false negatives, the VARIANT LYMPHS flag gave 1.5% false positives and 0.4% false negatives, and the IMM GRANS/BANDS flag gave 30.8% false positives and 2.3% false negatives. Several instrument and sample related problems were encountered during this study. Despite these limitations, the STKS can provide efficient 5 part WBC-diffs. and effective screening for WBC abnormalities.

  13. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing in a microfluidic Coulter counter.

    PubMed

    Scott, R; Sethu, P; Harnett, C K

    2008-04-01

    Electrical impedance-based particle detection or Coulter counting, offers a lab-on-chip compatible method for flow cytometry. Developments in this area will produce devices with greater portability, lower cost, and lower power requirements than fluorescence-based flow cytometry. Because conventional Coulter apertures are prone to clogging, hydrodynamic focusing improves the device by creating fluid-walled channels with variable width to increase sensitivity without the associated risk of blocking the channel. We describe a device that focuses the sample in three dimensions, creating a narrow sample stream on the floor of the channel for close interaction with sensing electrodes. The key to this design is a stepped outlet channel fabricated in a single layer with soft lithography. In contrast to previous impedance-based designs, the new design requires minimal alignment with the substrate. Three-dimensional focusing maximizes the sensitivity of the device to cell-size particles within much larger channels. Impedance-based particle sensing experiments within this device show an increase in percentage conductivity change by a factor of 2.5 over devices that only focus the sample in the horizontal direction.

  14. The Effect of Swelling Ratio on the Coulter Underestimation of Hydrogel Microsphere Diameters

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Michael; Cherukupalli, Abhimanyu; Medini, Michael; Falkowski, Ron

    2015-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the diameters of porous particles are underestimated by Coulter measurements. This phenomenon has also been observed in hydrogel particles, but not characterized. Since the Coulter principle uses the displacement of electrolyte to determine particle size, electrolyte contained within the swelled hydrogel microparticles results in an underestimate of actual particle diameters. The increased use of hydrogel microspheres in biomedical applications has led to the increased application of the Coulter principle to evaluate the size distribution of microparticles. A relationship between the swelling ratio of the particles and their reported Coulter diameters will permit calculation of the actual diameters of these particles. Using polyethylene glycol diacrylate hydrogel microspheres, we determined a correction factor that relates the polymer swelling ratio and the reported Coulter diameters to their actual size. PMID:26414785

  15. Evaluation of the Coulter STKS five-part differential.

    PubMed

    Cornbleet, P J; Myrick, D; Levy, R

    1993-01-01

    The authors evaluated the Coulter STKS (Coulter Corp., Hialeah, FL) five-part differential in a tertiary-care hospital using samples with a broad range of distributional and morphologic abnormalities. Particular attention was given to the performance of the instrument-generated suspect flags that occur as an aid to identify samples with abnormal leukocytes. A morphologically abnormal, or positive, blood smear was defined by the presence of any blasts, malignant lymphoid cells, grossly dysplastic neutrophils, nucleated red blood cells (nRBC), platelet clumps, or reactive lymphocytes of more than 5%. The presence of any white blood cell-related suspect flag, except for Immature Granulocyte/Bands (i.e., Blasts, Variant Lymph, NRBC, Platelet Clumps, Review Slide, or WBC*R), was considered to be a positive instrument result. The STKS showed excellent quantitative results for the WBC differential compared with the manual differential when these "morphologic abnormalities" were absent in a 400-cell manual differential or low in numbers (< or = 5%). Specificity of these non-immature granulocyte/band suspect flags was good, with a false-positive rate of only 11.7%. Overall sensitivity in 113 samples with morphologic abnormalities was 67.3%. Sensitivity to detection of > or = 1% abnormal WBCs or > or = 1 nRBC/100 WBCs (a subset of 78 samples) was 80.8%. Sensitivity to detection of more than 5% abnormal WBCs or more than 5 nRBC/100 WBCs (a subset of 53 samples) was 84.9%. The primary deficiency was the inability of the STKS to flag samples with lymphoma cells, lymphoid blasts, or more than 5% reactive lymphocytes.

  16. Teaching about Frederick Douglass: A Resource Guide for Teachers of Cultural Diversity. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 406

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanelli, Maria, Ed.; Rodriquez, Louis, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Teaching about Frederick Douglass" will stimulate conversation among liberal arts and education professionals as well as inform public school teachers about the life and times of Frederick Douglass. Tension exists at many institutions of higher education between liberal arts faculties who do not completely understand the function of education…

  17. Teaching about Frederick Douglass: A Resource Guide for Teachers of Cultural Diversity. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 406

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanelli, Maria, Ed.; Rodriquez, Louis, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Teaching about Frederick Douglass" will stimulate conversation among liberal arts and education professionals as well as inform public school teachers about the life and times of Frederick Douglass. Tension exists at many institutions of higher education between liberal arts faculties who do not completely understand the function of education…

  18. 77 FR 30004 - Notice to All Interested Parties of the Termination of the Receivership of 10003, Douglass...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION Notice to All Interested Parties of the Termination of the Receivership of 10003, Douglass National Bank, Kansas City, MO Notice is hereby given that the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation...

  19. Use of Coulter VCS for differential leukocyte counts.

    PubMed

    Picard, F; Terroux, N; Levy, J P

    1990-01-01

    The Coulter VCS is a tridimensional flow cytometer designed for differential leukocyte counting on the basis of cell volume, light scatter and conductivity. The VCS differential performed on 192 non-flagged samples was compared with the blood smear, taken as the reference method. A good correspondence was found between the two methods. Two hundred and seventy pathological samples were studied by both the VCS and the reference method: 219 samples with no anomalies other than quantitative changes and 51 with abnormal cells. 41% of the quantitative changes presented without any flag; 59% were flagged: either isolated X5 flags (30%) or other flags needing blood smear review (29%). Samples with abnormal cells (51) were detected with one or more flags: X3 + X6 in myelocytic disease X2 + X7 in lymphocytic disease. Only two (1 hairy cell leukemia, 1 lymphoma) were not flagged; however in these cases the abnormalities were revealed by the presence of either a striking neutropenia or a lymphocytosis. This corresponded to a false-negative rate of 0.4% in the group studied. Further studies were performed on patients with X5 flagging only. The VCS differential was compared to the optical differential as a reference method. There was a good relationship between the two methods; thus X5 flagging could be established without further slide review provided the numerical values were within the range valid for the laboratory. Thus, in our system of working, both VCS flags (except isolated X5) and laboratory performance limits were taken into account as regards the need for blood smear review. This resulted in a review rate of 15%.

  20. Wavelet transform-based methods for denoising of Coulter counter signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagtiani, Ashish V.; Sawant, Rupesh; Carletta, Joan; Zhe, Jiang

    2008-06-01

    A process based on discrete wavelet transforms is developed for denoising and baseline correction of measured signals from Coulter counters. Given signals from a particular Coulter counting experiment, which detect passage of particles through a fluid-filled microchannel, the process uses a cross-validation procedure to pick appropriate parameters for signal denoising; these parameters include the choice of the particular wavelet, the number of levels of decomposition, the threshold value and the threshold strategy. The process is demonstrated on simulated and experimental single channel data obtained from a particular multi-channel Coulter counter processing. For these example experimental signals from 20 µm polymethacrylate and Cottonwood/Eastern Deltoid pollen particles and the simulated signals, denoising is aimed at removing Gaussian white noise, 60 Hz power line interference and low frequency baseline drift. The process can be easily adapted for other Coulter counters and other sources of noise. Overall, wavelets are presented as a tool to aid in accurate detection of particles in Coulter counters.

  1. The African-American grandmother in autobiographical works by Frederick Douglass, Langston Hughes, and Maya Angelou.

    PubMed

    Hill-Lubin, M A

    1991-01-01

    Using the autobiographies of Frederick Douglass, Langston Hughes, and Maya Angelou, this article demonstrates that the portrait of the African-American grandmother is one of action, involvement, hope, and dignity. In examining the works, we observe her functioning in three areas: as the preserver and most tenacious survivor of the African extended family; second, as repository and distributor of the family history, wisdom, and black lore; this role places her at the foundation of the Black, oral and written, literary and creative traditions; and third, as the retainer and transmitter of values and ideals that support and enhance her humanity, her family, and her community. This function emphasizes her spirituality. It is suggested that the grandmother, having played an important role in the growth, development, and artistic flowering of the autobiographer, can become a model and source of empowerment for future generations.

  2. PHD2 in tumour angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, D A; Giaccia, A J

    2010-01-01

    Originally identified as the enzymes responsible for catalysing the oxidation of specific, conserved proline residues within hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), the additional roles for the prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) proteins have remained elusive. Of the four identified PHD enzymes, PHD2 is considered to be the key oxygen sensor, as knockdown of PHD2 results in elevated HIF protein. Several recent studies have highlighted the importance of PHD2 in tumourigenesis. However, there is conflicting evidence as to the exact role of PHD2 in tumour angiogenesis. The divergence seems to be because of the contribution of stromal-derived PHD2, and in particular the involvement of endothelial cells, vs tumour-derived PHD2. This review summarises our current understanding of PHD2 and tumour angiogenesis, focusing on the influences of PHD2 on vascular normalisation and neovascularisation. PMID:20461086

  3. "Comments on Coulter and Smith": The Issue of Authorial Surplus in Narrative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    Advocates of narrative research often contend that it is superior to nonnarrative research, both qualitative and quantitative, because they believe it is better able to represent multiple perspectives and foster multiple interpretations. The author of this comment article on Coulter and Smith (2009) draws on literary theory and an analysis of the…

  4. "Comments on Coulter and Smith": Narrative Researchers as Witnesses of Injustice and Agents of Social Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barone, Tom

    2009-01-01

    In commenting on Coulter and Smith (2009), the author explores issues related to the place of the political in education research and in literature, but especially in forms of narrative research that possess both scientific and literary dimensions. More specifically, the author examines four sets of issues related to the researching and writing of…

  5. An impedimetric approach for accurate particle sizing using a microfluidic Coulter counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagtiani, Ashish V.; Carletta, Joan; Zhe, Jiang

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we present the design, impedimetric characterization and testing of a microfabricated Coulter counter for particle size measurement that uses a pair of thin film coplanar Au/Ti electrodes. An electrical equivalent circuit model of the designed device is analyzed. Accurate measurement of particle size was achieved by operating the device at a frequency for which the overall impedance is dominated by the channel resistance. A combination of design features, including the use of a pair of sensing electrodes with a surface area of 100 µm by 435 µm, a spacing of 1785 µm between the two sensing electrodes and a 350 µm long microchannel, ensures that this resistance dominates over a range of relatively low frequencies. The device was characterized for NaCl electrolyte solutions with different ionic concentrations ranging from 10-5 to 0.1 M. Results proved that the resistive behavior of the sensor occurs over a range of relatively low frequencies for all tested concentrations. The Coulter counter was then used to detect 30 µm polystyrene particles at a selected excitation frequency. Testing results demonstrated that the device can accurately measure particle sizes with small error. The design can be extended to ac Coulter counters with sub-micron sensing channels. Analysis of three designs of ac Coulter counters including sub-micron sensing channels using the electrical equivalent circuit model predicts that they can be operated at even lower frequencies, to accurately size nanoscale particles.

  6. "Comments on Coulter and Smith": Relational Ontological Commitments in Narrative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clandinin, D. Jean; Murphy, M. Shaun

    2009-01-01

    In this comment article on Coulter and Smith (2009), the authors raise concerns that focusing exclusively on issues of representation may lead readers to misunderstandings about narrative research. The authors argue that narrative ways of thinking about the phenomena under study are interwoven with narrative research methodologies. Drawing on…

  7. "Comments on Coulter and Smith": Narrative Researchers as Witnesses of Injustice and Agents of Social Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barone, Tom

    2009-01-01

    In commenting on Coulter and Smith (2009), the author explores issues related to the place of the political in education research and in literature, but especially in forms of narrative research that possess both scientific and literary dimensions. More specifically, the author examines four sets of issues related to the researching and writing of…

  8. Experimental Air Embolism: Measurement of Microbubbles Using the Coulter Counter®

    PubMed Central

    Grulke, D. C.; Marsh, N. A.; Hills, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    Microbubbles in the range 20-250 μm were produced with fine hypodermic needles (0·001, 0·002 and 0·003 inch internal diameter) and were measured using a conventional Coulter Counter. Various bubble sizes could be obtained by varying combinations of needle size, gas pressure, liquid surfactant content and liquid flow rate. Bubbles produced and measured in this way were found to have a very narrow size distribution (80% of the bubbles falling within ± 2 μm of the mean radius) and could be generated at relatively constant frequencies. Over the entire bubble size range, the Coulter Counter method correlated well with two other bubble measuring methods: terminal rise velocity and volume flow rate of gas divided by bubble frequency. It is suggested that this method will enable the introduction of a known number of accurately sized microbubbles into the circulation for the purpose of studying experimental gas embolism. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4783166

  9. CLSI-based transference of CALIPER pediatric reference intervals to Beckman Coulter AU biochemical assays.

    PubMed

    Abou El Hassan, Mohamed; Stoianov, Alexandra; Araújo, Petra A T; Sadeghieh, Tara; Chan, Man Khun; Chen, Yunqi; Randell, Edward; Nieuwesteeg, Michelle; Adeli, Khosrow

    2015-11-01

    The CALIPER program has established a comprehensive database of pediatric reference intervals using largely the Abbott ARCHITECT biochemical assays. To expand clinical application of CALIPER reference standards, the present study is aimed at transferring CALIPER reference intervals from the Abbott ARCHITECT to Beckman Coulter AU assays. Transference of CALIPER reference intervals was performed based on the CLSI guidelines C28-A3 and EP9-A2. The new reference intervals were directly verified using up to 100 reference samples from the healthy CALIPER cohort. We found a strong correlation between Abbott ARCHITECT and Beckman Coulter AU biochemical assays, allowing the transference of the vast majority (94%; 30 out of 32 assays) of CALIPER reference intervals previously established using Abbott assays. Transferred reference intervals were, in general, similar to previously published CALIPER reference intervals, with some exceptions. Most of the transferred reference intervals were sex-specific and were verified using healthy reference samples from the CALIPER biobank based on CLSI criteria. It is important to note that the comparisons performed between the Abbott and Beckman Coulter assays make no assumptions as to assay accuracy or which system is more correct/accurate. The majority of CALIPER reference intervals were transferrable to Beckman Coulter AU assays, allowing the establishment of a new database of pediatric reference intervals. This further expands the utility of the CALIPER database to clinical laboratories using the AU assays; however, each laboratory should validate these intervals for their analytical platform and local population as recommended by the CLSI. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Evaluation of the blood analyzer Beckman Coulter LH 750: analytic performance, decision rules].

    PubMed

    Amouroux, I; Balay, M; Marfaing-Koka, A

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the new analyzer Beckman Coulter, an instrument dedicated to the cell blood count (CBC) and to the white blood cell (WBC) differential (including nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs)) over a global one month period, with three purposes: 1) evaluation of the analytical performance (precision, reproducibility, contamination, linearity); 2) accuracy of numerical results, by comparison to the laboratory instrument (CBC and WBC diff) or to the blood smear (NRBCs, low platelets); 3) evaluation, in terms of sensitivity and specificity, a set of abnormality messages built from the suspect flags and a few quantitative abnormalities. The analytical performances were found satisfactory. The WBC and platelet ranges of linearity were wider than in the GEN.S, as stated in the system specifications. However, the lack of adequate biological material made impossible the study of the whole mentioned linearity range. The accuracy of the CBC and differential parameters, as well as of reticulocytes, was studied with the Coulter GEN.S as reference instrument. The coefficients of correlation and the regression lines showed that the LH 750 results were similar to the GEN.S results. Furthermore, samples with thrombocytopenia and circulating NRBCs were evaluated and compared to the result obtained with microscopic lecture. The results showed a good relationship between platelets results given by the GEN.S and manual count leading to appropriate decision of transfusion. The correlation between GEN.S and manual count of NRBC was estimated as satisfactory. We used the LH 750 software to create conditional rules on the basis of qualitative and quantitative criteria, in order to define and enter a message system for detection of abnormalities. Our study showed that such a system flagged 95.7% of morphological abnormalities with a rate of unnecessary slide review (absence of any morphological abnormality on the blood smear) estimated at 8.3%. Furthermore, in 86% of the abnormalities

  11. Ph.D. shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The late 1990s will see a shortage of Ph.D. graduates, according to the Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C. AAU's new comprehensive study, “The Ph.D. Shortage: The Federal Role,” reports that competition for new Ph.D.s is already intense and can only intensify because demand is greater than supply in both academic and nonacademic markets.Doctoral education plays an increasingly important role in U.S. research and development programs. Students have a pivotal part in doing research and enriching it with new ideas. The AAU report says that graduate students are “major determinants of the creativity and productivity of U.S. academic research, the source of more than 50% of the nation's basic research.’ The market for doctoral education extends beyond the university. In 1985, about 43% of all Ph.D.s employed in this country were working outside higher education; the demand for doctorate recipients in nonacademic sectors continues to grow.

  12. Validation of the Beckman Coulter AcT 5 diff analyzer in a reference laboratory.

    PubMed

    Aulesa, C; Prieto, M

    2006-01-01

    At the Valle de Hebron Hospital's Central Laboratory, we have performed a study evaluating the performance, reliability, and practicability of the Beckman Coulter AcT 5 analyzer. The results observed with known controls showed within- and between-run imprecision of 1.05% to 6.97% for the basic hemogram parameters. With patient samples, the results were analogous, with within- and between-run imprecision of 1.33% to 5.98%. To complete the evaluation of the AcT 5 counter, we analyzed the influence of possible interfering factors such as the presence of jaundice, lipemia, hemolysis, platelet aggregates, and schistocytes on the results of the automated leukocyte differential as performed by the cell counter with the new chlorazol black stain. We studied the performance of the AcT 5 with regards to ease of use, speed, and cost. Finally, we evaluated the impact of introducing the AcT 5 counter into routine laboratory use as support to resolve problems raised with the Beckman Coulter GenS and LH-750 and the Bayer Advia 120 counters due to samples with interfering factors.

  13. Size distributions of fly ash using Coulter Multisizer: Use of multiple orifices and fitting to truncated log-normal distributions. [Coulter Multisizer

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, S.; Ebert, J.L.; Self, S.A.

    1991-11-01

    Fly ash particles, which are predominantly spherical and glassy, are produced by melting of the mineral inclusions in the coal during combustion. Particle diameters can range from sub-micrometer (micron or {mu}m) to greater than 100 {mu}m. The size distribution of fly ash is needed to determine its role in the radiation transfer process in pulverized coal combustors. The Coulter Multisizer is an useful instrument for sizing powders with a broad size distribution. A single Multisizer orifice can size particles only within a specific size range limited at the lower end to a few percent of orifice diameter by sensitivity and at the upper end by increasing non-linearity of the signal-volume relation. A scheme for combining data obtained using orifices of different diameters is described. The manufacturers state that the smallest particle which can be sized accurately is nominally 2% of the diameter of the orifice. However, it was found that the data for particles less than 4% of the orifice diameter were not reliable. In order to use the smaller orifices, the larger particles have to be removed from the sample. A wet-sieving apparatus, designed for accurate separation of the particles by size, is described. A log-normal distribution function, truncated outside the measurement limits, fits the size distribution data well. Size parameters for fly ashes of six representative US coals are presented.

  14. 93 Years of stand density and land-use legacy research at the Coulter Ranch Study Site

    Treesearch

    Andrew J. Sanchez Meador; Margaret M. Moore

    2008-01-01

    In 1913, the Fort Valley Experimental Forest initiated an unprecedented case-study experiment to determine the effects of harvesting methods on tree regeneration and growth on a ponderosa pine-Gambel oak forest at Coulter Ranch in northern Arizona. The harvesting methods examined were seed-tree, group selection, and light selection. In addition, the effects of...

  15. 93 years of stand density and land-use legacy research at the Coulter Ranch Study Site (P-53)

    Treesearch

    Andrew J. Sanchez Meador; Margaret M. Moore

    2008-01-01

    In 1913, the Fort Valley Experimental Forest initiated an unprecedented case-study experiment to determine the effects of harvesting methods on tree regeneration and growth on a ponderosa pine-Gambel oak forest at Coulter Ranch in northern Arizona. The harvesting methods examined were seed-tree, group selection, and light selection. In addition, the effects of...

  16. A micromachined high throughput Coulter counter for bioparticle detection and counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhe, Jiang; Jagtiani, Ashish; Dutta, Prashanta; Hu, Jun; Carletta, Joan

    2007-02-01

    We describe a micromachined Coulter counter with multiple sensing microchannels for quantitative measurement of polymethacrylate particles and pollen. A unique design with sensing microelectrodes in the center of the microchannels is demonstrated. This design creates isolation resistances among channels, and thus circumvents the crosstalk caused by automatic electrical connection among microchannels. When implemented using microfluidic channels, this design is appropriate for the sensing of microscale particles in deionized water or in dilute electrolyte solution. Our design has multiple channels operating in parallel, but integrated with just one sample reservoir and one power source. The results with a four-channel device show that this device is capable of differentiating and counting micro polymethacrylate particles and Juniper pollen rapidly. Moreover, the device throughput is improved significantly in comparison to a single-channel device. The concept can be extended to a large number of sensing channels in a single chip for significant improvement in throughput.

  17. CLSI-based transference of the CALIPER database of pediatric reference intervals to Beckman Coulter DxC biochemical assays.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Petra A T; Thomas, Dylan; Sadeghieh, Tara; Bevilacqua, Victoria; Chan, Man Khun; Chen, Yunqi; Randell, Edward; Adeli, Khosrow

    2015-09-01

    The CALIPER program has established a comprehensive database of age- and sex-stratified pediatric reference intervals for over 85 common biochemical markers, largely using the Abbott ARCHITECT assays. To allow a broader application of the CALIPER database, we examined transference to 36 Beckman Coulter Synchron Unicel DxC800 assays, based on the CLSI C28-A3/EP9-A3 guidelines. Patient sample comparisons were performed for 36 biochemical assays using 200 serum specimens obtained from pediatric patients on the Abbott ARCHITECT ci8200 and the Beckman Coulter DxC800. For each analyte, R(2) values were calculated to assess the quality of correlation between the platforms. Statistical criteria used to assess transferability included a) regression analysis to create the equation of the line of best fit, b) standardized residual, c) Bland-Altman, and d) quantile-quantile plots. Transferred reference intervals were further verified by analyzing serum samples from 100 healthy children from the CALIPER cohort on the Beckman Coulter system. The reference intervals for most of the assessed analytes were transferable to Beckman Coulter assays (31 out of 36 studied) and the newly calculated reference intervals were verified through analysis of CALIPER reference samples (28 out of 31). Eighteen assays demonstrated excellent correlation (R(2)≥0.95), and 13 assays showed strong correlation (0.77≤R2≤0.94). The current study allowed successful transference of a large number of biochemical markers from the CALIPER database to assays on the Beckman Coulter DxC800 platform. Transference should facilitate broader application of CALIPER reference intervals at pediatric centers using DxC biochemical assays. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of the Beckman Coulter UniCel DxH 800, Beckman Coulter LH 780, and Abbott Diagnostics Cell-Dyn Sapphire hematology analyzers on adult specimens in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Tan, Brent T; Nava, Armando J; George, Tracy I

    2011-06-01

    We evaluated the new Beckman Coulter DxH 800 hematology analyzer (Beckman Coulter, Miami, FL) vs the Abbott Diagnostics Cell-Dyn Sapphire (Abbott Diagnostics, Santa Clara, CA) and Beckman Coulter LH 780 hematology analyzers using 430 adult specimens. The DxH 800 provided a CBC and differential that correlated well with those of the Sapphire and LH 780, with most parameters showing correlation coefficients (r) of more than 0.97. In the instrument vs 400-cell manual differential comparison, all 3 instruments showed similar and acceptable accuracy to the reference method except for nucleated RBC (NRBC) enumeration, in which the DxH 800 and Sapphire outperformed the LH 780. We also compared clinical efficiency by determining whether flagged specimens showed abnormalities on a peripheral blood smear as defined by International Council for Standardization in Haematology criteria. The efficiency, sensitivity, and specificity of the DxH 800 were 77.0%, 87.1%, and 73.0%, respectively, compared with the Sapphire at 75.8%, 93.5%, and 68.8%, respectively, and LH 780 at 66.1%, 93.5%, and 55.3%, respectively.

  19. Blast flagging with the UniCel DxH 800 Coulter Cellular Analysis System.

    PubMed

    Barnes, P W; Eby, C S; Shimer, G

    2010-06-01

    We recently conducted a series of evaluations of the new UniCel DxH 800 Coulter Cellular Analysis System at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri. This report addresses issues relating to the flagging performance of the DxH 800, especially as it relates to the detection of blast cells. The DxH 800 was designed with major performance and hardware enhancements over the previous LH series analyzer. Capturing 29 individual measurements per cell analyzed, the system provides improved sensitivity and specificity, which means more reliable assessment of abnormal cell populations. We undertook these particular studies to assess these enhancements and to evaluate the analytical performance of the DxH 800's automated white blood cell differential and flagging of abnormal blood samples. Our studies placed specific emphases on the detection of blast cells. The Initial evaluation of the ability of the DxH 800 to flag blast cells was remarkable. We ran 95 samples containing > or =1% blasts on both the Beckman Coulter LH 750 and DxH 800 instruments. Whereas the LH 750 had a 6.4% false-negative rate, the DxH 800 had a 0.0% false-negative rate. We then conducted an extensive study of 435 blast-positive samples on the LH 750, 302 of which were analyzed on the DxH 800 and 94 of which were analyzed on Siemens' ADVIA 2120 Hematology System. With a 0.3% false-negative rate, the DxH 800 outperformed the LH 750, which had a 9.6% false-negative rate. In a previous study of 311 random patient samples, the overall success rate of the DxH 800 in detecting abnormal samples in a mixed population of samples resulted in fewer false negatives (3 versus 6) and significantly fewer false positives (60 versus 152) than the LH 750. The lower rate of false positives for the DxH 800 dramatically reduced the number of unnecessary smear reviews that otherwise would have to be run on the LH 750. The DxH 800 has demonstrated that it is capable of reducing the number of unnecessary differentials

  20. [Evaluation of the Coulter MAXM. Differential leukocyte count and left-shift alarm].

    PubMed

    Vives Corrons, J L; Jou, J M; Aymerich, M; Rozman, M; Villamor, N; Aguilar i Bascompte, J L; Marín, J L; Lloret, M; Besson, I

    1997-02-01

    To assess the reliability of the differential leucocyte count (DLC) and the left shift flagging (LSF) system provided by the Coulter MAXM (MAXM) haematology analyzer. 380 blood specimens (drawn with tri-K EDTA as anticoagulant) were studied. By using the reference method (NCCLS H20-A), 50 out of the 380 blood specimens presented abnormal DLC (bands > 6%). Of from these, in 39 (80%) the MAXM displayed LSF of "bands 1 or 2". In 118 left shift flagged specimens (MAXM) with normal manual DLC, 87 (74%) had the "bands 1" alarm and 31 (26%) the "bands 2" alarm. Accordingly if the LSF "bands 1" is overlooked, the percentage of FP decreases from 36% to 10% but the percentage of false negatives (FN) increases from 22% to 58%. In order to improve the appreciation of LSF by decreasing the need of manual revisions, the visual examination of the leucocyte distribution scattergram (LDS), also provided by the MAXM, was conveniently evaluated. This study was performed on 190 blood specimens from which the MAXM displayed a normal DLC in 122 (64%), the LSF of "bands" in 44 (23%) and the LSF of "bands 2" in 24 (12.6%). Of from the 122 specimens with normal DLC, four were FN, of from the 44 specimens with "bands 1" LSF, 37 were FP and of from the 24 specimens with "bands 2" LSF, 16 were FP. The visual appreciation of the LDS showed in the majority of samples with "bands 1" and "bands 2" a definitely different shape consisting in a sharper image up to the top of the picture when compared to samples with normal DLC (without flags). According to this criteria, all the 122 specimens with normal DLC displayed a normal LDS and all the 24 specimens with "bands 2" flag displayed abnormal LDS. Of from the 44 specimens with "bands 1" flag, 26 (59%) showed an abnormal LDS and 18 (41%) a normal LDS. It is noteworthy that of from the 26 specimens with abnormal LDS only 7 were true positive (TP), whereas the 18 specimens with normal LDS all showed a normal DLC according to the reference method

  1. Gaussian particle flow implementation of PHD filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lingling; Wang, Junjie; Li, Yunpeng; Coates, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Particle filter and Gaussian mixture implementations of random finite set filters have been proposed to tackle the issue of jointly estimating the number of targets and their states. The Gaussian mixture PHD (GM-PHD) filter has a closed-form expression for the PHD for linear and Gaussian target models, and extensions using the extended Kalman filter or unscented Kalman Filter have been developed to allow the GM-PHD filter to accommodate mildly nonlinear dynamics. Errors resulting from linearization or model mismatch are unavoidable. A particle filter implementation of the PHD filter (PF-PHD) is more suitable for nonlinear and non-Gaussian target models. The particle filter implementations are much more computationally expensive and performance can suffer when the proposal distribution is not a good match to the posterior. In this paper, we propose a novel implementation of the PHD filter named the Gaussian particle flow PHD filter (GPF-PHD). It employs a bank of particle flow filters to approximate the PHD; these play the same role as the Gaussian components in the GM-PHD filter but are better suited to non-linear dynamics and measurement equations. Using the particle flow filter allows the GPF-PHD filter to migrate particles to the dense regions of the posterior, which leads to higher efficiency than the PF-PHD. We explore the performance of the new algorithm through numerical simulations.

  2. Evidence for P-Glycoprotein Involvement in Cell Volume Regulation Using Coulter Sizing in Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Jennifer; Rioult, Damien; Abu-Kaoud, Nadine; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Marin, Matthieu; Le Foll, Frank

    2015-06-24

    The regulation of cell volume is an essential function that is coupled to a variety of physiological processes such as receptor recycling, excitability and contraction, cell proliferation, migration, and programmed cell death. Under stress, cells undergo emergency swelling and respond to such a phenomenon with a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) where they release cellular ions, and other osmolytes as well as a concomitant loss of water. The link between P-glycoprotein, a transmembrane transporter, and cell volume regulation is controversial, and changes in cells volume are measured using microscopy or electrophysiology. For instance, by using the patch-clamp method, our team demonstrated that chloride currents activated in the RVD were more intense and rapid in a breast cancer cell line overexpressing the P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The Cell Lab Quanta SC is a flow cytometry system that simultaneously measures electronic volume, side scatter and three fluorescent colors; altogether this provides unsurpassed population resolution and accurate cell counting. Therefore, here we propose a novel method to follow cellular volume. By using the Coulter-type channel of the cytometer Cell Lab Quanta SC MPL (multi-platform loading), we demonstrated a role for the P-gp during different osmotic treatments, but also a differential activity of the P-gp through the cell cycle. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a role of P-gp in cell volume regulation.

  3. Counting leukocytes from whole blood using a lab-on-a-chip Coulter counter.

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhe; Cho, Sung Hwan; Zhang, Arthur; Dai, Jie; Wu, Tsung-Feng; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    A microfluidic lab-on-a-chip Coulter counter was demonstrated to count micro particles and leukocytes from whole blood. Instead of electroplated or deposited metal electrodes, off-the-shelf gold pins were used as electrodes to simplify fabrication process, reduce cost, enhance device durability, and above all, achieve superior uniformity in E-field distribution for improved signal quality. A custom-designed, low-cost demodulation circuit was developed to detect the AC impedance signals of the particles and cells passing the detection area defined by the microfluidic channels. A mixture of polystyrene beads with three different sizes was used to characterize the device. The results showed high throughput at 2000 particles/s and clear separation among different sizes of beads with coefficients of variation (CV) of 13.53%, 10.35% and 5.67% for 7.66 µm, 10.5 µm and 14.7 µmbeads, respectively. To demonstrate the potential for a point-of-care or self-administered device for cancer patients going through chemotherapy, we have used the lab-on-a-chip device to count leukocytes from whole blood, generating encouraging preliminary results comparable to the results from a commercial flow cytometer.

  4. Prospective, Multi-Center Evaluation of the Beckman Coulter Prostate Health Index Using WHO Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Sokoll, Lori J.; Broyles, Dennis L.; Bangma, Chris H.; van Schaik, Ron H.N.; Klee, George G.; Wei, John T.; Sanda, Martin G.; Partin, Alan W.; Slawin, Kevin M.; Marks, Leonard S.; Mizrahi, Isaac A.; Shin, Sanghyuk S.; Cruz, Amabelle B.; Chan, Daniel W.; Roberts, William L.; Catalona, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Reported prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values may differ substantially between assays with the Hybritech and World Health Organization (WHO) standardization. [-2]proPSA (p2PSA) and the Beckman Coulter prostate health index (phi) are newly approved serum markers, which are associated with prostate cancer risk and aggressiveness. Our objective was to study the influence of assay standardization on these markers. Materials and Methods PSA, % free PSA (%fPSA), and p2PSA were measured using the Hybritech calibration in 892 men undergoing prostate biopsy from a prospective multicenter study. Phi was calculated as: [p2PSA/ fPSA) × (square root of PSA)]. Performance characteristics of phi for prostate cancer detection were then determined using re-calculated WHO calibration PSA values. Results The median phi was significantly higher in men with prostate cancer compared to those with negative biopsies using the WHO values (47.4 vs 39.8, p<0.001). Phi offered improved discrimination of prostate cancer detection on biopsy (AUC 0.704) compared to %fPSA or total PSA using the WHO calibration. Conclusions Phi can be calculated using Hybritech or WHO standardized assays, and significantly improved the prediction of biopsy outcome over %fPSA or PSA alone. PMID:23206426

  5. Evaluation of the erythrocyte and platelet morphological analysis given by the hematology analyzer Coulter STKS.

    PubMed

    Vinatier, I; Lorriaux, C; Capiod, J C; Faille, N; Delobel, J

    1992-01-01

    The morphological profiles of red blood cells (RBC) and platelets (Plt) derived from the distribution analysis given by the Coulter STKS were evaluated in two groups of patients suffering from non hematological (n = 293) and hematological (n = 257) conditions. The RBC and Plt flags were studied in terms of sensitivity of the morphological analysis and specificity and significance of each flag. When all RBC and Plt flags were considered, the percentages of false negatives and false positives in our subjects were found to be 4.7% and 13.4% respectively, with a global efficiency of 81.8%. The sensitivity of the alarm system was higher than 90% for all types of abnormality, except microcytosis (81%) and Howell-Jolly bodies (57% over a limited number of 7 cases). The specificity of the STKS response was found to be low except for anisocytosis (88.5%) and macrocytosis (86.1%). It was shown that the flags microcytosis and/or hypochromia and macrocytosis were poorly significant when they appeared in isolation (false positive rates of 86.6% and 84.2% respectively). Thus, these alarms could be eliminated from the review criteria. When considering only the flags anisocytosis, NRBCs, micro RBCs/RBC fragments, dimorphic RBC pop, PLT clumps and giant Plt, the percentage of false positives was 8.1%. However, it must be kept in mind that suspect leucocyte flags remained review criteria, resulting in a final false negative rate of 2.5% for RBC and Plt morphological abnormalities.

  6. Differences in detecting blasts between ADVIA 2120 and Beckman-Coulter LH750 hematology analyzers.

    PubMed

    Shelat, S G; Canfield, W; Shibutani, S

    2010-02-01

    The complete blood count is often used as a screening tool to detect hematologic abnormalities in the peripheral blood. In patients with suspected or known leukemia, blast cells serve as an indicator of disease pathology. We compared the analytical performance of the Siemens ADVIA 2120 to the Beckman-Coulter LH750 in the detection of blasts. In the study, 390 blood samples were analyzed from a general hospital population, which included oncology patients. The presence of blasts, as indicated by the analyzers' flags, was compared with the results of a manual differential (regarded as the reference method). The ADVIA 2120 demonstrated 100% sensitivity at detecting blasts compared with 62% using the LH750. This improved sensitivity came at the expense of a lower specificity (49% vs. 86%). The effect of the false-positive and false-negative samples on the laboratory's manual review was partially (false-positive) or completely (false-negative) mitigated by triggering of other criteria. Detecting blasts in the peripheral blood depends on the performance characteristics of the hematology analyzer, in conjunction with the stringency of the laboratory's manual review criteria.

  7. Evidence for P-Glycoprotein Involvement in Cell Volume Regulation Using Coulter Sizing in Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Pasquier, Jennifer; Rioult, Damien; Abu-Kaoud, Nadine; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Marin, Matthieu; Le Foll, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of cell volume is an essential function that is coupled to a variety of physiological processes such as receptor recycling, excitability and contraction, cell proliferation, migration, and programmed cell death. Under stress, cells undergo emergency swelling and respond to such a phenomenon with a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) where they release cellular ions, and other osmolytes as well as a concomitant loss of water. The link between P-glycoprotein, a transmembrane transporter, and cell volume regulation is controversial, and changes in cells volume are measured using microscopy or electrophysiology. For instance, by using the patch-clamp method, our team demonstrated that chloride currents activated in the RVD were more intense and rapid in a breast cancer cell line overexpressing the P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The Cell Lab Quanta SC is a flow cytometry system that simultaneously measures electronic volume, side scatter and three fluorescent colors; altogether this provides unsurpassed population resolution and accurate cell counting. Therefore, here we propose a novel method to follow cellular volume. By using the Coulter-type channel of the cytometer Cell Lab Quanta SC MPL (multi-platform loading), we demonstrated a role for the P-gp during different osmotic treatments, but also a differential activity of the P-gp through the cell cycle. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a role of P-gp in cell volume regulation. PMID:26114386

  8. Evaluation of the ABX Cobas Vega automated hematology analyzer and comparison with the Coulter STKS.

    PubMed

    Ferrero-Vacher, C; Sudaka, I; Jambou, D; Vanhaeke, D; Fischer, F; Bayle, J

    1997-06-01

    An evaluation of the new automated hematology analyzer was performed in comparison with the Coulter STKS on 1,694 blood samples coming from the different departments of Nice University Hospital. The Cobas Vega showed very satisfactory results in terms of repeatability, reproducibility and linearity. Correlation with the STKS was excellent with the exception of the following parameters: red blood cell distribution index and the absolute values for eosinophils and basophils. Two qualities were particularly appreciable: absence of leukocyte carryover, and stability of the complete blood count and leukocyte differential count over a long period. Analysis of qualitative flags showed that the overall blood smear review rate was 47% for the Cobas Vega, not forgetting that optical microscopy detects 37% of all abnormalities. The STKS's review rate was 49.5%. Flags commonly concerned the granulocytic lineage, 61% for the STKS and 48% for the Vega, with a false positive rate of 43.4% for the STKS compared with 22% for the Vega. The opposite phenomenon was observed with the flag for atypical lymphocytes which represented 11% of flags for the STKS and 25.6% for the Vega, with a false positive rate of 25.5% for the STKS and 34% for the Cobas Vega. This may be explained by the fact that lymphocyte abnormalities sometimes generated "granulocytic" flags on the STKS. Studies of the false negative rate carried out using light microscopy on 505 blood samples without flags on either system, detected the presence of a slight myelemia, and a few hyperbasophilic lymphocytes or plasmocytes in 18.6% of all cases. Finally, the Cobas Vega's practicality was greatly appreciated and there was no trouble with breakdowns throughout the whole period of its use.

  9. A multicentre evaluation of the new Beckman Coulter anti-Mullerian hormone immunoassay (AMH Gen II).

    PubMed

    Wallace, A M; Faye, S A; Fleming, R; Nelson, S M

    2011-07-01

    The measurement of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) has been by two commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assays: Diagnostics Systems Laboratory (DSL 10-14400) and Immunotech (A11893 IVD EU only). Beckman Coulter has developed a new assay for AMH (AMH Gen II A79765), which uses the DSL antibodies but is standardized to the Immunotech calibration. As a result, comparative data are urgently required between the old DSL assay and its replacement AMH Gen II. An evaluation of the AMH Gen II assay was performed at three sites, each with extensive experience of measuring circulating AMH in the adult female. Results were compared with the original DSL ELISA assay. The analysis was performed on a total of 271 patients' samples, approximately 90 at each site. Performance characteristics were evaluated for the AMHGen II assay. Linearity was acceptable with observed values close to the expected (mean recovery 106.3%). The functional sensitivity (20% coefficient of variation), calculated from precision profile data, was 1.5 pmol/L. Within- and between-batch imprecision, assessed over the concentration range of 5-70 pmol/L, were 5.3-11.4% and 3.8-17.3%, respectively. There was good agreement between assays with a Bablok-Passing regression equation AMH Gen II = 1.40 DSL-0.62 pmol/L, r = 0.96, n = 271. Our results demonstrate that similar precision and excellent between-assay agreement should be obtained when laboratories change from the DSL to the AMH Gen II ELISA and they should expect an increase in AMH values of approximately 40%.

  10. The John Stanley Coulter memorial lecture. Anatomy of change: the need for effective disability policy change agents.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The 2009 Coulter Lecture highlights the need for effective disability policy change agents to advocate for health care policy and research that focuses on optimizing the health and function of individuals with disabilities and chronic conditions-not only on their full restoration/cure. The lecture describes the "grotesque" historical treatment of persons with disabilities under the old policy framework, the treatment of people with disabilities under the new/emerging disability policy framework, and the critical role played by coalitions in bringing about progressive, sustainable change on behalf of individuals with disabilities. Copyright 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Yes, we need PhD immunologists!

    PubMed

    Bishop, Gail A

    2015-05-01

    Constrained research funding prompts some to advocate training fewer PhDs. However, PhD immunologists are critically needed for future health challenges. Rather than discouraging promising young scientists from pursuing doctorates, we should ensure that such training is relevant to many different career possibilities to which PhD immunologists can make valuable contributions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. The PH.D. and the Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beringause, Arthur

    The present status of the Ph.D. in English is briefly discussed. Don Cameron Allen's "The Ph.D. in English and American Literature" is praised as a much-needed study which can help the English profession revitalize graduate programs. Several of Allen's conclusions are briefly summarized. (BN)

  13. Measurement of serum anti-Müllerian hormone by Beckman Coulter ELISA and DSL ELISA: comparison and relevance in assisted reproduction technology (ART).

    PubMed

    Fréour, Thomas; Mirallié, Sophie; Bach-Ngohou, Kalyane; Denis, Marc; Barrière, Paul; Masson, Damien

    2007-01-01

    Numerous studies have evocated the clinical usefulness of serum AMH levels as a predictor of ovarian response and pregnancy in assisted reproductive technology cycles. Nevertheless, the analysis of the literature shows a great dispersion in serum AMH concentrations obtained with different methods from almost comparable populations. We compared two commercial immunoassays (AMH Beckman Coulter ELISA and AMH DSL ELISA) and we evaluated the AMH levels in serum as a prognosis value for ovarian response and pregnancy in assisted reproductive technology cycles. We found a close linear relationship between the two methods but AMH levels were almost 4.6-fold lower with the DSL kit than with the Beckman Coulter kit. We found a significant and positive correlation between the number of mature ovocytes inseminated and AMH levels obtained with the two methods. Whatever the ELISA used, we found no significant difference between AMH level of pregnancy and non pregnancy groups. Indeed, using the Beckman Coulter method, all pregnant patients had serum AMH levels over 1.4 microg/L. Conversely, no cut-off value can be found for the DSL kit. Our results show clearly for the first time that AMH results are method dependent even if the correlation obtained between the two methods remained excellent. The Beckman Coulter AMH ELISA should produce clinical agreement when used for prognosis purposes on patients undergoing assisted reproduction.

  14. [Evaluation of the analyzer of hematology Beckman Coulter® HmX™ in the university hospital of Oran].

    PubMed

    Zmouli, N; Moulasserdoun, K; Seghier, F

    2013-11-01

    The choice of an automaton of haematology is a determining stage, which has to take into account at the same time the quality of the results and the economic imperatives: workload, structure and organization of the laboratory. [corrected] It is in this spirit that we estimated during a period of 3 months the analyzer of haematology: the HmX™ Coulter with boatman of samples of the company Beckman. This automaton realizes the blood numeration, the formula leukocytic and the reticulocyte count. At first, we estimated the appropriate characteristics of device. Secondly, we estimated the relevance, the sensibility and the specificity of the alarms by comparing with the reference method, which is the optical microscopy. For that purpose, 125 blood smears resulting from service of haematology and from resuscitation were examined in optical microscopy. The technical tests were realized according to the recommendations of the International committee for evaluation of automatons of haematology. The analytical performances were satisfactory in particular the big interval of linearity and the absence of contamination. As regards the evaluation of the alarms system: rate of rejection is 63%, the sensibility 86%, the specificity 70%, the positive predictive value 80%, the negative predictive value 78% and the efficiency 80%. The alarms myelaemia and atypical lymphocytes were never sources of false negatives. The alarms erythroblasts and platelet aggregates did not engendered positive forgery. The blast cell alarm was responsible for a single case of false negative. The faithfulness of automaton is satisfactory: the absence of contamination, the big interval of linearity for the leukocytes, the red blood cells and the platelets as well as a good relevance of the alarms with regard to the anomalies found on the peripheral blood smear. From the user-friendliness and practicability point of view, the HmX™ Coulter was deeply appreciated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All

  15. Initial performance evaluation of the UniCel® DxH 800 Coulter® cellular analysis system

    PubMed Central

    HEDLEY, B D; KEENEY, M; CHIN-YEE, I; BROWN, W

    2011-01-01

    The Beckman Coulter UniCel® DxH 800 is a hematology analyzer incorporating new electronic and mechanical design with advanced algorithm technology to perform CBC, white blood cell (WBC) differential, nucleated red blood cell (NRBC), and reticulocyte analysis. Evaluation of this instrument was performed in our 800-bed tertiary care hospital and specifically centered upon the correlation of WBC, NRBC, and platelet (PLT) enumeration when compared to a predicate analyzer, the Coulter® LH 780, and flow cytometry (FCM) reference methods. Of particular interest were those samples with morphologically confirmed interference and extreme leukocytosis (evaluated with respect to red blood cell parameter correction). The sample set (n = 272) consisted of morphologically normal and hematologically abnormal patients. Correlation of the WBC, PLT, and NRBC showed r2 values of 0.994, 0.985, and 0.910 for the DxH 800 vs. FCM, respectively. The presence of interfering particles did not affect the accuracy of the DxH 800 with respect to WBC counts. The DxH 800 showed accurate PLT and NRBC counts in the clinically significant low range when compared to FCM. Compared to the LH 780, flagging rates were significantly reduced (NRBC flag), or equivalent (WBC, PLT flag) on the DxH 800. The DxH 800 demonstrated higher sensitivity and specificity for PLTs and NRBCs and achieved a lower NRBC false negative rate compared to the LH 780. The UniCel® DxH 800 represents a significant improvement to previous impedance analyzers in accurately detecting the presence of NRBCs at counts >1/100 WBC. Furthermore, it provides accurate PLT and WBC counts in the presence of interference and improved NRBC flagging efficiency when compared to the LH 780. Correction of red blood cell parameters is appropriate and accurate in cases of extreme leukocytosis. PMID:20491996

  16. Initial performance evaluation of the UniCel® DxH 800 Coulter® cellular analysis system.

    PubMed

    Hedley, B D; Keeney, M; Chin-Yee, I; Brown, W

    2011-02-01

    The Beckman Coulter UniCel® DxH 800 is a hematology analyzer incorporating new electronic and mechanical design with advanced algorithm technology to perform CBC, white blood cell (WBC) differential, nucleated red blood cell (NRBC), and reticulocyte analysis. Evaluation of this instrument was performed in our 800-bed tertiary care hospital and specifically centered upon the correlation of WBC, NRBC, and platelet (PLT) enumeration when compared to a predicate analyzer, the Coulter® LH 780, and flow cytometry (FCM) reference methods. Of particular interest were those samples with morphologically confirmed interference and extreme leukocytosis (evaluated with respect to red blood cell parameter correction). The sample set (n=272) consisted of morphologically normal and hematologically abnormal patients. Correlation of the WBC, PLT, and NRBC showed r(2) values of 0.994, 0.985, and 0.910 for the DxH 800 vs. FCM, respectively. The presence of interfering particles did not affect the accuracy of the DxH 800 with respect to WBC counts. The DxH 800 showed accurate PLT and NRBC counts in the clinically significant low range when compared to FCM. Compared to the LH 780, flagging rates were significantly reduced (NRBC flag), or equivalent (WBC, PLT flag) on the DxH 800. The DxH 800 demonstrated higher sensitivity and specificity for PLTs and NRBCs and achieved a lower NRBC false negative rate compared to the LH 780. The UniCel® DxH 800 represents a significant improvement to previous impedance analyzers in accurately detecting the presence of NRBCs at counts >1/100 WBC. Furthermore, it provides accurate PLT and WBC counts in the presence of interference and improved NRBC flagging efficiency when compared to the LH 780. Correction of red blood cell parameters is appropriate and accurate in cases of extreme leukocytosis. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Using the Mount Pinatubo Volcanic Eruption to Determine Climate Sensitivity: Comments on "Climate Forcing by the Volcanic Eruption of Mount Pinatubo" by David H. Douglass and Robert S. Knox

    SciTech Connect

    Wigley, T L; Ammann, C M; Santer, B D; Taylor, K E

    2005-04-22

    [1] Douglass and Knox [2005], hereafter referred to as DK, present an analysis of the observed cooling following the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption and claim that these data imply a very low value for the climate sensitivity (equivalent to 0.6 C equilibrium warming for a CO{sub 2} doubling). We show here that their analysis is flawed and their results are incorrect.

  18. [Power in the PhD programme].

    PubMed

    Tijdink, J K

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the role of power in the world of biomedical research. On the basis of some examples, I intend to demonstrate the influence of power, or its misuse, on PhD students and supervisors, and how this may have a negative effect on the research of PhD students. I will then outline how the biomedical research field can prevent these practices, and how it can create a better and more inspiring atmosphere for young, enthusiastic and talented researchers.

  19. The PHD labor market: A primer

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.G.

    1994-08-01

    There are currently two major issues regarding Ph.D. scientists that are cause for concern. The first issue, adequacy of Ph.D. supply, follows from a general concern among educators and science policy specialists that the 1990s and beyond will usher in an era of general shortages for Ph D. scientists. These expected shortages are thought to be the result of: (1) Inadequate Ph.D. supply response to demand changes. Ph.D. supply has been hampered by declining federal support and increasing time to complete the doctorate. The long gestation period to produce a Ph.D. implies relatively unresponsive labor supply. (2) Increasing industrial demand in such areas as electronics, environmental control and biotechnology. (3) Increasing academic demand after several years of decline (the ``baby boom echo``). In addition, replacement of aging faculty is expected to accelerate in the next decade. The second major issue regarding Ph.D. scientists concerns a dismal current labor market. Levels of federal R&D funding growth, particularly for young investigators, have been declining. Retrenchment of public and private universities facing budget problems has delayed (or cancelled) faculty hiring. There is currently widespread alarm and concern in the US science establishment about the perceived decline in the availability of research funding and university faculty positions to sustain the existing stock of scientists in productive activities and to continue to ``send the message`` to the best young minds that science has room for them. The first issue implies a future shortage of scientists, the second issue implies a current surplus. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of Ph.D. labor market models and summarize the existing knowledge on the labor market for Ph.D. scientists and engineers.

  20. Evaluation of the Beckman Coulter AcT 5 diff AL hematology analyzer in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Bhuta, Ujvala M; Ulstein, Howard

    2003-01-01

    The Coulter AcT 5-part differential (5 diff) autoloader (AL) hematology analyzer from Beckman Coulter (Fullerton, CA, USA) was evaluated at the Florida Medical Center in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, an acute care hospital facility. The AcT 5 diff AL is a new, fully automated bench-top 5-part differential hematology analyzer with automatic loading and sampling. It is designed as a front-line instrument for small- to medium-sized laboratories or as a backup in larger laboratories. We evaluated the performance of the AcT 5 diff AL for complete blood counts (CBCs). The Coulter Onyx AL was used as the reference instrument and the 5-part differential against the reference 400-cell manual differential count (2 operators x 200 cells). A total of 140 patient samples were analyzed in the study, with most of the samples obtained from our own laboratory workload. We supplemented this dataset with pediatric and oncology samples from nearby practices. All samples were analyzed within 4 hours of collection, and the AcT 5 diff AL demonstrated excellent accuracy with correlation values (r) > 0.98 for all directly measured CBC parameters (white blood cell count, red blood cell count, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, and platelets). Reproducibility studies on the AcT 5 diff AL also showed excellent results, with coefficients of variation much lower than the manufacturer's specifications. Initial differential comparisons showed good correlations for neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils (r = 0.84, 0.96, and 0.88, respectively) with a lower correlation for monocytes (r = 0.43). On subsequent review and data analysis we found differential discrepancies in 39 of the 140 samples, for which all showed multiple morphological flags, R diff flags, or poor scatterplot separations indicating that the AcT 5 diff AL differential was likely to be inaccurate and that a morphological assessment and differential was necessary. Given the acutecare setting that our laboratory serves and the

  1. Concentration, clay mineral composition and Coulter counter size distribution of suspended sediment in the turbidity maximum of the Jiaojiang river estuary, Zhejiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B. G.; Eisma, D.; Xie, Q. Ch.; Kalf, J.; Li, Y.; Xia, X.

    1999-09-01

    Measurements of current velocities, concentrations of suspended matter and Coulter counter size distributions of the suspended matter during the tidal cycle at the surface, at mid-depth and near to the bottom were carried out during spring and neap tide in the Jiaojiang river estuary, Zhejiang, China. The results indicate that a lutocline was present during most of the tidal cycle, except during the highest tides when the suspended-matter concentrations were approximately uniform over the entire water depth. Suspended-matter concentrations showed a relation with maximum flow velocities in the surface water and with increasing flow velocities in the bottom water, with regular deposition and resuspension during the tidal cycle. The clay mineral composition of the suspended matter indicated that most of the suspended matter was supplied by the Chang Jiang river. There was probably also some local supply and local sorting. The suspended-matter particle size, measured with a Coulter counter, became larger (with a larger standard deviation) when the suspended-matter concentration increased, and smaller when the suspended-matter concentration decreased. Size sorting during the tidal cycle indicated deflocculation and reflocculation processes; break-up of about 10 to 20% of the flocs in suspension is sufficient to produce the shift in the Coulter counter size distributions observed. This led to the conclusion that the trend in the smectite concentration in the estuary was the result of local sorting of smectite-containing particles after floc break-up.

  2. A Comparison of Mindray BC-6800, Sysmex XN-2000, and Beckman Coulter LH750 Automated Hematology Analyzers: A Pediatric Study.

    PubMed

    Ciepiela, Olga; Kotuła, Iwona; Kierat, Szymon; Sieczkowska, Sandra; Podsiadłowska, Anna; Jenczelewska, Anna; Księżarczyk, Karolina; Demkow, Urszula

    2016-11-01

    Modern automated laboratory hematology analyzers allow the measurement of over 30 different hematological parameters useful in the diagnostic and clinical interpretation of patient symptoms. They use different methods to measure the same parameters. Thus, a comparison of complete blood count made by Mindray BC-6800, Sysmex XN-2000 and Beckman Coulter LH750 was performed. A comparison of results obtained by automated analysis of 807 anticoagulated blood samples from children and 125 manual microscopic differentiations were performed. This comparative study included white blood cell count, red blood cell count, and erythrocyte indices, as well as platelet count. The present study showed a poor level of agreement between white blood cell enumeration and differentiation of the three automated hematology analyzers under comparison. A very good agreement was found when comparing manual blood smear and automated granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes differentiation. Red blood cell evaluation showed better agreement than white blood cells between the studied analyzers. To conclude, studied instruments did not ensure satisfactory interchangeability and did not facilitate a substitution of one analyzer by another. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Clinical utility of Beckman-Coulter Gen's reticulocyte analysis in the study of anemia of chronic disease (ACD).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana; Ortega, Carlos; Santos, Luís; Teixeira, Alexandre; Dinis, Maria Joáo; Vasconcelos, Iponina; Lacerda, Jorge; Fonseca, Elisa

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the reticulocyte parameters (classical and research parameters) acquired by the Beckman Coulter GEN'S blood counter (GEN'S; Brea, CA, USA) to establish the "reticulocyte profile" characteristics of patients with anemia of chronic disease (ACD). The reticulocyte parameters and profile provided by the GEN'S were studied in 38 anemic patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for the ACD, and the results were compared with those of 38 healthy controls in a multivariate statistical analysis using the Student t-test and the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis.Statistically significant (P <.05) differences between the 2 population groups were observed in several of the reticulocyte parameters provided by the GEN'S: mean volume of the reticulocyte population (MRV) (high), percentage of high light scatter reticulocytes HLR% (high), mean volume of the whole sphered red cell and reticulocyte population (MSCV) (high) MCV-MSCV (low) with the highest diagnostic value, as measured by the area under the ROC curve (>0.9), for the IRF (high) and the reticulocyte population data: mean channel scatter retics (high) and the mean channel conductivity retics (high). This study establishes the reticulocyte parameters and reticulocyte profile as provided by the GEN'S and characteristic of patients with ACD as compared with normal subjects. This should provide the basis for further studies comparing the reticulocyte profile of patients with ACD with those found in other types of anemia.

  4. Size distributions of fly ash using Coulter Multisizer: Use of multiple orifices and fitting to truncated log-normal distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, S.; Ebert, J.L.; Self, S.A.

    1991-11-01

    Fly ash particles, which are predominantly spherical and glassy, are produced by melting of the mineral inclusions in the coal during combustion. Particle diameters can range from sub-micrometer (micron or {mu}m) to greater than 100 {mu}m. The size distribution of fly ash is needed to determine its role in the radiation transfer process in pulverized coal combustors. The Coulter Multisizer is an useful instrument for sizing powders with a broad size distribution. A single Multisizer orifice can size particles only within a specific size range limited at the lower end to a few percent of orifice diameter by sensitivity and at the upper end by increasing non-linearity of the signal-volume relation. A scheme for combining data obtained using orifices of different diameters is described. The manufacturers state that the smallest particle which can be sized accurately is nominally 2% of the diameter of the orifice. However, it was found that the data for particles less than 4% of the orifice diameter were not reliable. In order to use the smaller orifices, the larger particles have to be removed from the sample. A wet-sieving apparatus, designed for accurate separation of the particles by size, is described. A log-normal distribution function, truncated outside the measurement limits, fits the size distribution data well. Size parameters for fly ashes of six representative US coals are presented.

  5. Successfully Accelerating Translational Research at an Academic Medical Center: The University of Michigan‐Coulter Translational Research Partnership Program

    PubMed Central

    Pienta, Kenneth J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Translational research encompasses the effective movement of new knowledge and discoveries into new approaches for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. There are many roadblocks to successful bench to bedside research, but few have received as much recent attention as the “valley of death.” The valley of death refers to the lack of funding and support for research that moves basic science discoveries into diagnostics, devices, and treatments in humans, and is ascribed to be the result of companies unwilling to fund research development that may not result in a drug or device that will be utilized in the clinic and conversely, the fact that researchers have no access to the funding needed to carry out preclinical and early clinical development to demonstrate potential efficacy in humans. The valley of death also exists because bridging the translational gap is dependent on successfully managing an additional four risks: scientific, intellectual property, market, and regulatory. The University of Michigan (UM) has partnered with the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation (CF) to create a model providing an infrastructure to overcome these risks. This model is easily adoptable to other academic medical centers (AMCs). Clin Trans Sci 2010; Volume 3: 316–318 PMID:21167009

  6. Successfully accelerating translational research at an academic medical center: the University of Michigan-Coulter translational research partnership program.

    PubMed

    Pienta, Kenneth J

    2010-12-01

    Translational research encompasses the effective movement of new knowledge and discoveries into new approaches for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. There are many roadblocks to successful bench to bedside research, but few have received as much recent attention as the "valley of death". The valley of death refers to the lack of funding and support for research that moves basic science discoveries into diagnostics, devices, and treatments in humans, and is ascribed to be the result of companies unwilling to fund research development that may not result in a drug or device that will be utilized in the clinic and conversely, the fact that researchers have no access to the funding needed to carry out preclinical and early clinical development to demonstrate potential efficacy in humans. The valley of death also exists because bridging the translational gap is dependent on successfully managing an additional four risks: scientific, intellectual property, market, and regulatory. The University of Michigan (UM) has partnered with the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation (CF) to create a model providing an infrastructure to overcome these risks. This model is easily adoptable to other academic medical centers (AMCs). © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. New Directions for the Ph.D.?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deener, David R.

    The award rate of doctorates has tripled since 1960 and the projections indicate that by 1980 the rate will be somewhere between 60 and 70,000. In recent years every facet of the PhD has come under attack. The degree will probably be reshaped from a standard of achievement and accomplishment to a standard of potential, from a demonstration of the…

  8. What My Ph.D. Taught Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The author started in the Ph.D. program in comparative literature at Princeton in 1992, a year after she graduated from college. She fell in love with mythology and the classical traditions and find herself teaching literature. In the remainder of her time at Princeton, she precepted for four or five more classes, got the chance to join the…

  9. What My Ph.D. Taught Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The author started in the Ph.D. program in comparative literature at Princeton in 1992, a year after she graduated from college. She fell in love with mythology and the classical traditions and find herself teaching literature. In the remainder of her time at Princeton, she precepted for four or five more classes, got the chance to join the…

  10. Response to the "Responsive PhD"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyssen, David

    2007-01-01

    In June 2005, 50 graduate school deans gathered at Princeton to address the fact that the number of new PhDs conferred each year far exceeds the number of tenure-track academic jobs on offer. Under the auspices of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation's Responsive PhD Project, these deans spoke passionately about how American…

  11. The panacea toolbox of a PhD biomedical student.

    PubMed

    Skaik, Younis

    2014-01-01

    Doing a PhD (doctor of philosophy) for the sake of contribution to knowledge should give the student an immense enthusiasm through the PhD period. It is the time in one's life that one spends to "hit the nail on the head" in a specific area and topic of interest. A PhD consists mostly of hard work and tenacity; however, luck and genius might also play a little role. You can pass all PhD phases without having both luck and genius. The PhD student should have pre-PhD and PhD toolboxes, which are "sine quibus non" for getting successfully a PhD degree. In this manuscript, the toolboxes of the PhD student are discussed.

  12. GM-PHD filter multitarget tracking in sonar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Daniel; Vo, Ba-Ngu; Bell, Judith

    2006-05-01

    The Gaussian Mixure Probability Hypothesis Density (GM-PHD) Multi-target Tracker was developed as an extension to the GM-PHD filter to provide track continuity. The algorithm is demonstrated on forward-looking sonar data with clutter and is compared with the results from the Particle PHD filter.

  13. A Multiattributes Approach for Ranking PhD Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urbancic, Frank R.

    2008-01-01

    In its plan to combat the PhD shortage crisis, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB; 2003) has called for the development of PhD program rankings to serve as incentives for academic institutions to invest more in PhD programs, thereby counterbalancing the disproportionate influence of master of business…

  14. PhD Students' Work Conditions and Study Environment in University- and Industry-Based PhD Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolmos, A.; Kofoed, L. B.; Du, X. Y.

    2008-01-01

    During the last 10 years, new models of funding and training PhD students have been established in Denmark in order to integrate industry into the entire PhD education. Several programmes have been conducted where it is possible to co-finance PhD scholarships or to become an employee as an industrial PhD in a company. An important question is what…

  15. Evaluation of the Coulter S-Plus IV three-part differential as a screening tool in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Miers, M K; Fogo, A B; Federspiel, C F; McAllister, N W; Phillips, P A; Cousar, J B

    1987-06-01

    The Coulter S-Plus IV separates leukocytes in peripheral blood by volume analysis into granulocytes, lymphocytes, and mononuclear cell fractions, the so-called three-part differential (3PD). White blood cell (WBC) counts, hemoglobin concentrations, platelet counts, 3PDs, and histograms were compared with smear differentials on 3,861 samples, including samples from oncology patients, to determine the predictive value of the Coulter parameters in detecting smear abnormalities. Results showed good correlation between the 3PD and smear differential for granulocytes and lymphocytes (correlation coefficients were 0.883 and 0.868, respectively) and poor correlation for mononuclear cells (0.492). No histogram region flag indicators were observed in the following samples: 15 of 40 samples with greater than or 1% blasts; 105 of 183 with greater than or 1 nucleated red blood cell (NRBC) per 100 WBCs; 65 of 113 with monocytosis greater than 1,600/microL (1.6 X 10(9)/L); 425 of 548 with greater than 2,000 bands/microL (2.0 X 10(9)/L); 84 of 112 with eosinophilia greater than 600/microL (0.6 X 10(9)L); and 88 of 149 with greater than 2% immature granulocytes. All samples with greater than 5% blasts were indicated by region flags and abnormal histograms. Oncology patient data were analyzed, yielding similar results. The authors established guidelines for using the Coulter 3PD data in their tertiary care laboratory to select samples that require smear evaluation.

  16. Not Your Father's Ph.D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withrow, Brandon G.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how the author, a devoted blogger, confronts his fear that his virtual life is damaging his career prospects in academe. As a new Ph.D. in religious studies, the author has every reason to believe he will find a tenure-track job. He has read the numbers and know that, on average, job candidates spend two to five years in…

  17. Comparison of four hematology analyzers, CELL-DYN Sapphire, ADVIA 120, Coulter LH 750, and Sysmex XE-2100, in terms of clinical usefulness.

    PubMed

    Kang, S H; Kim, H K; Ham, C K; Lee, D S; Cho, H I

    2008-12-01

    We evaluated the clinical usefulness (leukocyte distribution classification, morphologic classification, and morphologic flags) of the following four hematology analyzers: CELL-DYN Sapphire (CD-Sapphire) (Abbott Diagnostics, Santa Clara, CA, USA), ADVIA 120 (Bayer Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY, USA), Beckman Coulter LH 750 (Beckman Coulter, Miami, FL, USA), and Sysmex XE-2100 (TOA Medical Electronics Co., Kobe, Japan). Four hundred thirty samples from patients and 100 samples from healthy individuals were analyzed. For distributional classification, the sensitivity rates of CD-Sapphire, ADVIA 120, LH 750, and XE-2100 were 93.1, 95.9, 94.9, and 94.9%, respectively, and the efficiency rates were 80.7, 81.6, 84.1, and 84.2%, respectively. For morphologic classification, the sensitivity rates of CD-Sapphire, ADVIA 120, LH 750, and XE-2100 were 88.6, 93.2, 77.3, and 94.3%, respectively, and the efficiency rates were 80.9, 73.0, 79.5, and 74.2%, respectively. Comparing the findings in different morphologic flags, XE-2100 showed the highest sensitivity for Blasts flag (90.9%); CD-Sapphire showed the highest sensitivity for Immature granulocytes and/or Left-shift flag (85.5%); ADVIA 120 showed the highest sensitivity for Atypical lymphocytes flag (60.0%); and LH 750 showed the highest sensitivity for Nucleated RBC flag (75.0%). Our results demonstrate that the four analyzers are comparable in overall performance.

  18. Measurement of isolated myocyte volume using the Coulter models Z2 and ZM/C256: a comparison of instrument function.

    PubMed

    Said, S; Tamura, T; Gerdes, A M

    1998-09-01

    Changes in cardiac structure that depart from normal have generally been termed "remodeling". Assessment of ventricular remodeling at the cellular level should include measurement of myocyte dimensions. A well-established and reliable method to assess myocyte remodeling uses isolated cells and the Coulter Counter/Channelyzer system. The new Coulter Model Z2 has numerous modifications and improvements from the Model Z predecessor(s) interfaced to a pulse-height analyzer (e.g., channelyzer). Improvements of the Model Z2 over older instruments include: (i) elimination of the mercury manometer with accompanying oil-displacement pump; (ii) reduced size and weight; (iii) a higher degree of mechanization and automation; (iv) inclusion of an advanced comprehensive statistical package and (v) a substantial reduction in cost. The purpose of this study was to determine if the newly modified instrument produces the same results as the previous instrument combinations, which were shown to produce reliable cell volume data from irregularly shaped cells such as cardiac myocytes.

  19. Reactivation of hepatic EPO synthesis in mice after PHD loss.

    PubMed

    Minamishima, Yoji Andrew; Kaelin, William G

    2010-07-23

    The kidney controls erythropoietin production in adults, and the anemia that can accompany renal failure is a major medical problem. The liver controls erythropoietin production during fetal life but is silenced shortly after birth. Erythropoietin transcription is controlled by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), which is inhibited by three prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3). Systemic PHD2 inactivation has been found to increase renal, but not hepatic, erythropoietin production. In contrast, we show here that simultaneous genetic inactivation of all three PHD paralogs in mice reactivates hepatic erythropoietin production and stimulates red blood synthesis, suggesting that pan-PHD inhibitory drugs might be useful for the treatment of anemia caused by chronic kidney disease.

  20. Understanding Non-Traditional PhD Students Habitus--Implications for PhD Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Devika

    2015-01-01

    Against the background of vast changes in doctoral education and the emergence of non-traditional doctoral programmes, this paper investigates the habitus of non-traditional PhD students at a South African university. Bourdieu's conceptual tool of habitus informed the study. In-depth and open-ended interviews were conducted with 10 non-traditional…

  1. Understanding Non-Traditional PhD Students Habitus--Implications for PhD Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Devika

    2015-01-01

    Against the background of vast changes in doctoral education and the emergence of non-traditional doctoral programmes, this paper investigates the habitus of non-traditional PhD students at a South African university. Bourdieu's conceptual tool of habitus informed the study. In-depth and open-ended interviews were conducted with 10 non-traditional…

  2. Molecular Cloning of phd1 and Comparative Analysis of phd1, 2, and 3 Expression in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dandan; Wen, Luan; Chen, Yonglong

    2012-01-01

    Intensive gene targeting studies in mice have revealed that prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs) play important roles in murine embryonic development; however, the expression patterns and function of these genes during embryogenesis of other vertebrates remain largely unknown. Here we report the molecular cloning of phd1 and systematic analysis of phd1, phd2, and phd3 expression in embryos as well as adult tissues of Xenopus laevis. All three phds are maternally provided during Xenopus early development. The spatial expression patterns of phds genes in Xenopus embryos appear to define a distinct synexpression group. Frog phd2 and phd3 showed complementary expression in adult tissues with phd2 transcription levels being high in the eye, brain, and intestine, but low in the liver, pancreas, and kidney. On the contrary, expression levels of phd3 are high in the liver, pancreas, and kidney, but low in the eye, brain, and intestine. All three phds are highly expressed in testes, ovary, gall bladder, and spleen. Among three phds, phd3 showed strongest expression in heart. PMID:22645445

  3. Cellular oxygen sensing: Importins and exportins are mediators of intracellular localisation of prolyl-4-hydroxylases PHD1 and PHD2

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, Amrei; Pientka, Friederike Katharina; Moeckel, Sylvia; Kettelhake, Antje; Hartmann, Enno; Koehler, Matthias; Depping, Reinhard

    2009-10-02

    Hypoxia-inducible factors are crucial in the regulatory process of oxygen homeostasis of vertebrate cells. Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylation of HIF-{alpha} subunits by prolyl-hydroxylases (PHD1, PHD2 and PHD3) leads to transcription of a greater number of hypoxia responsive genes. We have investigated the subcellular distribution and the molecular mechanisms regulating the intracellular allocation of PHD1 and PHD2. As reported earlier we find PHD1 located exclusively in the nucleus. We demonstrate that nuclear import of PHD1 occurs importin {alpha}/{beta} dependently and relies on a nuclear localisation signal (NLS). By contrast PHD2 is cycling between nucleus and cytoplasm, and nuclear import seems to be independent of 'classical' importin {alpha}/{beta} receptors. Furthermore, we reveal that the exit of PHD2 from the nucleus requires CRM1 and the N-terminal 100 amino acids of the protein. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of the regulation of the oxygen sensor cascade of PHDs in different cellular compartments.

  4. Biomedical PhD education--an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Mulvany, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    The PhD, otherwise known as the doctor of philosophy or Dr. Phil., is an internationally recognized degree, indicating that the PhD graduate has received training in research under supervision. Traditionally, the PhD was the route to an academic career, with most successful PhD graduates receiving tenured university positions. However, over the past 20-30 years, and particularly the past 10 years, the situation has changed dramatically. Governments in many countries have invested massively in PhD education, believing that trained researchers will contribute to the 'knowledge society', and thus increase the competitiveness of their countries in the future economies of the world. Thus, only a small fraction of PhD graduates now end up in academic research. Yet, the PhD remains a research degree, and indeed, institutions have become heavily dependent on PhD students for their research output. The situation has thus created a paradox. On the one hand, it has become essential for institutions to have many PhD students and for the research performed to be of the highest level. On the other hand, the careers of PhD students are not necessarily going to be directly related to the research performed during their PhD studies. The purpose of this article is to explore how this seeming paradox is being addressed in biomedicine and to show that far from being inconsistent that the two aspects are in fact complementary. The article is based on the author's experience as Head of Aarhus Graduate School of Health Sciences 2002-2011 and his work with graduate schools across Europe and internationally through the organization ORPHEUS.

  5. A Renaissance in Engineering PhD Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akay, Adnan

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of engineering PhD education and its relationship to innovation and technology, and the need to reconsider how we educate PhD engineers. Much of the effort on engineering education in the last two decades focused on undergraduate education with a few exceptions that relate to master degree programs. Doctoral education…

  6. Research Collaboration and Commercialization: The PhD Candidate Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, Lawrence; Kenny, Breda

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores PhD students' perceptions of their entrepreneurial and commercial capabilities, their attitude towards university supports and the extent to which they engage in external collaboration. The study concentrated on current PhD researchers at one university in Ireland as a unit of analysis and provides encouraging evidence from the…

  7. The Undergraduate Origins of PhD Economists Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Wendy A.; Siegfried, John J.

    2015-01-01

    The authors update prior analyses of the undergraduate origins of individuals who earn a PhD in economics in the United States. They include the list of the top institutions worldwide graduating the largest number of undergraduates who subsequently earn an economics PhD from a U.S. university and lists of American institutions with the largest…

  8. The PhD Viva: A Space for Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Share, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the viva experiences of 87 social science PhD graduates from three Irish higher education institutions through a questionnaire that assessed outcome, preparation, conduct and post-viva. The majority were awarded their PhD with minor corrections, considered their viva as a summative assessment, and emphasised its purpose as…

  9. Tracking the PhD Students' Daily Computer Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sim, Kwong Nui; van der Meer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated PhD students' computer activities in their daily research practice. Software that tracks computer usage (Manic Time) was installed on the computers of nine PhD students, who were at their early, mid and final stage in doing their doctoral research in four different discipline areas (Commerce, Humanities, Health Sciences and…

  10. The Importance of Having a Ph.D., Career Advice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A presentation on the importance of having a PhD to motivate Initiative to Maximize Student Diversity Program (IMSD) undergrads towards conducting research, pursuing careers in the biomedical field, applying to grad school, and getting a Ph.D., based upon ARS scientist's experiences as a student, a ...

  11. The PhD Viva: A Space for Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Share, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the viva experiences of 87 social science PhD graduates from three Irish higher education institutions through a questionnaire that assessed outcome, preparation, conduct and post-viva. The majority were awarded their PhD with minor corrections, considered their viva as a summative assessment, and emphasised its purpose as…

  12. The Undergraduate Origins of PhD Economists Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Wendy A.; Siegfried, John J.

    2015-01-01

    The authors update prior analyses of the undergraduate origins of individuals who earn a PhD in economics in the United States. They include the list of the top institutions worldwide graduating the largest number of undergraduates who subsequently earn an economics PhD from a U.S. university and lists of American institutions with the largest…

  13. Research Collaboration and Commercialization: The PhD Candidate Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, Lawrence; Kenny, Breda

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores PhD students' perceptions of their entrepreneurial and commercial capabilities, their attitude towards university supports and the extent to which they engage in external collaboration. The study concentrated on current PhD researchers at one university in Ireland as a unit of analysis and provides encouraging evidence from the…

  14. Rethinking PhD Learning Incorporating Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shacham, Miri; Od-Cohen, Yehudit

    2009-01-01

    This paper grows from research which focuses on the learning characteristics of PhD students, incorporating communities of practice both during their studies and beyond completion of their PhD, and drawing on theories of adult learning and lifelong learning. It shows how professional discourse enhances academic discourse through student engagement…

  15. Evaluation of the new red cell parameters on Beckman Coulter DxH800 in distinguishing iron deficiency anaemia from thalassaemia trait.

    PubMed

    Ng, E H Y; Leung, J H W; Lau, Y S; Ma, E S K

    2015-04-01

    The new red blood cell (RBC) parameters such as reticulocyte haemoglobin content and percentage of hypochromic red cells or equivalent, although useful in the laboratory assessment of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), are confounded by thalassaemia trait (TT). We aim to evaluate the new red cell parameters on the Beckman Coulter DxH800 in distinguishing between IDA and TT. A total of 246 normal subjects, 102 patients with IDA and 115 subjects with TT were accrued for the study. The parameters studied were red blood cell size factor (RSF), low haemoglobin density (LHD%), microcytic anaemia factor (MAF), standard deviation of conductivity of the nonreticulocyte population (SD-C-NRET) and unghosted cell (UGC). Comparison between groups was performed by Student's t-test, and the diagnostic performance was determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Both the LHD% and RSF were significantly higher in IDA than TT, whereas MAF and SD-C-NRET were significantly lower. The SD-C-NRET showed the best diagnostic performance as a single parameter. A formula, [(RBC + Hb) × (HCT + SD-C-NRET)]/RDW-SD, was devised to distinguish between IDA and TT. With a cut-off value of 23, the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.995 (95% CI of 0.99-1.00), the sensitivity was 97%, and the specificity was 99.1%. The new RBC parameters on Beckman Coulter DxH800 provide useful information in distinguishing between IDA and TT, which is important for clinical decision-making and for streamlining laboratory testing. A new formula is devised that performs better than other discriminant functions in the literature. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Normal and homogeneous red blood cell populations over a wide range of hyper-iso-hypotonic media. III. Corrected volumes in Coulter Counter measurements.

    PubMed

    Mela, M; Eskelinen, S

    1984-12-01

    The volumes of human erythrocytes after rapid and gradual swelling in hypotonic NaCl media were measured using a Coulter Counter ZB at temperatures of +4 degrees C and +20 degrees C together with potassium leakage, the degree of hemolysis and the 'returning volume', i.e., the volume in an isotonic solution to which the cells will return from that in a hypotonic solution. The methodological and systematic errors in the volume measurements were corrected by taking into account the shape dependence of the Coulter Counter and the change in cell population during hemolysis, whereafter the measured cell volume values and the comparison between them become more reliable. The curves for cell volume as an inverse function of osmotic pressure appeared to be non-linear. The slopes were small at first but showed a rapid increase as the cells approached their maximal volume. The critical hemolytic volume was approx. 8% higher at +20 degrees C after both rapid and gradual swelling than at +4 degrees C and approx. 4% higher after a gradual swelling as compared with a rapid swelling both at +4 degrees C and +20 degrees C. A decrease in temperature resulted in an increase in the critical osmotic pressure both in rapid and gradual hemolysis, but did not greatly affect the amount of prelytic K+ leakage. The critical osmotic pressure was smaller in gradual hemolysis than in rapid hemolysis and the prelytic K+ leakage was doubled at both +4 degrees C and +20 degrees C. The shifts in osmotic fragility as a function of temperature may be due to differences in the visco-elastic properties of the cell membrane, but the shifts in osmotic fragility as a function of swelling rate may be connected with differences in potassium leakage and membrane stretch.

  17. Evaluation of the albumin cobalt binding (ACB) assay for measurement of ischaemia-modified albumin (IMA) on the Beckman Coulter LX-20.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Orla C; O'Sullivan, Jean; Ryan, John; Cunningham, Sean K

    2006-11-01

    In the presence of ischaemia, albumin undergoes changes resulting in the formation of ischaemia-modified albumin (IMA). Increased serum concentrations of IMA have been found in patients with myocardial ischaemia. The purpose of this study was threefold: to evaluate the albumin cobalt binding (ACB) assay for measurement of IMA on the Beckman Coulter LX-20; to establish a reference range for IMA; and to investigate the relationship between IMA and total albumin concentrations. The ACB assay was evaluated under the following headings: imprecision, accuracy and reliability. A reference range was established on a population of 81 healthy subjects. The within-batch coefficient of variation (CV) at IMA concentrations of 88, 99 and 120 KU/L were 1.4, 2.0 and 2.5%, respectively. The between-batch CVs at 74, 84 and 123 KU/L were 3.4, 3.3 and 3.0%, respectively. Comparison with the Cobas Mira Plus showed a mean negative bias of 7 KU/L. The 97.5th percentile established on our reference population was 110 KU/L. A significant inverse relationship was found between total serum albumin and IMA concentrations (r = -0.66, P < 0.0001). Correcting the IMA concentrations for total albumin in our reference population, using a formula devised in this study, yielded a range similar to that of uncorrected IMA. The ACB assay was found to have acceptable precision and performed very satisfactorily on the Beckman Coulter LX-20. A correction to measured IMA concentrations, to take into account total albumin concentrations, may need to be applied for the proper interpretation of IMA results.

  18. Young PHD's in Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Eleanor

    2002-01-01

    The Cooperating Hampton Roads Organizations for Minorities in Engineering (CHROME) in cooperation with the NASA Office of Space Flight, Human Exploration and Development of Space Enterprise sponsored a summer institute, Young PHD#s (Persons Having Dreams) in Human Space Flight. This 3-day institute used the curriculum of a workshop designed for space professionals, 'Human Space Flight-Analysis and Design: An Integrated, Systematic Approach.' The content was tailored to a high school audience. This institute seeks to stimulate the interest of pre-college students in space flight and motivate them to pursue further experiences in this field. Additionally, this institute will serve as a pilot model for a pre- collegiate training program that can be replicated throughout the country. The institute was complemented with a trip to the Goddard Space Flight Center.

  19. Young PHD's in Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Eleanor

    2002-01-01

    The Cooperating Hampton Roads Organizations for Minorities in Engineering (CHROME) in cooperation with the NASA Office of Space Flight, Human Exploration and Development of Space Enterprise sponsored a summer institute, Young PHD#s (Persons Having Dreams) in Human Space Flight. This 3-day institute used the curriculum of a workshop designed for space professionals, 'Human Space Flight-Analysis and Design: An Integrated, Systematic Approach.' The content was tailored to a high school audience. This institute seeks to stimulate the interest of pre-college students in space flight and motivate them to pursue further experiences in this field. Additionally, this institute will serve as a pilot model for a pre- collegiate training program that can be replicated throughout the country. The institute was complemented with a trip to the Goddard Space Flight Center.

  20. ['Sandwich PhD': considerations for a successful experience abroad].

    PubMed

    Salvetti, Marina de Goes; Bueno, Mariana; Gastaldo, Denise; Kimura, Amélia Fumiko; Pimenta, Cibele Andrucioli de Mattos

    2013-03-01

    International PhD internship, named "Sandwich PhD" in Brazil is an opportunity to improve research abilities, to become known in academic area and to establish and/or increase work opportunities in an international context. In this article, we describe key factors regarding the planning and development of the "Sandwich PhD" as experienced by professors and students involved in the collaboration between the School of Nursing, University of São Paulo and Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Canada. We also present the participation of PhD students' network as an alternative to the "Sandwich PhD". An international experience, when well-planned and developed correctly, promotes students' personal and professional development and favors the internationalization of Brazilian graduate programs and research groups.

  1. Launching a Geoscience Career: Insights Gained from MS PHD'S Beyond the PhD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, W. I.; Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Jansma, P. E.; Huggans, M. J.; Ricciardi, L.

    2013-05-01

    The Beyond the PhD (B-PhD) Professional Development Program is the newest addition to the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S®) Professional Development Program in Earth System Science. This exciting new program is designed to facilitate the development of a new community of underrepresented minority (URM) doctoral candidates and recent doctorate degree recipients in Earth system science (ESS)-related fields. Building upon MS PHD'S extensive professional development activities provided to URM undergraduate and graduate students, B-PhD's vision is to encourage and support URM doctoral students and early career PhD's in becoming part of the global workforce. (Since its inception in 2003, MSPHD'S supports 213 participants of which 42 have achieved the doctoral degree and another 71 are enrolled in doctoral programs.) By providing customized support and advocacy for participants, B-PhD facilitates smoother and informed transitions from graduate school to postdoctoral and tenure-track positions, as well as other "first" jobs in academia, government, industry, and non-profit organizations. In 2011, the first conference for 18 doctoral candidate and recent graduates was hosted at the University of Texas at Arlington's (UTA) College of Science. Using a format of guest speakers, brown bag discussions, and interactive breakout sessions, participants engaged in sessions entitled "Toolkits for Success in Academia, Business and Industry, Federal Government and Non-Profits", "Defining Short, Mid and Long Term Career Goals", "Accessing and Refining Skill Sets and Other Door Openers", "International Preparation and Opportunities", "Paying it Forward/Lifting as You Climb", and "Customized Strategies for Next Steps". This presentation will discuss outcomes from this pilot project, the use of social media to track and support ongoing B-PhD activities, and objectives for future B-PhD workshops.

  2. Italia-Netherland PhD Program: the I.O. PhD Research Program.

    PubMed

    Bellissima, Valentina; Borghesi, Alessandro; Bozzetti, Valentina; Dessì, Angelica; Fabiano, Adele; Risso, Francesco M; Salvo, Vincenzo; Satriano, Angela; Silvagni, Davide; Varrica, Alessandro; van Bel, Frank; Visser, Gerard H A; Vles, Hans Js; Zimmermann, Luc J I; Gavilanes, Antonio D W; Gazzolo, Diego

    2011-10-01

    In the framework of long-term scientific collaboration among the founder members coming from Holland and Italy there was a growing consensus to activate a philosophical doctorate (PhD) program, involving young Italian researchers in the field of perinatal medicine, neonatology and pediatrics. The aims were to promote excellence in research, offering to young Italian physicians the opportunity to maturate an International research experience leading to PhD degree, and to promote human and technological improvement energies in perinatal, neonatal and pediatrics research. Thus, an official collaboration among the Dutch Universities from Maastricht and Utrecht and the Italian Children's Hospital from Alessandria, has been activated on March 1st 2010, finalized to the PhD program. The experimental phase included the selection of projects and relative candidates after an interview-selection focusing on their scientific attitudes and the availability on their research projects. Candidates' selection started on May 2010 and on September 29th ten projects and candidates have been approved by the scientific commission. Research topics included: perinatal asphyxia, aging and the origin of adulthood neurodegenerative disease, neuroprotective strategies, biochemical pulmonology, intrauterine growth retardation and perinatal teratology. To date, all projects have been approved by local Ethics Committee from the University/Hospital of origin of the candidates. Five manuscripts have been published and/or submitted to international Journals regarding pneumology, perinatal asphyxia and teratology, whilst about 60-70% of data regarding clinical studies have already been collected.

  3. Innovation in Learning: PhD and DNP Student Collaborations.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2017-09-01

    Working together, PhD and Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) students can advance knowledge creation and the translation of knowledge into practice. Although different in purpose and education, PhD and DNP programs should prepare students to collaborate throughout their careers. This article describes an innovative pilot project that partnered PhD and DNP students during their graduate programs. Group meetings were used to facilitate collaboration among 12 PhD and DNP students interested in pain management. Using a five-stage collaboration process model, students worked together on dissertation and capstone projects. PhD and DNP students collaborated on the completion of dissertation and capstone projects, as well as on publications and presentations. A case example of an effective partnership is included. Partnering of PhD and DNP students can further the development of new nursing knowledge and evidence-based practice. Successful collaboration can be facilitated by PhD and DNP faculty. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(9):556-559.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Meet EPA Engineer Shawn Ryan, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Shawn Ryan, Ph.D. is a chemical engineer at EPA's National Homeland Security Research Center. He has worked at EPA for 12 years, nine of which have been devoted to leading research to support decontamination and consequence management.

  5. Meet EPA Scientist Heriberto Cabezas, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Heriberto Cabezas, Ph.D. is currently the Senior Science Advisor to the Sustainable Technology Division in EPA's National Risk Management Research Lab, where he works to advance the application of science and technologies to address sustainability.

  6. Meet EPA Environmental Engineer Terra Haxton, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA Environmental Engineer Terra Haxton, Ph.D., uses computer simulation models to protect drinking water. She investigates approaches to help water utilities be better prepared to respond to contamination incidents in their distribution systems.

  7. Meet EPA Scientist Tim Shafer, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Tim Shafer earned his bachelor’s degree in biology and chemistry from Hope College in Holland, MI, in 1986 and his Ph.D. in pharmacology and environmental toxicology from Michigan State University in 1991.

  8. Meet EPA Biologist Laura Jackson, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Research Biologist Laura Jackson, Ph.D., has worked for the EPA for 22 years, leading research initiatives in a diversity of disciplines, including environmental monitoring, land use planning, and the impacts that urbanization has on an area's ecology

  9. Meet EPA Scientist Susan Yee, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Susan Yee, Ph.D., is an ecologist at EPA's Gulf Ecology Division. She is working on the Puerto Rico Sustainable Communities program, developing decision support tools to evaluate how alternative decisions impact coastal ecosystem goods and services

  10. Meet EPA Scientist Michael Nye, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Michael Nye, Ph.D., is a social scientist who studies natural risk, socio-demographic change and sustainable behavior. Prior to joining EPA, he worked for the UK Environment Agency in flood risk management and emergency preparedness

  11. Meet EPA Microbiologist Eric Villegas, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Eric Villegas, Ph.D. is a research microbiologist in EPA's Office of Research and Development. His recent work focuses on next generation sequencing technology to better understand risks associated with waterborne parasites.

  12. Ashley Felix, Ph.D., M.P.H.

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) alumna, Ashley Felix, Ph.D., M.P.H., details her transition from pre-med student to an epidemiologist who focuses on studying the causes and prevention of disease.

  13. Meet EPA Scientist Dermont Bouchard, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA Scientist Dermont Bouchard, Ph.D., is working to better understand how tiny nanomaterials might be released into the environment. His research helps regulators and other decision-makers lower risks and better protect human health and the environment

  14. Meet EPA Scientist Valerie Zartarian, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Senior exposure scientist and research environmental engineer Valerie Zartarian, Ph.D. helps build computer models and other tools that advance our understanding of how people interact with chemicals.

  15. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  16. Meet EPA Chemist Linda Sheldon, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Environmental chemist Linda Sheldon, Ph.D, is the Associate Director for Human Heath in the National Exposure Research Laboratory. She studies environmental exposure, particularly focusing on children's environments and their contact with chemicals.

  17. Meet EPA Natural Resource Economist Marisa Mazzotta, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Marisa Mazzotta, Ph.D. currently works as an Economist at EPA's Atlantic Ecology Division. Her research focuses on the public's valuation and prioritization of natural resources, and the relationship between ecological changes and economic benefits.

  18. Meet EPA Scientist Jody Shoemaker, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA research chemist Jody Shoemaker, Ph.D., works to support Agency efforts to protect drinking water. She helps develop methods for analyzing organic chemicals on the Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL).

  19. Meet EPA Scientist Blake Schaeffer, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA research ecologist Blake Schaeffer, Ph.D. focuses on ways to use satellite remote sensing technology to monitor water quality. His research interests broadly include deriving water quality parameters in coasts, estuaries, and lakes using satellites

  20. Meet EPA Chemist Quincy Teng, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA research chemist Quincy Teng, Ph.D., focuses on the application of metabolomics—a relatively new, specialized field of biochemistry focused on studying small molecules known as metabolites—on environmental and life sciences.

  1. Meet EPA Biologist Mitch Kostich, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA biologist, Mitch Kostich, Ph.D., conducts research to identify risks from exposures to chemical contaminants in water. His research uses technologies to prioritize contaminants in the environment based on the potential risks they pose to life

  2. Meet EPA Scientist Jeff Szabo, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA scientist Jeff Szabo, Ph.D., has worked for the EPA’s National Homeland Security Research Center since 2005. He conducts and manages water security research projects at EPA’s Test and Evaluation facility.

  3. Meet EPA Ecologist Paul Mayer, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA ecologist Paul Mayer, Ph.D. works in EPA's Groundwater and Ecosystem Restoration division where he studies riparian zones (the area along rivers and streams where the habitats are influenced by both the land and water) and stream restoration

  4. Meet EPA Scientist Jordan West, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Jordan West, Ph.D. is an aquatic ecologist at EPA. Her areas of expertise include freshwater & marine ecology, climate change impacts and adaptation, resilience and threshold theory, environmental risk assessment, expert elicitation & stakeholder processes

  5. NMR Structure Note: PHD Domain from Human SHPRH

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Luciana E. F.; Pustovalova, Yulia; Kile, Andrew C.; Pozhidaeva, Alexandra; Cimprich, Karlene A.; Almeida, Fabio C. L.; Bezsonova, Irina; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.

    2013-01-01

    SHPRH (SNF2, histone linker, PHD, RING, helicase) is a SWI2/SNF2-family ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factor, and one of E3 ubiquitin ligases responsible for Ubc13-Mms2-dependent K63 poly-ubiquitination of PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) that promotes error-free DNA damage tolerance in eukaryotes. In contrast to its functional homologues, S. cerevisiae Rad5 and human HLTF (helicase like transcription factor), SHPRH contains a PHD (plant homeodomain) finger embedded in the ‘minor’ insert region of the core helicase-like domain. PHD fingers are often found in proteins involved in chromatin remodeling and transcription regulation, and are generally considered as ‘readers’ of methylation state of histone tails, primarily the lysine 4 (K4) residue of histone H3 (H3K4). Here we report the solution NMR structure of the SHPRH PHD domain and investigate whether this domain is capable of recognizing H3K4 modifications. The domain adopts a canonical PHD-finger fold with a central two-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet flanked on both sides by the two interleaved zinc-binding sites. Despite the presence of a subset of aromatic residues characteristic for PHD-fingers that preferentially bind methylated H3K4, NMR titration experiments reveal that SHPRH PHD does not specifically interact with the H3-derived peptides irrespective of K4 methylation. This result suggests that the SHPRH PHD domain might have evolved a different function other than recognizing histone modifications. PMID:23907177

  6. The PhD in Writing Accompanied by an Exegesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Josie

    2005-01-01

    The position of this paper is to further the discussion on what constitutes academic assessment in the PhD by artefact and exegesis. In doing so, it explores some of the ideas that arose in setting up the PhD in creative writing at Swinburne University of Technology. Thus, I: (1) survey some of the questions that arise about the journeys made by…

  7. Structural insight into histone recognition by the ING PHD fingers.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Karen S; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2009-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Growth (ING) tumor suppressors are implicated in oncogenesis, control of DNA damage repair, cellular senescence and apoptosis. All members of the ING family contain unique amino-terminal regions and a carboxy-terminal plant homeodomain (PHD) finger. While the amino-terminal domains associate with a number of protein effectors including distinct components of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes, the PHD finger binds strongly and specifically to histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3). In this review we describe the molecular mechanism of H3K4me3 recognition by the ING1-5 PHD fingers, analyze the determinants of the histone specificity and compare the biological activities and structures within subsets of PHD fingers. The atomic-resolution structures of the ING PHD fingers in complex with a H3K4me3 peptide reveal that the histone tail is bound in a large and deep binding site encompassing nearly one-third of the protein surface. An extensive network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic and cation-pi contacts, and complementary surface interactions coordinate the first six residues of the H3K4me3 peptide. The trimethylated Lys4 occupies an elongated groove, formed by the highly conserved aromatic and hydrophobic residues of the PHD finger, whereas the adjacent groove accommodates Arg2. The two grooves are connected by a narrow channel, the small size of which defines the PHD finger's specificity, excluding interactions with other modified histone peptides. Binding of the ING PHD fingers to H3K4me3 plays a critical role in regulating chromatin acetylation. The ING proteins function as tethering molecules that physically link the HDAC and HAT enzymatic complexes to chromatin. In this review we also highlight progress recently made in understanding the molecular basis underlying biological and tumorigenic activities of the ING tumor suppressors.

  8. Cardiopulmonary phenotype associated with human PHD2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Nick P; Smith, Thomas G; Balanos, George M; Dorrington, Keith L; Maxwell, Patrick H; Robbins, Peter A

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen-dependent regulation of the erythropoietin gene is mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family of transcription factors. When oxygen is plentiful, HIF undergoes hydroxylation by a family of oxygen-dependent prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) proteins, promoting its association with the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) ubiquitin E3 ligase and subsequent proteosomal degradation. When oxygen is scarce, the PHD enzymes are inactivated, leading to HIF accumulation and upregulation not only of erythropoietin expression, but also the expression of hundreds of other genes, including those coordinating cardiovascular and ventilatory adaptation to hypoxia. Nevertheless, despite the identification of over 50 mutations in the PHD-HIF-VHL pathway in patients with previously unexplained congenital erythrocytosis, there are very few reports of associated cardiopulmonary abnormalities. We now report exaggerated pulmonary vascular and ventilatory responses to acute hypoxia in a 35-year-old man with erythrocytosis secondary to heterozygous mutation in PHD2, the most abundant of the PHD isoforms. We compare this phenotype with that reported in patients with the archetypal disorder of cellular oxygen sensing, Chuvash polycythemia, and discuss the possible clinical implications of our findings, particularly in the light of the emerging role for small molecule PHD inhibitors in clinical practice.

  9. Automated five-part white blood cell differential counts. Efficiency of software-generated white blood cell suspect flags of the hematology analyzers Sysmex SE-9000, Sysmex NE-8000, and Coulter STKS.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer-Scherrer, R; Knöbl, P; Korninger, L; Schwarzinger, I

    1997-06-01

    The present study evaluates the efficiency of software-generated white blood cell (WBC) "suspect flags" of the hematology analyzers Sysmex SE-9000, Sysmex NE-8000, and Coulter STKS. Automated WBC differential counts were considered positive if they contained any suspect WBC flag indicating the presence of blasts, myeloid precursor cells, or abnormal lymphocytes. Reference differential counts were performed by microscopic examination of 400 WBCs per sample. After comparison to the reference method, automated differential counts were classified as true-positive, true-negative, false-positive, and false-negative. The flagging efficiency of analyzers was expressed as a percentage of subjects correctly classified. Four hundred sixty-seven blood samples were randomly chosen for comparison analysis from various inpatient and outpatient departments of the Vienna university hospital, Austria. The efficiency rates of flagging for the presence of > or = 1% abnormal WBCs were 78% (SE-9000), 77% (NE-8000), and 72% (Coulter STKS). The flagging efficiencies were best for samples with normal WBC counts. With regard to the specific suspect flags, the flagging of blast cells was most efficient on all analyzers. Our results demonstrate the comparable overall performance of three analyzers, SE-9000, NE-8000, and Coulter STKS. They further underscore the importance of critical interpretation of automated differential counts, because at a detection limit of > or = 1% abnormal WBCs > 20% of samples were not correctly flagged by either analyzer.

  10. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2008-02-01

    In an effort to encourage self-regulation of the astronomy job market, I examine the supply of, and demand for, astronomers over time. On the supply side, I document the production rate of Ph.D. astronomers from 1970 to 2006 using the UMI Dissertation Abstracts database, along with data from other independent sources. I compare the long-term trends in Ph.D. production with federal astronomy research funding over the same time period, and I demonstrate that additional funding is correlated with higher subsequent Ph.D. production. On the demand side, I monitor the changing patterns of employment using statistics about the number and types of jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register from 1984 to 2006. Finally, I assess the sustainability of the job market by normalizing this demand by the annual Ph.D. production. The most recent data suggest that there are now annual advertisements for about one postdoctoral job, half a faculty job, and half a research/support position for every new domestic Ph.D. recipient in astronomy and astrophysics. The average new astronomer might expect to hold up to 3 jobs before finding a steady position.

  11. Cubature Information SMC-PHD for Multi-Target Tracking.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Wang, Zulin; Xu, Mai

    2016-05-09

    In multi-target tracking, the key problem lies in estimating the number and states of individual targets, in which the challenge is the time-varying multi-target numbers and states. Recently, several multi-target tracking approaches, based on the sequential Monte Carlo probability hypothesis density (SMC-PHD) filter, have been presented to solve such a problem. However, most of these approaches select the transition density as the importance sampling (IS) function, which is inefficient in a nonlinear scenario. To enhance the performance of the conventional SMC-PHD filter, we propose in this paper two approaches using the cubature information filter (CIF) for multi-target tracking. More specifically, we first apply the posterior intensity as the IS function. Then, we propose to utilize the CIF algorithm with a gating method to calculate the IS function, namely CISMC-PHD approach. Meanwhile, a fast implementation of the CISMC-PHD approach is proposed, which clusters the particles into several groups according to the Gaussian mixture components. With the constructed components, the IS function is approximated instead of particles. As a result, the computational complexity of the CISMC-PHD approach can be significantly reduced. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of our approaches.

  12. The Training and Work of Ph.D. Physical Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.; Schweitzer, A. E.

    2003-05-01

    Doctoral education has often been viewed as the pinnacle of the formal education system. How useful is doctoral training in one's later career? In an NSF-funded project, we set out to perform a study of the training, careers, and work activities of Ph.D. physical scientists. The study included both in-depth interviews and a survey sent out to a sample of Ph.D. holders 4-8 years after graduation. Come and find out the results of this study: What skills are most Ph.D. physical scientists using? What should graduate programs be teaching? Are Ph.D.'s who are working in their specific field of training happier than their counterparts working different jobs? What skills and preparation lead to future job satisfaction, perhaps the most important indicator of the "success" of graduate education? A preprint and further details can be found at the project web site at: spot.colorado.edu/ phdcarer.

  13. Dido3 PHD Modulates Cell Differentiation and Division

    PubMed Central

    Gatchalian, Jovylyn; Fütterer, Agnes; Rothbart, Scott B.; Tong, Qiong; Rincon-Arano, Hector; de Diego, Ainhoa Sánchez; Groudine, Mark; Strahl, Brian D.; Martínez-A, Carlos; van Wely, Karel H.M.; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Death Inducer Obliterator 3 (Dido3) is implicated in the maintenance of stem cell genomic stability and tumorigenesis. Here, we show that Dido3 regulates the expression of stemness genes in embryonic stem cells through its plant homeodomain (PHD) finger. Binding of Dido3 PHD to histone H3K4me3 is disrupted by threonine phosphorylation that triggers Dido3 translocation from chromatin to the mitotic spindle. The crystal structure of Dido3 PHD in complex with H3K4me3 reveals an atypical aromatic-cage-like binding site that contains a histidine residue. Biochemical, structural, and mutational analyses of the binding mechanism identified the determinants of specificity and affinity and explained the inability of homologous PHF3 to bind H3K4me3. Together, our findings reveal a link between the transcriptional control in embryonic development and regulation of cell division. PMID:23831028

  14. An analysis of Ph.D. examiners' reports in engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Elena; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing calls for an overall transformation of the nature of engineering Ph.D. programs and the way theses are assessed. There exists a need to understand the examination process to ensure the best quality outcome for candidates in engineering. The work we present in this paper uses data collected between 2003 and 2010 for a total of 1220 Australian Ph.D. theses by analysing examiner reports. Our analysis indicates that Ph.D. theses in engineering, N = 106, differ considerably from those in other fields in areas such as gender of candidates and examiners and the examiners' geographical location. We also found that assessment areas such as significance and contribution of the thesis, publications arising from the thesis, breadth, depth and recency of the literature review and communication and editorial correctness are areas in which the proportion of text of engineering examiners' comments differs significantly from other fields.

  15. Mid-Career PhD Physicists: Academia & Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Susan

    2017-01-01

    What jobs do mid-career PhD physicists hold? In a first-ever study, we collected data in 2011 from over 1,500 physics PhD recipients from the classes of 1996, 1997, 2000, and 2001. About 45% of the physics PhD recipients in these classes immediately took jobs that were not temporary, and over 40% accepted postdocs. How does taking a postdoc affect mid-career employment? What is the relationship between first job (after any postdocs) and mid-career employment? How do physicists' actual jobs compare with what they thought they would be doing when they graduated? Using our initial employment and mid-career data, I will answer these questions and more.

  16. Harvard College Observatory: Shapley's Factory for PhD Degrees?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welther, B. L.

    2000-12-01

    When Harlow Shapley assumed the Directorship of Harvard College Observatory in 1921, there was no program in place there to train the next generation of astronomers. In 1923, using the Pickering Fund for women assistants, Shapley hired a young English woman, Cecilia Payne, to work on stellar spectra. Just two short years later, Payne completed her research and wrote a celebrated thesis on stellar atmospheres. Because Harvard University was not prepared to confer a PhD degree on a woman at that time, Payne presented her thesis to Radcliffe College. Thus, in 1925 she became the first person to receive a PhD in astronomy for a research project at HCO. By 1933, a PhD in Astronomy had been conferred on eight graduate students who had undertaken research projects at HCO: four men who received their degree from Harvard, and four women, from Radcliffe. In subsequent years, however, the equal distribution of degrees for men and women quickly changed. When the 30th degree was bestowed in 1943, only 10 of the candidates were women. By 1955, when the 60th degree was conferred, only 14 women had received a PhD. In just two decades, then, the ratio of women astronomers had steadily dropped from a solid 50% at the height of the Shapley era to slightly less than 25% at his retirement. Also, until the mid-1960s, the women astronomers still had to apply to Radcliffe for their PhD degrees. This paper will briefly examine the funding and research topics of some of the HCO PhD candidates in the Shapley Era (1921-1955). It will also highlight some of their subsequent contributions to 20th-century American Astronomy.

  17. Interview Scheduling Strategies of New Ph.D. Economists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    List, John A.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the factors that affect procuring job interviews for new Ph.D. economists. Used a data set from the personal surveys of a cohort of first-time job seekers who attended the 1997 American Economic Association (AEA) meeting in New Orleans (Louisiana). States that estimation results suggest a heterogeneity in the interview decision across…

  18. An Analysis of Ph.D. Examiners' Reports in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Elena; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing calls for an overall transformation of the nature of engineering Ph.D. programs and the way theses are assessed. There exists a need to understand the examination process to ensure the best quality outcome for candidates in engineering. The work we present in this paper uses data collected between 2003…

  19. Asad Umar, DVM, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Asad Umar received his PhD in Biochemistry and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, in 1993. He conducted his postdoctoral training in the laboratories of Patricia Gearhart in Baltimore, MD and Thomas Kunkel at the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences in Research Triangle Park, NC. Dr. |

  20. Richard Mazurchuk, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Richard Mazurchuk received a BS in Physics and MS and PhD in Biophysics from SUNY Buffalo. His research focused on developing novel multi-modality imaging techniques, contrast (enhancing) agents and methods to assess the efficacy of experimental therapeutics. |

  1. Robert Shoemaker, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Robert Shoemaker obtained his PhD in human genetics from the Graduate School of Public Health of the University of Pittsburgh in 1975. Following postdoctoral experience at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology he moved to the Children's Hospital Medical Center of Akron. His research on pediatric tumors led to an interest in the genetics of drug resistance and new drug discovery. |

  2. Peer Mentorship and Transformational Learning: PhD Student Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jane P.; Ogenchuk, Marcella J.; Nsiah, Joseph K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to describe our peer mentorship experiences and explain how these experiences fostered transformational learning during our PhD graduate program in educational administration. As a literature backdrop, we discuss characteristics of traditional forms of mentorship and depict how our experiences of peer mentorship was…

  3. Gender Differences in Research Patterns among PhD Economists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbezat, Debra A.

    2006-01-01

    This study is based on a 1996 survey of PhD economists working in the academic and nonacademic sectors since 1989. Despite a raw gender difference in all types of research output, the male dummy variable proves statistically significant in predicting only one publication measure. In a full sample and faculty subsample, number of years since…

  4. Vance Berger, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Vance Berger completed his PhD in statistics at Rutgers University in 1995, and then began working at the FDA. This is where he developed his research focus on biases and threats to the validity of medical studies, especially clinical trials. In 1999, Dr. Berger joined the NCI, and has remained ever since. |

  5. How Broad Liberal Arts Training Produces Phd Economists: Carleton's Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourne, Jenny; Grawe, Nathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Several recent studies point to strong performance in economics PhD programs of graduates from liberal arts colleges. While every undergraduate program is unique and the likelihood of selection bias combines with small sample sizes to caution against drawing strong conclusions, the authors reflect on their experience at Carleton College to…

  6. Christos Patriotis, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Christos Patriotis obtained his MSc in Biochemistry from the University of Sofia, Bulgaria in 1985 and his PhD in Molecular Biology from the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences in 1990. Postdoctoral training focused on signal transduction and tumor cell biology. |

  7. Measures for Ph.D. Evaluation: The Recruitment Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, Antonella; Fruzzetti, Stefania; Ghellini, Giulio; Neri, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In the last years the quality of Higher Education (HE) system and its evaluation have been key issues of the political and scientific debate on education policies all over Europe. In the wide landscape that involves the entire HE system we draw attention on the third level of its organization, i.e. the Ph.D. In particular, this paper discusses the…

  8. Meet EPA Ecologist Michael Murrell, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Michael Murrel, Ph.D., is a EPA research ecologist working on the Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Project, helping develop models of the northern Gulf to quantify the links between freshwater flowing into the Gulf from the land, nutrients, and hypoxia—“dead zones”

  9. An Analysis of Ph.D. Examiners' Reports in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Elena; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing calls for an overall transformation of the nature of engineering Ph.D. programs and the way theses are assessed. There exists a need to understand the examination process to ensure the best quality outcome for candidates in engineering. The work we present in this paper uses data collected between 2003…

  10. How Broad Liberal Arts Training Produces Phd Economists: Carleton's Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourne, Jenny; Grawe, Nathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Several recent studies point to strong performance in economics PhD programs of graduates from liberal arts colleges. While every undergraduate program is unique and the likelihood of selection bias combines with small sample sizes to caution against drawing strong conclusions, the authors reflect on their experience at Carleton College to…

  11. Promoting Creativity in PhD Supervision: Tensions and Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitelock, Denise; Faulkner, Dorothy; Miell, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the processes of collaborative creativity are just as important within the sociocultural context of PhD supervisory practice, as they are in other organizational and educational settings. In order to test this claim a series of interviews with supervisors and students were undertaken to uncover the pedagogic processes…

  12. PHD2 regulates arteriogenic macrophages through TIE2 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Alexander; Veschini, Lorenzo; Takeda, Yukiji; Costa, Sandra; Delamarre, Estelle; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Henze, Anne-Theres; Wenes, Mathias; Serneels, Jens; Pucci, Ferdinando; Roncal, Carmen; Anisimov, Andrey; Alitalo, Kari; De Palma, Michele; Mazzone, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Occlusion of the main arterial route redirects blood flow to the collateral circulation. We previously reported that macrophages genetically modified to express low levels of prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) display an arteriogenic phenotype, which promotes the formation of collateral vessels and protects the skeletal muscle from ischaemic necrosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that femoral artery occlusion induces a switch in macrophage phenotype through angiopoietin-1 (ANG1)-mediated Phd2 repression. ANG blockade by a soluble trap prevented the downregulation of Phd2 expression in macrophages and their phenotypic switch, thus inhibiting collateral growth. ANG1-dependent Phd2 repression initiated a feed-forward loop mediated by the induction of the ANG receptor TIE2 in macrophages. Gene silencing and cell depletion strategies demonstrate that TIE2 induction in macrophages is required to promote their proarteriogenic functions, enabling collateral vessel formation following arterial obstruction. These results indicate an indispensable role for TIE2 in sustaining in situ programming of macrophages to a proarteriogenic, M2-like phenotype, suggesting possible new venues for the treatment of ischaemic disorders. PMID:23616286

  13. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2007-05-01

    As in many sciences, the production rate of new Ph.D. astronomers is decoupled from the global demand for trained scientists. As noted by Thronson (1991, PASP, 103, 90), overproduction appears to be built into the system, making the mathematical formulation of surplus astronomer production similar to that for industrial pollution models -- an unintended side effect of the process. Following Harris (1994, ASP Conf., 57, 12), I document the production of Ph.D. astronomers from 1990 to 2005 using the online Dissertation Abstracts database. To monitor the changing patterns of employment, I examine the number of postdoctoral, tenure-track, and other jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register during this same period. Although the current situation is clearly unsustainable, it was much worse a decade ago with nearly 7 new Ph.D. astronomers in 1995 for every new tenure-track job. While the number of new permanent positions steadily increased throughout the late 1990's, the number of new Ph.D. recipients gradually declined. After the turn of the century, the production of new astronomers leveled off, but new postdoctoral positions grew dramatically. There has also been recent growth in the number of non-tenure-track lecturer, research, and support positions. This is just one example of a larger cultural shift to temporary employment that is happening throughout society -- it is not unique to astronomy.

  14. Supervising the PhD: A Guide to Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delamont, Sara; Atkinson, Paul; Parry, Odette

    This handbook is a practical guide for the novice and experienced supervisor of Ph.D. students focusing on the British system. The book is organized to follow the progress of a student from starting out to a career after the viva voce examination. The chapters are: (1) "A Most Persuasive Piece of Argument"; (2) "Caught and Held by a…

  15. Online Ph.D. Program Delivery Models and Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorissen, Shari L.; Keen, James P.; Riedel, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide information to an online university that offers Ph.D. programs in three formats: knowledge area modules (or KAM, a type of faculty-led, self-directed doctoral study), course-based model, and mixed model (a combination of the KAM and course-based models). The investigators sought to determine why students…

  16. The PhD Project: How Successful Is It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Bill N.; Williams, Satina V.; Walden, W. Darrell

    2011-01-01

    The PhD Project's mission to diversify the work force by increasing the diversity of business school faculty is quite admirable, but is the Project successful? To gather insights toward responding to that question and to offer suggestions, we reviewed three of the Project's objectives that relate most closely to minority doctoral students and…

  17. Gender Differences in Research Patterns among PhD Economists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbezat, Debra A.

    2006-01-01

    This study is based on a 1996 survey of PhD economists working in the academic and nonacademic sectors since 1989. Despite a raw gender difference in all types of research output, the male dummy variable proves statistically significant in predicting only one publication measure. In a full sample and faculty subsample, number of years since…

  18. Do We Need Incentives for PhD Supervisors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadowski, Dieter; Schneider, Peter; Thaller, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    This article presents empirical results of explorative case studies that examine whether the New Public Management mechanisms have improved the academic performance of PhD education in selected German and European economics departments. Our data rely on document analyses of organisational variables and in-depth semi-structured interviews with…

  19. Karl Krueger, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Karl Krueger received a PhD in biochemistry from Vanderbilt University and continued his research training at NIH as a postdoctoral fellow before joining the faculty at Georgetown University School of Medicine. His research throughout this period focused on different aspects of drug receptors and their role in the nervous system. |

  20. Supervising the PhD: A Guide to Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delamont, Sara; Atkinson, Paul; Parry, Odette

    This handbook is a practical guide for the novice and experienced supervisor of Ph.D. students focusing on the British system. The book is organized to follow the progress of a student from starting out to a career after the viva voce examination. The chapters are: (1) "A Most Persuasive Piece of Argument"; (2) "Caught and Held by a…

  1. PhD Students, Interculturality, Reflexivity, Community and Internationalisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Interviews with a small group of doctoral students at a British university indicate that the students feel that the programme provides an environment within which they develop interculturality through reflexive engagement with the PhD community and in some cases with the participants in their research. Significant here is that they are…

  2. Undertaking Individual Transdisciplinary PhD Research for Sustainable Development: Case Studies from South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Breda, John; Musango, Josephine; Brent, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to improve the understanding of individual transdisciplinary PhD research in a developing country context, focusing on three individual PhD case studies in South Africa. Design/Methodology/Approach: Multiple-case method was used, and three completed transdisciplinary PhD research efforts undertaken at the Stellenbosch…

  3. International PhD Students in Australian Universities: Financial Support, Course Experience and Career Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, G.

    2003-01-01

    Using data from a social survey of PhD students in two major Australian universities supplemented by student interviews, this article reports on the financial support, course experience and career plans of international PhD students. While most international PhD students hold scholarships which include stipends, a minority of students experience…

  4. Undertaking Individual Transdisciplinary PhD Research for Sustainable Development: Case Studies from South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Breda, John; Musango, Josephine; Brent, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to improve the understanding of individual transdisciplinary PhD research in a developing country context, focusing on three individual PhD case studies in South Africa. Design/Methodology/Approach: Multiple-case method was used, and three completed transdisciplinary PhD research efforts undertaken at the Stellenbosch…

  5. Trust Me, I'm a Doctor: A PhD Survival Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deconinck, Koen

    2015-01-01

    So, you have decided to do a PhD … now what? In this essay, the author provides some advice for beginning PhD students, basically sharing what he would tell his younger self. Doing a PhD is a transformative experience, but the process is challenging, not merely on an intellectual level but also psychologically. To overcome these challenges, one…

  6. Developing Discourses of Knowledge and Understanding: Longitudinal Studies of Ph.D. Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandiko, Camille B.; Kinchin, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    Competing notions of what a Ph.D. has been, is and should be are undercurrents in doctoral education. A longitudinal study of Ph.D. supervision based on interviews and concept mapping was used to surface understandings of the purpose of a Ph.D. This research tracks change over time for both the student and the supervisor. The data were analysed…

  7. International PhD Students in Australian Universities: Financial Support, Course Experience and Career Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, G.

    2003-01-01

    Using data from a social survey of PhD students in two major Australian universities supplemented by student interviews, this article reports on the financial support, course experience and career plans of international PhD students. While most international PhD students hold scholarships which include stipends, a minority of students experience…

  8. "A 'Problem' to Be Managed?" Completing a PhD in the Arts and Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owler, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Driven largely by efficiency imperatives, many universities have come to adopt a managerialist approach to research over the last several years. University administrators have become actively concerned with the traditionally long times taken to complete a PhD and high attrition rates. Consequently, the PhD, and PhD students' experience of struggle…

  9. Trust Me, I'm a Doctor: A PhD Survival Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deconinck, Koen

    2015-01-01

    So, you have decided to do a PhD … now what? In this essay, the author provides some advice for beginning PhD students, basically sharing what he would tell his younger self. Doing a PhD is a transformative experience, but the process is challenging, not merely on an intellectual level but also psychologically. To overcome these challenges, one…

  10. Solution structure of an atypical PHD finger in BRPF2 and its interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Qin, Su; Zhang, Jiahai; Ji, Peng; Shi, Yunyu; Wu, Jihui

    2012-10-01

    Plant homeodomain (PHD) finger is found to be a versatile reader that functions in recruiting transcription factors and chromatin modification complexes. Bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing (BRPF) proteins are identified as scaffold component in a couple of histone acetyltransferase (HATs) complexes but the biological function of PHD fingers, composing the motif called PZPM (PHD/Zn-knuckle/PHD Motif), in BRPF proteins is far from being well understood. Here we report the three-dimensional solution structure of the second PHD finger of PZPM in human BRPF2. According to the structure, BRPF2 PHD2 possesses a two-strand β sheet which is different from any other PHD fingers. Functionally, this PHD finger can potentially bind DNA non-specifically with an evolutionarily conserved and positively charged surface. We provide the structural and interaction information of this atypical PHD finger and categorize this BRPF2 PHD2 into a new subset of PHD finger. Moreover our work also shed light on the functional aspect of the PZPM.

  11. Developing Discourses of Knowledge and Understanding: Longitudinal Studies of Ph.D. Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandiko, Camille B.; Kinchin, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    Competing notions of what a Ph.D. has been, is and should be are undercurrents in doctoral education. A longitudinal study of Ph.D. supervision based on interviews and concept mapping was used to surface understandings of the purpose of a Ph.D. This research tracks change over time for both the student and the supervisor. The data were analysed…

  12. Correction of patient results for Beckman Coulter LX-20 assays affected by interference due to hemoglobin, bilirubin or lipids: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Henricus J; Steen, Gerard; Naus, André J M; Goevaerts, Berrie; Agricola, Pauline T; Schoenmakers, Christian H H

    2007-01-01

    The influence of interference by hemolysis, icterus and lipemia on the results of routine chemistries may lead to wrong interpretations. On Synchron LX-20 instruments (Beckman Coulter) serum or plasma indices can be used as reliable semi-quantitative measures of the magnitude of such interference. In an article recently published in this journal, we presented the results of a multicenter study carried out in Dutch hospitals in which we determined cutoff indices for analytes above which analytically significant interference exists. Clinically significant interference cutoff indices were also derived for these analytes. In this article, we describe the handling of patient samples with clinically significant interference by hemolysis, icterus or lipemia. We investigated several possible approaches for correction of the result: dilution of the interference; mathematical correction in the case of hemolysis; treatment with ferrocyanide to destroy bilirubin; and removal of lipids in lipemic patient samples. We concluded, that mathematical correction of potassium or lactate dehydrogenase results in hemolytic samples can only be carried out if intravascular hemolysis is ruled out. Hemoglobin quantification in serial patient samples, combined with measurement of haptoglobin, represents a useful tool to rule out in vivo hemolysis. We derived an algorithm for this situation. We do not simply recommend mathematical correction, unless it is clinically acceptable. We present formulas for potassium and lactate dehydrogenase: corrected potassium=measured potassium-(hemolytic index increment x 0.14); corrected lactate dehydrogenase=measured lactate dehydrogenase-(hemolytic index increment x 75). The dilution studies indicated that dilution is only applicable for bilirubin, C-reactive protein and iron. The results of treatment with ferrocyanide were poor, and we do not recommend this method. Removal of lipids using high-speed centrifugation or LipoClear (StatSpin Inc.), a non

  13. Postgraduate research training: the PhD and MD thesis.

    PubMed

    Higginson, I; Corner, J

    1996-04-01

    Higher research degrees, such as the PhD, MPhil and MD, have existed within universities for 80 years or more, although the differences between the MD and PhD remain confused. A higher research degree training provides individuals with greater research knowledge and skills, and benefits the specialty. Concern exists about the levels of supervision sometimes provided, failure to complete degrees, and the variable levels of research knowledge and skills attained. We propose that higher research degrees in palliative care have four functions: extending personal scholarship, generating knowledge, training for the individual and contributing to the growth of the specialty. Such an approach may include: a formalised first year with taught components such as in research MSc programmes, formal supervision and progress assessment. In palliative care, clinical and academic approaches need greater integration. Multiprofessional learning is essential. To allow individuals to undertake higher research degree programmes, fellowships or specific funding are needed.

  14. Critical issues in PhD training for biomedical scientists.

    PubMed

    Juliano, R L; Oxford, G S

    2001-10-01

    The rapidly changing world of modern biomedical research is raising important new issues for traditional PhD training programs and is creating concern among young PhD scientists about their futures. Specifically, the United States is producing substantially more biomedical PhDs than can be accommodated in professional positions that truly require the PhD as a credential. The "surplus" PhD population is being relegated to poorly paid, unstable, and increasingly unsatisfying jobs. In addition, many current graduate and postdoctoral training programs may not be adequately preparing young scientists for the more complex, more quantitative biological science of the future. Finally, many current graduate training programs are not attracting a sufficient portion of the most talented young people in the nation. To ameliorate these problems in the training and early career paths of basic biomedical scientists, the authors make specific recommendations, such as urging (1) that graduate trainees should be supported exclusively by competitive individual fellowships, training grants, or institutional funds and not by RO1s or similar research awards; (2) that graduate and postdoctoral stipends be increased so that they provide a reasonable living wage; and (3) that research-intensive academic institutions create a career path for biomedical PhDs other than that designed for the traditional tenure-track, grant-funded principal investigator and faculty member. They conclude that it is in the interest of faculty and institutions to make these and other drastic changes because the current system is both inherently unfair and self-destructive.

  15. Hala Azzam, PhD, MPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Hala Azzam is a Cancer Epidemiologist in the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) in the Division of Cancer Prevention within the National Cancer Institute. She received her Bachelor's degree in molecular biology from Kings College London University, her PhD in anatomy and cell biology from Georgetown University Lombardi Cancer Center, and her MPH in epidemiology from Johns Hopkins University. She is also a CPFP alumna. |

  16. Altaf Mohammed, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Altaf Mohammed serves as a Program Director and COR for the Chemopreventive Agent Development Research Group (CADRG), Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP), National Cancer Institute (NCI). Dr. Mohammed obtained his Ph.D. in Microbiology from India before moving to the Department of Medicine at University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC) in Oklahoma City for a post-doctoral fellowship in carcinogenesis and cancer chemoprevention.  Dr. |

  17. Young Kim, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Young S Kim, PhD, joined the Division of Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute in 1998 as a Program Director who oversees and monitors NCI grants in the area of Nutrition and Cancer. She serves as an expert in nutrition, molecular biology, and genomics as they relate to cancer prevention. Dr. Kim assists with research initiatives that will advance nutritional science and lead to human health benefits. |

  18. The Research Doctorate in Nursing: The PhD.

    PubMed

    Rice, David

    2016-03-01

    When nurses are considering an advanced degree beyond the master's level of educational preparation, a number of considerations may direct the decision-making process. The doctorate of philosophy (PhD) in nursing is a research degree that will well serve nurses who have the desire to apply theory and develop formal programs of research, become faculty of nursing, combine clinical practice with formal research, and advance through professional leadership in the ranks of hospitals and health systems organizations. 
.

  19. Jennifer Sargent, PhD | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Jennifer Sargent, PhDMay 3, 2016 Senior Editor, The Lancet London, UK Jennifer Sargent, Ph.D., is currently a Senior Editor at The Lancet.  Previously, she was an Associate Editor at Nature Reviews Endocrinology.  Dr. Sargent is also a former NIH Research Fellow, and served as an editor on the NIH Fellows Editorial Board, as well as completing a NIH Catalyst editorial internship. Topics to be covered:

  20. Lynn Sorbara, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Lynn Sorbara earned her PhD from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1986. Her thesis research was in the areas of the mechanism of action of the drug, Taxol, and of multidrug resistance. After postdoctoral fellowships at the Rockefeller University and the Mount Sinai College of Medicine in Manhattan, she came to the NIH as a Senior Staff Fellow in the Diabetes Branch of NIDDK. |

  1. Iranian PhD student wins human-rights prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Jon

    2013-11-01

    A physicist imprisoned in Iran while on a break from his PhD studies in the US has been awarded a human-rights prize. Omid Kokabee, who had been based at the University of Texas in Austin, has been given the Andrei Sakharov Prize from the American Physical Society (APS) for "his courage in refusing to use his physics knowledge to work on projects that he deemed harmful to humanity, in the face of extreme physical and psychological pressure".

  2. Vernon Steele, PhD, MPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Vernon Steele is a Program Director and Group Leader for the Chemoprevention Agent Development Research Group in the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention. He earned his MS and PhD degrees in Radiation Biology at the University of Rochester in 1975 studying radiation effects on cell differentiation. He recently received his Masters of Public Health degree from Johns Hopkins University focusing on environmental toxicology. |

  3. The multisensor PHD filter: II. Erroneous solution via Poisson magic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Ronald

    2009-05-01

    The theoretical foundation for the probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter is the FISST multitarget differential and integral calculus. The "core" PHD filter presumes a single sensor. Theoretically rigorous formulas for the multisensor PHD filter can be derived using the FISST calculus, but are computationally intractable. A less theoretically desirable solution-the iterated-corrector approximation-must be used instead. Recently, it has been argued that an "elementary" methodology, the "Poisson-intensity approach," renders FISST obsolete. It has further been claimed that the iterated-corrector approximation is suspect, and in its place an allegedly superior "general multisensor intensity filter" has been proposed. In this and a companion paper I demonstrate that it is these claims which are erroneous. The companion paper introduces formulas for the actual "general multisensor intensity filter." In this paper I demonstrate that (1) the "general multisensor intensity filter" fails in important special cases; (2) it will perform badly in even the easiest multitarget tracking problems; and (3) these rather serious missteps suggest that the "Poisson-intensity approach" is inherently faulty.

  4. The Added Value of a PhD in Medicine--PhD Students' Perceptions of Acquired Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anttila, Henrika; Lindblom-Ylänne, Sari; Lonka, Kristi; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    PhD in the field of medicine is more common than in any other domain. Many medical doctors are driven towards PhD, but also students with other backgrounds (usually MSc) are conducting a PhD in medical schools. Higher education has invested a lot in developing generic and research competences. Still little is known about how PhD students…

  5. Interaction Gaps in PhD Education and ICT as a Way Forward: Results from a Study in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aghaee, Naghmeh; Jobe, William Byron; Karunaratne, Thashmee; Smedberg, Åsa; Hansson, Henrik; Tedre, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Many research studies have highlighted the low completion rate and slow progress in PhD education. Universities strive to improve throughput and quality in their PhD education programs. In this study, the perceived problems of PhD education are investigated from PhD students' points of view, and how an Information and Communication Technology…

  6. Pre-mixing serum samples with assay buffer is a prerequisite for reproducible anti-Mullerian hormone measurement using the Beckman Coulter Gen II assay.

    PubMed

    Han, Xuguang; McShane, Monika; Sahertian, Renee; White, Chris; Ledger, William

    2014-05-01

    Does pre-mixing stored serum samples with assay buffer improve the reproducibility of the Beckman Gen II assay for anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH)? Pre-mixing serum samples with assay buffer is a prerequisite for reproducible measurement of AMH in serum using the Beckman Coulter Gen II assay. Discrepancies in the results obtained from AMH assays have raised doubts concerning the clinical utility of measuring AMH. Sample storage conditions may be responsible for the lack of reproducibility of results obtained from the Gen II kit. This was a prospective study in which serum samples were stored at three different temperatures and assayed for AMH at times 0, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48 h and 1 or 2 weeks after collection. Volunteers (n = 28) were healthy non-pregnant and early pregnant women aged 22-41 years. Anonymized long-term stored samples (n = 42, stored at -20° for 2 weeks) from fertility clinic attendees were also included. For determining the reference range, 179 samples from healthy pregnant women presenting for first trimester screening were used. Thirty separate assays were performed by two operators using four different Gen II kit lots with both kit and in-house quality controls (QCs) included in each assay. In addition to the standard protocol, a modified protocol (pre-mixing samples with assay buffer) was used for selected sample groups. In non-pregnant women, AMH concentrations remained unchanged in serum stored for up to 8 h at room temperature, -20 and -80°C. At room temperature, levels started to rise by 24 h, increasing by up to 29% of the time 0 h value by 48 h and 26% after 1 week. Significant changes versus baseline (time 0 h) in measured AMH concentration were also observed after storage at -20 and -80°C (only at the 12 h time point). In the pregnant group, there was a 50% increase above baseline in samples stored for 48 h at room temperature. When samples were pre-mixed with assay buffer, AMH concentrations showed a consistent increase versus the

  7. PHD3 Stabilizes the Tight Junction Protein Occludin and Protects Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Zhang, Hai-Sheng; Fong, Guo-Hua; Xi, Qiu-Lei; Wu, Guo-Hao; Bai, Chen-Guang; Ling, Zhi-Qiang; Fan, Li; Xu, Yi-Ming; Qin, Yan-Qing; Yuan, Tang-Long; Sun, Heng; Fang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs) control cellular adaptation to hypoxia. PHDs are found involved in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, the exact role of PHD3, a member of the PHD family, in IBD remains unknown. We show here that PHD3 plays a critical role in maintaining intestinal epithelial barrier function. We found that genetic ablation of Phd3 in intestinal epithelial cells led to spontaneous colitis in mice. Deletion of PHD3 decreases the level of tight junction protein occludin, leading to a failure of intestinal epithelial barrier function. Further studies indicate that PHD3 stabilizes occludin by preventing the interaction between the E3 ligase Itch and occludin, in a hydroxylase-independent manner. Examination of biopsy of human ulcerative colitis patients indicates that PHD3 is decreased with disease severity, indicating that PHD3 down-regulation is associated with progression of this disease. We show that PHD3 protects intestinal epithelial barrier function and reveal a hydroxylase-independent function of PHD3 in stabilizing occludin. These findings may help open avenues for developing a therapeutic strategy for IBD. PMID:26124271

  8. Opposing regulation and roles for PHD3 in lung dendritic cells and alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tavernier, Simon J; Vanlangenakker, Nele; Vetters, Jessica; Carmeliet, Peter; Janssens, Sophie; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2017-10-01

    The prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing enzymes (PHDs) are important metabolic sensors of the cell and its environment, which might be employed to alert cells of the immune system. These enzymes regulate the expression of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) isoforms and NF-κB, crucial transcription factors controlling cellular metabolism and inflammation. PHD/HIF signaling is activated in the allergic lung and is proposed as a potential druggable pathway. Here, we investigated the regulation and role of the PHD isoforms in CD11c-expressing dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (Mϕ), sensors of the environment and crucial antigen-presenting cells in the pathogenesis of asthma. Although PHD2 and PHD3 were expressed in baseline, stimulation with house dust mite (HDM) allergen, hypoxia, and TLR4 ligands induced the expression of PHD3 in DCs. Conditional deletion or overexpression of PHD3 in CD11c(hi) cells had minor effects on DCs and alveolar Mϕ biology in steady state. However, when put into competition with wild-type counterparts in mixed chimeric mice, alveolar Mϕ uniquely required PHD3 for optimal reconstitution of the alveolar space. Using genetic and chemical approaches, we were unable to find a clear role for PHD3 or the other PHD isoforms in DCs in asthma development. These data show cell-specific competitive advantage of PHD3 expression in antigen-presenting cells, but question whether therapeutic manipulation of PHDs in DCs would offer therapeutic benefit in asthma. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  9. The MEKK1 PHD ubiquitinates TAB1 to activate MAPKs in response to cytokines.

    PubMed

    Charlaftis, Nikolaos; Suddason, Tesha; Wu, Xuefeng; Anwar, Saba; Karin, Michael; Gallagher, Ewen

    2014-11-03

    Unlike the other MAP3Ks, MEKK1 (encoded by Map3k1) contains a PHD motif. To understand the role of this motif, we have created a knockin mutant of mouse Map3k1 (Map3k1(m) (PHD)) with an inactive PHD motif. Map3k1(m) (PHD) ES cells demonstrate that the MEKK1 PHD controls p38 and JNK activation during TGF-β, EGF and microtubule disruption signalling, but does not affect MAPK responses to hyperosmotic stress. Protein microarray profiling identified the adaptor TAB1 as a PHD substrate, and TGF-β- or EGF-stimulated Map3k1(m) (PHD) ES cells exhibit defective non-canonical ubiquitination of MEKK1 and TAB1. The MEKK1 PHD binds and mediates the transfer of Lys63-linked poly-Ub, using the conjugating enzyme UBE2N, onto TAB1 to regulate TAK1 and MAPK activation by TGF-β and EGF. Both the MEKK1 PHD and TAB1 are critical for ES-cell differentiation and tumourigenesis. Map3k1(m) (PHD) (/+) mice exhibit aberrant cardiac tissue, B-cell development, testis and T-cell signalling.

  10. Applied PhD Research in a Work-Based Environment: An Activity Theory-Based Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granata, S. N.; Dochy, F.

    2016-01-01

    Activity theory is used to compare PhD undertaken at university, that is, academic PhD, with PhD performed in collaboration with industry, that is, semi-industrial PhD. The research is divided into a literature review and a case study. Semi-industrial and academic PhD are modelled as activity systems, and differences are highlighted in terms of…

  11. Applied PhD Research in a Work-Based Environment: An Activity Theory-Based Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granata, S. N.; Dochy, F.

    2016-01-01

    Activity theory is used to compare PhD undertaken at university, that is, academic PhD, with PhD performed in collaboration with industry, that is, semi-industrial PhD. The research is divided into a literature review and a case study. Semi-industrial and academic PhD are modelled as activity systems, and differences are highlighted in terms of…

  12. MS PHD'S Professional Development Program: A Scientific Renaissance in Cyberspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J. M.; Williamson, V. A.; Griess, C. A.; Pyrtle, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    This study is a component of a four-year investigation of MS PHD'S Professional Development Program's virtual community through the lenses of underrepresented minority students in Earth system science and engineering fields. In this presentation, the development, assessment and projected utilization of the ongoing study will be discussed. The overall goal of this study is to examine the effectiveness of virtual team building methods and understand how the development of a communal cyberinfrastructure acts as an integral part of the emergence of a Scientific Renaissance. The exemplar, Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S), provides professional development experiences to facilitate the advancement of students of color achieving outstanding Earth system careers. Undergraduate and graduate students are supported through access to scientific conferences, mentorship and virtual community building. Framed by critical theory, this ethnographic exploration uses a mixed methods research design to record, observe, and analyze both the processes and products of the website, listserv and synchronous web-based dialogue. First, key findings of the formative evaluation and annual reports of the successfully implemented 2003 MS PHD'S Pilot Project are presented. These findings inform future evaluations of the use of technological resources and illustrate how this public space provides peer support and enriched research opportunities. Quantitative methods such as statistical analysis, academic and professional tracking and evaluative tools for scientific content and competency are complimented by qualitative methods that include observations, heuristic case studies and focus group interviews. The findings of this ongoing investigation will provide insight on how national organizations, higher education practitioners, community-based support systems and underrepresented minorities in the sciences promote diversity by developing

  13. Leonard F. Peltier, MD, PhD, 1920-2003.

    PubMed

    Reckling, Frederick W; Lo Vecchio, Janolyn G; Reckling, JoAnn B

    2004-05-01

    Leonard F. Peltier, MD, PhD, was an orthopaedic surgeon, academician, administrator, laboratory investigator, historian, and mentor. His career spanned nearly six decades, beginning with graduate education at the University of Minnesota (UM) under the auspices of Owen H. Wangensteen, MD, PhD. In addition to obtaining a PhD in physiology in the UM Graduate School, he completed general and orthopaedic surgery residencies and attained board certification in each specialty. He served in the US Army Occupation Force Medical Corps in Germany just after World War II. In 1957, at 37 years old, he assumed the chairmanship of the orthopaedic training program at the University of Kansas. In 1971, he couldn't resist the opportunity to become one of the founding members of the "start-up" University of Arizona College of Medicine, accepting an appointment as chair of the new orthopaedic training program, where he remained until his retirement in 1990. He took clinical problems to the laboratory, and made important scientific contributions, particularly in the area of fat embolism and in using calcium sulfate (plaster of Paris) to fill bone defects. He served on governing boards of national professional organizations and presided over the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma from 1980-1981. Throughout his career, he was fascinated by, and published extensively in, the history of medicine arena. Known fondly as "the professor" to many of his residents and colleagues, he had a pragmatic, honest, upbeat, and often humorous approach to life's challenges, valuing personal integrity above other virtues. He explored various eclectic interests far beyond his professional contributions while maintaining his family as a central priority. With his exemplary productivity and interests in the surgical and laboratory sciences, history of medicine, appreciation of fine arts, and perceptive and effective interactions with family, friends, patients, and colleagues, the memory of Leonard

  14. Pyrithione Zn selectively inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase PHD3.

    PubMed

    Na, Yu-Ran; Woo, Dustin J; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2016-04-01

    Increasing evidence emphasizes the role of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) isoforms in regulating non-HIF substrates, but isoform selective PHD inhibitors under physiological conditions have not yet been reported. Here we have identified pyrithione Zn (PZ) as a potent, isoform-selective PHD3 inhibitor. The IC50 value of PZ was determined as 0.98 μM for PHD3, while it did not show any inhibitory activity toward full length and truncated PHD2 up to 1 mM. The selective efficacy of PZ was further demonstrated at the cellular level by observing inhibition of the PHD3-dependent DNA damage response pathway without stabilization of HIF-1α.

  15. What Took Them So Long? Explaining PhD Delays among Doctoral Candidates

    PubMed Central

    van de Schoot, Rens; Yerkes, Mara A.; Mouw, Jolien M.; Sonneveld, Hans

    2013-01-01

    A delay in PhD completion, while likely undesirable for PhD candidates, can also be detrimental to universities if and when PhD delay leads to attrition/termination. Termination of the PhD trajectory can lead to individual stress, a loss of valuable time and resources invested in the candidate and can also mean a loss of competitive advantage. Using data from two studies of doctoral candidates in the Netherlands, we take a closer look at PhD duration and delay in doctoral completion. Specifically, we address the question: Is it possible to predict which PhD candidates will experience delays in the completion of their doctorate degree? If so, it might be possible to take steps to shorten or even prevent delay, thereby helping to enhance university competitiveness. Moreover, we discuss practical do's and don'ts for universities and graduate schools to minimize delays. PMID:23935895

  16. What took them so long? Explaining PhD delays among doctoral candidates.

    PubMed

    van de Schoot, Rens; Yerkes, Mara A; Mouw, Jolien M; Sonneveld, Hans

    2013-01-01

    A delay in PhD completion, while likely undesirable for PhD candidates, can also be detrimental to universities if and when PhD delay leads to attrition/termination. Termination of the PhD trajectory can lead to individual stress, a loss of valuable time and resources invested in the candidate and can also mean a loss of competitive advantage. Using data from two studies of doctoral candidates in The Netherlands, we take a closer look at PhD duration and delay in doctoral completion. Specifically, we address the question: Is it possible to predict which PhD candidates will experience delays in the completion of their doctorate degree? If so, it might be possible to take steps to shorten or even prevent delay, thereby helping to enhance university competitiveness. Moreover, we discuss practical do's and don'ts for universities and graduate schools to minimize delays.

  17. The Purpose of the PhD: Theorising the Skills Acquired by Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowbray, Susan; Halse, Christine

    2010-01-01

    In the past decade there has been a marked push for the development of employability skills to be part of the PhD process. This push is generally by stakeholders from above and outside the PhD process, i.e. government and industry, who view skills as a "summative product" of the PhD. In contrast, our study interviewed stakeholders inside…

  18. A Two-Level Structural Equation Model for Evaluating the External Effectiveness of PhD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiandotto, Bruno; Masserini, Lucio

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the number of PhDs in Italy has significantly grown and purposes of PhD courses have expanded from the traditional ones. The analysis of the contribution of PhD title for job placement and employment condition of PhDs is an important tool for evaluating the quality and the effectiveness of PhD courses. For this reason, knowledge of…

  19. The Purpose of the PhD: Theorising the Skills Acquired by Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowbray, Susan; Halse, Christine

    2010-01-01

    In the past decade there has been a marked push for the development of employability skills to be part of the PhD process. This push is generally by stakeholders from above and outside the PhD process, i.e. government and industry, who view skills as a "summative product" of the PhD. In contrast, our study interviewed stakeholders inside…

  20. Exploring PHD fingers and H3K4me0 interactions with molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy calculations: AIRE-PHD1, a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Spiliotopoulos, Dimitrios; Spitaleri, Andrea; Musco, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    PHD fingers represent one of the largest families of epigenetic readers capable of decoding post-translationally modified or unmodified histone H3 tails. Because of their direct involvement in human pathologies they are increasingly considered as a potential therapeutic target. Several PHD/histone-peptide structures have been determined, however relatively little information is available on their dynamics. Studies aiming to characterize the dynamic and energetic determinants driving histone peptide recognition by epigenetic readers would strongly benefit from computational studies. Herein we focus on the dynamic and energetic characterization of the PHD finger subclass specialized in the recognition of histone H3 peptides unmodified in position K4 (H3K4me0). As a case study we focused on the first PHD finger of autoimmune regulator protein (AIRE-PHD1) in complex with H3K4me0. PCA analysis of the covariance matrix of free AIRE-PHD1 highlights the presence of a "flapping" movement, which is blocked in an open conformation upon binding to H3K4me0. Moreover, binding free energy calculations obtained through Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM/PBSA) methodology are in good qualitative agreement with experiments and allow dissection of the energetic terms associated with native and alanine mutants of AIRE-PHD1/H3K4me0 complexes. MM/PBSA calculations have also been applied to the energetic analysis of other PHD fingers recognizing H3K4me0. In this case we observe excellent correlation between computed and experimental binding free energies. Overall calculations show that H3K4me0 recognition by PHD fingers relies on compensation of the electrostatic and polar solvation energy terms and is stabilized by non-polar interactions.

  1. The experience of disagreement between students and supervisors in PhD education: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background PhD supervision is mostly individual and disagreement between supervisors and PhD students is a seldom-discussed topic at universities. The present study aimed to describe the experience of disagreement between PhD students and supervisors. Methods Nine supervisors and seven PhD students from Sweden and England were interviewed using a video recorder. The recorded material was analysed using inductive content analysis. Results Disagreements in PhD education can be described with the overarching theme: the nature of the disagreements changes over time. Five categories emerged to describe the variations of the experiences: involvement in important decisions, supervisors not being up-to-date, dubious advice from supervisors, mediating between supervisors, and interpersonal relationships. Conclusions There is a gradual shift in competence where PhD students may excel supervisors in subject knowledge. Early disagreements may indicate immaturity of the student while disagreements later may indicate that the student is maturing making their own decisions. Consequently, disagreements may need to be addressed differently depending on when they occur. Addressing them inappropriately might slow the progressions and result in higher attrition rate among PhD students. The five categories may be elements in future PhD supervisor training programs and should be further evaluated for their importance and impact on PhD education. PMID:24074051

  2. Macrophage skewing by Phd2 haplodeficiency prevents ischaemia by inducing arteriogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yukiji; Costa, Sandra; Delamarre, Estelle; Roncal, Carmen; Leite de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Finisguerra, Veronica; Deschoemaeker, Sofie; Bruyère, Françoise; Wenes, Mathias; Hamm, Alexander; Serneels, Jens; Magat, Julie; Bhattacharyya, Tapan; Anisimov, Andrey; Jordan, Benedicte F; Alitalo, Kari; Maxwell, Patrick; Gallez, Bernard; Zhuang, Zhen W; Saito, Yoshihiko; Simons, Michael; De Palma, Michele; Mazzone, Massimiliano

    2011-10-09

    PHD2 serves as an oxygen sensor that rescues blood supply by regulating vessel formation and shape in case of oxygen shortage. However, it is unknown whether PHD2 can influence arteriogenesis. Here we studied the role of PHD2 in collateral artery growth by using hindlimb ischaemia as a model, a process that compensates for the lack of blood flow in case of major arterial occlusion. We show that Phd2 (also known as Egln1) haplodeficient (Phd2(+/-)) mice displayed preformed collateral arteries that preserved limb perfusion and prevented tissue necrosis in ischaemia. Improved arteriogenesis in Phd2(+/-) mice was due to an expansion of tissue-resident, M2-like macrophages and their increased release of arteriogenic factors, leading to enhanced smooth muscle cell (SMC) recruitment and growth. Both chronic and acute deletion of one Phd2 allele in macrophages was sufficient to skew their polarization towards a pro-arteriogenic phenotype. Mechanistically, collateral vessel preconditioning relied on the activation of canonical NF-κB pathway in Phd2(+/-) macrophages. These results unravel how PHD2 regulates arteriogenesis and artery homeostasis by controlling a specific differentiation state in macrophages and suggest new treatment options for ischaemic disorders.

  3. AIRE-PHD fingers are structural hubs to maintain the integrity of chromatin-associated interactome

    PubMed Central

    Gaetani, Massimiliano; Matafora, Vittoria; Saare, Mario; Spiliotopoulos, Dimitrios; Mollica, Luca; Quilici, Giacomo; Chignola, Francesca; Mannella, Valeria; Zucchelli, Chiara; Peterson, Pärt; Bachi, Angela; Musco, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene cause autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE is expressed in thymic medullary epithelial cells, where it promotes the expression of peripheral-tissue antigens to mediate deletional tolerance, thereby preventing self-reactivity. AIRE contains two plant homeodomains (PHDs) which are sites of pathological mutations. AIRE-PHD fingers are important for AIRE transcriptional activity and presumably play a crucial role in the formation of multimeric protein complexes at chromatin level which ultimately control immunological tolerance. As a step forward the understanding of AIRE-PHD fingers in normal and pathological conditions, we investigated their structure and used a proteomic SILAC approach to assess the impact of patient mutations targeting AIRE-PHD fingers. Importantly, both AIRE-PHD fingers are structurally independent and mutually non-interacting domains. In contrast to D297A and V301M on AIRE-PHD1, the C446G mutation on AIRE-PHD2 destroys the structural fold, thus causing aberrant AIRE localization and reduction of AIRE target genes activation. Moreover, mutations targeting AIRE-PHD1 affect the formation of a multimeric protein complex at chromatin level. Overall our results reveal the importance of AIRE-PHD domains in the interaction with chromatin-associated nuclear partners and gene regulation confirming the role of PHD fingers as versatile protein interaction hubs for multiple binding events. PMID:23074189

  4. Defective Tibetan PHD2 binding to p23 links high altitude adaption to altered oxygen sensing.

    PubMed

    Song, Daisheng; Li, Lin-sheng; Arsenault, Patrick R; Tan, Qiulin; Bigham, Abigail W; Heaton-Johnson, Katherine J; Master, Stephen R; Lee, Frank S

    2014-05-23

    The Tibetan population has adapted to the chronic hypoxia of high altitude. Tibetans bear a genetic signature in the prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2/EGLN1) gene, which encodes for the central oxygen sensor of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. Recent studies have focused attention on two nonsynonymous coding region substitutions, D4E and C127S, both of which are markedly enriched in the Tibetan population. These amino acids reside in a region of PHD2 that harbors a zinc finger, which we have previously discovered binds to a Pro-Xaa-Leu-Glu (PXLE) motif in the HSP90 cochaperone p23, thereby recruiting PHD2 to the HSP90 pathway to facilitate HIF-α hydroxylation. We herein report that the Tibetan PHD2 haplotype (D4E/C127S) strikingly diminishes the interaction of PHD2 with p23, resulting in impaired PHD2 down-regulation of the HIF pathway. The defective binding to p23 depends on both the D4E and C127S substitutions. We also identify a PXLE motif in HSP90 itself that can mediate binding to PHD2 but find that this interaction is maintained with the D4E/C127S PHD2 haplotype. We propose that the Tibetan PHD2 variant is a loss of function (hypomorphic) allele, leading to augmented HIF activation to facilitate adaptation to high altitude. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. AIRE-PHD fingers are structural hubs to maintain the integrity of chromatin-associated interactome.

    PubMed

    Gaetani, Massimiliano; Matafora, Vittoria; Saare, Mario; Spiliotopoulos, Dimitrios; Mollica, Luca; Quilici, Giacomo; Chignola, Francesca; Mannella, Valeria; Zucchelli, Chiara; Peterson, Pärt; Bachi, Angela; Musco, Giovanna

    2012-12-01

    Mutations in autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene cause autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE is expressed in thymic medullary epithelial cells, where it promotes the expression of peripheral-tissue antigens to mediate deletional tolerance, thereby preventing self-reactivity. AIRE contains two plant homeodomains (PHDs) which are sites of pathological mutations. AIRE-PHD fingers are important for AIRE transcriptional activity and presumably play a crucial role in the formation of multimeric protein complexes at chromatin level which ultimately control immunological tolerance. As a step forward the understanding of AIRE-PHD fingers in normal and pathological conditions, we investigated their structure and used a proteomic SILAC approach to assess the impact of patient mutations targeting AIRE-PHD fingers. Importantly, both AIRE-PHD fingers are structurally independent and mutually non-interacting domains. In contrast to D297A and V301M on AIRE-PHD1, the C446G mutation on AIRE-PHD2 destroys the structural fold, thus causing aberrant AIRE localization and reduction of AIRE target genes activation. Moreover, mutations targeting AIRE-PHD1 affect the formation of a multimeric protein complex at chromatin level. Overall our results reveal the importance of AIRE-PHD domains in the interaction with chromatin-associated nuclear partners and gene regulation confirming the role of PHD fingers as versatile protein interaction hubs for multiple binding events.

  6. Multivalent recognition of histone tails by the PHD fingers of CHD5.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Samuel S; Musselman, Catherine A; Srinivasan, Rajini; Svaren, John P; Kutateladze, Tatiana G; Denu, John M

    2012-08-21

    The chromodomain, helicase, DNA-binding protein 5 (CHD5) is a chromatin remodeling enzyme which is implicated in tumor suppression. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of the CHD5 PHD fingers to specifically recognize the unmodified N-terminus of histone H3. We use two distinct modified peptide-library platforms (beads and glass slides) to determine the detailed histone binding preferences of PHD(1) and PHD(2) alone and the tandem PHD(1-2) construct. Both domains displayed similar binding preferences for histone H3, where modification (e.g., methylation, acetylation, and phosphorylation) at H3R2, H3K4, H3T3, H3T6, and H3S10 disrupts high-affinity binding, and the three most N-terminal amino acids (ART) are crucial for binding. The tandem CHD5-PHD(1-2) displayed similar preferences to those displayed by each PHD finger alone. Using NMR, surface plasmon resonance, and two novel biochemical assays, we demonstrate that CHD5-PHD(1-2) simultaneously engages two H3 N-termini and results in a 4-11-fold increase in affinity compared with either PHD finger alone. These studies provide biochemical evidence for the utility of tandem PHD fingers to recruit protein complexes at targeted genomic loci and provide the framework for understanding how multiple chromatin-binding modules function to interpret the combinatorial PTM capacity written in chromatin.

  7. The role of prolyl hydroxylase domain protein (PHD) during rosiglitazone-induced adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juyoung; Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Cha, Ji-Young; Jeong, Yun-Seung; Rhee, Sang Dahl; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2014-01-31

    Rosiglitazone, a well known insulin sensitizer, stimulates adipocyte differentiation via the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Previous two-dimensional proteomics studies using C3H10T1/2 murine mesenchymal pluripotent stem cells revealed that prolyl hydroxylase domain protein (PHD) levels significantly increased during rosiglitazone-induced adipocyte differentiation (RIAD). In this study, we investigated the functional role played by PHD during RIAD. Three PHD isoforms (PHD1, 2, and 3) were found to be up-regulated in C3H10T1/2 cells during RIAD, whereas PHD knockdown and treatment with PHD inhibitors (dimethyloxalyl glycine or ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) blocked RIAD. PHD inhibition was found to be associated with increases in the levels of anti-adipogenic proteins such as GATA-3, KLF-2, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ binding motif (TAZ), with their reduced ubiquitination, suggesting that PHDs evoke the ubiquitination/proteasomal degradation of anti-adipogenic proteins. On the other hand, MG-132 (a proteasomal inhibitor) prevented the degradation of anti-adipogenic proteins and retarded RIAD. PPARγ antagonists (bisphenol A diglycidyl ether or GW9662) blunted the effects of rosiglitazone on PHD regulation. Furthermore, putative PPARγ binding sites were identified in the promoter region of PHDs by ChIP-PCR, implying that rosiglitazone may induce PHD up-regulation directly by PPARγ activation. Consistent with in vitro results, oral administration of rosiglitazone to ob/ob mice for 2 weeks increased adipose PHD levels and decreased anti-adipogenic protein levels by increasing their ubiquitination. These results suggest that rosiglitazone increases PHD expression in a PPARγ-dependent manner and that this leads to the commitment of anti-adipogenic proteins to the ubiquitination-proteasomal pathway and to the subsequent induction of adipocyte differentiation.

  8. I-determinants for a successful PhD or postdoctoral outcome

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2016-01-01

    Many resources are invested in research training, but very little literature exists on predictors for a successful PhD and postdoctoral training outcome. A PhD program has two overall objectives: to extend knowledge about a hopefully important health topic and to provide extensive training to improve the PhD student’s skills through learning research methods and collaboration. A substantial number of PhD students may run into some kind of problem in the course of their PhD program. In this article, some determinants all starting with an “I” and indicative of a good PhD outcome are reported. The successful PhD student can be described as having an Interest in the PhD program, an Incentive for the program, and an Idea of what he or she wants to investigate, showing Initiative, and having high personal Integrity and good Interpersonal relationships. When these so-called I-determinants are present, the likelihood of success in a PhD program is high. More evidence is available for selection of candidates for postdoctoral appointments since it is known that the postdoctoral candidate has completed a PhD program, published papers in peer-reviewed journals, and received awarded grants. However, other characteristics determine a successful transition of the postdoctoral candidate into a research leader. These determinants are Identity, Independence and Image, Implementation ability in terms of being able to implement decisions and projects, working with Innovative and Important topics, having In-depth knowledge of the research topic, being Interactive and Integrated with the scientific community, and Internationally oriented. In conclusion, regardless of the framework of research, the personal characteristics of a researcher play a very important role in the quality of research. Application of some of the principles mentioned in this article might allow decision to reach a more evidence-based way to recruit PhD students and postdoctorals. PMID:27574466

  9. I-determinants for a successful PhD or postdoctoral outcome.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2016-01-01

    Many resources are invested in research training, but very little literature exists on predictors for a successful PhD and postdoctoral training outcome. A PhD program has two overall objectives: to extend knowledge about a hopefully important health topic and to provide extensive training to improve the PhD student's skills through learning research methods and collaboration. A substantial number of PhD students may run into some kind of problem in the course of their PhD program. In this article, some determinants all starting with an "I" and indicative of a good PhD outcome are reported. The successful PhD student can be described as having an Interest in the PhD program, an Incentive for the program, and an Idea of what he or she wants to investigate, showing Initiative, and having high personal Integrity and good Interpersonal relationships. When these so-called I-determinants are present, the likelihood of success in a PhD program is high. More evidence is available for selection of candidates for postdoctoral appointments since it is known that the postdoctoral candidate has completed a PhD program, published papers in peer-reviewed journals, and received awarded grants. However, other characteristics determine a successful transition of the postdoctoral candidate into a research leader. These determinants are Identity, Independence and Image, Implementation ability in terms of being able to implement decisions and projects, working with Innovative and Important topics, having In-depth knowledge of the research topic, being Interactive and Integrated with the scientific community, and Internationally oriented. In conclusion, regardless of the framework of research, the personal characteristics of a researcher play a very important role in the quality of research. Application of some of the principles mentioned in this article might allow decision to reach a more evidence-based way to recruit PhD students and postdoctorals.

  10. Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S) Beyond the PhD Professional Development Program: A Pilot Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A.; Jearld, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Huggans, M.; Ricciardi, L.; Thomas, S. H.; Jansma, P. E.

    2012-12-01

    In 2011 the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S)® initiative launched its newest activity entitled the MS PHD'S "Beyond the PhD (B-PhD) Professional Development Program." This exciting new program was designed to facilitate the development of a new community of underrepresented minority (URM) doctoral candidates and recent doctorate degree recipients in Earth system science (ESS)-related fields. The MS PHD'S B-PhD provides customized support and advocacy for MS PHD'S B-PhD participants in order to facilitate smoother and informed transitions from graduate school, to postdoctoral and tenure-track positions, as well as other "first" jobs in government, industry, and non-profit organizations. In November 2011 the first cohort of MS PHD'S B-PhD participants engaged in intensive sessions on the following topics: "Toolkits for Success for Academia, Business/Industry, Federal Government and Non-Profits", "Defining Short, Mid and Long Term Career Goals", "Accessing and Refining Skill Sets and Other Door Openers", "International Preparation and Opportunities", "Paying it Forward/Lifting as You Climb", and "Customized Strategies for Next Steps". This pilot event, which was hosted by the University of Texas at Arlington's (UTA) College of Science, also provided opportunities for participants to serve as guest lecturers in the UTA's Colleges of Science and Engineering and included one-on-one discussions with MS PHD'S B-PhD mentors and guest speakers who are well established within their individual ESS fields. Insights regarding opportunities, challenges and obstacles commonly faced by URMs within the ESS fields, as well as strategies for success were shared by MS PHD'S B-PhD mentors and guest speakers. Survey results indicate that MS PHD'S B-PhD participants appreciated not only the material covered during this pilot activity, but also appreciated the opportunity to become part of a community of young URM ESS

  11. Intercultural PhD Supervision: Exploring the Hidden Curriculum in a Social Science Faculty Doctoral Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidman, Joanna; Manathunga, Catherine; Cornforth, Sue

    2017-01-01

    International knowledge markets rely heavily on a ready supply of highly mobile doctoral students, many of whom are from the global South, to bring in revenue. The supervision of these PhD students, however, can reproduce neo-colonial knowledge relations, often in subtle ways. In settler nations, international PhD students may find that they are…

  12. The Ph.D. Degree at Berkeley: Interviews, Placement, and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breneman, David W.

    This report presents empirical data in support of the behavioral, demand-oriented theory of Ph.D. production. A close examination of the Ph.D. curricula of the English, Economics, and Chemistry departments at Berkeley, chosen as representative of the extremes of departmental behavior, demonstrates that requirements do differ substantially and in a…

  13. A Qualitative Study of the Experiences of Gatekeeping among PhD Counselor Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erbes, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the gatekeeping experiences of a group of PhD counselor educators, by utilizing a phenomenological approach. This design was chosen as it could best examine the lived experiences of the participants. Nine PhD counselor educators participated in this study through a series of two interviews. All of the…

  14. Innovation in PhD Completion: The Hardy Shall Succeed (And Be Happy!)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Hugh; Gardiner, Maria; Marshall, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    What is it that makes a PhD such a difficult process, and prevents candidates from completing on time? In this paper, we propose that self-sabotaging behaviours, including overcommitting, procrastination and perfectionism, have a role to play. At Flinders University, we have developed a program in which we work with PhD students to help to reduce…

  15. Assessing the Quality of PhD Dissertations. A Survey of External Committee Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyvik, Svein; Thune, Taran

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a study of the quality assessment of doctoral dissertations, and asks whether examiner characteristics influence assessment of research quality in PhD dissertations. Utilising a multi-dimensional concept of quality of PhD dissertations, we look at differences in assessment of research quality, and particularly test whether…

  16. Creating Entrepreneurial Networks: Academic Entrepreneurship, Mobility and Collaboration during PhD Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bienkowska, Dzamila; Klofsten, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Network-building activities of PhD students are an important area of study in furthering our understanding of academic entrepreneurship. This paper focuses on PhD students' participation in network-building activities defined as mobility and collaboration, as well as own interest in and perceived grade of support for commercialisation from various…

  17. Examiner Comment on the Literature Review in Ph.D. Theses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid; Fairbairn, Hedy; Lovat, Terry

    2007-01-01

    The review of literature, so central to scholarly work and disciplined inquiry, is expected of the Ph.D. student, but how far along the road are they expected to travel? This article investigates the expectations of "the literature" in research and scholarship at Ph.D. level from the examiner and assessment perspective. The analysis…

  18. Jeanne Murphy, PhD, CNM, [F] | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Jeanne Murphy, PhD, CNM is a postdoctoral Cancer Prevention Fellow in the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group in the Division of Cancer Prevention. She comes to BGCRG with a PhD from Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. She also completed a graduate certificate in Health Disparities and Health Inequality at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. |

  19. Undertaking the Journey Together: Peer Learning for a Successful and Enjoyable PhD Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stracke, Elke

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the challenge of supervising PhD students. Any supervision is likely to constitute a challenging experience for the supervisor, even more so when they are a new academic staff member with little experience in PhD supervision in the Australasian context. This paper shows how one supervisor addressed the challenge by fostering…

  20. Digital Doctorates? An Exploratory Study of PhD Candidates' Use of Online Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Robyn; Wilson, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Online environments are transforming learning, including doctoral education. Yet the ways in which the PhD experience is shaped and transformed through these digital modes of engagement is seldom addressed, and not systematically understood. In this article, we explore PhD students' perceptions and use of digital tools. Drawing on the results of…

  1. Delivering an Organizational Leadership PhD Program at a Distance: University of Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Joseph Lee; Williams, T. H. Lee

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors identify and review a number of key features in the successful development and maintenance of a PhD program delivered at a distance. The University of Oklahoma's PhD program in organizational leadership was developed in the early 1990s and delivered (primarily, but not completely) to military personnel and families…

  2. The Undergraduate Origins of PhD Economists: The Berkeley Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olney, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    The University of California, Berkeley sends more undergraduate students to economics PhD programs than any other public university. While this fact is surely a function of its size, there may be lessons from the Berkeley experience that others could adopt. To investigate why Berkeley generates so many economics PhD students, the author convened…

  3. Differing Motivations and Requirements in PhD Student Cohorts: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Ryan; Chakravarti, Sumone; Baik, Chi

    2016-01-01

    The PhD student experience is an increasingly important area of education research in Australia and internationally. Although many factors supporting the PhD experience have been identified, there has been a tendency towards examining the issue through a cohort-wide lens, in which the nuances of experience of smaller groups and individuals may be…

  4. Delivering an Organizational Leadership PhD Program at a Distance: University of Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Joseph Lee; Williams, T. H. Lee

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors identify and review a number of key features in the successful development and maintenance of a PhD program delivered at a distance. The University of Oklahoma's PhD program in organizational leadership was developed in the early 1990s and delivered (primarily, but not completely) to military personnel and families…

  5. Research(er) at Home: Auto/Ethnography of (My) PhD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benová, Kamila

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the PhD phase of tertiary higher education (in Slovakia), which is here considered as the specific phase of the academic career. It tries to answer the question: what is the PhD, in the context of research, theoretically and methodologically approached as a critical ethnography of higher education. It is focused on the…

  6. Annotated List of Ph.D. Dissertations in Reading, 1916-1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago Univ., IL. Dept. of Education.

    An annotated listing of 72 Ph.D. dissertations from the University of Chicago on topics related to reading and the teaching of reading is presented. Annotations were obtained from (1) the authors, (2) the Department of Education's "Annotated List of Ph.D. Dissertations January, 1936 through June, 1951," and (3) current members of Lambda…

  7. Assessing the Quality of PhD Dissertations. A Survey of External Committee Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyvik, Svein; Thune, Taran

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a study of the quality assessment of doctoral dissertations, and asks whether examiner characteristics influence assessment of research quality in PhD dissertations. Utilising a multi-dimensional concept of quality of PhD dissertations, we look at differences in assessment of research quality, and particularly test whether…

  8. Enhancing the Industrial PhD Programme as a Policy Tool for University-Industry Cooperation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roolaht, Tõnu

    2015-01-01

    The changing role of universities in society includes the increasing expectation that academic institutions should engage in collaboration with companies. Industrial PhD programmes are educational tools for building bridges between the academic sector and industry. In these programmes, the PhD student studies and carries out research while being…

  9. The Undergraduate Origins of PhD Economists: The Berkeley Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olney, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    The University of California, Berkeley sends more undergraduate students to economics PhD programs than any other public university. While this fact is surely a function of its size, there may be lessons from the Berkeley experience that others could adopt. To investigate why Berkeley generates so many economics PhD students, the author convened…

  10. In Memoriam: Amar J.S. Klar, Ph.D. | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    In Memoriam: Amar J.S. Klar, Ph.D. The Center for Cancer Research mourns the recent death of colleague and friend Amar J.S. Klar, Ph.D.  Dr. Klar was a much-liked and respected member of the NCI community as part of the Gene Regulation and Chromosome Biology Laboratory since 1988.

  11. Supervisor Selection or Allocation and Continuity of Supervision: Ph.D. Students' Progress and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ives, Glenice; Rowley, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    This article reports part of an Australian longitudinal study which examined the patterns evident in the relationships Ph.D. students and supervisors developed and the ways they worked together. The participants were 21 Ph.D. students and their main supervisors. Data were collected via interviews conducted between 1995 and 1998. Three interviews…

  12. Learning from a Lived Experience of a PhD: A Reflexive Ethnography of Two Journeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aziato, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nurses globally have strived to obtain a Doctor of Philosophy Degree (PhD) especially those in academia. Few publications have focused on lived experiences of nurses especially those reporting failed attempts. Thus, this paper presents how lessons learnt from a failed attempt of a PhD in Nursing was used to achieve an outstanding…

  13. Digital Doctorates? An Exploratory Study of PhD Candidates' Use of Online Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Robyn; Wilson, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Online environments are transforming learning, including doctoral education. Yet the ways in which the PhD experience is shaped and transformed through these digital modes of engagement is seldom addressed, and not systematically understood. In this article, we explore PhD students' perceptions and use of digital tools. Drawing on the results of…

  14. Differing Motivations and Requirements in PhD Student Cohorts: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Ryan; Chakravarti, Sumone; Baik, Chi

    2016-01-01

    The PhD student experience is an increasingly important area of education research in Australia and internationally. Although many factors supporting the PhD experience have been identified, there has been a tendency towards examining the issue through a cohort-wide lens, in which the nuances of experience of smaller groups and individuals may be…

  15. Creating Entrepreneurial Networks: Academic Entrepreneurship, Mobility and Collaboration during PhD Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bienkowska, Dzamila; Klofsten, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Network-building activities of PhD students are an important area of study in furthering our understanding of academic entrepreneurship. This paper focuses on PhD students' participation in network-building activities defined as mobility and collaboration, as well as own interest in and perceived grade of support for commercialisation from various…

  16. Research(er) at Home: Auto/Ethnography of (My) PhD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benová, Kamila

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the PhD phase of tertiary higher education (in Slovakia), which is here considered as the specific phase of the academic career. It tries to answer the question: what is the PhD, in the context of research, theoretically and methodologically approached as a critical ethnography of higher education. It is focused on the…

  17. Examiner Comment on the Literature Review in Ph.D. Theses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid; Fairbairn, Hedy; Lovat, Terry

    2007-01-01

    The review of literature, so central to scholarly work and disciplined inquiry, is expected of the Ph.D. student, but how far along the road are they expected to travel? This article investigates the expectations of "the literature" in research and scholarship at Ph.D. level from the examiner and assessment perspective. The analysis…

  18. Content Analysis of the Ph.D vs. Ed.D. Dissertation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coorough, Calleen; Nelson, Jack

    Typically, the Ph.D. degree is said to be more research-oriented, whereas the Ed.D. degree is aimed more at the educational practitioner. The two degrees were compared with regard to research design, statistics, target populations for inference of findings, and other characteristics. A sample of 1,007 Ph.D. and 960 Ed.D dissertations was selected…

  19. Enhancing the Industrial PhD Programme as a Policy Tool for University-Industry Cooperation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roolaht, Tõnu

    2015-01-01

    The changing role of universities in society includes the increasing expectation that academic institutions should engage in collaboration with companies. Industrial PhD programmes are educational tools for building bridges between the academic sector and industry. In these programmes, the PhD student studies and carries out research while being…

  20. Searching for "A Third Space": A Creative Pathway towards International PhD Students' Academic Acculturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Dely Lazarte; Baumfield, Vivienne; Reid, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Undertaking a PhD is a challenging endeavour. Pursuing a doctoral education in a "foreign" context tends to increase the demands of this intellectual venture. The nature of research-based PhD programmes, often characterised by a lack of formal curricula where academic supervision lasts several years, may add another layer of complexity.…

  1. Research and Professional Development Plan (RPDP) for PhD Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Emer; Carton, Janet; Rosten, Claire

    2009-01-01

    The University College Dublin (UCD) Research and Professional Development Plan (RPDP) is a set of tools to aid in the planning and progress of a PhD student's research and professional skills. It is an integral part of the Structured PhD programme at UCD and has been specifically designed to aid students in the planning, monitoring and completion…

  2. Searching for "A Third Space": A Creative Pathway towards International PhD Students' Academic Acculturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Dely Lazarte; Baumfield, Vivienne; Reid, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Undertaking a PhD is a challenging endeavour. Pursuing a doctoral education in a "foreign" context tends to increase the demands of this intellectual venture. The nature of research-based PhD programmes, often characterised by a lack of formal curricula where academic supervision lasts several years, may add another layer of complexity.…

  3. NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program Ronald E. McNair PhD Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Sunnie

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Ronald E. McNair PHD Program was funded in September 1995. Implementation began during the spring of 1996. The deferment of the actual program initial semester enabled the program to continue support through the fall semester of 1998. This was accomplished by a no-cost extension from August 15, 1998 through December 31, 1998. There were 12 fellows supported by the program in 1996, 15 fellows in 1997, and 15 fellows 1998. Current program capacity is 15 fellows per funding support. Support for the academic outreach component began in spring 1998. The program was named the "Good Enough" Crew Activity (GECA) in honor of Dr. McNair's philosophy of everyone being good enough to achieve anything they want bad enough. The program currently enrolls 65 students from the third through the eight grades. The program is held 12 Saturdays per semester. The time is 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM each Saturday Morning. Program direction and facilitation is jointly administered with the PHD fellows and the Saturday Academy staff. Dr. John Kelly, REM-PHD Principal Investigator serves in a program oversight and leadership capacity. Ms. Sunnie Howard, The NASA REM-PHD Administrative Coordinator serves in an administrative and logistical capacity. Mr. Aaron Hatch, the NASA-AMES Liaison Officer, serve@'in a consultative and curriculum review capacity. The first recognition activity will be held on December 12, 1998, with the students, parents, faculty, PHD fellows, and other local student support services persons. Program outreach efforts are jointly supported by the NASA REM-PHD Program and the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. The Ph.D. program reached its first milestone in May 1998. North Carolina A&T State University graduated the first Ph.D. fellows. The first three Ph.D. Alumni were Ronald E. McNair PHD Program Fellows. It is hoped that this is just the beginning of a highly acclaimed doctoral program. The ultimate program success will be recognized when the

  4. NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program Ronald E. McNair PhD Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Sunnie

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Ronald E. McNair PHD Program was funded in September 1995. Implementation began during the spring of 1996. The deferment of the actual program initial semester enabled the program to continue support through the fall semester of 1998. This was accomplished by a no-cost extension from August 15, 1998 through December 31, 1998. There were 12 fellows supported by the program in 1996, 15 fellows in 1997, and 15 fellows 1998. Current program capacity is 15 fellows per funding support. Support for the academic outreach component began in spring 1998. The program was named the "Good Enough" Crew Activity (GECA) in honor of Dr. McNair's philosophy of everyone being good enough to achieve anything they want bad enough. The program currently enrolls 65 students from the third through the eight grades. The program is held 12 Saturdays per semester. The time is 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM each Saturday Morning. Program direction and facilitation is jointly administered with the PHD fellows and the Saturday Academy staff. Dr. John Kelly, REM-PHD Principal Investigator serves in a program oversight and leadership capacity. Ms. Sunnie Howard, The NASA REM-PHD Administrative Coordinator serves in an administrative and logistical capacity. Mr. Aaron Hatch, the NASA-AMES Liaison Officer, serve@'in a consultative and curriculum review capacity. The first recognition activity will be held on December 12, 1998, with the students, parents, faculty, PHD fellows, and other local student support services persons. Program outreach efforts are jointly supported by the NASA REM-PHD Program and the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. The Ph.D. program reached its first milestone in May 1998. North Carolina A&T State University graduated the first Ph.D. fellows. The first three Ph.D. Alumni were Ronald E. McNair PHD Program Fellows. It is hoped that this is just the beginning of a highly acclaimed doctoral program. The ultimate program success will be recognized when the

  5. PHD2: from hypoxia regulation to disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Ana M; Wielockx, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen represents one of the major molecules required for the development and maintenance of life. An adequate response to hypoxia is therefore required for the functioning of the majority of living organisms and relies on the activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. HIF prolyl hydroxylase domain-2 (PHD2) has long been recognized as the major regulator of this response, controlling a myriad of outcomes that range from cell death to proliferation. However, this enzyme has been associated with more pathways, making the role of this protein remarkably complex under distinct pathologies. While a protective role seems to exist in physiological conditions such as erythropoiesis; the picture is more complex during pathologies such as cancer. Since the regulation of this enzyme and its closest family members is currently considered as a possible therapy for various diseases, understanding the different particular roles of this protein is essential. PMID:27800508

  6. PHD2: from hypoxia regulation to disease progression.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Ana M; Wielockx, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen represents one of the major molecules required for the development and maintenance of life. An adequate response to hypoxia is therefore required for the functioning of the majority of living organisms and relies on the activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. HIF prolyl hydroxylase domain-2 (PHD2) has long been recognized as the major regulator of this response, controlling a myriad of outcomes that range from cell death to proliferation. However, this enzyme has been associated with more pathways, making the role of this protein remarkably complex under distinct pathologies. While a protective role seems to exist in physiological conditions such as erythropoiesis; the picture is more complex during pathologies such as cancer. Since the regulation of this enzyme and its closest family members is currently considered as a possible therapy for various diseases, understanding the different particular roles of this protein is essential.

  7. Mentored peer reviewing for PhD faculty and students.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiayun; Kim, Kyounghae; Kurtz, Melissa; Nolan, Marie T

    2016-02-01

    There is a need for scholars to be prepared as peer reviewers in order to ensure the continual publication of quality science. However, developing the skills to craft a constructive critique can be difficult. In this commentary, we discuss the use of a group peer review mentoring model for PhD students to gain experience in peer review from a faculty member who is experienced in peer review. Central to this model, was the opportunity for each student and faculty mentor to openly discuss their critique of the manuscript. Through this enriching experience, novice researchers were able to learn the elements of a good peer review, better determine a manuscript's substantive contribution to science, and advance the quality of their own manuscript writing.

  8. The Harvard-MIT PHD Program in Bioastronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Laurence R.; Natapoff, Alan

    2008-06-01

    The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI)1 supports a PhD program in Space Life Sciences with a specialty in Bioastronautics at MIT. (A sibling program operates at TAMU.) It gives broad training in life sciences, emphasizes hands-on field experience, provides access to laboratories in the Harvard-MIT community for thesis research, and prepares students for many options in space biomedicine. The Program trains prospective leaders in the field able to manage the challenges of design for the life-hostile space environment. Beyond subject and thesis work, students participate in a summer internship and a clinical preceptorship at a NASA center--and an introduction to clinical medicine and medical engineering.

  9. Earth and Space Science PhD Employment Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesler, J. L.

    2001-05-01

    A recent report by the American Geophysical Union and the American Geological Institute, "Earth and Space Science PhDs, Class of 1999" looked at employment trends of recent graduates. Demographically, our graduates are, as a population, older than those who graduated in any other physical science. While almost one-third of graduates are employed in a different subfield than that of their degree, more than 80% of Earth and space science PhDs secure initial employment in the geosciences. Graduates are finding employment in less than 6 months and the unemployment rate has dropped significantly below that of two years ago. The PhD classes of 1996, 1997, and 1998 had ~ 50% of their graduates taking postdoctoral appointments. In 1999, this declined to only 38% postdocs with an increase in permanent employment in both the education and government sectors. Perception of the job market is improving as well. Respondents are considerably happier than they were in 1996.

  10. Multi-Target Detection from Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanner Using Phd Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, T.; Hiramatsu, D.; Nakanishi, W.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new technique to detect multiple targets from full-waveform airborne laser scanner. We introduce probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter, a type of Bayesian filtering, by which we can estimate the number of targets and their positions simultaneously. PHD filter overcomes some limitations of conventional Gaussian decomposition method; PHD filter doesn't require a priori knowledge on the number of targets, assumption of parametric form of the intensity distribution. In addition, it can take a similarity between successive irradiations into account by modelling relative positions of the same targets spatially. Firstly we explain PHD filter and particle filter implementation to it. Secondly we formulate the multi-target detection problem on PHD filter by modelling components and parameters within it. At last we conducted the experiment on real data of forest and vegetation, and confirmed its ability and accuracy.

  11. The role of PHD2 mutations in the pathogenesis of erythrocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Gardie, Betty; Percy, Melanie J; Hoogewijs, David; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Bento, Celeste; Arsenault, Patrick R; Richard, Stéphane; Almeida, Helena; Ewing, Joanne; Lambert, Frédéric; McMullin, Mary Frances; Schofield, Christopher J; Lee, Frank S

    2014-01-01

    The transcription of the erythropoietin (EPO) gene is tightly regulated by the hypoxia response pathway to maintain oxygen homeostasis. Elevations in serum EPO level may be reflected in an augmentation in the red cell mass, thereby causing erythrocytosis. Studies on erythrocytosis have provided insights into the function of the oxygen-sensing pathway and the critical proteins involved in the regulation of EPO transcription. The α subunits of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor are hydroxylated by three prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) enzymes, which belong to the iron and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenase superfamily. Sequence analysis of the genes encoding the PHDs in patients with erythrocytosis has revealed heterozygous germline mutations only occurring in Egl nine homolog 1 (EGLN1, also known as PHD2), the gene that encodes PHD2. To date, 24 different EGLN1 mutations comprising missense, frameshift, and nonsense mutations have been described. The phenotypes associated with the patients carrying these mutations are fairly homogeneous and typically limited to erythrocytosis with normal to elevated EPO. However, exceptions exist; for example, there is one case with development of concurrent paraganglioma (PHD2-H374R). Analysis of the erythrocytosis-associated PHD2 missense mutations has shown heterogeneous results. Structural studies reveal that mutations can affect different domains of PHD2. Some are close to the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor α/2-oxoglutarate or the iron binding sites for PHD2. In silico studies demonstrate that the mutations do not always affect fully conserved residues. In vitro and in cellulo studies showed varying effects of the mutations, ranging from mild effects to severe loss of function. The exact mechanism of a potential tumor-suppressor role for PHD2 still needs to be elucidated. A knockin mouse model expressing the first reported PHD2-P317R mutation recapitulates the phenotype observed in humans (erythrocytosis with

  12. Prolyl-4-Hydroxylase 3 (PHD3) Expression Is Downregulated during Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Place, Trenton L.; Nauseef, Jones T.; Peterson, Maina K.; Henry, Michael D.; Mezhir, James J.; Domann, Frederick E.

    2013-01-01

    Prolyl-4-hydroxylation by the intracellular prolyl-4-hydroxylase enzymes (PHD1-3) serves as a master regulator of environmental oxygen sensing. The activity of these enzymes is tightly tied to tumorigenesis, as they regulate cell metabolism and angiogenesis through their control of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stability. PHD3 specifically, is gaining attention for its broad function and rapidly accumulating array of non-HIF target proteins. Data from several recent studies suggest a role for PHD3 in the regulation of cell morphology and cell migration. In this study, we aimed to investigate this role by closely examining the relationship between PHD3 expression and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT); a transcriptional program that plays a major role in controlling cell morphology and migratory capacity. Using human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cell lines and Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells, we examined the correlation between several markers of EMT and PHD3 expression. We demonstrated that loss of PHD3 expression in PDA cell lines is highly correlated with a mesenchymal-like morphology and an increase in cell migratory capacity. We also found that induction of EMT in MDCK cells resulted in the specific downregulation of PHD3, whereas the expression of the other HIF-PHD enzymes was not affected. The results of this study clearly support a model by which the basal expression and hypoxic induction of PHD3 is suppressed by the EMT transcriptional program. This may be a novel mechanism by which migratory or metastasizing cells alter signaling through specific pathways that are sensitive to regulation by O2. The identification of downstream pathways that are affected by the suppression of PHD3 expression during EMT may provide important insight into the crosstalk between O2 and the migratory and metastatic potential of tumor cells. PMID:24367580

  13. Identification of the phd gene cluster responsible for phenylpropanoid utilization in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Kallscheuer, Nicolai; Vogt, Michael; Kappelmann, Jannick; Krumbach, Karin; Noack, Stephan; Bott, Michael; Marienhagen, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Phenylpropanoids as abundant, lignin-derived compounds represent sustainable feedstocks for biotechnological production processes. We found that the biotechnologically important soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum is able to grow on phenylpropanoids such as p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid, and 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid as sole carbon and energy sources. Global gene expression analyses identified a gene cluster (cg0340-cg0341 and cg0344-cg0347), which showed increased transcription levels in response to phenylpropanoids. The gene cg0340 (designated phdT) encodes for a putative transporter protein, whereas cg0341 and cg0344-cg0347 (phdA-E) encode enzymes involved in the β-oxidation of phenylpropanoids. The phd gene cluster is transcriptionally controlled by a MarR-type repressor encoded by cg0343 (phdR). Cultivation experiments conducted with C. glutamicum strains carrying single-gene deletions showed that loss of phdA, phdB, phdC, or phdE abolished growth of C. glutamicum with all phenylpropanoid substrates tested. The deletion of phdD (encoding for putative acyl-CoA dehydrogenase) additionally abolished growth with the α,β-saturated phenylpropanoid 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid. However, the observed growth defect of all constructed single-gene deletion strains could be abolished through plasmid-borne expression of the respective genes. These results and the intracellular accumulation of pathway intermediates determined via LC-ESI-MS/MS in single-gene deletion mutants showed that the phd gene cluster encodes for a CoA-dependent, β-oxidative deacetylation pathway, which is essential for the utilization of phenylpropanoids in C. glutamicum.

  14. Modelling Research: A Collaborative Approach to Helping PhD Students Develop Higher-Level Research Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Perez, Alexeis; Ayres, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A high proportion of PhD candidates in science and engineering fail to complete their degrees. This paper reports the results of a series of workshops where experienced researchers and supervisors were brought together with PhD students to discuss and develop a model of the PhD process. The objective was to help students develop a more rounded and…

  15. Modelling Research: A Collaborative Approach to Helping PhD Students Develop Higher-Level Research Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Perez, Alexeis; Ayres, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A high proportion of PhD candidates in science and engineering fail to complete their degrees. This paper reports the results of a series of workshops where experienced researchers and supervisors were brought together with PhD students to discuss and develop a model of the PhD process. The objective was to help students develop a more rounded and…

  16. Genome-wide identification, classification and expression analysis of the PHD-finger protein family in Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shengnan; Wu, Min; Dong, Qing; Jiang, Haiyang; Cai, Ronghao; Xiang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The plant homeobox domain (PHD) proteins are widespread in eukaryotes, and play important roles in regulating chromatin and transcription. Comprehensive analyses of PHD-finger proteins have been performed in animals, but few plant PHD-finger proteins involved in growth and development have been characterized functionally. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide survey of PHD-finger proteins in Populus trichocarpa by describing the phylogenetic relationship, gene structure, and chromosomal location and microarray analyses of each predicted PHD-finger family member. We identified 73 PHD-finger genes (PtPHD1-73) and classified them into eleven subfamilies (A-K) by phylogenetic analysis. Seventy-two of the 73 genes were unevenly distributed on all 19 chromosomes, with seven segmental duplication events. Analysis of the Ka (non-synonymous substitution rate)/Ks (synonymous substitution rate) ratios suggested that the duplicated genes of the PHD-finger family mainly underwent purifying selection with restrictive functional divergence after the duplication events. Expression profiles analysis indicated that 67 PHD-finger genes were differentially expressed in various tissues. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses of nine selected PtPHD genes under high salinity, drought and cold stresses were also performed to explore their stress-related expression patterns. The results of this study provide a thorough overview of poplar PHD-finger proteins and will be valuable for further functional research of poplar PHD-finger genes to unravel their biological roles.

  17. Integrative research on environmental and landscape change: PhD students' motivations and challenges.

    PubMed

    Tress, Bärbel; Tress, Gunther; Fry, Gary

    2009-07-01

    The growing demand for integrative (interdisciplinary or transdisciplinary) approaches in the field of environmental and landscape change has increased the number of PhD students working in this area. Yet, the motivations to join integrative projects and the challenges for PhD students have so far not been investigated. The aims of this paper were to identify the understanding of PhD students with regard to integrative research, their motivations to join integrative projects, their expectations in terms of integration and results, and to reveal the challenges they face in integrative projects. We collected data by a questionnaire survey of 104 PhD students attending five PhD Master Classes held from 2003 to 2006. We used manual content analysis to analyse the free-text answers. The results revealed that students lack a differentiated understanding of integrative approaches. The main motivations to join integrative projects were the dissertation subject, the practical relevance of the project, the intellectual stimulation of working with different disciplines, and the belief that integrative research is more innovative. Expectations in terms of integration were high. Core challenges for integration included intellectual and external challenges such as lack of knowledge of other disciplines, knowledge transfer, reaching depth, supervision, lack of exchange with other students and time demands. To improve the situation for PhD students, we suggest improving knowledge on integrative approaches, balancing practical applicability with theoretical advancement, providing formal introductions to other fields of research, and enhancing institutional support for integrative PhD projects.

  18. Academic and research misconduct in the PhD: issues for students and supervisors.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Theresa; Carroll, Jude

    2008-02-01

    There are many pressures upon PhD students not least the requirement to make an original or significant contribution to knowledge. Some students, confronted with complex research processes, might adopt practices that compromise standards that are unacceptable within a research community. These practices challenge the PhD student-supervisor relationship and have implication for the individual, the supervisory team, the institution, the awarding body and the wider research context. Discussion relating to misconduct within the PhD is of international importance if the aim is to encourage and facilitate rigorous research practice. Cases involving academic and research misconduct, especially those occurring at PhD level, are likely to become more frequent as numbers of PhD students increase and will demand appropriate, defensible responses from supervisors. Misconduct during PhD study can be difficult to resolve because of lack of clarity in definitions, supervisor naiveté and failure to acknowledge students' decision making limitations. Using scenarios from the first author's supervisory practice to illustrate issues of concern for students and supervisors during PhD supervision, the authors aim to illuminate the importance of engagement with regulatory bodies; problems of knowledge and understanding transfer; culturally specific issues and meanings of academic theft.

  19. Loss of PHD3 allows tumours to overcome hypoxic growth inhibition and sustain proliferation through EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Henze, Anne-Theres; Garvalov, Boyan K.; Seidel, Sascha; Cuesta, Angel M.; Ritter, Mathias; Filatova, Alina; Foss, Franziska; Dopeso, Higinio; Essmann, Clara L.; Maxwell, Patrick H.; Reifenberger, Guido; Carmeliet, Peter; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Acker, Till

    2014-01-01

    Solid tumours are exposed to microenvironmental factors such as hypoxia that normally inhibit cell growth. However, tumour cells are capable of counteracting these signals through mechanisms that are largely unknown. Here we show that the prolyl hydroxylase PHD3 restrains tumour growth in response to microenvironmental cues through the control of EGFR. PHD3 silencing in human gliomas or genetic deletion in a murine high-grade astrocytoma model markedly promotes tumour growth and the ability of tumours to continue growing under unfavourable conditions. The growth-suppressive function of PHD3 is independent of the established PHD3 targets HIF and NF-κB and its hydroxylase activity. Instead, loss of PHD3 results in hyperphosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Importantly, epigenetic/genetic silencing of PHD3 preferentially occurs in gliomas without EGFR amplification. Our findings reveal that PHD3 inactivation provides an alternative route of EGFR activation through which tumour cells sustain proliferative signalling even under conditions of limited oxygen availability. PMID:25420773

  20. Haematopoietic malignancies caused by dysregulation of a chromatin-binding PHD finger

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gang G.; Song, Jikui; Wang, Zhanxin; Dormann, Holger L.; Casadio, Fabio; Li, Haitao; Luo, Jun-Li; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Allis, C. David

    2009-07-21

    Histone H3 lysine4 methylation (H3K4me) has been proposed as a critical component in regulating gene expression, epigenetic states, and cellular identities. The biological meaning of H3K4me is interpreted by conserved modules including plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers that recognize varied H3K4me states. The dysregulation of PHD fingers has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancers and immune or neurological disorders. Here we report that fusing an H3K4-trimethylation (H3K4me3)-binding PHD finger, such as the carboxy-terminal PHD finger of PHF23 or JARID1A (also known as KDM5A or RBBP2), to a common fusion partner nucleoporin-98 (NUP98) as identified in human leukaemias, generated potent oncoproteins that arrested haematopoietic differentiation and induced acute myeloid leukaemia in murine models. In these processes, a PHD finger that specifically recognizes H3K4me3/2 marks was essential for leukaemogenesis. Mutations in PHD fingers that abrogated H3K4me3 binding also abolished leukaemic transformation. NUP98-PHD fusion prevented the differentiation-associated removal of H3K4me3 at many loci encoding lineage-specific transcription factors (Hox(s), Gata3, Meis1, Eya1 and Pbx1), and enforced their active gene transcription in murine haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Mechanistically, NUP98-PHD fusions act as 'chromatin boundary factors', dominating over polycomb-mediated gene silencing to 'lock' developmentally critical loci into an active chromatin state (H3K4me3 with induced histone acetylation), a state that defined leukaemia stem cells. Collectively, our studies represent, to our knowledge, the first report that deregulation of the PHD finger, an 'effector' of specific histone modification, perturbs the epigenetic dynamics on developmentally critical loci, catastrophizes cellular fate decision-making, and even causes oncogenesis during mammalian development.

  1. Haematopoietic malignancies caused by dysregulation of a chromatin-binding PHD finger.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang G; Song, Jikui; Wang, Zhanxin; Dormann, Holger L; Casadio, Fabio; Li, Haitao; Luo, Jun-Li; Patel, Dinshaw J; Allis, C David

    2009-06-11

    Histone H3 lysine 4 methylation (H3K4me) has been proposed as a critical component in regulating gene expression, epigenetic states, and cellular identities1. The biological meaning of H3K4me is interpreted by conserved modules including plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers that recognize varied H3K4me states. The dysregulation of PHD fingers has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancers and immune or neurological disorders. Here we report that fusing an H3K4-trimethylation (H3K4me3)-binding PHD finger, such as the carboxy-terminal PHD finger of PHF23 or JARID1A (also known as KDM5A or RBBP2), to a common fusion partner nucleoporin-98 (NUP98) as identified in human leukaemias, generated potent oncoproteins that arrested haematopoietic differentiation and induced acute myeloid leukaemia in murine models. In these processes, a PHD finger that specifically recognizes H3K4me3/2 marks was essential for leukaemogenesis. Mutations in PHD fingers that abrogated H3K4me3 binding also abolished leukaemic transformation. NUP98-PHD fusion prevented the differentiation-associated removal of H3K4me3 at many loci encoding lineage-specific transcription factors (Hox(s), Gata3, Meis1, Eya1 and Pbx1), and enforced their active gene transcription in murine haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Mechanistically, NUP98-PHD fusions act as 'chromatin boundary factors', dominating over polycomb-mediated gene silencing to 'lock' developmentally critical loci into an active chromatin state (H3K4me3 with induced histone acetylation), a state that defined leukaemia stem cells. Collectively, our studies represent, to our knowledge, the first report that deregulation of the PHD finger, an 'effector' of specific histone modification, perturbs the epigenetic dynamics on developmentally critical loci, catastrophizes cellular fate decision-making, and even causes oncogenesis during mammalian development.

  2. A Knock-in Mouse Model of Human PHD2 Gene-associated Erythrocytosis Establishes a Haploinsufficiency Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Patrick R.; Pei, Fei; Lee, Rebecca; Kerestes, Heddy; Percy, Melanie J.; Keith, Brian; Simon, M. Celeste; Lappin, Terence R. J.; Khurana, Tejvir S.; Lee, Frank S.

    2013-01-01

    The central pathway for controlling red cell mass is the PHD (prolyl hydroxylase domain protein):hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. HIF, which is negatively regulated by PHD, activates numerous genes, including ones involved in erythropoiesis, such as the ERYTHROPOIETIN (EPO) gene. Recent studies have implicated PHD2 as the key PHD isoform regulating red cell mass. Studies of humans have identified erythrocytosis-associated, heterozygous point mutations in the PHD2 gene. A key question concerns the mechanism by which human mutations lead to phenotypes. In the present report, we generated and characterized a mouse line in which a P294R knock-in mutation has been introduced into the mouse Phd2 locus to model the first reported human PHD2 mutation (P317R). Phd2P294R/+ mice display a degree of erythrocytosis equivalent to that seen in Phd2+/− mice. The Phd2P294R/+-associated erythrocytosis is reversed in a Hif2a+/−, but not a Hif1a+/− background. Additional studies using various conditional knock-outs of Phd2 reveal that erythrocytosis can be induced by homozygous and heterozygous knock-out of Phd2 in renal cortical interstitial cells using a Pax3-Cre transgene or by homozygous knock-out of Phd2 in hematopoietic progenitors driven by a Vav1-Cre transgene. These studies formally prove that a missense mutation in PHD2 is the cause of the erythrocytosis, show that this occurs through haploinsufficiency, and point to multifactorial control of red cell mass by PHD2. PMID:24121508

  3. The intrinsically disordered domain of the antitoxin Phd chaperones the toxin Doc against irreversible inactivation and misfolding.

    PubMed

    De Gieter, Steven; Konijnenberg, Albert; Talavera, Ariel; Butterer, Annika; Haesaerts, Sarah; De Greve, Henri; Sobott, Frank; Loris, Remy; Garcia-Pino, Abel

    2014-12-05

    The toxin Doc from the phd/doc toxin-antitoxin module targets the cellular translation machinery and is inhibited by its antitoxin partner Phd. Here we show that Phd also functions as a chaperone, keeping Doc in an active, correctly folded conformation. In the absence of Phd, Doc exists in a relatively expanded state that is prone to dimerization through domain swapping with its active site loop acting as hinge region. The domain-swapped dimer is not capable of arresting protein synthesis in vitro, whereas the Doc monomer is. Upon binding to Phd, Doc becomes more compact and is secured in its monomeric state with a neutralized active site.

  4. Systematic Analysis of the Maize PHD-Finger Gene Family Reveals a Subfamily Involved in Abiotic Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianqian; Liu, Jinyang; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Yang; Jiang, Haiyang; Cheng, Beijiu

    2015-09-30

    Plant homeodomain (PHD)-finger proteins were found universally in eukaryotes and known as key players in regulating transcription and chromatin structure. Many PHD-finger proteins have been well studied on structure and function in animals. Whereas, only a few of plant PHD-finger factors had been characterized, and majority of PHD-finger proteins were functionally unclear. In this study, a complete comprehensive analysis of maize PHD family is presented. Sixty-seven PHD-finger genes in maize were identified and further divided into ten groups according to phylogenetic analysis that was supported by motif and intron/exon analysis. These genes were unevenly distributed on ten chromosomes and contained 12 segmental duplication events, suggesting that segmental duplications were the major contributors in expansion of the maize PHD family. The paralogous genes mainly experienced purifying selection with restrictive functional divergence after the duplication events on the basis of the Ka/Ks ratio. Gene digital expression analysis showed that the PHD family had a wide expression profile in maize development. In addition, 15 potential stress response genes were detected by promoter cis-element and expression analysis. Two proteins ZmPHD14 and ZmPHD19 were located in the nucleus. These results provided a solid base for future functional genome study of the PHD-finger family in maize and afforded important clues for characterizing and cloning potentially important candidates in response to abiotic stresses.

  5. Evaluation of the Beckman Coulter UniCel DxH 800 and Abbott Diagnostics Cell-Dyn Sapphire hematology analyzers on pediatric and neonatal specimens in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Tan, Brent T; Nava, Armando J; George, Tracy I

    2011-06-01

    We evaluated the new UniCel DxH 800 hematology analyzer (Beckman Coulter, Miami, FL) vs the Cell-Dyn Sapphire (Abbott Diagnostics, Santa Clara, CA) using 156 pediatric specimens in Microtainer tubes (Becton Dickinson, Franklin Lakes, NJ). The CBC and differential showed good interinstrument correlation, including WBCs (r = 0.995), RBCs (r = 0.992), hemoglobin (r = 0.998), mean corpuscular volume (r = 0.988), platelets (r = 0.997), neutrophils (r = 0.988), lymphocytes (r = 0.984), monocytes (r = 0.815), eosinophils (r = 0.840), basophils (r = 0.049), and nucleated RBCs (NRBCs; r = 0.906). In the instrument vs 400-cell manual differential comparison, the DxH 800 and Sapphire showed comparable performance for nearly all parameters except for NRBCs, for which the DxH 800 correlated better (r = 0.989) than the Sapphire (r = 0.906). We also compared clinical efficiency by determining whether flagged specimens showed abnormalities on a peripheral blood smear as defined by International Council for Standardization in Haematology criteria. The efficiency of the DxH 800 was 78.0% vs the Sapphire at 68.1%. Both instruments showed identical sensitivity (91.1%), but the specificity for the DxH 800 (71.9%) was higher than that of the Sapphire (57.3%).

  6. A New Venture in Graduate Education: Co-Op Ph.D. Programme in Chemical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahidy, Thomas Z.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a cooperative Ph.D. program at the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, in which industrial and governmental employers participate with the Department of Chemical Engineering in training chemical engineers. (CS)

  7. Improved Bearings-Only Multi-Target Tracking with GM-PHD Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Song, Taek Lyul

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an improved nonlinear Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD) filter is proposed to address bearings-only measurements in multi-target tracking. The proposed method, called the Gaussian mixture measurements-probability hypothesis density (GMM-PHD) filter, not only approximates the posterior intensity using a Gaussian mixture, but also models the likelihood function with a Gaussian mixture instead of a single Gaussian distribution. Besides, the target birth model of the GMM-PHD filter is assumed to be partially uniform instead of a Gaussian mixture. Simulation results show that the proposed filter outperforms the GM-PHD filter embedded with the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF). PMID:27626423

  8. Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., to Retire as NCI Associate Director for Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    On December 2, Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., director, Office of Scientific Operations, and NCI associate director for Frederick, will put the finishing touches on a 37-year career with the National Cancer Institute.

  9. A New Venture in Graduate Education: Co-Op Ph.D. Programme in Chemical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahidy, Thomas Z.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a cooperative Ph.D. program at the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, in which industrial and governmental employers participate with the Department of Chemical Engineering in training chemical engineers. (CS)

  10. Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., to Retire as NCI Associate Director for Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    On December 2, Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., director, Office of Scientific Operations, and NCI associate director for Frederick, will put the finishing touches on a 37-year career with the National Cancer Institute.

  11. Improved Bearings-Only Multi-Target Tracking with GM-PHD Filtering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Song, Taek Lyul

    2016-09-10

    In this paper, an improved nonlinear Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD) filter is proposed to address bearings-only measurements in multi-target tracking. The proposed method, called the Gaussian mixture measurements-probability hypothesis density (GMM-PHD) filter, not only approximates the posterior intensity using a Gaussian mixture, but also models the likelihood function with a Gaussian mixture instead of a single Gaussian distribution. Besides, the target birth model of the GMM-PHD filter is assumed to be partially uniform instead of a Gaussian mixture. Simulation results show that the proposed filter outperforms the GM-PHD filter embedded with the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF).

  12. Diverse functions of PHD fingers of the MLL/KMT2 subfamily.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muzaffar; Hom, Robert A; Blakeslee, Weston; Ikenouye, Larissa; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2014-02-01

    Five members of the KMT2 family of lysine methyltransferases, originally named the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL1-5) proteins, regulate gene expression during embryogenesis and development. Each KMT2A-E contains a catalytic SET domain that methylates lysine 4 of histone H3, and one or several PHD fingers. Over the past few years a growing number of studies have uncovered diverse biological roles of the KMT2A-E PHD fingers, implicating them in binding to methylated histones and other nuclear proteins, and in mediating the E3 ligase activity and dimerization. Mutations in the PHD fingers or deletion of these modules are linked to human diseases including cancer and Kabuki syndrome. In this work, we summarize recently identified biological functions of the KMT2A-E PHD fingers, discuss mechanisms of their action, and examine preference of these domains for histone and non-histone ligands.

  13. Authoring a PhD Patrick Dunleavy Authoring a PhD Palgrave Macmillan No of pages: 300 £16.99 1403905843 1403905843 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2003-10-01

    This is a clever book. The author has recognised that potential PhD students are offered thorough advice regarding their chosen topic as well as areas such as data analysis, but when it comes to the crucial area of authoring skills advice can be scant or non-existent. This is clearly an oversight on the part of many educational establishments; the skills required in authoring a 'big book' style of PhD of some 80,000 to 100,000 words from conceptualisation through to completion are not innate.

  14. Articulating Expectations for PhD Candidature upon Commencement: Ensuring Supervisor/Student "Best Fit"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxham, Lorna; Dwyer, Trudy; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2013-01-01

    The journey towards completion of a PhD is a bumpy one for many. One of the major factors that influence successful and on-time thesis completion is the relationship that the PhD candidate has with her or his supervisor. This paper presents results from research undertaken using a 12-item survey to collect data from a purposive sample: PhD…

  15. Final Report: Support for Polytechnic PhD Student, September 24, 1996 - June 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Myerson, Allan S.

    2000-01-19

    Polytechnic University PhD student working on research projects in the area of fossil energy and renewable energy were supported in this program and did their research work at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the Department of Applied Sciences. One of these students had completed an MS degree in Chemical Engineering at Howard University while doing his research at Brookhaven. This student continued his studies by becoming a Polytechnic PhD student while doing his research work at Brookhaven.

  16. Articulating Expectations for PhD Candidature upon Commencement: Ensuring Supervisor/Student "Best Fit"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxham, Lorna; Dwyer, Trudy; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2013-01-01

    The journey towards completion of a PhD is a bumpy one for many. One of the major factors that influence successful and on-time thesis completion is the relationship that the PhD candidate has with her or his supervisor. This paper presents results from research undertaken using a 12-item survey to collect data from a purposive sample: PhD…

  17. SMC-PHD-based multi-target tracking with reduced peak extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Darcy; Tharmarasa, Ratnasingham; Lang, Thomas; Kirubarajan, T.

    2009-08-01

    The Probability Hypothesis Density (PHD) filter is a powerful new tool in the field of multitarget tracking. Unlike classical multi-target tracking approaches, such as Multiple Hypothesis Tracking (MHT), in each scan it provides a complete solution to multi-target state estimation without the necessity for explicit measurement-to-track data association. The PHD filter recursively propagates the first order moment of the multi-target posterior. This allows us to determine the expected number of targets as well as their state estimates at each scan. However, there is no implicit connection between the target state estimates in consecutive scans. In this paper, a new cluster-based approach is proposed for track labeling in the Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC i.e. particle filter based) PHD filter. The method associates a likelihood vector to each particle in the SMC estimate. This vector indicates the likelihood that the particle estimate belongs to each of the established target tracks. This likelihood vector is propagated along with the PHD moment and updated with the PHD function. By maintaining a set of associations from scan to scan, the new method provides a complete PHD solution for a multi-target tracking application over time. The method is tested on both clean and noisy multi-target tracking scenarios and the results are compared to some previously published methods.

  18. MS PHD'S: Effective Strategies for the Retention and Advancement of URM Students in ESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalera, J.; Burgess, A. K.; Pace, L.; Scott, O.; Strickland, J.; Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ithier-Guzman, W.

    2012-12-01

    The Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S) Professional Development Program in Earth system science (ESS) is a model initiative for improving the retention of underrepresented minority (URM) students in STEM fields. Entering its ninth cohort, MS PHD'S remains committed to helping URM undergraduate and graduate students achieve outstanding careers in ESS. MS PHD'S facilitates URM student achievement through a three-phase program designed to increase student exposure to the ESS community. By engaging in a series of professional development and skill building exercises, peer-to-peer community building activities, participation in scientific society conferences and workshops, mentoring by URM and other scientists, and a virtual community, URM students gain the confidence and support necessary to achieve their academic goals and enter the ESS workforce. Since its inception, MS PHD'S continues to support 189 participants. Of these 189 participants, 35 have advanced from undergraduate and graduate academic pathways to completion of their PhD and another 60 are currently enrolled in doctoral programs. MS PHD'S maintains close ties with program alumni to further support retention, inclusivity, and broadening participation of URM students and graduates in STEM activities. Its model is built on reengaging alumni to become mentors and leaders for each new cohort as well as facilitating valuable opportunities for alumni to advance in their ESS related academic and professional career pathways.

  19. Structure of human Sp140 PHD finger: an atypical fold interacting with Pin1.

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Chiara; Tamburri, Simone; Quilici, Giacomo; Palagano, Eleonora; Berardi, Andrea; Saare, Mario; Peterson, Pärt; Bachi, Angela; Musco, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Sp140 is a nuclear leukocyte-specific protein involved in primary biliary cirrhosis and a risk factor in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The presence of several chromatin related modules such as plant homeodomain (PHD), bromodomain and SAND domain suggests a role in chromatin-mediated regulation of gene expression; however, its real function is still elusive. Herein we present the solution structure of Sp140-PHD finger and investigate its role as epigenetic reader in vitro. Sp140-PHD presents an atypical PHD finger fold which does not bind to histone H3 tails but is recognized by peptidylprolyl isomerase Pin1. Pin1 specifically binds to a phosphopeptide corresponding to the L3 loop of Sp140-PHD and catalyzes cis-trans isomerization of a pThr-Pro bond. Moreover co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate FLAG-Sp140 interaction with endogenous Pin1 in vivo. Overall these data include Sp140 in the list of the increasing number of Pin1 binders and expand the regulatory potential of PHD fingers as versatile structural platforms for diversified interactions.

  20. Solution NMR structure and histone binding of the PHD domain of human MLL5.

    PubMed

    Lemak, Alexander; Yee, Adelinda; Wu, Hong; Yap, Damian; Zeng, Hong; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Houliston, Scott; Aparicio, Samuel; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H

    2013-01-01

    Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5) is a histone methyltransferase that plays a key role in hematopoiesis, spermatogenesis and cell cycle progression. In addition to its catalytic domain, MLL5 contains a PHD finger domain, a protein module that is often involved in binding to the N-terminus of histone H3. Here we report the NMR solution structure of the MLL5 PHD domain showing a variant of the canonical PHD fold that combines conserved H3 binding features from several classes of other PHD domains (including an aromatic cage) along with a novel C-terminal α-helix, not previously seen. We further demonstrate that the PHD domain binds with similar affinity to histone H3 tail peptides di- and tri-methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me2 and H3K4me3), the former being the putative product of the MLL5 catalytic reaction. This work establishes the PHD domain of MLL5 as a bone fide 'reader' domain of H3K4 methyl marks suggesting that it may guide the spreading or further methylation of this site on chromatin.

  1. Hyperplasia of pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEB) in lungs of prolyl hydroxylase -1(PHD-1) deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Yeger, Herman; Ratcliffe, Peter; Bishop, Tammie; Cutz, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary NEB, widely distributed within the airway mucosa of mammalian lungs, are presumed hypoxia sensitive airway O(2) sensors responding to changes in airway gas concentration. NEB cell hyperplasia has been reported after exposure to chronic hypoxia and in a variety of paediatric and adult lung disorders. Prolyl hydroxylases (PHD 1-3) regulate the stability of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF's) in an O(2)-dependent manner and function as intrinsic oxygen sensors. To determine a possible role of PHD-1in NEB cells we have quantitated NEB's in lungs of neonatal (P2) and adult (2 months) PHD-1-deficient mice and compared them to wild type (WT) control mice. Lung tissues fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin were processed for immunoperoxidase method and frozen sections for multilabel immunoflourescence using antibodies for NEB markers synaptophysin, synaptic vesicle protein 2 and the peptide CGRP. The frequency and size of NEB in lungs of PHD-1 deficient neonatal mice (P2) and at 2 months was increased significantly compared to WT controls (p < 0.01). The present data suggests an important role for PHD enzymes in NEB cell biology deserving further studies. Since the PHD-1 deficient mouse appears to be the first animal model showing NEB cell hyperplasia it may be useful for studies of NEB physiology and pathobiology.

  2. Inhibition of the oxygen sensor PHD2 in the liver improves survival in lactic acidosis by activating the Cori cycle.

    PubMed

    Suhara, Tomohiro; Hishiki, Takako; Kasahara, Masataka; Hayakawa, Noriyo; Oyaizu, Tomoko; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akiko; Morisaki, Hiroshi; Kaelin, William G; Suematsu, Makoto; Minamishima, Yoji Andrew

    2015-09-15

    Loss of prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) activates the hypoxia-inducible factor-dependent hypoxic response, including anaerobic glycolysis, which causes large amounts of lactate to be released from cells into the circulation. We found that Phd2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) produced more lactate than wild-type MEFs, as expected, whereas systemic inactivation of PHD2 in mice did not cause hyperlacticacidemia. This unexpected observation led us to hypothesize that the hypoxic response activated in the liver enhances the Cori cycle, a lactate-glucose carbon recycling system between muscle and liver, and thereby decreases circulating lactate. Consistent with this hypothesis, blood lactate levels measured after a treadmill or lactate tolerance test were significantly lower in Phd2-liver-specific knockout (Phd2-LKO) mice than in control mice. An in vivo (13)C-labeled lactate incorporation assay revealed that the livers of Phd2-LKO mice produce significantly more glucose derived from (13)C-labeled lactate than control mice, suggesting that blockade of PHD2 in the liver ameliorates lactic acidosis by activating gluconeogenesis from lactate. Phd2-LKO mice were resistant to lactic acidosis induced by injection of a lethal dose of lactate, displaying a significant elongation of survival. Moreover, oral administration of a PHD inhibitor improved survival in an endotoxin shock mice model. These data suggest that PHD2 is a potentially novel drug target for the treatment of lactic acidosis, which is a serious and often fatal complication observed in some critically ill patients.

  3. Preparing for Graduate-Level Training in Professional Psychology: Comparisons across Clinical PhD, Counseling PhD, and Clinical PsyD Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karazsia, Bryan T.; Smith, Lena

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, faculty who teach in clinical and counseling doctor of philosophy (PhD) or doctor of psychology (PsyD) programs completed surveys regarding preferences for prospective student preparations to graduate programs. Faculty expectations of minimum and ideal undergraduate training were highest for scientific methods, though…

  4. Professional Socialization for the Ph.D.: An Exploration of Career and Professional Development Preparedness and Readiness for Ph.D. Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helm, Matt; Campa, Henry, III; Moretto, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to uncover the career readiness and professional development needs of Ph.D. students at a large, Midwestern research university. Findings indicate that career goals of graduate students change over time, skill preparation for academic and non-academic careers continues to be inadequate for many students and professional…

  5. Academic Experiences of International PhD Students in Australian Higher Education: From an EAP Program to a PhD Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Jeong-Bae; Park, Sang-Soon

    2014-01-01

    For the last few decades, Australia has played a pivotal role in the supply of quality education to international students and other educational industries associated with them. In the higher education sector, in particular, international PhD student numbers continue to increase. However, the limited availability of resources for the students and…

  6. Professional Socialization for the Ph.D.: An Exploration of Career and Professional Development Preparedness and Readiness for Ph.D. Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helm, Matt; Campa, Henry, III; Moretto, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to uncover the career readiness and professional development needs of Ph.D. students at a large, Midwestern research university. Findings indicate that career goals of graduate students change over time, skill preparation for academic and non-academic careers continues to be inadequate for many students and professional…

  7. Preparing for Graduate-Level Training in Professional Psychology: Comparisons across Clinical PhD, Counseling PhD, and Clinical PsyD Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karazsia, Bryan T.; Smith, Lena

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, faculty who teach in clinical and counseling doctor of philosophy (PhD) or doctor of psychology (PsyD) programs completed surveys regarding preferences for prospective student preparations to graduate programs. Faculty expectations of minimum and ideal undergraduate training were highest for scientific methods, though…

  8. A PHD-polycomb repressive complex 2 triggers the epigenetic silencing of FLC during vernalization.

    PubMed

    De Lucia, Filomena; Crevillen, Pedro; Jones, Alexandra M E; Greb, Thomas; Dean, Caroline

    2008-11-04

    Vernalization, the acceleration of flowering by winter, involves cold-induced epigenetic silencing of Arabidopsis FLC. This process has been shown to require conserved Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) components including the Su(z)12 homologue, VRN2, and two plant homeodomain (PHD) finger proteins, VRN5 and VIN3. However, the sequence of events leading to FLC repression was unclear. Here we show that, contrary to expectations, VRN2 associates throughout the FLC locus independently of cold. The vernalization-induced silencing is triggered by the cold-dependent association of the PHD finger protein VRN5 to a specific domain in FLC intron 1, and this association is dependent on the cold-induced PHD protein VIN3. In plants returned to warm conditions, VRN5 distribution changes, and it associates more broadly over FLC, coincident with significant increases in H3K27me3. Biochemical purification of a VRN5 complex showed that during prolonged cold a PHD-PRC2 complex forms composed of core PRC2 components (VRN2, SWINGER [an E(Z) HMTase homologue], FIE [an ESC homologue], MSI1 [p55 homologue]), and three related PHD finger proteins, VRN5, VIN3, and VEL1. The PHD-PRC2 activity increases H3K27me3 throughout the locus to levels sufficient for stable silencing. Arabidopsis PHD-PRC2 thus seems to act similarly to Pcl-PRC2 of Drosophila and PHF1-PRC2 of mammals. These data show FLC silencing involves changed composition and dynamic redistribution of Polycomb complexes at different stages of the vernalization process, a mechanism with greater parallels to Polycomb silencing of certain mammalian loci than the classic Drosophila Polycomb targets.

  9. Comparison of five automated hematology analyzers in a university hospital setting: Abbott Cell-Dyn Sapphire, Beckman Coulter DxH 800, Siemens Advia 2120i, Sysmex XE-5000, and Sysmex XN-2000.

    PubMed

    Bruegel, Mathias; Nagel, Dorothea; Funk, Manuela; Fuhrmann, Petra; Zander, Johannes; Teupser, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Various types of automated hematology analyzers are used in clinical laboratories. Here, we performed a side-by-side comparison of five current top of the range routine hematology analyzers in the setting of a university hospital central laboratory. Complete blood counts (CBC), differentials, reticulocyte and nucleated red blood cell (NRBC) counts of 349 patient samples, randomly taken out of routine diagnostics, were analyzed with Cell-Dyn Sapphire (Abbott), DxH 800 (Beckman Coulter), Advia 2120i (Siemens), XE-5000 and XN-2000 (Sysmex). Inter-instrument comparison of CBCs including reticulocyte and NRBC counts and investigation of flagging quality in relation to microscopy were performed with the complete set of samples. Inter-instrument comparison of five-part differential was performed using samples without atypical cells in blood smear (n=292). Automated five-part differentials and NRBCs were additionally compared with microscopy. The five analyzers showed a good concordance for basic blood count parameters. Correlations between instruments were less well for reticulocyte counts, NRBCs, and differentials. The poorest concordance for NRBCs with microscopy was observed for Advia 2120i (Kendall's τb=0.37). The highest flagging sensitivity for blasts was observed for XN-2000 (97% compared to 65%-76% for other analyzers), whereas overall specificity was comparable between different instruments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most comprehensive side-by-side comparison of five current top of the range routine hematology analyzers. Variable analyzer quality and parameter specific limitations must be considered in defining laboratory algorithms in clinical practice.

  10. Deletion or Inhibition of the Oxygen Sensor PHD1 Protects against Ischemic Stroke via Reprogramming of Neuronal Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Quaegebeur, Annelies; Segura, Inmaculada; Schmieder, Roberta; Verdegem, Dries; Decimo, Ilaria; Bifari, Francesco; Dresselaers, Tom; Eelen, Guy; Ghosh, Debapriva; Davidson, Shawn M; Schoors, Sandra; Broekaert, Dorien; Cruys, Bert; Govaerts, Kristof; De Legher, Carla; Bouché, Ann; Schoonjans, Luc; Ramer, Matt S; Hung, Gene; Bossaert, Goele; Cleveland, Don W; Himmelreich, Uwe; Voets, Thomas; Lemmens, Robin; Bennett, C Frank; Robberecht, Wim; De Bock, Katrien; Dewerchin, Mieke; Ghesquière, Bart; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-02-09

    The oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs) regulate cellular metabolism, but their role in neuronal metabolism during stroke is unknown. Here we report that PHD1 deficiency provides neuroprotection in a murine model of permanent brain ischemia. This was not due to an increased collateral vessel network. Instead, PHD1(-/-) neurons were protected against oxygen-nutrient deprivation by reprogramming glucose metabolism. Indeed, PHD1(-/-) neurons enhanced glucose flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway by diverting glucose away from glycolysis. As a result, PHD1(-/-) neurons increased their redox buffering capacity to scavenge oxygen radicals in ischemia. Intracerebroventricular injection of PHD1-antisense oligonucleotides reduced the cerebral infarct size and neurological deficits following stroke. These data identify PHD1 as a regulator of neuronal metabolism and a potential therapeutic target in ischemic stroke.

  11. DELETION OR INHIBITION OF THE OXYGEN SENSOR PHD1 PROTECTS AGAINST ISCHEMIC STROKE VIA REPROGRAMMING OF NEURONAL METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Quaegebeur, Annelies; Segura, Inmaculada; Schmieder, Roberta; Verdegem, Dries; Decimo, Ilaria; Bifari, Francesco; Dresselaers, Tom; Eelen, Guy; Ghosh, Debapriva; Schoors, Sandra; Janaki Raman, Sudha Rani; Cruys, Bert; Govaerts, Kristof; De Legher, Carla; Bouché, Ann; Schoonjans, Luc; Ramer, Matt S.; Hung, Gene; Bossaert, Goele; Cleveland, Don W.; Himmelreich, Uwe; Voets, Thomas; Lemmens, Robin; Bennett, C. Frank; Robberecht, Wim; De Bock, Katrien; Dewerchin, Mieke; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Ghesquière, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Summary The oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs) regulate cellular metabolism, but their role in neuronal metabolism during stroke is unknown. Here we report that PHD1 deficiency provides neuroprotection in a murine model of permanent brain ischemia. This was not due to an increased collateral vessel network, nor to enhanced neurotrophin expression. Instead, PHD1−/− neurons were protected against oxygen-nutrient deprivation by reprogramming glucose metabolism. Indeed, PHD1−/− neurons enhanced glucose flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway by diverting glucose from glycolysis. As a result, PHD1−/− neurons increased their redox buffering capacity to scavenge oxygen radicals in ischemia. Intracerebroventricular injection of PHD1-antisense oligonucleotides reduced the cerebral infarct size and neurological deficits following stroke. These data identify PHD1 as a novel regulator of neuronal metabolism and a potential therapeutic target in ischemic stroke. PMID:26774962

  12. Increased EPO Levels Are Associated With Bone Loss in Mice Lacking PHD2 in EPO-Producing Cells.

    PubMed

    Rauner, Martina; Franke, Kristin; Murray, Marta; Singh, Rashim Pal; Hiram-Bab, Sahar; Platzbecker, Uwe; Gassmann, Max; Socolovsky, Merav; Neumann, Drorit; Gabet, Yankel; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Wielockx, Ben

    2016-10-01

    The main oxygen sensor hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) is a critical regulator of tissue homeostasis during erythropoiesis, hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, and wound healing. Recent studies point toward a role for the PHD2-erythropoietin (EPO) axis in the modulation of bone remodeling, even though the studies produced conflicting results. Here, we used a number of mouse strains deficient of PHD2 in different cell types to address the role of PHD2 and its downstream targets HIF-1α and HIF-2α in bone remodeling. Mice deficient for PHD2 in several cell lineages, including EPO-producing cells, osteoblasts, and hematopoietic cells (CD68:cre-PHD2(f/f) ) displayed a severe reduction of bone density at the distal femur as well as the vertebral body due to impaired bone formation but not bone resorption. Importantly, using osteoblast-specific (Osx:cre-PHD2(f/f) ) and osteoclast-specific PHD2 knock-out mice (Vav:cre- PHD2(f/f) ), we show that this effect is independent of the loss of PHD2 in osteoblast and osteoclasts. Using different in vivo and in vitro approaches, we show here that this bone phenotype, including the suppression of bone formation, is directly linked to the stabilization of the α-subunit of HIF-2, and possibly to the subsequent moderate induction of serum EPO, which directly influenced the differentiation and mineralization of osteoblast progenitors resulting in lower bone density. Taken together, our data identify the PHD2:HIF-2α:EPO axis as a so far unknown regulator of osteohematology by controlling bone homeostasis. Further, these data suggest that patients treated with PHD inhibitors or EPO should be monitored with respect to their bone status. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  13. DNP and PhD Collaboration: Bringing Together Practice and Research Expertise as Predegree and Postdegree Scholars.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Susan Weber; Yingling, Charles; Jones, Krista; Tenfelde, Sandi

    2015-01-01

    A deliberate course of predegree intraprofessional DNP and PhD student collaboration can yield relationships that will facilitate postdegree teamwork. Working together, DNP-prepared nurses can use their practice expertise, and PhD-prepared nurses can use their research expertise to improve and change health care. This article presents 3 contexts in which predegree collaboration can occur between DNP and PhD students. Postdegree DNP and PhD collaboration can occur in 2 contexts.

  14. Molecular evolution of the metazoan PHD-HIF oxygen-sensing system.

    PubMed

    Rytkönen, Kalle T; Williams, Tom A; Renshaw, Gillian M; Primmer, Craig R; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2011-06-01

    Metazoans rely on aerobic energy production, which requires an adequate oxygen supply. During reduced oxygen supply (hypoxia), the most profound changes in gene expression are mediated by transcription factors known as hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). HIF alpha proteins are commonly posttranslationally regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase (PHD) enzymes, which are direct "sensors" of cellular oxygen levels. We examined the molecular evolution of the metazoan PHD-HIF oxygen-sensing system by constructing complete phylogenies for PHD and HIF alpha genes and used computational tools to characterize the molecular changes underlying the functional divergence of PHD and HIF alpha duplicates. The presence of PHDs in metazoan genomes predates the emergence of HIF alphas. Our analysis revealed an unexpected diversity of PHD genes and HIF alpha sequence characteristics in invertebrates, suggesting that the simple oxygen-sensing systems of Caenorhabditis and Drosophila may not be typical of other invertebrate bilaterians. We studied the early vertebrate evolution of the system by sequencing these genes in early-diverging cartilaginous fishes, elasmobranchs. Cartilaginous fishes appear to have three paralogs of both PHD and HIF alpha. The novel sequences were used as outgroups for a detailed molecular analysis of PHD and HIF alpha duplicates in a major air-breathing vertebrate lineage, the mammals, and a major water-breathing vertebrate lineage, the teleosts. In PHDs, functionally divergent amino acid sites were detected near the HIF alpha-binding channel and beta2beta3 loop that defines its substrate specificity. In HIF alphas, more functional divergence was found in teleosts than in mammals, especially in the HIF-1 alpha PAS domain and HIF-2 alpha oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domains, which interact with PHDs. Overall, in the vertebrates, elevated substitution rates in the HIF-2 alpha N-terminal ODD domain, together with a functional divergence associated with the known

  15. Employability of genetic counselors with a PhD in genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jody P; Myers, Melanie F; Huether, Carl A; Bedard, Angela C; Warren, Nancy Steinberg

    2008-06-01

    The development of a PhD in genetic counseling has been discussed for more than 20 years, yet the perspectives of employers have not been assessed. The goal of this qualitative study was to gain an understanding of the employability of genetic counselors with a PhD in genetic counseling by conducting interviews with United States employers of genetic counselors. Study participants were categorized according to one of the following practice areas: academic, clinical, government, industry, laboratory, or research. All participants were responsible for hiring genetic counselors in their institutions. Of the 30 employers interviewed, 23 envisioned opportunities for individuals with a PhD degree in genetic counseling, particularly in academic and research settings. Performing research and having the ability to be a principal investigator on a grant was the primary role envisioned for these individuals by 22/30 participants. Employers expect individuals with a PhD in genetic counseling to perform different roles than MS genetic counselors with a master's degree. This study suggests there is an employment niche for individuals who have a PhD in genetic counseling that complements, and does not compete with, master's prepared genetic counselors.

  16. Preparing Postbaccalaureates for Entry and Success in Biomedical PhD Programs

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Joshua D.; Harrell, Jessica R.; Cohen, Kimberley W.; Miller, Virginia L.; Phelps, Patricia V.; Cook, Jeanette G.

    2016-01-01

    Certain racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, and those from low socioeconomic backgrounds remain underrepresented (UR) in the biomedical sciences. This underrepresentation becomes more extreme at each higher education stage. To support UR scholars during the critical transition from baccalaureate to PhD, we established an intensive, 1-yr postbaccalaureate training program. We hypothesized that this intervention would strengthen each participant’s competitiveness for leading PhD programs and build a foundation of skills and self-efficacy important for success during and after graduate school. Scholar critical analysis skills, lab technique knowledge, and Graduate Record Examination scores all improved significantly during the program. Scholars reported significant confidence growth in 21 of 24 categories related to success in research careers. In 5 yr, 91% (41/45) of scholars transitioned directly into PhD programs. Importantly, 40% (18/45) of participating postbaccalaureate scholars had previously been declined acceptance into graduate school; however, 17/18 of these scholars directly entered competitive PhD programs following our training program. Alumni reported they were “extremely well” prepared for graduate school, and 95% (39/41) are currently making progress to graduation with a PhD. In conclusion, we report a model for postbaccalaureate training that could be replicated to increase participation and success among UR scholars in the biomedical sciences. PMID:27496358

  17. Predicting the "graduate on time (GOT)" of PhD students using binary logistics regression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariff, S. Sarifah Radiah; Rodzi, Nur Atiqah Mohd; Rahman, Kahartini Abdul; Zahari, Siti Meriam; Deni, Sayang Mohd

    2016-10-01

    Malaysian government has recently set a new goal to produce 60,000 Malaysian PhD holders by the year 2023. As a Malaysia's largest institution of higher learning in terms of size and population which offers more than 500 academic programmes in a conducive and vibrant environment, UiTM has taken several initiatives to fill up the gap. Strategies to increase the numbers of graduates with PhD are a process that is challenging. In many occasions, many have already identified that the struggle to get into the target set is even more daunting, and that implementation is far too ideal. This has further being progressing slowly as the attrition rate increases. This study aims to apply the proposed models that incorporates several factors in predicting the number PhD students that will complete their PhD studies on time. Binary Logistic Regression model is proposed and used on the set of data to determine the number. The results show that only 6.8% of the 2014 PhD students are predicted to graduate on time and the results are compared wih the actual number for validation purpose.

  18. Strategic innovation between PhD and DNP programs: Collaboration, collegiality, and shared resources.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Joellen; Rayman, Kathleen; Diffenderfer, Sandra; Stidham, April

    2016-01-01

    At least 111 schools and colleges of nursing across the nation provide both PhD and DNP programs (AACN, 2014a). Collaboration between nurses with doctoral preparation as researchers (PhD) and practitioners (DNP) has been recommended as essential to further the profession; that collaboration can begin during the educational process. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and implementation of successful DNP and PhD program collaboration, and to share the results of that collaboration in an educational setting. Faculty set strategic goals to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of both new DNP and existing PhD programs. The goals were to promote collaboration and complementarity between the programs through careful capstone and dissertation differentiation, complementary residency activities, joint courses and inter-professional experiences; promote collegiality in a blended on-line learning environment through shared orientation and intensive on-campus sessions; and maximize resources in program delivery through a supportive organizational structure, equal access to technology support, and shared faculty responsibilities as appropriate to terminal degrees. Successes such as student and faculty accomplishments, and challenges such as managing class size and workload, are described. Collaboration, collegiality and the sharing of resources have strengthened and enriched both programs and contributed to the success of students, faculty. These innovative program strategies can provide a solid foundation for DNP and PhD collaboration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxygen-dependent ATF-4 stability is mediated by the PHD3 oxygen sensor.

    PubMed

    Köditz, Jens; Nesper, Jutta; Wottawa, Marieke; Stiehl, Daniel P; Camenisch, Gieri; Franke, Corinna; Myllyharju, Johanna; Wenger, Roland H; Katschinski, Dörthe M

    2007-11-15

    The activating transcription factor-4 (ATF-4) is translationally induced under anoxic conditions, mediates part of the unfolded protein response following endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and is a critical regulator of cell fate. Here, we identified the zipper II domain of ATF-4 to interact with the oxygen sensor prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain 3 (PHD3). The PHD inhibitors dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) and hypoxia, or proteasomal inhibition, all induced ATF-4 protein levels. Hypoxic induction of ATF-4 was due to increased protein stability, but was independent of the ubiquitin ligase von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL). A novel oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain was identified adjacent to the zipper II domain. Mutations of 5 prolyl residues within this ODD domain or siRNA-mediated down-regulation of PHD3, but not of PHD2, was sufficient to stabilize ATF-4 under normoxic conditions. These data demonstrate that PHD-dependent oxygen-sensing recruits both the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and ATF-4 systems, and hence not only confers adaptive responses but also cell fate decisions.

  20. MS PHD'S: A Synergistic Model for Diversifying the Earth Science Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardi, L.; Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ithier-Guzman, W.; Braxton, L.; Johnson, A.

    2013-05-01

    The Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S) program focuses on increasing the number of underrepresented minorities (URM) receiving advanced degrees in Earth system sciences (ESS). Subscribing to Aristotle's philosophy that the "whole is greater than the sum of its parts", MS PHD'S uses a synergistic model of tiered mentoring practices, successful minority scientist role models, peer-to-peer community building activities, professional development training techniques, networking opportunities, and state of the art virtual communication tools to facilitate the retention and advancement of underrepresented ESS scientists. Using a three-phase program structure supported by a virtual community, URM students in ESS are afforded opportunities to establish mentoring relationships with successful scientists, build meaningful ties with URM peers and future colleagues, strengthen oral and written communication skills, engage in networking opportunities within premier scientific venues, and maintain continuity of networks formed through program participation. Established in 2003, MS PHD'S is now in its ninth cohort. From the original cohort of 24 participants, the program has grown to support 213 participants. Of these 213 participants, 42 have obtained the doctorate and are employed within the ESS workforce. Another 71 are enrolled in doctoral programs. Looking to the future with the purpose of continually furthering its synergistic philosophy, MS PHD'S has developed a new initiative, Beyond the PhD, designed to support and advance the representation of URM scientists within a global workforce.

  1. Cellular Oxygen Sensing: Crystal Structure of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylase (PHD2)

    SciTech Connect

    McDonough,M.; Li, V.; Flashman, E.; Chowdhury, R.; Mohr, C.; Lienard, B.; Zondlo, J.; Oldham, N.; Clifton, I.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Cellular and physiological responses to changes in dioxygen levels in metazoans are mediated via the posttranslational oxidation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF). Hydroxylation of conserved prolyl residues in the HIF-{alpha} subunit, catalyzed by HIF prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs), signals for its proteasomal degradation. The requirement of the PHDs for dioxygen links changes in dioxygen levels with the transcriptional regulation of the gene array that enables the cellular response to chronic hypoxia; the PHDs thus act as an oxygen-sensing component of the HIF system, and their inhibition mimics the hypoxic response. We describe crystal structures of the catalytic domain of human PHD2, an important prolyl-4-hydroxylase in the human hypoxic response in normal cells, in complex with Fe(II) and an inhibitor to 1.7 Angstroms resolution. PHD2 crystallizes as a homotrimer and contains a double-stranded {beta}-helix core fold common to the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependant dioxygenase family, the residues of which are well conserved in the three human PHD enzymes (PHD 1-3). The structure provides insights into the hypoxic response, helps to rationalize a clinically observed mutation leading to familial erythrocytosis, and will aid in the design of PHD selective inhibitors for the treatment of anemia and ischemic disease.

  2. Interoperability in digital electrocardiography: harmonization of ISO/IEEE x73-PHD and SCP-ECG.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Jesús D; Chiarugi, Franco; Alesanco, Alvaro; Martínez-Espronceda, Miguel; Serrano, Luis; Chronaki, Catherine E; Escayola, Javier; Martínez, Ignacio; García, José

    2010-11-01

    The ISO/IEEE 11073 (x73) family of standards is a reference frame for medical device interoperability. A draft for an ECG device specialization (ISO/IEEE 11073-10406-d02) has already been presented to the Personal Health Device (PHD) Working Group, and the Standard Communications Protocol for Computer-Assisted ElectroCardioGraphy (SCP-ECG) Standard for short-term diagnostic ECGs (EN1064:2005+A1:2007) has recently been approved as part of the x73 family (ISO 11073-91064:2009). These factors suggest the coordinated use of these two standards in foreseeable telecardiology environments, and hence the need to harmonize them. Such harmonization is the subject of this paper. Thus, a mapping of the mandatory attributes defined in the second draft of the ISO/IEEE 11073-10406-d02 and the minimum SCP-ECG fields is presented, and various other capabilities of the SCP-ECG Standard (such as the messaging part) are also analyzed from an x73-PHD point of view. As a result, this paper addresses and analyzes the implications of some inconsistencies in the coordinated use of these two standards. Finally, a proof-of-concept implementation of the draft x73-PHD ECG device specialization is presented, along with the conversion from x73-PHD to SCP-ECG. This paper, therefore, provides recommendations for future implementations of telecardiology systems that are compliant with both x73-PHD and SCP-ECG.

  3. Insights into the proline hydroxylase (PHD) family, molecular evolution and its impact on human health.

    PubMed

    Minervini, Giovanni; Quaglia, Federica; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2015-09-01

    PHDs (proline hydroxylases) are a small protein family found in all organisms, considered the central regulator of the molecular hypoxia response due to PHDs being completely inactivated under low oxygen concentration. At physiological oxygen concentration, PHDs drive the degradation of the HIF-1α (hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α), which is responsible for upregulating the expression of genes involved in the cellular response to hypoxia. Hypoxia is a common feature of most tumors, in particular during metastasis development. Indeed, cancer reacts by activating pathways promoting new blood vessel formation and activating strategies aimed to improve survival. In this scenario, the PHD family regulates the activation of HIF-1α and cell-cycle regulation. Several PHD mutations were found in cancer patients, underlining their importance for human health. Here, we propose a Bayesian model able to predict the pathological effect of human PHD mutations and their correlation with cancer outcome. The model was developed through an integrative in silico approach, where data collected from the literature has been coupled with sequence evolution and structural analysis. The model was used to assess 135 human PHD variants. Finally, bioinformatics characterization was used to demonstrate how few amino acid changes are able to explain the functional specialization of PHD family members and their physiological role in human health.

  4. Preparing Postbaccalaureates for Entry and Success in Biomedical PhD Programs.

    PubMed

    Hall, Joshua D; Harrell, Jessica R; Cohen, Kimberley W; Miller, Virginia L; Phelps, Patricia V; Cook, Jeanette G

    2016-01-01

    Certain racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, and those from low socioeconomic backgrounds remain underrepresented (UR) in the biomedical sciences. This underrepresentation becomes more extreme at each higher education stage. To support UR scholars during the critical transition from baccalaureate to PhD, we established an intensive, 1-yr postbaccalaureate training program. We hypothesized that this intervention would strengthen each participant's competitiveness for leading PhD programs and build a foundation of skills and self-efficacy important for success during and after graduate school. Scholar critical analysis skills, lab technique knowledge, and Graduate Record Examination scores all improved significantly during the program. Scholars reported significant confidence growth in 21 of 24 categories related to success in research careers. In 5 yr, 91% (41/45) of scholars transitioned directly into PhD programs. Importantly, 40% (18/45) of participating postbaccalaureate scholars had previously been declined acceptance into graduate school; however, 17/18 of these scholars directly entered competitive PhD programs following our training program. Alumni reported they were "extremely well" prepared for graduate school, and 95% (39/41) are currently making progress to graduation with a PhD. In conclusion, we report a model for postbaccalaureate training that could be replicated to increase participation and success among UR scholars in the biomedical sciences.

  5. [MD PhD programs: Providing basic science education for ophthalmologists].

    PubMed

    Spaniol, K; Geerling, G

    2015-06-01

    Enrollment in MD PhD programs offers the opportunity of a basic science education for medical students and doctors. These programs originated in the USA where structured programs have been offered for many years, but now German universities also run MD PhD programs. The MD PhD programs provided by German universities were investigated regarding entrance requirements, structure and financing modalities. An internet and telephone-based search was carried out. Out of 34 German universities 22 offered MD PhD programs. At 15 of the 22 universities a successfully completed course of studies in medicine was required for enrollment, 7 programs admitted medical students in training and 7 programs required a medical doctoral thesis, which had to be completed with at least a grade of magna cum laude in 3 cases. Financing required scholarships in many cases. Several German universities currently offer MD PhD programs; however, these differ considerably regarding entrance requirements, structure and financing. A detailed analysis investigating the success rates of these programs (e.g. successful completion and career paths of graduates) would be of benefit.

  6. A model for supporting and training clinical pharmaceutical scientist PhD students.

    PubMed

    Tortorici, Michael A; Skledar, Susan J; Zemaitis, Michael A; Weber, Robert J; Smith, Randall B; Kroboth, Patricia D; Poloyac, Samuel M

    2007-04-15

    To enhance the clinical training and financial support of graduate students in a Clinical Pharmaceutical Scientist PhD Program at the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy. The School of Pharmacy and University of Pittsburgh Medical Center entered into a collaborative agreement to develop the Clinical Scientist Associate (CSA) program, as well as financially support students enrolled in a Pharmaceutical Sciences PhD program. These clinical training experiences are in addition to the didactic and laboratory experiences in the pharmaceutical sciences graduate program. Since 2002, three students have participated as CSAs, simultaneously working on their graduate research and meeting the requirements of the CSA program. The CSA program is a novel model for clinical training and support of post-PharmD graduate students enrolled in a PhD clinical pharmaceutical scientist program.

  7. Structure of the PHD zinc finger from human Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Pascual, J; Martinez-Yamout, M; Dyson, H J; Wright, P E

    2000-12-15

    The PHD (plant homeo domain) is a approximately 50-residue motif found mainly in proteins involved in eukaryotic transcription regulation. The characteristic sequence feature is a conserved Cys(4)-HisCys(3) zinc binding motif. We have determined the solution structure of the PHD motif from the human Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) protein. The domain folds into an interleaved zinc finger which binds two Zn(2+) in a similar manner to that of the RING and FYVE domains. The structure reveals a conserved zinc-binding core, together with two variable loops that are likely candidates for interactions between the various PHD domains and their specific ligands. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  8. The PH-D proposal - A manned mission to Phobos and Deimos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    The rationale for a manned mission to the satellites of Mars is discussed. The view has been expressed that NASA must define a major program to follow the Shuttle and to utilize it. However, such a program could not be initiated and proceed without public support, and to obtain this support, public interest would have to be excited. It is shown that, of a number of possible targets for manned exploration in the solar system, Mars appears to be the only possible candidate. Attention is given to a comparison of three Mars missions, a Mars 1984 mission, a manned landing on Mars surface, a manned landing on Phobos and Deimos (Ph-D project), putting men in Mars orbit, the capabilities of the Ph-D mission, a description of the spacecraft, a Ph-D project operations plan, and aspects of timing, technology, and costs.

  9. The Binding Specificity of the PHD-Finger Domain of VIN3 Moderates Vernalization Response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hwan; Sung, Sibum

    2017-02-01

    Vernalization is a response to winter cold to initiate flowering in spring. VERNALIZATION INSENSITIVE3 (VIN3) is induced by winter cold and is essential to vernalization response in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). VIN3 encodes a PHD-finger domain that binds to modified histones in vitro. An alteration in the binding specificity of the PHD-finger domain of VIN3 results in a hypervernalization response. The hypervernalization response is achieved by increased enrichments of VIN3 and trimethylation of Histone H3 Lys 27 at the FLC locus without invoking the increased enrichment of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2. Our result shows that the binding specificity of the PHD-finger domain of VIN3 plays a role in mediating a proper vernalization response in Arabidopsis.

  10. Cooperative Localization for Multi-AUVs Based on GM-PHD Filters and Information Entropy Theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lichuan; Wang, Tonghao; Zhang, Feihu; Xu, Demin

    2017-10-08

    Cooperative localization (CL) is considered a promising method for underwater localization with respect to multiple autonomous underwater vehicles (multi-AUVs). In this paper, we proposed a CL algorithm based on information entropy theory and the probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter, aiming to enhance the global localization accuracy of the follower. In the proposed framework, the follower carries lower cost navigation systems, whereas the leaders carry better ones. Meanwhile, the leaders acquire the followers' observations, including both measurements and clutter. Then, the PHD filters are utilized on the leaders and the results are communicated to the followers. The followers then perform weighted summation based on all received messages and obtain a final positioning result. Based on the information entropy theory and the PHD filter, the follower is able to acquire a precise knowledge of its position.

  11. Science PhD Career Preferences: Levels, Changes, and Advisor Encouragement

    PubMed Central

    Sauermann, Henry; Roach, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Even though academic research is often viewed as the preferred career path for PhD trained scientists, most U.S. graduates enter careers in industry, government, or “alternative careers.” There has been a growing concern that these career patterns reflect fundamental imbalances between the supply of scientists seeking academic positions and the availability of such positions. However, while government statistics provide insights into realized career transitions, there is little systematic data on scientists' career preferences and thus on the degree to which there is a mismatch between observed career paths and scientists' preferences. Moreover, we lack systematic evidence whether career preferences adjust over the course of the PhD training and to what extent advisors exacerbate imbalances by encouraging their students to pursue academic positions. Based on a national survey of PhD students at tier-one U.S. institutions, we provide insights into the career preferences of junior scientists across the life sciences, physics, and chemistry. We also show that the attractiveness of academic careers decreases significantly over the course of the PhD program, despite the fact that advisors strongly encourage academic careers over non-academic careers. Our data provide an empirical basis for common concerns regarding labor market imbalances. Our results also suggest the need for mechanisms that provide PhD applicants with information that allows them to carefully weigh the costs and benefits of pursuing a PhD, as well as for mechanisms that complement the job market advice advisors give to their current students. PMID:22567149

  12. Nurses in the clinical area: relevance of a PhD.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Lesley M; Mohan, Shantala

    2008-01-01

    This project aimed to explore the application and relevance of a PhD to nurses working in the clinical area. The complexity of nursing practice requires clinical nurses to be competent as investigators and professional leaders who could help structure nursing practice in more efficient ways. Research proposes that a PhD offers Limited employment opportunities, is mainly research oriented and tends to direct a nurse away from the clinical field. A mixed method study design utilising surveys and interviews was chosen to collect data for this study. Participants were nurses with a doctoral degree working/having worked in a clinical area after obtaining their PhD Nurses were recruited through student databases from Australian universities that offer doctoral degrees in nursing and also by using a snowball sampling technique. The majority of the 19 nurses who participated in the study had: varied expectation of doing a PhD; maintained their clinical positions after obtaining their doctoral degree, considered that the degree helped them to obtain better jobs/promotions and acknowledged the value of the PhD in patient care, in improving research and informing health policy. This study has exposed the positive aspects of completing a PhD and identifies its constructive application in the clinical area. It is essential to provide support and opportunities for nurses working in the clinical area to pursue doctoral degrees in order to enable them to enhance knowledge and build confidence and leadership skills and contribute to the improvement of nursing practice and the continued development of the profession.

  13. Publication rate and PhD enrolment following a medical pre-graduate research programme.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Marlene; Okkels, Niels; Christensen, Mette Krogh; Telinius, Niklas; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe

    2015-09-01

    In the 1990s, the publication and PhD recruitment rates following the Danish pre-graduate research programme (PGRP) in medicine were 54% and 33%, respectively. Updated estimates are unknown. All medical students enrolled in the PGRP at the Faculty of Medicine, Aarhus University (Health), Denmark, during 2003-2012 were included (n = 687). The PGRP files were merged with PhD students' files at Health. A systematic literature search was completed for research students who had enrolled during the 2006-2009 period (n = 227). The factors investigated were student age, sex, PGRP completion time and years in medical school at the time of PGRP initiation. Supervisors were described by sex, title, position and affiliation. Calculations were tested by the chi-squared test; p < 0.05 was considered significant. A larger proportion of male medical students conducted a PGRP compared to female medical students (28% versus 19%; p < 0.01). Within three and a half years from PGRP initiation, 13% of the research students had enrolled in a PhD programme at Health, and 52% had published ≥ 1 paper with ≥ 1 supervisor. The research student was the first author on 43% of the overall 224 papers, and 90% were original articles. Publication was positively associated with completion of the PGRP in < 18 months and with embarking on a PhD and with having a male main supervisor. PhD recruitment was related to enrolment in the PGRP after fewer years in medical school. Fast completion of the PGRP and early enrolment in the programme were associated with scientific publishing and PhD recruitment. The publication rate has remained stable over time.

  14. Science PhD career preferences: levels, changes, and advisor encouragement.

    PubMed

    Sauermann, Henry; Roach, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Even though academic research is often viewed as the preferred career path for PhD trained scientists, most U.S. graduates enter careers in industry, government, or "alternative careers." There has been a growing concern that these career patterns reflect fundamental imbalances between the supply of scientists seeking academic positions and the availability of such positions. However, while government statistics provide insights into realized career transitions, there is little systematic data on scientists' career preferences and thus on the degree to which there is a mismatch between observed career paths and scientists' preferences. Moreover, we lack systematic evidence whether career preferences adjust over the course of the PhD training and to what extent advisors exacerbate imbalances by encouraging their students to pursue academic positions. Based on a national survey of PhD students at tier-one U.S. institutions, we provide insights into the career preferences of junior scientists across the life sciences, physics, and chemistry. We also show that the attractiveness of academic careers decreases significantly over the course of the PhD program, despite the fact that advisors strongly encourage academic careers over non-academic careers. Our data provide an empirical basis for common concerns regarding labor market imbalances. Our results also suggest the need for mechanisms that provide PhD applicants with information that allows them to carefully weigh the costs and benefits of pursuing a PhD, as well as for mechanisms that complement the job market advice advisors give to their current students.

  15. Deconstructing doctoral dissertations: how many papers does it take to make a PhD?

    PubMed

    Hagen, Nils T

    2010-11-01

    A collection of coauthored papers is the new norm for doctoral dissertations in the natural and biomedical sciences, yet there is no consensus on how to partition authorship credit between PhD candidates and their coauthors. Guidelines for PhD programs vary but tend to specify only a suggested range for the number of papers to be submitted for evaluation, sometimes supplemented with a requirement for the PhD candidate to be the principal author on the majority of submitted papers. Here I use harmonic counting to quantify the actual amount of authorship credit attributable to individual PhD graduates from two Scandinavian universities in 2008. Harmonic counting corrects for the inherent inflationary and equalizing biases of routine counting methods, thereby allowing the bibliometrically identifiable amount of authorship credit in approved dissertations to be analyzed with unprecedented accuracy. Unbiased partitioning of authorship credit between graduates and their coauthors provides a post hoc bibliometric measure of current PhD requirements, and sets a de facto baseline for the requisite scientific productivity of these contemporary PhD's at a median value of approximately 1.6 undivided papers per dissertation. Comparison with previous census data suggests that the baseline has shifted over the past two decades as a result of a decrease in the number of submitted papers per candidate and an increase in the number of coauthors per paper. A simple solution to this shifting baseline syndrome would be to benchmark the amount of unbiased authorship credit deemed necessary for successful completion of a specific PhD program, and then monitor for departures from this level over time. Harmonic partitioning of authorship credit also facilitates cross-disciplinary and inter-institutional analysis of the scientific output from different PhD programs. Juxtaposing bibliometric benchmarks with current baselines may thus assist the development of harmonized guidelines and

  16. Top tips for PhD thesis examination: nurse clinicians, researchers and novices.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; Hunt, Glenn E

    2012-01-01

    Interestingly, there are very few guidelines in the literature to assist novice nurse PhD examiners. In this paper, we aim to provide information to nurses, researchers or early career academics who have little experience in assessing a university thesis. The article provides background information about recent changes in the university sector; overviews some research on experienced examiners views; presents factors that differentiate between high and low quality PhD theses; and outlines some pointers that may be useful when marking at the doctoral level.

  17. The Benefits of Publishing Systematic Quantitative Literature Reviews for PhD Candidates and Other Early-Career Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Catherine; Byrne, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Universities increasingly expect students to publish during a PhD candidature because it benefits the candidate, supervisor, institution, and wider community. Here, we describe a method successfully used by early-career researchers including PhD candidates to undertake and publish literature reviews--a challenge for researchers new to a field. Our…

  18. Conditional Deletion of the Phd2 Gene in Articular Chondrocytes Accelerates Differentiation and Reduces Articular Cartilage Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shaohong; Pourteymoor, Sheila; Alarcon, Catrina; Mohan, Subburaman

    2017-01-01

    Based on our findings that PHD2 is a negative regulator of chondrocyte differentiation and that hypoxia signaling is implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, we investigated the consequence of disruption of the Phd2 gene in chondrocytes on the articular cartilage phenotype in mice. Immunohistochemistry detected high expression of PHD2 in the superficial zone (SZ), while PHD3 and HIF-1α (target of PHD2) are mainly expressed in the middle-deep zone (MDZ). Conditional deletion of the Phd2 gene (cKO) in chondrocytes accelerated the transition of progenitors to hypertrophic (differentiating) chondrocytes as revealed by reduced SZ thickness, and increased MDZ thickness, as well as increased chondrocyte hypertrophy. Immunohistochemistry further revealed decreased levels of progenitor markers but increased levels of hypertrophy markers in the articular cartilage of the cKO mice. Treatment of primary articular chondrocytes, in vitro, with IOX2, a specific inhibitor of PHD2, promoted articular chondrocyte differentiation. Knockdown of Hif-1α expression in primary articular chondrocytes using lentiviral vectors containing Hif-1α shRNA resulted in reduced expression levels of Vegf, Glut1, Pgk1, and Col10 compared to control shRNA. We conclude that Phd2 is a key regulator of articular cartilage development that acts by inhibiting the differentiation of articular cartilage progenitors via modulating HIF-1α signaling. PMID:28349987

  19. The Benefits of Publishing Systematic Quantitative Literature Reviews for PhD Candidates and Other Early-Career Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Catherine; Byrne, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Universities increasingly expect students to publish during a PhD candidature because it benefits the candidate, supervisor, institution, and wider community. Here, we describe a method successfully used by early-career researchers including PhD candidates to undertake and publish literature reviews--a challenge for researchers new to a field. Our…

  20. A Networked Pathway to the PhD: The African-Norwegian Case of Productive Learning Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattingh, Annemarie; Lillejord, Solvi

    2011-01-01

    How do PhD students become socialised into the professional world of academic work? This article pays attention to a "networked" support pathway towards a PhD. The network constitutes an international research collaboration through a programme called Productive Learning Cultures (PLC) (2002-2011) between Norway and seven countries,…

  1. PhD Crisis Discourse: A Critical Approach to the Framing of the Problem and Some Australian "Solutions"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthbert, Denise; Molla, Tebeje

    2015-01-01

    A feature of HE reform discourse is the tendency to construct the rationale for reform in terms of averting calamity and risk. We refer to this risk talk as "crisis discourse." This study examines the formulation of PhD crisis discourse internationally and in Australia. We find that a key feature of PhD crisis discourse is that…

  2. Mutation analysis of HIF prolyl hydroxylases (PHD/EGLN) in individuals with features of phaeochromocytoma and renal cell carcinoma susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Astuti, Dewi; Ricketts, Christopher J; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; McDonough, Michael A; Gentle, Dean; Kirby, Gail; Schlisio, Susanne; Kenchappa, Rajappa S; Carter, Bruce D; Kaelin, William G; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Schofield, Christopher J; Latif, Farida; Maher, Eamonn R

    2011-02-01

    Germline mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) and succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) genes can cause inherited phaeochromocytoma and/or renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Dysregulation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcription factors has been linked to VHL and SDHB-related RCC; both HIF dysregulation and disordered function of a prolyl hydroxylase domain isoform 3 (PHD3/EGLN3)-related pathway of neuronal apoptosis have been linked to the development of phaeochromocytoma. The 2-oxoglutarate-dependent prolyl hydroxylase enzymes PHD1 (EGLN2), PHD2 (EGLN1) and PHD3 (EGLN3) have a key role in regulating the stability of HIF-α subunits (and hence expression of the HIF-α transcription factors). A germline PHD2 mutation has been reported in association with congenital erythrocytosis and recurrent extra-adrenal phaeochromocytoma. We undertook mutation analysis of PHD1, PHD2 and PHD3 in two cohorts of patients with features of inherited phaeochromocytoma (n=82) and inherited RCC (n=64) and no evidence of germline mutations in known susceptibility genes. No confirmed pathogenic mutations were detected suggesting that mutations in these genes are not a frequent cause of inherited phaeochromocytoma or RCC.

  3. A Networked Pathway to the PhD: The African-Norwegian Case of Productive Learning Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattingh, Annemarie; Lillejord, Solvi

    2011-01-01

    How do PhD students become socialised into the professional world of academic work? This article pays attention to a "networked" support pathway towards a PhD. The network constitutes an international research collaboration through a programme called Productive Learning Cultures (PLC) (2002-2011) between Norway and seven countries,…

  4. Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain-Containing Protein 2 (Phd2) Regulates Chondrocyte Differentiation and Secondary Ossification in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shaohong; Aghajanian, Patrick; Pourteymoor, Sheila; Alarcon, Catrina; Mohan, Subburaman

    2016-01-01

    Endochondral ossification plays an important role in the formation of the primary ossification centers (POCs) and secondary ossification centers (SOCs) of mammalian long bones. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate POC and SOC formation are different. We recently demonstrated that Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain-containing Protein 2 (Phd2) is a key mediator of vitamin C effects on bone. We investigated the role of Phd2 on endochondral ossification of the epiphyses by conditionally deleting the Phd2 gene in osteoblasts and chondrocytes. We found that the deletion of Phd2 in osteoblasts did not cause changes in bone parameters in the proximal tibial epiphyses in 5 week old mice. In contrast, deletion of Phd2 in chondrocytes resulted in increased bone mass and bone formation rate (normalized to tissue volume) in long bone epiphyses, indicating that Phd2 expressed in chondrocytes, but not osteoblasts, negatively regulates secondary ossification of epiphyses. Phd2 deletion in chondrocytes elevated mRNA expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) signaling molecules including Hif-1α, Hif-2α, Vegfa, Vegfb, and Epo, as well as markers for chondrocyte hypertrophy and mineralization such as Col10, osterix, alkaline phosphatase, and bone sialoprotein. These data suggest that Phd2 expressed in chondrocytes inhibits endochondral ossification at the epiphysis by suppressing HIF signaling pathways. PMID:27775044

  5. PhD Crisis Discourse: A Critical Approach to the Framing of the Problem and Some Australian "Solutions"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthbert, Denise; Molla, Tebeje

    2015-01-01

    A feature of HE reform discourse is the tendency to construct the rationale for reform in terms of averting calamity and risk. We refer to this risk talk as "crisis discourse." This study examines the formulation of PhD crisis discourse internationally and in Australia. We find that a key feature of PhD crisis discourse is that…

  6. Diversity & the Ph.D.: A Review of Efforts to Broaden Race & Ethnicity in U.S. Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation (NJ1), 2005

    2005-01-01

    Created through Woodrow Wilson's Responsive Ph.D. initiative, "Diversity and the Ph.D." looks at a range of mechanisms through which foundations, government agencies, and nonprofits have sought to recruit and retain more minority students in U.S. doctoral programs. Drawing on interviews with the leaders of 13 such programs, the report also points…

  7. Challenges of PhD Graduated Nurses for Role Acceptance as a Clinical Educator: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Haghighi Moghadam, Yousef; Atashzadeh-Shoorideh, Foroozan; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Feizi, Aram

    2017-06-01

    Introduction: Clinical education is the core component of nursing education. PhD graduated nurses who are faculty members can play a main role in clinical instruction. However, there is not clear understanding about the challenges which they may encounter for accepting their role as clinical educator. The aim of this study was to explore the challenges of role acceptance by PhD aduated nurses who are faculty members. Methods: In this qualitative exploratory study a total of 13 participants (8 PhD graduated in nursing, 3 head of departments of nursing, one educational vice chancellor of nursing school, and one nurse) were selected by purposive sampling method. Data were collected by semi-structured, face to face interview and analyzed by conventional content analysis approach developed by Graneheim and Lundman. Results: The main theme emerged from data analysis was "identity threat". This theme had five categories including expectations beyond ability, lack of staff's rely on the performance of PhD graduated nurses, poor clinical competencies, doubtfulness, and obligation. Conclusion: PhD graduated nurses experienced some worries about their role as clinical educators and argued that they have not been prepared for their role. Therefore, policy makers and authorities of nursing schools should support PhD graduated nurses for accepting their new roles as clinical educators. Moreover, some changes in nursing PhD curriculum is needed to improve the clinical competencies of PhD graduated and prepare them for their role as a clinical educator.

  8. Computational analysis of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein 2 (PHD2) mutations promoting polycythemia insurgence in humans.

    PubMed

    Minervini, Giovanni; Quaglia, Federica; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2016-01-12

    Idiopathic erythrocytosis is a rare disease characterized by an increase in red blood cell mass due to mutations in proteins of the oxygen-sensing pathway, such as prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2). Here, we present a bioinformatics investigation of the pathological effect of twelve PHD2 mutations related to polycythemia insurgence. We show that few mutations impair the PHD2 catalytic site, while most localize to non-enzymatic regions. We also found that most mutations do not overlap the substrate recognition site, suggesting a novel PHD2 binding interface. After a structural analysis of both binding partners, we suggest that this novel interface is responsible for PHD2 interaction with the LIMD1 tumor suppressor.

  9. Computational analysis of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein 2 (PHD2) mutations promoting polycythemia insurgence in humans

    PubMed Central

    Minervini, Giovanni; Quaglia, Federica; Tosatto, Silvio CE

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic erythrocytosis is a rare disease characterized by an increase in red blood cell mass due to mutations in proteins of the oxygen-sensing pathway, such as prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2). Here, we present a bioinformatics investigation of the pathological effect of twelve PHD2 mutations related to polycythemia insurgence. We show that few mutations impair the PHD2 catalytic site, while most localize to non-enzymatic regions. We also found that most mutations do not overlap the substrate recognition site, suggesting a novel PHD2 binding interface. After a structural analysis of both binding partners, we suggest that this novel interface is responsible for PHD2 interaction with the LIMD1 tumor suppressor. PMID:26754054

  10. The Future of Rhetoric in English Department Ph.D. Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Suzanne

    1995-01-01

    Offers a utopian vision of what the place of rhetoric should be in a department that thinks of itself as literary. Argues that a Ph.D. in English that encompasses both literature and rhetoric works because it is really a degree in rhetoric. (TB)

  11. Regulating Emotions and Aiming for a Ph.D.: Excerpts from "Anthropology Matters"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovland, Ingie

    2012-01-01

    In this article I will present a range of experiences of graduate socialisation that have been discussed in past articles in the journal "Anthropology Matters". These are the experiences of social anthropology Ph.D. students in the United Kingdom. The overarching theme for the article is "regulating emotions", and the excerpts…

  12. International Students' Motivation to Pursue and Complete a Ph.D. in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    This study explores what motivates 19 international students to pursue a Ph.D. at a public research university in the U.S. and, more importantly, what motivates them to persist despite unsatisfying socialization. Based on value-expectancy achievement motivation theory, four motivations emerged: intrinsic interest in research, intrinsic interest in…

  13. Innovation in Ph.D. Programs and Scores in Reputational Rankings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, David S.

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is presented both for and against the proposition that innovation is punished by surveys that rank academic quality. Systematic work is needed to show how innovation, experimentation, and lack of orthodoxy in research and teaching affect Ph.D. programs' ratings in academic quality rankings. (Author/MLW)

  14. Can You Earn a Ph.D. in Economics in Five Years?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Wendy A.; Finegan, T. Aldrich; Siegfried, John J.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate graduate school outcomes for students who entered economics Ph.D. programs in Fall 2002. Students in Top-15 ranked programs and those with higher verbal and quantitative GRE scores are less likely to have dropped out, but no more likely to have graduated. Those with undergraduate degrees from Top-60 U.S. liberal arts colleges and…

  15. Points of Focus and Position: Intertextual Reference in PhD Theses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the nature of texts produced for assessment at the highest level of advanced academic literacy: PhD theses. Eight theses from within a single department (Agricultural Botany) at a British university are the subject of study, and the contexts in which these texts were written are investigated through interviews with the…

  16. Ensuring PhD development of responsible conduct of research behaviors: who's responsible?

    PubMed

    Titus, Sandra L; Ballou, Janice M

    2014-03-01

    The importance of public confidence in scientific findings and trust in scientists cannot be overstated. Thus, it becomes critical for the scientific community to focus on enhancing the strategies used to educate future scientists on ethical research behaviors. What we are lacking is knowledge on how faculty members shape and develop ethical research standards with their students. We are presenting the results of a survey with 3,500 research faculty members. We believe this is the first report on how faculty work with and educate their PhD students on basic research standards. Specifically, we wanted to determine whether individual faculty members, who are advisors or mentors, differ in how they implemented components of responsible conduct of research (RCR) with their PhD students. Mentors were more likely than advisors or supervisors to report working with all of their PhDs, who graduated in the last 5 years, on the 17 recognized critical components of RCR training and research skill development. We also found about half of the faculty members believe RCR is an institutional responsibility versus a faculty responsibility. Less than a quarter have had opportunities to participate in faculty training to be a better mentor, advisor, or research teacher, and about one third of faculty did not or could not remember whether they had guidelines related to their responsibilities to PhD students. We discuss the implications of our findings and focus on ways that PhD research mentoring can be enhanced.

  17. Re-Envisioning the Arts PhD: Intellectual Entrepreneurship and the Intellectual Arts Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherwitz, Richard A.; Beckman, Gary D.

    2006-01-01

    The authors of this article contend that most doctoral students in the arts do not fully appreciate the meaning of their PhD, and that the current system of graduate education perpetuates this phenomenon, with each generation of professors passing down their understanding of the doctorate to succeeding generations. The authors argue that what is…

  18. The Ph.D. in English and Foreign Languages: A Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Departments of English, New York, NY.

    This special issue presents the speeches, surveys, and workshop reports of the University of Texas Conference on the Research Component of the Ph.D. in English and Foreign Languages held in Austin in December 1972. Also included are updated papers and reports from the Purdue University Conference on Graduate Education held earlier in 1972.…

  19. Meet EPA Scientist Carolina Peñalva-Arana, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA scientist Carolina Peñalva-Arana, Ph.D., researches how to use molecular data to determine the health of an ecosystem. She and her colleagues are observing these tiny changes in ecosystem health to predict when an ecosystem is impaired earlier

  20. From Student to Scholar: The Academic Library and Social Sciences PhD Students' Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming-May, Rachel; Yuro, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Although research concerning the information-seeking behavior of academic library users is abundant, few studies have focused specifically on PhD students. This oversight has had an impact on librarians' ability to effectively market services such as information literacy instruction and research assistance to doctoral students. In order to…

  1. Content Analysis of PhD and EdD Dissertations in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, David W.; Haley-Mize, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Previous research conducted by Nelson and Coorough (1994) found support for the statement that PhD programs were more research oriented, whereas doctorate of education (EdD) programs were more oriented to the educational practitioner. This previous study, however, had grouped all dissertations in education and had not looked at dissertations by…

  2. PhD Students' Perceptions of the Relationship between Philosophy and Research: A Qualitative Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efinger, Joan; Maldonado, Nancy; McArdle, Geri

    2004-01-01

    This study explored, described, and discovered meaning in the lived experiences of PhD students regarding two courses: Philosophy of Science and Qualitative Methods. The philosophical underpinning was constructivism. The phenomenological methodology employed a structured questionnaire to collect data. It involved mailed computer disks with…

  3. Commentary: Attitude Adjustment--Educating PhD Scientist for Business Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Sheldon M.

    2011-01-01

    The PhD graduate from a US research academic institution who has worked 5-7 years to solve a combination of laboratory and computational problems after an in-depth classroom experience is likely superbly trained in at least a subset of the life sciences and the underlying methodology and thought processes required to perform high level research.…

  4. Career-Self Management and Entrepreneurship: An Experience with PhD Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Joana Carneiro; do Ceu Taveira, Maria; Sa, Elisabete

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This study presents an experience developed with PhD students aimed to analyze the extent to which career self-management should be approached along with entrepreneurship issues to promote students' career development. Method: An intervention group who attended a Career Self-Management Seminar (EG1), a comparison group who attended…

  5. Publish and Be Doctor-Rated: The PhD by Published Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badley, Graham

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is, first, to provide a brief account of the PhD by published work focusing especially on quality assurance issues such as eligibility of candidates, the nature of the submission itself, supervision and assessment procedures. Second, it seeks to offer a discussion of the criteria to be met by candidates in…

  6. Factors Affecting Timely Completion of a PhD: A Complex Systems Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitchforth, Jegar; Beames, Stephanie; Thomas, Aleysha; Falk, Matthew; Farr, Charisse; Gasson, Susan; Thamrin, Sri Astuti; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2012-01-01

    Completing a PhD on time is a complex process, influenced by many interacting factors. In this paper we take a Bayesian Network approach to analyzing the factors perceived to be important in achieving this aim. Focusing on a single research group in Mathematical Sciences, we develop a conceptual model to describe the factors considered to be…

  7. Classifying Australian PhD Theses: Linking Research and Library Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macauley, Peter; Evans, Terry; Pearson, Margot

    2010-01-01

    This article draws on the findings from, and the methods and approach used in the provision of a database of Australian PhD thesis records for the period 1987 to 2006, coded by Research Fields, Courses and Disciplines (RFCD) fields of study. Importantly, the project was not merely the creation of yet another database but something that constitutes…

  8. Learning to Write a Research Article: Ph.D. Students' Transitions toward Disciplinary Writing Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castello, Montserrat; Inesta, Anna; Corcelles, Mariona

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study designed from a socially situated and activity theory perspective aimed at gaining a deeper understanding of how Ph.D. students regulate their academic writing activity. Writing regulation is a complex activity of a highly situated and social nature, involving cyclical thought-action-emotion dynamics and the…

  9. Regulating Emotions and Aiming for a Ph.D.: Excerpts from "Anthropology Matters"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovland, Ingie

    2012-01-01

    In this article I will present a range of experiences of graduate socialisation that have been discussed in past articles in the journal "Anthropology Matters". These are the experiences of social anthropology Ph.D. students in the United Kingdom. The overarching theme for the article is "regulating emotions", and the excerpts…

  10. As others see us: what PhD students say about supervisors.

    PubMed

    Yarwood-Ross, Lee; Haigh, Carol

    2014-09-01

    To explore the attitudes that doctoral students share with each other in an online postgraduate discussion forum. The supervisory role is pivotal to the successful completion of a PhD. Student satisfaction surveys are implemented by some universities, but there is currently no research that has investigated PhD students' experiences of supervision in the less formal environment of an online postgraduate discussion forum. Data were collected between September and December 2012 from the Postgraduate Forum, which receives posts from the global student community. The keywords used in the search were 'supervisor(s)' and 'supervision'. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. All relevant titles and posts from between January 2002 and the end of December 2012 were searched. The authors discovered five major themes: communication difficulties, control and engagement, academic bullying, lack of trust, and desertion. The relationship between students and supervisors is vital to successful PhD completion, and this study has provided some of the experiences students share with each other in an online postgraduate discussion forum. The online discussion forum provided an insight into students' perspectives of supervision but as it is asynchronous, there is limited analysis. Further research incorporating synchronous data collection methods would be helpful to examine students' experiences in greater detail. This study shows how an online postgraduate forum can be used as a source of data to gain an insight into PhD students' perspectives of supervision.

  11. The Focus and Substance of Formative Comment Provided by PhD Examiners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid; Fairbairn, Hedy; Lovat, Terence

    2014-01-01

    In practice and process PhD examination is distinctive, reflecting the high expectations of students whose learning has been directed to their becoming researchers. This article builds on previous research on the examination of Australian theses that revealed that examiners in Science (n?=?542) and Education (n?=?241) provide a substantial…

  12. Learning Opportunities in PhD Supervisory Talks: A Social Constructionist Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Wenwen; Singhasiri, Wareesiri

    2016-01-01

    Although PhD supervision has been recognised as an educative process and a complex pedagogy for decades, there is little research into on-site pedagogic processes. Informed by social constructionism and a Foucauldian approach, this qualitative case study explores how learning opportunities were created by analysing both a supervisor's verbal…

  13. Re-Envisioning the Arts PhD: Intellectual Entrepreneurship and the Intellectual Arts Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherwitz, Richard A.; Beckman, Gary D.

    2006-01-01

    The authors of this article contend that most doctoral students in the arts do not fully appreciate the meaning of their PhD, and that the current system of graduate education perpetuates this phenomenon, with each generation of professors passing down their understanding of the doctorate to succeeding generations. The authors argue that what is…

  14. The Impact of Publishing during PhD Studies on Career Research Publication, Visibility, and Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horta, Hugo; Santos, João M.

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the impact that publishing during the period of PhD study has on researchers' future knowledge production, impact, and co-authorship. The analysis is based on a representative sample of PhDs from all fields of science working in Portugal. For each researcher in the dataset, we compiled a lifetime publication record and…

  15. Imaginaries of "Europe" in the Governmentality of PhD Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergviken Rensfeldt, Annika

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the recent European governing of PhD education by describing and destabilizing how Europe, as a social construct, is inscribed in the governing in multiple ways. Conceptually, it aligns with post-Foucauldian research interests in imaginaries of societies, subjectivities, and politics of knowledge. Based on European policies…

  16. At the MLA, a Ph.D. Candidate Navigates the Jobs Gantlet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    It's the night before one of Javier Jimenez's big job interviews at the Modern Language Association (MLA) meeting. The 35-year-old graduate student, who is scheduled to earn his Ph.D. in comparative literature this spring from the University of California at Berkeley, is trying to ward off anxiety and abdominal pains. The mystique of the MLA, the…

  17. A Dialogic about Using Facebook Status Updates for Education Research: A PhD Student's Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Naomi; Penn-Edwards, Sorrel; Sim, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Facebook status updates provided the data for a study about the transition learning experiences of 1st-year university students. Strict ethical guidelines were proposed by the PhD researcher from the outset of the study. Anonymity was considered important for the approved ethical clearance for both the university and the participants.…

  18. Extended Candidature and Non-Completion of a Ph.D. at Makerere University, Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamala, Robert; Ocaya, Bruno; Oonyu, Joseph C.

    2012-01-01

    Although student persistence in graduate programs is widely regarded as an important topic in the literature of higher education, many such works focus on the completion of studies. This paper examines the dynamics of attrition resulting in either delayed or non-completion of doctoral studies. Administrative data of 294 Ph.D. students at Makerere…

  19. History of Spanish Mathematics Education Focusing on PhD Theses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallejo-Ruiz, Monica; Fernandez-Cano, Antonio; Torralbo, Manuel; Maz, Alexander; Rico, Luis

    2008-01-01

    This article offers an overview of mathematics education in Spain, analyzing the production of PhD theses over the last 30 years. This period has been divided into four cycles that describe the evolution of Spanish research in the field of mathematics education, together with changes in university and social politics. This paper also includes a…

  20. Managing Criticism in Ph.D. Supervision: A Qualitative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Sarah; Seale, Clive

    2007-01-01

    This article is part of a larger study which presents findings from an in-depth longitudinal case study of a student's Ph.D. journey. It shows how criticism is produced and managed in the supervisory relationship. As well as an overview of types of criticism produced across a range of supervisory interactions, the article presents a micro-analysis…

  1. Completing a PhD by Publication: A Review of Australian Policy and Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Denise

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing impetus for higher-degree-by-research students to publish during candidature. Research performance, including higher degree completions and publication output, commonly determines university funding, and doctorates with publishing experience are better positioned for a career in softening academic labour markets. The PhD by…

  2. The PhD and the Autonomous Self: Gender, Rationality and Postgraduate Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lesley; Lee, Alison; Green, Bill

    2000-01-01

    Explores ideas of autonomy and the independent scholar that underpin traditional practices of postgraduate pedagogy, particularly PhD programs in the humanities and social sciences. Finds practices underlain by the gendered nature of ideas of autonomy and the paradoxical nature of the processes intended to produce the autonomous scholar self.…

  3. Completing a PhD by Publication: A Review of Australian Policy and Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Denise

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing impetus for higher-degree-by-research students to publish during candidature. Research performance, including higher degree completions and publication output, commonly determines university funding, and doctorates with publishing experience are better positioned for a career in softening academic labour markets. The PhD by…

  4. Liberal Arts Colleges and the Production of PhD Economists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson, Philip N.; Magenheim, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Data from the National Science Foundation (2014) indicate that at least one PhD in economics was awarded to a Swarthmore College graduate in every year since 1966. The authors' purpose in this article is to consider factors that may have contributed to the high number of PhDs in economics awarded to Swarthmore College graduates. While there is…

  5. The Concept of "Originality" in the Ph.D.: How Is It Interpreted by Examiners?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Gillian; Lunt, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores ways in which examiners, supervisors and others interpret the concept of "originality" when evaluating candidates' achievements in the final Ph.D. examination. It is based on institutional responses to a question in a 2006 discussion paper on doctoral assessment about how universities define originality for the…

  6. Career Aspirations and Career Outcomes for Solar and Space Physics Ph.D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Results from a recent graduate student survey found unsurprisingly that Solar and Space Physics (S&SP) Ph.D. graduate students almost all aspire to have research careers in Solar and Space Physics. This study reports on the research career outcomes over the last decade for S&SP Ph.Ds. We used publication of peer-reviewed articles as the indicator for persistence in a research career. We found that nearly two-thirds (64%) of Ph.D.s who graduated between 2001 to 2009 published refereed-papers four or more years after their Ph.D., while 17% of Ph.D.s never published another paper beyond the year they received their Ph.D. The remaining 19% of Ph.Ds, stopped publishing within three-years of receiving their Ph.D. We found that though there is statistically no difference on persistence of publishing research between graduates of the largest programs compared to all other programs, there are significant differences between programs. We also found there was no gender differences in any of the persistence data (i.e., men and women stop or continue publishing at the same rates). Graduate programs, faculty advisors and potential graduate students can use these data for career planning. This study suggests that a significant majority of S&SP Ph.D.s (77%) find post-doctoral research positions and a majority (56%) find research careers beyond their post-doc.

  7. Learning Opportunities in PhD Supervisory Talks: A Social Constructionist Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Wenwen; Singhasiri, Wareesiri

    2016-01-01

    Although PhD supervision has been recognised as an educative process and a complex pedagogy for decades, there is little research into on-site pedagogic processes. Informed by social constructionism and a Foucauldian approach, this qualitative case study explores how learning opportunities were created by analysing both a supervisor's verbal…

  8. The Concept of "Originality" in the Ph.D.: How Is It Interpreted by Examiners?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Gillian; Lunt, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores ways in which examiners, supervisors and others interpret the concept of "originality" when evaluating candidates' achievements in the final Ph.D. examination. It is based on institutional responses to a question in a 2006 discussion paper on doctoral assessment about how universities define originality for the…

  9. How To Get a Ph.D.: Managing the Peaks and Troughs of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Estelle M.; Pugh, D. S.

    This book provides a practical, realistic understanding of the process of doing research for a doctorate degree (Ph.D.) from a British viewpoint. The work discusses many issues often left unconsidered, such as the emotional investment made by students and its effects, the skills required by an effective supervisor, and the importance of time. The…

  10. New Variant PhD: The Changing Nature of the Doctorate in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Since the early twentieth century the PhD has been the research degree of choice in the UK, but traditional ideas and practices relating to the degree are now being challenged. This paper sketches out the main drivers of change and explores the main challenges confronting doctoral study within the UK. It explains why there is a need for a…

  11. Originality and the PhD: what is it and how can it be demonstrated?

    PubMed

    Gill, Paul; Dolan, Gina

    2015-07-01

    To explore the concept of originality in doctoral research and outline ways in which doctoral candidates can begin to identify, formulate and articulate their individual contributions to knowledge. Originality is a major feature of doctoral research but considerable confusion exists regarding what can and cannot constitute originality in the PhD and how the contribution to knowledge can be demonstrated clearly. This is a discussion paper. A review of relevant, published literature relating to originality in the PhD. Many doctoral candidates merely outline why they believe their work to be original, instead of demonstrating critically how and in what way their research makes a meaningful contribution to the body of knowledge. The concept of originality in the PhD is complex and multi-faceted. Identifying and conveying originality in doctoral research takes considerable time, contemplation and effort. This process is, however, integral to the PhD itself, and the skills acquired are essential for post-doctoral development. A good doctoral thesis should clearly outline the different ways in which the work is original. A succinct, focused, critical appraisal of the specific contribution to knowledge is preferable to an exhaustive list.

  12. The Focus and Substance of Formative Comment Provided by PhD Examiners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid; Fairbairn, Hedy; Lovat, Terence

    2014-01-01

    In practice and process PhD examination is distinctive, reflecting the high expectations of students whose learning has been directed to their becoming researchers. This article builds on previous research on the examination of Australian theses that revealed that examiners in Science (n?=?542) and Education (n?=?241) provide a substantial…

  13. The Ph.D. Debacle: Job Search Skills--The Path Not Taken?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Gordon

    The difficult job market for PhD's during the current period of retrenchment on campuses and the need for job search skills for the jobs in the nonacademic sector are addressed. It is suggested that colleges and universities should adapt a version of the Deeper Investigation of Growth (DIG) techniques pioneered by Richard Gummere at Columbia…

  14. Measuring efficiency of university-industry Ph.D. projects using best worst method.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Negin; Rezaei, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    A collaborative Ph.D. project, carried out by a doctoral candidate, is a type of collaboration between university and industry. Due to the importance of such projects, researchers have considered different ways to evaluate the success, with a focus on the outputs of these projects. However, what has been neglected is the other side of the coin-the inputs. The main aim of this study is to incorporate both the inputs and outputs of these projects into a more meaningful measure called efficiency. A ratio of the weighted sum of outputs over the weighted sum of inputs identifies the efficiency of a Ph.D. The weights of the inputs and outputs can be identified using a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) method. Data on inputs and outputs are collected from 51 Ph.D. candidates who graduated from Eindhoven University of Technology. The weights are identified using a new MCDM method called Best Worst Method (BWM). Because there may be differences in the opinion of Ph.D. candidates and supervisors on weighing the inputs and outputs, data for BWM are collected from both groups. It is interesting to see that there are differences in the level of efficiency from the two perspectives, because of the weight differences. Moreover, a comparison between the efficiency scores of these projects and their success scores reveals differences that may have significant implications. A sensitivity analysis divulges the most contributing inputs and outputs.

  15. PhD Pedagogy and the Changing Knowledge Landscapes of Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkins, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    PhD supervision is increasingly embedded in frameworks that link research to issues of knowledge transfer involving the translation of knowledge to domains outside the university where it can be taken up and applied. This tends to require research that goes beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries and raises questions of the nature of knowledge…

  16. The Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Evaluation: Reflections on Its Development and First Seven Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coryn, Chris L. S.; Stufflebeam, Daniel L.; Davidson, E. Jane; Scriven, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background: The Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Evaluation (IDPE) program at Western Michigan University (WMU) was designed and developed to address the increasing need and demand for highly trained and skilled evaluators. After only six and a half years, the program's graduates are serving in important evaluation leadership positions throughout the…

  17. On-Going Dialogue: Degrees of Difference: The Ph.D. and the Ed.D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, D. Stanley

    1987-01-01

    The controversy over Ph.D. vs. Ed.D. programs in higher education is examined, including discussion of differential research requirements and the ways in which traditional disciplines dominate thinking about the study of higher education. It is concluded that each field must define its own standards for each degree. (MSE)

  18. PhD versus DSW: A Critique of Trends in Social Work Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Tyriesa

    2016-01-01

    Social work educators are in a phase of reintroducing the doctor of social work (DSW) degree and refining distinctions between PhD and DSW doctoral programs. This article examines how the two options have been prey to a noticeable "seesaw of precedence", resulting in a debatable history of social work's approach to doctoral education…

  19. Liberal Arts Colleges and the Production of PhD Economists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson, Philip N.; Magenheim, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Data from the National Science Foundation (2014) indicate that at least one PhD in economics was awarded to a Swarthmore College graduate in every year since 1966. The authors' purpose in this article is to consider factors that may have contributed to the high number of PhDs in economics awarded to Swarthmore College graduates. While there is…

  20. Gender and Doctoral Studies: The Perceptions of Ph.D. Students in an American University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz-Costes, Beth; Helmke, Laura Andrews; Ulku-Steiner, Beril

    2006-01-01

    Twenty students enrolled in Ph.D. programmes were interviewed to examine the role of gender in their academic experiences. Gender was examined in three ways: gender of the student, gender of the student's faculty supervisor and gender make-up of the faculty within the student's department or academic unit. All students reported the importance of…

  1. Factors Influencing International PhD Students to Study Physics in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Serene H.-J.; Nieminen, Timo A.; Townson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Since physics research is an activity of an active international community, international visits are a common way for physicists to share scientific knowledge and skills. International mobility of physicists is also important for PhD physics study and research training. We investigated personal and social factors that influenced the decision for…

  2. Determinants among PhD Economists of Membership in a Professional Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Arthur M., Jr.; Haurin, Donald R.

    1994-01-01

    Tested hypotheses about the value of American Economic Association (AEA) membership. An AEA economist is likely to be male, from a highly ranked PhD school, active in publishing research, highly cited for publications, and not in either the business administration or the agriculture subfields. The study involved 913 economists who received their…

  3. Winning the PhD Game: Evocative Playing of Snakes and Ladders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickie, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a qualitative approach to developing an understanding of the lived experiences of PhD students. Rather than relying on textbook reports and theories about studying a higher degree by research, by allowing the students' voices to be heard, explicit and conscious research can be used to generate appropriate…

  4. International Students' Motivation to Pursue and Complete a Ph.D. in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    This study explores what motivates 19 international students to pursue a Ph.D. at a public research university in the U.S. and, more importantly, what motivates them to persist despite unsatisfying socialization. Based on value-expectancy achievement motivation theory, four motivations emerged: intrinsic interest in research, intrinsic interest in…

  5. The PhD Dissertation Defense in Canada: An Institutional Policy Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shuhua

    2008-01-01

    Drawing upon publicly accessible information on the websites of ten Canadian research universities, this paper aims to shed some light on the assumed variation of institutional policies regarding the PhD dissertation defense in Canada. It discusses "How are the institutional policies on the doctoral dissertation defense different across…

  6. The Latina/o Pathway to the Ph.D.: Abriendo Caminos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos, Jeanett, Ed.; Gloria, Alberta M., Ed.; Kamimura, Mark, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This is the first book specifically to engage with the absence of Latinas/os in doctoral studies. It proposes educational and administrative strategies to open up the pipeline, and institutional practices to ensure access, support, models and training for Latinas/os aspiring to the Ph.D. The under-education of Latina/o youth begins early. Given…

  7. On Doctoral Education: How to Supervise a PhD, 1985-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Raewyn; Manathunga, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, the authors talk about higher degree supervision as a human relationship, and shares how to supervise a PhD. There's a tendency now to talk about supervision as if it's a technical process one needs to learn the rules of. This paper urges educators to think about this as a human educational relationship, which has all the ups and…

  8. A Statistical Profile of the London PhD in History, 1921-90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicoll, Irena

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes information from a computerized database of Ph.D. candidates in history between 1921-90. Examines the numbers of doctoral degrees produced at each college within the university, as well as students' gender, nationality, and age. Questions previously held assumptions concerning rates of completion and submission. Includes statistical…

  9. Constructing an Institutional Identity in University Tea Rooms: The International PhD Student Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fotovatian, Sepideh; Miller, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    This case study profiles eight international PhD students and describes the process of the construction and negotiation of their social and institutional identities in an Australian university. Audio-recorded informal conversations of the students highlight the role of social membership, staffroom interactions and language in the construction of…

  10. Report of the Survey of Howard University: The Graduate School and Selected Ph.D. Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Results of the Office of Education's Bureau of Higher and Continuing Education's inspection of Howard University's Graduate School and the Ph.D. program are presented. The inspection was performed by conducting a survey of the administrative staff, the faculty, and student body, and by examining relevant facilities, laboratories, equipment,…

  11. PhD versus DSW: A Critique of Trends in Social Work Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Tyriesa

    2016-01-01

    Social work educators are in a phase of reintroducing the doctor of social work (DSW) degree and refining distinctions between PhD and DSW doctoral programs. This article examines how the two options have been prey to a noticeable "seesaw of precedence", resulting in a debatable history of social work's approach to doctoral education…

  12. Improving Cardiovascular Health in Diverse Populations: A Conversation With Anushka Patel, MBBS, SM, PhD.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anushka; Rutherford, John D

    2017-02-07

    Anushka Patel is the Chief Scientist, The George Institute for Global Health, Professor of Medicine, University of Sydney and a Cardiologist, at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, all based in Sydney, Australia. She obtained her MBBS from the University of Queensland, a Master of Science degree in Epidemiology from Harvard University, and her PhD from the University of Sydney.

  13. Preparing Postbaccalaureates for Entry and Success in Biomedical PhD Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Joshua D.; Harrell, Jessica R.; Cohen, Kimberley W.; Miller, Virginia L.; Phelps, Patricia V.; Cook, Jeanette G.

    2016-01-01

    Certain racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, and those from low socioeconomic backgrounds remain underrepresented (UR) in the biomedical sciences. This underrepresentation becomes more extreme at each higher education stage. To support UR scholars during the critical transition from baccalaureate to PhD, we established an…

  14. PhD and the Manager's Dream: Professionalising the Students, the Degree and the Supervisors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matos, Frederico

    2013-01-01

    This article has two main aims: to analyse relevant literature on the doctoral degree, and to assess whether recent funding changes in the UK have changed the nature of the PhD in the social sciences in a research-intensive and prestigious UK university. Data were collected at BlueSkies University where interviews with social sciences PhD…

  15. Points of Focus and Position: Intertextual Reference in PhD Theses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the nature of texts produced for assessment at the highest level of advanced academic literacy: PhD theses. Eight theses from within a single department (Agricultural Botany) at a British university are the subject of study, and the contexts in which these texts were written are investigated through interviews with the…

  16. PhD Pedagogy and the Changing Knowledge Landscapes of Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkins, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    PhD supervision is increasingly embedded in frameworks that link research to issues of knowledge transfer involving the translation of knowledge to domains outside the university where it can be taken up and applied. This tends to require research that goes beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries and raises questions of the nature of knowledge…

  17. Preparing Postbaccalaureates for Entry and Success in Biomedical PhD Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Joshua D.; Harrell, Jessica R.; Cohen, Kimberley W.; Miller, Virginia L.; Phelps, Patricia V.; Cook, Jeanette G.

    2016-01-01

    Certain racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, and those from low socioeconomic backgrounds remain underrepresented (UR) in the biomedical sciences. This underrepresentation becomes more extreme at each higher education stage. To support UR scholars during the critical transition from baccalaureate to PhD, we established an…

  18. Imaginaries of "Europe" in the Governmentality of PhD Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergviken Rensfeldt, Annika

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the recent European governing of PhD education by describing and destabilizing how Europe, as a social construct, is inscribed in the governing in multiple ways. Conceptually, it aligns with post-Foucauldian research interests in imaginaries of societies, subjectivities, and politics of knowledge. Based on European policies…

  19. The Impact of Publishing during PhD Studies on Career Research Publication, Visibility, and Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horta, Hugo; Santos, João M.

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the impact that publishing during the period of PhD study has on researchers' future knowledge production, impact, and co-authorship. The analysis is based on a representative sample of PhDs from all fields of science working in Portugal. For each researcher in the dataset, we compiled a lifetime publication record and…

  20. Commentary: Attitude Adjustment--Educating PhD Scientist for Business Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Sheldon M.

    2011-01-01

    The PhD graduate from a US research academic institution who has worked 5-7 years to solve a combination of laboratory and computational problems after an in-depth classroom experience is likely superbly trained in at least a subset of the life sciences and the underlying methodology and thought processes required to perform high level research.…

  1. PhD and the Manager's Dream: Professionalising the Students, the Degree and the Supervisors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matos, Frederico

    2013-01-01

    This article has two main aims: to analyse relevant literature on the doctoral degree, and to assess whether recent funding changes in the UK have changed the nature of the PhD in the social sciences in a research-intensive and prestigious UK university. Data were collected at BlueSkies University where interviews with social sciences PhD…

  2. The Impact of Institutional Student Support on Graduation Rates in US Ph.D. Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolli, Thomas; Agasisti, Tommaso; Johnes, Geraint

    2015-01-01

    Using National Research Council data, we investigate the determinants of graduation rates in US Ph.D. programmes. We emphasise the impact that support and facilities offered to doctoral students have on completion rates. Significant, strong and positive effects are found for the provision of on-site graduate conferences and dedicated workspace,…

  3. Factors Influencing International PhD Students to Study Physics in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Serene H.-J.; Nieminen, Timo A.; Townson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Since physics research is an activity of an active international community, international visits are a common way for physicists to share scientific knowledge and skills. International mobility of physicists is also important for PhD physics study and research training. We investigated personal and social factors that influenced the decision for…

  4. Constructing an Institutional Identity in University Tea Rooms: The International PhD Student Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fotovatian, Sepideh; Miller, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    This case study profiles eight international PhD students and describes the process of the construction and negotiation of their social and institutional identities in an Australian university. Audio-recorded informal conversations of the students highlight the role of social membership, staffroom interactions and language in the construction of…

  5. At a Distance: A Comparative Study of Distance Delivery Modalities for PhD Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Andrew G.

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to ascertain and compare the attitudes and perceptions of PhD nursing students attending their coursework through synchronous and asynchronous means at two different universities. Many studies have been performed comparing both synchronous videoconferencing and asynchronous online education with the traditional classroom, but no…

  6. Hypoxia and loss of PHD2 inactivate stromal fibroblasts to decrease tumour stiffness and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Chris D; Pedersen, Jesper T; Venning, Freja A; Singh, Lukram Babloo; Moeendarbary, Emad; Charras, Guillaume; Cox, Thomas R; Sahai, Erik; Erler, Janine T

    2015-10-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) interact with tumour cells and promote growth and metastasis. Here, we show that CAF activation is reversible: chronic hypoxia deactivates CAFs, resulting in the loss of contractile force, reduced remodelling of the surrounding extracellular matrix and, ultimately, impaired CAF-mediated cancer cell invasion. Hypoxia inhibits prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2), leading to hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α stabilisation, reduced expression of αSMA and periostin, and reduced myosin II activity. Loss of PHD2 in CAFs phenocopies the effects of hypoxia, which can be prevented by simultaneous depletion of HIF-1α. Treatment with the PHD inhibitor DMOG in an orthotopic breast cancer model significantly decreases spontaneous metastases to the lungs and liver, associated with decreased tumour stiffness and fibroblast activation. PHD2 depletion in CAFs co-injected with tumour cells similarly prevents CAF-induced metastasis to lungs and liver. Our data argue that reversion of CAFs towards a less active state is possible and could have important clinical implications.

  7. Competitive binding of a benzimidazole to the histone-binding pocket of the Pygo PHD finger.

    PubMed

    Miller, Thomas C R; Rutherford, Trevor J; Birchall, Kristian; Chugh, Jasveen; Fiedler, Marc; Bienz, Mariann

    2014-12-19

    The Pygo-BCL9 complex is a chromatin reader, facilitating β-catenin-mediated oncogenesis, and is thus emerging as a potential therapeutic target for cancer. Its function relies on two ligand-binding surfaces of Pygo's PHD finger that anchor the histone H3 tail methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me) with assistance from the BCL9 HD1 domain. Here, we report the first use of fragment-based screening by NMR to identify small molecules that block protein-protein interactions by a PHD finger. This led to the discovery of a set of benzothiazoles that bind to a cleft emanating from the PHD-HD1 interface, as defined by X-ray crystallography. Furthermore, we discovered a benzimidazole that docks into the H3K4me specificity pocket and displaces the native H3K4me peptide from the PHD finger. Our study demonstrates the ligandability of the Pygo-BCL9 complex and uncovers a privileged scaffold as a template for future development of lead inhibitors of oncogenesis.

  8. Learning to Become Teacher Educators: Testimonies of Three PHD Students in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Rui

    2015-01-01

    While there has been an increasing number of graduate students who enter teacher education after obtaining a higher research degree (e.g., PhD or EdD), scant attention has been paid to their professional learning as prospective teacher educators in higher education. To fill this gap, this study, informed by the social theory of learning,…

  9. A Dialogic about Using Facebook Status Updates for Education Research: A PhD Student's Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Naomi; Penn-Edwards, Sorrel; Sim, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Facebook status updates provided the data for a study about the transition learning experiences of 1st-year university students. Strict ethical guidelines were proposed by the PhD researcher from the outset of the study. Anonymity was considered important for the approved ethical clearance for both the university and the participants.…

  10. The Latina/o Pathway to the Ph.D.: Abriendo Caminos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos, Jeanett, Ed.; Gloria, Alberta M., Ed.; Kamimura, Mark, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This is the first book specifically to engage with the absence of Latinas/os in doctoral studies. It proposes educational and administrative strategies to open up the pipeline, and institutional practices to ensure access, support, models and training for Latinas/os aspiring to the Ph.D. The under-education of Latina/o youth begins early. Given…

  11. At the MLA, a Ph.D. Candidate Navigates the Jobs Gantlet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    It's the night before one of Javier Jimenez's big job interviews at the Modern Language Association (MLA) meeting. The 35-year-old graduate student, who is scheduled to earn his Ph.D. in comparative literature this spring from the University of California at Berkeley, is trying to ward off anxiety and abdominal pains. The mystique of the MLA, the…

  12. Classifying Australian PhD Theses: Linking Research and Library Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macauley, Peter; Evans, Terry; Pearson, Margot

    2010-01-01

    This article draws on the findings from, and the methods and approach used in the provision of a database of Australian PhD thesis records for the period 1987 to 2006, coded by Research Fields, Courses and Disciplines (RFCD) fields of study. Importantly, the project was not merely the creation of yet another database but something that constitutes…

  13. Final Report on Montana's Ph.D. Programs Existing on More than One Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Freeman J.

    In 1975, the Montana Board of Regents charged the Commissioner of Higher Education with reviewing the five Ph.D. programs in the state that are offered at more than one campus: microbiology, botany, zoology, chemistry, and mathematics. Teams from other universities reviewed the programs and submitted reports, with recommendations. The…

  14. Inhibition of the oxygen sensor PHD2 in the liver improves survival in lactic acidosis by activating the Cori cycle

    PubMed Central

    Suhara, Tomohiro; Hishiki, Takako; Kasahara, Masataka; Hayakawa, Noriyo; Oyaizu, Tomoko; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akiko; Morisaki, Hiroshi; Kaelin, William G.; Suematsu, Makoto; Minamishima, Yoji Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Loss of prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) activates the hypoxia-inducible factor-dependent hypoxic response, including anaerobic glycolysis, which causes large amounts of lactate to be released from cells into the circulation. We found that Phd2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) produced more lactate than wild-type MEFs, as expected, whereas systemic inactivation of PHD2 in mice did not cause hyperlacticacidemia. This unexpected observation led us to hypothesize that the hypoxic response activated in the liver enhances the Cori cycle, a lactate–glucose carbon recycling system between muscle and liver, and thereby decreases circulating lactate. Consistent with this hypothesis, blood lactate levels measured after a treadmill or lactate tolerance test were significantly lower in Phd2-liver-specific knockout (Phd2-LKO) mice than in control mice. An in vivo 13C-labeled lactate incorporation assay revealed that the livers of Phd2-LKO mice produce significantly more glucose derived from 13C-labeled lactate than control mice, suggesting that blockade of PHD2 in the liver ameliorates lactic acidosis by activating gluconeogenesis from lactate. Phd2-LKO mice were resistant to lactic acidosis induced by injection of a lethal dose of lactate, displaying a significant elongation of survival. Moreover, oral administration of a PHD inhibitor improved survival in an endotoxin shock mice model. These data suggest that PHD2 is a potentially novel drug target for the treatment of lactic acidosis, which is a serious and often fatal complication observed in some critically ill patients. PMID:26324945

  15. Low immediate scientific yield of the PhD among medical doctors.

    PubMed

    Fosbøl, Emil L; Fosbøl, Philip L; Rerup, Sofie; Østergaard, Lauge; Ahmed, Mohammed H; Butt, Jawad; Davidsen, Julie; Shanmuganathan, Nirusiya; Juul, Simon; Lewinter, Christian

    2016-07-24

    We studied the scientific yield of the medical PhD program at all Danish Universities. We undertook a retrospective observational study. Three PhD schools in Denmark were included in order to evaluate the postdoctoral research production over more than 18 years through individual publications accessed by PubMed. A total of 2686 PhD-graduates (1995-2013) with a medical background were included according to registries from all PhD schools in Denmark. They had a median age of 35 years (interquartile range (IQR), 32-38) and 53 % were women at the time of graduation. Scientific activity over time was assessed independently of author-rank and inactivity was measured relative to the date of graduation. Factors associated with inactivity were identified using multivariable logistic regression. 88.6 % of the PhD theses were conducted in internal medicine vs. 11.4 % in surgery. During follow-up (median 6.9 years, IQR 3.0-11.7), PubMed data searches identified that 87 (3.4 %) of the PhD graduates had no publication after they graduated from the PhD program, 40 % had 5 or less, and 90 % had 30 or less. The median number of publications per year after PhD graduation was 1.12 (IQR 0.61-1.99) papers per year. About 2/3 of the graduates became inactive after 1 year and approximately 21 % of the graduates remained active during the whole follow-up. Female gender was associated with inactivity: adjusted odds ratio 1.59 (95 % confidence interval 1.24-2.05). The scientific production of Danish medic PhD-graduates was mainly produced around the time of PhD-graduation. After obtaining the PhD-degree the scientific production declines suggesting that scientific advance fails and resources are not harnessed.

  16. Deconstructing doctoral dissertations: how many papers does it take to make a PhD?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A collection of coauthored papers is the new norm for doctoral dissertations in the natural and biomedical sciences, yet there is no consensus on how to partition authorship credit between PhD candidates and their coauthors. Guidelines for PhD programs vary but tend to specify only a suggested range for the number of papers to be submitted for evaluation, sometimes supplemented with a requirement for the PhD candidate to be the principal author on the majority of submitted papers. Here I use harmonic counting to quantify the actual amount of authorship credit attributable to individual PhD graduates from two Scandinavian universities in 2008. Harmonic counting corrects for the inherent inflationary and equalizing biases of routine counting methods, thereby allowing the bibliometrically identifiable amount of authorship credit in approved dissertations to be analyzed with unprecedented accuracy. Unbiased partitioning of authorship credit between graduates and their coauthors provides a post hoc bibliometric measure of current PhD requirements, and sets a de facto baseline for the requisite scientific productivity of these contemporary PhD’s at a median value of approximately 1.6 undivided papers per dissertation. Comparison with previous census data suggests that the baseline has shifted over the past two decades as a result of a decrease in the number of submitted papers per candidate and an increase in the number of coauthors per paper. A simple solution to this shifting baseline syndrome would be to benchmark the amount of unbiased authorship credit deemed necessary for successful completion of a specific PhD program, and then monitor for departures from this level over time. Harmonic partitioning of authorship credit also facilitates cross-disciplinary and inter-institutional analysis of the scientific output from different PhD programs. Juxtaposing bibliometric benchmarks with current baselines may thus assist the development of harmonized guidelines and

  17. The evaluation of reproductive health PhD program in Iran: The input indicators analysis

    PubMed Central

    AbdiShahshahani, Mahshid; Ehsanpour, Soheila; Yamani, Nikoo; Kohan, Shahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Appropriate quality achievement of a PhD program requires frequent assessment and discovering the shortcomings in the program. Inputs, which are important elements of the curriculum, are frequently missed in evaluations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the input indicators of reproductive health PhD program in Iran based on the Context, Input, Process, and Product (CIPP) evaluation model. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive and evaluative study based on the CIPP evaluation model. It was conducted in 2013 in four Iranian schools of nursing and midwifery of medical sciences universities. Statistical population consisted of four groups: heads of departments (n = 5), faculty members (n = 18), graduates (n = 12), and PhD students of reproductive health (n = 54). Data collection tools were five separate questionnaires including 37 indicators that were developed by the researcher. Content and face validity were evaluated based on the experts’ indications. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient was calculated in order to obtain the reliability of the questionnaires. Collected data were analyzed by SPSS software. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics (mean, frequency, percentage, and standard deviation), and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and least significant difference (LSD) post hoc tests to compare means between groups. Results: The results of the study indicated that the highest percentage of the heads of departments (80%), graduates (66.7%), and students (68.5%) evaluated the status of input indicators of reproductive health PhD program as relatively appropriate, while most of the faculties (66.7%) evaluated that as appropriate. Conclusions: It is suggested to explore the reasons for relatively appropriate evaluation of input indicators by further academic researches and improve the reproductive health PhD program accordingly. PMID:25558260

  18. [Research misconduct: Knowledge, actions and attitudes of PhD candidates].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Bjørn; Holm, Søren

    2016-09-01

    BACKGROUND Increasing attention is being paid to research misconduct in academic journals and in the media, but we know relatively little about its extent or attitudes to research misconduct, or how these are changing. This study therefore aims to investigate PhD candidates' knowledge, own actions and attitudes to specific forms of research misconduct.MATERIAL AND METHOD In autumn 2015, an anonymous questionnaire survey was distributed to all participants in the introductory course for PhD candidates at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Oslo.RESULTS Altogether 77 PhD candidates (79 %) responded to the questionnaire. A total of 62 % conducted clinical research and 25 % conducted basic research. Around one in four had heard about serious forms of research misconduct in the previous year, and around 4 % were aware of various forms of serious research misconduct in their own department in the previous year. Compared to earlier studies, an increasing number (16 %) responded that they had been subjected to unethical pressure with regard to inclusion or order of authors. Approximately two-thirds were uncertain of whether their department had written policies for academic conduct. One-third of PhD candidates did not disassociate themselves from actions that are generally viewed as scientific misconduct. One-tenth thought it acceptable to falsify or fabricate data in order to expedite publication, one-fifth did not object to taking the credit for others' ideas, and almost half did not believe it was wrong to attempt a number of methods of analysis until one arrived at a significant answer.INTERPRETATION PhD candidates at the Faculty of Medicine were aware of research misconduct, both generally and from their own department. They themselves reported some type of scientific misconduct, and a large majority were uncertain of their department's guidelines. Some of the candidates also accepted several forms of research misconduct.

  19. A National Content Analysis of PhD Program Objectives, Structures, and Curricula: Do Programs Address the Full Range of Social Work's Needs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drisko, James; Hunnicutt, Christie; Berenson, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The Group for the Advancement of Doctoral Education (GADE) promotes excellence in PhD education in Social Work. GADE's 2013 Quality Guidelines for PhD Programs heavily emphasize preparation for research. Little is known, however, about the details of the contemporary social work PhD program structure and curriculum. Several prior surveys have…

  20. A National Content Analysis of PhD Program Objectives, Structures, and Curricula: Do Programs Address the Full Range of Social Work's Needs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drisko, James; Hunnicutt, Christie; Berenson, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The Group for the Advancement of Doctoral Education (GADE) promotes excellence in PhD education in Social Work. GADE's 2013 Quality Guidelines for PhD Programs heavily emphasize preparation for research. Little is known, however, about the details of the contemporary social work PhD program structure and curriculum. Several prior surveys have…

  1. Double immunohistochemical staining method for HIF-1alpha and its regulators PHD2 and PHD3 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Mary M; Toth, Karoly; Chintala, Sreenivasulu; Rustum, Youcef M

    2010-07-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1alpha) is expressed in the nuclei of tumor cells under hypoxic conditions, and is regulated, in part, by cytoplasmic prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs). As HIF-1alpha is selectively expressed in tumor cells, inhibitors are being developed for cancer therapy. Although methods for the detection of HIF-1alpha and PHDs are available, an immunohistochemical double staining method for these markers in individual tumor cells is not available. For method development a human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) xenograft, A253, was used as a known positive control tissue for HIF-1alpha in well-differentiated areas without microvessels. This laboratory showed that tumor cells in these areas are strongly positive for hypoxia markers. Another human, poorly differentiated SCC xenograft, FaDu, without hypoxic areas, was used as a negative control. PHD2 and 3 immunostaining was optimized individually using the human kidney. To optimize HIF-1alpha detection the pressure cooker time for antigen retrieval, concentration of the primary antibody, amplification reagent, and DAB development time were decreased. Casein blocking further decreased the background. Double staining resulted in brown nuclei for HIF-1alpha (DAB), and pink cytoplasmic staining for PHD2, 3 (fast red). The isotype-matched controls were negative. Normal human tissues had no detectable HIF-1alpha, but expressed PHD2, 3. The potential use of this new and improved method was confirmed by analyzing 15 surgical biopsies of oropharyngeal SCC of which 6 were positive for HIF-1alpha. This new method defined the optimal conditions for detection of HIF-1alpha and PHDs in individual tumor cells and could have a diagnostic and therapeutic potential.

  2. PHD1 links cell-cycle progression to oxygen sensing through hydroxylation of the centrosomal protein Cep192.

    PubMed

    Moser, Sandra C; Bensaddek, Dalila; Ortmann, Brian; Maure, Jean-Francois; Mudie, Sharon; Blow, J Julian; Lamond, Angus I; Swedlow, Jason R; Rocha, Sonia

    2013-08-26

    PHD1 belongs to the family of prolyl-4-hydroxylases (PHDs) that is responsible for posttranslational modification of prolines on specific target proteins. Because PHD activity is sensitive to oxygen levels and certain byproducts of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, PHDs act as sensors of the cell's metabolic state. Here, we identify PHD1 as a critical molecular link between oxygen sensing and cell-cycle control. We show that PHD1 function is required for centrosome duplication and maturation through modification of the critical centrosome component Cep192. Importantly, PHD1 is also required for primary cilia formation. Cep192 is hydroxylated by PHD1 on proline residue 1717. This hydroxylation is required for binding of the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCF(Skp2), which ubiquitinates Cep192, targeting it for proteasomal degradation. By modulating Cep192 levels, PHD1 thereby affects the processes of centriole duplication and centrosome maturation and contributes to the regulation of cell-cycle progression. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The status of PhD education in economic, social, and administrative sciences between 2005 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Farley, Joel F; Wang, Chi-Chuan; Blalock, Susan J

    2010-09-10

    To describe the funding, education, enrollment, and graduation patterns from economic, social, and administrative sciences PhD programs in colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States. Economic, social, and administrative sciences PhD programs were identified from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Web site. A 41-item online survey instrument was sent to the director of graduate studies of each identified program. Only programs offering a PhD degree were included in the study. Of the 26 programs surveyed, 20 (77%) provided useable responses to the survey instrument. Approximately 91% of PhD programs guarantee funding to incoming students with an average commitment of 2.9 years. On average, students were paid a stipend of $18,000 per year for commitments to research and teaching assistantships, each averaging approximately 2 years in length. Programs admitted an average of 3.5 students per year and graduated approximately 85% of entering students. The majority of students are non-US citizens and accept positions in either academic or industrial positions after graduation. Most economic, social, and administrative sciences PhD programs guarantee funding to incoming PhD candidates. Programs offering funding packages significantly below the average may be at a competitive disadvantage. It is unclear whether the number of students graduating from PhD programs is adequate to fulfill academic and industrial needs.

  4. Obesity-induced kidney injury is attenuated by amelioration of aberrant PHD2 activation in proximal tubules

    PubMed Central

    Futatsugi, Koji; Tokuyama, Hirobumi; Shibata, Shinsuke; Naitoh, Makiko; Kanda, Takeshi; Minakuchi, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Hayashi, Koichi; Minamishima, Yoji Andrew; Yanagita, Motoko; Wakino, Shu; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of tissue ischemia in obesity-induced kidney injury remains to be elucidated. Compared with low fat diet (LFD)-mice, high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice became obese with tubular enlargement, glomerulomegaly and peritubular capillary rarefaction, and exhibited both tubular and glomerular damages. In HFD-fed mice, despite the increase in renal pimonidazole-positive areas, the expressions of the hypoxia-responsive genes such as Prolyl-hydroxylase PHD2, a dominant oxygen sensor, and VEGFA were unchanged indicating impaired hypoxic response. Tamoxifen inducible proximal tubules (PT)-specific Phd2 knockout (Phd2-cKO) mice and their littermate control mice (Control) were created and fed HFD or LFD. Control mice on HFD (Control HFD) exhibited renal damages and renal ischemia with impaired hypoxic response compared with those on LFD. After tamoxifen treatment, HFD-fed knockout mice (Phd2-cKO HFD) had increased peritubular capillaries and the increased expressions of hypoxia responsive genes compared to Control HFD mice. Phd2-cKO HFD also exhibited the mitigation of tubular damages, albuminuria and glomerulomegaly. In human PT cells, the increased expressions of hypoxia-inducible genes in hypoxic condition were attenuated by free fatty acids. Thus, aberrant hypoxic responses due to dysfunction of PHD2 caused both glomerular and tubular damages in HFD-induced obese mice. Phd2-inactivation provides a novel strategy against obesity-induced kidney injury. PMID:27827416

  5. The PHD finger of p300 influences its ability to acetylate histone and non-histone targets.

    PubMed

    Rack, Johannes G M; Lutter, Timo; Kjæreng Bjerga, Gro Elin; Guder, Corina; Ehrhardt, Christine; Värv, Signe; Ziegler, Mathias; Aasland, Rein

    2014-12-12

    In enzymes that regulate chromatin structure, the combinatorial occurrence of modules that alter and recognise histone modifications is a recurrent feature. In this study, we explored the functional relationship between the acetyltransferase domain and the adjacent bromodomain/PHD finger (bromo/PHD) region of the transcriptional coactivator p300. We found that the bromo/PHD region of p300 can bind to the acetylated catalytic domain in vitro and augment the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Deletion of the PHD finger, but not the bromodomain, impaired the ability of the enzyme to acetylate histones in vivo, whilst it enhanced p300 self-acetylation. A point mutation in the p300 PHD finger that is related to the Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome resulted in increased self-acetylation but retained the ability to acetylate histones. Hence, the PHD finger appears to negatively regulate self-acetylation. Furthermore, our data suggest that the PHD finger has a role in the recruitment of p300 to chromatin.

  6. Derivation of PHD-TBD filter and comments on `joint detection and estimation of multiple objects from image observations'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhi-guang; Zhang, Yan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, through analyzing the derivation process and computer simulations, we find that the update formulas for PHD-TBD filter in paper [5] are somewhat unreasonably. When using the paper's PHD update formula, the targets' state parameters cannot be estimated. Following the method in paper 2, we treat the objects to be detected in TBD situations as special extended targets and derive a new PHD-TBD update formula analytically under this assumption. The correctness of the derivation is validated by computer simulations.

  7. The training, careers, and work of Ph.D. physical scientists: Not simply academic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Pedersen-Gallegos, Liane; Riegle-Crumb, Catherine

    2002-11-01

    We present an in-depth portrait of the training, careers, and work of recent Ph.D. physical scientists. Use of specialized training varies widely, with about half often using knowledge of their Ph.D. specialty area in their jobs. The use of specialized training does not, however, correlate with job satisfaction. In this and other important measures, there are relatively few differences between "academics" and "nonacademics." Important job skills for all employment sectors include writing, oral presentation, management, data analysis, designing projects, critical thinking, and working in an interdisciplinary context. Rankings given by respondents of graduate training in some of these skill areas were significantly lower than the importance of these skills in the workplace. We also found that the rated quality of graduate training varies relatively little by department or advisor. Finally, although nonacademic aspirations among graduate students are fairly common, these do not appear to be well supported while in graduate school.

  8. Against intimacy: focusing on the task in hand in PhD supervision.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Austyn

    Worldwide, more nurses are undertaking doctoral studies now than at any other time. However, there is little high-quality evidence focused on investigating successful completion of such studies. Instead there is considerable literature dedicated to untested assumptions about the nature of the supervisory relationship. This article reflects on three critical incidents to show that the key to successful PhD completion may have much less to do with the supervisory relationship than this literature assumes. Success is rather grounded in clear understanding of how all the pertinent tasks fit together. A free online interactive resource is introduced as one method of facilitating this clarity within the supervisory relationship. The effectiveness of this resource could be tested, thereby generating meaningful data for PhD students and their supervisors.

  9. Examining the British PhD viva: opening new doors or scarring for life?

    PubMed

    Carter, Bernie; Whittaker, Karen

    2009-01-01

    The PhD viva -- regardless of its format -- has the potential to be a significant rite of passage for the student. It is an experience that can resonate for months or years afterwards. Part of the challenge is that for everyone involved -- student, supervisory team and examiners -- a degree of end-point uncertainty exists. These ambiguities and tensions are perhaps an inherent part of any examination but are particularly characteristic of the examination of the individual and unique body of work that constitutes the doctoral thesis. In recent years, increased attention has been placed on the processes that surround the examination, aiming to increase transparency, consistency and fairness. However, the process of examining a student and their thesis remains challenging and is surrounded by different agendas, ideologies and practices. This paper examines some of the issues surrounding the PhD viva, primarily focusing on the British viva whilst weaving in commentary about the Australian system.

  10. Protein Interactions of the MLL PHD Fingers Modulate MLL Target Gene Regulation in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fair, Keri; Anderson, Melanie; Bulanova, Elena; Mi, Huaifeng; Tropschug, Maximilian; Diaz, Manuel O.

    2001-01-01

    The PHD fingers of the human MLL and Drosophila trx proteins have strong amino acid sequence conservation but their function is unknown. We have determined that these fingers mediate homodimerization and binding of MLL to Cyp33, a nuclear cyclophilin. These two proteins interact in vitro and in vivo in mammalian cells and colocalize at specific nuclear subdomains. Overexpression of the Cyp33 protein in leukemia cells results in altered expression of HOX genes that are targets for regulation by MLL. These alterations are suppressed by cyclosporine and are not observed in cell lines that express a mutant MLL protein without PHD fingers. These results suggest that binding of Cyp33 to MLL modulates its effects on the expression of target genes. PMID:11313484

  11. Protein interactions of the MLL PHD fingers modulate MLL target gene regulation in human cells.

    PubMed

    Fair, K; Anderson, M; Bulanova, E; Mi, H; Tropschug, M; Diaz, M O

    2001-05-01

    The PHD fingers of the human MLL and Drosophila trx proteins have strong amino acid sequence conservation but their function is unknown. We have determined that these fingers mediate homodimerization and binding of MLL to Cyp33, a nuclear cyclophilin. These two proteins interact in vitro and in vivo in mammalian cells and colocalize at specific nuclear subdomains. Overexpression of the Cyp33 protein in leukemia cells results in altered expression of HOX genes that are targets for regulation by MLL. These alterations are suppressed by cyclosporine and are not observed in cell lines that express a mutant MLL protein without PHD fingers. These results suggest that binding of Cyp33 to MLL modulates its effects on the expression of target genes.

  12. Time to the Doctorate and Labor Demand for New PhD Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groen, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the influence of labor demand for new PhD recipients on time to the doctorate. I use student-level data on all doctorates awarded by U.S. universities in seven humanities and social science fields together with the annual number of job listings by field from 1975 to 2005. An increase in the number of job listings in a field…

  13. Earth and Space Science Ph.D. Class of 2003 Report released

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keelor, Brad

    AGU and the American Geological Institute (AGI) released on 26 July an employment study of 180 Earth and space science Ph.D. recipients who received degrees from U.S. universities in 2003. The AGU/AGI survey asked graduates about their education and employment, efforts to find their first job after graduation, and experiences in graduate school. Key results from the study include: The vast majority (87%) of 2003 graduates found work in the Earth and space sciences, earning salaries commensurate with or slightly higher than 2001 and 2002 salary averages. Most (64%) graduates were employed within academia (including postdoctoral appointments), with the remainder in government (19%), industry (10%), and other (7%) sectors. Most graduates were positive about their employment situation and found that their work was challenging, relevant, and appropriate for someone with a Ph.D. The percentage of Ph.D. recipients accepting postdoctoral positions (58%) increased slightly from 2002. In contrast, the fields of physics and chemistry showed significant increases in postdoctoral appointments for Ph.D.s during the same time period. As in previous years, recipients of Ph.D.s in the Earth, atmospheric, and ocean sciences (median age of 32.7 years) are slightly older than Ph.D. recipients in most other natural sciences (except computer sciences), which is attributed to time taken off between undergraduate and graduate studies. Women in the Earth, atmospheric,and ocean sciences earned 33% of Ph.D.s in the class of 2003, surpassing the percentage of Ph.D.s earned by women in chemistry (32%) and well ahead of the percentage in computer sciences (20%), physics (19%), and engineering (17%). Participation of other underrepresented groups in the Earth, atmospheric, and ocean sciences remained extremely low.

  14. The Role of PhD Faculty in Advancing Research in Departments of Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bell, Teresa M; Valsangkar, Nakul; Joshi, Mugdha; Mayo, John; Blanton, Casi; Zimmers, Teresa A; Torbeck, Laura; Koniaris, Leonidas G

    2017-01-01

    To determine the academic contribution as measured by number of publications, citations, and National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding from PhD scientists in US departments of surgery. The number of PhD faculty working in US medical school clinical departments now exceeds the number working in basic science departments. The academic impact of PhDs in surgery has not been previously evaluated. Academic metrics for 3850 faculties at the top 55 NIH-funded university and hospital-based departments of surgery were collected using NIH RePORTER, Scopus, and departmental websites. MD/PhDs and PhDs had significantly higher numbers of publications and citations than MDs, regardless of academic or institutional rank. PhDs had the greatest proportion of NIH funding compared to both MDs and MD/PhDs. Across all academic ranks, 50.2% of PhDs had received NIH funding compared with 15.2% of MDs and 33.9% of MD/PhDs (P < 0.001). The proportion of PhDs with NIH funding in the top 10 departments did not differ from those working in departments ranked 11 to 50 (P = 0.456). A greater percentage of departmental PhD faculty was associated with increased rates of MD funding. The presence of dedicated research faculty with PhDs supports the academic mission of surgery departments by increasing both NIH funding and scholarly productivity. In contrast to MDs and MD/PhDs, PhDs seem to have similar levels of academic output and funding independent of the overall NIH funding environment of their department. This suggests that research programs in departments with limited resources may be enhanced by the recruitment of PhD faculty.

  15. Theoretical Remarks on Combined Creative and Scholarly PhD Degrees in the Visual Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, James

    2004-01-01

    One of the most interesting curricular developments in the field of studio art is the PhD in studio art. If it catches on in the U.S. as it has in the U.K., it may become the de facto terminal degree for artists who wish to teach, just as the MFA (the current terminal degree) became a practical necessity in the 1960s. The new degrees combine…

  16. Time to the Doctorate and Labor Demand for New PhD Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groen, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the influence of labor demand for new PhD recipients on time to the doctorate. I use student-level data on all doctorates awarded by U.S. universities in seven humanities and social science fields together with the annual number of job listings by field from 1975 to 2005. An increase in the number of job listings in a field…

  17. Including systematic reviews in PhD programmes and candidatures in nursing - 'Hobson's choice'?

    PubMed

    Olsson, Cecilia; Ringnér, Anders; Borglin, Gunilla

    2014-03-01

    Nowadays, gathering and synthesising evidence, i.e. conducting systematic reviews, is considered an important part of any health service research endeavour. Reviewing the literature, however suggest that it is not yet common that PhD students/doctoral candidates publish systematic reviews or even include a high quality review of the literature as a part of their PhD programme or candidature. Implying that systematic reviewing skills might not be acquired by going through an education on a postgraduate level. Additionally, scholars debating systematic reviews 'to be or not to be' as a part of research training seem to be sparse, especially within the field of nursing. In this issue for debate, we would like to propose that the absence of systematic reviews' in this context might severely hamper the 'up and coming' researchers as well as the research conducted. We envisage that this lack can have a negative impact on international nursing practice, and therefore propose that systematic reviews should be considered, whenever appropriate, as a mandatory part of any PhD programme or candidature. We believe that abilities in systematic reviewing will be a sought after research skills in the near future. Including systematic reviews would promote i) refined, well-grounded adequate research questions, ii) PhDs with broad and elevated methodological skills, iii) an increased level of evidence based nursing praxis. However, to make this a reality, supervisors, PhD students, and candidates would need to understand the value of this kind of research activity. Finally, lobbying University faculty boards and grant providers that are not inclined to view literature reviews as 'proper' research or as an important part of health service research, needs to be put on the agenda. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. PhD by publication: a prospective as well as retrospective award? Some subversive thoughts.

    PubMed

    Davies, Ruth E; Rolfe, Gary

    2009-08-01

    Although the discipline of nurse education within the UK has been part of the higher education sector since the 1950s, relatively few nurse academics currently hold a doctorate. This has implications at a national, local and personal level, and can be partly accounted for by the particular demographic and work issues faced by nurse academics, together with issues about the nature of the traditional PhD itself as a suitable and relevant qualification in the discipline of nurse education. As an alternative, we suggest a route to a PhD that takes advantage of the regulations already in place in many Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) for a 'staff doctorate' by publication and which has been set up to accredit academic staff who have a corpus of published papers. In addition to this retrospective PhD by publication we also suggest that that the prospective route to a PhD by publication be promoted, based on established programmes in Europe and Australia. We argue that both routes address many of the issues and difficulties faced by nurse academics, their HEIs and the discipline generally and are relevant to other countries in the developed world as well as the UK. Promotion of these routes will give individual tutors and lecturers the opportunity for academic, professional and personal development within their own organisation and at the same time enable HEIs within the developed world to increase their overall performance in the next Research Excellence Framework (or equivalent depending on their country), thus enhancing the standing and reputation of nursing as an academic discipline.

  19. Pathways to the PhD in Nursing: An Analysis of Similarities and Differences.

    PubMed

    Nehls, Nadine; Barber, Gale; Rice, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    New educational pathways are needed to increase the number of doctor of philosophy (PhD)-prepared nurses. To address this need, an early-entry PhD option designed to engage students in PhD coursework and research during the undergraduate nursing major was developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. An evaluation comparing the early-entry option with two more conventional entry points was conducted. Three groups (N = 84) comprised the sample: (a) early-entry students admitted as undergraduates or immediately upon graduation (N = 29), (b) mid-entry students with baccalaureate degrees and at least 1 year of work experience (N = 27), and (c) delayed-entry students with master's degrees and 1 or more years of work experience (N = 28). Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from the 3 groups of students who were admitted from 2002 to 2011. The sources of data were transcriptions of individual interviews and reviews of existing data. Seventy-seven percent of the sample participated in the individual interviews. The database review included all students who matriculated into the PhD program. Common themes among the 3 groups included a need for educational funding, the importance of a faculty mentor, and concern about preparation for the teaching role and the academic work environment. The groups were also comparable in terms of research productivity during doctoral study and postgraduation employment. Differences were found on measures of diversity, program progression, and perceptions of clinical competence. The findings provide needed data for the development and expansion of educational pathways to the PhD in nursing.

  20. Advancing Minorities and Women to the PhD in Physics and Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassun, Keivan

    2017-01-01

    We briefly review the current status of underrepresented minorities in physics and astronomy: The underrepresentation of Black-, Hispanic-, and Native-Americans is an order of magnitude problem. We then describe the Fisk-Vanderbilt Masters-to-PhD Bridge program as a successful model for addressing this problem. Since 2004 the program has admitted 110 students, 90% of them underrepresented minorities (50% female), with a retention rate of 90%. The program has become the top producer of African American master's degrees in physics, and is now one of the top producers of minority PhDs in astronomy, materials science, and physics. We summarize the main features of the program including its core strategies: (1) replacing the GRE in admissions with indicators that are better predictive of long-term success, (2) partnering with a minority-serving institution for student training through collaborative research, and (3) using the master's degree as a deliberate stepping stone to the PhD. We show how misuse of the GRE in graduate admissions may by itself in large part explain the ongoing underrepresentation of minorities in PhD programs, and we describe our alternate methods to identify talented individuals most likely to succeed. We describe our mentoring model and toolkit which may be utilized to enhance the success of all PhD students.

  1. Prolyl hydroxylase domain-2 (PHD2) inhibition may be a better therapeutic strategy in renal anemia.

    PubMed

    Soni, Hitesh

    2014-05-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) has revolutionized the life of dialysis patients with anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Newer erythropoietin analogues with improved profile have been introduced recently. However, there are many concerns such as safety, economy and patient compliance with these newer rHuEPo analogues. Small molecules aimed to inhibit prolyl hydroxylase domain-2 (PHD2) may prevent degradation of hypoxia inducible factor-2 (HIF2) which leads to endogenous erythropoietin production. This therapeutic intervention may not only overcome the patient compliance and economic burden but also possibly overcome the safety issues related to rHuEPO and its analogues. Moreover, PHD2 inhibitors may increase the endogenous circulating iron availability via suppression of hepcidin, a master regulator of iron homeostasis which further reduces the need for exogenous intravenous iron administration for effective erythropoiesis in renal anemia patients. In conclusion, small molecule PHD2 inhibitors may have better therapeutic efficacy and potential to address clinical concerns associated with rHuEPO and rHuEPO mimetic peptides.

  2. Increasing Diversity in Physics at the PhD Level and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassun, Keivan

    2014-03-01

    We briefly review the current status of underrepresented minorities in physics: The underrepresentation of Blacks, Hispanics, and Native Americans is an order of magnitude problem. We then describe the Fisk-Vanderbilt Masters-to-PhD Bridge program as a successful model for addressing this problem. Since 2004 the program has admitted 67 students, 60 of them underrepresented minorities (50% female), with a retention rate of 90%. Already, the program is the top producer of African American master's degrees in physics, and is the top producer of minority PhDs in astronomy, materials science, and physics. We summarize the main features of the program including its core strategies: (1) replacing the GRE in admissions with indicators that are better predictive of long-term success, (2) partnering with a minority-serving institution for student training through collaborative research, and (3) using the master's degree as a deliberate stepping stone to the PhD. We show how misuse of the GRE in graduate admissions may by itself in large part explain the ongoing underrepresentation of minorities in PhD programs, and we describe our alternate methods to identify talented individuals most likely to succeed. We describe our mentoring model and toolkit which may be utilized to enhance the success of all PhD students.

  3. MS PHD'S: A successful model for reaching underrepresented minorities (URM) students through virtual platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, O.; Johnson, A.; Williamson, V.; Ricciardi, L.; Jearld, A., Jr.; Guzman, W. I.

    2014-12-01

    To successfully recruit and retain underrepresented minority (URM) students and early career scientists, many programs supplement traditional curricular activities with multiple online platforms, establishing "virtual communities" that are free and easily accessible. These virtual communities offer readily sustainable opportunities to facilitate communication across a wide range of cultural lines and socioeconomic levels thereby broadening participation and inclusivity in STEM. Established in 2003, the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S) in Earth System Science Professional Development Program has successfully used virtual community tools such as a listserv, community forum, social media, and VoIP technologies, to extend the face-to-face activities of the program and support the advancement of URM students and early career scientists in STEM. The use of multiple facets of virtual community by MS PHD'S participants supports and encourages "real life" interactions and mentorship, facilitates networking and professional development, and maintains continuity of shared networks. The program is now in its ninth cohort and supports 213 participants. To date, 54 participants have completed their PhD and another 61 are currently enrolled in doctoral programs.

  4. ISO/IEEE 11073 PHD message generation toolkit to standardize healthcare device.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joon-Ho; Park, Chanyong; Park, Soo-Jun; Lee, Kyu-Chul

    2011-01-01

    As senior population increases, various healthcare devices and services are developed such as fall detection device, home hypertension management service, and etc. However, to vitalize healthcare devices and services market, standardization for interoperability between device and service must precede. To achieve the standardization goal, the IEEE 11073 Personal Health Device (PHD) group has been standardized many healthcare devices, but until now there are few devices compatible with the PHD standard. One of main reasons is that it isn't easy for device manufactures to implement standard communication module by analyzing standard documents of over 600 pages. In this paper, we propose a standard message generation toolkit to easily standardize existing non-standard healthcare devices. The proposed toolkit generates standard PHD messages using inputted device information, and the generated messages are adapted to the device with the standard state machine file. For the experiments, we develop a reference H/W, and test the proposed toolkit with three healthcare devices: blood pressure, weighting scale, and glucose meter. The proposed toolkit has an advantage that even if the user doesn't know the standard in detail, the user can easily standardize the non-standard healthcare devices.

  5. Using Simulation in Nursing PhD Education: Facilitating Application of Responsible Conduct of Research Principles.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Margaret F; Supiano, Katherine; Wilson, Rebecca; Lassche, Madeline; Latendresse, Gwen

    Simulation is a standard clinical nursing educational approach; however, simulation is rarely used in nonclinical nursing education. In doctor of philosophy (PhD) programs, ethical content about responsible conduct of research (RCR) is traditionally didactic, presented early in the program of study. Ethics content merits review before students begin the dissertation phase; thus, the purpose of this project was to design and implement simulated scenarios to help students apply RCR principles prior to beginning independent research. Two scenarios were developed: (a) a potential protocol change discussed in a research team meeting and (b) an in-home data collection experience with an elderly participant and her daughter. Actors were trained faculty volunteers, playing roles outside their usual academic positions. Faculty facilitated scenarios by posing questions as cues related to desired learning outcomes as scenarios unfolded. Eleven nursing PhD students and 6 faculty participated. Debriefing facilitated discussion of RCR principles, common research quandaries, and suggested scenario revisions. Faculty, expert observation, and video-review showed that younger and less experienced students tried to give the "right" answer rather than implement RCR appropriate solutions. Students with more clinical experience had difficulty adopting the less familiar researcher role. Overall, simulation is a novel and useful way to enhance RCR content in PhD programs.

  6. Educating future nursing scientists: Recommendations for integrating omics content in PhD programs.

    PubMed

    Conley, Yvette P; Heitkemper, Margaret; McCarthy, Donna; Anderson, Cindy M; Corwin, Elizabeth J; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Dorsey, Susan G; Gregory, Katherine E; Groer, Maureen W; Henly, Susan J; Landers, Timothy; Lyon, Debra E; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y; Voss, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Preparing the next generation of nursing scientists to conduct high-impact, competitive, sustainable, innovative, and interdisciplinary programs of research requires that the curricula for PhD programs keep pace with emerging areas of knowledge and health care/biomedical science. A field of inquiry that holds great potential to influence our understanding of the underlying biology and mechanisms of health and disease is omics. For the purpose of this article, omics refers to genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, epigenomics, exposomics, microbiomics, and metabolomics. Traditionally, most PhD programs in schools of nursing do not incorporate this content into their core curricula. As part of the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science's Idea Festival for Nursing Science Education, a work group charged with addressing omics preparation for the next generation of nursing scientists was convened. The purpose of this article is to describe key findings and recommendations from the work group that unanimously and enthusiastically support the incorporation of omics content into the curricula of PhD programs in nursing. The work group also calls to action faculty in schools of nursing to develop strategies to enable students needing immersion in omics science and methods to execute their research goals.

  7. Research Career Persistence for Solar and Space Physics PhD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldwin, Mark B.; Morrow, Cherilynn

    2016-06-01

    Results from a recent graduate student survey found unsurprisingly that Solar and Space Physics (S&SP) PhD graduate students almost all aspire to have research careers in Solar and Space Physics. This study reports on the research career persistence over the first decade of the new millennium for S&SP PhDs. We used publication of science citation indexed articles as the indicator for persistence in a research career. We found that nearly two thirds (64%) of PhDs who graduated between 2001 and 2009 published refereed papers in 2012 or 2013, while 17% of PhDs never published another paper beyond the year they received their PhD. The remaining 19% of PhDs stopped publishing within three years of receiving their PhD. We found no gender difference between research persistence. We also found that though there is statistically no difference on persistence of publishing research between graduates of the largest programs compared to all other programs, there are significant differences between individual programs. This study indicates that a majority of S&SP PhDs find research careers but that a significant fraction pursue careers where publishing in science citation indexed journals is not required. Graduate programs, advisors, and potential graduate students can use these data for career planning and developing mentoring programs that meet the career outcomes of all of their graduates.

  8. Management of Stress and Anxiety Among PhD Students During Thesis Writing: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Bazrafkan, Leila; Shokrpour, Nasrin; Yousefi, Alireza; Yamani, Nikoo

    2016-01-01

    Today, postgraduate students experience a variety of stresses and anxiety in different situations of academic cycle. Stress and anxiety have been defined as a syndrome shown by emotional exhaustion and reduced personal goal achievement. This article addresses the causes and different strategies of coping with this phenomena by PhD students at Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences. The study was conducted by a qualitative method using conventional content analysis approach. Through purposive sampling, 16 postgraduate medical sciences PhD students were selected on the basis of theoretical sampling. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews and field observations. Six hundred fifty-four initial codes were summarized and classified into 4 main categories and 11 subcategories on the thematic coding stage dependent on conceptual similarities and differences. The obtained codes were categorized under 4 themes including "thesis as a major source of stress," "supervisor relationship," "socioeconomic problem," and "coping with stress and anxiety." It was concluded that PhD students experience stress and anxiety from a variety of sources and apply different methods of coping in effective and ineffective ways. Purposeful supervision and guidance can reduce the cause of stress and anxiety; in addition, coping strategy must be in a thoughtful approach, as recommended in this study.

  9. PHD3 Loss in Cancer Enables Metabolic Reliance on Fatty Acid Oxidation via Deactivation of ACC2.

    PubMed

    German, Natalie J; Yoon, Haejin; Yusuf, Rushdia Z; Murphy, J Patrick; Finley, Lydia W S; Laurent, Gaëlle; Haas, Wilhelm; Satterstrom, F Kyle; Guarnerio, Jlenia; Zaganjor, Elma; Santos, Daniel; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Beck, Andrew H; Gygi, Steven P; Scadden, David T; Kaelin, William G; Haigis, Marcia C

    2016-09-15

    While much research has examined the use of glucose and glutamine by tumor cells, many cancers instead prefer to metabolize fats. Despite the pervasiveness of this phenotype, knowledge of pathways that drive fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in cancer is limited. Prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins hydroxylate substrate proline residues and have been linked to fuel switching. Here, we reveal that PHD3 rapidly triggers repression of FAO in response to nutrient abundance via hydroxylation of acetyl-coA carboxylase 2 (ACC2). We find that PHD3 expression is strongly decreased in subsets of cancer including acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is linked to a reliance on fat catabolism regardless of external nutrient cues. Overexpressing PHD3 limits FAO via regulation of ACC2 and consequently impedes leukemia cell proliferation. Thus, loss of PHD3 enables greater utilization of fatty acids but may also serve as a metabolic and therapeutic liability by indicating cancer cell susceptibility to FAO inhibition.

  10. Cruising through the journey without getting drowned: The saga of a PhD student in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Galen, Louise van; Wachelder, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    Young medical trainees all over the world are encouraged to investigate unknown areas of medicine that need clarification. This often leads them to undertake a PhD (Doctor of Philosophy). Being curious, critical, and creative are necessary competences which enable us to engender scientific research within acute (internal) medicine. Worldwide, huge numbers of professionals are pursuing a PhD, with the aim of receiving a 'Doctor'-title. These PhD trajectories vary distinctly between countries. Since the distances in the scientific world are getting smaller and it is becoming more easy to work with each other across borders, it might be interesting to know what it requires to become an academic 'doctor' overseas. Hereby, we provide a concise insight in to the differences between doing PhD in (acute) medicine in the Netherlands and in the UK.

  11. Distinct deregulation of the hypoxia inducible factor by PHD2 mutants identified in germline DNA of patients with polycythemia

    PubMed Central

    Ladroue, Charline; Hoogewijs, David; Gad, Sophie; Carcenac, Romain; Storti, Federica; Barrois, Michel; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Leporrier, Michel; Casadevall, Nicole; Hermine, Olivier; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Baruchel, André; Fakhoury, Fadi; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Feunteun, Jean; Mazure, Nathalie; Pouysségur, Jacques; Wenger, Roland H.; Richard, Stéphane; Gardie, Betty

    2012-01-01

    Background Congenital secondary erythrocytoses are due to deregulation of hypoxia inducible factor resulting in overproduction of erythropoietin. The most common germline mutation identified in the hypoxia signaling pathway is the Arginine 200-Tryptophan mutant of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene, resulting in Chuvash polycythemia. This mutant displays a weak deficiency in hypoxia inducible factor α regulation and does not promote tumorigenesis. Other von Hippel-Lindau mutants with more deleterious effects are responsible for von Hippel-Lindau disease, which is characterized by the development of multiple tumors. Recently, a few mutations in gene for the prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 protein (PHD2) have been reported in cases of congenital erythrocytosis not associated with tumor formation with the exception of one patient with a recurrent extra-adrenal paraganglioma. Design and Methods Five PHD2 variants, four of which were novel, were identified in patients with erythrocytosis. These PHD2 variants were functionally analyzed and compared with the PHD2 mutant previously identified in a patient with polycythemia and paraganglioma. The capacity of PHD2 to regulate the activity, stability and hydroxylation of hypoxia inducible factor α was assessed using hypoxia-inducible reporter gene, one-hybrid and in vitro hydroxylation assays, respectively. Results This functional comparative study showed that two categories of PHD2 mutants could be distinguished: one category with a weak deficiency in hypoxia inducible factor α regulation and a second one with a deleterious effect; the mutant implicated in tumor occurrence belongs to the second category. Conclusions As observed with germline von Hippel-Lindau mutations, there are functional differences between the PHD2 mutants with regards to hypoxia inducible factor regulation. PHD2 mutation carriers do, therefore, need careful medical follow-up, since some mutations must be considered as potential candidates for

  12. Loss of MLL PHD-finger-3 is necessary for MLL-ENL-induced hematopoietic stem cell immortalization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Santillan, Donna A.; Koonce, Mark; Wei, Wei; Luo, Roger; Thirman, Michael J.; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J.; Diaz, Manuel O.

    2009-01-01

    Reciprocal chromosomal translocations at the MLL gene locus result in expression of novel fusion proteins such as MLL-ENL associated with leukemia. The three PHD finger cassette, one of the highly conserved domains in MLL, is absent in all fusion proteins. This domain has been shown to interact with Cyp33, a cyclophilin which enhances the recruitment of HDACs to the MLL repression domain and mediates HOX gene repression. Insertion of the third PHD finger of MLL, into MLL-ENL allows the recruitment of Cyp33, and subsequently HDAC1, to the fusion protein. Furthermore, expression of the fusion protein with the PHD finger insertion mediates the down-regulation of the HOXC8 gene expression in a Cyp33 dependent manner. Finally, the addition of the PHD finger domain or the 3rd PHD finger alone, into MLL-ENL, blocks the hematopoietic-stem-cell immortalization potential of the fusion protein in serial plating colony assays. Insertion of only the 1st and 2nd PHD fingers has no such effect. These data support the hypothesis that the binding of Cyp33 to the MLL 3rd PHD finger switches the MLL function from trans-activation to repression. In the immortalizing MLL fusion protein, the loss of the PHD fingers, in combination with the gain of the activation domain of ENL, or of other partner proteins, makes the fusion protein a constitutive trans-activator. This leads to constitutive over expression of MLL target genes that block stem cell commitment and promote stem cell renewal, probably the first step in MLL-related leukemogenesis. PMID:18676843

  13. Loss of MLL PHD finger 3 is necessary for MLL-ENL-induced hematopoietic stem cell immortalization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Santillan, Donna A; Koonce, Mark; Wei, Wei; Luo, Roger; Thirman, Michael J; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J; Diaz, Manuel O

    2008-08-01

    Reciprocal chromosomal translocations at the MLL gene locus result in expression of novel fusion proteins, such as MLL-ENL, associated with leukemia. The three PHD finger cassette, one of the highly conserved domains in MLL, is absent in all fusion proteins. This domain has been shown to interact with Cyp33, a cyclophilin which enhances the recruitment of histone deacetylases (HDAC) to the MLL repression domain and mediates HOX gene repression. Insertion of the third PHD finger of MLL into MLL-ENL allows the recruitment of Cyp33 and, subsequently, HDAC1 to the fusion protein. Furthermore, expression of the fusion protein with the PHD finger insertion mediates the down-regulation of the HOXC8 gene expression in a Cyp33-dependent manner. Finally, the addition of the PHD finger domain or the third PHD finger alone into MLL-ENL blocks the hematopoietic stem cell immortalization potential of the fusion protein in serial plating colony assays. Insertion of only the first and second PHD fingers has no such effect. These data support the hypothesis that the binding of Cyp33 to the MLL third PHD finger switches the MLL function from transactivation to repression. In the immortalizing MLL fusion protein, the loss of the PHD fingers, in combination with the gain of the activation domain of ENL or of other partner proteins, makes the fusion protein a constitutive transactivator. This leads to constitutive overexpression of MLL target genes that block stem cell commitment and promote stem cell renewal, probably the first step in MLL-related leukemogenesis.

  14. A Nontraditional PhD Program in a Traditional World: A Story of Blended Strategies and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordyke, Shane; Palmer, Daniel; Anderson, William; Braunstein, Rich; Fairholm, Matt

    2011-01-01

    PhD programs in the United States are increasingly marked by the rising influence of market-oriented dynamics. As a case in point, one of the primary objectives of the new PhD program offered at the University of South Dakota is to deliver a doctoral program through a flexible--or hybrid--format that is accessible to nontraditional as well as…

  15. Biomedical Science Ph.D. Career Interest Patterns by Race/Ethnicity and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Kenneth D.; McGready, John; Bennett, Jessica C.; Griffin, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Increasing biomedical workforce diversity remains a persistent challenge. Recent reports have shown that biomedical sciences (BMS) graduate students become less interested in faculty careers as training progresses; however, it is unclear whether or how the career preferences of women and underrepresented minority (URM) scientists change in manners distinct from their better-represented peers. We report results from a survey of 1500 recent American BMS Ph.D. graduates (including 276 URMs) that examined career preferences over the course of their graduate training experiences. On average, scientists from all social backgrounds showed significantly decreased interest in faculty careers at research universities, and significantly increased interest in non-research careers at Ph.D. completion relative to entry. However, group differences emerged in overall levels of interest (at Ph.D. entry and completion), and the magnitude of change in interest in these careers. Multiple logistic regression showed that when controlling for career pathway interest at Ph.D. entry, first-author publication rate, faculty support, research self-efficacy, and graduate training experiences, differences in career pathway interest between social identity groups persisted. All groups were less likely than men from well-represented (WR) racial/ethnic backgrounds to report high interest in faculty careers at research-intensive universities (URM men: OR 0.60, 95% CI: 0.36–0.98, p = 0.04; WR women: OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.47–0.89, p = 0.008; URM women: OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.30–0.71, p<0.001), and URM women were more likely than all other groups to report high interest in non-research careers (OR: 1.93, 95% CI: 1.28–2.90, p = 0.002). The persistence of disparities in the career interests of Ph.D. recipients suggests that a supply-side (or “pipeline”) framing of biomedical workforce diversity challenges may limit the effectiveness of efforts to attract and retain the best and most

  16. Biomedical Science Ph.D. Career Interest Patterns by Race/Ethnicity and Gender.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Kenneth D; McGready, John; Bennett, Jessica C; Griffin, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Increasing biomedical workforce diversity remains a persistent challenge. Recent reports have shown that biomedical sciences (BMS) graduate students become less interested in faculty careers as training progresses; however, it is unclear whether or how the career preferences of women and underrepresented minority (URM) scientists change in manners distinct from their better-represented peers. We report results from a survey of 1500 recent American BMS Ph.D. graduates (including 276 URMs) that examined career preferences over the course of their graduate training experiences. On average, scientists from all social backgrounds showed significantly decreased interest in faculty careers at research universities, and significantly increased interest in non-research careers at Ph.D. completion relative to entry. However, group differences emerged in overall levels of interest (at Ph.D. entry and completion), and the magnitude of change in interest in these careers. Multiple logistic regression showed that when controlling for career pathway interest at Ph.D. entry, first-author publication rate, faculty support, research self-efficacy, and graduate training experiences, differences in career pathway interest between social identity groups persisted. All groups were less likely than men from well-represented (WR) racial/ethnic backgrounds to report high interest in faculty careers at research-intensive universities (URM men: OR 0.60, 95% CI: 0.36-0.98, p = 0.04; WR women: OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.47-0.89, p = 0.008; URM women: OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.30-0.71, p<0.001), and URM women were more likely than all other groups to report high interest in non-research careers (OR: 1.93, 95% CI: 1.28-2.90, p = 0.002). The persistence of disparities in the career interests of Ph.D. recipients suggests that a supply-side (or "pipeline") framing of biomedical workforce diversity challenges may limit the effectiveness of efforts to attract and retain the best and most diverse

  17. Chapter 21: Hyperplasia of Pulmonary Neuroepithelial Bodies (NEB) in Lungs of Prolyl Hydroxylase –1(PHD-1) Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jie; Yeger, Herman; Ratcliffe, Peter; Bishop, Tammie

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary NEB, widely distributed within the airway mucosa of mammalian lungs, are presumed hypoxia sensitive airway O2 sensors responding to changes in airway gas concentration. NEB cell hyperplasia has been reported after exposure to chronic hypoxia and in a variety of paediatric and adult lung disorders. Prolyl hydroxylases (PHD 1–3) regulate the stability of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF’s) in an O2-dependent manner and function as intrinsic oxygen sensors. To determine a possible role of PHD-1in NEB cells we have quantitated NEB’s in lungs of neonatal (P2) and adult (2 months) PHD-1-deficient mice and compared them to wild type (WT) control mice. Lung tissues fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin were processed for immunoperoxidase method and frozen sections for multilabel immunoflourescence using antibodies for NEB markers synaptophysin, synaptic vesicle protein 2 and the peptide CGRP. The frequency and size of NEB in lungs of PHD-1 deficient neonatal mice (P2) and at 2 months was increased significantly compared to WT controls (p < 0.01). The present data suggests an important role for PHD enzymes in NEB cell biology deserving further studies. Since the PHD-1 deficient mouse appears to be the first animal model showing NEB cell hyperplasia it may be useful for studies of NEB physiology and pathobiology. PMID:23080156

  18. Prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) inhibition protects human renal epithelial cells and mice kidney from hypoxia injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yihong; Ding, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) is a key oxygen sensor, setting low steady-state level of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α). Here, we showed that treatment of cobalt chloride (CoCl2), a hypoxia mimic, in HK-2 tubular epithelial cells induced PHD2 and HIF-1/2α expression as well as cell apoptosis and autophagy activation. Three methyladenine (3-MA), the autophagy inhibitor, blocked autophagy and protected HK-2 cells from CoCl2. Significantly, siRNA knockdown of PHD2 also protected HK-2 cells from CoCl2, possibly via increasing HIF-1α expression. Reversely, HIF-1α siRNA knockdown almost abolished cytoprotection by PHD2 siRNA in CoCl2-treated HK-2 cells. In vivo, pretreatment with a PHD inhibitor L-mimosine remarkably attenuated mice renal ischemia-reperfusion injuries. Molecularly, L-mimosine inhibited apoptosis and inflammatory responses in injured mice kidneys. Together, our results suggest that PHD2 silence or inhibition protects human renal epithelial cells and mice kidney from hypoxia injuries. PMID:27527871

  19. Publishing scientific papers based on Master's and Ph.D. theses from a small scientific community: case study of Croatian medical schools.

    PubMed

    Frković, Vedran; Skender, Tomislav; Dojćinović, Bojan; Bilić-Zulle, Lidija

    2003-02-01

    To evaluate publishing activity of medical doctors after they have obtained Master's or Ph.D. degree at the Rijeka and Zagreb University Schools of Medicine in Croatia, and establish the number of journal articles based on these theses. Data on Master's and Ph.D. theses defended at the Rijeka and Zagreb University Schools of Medicine in the 1990-1999 period were collected by hand-search of the archive. MEDLINE and Current Contents databases were searched for journal articles resulting from the theses. During the 10-year period, 1,535 Master's and 634 Ph.D. theses were defended at the Rijeka and Zagreb University Schools of Medicine (253 Master's and 138 Ph.D. theses from Rijeka and 1,282 Master's and 496 Ph.D. theses from Zagreb). There were 201 (14%) Master's and 218 (34%) Ph.D. theses that resulted in articles published in journals indexed in MEDLINE (13% of Master's and 11% of Ph.D. theses from Rijeka, and 14% of Master's and 41% of Ph.D. theses from Zagreb). Also, 97 (6%) Master's and 129 (20%) Ph.D. theses that resulted in articles published in Current Contents journals (8% of Master's and 6% of Ph.D. theses from Rijeka, and 6% of Master's and 24% of Ph.D. theses from Zagreb). There was no significant difference between the two Universities with respect to published articles based on Master's theses, but there were significantly more articles from Ph.D. theses in Zagreb (p<0.001). Most of the theses resulted in a single publication (95%), 19 (5%) in 2, and 2 in 3 publications. Out of all 453 journal articles, 31% were published in Croatian and 69% in international journals. Most Croatian Master's and Ph.D. theses are not made available to the scientific community. There should be more institutional effort directed at the stimulation of postgraduate students to publish their scientific work.

  20. Factors that facilitate or inhibit interest of domestic students in the engineering PhD: A mixed methods study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell Smith, Michelle C.

    Given the increasing complexity of technology in our society, the United States has a growing demand for a more highly educated technical workforce. Unfortunately, the proportion of United States citizens earning a PhD in engineering has been declining and there is concern about meeting the economic, national security and quality of life needs of our country. This mixed methods sequential exploratory instrument design study identified factors that facilitate or inhibit interest in engineering PhD programs among domestic engineering undergraduate students in the United States. This study developed a testable theory for how domestic students become interested in engineering PhD programs and a measure of that process, the Exploring Engineering Interest Inventory (EEII). The study was conducted in four phases. The first phase of the study was a qualitative grounded theory exploration of interest in the engineering PhD. Qualitative data were collected from domestic engineering students, engineering faculty and industry professional who had earned a PhD in engineering. The second phase, instrument development, developed the Exploring Engineering Interest Inventory (EEII), a measurement instrument designed with good psychometric properties to test a series of preliminary hypotheses related to the theory generated in the qualitative phase. In the third phase of the study, the EEII was used to collect data from a larger sample of junior and senior engineering majors. The fourth phase integrated the findings from the qualitative and quantitative phases. Four factors were identified as being significant influences of interest in the engineering PhD: Personal characteristics, educational environment, misperceptions of the economic and personal costs, and misperceptions of engineering work. Recommendations include increasing faculty encouragement of students to pursue an engineering PhD and programming to correct the misperceptions of the costs of the engineering PhD and the

  1. The Ph.D. Process - A Student's Guide to Graduate School in the Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Dale F.; Karp, Jonathan D.; Cohen, Nicholas

    1999-02-01

    The Ph.D. Process offers the essential guidance that students in the biological and physical sciences need to get the most out of their years in graduate school. Drawing upon the insights of numerous current and former graduate students, this book presents a rich portrayal of the intellectual and emotional challenges inherent in becoming a scientist, and offers the informed, practical advice a "best friend" would give about each stage of the graduate school experience. What are the best strategies for applying to a graduate program? How are classes conducted? How should I choose an advisor and a research project? What steps can I take now to make myself more "employable" when I get my degree? What goes on at the oral defense? Through a balanced, thorough examination of issues ranging from lab etiquette to stress management, the authors--each a Ph.D. in the sciences--provide the vital information that will allow students to make informed decisions all along the way to the degree. Headlined sections within each chapter make it fast and easy to look up any subject, while dozens of quotes describing personal experiences in graduate programs from people in diverse scientific fields contribute invaluable real-life expertise. Special attention is also given to the needs of international students.Read in advance, this book prepares students for each step of the graduate school experience that awaits them. Read during the course of a graduate education, it serves as a handy reference covering virtually all major issues and decisions a doctoral candidate is likely to face. The Ph.D. Process is the one book every graduate student in the biological and physical sciences can use to stay a step ahead, from application all the way through graduation.

  2. Building Better Bridges: An Evaluation of The Bridge to the Ph.D. Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellyn Sanderson, Robyn; Lobel, Caroline; Agueros, Marcel A.; Anderson, Vanessa; Ash, Summer; Purdie-Vaughns, Valerie; Romero-Canyas, Rainer; Walker, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Columbia University's Bridge to the Ph.D. in the Natural Sciences Program is increasing the number of underrepresented scholars entering graduate programs and equipping them to succeed in these programs. In a given year, three to five Bridge participants are hired as full-time Columbia University research assistants for up to two years. Now in its seventh year, the Program supports seven participants, and its alumni (including five astronomers) have gone on to Ph.D. programs across the country. Although to date fewer than 40 people have participated in the Program, a number too small for an exclusively statistical evaluation of its effectiveness, we are collecting invaluable longitudinal data on the career progressions of underrepresented aspiring scientists across the natural sciences. At least a dozen Bridge alumni will earn their Ph.D. in the next two-three years, and we will then learn much more about the impact that the Bridge Program has had on our participants' trajectories. Among other things, we hope to use these data to determine the Program's effectiveness in developing feelings of self-efficacy and participants' confidence in their ability to succeed in doctoral programs, to measure the rate at which Bridge alumni successfully complete doctoral programs relative to their peers, and to identify the aspects of the Program that participants find most helpful to their progress at different stages of their paths to and through doctoral programs. Here we describe the data we have already obtained as part of our on-going study, and preliminary results from our analysis.

  3. PHD finger of the SUMO ligase Siz/PIAS family in rice reveals specific binding for methylated histone H3 at lysine 4 and arginine 2.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Heisaburo; Suzuki, Rintaro; Tsuchiya, Wataru; Taichi, Misako; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Yamazaki, Toshimasa

    2012-06-21

    We determined the three-dimensional structure of the PHD finger of the rice Siz/PIAS-type SUMO ligase, OsSiz1, by NMR spectroscopy and investigated binding ability for a variety of methylated histone H3 tails, showing that OsSiz1-PHD primarily recognizes dimethylated Arg2 of the histone H3 and that methylations at Arg2 and Lys4 reveal synergy effect on binding to OsSiz1-PHD. The K4 cage of OsSiz1-PHD for trimethylated Lys4 of H3K4me3 was similar to that of the BPTF-PHD finger, while the R2 pocket for Arg2 was different. It is intriguing that the PHD module of Siz/PIAS plays an important role, with collaboration with the DNA binding domain SAP, in gene regulation through SUMOylation of a variety of effectors associated with the methylated arginine-riched chromatin domains.

  4. The first Italian doctorate (PhD Course) in Physics Education Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelini, Marisa; Santi, Lorenzo

    2008-05-01

    The first PhD Italian course in Physics Education Research in Udine aims to qualify young researchers and teachers coming from all the Italian groups of research in the field. It becomes a context for developing research projects carried out following parallel research lines on: Teaching/Learning paths for didactic innovation, cognitive research, ICT for strategies to overcome conceptual knots in physics; E-learning for personalization; d) Computer on-line experiments and modelling; e) Teacher formation and training; f) Informal learning in science.

  5. Structure, function and regulation of jade family PHD finger 1 (JADE1).

    PubMed

    Panchenko, Maria V

    2016-09-01

    The family of JADE proteins includes three paralogues encoded by individual genes and designated PHF17 (JADE1), PHF16 (JADE2), and PHF15 (JADE3). All three JADE proteins bear in tandem two Plant Homeo-domains (PHD) which are zinc finger domains. This review focuses on one member of the JADE family, JADE1. Studies addressing the biochemical, cellular and biological role of JADE1 are discussed. Recent discoveries of JADE1 function in the regulation of the epithelial cell cycle with potential relevance to disease are presented. Unresolved questions and future directions are formulated.

  6. An interdepartmental Ph.D. program in computational biology and bioinformatics: the Yale perspective.

    PubMed

    Gerstein, Mark; Greenbaum, Dov; Cheung, Kei; Miller, Perry L

    2007-02-01

    Computational biology and bioinformatics (CBB), the terms often used interchangeably, represent a rapidly evolving biological discipline. With the clear potential for discovery and innovation, and the need to deal with the deluge of biological data, many academic institutions are committing significant resources to develop CBB research and training programs. Yale formally established an interdepartmental Ph.D. program in CBB in May 2003. This paper describes Yale's program, discussing the scope of the field, the program's goals and curriculum, as well as a number of issues that arose in implementing the program. (Further updated information is available from the program's website, www.cbb.yale.edu.)

  7. Structure, function and regulation of Jade Family PHD Finger 1 (JADE1)

    PubMed Central

    Panchenko, Maria V.

    2016-01-01

    The family of JADE proteins includes three paralogues encoded by individual genes and designated PHF17 (JADE1), PHF16 (JADE2), and PHF15 (JADE3). All three JADE proteins bear in tandem two Plant Homeo-domains (PHD) which are zinc finger domains. This review focuses on one member of the JADE family, JADE1. Studies addressing the biochemical, cellular and biological role of JADE1 are discussed. Recent discoveries of JADE1 function in the regulation of the epithelial cell cycle with potential relevance to disease are presented. Unresolved questions and future directions are formulated. PMID:27155521

  8. Inhibition of PHD3 by salidroside promotes neovascularization through cell–cell communications mediated by muscle-secreted angiogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Kasim, Vivi; Xie, Yu-Dan; Huang, Can; Sisjayawan, Julita; Dwi Ariyanti, Agnes; Yan, Xue-Song; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Cai-Ping; Yang, Li; Miyagishi, Makoto; Wu, Shou-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic angiogenesis has been considered as a potential strategy for treating peripheral artery diseases including hind-limb ischemia (HLI); however, no effective drug-based treatment is currently available. Here we showed that intramuscular administration of salidroside, an active compound of Chinese herb Rhodiola, could robustly enhance blood perfusion recovery by promoting neovascularization in HLI mice. We revealed that salidroside promoted skeletal muscle cell migration and paracrine function through inhibiting the transcriptional level of prolyl-hydroxylase domain 3 (PHD3) without affecting PHD1 and PHD2. Paracrine signals from salidroside-treated skeletal muscle cells enhanced endothelial and smooth muscle cells migration, while inhibition of FGF2/FGF2R and PDGF-BB/PDGFR-β pathways abolished this effect, as well as neovascularization in HLI mice. Furthermore, we elucidated that salidroside inhibition on PHD3 might occur through estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Together, our findings highlights the potential application of salidroside as a novel pharmalogical inhibitor of ERα/PHD3 axis for therapeutic angiogenesis in HLI diseases. PMID:28266625

  9. The Value of Preparing PhD Students as Research Mentors: Application of Kram's Temporal Mentoring Model.

    PubMed

    Abbott-Anderson, Kristen; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Lyles, Annmarie A

    The ability to successfully mentor others is an essential skill necessary for building and strengthening an infrastructure of well-prepared nurse faculty to accelerate advancements in nursing science. Mentoring is a fundamental part of the nurse faculty role, but new faculty are often unprepared to take on mentoring roles early in their academic career. Applied training in research mentoring initiated during doctor of philosophy (PhD) programs may better prepare future faculty to manage teaching and mentoring responsibilities earlier and with greater confidence. The unique opportunity exists for PhD students to engage in research mentoring with undergraduate nursing students, with probable benefits for both the mentor and the mentee. This manuscript uses Kram's temporal mentoring model as a guide to examine the training experiences of 3 PhD students mentoring undergraduate nursing students and discusses the benefits and challenges associated with these mentoring relationships. Collectively, these experiences provide preliminary support and guidance for the development and adoption of formal PhD mentor training programs to better prepare future PhD nursing faculty for their mentoring responsibilities.

  10. The bachelor's to Ph.D. STEM pipeline no longer leaks more women than men: a 30-year analysis.

    PubMed

    Miller, David I; Wai, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    For decades, research and public discourse about gender and science have often assumed that women are more likely than men to "leak" from the science pipeline at multiple points after entering college. We used retrospective longitudinal methods to investigate how accurately this "leaky pipeline" metaphor has described the bachelor's to Ph.D. transition in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields in the U.S. since the 1970s. Among STEM bachelor's degree earners in the 1970s and 1980s, women were less likely than men to later earn a STEM Ph.D. However, this gender difference closed in the 1990s. Qualitatively similar trends were found across STEM disciplines. The leaky pipeline metaphor therefore partially explains historical gender differences in the U.S., but no longer describes current gender differences in the bachelor's to Ph.D. transition in STEM. The results help constrain theories about women's underrepresentation in STEM. Overall, these results point to the need to understand gender differences at the bachelor's level and below to understand women's representation in STEM at the Ph.D. level and above. Consistent with trends at the bachelor's level, women's representation at the Ph.D. level has been recently declining for the first time in over 40 years.

  11. [PhD theses on gerontological topics in Russia 1995-2012: scientometric analysis].

    PubMed

    Smol'kin, A A; Makarova, E A

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a scientometric analysis of PhD theses on gerontological topics in Russian humanities (excluding economics) for the period from 1995 to 2012. During this period, 253 PhD theses (238 of "candidate dissertations," and 15 of "doctoral dissertations") were defended in Russia. Almost half of them were defended during the boom years (2005-2006; 2009-2010). The number of theses defended in the 2000-s has increased significantly compared to the second half of 1990-s. However for gerontological PhD-s overall as a percentage of all theses defended in Russian humanities, the number hardly changed and remained small (less than 0.3%). The leading discipline in the study of aging (within the humanities) is sociology accounting for more than a third of all defended theses. Though the theses were defended in 48 cities, more than half of them were defended in 3 cities, which are Moscow, St. Petersburg and Saratov. Thematic analysis showed that the leading position was occupied by two topics: "the elderly and the state" (42%) and "(re)socialization/adaptation of the elderly" (25%). 14% of the works are devoted to intergenerational relations and social status of the elderly. Other topics (old man/woman's personality, self-perceptions of aging, violence and crime against the elderly, loneliness, discrimination, etc.) are presented by very few studies.

  12. The STEM Pipeline: The Role of Summer Research Experience in Minority Students' Ph.D. Aspirations.

    PubMed

    Pender, Matea; Marcotte, Dave E; Sto Domingo, Mariano R; Maton, Kenneth I

    2010-12-10

    Practical research experience has been seen as an important tool to enhance learning in STEM fields and shape commitment to science careers. Indeed, this was a prominent recommendation of the Boyer Commission. Further, there is evidence this is especially important for minority students. In this paper, we examine the role of practical research experience during the summer for talented minority undergraduates in STEM fields. We focus on the link between summer research and STEM Ph.D. program matriculation. We examine evidence on this question using detailed data on students participating in the Meyerhoff Scholarship Program over a 14 year period at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. Our results provide evidence of strong positive effects of summer research on participation in STEM Ph.D. programs. Further, we show that the effects of summer research vary with the frequency and timing of these experiences. The evidence that educational strategies such as summer research experiences improve academic outcomes of minorities is vital, given concern about the science pipeline in the U.S. and the continuing growth in the racial/ethnic diversity of the college-age population.

  13. Janet Quinn, RN, PhD. Therapeutic touch and a healing way. Interview by Bonnie Horrigan.

    PubMed

    Quinn, J

    1996-07-01

    Janet Quinn, RN, PhD, is an associate professor and senior scholar at the Center for Human Caring at the School of Nursing, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, in Denver, Colo. In addition to teaching she conducts research, lectures, writes, and maintains a private practice in Boulder, Colo. She received her PhD in nursing research and theory development from New York University in 1982. Quinn is a member of Sigma Theta Tau, and is active in a diverse group of professional organizations including the American Nurses Association, American Holistic Nurses Association, Association for Holotropic Breathwork International, Association for Transpersonal Psychology, International Society for the Study of Subtle Energy and Energy Medicine, Hakomi Therapy Association, and the Institute of Noetic Sciences. During her career she has received many awards including the Healers Award from the Nurse Healers and Professional Associates (1995); the Edgar S Wilson, MD, Fellowship Award from the International Society for the Study of Subtle Energies and Energy Medicine (1994); and the Holistic Nurse of the Year award from the American Holistic Nurses Association. Alternative Therapies interviewed Dr Quinn at her office in Boulder, Colo.

  14. NASDA President Isao Uchida greets STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The president of the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, Isao Uchida, at left, chats with STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of NASDA, shortly after the landing of Columbia at Kennedy Space Center. STS-87 concluded its mission with a main gear touchdown at 7:20:04 a.m. EST Dec. 5, at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility Runway 33, drawing the 15-day, 16-hour and 34- minute-long mission of 6.5 million miles to a close. Also onboard the orbiter were Commander Kevin Kregel; Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialists Winston Scott and Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D.; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. During the 88th Space Shuttle mission, the crew performed experiments on the United States Microgravity Payload-4 and pollinated plants as part of the Collaborative Ukrainian Experiment. This was the 12th landing for Columbia at KSC and the 41st KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program.

  15. Home healthcare settop-box for senior chronic care using ISO/IEEE 11073 PHD standard.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joon-Ho; Park, Chanyong; Park, Soo-Jun

    2010-01-01

    As the number of seniors with chronic disease increases, the need of home healthcare settop-box is increased to manage their chronic disease in their home environment. Using the home healthcare settop-box, the patients can regularly check their health data, and finally, it can lead the decrease of medical expenses. For the home healthcare settop-box, the most important factor is the standard compatibility, which can interoperate with standard devices of any other companies. In this paper, we propose a home healthcare settop-box using ISO/IEEE 11073 PHD standard. It collects health data according to the PHD standard, and provides a chronic-care service based on the collected data. The proposed settop-box is connected with 3 devices of weigh scale, blood pressure monitor, and glucose meter, and tested at 10 homes for a month. Lastly, the proposed settop-box can be used for various healthcare services such as Google Health and Telemedicine Services using a healthcare platform server.

  16. NASDA President Isao Uchida greets STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The president of the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, Isao Uchida, at left, chats with STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of NASDA, shortly after the landing of Columbia at Kennedy Space Center. STS-87 concluded its mission with a main gear touchdown at 7:20:04 a.m. EST Dec. 5, at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility Runway 33, drawing the 15-day, 16-hour and 34- minute-long mission of 6.5 million miles to a close. Also onboard the orbiter were Commander Kevin Kregel; Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialists Winston Scott and Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D.; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. During the 88th Space Shuttle mission, the crew performed experiments on the United States Microgravity Payload-4 and pollinated plants as part of the Collaborative Ukrainian Experiment. This was the 12th landing for Columbia at KSC and the 41st KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program.

  17. It takes two to tango: the structure and function of LIM, RING, PHD and MYND domains.

    PubMed

    Matthews, J M; Bhati, M; Lehtomaki, E; Mansfield, R E; Cubeddu, L; Mackay, J P

    2009-01-01

    LIM (Lin-11, Isl-1, Mec-3), RING (Really interesting new gene), PHD (Plant homology domain) and MYND (myeloid, Nervy, DEAF-1) domains are all zinc-binding domains that ligate two zinc ions. Unlike the better known classical zinc fingers, these domains do not bind DNA, but instead mediate interactions with other proteins. LIM-domain containing proteins have diverse functions as regulators of gene expression, cell adhesion and motility and signal transduction. RING finger proteins are generally associated with ubiquitination; the presence of such a domain is the defining feature of a class of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases. PHD proteins have been associated with SUMOylation but most recently have emerged as a chromatin recognition motif that reads the methylation state of histones. The function of the MYND domain is less clear, but MYND domains are also found in proteins that have ubiquitin ligase and/or histone methyltransferase activity. Here we review the structure-function relationships for these domains and discuss strategies to modulate their activity.

  18. Regulation of early T cell development by the PHD finger of histone lysine methyltransferase ASH1

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yujiro Nakayama, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Masaru; Kioussis, Dimitris

    2008-01-18

    We have previously isolated a mammalian homologue of Drosophila discsabsent, small, orhomeotic-1 (ash1) from the murine thymus, and recently shown that its SET domain methylates histone H3 lysine 36 (K36). Expression of ASH1 has been reported to be increased in NOD thymocytes in a BDC2.5 clonotype background, but its function in T cell development has remained elusive. Here we report that the ash1 gene is expressed at high levels in thymocytes of mice deficient for rag1 or tcra genes. ASH1 proteins are present at peri-nuclei and as nuclear speckles in thymocytes. Some of the nuclear ASH1 co-localize with RAG2. Expression of the evolutionarily conserved PHD finger of ASH1 impairs T cell development at the DP stage, and causes increased transcription from the HoxA9 promoter in vitro. Moreover, the C-terminal part of ASH1 interacts with HDAC1 repression complexes, suggesting that the PHD finger of ASH1 may be involved in down-regulation of genes for normal development of {alpha}{beta} T cells.

  19. Identifying Barriers and Facilitators to Nurse Faculty Careers for PhD Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Fang, Di; Bednash, Geraldine D; Arietti, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    The shortage of doctorally educated nurses pursuing faculty careers is a major concern regarding the development of the nurse faculty workforce. This cross-sectional study aims to identify barriers and facilitators to academic careers for doctoral (PhD) nursing students. A total of 1,500 PhD students were randomly selected from nursing schools across the country to participate in our survey, and a 62.8% response rate was achieved. The study found that 72% of respondents planned to pursue faculty careers after graduating. Students with postgraduation plans for academic careers, nonacademic careers, and undecided careers showed distinct profiles of demographic and academic characteristics. They also perceived facilitators and barriers to faculty careers differently. The most influential facilitators were interest in teaching and an appreciation of the impact of nursing research on patient care, and the most considered barriers were poor financial compensation and a negative perception of academia. Minority students were more likely than White students to have plans for academic careers. Various experiences during doctoral education appeared to have a positive impact on students' decisions to pursue academic careers.

  20. The STEM Pipeline: The Role of Summer Research Experience in Minority Students' Ph.D. Aspirations

    PubMed Central

    Pender, Matea; Marcotte, Dave E.; Sto. Domingo, Mariano R.; Maton, Kenneth I.

    2011-01-01

    Practical research experience has been seen as an important tool to enhance learning in STEM fields and shape commitment to science careers. Indeed, this was a prominent recommendation of the Boyer Commission. Further, there is evidence this is especially important for minority students. In this paper, we examine the role of practical research experience during the summer for talented minority undergraduates in STEM fields. We focus on the link between summer research and STEM Ph.D. program matriculation. We examine evidence on this question using detailed data on students participating in the Meyerhoff Scholarship Program over a 14 year period at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. Our results provide evidence of strong positive effects of summer research on participation in STEM Ph.D. programs. Further, we show that the effects of summer research vary with the frequency and timing of these experiences. The evidence that educational strategies such as summer research experiences improve academic outcomes of minorities is vital, given concern about the science pipeline in the U.S. and the continuing growth in the racial/ethnic diversity of the college-age population. PMID:21841903